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Sample records for cut muscle fibers

  1. Nile blue fluorescence signals from cut single muscle fibers under voltage or current clamp conditions

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    A method is presented for recording extrinsic optical signals from segments of single skeletal muscle fibers under current or voltage clamp conditions. Such segments, which are cut from intact fibers, are maintained in a relaxed state, while exhbiting otherwise normal physiological properties, including healthy delayed rectifier currents. Extrinsic fluorescence changes are demonstrated, using the permeant potentiometric probe, Nile Blue A. These changes vary nonlinearly with the controlled surface membrane potential, in a manner which suggests that they arise from potential changes in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. According to this interpretation, a simple model based on the gating charge movement implicated in excitation-contraction coupling, provides a self-consistent description of the voltage dependence of the signal that requires no additional parameters. PMID:310445

  2. Effect of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium depletion on intramembranous charge movement in frog cut muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Cut muscle fibers from Rana temporaria (sarcomere length, 3.3-3.5 microns; temperature, 13-16 degrees C) were mounted in a double Vaseline-gap chamber and equilibrated for at least an hour with an internal solution that contained 20 mM EGTA and phenol red and an external solution that contained predominantly TEA-gluconate; both solutions were nominally Ca-free. The increase in total myoplasmic concentration of Ca (delta[CaT]) produced by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca release was estimated from the change in pH produced when the released Ca was complexed by EGTA (Pape, P.C., D.-S. Jong, and W.K. Chandler. 1995. Journal of General Physiology. 106:259-336). The resting value of SR Ca content, [CaSR]R (expressed as myoplasmic concentration), was taken to be equal to the value of delta[CaT] obtained during a step depolarization (usually to -50 to -40 mV) that was sufficiently long (200-750 ms) to release all of the readily releasable Ca from the SR. In ten fibers, the first depolarization gave [CaSR]R = 839-1,698 microM. Progressively smaller values were obtained with subsequent depolarizations until, after 30-40 depolarizations, the value of [CaSR]R had usually been reduced to < 10 microM. Measurements of intramembranous charge movement, Icm, showed that, as the value of [CaSR]R decreased, ON-OFF charge equality held and the amount of charge moved remained constant. ON Icm showed brief initial I beta components and prominent I gamma "humps", even after the value of [CaSR]R was < 10 microM. Although the amplitude of the hump component decreased during depletion, its duration increased in a manner that preserved the constancy of ON charge. In the depleted state, charge movement was steeply voltage dependent, with a mean value of 7.2 mV for the Boltzmann factor k. These and other results are not consistent with the idea that there is one type of charge, Q beta, and that I gamma is a movement of Q beta caused by SR Ca release, as proposed by Pizarro, Csernoch, Uribe

  3. Calcium inactivation of calcium release in frog cut muscle fibers that contain millimolar EGTA or Fura-2

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Cut muscle fibers from Rana temporaria (sarcomere length, 3.4-4.2 microns) were mounted in a double Vaseline-gap chamber (14-15 degrees C) and equilibrated with end-pool solutions that contained 20 mM EGTA and 1.76 mM Ca. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca release was estimated from changes in pH (Pape, P. C., D.-S. Jong, and W.K. Chandler. 1995. Journal of General Physiology. 106:000-000). Although the amplitude and duration of the [Ca] transient, as well as its spatial spread from the release sites, are reduced by EGTA, SR Ca release elicited by either depolarizing voltage-clamp pulses or action potentials behaved in a manner consistent with Ca inactivation of Ca release. After a step depolarization to -20 or 10 mV, the rate of SR Ca release, corrected for SR Ca depletion, reached a peak value within 5-15 ms and then rapidly decreased to a quasi-steady level that was about half the peak value; the time constant of the last half of the decrease was usually 2- 4 ms. Immediately after an action potential or a 10-15 ms prepulse to - 20 mV, the peak rate of SR Ca release elicited by a second stimulation, as well as the fractional amount of release, were substantially decreased. The rising phase of the rate of release was also reduced, suggesting that at least 0.9 of the ability of the SR to release Ca had been inactivated by the first stimulation. There was little change in intramembranous charge movement, suggesting that the changes in SR Ca release were not caused by changes in its voltage activation. These effects of a first stimulation on the rate of SR Ca release elicited by a second stimulation recovered during repolarization to -90 mV; the time constant of recovery was approximately 25 ms in the action- potential experiments and approximately 50 ms in the voltage-clamp experiments. Fura-2, which is able to bind Ca more rapidly than EGTA and hence reduce the amplitude of the [Ca] transient and its spatial spread from release sites by a greater amount, did not

  4. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  5. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  6. CO2-Laser Cutting Fiber Reinforced Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R.; Nuss, Rudolf; Geiger, Manfred

    1989-10-01

    Guided by experimental investigations laser cutting of glass fiber reinforced reactive injection moulded (RRIM)-polyurethanes which are used e.g. in car industry for bumpers, spoilers, and further components is described. A Comparison with other cutting techniques as there are water jet cutting, milling, punching, sawing, cutting with conventional knife and with ultrasonic excited knife is given. Parameters which mainly influence cutting results e.g. laser power, cutting speed, gas nature and pressure will be discussed. The problematic nature in characterising micro and macro geometry of laser cut edges of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) is explained. The topography of cut edges is described and several characteristic values are introduced to specify the obtained working quality. The surface roughness of laser cut edges is measured by both, an optical and a mechanical sensor and their reliabilities are compared.

  7. Muscle profiling to improve the value of retail meat cuts.

    PubMed

    Jung, E Y; Hwang, Y H; Joo, S T

    2016-10-01

    Nutrition and meat quality are always important to consumers, but vary by individual muscle or muscle groups in retail meat cuts. Muscle profiling of nutrient content and palatability for all retail beef cuts is necessary to suggest healthy and tasty beef cuts and to inform consumers of the benefits of beef consumption. The current paper reviews numerous studies that provide muscle profiles for nutrients and palatability attributes of muscles or muscle groups in retail beef cuts. The composition of nutrients including protein, fat, moisture, vitamins, and minerals in beef cuts is documented as well as the nutritive role as a part of a healthy diet. In addition, this review presents knowledge in relation to innovative carcass fabrication and value-added cuts to improve the value of beef carcass. Finally, the current work emphasize the palatability assessment of individual beef muscles, and concludes that all retail beef cuts should be merchandised for proper cooking according to the palatability profiles of beef muscles.

  8. Aging of skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Miljkovic, Natasa; Lim, Jae-Young; Miljkovic, Iva; Frontera, Walter R

    2015-04-01

    Aging has become an important topic for scientific research because life expectancy and the number of men and women in older age groups have increased dramatically in the last century. This is true in most countries of the world including the Republic of Korea and the United States. From a rehabilitation perspective, the most important associated issue is a progressive decline in functional capacity and independence. Sarcopenia is partly responsible for this decline. Many changes underlying the loss of muscle mass and force-generating capacity of skeletal muscle can be understood at the cellular and molecular levels. Muscle size and architecture are both altered with advanced adult age. Further, changes in myofibers include impairments in several physiological domains including muscle fiber activation, excitation-contraction coupling, actin-myosin cross-bridge interaction, energy production, and repair and regeneration. A thorough understanding of these alterations can lead to the design of improved preventative and rehabilitative interventions, such as personalized exercise training programs.

  9. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    PubMed

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The effects of cutting or of stretching skeletal muscle in vitro on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seider, M. J.; Kapp, R.; Chen, C.-P.; Booth, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Skeletal muscle preparations using cut muscle fibers have often been used in studies of protein metabolism. The present paper reports an investigation of the effect of muscle cutting or stretching in vitro on the rates of protein synthesis and/or degradation. Protein synthesis and content, and ATP and phosphocreatine levels were monitored in soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from the rat with various extents of muscle fiber cuts and following stretching to about 120% the resting length. Rates of protein synthesis are found to be significantly lower and protein degradation higher in the cut muscles than in uncut controls, while ATP and phosphocreatine concentrations decreased. Stretched intact muscles, on the other hand, are observed to have higher concentrations of high-energy phosphates than unstretched muscles, while rates of protein degradation were not affected. Results thus demonstrate that the cutting of skeletal muscle fibers alters many aspects of muscle metabolism, and that moderate decreases in ATP concentration do not alter rates of protein concentration in intact muscles in vitro.

  11. Single muscle fiber adaptations with marathon training.

    PubMed

    Trappe, Scott; Harber, Matthew; Creer, Andrew; Gallagher, Philip; Slivka, Dustin; Minchev, Kiril; Whitsett, David

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the effects of marathon training on single muscle fiber contractile function in a group of recreational runners. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the gastrocnemius muscle of seven individuals (22 +/- 1 yr, 177 +/- 3 cm, and 68 +/- 2 kg) before, after 13 wk of run training, and after 3 wk of taper. Slow-twitch myosin heavy chain [(MHC) I] and fast-twitch (MHC IIa) muscle fibers were analyzed for size, strength (P(o)), speed (V(o)), and power. The run training program led to the successful completion of a marathon (range 3 h 56 min to 5 h 35 min). Oxygen uptake during submaximal running and citrate synthase activity were improved (P < 0.05) with the training program. Muscle fiber size declined (P < 0.05) by approximately 20% in both fiber types after training. P(o) was maintained in both fiber types with training and increased (P < 0.05) by 18% in the MHC IIa fibers after taper. This resulted in >60% increase (P < 0.05) in force per cross-sectional area in both fiber types. Fiber V(o) increased (P < 0.05) by 28% in MHC I fibers with training and was unchanged in MHC IIa fibers. Peak power increased (P < 0.05) in MHC I and IIa fibers after training with a further increase (P < 0.05) in MHC IIa fiber power after taper. These data show that marathon training decreased slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fiber size but that it maintained or improved the functional profile of these fibers. A taper period before the marathon further improved the functional profile of the muscle, which was targeted to the fast-twitch muscle fibers.

  12. Hydrostatic compression in glycerinated rabbit muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, K W; Fortune, N S; Geeves, M A

    1990-12-01

    Glycerinated muscle fibers isolated from rabbit psoas muscle, and a number of other nonmuscle elastic fibers including glass, rubber, and collagen, were exposed to hydrostatic pressures of up to 10 MPa (100 Atm) to determine the pressure sensitivity of their isometric tension. The isometric tension of muscle fibers in the relaxed state (passive tension) was insensitive to increased pressure, whereas the muscle fiber tension in rigor state increased linearly with pressure. The tension of all other fiber types (except rubber) also increased with pressure; the rubber tension was pressure insensitive. The pressure sensitivity of rigor tension was 2.3 kN/m2/MPa and, in comparison with force/extension relation determined at atmospheric pressure, the hydrostatic compression in rigor muscle fibers was estimated to be 0.03% Lo/MPa. As reported previously, the active muscle fiber tension is depressed by increased pressure. The possible underlying basis of the different pressure-dependent tension behavior in relaxed, rigor, and active muscle is discussed.

  13. Efficiency of Laser Cutting of Carbon Fiber Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Alexander N.; Zaeh, Michael F.

    Laser cutting of carbon fiber textiles has various advantages over conventional processes like ultrasonic knife cutting: It is wear free, no fibers are left uncut in the kerf, it is able to cut complex contours, and the cut edge is clearly defined. To ensure a complete cut under variable conditions, e.g. the thickness of the material, line energy has to be applied at a higher level than theoretically necessary to account for those variations. This energy is transilluminated through the kerf. In addition, not all laser energy is absorbed by the fibers but reflected and transmitted within the space between the fibers. Experiments were carried out to measure the percentage of laser power transilluminated through multi-layered carbon fiber textiles during laser cutting with maximum speed. To do so, blocks of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were placed underneath the samples and the mass of the sublimed material was measured. Depending on the angle of the fiber, between 9% and 40% of the laser power was transilluminated.

  14. Fiber architecture of canine abdominal muscles.

    PubMed

    Boriek, Aladin M; Ortize, Jaime; Zhu, Deshen

    2002-02-01

    During respiration, abdominal muscles experience loads, not only in the muscle-fiber direction but also transverse to the fibers. We wondered whether the abdominal muscles exhibit a fiber architecture that is similar to the diaphragm muscle, and, therefore, we chose two adjacent muscles: the internal oblique (IO), with about the same muscle length as the diaphragm, and the transverse abdominis (TA), which is twice as long as the diaphragm. First, we used acetylcholinesterase staining to examine the distribution of neuromuscular junctions on both surfaces of the TA and IO muscles in six dogs. A maximum of four irregular bands of neuromuscular junctions crossed the IO, and as many as six bands crossed the TA, which is consistent with a discontinuous fiber architecture. In six additional dogs, we examined fiber architecture of these muscles by microdissecting 103 fascicles from the IO and 139 from the TA. Each fascicle contained between 20 and 30 muscle fibers. The mean length of nonspanning fibers (NSF) ranged from 2.8 +/- 0.3 cm in the IO to 4.3 +/- 0.5 cm in the TA, and the mean length of spanning fibers ranged from 4.3 +/- 0.5 cm in the IO to 7.6 +/- 1.4 cm in the TA. NSF accounted for 89.6 +/- 1.5% of all fibers dissected from the IO and 99.1 +/- 0.2% of all fibers dissected from the TA. The percentage of NSF with both ends tapered was 6.2 +/- 1.0 and 41.0 +/- 2.3% for IO and TA, respectively. These data show that fiber architecture in either IO or TA is discontinuous, with much more short-tapered fibers in the TA than in the IO. When abdominal muscles are submaximally activated, as during both normal expiration and maximal expiratory efforts, muscle force could be transmitted to the cell membrane and to the extracellular intramuscular connective tissue by shear linkage, presumably via structural transmembrane proteins.

  15. CO2 Laser Cutting of Glass Fiber Reinforce Polymer Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimah, S.; Ishak, M.; Aqida, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    The lamination, matrix properties, fiber orientation, and relative volume fraction of matrix of polymer structure make this polymer hard to process. The cutting of polymer composite using CO2 laser could involve in producing penetration energy in the process. Identification of the dominant factors that significantly affect the cut quality is important. The objective of this experiment is to evaluate the CO2 spot size of beam cutting for Glass Fiber Reinforce Polymer Composite (GFRP). The focal length selected 9.5mm which gave smallest focus spot size according to the cutting requirements. The effect of the focal length on the cut quality was investigated by monitoring the surface profile and focus spot size. The beam parameter has great effect on both the focused spot size and surface quality.

  16. An evaluation of the reliability of muscle fiber cross-sectional area and fiber number measurements in rat skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The reliability of estimating muscle fiber cross-sectional area (measure of muscle fiber size) and fiber number from only a subset of fibers in rat hindlimb muscle cross-sections has not been systematically evaluated. This study examined the variability in mean estimates of fiber cross-s...

  17. Age-related changes in rat intrinsic laryngeal muscles: analysis of muscle fibers, muscle fiber proteins, and subneural apparatuses.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoya; Taguchi, Aki; Motoyoshi, Kazumi; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Desaki, Junzo

    2013-03-01

    We compared age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles of aged and young adult rats by determining the number and diameter of muscle fibers, contractile muscle protein (myosin heavy chain isoforms, MHC) composition, and the morphology of the subneural apparatuses. In aged rats, both the numbers and the diameters of muscle fibers decreased in the cricothyroid (CT) muscle. The number of fibers, but not diameter, decreased in the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. In the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle, neither the number nor the diameter of fibers changed significantly. Aging was associated with a decrease in type IIB and an increase in type IIA MHC isoform levels in CT muscle, but no such changes were observed in the TA or PCA muscles. Morphological examination of primary synaptic clefts of the subneural apparatus revealed that aging resulted in decreased labyrinthine and increased depression types in only the CT muscle. In the aged group, morphologically immature subneural apparatuses were found infrequently in the CT muscle, indicating continued tissue remodeling. We suggest, therefore, that age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles primarily involve the CT muscle, whereas the structures of the TA and PCA muscles may better resist aging processes and therefore are less vulnerable to functional impairment. This may reflect differences in their roles; the CT muscle controls the tone of the vocal folds, while the TA and PCA muscles play an essential role in vital activities such as respiration and swallowing.

  18. Remote Fiber Laser Cutting System for Dismantling Glass Melter - 13071

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsui, Takashi; Miura, Noriaki; Oowaki, Katsura; Kawaguchi, Isao; Miura, Yasuhiko; Ino, Tooru

    2013-07-01

    Since 2008, the equipment for dismantling the used glass melter has been developed in High-level Liquid Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility in the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP). Due to the high radioactivity of the glass melter, the equipment requires a fully-remote operation in the vitrification cell. The remote fiber laser cutting system was adopted as one of the major pieces of equipment. An output power of fiber laser is typically higher than other types of laser and so can provide high-cutting performance. The fiber laser can cut thick stainless steel and Inconel, which are parts of the glass melter such as casings, electrodes and nozzles. As a result, it can make the whole of the dismantling work efficiently done for a shorter period. Various conditions of the cutting test have been evaluated in the process of developing the remote fiber cutting system. In addition, the expected remote operations of the power manipulator with the laser torch have been fully verified and optimized using 3D simulations. (authors)

  19. Nutrient Content of Single – Muscle Pork Cuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The two objectives of this study were to determine the nutrient profiles of four fresh pork cuts (fabricated from individual muscles extracted from subprimals) for dissemination in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR) and determine cooking yields and nutrient retention fac...

  20. Distribution of slow muscle fiber of muscle spindle in postnatal rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Iwao; Imura, Kosuke; Miwa, Yoko; Ide, Yoshiaki; Murata, Megumi; Sunohara, Masataka

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the properties of the muscle spindle in the masseter muscle at an immunohistochemical level in rats fed for 6 weeks. Slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were measured and intrafusal fibers in the muscle spindle were studied to determine the relationship between the superficial and deep regions of rat masseter muscle after alternated feeding pattern. However, muscle spindles were found in both regions, mainly in the deep region of the posterior superficial region of masseter muscle. The total number of the slow fiber in the intrafusal fiber and number of muscle spindle in the deep region were high from 5 to 8 weeks old in spite of various dimensions of data such as diameter and the compositions of the intrafusal fiber. The relationship of the protein expression of slow MyHC in the two regions at 5 weeks old reversed five weeks later (10 weeks old). This period is an important stage because the mastication system in masseter muscle with muscle spindle may be changed during the alternated feeding pattern of suckling to mastication. The changes may be a marker of the feeding system and of the control by the tension receptor of muscle spindle in this stage of masseter muscle after postnatal development.

  1. Calcium Sparks in Intact Skeletal Muscle Fibers of the Frog

    PubMed Central

    Hollingworth, S.; Peet, J.; Chandler, W.K; Baylor, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    Calcium sparks were studied in frog intact skeletal muscle fibers using a home-built confocal scanner whose point-spread function was estimated to be ∼0.21 μm in x and y and ∼0.51 μm in z. Observations were made at 17–20°C on fibers from Rana pipiens and Rana temporaria. Fibers were studied in two external solutions: normal Ringer's ([K+] = 2.5 mM; estimated membrane potential, −80 to −90 mV) and elevated [K+] Ringer's (most frequently, [K+] = 13 mM; estimated membrane potential, −60 to −65 mV). The frequency of sparks was 0.04–0.05 sarcomere−1 s−1 in normal Ringer's; the frequency increased approximately tenfold in 13 mM [K+] Ringer's. Spark properties in each solution were similar for the two species; they were also similar when scanned in the x and the y directions. From fits of standard functional forms to the temporal and spatial profiles of the sparks, the following mean values were estimated for the morphological parameters: rise time, ∼4 ms; peak amplitude, ∼1 ΔF/F (change in fluorescence divided by resting fluorescence); decay time constant, ∼5 ms; full duration at half maximum (FDHM), ∼6 ms; late offset, ∼0.01 ΔF/F; full width at half maximum (FWHM), ∼1.0 μm; mass (calculated as amplitude × 1.206 × FWHM3), 1.3–1.9 μm3. Although the rise time is similar to that measured previously in frog cut fibers (5–6 ms; 17–23°C), cut fiber sparks have a longer duration (FDHM, 9–15 ms), a wider extent (FWHM, 1.3–2.3 μm), and a strikingly larger mass (by 3–10-fold). Possible explanations for the increase in mass in cut fibers are a reduction in the Ca2+ buffering power of myoplasm in cut fibers and an increase in the flux of Ca2+ during release. PMID:11723160

  2. Graded Activation in Frog Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Costantin, L. L.; Taylor, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    The membrane potential of frog single muscle fibers in solutions containing tetrodotoxin was controlled with a two-electrode voltage clamp. Local contractions elicited by 100-ms square steps of depolarization were observed microscopically and recorded on cinefilm. The absence of myofibrillar folding with shortening to striation spacings below 1.95 µm served as a criterion for activation of the entire fiber cross section. With depolarizing steps of increasing magnitude, shortening occurred first in the most superficial myofibrils and spread inward to involve axial myofibrils as the depolarization was increased. In contractions in which the entire fiber cross section shortened actively, both the extent of shortening and the velocity of shortening at a given striation spacing could be graded by varying the magnitude of the depolarization step. The results provide evidence that the degree of activation of individual myofibrils can be graded with membrane depolarization. PMID:4540418

  3. Regional heterogeneity in muscle fiber strain: the role of fiber architecture

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, E.; Deslauriers, Amber R.

    2014-01-01

    The force, mechanical work and power produced by muscle fibers are profoundly affected by the length changes they undergo during a contraction. These length changes are in turn affected by the spatial orientation of muscle fibers within a muscle (fiber architecture). Therefore any heterogeneity in fiber architecture within a single muscle has the potential to cause spatial variation in fiber strain. Here we examine how the architectural variation within a pennate muscle and within a fusiform muscle can result in regional fiber strain heterogeneity. We combine simple geometric models with empirical measures of fiber strain to better understand the effect of architecture on fiber strain heterogeneity. We show that variation in pennation angle throughout a muscle can result in differences in fiber strain with higher strains being observed at lower angles of pennation. We also show that in fusiform muscles, the outer/superficial fibers of the muscle experience lower strains than central fibers. These results show that regional variation in mechanical output of muscle fibers can arise solely from architectural features of the muscle without the presence of any spatial variation in motor recruitment. PMID:25161626

  4. Mapping of intramuscular tenderness and muscle fiber orientation of muscles in the beef round.

    PubMed

    Senaratne, L S; Calkins, C R; de Mello, A S; Pokharel, S; Hinkle, J B

    2010-09-01

    Intramuscular tenderness variation and muscle fiber orientation of beef M. adductor femoris (AF), M. biceps femoris (BF), M. gracilis (GL), M. pectineus (PT), M. sartorius (SR), M. semimembranosus (SM), M. semitendinosus (SO), M. vastus intermedius (VI), M. vastus medialis (VM), and M. vastus lateralis (VL) were investigated. The USDA Choice boxed beef subprimals were purchased and aged for 14 d from boxed date. The AF, BF, GL, PT, SR, SM, SO, VI, VM, and VL (n = 10 each) were fabricated from subprimals. Crust-frozen AF, BF, SO, SM, and VL were cut into 2.54-cm steaks perpendicular to the long axis and grilled (71 degrees C). The PT, SR, VI, and VM were grilled (71 degrees C) as whole muscles, whereas the GL was grilled after cutting into anterior and posterior regions. Grilled muscles were cut into equal size sections perpendicular to long axis of muscles. Location-specific cores were prepared from each steak/section, and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) was measured. The muscle fiber orientations of BF, PT, and VI were bipennate, SR and SO were fusiform, and AD, SM, VL, GL, and VM were unipennate. The overall mean WBSF values for BF, SO, AF, SM, PT, SR, GL, VI, VM, and VL were 5.62, 4.86, 4.18, 4.90, 3.76, 4.44, 4.75, 4.78, 4.24, and 6.53 kg, respectively. Based on WBSF values, PT was tender, BF and VL were tough, and VM, VI, SM, GL SR, AF, and SO were intermediate. The first 2 proximal steaks of long head BF were more tender than the rest (P < 0.05). In the SO, the tenderness decreased from the middle of the muscle to both ends (P < 0.05). The anterior sides of the long head BF and SO were tougher than their posterior sides (P < 0.05).The first 4 steaks of the SM were more tender than the rest of the muscle (P < 0.05). There was a significant tenderness increment from the middle of the AF and SR to both ends of each muscle (P < 0.05). The medial side of the VI was more tender than its lateral side (P < 0.05). The VM had its smallest shear force value at the

  5. Micro-hole drilling and cutting using femtosecond fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Liu, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Micro-hole drilling and cutting in ambient air are presented by using a femtosecond fiber laser. At first, the micro-hole drilling was investigated in both transparent (glasses) and nontransparent (metals and tissues) materials. The shape and morphology of the holes were characterized and evaluated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Debris-free micro-holes with good roundness and no thermal damage were demonstrated with the aspect ratio of 8∶1. Micro-hole drilling in hard and soft tissues with no crack or collateral thermal damage is also demonstrated. Then, trench micromachining and cutting were studied for different materials and the effect of the laser parameters on the trench properties was investigated. Straight and clean trench edges were obtained with no thermal damage.

  6. Disodium cromoglycate protects dystrophin-deficient muscle fibers from leakiness.

    PubMed

    Marques, Maria Julia; Ventura Machado, Rafael; Minatel, Elaine; Santo Neto, Humberto

    2008-01-01

    In dystrophin-deficient fibers of mdx mice and in Duchenne dystrophy, the lack of dystrophin leads to sarcolemma breakdown and muscle degeneration. We verified that cromolyn, a mast-cell stabilizer agent, stabilized dystrophic muscle fibers using Evans blue dye as a marker of sarcolemma leakiness. Mdx mice (n=8; 14 days of age) received daily intraperitoneal injections of cromolyn (50 mg/kg body weight) for 15 days. Untreated mdx mice (n=8) were injected with saline. Cryostat cross-sections of the sternomastoid, tibialis anterior, and diaphragm muscles were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Cromolyn dramatically reduced Evans blue dye-positive fibers in all muscles (P<0.05; Student's t-test) and led to a significant increase in the percentage of fibers with peripheral nuclei. This study supports the protective effects of cromolyn in dystrophic muscles and further indicates its action against muscle fiber leakiness in muscles that are differently affected by the lack of dystrophin.

  7. Diffusion-Tensor MRI Based Skeletal Muscle Fiber Tracking.

    PubMed

    Damon, Bruce M; Buck, Amanda K W; Ding, Zhaohua

    2011-11-01

    A skeletal muscle's function is strongly influenced by the internal organization and geometric properties of its fibers, a property known as muscle architecture. Diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging-based fiber tracking provides a powerful tool for non-invasive muscle architecture studies, has three-dimensional sensitivity, and uses a fixed frame of reference. Significant advances have been made in muscle fiber tracking technology, including defining seed points for fiber tracking, quantitatively characterizing muscle architecture, implementing denoising procedures, and testing validity and repeatability. Some examples exist of how these data can be integrated with those from other advanced MRI and computational methods to provide novel insights into muscle function. Perspectives are offered regarding future directions in muscle diffusion-tensor imaging, including needs to develop an improved understanding for the microstructural basis for reduced and anisotropic diffusion, establish the best practices for data acquisition and analysis, and integrate fiber tracking with other physiological data.

  8. Muscle fiber type diversification during exercise and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Rizwan; Bhaskaran, Shylesh; Van Remmen, Holly

    2016-09-01

    The plasticity of skeletal muscle can be traced down to extensive metabolic, structural and molecular remodeling at the single fiber level. Skeletal muscle is comprised of different fiber types that are the basis of muscle plasticity in response to various functional demands. Resistance and endurance exercises are two external stimuli that differ in their duration and intensity of contraction and elicit markedly different responses in muscles adaptation. Further, eccentric contractions that are associated with exercise-induced injuries, elicit varied muscle adaptation and regenerative responses. Most adaptive changes are fiber type-specific and are highly influenced by diverse structural, metabolic and functional characteristics of individual fiber types. Regulation of signaling pathways by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress also plays an important role in muscle fiber adaptation during exercise. This review focuses on cellular and molecular responses that regulate the adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise and exercise-related injuries.

  9. Slow fiber cluster pattern in pig longissimus thoracis muscle: implications for myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, S; Wilsons, I J; Horgan, G W; Maltin, C A

    2003-04-01

    Recent evidence implicates fiber type proportions as playing a role in meat eating quality, and in pigs it has been suggested that the slow oxidative fibers contribute to both juiciness and tenderness. The fiber distribution in pigs is different from that found in most other species, in which the various types of skeletal muscle fiber are distributed in a "checkerboard" pattern, because in pigs the slow oxidative fibers have a clustered distribution. The initial processes leading to fiber clustering are likely to occur during myogenesis, but the precise mechanistic aetiology of this patterning and whether the slow oxidative fiber clusters occur in a random or ordered fashion is unknown. In the present study longissimus thoracis muscle from Large White crossbred pigs was sampled at the 10th rib, 48 h postmortem. Transverse cryo-sections were cut and histochemically stained to allow the identification of the main muscle fiber types: slow oxidative, fast glycolytic, and fast oxidative glycolytic. Images of the sections were captured and analyzed using point processes and Voronoi Tesselations to examine the randomness and spatial distribution of the clusters of slow oxidative fibers found in pig longissimus thoracis muscle. The results showed that an assumption of complete spatial randomness can be rejected and that a mathematical model incorporating a minimum distance of 1.7 to 2.0 microm between cluster centers produced fiber patterns similar to those observed in the original transverse sections of the muscle. In addition, if it assumed that the central fiber in each cluster is derived from primary myoblast progenitors, these results suggest that there may be some degree of repulsion between the primary fibers during the initial stages of cluster formation. The mechanistic basis of such repulsion is not clear, but it is speculated that secreted factors, such as sonic hedgehog or myostatin may play a role.

  10. An improved vaseline gap voltage clamp for skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    A Vaseline gap potentiometric recording and voltage clamp method is developed for frog skeletal muscle fibers. The method is based on the Frankenhaeuser-Dodge voltage clamp for myelinated nerve with modifications to improve the frequency response, to compensate for external series resistance, and to compensate for the complex impedance of the current-passing pathway. Fragments of single muscle fibers are plucked from the semitendinosus muscle and mounted while depolarized by a solution like CsF. After Vaseline seals are formed between fluid pools, the fiber ends are cut once again, the central region is rinsed with Ringer solution, and the feedback amplifiers are turned on. Errors in the potential and current records are assessed by direct measurements with microelectrodes. The passive properties of the preparation are simulated by the "disk" equivalent circuit for the transverse tubular system and the derived parameters are similar to previous measurements with microelectrodes. Action potentials at 5 degrees C are long because of the absence of delayed rectification. Their shape is approximately simulated by solving the disk model with sodium permeability in the surface and tubular membranes. Voltage clamp currents consist primarily of capacity currents and sodium currents. The peak inward sodium current density at 5 degrees C is 3.7 mA/cm2. At 5 degrees C the sodium currents are smoothly graded with increasing depolarization and free of notches suggesting good control of the surface membrane. At higher temperatures a small, late extra inward current appears for small depolarizations that has the properties expected for excitation in the transverse tubular system. Comparison of recorded currents with simulations shows that while the transverse tubular system has regenerative sodium currents, they are too small to make important errors in the total current recorded at the surface under voltage clamp at low temperature. The tubules are definitely not under voltage

  11. Regeneration of frog twitch and slow muscle fibers after mincing.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Emser, W

    1985-10-01

    Iliofibularis muscles of Rana temporaria were minced and allowed to regenerate in the iliofibularis or the sartorius bed of the same frog. Regenerated muscles were examined for the presence of slow muscle fibers using electrophysiologic, histochemical, and contractile parameters. Muscle regeneration from sartorius mince was also studied. Regeneration was more successful from iliofibularis than from sartorius mince, and the iliofibularis bed was more favorable for regeneration than the sartorius bed for both types of muscle. Twitch fibers regenerated within a few months, but slow fibers could not be identified earlier than 14 months after muscle destruction. Slow muscle fibers regenerated only from iliofibularis mince, both orthotopically and heterotopically. All regenerates capable of maintaining a K-contracture contained histochemically identified slow fibers; the membrane properties of electrophysiologically identified slow fibers were normal. It is concluded that slow muscle fibers regenerate only from the remnants of a muscle that contains slow fibers. The results are discussed with respect to the role of innervating nerve fibers.

  12. Effect of altering starting length and activation timing of muscle on fiber strain and muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-05-01

    Muscle strain injuries are some of the most frequent injuries in sports and command a great deal of attention in an effort to understand their etiology. These injuries may be the culmination of a series of subcellular events accumulated through repetitive lengthening (eccentric) contractions during exercise, and they may be influenced by a variety of variables including fiber strain magnitude, peak joint torque, and starting muscle length. To assess the influence of these variables on muscle injury magnitude in vivo, we measured fiber dynamics and joint torque production during repeated stretch-shortening cycles in the rabbit tibialis anterior muscle, at short and long muscle lengths, while varying the timing of activation before muscle stretch. We found that a muscle subjected to repeated stretch-shortening cycles of constant muscle-tendon unit excursion exhibits significantly different joint torque and fiber strains when the timing of activation or starting muscle length is changed. In particular, measures of fiber strain and muscle injury were significantly increased by altering activation timing and increasing the starting length of the muscle. However, we observed differential effects on peak joint torque during the cyclic stretch-shortening exercise, as increasing the starting length of the muscle did not increase torque production. We conclude that altering activation timing and muscle length before stretch may influence muscle injury by significantly increasing fiber strain magnitude and that fiber dynamics is a more important variable than muscle-tendon unit dynamics and torque production in influencing the magnitude of muscle injury.

  13. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF BARNACLE GIANT MUSCLE FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, Graham; McNeill, Patricia A.; Selverston, Allen I.

    1973-01-01

    Increasing use of barnacle giant muscle fibers for physiological research has prompted this investigation of their fine structure. The fibers are invaginated by a multibranched system of clefts connecting to the exterior and filled with material similar to that of the basement material of the sarcolemmal complex. Tubules originate from the surface plasma membrane at irregular sites, and also from the clefts They run transversely, spirally, and longitudinally, making many diadic and some triadic contacts with cisternal sacs of the longitudinal sarcoplasmic reticulum. The contacts are not confined to any particular region of the sarcomere. The tubules are wider and their walls are thicker at points of contact with Z material. Some linking of the Z regions occurs across spaces within the fiber which contain large numbers of glycogen particles. A-band lengths are extremely variable, in the range 2.2 µm–20.3 µm (average 5.2 µm) Individual thick filaments have thin (110 Å) hollow regions alternating with thick (340 Å) solid ones. Bridges between thick filaments occur at random points and are not concentrated into an M band The thin:thick filament ratio is variable in different parts of a fiber, from 3:1 to 6:1. Z bands are basically perforated, but the number of perforations may increase during contraction. PMID:4264604

  14. Automated recognition of the iliac muscle and modeling of muscle fiber direction in torso CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, N.; Zhou, X.; Azuma, K.; Muramatsu, C.; Hara, T.; Fujita, H.

    2016-03-01

    The iliac muscle is an important skeletal muscle related to ambulatory function. The muscles related to ambulatory function are the psoas major and iliac muscles, collectively defined as the iliopsoas muscle. We have proposed an automated recognition method of the iliac muscle. Muscle fibers of the iliac muscle have a characteristic running pattern. Therefore, we used 20 cases from a training database to model the movement of the muscle fibers of the iliac muscle. In the recognition process, the existing position of the iliac muscle was estimated by applying the muscle fiber model. To generate an approximation mask by using a muscle fiber model, a candidate region of the iliac muscle was obtained. Finally, the muscle region was identified by using values from the gray value and boundary information. The experiments were performed by using the 20 cases without abnormalities in the skeletal muscle for modeling. The recognition result in five cases obtained a 76.9% average concordance rate. In the visual evaluation, overextraction of other organs was not observed in 85% of the cases. Therefore, the proposed method is considered to be effective in the recognition of the initial region of the iliac muscle. In the future, we will integrate the recognition method of the psoas major muscle in developing an analytical technique for the iliopsoas area. Furthermore, development of a sophisticated muscle function analysis method is necessary.

  15. Electrical activation of artificial muscles containing polyacrylonitrile gel fibers.

    PubMed

    Schreyer, H B; Gebhart, N; Kim, K J; Shahinpoor, M

    2000-01-01

    Gel fibers made from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are known to elongate and contract when immersed in caustic and acidic solutions, respectively. The amount of contraction for these pH-activated fibers is 50% or greater, and the strength of these fibers is shown to be comparable to that of human muscle. Despite these attributes, the need of strong acids and bases for actuation has limited the use of PAN gel fibers as linear actuators or artificial muscles. Increasing the conductivity by depositing platinum on the fibers or combining the fibers with graphite fibers has allowed for electrical activation of artificial muscles containing gel fibers when placed in an electrochemical cell. The electrolysis of water in such a cell produces hydrogen ions at an artificial muscle anode, thus locally decreasing the pH and causing the muscle to contract. Reversing the electric field allows the PAN muscle to elongate. A greater than 40% contraction in artificial muscle length in less than 10 min is observed when it is placed as an electrode in a 10 mM NaCl electrolyte solution and connected to a 10 V power supply. These results indicate potential in developing electrically activated PAN muscles and linear actuators, which would be much more applicable than chemically activated muscles.

  16. Calcium Efflux from Barnacle Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J. M.; Blaustein, M. P.

    1974-01-01

    Calcium-45 was injected into single giant barnacle muscle fibers, and the rate of efflux was measured under a variety of conditions. The rate constant (k) for 45Ca efflux into standard seawater averaged 17 x 10–4 min–1 which corresponds to an efflux of about 1–2 pmol/cm2·s. Removal of external Ca (Cao) reduced the efflux by 50%. In most fibers about 40% of the 45Ca efflux into Ca-free seawater was dependent on external Na (Nao); treatment with 3.5 mM caffeine increased the magnitude of the Nao-dependent efflux. In a few fibers removal of Nao, in the absence of Cao, either had no effect or increased k; caffeine (2–3.5 mM) unmasked an Nao-dependent efflux in these fibers. The Nao-dependent Ca efflux had a Q10 of about 3.7. The data are consistent with the idea that a large fraction of the Ca efflux may be carrier-mediated, and may involve both Ca-Ca and Na-Ca counterflow. The relation between the Nao-dependent Ca efflux and the external Na concentration is sigmoid, and suggests that two, or more likely three, external Na+ ions may activate the efflux of one Ca+2. With a three-for-one Na-Ca exchange, the Na electrochemical gradient may be able to supply sufficient energy to maintain the Ca gradient in these fibers. Other, more complex models are not excluded, however, and may be required to explain some puzzling features of the Ca efflux such as the variable Nao-dependence. PMID:4812633

  17. Muscle organizers in Drosophila: the role of persistent larval fibers in adult flight muscle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, E. R.; Fernandes, J.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    In many organisms muscle formation depends on specialized cells that prefigure the pattern of the musculature and serve as templates for myoblast organization and fusion. These include muscle pioneers in insects and muscle organizing cells in leech. In Drosophila, muscle founder cells have been proposed to play a similar role in organizing larval muscle development during embryogenesis. During metamorphosis in Drosophila, following histolysis of most of the larval musculature, there is a second round of myogenesis that gives rise to the adult muscles. It is not known whether muscle founder cells organize the development of these muscles. However, in the thorax specific larval muscle fibers do not histolyze at the onset of metamorphosis, but instead serve as templates for the formation of a subset of adult muscles, the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs). Because these persistent larval muscle fibers appear to be functioning in many respects like muscle founder cells, we investigated whether they were necessary for DLM development by using a microbeam laser to ablate them singly and in combination. We found that, in the absence of the larval muscle fibers, DLMs nonetheless develop. Our results show that the persistent larval muscle fibers are not required to initiate myoblast fusion, to determine DLM identity, to locate the DLMs in the thorax, or to specify the total DLM fiber volume. However, they are required to regulate the number of DLM fibers generated. Thus, while the persistent larval muscle fibers are not obligatory for DLM fiber formation and differentiation, they are necessary to ensure the development of the correct number of fibers.

  18. Mechanisms of nascent fiber formation during avian skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, K. M.; Schultz, E.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined two putative mechanisms of new fiber formation in postnatal skeletal muscle, namely longitudinal fragmentation of existing fibers and de novo formation. The relative contributions of these two mechanisms to fiber formation in hypertrophying anterior latissimus dorsi (ALD) muscle were assessed by quantitative analysis of their nuclear populations. Muscle hypertrophy was induced by wing-weighting for 1 week. All nuclei formed during the weighting period were labeled by continuous infusion of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a thymidine analog, and embryonic-like fibers were identified using an antibody to ventricular-like embryonic (V-EMB) myosin. The number of BrdU-labeled and unlabeled nuclei in V-EMB-positive fibers were counted. Wing-weighting resulted in significant muscle enlargement and the appearance of many V-EMB+ fibers. The majority of V-EMB+ fibers were completely independent of mature fibers and had a nuclear density characteristics of developing fibers. Furthermore, nearly 100% of the nuclei in independent V-EMB+ fibers were labeled. These findings strongly suggest that most V-EMB+ fibers were nascent fibers formed de novo during the weighting period by satellite cell activation and fusion. Nascent fibers were found primarily in the space between fascicles where they formed a complex anastomosing network of fibers running at angles to one another. Although wing-weighting induced an increase in the number of branched fibers, there was no evidence that V-EMB+ fibers were formed by longitudinal fragmentation. The location of newly formed fibers in wing-weighted and regenerating ALD muscle was compared to determine whether satellite cells in the ALD muscle were unusual in that, if stimulated to divide, they would form fibers in the inter- and intrafascicular space. In contrast to wing-weighted muscle, nascent fibers were always found closely associated with necrotic fibers. These results suggest that wing-weighting is not simply another

  19. Laser cutting of carbon fiber reinforced thermo-plastics (CFRTP) by single-mode fiber laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sato, Tadatake; Narazaki, Aiko; Kurosaki, Ryozo; Muramatsu, Mayu; Harada, Yoshihisa; Anzai, Kenji; Aoyama, Mitsuaki; Matsushita, Masafumi; Furukawa, Koichi; Nishino, Michiteru; Fujisaki, Akira; Miyato, Taizo; Kayahara, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    We report on the laser cutting of carbon fiber reinforced thermo-plastics (CFRTP) with a cw IR fiber laser (single-mode fiber laser, average power: 350 W). CFRTP is a high strength composite material with a lightweight, and is increasingly being used various applications. A well-defined cutting of CFRTP which were free of debris and thermal-damages around the grooves, were performed by the laser irradiation with a fast beam galvanometer scanning on a multiple-scanpass method.

  20. Muscle fiber types composition and type identified endplate morphology of forepaw intrinsic muscles in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Mi, Jing-Yi; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Xiao-Yun; Rui, Yong-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The failure to accept reinnervation is considered to be one of the reasons for the poor motor functional recovery of intrinsic hand muscles (IHMs) after nerve injury. Rat could be a suitable model to be used in simulating motor function recovery of the IHMs after nerve injury as to the similarities in function and anatomy of the muscles between human and rat. However, few studies have reported the muscle fiber types composition and endplate morphologic characteristics of intrinsic forepaw muscles (IFMs) in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain isoforms and acetylcholine receptors were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and endplates on type-identified fibers of the lumbrical muscles (LMs), interosseus muscles (IMs), abductor digiti minimi (AM) and flexor pollicis brevis (FM) in rat forepaw. The majority of IFMs fibers were labeled positively for fast-switch fiber. However, the IMs were composed of only slow-switch fiber. With the exception of the IMs, the other IFMs had a part of hybrid fibers. Two-dimensional morphological characteristics of endplates on I and IIa muscle fiber had no significant differences among the IFMs. The LMs is the most suitable IFMs of rat to stimulate reinnervation of the IHMs after nerve injury. Gaining greater insight into the muscle fiber types composition and endplate morphology in the IFMs of rat may help understand the pathological and functional changes of IFMs in rat model stimulating reinnervation of IHMs after peripheral nerve injury.

  1. Anisotropic Smoothing Improves DT-MRI-Based Muscle Fiber Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Amanda K. W.; Ding, Zhaohua; Elder, Christopher P.; Towse, Theodore F.; Damon, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effect of anisotropic smoothing on fiber tracking measures, including pennation angle, fiber tract length, and fiber tract number in the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle in healthy subjects using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI). Materials and Methods 3T DW-MRI data were used for muscle fiber tractography in the MG of healthy subjects. Anisotropic smoothing was applied at three levels (5%, 10%, 15%), and pennation angle, tract length, fiber tract number, fractional anisotropy, and principal eigenvector orientation were quantified for each smoothing level. Results Fiber tract length increased with pre-fiber tracking smoothing, and local heterogeneities in fiber direction were reduced. However, pennation angle was not affected by smoothing. Conclusion Modest anisotropic smoothing (10%) improved fiber-tracking results, while preserving structural features. PMID:26010830

  2. Twitch tension, muscle weight, and fiber area of exercised reinnervating rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hie, H B; van Nie, C J; Vermeulen-van der Zee, E

    1982-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dynamic exercise on weight and isometric twitch tension of the reinnervating rat gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle complex as well as on histology of the reinnervating plantaris muscle. Two groups of 6-week-old female Wistar rats, 1 control (n = 17) and 1 experimental (n = 17), were denervated unilaterally by cutting and resecting the sciatic nerve. To effect reinnervation a skin grafting operation was carried out on the nerve so that the gap caused by resection was bridged. The experimental group began exercising on a motor-driven treadmill 18 days following the graft. A progressive training program of 18 weeks of treadmill running, 5 days/week, was carried out by the animals. Training intensity was gradually increased until during the final 3 weeks they were running up a 25% grade at a speed of 720m/hour for 2 hours a day. Exercise did not damage the reinnervating muscle. Absolute wet weight and maximum isometric twitch tension of the reinnervating gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle complex were increased significantly, by 15 1/2% and 30% respectively, after exercise. Training resulted in a significant increase in fiber and muscle cross-sectional areas of the reinnervating plantaris, by 28% and 23% respectively. Exercise brought about no change in total relative amount of connective tissue in the reinnervating plantaris. This study indicates that dynamic exercise has a significant positive effect on the weight, twitch tension and histologic appearance of the reinnervating gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle and thus may enhance their functional recovery. It is likely that this type of training is also effective in the treatment of patients recovering from peripheral nerve injuries.

  3. A retracting wire knife for cutting fiber bundles and making sheet lesions of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Shibata, M; Russell, I S

    1979-07-01

    A retracting knife which has two cutting wires for the transection of fiber bundles is described. The knife holds the fiber bundles of the stria terminalis between the two cutting wires and transects them by a shearing movement as the wires close. In addition, the feasability of such a knife producing a sheet lesion around the n. caudatus is also described.

  4. Functional characteristics of the rat jaw muscles: daily muscle activity and fiber type composition.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Tanaka, Eiji; van Wessel, Tim; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanne, Kazuo

    2009-12-01

    Skeletal muscles have a heterogeneous fiber type composition, which reflects their functional demand. The daily muscle use and the percentage of slow-type fibers have been shown to be positively correlated in skeletal muscles of larger animals but for smaller animals there is no information. The examination of this relationship in adult rats was the purpose of this study. We hypothesized a positive relationship between the percentage of fatigue-resistant fibers in each muscle and its total duration of use per day. Fourteen Wistar strain male rats (410-450 g) were used. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, deep masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time) exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (2, 5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of the fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining. At lower activity levels (exceeding 2 and 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of digastric muscle was significantly (P < 0.01) longer than those of the other muscles. The anterior belly of digastric muscle also contained the highest percentage of slow-type fibers (type I fiber and hybrid fiber co-expressing myosin heavy chain I + IIA) (ca. 11%; P < 0.05). By regression analysis for all four muscles, an inter-muscular comparison showed a positive relationship between the duty time (exceeding 50% of the peak activity) and the percentage of type IIX fibers (P < 0.05), which demonstrate intermediate physiological properties relative to type IIA and IIB fibers. For the jaw muscles of adult male rats, the variations of fiber type composition and muscle use suggest that the muscle containing the largest amounts of slow-type fibers (the anterior belly of digastric muscle) is mainly

  5. Preferential Type II Muscle Fiber Damage From Plyometric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Filippo; Isaacs, Ashwin W.; Myburgh, Kathryn H.

    2012-01-01

    Context Plyometric training has been successfully used in different sporting contexts. Studies that investigated the effect of plyometric training on muscle morphology are limited, and results are controversial with regard to which muscle fiber type is mainly affected. Objective To analyze the skeletal muscle structural and ultrastructural change induced by an acute bout of plyometric exercise to determine which type of muscle fibers is predominantly damaged. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Eight healthy, untrained individuals (age = 22 ± 1 years, height = 179.2 ± 6.4 cm, weight = 78.9 ± 5.9 kg). Intervention(s) Participants completed an acute bout of plyometric exercise (10 sets of 10 squat-jumps with a 1-minute rest between sets). Main Outcome Measure(s) Blood samples were collected 9 days and immediately before and 6 hours and 1, 2, and 3 days after the acute intervention. Muscle samples were collected 9 days before and 3 days after the exercise intervention. Blood samples were analyzed for creatine kinase activity. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for damage using fluorescent and electron transmission microscopy. Results Creatine kinase activity peaked 1 day after the exercise bout (529.0 ± 317.8 U/L). Immunofluorescence revealed sarcolemmal damage in 155 of 1616 fibers analyzed. Mainly fast-twitch fibers were damaged. Within subgroups, 7.6% of type I fibers, 10.3% of type IIa fibers, and 14.3% of type IIx fibers were damaged as assessed by losses in dystrophin staining. Similar damage was prevalent in IIx and IIa fibers. Electron microscopy revealed clearly distinguishable moderate and severe sarcomere damage, with damage quantifiably predominant in type II muscle fibers of both the glycolytic and oxidative subtypes (86% and 84%, respectively, versus only 27% of slow-twitch fibers). Conclusions We provide direct evidence that a single bout of plyometric exercise affected mainly type II muscle

  6. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John J; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S; Esser, Karyn A; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2011-09-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca(2+) sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells.

  7. Fiber-type susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced damage of hindlimb-unloaded rat AL muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayan, K.; Thompson, J. L.; Norenberg, K. M.; Fitts, R. H.; Riley, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Slow oxidative (SO) fibers of the adductor longus (AL) were predominantly damaged during voluntary reloading of hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats and appeared explainable by preferential SO fiber recruitment. The present study assessed damage after eliminating the variable of voluntary recruitment by tetanically activating all fibers in situ through the motor nerve while applying eccentric (lengthening) or isometric contractions. Muscles were aldehyde fixed and resin embedded, and semithin sections were cut. Sarcomere lesions were quantified in toluidine blue-stained sections. Fibers were typed in serial sections immunostained with antifast myosin and antitotal myosin (which highlights slow fibers). Both isometric and eccentric paradigms caused fatigue. Lesions occurred only in eccentrically contracted control and HU muscles. Fatigue did not cause lesions. HU increased damage because lesioned- fiber percentages within fiber types and lesion sizes were greater than control. Fast oxidative glycolytic (FOG) fibers were predominantly damaged. In no case did damaged SO fibers predominate. Thus, when FOG, SO, and hybrid fibers are actively lengthened in chronically unloaded muscle, FOG fibers are intrinsically more susceptible to damage than SO fibers. Damaged hybrid-fiber proportions ranged between these extremes.

  8. Muscle growth and fiber type composition in hind limb muscles during postnatal development in pigs.

    PubMed

    Wank, Veit; Fischer, Martin S; Walter, Bernd; Bauer, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    Rapid postnatal development in pigs is reflected by differentiation in skeletal muscle. This process depends on muscle function and demands, but a comprehensive overview of individual developmental characteristics of quickly growing leg muscles in pigs is still missing. This study focused on the development of 10 hind limb muscles in pigs. To determine these changes in mass, fiber type patterns and fiber diameters were analyzed 0, 2, 4, 7, 14, 28, 42, 56 and 400 days after birth. Generally, the proportion of slow fibers increased from birth to 8 weeks. Thereafter, only minor changes in muscle fiber type composition were observed. The majority of the muscles contained less then 10% slow-twitch fibers at birth, increasing to between 12 (Musculus vastus lateralis) and 38% (M. gastrocnemius medialis) in adult pigs. By contrast, postural muscles already had 20-30% slow fibers at birth, and this contribution increased up to 65% in adults (i.e. M. vastus intermedius). From birth to the 2nd week, only in slow fibers could activity of oxidative enzymes be detected. A differentiation of fast-twitch fibers into subtypes with high (comparable to type IIA) and low oxidative metabolism (equivalent to type IIB) occurred between the 2nd and 4th week of life. The ratio between type II fibers with high and low oxidative enzyme activity did not change markedly through development in any muscle, although there was a trend towards an increasing proportion of type IIA fibers in the soleus. In the majority of the muscles investigated, the fast-twitch fibers with low oxidative metabolism (IIB) obtained the largest cross-sectional area. In contrast, at birth no remarkable differences in the diameter of fast and slow fibers were found. The rapid increase in muscle mass compared to body mass reflects the high performance in meat production of the cross pig investigated.

  9. Changes in muscle fiber contractility and extracellular matrix production during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mendias, Christopher L; Schwartz, Andrew J; Grekin, Jeremy A; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Sugg, Kristoffer B

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle can adapt to increased mechanical loads by undergoing hypertrophy. Transient reductions in whole muscle force production have been reported during the onset of hypertrophy, but contractile changes in individual muscle fibers have not been previously studied. Additionally, the extracellular matrix (ECM) stores and transmits forces from muscle fibers to tendons and bones, and determining how the ECM changes during hypertrophy is important in understanding the adaptation of muscle tissue to mechanical loading. Using the synergist ablation model, we sought to measure changes in muscle fiber contractility, collagen content, and cross-linking, and in the expression of several genes and activation of signaling proteins that regulate critical components of myogenesis and ECM synthesis and remodeling during muscle hypertrophy. Tissues were harvested 3, 7, and 28 days after induction of hypertrophy, and nonoverloaded rats served as controls. Muscle fiber specific force (sFo), which is the maximum isometric force normalized to cross-sectional area, was reduced 3 and 7 days after the onset of mechanical overload, but returned to control levels by 28 days. Collagen abundance displayed a similar pattern of change. Nearly a quarter of the transcriptome changed over the course of overload, as well as the activation of signaling pathways related to hypertrophy and atrophy. Overall, this study provides insight into fundamental mechanisms of muscle and ECM growth, and indicates that although muscle fibers appear to have completed remodeling and regeneration 1 mo after synergist ablation, the ECM continues to be actively remodeling at this time point.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study utilized a rat synergist ablation model to integrate changes in single muscle fiber contractility, extracellular matrix composition, activation of important signaling pathways in muscle adaption, and corresponding changes in the muscle transcriptome to provide novel insight into the basic

  10. Individual sarcomere lengths in whole muscle fibers and optimal fiber length computation.

    PubMed

    Infantolino, Benjamin W; Ellis, Michael J; Challis, John H

    2010-11-01

    Estimation of muscle fiber optimum length is typically accomplished using either laser diffraction or by counting the number of sarcomeres in a portion of the muscle fiber, measuring the distance that encompasses those sarcomeres and dividing by the number of sarcomeres to obtain an average sarcomere length. If the sarcomeres are not uniformly distributed, either of these techniques could produce errors when estimating optimum lengths. The purposes of this study were: to describe new software that automatically analyzes digital images of skeletal muscle fibers to measure individual sarcomere lengths; and to use this software to measure individual sarcomere lengths along complete muscle fibers to examine the influence of computing whole muscle fiber properties from portions of the fiber. Six complete muscle fibers were imaged using a digital camera attached to a microscope. The images were then processed to achieve the best resolution possible, individual sarcomeres along the image were detected, and each individual sarcomere length was measured. The software accuracy was compared with that of manual measurement and was found to be as accurate. In addition, the time to measure individual sarcomere lengths was greatly reduced using the software compared with manual measurement. The arrangement of individual sarcomere lengths demonstrated long-range correlations, which indicates problems in assuming only a portion of a fiber can be used to determine whole fiber properties. This study has provided evidence on the number of sarcomeres which must be analyzed to infer the properties of whole muscles.

  11. Experimental Investigations on Fusion Cutting Stainless Steel with Fiber and CO2 Laser Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, S.; Mahrle, A.; Wetzig, A.; Beyer, E.

    First results of an experimental study on inert-gas fusion cutting stainless steel with different types of laser are presented. In particular, the cutting capabilities of a fiber and a CO2 laser beam with similar Rayleigh length have been compared as a function of material thickness with respect to achievable maximum cutting speed, cut edge surface roughness and cut kerf geometry. The most interesting finding achieved so far concerns the observation that the cut kerfs are nearly identical in size but differ qualitatively in shape for both laser teypes.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Muscle Fiber Composition Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, Nadia A.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the selective and debilitating atrophy of specific skeletal muscle fiber types that accompanies sustained conditions of microgravity. Since little is currently known about the regulation of fiber-specific gene expression programs in mammalian muscle, elucidation of the basic mechanisms of fiber diversification is a necessary prerequisite to the generation of therapeutic strategies for attenuation of muscle atrophy on earth or in space. Vertebrate skeletal muscle development involves the fusion of undifferentiated mononucleated myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers, with a concomitant activation of muscle-specific genes encoding proteins that form the force-generating contractile apparatus. The regulatory circuitry controlling skeletal muscle gene expression has been well studied in a number of vertebrate animal systems. The goal of this project has been to achieve a similar level of understanding of the mechanisms underlying the further specification of muscles into different fiber types, and the role played by innervation and physical activity in the maintenance and adaptation of different fiber phenotypes into adulthood. Our recent research on the genetic basis of fiber specificity has focused on the emergence of mature fiber types and have implicated a group of transcriptional regulatory proteins, known as E proteins, in the control of fiber specificity. The restriction of E proteins to selected muscle fiber types is an attractive hypothetical mechanism for the generation of muscle fiber-specific patterns of gene expression. To date our results support a model wherein different E proteins are selectively expressed in muscle cells to determine fiber-restricted gene expression. These studies are a first step to define the molecular mechanisms responsible for the shifts in fiber type under conditions of microgravity, and to determine the potential importance of E proteins as

  13. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers of rats after exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akuzawa, M.; Hataya, M.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers were electron microscopically studied in rats forced to run on the treadmill until all-out. When they were mild and limited to relatively small areas, the reconstruction of filaments ensued within 10 days without infiltration of cells. When they were severe and extensive, phagocytes infiltrated in the lesions and removed degenerative sacroplasmic debris from muscle fibers. A little later, myoblasts appeared and regeneration was accomplished in 30 days in much the same manner as in myogenesis.

  14. Differential Responses of Soleus and Plantaris Muscle Fibers to Overloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Fuminori; Shibaguchi, Tsubasa; Ohira, Takashi; Nakai, Naoya; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2013-02-01

    Responses of slow and fast fibers in soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats to overloading by the tendon transection of synergists were studied. Overloading-related hypertrophy was noted in the slow fibers of plantaris and soleus, although the magnitude was greater in plantaris. Five genes with minor expression in slow soleus muscle were identified by microarray analysis. Base-line expressions of these genes in slow fibers of plantaris were also low. Further, repressive effects of overloading on these genes were seen in some fast fibers of plantaris, not in whole plantaris and soleus. The data suggested that the repression of particular genes might be related to the pronounced morphological response of fibers expressing type II, including I+II, myosin heavy chain (MyHC), although these genes with lower base-line expression in slow fibers did not respond to overloading.

  15. Mechanical properties and fiber type composition of chronically inactive muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Monti, R. J.; Vallance, K. A.; Kim, J. A.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    A role for neuromuscular activity in the maintenance of skeletal muscle properties has been well established. However, the role of activity-independent factors is more difficult to evaluate. We have used the spinal cord isolation model to study the effects of chronic inactivity on the mechanical properties of the hindlimb musculature in cats and rats. This model maintains the connectivity between the motoneurons and the muscle fibers they innervate, but the muscle unit is electrically "silent". Consequently, the measured muscle properties are activity-independent and thus the advantage of using this model is that it provides a baseline level (zero activity) from which regulatory factors that affect muscle cell homeostasis can be defined. In the present paper, we will present a brief review of our findings using the spinal cord isolation model related to muscle mechanical and fiber type properties.

  16. Statistical characteristics of surface integrity by fiber laser cutting of Nitinol vascular stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, C. H.; Liu, J. F.; Guo, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Nitinol alloys have been widely used in manufacturing of vascular stents due to the outstanding properties such as superelasticity, shape memory, and superior biocompatibility. Laser cutting is the dominant process for manufacturing Nitinol stents. Conventional laser cutting usually produces unsatisfactory surface integrity which has a significant detrimental impact on stent performance. Emerging as a competitive process, fiber laser with high beam quality is expected to produce much less thermal damage such as striation, dross, heat affected zone (HAZ), and recast layer. To understand the process capability of fiber laser cutting of Nitinol alloy, a design-of-experiment based laser cutting experiment was performed. The kerf geometry, roughness, topography, microstructure, and hardness were studied to better understand the nature of the HAZ and recast layer in fiber laser cutting. Moreover, effect size analysis was conducted to investigate the relationship between surface integrity and process parameters.

  17. An investigation on co-axial water-jet assisted fiber laser cutting of metal sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhukar, Yuvraj K.; Mullick, Suvradip; Nath, Ashish K.

    2016-02-01

    Water assisted laser cutting has received significant attention in recent times with assurance of many advantages than conventional gas assisted laser cutting. A comparative study between co-axial water-jet and gas-jet assisted laser cutting of thin sheets of mild steel (MS) and titanium (Ti) by fiber laser is presented. Fiber laser (1.07 μm wavelength) was utilised because of its low absorption in water. The cut quality was evaluated in terms of average kerf, projected dross height, heat affected zone (HAZ) and cut surface roughness. It was observed that a broad range process parameter could produce consistent cut quality in MS. However, oxygen assisted cutting could produce better quality only with optimised parameters at high laser power and high cutting speed. In Ti cutting the water-jet assisted laser cutting performed better over the entire range of process parameters compared with gas assisted cutting. The specific energy, defined as the amount of laser energy required to remove unit volume of material was found more in case of water-jet assisted laser cutting process. It is mainly due to various losses associated with water assisted laser processing such as absorption of laser energy in water and scattering at the interaction zone.

  18. Adaptations of human skeletal muscle fibers to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, M. Kathleen; Allen, David L.; Mohajerani, Laleh; Greenisen, Michael C.; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    1995-01-01

    Human skeletal muscle fibers seem to share most of the same interrelationships among myosin ATPase activity, myosin heavy chain (MHC) phenotype, mitochondrial enzyme activities, glycolytic enzyme activities, and cross-sectional area (CSA) as found in rat, cat, and other species. One difference seems to be that fast fibers with high mitochrondrial content occur less frequently in humans than in the rat or cat. Recently, we have reported that the type of MHC expressed and the size of the muscle fibers in humans that have spent 11 days in space change significantly. Specifically, about 8% more fibers express fast MHCs and all phenotypes atrophy in the vastus lateralis (VL) post compared to preflight. In the present paper we examine the relationships among the population of myonuclei, MHC type, and CSA of single human muscle fibers before and after spaceflight. These are the first data that define the relationship among the types of MHC expressed, myonuclei number, and myonuclei domain of single fibers in human muscle. We then compare these data to similar measures in the cat. In addition, the maximal torque that can be generated by the knee extensors and their fatigability before and after spaceflight are examined. These data provide some indication of the potential physiologica consequences of the muscle adaptations that occur in humans in response to spaceflight.

  19. Human Masseter Muscle Fiber Type Properties, Skeletal Malocclusions, and Muscle Growth Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sciote, James Joseph; Horton, Michael J.; Rowlerson, Anthea M.; Ferri, Joel; Close, John M.; Raoul, Gwenael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We identified masseter muscle fiber type property differences in subjects with dentofacial deformities. Patients and Methods Samples of masseter muscle were collected from 139 young adults during mandibular osteotomy procedures to assess mean fiber areas and percent tissue occupancies for the 4 fiber types that comprise the muscle. Subjects were classified into 1 of 6 malocclusion groups based on the presence of a skeletal Class II or III sagittal dimension malocclusion and either a skeletal open, deep, or normal bite vertical dimension malocclusion. In a subpopulation, relative quantities of the muscle growth factors IGF-I and GDF-8 gene expression were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Fiber properties were not different in the sagittal malocclusion groups, but were very different in the vertical malocclusion groups (P ≤ .0004). There were significant mean fiber area differences for type II (P ≤ .0004) and type neonatal—atrial (P = .001) fiber types and for fiber percent occupancy differences for both type I–II hybrid fibers and type II fibers (P ≤ .0004). Growth factor expression differed by gender for IGF-I (P = .02) and GDF-8 (P < .01). The ratio of IGF-I:GDF-8 expression associates with type I and II mean fiber areas. Conclusion Fiber type properties are very closely associated with variations in vertical growth of the face, with statistical significance for overall comparisons at P ≤ .0004. An increase in masseter muscle type II fiber mean fiber areas and percent tissue occupancies is inversely related to increases in vertical facial dimension. PMID:21821327

  20. Muscle Transcriptional Profile Based on Muscle Fiber, Mitochondrial Respiratory Activity, and Metabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Du, Yang; Trakooljul, Nares; Brand, Bodo; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Wicke, Michael; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly metabolically active tissue that both stores and consumes energy. Important biological pathways that affect energy metabolism and metabolic fiber type in muscle cells may be identified through transcriptomic profiling of the muscle, especially ante mortem. Here, gene expression was investigated in malignant hyperthermia syndrome (MHS)-negative Duroc and Pietrian (PiNN) pigs significantly differing for the muscle fiber types slow-twitch-oxidative fiber (STO) and fast-twitch-oxidative fiber (FTO) as well as mitochondrial activity (succinate-dependent state 3 respiration rate). Longissimus muscle samples were obtained 24 h before slaughter and profiled using cDNA microarrays. Differential gene expression between Duroc and PiNN muscle samples were associated with protein ubiquitination, stem cell pluripotency, amyloid processing, and 3-phosphoinositide biosynthesis and degradation pathways. In addition, weighted gene co-expression network analysis within both breeds identified several co-expression modules that were associated with the proportion of different fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and ATP metabolism. In particular, Duroc results revealed strong correlations between mitochondrion-associated co-expression modules and STO (r = 0.78), fast-twitch glycolytic fiber (r = -0.98), complex I (r=0.72) and COX activity (r = 0.86). Other pathways in the protein-kinase-activity enriched module were positively correlated with STO (r=0.93), while negatively correlated with FTO (r = -0.72). In contrast to PiNN, co-expression modules enriched in macromolecule catabolic process, actin cytoskeleton, and transcription activator activity were associated with fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and metabolic enzyme activities. Our results highlight the importance of mitochondria for the oxidative capacity of porcine muscle and for breed-dependent molecular pathways in muscle cell fibers. PMID:26681915

  1. CYTOLOGICAL STUDIES OF FIBER TYPES IN SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Geraldine F.; Padykula, Helen A.

    1966-01-01

    A comparative investigation of the mammalian diaphragm has revealed a correlation between certain cytological aspects of red and white muscle fibers and functional activity. This skeletal muscle presents the advantage of a similar and constant function among the mammals, but its functional activity varies in a quantitative manner. Both the rate of breathing (and hence the rate of contraction of the diaphragm) and metabolic activity are known to be inversely related to body size; and this study has demonstrated a relationship between cytological characteristics of the diaphragm and body size of the animal. Small fibers rich in mitochondria (red fibers) are characteristic of small mammals, which have high metabolic activity and fast breathing rates; and large fibers with relatively low mitochondrial content predominate in large mammals, which have lower metabolic activity and slower breathing rates. In mammals with body size intermediate between these two groups (including the laboratory rat), the diaphragm consists of varying mixtures of fiber types. In general, the mitochondrial content of diaphragm fibers is inversely related to body size. It appears, then, that the red fiber reflects a high degree of metabolic activity or a relatively high rate of contraction within the range exhibited by this muscle. PMID:5950272

  2. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor signaling prevents muscle fiber growth during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sugg, Kristoffer B; Korn, Michael A; Sarver, Dylan C; Markworth, James F; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-03-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor receptors alpha and beta (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) mark fibroadipogenic progenitor cells/fibroblasts and pericytes in skeletal muscle, respectively. While the role that these cells play in muscle growth and development has been evaluated, it was not known whether the PDGF receptors activate signaling pathways that control transcriptional and functional changes during skeletal muscle hypertrophy. To evaluate this, we inhibited PDGFR signaling in mice subjected to a synergist ablation muscle growth procedure, and performed analyses 3 and 10 days after induction of hypertrophy. The results from this study indicate that PDGF signaling is required for fiber hypertrophy, extracellular matrix production, and angiogenesis that occur during muscle growth.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Muscle Fiber Composition Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, Nadia A.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the selective and debilitating atrophy of specific skeletal muscle fiber types that accompanies sustained conditions of microgravity. Since little is currently known about the regulation of fiber-specific gene expression programs in mammalian muscle, elucidation of the basic mechanisms of fiber diversification is a necessary prerequisite to the generation of therapeutic strategies for attenuation of muscle atrophy on earth or in space. Vertebrate skeletal muscle development involves the fusion of undifferentiated mononucleated myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers, with a concomitant activation of muscle-specific genes encoding proteins that form the force-generating contractile apparatus. The regulatory circuitry controlling skeletal muscle gene expression has been well studied in a number of vertebrate animal systems. The goal of this project has been to achieve a similar level of understanding of the mechanisms underlying the further specification of muscles into different fiber types, and the role played by innervation and physical activity in the maintenance and adaptation of different fiber phenotypes into adulthood. Our recent research on the genetic basis of fiber specificity has focused on the emergence of mature fiber types and have implicated a group of transcriptional regulatory proteins, known as E proteins, in the control of fiber specificity. The restriction of E proteins to selected muscle fiber types is an attractive hypothetical mechanism for the generation of muscle fiber-specific patterns of gene expression. To date our results support a model wherein different E proteins are selectively expressed in muscle cells to determine fiber-restricted gene expression. These studies are a first step to define the molecular mechanisms responsible for the shifts in fiber type under conditions of microgravity, and to determine the potential importance of E proteins as

  4. Postnatal development of fiber type composition in rabbit jaw and leg muscles.

    PubMed

    Korfage, J A M; Helmers, R; Matignon, M de Goüyon; van Wessel, T; Langenbach, G E J; van Eijden, T M G J

    2009-01-01

    We examined the difference in fiber type composition and cross-sectional areas during postnatal development in male rabbit jaw muscles and compared these with changes in leg muscles. The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) content of the fibers was determined by immunohistochemistry. No fiber type difference was found between the jaw muscles in 20-week-old rabbits. However, the way this adult fiber type composition was reached differed between the muscles. The deep temporalis, medial pterygoid, and superficial masseter displayed an increase in alpha fibers during early and a decrease during late postnatal development. Other jaw muscles displayed an increase in alpha fibers during early development only. In contrast, alpha fibers were not found in the soleus, in which fiber type changes were completed at week 4. The gastrocnemius muscle did not change its fiber type composition. Initially, fibers in jaw-opening muscles had larger cross-sectional areas than in other muscles, but they increased less during development. Although there were no large differences in the fiber type composition of muscles in young adult rabbits, large differences were found in the jaw muscles, but not in the leg muscles, during development. In part, these developmental changes in fiber percentages within the jaw muscles can be explained by functional modifications in this muscle group. In the present study, the deep temporalis, medial pterygoid, and superficial masseter showed the most dramatic percent changes in fibers during postnatal development.

  5. Experimental comparisons between McKibben type artificial muscles and straight fibers type artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Taro

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes experimental comparison between a conventional McKibben type artificial muscle and a straight fibers type artificial muscle developed by the authors. A wearable device and a rehabilitation robot which assists a human muscle should have characteristics similar to those of human muscle. In addition, because the wearable device and the rehabilitation robot should be light, an actuator with a high power/weight ratio is needed. At present, the McKibben type is widely used as an artificial muscle, but in fact its physical model is highly nonlinear. Further, the heat and mechanical loss of this actuator are large because of the friction caused by the expansion and contraction of the sleeve. Therefore, the authors have developed an artificial muscle tube in which high strength glass fibers have been built into the tube made from natural latex rubber. As results, experimental results demonstrated that the developed artificial muscle is more effective regarding its fundamental characteristics than that of the McKibben type; the straight fibers types of artificial muscle have more contraction ratio and power, longer lifetime than the McKibben types. And it has almost same characteristics of human muscle for isotonic and isometric that evaluate it dynamically.

  6. The importance of material structure in the laser cutting of glass fiber reinforced plastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Caprino, G. . Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione); Tagliaferri, V. . Istituto di Ingegneria Meccanica); Covelli, L. )

    1995-01-01

    A previously proposed micromechanical formula, aiming to predict the vaporization energy Q[sub v] of composite materials as a function of fiber and matrix properties and fiber volume ratio, was assessed. The experimental data, obtained on glass fiber reinforced plastic panels with different fiber contents cut by a medium power CO[sub 2] cw laser, were treated according to a procedure previously suggested, in order to evaluate Q[sub v]. An excellent agreement was found between experimental and theoretical Q[sub v] values. Theory was then used to predict the response to laser cutting of a composite material with a fiber content varying along the thickness. The theoretical predictions indicated that, in this case, the interpretation of the experimental results may be misleading, bringing to errors in the evaluation of the material thermal properties, or in the prediction of the kerf depth. Some experimental data were obtained, confirming the theoretical findings.

  7. Equilibrium distribution of ions in a muscle fiber.

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, D W; Godt, R E

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a mathematical description of the equilibrium (Donnan) distribution of mobile ions between two phases containing fixed charges. This differs from the classical Donnan derivation by including mobile polyvalent ions such as those present in intact muscle fibers and in solutions used with skinned muscle fibers. Given the average concentrations of ionic species present in intact frog muscle, we calculate that the myofibrillar fixed charge density (-42 meq/liter cytoplasmic fluid) is in close agreement with estimates from amino acid analysis of myofibrillar proteins. As expected, with negative fixed charges in the myofibril, anions are excluded from the myofibrillar space while cations are concentrated in this space; the ratio between the average intra- and extramyofibrillar concentrations for an ion of valence n is (1.11)n. This model allowed us to design a bathing solution for skinned muscle fibers in which the intramyofibrillar ion concentrations closely approximate those found in intact frog muscle cells. Our model, applied to the A- and I-bands of the sarcomere, suggests that likely differences in fixed charge densities in these regions accounts for only a small fraction of the extreme concentration of phosphocreatine observed in the I-bands of intact frog muscle. PMID:2819235

  8. Comparisons of different muscle metabolic enzymes and muscle fiber types in Jinhua and Landrace pigs.

    PubMed

    Guo, J; Shan, T; Wu, T; Zhu, L N; Ren, Y; An, S; Wang, Y

    2011-01-01

    Western and indigenous Chinese pig breeds show obvious differences in muscle growth and meat quality, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the breed-specific mechanisms controlling meat quality and postmortem muscle metabolism. The specific purpose was to investigate the variations in meat quality, muscle fiber type, and enzyme activity between local Jinhua and exotic Landrace pigs at the same age (180 d of age), as well as the same BW of 64 kg, respectively. We compared differentially expressed muscle fiber types such as types I and IIa (oxidative), type IIb (glycolytic), as well as type IIx (intermediate) fibers in LM and soleus muscles of Jinhua and Landrace pigs using real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Furthermore, the metabolic enzyme activities of lactate dehydrogenase, as well as succinic dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase, were used as markers of glycolytic and oxidative capacities, respectively. Results showed that Jinhua pigs exhibited greater intramuscular fat content and less drip loss compared with the Landrace (P < 0.01). Meanwhile, the mRNA abundance of oxidative and intermediate fibers was increased in Jinhua pigs, whereas the glycolytic fibers were more highly expressed in the Landrace (P < 0.01). In addition, Jinhua pigs possessed greater oxidative capacity than that of the Landrace (P < 0.05). These results suggested that the increased expression of the oxidative and intermediate fibers and greater activities of oxidative enzymes in Jinhua pigs were related to meat quality as indicated by a greater intramuscular fat and reduced drip loss. Based on these results, we conclude that muscle fiber composition and postmortem muscle metabolism can explain, in part, the variation of meat quality in Jinhua and Landrace pigs. These results may provide valuable information for understanding the molecular mechanism responsible for breed specific differences in growth performance

  9. Severely Atrophic Human Muscle Fibers With Nuclear Misplacement Survive Many Years of Permanent Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Likewise in rodents, after complete spinal cord injury (SCI) the lower motor neuron (LMN) denervated human muscle fibers lose completely the myofibrillar apparatus and the coil distribution of myonuclei that are relocated in groups (nuclear clumps) in the center of severely atrophic muscle fibers. Up to two years of LMN denervation the muscle fibers with nuclear clumps are very seldom, but in this cohort of patients the severely atrophic muscle fibers are frequent in muscle biopsies harvested three to six years after SCI. Indeed, the percentage increased to 27 ± 9% (p< 0.001), and then abruptly decreased from the 6th year onward, when fibrosis takes over to neurogenic muscle atrophy. Immunohistochemical analyses shown that nuclear misplacements occurred in both fast and slow muscle fibers. In conclusion, human muscle fibers survive permanent denervation much longer than generally accepted and relocation of nuclei is a general behavior in long term denervated muscle fibers. PMID:27478559

  10. Electrically and Hybrid-Induced Muscle Activations: Effects of Muscle Size and Fiber Type

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Kelly; Faghri, Pouran D.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of three electrical stimulation (ES) frequencies (10, 35, and 50 Hz) on two muscle groups with different proportions of fast and slow twitch fibers (abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and vastus lateralis (VL)) was explored. We evaluated the acute muscles’ responses individually and during hybrid activations (ES superimposed by voluntary activations). Surface electromyography (sEMG) and force measurements were evaluated as outcomes. Ten healthy adults (mean age: 24.4 ± 2.5 years) participated after signing an informed consent form approved by the university Institutional Review Board. Protocols were developed to: 1) compare EMG activities during each frequency for each muscle when generating 25% Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) force, and 2) compare EMG activities during each frequency when additional voluntary activation was superimposed over ES-induced 25% MVC to reach 50% and 75% MVC. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) was utilized to separate ES artifacts from voluntary muscle activation. For both muscles, higher stimulation frequency (35 and 50Hz) induced higher electrical output detected at 25% of MVC, suggesting more recruitment with higher frequencies. Hybrid activation generated proportionally less electrical activity than ES alone. ES and voluntary activations appear to generate two different modes of muscle recruitment. ES may provoke muscle strength by activating more fatiguing fast acting fibers, but voluntary activation elicits more muscle coordination. Therefore, during the hybrid activation, less electrical activity may be detected due to recruitment of more fatigue-resistant deeper muscle fibers, not reachable by surface EMG. PMID:27990244

  11. Single muscle fiber gene expression with run taper.

    PubMed

    Murach, Kevin; Raue, Ulrika; Wilkerson, Brittany; Minchev, Kiril; Jemiolo, Bozena; Bagley, James; Luden, Nicholas; Trappe, Scott

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated gene expression changes in gastrocnemius slow-twitch myosin heavy chain I (MHC I) and fast-twitch (MHC IIa) muscle fibers of collegiate cross-country runners (n = 6, 20±1 y, VO₂max = 70±1 ml•kg-1•min-1) during two distinct training phases. In a controlled environment, runners performed identical 8 kilometer runs (30:18±0:30 min:s, 89±1% HRmax) while in heavy training (∼72 km/wk) and following a 3 wk taper. Training volume during the taper leading into peak competition was reduced ∼50% which resulted in improved race times and greater cross-section and improved function of MHC IIa fibers. Single muscle fibers were isolated from pre and 4 hour post run biopsies in heavily trained and tapered states to examine the dynamic acute exercise response of the growth-related genes Fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (FN14), Myostatin (MSTN), Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72), Muscle ring-finger protein-1 (MURF1), Myogenic factor 6 (MRF4), and Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) via qPCR. FN14 increased 4.3-fold in MHC IIa fibers with exercise in the tapered state (P<0.05). MSTN was suppressed with exercise in both fiber types and training states (P<0.05) while MURF1 and HSP72 responded to running in MHC IIa and I fibers, respectively, regardless of training state (P<0.05). Robust induction of FN14 (previously shown to strongly correlate with hypertrophy) and greater overall transcriptional flexibility with exercise in the tapered state provides an initial molecular basis for fast-twitch muscle fiber performance gains previously observed after taper in competitive endurance athletes.

  12. Contractile properties of thin (actin) filament-reconstituted muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, S; Funatsu, T; Fujita, H

    1998-01-01

    Selective removal and reconstitution of the components of muscle fibers (fibrils) is a useful means of examining the molecular mechanism underlying the formation of the contractile apparatus. In addition, this approach is powerful for examining the structure-function relationship of a specific component of the contractile system. In previous studies, we have achieved the partial structural and functional reconstitution of thin filaments in the skeletal contractile apparatus and full reconstitution in the cardiac contractile apparatus. First, all thin filaments other than short fragments at the Z line were removed by treatment with plasma gelsolin, an actin filament-severing protein. Under these conditions, no active tension could be generated. By incorporating exogenous actin into these thin filament-free fibers, actin filaments were reconstituted by polymerization on the short actin fragments remaining at the Z line, and active tension, which was insensitive to Ca2+, was restored. The active tension after the reconstitution of thin filaments reached as high as 30% of the original level in skeletal muscle, while it reached 140% in cardiac muscle. The augmentation of tension in cardiac muscle is mainly attributable to the elongation of reconstituted filaments, longer than the average length of thin filaments in an intact muscle. These results indicate that a muscle contractile apparatus with a high order structure and function can be constructed by the self-assembly of constituent proteins. Recently, we applied this reconstitution system to the study of the mechanism of spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in thin (actin) filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers. As a result, we found that SPOC occurs even in regulatory protein-free actin filament-reconstituted fibers (Fujita & Ishiwata, manuscript submitted), although the SPOC conditions were slightly different from the standard SPOC conditions. This result strongly suggests that spontaneous oscillation

  13. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes Upon Emissions From Cutting and Sanding Carbon Fiber-Epoxy Composites

    PubMed Central

    Heitbrink, William A.; Lo, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20% to 80% compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9×108 and 2.8×106 fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC. PMID:26478716

  14. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes Upon Emissions From Cutting and Sanding Carbon Fiber-Epoxy Composites.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, William A; Lo, Li-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20% to 80% compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9×10(8) and 2.8×10(6) fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC.

  15. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitbrink, William A.; Lo, Li-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20-80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 108 and 2.8 × 106 fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC.

  16. Biochemical adaptations of antigravity muscle fibers to disuse atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Studies are presented in four parts of this report. The four parts include; (1) studies to gain information on the molecular basis of atrophy by antigravity muscle; (2) studies on the work capacity of antigravity muscles during atrophy and during recovery from atrophy; (3) studies on recovery of degenerated antigravity fibers after removal of hind-limb casts; and (4) studies on the atrophy and recovery of bone. The philosophy of these studies was to identify the time sequence of events in the soleus muscle of the rat following immobilization of the hind limbs, so that the length of the soleus muscle within the fixed limb is less than its resting length. In two separate studies, no decline in the weight of the soleus muscle could be detected during the first 72 hours of limb immobilization.

  17. The muscle fiber type–fiber size paradox: hypertrophy or oxidative metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    van Wessel, T.; de Haan, A.; van der Laarse, W. J.

    2010-01-01

    An inverse relationship exists between striated muscle fiber size and its oxidative capacity. This relationship implies that muscle fibers, which are triggered to simultaneously increase their mass/strength (hypertrophy) and fatigue resistance (oxidative capacity), increase these properties (strength or fatigue resistance) to a lesser extent compared to fibers increasing either of these alone. Muscle fiber size and oxidative capacity are determined by the balance between myofibrillar protein synthesis, mitochondrial biosynthesis and degradation. New experimental data and an inventory of critical stimuli and state of activation of the signaling pathways involved in regulating contractile and metabolic protein turnover reveal: (1) higher capacity for protein synthesis in high compared to low oxidative fibers; (2) competition between signaling pathways for synthesis of myofibrillar proteins and proteins associated with oxidative metabolism; i.e., increased mitochondrial biogenesis via AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates the rate of protein synthesis; (3) relatively higher expression levels of E3-ligases and proteasome-mediated protein degradation in high oxidative fibers. These observations could explain the fiber type–fiber size paradox that despite the high capacity for protein synthesis in high oxidative fibers, these fibers remain relatively small. However, it remains challenging to understand the mechanisms by which contractile activity, mechanical loading, cellular energy status and cellular oxygen tension affect regulation of fiber size. Therefore, one needs to know the relative contribution of the signaling pathways to protein turnover in high and low oxidative fibers. The outcome and ideas presented are relevant to optimizing treatment and training in the fields of sports, cardiology, oncology, pulmonology and rehabilitation medicine. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00421-010-1545-0) contains

  18. Oxygen-assisted multipass cutting of carbon fiber reinforced plastics with ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, T. V.; Komlenok, M. S.; Konov, V. I.; Freitag, C.; Onuseit, V.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    2014-03-14

    Deep multipass cutting of bidirectional and unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) with picosecond laser pulses was investigated in different static atmospheres as well as with the assistance of an oxygen or nitrogen gas flow. The ablation rate was determined as a function of the kerf depth and the resulting heat affected zone was measured. An assisting oxygen gas flow is found to significantly increase the cutting productivity, but only in deep kerfs where the diminished evaporative ablation due to the reduced laser fluence reaching the bottom of the kerf does not dominate the contribution of reactive etching anymore. Oxygen-supported cutting was shown to also solve the problem that occurs when cutting the CFRP parallel to the fiber orientation where a strong deformation and widening of the kerf, which temporarily slows down the process speed, is revealed to be typical for processing in standard air atmospheres.

  19. Polarization-sensitive optical projection tomography for muscle fiber imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mengjie; Dong, Di; Zeng, Chaoting; Liang, Xiao; Yang, Xin; Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge; Hui, Hui; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a tool used for three-dimensional imaging of millimeter-scale biological samples, with the advantage of exhibiting isotropic resolution typically in the micron range. OPT can be divided into two types: transmission OPT (tOPT) and emission OPT (eOPT). Compared with eOPT, tOPT discriminates different tissues based on their absorption coefficient, either intrinsic or after specific staining. However, it fails to distinguish muscle fibers whose absorption coefficients are similar to surrounding tissues. To circumvent this problem, in this article we demonstrate a polarization sensitive OPT system which improves the detection and 3D imaging of muscle fibers by using polarized light. We also developed image acquisition and processing protocols that, together with the system, enable the clear visualization of muscles. Experimental results show that the muscle fibers of diaphragm and stomach, difficult to be distinguished in regular tOPT, were clearly displayed in our system, proving its potential use. Moreover, polarization sensitive OPT was fused with tOPT to investigate the stomach tissue comprehensively. Future applications of polarization sensitive OPT could be imaging other fiber-like structures such as myocardium or other tissues presenting high optical anisotropy. PMID:26752330

  20. Fiber optic biofluorometer for physiological research on muscle slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, Mathias; Dendorfer, Andreas; Werner, Jan; Lambertz, Daniel; Klein, Karl-Friedrich

    2016-03-01

    A focus of research in cell physiology is the detection of Ca2+, NADH, FAD, ATPase activity or membrane potential, only to name a few, in muscle tissues. In this work, we report on a biofluorometer using ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), optical fibers and two photomultipliers (PMTs) using synchronized fluorescence detection with integrated background correction to detect free calcium, Ca2+, in cardiac muscle tissue placed in a horizontal tissue bath and a microscope setup. Fiber optic probes with imaging optics have been designed to transport excitation light from the biofluorometer's light output to a horizontal tissue bath and to collect emission light from a tissue sample of interest to two PMTs allowing either single excitation / single emission or ratiometric, dual excitation / single emission or single excitation / dual emission fluorescence detection of indicator dyes or natural fluorophores. The efficient transport of light from the excitation LEDs to the tissue sample, bleaching effects of the excitation light in both, polymer and fused silica-based fibers will be discussed. Furthermore, a new approach to maximize light collection of the emission light using high NA fibers and high NA coupling optics will be shown. Finally, first results on Ca2+ measurements in cardiac muscle slices in a traditional microscope setup and a horizontal tissue bath using fiber optic probes will be introduced and discussed.

  1. Morphology of the lumbar transversospinal muscles examined in a mouse bearing a muscle fiber-specific nuclear marker.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Jon; Deries, Marianne; Duxson, Marilyn

    2010-12-01

    Although the morphology of human lumbar transversospinal (TSP) muscles has been studied, little is known about the structure of these muscles in the mouse (Mus musculus). Such information is relevant given mice are often used as a "normal" phenotype for studies modeling human development. This study describes the gross morphology, muscle fiber arrangement, and innervation pattern of the mouse lumbar TSP muscles. A unique feature of the study is the use of a transgenic mouse line bearing a muscle-specific nuclear marker that allows clear delineation of muscle fiber and connective tissue boundaries. The lumbar TSP muscles of five mice were examined bilaterally; at each spinal level muscles attached to the caudal edge of the spinous process and passed caudally as a single complex unit. Fibers progressively terminated over the four vertebral segments caudad, with multiple points of muscle fiber attachment on each vertebra. Motor endplates, defined with acetylcholinesterase histochemistry, were consistently located half way along each muscle fiber, regardless of length, with all muscle fibers arranged in-parallel rather than in-series. These results provide information relevant to interpretation of developmental and functional studies involving this muscle group in the mouse and show mouse lumbar TSP muscles are different in form to descriptions of equivalent muscles in humans and horses.

  2. Effect of swim exercise training on human muscle fiber function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Costill, D. L.; Gardetto, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of swim exercise training on the human muscle fiber function was investigated in swimmers trained in a typical collegiate swim-training program followed by an intensified 10-day training period. The measured parameters included the peak tension (P0), negative log molar Ca(2+) concentration (pCa)-force, and maximal shortening speed (Vmax) of the slow-twitch type I and fast-twitch type II fibers obtained by biopsy from the deltoid muscle. The P0 values were found to be not altered after either the training or the 10-day intensive program. The type I fibers from the trained swimmers showed pCa-force curves shifted to the right, such that higher free Ca(2+) levels were required to elicit a given percent of P0. The training program significantly increased the Vmax in the type I fibers and decreased that of the type II fibers, and the 10-day intensive training produced a further significant decrease of the type II fibers.

  3. Isolation of satellite cells from single muscle fibers from young, aged, or dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Di Foggia, Valentina; Robson, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contains an identified resident stem cell population called the satellite cells. This cell is responsible for the majority of the postnatal growth and regenerative potential of skeletal muscle. Other cells do contribute to skeletal muscle regeneration and in cultures of minced whole muscle these cells are cultured along with the satellite cells and it is impossible to dissect out their contribution compared to the satellite cells. Therefore, a method to culture pure satellite cells has been developed to study the signaling pathways that control their proliferation and differentiation. In our studies into the role of the resident myogenic stem cells in regeneration, myopathic conditions, and aging, we have optimized the established techniques that already exist to isolate pure satellite cell cultures from single muscle fibers. We have successfully isolated satellite cells from young adults through to 24-month-old muscles and obtained populations of cells that we are studying for the signaling events that regulate their proliferative potential.

  4. Prediction of cutting forces in machining of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastics composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Surinder Kumar; Gupta, Meenu; Satsangi, P. S.

    2013-06-01

    Machining of plastic materials has become increasingly important in any engineering industry subsequently the prediction of cutting forces. Forces quality has greater influence on components, which are coming in contact with each other. So it becomes necessary to measure and study machined forces and its behavior. In this research work, experimental investigations are conducted to determine the effects of cutting conditions and tool geometry on the cutting forces in the turning of the unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastics (UD-GFRP) composites. In this experimental study, carbide tool (K10) having different tool nose radius and tool rake angle is used. Experiments are conducted based on the established Taguchi's technique L18 orthogonal array on a lathe machine. It is found that the depth of cut is the cutting parameter, which has greater influence on cutting forces. The effect of the tool nose radius and tool rake angles on the cutting forces are also considerably significant. Based on statistical analysis, multiple regression model for cutting forces is derived with satisfactory coefficient ( R 2). This model proved to be highly preferment for predicting cutting forces.

  5. Thin Filament-Reconstituted Skinned Muscle Fibers for the Study of Muscle Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Sayaka; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Fukuda, Norio; Kurihara, Satoshi; Fujita, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    We review the use of thin filament-reconstituted muscle fibers in the study of muscle physiology. Thin filament extraction and reconstitution protocol is a powerful technique to study the role of each component of the thin filament. It is also useful for studying the properties of genetically modified molecules such as actin and tropomyosin. We also review the combination of this protocol with sinusoidal analysis, which will provide a solid technique for determining the effect of regulatory proteins on actomyosin interaction and concomitant cross-bridge kinetics. We suggest that thin filament-reconstituted muscle fibers are an ideal system for studying muscle physiology especially when gene modifications of actin or tropomyosin are involved. PMID:22131807

  6. Green nanotechnology: a short cut to beneficiation of natural fibers.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Tamer Y A; Mobarak, Fardous

    2011-01-01

    For the first time worldwide, it is shown that our novel nanocomposite produced from natural fibers vaccinated with glucose--by fully green nanotechnology--possesses surprising reactivity towards urea. Magic super absorbent carbamated nanocomposite cotton fabrics having remarkable distinguished properties were obtained in few minutes. It is well established that carbamates possess antibacterial effects. The produced magic nanocomposite fabrics, we discovered for the first time worldwide, find their use as woven or nonwoven hygienic pads, bandages or paper nanocomposites.

  7. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-04-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  8. Respiratory muscle fiber remodeling in chronic hyperinflation: dysfunction or adaptation?

    PubMed

    Clanton, Thomas L; Levine, Sanford

    2009-07-01

    The diaphragm and other respiratory muscles undergo extensive remodeling in both animal models of emphysema and in human chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but the nature of the remodeling is different in many respects. One common feature is a shift toward improved endurance characteristics and increased oxidative capacity. Furthermore, both animals and humans respond to chronic hyperinflation by diaphragm shortening. Although in rodent models this clearly arises by deletion of sarcomeres in series, the mechanism has not been proven conclusively in human chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Unique characteristics of the adaptation in human diaphragms include shifts to more predominant slow, type I fibers, expressing slower myosin heavy chain isoforms, and type I and type II fiber atrophy. Although some laboratories report reductions in specific force, this may be accounted for by decreases in myosin heavy chain content as the muscles become more oxidative and more efficient. More recent findings have reported reductions in Ca(2+) sensitivity and reduced myofibrillar elastic recoil. In contrast, in rodent models of disease, there is no consistent evidence for loss of specific force, no consistent shift in fiber populations, and atrophy is predominantly seen only in fast, type IIX fibers. This review challenges the hypothesis that the adaptations in human diaphragm represent a form of dysfunction, secondary to systemic disease, and suggest that most findings can as well be attributed to adaptive processes of a complex muscle responding to unique alterations in its working environment.

  9. Latent mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations drive muscle fiber loss at old age.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Allen; Wanagat, Jonathan; Cheema, Nashwa; Widjaja, Kevin; McKenzie, Debbie; Aiken, Judd M

    2016-08-25

    With age, somatically derived mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion mutations arise in many tissues and species. In skeletal muscle, deletion mutations clonally accumulate along the length of individual fibers. At high intrafiber abundances, these mutations disrupt individual cell respiration and are linked to the activation of apoptosis, intrafiber atrophy, breakage, and necrosis, contributing to fiber loss. This sequence of molecular and cellular events suggests a putative mechanism for the permanent loss of muscle fibers with age. To test whether mtDNA deletion mutation accumulation is a significant contributor to the fiber loss observed in aging muscle, we pharmacologically induced deletion mutation accumulation. We observed a 1200% increase in mtDNA deletion mutation-containing electron transport chain-deficient muscle fibers, an 18% decrease in muscle fiber number and 22% worsening of muscle mass loss. These data affirm the hypothesized role for mtDNA deletion mutation in the etiology of muscle fiber loss at old age.

  10. Myoglobin plasma level related to muscle mass and fiber composition: a clinical marker of muscle wasting?

    PubMed

    Weber, Marc-André; Kinscherf, Ralf; Krakowski-Roosen, Holger; Aulmann, Michael; Renk, Hanna; Künkele, Annette; Edler, Lutz; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hildebrandt, Wulf

    2007-08-01

    Progressive muscle wasting is a central feature of cancer-related cachexia and has been recognized as a determinant of poor prognosis and quality of life. However, until now, no easily assessable clinical marker exists that allows to predict or to track muscle wasting. The present study evaluated the potential of myoglobin (MG) plasma levels to indicate wasting of large locomotor muscles and, moreover, to reflect the loss of MG-rich fiber types, which are most relevant for daily performance. In 17 cancer-cachectic patients (weight loss 22%) and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls, we determined plasma levels of MG and creatine kinase (CK), maximal quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) by magnetic resonance imaging, muscle morphology and fiber composition in biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle, body cell mass (BCM) by impedance technique as well as maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max). In cachectic patients, plasma MG, muscle CSA, BCM, and VO(2)max were 30-35% below control levels. MG showed a significant positive correlation to total muscle CSA (r = 0.65, p < 0.001) and to the CSA fraction formed by type 1 and 2a fibers (r = 0.80, p < 0.001). However, when adjusted for body height and age by multiple regression, MG yielded a largely improved prediction of total CSA (multiple r = 0.83, p < 0.001) and of fiber type 1 and 2a CSA (multiple r = 0.89, p < 0.001). The correlations between CK and these muscle parameters were weaker, and elevated CK values were observed in 20% of control subjects despite a prior abstinence from exercise for 5 days. In conclusion, plasma MG, when adjusted for anthropometric parameters unaffected by weight, may be considered as a novel marker of muscle mass (CSA) indicating best the mass of MG-rich type 1 and 2a fibers as well as VO(2)max as an important functional readout. CK plasma levels appear to be less reliable because prolonged increases are observed in even subclinical myopathies or after exercise. Notably, cancer

  11. Ultrafiltration Membrane Module Virus Reduction at Different Fluxes, and with a Cut Fiber

    EPA Science Inventory

    NSF International evaluated The Dow Chemical Company SFD-2880 UF membrane module for MS2 reduction at four different fluxes, and also with and without a cut fiber, to compare MS2 log reduction under the different scenarios. All tests were conducted in accordance with the U.S. En...

  12. Fiber type characterization of striated muscles related to micturition in female rabbits.

    PubMed

    López-García, Kenia; Mariscal-Tovar, Silvia; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Jiménez-Estrada, Ismael; Castelán, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    Pelvic and perineal striated muscles are relevant for reproduction and micturition in female mammals. Damage to these muscles is associated with pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence. The fiber type composition of skeletal muscle influences the susceptibility for damage and/or regeneration. The aim of the present study was to determine the fiber type composition of a perineal muscle, the bulbospongiosus, and a pelvic muscle, the pubococcygeus. Both muscles were harvested from adult female rabbits (8-10 months old). NADH-TR (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide tetrazolium reductase) histochemistry was undertaken to identify oxidative and glycolytic muscle fibers. Alkaline (pH 9.4) ATP-ase (actomyosin adenosine triphosphatase) histochemistry was used to classify type I, type IIb or type IIa/IId muscle fibers. Results showed that the content of glycolytic fibers in the bulbospongiosus muscle was higher than that of oxidative fibers. Meanwhile, the opposite was true for the pubococcygeus. In the bulbospongiosus muscle, the content of type IIb muscle fibers was higher than that of type I, but was similar to that of type IIa/IId. In contrast, the content of each fiber type was similar in the pubococcygeus muscle. The relative proportion of fibers in bulbospongiosus and pubococcygeus muscles is consistent with their function during voiding and storage phases of micturition.

  13. Myoplasmic calcium transients monitored with purpurate indicator dyes injected into intact frog skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Intact single twitch fibers from frog muscle were studied on an optical bench apparatus after microinjection with tetramethylmurexide (TMX) or purpurate-3,3' diacetic acid (PDAA), two compounds from the purpurate family of absorbance Ca2+ indicators previously used in cut muscle fibers (Maylie, J., M. Irving, N. L. Sizto, G. Boyarsky, and W. K. Chandler. 1987. J. Gen. Physiol. 89:145-176; Hirota, A., W. K. Chandler, P. L. Southwick, and A. S. Waggoner. 1989. J. Gen. Physiol. 94:597-631.) The apparent longitudinal diffusion constant of PDAA (mol wt 380) in myoplasm was 0.99 (+/- 0.04, SEM) x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 (16-17 degrees C), a value which suggests that 24-43% of the PDAA molecules were bound to myoplasmic constituents of large molecular weight. The corresponding values for TMX (mol wt 322) were 0.98 (+/- 0.05) x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 and 44-50%, respectively. Muscle membranes (surface and/or transverse-tubular) appear to be permeable to TMX and, to a lesser extent, to PDAA, since the total amount of indicator contained within a fiber decreased with time after injection. The average time constants for disappearance of indicator were 46 (+/- 7, SEM) min for TMX and 338 (+/- 82) min for PDAA. The fraction of indicator in the Ca2(+)-bound state in resting fibers was significantly different from zero for TMX (0.070 +/- 0.008) but not for PDAA (0.026 +/- 0.009). In in vitro calibrations PDAA but not TMX appeared to react with Ca2+ with 1:1 stoichiometry. In agreement with Hirota et al. (Hirota, A., W. K. Chandler, P. L. Southwick, and A. S. Waggoner. 1989. J. Gen. Physiol. 94:597-631), we conclude that PDAA is probably a more reliable myoplasmic Ca2+ indicator than TMX. In fibers that contained PDAA and were stimulated by a single action potential, the calibrated peak value of the myoplasmic free [Ca2+] transient (delta[Ca2+]) averaged 9.4 (+/- 0.6) microM, a value about fivefold larger than that calibrated with antipyrylazo III under otherwise identical conditions (Baylor, S. M

  14. Memristive Model of the Barnacle Giant Muscle Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sah, Maheshwar Pd.; Kim, Hyongsuk; Eroglu, Abdullah; Chua, Leon

    The generation of action potentials (oscillations) in biological systems is a complex, yet poorly understood nonlinear dynamical phenomenon involving ions. This paper reveals that the time-varying calcium ion and the time-varying potassium ion, which are essential for generating action potentials in Barnacle giant muscle fibers are in fact generic memristors in the perspective of electrical circuit theory. We will show that these two ions exhibit all the fingerprints of memristors from the equations of the Morris-Lecar model of the Barnacle giant muscle fibers. This paper also gives a textbook reference to understand the difference between memristor and nonlinear resistor via analysis of the potassium ion-channel memristor and calcium ion-channel nonlinear resistor. We will also present a comprehensive in-depth analysis of the generation of action potentials (oscillations) in memristive Morris-Lecar model using small-signal circuit model and the Hopf bifurcation theorem.

  15. Imaging of calcium transients in skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, J; DiFranco, M; Compagnon, D; Suarez-Isla, B A

    1991-01-01

    Epifluorescence images of Ca2+ transients elicited by electrical stimulation of single skeletal muscle fibers were studied with fast imaging techniques that take advantage of the large fluorescence signals emitted at relatively long wavelengths by the dyes fluo-3 and rhod-2 in response to binding of Ca2+ ions, and of the suitable features of a commercially available CCD video camera. The localized release of Ca2+ in response to microinjection of InsP3 was also monitored to demonstrate the adequate space and time resolutions of the imaging system. The time resolution of the imager system, although limited to the standard video frequency response, still proved to be adequate to investigate the fast Ca2+ release process in skeletal muscle fibers at low temperatures. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:2015378

  16. The effects of femoral neck cut, cable tension, and muscles forces on the greater trochanter fixation.

    PubMed

    Petit, Yvan; Cloutier, Luc P; Duke, Kajsa; Laflamme, G Yves

    2012-04-01

    Greater trochanter (GT) stabilization techniques following a fracture or an osteotomy are still showing high levels of postoperative complications. Understanding the effect of femoral neck cut placement, cable tension and muscles forces on GT fragment displacements could help surgeons optimize their techniques. A 3D finite element model has been developed to evaluate, through a statistical experimental design, the impact of the above variables on the GT fragment gap and sliding displacements. Muscles forces were simulating typical daily activities. Stresses were also investigated. The femoral neck cut placement had the most significant effect on the fragment displacement. Lowering it by 5 mm increased the gap and sliding fragment displacements by 288 and 128 %, respectively. Excessive cable tightening provided no significant reduction in fragment displacement. Muscle activities increased the gap and the sliding displacements for all muscle configurations. The maximum total displacement of 0.41 mm was present with a 10 mm femoral neck cut, a cable tension of 178 N, and stair climbing. Caution must be used not to over tighten the cables as the potential damage caused by the increased stress is more significant than any reduction in fragment displacement. Furthermore, preservation of the contact area is important for GT stabilization.

  17. Egr3-dependent muscle spindle stretch receptor intrafusal muscle fiber differentiation and fusimotor innervation homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Fernandes, Michelle; Tourtellotte, Warren G

    2015-04-08

    Muscle stretch proprioceptors (muscle spindles) are required for stretch reflexes and locomotor control. Proprioception abnormalities are observed in many human neuropathies, but the mechanisms involved in establishing and maintaining muscle spindle innervation and function are still poorly understood. During skeletal muscle development, sensory (Ia-afferent) innervation induces contacted myotubes to transform into intrafusal muscle fibers that form the stretch receptor core. The transcriptional regulator Egr3 is induced in Ia-afferent contacted myotubes by Neuregulin1 (Nrg1)/ErbB receptor signaling and it has an essential role in spindle morphogenesis and function. Because Egr3 is widely expressed during development and has a pleiotropic function, whether Egr3 functions primarily in skeletal muscle, Ia-afferent neurons, or in Schwann cells that myelinate Ia-afferent axons remains unresolved. In the present studies, cell-specific ablation of Egr3 in mice showed that it has a skeletal muscle autonomous function in stretch receptor development. Moreover, using genetic tracing, we found that Ia-afferent contacted Egr3-deficient myotubes were induced in normal numbers, but their development was blocked to generate one to two shortened fibers that failed to express some characteristic myosin heavy chain (MyHC) proteins. These "spindle remnants" persisted into adulthood, remained innervated by Ia-afferents, and expressed neurotrophin3 (NT3), which is required for Ia-afferent neuron survival. However, they were not innervated by fusimotor axons and they did not express glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which is essential for fusimotor neuron survival. These results demonstrate that Egr3 has an essential role in regulating gene expression that promotes normal intrafusal muscle fiber differentiation and fusimotor innervation homeostasis.

  18. Laser Cutting of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers using Highly Brilliant Laser Beam Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzbach, Annett; Hauser, Markus; Beyer, Eckhard

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) are applied more and more in the aircraft industry as well as in the automobile industry. The principal reason is the highly mechanical load capacity along with the low density. Moreover, the corrosion resistance plus the damping behavior of the material can be utilized fully in highly stressed structures. However, the concept of manufacture CFRP-parts close to the final contour does not substitute the need of cutting them. The different properties of fiberand matrix-material constitute an ambitious challenge while cutting CFRP using a laser beam. This paper deals with elementary analysis of the laser remote cutting process and the gas assisted laser cutting of CFRP.

  19. Spectrum of temperature pulsations of the melt in gas-assisted cutting with fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrov, Alexander V.; Zavalov, Yury N.; Dubrov, Vladimir D.; Grezev, Anatoly N.; Grezev, Nikolay V.; Makarova, Elena S.; Dubrovin, Nickolay G.

    2012-09-01

    Measurements of the temperature behavior in the zone of action of the laser-radiation on the molten metal have been performed using multichannel pyrometer. Measurements were carried out for test cutting of a 3-mm mild-steel plate with several values of cutting speed and pressure of assist gas (oxygen), using an 1800-watt Ytterbium fiber laser. It is shown that fluctuations of temperature are related to local melt's surface deformations due to unequal radiation absorption; thus the noise spectrum of temperature fluctuations reflects turbulent surface deformation caused by gas jet and capillary waves. The maximum density of turbulent energy dissipation ε depends on cutting conditions: its value rises with increasing cutting velocity and oxygen pressure in a described range of parameters. The maximum of ε is localized near depth of (1.2…1.5) mm along the cutting front. We can distinguish the specific radiation pulsation spectrum of laser cutting from other processes of radiation affection to the sample, including unwanted degrading of the quality of technological operations. The spectrum of capillary waves on the melt's surface is formed under the effect of assisted gas jet and has a function of ω-3, ω is cycle frequency. The results of this investigation can be useful for the development of monitoring and quality-control systems for the laser-cutting process.

  20. Fluctuations in tension during contraction of single muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Borejdo, J; Morales, M F

    1977-01-01

    We have searched for fluctuations in the steady-state tension developed by stimulated single muscle fibers. Such tension "noise" is expected to be present as a result of the statistical fluctuations in the number and/or state of myosin cross-bridges interacting with thin filament sites at any time. A sensitive electro-optical tension transducer capable of resolving the expected fluctuations in magnitude and frequency was constructed to search for the fluctuations. The noise was analyzed by computing the power spectra and amplitude of stochastic fluctuations in the photomultiplier counting rate, which was made proportional to muscle force. The optical system and electronic instrumentation together with the minicomputer software are described. Tensions were measured in single skinned glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers in rigor and during contraction and relaxation. The results indicate the presence of fluctuations in contracting muscles and a complete absence of tension noise in eith rigor or relaxation. Also, a numerical method was developed to simulate the power spectra and amplitude of fluctuations, given the rate constants for association and dissociation of the cross-bridges and actin. The simulated power spectra and the frequency distributions observed experimentally are similar. PMID:922123

  1. Investigation and experimental measurement of scissor blade cutting forces using fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, D. J.; Rajan, G.; McGrath, M. M.; Coyle, E.; Semenova, Y.; Farrell, G.

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports on unique and scalable sensorized medical scissor blades for application in minimally invasive robotic surgery. The blades exploit the strain sensing capabilities of a single fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor bonded to the blade surface. This smart sensing structure allows detection of friction and material fracture forces during cutting and subsequently enables accurate estimation of the blade kinetic friction coefficient and fracture toughness values of the material being cut. We present theory on the determination of strain variation along the blade length during combined direct and lateral loading of the blade element during operation. Demonstration of the sensorized instrument is realized on an application specific experimental test-bed employing a commercial interrogation system for signal demodulation. Friction and cutting forces measured using the FBG are validated against load cell force data from the test-bed. Characterization tests showed that the sensorized blade has an unfiltered force sensing resolution of 0.5 N over a 30 N load range. This work demonstrates that a single optical fiber placed onto cutting instrument blades can, in an unobtrusive manner, reliably measure friction forces and material fracture properties during surgical cutting.

  2. Heterogeneity of fiber characteristics in the rat masseter and digastric muscles.

    PubMed

    Sano, R; Tanaka, E; Korfage, J A M; Langenbach, G E J; Kawai, Nobuhiko; van Eijden, T M G J; Tanne, K

    2007-10-01

    The functional requirements in muscle use are related to the fiber type composition of the muscles and the cross-sectional area of the individual fibers. We investigated the heterogeneity in the fiber type composition and fiber cross-sectional area in two muscles with an opposing function, namely the digastric and masseter muscles (n = 5 for each muscle) of adult male rats, by means of immunohistochemical staining according to their myosin heavy chain (MyHC) content. The digastric and masseter muscles were taken from Wistar strain male rats 10 weeks old. In the masseter six predefined sample locations were examined; in the digastric four. Most regions showed dominant proportions of type IIA and IIX fibers. However, both muscles also revealed a regional heterogeneity in their fiber type distribution. In the digastric, type I fibers were detected only at the central and deep areas of the anterior and posterior belly, respectively. Meanwhile, the peripheral area of the anterior belly contained a higher proportion of type IIB fibers. In the masseter, the type I fibers were absent. In the superficial masseter the distribution of IIA and IIB fibers was significantly different between the superior and inferior regions. In the deep masseter, regional differences were observed among all four examined areas, of which the posterolateral region contained the highest proportion of type IIB fibers. The cross-sectional areas of type IIB fibers were always the largest, followed by the type IIX and IIA fibers. Only a few differences in cross-sectional area of corresponding fiber types were detected between the various sites. In conclusion, the masseter and digastric muscles showed an obvious heterogeneity of fiber type composition and fiber cross-sectional area. Their heterogeneity reflects the complex role of the both muscles during function. This detailed description of the fiber type composition can serve as a reference for future studies examining the muscular adaptations after

  3. Halothane cooling contractures of skinned mammalian muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Sudo, R T; Zapata-Sudo, G; Suarez-Kurtz, G

    1990-11-01

    The effects of halothane or cooling on Ca2(+)-activated tensions and on the uptake and release of Ca2+ by the sarcoplasmic reticulum were investigated in chemically skinned fibers of the extensor digitorum longus muscle of adult rabbits. At 22 degrees C, halothane (greater than 0.46 mM) induced Ca2+ release from the SR of Ca2(+)-loaded skinned fibers that resulted in transient tensions. Higher concentrations of halothane (greater than 4.65 mM) reduced the steady-state accumulation of Ca2+ in the SR at 22 degrees C. Cooling (to less than 10 degrees C) elicited transient contractures (cooling-induced contractures [CC]) in Ca2(+)-loaded skinned fibers, despite the fact that the tensions elicited by adding Ca2+ to the bath were depressed at these low temperatures. The skinned fibers did not develop CCs at 12-16 degrees C. Halothane cooling contractures could be elicited at these temperatures by exposing the fibers to halothane concentrations that failed to elicit Ca2+ release at 22 degrees C. The halothane cooling contractures were blocked by procaine but not by lidocaine. It was concluded that these contractures resulted from a synergistic interaction between halothane and cooling that stimulates Ca2+ release from, and reduces Ca2+ uptake by, the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  4. Calcium transients in asymmetrically activated skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Trube, G; Lopez, J R; Taylor, S R

    1981-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers of the frog Rana temporaria were held just taut and stimulated transversely by unidirectional electrical fields. We observed the reversible effects of stimulus duration (0.1-100 ms) and strength on action potentials, intracellular Ca2+ transients (monitored by aequorin), and contractile force during fixed-end contractions. Long duration stimuli (e.g., 10 ms) induced a maintained depolarization on the cathodal side of a cell and a maintained hyperpolarization on its anodal side. The hyperpolarization of the side facing the anode prevented the action potential from reaching mechanical threshold during strong stimuli. Variation of the duration or strength of a stimulus changed the luminescent response from a fiber injected with aequorin. Thus, the intracellular Ca2+ released during excitation-contraction coupling could be changed by the stimulus parameters. Prolongation of a stimulus at field strengths above 1.1 x rheobase decreased the amplitude of aequorin signals and the force of contractions. The decreases in aequorin and force signals from a given fiber paralleled one another and depended on the stimulus strength, but not on the stimulus polarity. These changes were completely reversible for stimulus strengths up to at least 4.2 x rheobase. The graded decreases in membrane depolarization, aequorin signals, and contractile force were correlated with the previously described folding of myofibrils in fibers allowed to shorten in response to the application of a long duration stimulus. The changes in aequorin signals and force suggest an absence of myofilament activation by Ca2+ in the section of the fiber closest to the anode. The results imply that injected aequorin distributes circumferentially in frog muscle with a coefficient of at least 10(-7) cm2/s, which is not remarkably different from the previously measured coefficient of 5 x 10(-8) cm2/s for its diffusion lengthwise. PMID:6976801

  5. Fiber type effects on contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 abundance in single fibers from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Castorena, Carlos M; Arias, Edward B; Sharma, Naveen; Bogan, Jonathan S; Cartee, Gregory D

    2015-02-01

    To fully understand skeletal muscle at the cellular level, it is essential to evaluate single muscle fibers. Accordingly, the major goals of this study were to determine if there are fiber type-related differences in single fibers from rat skeletal muscle for: 1) contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and/or 2) the abundance of GLUT4 and other metabolically relevant proteins. Paired epitrochlearis muscles isolated from Wistar rats were either electrically stimulated to contract (E-Stim) or remained resting (No E-Stim). Single fibers isolated from muscles incubated with 2-deoxy-d-[(3)H]glucose (2-DG) were used to determine fiber type [myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform protein expression], 2-DG uptake, and abundance of metabolically relevant proteins, including the GLUT4 glucose transporter. E-Stim, relative to No E-Stim, fibers had greater (P < 0.05) 2-DG uptake for each of the isolated fiber types (MHC-IIa, MHC-IIax, MHC-IIx, MHC-IIxb, and MHC-IIb). However, 2-DG uptake for E-Stim fibers was not significantly different among these five fiber types. GLUT4, tethering protein containing a UBX domain for GLUT4 (TUG), cytochrome c oxidase IV (COX IV), and filamin C protein levels were significantly greater (P < 0.05) in MHC-IIa vs. MHC-IIx, MHC-IIxb, or MHC-IIb fibers. TUG and COX IV in either MHC-IIax or MHC-IIx fibers exceeded values for MHC-IIxb or MHC-IIb fibers. GLUT4 levels for MHC-IIax fibers exceeded MHC-IIxb fibers. GLUT4, COX IV, filamin C, and TUG abundance in single fibers was significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with each other. Differences in GLUT4 abundance among the fiber types were not accompanied by significant differences in contraction-stimulated glucose uptake.

  6. Preparation of adult muscle fiber-associated stem/precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Conboy, Michael J; Conboy, Irina M

    2010-01-01

    In our studies of muscle regeneration we have developed, modified, and optimized techniques to isolate and study the stem and precursor cells to muscle tissue. Our goals have been to obtain for study muscle fibers in bulk, or the fiber-associated cells, separately from the other cells found in muscle. Using these techniques, myofiber-associated cells may be isolated from neonatal through adult muscle, from resting or from regenerating muscle, thus allowing one to investigate the cellular populations participating during the time course of these events. The protocol is applicable to any age and condition of muscle and may be adapted for other tissues.

  7. Cutting and drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by 70W short pulse nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, Peter; Stolberg, Klaus; Bastick, Stefan; Ziolkowski, Ewa; Roehner, Markus; Suttmann, Oliver; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2014-02-01

    Continuous carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) are recognized as having a significant lightweight construction potential for a wide variety of industrial applications. However, a today`s barrier for a comprehensive dissemination of CFRP structures is the lack of economic, quick and reliable manufacture processes, e.g. the cutting and drilling steps. In this paper, the capability of using pulsed disk lasers in CFRP machining is discussed. In CFRP processing with NIR lasers, carbon fibers show excellent optical absorption and heat dissipation, contrary to the plastics matrix. Therefore heat dissipation away from the laser focus into the material is driven by heat conduction of the fibres. The matrix is heated indirectly by heat transfer from the fibres. To cut CFRP, it is required to reach the melting temperature for thermoplastic matrix materials or the disintegration temperature for thermoset systems as well as the sublimation temperature of the reinforcing fibers simultaneously. One solution for this problem is to use short pulse nanosecond lasers. We have investigated CFRP cutting and drilling with such a laser (max. 7 mJ @ 10 kHz, 30 ns). This laser offers the opportunity of wide range parameter tuning for systematic process optimization. By applying drilling and cutting operations based on galvanometer scanning techniques in multi-cycle mode, excellent surface and edge characteristics in terms of delamination-free and intact fiber-matrix interface were achieved. The results indicate that nanosecond disk laser machining could consequently be a suitable tool for the automotive and aircraft industry for cutting and drilling steps.

  8. In-fiber rectangular air fabry-perot strain sensor based on high-precision fiber cutting platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Chen, Mao-qing; Lv, Ri-qing; Xia, Feng

    2017-02-01

    An in-fiber rectangular air Fabry-Perot (FP) strain sensor based on a high-precision fiber cutting platform (HFCP) is proposed. The HFCP consisting of a CCD notation system, a micro-displacement platform, and an optical fiber cleaver can be used to precisely control the length of FP cavity. The microcavity of FP (even only tens of microns) with smooth reflective surface can be realized easily by using this system. The FP structures with different cavity lengths have been fabricated in this paper. Simulation and experimental results prove that the shorter length the cavity has, the higher strain sensitivity and the larger free spectral range (FSR) the sensor obtains. The strain sensitivity and FSR of in-fiber rectangular air FP sensor with a cavity length of 35 μm can be up to 2.23 pm/με and 28.5 nm respectively. Moreover, the proposed FP strain sensor has a negligible temperature sensitivity in the range of 25-75 °C. It is anticipated that such easy making, compact and low-cost fiber-optic strain sensors could find important applications in practice.

  9. Elaboration of excimer lasers dosimetry for bone and meniscus cutting and drilling using optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Renate; Dressel, Martin; Neu, Walter; Jungbluth, Karl-Heinz

    1991-05-01

    In order to optimize bone and cartilage ablation, various excimer laser systems at 308 nm wavelength (pulse width 28 ns, 60 ns, 300 ns) and tapered fibers (core diameter 400 micrometers , 600 micrometers , 1000 micrometers ) were combined. By varying the major parameters such as fluence, pulselength, repetition rate, fiber diameter, medium, manner of application (drilling, cutting); analysis was made of the interaction of the excimer laser beam with different organic material (meniscus, bone tissue). More than 300 cuts and drillings have been realized with different parameters. The ablation rate mainly depends on fluence, repetition rate and pulse duration. The achieved ablation rate was 3 micrometers /pulse in bone. The drilling speed of the meniscus was 6 mm/s. The samples showed no carbonization at all, when being cut or drilled in liquid medium. This might be a breakthrough in fiber guided excimer laser surgery. From these and further experiments the authors obtained the dosimetry, which will be the basis for the elaboration of necessary operation guidelines for accident surgery.

  10. A comparative study of the membrane structure in different types of muscle fibers in the frog.

    PubMed

    Verma, V

    1984-09-01

    The muscle membrane of slow and fast fibers in cruralis and iliofibularis muscles and of intermediate fibers in submaxillaris muscle of the frog is studied in freeze-fracture replicas. A comparison of membrane folds, number, size and distribution of caveolae and of intramembrane particles (IMP) is given. In slow muscle fibers, the membrane folds are systematically present at the level of the I zone with a transversal continuity, whereas in fast and intermediate types the membrane folds are small and are randomly distributed. In slow muscle the caveolae are more numerous at the I zone than in the part corresponding to the center of the sarcomere. In fast muscle, small groups of caveolae form linear patterns, and in intermediate fibers the distribution is random. The number of caveolae in slow muscle fibers is two times more than in fast and intermediate fibers. The mean area of caveolae opening is largest in fast and smallest in slow muscle fibers. The number of IMP is significantly different in the three types of fibers, being highest in slow and lowest in intermediate fibers. The different pattern of folds in slow fibers may correspond to the different contractile properties of this fiber type. The presence of double the number of caveolae in slow fibers correlated to the less elaborate T system in this fiber type shows the possibility that slow fibers may be the result of an arrest during development for the performance of a different function. The difference in IMP density in the three muscle fiber types may be interpreted as the difference in their electrical properties.

  11. Experimental investigation on fiber and CO2 inert gas fusion cutting of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scintilla, L. D.; Tricarico, L.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of processing parameters and laser source type on cutting edge quality of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets and differences in cutting efficiency between fiber and CO2 lasers were studied. A first part of the cutting experiments compared a fiber and CO2 laser source when cutting 1 mm thick sheets in continuous wave mode and using Argon as an assist gas. The effects of cutting speed and assist gas pressure were investigated and optimal conditions were identified. In the second part of the experimental investigation, 3.3 mm thick sheets were cut using fiber laser. Focal position and cutting speed were varied in order to detect the optimal combination of processing parameters to obtain the best edge quality. For both sheet thicknesses investigated, surface roughness, dross height, and striation pattern inclination were measured. Cutting quality assessment and classification was carried out according to UNI EN ISO 9013 standard. Results showed that productivity, process efficiency and cutting edges quality obtained using fiber lasers outperform CO2 laser performances and therefore are considered suitable for application like sheet metal trimming.

  12. Electro-optical property of extremely stretched skinned muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Umazume, Y; Fujime, S

    1975-01-01

    Skinned fibers of frog semitendinosus muscle could easily be stretched up to 8 mum or more in sarcomere length. Such extremely stretched fibers gave quite sharp optical diffraction patterns. The intensities of all observable diffraction lines were found to increase on application of electric field (10 similar to 100 V/cm) parallel to the fiber axis, provided that there was no overlap between thin and thick filaments. By use of a polarizing microscope, it was concluded that I-bands were mainly responsible for this intensity increase. By application of square pulses, the time course of the intensity increase and decay was followed. The analysis based on a simple model suggests: (a) Each thin filament has a permanent dipole movement and the movement directs from Z-bands to the free end of the thin filament. (b) The flexural rigidity of thin filaments is estimated to be similar to 3 with 10-17 dyn with cm-2. The present fibers will provide various applications in physiochemical studies of in vivo thin and thick filaments. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:1078630

  13. Ultrastructure of mouse striated muscle fibers following pravastatin administration.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Michael; Salman, Hertzel; Djaldetti, Meir; Alexandrova, Svetlana; Punsky, Igor; Bessler, Hanna

    2003-01-01

    To examine the effect of pravastatin administration on striated muscle ultrastructure, 10 BalbC mice were given pravastatin 40 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. At the end of the study, blood was withdrawn for evaluation of the serum creatine phospho-kinase (CPK) level and the muscles of the hind legs, as well as the heart and liver of the animals were examined with a light and transmission electron microscope. After treatment with pravastatin the results showed a 101% increase in serum CPK level in comparison to untreated controls. Hematoxillin-eosin stained tissues of pravastatin treated mice did not show any abnormal findings. While the ultrastructure of the heart and liver of the treated animals appeared normal, the muscle fibers showed a marked alterations of the mitochondria, which were increased in size compared to those of the controls. The cristae were heavily damaged and even completely destructed, giving the mitochondria appearance of empty vacuoles. The findings are in favor of a specificity of pravastatin for striated muscles.

  14. Quantification of muscle fiber strain during in vivo repetitive stretch-shortening cycles.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2005-08-01

    Muscles subjected to lengthening contractions exhibit evidence of subcellular disruption, arguably a result of fiber strain magnitude. Due to the difficulty associated with measuring fiber strains during lengthening contractions, fiber length estimates have been used to formulate relationships between the magnitude of injury and mechanical measures such as fiber strain. In such protocols, the series compliance is typically minimized by removing the distal tendon and/or preactivating the muscle. These in vitro and in situ experiments do not represent physiological contractions well where fiber strain and muscle strain may be disassociated; thus the mechanisms of in vivo muscle injury remain elusive. The purpose of this paper was to quantify fiber strains during lengthening contractions in vivo and assess the potential role of fiber strain in muscle injury following repetitive stretch-shortening cycles. Using intact New Zealand White rabbit dorsiflexors, fiber strain and joint torque were measured during 50 stretch-shortening cycles. We were able to show that fiber length changes are disassociated from muscle tendon unit length changes and that complex fiber dynamics during these cycles prevent easy estimates of fiber strains. In addition, fiber strains vary, depending on how they are defined, and vary from repetition to repetition, thereby further complicating the potential relationship between muscle injury and fiber strain. We conclude from this study that, during in vivo stretch-shortening cycles, the relationship between fiber strain and muscle injury is complex. This is due, in part, to temporal effects of repeated loading on fiber strain magnitude that may be explained by an increasing compliance of the contractile element as exercise progresses.

  15. 20-Hydroxyecdysone increases fiber size in a muscle-specific fashion in rat.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Noémi; Szabó, András; Kacsala, Péter; Héger, Júlia; Zádor, Ernö

    2008-09-01

    20-Hydroxyecdysone (20E) is an ecdysteroid hormone that regulates moulting in insects. Interestingly, 20E is also found most abundantly in plant species and has anabolic effects in vertebrates, i.e. increasing muscle size without androgen influence. The effect of 20E on slow and fast fiber types of skeletal muscle has not been reported yet. Here we present that 20E affects the size (cross-sectional area, CSA) of the different fiber types in a muscle-specific manner. The effect on fiber size was modified by the distance from the site of the treatment and the presence of a regenerating soleus muscle in the animal. Besides the fiber size, 20E also increased the myonuclear number in the fibers of normal and regenerating muscles, suggesting the activation of satellite cells. According to our results 20E may provide an alternative for substitution of anabolic-androgenic steroids in therapeutic treatments against muscle atrophy.

  16. In vivo simultaneous evaluations of sarcomere imaging and muscle fiber tension.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ning; Ren, Yupeng; Tsai, Liang-Ching; Gao, Fan; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2016-03-21

    Muscle fiber tension and sarcomere length play critical roles in regulating muscle functions and adaptations under pathological conditions. However, methods are lacking to quantify these two variables simultaneously in vivo. A novel force microscope was developed with the unique capabilities of estimating muscle fiber tension and acquiring sarcomere images simultaneously in vivo. The force microscope consisting of a custom microscopic imaging system and a force sensor was used to quantify in vivo sarcomere length, muscle fiber tension and stress of the tibialis cranialis muscle at plantar-flexed and dorsi-flexed positions from 11 rat hind limbs. Results showed that sarcomere images and fiber tension could be measured together in vivo with significantly higher muscle fiber tension and stress and longer sarcomere length at the plantar-flexed position when compared to their counterparts at the dorsi-flexed position. The fiber tension estimated using the force microscope had close agreement with the direct measurements of the fiber tension. The present force microscope with simultaneous characterizations of fiber tension and sarcomere imaging provides us a useful in vivo tool to investigate the roles of muscle tension in regulating sarcomere and muscle fiber functions under physiological and pathological conditions.

  17. Constant Fiber Number During Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Modified Arachidonate Metabolism During Hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G.

    1985-01-01

    A previously documented shift from Type I to IIA predominance of the soleus muscle during rat suspension was further investigated to determine if this shift was by selective reduction of a single fiber type, simultaneous reduction and formation of fibers with different fiber types, or a transformation of fiber type by individual fibers. By partial acid digestion and dissection, average total soleus fiber number was found to be 3022 + or - 80 (SE) and 3008 + or - 64 before and after four-week suspension (n=12). Another area of current research was based on previous studies which indicate that prostaglandins are biosynthesized by skeletal muscle and evoke protein synthesis and degradation.

  18. Single muscle fiber adaptations to resistance training in old (>80 yr) men: evidence for limited skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Slivka, Dustin; Raue, Ulrika; Hollon, Chris; Minchev, Kiril; Trappe, Scott

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whole muscle and single muscle fiber adaptations in very old men in response to progressive resistance training (PRT). Six healthy independently living old men (82 +/- 1 yr; range 80-86 yr, 74 +/- 4 kg) resistance-trained the knee extensors (3 sets, 10 repetitions) at approximately 70% one repetition maximum 3 days/wk for 12 wk. Whole thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was assessed before and after PRT using computed tomography (CT). Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis before and after the PRT program. Isolated myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and IIa single muscle fibers (n = 267; 142 pre; 125 post) were studied for diameter, peak tension, shortening velocity, and power. An additional set of isolated single muscle fibers (n = 2,215; 1,202 pre; 1,013 post) was used to identify MHC distribution. One repetition maximum knee extensor strength increased (P < 0.05) 23 +/- 4 kg (56 +/- 4 to 79 +/- 7 kg; 41%). Muscle CSA increased (P < 0.05) 3 +/- 1 cm2 (120 +/- 7 to 123 +/- 7 cm2; 2.5%). Single muscle fiber contractile function and MHC distribution were unaltered with PRT. These data indicate limited muscle plasticity at the single-muscle fiber level with a resistance-training program among the very old. The minor increases in whole muscle CSA coupled with the static nature of the myocellular profile indicate that the strength gains were primarily neurological. These data contrast typical muscle responses to resistance training in young ( approximately 20 yr) and old ( approximately 70 yr) humans and indicate that the physiological regulation of muscle remodeling is adversely modified in the oldest old.

  19. Influence of exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on human skeletal muscle satellite cell content and muscle fiber growth.

    PubMed

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Riis, Simon; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Paoli, Frank de; Vissing, Kristian

    2014-10-15

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are involved in remodeling and hypertrophy processes of skeletal muscle. However, little knowledge exists on extrinsic factors that influence the content of SCs in skeletal muscle. In a comparative human study, we investigated the muscle fiber type-specific association between emergence of satellite cells (SCs), muscle growth, and remodeling in response to 12 wk unilateral resistance training performed as eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc) resistance training ± whey protein (Whey, 19.5 g protein + 19.5 g glucose) or placebo (Placebo, 39 g glucose) supplementation. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were analyzed for fiber type-specific SCs, myonuclei, and fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). Following training, SCs increased with Conc in both type I and type II fibers (P < 0.01) and exhibited a group difference from Ecc (P < 0.05), which did not increase. Myonuclei content in type I fibers increased in all groups (P < 0.01), while a specific accretion of myonuclei in type II fibers was observed in the Whey-Conc (P < 0.01) and Placebo-Ecc (P < 0.01) groups. Similarly, whereas type I fiber CSA increased independently of intervention (P < 0.001), type II fiber CSA increased exclusively with Whey-Conc (P < 0.01) and type II fiber hypertrophy correlated with whole muscle hypertrophy exclusively following Conc training (P < 0.01). In conclusion, isolated concentric knee extensor resistance training appears to constitute a stronger driver of SC content than eccentric resistance training while type II fiber hypertrophy was accentuated when combining concentric resistance training with whey protein supplementation.

  20. How muscle fiber lengths and velocities affect muscle force generation as humans walk and run at different speeds

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Edith M.; Hamner, Samuel R.; Seth, Ajay; Millard, Matthew; Delp, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The lengths and velocities of muscle fibers have a dramatic effect on muscle force generation. It is unknown, however, whether the lengths and velocities of lower limb muscle fibers substantially affect the ability of muscles to generate force during walking and running. We examined this issue by developing simulations of muscle–tendon dynamics to calculate the lengths and velocities of muscle fibers from electromyographic recordings of 11 lower limb muscles and kinematic measurements of the hip, knee and ankle made as five subjects walked at speeds of 1.0–1.75 m s−1 and ran at speeds of 2.0–5.0 m s−1. We analyzed the simulated fiber lengths, fiber velocities and forces to evaluate the influence of force–length and force–velocity properties on force generation at different walking and running speeds. The simulations revealed that force generation ability (i.e. the force generated per unit of activation) of eight of the 11 muscles was significantly affected by walking or running speed. Soleus force generation ability decreased with increasing walking speed, but the transition from walking to running increased the force generation ability by reducing fiber velocities. Our results demonstrate the influence of soleus muscle architecture on the walk-to-run transition and the effects of muscle–tendon compliance on the plantarflexors' ability to generate ankle moment and power. The study presents data that permit lower limb muscles to be studied in unprecedented detail by relating muscle fiber dynamics and force generation to the mechanical demands of walking and running. PMID:23470656

  1. Skeletal muscle fiber atrophy: altered thin filament density changes slow fiber force and shortening velocity.

    PubMed

    Riley, D A; Bain, J L W; Romatowski, J G; Fitts, R H

    2005-02-01

    Single skinned fibers from soleus and adductor longus (AL) muscles of weight-bearing control rats and rats after 14-day hindlimb suspension unloading (HSU) were studied physiologically and ultrastructurally to investigate how slow fibers increase shortening velocity (V0) without fast myosin. We hypothesized that unloading and shortening of soleus during HSU reduces densities of thin filaments, generating wider myofilament separations that increase V0 and decrease specific tension (kN/m2). During HSU, plantarflexion shortened soleus working length 23%. AL length was unchanged. Both muscles atrophied as shown by reductions in fiber cross-sectional area. For AL, the 60% atrophy accounted fully for the 58% decrease in absolute tension (mN). In the soleus, the 67% decline in absolute tension resulted from 58% atrophy plus a 17% reduction in specific tension. Soleus fibers exhibited a 25% reduction in thin filaments, whereas there was no change in AL thin filament density. Loss of thin filaments is consistent with reduced cross bridge formation, explaining the fall in specific tension. V0 increased 27% in soleus but was unchanged in AL. The V0 of control and HSU fibers was inversely correlated (R = -0.83) with thin filament density and directly correlated (R = 0.78) with thick-to-thin filament spacing distance in a nonlinear fashion. These data indicate that reduction in thin filament density contributes to an increased V0 in slow fibers. Osmotically compacting myofilaments with 5% dextran returned density, spacing, and specific tension and slowed V0 to near-control levels and provided evidence for myofilament spacing modulating tension and V0.

  2. Microintegrating smooth muscle cells into a biodegradable, elastomeric fiber matrix

    PubMed Central

    Stankus, John J.; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable elastomers into matrices that can resemble the scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration with this technique remains challenging and time consuming. We have overcome this limitation by electrospraying vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) concurrently with electrospinning a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU). Trypan blue staining revealed no significant decrease in cell viability from the fabrication process and electrosprayed SMCs spread and proliferated similar to control unprocessed SMCs. The resulting SMC microintegrated PEUU constructs were cultured under static conditions or transmural perfusion. Higher cell numbers resulted with perfusion culture with 131% and 98% more viable cells versus static culture at days 4 and 7 (p < 0.05). Fluorescent imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining further illustrated high cell densities integrated between the elastomeric fibers after perfusion culture. SMC microintegrated PEUU was strong, flexible and anisotropic with tensile strengths ranging from 2.0 to 6.5 MPa and breaking strains from 850 to 1700% dependent on the material axis. The ability to microintegrate smooth muscle or other cell types into a biodegradable elastomer fiber matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate high cell density elastic tissue mimetics, blood vessels or other cardiovascular tissues. PMID:16095685

  3. Dimensions of calcium release domains in frog skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Julio L.; DiFranco, Marino; Novo, David

    2001-07-01

    The spatiotemporal properties of the Ca2+ release process in skeletal muscle fibers were determined using an improved confocal spot detection system. Muscle fibers were loaded with the low affinity fluorescent Ca2+ indicator OGB-5N and localized action potential-induced fluorescence signals were recorded from consecutive locations separated by 200 nm within a single sarcomere. Three-dimensional reconstructions on the Ca2+ transients illustrate the existence of domains of increased fluorescence around Ca2+ release sites in the neighborhood of the T-tubules. We estimated the dimensions of these domains by drawing isochronal curves ((delta) F/F vs. spot position) and fitting Gaussian profiles to them. It was found that the earliest detectable full-width-at-half- maximum of these profiles was 0.77 +/- 0.25 micrometers and increased rapidly with time to 1.4 +/- 0.2 micrometers at their peak (18 degree(s)C). A brief, but statistically significant delay of 0.8 +/- 0.42ms was observed between the onset of the fluorescent transients at the Z- and M-lines. Our results are compatible with the possibility that, in response to AP stimulation, Ca2+ is not released exclusively from the junctional region of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, but from a broader expanse of the triadic region.

  4. Microintegrating smooth muscle cells into a biodegradable, elastomeric fiber matrix.

    PubMed

    Stankus, John J; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Wagner, William R

    2006-02-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable elastomers into matrices that can resemble the scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration with this technique remains challenging and time consuming. We have overcome this limitation by electrospraying vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) concurrently with electrospinning a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU). Trypan blue staining revealed no significant decrease in cell viability from the fabrication process and electrosprayed SMCs spread and proliferated similar to control unprocessed SMCs. The resulting SMC microintegrated PEUU constructs were cultured under static conditions or transmural perfusion. Higher cell numbers resulted with perfusion culture with 131% and 98% more viable cells versus static culture at days 4 and 7 (p<0.05). Fluorescent imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining further illustrated high cell densities integrated between the elastomeric fibers after perfusion culture. SMC microintegrated PEUU was strong, flexible and anisotropic with tensile strengths ranging from 2.0 to 6.5 MPa and breaking strains from 850 to 1,700% dependent on the material axis. The ability to microintegrate smooth muscle or other cell types into a biodegradable elastomer fiber matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate high cell density elastic tissue mimetics, blood vessels or other cardiovascular tissues.

  5. Human muscle fiber type-specific insulin signaling: impact of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Albers, Peter H; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Birk, Jesper B; Kristensen, Dorte E; Vind, Birgitte F; Baba, Otto; Nøhr, Jane; Højlund, Kurt; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue composed of different fiber types. Studies suggest that insulin-mediated glucose metabolism is different between muscle fiber types. We hypothesized that differences are due to fiber type-specific expression/regulation of insulin signaling elements and/or metabolic enzymes. Pools of type I and II fibers were prepared from biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscles from lean, obese, and type 2 diabetic subjects before and after a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Type I fibers compared with type II fibers have higher protein levels of the insulin receptor, GLUT4, hexokinase II, glycogen synthase (GS), and pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1α (PDH-E1α) and a lower protein content of Akt2, TBC1 domain family member 4 (TBC1D4), and TBC1D1. In type I fibers compared with type II fibers, the phosphorylation response to insulin was similar (TBC1D4, TBC1D1, and GS) or decreased (Akt and PDH-E1α). Phosphorylation responses to insulin adjusted for protein level were not different between fiber types. Independently of fiber type, insulin signaling was similar (TBC1D1, GS, and PDH-E1α) or decreased (Akt and TBC1D4) in muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes compared with lean and obese subjects. We conclude that human type I muscle fibers compared with type II fibers have a higher glucose-handling capacity but a similar sensitivity for phosphoregulation by insulin.

  6. Fiber-type composition of hindlimb muscles in the turtle, Pseudemys (Trachemys) scripta elegans.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, D H; Callister, R J; Stuart, D G

    1995-08-01

    A description is provided of the fiber-type composition of several hindlimb muscles of the adult turtle, Pseudemys (Trachemys) scripta elegans. In addition, cross-section areas of each fiber type and an estimation of the relative (weighted) cross-section area (wCSA) occupied by the different fiber types are also provided. Seven muscles were selected for study, based on their suitability for future neurophysiological analysis as components of the segmental motor system, and on their homologies with muscles in other vertebrates. The test muscles were iliofibularis (ILF), ambiens (AMB), external gastrocnemius (EG), extensor digitorum communis (EDC), flexor digitorum longus (FDL), tibialis anterior (TA), and peroneus anterior (PA). Serial sections of these muscles were stained for myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), NADH-diaphorase, and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-GPDH), thereby enabling fiber-type classification on the basis of indirect markers for contraction speed and oxidative (aerobic) vs. glycolytic (anaerobic) metabolism. All muscles contained three fiber types: slow oxidative (SO; possibly including some non-twitch tonic fibers); fast oxidative glycolytic (FOG); and fast glycolytic (Fg). There were at least 30% FOG and 50% FOG + Fg fibers in the seven muscles, the extreme distributions being the predominantly glycolytic ILF vs. the predominantly oxidative FDL muscle (ILF--15.5% SO, 35.2% FOG, 49.3% Fg vs. FDL--49.1% SO, 41.1% FOG, 9.8% Fg). As in other species, the test muscles exhibited varying degrees of regional concentration (compartmentalization) of the different fiber types. This feature was most striking in ILF. Pronounced compartmentalization was also observed in AMB, EG, PA, TA, and EDC, whereas the distribution of fiber types in the highly oxidative FDL was homogeneous. In five of the seven muscles, fiber size was ranked with Fg > FOG > SO. In terms of wCSA, which provides a coarse-grain measure of the different fiber types

  7. Muscle fiber characteristics of broiler breast fillets with the wooden breast condition.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler breast fillets exhibiting the wooden breast condition are described as having a rigid feel and abnormal texture attributes; however, changes at the muscle fiber level in wooden breast fillets are not well understood. The objective of this study was to compare the histochemical muscle fiber ...

  8. Metabolic and morphometric profile of muscle fibers in chronic hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Mario; Wang, Huiyuan; Storer, Thomas W.; Casaburi, Richard; Cohen, Arthur H.; Kopple, Joel D.

    2012-01-01

    Muscle weakness and effort intolerance are common in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. This study characterized morphometric, histochemical, and biochemical properties of limb muscle in MHD patients compared with controls (CTL) with similar age, gender, and ethnicity. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained from 60 MHD patients, 1 day after dialysis, and from 21 CTL. Muscle fiber types and capillaries were identified immunohistochemically. Individual muscle fiber cross-sectional areas (CSA) were quantified. Individual fiber oxidative capacities were determined (microdensitometric assay) to measure succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity. Mean CSAs of type I, IIA, and IIX fibers were 33, 26, and 28% larger in MHD patients compared with CTL. SDH activities for type I, IIA, and IIX fibers were reduced by 29, 40, and 47%, respectively, in MHD. Capillary to fiber ratio was increased by 11% in MHD. The number of capillaries surrounding individual fiber types were also increased (type I: 9%; IIA: 10%; IIX: 23%) in MHD patients. However, capillary density (capillaries per unit muscle fiber area) was reduced by 34% in MHD patients, compared with CTL. Ultrastuctural analysis revealed swollen mitochondria with dense matrix in MHD patients. These results highlight impaired oxidative capacity and capillarity in MHD patients. This would be expected to impair energy production as well as substrate and oxygen delivery and exchange and contribute to exercise intolerance. The enlarged CSA of muscle fibers may, in part, be accounted for by edema. We speculate that these changes contribute to reduce limb strength in MHD patients by reducing specific force. PMID:22016372

  9. Work production and work absorption in muscle strips from vertebrate cardiac and insect flight muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Maughan, D; Moore, J; Vigoreaux, J; Barnes, B; Mulieri, L A

    1998-01-01

    Stretch activation, which underlies the ability of all striated muscles to do oscillatory work, is a prominent feature of both insect flight and vertebrate cardiac muscle. We have examined and compared work-producing and work-absorbing processes in skinned fibers of Drosophila flight muscle, mouse papillary muscle, and human ventricular strips. Using small amplitude sinusoidal length perturbation analysis, we distinguished viscoelastic properties attributable to crossbridge processes from those attributable to other structures of the sarcomere. Work-producing and work-absorbing processes were identified in Ca(2+)-activated fibers by deconvolving complex stiffness data. An 'active' work-producing process ("B"), attributed to crossbridge action, was identified, as were two work-absorbing processes, one attributable to crossbridge action ("C") and the other primarily to viscoelastic properties of parallel passive structures ("A"). At maximal Ca(2+)-activation (pCa 5, 27 degrees C), maximum net power output (processes A, B and C combined) occurs at a frequency of: 1.3 +/- 0.1 Hz for human, 10.9 +/- 2.2 Hz for mouse, and 226 +/- 9 Hz for fly, comparable to the resting heart rate of the human (1 Hz, 37 degrees C) and mouse (10 Hz, 37 degrees C) and to the wing beat frequency of the fruit fly (200 Hz, 22 degrees C). Process B maximal work production per myosin head is 7-11 x 10(-21) J per perturbation cycle, equivalent to approximately 2 kT of energy. Process C maximal work absorption is about the same magnitude. The equivalence suggests the possibility that a thermal ratchet type mechanism operates during small amplitude length perturbations. We speculate that there may be a survival advantage in having a mechanical energy dissipater (i.e., the C process) at work in muscles if they can be injuriously stretched by the system in which they operate.

  10. Skeletal muscle fiber, nerve, and blood vessel breakdown in space-flown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Ellis, S.; Bain, J. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Sedlak, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    Histochemical and ultrastructural analyses were performed postflight on hind limb skeletal muscles of rats orbited for 12.5 days aboard the unmanned Cosmos 1887 biosatellite and returned to Earth 2 days before sacrifice. The antigravity adductor longus (AL), soleus, and plantaris muscles atrophied more than the non-weight-bearing extensor digitorum longus, and slow muscle fibers were more atrophic than fast fibers. Muscle fiber segmental necrosis occurred selectively in the AL and soleus muscles; primarily, macrophages and neutrophils infiltrated and phagocytosed cellular debris. Granule-rich mast cells were diminished in flight AL muscles compared with controls, indicating the mast cell secretion contributed to interstitial tissue edema. Increased ubiquitination of disrupted myofibrils implicated ubiquitin in myofilament degradation. Mitochondrial content and succinic dehydrogenase activity were normal, except for subsarcolemmal decreases. Myofibrillar ATPase activity of flight AL muscle fibers shifted toward the fast type. Absence of capillaries and extravasation of red blood cells indicated failed microcirculation. Muscle fiber regeneration from activated satellite cells was detected. About 17% of the flight AL end plates exhibited total or partial denervation. Thus, skeletal muscle weakness associated with spaceflight can result from muscle fiber atrophy and segmental necrosis, partial motor denervation, and disruption of the microcirculation.

  11. Fiber-type differences in masseter muscle associated with different facial morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Rowlerson, Anthea; Raoul, Gwénaël; Daniel, Yousif; Close, John; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Ferri, Joel; Sciote, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The influence of muscle forces and associated physiologic behaviors on dental and skeletal development is well recognized but difficult to quantify because of the limited understanding of the interrelationships between physiologic and other mechanisms during growth. Methods The purpose of this study was to characterize fiber-type composition of masseter muscle in 44 subjects during surgical correction of malocclusion. Four fiber types were identified after immunostaining of biopsy sections with myosin heavy chain-specific antibodies, and the average fiber diameter and percentage of muscle occupancy of the fiber types were determined in each of 6 subject groups (Class II or Class III and open bite, normal bite, or deepbite). A 2 × 3 × 4 analysis of variance was used to determine significant differences between mean areas for fiber types, vertical relationships, and sagittal relationships. Results There were significant differences in percentage of occupancy of fiber types in masseter muscle in bite groups with different vertical dimensions. Type I fiber occupancy increased in open bites, and conversely, type II fiber occupancy increased in deepbites. The association between sagittal jaw relationships and mean fiber area was less strong, but, in the Class III group, the average fiber area was significantly different between the open bite, normal bite, and deepbite subjects. In the Class III subjects, type I and I/II hybrid fiber areas were greatly increased in subjects with deepbite. Conclusions Given the variation between subjects in fiber areas and fiber numbers, larger subject populations will be needed to demonstrate more significant associations between sagittal relationships and muscle composition. However, the robust influence of jaw-closing muscles on vertical dimension allowed us to conclude that vertical bite characteristics vary according to the fiber type composition of masseter muscle. PMID:15643413

  12. Control of fresh meat quality through manipulation of muscle fiber characteristics.

    PubMed

    Joo, S T; Kim, G D; Hwang, Y H; Ryu, Y C

    2013-12-01

    Variations of fresh meat quality exist because the quality traits are affected by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Because the meat quality is basically dependent on muscle fiber characteristics, numerous studies have reported the relationship between quality traits and fiber characteristics. Despite intensive research, the relationship is yet to be fully established, however, the present knowledge suggests several potential ways to manipulate muscle fiber characteristics to improve meat quality. The present paper reviews the definition of fresh meat quality, meat quality traits and variations of meat quality. Also, this review presents recent knowledge underlying the relationship between fresh meat quality traits and muscle fiber characteristics. Finally, the present work proposes several potential factors including breed, genotype, sex, hormone, growth performance, diet, muscle location, exercise and ambient temperature that can be used to manipulate muscle fiber characteristics and subsequently meat quality in animals.

  13. Aging alters contractile properties and fiber morphology in pigeon skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Alway, Stephen E; Hollander, John M; Wimsatt, Jeffrey H

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that skeletal muscle from pigeons would display age-related alterations in isometric force and contractile parameters as well as a shift of the single muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) distribution toward smaller fiber sizes. Maximal force output, twitch contraction durations and the force-frequency relationship were determined in tensor propatagialis pars biceps muscle from young 3-year-old pigeons, middle-aged 18-year-old pigeons, and aged 30-year-old pigeons. The fiber CSA distribution was determined by planimetry from muscle sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Maximal force output of twitch and tetanic contractions was greatest in muscles from young pigeons, while the time to peak force of twitch contractions was longest in muscles from aged pigeons. There were no changes in the force-frequency relationship between the age groups. Interestingly, the fiber CSA distribution in aged muscles revealed a greater number of larger sized muscle fibers, which was verified visually in histological images. Middle-aged and aged muscles also displayed a greater amount of slow myosin containing muscle fibers. These data demonstrate that muscles from middle-aged and aged pigeons are susceptible to alterations in contractile properties that are consistent with aging, including lower force production and longer contraction durations. These functional changes were supported by the appearance of slow myosin containing muscle fibers in muscles from middle-aged and aged pigeons. Therefore, the pigeon may represent an appropriate animal model for the study of aging-related alterations in skeletal muscle function and structure.

  14. Early changes in muscle atrophy and muscle fiber type conversion after spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection cause muscle atrophy and muscle fiber type conversion. It is still unknown how spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection each affect the differentiation of muscle fiber type conversion mechanism and muscle atrophy. The aim of our study was to evaluate the difference of muscle weight change, muscle fiber type conversion, and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivatior-1α (PGC-1α) expression brought about by spinal cord transection and by peripheral nerve transection. Methods Twenty-four Wistar rats underwent surgery, the control rats underwent a laminectomy; the spinal cord injury group underwent a spinal cord transection; the denervation group underwent a sciatic nerve transection. The rats were harvested of the soleus muscle and the TA muscle at 0 week, 1 week and 2 weeks after surgery. Histological examination was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunofluorescent staing. Western blot was performed with 3 groups. Results Both sciatic nerve transection and spinal cord transection caused muscle atrophy with the effect being more severe after sciatic nerve transection. Spinal cord transection caused a reduction in the expression of both sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. On the other hand, sciatic nerve transection produced an increase in expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. The results of the expression of PGC-1α were expected in other words muscle atrophy after sciatic nerve transection is less than after spinal cord transection, however muscle atrophy after sciatic nerve transection was more severe than after spinal cord transection. Conclusion In the conclusion, spinal cord transection diminished the expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. On the other hand, sciatic nerve transection enhanced the expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus

  15. Contractile properties of rat, rhesus monkey, and human type I muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Romatowski, J. G.; Karhanek, M.; Fitts, R. H.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that skeletal muscle intrinsic maximal shortening velocity is inversely related to species body mass. However, there is uncertainty regarding the relationship between the contractile properties of muscle fibers obtained from commonly studied laboratory animals and those obtained from humans. In this study we determined the contractile properties of single chemically skinned fibers prepared from rat, rhesus monkey, and human soleus and gastrocnemius muscle samples under identical experimental conditions. All fibers used for analysis expressed type I myosin heavy chain as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Allometric coefficients for type I fibers from each muscle indicated that there was little change in peak tension (force/fiber cross-sectional area) across species. In contrast, both soleus and gastrocnemius type I fiber maximal unloaded shortening velocity (Vo), the y-intercept of the force-velocity relationship (Vmax), peak power per unit fiber length, and peak power normalized for fiber length and cross-sectional area were all inversely related to species body mass. The present allometric coefficients for soleus fiber Vo (-0.18) and Vmax (-0.11) are in good agreement with published values for soleus fibers obtained from common laboratory and domesticated mammals. Taken together, these observations suggest that the Vo of slow fibers from quadrupeds and humans scale similarly and can be described by the same quantitative relationships. These findings have implications in the design and interpretation of experiments, especially those that use small laboratory mammals as a model of human muscle function.

  16. [Comparison of force and shortening velocity in fast and slow rabbit muscle fibers at different temperatures].

    PubMed

    Kochubeĭ, P V; Bershitskiĭ, S Iu

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of force, maximal shortening velocity and power of maximally activated single permeabilized fibers from fast and slow muscles of the rabbit were recorded in a temperature range from 10 to 35 degrees C with 5 degrees C step. It was found that temperature dependence of force of both types of fibers is identical. Averaged maximal shortening velocity in the slow fibers, unlike the fast fibers, had no statistically significant temperature dependence that is not in agreement with the data obtained on intact rat muscle fibers and in an in vitro motility assay. However maximal shortening velocity in each individual slow fiber did depend on temperature. The temperature dependence of power of the slow fibers was lower than that of the fast ones. Because of large data scattering the average temperature dependence of power of the slow fibers was significantly lower than that in individual slow fibers.

  17. Skeletal muscle fiber types in the ghost crab, Ocypode quadrata: implications for running performance.

    PubMed

    Perry, Michael J; Tait, Jennifer; Hu, John; White, Scott C; Medler, Scott

    2009-03-01

    Ghost crabs possess rapid running capabilities, which make them good candidates for comparing invertebrate exercise physiology with that of more extensively studied vertebrates. While a number of studies have examined various aspects of running physiology and biomechanics in terrestrial crabs, none to date have defined the basic skeletal muscle fiber types that power locomotion. In the current study, we investigated skeletal muscle fiber types comprising the extensor and flexor carpopodite muscles in relation to running performance in the ghost crab. We used kinematic analyses to determine stride frequency and muscle shortening velocity and found that both parameters are similar to those of comparably sized mammals but slower than those observed in running lizards. Using several complementary methods, we found that the muscles are divided into two primary fiber types: those of the proximal and distal regions possess long sarcomeres (6.2+/-2.3 microm) observed in crustacean slow fibers and have characteristics of aerobic fibers whereas those of the muscle mid-region have short sarcomeres (3.5+/-0.4 microm) characteristic of fast fibers and appear to be glycolytic. Each fiber type is characterized by several different myofibrillar protein isoforms including multiple isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MHC), troponin I (TnI), troponin T (TnT) and a crustacean fast muscle protein, P75. Three different isoforms of MHC are differentially expressed in the muscles, with fibers of the mid-region always co-expressing two isoforms at a 1:1 ratio within single fibers. Based on our analyses, we propose that these muscles are functionally divided into a two-geared system, with the aerobic fibers used for slow sustained activities and the glycolytic mid-region fibers being reserved for explosive sprints. Finally, we identified subtle differences in myofibrillar isoform expression correlated with crab body size, which changes by several orders of magnitude during an animal's lifetime.

  18. Green tea extract decreases muscle pathology and NF-κB immunostaining in regenerating muscle fibers of mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Nicholas P.; Call, Jarrod A.; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Robertson, John L.; Grange, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a debilitating genetic disorder characterized by severe muscle wasting and early death in afflicted boys. The primary cause of this disease is mutations in the dystrophin gene resulting in massive muscle degeneration and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to determine if dystrophic muscle pathology and inflammation were decreased by pre-natal and early dietary intervention with green tea extract. METHODS Mdx breeder mice and pups were fed diets containing 0.25% or 0.5% green tea extract and compared to untreated mdx and C57BL/6J mice. Serum creatine kinase was assessed as a systemic indicator of muscle damage. Quantitative histopathological and immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine muscle pathology, macrophage infiltration, and NF-κB localization. RESULTS Early treatment of mdx mice with green tea extract significantly decreased serum creatine kinase by ~85% at age 42 days (P≤0.05). In these mice, the area of normal fiber morphology was increased by as much as ~32% (P≤0.05). The primary histopathological change was a ~21% decrease in the area of regenerating fibers (P≤0.05). NF-κB staining in regenerating muscle fibers was also significantly decreased in green tea extract-treated mdx mice when compared to untreated mdx mice. CONCLUSION Early treatment with green tea extract decreases dystrophic muscle pathology potentially by regulating NF-κB activity in regenerating muscle fibers. PMID:19897286

  19. Management of low transsphincteric anal fistula with serial setons and interval muscle-cutting fistulotomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Rosen, Lester

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluates low transsphincteric anal fistula managed by serial setons and interval fistulotomy, with attention to healing without recurrence and preservation of continence. Following Institutional Review Board approval, consecutive anal fistula operations performed by a single surgeon from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2013 were retrospectively reviewed using electronic medical records and telephone interviews for patients lost to follow up. Of the 71 patients, 26 (37%) had low transsphincteric fistula (23 males and 3 females; mean age: 46 years), treated at our institution by seton placement followed by interval surgical muscle cutting and subsequent seton replacement or final fistulotomy. Of the 26 patients, 22 (85%) were initially referred due to previous failed treatment, with a 30.6 month mean duration of fistula prior to referral and a mean of 2.2 (range: 0 -6) prior anorectal surgeries. At a mean follow-up of 11.9 months, none of the 21 patients experienced recurrence or fecal incontinence. Serial seton with interval muscle-cutting sphincterotomy followed by complete fistulotomy is an effective treatment for the management of patients who are either initially seen for low transsphincteric fistula, or referred after failed anorectal surgery for that condition.

  20. Mitochondrial ROS regulate oxidative damage and mitophagy but not age-related muscle fiber atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K.; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P.; Nye, Gareth A.; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia I.; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Griffiths, Richard D.; Jackson, Malcolm J.; McArdle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function is a major contributor to morbidity and has a profound effect on the quality of life of older people. The potential role of age-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cumulative oxidative stress as the underlying cause of muscle aging remains a controversial topic. Here we show that the pharmacological attenuation of age-related mitochondrial redox changes in muscle with SS31 is associated with some improvements in oxidative damage and mitophagy in muscles of old mice. However, this treatment failed to rescue the age-related muscle fiber atrophy associated with muscle atrophy and weakness. Collectively, these data imply that the muscle mitochondrial redox environment is not a key regulator of muscle fiber atrophy during sarcopenia but may play a key role in the decline of mitochondrial organelle integrity that occurs with muscle aging. PMID:27681159

  1. Changes in skeletal muscle biochemistry and histology relative to fiber type in rats with heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Duan, C.; Mattson, J. P.; Musch, T. I.

    1997-01-01

    One of the primary consequences of left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) after myocardial infarction is a decrement in exercise capacity. Several factors have been hypothesized to account for this decrement, including alterations in skeletal muscle metabolism and aerobic capacity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether LVD-induced alterations in skeletal muscle enzyme activities, fiber composition, and fiber size are 1) generalized in muscles or specific to muscles composed primarily of a given fiber type and 2) related to the severity of the LVD. Female Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated controls (n = 13) and rats with moderate (n = 10) and severe (n = 7) LVD. LVD was surgically induced by ligating the left main coronary artery and resulted in elevations (P < 0.05) in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (sham, 5 +/- 1 mmHg; moderate LVD, 11 +/- 1 mmHg; severe LVD, 25 +/- 1 mmHg). Moderate LVD decreased the activities of phosphofructokinase (PFK) and citrate synthase in one muscle composed of type IIB fibers but did not modify fiber composition or size of any muscle studied. However, severe LVD diminished the activity of enzymes involved in terminal and beta-oxidation in muscles composed primarily of type I fibers, type IIA fibers, and type IIB fibers. In addition, severe LVD induced a reduction in the activity of PFK in type IIB muscle, a 10% reduction in the percentage of type IID/X fibers, and a corresponding increase in the portion of type IIB fibers. Atrophy of type I fibers, type IIA fibers, and/or type IIB fibers occurred in soleus and plantaris muscles of rats with severe LVD. These data indicate that rats with severe LVD after myocardial infarction exhibit 1) decrements in mitochondrial enzyme activities independent of muscle fiber composition, 2) a reduction in PFK activity in type IIB muscle, 3) transformation of type IID/X to type IIB fibers, and 4) atrophy of type I, IIA, and IIB fibers.

  2. Diagnostics, Modeling and Simulation: Three Keys Towards Mastering the Cutting Process with Fiber, Disk and Diode Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petring, Dirk; Molitor, Thomas; Schneider, Frank; Wolf, Norbert

    Even established laser processing technologies such as cutting are far away from being completely understood. Nevertheless, the progress in industrially available laser cutting systems and applications is quite respectable. Fiber and disk laser cutting changed from a debatable newcomer to a serious part of the business while the diode laser appears at the horizon as the next player to be reckoned. Understanding of the process and its performance are continually improved. This paper highlights results of research and development from the recent years. Some speculations, simulations, diagnostics and facts about the process, its properties and capabilities are assessed. Earlier and latest diagnostics and CALCut simulation results of laser beam cutting processes are presented.

  3. Persistent Muscle Fiber Regeneration in Long Term Denervation. Past, Present, Future

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Ugo; Boncompagni, Simona; Gobbo, Valerio; Rossini, Katia; Zampieri, Sandra; Mosole, Simone; Ravara, Barbara; Nori, Alessandra; Stramare, Roberto; Ambrosio, Francesco; Piccione, Francesco; Masiero, Stefano; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Gargiulo, Paolo; Protasi, Feliciano; Kern, Helmut; Pond, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ravages of long term denervation there is structural and ultrastructural evidence for survival of muscle fibers in mammals, with some fibers surviving at least ten months in rodents and 3-6 years in humans. Further, in rodents there is evidence that muscle fibers may regenerate even after repeated damage in the absence of the nerve, and that this potential is maintained for several months after denervation. While in animal models permanently denervated muscle sooner or later loses the ability to contract, the muscles may maintain their size and ability to function if electrically stimulated soon after denervation. Whether in mammals, humans included, this is a result of persistent de novo formation of muscle fibers is an open issue we would like to explore in this review. During the past decade, we have studied muscle biopsies from the quadriceps muscle of Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) patients suffering with Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome, a condition that fully and irreversibly disconnects skeletal muscle fibers from their damaged innervating motor neurons. We have demonstrated that human denervated muscle fibers survive years of denervation and can be rescued from severe atrophy by home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation (h-bFES). Using immunohistochemistry with both non-stimulated and the h-bFES stimulated human muscle biopsies, we have observed the persistent presence of muscle fibers which are positive to labeling by an antibody which specifically recognizes the embryonic myosin heavy chain (MHCemb). Relative to the total number of fibers present, only a small percentage of these MHCemb positive fibers are detected, suggesting that they are regenerating muscle fibers and not pre-existing myofibers re-expressing embryonic isoforms. Although embryonic isoforms of acetylcholine receptors are known to be re-expressed and to spread from the end-plate to the sarcolemma of muscle fibers in early phases of muscle denervation, we suggest that the MHCemb

  4. Contractile properties of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenital cleft palates and normal palates of Spanish goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine muscle. It was determined that the muscle fibers of the cleft palate-induced goats were primarily of the type 2 (fast fibers) which fatigue easil...

  5. Ablation of Protein Kinase CK2β in Skeletal Muscle Fibers Interferes with Their Oxidative Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Eiber, Nane; Simeone, Luca; Hashemolhosseini, Said

    2017-01-01

    The tetrameric protein kinase CK2 was identified playing a role at neuromuscular junctions by studying CK2β-deficient muscle fibers in mice, and in cultured immortalized C2C12 muscle cells after individual knockdown of CK2α and CK2β subunits. In muscle cells, CK2 activity appeared to be at least required for regular aggregation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which serves as a hallmark for the presence of a postsynaptic apparatus. Here, we set out to determine whether any other feature accompanies CK2β-deficient muscle fibers. Hind limb muscles gastrocnemius, plantaris, and soleus of adult wildtype and CK2β-deficient mice were dissected, cross-sectioned, and stained histochemically by Gomori trichrome and for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) enzymatic activities. A reduction of oxidative enzymatic activity was determined for CK2β-deficient muscle fibers in comparison with wildtype controls. Importantly, the CK2β-deficient fibers, muscle fibers that typically exhibit high NADH dehydrogenase and SDH activities, like slow-type fibers, showed a marked reduction in these activities. Altogether, our data indicate additional impairments in the absence of CK2β in skeletal muscle fibers, pointing to an eventual mitochondrial myopathy. PMID:28106831

  6. Fiber type composition and maximum shortening velocity of muscles crossing the human shoulder.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, R C; Lungren, M P; Langenderfer, J E; Hughes, R E

    2007-03-01

    A study of the fiber type composition of fourteen muscles spanning the human glenohumeral joint was carried out with the purpose of determining the contribution of fiber types to overall muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and to estimate the maximum shortening velocity (V(max)) of those muscles. Muscle biopsies were procured from 4 male cadavers (mean age 50) within 24 hr of death, snap frozen, mounted, and transversely sectioned (10 microm). Slides were stained for myofibrillar ATPase after alkaline preincubation. Photoimages were taken of defined areas (100 fibers) using the Bioquant system, and fiber type and CSA were measured from these images. Staining for mATPase produced three different fiber types: slow-oxidative (SO), fast-oxidative-glycolytic (FOG), and fast-glycolytic (FG). On average, the muscle fiber type composition ranged from 22 to 40% of FG, from 17 to 51% of FOG, and from 23 to 56% of SO. Twelve out of the 14 muscles had average SO proportions ranging from 35 to 50%. V(max) was calculated from the fiber type contribution relative to CSA and shortening velocity values taken from the literature. The maximum velocities of shortening presented here provide a physiological basis for the development of human shoulder musculoskeletal models suitable for predicting muscle forces for functionally relevant tasks encompassing conditions of muscle shortening and lengthening.

  7. Muscle Fiber Size and Function in Elderly Humans: A Longitudinal Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross-sectional studies are likely to underestimate age-related changes in skeletal muscle strength and mass. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to assess whole muscle and single muscle fiber alterations in the same cohort of 12 older (mean age: start of study=71.1+/-5.4 yrs and end of study...

  8. Function of longitudinal vs circular muscle fibers in esophageal peristalsis, deduced with mathematical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Brasseur, James G; Nicosia, Mark A; Pal, Anupam; Miller, Larry S

    2007-01-01

    We summarize from previous works the functions of circular vs. longitudinal muscle in esophageal peristaltic bolus transport using a mix of experimental data, the conservation laws of mechanics and mathematical modeling. Whereas circular muscle tone generates radial closure pressure to create a local peristaltic closure wave, longitudinal muscle tone has two functions, one physiological with mechanical implications, and one purely mechanical. Each of these functions independently reduces the tension of individual circular muscle fibers to maintain closure as a consequence of shortening of longitudinal muscle locally coordinated with increasing circular muscle tone. The physiological function is deduced by combining basic laws of mechanics with concurrent measurements of intraluminal pressure from manometry, and changes in cross sectional muscle area from endoluminal ultrasound from which local longitudinal shortening (LLS) can be accurately obtained. The purely mechanical function of LLS was discovered from mathematical modeling of peristaltic esophageal transport with the axial wall motion generated by LLS. Physiologically, LLS concentrates circular muscle fibers where closure pressure is highest. However, the mechanical function of LLS is to reduce the level of pressure required to maintain closure. The combined physiological and mechanical consequences of LLS are to reduce circular muscle fiber tension and power by as much as 1/10 what would be required for peristalsis without the longitudinal muscle layer, a tremendous benefit that may explain the existence of longitudinal muscle fiber in the gut. We also review what is understood of the role of longitudinal muscle in esophageal emptying, reflux and pathology. PMID:17457963

  9. Expression profiling reveals heightened apoptosis and supports fiber size economy in the murine muscles of mastication.

    PubMed

    Evans, Marianna; Morine, Kevin; Kulkarni, Cyelee; Barton, Elisabeth R

    2008-09-17

    Distinctions between craniofacial and axial muscles exist from the onset of development and throughout adulthood. The masticatory muscles are a specialized group of craniofacial muscles that retain embryonic fiber properties in the adult, suggesting that the developmental origin of these muscles may govern a pattern of expression that differs from limb muscles. To determine the extent of these differences, expression profiling of total RNA isolated from the masseter and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of adult female mice was performed, which identified transcriptional changes in unanticipated functional classes of genes in addition to those attributable to fiber type. In particular, the masseters displayed a reduction of transcripts associated with contractile and cytoskeletal load-sensing and anabolic processes, and heightened expression of genes associated with stress. Associated with these observations was a significantly smaller fiber cross-sectional area in masseters, significantly elevated load-sensing signaling (phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase), and increased apoptotic index in masseters compared with TA muscles. Based on these results, we hypothesize that masticatory muscles may have a fundamentally different strategy for muscle design, compared with axial muscles. Specifically there are small diameter fibers that have an attenuated ability to hypertrophy, but an increased propensity to undergo apoptosis. These results may provide insight into the molecular basis for specific muscle-related pathologies associated with masticatory muscles.

  10. Cut-off analysis of 19-cell Yb-doped double-cladding rod-type photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Poli, F; Coscelli, E; Alkeskjold, T T; Passaro, D; Cucinotta, A; Leick, L; Broeng, J; Selleri, S

    2011-05-09

    Yb-doped double-cladding large mode area rod-type photonic crystal fibers are a key component for power scaling in fiber laser systems. Recently, designs with 19-cell core defect, that is with 19 missing air-holes in the center of the photonic crystal cladding, have been proposed, with reported core diameter up to 100 μm. In this paper an analysis of the cut-off wavelength of the first high-order mode in such low-NA fibers is reported, accounting for different approaches for the definition of the cladding effective index. Results have shown that taking into account the finite fiber cross-section and considering the first cladding mode of the actual fiber is mandatory to obtain a correct estimate of the cut-off wavelength.

  11. Effect of laser incidence angle on cut quality of 4 mm thick stainless steel sheet using fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullick, Suvradip; Agrawal, Arpit Kumar; Nath, Ashish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Fiber laser has potential to outperform the more traditionally used CO2 lasers in sheet metal cutting applications due to its higher efficiency, better beam quality, reliability and ease of beam delivery through optical fiber. It has been however, reported that the higher focusability and shorter wavelength are advantageous for cutting thin metal sheets up to about 2 mm only. Better focasability results in narrower kerf-width, which leads to an earlier flow separation in the flow of assist gas within the kerf, resulting in uncontrolled material removal and poor cut quality. However, the advarse effect of tight focusability can be taken care by shifting the focal point position towards the bottom surface of work-piece, which results in a wider kerf size. This results in a more stable flow within the kerf for a longer depth, which improves the cut quality. It has also been reported that fiber laser has an unfavourable angle of incidence during cutting of thick sections, resulting in poor absorption at the metal surface. Therefore, the effect of laser incidence angle, along with other process parameters, viz. cutting speed and assist gas pressure on the cut quality of 4 mm thick steel sheet has been investigated. The change in laser incidence angle has been incorporated by inclining the beam towards and away from the cut front, and the quality factors are taken as the ratio of kerf width and the striation depth. Besides the absorption of laser radiation, beam inclination is also expected to influence the gas flow characteristics inside the kerf, shear force phenomena on the molten pool, laser beam coupling and laser power distribution at the inclined cut surface. Design of experiment has been used by implementing response surface methodology (RSM) to study the parametric dependence of cut quality, as well as to find out the optimum cut quality. An improvement in quality has been observed for both the inclination due to the combined effect of multiple phenomena.

  12. Muscle-fiber transdifferentiation in an experimental model of respiratory chain myopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Skeletal muscle fiber composition and muscle energetics are not static and change in muscle disease. This study was performed to determine whether a mitochondrial myopathy is associated with adjustments in skeletal muscle fiber-type composition. Methods Ten rats were treated with zidovudine, an antiretroviral nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that induces a myopathy by interfering with mitochondrial functions. Soleus muscles were examined after 21 weeks of treatment. Ten untreated rats served as controls. Results Zidovudine induced a myopathy with mitochondrial DNA depletion, abnormalities in mitochondrial ultrastructure, and reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity. Mitochondrial DNA was disproportionally more diminished in type I compared with type II fibers, whereas atrophy predominated in type II fibers. Compared with those of controls, zidovudine-exposed soleus muscles contained an increased proportion (256%) of type II fibers, whereas neonatal myosin heavy chains remained repressed, indicating fiber-type transformation in the absence of regeneration. Microarray gene-expression analysis confirmed enhanced fast-fiber isoforms, repressed slow-fiber transcripts, and reduced neonatal fiber transcripts in the mitochondrial myopathy. Respiratory chain transcripts were diminished, whereas the enzymes of glycolysis and glycogenolysis were enhanced, indicating a metabolic adjustment from oxidative to glycolytic capacities. A coordinated regulation was found of transcription factors known to orchestrate type II fiber formation (upregulation of MyoD, Six1, Six2, Eya1, and Sox6, and downregulation of myogenin and ERRγ). Conclusions The type I to type II fiber transformation in mitochondrial myopathy implicates mitochondrial function as a new regulator of skeletal muscle fiber type. PMID:23107834

  13. High Power Laser Cutting of Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Polymers with cw- and Pulsed Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F.; Wolf, N.; Petring, D.

    Glass fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers with thermoplastic matrix enable high volume production with short cycle times. Cutting and trimming operations in these production chains require the use of high average laser power for an efficient cutting speed, but employment of high laser power runs the risk to induce a wide heat affected zone (HAZ). This paper deals with investigations with cw and ns-pulsed CO2-laser radiation in the kilowatt range in single-pass and multiple-pass processes. Using multi-pass processing at high processing speeds of 100 m/min and above a reduced heat affected zone in the range of 100 μm to 200 μm could be achieved by the ns-pulsed radiation. With cw radiation at the same average power of 1 kW however, the HAZ was 300-400 μm. Also employing ns-pulses in the kW-range average power leads to heat accumulation in the material. Small HAZ were obtained with sufficient break times between subsequent passes.

  14. Distinct muscle apoptotic pathways are activated in muscles with different fiber types a rat model of critical illness myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Benjamin T.; Confides, Amy L.; Rich, Mark M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is associated with severe muscle atrophy and fatigue in affected patients. Apoptotic signaling is involved in atrophy and is elevated in muscles from patients with CIM. In this study we investigated underlying mechanisms of apoptosis-related pathways in muscles with different fiber type composition in a rat model of CIM using denervation and glucocorticoid administration (denervation and steroid-induced myopathy, DSIM). Soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed severe muscle atrophy (40–60% of control muscle weight) and significant apoptosis in interstitial as well as myofiber nuclei that was similar between the two muscles with DSIM. Caspase-3 and −8 activities, but not caspase-9 and −12, were elevated in TA and not in soleus muscle, while the caspase-independent proteins endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were not changed in abundance nor differentially localized in either muscle. Anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70, −27, and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) were elevated in soleus compared to TA muscle and ARC was significantly decreased with induction of DSIM in soleus. Results indicate that apoptosis is a significant process associated with DSIM in both soleus and TA muscles, and that apoptosis-associated processes are differentially regulated in muscles of different function and fiber type undergoing atrophy due to DSIM. We conclude that interventions combating apoptosis with CIM may need to be directed towards inhibiting caspase-dependent as well as -independent mechanisms to be able to affect muscles of all fiber types. PMID:25740800

  15. Distinct muscle apoptotic pathways are activated in muscles with different fiber types in a rat model of critical illness myopathy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Benjamin T; Confides, Amy L; Rich, Mark M; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E

    2015-06-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is associated with severe muscle atrophy and fatigue in affected patients. Apoptotic signaling is involved in atrophy and is elevated in muscles from patients with CIM. In this study we investigated underlying mechanisms of apoptosis-related pathways in muscles with different fiber type composition in a rat model of CIM using denervation and glucocorticoid administration (denervation and steroid-induced myopathy, DSIM). Soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed severe muscle atrophy (40-60% of control muscle weight) and significant apoptosis in interstitial as well as myofiber nuclei that was similar between the two muscles with DSIM. Caspase-3 and -8 activities, but not caspase-9 and -12, were elevated in TA and not in soleus muscle, while the caspase-independent proteins endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were not changed in abundance nor differentially localized in either muscle. Anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70, -27, and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) were elevated in soleus compared to TA muscle and ARC was significantly decreased with induction of DSIM in soleus. Results indicate that apoptosis is a significant process associated with DSIM in both soleus and TA muscles, and that apoptosis-associated processes are differentially regulated in muscles of different function and fiber type undergoing atrophy due to DSIM. We conclude that interventions combating apoptosis with CIM may need to be directed towards inhibiting caspase-dependent as well as -independent mechanisms to be able to affect muscles of all fiber types.

  16. Muscle Degeneration in Neuramindase 1 Deficient Mice Results from Infiltration of the Muscle Fibers by Expanded Connective Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zanoteli, Edmar; van de Vlekkert, Diantha; Bonten, Erik J.; Hu, Huimin; Mann, Linda; Gomero, Elida M.; Harris, A. John; Ghersi, Giulio; d’Azzo, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Neuraminidase 1 (NEU1) regulates the catabolism of sialoglycoconjugates in lysosomes. Congenital NEU1 deficiency in children is the basis of sialidosis, a severe neurosomatic disorder in which patients experience a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations varying in the age of onset and severity. Osteoskeletal deformities and muscle hypotonia have been described in patients with sialidosis. Here we present the first comprehensive analysis of the skeletal muscle pathology associated with loss of Neu1 function in mice. In this animal model, skeletal muscles showed an expansion of the epimysial and perimysial spaces, associated with proliferation of fibroblast-like cells and abnormal deposition of collagens. Muscle fibers located adjacent to the expanded connective tissue underwent extensive invagination of their sarcolemma, which resulted in the infiltration of the fibers by fibroblast-like cells and extracellular matrix, and in their progressive cytosolic fragmentation. Both the expanded connective tissue and the juxtaposed infiltrated muscle fibers were strongly positive for lysosomal markers, and displayed increased proteolytic activity of lysosomal cathepsins and metalloproteinases. These combined features could lead to abnormal remodeling of the extracellular matrix that could be responsible for sarcolemmal invagination and progressive muscle fiber degeneration, ultimately resulting in an overt atrophic phenotype. This unique pattern of muscle damage, which has never been described in any myopathy, might explain the neuromuscular manifestations reported in patients with the type II severe form of sialidosis. More broadly, these findings point to a potential role of NEU1 in cell proliferation and extracellular matrix remodeling. PMID:20388541

  17. Mitochondrial Dynamics is a Distinguishing Feature of Skeletal Muscle Fiber Types and Regulates Organellar Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Prashant; Varuzhanyan, Grigor; Pham, Anh H; Chan, David C

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers differentiate into specific fiber types with distinct metabolic properties determined by their reliance on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Using in vivo approaches, we find that OXPHOS-dependent fibers, compared to glycolytic fibers, contain elongated mitochondrial networks with higher fusion rates that are dependent on the mitofusins Mfn1 and Mfn2. Switching of a glycolytic fiber to an oxidative IIA type is associated with elongation of mitochondria, suggesting that mitochondrial fusion is linked to metabolic state. Furthermore, we reveal that mitochondrial proteins are compartmentalized to discrete domains centered around their nuclei of origin. The domain dimensions are dependent on fiber type and are regulated by the mitochondrial dynamics proteins Mfn1, Mfn2, and Mff. Our results indicate that mitochondrial dynamics is tailored to fiber type physiology and provides a rationale for the segmental defects characteristic of aged and diseased muscle fibers.

  18. Ryanodine interferes with charge movement repriming in amphibian skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, A; Caputo, C

    1996-01-01

    Cut twitch muscle fibers mounted in a triple Vaseline-gap chamber were used to study the effects of ryanodine on intramembranous charge movement, and in particular on the repriming of charge 1. Charge 1 repriming was measured either under steady-state conditions or by using a pulse protocol designed to study the time course of repriming. This protocol consisted of repolarizing the fibers to -100 mV from a holding potential of 0 mV, and then measuring the reprimed charge moving in the potential range between -40 and +20 mV. Ryanodine at a high concentration (100 microM) did not affect the maximum amount of movable charge 1 and charge 2, or their voltage dependence. This indicates that the alkaloid does not interact with the voltage sensor molecules. However, ryanodine did reduce the amount of reprimed charge 1 by approximately 60% suggesting the possibility of a retrograde interaction between ryanodine receptors and voltage sensors. PMID:8770214

  19. Is fast fiber innervation responsible for increased acetylcholinesterase activity in reinnervating soleus muscles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misulis, K. E.; Dettbarn, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted as to whether the predominantly slow SOL, which is low in AChE activity, is initially reinnervated by axons that originally innervated fast muscle fibers with high AChE activity, such as those of the EDL. Local denervation of the SOL in the guinea pig was performed because this muscle is composed solely of slow (type I) fibers; thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of homologous muscle fast fiber innervation. The overshoot in this preparation was qualitatively similar to that seen with distal denervation in the guinea pig and local and distal denervation in the rat. Thus, initial fast fiber innvervation is not responsible for the patterns of change in AChE activity seen with reinnervation in the SOL. It is concluded that the neural control of AChe is different in these two muscles and may reflect specific differences in the characteristics of AChE regulation in fast and slow muscle.

  20. Muscle fiber type distribution in climbing Hawaiian gobioid fishes: ontogeny and correlations with locomotor performance.

    PubMed

    Cediel, Roberto A; Blob, Richard W; Schrank, Gordon D; Plourde, Robert C; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2008-01-01

    Three species of Hawaiian amphidromous gobioid fishes are remarkable in their ability to climb waterfalls up to several hundred meters tall. Juvenile Lentipes concolor and Awaous guamensis climb using rapid bursts of axial undulation, whereas juvenile Sicyopterus stimpsoni climb using much slower movements, alternately attaching oral and pelvic sucking disks to the substrate during prolonged bouts of several cycles. Based on these differing climbing styles, we hypothesized that propulsive musculature in juvenile L. concolor and A. guamensis would be dominated by white muscle fibers, whereas S. stimpsoni would exhibit a greater proportion of red muscle fibers than other climbing species. We further predicted that, because adults of these species shift from climbing to burst swimming as their main locomotor behavior, muscle from adult fish of all three species would be dominated by white fibers. To test these hypotheses, we used ATPase assays to evaluate muscle fiber type distribution in Hawaiian climbing gobies for three anatomical regions (midbody, anal, and tail). Axial musculature was dominated by white muscle fibers in juveniles of all three species, but juvenile S. stimpsoni had a significantly greater proportion of red fibers than the other two species. Fiber type proportions of adult fishes did not differ significantly from those of juveniles. Thus, muscle fiber type proportions in juveniles appear to help accommodate differences in locomotor demands among these species, indicating that they overcome the common challenge of waterfall climbing through both diverse behaviors and physiological specializations.

  1. Denervation causes fiber atrophy and myosin heavy chain co-expression in senescent skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Sharon L; Rygiel, Karolina; Purves-Smith, Fennigje M; Solbak, Nathan M; Turnbull, Douglas M; Hepple, Russell T

    2012-01-01

    Although denervation has long been implicated in aging muscle, the degree to which it is causes the fiber atrophy seen in aging muscle is unknown. To address this question, we quantified motoneuron soma counts in the lumbar spinal cord using choline acetyl transferase immunhistochemistry and quantified the size of denervated versus innervated muscle fibers in the gastrocnemius muscle using the in situ expression of the denervation-specific sodium channel, Nav₁.₅, in young adult (YA) and senescent (SEN) rats. To gain insights into the mechanisms driving myofiber atrophy, we also examined the myofiber expression of the two primary ubiquitin ligases necessary for muscle atrophy (MAFbx, MuRF1). MN soma number in lumbar spinal cord declined 27% between YA (638±34 MNs×mm⁻¹) and SEN (469±13 MNs×mm⁻¹). Nav₁.₅ positive fibers (1548±70 μm²) were 35% smaller than Nav₁.₅ negative fibers (2367±78 μm²; P<0.05) in SEN muscle, whereas Nav₁.₅ negative fibers in SEN were only 7% smaller than fibers in YA (2553±33 μm²; P<0.05) where no Nav₁.₅ labeling was seen, suggesting denervation is the primary cause of aging myofiber atrophy. Nav₁.₅ positive fibers had higher levels of MAFbx and MuRF1 (P<0.05), consistent with involvement of the proteasome proteolytic pathway in the atrophy of denervated muscle fibers in aging muscle. In summary, our study provides the first quantitative assessment of the contribution of denervation to myofiber atrophy in aging muscle, suggesting it explains the majority of the atrophy we observed. This striking result suggests a renewed focus should be placed on denervation in seeking understanding of the causes of and treatments for aging muscle atrophy.

  2. Denervation Causes Fiber Atrophy and Myosin Heavy Chain Co-Expression in Senescent Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Sharon L.; Rygiel, Karolina; Purves-Smith, Fennigje M.; Solbak, Nathan M.; Turnbull, Douglas M.; Hepple, Russell T.

    2012-01-01

    Although denervation has long been implicated in aging muscle, the degree to which it is causes the fiber atrophy seen in aging muscle is unknown. To address this question, we quantified motoneuron soma counts in the lumbar spinal cord using choline acetyl transferase immunhistochemistry and quantified the size of denervated versus innervated muscle fibers in the gastrocnemius muscle using the in situ expression of the denervation-specific sodium channel, Nav1.5, in young adult (YA) and senescent (SEN) rats. To gain insights into the mechanisms driving myofiber atrophy, we also examined the myofiber expression of the two primary ubiquitin ligases necessary for muscle atrophy (MAFbx, MuRF1). MN soma number in lumbar spinal cord declined 27% between YA (638±34 MNs×mm−1) and SEN (469±13 MNs×mm−1). Nav1.5 positive fibers (1548±70 μm2) were 35% smaller than Nav1.5 negative fibers (2367±78 μm2; P<0.05) in SEN muscle, whereas Nav1.5 negative fibers in SEN were only 7% smaller than fibers in YA (2553±33 μm2; P<0.05) where no Nav1.5 labeling was seen, suggesting denervation is the primary cause of aging myofiber atrophy. Nav1.5 positive fibers had higher levels of MAFbx and MuRF1 (P<0.05), consistent with involvement of the proteasome proteolytic pathway in the atrophy of denervated muscle fibers in aging muscle. In summary, our study provides the first quantitative assessment of the contribution of denervation to myofiber atrophy in aging muscle, suggesting it explains the majority of the atrophy we observed. This striking result suggests a renewed focus should be placed on denervation in seeking understanding of the causes of and treatments for aging muscle atrophy. PMID:22235261

  3. Efficient single muscle fiber isolation from alcohol-fixed adult muscle following β-galactosidase staining for satellite cell detection.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mayank; Asakura, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Staining for β-galactosidase activity for whole tissues, sections, and cells is a common method to detect expression of β-galactosidase reporter transgene as well as senescence-dependent β-galactosidase activity. Choice of fixatives is a critical step for detection of β-galactosidase activity, subsequent immunostaining, and enzymatic digestion of tissue to dissociate cells. In this report, the authors examined several aldehyde and alcohol fixatives in mouse skeletal muscle tissues for their efficiency at improving detection of β-galactosidase activity as well as detection by immunostaining. In addition, fixatives were also analyzed for their efficiency for collagenase digestion to isolate single muscle fibers on postfixed β-galactosidase-stained whole skeletal muscle tissues. The results show that fixing cells with isopropanol yields the greatest reliability and intensity in both β-galactosidase staining as well as double staining for β-galactosidase activity and antibodies. In addition, isopropanol and ethanol, but not glutaraldehyde or paraformaldehyde, allow for the isolation of single muscle fibers from the diaphragm and tibialis anterior muscles following postfixed β-galactosidase staining. Using this method, it is possible to identify the amount of cells that occupy the satellite cell compartment in single muscle fibers prepared from any muscle tissues, including tibialis anterior muscle and diaphragm.

  4. Catalase-positive microperoxisomes in rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle fiber types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L. W.; Ellis, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    The size, distribution, and content of catalase-reactive microperoxisomes were investigated cytochemically in three types of muscle fibers from the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of male rats. Muscle fibers were classified on the basis of the mitochondrial content and distribution, the Z-band widths, and the size and shape of myofibrils as the slow-twitch oxidative (SO), the fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG), and the fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers. It was found that both the EDL and soleus SO fibers possessed the largest microperoxisomes. A comparison of microperoxisome number per muscle fiber area or the microperoxisome area per fiber area revealed following ranking, starting from the largest number and the area-ratio values: soleus SO, EDL SO, EDL FOG, and EDL FG.

  5. Slow to fast alterations in skeletal muscle fibers caused by clenbuterol, a beta(2)-receptor agonist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Easton, Thomas G.; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2)-receptor agonist, clenbuterol, and a beta(2) antagonist, butoxamine, on the skeletal muscle fibers of rats were investigated. It was found that chronic treatment of rats with clenbuterol caused hypertrophy of histochemically identified fast-twitch, but not slow-twitch, fibers within the soleus, while in the extensor digitorum longus the mean areas of both fiber types were increased; in both muscles, the ratio of the number of fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was increased. In contrast, a treatment with butoxamine caused a reduction of the fast-twitch fiber size in both muscles, and the ratio of the fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was decreased.

  6. Sarcomere Length and Tension Changes in Tetanized Frog Muscle Fibers after Quick Stretches and Releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugi, Haruo; Kobayashi, Takakazu

    1983-10-01

    The sarcomere length changes in tetanized frog muscle fibers in response to quick fiber length changes were examined along the fiber length with a high-sensitivity laser diffraction technique. The experiments were only performed with muscle fibers in which the uniform orientation and sarcomere length of the component myofibrils were well preserved during a tetanus. When the sarcomere length changes were recorded near the fixed fiber end, the delay of the onset of sarcomere length change in response to the applied fiber length change tended to be longer than that of the onset of tension changes recorded at the fixed fiber end. The magnitude of sarcomere length changes was larger near the moving fiber end than near the fixed fiber end. In the case of quick releases, the resulting sarcomere shortening tended to outlast the fiber shortening, so that the quick tension recovery started during the sarcomere shortening. These results indicate (i) that the tension changes in response to quick fiber length changes may not give direct information about the cross-bridge properties and (ii) that the viscoelastic multisegmental nature of muscle fibers should be taken into consideration in interpreting the tension responses to quick length changes.

  7. Muscle fatigue examined at different temperatures in experiments on intact mammalian (rat) muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Roots, H.; Ball, G.; Talbot-Ponsonby, J.; King, M.; McBeath, K.; Ranatunga, K. W.

    2009-01-01

    In experiments on small bundles of intact fibers from a rat fast muscle, in vitro, we examined the decline in force in repeated tetanic contractions; the aim was to characterize the effect of shortening and of temperature on the initial phase of muscle fatigue. Short tetanic contractions were elicited at a control repetition rate of 1/60 s, and fatigue was induced by raising the rate to 1/5 s for 2–3 min, both in isometric mode (no shortening) and in shortening mode, in which each tetanic contraction included a ramp shortening at a standard velocity. In experiments at 20°C (n = 12), the force decline during a fatigue run was 25% in the isometric mode but was significantly higher (35%) in the shortening mode. In experiments at different temperatures (10–30°C, n = 11), the tetanic frequency and duration were adjusted as appropriate, and for shortening mode, the velocity was adjusted for maximum power output. In isometric mode, fatigue of force was significantly less at 30°C (∼20%) than at 10°C (∼30%); the power output (force × velocity) was >10× higher at 30°C than at 10°C, and power decline during a fatigue run was less at 30°C (∼20–30%) than at 10°C (∼50%). The finding that the extent of fatigue is increased with shortening contractions and is lower at higher temperatures is consistent with the view that force depression by inorganic phosphate, which accumulates within fibers during activity, may be a primary cause of initial muscle fatigue. PMID:19057001

  8. A multiscale chemo-electro-mechanical skeletal muscle model to analyze muscle contraction and force generation for different muscle fiber arrangements

    PubMed Central

    Heidlauf, Thomas; Röhrle, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The presented chemo-electro-mechanical skeletal muscle model relies on a continuum-mechanical formulation describing the muscle's deformation and force generation on the macroscopic muscle level. Unlike other three-dimensional models, the description of the activation-induced behavior of the mechanical model is entirely based on chemo-electro-mechanical principles on the microscopic sarcomere level. Yet, the multiscale model reproduces key characteristics of skeletal muscles such as experimental force-length and force-velocity data on the macroscopic whole muscle level. The paper presents the methodological approaches required to obtain such a multiscale model, and demonstrates the feasibility of using such a model to analyze differences in the mechanical behavior of parallel-fibered muscles, in which the muscle fibers either span the entire length of the fascicles or terminate intrafascicularly. The presented results reveal that muscles, in which the fibers span the entire length of the fascicles, show lower peak forces, more dispersed twitches and fusion of twitches at lower stimulation frequencies. In detail, the model predicted twitch rise times of 38.2 and 17.2 ms for a 12 cm long muscle, in which the fibers span the entire length of the fascicles and with twelve fiber compartments in series, respectively. Further, the twelve-compartment model predicted peak twitch forces that were 19% higher than in the single-compartment model. The analysis of sarcomere lengths during fixed-end single twitch contractions at optimal length predicts rather small sarcomere length changes. The observed lengths range from 75 to 111% of the optimal sarcomere length, which corresponds to a region with maximum filament overlap. This result suggests that stability issues resulting from activation-induced stretches of non-activated sarcomeres are unlikely in muscles with passive forces appearing at short muscle length. PMID:25566094

  9. Calcium-activated force of human muscle fibers following a standardized eccentric contraction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Jun; Widrick, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-01

    Peak Ca(2+)-activated specific force (force/fiber cross-sectional area) of human chemically skinned vastus lateralis muscle fiber segments was determined before and after a fixed-end contraction or an eccentric contraction of standardized magnitude (+0.25 optimal fiber length) and velocity (0.50 unloaded shortening velocity). Fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform content was assayed by SDS-PAGE. Posteccentric force deficit, a marker of damage, was similar for type I and IIa fibers but threefold greater for type IIa/IIx hybrid fibers. A fixed-end contraction had no significant effect on force. Multiple linear regression revealed that posteccentric force was explained by a model consisting of a fiber type-independent and a fiber type-specific component (r(2) = 0.91). Preeccentric specific force was directly associated with a greater posteccentric force deficit. When preeccentric force was held constant, type I and IIa fibers showed identical susceptibility to damage, while type IIa/IIx fibers showed a significantly greater force loss. This heightened sensitivity to damage was directly related to the amount of type IIx MHC in the hybrid fiber. Our model reveals a fiber-type sensitivity of the myofilament lattice or cytoskeleton to mechanical strain that can be described as follows: type IIa/IIx > type IIa = type I. If these properties extend to fibers in vivo, then alterations in the number of type IIa/IIx fibers may modify a muscle's susceptibility to eccentric damage.

  10. Metabolic and morphologic properties of single muscle fibers in the rat after spaceflight, Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miu, B.; Martin, T. P.; Roy, R. R.; Oganov, V.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E.; Marini, J. F.; Leger, J. J.; Bodine-Fowler, S. C.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1990-01-01

    The adaptation of a slow (soleus, Sol) and a fast (medial gastrocnemius, MG) skeletal muscle to spaceflight was studied in five young male rats. The flight period was 12.5 days and the rats were killed approximately 48 h after returning to 1 g. Five other rats that were housed in cages similar to those used by the flight rats were maintained at 1 g for the same period of time to serve as ground-based controls. Fibers were classified as dark or light staining for myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). On the average, the fibers in the Sol of the flight rats atrophied twice as much as those in the MG. Further, the fibers located in the deep (close to the bone and having the highest percentage of light ATPase and high oxidative fibers in the muscle cross section) region of the MG atrophied more than the fibers located in the superficial (away from the bone and having the lowest percentage of light ATPase and high oxidative fibers in the muscle cross-section) region of the muscle. Based on quantitative histochemical assays of single muscle fibers, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity per unit volume was unchanged in fibers of the Sol and MG. However, in the Sol, but not the MG, the total amount of SDH activity in a 10-microns-thick section of a fiber decreased significantly in response to spaceflight. Based on population distributions, it appears that the alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) activities were elevated in the dark ATPase fibers in the Sol, whereas the light fibers in the Sol and both fiber types in the MG did not appear to change. The ratio of GPD to SDH activities increased in the dark (but not light) fibers of the Sol and was unaffected in the MG. Immunohistochemical analyses indicate that approximately 40% of the fibers in the Sol of flight rats expressed a fast myosin heavy chain compared with 22% in control rats. Further, 31% of the fibers in the Sol of flight rats expressed both fast and slow myosin heavy chains compared with 8% in

  11. Experiment K-6-21. Effect of microgravity on 1) metabolic enzymes of type 1 and type 2 muscle fibers and on 2) metabolic enzymes, neutransmitter amino acids, and neurotransmitter associated enzymes in motor and somatosensory cerebral cortex. Part 1: Metabolic enzymes of individual muscle fibers; part 2: metabolic enzymes of hippocampus and spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O.; Mcdougal, D., Jr.; Nemeth, Patti M.; Maggie, M.-Y. Chi; Pusateri, M.; Carter, J.; Manchester, J.; Norris, Beverly; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    The individual fibers of any individual muscle vary greatly in enzyme composition, a fact which is obscured when enzyme levels of a whole muscle are measured. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess the changes due to weightless on the enzyme patterns composed by the individual fibers within the flight muscles. In spite of the limitation in numbers of muscles examined, it is apparent that: (1) that the size of individual fibers (i.e., their dry weight) was reduced about a third, (2) that this loss in dry mass was accompanied by changes in the eight enzymes studied, and (3) that these changes were different for the two muscles, and different for the two enzyme groups. In the soleus muscle the absolute amounts of the three enzymes of oxidative metabolism decreased about in proportion to the dry weight loss, so that their concentration in the atrophic fibers was almost unchanged. In contrast, there was little loss among the four enzymes of glycogenolysis - glycolysis so that their concentrations were substantially increased in the atrophic fibers. In the TA muscle, these seven enzymes were affected in just the opposite direction. There appeared to be no absolute loss among the oxidative enzymes, whereas the glycogenolytic enzymes were reduced by nearly half, so that the concentrations of the first metabolic group were increased within the atrophic fibers and the concentrations of the second group were only marginally decreased. The behavior of hexokinase was exceptional in that it did not decrease in absolute terms in either type of muscle and probably increased as much as 50 percent in soleus. Thus, their was a large increase in concentration of this enzyme in the atrophied fibers of both muscles. Another clear-cut finding was the large increase in the range of activities of the glycolytic enzymes among individual fibers of TA muscles. This was due to the emergence of TA fibers with activities for enzymes of this group extending down to levels as low as

  12. Differences in muscle fiber size and associated energetic costs in phylogenetically paired tropical and temperate birds.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Williams, Joseph B

    2014-01-01

    Tropical and temperate birds provide a unique system to examine mechanistic consequences of life-history trade-offs at opposing ends of the pace-of-life spectrum; tropical birds tend to have a slow pace of life whereas temperate birds the opposite. Birds in the tropics have a lower whole-animal basal metabolic rate and peak metabolic rate, lower rates of reproduction, and longer survival than birds in temperate regions. Although skeletal muscle has a relatively low tissue-specific metabolism at rest, it makes up the largest fraction of body mass and therefore contributes more to basal metabolism than any other tissue. A principal property of muscle cells that influences their rate of metabolism is fiber size. The optimal fiber size hypothesis attempts to link whole-animal basal metabolic rate to the cost of maintaining muscle mass by stating that larger fibers may be metabolically cheaper to maintain since the surface area∶volume ratio (SA∶V) is reduced compared with smaller fibers and thus the amount of area to transport ions is also reduced. Because tropical birds have a reduced whole-organism metabolism, we hypothesized that they would have larger muscle fibers than temperate birds, given that larger muscle fibers have reduced energy demand from membrane Na(+)-K(+) pumps. Alternatively, smaller muscle fibers could result in a lower capacity for shivering and exercise. To test this idea, we examined muscle fiber size and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in 16 phylogenetically paired species of tropical and temperate birds. We found that 3 of the 16 paired comparisons indicated that tropical birds had significantly larger fibers, contrary to our hypothesis. Our data show that SA∶V is proportional to Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in muscles of birds.

  13. Gravitational unloading effects on muscle fiber size, phenotype and myonuclear number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Y.; Yoshinaga, T.; Nomura, T.; Kawano, F.; Ishihara, A.; Nonaka, I.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of gravitational unloading with or without intact neural activity and/or tension development on myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition, cross-sectional area (CSA), number of myonuclei, and myonuclear domain (cytoplasmic volume per myonucleus ratio) in single fibers of both slow and fast muscles of rat hindlimbs are reviewed briefly. The atrophic response to unloading is generally graded as follows: slow extensors > fast extensors > fast flexors. Reduction of CSA is usually greater in the most predominant fiber type of that muscle. The percentage of fibers expressing fast MHC isoforms increases in unloaded slow but not fast muscles. Myonuclear number per mm of fiber length and myonuclear domain is decreased in the fibers of the unloaded predominantly slow soleus muscle, but not in the predominantly fast plantaris. Decreases in myonuclear number and domain, however, are observed in plantaris fibers when tenotomy, denervation, or both are combined with hindlimb unloading. All of these results are consistent with the view that a major factor for fiber atrophy is an inhibition or reduction of loading of the hindlimbs. These data also indicate that predominantly slow muscles are more responsive to unloading than predominantly fast muscles. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High endocytotic activity occurs periodically in the endplate region of denervated mouse striated muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, G; Tågerud, S

    1995-08-01

    High endocytotic activity after denervation of skeletal muscle occurs in a proportion of muscle fibers (both slow and fast fiber types) in the endplate region. The present study was performed in order to examine if a periodicity in the endocytotic activity could explain why the process is not observed in all fibers at a given time. Three markers, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), rhodamine B isothiocyanate-labeled dextran, and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran were used to demonstrate endocytotic activity of muscle fibers of the denervated mouse hemidiaphragm in vivo. Acetylcholine esterase staining was used in conjunction with HRP uptake to determine the proportion of denervated muscle fibers with endocytotic activity in the endplate region at any one time. The results show that 25-50% of the muscle fibers display high endocytotic activity in the endplate region at a given time 10 days after denervation. The existence of a periodicity in this endocytotic activity is suggested by results obtained using two different endocytotic markers administered at time intervals of 0-7 days. We conclude that loss of contact with the innervating motorneuron induces a high endocytotic activity which occurs periodically in the perisynaptic region of skeletal muscle fibers.

  15. Effects of muscle fiber type and size on EMG median frequency and conduction velocity.

    PubMed

    Kupa, E J; Roy, S H; Kandarian, S C; De Luca, C J

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes an in vitro method for comparing surface-detected electromyographic median frequency (MF) and conduction velocity (CV) parameters with histochemical measurements of muscle fiber type composition and cross-sectional area (CSA). Electromyographic signals were recorded during electrically elicited tetanic contractions from rat soleus, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm muscles placed in an oxygenated Krebs bath. Fibers were typed as slow oxidative, fast oxidative glycolytic, and fast glycolytic based on histochemical enzyme stains. Muscles with a greater percentage of fast glycolytic and fast oxidative glycolytic fibers exhibited greater initial values of MF and CV as well as a greater reduction in these variables over the course of the contraction. Regression indicated that fiber type composition could be predicted based on two MF parameters. A weighted measure of muscle fiber CSA was found to be linearly related to both initial MF and CV. The results of this study suggest that MF and CV parameters recorded during a muscular contraction are related to muscle fiber type composition and muscle fiber CSA.

  16. Fiber type composition of the sternomastoid and diaphragm muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Guido, Anderson Neri; Campos, Gerson Eduardo Rocha; Neto, Humberto Santo; Marques, Maria Julia; Minatel, Elaine

    2010-10-01

    The muscle fiber phenotype is mainly determined by motoneuron innervation and changes in neuromuscular interaction alter the muscle fiber type. In dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, changes in the molecular assembly of the neuromuscular junction and in nerve terminal sprouting occur in the sternomastoid (STN) muscle during early stages of the disease. In this study, we were interested to see whether early changes in neuromuscular assembly are correlated with alterations in fiber type in dystrophic STN at 2 months of age. A predominance of hybrid fast myofibers (about 52% type IIDB) was observed in control (C57Bl/10) STN. In mdx muscle, the lack of dystrophin did not change this profile (about 54% hybrid type IIDB). Pure fast type IID fibers predominated in normal and dystrophic diaphragm (DIA; about 39% in control and 30% in mdx muscle) and a population of slow Type I fibers was also present (about 10% in control and 13% in mdx muscle). In conclusion, early changes in neuromuscular assembly do not affect the fiber type composition of dystrophic STN. In contrast to the pure fast fibers of the more affected DIA, the hybrid phenotype of the STN may permit dynamic adaptations during progression of the disease.

  17. Spermine oxidase maintains basal skeletal muscle gene expression and fiber size and is strongly repressed by conditions that cause skeletal muscle atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bongers, Kale S.; Fox, Daniel K.; Kunkel, Steven D.; Stebounova, Larissa V.; Murry, Daryl J.; Pufall, Miles A.; Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. To better understand the mechanisms of muscle atrophy, we used mouse models to search for a skeletal muscle protein that helps to maintain muscle mass and is specifically lost during muscle atrophy. We discovered that diverse causes of muscle atrophy (limb immobilization, fasting, muscle denervation, and aging) strongly reduced expression of the enzyme spermine oxidase. Importantly, a reduction in spermine oxidase was sufficient to induce muscle fiber atrophy. Conversely, forced expression of spermine oxidase increased muscle fiber size in multiple models of muscle atrophy (immobilization, fasting, and denervation). Interestingly, the reduction of spermine oxidase during muscle atrophy was mediated by p21, a protein that is highly induced during muscle atrophy and actively promotes muscle atrophy. In addition, we found that spermine oxidase decreased skeletal muscle mRNAs that promote muscle atrophy (e.g., myogenin) and increased mRNAs that help to maintain muscle mass (e.g., mitofusin-2). Thus, in healthy skeletal muscle, a relatively low level of p21 permits expression of spermine oxidase, which helps to maintain basal muscle gene expression and fiber size; conversely, during conditions that cause muscle atrophy, p21 expression rises, leading to reduced spermine oxidase expression, disruption of basal muscle gene expression, and muscle fiber atrophy. Collectively, these results identify spermine oxidase as an important positive regulator of muscle gene expression and fiber size, and elucidate p21-mediated repression of spermine oxidase as a key step in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:25406264

  18. Spermine oxidase maintains basal skeletal muscle gene expression and fiber size and is strongly repressed by conditions that cause skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Bongers, Kale S; Fox, Daniel K; Kunkel, Steven D; Stebounova, Larissa V; Murry, Daryl J; Pufall, Miles A; Ebert, Scott M; Dyle, Michael C; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Adams, Christopher M

    2015-01-15

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. To better understand the mechanisms of muscle atrophy, we used mouse models to search for a skeletal muscle protein that helps to maintain muscle mass and is specifically lost during muscle atrophy. We discovered that diverse causes of muscle atrophy (limb immobilization, fasting, muscle denervation, and aging) strongly reduced expression of the enzyme spermine oxidase. Importantly, a reduction in spermine oxidase was sufficient to induce muscle fiber atrophy. Conversely, forced expression of spermine oxidase increased muscle fiber size in multiple models of muscle atrophy (immobilization, fasting, and denervation). Interestingly, the reduction of spermine oxidase during muscle atrophy was mediated by p21, a protein that is highly induced during muscle atrophy and actively promotes muscle atrophy. In addition, we found that spermine oxidase decreased skeletal muscle mRNAs that promote muscle atrophy (e.g., myogenin) and increased mRNAs that help to maintain muscle mass (e.g., mitofusin-2). Thus, in healthy skeletal muscle, a relatively low level of p21 permits expression of spermine oxidase, which helps to maintain basal muscle gene expression and fiber size; conversely, during conditions that cause muscle atrophy, p21 expression rises, leading to reduced spermine oxidase expression, disruption of basal muscle gene expression, and muscle fiber atrophy. Collectively, these results identify spermine oxidase as an important positive regulator of muscle gene expression and fiber size, and elucidate p21-mediated repression of spermine oxidase as a key step in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle atrophy.

  19. Further study of the electrical and machanical responses of slow fibers in cat extraocular muscles.

    PubMed

    Pilar, G

    1967-10-01

    Electrical and mechanical responses have been obtained in situ and in vitro from the superior oblique muscle stimulated by single and repetitive electrical pulses, applied to the trochlear nerve. Two different types of muscle fibers are described, the twitch and the slow. The slow type is characterized electrically by the presence of junctional potentials, which have reversal potentials between -10 and -20 mv, and do not show propagated responses or spikes, during nerve stimulation. When the slow muscle fibers are repetitively stimulated in situ, a prolonged contraction is maintained during stimulation. At the time, the recorded electrical activity is produced locally, at the level of the neuromuscular junctions of the slow fibers. These results indicate that the contractile mechanism of the slow muscle fibers is activated locally and segmentally.

  20. Degeneration of oxidative muscle fibers in HTLV-1 tax transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Nerenberg, M I; Wiley, C A

    1989-12-01

    The HTLV-1 tax gene under control of the HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) was introduced into transgenic mice. Previously tax protein expression in the muscle and peripheral nerves of three independent mouse lines was reported. Here the localization of this transgenic protein at a cellular and subcellular level is described. Tax protein was expressed in oxidative muscle fibers that developed severe progressive atrophy. It localized to the cytoplasma where it was associated with structures resembling degenerating Z bands. This pattern of muscle fiber involvement is similar to that observed in human retroviral associated myopathy. This transgenic mouse model suggests that preferential expression of the HTLV-1 viral promoter in oxidative muscle fibers may explain the productive infection of these fibers in HTLV-1 myopathy.

  1. Comparative Study of Remote Fiber Laser and Water-Jet Guided Laser Cutting of Thin Metal Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Klaus; Adelmann, Benedikt; Hellmann, Ralf

    This article presents a comparison between remote laser cutting with a fiber laser and water-jet guided laser cutting using a 532 nm solid state laser. Complex contours are processed in stainless steel and brass sheets (thickness ≤ 100 μm), respectively. Results for achievable quality and productivity as well as possible applications for both systems are shown and discussed. We sustained dross free cuts with almost no heat affected zone and small kerf width for the water-jet guided process, whereas small dross, notable heat affected zone and varying kerf width where observed for remote cutting. However, process times for the water-jet guided process where considerably higher than those for remote cutting.

  2. Ultrastructural study of muscles fibers in tick Hyalomma (Hyalomma) anatolicum anatolicum (Ixodoidea: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Bughdadi, Faisal A

    2010-09-01

    In the present study, ticks were obtained from a colony maintained at 28 degrees C and 75% relative humidity in at the Department of Biology, University College Umm Al-Qura University, Saudi Arabia and the Transmission Electron Microscope technique (TEM) was used to describes the ultrastructure and description of muscle of the of ixodid tick Hyalomma (Hyalomma) anatolicum anatolicum. The results showed that muscles of the unfed ticks Hyalomma (Hyalomma) anatolicum anatolicum in longitudinal sections are spindle-shaped to cylindrical muscle fibers. In the unfed nymph Hyalomma (Hyalomma) anatolicum anatolicum skeletal and visceral muscles are distinguished according to structure, function and position. These muscles include the capitulum, dorsoventral and leg oblique muscles. All muscle fibers are ensheathed (covered by sheath) in a sarcolemma. Their muscle fibers have striated pattern of successive sarcomeres whose thick myosin filaments are surrounded by orbitals of up to 12 thin actin filaments. The cytoplasm of the epidermal cell appears largely devoted with complicated microtubules present in parallel with long axis of adjacent muscle fibers. The cell membrane invaginates into tubular system extending deeply into the sarcoplasm and closely associated to cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum. The tubular system and sarcoplasmic reticulum forming two-membered (dyads) are considered to be the main route of calcium ions whose movement are synchronized with the motor impulse to control muscles contraction. In the sarcoplasm two types of muscle fibers are recognized according to thickness and density and mitochondrial size, distribution and population. Both skeletal and visceral muscles are invaginated by tracheoles and innervated by nerve axons containing synaptic vesicles. The actin and myosin filaments are slightly interrupted and the tubular system sarcoplasmic reticulum is well demonstrated.

  3. Effects of chronic centrifugation on skeletal muscle fibers in young developing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Three groups of 30-d old male and female rats were centrifuged for 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks, after which their soleus and plantaris muscles were analysed for changes in proportions of muscle fiber types. The groups were: earth control, maintained at earth gravity without rotation; rotation control, subjected to a gravitational force of 1.05 G and 28 rpm; and rotation experimental, subjected to a gravitational force of 2 G and 28 rpm. Muscle fibers were classified into four fiber types on the basis of actomyosin ATPase activity as slow oxidative, fast oxidative glycolytic and either fast glycolytic (plantaris) or intermediate (soleus). Hypergravity resulted in an increase in slow oxidative fibers in soleus relative to the earth control, but not of females treated similarly. The relationship of body weight to the changes in proportion of slow oxidative fibers is discussed.

  4. Cycle Training Increased GLUT4 and Activation of mTOR in Fast Twitch Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Charles A.; Howell, Mary E.A.; Baker, Jonathan D.; Dykes, Rhesa J.; Duffourc, Michelle M.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Stone, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine if cycle training of sedentary subjects would increase the expression of the principle muscle glucose transporters, six volunteers completed six weeks of progressively increasing intensity stationary cycle cycling. Methods In vastus lateralis muscle biopsies, changes in expression of GLUT1, GLUT4, GLUT5, and GLUT12 were compared using quantitative immunoblots with specific protein standards. Regulatory pathway components were evaluated by immunoblots of muscle homogenates and immunohistochemistry of microscopic sections. Results GLUT1 was unchanged, GLUT4 increased 66%, GLUT12 increased 104%, and GLUT5 decreased 72%. A mitochondrial marker (cytochrome c) and regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α and phospho-AMPK) were unchanged, but the muscle hypertrophy pathway component, phospho-mTOR increased 83% after the exercise program. In baseline biopsies, GLUT4 by immunohistochemical techniques was 37% greater in Type I (slow twitch, red) muscle fibers, but the exercise training increased GLUT4 expression in Type II (fast twitch, white) fibers by 50%, achieving parity with the Type I fibers. Baseline phospho-mTOR expression was 50% higher in Type II fibers and increased more in Type II fibers (62%) with training, but also increased in Type I fibers (34%). Conclusion Progressive intensity stationary cycle training of previously sedentary subjects increased muscle insulin-responsive glucose transporters (GLUT4 and GLUT12) and decreased the fructose transporter (GLUT5). The increase in GLUT4 occurred primarily in Type II muscle fibers and this coincided with activation of the mTOR muscle hypertrophy pathway. There was little impact on Type I fiber GLUT4 expression and no evidence of change in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:20010125

  5. Effects of cannabinoids on caffeine contractures in slow and fast skeletal muscle fibers of the frog.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Miguel; Ortiz-Mesina, Mónica; Trujillo, Xóchitl; Sánchez-Pastor, Enrique; Vásquez, Clemente; Castro, Elena; Velasco, Raymundo; Montoya-Pérez, Rocío; Onetti, Carlos

    2009-05-01

    The effect of cannabinoids on caffeine contractures was investigated in slow and fast skeletal muscle fibers using isometric tension recording. In slow muscle fibers, WIN 55,212-2 (10 and 5 microM) caused a decrease in tension. These doses reduced maximum tension to 67.43 +/- 8.07% (P = 0.02, n = 5) and 79.4 +/- 14.11% (P = 0.007, n = 5) compared to control, respectively. Tension-time integral was reduced to 58.37 +/- 7.17% and 75.10 +/- 3.60% (P = 0.002, n = 5), respectively. Using the CB(1) cannabinoid receptor agonist ACPA (1 microM) reduced the maximum tension of caffeine contractures by 68.70 +/- 11.63% (P = 0.01, n = 5); tension-time integral was reduced by 66.82 +/- 6.89% (P = 0.02, n = 5) compared to controls. When the CB(1) receptor antagonist AM281 was coapplied with ACPA, it reversed the effect of ACPA on caffeine-evoked tension. In slow and fast muscle fibers incubated with the pertussis toxin, ACPA had no effect on tension evoked by caffeine. In fast muscle fibers, ACPA (1 microM) also decreased tension; the maximum tension was reduced by 56.48 +/- 3.4% (P = 0.001, n = 4), and tension-time integral was reduced by 57.81 +/- 2.6% (P = 0.006, n = 4). This ACPA effect was not statistically significant with respect to the reduction in tension in slow muscle fibers. Moreover, we detected the presence of mRNA for the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor on fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers, which was significantly higher in fast compared to slow muscle fiber expression. In conclusion, our results suggest that in the slow and fast muscle fibers of the frog cannabinoids diminish caffeine-evoked tension through a receptor-mediated mechanism.

  6. Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Nicholas L; Banks, Glen B; Tsang, Mark; Margineantu, Daciana; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Chan, Jacky; Torres, Michelle; Liggitt, H Denny; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K; Hockenbery, David M; Raftery, Daniel; Iritani, Brian M

    2015-01-13

    Mammalian skeletal muscle is broadly characterized by the presence of two distinct categories of muscle fibers called type I "red" slow twitch and type II "white" fast twitch, which display marked differences in contraction strength, metabolic strategies, and susceptibility to fatigue. The relative representation of each fiber type can have major influences on susceptibility to obesity, diabetes, and muscular dystrophies. However, the molecular factors controlling fiber type specification remain incompletely defined. In this study, we describe the control of fiber type specification and susceptibility to metabolic disease by folliculin interacting protein-1 (Fnip1). Using Fnip1 null mice, we found that loss of Fnip1 increased the representation of type I fibers characterized by increased myoglobin, slow twitch markers [myosin heavy chain 7 (MyH7), succinate dehydrogenase, troponin I 1, troponin C1, troponin T1], capillary density, and mitochondria number. Cultured Fnip1-null muscle fibers had higher oxidative capacity, and isolated Fnip1-null skeletal muscles were more resistant to postcontraction fatigue relative to WT skeletal muscles. Biochemical analyses revealed increased activation of the metabolic sensor AMP kinase (AMPK), and increased expression of the AMPK-target and transcriptional coactivator PGC1α in Fnip1 null skeletal muscle. Genetic disruption of PGC1α rescued normal levels of type I fiber markers MyH7 and myoglobin in Fnip1-null mice. Remarkably, loss of Fnip1 profoundly mitigated muscle damage in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results indicate that Fnip1 controls skeletal muscle fiber type specification and warrant further study to determine whether inhibition of Fnip1 has therapeutic potential in muscular dystrophy diseases.

  7. Myosin types and fiber types in cardiac muscle. I. Ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Antisera against bovine atrial myosin were raised in rabbits, purified by affinity chromatography, and absorbed with insolubilized ventricular myosin. Specific anti-bovine atrial myosin (anti-bAm) antibodies reacted selectively with atrial myosin heavy chains, as determined by enzyme immunoassay combined with SDS-gel electrophoresis. In direct and indirect immunofluorescence assay, anti-bAm was found to stain all atrial muscle fibers and a minor proportion of ventricular muscle fibers in the right ventricle of the bovine heart. In contrast, almost all muscle fibers in the left ventricle were unreactive. Purkinje fibers showed variable reactivity. In the rabbit heart, all atrial muscle fibers were stained by anti-bAm, whereas ventricular fibers showed a variable response in both the right and left ventricle, with a tendency for reactive fibers to be more numerous in the right ventricle and in subepicardial regions. Diversification of fiber types with respect to anti-bAm reactivity was found to occur during late stages of postnatal development in the rabbit heart and to be influenced by thyroid hormone. All ventricular muscle fibers became strongly reactive after thyroxine treatment, whereas they became unreactive or poorly reactive after propylthiouracil treatment. These findings are consistent with the existence of different ventricular isomyosins whose relative proportions can vary according to the thyroid state. Variations in ventricular isomyosin composition can account for the changes in myosin Ca2+-activated ATPase activity previously observed in cardiac muscle from hyper- and hypothyroid animals and may be responsible for the changes in the velocity of contraction of ventricular myocardium that occur under these conditions. The differential distribution of ventricular isomyosins in the normal heart suggests that fiber types with different contractile properties may coexist in the ventricular myocardium. PMID:7009623

  8. Contractile properties of muscle fibers from the deep and superficial digital flexors of horses.

    PubMed

    Butcher, M T; Chase, P B; Hermanson, J W; Clark, A N; Brunet, N M; Bertram, J E A

    2010-10-01

    Equine digital flexor muscles have independent tendons but a nearly identical mechanical relationship to the main joint they act upon. Yet these muscles have remarkable diversity in architecture, ranging from long, unipennate fibers ("short" compartment of DDF) to very short, multipennate fibers (SDF). To investigate the functional relevance of the form of the digital flexor muscles, fiber contractile properties were analyzed in the context of architecture differences and in vivo function during locomotion. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fiber type was studied, and in vitro motility assays were used to measure actin filament sliding velocity (V(f)). Skinned fiber contractile properties [isometric tension (P(0)/CSA), velocity of unloaded shortening (V(US)), and force-Ca(2+) relationships] at both 10 and 30°C were characterized. Contractile properties were correlated with MHC isoform and their respective V(f). The DDF contained a higher percentage of MHC-2A fibers with myosin (heavy meromyosin) and V(f) that was twofold faster than SDF. At 30°C, P(0)/CSA was higher for DDF (103.5 ± 8.75 mN/mm(2)) than SDF fibers (81.8 ± 7.71 mN/mm(2)). Similarly, V(US) (pCa 5, 30°C) was faster for DDF (2.43 ± 0.53 FL/s) than SDF fibers (1.20 ± 0.22 FL/s). Active isometric tension increased with increasing Ca(2+) concentration, with maximal Ca(2+) activation at pCa 5 at each temperature in fibers from each muscle. In general, the collective properties of DDF and SDF were consistent with fiber MHC isoform composition, muscle architecture, and the respective functional roles of the two muscles in locomotion.

  9. A One-Step Immunostaining Method to Visualize Rodent Muscle Fiber Type within a Single Specimen

    PubMed Central

    Sawano, Shoko; Komiya, Yusuke; Ichitsubo, Riho; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Nakamura, Mako; Tatsumi, Ryuichi; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide; Mizunoya, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present a quadruple immunostaining method for rapid muscle fiber typing of mice and rats using antibodies specific to the adult myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms MyHC1, 2A, 2X, and 2B, which are common marker proteins of distinct muscle fiber types. We developed rat monoclonal antibodies specific to each MyHC isoform and conjugated these four antibodies to fluorophores with distinct excitation and emission wavelengths. By mixing the four types of conjugated antibodies, MyHC1, 2A, 2X, and 2B could be distinguished within a single specimen allowing for facile delineation of skeletal muscle fiber types. Furthermore, we could observe hybrid fibers expressing MyHC2X and MyHC2B together in single longitudinal muscle sections from mice and rats, that was not attained in previous techniques. This staining method is expected to be applied to study muscle fiber type transition in response to environmental factors, and to ultimately develop techniques to regulate animal muscle fiber types. PMID:27814384

  10. Mechanical and/or neural activity-dependent regulation of soleus muscle fibers of mdx mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Lan, Yong Bo; Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Wang, Xiao Dong; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2005-08-01

    Roles of mechanical and/or neural activity in the necrosis -regeneration cycle in the soleus muscle fibers of mdxmicewerestudied. Five-weeks-oldmalemdxand wild type (WT) mice were separated into tenotomy (T), denervation (D), and T+D groups. The distal tendons of the left plantarflexors (soleus, plantaris, and gastrocnemius) were ablated in the T group. The left sciatic nerve was transected at the gluteal region in the D group. The right limb was kept intact as the normal control. Ambulation was allowed after the surgery. Soleus muscle was sampled 14 days after the surgery and analyses were performed in cross-section of whole muscle and in single fibers removed longitudinally. The total fiber number of the untreated muscle was 913±19 (Mean±SEM) and 872±45 in WT and mdx mice, respectively. The fiber number in mdx mice was decreased 48% by T and 31-35% by D and T+D, which induced fiber atrophy, may be due to either inhibited regeneration or stimulated necrosis. Although fibers with central nuclei or necrosis were not observed in WT muscle, 25-40% of fibers (vs. 40% in the contralateral control side) in treated muscles of mdx mice, analyzed cross-sectionally, were central-nucleated. However, fibers with only central nuclei were not detected in the longitudinally isolated fibers of treated groups, may be due to the phenomenon that the fibers with necrosis were lost in the relaxing solution. But % fibers with both central and peripheral nuclei were decreased and those with peripheral nuclei alone were increased by T. In both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, the % distribution of the central-nucleated relative to total fiber number was not affected by D, but decreased by T in mdx mice (p>0.05). Myonuclear number per mm of fiber length was identical generally, although the number was increased by T. Furthermore, DNA fragmentation was noted in the mdx fibers with necrosis. These data suggested that the localization of myonuclei, as well as either necrosis or

  11. Dystrophic skeletal muscle fibers display alterations at the level of calcium microdomains

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Woods, Christopher E.; Capote, Joana; Vergara, Julio L.

    2008-01-01

    The spatiotemporal properties of the Ca2+-release process in skeletal muscle fibers from normal and mdx fibers were determined using the confocal-spot detection technique. The Ca2+ indicator OGB-5N was used to record action potential-evoked fluorescence signals at consecutive locations separated by 200 nm along multiple sarcomeres of FDB fibers loaded with 10- and 30-mM EGTA. Three-dimensional reconstructions of fluorescence transients demonstrated the existence of microdomains of increased fluorescence around the Ca2+-release sites in both mouse strains. The Ca2+ microdomains in mdx fibers were regularly spaced along the fiber axis, displaying a distribution similar to that seen in normal fibers. Nevertheless, both preparations differed in that in 10-mM EGTA Ca2+ microdomains had smaller amplitudes and were wider in mdx fibers than in controls. In addition, Ca2+-dependent fluorescence transients recorded at selected locations within the sarcomere of mdx muscle fibers were not only smaller, but also slower than their counterparts in normal fibers. Notably, differences in the spatial features of the Ca2+ microdomains recorded in mdx and normal fibers, but not in the amplitude and kinetics of the Ca2+ transients, were eliminated in 30-mM EGTA. Our results consistently demonstrate that Ca2+-release flux calculated from release sites in mdx fibers is uniformly impaired with respect to those normal fibers. The Ca2+-release reduction is consistent with that previously measured using global detection techniques. PMID:18787128

  12. Embryonic arsenic exposure reduces the number of muscle fibers in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Angela R; Gibson, Alec W; Bain, Lisa J

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a contaminant of drinking water and has been correlated with adverse developmental outcomes such as low birth weight, reduced weight gain, and altered locomotor activity. Previous research has shown that killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) exposed to high arsenic levels during embryogenesis had smaller muscle fiber diameters. The current study was designed to determine whether changes in muscle fibers persisted, were exacerbated, or resolved over time. Killifish embryos were exposed to 0-5 ppm arsenite and, upon hatching, were transferred into either clean water or continued receiving the same exposure to arsenic for up to 16 weeks. Arsenic significantly decreased the weight of both embryonic-only exposed juveniles and continuously exposed juveniles between 4 and 16 weeks of development at concentrations as low as 0.8 ppm. Although arsenite exposure increased the percentage of small diameter fibers during the early weeks, fiber diameters returned to control levels in the embryonic-only exposed fish. However, muscle fiber density was still reduced to 85.7%, 80.3%, and 73.8% of control for the 0.8, 2, and 5 ppm embryonic-only exposure groups, respectively, even after 16 weeks of development. These results indicate that while continuous exposure to arsenic may alter the size of muscle fibers, embryonic-only exposure to arsenic has lasting effects on the number of muscle fibers formed.

  13. MOUSE TRANSGENIC LINES THAT SELECTIVELY LABEL TYPE I, TYPE IIA AND TYPES IIX+B SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Chakkalakal, Joe V.; Kuang, Shihuan; Buffelli, Mario; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Sanes, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers vary in contractile and metabolic properties. Four main fiber types are present in mammalian trunk and limb muscles; they are called I, IIA, IIX and IIB, ranging from slowest- to fastest-contracting. Individual muscles contain stereotyped proportions of two or more fiber types. Fiber type is determined by a combination of nerve-dependent and –independent influences, leading to formation of “homogeneous motor units” in which all branches of a single motor neuron form synapses on fibers of a single type. Fiber type composition of muscles can be altered in adulthood by multiple factors including exercise, denervation, hormones and aging. To facilitate analysis of muscle development, plasticity and innervation, we generated transgenic mouse lines in which Type I, Type IIA, and Type IIX+B fibers can be selectively labeled with distinguishable fluorophores. We demonstrate their use for motor unit reconstruction and live imaging of nerve-dependent alterations in fiber type. PMID:21898764

  14. Immunohistochemical detection of interleukin-6 in human skeletal muscle fibers following exercise.

    PubMed

    Penkowa, Milena; Keller, Charlotte; Keller, Pernille; Jauffred, Sune; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2003-11-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is produced by many different cell types. Human skeletal muscles produce and release high amounts of IL-6 during exercise; however, the cell source of origin in the muscle is not known. Therefore, we studied the protein expression of IL-6 by immunohistochemistry in human muscle tissue from biopsies obtained at time points 0, 3, 4.5, 6, 9, and 24 h in relation to 3 h of bicycle exercise performed by healthy young males (n=12) and in resting controls (n=6). The IL-6 expression was clearly increased after exercise and remained high even by 24 h, relative to pre-exercise or resting individuals. The IL-6 immunostainings of skeletal muscle cells were homogeneous and without difference between muscle fiber types. The IL-6 mRNA peaked immediately after the exercise, and, in accordance, the IL-6 protein expression within muscle cells was most pronounced around 3 h post-exercise. However, the finding that plasma IL-6 concentration peaked in the end of exercise indicates a high turnover of muscle-derived IL-6. In conclusion, the finding of marked IL-6 protein expression exclusively within skeletal muscle fibers following exercise demonstrates that skeletal muscle fibers of all types are the dominant cell source of exercise-induced release of IL-6 from working muscle.

  15. Myosin content of individual human muscle fibers isolated by laser capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Stone, William L.; Howell, Mary E. A.; Brannon, Marianne F.; Hall, H. Kenton; Gibson, Andrew L.; Stone, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle fiber composition correlates with insulin resistance, and exercise training can increase slow-twitch (type I) fibers and, thereby, mitigate diabetes risk. Human skeletal muscle is made up of three distinct fiber types, but muscle contains many more isoforms of myosin heavy and light chains, which are coded by 15 and 11 different genes, respectively. Laser capture microdissection techniques allow assessment of mRNA and protein content in individual fibers. We found that specific human fiber types contain different mixtures of myosin heavy and light chains. Fast-twitch (type IIx) fibers consistently contained myosin heavy chains 1, 2, and 4 and myosin light chain 1. Type I fibers always contained myosin heavy chains 6 and 7 (MYH6 and MYH7) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), whereas MYH6, MYH7, and MYL3 were nearly absent from type IIx fibers. In contrast to cardiomyocytes, where MYH6 (also known as α-myosin heavy chain) is seen solely in fast-twitch cells, only slow-twitch fibers of skeletal muscle contained MYH6. Classical fast myosin heavy chains (MHC1, MHC2, and MHC4) were present in variable proportions in all fiber types, but significant MYH6 and MYH7 expression indicated slow-twitch phenotype, and the absence of these two isoforms determined a fast-twitch phenotype. The mixed myosin heavy and light chain content of type IIa fibers was consistent with its role as a transition between fast and slow phenotypes. These new observations suggest that the presence or absence of MYH6 and MYH7 proteins dictates the slow- or fast-twitch phenotype in skeletal muscle. PMID:26676053

  16. Contraction-induced injury to single permeabilized muscle fibers from normal and congenitally-clefted goat palates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine (LVP) muscle. It was determined that muscle fiber type, size, and sensitivity to contraction-induced injury was different between cleft palate ind...

  17. Effects of fiber type and diet on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times of skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mardini, I.A.; McCarter, R.J.; Fullerton, G.D.

    1986-03-01

    NMR studies of muscle have typically used muscles of mixed fiber composition and have not taken into account the metabolic state of the host. Samples of psoas (type IIB fibers) and soleus (type I fibers) muscles were obtained from 3 groups of rabbits: group C, fed regular chow; group DK fed a potassium deficient diet; and group HC fed a high cholesterol diet. The T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ relaxation times of psoas and soleus muscles were not significantly different for group C. Following dietary manipulation, (groups KD and HC), however, the relaxation times of the psoas and soleus muscles were significantly different. There was also a significant difference in water content of psoas muscles in groups KD and HC vs. group C but the observed differences in NMR results could be only partially accounted for by the shift in water content. The authors results suggest that (1) changes in ion or cholesterol concentration are capable of inducing changes in water bonding and structuring in muscle tissues; (2) diet must be added to the growing list of environmental factors that can cause NMR contrast changes; (3) selective use of muscles rich in one fiber type or another for NMR measurements could provide either control or diagnostic information, related to changes in body composition.

  18. Thyroid hormone regulates muscle fiber type conversion via miR-133a1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Duo; Wang, Xiaoyun; Li, Yuying; Zhao, Lei; Lu, Minghua; Yao, Xuan; Xia, Hongfeng; Wang, Yu-cheng; Liu, Mo-Fang; Jiang, Jingjing; Li, Xihua

    2014-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormone (TH) is a major determinant of muscle fiber composition, but the molecular mechanism by which it does so remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that miR-133a1 is a direct target gene of TH in muscle. Intriguingly, miR-133a, which is enriched in fast-twitch muscle, regulates slow-to-fast muscle fiber type conversion by targeting TEA domain family member 1 (TEAD1), a key regulator of slow muscle gene expression. Inhibition of miR-133a in vivo abrogated TH action on muscle fiber type conversion. Moreover, TEAD1 overexpression antagonized the effect of miR-133a as well as TH on muscle fiber type switch. Additionally, we demonstrate that TH negatively regulates the transcription of myosin heavy chain I indirectly via miR-133a/TEAD1. Collectively, we propose that TH inhibits the slow muscle phenotype through a novel epigenetic mechanism involving repression of TEAD1 expression via targeting by miR-133a1. This identification of a TH-regulated microRNA therefore sheds new light on how TH achieves its diverse biological activities. PMID:25512392

  19. Size and myonuclear domains in Rhesus soleus muscle fibers: short-term spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Talmadge, R. J.; Bodine, S. C.; Fanton, J. W.; Koslovskaya, I.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    The cross-sectional area (CSA), myonuclear number per mm of fiber length, and myonuclear domain (cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus) of mechanically isolated single fibers from biopsies of the soleus muscle of 5 vivarium control, 3 flight simulation and 2 flight (BION 11) Rhesus monkeys (Macaca [correction of Macacca] mulatta) were determined using confocal microscopy before and after a 14-day experimental period. Simulation monkeys were confined in chairs placed in capsules identical to those used during the flight. Fibers were classified as type I, type II or hybrid (containing both types I and II) based on myosin heavy chain (MHC) gel electrophoresis. A majority of the fibers sampled contained only type I MHC, i.e. 89, 62 and 68% for the control, simulation and flight groups, respectively. Most of the remaining fibers were hybrids, i.e. 8, 36 and 32% for the same groups. There were no significant pre-post differences in the fiber type composition for any of the experimental groups. There also were no significant pre-post differences in fiber CSA, myonuclear number or myonuclear domain. There was, however, a tendency for the fibers in the post-flight biopsies to have a smaller mean CSA and myonuclear domain (approximately 10%, p=0.07) than the fibers in the pre-flight biopsy. The combined mean cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus for all muscle fiber phenotypes in the Rhesus soleus muscle was approximately 25,000 micrometers3 and there were no differences in pre-post samples for the control and simulated groups. The cytoplasmic domains tended to be lower (p=0.08) after than before flight. No phenotype differences in cytoplasmic domains were observed. These data suggest that after a relatively short period of actual spaceflight, modest fiber atrophy occurs in the soleus muscle fibers without a concomitant change in myonuclear number.

  20. The Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Active Hyperemia: The Differential Role of Adenosine in Muscles of Varied Fiber Types

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-21

    0.2 Hz and three mnscles ~;timulated to contract at 0.4 Hz during BADA infuston. These m~tabolites were also mea~•1red in two muscles contractin ~ at...APR 1986 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Active Hyperemia: The Differential...Role of Adenosine in Muscles of Varied Fiber Types 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  1. Quantitative diffusion tensor MRI-based fiber tracking of human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Lansdown, Drew A; Ding, Zhaohua; Wadington, Megan; Hornberger, Jennifer L; Damon, Bruce M

    2007-08-01

    Diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) offers great potential for understanding structure-function relationships in human skeletal muscles. The purposes of this study were to demonstrate the feasibility of using in vivo human DT-MRI fiber tracking data for making pennation angle measurements and to test the hypothesis that heterogeneity in the orientation of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle's aponeurosis would lead to heterogeneity in pennation angle. Eight healthy subjects (5 male) were studied. T(1)-weighted anatomical MRI and DT-MRI data were acquired of the TA muscle. Fibers were tracked from the TA's aponeurosis by following the principal eigenvector. The orientations of the aponeurosis and muscle fiber tracts in the laboratory frame of reference and the orientation of the fiber tracts with respect to the aponeurosis [i.e., the pennation angle (theta)] were determined. The muscle fiber orientations, when expressed relative to the laboratory frame of reference, did not change as functions of superior-to-inferior position. The sagittal and coronal orientations of the aponeurosis did not change in practically significant manners either, but the aponeurosis' axial orientation changed by approximately 40 degrees . As a result, the mean value for theta decreased from 16.3 (SD 6.9) to 11.4 degrees (SD 5.0) along the muscle's superior-to-inferior direction. The mean value of theta was greater in the deep than in the superficial compartment. We conclude that pennation angle measurements of human muscle made using DT-MRI muscle fiber tracking are feasible and reveal that in the foot-head direction, there is heterogeneity in the pennation properties of the human TA muscle.

  2. A mathematical model of force transmission from intrafascicularly terminating muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Sharafi, Bahar; Blemker, Silvia S

    2011-07-28

    Many long skeletal muscles are comprised of fibers that terminate intrafascicularly. Force from terminating fibers can be transmitted through shear within the endomysium that surrounds fibers or through tension within the endomysium that extends from fibers to the tendon; however, it is unclear which pathway dominates in force transmission from terminating fibers. The purpose of this work was to develop mathematical models to (i) compare the efficacy of lateral (through shear) and longitudinal (through tension) force transmission in intrafascicularly terminating fibers, and (ii) determine how force transmission is affected by variations in the structure and properties of fibers and the endomysium. The models demonstrated that even though the amount of force that can be transmitted from an intrafascicularly terminating fiber is dependent on fiber resting length (the unstretched length at which passive stress is zero), endomysium shear modulus, and fiber volume fraction (the fraction of the muscle cross-sectional area that is occupied by fibers), fibers that have values of resting length, shear modulus, and volume fraction within physiologic ranges can transmit nearly all of their peak isometric force laterally through shearing of the endomysium. By contrast, the models predicted only limited force transmission ability through tension within the endomysium that extends from the fiber to the tendon. Moreover, when fiber volume fraction decreases to unhealthy ranges (less than 50%), the force-transmitting potential of terminating fibers through shearing of the endomysium decreases significantly. The models presented here support the hypothesis that lateral force transmission through shearing of the endomysium is an effective mode of force transmission in terminating fibers.

  3. Fiber type composition of the muscle responsible for throat fan extension in green anole lizards.

    PubMed

    Rosen, G J; O'Bryant, E L; Swender, D; Wade, J

    2004-01-01

    Throat fan (dewlap) extension is sexually dimorphic in green anole lizards (Anolis carolinensis). Males have larger dewlaps which they display more frequently than females. Correlated with the behavior, sexual dimorphisms occur in the skeletal, muscular and neural structures responsible for dewlap extension in green anoles. We used histochemical techniques to stain for myosin ATPase and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) to determine whether sex differences also exist in fiber type composition of the ceratohyoideus, the muscle that extends the dewlap. Based on the staining pattern for the two enzymes, four fiber types were identified: fast-oxidative-glycolytic (FOG), fast-glycolytic (FG), slow-oxidative (SO), and tonic. In the ceratohyoideus of both sexes, the predominate fiber types were FOG (approximately 43%) and FG (approximately 34%). Also in both males and females, the FOG and FG fibers had approximately twice the cross-sectional area of the SO and tonic fibers. No sex differences occurred in the percentages of FOG and FG fibers. However, males had a greater percentage of tonic fibers than females, whereas females had a greater percentage of SO fibers than males. The high proportion of FOG fibers in the anole ceratohyoideus makes it similar to other relatively fatigue-resistant muscles used in movements of moderate speed and duration. Although the precise role of tonic fibers in dewlap extension is not known, the greater percentage of these fibers in the male ceratohyoideus might be required to stabilize or maintain extension of the large dewlap apparatus in males.

  4. Multiple isoforms of myofibrillar proteins in crustacean muscle: evidence for two slow fiber types

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Four distinct patterns of myofibrillar proteins, extracted from fast and slow muscles of the lobster, Homarus americanus, are distinguished by different assemblages of regulatory and contractile protein variants. Multiple isoforms of troponin-T, -I, and -C, paramyosin, and myosin light chains occur in six muscles of the claws and abdomen. Analysis of glycerinated fibers from the claws of lobster and land crab, Gecarcinus lateralis, show that more than one isoform is expressed in a single fiber, forming unique assemblages by which subgroups can be discriminated within the broader categories of fast and slow fibers. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Nuclear receptor/microRNA circuitry links muscle fiber type to energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhenji; Rumsey, John; Hazen, Bethany C; Lai, Ling; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Xie, Hui; Conley, Kevin E; Auwerx, Johan; Smith, Steven R; Olson, Eric N; Kralli, Anastasia; Kelly, Daniel P

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the coordinate regulation of the metabolic and structural programs controlling muscle fitness and endurance are unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ was shown to activate muscle endurance programs in transgenic mice. In contrast, muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of the related nuclear receptor, PPARα, results in reduced capacity for endurance exercise. We took advantage of the divergent actions of PPARβ/δ and PPARα to explore the downstream regulatory circuitry that orchestrates the programs linking muscle fiber type with energy metabolism. Our results indicate that, in addition to the well-established role in transcriptional control of muscle metabolic genes, PPARβ/δ and PPARα participate in programs that exert opposing actions upon the type I fiber program through a distinct muscle microRNA (miRNA) network, dependent on the actions of another nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ). Gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies in mice, together with assessment of muscle biopsies from humans, demonstrated that type I muscle fiber proportion is increased via the stimulatory actions of ERRγ on the expression of miR-499 and miR-208b. This nuclear receptor/miRNA regulatory circuit shows promise for the identification of therapeutic targets aimed at maintaining muscle fitness in a variety of chronic disease states, such as obesity, skeletal myopathies, and heart failure.

  6. Muscle fibers in the central nervous system of nemerteans: spatial organization and functional role.

    PubMed

    Petrov, A A; Zaitseva, O V

    2012-08-01

    The system of muscle fibers associated with the brain and lateral nerve cords is present in all major groups of enoplan nemerteans. Unfortunately, very little is known about the functional role and spatial arrangement of these muscles of the central nervous system. This article examines the architecture of the musculature of the central nervous system in two species of monostiliferous nemerteans (Emplectonema gracile and Tetrastemma cf. candidum) using phalloidin staining and confocal microscopy. The article also briefly discusses the body-wall musculature and the muscles of the cephalic region. In both species, the lateral nerve cords possess two pairs of cardinal muscles that run the length of the nerve cords and pass through the ventral cerebral ganglia. A system of peripheral muscles forms a meshwork around the lateral nerve cords in E. gracile. The actin-rich processes that ramify within the nerve cords in E. gracile (transverse fibers) might represent a separate population of glia-like cells or sarcoplasmic projections of the peripheral muscles of the central nervous system. The lateral nerve cords in T. cf. candidum lack peripheral muscles but have muscles similar in their position and orientation to the transverse fibers. The musculature of the central nervous system is hypothesized to function as a support system for the lateral nerve cords and brain, preventing rupturing and herniation of the nervous tissue during locomotion. The occurrence of muscles of the central nervous system in nemerteans and other groups and their possible relevance in taxonomy are discussed.

  7. Fiber size and myosin phenotypes of selected rhesus lower limb muscles after a 14-day spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bodine, S. C.; Pierotti, D. J.; Talmadge, R. J.; Barkhoudarian, G.; Kim, J.; Fanton, J. W.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle biopsies were taken from the rhesus (Macaca mulatta) soleus (Sol, a slow ankle extensor), medial gastrocnemius (MG, a fast ankle extensor), tibialis anterior (TA, a fast ankle flexor), and vastus lateralis (VL, a fast knee extensor) muscles in vivarium controls (n=5) before and after either a 14-day spaceflight (Bion 11, n=2) or a 14-day ground-based flight simulation (n=3). Myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition (gel electrophoresis), fiber type distribution (immunohistochemistry), and fiber size were determined. Although there were no significant changes, each muscle showed trends towards adaptation.

  8. Comparison of Characteristics of Myosin Heavy Chain-based Fiber and Meat Quality among Four Bovine Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gap-Don; Yang, Han-Sul; Jeong, Jin-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Muscle fiber characteristics account for meat quality and muscle fibers are mainly classified into three or more types according to their contractile and metabolic properties. However, the majority of previous studies on bovine skeletal muscle are based on myosin ATPase activity. In the present study, the differences in the characteristics of muscle fibers classified by the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) among four bovine skeletal muscles such as longissimus thoracis (LT), psoas major (PM), semimembranosus (SM) and semitendinosus (ST) and their relationships to beef quality were investigated. MHCs 2x, 2a and slow were identified by LC-MS/MS and IIX, IIA and I fiber types were classified. PM, which had the smallest size and highest density of fibers regardless of type, showed the highest myoglobin content, CIE L*, a*, b* and sarcomere length (p<0.05), whereas ST with the highest composition of IIX, showed high shear force and low sarcomere length (p<0.05). The correlation coefficients between muscle fiber characteristics and meat quality showed that type IIX is closely related to poor beef quality and that a high density of small-sized fibers is related to redness and tenderness. Therefore, the differences in meat quality between muscles can be explained by the differences in muscle fiber characteristics, and especially, the muscles with good quality are composed of more small-sized fibers regardless of fiber type. PMID:28115894

  9. Contractile function of single muscle fibers after hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardetto, P. R.; Schluter, J. M.; Fitts, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of two weeks of hind-limb suspension (HS) on the functional properties of slow-twitch and fast-twitch single fibers isolated from the predominantly slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch gastrocnemius of the suspended leg of rats were investigated. Single fibers were suspended between a motor arm and force transducer, and, after their functional properties were studied, the fiber type was established by the myosin heavy chain analysis. It was found that, after HS, the greatest decrease in diameter and a reduction in peak tension occurred in slow-twitch fibers from soleus, followed by slow-twitch fibers from gastrocnemius. Fast-twitch fibers from the red gastrocnemius showed a significant reduction in diameter but no change in peak tension. No effect of HS was observed on the diameter of the fast-twitch fibers from the white gastsrocnemius (which is known to contain 87 percent fast glycolytic fibers).

  10. Pubovisceralis Muscle Fiber Architecture Determination: Comparison Between Biomechanical Modeling and Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Sofia; Parente, Marco; Silva, Elisabete; Da Roza, Thuane; Mascarenhas, Teresa; Leitão, João; Cunha, João; Natal Jorge, Renato; Nunes, Rita Gouveia

    2017-01-17

    Biomechanical analysis of pelvic floor dysfunction requires knowledge of certain biomechanical parameters, such as muscle fiber direction, in order to adequately model function. Magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides an estimate of overall muscle fiber directionality based on the mathematical description of water diffusivity. This work aimed at evaluating the concurrence between pubovisceralis muscle fiber representations obtained from DTI, and the maximum principal stress lines obtained through the finite element method. Seven datasets from axial T2-weighted images were used to build numerical models, and muscle fiber orientation estimated from the DT images. The in-plane projections of the first eigenvector of both vector fields describing muscle fiber orientation were extracted and compared. The directional consistency was evaluated by calculating the angle between the normalized vectors for the entire muscle and also for the right and left insertions, middle portions, and anorectal area. The values varied between 28° ± 6 (right middle portion) and 34° ± 9 (anorectal area), and were higher than the angular precision of the DT estimates, evaluated using wild bootstrapping analysis. Angular dispersion ranged from 17° ± 4 (left middle portion) to 23° ± 5 (anorectal area). Further studies are needed to examine acceptability of these differences when integrating the vectors estimated from DTI in the numerical analysis.

  11. Spaceflight and growth effects on muscle fibers in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodine-Fowler, Sue C.; Roy, Roland R.; Rudolph, William; Haque, Naz; Kozlovskaia, Inessa B.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of a 14-day spaceflight onboard Cosmos 2044 on selected morphological and metabolic properties of single muscle fibers was investigated in a nonhuman primate, Macaca mulatta. It is concluded that the 14-day spaceflight had little impact on fiber size in the soleus (S) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles, whereas it appeared to be a slight decrease in sized in the tibialis anterior (TA). The mean fiber size in the postflight biopsies increased relative to preflight values. The mean fiber succinate dehydrogenase activity was found to decrease in the MG, whereas there was no apparent effect of spaceflight on the s and ta muscles. The differences in response of the S, MG, and TA to spaceflight in monkeys vs rats may be related to a species responsiveness to spaceflight, the manner in which the animals were restrained, and/or the possibility that the ankle musculature was able to function against a load while in space.

  12. The role of nitric oxide in muscle fibers with oxidative phosphorylation defects

    SciTech Connect

    Tengan, Celia H. . E-mail: chtengan@neuro.epm.br; Kiyomoto, Beatriz H.; Godinho, Rosely O.; Gamba, Juliana; Neves, Afonso C.; Schmidt, Beny; Oliveira, Acary S.B.; Gabbai, Alberto A.

    2007-08-03

    NO has been pointed as an important player in the control of mitochondrial respiration, especially because of its inhibitory effect on cytochrome c oxidase (COX). However, all the events involved in this control are still not completely elucidated. We demonstrate compartmentalized abnormalities on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity on muscle biopsies of patients with mitochondrial diseases. NOS activity was reduced in the sarcoplasmic compartment in COX deficient fibers, whereas increased activity was found in the sarcolemma of fibers with mitochondrial proliferation. We observed increased expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) in patients and a correlation between nNOS expression and mitochondrial content. Treatment of skeletal muscle culture with an NO donor induced an increase in mitochondrial content. Our results indicate specific roles of NO in compensatory mechanisms of muscle fibers with mitochondrial deficiency and suggest the participation of nNOS in the signaling process of mitochondrial proliferation in human skeletal muscle.

  13. Measurement of the Impedance of Frog Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Valdiosera, R.; Clausen, C.; Eisenberg, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Impedance measurements are necessary to determine the passive electrical properties of cells including the equivalent circuits of the several pathways for current flow. Such measurements are usually made with microelectrodes of high impedance (some 15 MΩ) over a wide frequency range (1-10,000 Hz) and so are subject to many errors. An input amplifier has been developed which has negligible phase shift in this frequency range because it uses negative feedback to keep tiny the voltage on top of the microelectrode. An important source of artifact is the extracellular potential produced by capacitive current flow through the wall of the microelectrodes and the effective resistance of the bathing solution. This artifact is reduced some 10 times by shielding the current microelectrode with a conductive paint. The residual artifact is analyzed, measured, and subtracted from our results. The interelectrode coupling capacitance is reduced below 2 × 10-17 F and can be neglected. Phase and amplitude measurements are made with phase-sensitive detectors insensitive to noise. The entire apparatus is calibrated at different signal to noise ratios and the nature of the extracellular potential is investigated. The phase shift in the last 5-20 μm of the microelectrode tip is shown to be small and quite independent of frequency under several conditions. Experimental measurements of the phase characteristic of muscle fibers in normal Ringer are presented. The improvements in apparatus and the physiological significance of impedance measurements are discussed. It is suggested that the interpretation of impedance measurements is sensitive to small errors and so it is necessary to present objective evidence of the reliability of one's apparatus and measurements. PMID:4857358

  14. In Vivo Microscopy Reveals Extensive Embedding of Capillaries within the Sarcolemma of Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, Brian; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Dao, Lam; Bakalar, Matthew; French, Stephanie; Chess, David J.; Taylor, Joni L.; Picard, Martin; Aponte, Angel; Daniels, Mathew P.; Esfahani, Shervin; Cushman, Samuel; Balaban, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide insight into mitochondrial function in vivo, we evaluated the 3D spatial relationship between capillaries, mitochondria, and muscle fibers in live mice. Methods 3D volumes of in vivo murine Tibialis anterior muscles were imaged by multi-photon microscopy (MPM). Muscle fiber type, mitochondrial distribution, number of capillaries, and capillary-to-fiber contact were assessed. The role of myoglobin-facilitated diffusion was examined in myoglobin knockout mice. Distribution of GLUT4 was also evaluated in the context of the capillary and mitochondrial network. Results MPM revealed that 43.6 ± 3.3% of oxidative fiber capillaries had ≥ 50% of their circumference embedded in a groove in the sarcolemma, in vivo. Embedded capillaries were tightly associated with dense mitochondrial populations lateral to capillary grooves and nearly absent below the groove. Mitochondrial distribution, number of embedded capillaries, and capillary-to-fiber contact were proportional to fiber oxidative capacity and unaffected by myoglobin knockout. GLUT4 did not preferentially localize to embedded capillaries. Conclusions Embedding capillaries in the sarcolemma may provide a regulatory mechanism to optimize delivery of oxygen to heterogeneous groups of muscle fibers. We hypothesize that mitochondria locate to paravascular regions due to myofibril voids created by embedded capillaries, not to enhance the delivery of oxygen to the mitochondria. PMID:25279425

  15. Maximal sprint speeds and muscle fiber composition of wild and laboratory house mice.

    PubMed

    Garland, T; Gleeson, T T; Aronovitz, B A; Richardson, C S; Dohm, M R

    1995-11-01

    We compared males from four groups of house mice (Mus domesticus), all bred and raised under common conditions in the laboratory: randombred Hsd:ICR; a wild population from Wisconsin; hybrids from lab dams; hybrids from wild dams. Wild mice were much faster sprinters (maximal forced sprint speeds over 1.0 m ranged from 2.38 to 3.34 m/s) than were lab mice (range = 0.89-1.68 m/s). Hybrids exhibited intermediate speeds (range = 1.54-2.70 m/s) and body masses, indicating largely additive inheritance. Type-specific mean muscle fiber cross-sectional areas of the gastrocnemius muscle did not differ significantly among groups. Percentage cross-sectional areas occupied by each of the three identified fiber types also did not differ significantly among groups, nor did they covary with body mass. For their body mass, however, lab mice had smaller gastrocnemius muscles than did wild and hybrid mice, which had muscles of similar size. Although we cannot rule out the possibility that smaller gastrocnemius muscles or slight differences in fiber composition account for the lower sprint speeds of the lab mice, we suggest that differences in unmeasured physiological, behavioral or motivational factors are probably the primary cause. This interpretation is supported by a lack of correlation between individual differences in sprint speed and either relative gastrocnemius muscle mass or muscle fiber type composition.

  16. Novel demonstration of amyloid-β oligomers in sporadic inclusion-body myositis muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Nogalska, Anna; D'Agostino, Carla; Engel, W King; Klein, William L; Askanas, Valerie

    2010-11-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) within muscle fibers has been considered an upstream step in the development of the s-IBM pathologic phenotype. Aβ42, which is considered more cytotoxic than Aβ40 and has a higher propensity to oligomerize, is preferentially increased in s-IBM muscle fibers. In Alzheimer disease (AD), low-molecular weight Aβ oligomers and toxic oligomers, also referred to as "Aβ-Derived Diffusible Ligands" (ADDLs), are considered strongly cytotoxic and proposed to play an important pathogenic role. ADDLs have been shown to be increased in AD brain. We now report for the first time that in s-IBM muscle biopsies Aβ-dimer, -trimer, and -tetramer are identifiable by immunoblots. While all the s-IBM samples we studied had Aβ-oligomers, their molecular weights and intensity varied between the patient samples. None of the control muscle biopsies had Aβ oligomers. Dot-immunoblots using highly specific anti-ADDL monoclonal antibodies also showed highly increased ADDLs in all s-IBM biopsies studied, while controls were negative. By immunofluorescence, in some of the abnormal s-IBM muscle fibers ADDLs were accumulated in the form of plaque-like inclusions, and were often increased diffusely in very small fibers. Normal and disease-controls were negative. By gold-immuno-electron microscopy, ADDL-immunoreactivities were in close proximity to 6-10 nm amyloid-like fibrils, and also were immunodecorating amorphous and floccular material. In cultured human muscle fibers, we found that inhibition of autophagy led to the accumulation of Aβ oligomers. This novel demonstration of Aβ42 oligomers in s-IBM muscle biopsy provides additional evidence that intra-muscle fiber accumulation of Aβ42 oligomers in s-IBM may contribute importantly to s-IBM pathogenic cascade.

  17. Adaptation of fibers in fast-twitch muscles of rats to spaceflight and hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bian; Ohira, Yoshi; Roy, Roland R.; Nguyen, Quyet; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Oganov, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The adaptation of single fibers in medial gastrocnemius (MG), a fast-twitch extensor, and in tibialis anterior (TA), a fast-twitch flexor, was studied after 14 days of spaceflight onboard Cosmos 2044 or hindlimb suspension. Quantitative myosin ATPase activities of single fibers were measured in flight and suspended rats. Each of the enzyme and size measurements were directly correlated within each fiber with respect to its qualitative myosin ATPase staining properties and its expression of fast, slow, or both myosin heavy chains (MHC). The percentage of slow- and fast-twitch fibers of the MG and TA were found to be unchanged. Mean fiber size of all fibers was unaffected after flight or suspension. The ATPase activity in the MG was higher in flight than in control or suspended rats. In comparison to Cosmos 1887 spaceflight, the adaptations in the muscle fibers of the MG were more moderate.

  18. Clustering of the human skeletal muscle fibers using linear programming and angular Hilbertian metrics.

    PubMed

    Neji, Radhouène; Besbes, Ahmed; Komodakis, Nikos; Deux, Jean-François; Maatouk, Mezri; Rahmouni, Alain; Bassez, Guillaume; Fleury, Gilles; Paragios, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a manifold clustering method fo the classification of fibers obtained from diffusion tensor images (DTI) of the human skeletal muscle. Using a linear programming formulation of prototype-based clustering, we propose a novel fiber classification algorithm over manifolds that circumvents the necessity to embed the data in low dimensional spaces and determines automatically the number of clusters. Furthermore, we propose the use of angular Hilbertian metrics between multivariate normal distributions to define a family of distances between tensors that we generalize to fibers. These metrics are used to approximate the geodesic distances over the fiber manifold. We also discuss the case where only geodesic distances to a reduced set of landmark fibers are available. The experimental validation of the method is done using a manually annotated significant dataset of DTI of the calf muscle for healthy and diseased subjects.

  19. Altered distribution of mitochondria in rat soleus muscle fibers after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Gordon J.; Martin, Thomas P.; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Oganov, V. S.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of an exposure to microgravity on the distribution of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity throughout the soleus muscle fibers was investigated by measuring SDH activity throughout the cross section of 20-30 fibers each of the slow-twitch oxidative and fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic types of fibers in rats exposed to 12.5 days in space aboard Cosmos 1887. It was found that, after the spaceflight, the entire regional distribution of SDH activity was significantly altered (as compared to ground controls) in the slow-twitch oxidative fibers, whereas the fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic fibers from muscles of flown rats exhibited a significantly lower SDH activity only in their subsarcolemmal region.

  20. Mitochondrial specialization revealed by single muscle fiber proteomics: focus on the Krebs cycle.

    PubMed

    Schiaffino, S; Reggiani, C; Kostrominova, T Y; Mann, M; Murgia, M

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a highly sensitive mass spectrometry-based proteomic workflow to examine the proteome of single muscle fibers. This study revealed significant differences in the mitochondrial proteome of the four major fiber types present in mouse skeletal muscle. Here, we focus on Krebs cycle enzymes and in particular on the differential distribution of the two mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenases, IDH2 and IDH3. Type 1/slow fibers contain high levels of IDH2 and relatively low levels of IDH3, whereas fast 2X and 2B fibers show an opposite expression pattern. The findings suggest that in skeletal muscle, IDH2 functions in the forward direction of the Krebs cycle and that substrate flux along the cycle occurs predominantly via IDH2 in type 1 fibers and via IDH3 in 2X and 2B fibers. IDH2-mediated conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate leads to the generation of NADPH, which is critical to buffering the H2O2 produced by the respiratory chain. Nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT), the other major mitochondrial enzyme involved in NADPH generation, is also more abundant in type 1 fibers. We suggest that the continuously active type 1 fibers are endowed with a more efficient H2O2 scavenging capacity to cope with the higher levels of reactive oxygen species production.

  1. Skeletal muscle fiber analysis by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging at high mass and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Garrett, Timothy J; Carter, Christy S; Spengler, Bernhard; Yost, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous muscle fibers with various fiber types. These fibers can be classified into different classes based on their different characteristics. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has been applied to study and visualize different metabolomics profiles of different fiber types. Here, skeletal muscles were analyzed by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe MALDI-MSI at high spatial and high mass resolution.

  2. Sphingomyelinase depresses force and calcium sensitivity of the contractile apparatus in mouse diaphragm muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Moylan, Jennifer S.; Stasko, Shawn; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Campbell, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Diseases that result in muscle weakness, e.g., heart failure, are characterized by elevated sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity. In intact muscle, SMase increases oxidants that contribute to diminished muscle force. However, the source of oxidants, specific processes of muscle contraction that are dysfunctional, and biochemical changes underlying the weakness elicited by SMase remain unknown. We tested three hypotheses: 1) SMase-induced depression of muscle force is mediated by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), 2) SMase depresses force and calcium sensitivity of the contractile apparatus, and 3) SMase promotes oxidation and phosphorylation of myofibrillar proteins. Our experiments included intact muscle bundles, permeabilized single fibers, and isolated myofibrillar proteins. The mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant d-Arg-2′,6′-dimethyl-Tyr-Lys-Phe-NH2, decreased cytosolic oxidants and protected intact muscle bundles from weakness stimulated by SMase. SMase depressed maximal calcium-activated force by 20% in permeabilized single fibers (in kN/m2: control 117 ± 6; SMase 93 ± 8; P < 0.05). Calcium sensitivity of permeabilized single fibers decreased from 5.98 ± 0.03 (control) to 5.91 ± 0.02 (SMase; P < 0.05). Myofibrillar protein nitrotyrosines, carbonyls, and phosphorylation were unaltered by SMase. Our study shows that the fall in specific force of intact muscle elicited by SMase is mediated by mitochondrial ROS and can be attributed largely to dysfunction of the contractile apparatus. PMID:22362402

  3. Effects of disuse by limb immobilization on different muscle fiber types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Seider, M. J.; Hugman, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of disuse by limb immobilization on different muscle fiber types are reviewed. It is demonstrated that many changes occurring in atrophying skeletal muscles of young rats can be explained by the duration of the half-lives of muscle proteins. Differences are found to exist in responses of fast- and slow-twitch muscles due to disuse atrophy, and the appearance of plasticity in skeletal muscle begins to occur very soon after changes in the level of contractile activity. Rates of protein degradation increase in slow-twitch muscles at rapidly growing rates after approximately one day of limb immobilization; however, no change in the rates of protein degradation is noted in fast-twitch muscles of young rats.

  4. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 ablation in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles reduces angiogenesis resulting in impaired growth of regenerated muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daigo; Nakamura, Akinori; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2011-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of endopeptidases classified into subgroups based on substrate preference in normal physiological processes such as embryonic development and tissue remodeling, as well as in various disease processes via degradation of extracellular matrix components. Among the MMPs, MMP-9 and MMP-2 have been reported to be up-regulated in skeletal muscles in the lethal X-linked muscle disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by loss of dystrophin. A recent study showed that deletion of the MMP9 gene in mdx, a mouse model for DMD, improved skeletal muscle pathology and function; however, the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle is not well known. In this study, we aimed at verifying the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle by using mdx mice with genetic ablation of MMP-2 (mdx/MMP-2(-/-)). We found impairment of regenerated muscle fiber growth with reduction of angiogenesis in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), an important angiogenesis-related factor, decreased in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. MMP-2 had not a critical role in the degradation of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) components such as β-dystroglycan and β-sarcoglycan in the regeneration process of the dystrophic muscle. Accordingly, MMP-2 may be essential for growth of regenerated muscle fibers through VEGF-associated angiogenesis in the dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

  5. Muscle cell membranes from early degeneration muscle cell fibers in Solenopsis are leaky to lanthanum: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.G.; Davis, W.L.

    1985-06-01

    Lanthanum infusion techniques, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis were utilized to compare the permeability of muscle cell membranes from normal and degenerating muscle fibers of Solenopsis spp. In normal fibers, the electron-dense tracer was limited to components of the sarcotubular system. However, the insemination-induced degeneration of muscle fibers was characterized by the presence of an electron-dense precipitate within the myofibrils and mitochondria as well as in the extramyofibrillar spaces. The electron-dense material was subsequently identified by elemental analysis to be lanthanum. Such data indicate that one of the earliest stages of muscle degeneration involves an alteration in cell membrane permeability.

  6. Heat accumulation effects in short-pulse multi-pass cutting of carbon fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Freitag, C.; Komlenok, M. S.; Onuseit, V.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.; Konov, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    The formation of a matrix evaporation zone (MEZ) in carbon fiber reinforced plastics during multi-pass laser cutting with picosecond laser pulses is studied for a wide range of pulse frequencies (fp = 10-800 kHz) and feed rates (vf = 0.002-10 m/s). Three regimes of the formation of the MEZ are found and related with different heat accumulation effects: (i) small MEZ (<2 μm) with negligible heat accumulation, (ii) moderate-size MEZ (up to a few hundred microns) determined by heat accumulation between pulses, and (iii) large MEZ (up to a few millimeters) caused by heat accumulation between scans. The dependence of the size of the MEZ on the number of scans and the scan frequency was studied to distinguish the two heat accumulation effects (between pulses and between scans), which occur on different time-scales. A diagram to illustrate the boundaries between the three regimes of the formation of the MEZ as a function of feed rate and pulse frequency is proposed as a promising base for further studies and as a useful tool to optimize the processing parameters in practice.

  7. Fiber polymorphism in skeletal muscles of the American lobster, Homarus americanus: continuum between slow-twitch (S1) and slow-tonic (S2) fibers.

    PubMed

    Medler, Scott; Lilley, Travis; Mykles, Donald L

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of studies has reported the existence of single fibers expressing more than one myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform at the level of fiber proteins and/or mRNA. These mixed phenotype fibers, often termed hybrid fibers, are currently being recognized as the predominant fiber type in many muscles, and the implications of these findings are currently a topic of great interest. In a recent study, we reported single fibers from the cutter claw closer muscle of lobsters that demonstrated a gradation between the slow-twitch (S1) and slow-tonic (S2) muscle phenotype. In the present study, we focused on S1 and S2 fibers from the superficial abdominal muscles of the lobster as a model to study the continuum among muscle fiber types. Complementary DNAs (cDNA) encoding an S2 isoform of myosin heavy chain (MHC) and an S2 isoform of tropomyosin (Tm) were isolated from the superficial abdominal flexor muscles of adult lobsters. These identified sequences were used to design PCR primers used in conjunction with RT-PCR and real-time PCR to measure expression levels of these genes in small muscle samples and single fibers. The relative expression of the corresponding S1 MHC and S1 Tm isoforms was measured in the same samples with PCR primers designed according to previously identified sequences. In addition, we measured the relative proportions of MHC, troponin (Tn) T and I protein isoforms present in the same samples to examine the correlation of these proteins with one another and with the MHC and Tm mRNAs. These analyses revealed significant correlations among the different myofibrillar proteins, with the S1 and S2 fibers being characterized by a whole assemblage of myofibrillar isoforms. However, they also showed that small muscle samples, and more importantly single fibers, existed as a continuum from one phenotype to another. Most fibers possessed mixtures of mRNA for MHC isoforms that were unexpected based on protein analysis. These findings

  8. Magnetic field of a single muscle fiber. First measurements and a core conductor model.

    PubMed Central

    van Egeraat, J M; Friedman, R N; Wikswo, J P

    1990-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the magnetic field from a single muscle fiber of the frog gastrocnemius, obtained by using a toroidal pickup coil coupled to a room-temperature, low-noise amplifier. The axial currents associated with the magnetic fields of single fibers were biphasic and had peak-to-peak amplitudes ranging between 50 and 100 nA, depending primarily on the fiber radius. With an intracellular microelectrode, we measured the action potential of the same fiber, which allowed us to determine that the intracellular conductivity of the muscle fiber in the core conductor approximation was 0.20 +/- 0.09 S/m. Similarly, we found that the effective membrane capacitance was 0.030 +/- 0.011 F/m2. These results were not significantly affected by the anisotropic conductivity of the muscle bundle. We demonstrate how our magnetic technique can be used to determine the transmembrane action potential without penetrating the membrane with a microelectrode, thereby offering a reliable, stable, and atraumatic method for studying contracting muscle fibers. PMID:2306511

  9. From Slow to Fast: Hypogravity-Induced Remodeling of Muscle Fiber Myosin Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shenkman, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle consists of different fiber types arranged in a mosaic pattern. These fiber types are characterized by specific functional properties. Slow-type fibers demonstrate a high level of fatigue resistance and prolonged contraction duration, but decreased maximum contraction force and velocity. Fast-type fibers demonstrate high contraction force and velocity, but profound fatigability. During the last decades, it has been discovered that all these properties are determined by the predominance of slow or fast myosin-heavy-chain (MyHC) isoforms. It was observed that gravitational unloading during space missions and simulated microgravity in ground-based experiments leads to the transformation of some slow-twitch muscle fibers into fast-twitch ones due to changes in the patterns of MyHC gene expression in the postural soleus muscle. The present review covers the facts and mechanistic speculations regarding myosin phenotype remodeling under conditions of gravitational unloading. The review considers the neuronal mechanisms of muscle fiber control and molecular mechanisms of regulation of myosin gene expression, such as inhibition of the calcineurin/NFATc1 signaling pathway, epigenomic changes, and the behavior of specific microRNAs. In the final portion of the review, we discuss the adaptive role of myosin phenotype transformations. PMID:28050266

  10. Association of blood glucose, blood lactate, serum cortisol levels, muscle metabolites, muscle fiber type composition, and pork quality traits.

    PubMed

    Choe, J H; Kim, B C

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of blood glucose levels with blood lactate, serum cortisol levels, postmortem muscle glycogen and lactate content, muscle fiber type composition, and pork quality traits. Compared to pigs with lower blood glucose levels, pigs with higher blood glucose levels showed higher blood lactate and serum cortisol levels at exsanguination, and they had lower residual glycogen and higher lactate content in the muscle at 45min postmortem. In addition, pigs with higher blood glucose levels had higher type IIB and lower type I area composition and finally exhibited lower muscle pH, paler color, and excessive loss of fluid on surface. These results imply that measuring blood glucose levels at exsanguination can be useful to indicate early glycolytic rates during postmortem and thus may be of value in the identification of pork with undesirable quality traits.

  11. Electrotonic Interaction between Muscle Fibers in the Rabbit Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Tille, J.

    1966-01-01

    Transmembrane potentials were recorded simultaneously from pairs of ventricular fibers in an isolated, regularly beating preparation. A double-barrelled microelectrode was used to record the potentials from, and to polarize, one fiber. A single microelectrode was used to record from a distant fiber. The existence of two systems of fibers, termed P and V, was confirmed. Histological evidence for the existence of two types of fibers is also presented. Electrotonic current spread was observed within both systems, electrotonic interaction between the two systems was rare and always weak. In the case of those pairs of fibers showing electrotonic interaction, the distance for an e-fold decrease in magnitude of the electrotonic potentials was found to be from 300 to 600 µ in P fibers and from 100 to 300 µ in V fibers. However, no electrotonic interaction could be observed in the majority of V fiber pairs. Moreover, the magnitude of the electrotonic potential did not decay monotonically with distance in any one direction. It is concluded that the rabbit ventricle cannot be regarded as a single freely interconnected syncytium. PMID:5971027

  12. Denervation produces different single fiber phenotypes in fast- and slow-twitch hindlimb muscles of the rat.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M F; Stephenson, G M M; Stephenson, D G

    2006-09-01

    Using a single, mechanically skinned fiber approach, we tested the hypothesis that denervation (0 to 50 days) of skeletal muscles that do not overlap in fiber type composition [extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles of Long-Evans hooded rats] leads to development of different fiber phenotypes. Denervation (50 day) was accompanied by 1) a marked increase in the proportion of hybrid IIB/D fibers (EDL) and I/IIA fibers (SOL) from 30% to >75% in both muscles, and a corresponding decrease in the proportion of pure fibers expressing only one myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform; 2) complex muscle- and fiber-type specific changes in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-loading level at physiological pCa approximately 7.1, with EDL fibers displaying more consistent changes than SOL fibers; 3) decrease by approximately 50% in specific force of all fiber types; 4) decrease in sensitivity to Ca(2+), particularly for SOL fibers (by approximately 40%); 5) decrease in the maximum steepness of the force-pCa curves, particularly for the hybrid I/IIA SOL fibers (by approximately 35%); and 6) increased occurrence of biphasic behavior with respect to Sr(2+) activation in SOL fibers, indicating the presence of both slow and fast troponin C isoforms. No fiber types common to the two muscles were detected at any time points (day 7, 21, and 50) after denervation. The results provide strong evidence that not only neural factors, but also the intrinsic properties of a muscle fiber, influence the structural and functional properties of a particular muscle cell and explain important functional changes induced by denervation at both whole muscle and single cell levels.

  13. Spaceflight effects on single skeletal muscle fiber function in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Desplanches, D.; Romatowski, J. G.; Widrick, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to understand how 14 days of weightlessness alters the cellular properties of individual slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibers in the rhesus monkey. The diameter of the soleus (Sol) type I, medial gastrocnemius (MG) type I, and MG type II fibers from the vivarium controls averaged 60 +/- 1, 46 +/- 2, and 59 +/- 2 microm, respectively. Both a control 1-G capsule sit (CS) and spaceflight (SF) significantly reduced the Sol type I fiber diameter (20 and 13%, respectively) and peak force, with the latter declining from 0.48 +/- 0.01 to 0.31 +/- 0.02 (CS group) and 0.32 +/- 0.01 mN (SF group). When the peak force was expressed as kiloNewtons per square meter (kN/m(2)), only the SF group showed a significant decline. This group also showed a significant 15% drop in peak fiber stiffness that suggests that fewer cross bridges were contracting in parallel. In the MG, SF but not CS depressed the type I fiber diameter and force. Additionally, SF significantly depressed absolute (mN) and relative (kN/m(2)) force in the fast-twitch MG fibers by 30% and 28%, respectively. The Ca(2+) sensitivity of the type I fiber (Sol and MG) was significantly reduced by growth but unaltered by SF. Flight had no significant effect on the mean maximal fiber shortening velocity in any fiber type or muscle. The post-SF Sol type I fibers showed a reduced peak power and, at peak power, an elevated velocity and decreased force. In conclusion, CS and SF caused atrophy and a reduced force and power in the Sol type I fiber. However, only SF elicited atrophy and reduced force (mN) in the MG type I fiber and a decline in relative force (kN/m(2)) in the Sol type I and MG type II fibers.

  14. Effects of fiber type on force depression after active shortening in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Joumaa, V; Power, G A; Hisey, B; Caicedo, A; Stutz, J; Herzog, W

    2015-07-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate force depression in Type I and Type II muscle fibers. Experiments were performed using skinned fibers from rabbit soleus and psoas muscles. Force depression was quantified after active fiber shortening from an average sarcomere length (SL) of 3.2µ m to an average SL of 2.6 µm at an absolute speed of 0.115f iber length/s and at a relative speed corresponding to 17% of the unloaded shortening velocity (V0) in each type of fibers. Force decay and mechanical work during shortening were also compared between fiber types. After mechanical testing, each fiber was subjected to myosin heavy chain (MHC) analysis in order to confirm its type (Type I expressing MHC I, and Type II expressing MHC IId). Type II fibers showed greater steady-state force depression after active shortening at a speed of 0.115 fiber length/s than Type I fibers (14.5±1.5% versus 7.8±1.7%). Moreover, at this absolute shortening speed, Type I fibers showed a significantly greater rate of force decay during shortening and produced less mechanical work than Type II fibers. When active shortening was performed at the same relative speed (17% V0), the difference in force depression between fiber types was abolished. These results suggest that no intrinsic differences were at the origin of the disparate force depressions observed in Type I and Type II fibers when actively shortened at the same absolute speed, but rather their distinct force-velocity relationships.

  15. Size and metabolic properties of fibers in rat fast-twitch muscles after hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Roland R.; Bello, Maureen A.; Bouissou, Phillip; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb suspension (HS) on single fibers of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were studied in rats. Fiber area and the activities of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) were determined in tissue sections using an image analysis system. After 28 days of HS, the MG atrophied 28 percent, whereas the TA weight was maintained. Both dark- and light-ATPase fibers in the deep region of the MG had decreased cross-sectional areas following HS, with the atrophic response being twice as great in the light-ATPase fibers than in the dark-ATPase fibers. Following HS, mean SDH activities of both fiber types were significantly lower in the MG and TA than in the CON; by contrast, mean GPD activities were either maintained at the CON level or were higher in both MG and TA muscles. The data suggest an independence of the mechanisms determining the muscle fiber size and the metabolic adaptations associated with HS.

  16. Bion 11 Spaceflight Project: Effect of Weightlessness on Single Muscle Fiber Function in Rhesus Monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, Robert H.; Romatowski, Janell G.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; DeLaCruz, Lourdes

    1999-01-01

    Although it is well known that microgravity induces considerable limb muscle atrophy, little is known about how weightlessness alters cell function. In this study, we investigated how weightlessness altered the functional properties of single fast and slow striated muscle fibers. Physiological studies were carried out to test the hypothesis that microgravity causes fiber atrophy, a decreased peak force (Newtons), tension (Newtons/cross-sectional area) and power, an elevated peak rate of tension development (dp/dt), and an increased maximal shortening velocity (V(sub o)) in the slow type I fiber, while changes in the fast-twitch fiber are restricted to atrophy and a reduced peak force. For each fiber, we determined the peak force (P(sub o)), V(sub o), dp/dt, the force-velocity relationship, peak power, the power-force relationship, the force-pCa relationship, and fiber stiffness. Biochemical studies were carried out to assess the effects of weightlessness on the enzyme and substrate profile of the fast- and slow-twitch fibers. We predicted that microgravity would increase resting muscle glycogen and glycolytic metabolism in the slow fiber type, while the fast-twitch fiber enzyme profile would be unaltered. The increased muscle glycogen would in part result from an elevated hexokinase and glycogen synthase. The enzymes selected for study represent markers for mitochondrial function (citrate synthase and 0-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase), glycolysis (Phosphofructokinase and lactate dehydrogenase), and fatty acid transport (Carnitine acetyl transferase). The substrates analyzed will include glycogen, lactate, adenosine triphosphate, and phosphocreatine.

  17. Velocity, force, power, and Ca2+ sensitivity of fast and slow monkey skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Bodine, S. C.; Romatowski, J. G.; Widrick, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we determined the contractile properties of single chemically skinned fibers prepared from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (Sol) muscles of adult male rhesus monkeys and assessed the effects of the spaceflight living facility known as the experiment support primate facility (ESOP). Muscle biopsies were obtained 4 wk before and immediately after an 18-day ESOP sit, and fiber type was determined by immunohistochemical techniques. The MG slow type I fiber was significantly smaller than the MG type II, Sol type I, and Sol type II fibers. The ESOP sit caused a significant reduction in the diameter of type I and type I/II (hybrid) fibers of Sol and MG type II and hybrid fibers but no shift in fiber type distribution. Single-fiber peak force (mN and kN/m2) was similar between fiber types and was not significantly different from values previously reported for other species. The ESOP sit significantly reduced the force (mN) of Sol type I and MG type II fibers. This decline was entirely explained by the atrophy of these fiber types because the force per cross-sectional area (kN/m2) was not altered. Peak power of Sol and MG fast type II fiber was 5 and 8.5 times that of slow type I fiber, respectively. The ESOP sit reduced peak power by 25 and 18% in Sol type I and MG type II fibers, respectively, and, for the former fiber type, shifted the force-pCa relationship to the right, increasing the Ca2+ activation threshold and the free Ca2+ concentration, eliciting half-maximal activation. The ESOP sit had no effect on the maximal shortening velocity (Vo) of any fiber type. Vo of the hybrid fibers was only slightly higher than that of slow type I fibers. This result supports the hypothesis that in hybrid fibers the slow myosin heavy chain would be expected to have a disproportionately greater influence on Vo.

  18. AHNAK1 and AHNAK2 are costameric proteins: AHNAK1 affects transverse skeletal muscle fiber stiffness

    SciTech Connect

    Marg, Andreas; Haase, Hannelore; Neumann, Tanja; Kouno, Michiyoshi; Morano, Ingo

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} AHNAK1 and AHNAK2 are costameric proteins. {yields} Intact membrane repair in AHNAK1-deficient mice. {yields} AHNAK1{sup -/-} single fibers have a higher transverse stiffness. -- Abstract: The AHNAK scaffold PDZ-protein family is implicated in various cellular processes including membrane repair; however, AHNAK function and subcellular localization in skeletal muscle are unclear. We used specific AHNAK1 and AHNAK2 antibodies to analyzed the detailed localization of both proteins in mouse skeletal muscle. Co-localization of AHNAK1 and AHNAK2 with vinculin clearly demonstrates that both proteins are components of the costameric network. In contrast, no AHNAK expression was detected in the T-tubule system. A laser wounding assay with AHNAK1-deficient fibers suggests that AHNAK1 is not involved in membrane repair. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we observed a significantly higher transverse stiffness of AHNAK1{sup -/-} fibers. These findings suggest novel functions of AHNAK proteins in skeletal muscle.

  19. Expansion of revertant fibers in dystrophic mdx muscles reflects activity of muscle precursor cells and serves as an index of muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Toshifumi; Lu, Qi-Long; Morgan, Jennifer E; Davies, Kay E; Fisher, Rosie; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Partridge, Terence A

    2006-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse myopathies reflect a lack of dystrophin in muscles. However, both contain sporadic clusters of revertant fibers (RFs) that express dystrophin. RF clusters expand in size with age in mdx mice. To test the hypothesis that the expansion of clusters is achieved through the process of muscle degeneration and regeneration, we analyzed muscles of mdx mice in which degeneration and regeneration were inhibited by the expression of micro-dystrophins or utrophin transgenes. Postnatal RF expansion was diminished in direct correlation to the protective effect of the transgene expression. Similarly, expansion of RFs was inhibited when muscle regeneration was blocked by irradiation. However, in irradiated muscles, irradiation-tolerant quiescent muscle precursor cells reactivated by notexin effectively restored RF expansion. Our observations demonstrate that revertant events occur initially within a subset of muscle precursor cells. The proliferation of these cells, as part of the regeneration process, leads to the expansion of RF clusters within degenerating muscles. This expansion of revertant clusters depicts the cumulative history of regeneration, thus providing a useful index for functional evaluation of therapies that counteract muscle degeneration.

  20. Correlation between histochemically assessed fiber type distribution and isomyosin and myosin heavy chain content in porcine skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Bee, G; Solomon, M B; Czerwinski, S M; Long, C; Pursel, V G

    1999-08-01

    Highly sensitive enzyme assays developed to differentiate skeletal muscle fibers allow the recognition of three main fiber types: slow-twitch oxidative (SO), fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG), and fast-twitch glycolytic (FG). Myosin, the predominant contractile protein in mammalian skeletal muscle, can be separated based on the electrophoretic mobility under nondissociating conditions into SM2, SM1, IM, FM3, and FM2 isoforms, or under dissociating conditions into myosin heavy chain (MHC) I, IIb, IIx/d, and IIa. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the histochemical method of differentiation of fiber types is consistent with the electrophoretically identified isomyosin and MHC isoforms. These comparisons were made using serratus ventralis (SV), gluteus medius (GM), and longissimus muscles (LM) from 13 pigs. Two calculation methods for the histochemical assessed fiber type distribution were adopted. The first method incorporated the number of fibers counted for each fiber type and calculated a percentage of the total fiber number (fiber number percentage: FNP). The second method expressed the cross-sectional area of each fiber type as a percentage of the total fiber area measured per muscle (fiber area percentage: FAP). Independent of the calculation methods, correlation analyses revealed in all muscles a strong relation between SO fibers, the slow isomyosin (SM1 and SM2), and MHCI, as well as between the FG fibers, the fast isomyosin (FM3 and FM2), and MHCIIx/b content (P<.05). There were no correlations between FOG fiber population assessed by histochemical analysis and intermediate isoform (IM) or MHCIIa content. The present results did not provide conclusive evidence as to which of the calculation methods (FNP or FAP) was more closely related to myosin composition of skeletal muscles. Despite some incompatibility between the methods, the present study shows that histochemical as well as electrophoretic analyses yielded important

  1. ATP consumption and efficiency of human single muscle fibers with different myosin isoform composition.

    PubMed Central

    He, Z H; Bottinelli, R; Pellegrino, M A; Ferenczi, M A; Reggiani, C

    2000-01-01

    Chemomechanical transduction was studied in single fibers isolated from human skeletal muscle containing different myosin isoforms. Permeabilized fibers were activated by laser-pulse photolytic release of 1.5 mM ATP from p(3)-1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethylester of ATP. The ATP hydrolysis rate in the muscle fibers was determined with a fluorescently labeled phosphate-binding protein. The effects of varying load and shortening velocity during contraction were investigated. The myosin isoform composition was determined in each fiber by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. At 12 degrees C large variations (three- to fourfold) were found between slow and fast (2A and 2A-2B) fibers in their maximum shortening velocity, peak power output, velocity at which peak power is produced, isometric ATPase activity, and tension cost. Isometric tension was similar in all fiber groups. The ATP consumption rate increased during shortening in proportion to shortening velocity. At 12 degrees C the maximum efficiency was similar (0.21-0.27) for all fiber types and was reached at a higher speed of shortening for the faster fibers. In all fibers, peak efficiency increased to approximately 0.4 when the temperature was raised from 12 degrees C to 20 degrees C. The results were simulated with a kinetic scheme describing the ATPase cycle, in which the rate constant controlling ADP release is sensitive to the load on the muscle. The main difference between slow and fast fibers was reproduced by increasing the rate constant for the hydrolysis step, which was rate limiting at low loads. Simulation of the effect of increasing temperature required an increase in the force per cross-bridge and an acceleration of the rate constants in the reaction pathway. PMID:10920025

  2. IP3-dependent, post-tetanic calcium transients induced by electrostimulation of adult skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Mariana; Figueroa, Reinaldo; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Escobar, Matías; Molgó, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    Tetanic electrical stimulation induces two separate calcium signals in rat skeletal myotubes, a fast one, dependent on Cav 1.1 or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors and related to contraction, and a slow signal, dependent on DHPR and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and related to transcriptional events. We searched for slow calcium signals in adult muscle fibers using isolated adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers from 5–7-wk-old mice, loaded with fluo-3. When stimulated with trains of 0.3-ms pulses at various frequencies, cells responded with a fast calcium signal associated with muscle contraction, followed by a slower signal similar to one previously described in cultured myotubes. Nifedipine inhibited the slow signal more effectively than the fast one, suggesting a role for DHPR in its onset. The IP3R inhibitors Xestospongin B or C (5 µM) also inhibited it. The amplitude of post-tetanic calcium transients depends on both tetanus frequency and duration, having a maximum at 10–20 Hz. At this stimulation frequency, an increase of the slow isoform of troponin I mRNA was detected, while the fast isoform of this gene was inhibited. All three IP3R isoforms were present in adult muscle. IP3R-1 was differentially expressed in different types of muscle fibers, being higher in a subset of fast-type fibers. Interestingly, isolated fibers from the slow soleus muscle did not reveal the slow calcium signal induced by electrical stimulus. These results support the idea that IP3R-dependent slow calcium signals may be characteristic of distinct types of muscle fibers and may participate in the activation of specific transcriptional programs of slow and fast phenotype. PMID:20837675

  3. Fundamental Studies of Fiber-Guided Soft Tissue Cutting by Means of Pulsed Midinfrared Lasers and their Application in Ureterotomy.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, R; Knipper, A; Dro Ge, G; Schro Er, F; Gromoll, B; Birngruber, R

    1998-01-01

    Fiber-guided ablation of soft tissue with pulsed holmium and thulium lasers was investigated for intraluminal incisions. A bare fiber/tissue-contact application system with a nearly tangential irradiation geometry was first used in vitro on porcine ureter tissue. The efficiency and precision of the method was analyzed for different laser and application parameters. The ablation dynamics in water and tissue was investigated by fast flash photography. Uniform cuts could be achieved with 200- and 318-μm fibers using a free-running holmium laser with a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz and an average power of up to 4 W. The depth of the cuts could be increased by using a thulium laser with the same laser parameters. By reducing the pulse duration by one order of magnitude, the quality of the incisions was made more irregular, the zone of thermomechanical damage increased, and the cuts became deeper owing to the growing influence of cavitation on shorter laser pulse durations. In a first clinical trial, 20 patients underwent holmium laser therapy to reopen ureteral strictures. Neither bleeding nor other adverse effects due to the laser treatment occurred, showing IR laser ureterotomy to be a suitable and promising minimally invasive technique. © 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  4. Comparison of Muscle Fiber and Meat Quality Characteristics in Different Japanese Quail Lines

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Y. M.; Hwang, S.; Lee, K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the growth performance, fiber characteristics of the pectoralis major muscle, and meat quality characteristics in the heavy weight (HW) and random bred control (RBC) quail lines and genders. The HW male exhibited more than two times greater body (245.7 vs 96.1 g, p<0.05) and pectoralis major muscle (PMW; 37.1 vs 11.1 g, p<0.05) weights compared to the RBC female. This growth performance in the HW line was associated with a greater muscle fiber area (1,502 vs 663.0 μm2, p<0.001) compared to the RBC line. Greater muscle mass of the HW male was accompanied by a higher percentage of type IIB fiber compared to the HW female (64.0% vs 51.0%, p<0.05). However, muscle fiber hyperplasia (increase in fiber number) has had a somewhat limited effect on PMW between the two lines. On the other hand, the HW line harboring a higher proportion of type IIB fiber showed rapid pH decline at the early postmortem period (6.23 vs 6.41, p<0.05) and lighter meat surface (53.5 vs 47.3, p<0.05) compared to the RBC line harboring a lower proportion of type IIB fiber. There were no significant differences observed in the measurement of water-holding capacity including drip loss (2.74% vs 3.07%, p>0.05) and cooking loss (21.9% vs 20.4%, p>0.05) between the HW and RBC lines. Therefore, the HW quail line developed by selection from the RBC quail, was slightly different in the meat quality characteristics compared to the RBC line, and a marked difference was found in growth performance between the two quail lines. PMID:27383804

  5. Hierarchically buckled sheath-core fibers for superelastic electronics, sensors, and muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. F.; Fang, S.; Moura, F. A.; Ding, J. N.; Jiang, N.; Di, J.; Zhang, M.; Lepró, X.; Galvão, D. S.; Haines, C. S.; Yuan, N. Y.; Yin, S. G.; Lee, D. W.; Wang, R.; Wang, H. Y.; Lv, W.; Dong, C.; Zhang, R. C.; Chen, M. J.; Yin, Q.; Chong, Y. T.; Zhang, R.; Wang, X.; Lima, M. D.; Ovalle-Robles, R.; Qian, D.; Lu, H.; Baughman, R. H.

    2015-07-01

    Superelastic conducting fibers with improved properties and functionalities are needed for diverse applications. Here we report the fabrication of highly stretchable (up to 1320%) sheath-core conducting fibers created by wrapping carbon nanotube sheets oriented in the fiber direction on stretched rubber fiber cores. The resulting structure exhibited distinct short- and long-period sheath buckling that occurred reversibly out of phase in the axial and belt directions, enabling a resistance change of less than 5% for a 1000% stretch. By including other rubber and carbon nanotube sheath layers, we demonstrated strain sensors generating an 860% capacitance change and electrically powered torsional muscles operating reversibly by a coupled tension-to-torsion actuation mechanism. Using theory, we quantitatively explain the complementary effects of an increase in muscle length and a large positive Poisson’s ratio on torsional actuation and electronic properties.

  6. STRETCHY ELECTRONICS. Hierarchically buckled sheath-core fibers for superelastic electronics, sensors, and muscles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z F; Fang, S; Moura, F A; Ding, J N; Jiang, N; Di, J; Zhang, M; Lepró, X; Galvão, D S; Haines, C S; Yuan, N Y; Yin, S G; Lee, D W; Wang, R; Wang, H Y; Lv, W; Dong, C; Zhang, R C; Chen, M J; Yin, Q; Chong, Y T; Zhang, R; Wang, X; Lima, M D; Ovalle-Robles, R; Qian, D; Lu, H; Baughman, R H

    2015-07-24

    Superelastic conducting fibers with improved properties and functionalities are needed for diverse applications. Here we report the fabrication of highly stretchable (up to 1320%) sheath-core conducting fibers created by wrapping carbon nanotube sheets oriented in the fiber direction on stretched rubber fiber cores. The resulting structure exhibited distinct short- and long-period sheath buckling that occurred reversibly out of phase in the axial and belt directions, enabling a resistance change of less than 5% for a 1000% stretch. By including other rubber and carbon nanotube sheath layers, we demonstrated strain sensors generating an 860% capacitance change and electrically powered torsional muscles operating reversibly by a coupled tension-to-torsion actuation mechanism. Using theory, we quantitatively explain the complementary effects of an increase in muscle length and a large positive Poisson's ratio on torsional actuation and electronic properties.

  7. De novo synthesis of adenine nucleotides in different skeletal muscle fiber types

    SciTech Connect

    Tullson, P.C.; John-Alder, H.B.; Hood, D.A.; Terjung, R.L.

    1988-09-01

    Management of adenine nucleotide catabolism differs among skeletal muscle fiber types. This study evaluated whether there are corresponding differences in the rates of de novo synthesis of adenine nucleotide among fiber type sections of skeletal muscle using an isolated perfused rat hindquarter preparation. Label incorporation into adenine nucleotides from the (1-14C)glycine precursor was determined and used to calculate synthesis rates based on the intracellular glycine specific radioactivity. Results show that intracellular glycine is closely related to the direct precursor pool. Rates of de novo synthesis were highest in fast-twitch red muscle (57.0 +/- 4.0, 58.2 +/- 4.4 nmol.h-1.g-1; deep red gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis), relatively high in slow-twitch red muscle (47.0 +/- 3.1; soleus), and low in fast-twitch white muscle (26.1 +/- 2.0 and 21.6 +/- 2.3; superficial white gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis). Rates for four mixed muscles were intermediate, ranging between 32.3 and 37.3. Specific de novo synthesis rates exhibited a strong correlation (r = 0.986) with muscle section citrate synthase activity. Turnover rates (de novo synthesis rate/adenine nucleotide pool size) were highest in high oxidative muscle (0.82-1.06%/h), lowest in low oxidative muscle (0.30-0.35%/h), and intermediate in mixed muscle (0.44-0.55%/h). Our results demonstrate that differences in adenine nucleotide management among fiber types extends to the process of de novo adenine nucleotide synthesis.

  8. Myosin types and fiber types in cardiac muscle. II. Atrial myocardium

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies were produced against myosins isolated from the left atrial myocardium (anti-bAm) and the left ventricular myocardium (anti-bVm) of the bovine heart. Cross-reactive antibodies were removed by cross- absorption. Absorbed anti-bAm and anti-bVm were specific for the myosin heavy chains when tested by enzyme immunoassay combined with SDS gel electrophoresis. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to determine the reactivity of atrial muscle fibers to the two antibodies. Three populations of atrial muscle fibers were distinguished in the bovine heart: (a) fibers reactive with anti-bAm and unreactive with anti-bVm, like most fibers in the left atrium; (b) fibers reactive with both antibodies, especially numerous in the right atrium; (c) fibers reactive with anti-bVm and unreactive with anti-bAm, present only in the interatrial septum and in specific regions of the right atrium, such as the crista terminalis. These findings can be accounted for by postulating the existence of two distinct types of atrial myosin heavy chains, one of which is antigenically related to ventricular myosin. The tendency for fibers labeled by anti-bVm to occur frequently in bundles and their preferential distribution in the crista terminalis, namely along one of the main conduction pathways between the sinus node and the atrioventricular node, and in the interatrial septum, where different internodal tracts are known to converge, suggests that these fibers may be specialized for faster conduction. PMID:6218175

  9. Intramembranous charge movement in frog cut twitch fibers mounted in a double vaseline-gap chamber

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Intramembranous charge movement was measured in cut twitch fibers mounted in a double Vaseline-gap chamber with either a tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA.Cl) or a TEA2.SO4 solution (13-14 degrees C) in the central pool. Charge vs. voltage data were fitted by a single two-state Boltzmann distribution function. The average values of V (the voltage at which steady-state charge is equally distributed between the two Boltzmann states), k (the voltage dependence factor), and qmax/cm (the maximum charge divided by the linear capacitance, both per unit length of fiber) were V = -53.3 mV (SEM, 1.1 mV), k = 6.3 mV (SEM, 0.3 mV), qmax/cm = 18.0 nC/microF (SEM, 1.1 nC/microF) in the TEA.Cl solution; and V = -35.1 mV (SEM, 1.8 mV), k = 10.5 mV (SEM, 0.9 mV), qmax/cm = 36.3 nC/microF (SEM, 3.2 nC/microF) in the TEA2.SO4 solution. These values of k are smaller than those previously reported for cut twitch fibers and are as small as those reported for intact fibers. If a correction is made for the contributions of currents from under the Vaseline seals, V = -51.2 mV (SEM, 1.1 mV), k = 7.2 mV (SEM, 0.4 mV), qmax/cm = 22.9 nC/microF (SEM, 1.4 nC/microF) in the TEA.Cl solution; and V = -34.0 mV (SEM, 1.9 mV), k = 10.1 mV (SEM, 1.1 mV), qmax/cm = 38.8 nC/microF (SEM, 3.2 nC/microF) in the TEA2.SO4 solution. With this correction, however, the fit of the theoretical curve to the data is poor. A good fit with this correction can be obtained with a sum of two Boltzmann distribution functions. The first has average values V = -33.0 mV (SEM, 2.8 mV), k = 11.0 mV (SEM, 0.5 mV), qmax/cm = 10.6 nC/microF (SEM, 1.0 nC/microF) in the TEA.Cl solution; and V = - 20.0 mV (SEM, 3.3 mV), k = 17.0 mV (SEM, 2.0 mV), qmax/cm = 36.4 nC/microF (SEM, 2.3 nC/microF) in the TEA2.SO4 solution. The second has average values V = -56.5 mV (SEM, 1.3 mV), k = 2.9 mV (SEM, 0.4 mV), qmax/cm = 13.2 nC/microF (SEM, 1.0 nC/microF) in the TEA.Cl solution; and V = -41.6 mV (SEM, 1.4 mV), k = 2.5 mV (SEM, 0.8 mV), qmax

  10. Measurement of sarcomere shortening in skinned fibers from frog muscle by white light diffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Y E

    1987-01-01

    A new optical-electronic method has been developed to detect striation spacing of single muscle fibers. The technique avoids Bragg-angle and interference-fringe effects associated with laser light diffraction by using polychromatic (white) light. The light is diffracted once by an acousto-optical device and then diffracted again by the muscle fiber. The double diffraction reverses the chromatic dispersion normally obtained with polychromatic light. In frog skinned muscle fibers, active and passive sarcomere shortening were smooth when observed by white light diffraction, whereas steps and pauses occurred in the striation spacing signals obtained with laser illumination. During active contractions skinned fibers shortened at high rates (3-5 microns/s per half sarcomere, 0-5 degrees C) at loads below 5% of isometric tension. Compression of the myofibrillar lateral filament spacing using osmotic agents reduced the shortening velocity at low loads. A hypothesis is presented that high shortening velocities are observed with skinned muscle fibers because the cross-bridges cannot support compressive loads when the filament lattice is swollen. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:3496924

  11. Effect of extracellular potassium accumulation on muscle fiber conduction velocity: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Emma; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2009-10-01

    A progressive reduction in muscle fiber conduction velocity is typically observed during fatiguing muscle contraction. Although the exact causes of the conduction velocity decrease have not yet been fully established, increasing evidence suggests that changes in extracellular potassium concentration may be largely responsible. In this study, a mathematical model was developed to examine the effect of extracellular potassium concentration on the muscle fiber action potential and conduction velocity. The model was used to simulate changes in extracellular potassium concentration at a range of temperatures and extracellular potassium accumulation during repetitive stimulation of the muscle fiber at 37 degrees C. The action potential broadened, and its amplitude and conduction velocity decreased as extracellular potassium concentration increased. The potassium-induced changes in action potential shape and conduction velocity were eliminated when the inward rectifier channels were removed from the model. The results support the hypothesis that accumulation of extracellular potassium ions may be a major contributor to the reduction in muscle fiber conduction velocity and loss of membrane excitability during fatiguing contractions. They additionally suggest that inward rectifier currents play a critical role in potassium-induced membrane depolarization, leading to increased sodium inactivation and resulting in the observed reduction in conduction velocity and membrane excitability.

  12. Myosin flares and actin leptomeres as myofibril assembly/disassembly intermediates in sonic muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Nahirney, Patrick C; Fischman, Donald A; Wang, Kuan

    2006-04-01

    The sonic muscle of type 1 male midshipman fish produces loud and enduring mating calls. Each sonic muscle fiber contains a tubular contractile apparatus with radially arranged myofibrillar plates encased in a desmin-rich cytoskeleton that is anchored to broad Z bands (approximately 1.2 micro m wide). Immunomicroscopy has revealed patches of myosin-rich "flares" emanating from the contractile tubes into the peripheral sarcoplasm along the length of the fibers. These flares contain swirls of thick filaments devoid of associated thin filaments. In other regions of the sarcoplasm at the inner surface of the sarcolemma and near Z bands, abundant ladder-like leptomeres occur with rungs every 160 nm. Leptomeres consist of dense arrays of filaments (approximately 4 nm) with a structure that resembles myofibrillar Z band structure. We propose that flares and leptomeres are distinct filamentous arrays representing site-specific processing of myofibrillar components during the assembly and disassembly of the sarcomere. Recent reports that myosin assembles into filamentous aggregates before incorporating into the A band in the skeletal muscles of vertebrates and Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that sonic fibers utilize a similar pathway. Thus, sonic muscle fibers, with their tubular design and abundant sarcoplasmic space, may provide an attractive muscle model to identify myofibrillar intermediates by structural and molecular techniques.

  13. Reduction of type IIb myosin and IIB fibers in tibialis anterior muscle of mini-muscle mice from high-activity lines.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Geneviève M; Guderley, Helga; Joanisse, Denis R; Garland, Theodore

    2009-03-01

    Selective breeding of laboratory house mice (Mus domesticus) for high voluntary wheel running has generated four replicate lines that show an almost threefold increase in daily wheel-running distances as compared with four nonselected control lines. An unusual hindlimb "mini-muscle" phenotype (small muscles, increased mitochondrial enzyme levels, disorganized fiber distribution) has increased in frequency in two of the four replicate selected lines. The gene of major effect that accounts for this phenotype is an autosomal recessive that has been mapped to a 2.6335 Mb interval on MMU11, but not yet identified. This study examined the tibialis anterior muscle to determine whether changes in muscle fiber types could explain such modifications in muscle size and properties. Although selected and control lines did not exhibit systematic differences in the fiber types present in the tibialis anterior muscle, as assessed by electrophoresis of myosin heavy chains (MHC) and by histochemistry, mini-muscle mice lacked type IIB fibers and the corresponding MHCs. Mini-muscle tibialis show increased activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase compared with the normally sized muscles, likely the result of the modified fiber types in the muscle. The mini-muscle phenotype is the major means through which selective breeding for high wheel running has modified the functional capacities of the hindlimb muscles, as normally sized tibialis anterior muscles from control and selected lines did not show general differences in their enzymatic capacities, MHC profiles or fiber type composition, with the exception of an elevated hexokinase activity and a reduced GPa activity in the selected lines.

  14. Eccentric contraction-induced injury to type I, IIa, and IIa/IIx muscle fibers of elderly adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscles of old laboratory rodents experience exaggerated force losses after eccentric contractile activity. We extended this line of inquiry to humans and investigated the influence of fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform content on the injury process. Skinned muscle fiber segments, prepared from ...

  15. Identification and quantification in single muscle fibers of four isoforms of parvalbumin in the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Simonides, W S; van Hardeveld, C

    1989-10-05

    The major parvalbumins present in the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis were identified and the total parvalbumin content of different types of single fibers of this muscle was determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). The criteria used in the identification of proteins as parvalbumins were: a relative molecular mass (Mr) between 10,000 and 14,000, an isoelectric point (pI) between 4.0 and 5.0, and a Ca2+-dependent mobility when run on a polyacrylamide gel in the absence of SDS. Four proteins were thus identified as parvalbumins: PA1, Mr 14,000, pI 4.90; PA2, Mr 11,000, pI 4.90; PA3, Mr 11,000, pI 4.95; and PA4, Mr 11,000, pI 4.25. An ultraviolet absorbance spectrum characteristic of parvalbumins was recorded for a purified preparation of these four proteins. Because the apparent Mr of rabbit parvalbumin in the gel system used was 14,000, whereas the true value is 12,100, it is not excluded that the Mr of component PA1 of 14,000 is an overestimation. The total parvalbumin content of muscles and single muscle fibers was determined using the supernatant obtained after centrifugation of tissue homogenates. Analysis of the protein pattern after electrophoresis in the presence of SDS of this fraction indicated that the Mr 14,000 and 11,000 protein bands contained virtually only parvalbumin. Quantification of the total parvalbumin content of relatively fast (type 1) and slow (type 2) contracting and relaxing single muscle fibers, using laser densitometric analysis of minigels, yielded mean values (mg protein/g wet wt., +/- S.D.) of 5.2 +/- 0.8 for nine type 1 fibers, and 1.9 +/- 1.0 for five type 2 fibers. Both fiber types contained about 2.5-times as much of the Mr 14,000 isoform relative to the combined Mr 11,000 isoforms.

  16. Extraction and functional reformation of thick filaments in chemically skinned molluscan catch muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Tanaka, H

    1979-02-01

    A method for the almost complete extraction of myosin from smooth muscle fibers of the anterior byssal retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis was developed, and functional reformation of thick filaments in the fibers was achieved. Complete removal of myosin from the glycerol-extracted ABRM fibers with a solution containing 600 mM KCl, 5 mM MgCl2, and 5 mM ATP was difficult. However, successive treatments of the ABRM fibers with glycerol and saponin made the plasma membrane permeable to Mg-ATP and myosin. The extraction of myosin completely eliminated the tension induced by the addition of Mg-ATP. Partial recovery of tension development was observed by irrigation of myosin into fibers from which myosin had been extracted. Similar results were obtained using rabbit myosin instead of ABRM myosin. Addition of heavy meromyosin, on the other hand, had a suppressive effect on the tension development, as is the case in glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers.

  17. Beam shaping for kilowatt fiber-coupled diode lasers by using one-step beam cutting-rotating of prisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yulong; Dong, Zhiyong; Chen, Yongqi; Qi, Yaoyao; Yuan, Xiandan; Qi, Yunfei; Xu, Li; Lin, Xuechun; Zou, Yonggang; Zhao, Pengfei

    2016-12-01

    The beam quality mismatch of laser diode stacks in both axes limits many direct applications for fiber or solid laser pumping and material processing. In this paper, a one-step cutting-rotating beam shaping system has been designed to homogenize the beam quality of two polarization-multiplexing laser diode stacks. Coupling laser diode stacks consisting of eight bars into a standard fiber with a core diameter of 600 μm and an NA of 0.22 is achieved. The simulative result shows that the system will have an output power over 1056 W. By using the technique, the production of compact and high brightness fiber-coupling diode lasers can be directly used for laser cladding and laser surface hardening processes.

  18. Pointed-end capping by tropomodulin modulates actomyosin crossbridge formation in skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ochala, Julien; Gokhin, David S.; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Fowler, Velia M.

    2014-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, thick and thin filaments are arranged in a myofibrillar lattice. Tropomodulin 1 (Tmod1) is a pointed-end capping and tropomyosin-binding protein that controls thin-filament assembly, stability, and lengths. It remains unknown whether Tmods have other functional roles, such as regulating muscle contractility. To investigate this, we recorded and analyzed the mechanical properties and X-ray diffraction patterns of single membrane-permeabilized skeletal muscle fibers from mice lacking Tmod1. Results show that absence of Tmod1 and its replacement by Tmod3 and Tmod4 may impair initial tropomyosin movement over actin subunits during thin-filament activation, thus reducing both the fraction of actomyosin crossbridges in the strongly bound state (−29%) and fiber force-generating capacity (−31%). Therefore, Tmods are novel regulators of actomyosin crossbridge formation and muscle contractility, and future investigations and models of skeletal muscle force production must incorporate Tmods.—Ochala, J., Gokhin, D. S., Iwamoto, H., Fowler, V. M. Pointed-end capping by tropomodulin modulates actomyosin crossbridge formation in skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:24072783

  19. Functional imaging of skeletal muscle fiber in different physiological states by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Tesi, C.; Piroddi, N.; Poggesi, C.; Castiglioni, C.; Milani, A.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2007-07-01

    The intrinsically ordered arrays of proteins in skeletal muscle allows imaging of this tissue by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG). Biochemical and colocalization studies have gathered an increasing wealth of clues for the attribution of the molecular origin of the muscle SHG signal to the motor protein myosin. Thus, SHG represents a potentially very powerful tool in the investigation of structural dynamics occurring in muscle during active production of force. A full characterization of the polarization-dependence of the SHG signal represents a very selective information on the orientation of the emitting proteins and their dynamics during contraction, provided that different physiological states of muscle (relaxed, rigor and active) exhibit distinct patterns of SHG polarization dependence. Here polarization data are obtained from single frog muscle fibers at rest and during isometric contraction and interpreted, by means of a model, in terms of an average orientation of the SHG emitters which are structured with a cylindrical symmetry about the fiber axis. Optimizing the setup for accurate polarization measurements with SHG, we developed a line scan imaging method allowing measurement of SHG polarization curves in different physiological states. We demonstrate that muscle fiber displays a measurable variation of the orientation of SHG emitters with the transition from rest to isometric contraction.

  20. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments.

  1. Smooth Muscle-Like Tissue Constructs with Circumferentially Oriented Cells Formed by the Cell Fiber Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Amy Y.; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments. PMID:25734774

  2. Relationship between function of masticatory muscle in mouse and properties of muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Abe, Shinichi; Hiroki, Emi; Iwanuma, Osamu; Sakiyama, Koji; Shirakura, Yoshitaka; Hirose, Daiki; Shimoo, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masashi; Ikari, Yasutoyo; Kikuchi, Ryusuke; Ide, Yoshinobu; Yoshinari, Masao

    2008-05-01

    Mammals exhibit marked morphological differences in the muscles surrounding the jaw bone due to differences in eating habits. Furthermore, the myofiber properties of the muscles differ with function. Since the muscles in the oral region have various functions such as eating, swallowing, and speech, it is believed that the functional role of each muscle differs. Therefore, to clarify the functional role of each masticatory muscle, the myofiber properties of the adult mouse masticatory muscles were investigated at the transcriptional level. Expression of MyHC-2b with a fast contraction rate and strong force was frequently noted in the temporal and masseter muscles. This suggests that the temporal and masseter muscles are closely involved in rapid antero-posterior masticatory movement, which is characteristic in mice. Furthermore, expression of MyHC-1 with a low contraction rate and weak continuous force was frequently detected in the lateral pterygoid muscle. This suggests that, in contrast to other masticatory muscles, mouse lateral pterygoid muscle is not involved in fast masticatory movement, but is involved in functions requiring continuous force such as retention of jaw position. This study revealed that muscles with different roles function comprehensively during complicated masticatory movement.

  3. Modulation of Muscle Fiber Compositions in Response to Hypoxia via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-1

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Daniel D.; Kim, Gyuyoup; Pae, Eung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Muscle fiber-type changes in hypoxic conditions in accordance with pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (Pdk)-1 and hypoxia inducible factor (Hif)-1α were investigated in rats. Hif-1α and its down-stream molecule Pdk-1 are well known for readily response to hypoxia. We questioned their roles in relation to changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition in skeletal muscles. We hypothesize that the level of Pdk-1 with respect to the level of Hif-1α determines MyHC composition of the muscle in rats in hypoxia. Young male rats were housed in a chamber maintained at 11.5% (for sustained hypoxia) or fluctuating between 11.5 and 20.8% (for intermittent hypoxia or IH) oxygen levels. Then, muscle tissues from the geniohyoid (GH), soleus, and anterior tibialis (TA) were obtained at the end of hypoxic conditionings. After both hypoxic conditionings, protein levels of Pdk-1 and Hif-1 increased in GH muscles. GH muscles in acute sustained hypoxia favor an anaerobic glycolytic pathway, resulting in an increase in glycolytic MyHC IIb protein-rich fibers while maintain original fatigue-resistant MyHC IIa protein in the fibers; thus, the numbers of IIa- and IIb MyHC co-expressing fibers increased. Exogenous Pdk-1 over-expression using plasmid vectors elevated not only the glycolytic MyHC IIb, but also IIx as well as IIa expressions in C2C12 myotubes in ambient air significantly. The increase of dual expression of IIa- and IIb MyHC proteins in fibers harvested from the geniohyoid muscle has a potential to improve endurance as shown in our fatigability tests. By increasing the Pdk-1/Hif-1 ratio, a mixed-type muscle could alter endurance within the innate characteristics of the muscle toward more fatigue resistant. We conclude that an increased Pdk-1 level in skeletal muscle helps maintain MyHC compositions to be a fatigue resistant mixed-type muscle. PMID:28018235

  4. Modulation of Muscle Fiber Compositions in Response to Hypoxia via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Daniel D; Kim, Gyuyoup; Pae, Eung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Muscle fiber-type changes in hypoxic conditions in accordance with pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (Pdk)-1 and hypoxia inducible factor (Hif)-1α were investigated in rats. Hif-1α and its down-stream molecule Pdk-1 are well known for readily response to hypoxia. We questioned their roles in relation to changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition in skeletal muscles. We hypothesize that the level of Pdk-1 with respect to the level of Hif-1α determines MyHC composition of the muscle in rats in hypoxia. Young male rats were housed in a chamber maintained at 11.5% (for sustained hypoxia) or fluctuating between 11.5 and 20.8% (for intermittent hypoxia or IH) oxygen levels. Then, muscle tissues from the geniohyoid (GH), soleus, and anterior tibialis (TA) were obtained at the end of hypoxic conditionings. After both hypoxic conditionings, protein levels of Pdk-1 and Hif-1 increased in GH muscles. GH muscles in acute sustained hypoxia favor an anaerobic glycolytic pathway, resulting in an increase in glycolytic MyHC IIb protein-rich fibers while maintain original fatigue-resistant MyHC IIa protein in the fibers; thus, the numbers of IIa- and IIb MyHC co-expressing fibers increased. Exogenous Pdk-1 over-expression using plasmid vectors elevated not only the glycolytic MyHC IIb, but also IIx as well as IIa expressions in C2C12 myotubes in ambient air significantly. The increase of dual expression of IIa- and IIb MyHC proteins in fibers harvested from the geniohyoid muscle has a potential to improve endurance as shown in our fatigability tests. By increasing the Pdk-1/Hif-1 ratio, a mixed-type muscle could alter endurance within the innate characteristics of the muscle toward more fatigue resistant. We conclude that an increased Pdk-1 level in skeletal muscle helps maintain MyHC compositions to be a fatigue resistant mixed-type muscle.

  5. Is functional hypertrophy and specific force coupled with the addition of myonuclei at the single muscle fiber level?

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Rizwan; Renaud, Guillaume; Morine, Kevin; Barton, Elisabeth R; Sweeney, H Lee; Larsson, Lars

    2012-03-01

    Muscle force is typically proportional to muscle size, resulting in constant force normalized to muscle fiber cross-sectional area (specific force). Mice overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) exhibit a proportional gain in muscle force and size, but not the myostatin-deficient mice. In an attempt to explore the role of the cytoplasmic volume supported by individual myonuclei [myonuclear domain (MND) size] on functional capacity of skeletal muscle, we have investigated specific force in relation to MND and the content of the molecular motor protein, myosin, at the single muscle fiber level from myostatin-knockout (Mstn(-/-)) and IGF-1-overexpressing (mIgf1(+/+)) mice. We hypothesize that the addition of extra myonuclei is a prerequisite for maintenance of specific force during muscle hypertrophy. A novel algorithm was used to measure individual MNDs in 3 dimensions along the length of single muscle fibers from the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus and the slow-twitch soleus muscle. A significant effect of the size of individual MNDs in hypertrophic muscle fibers on both specific force and myosin content was observed. This effect was muscle cell type specific and suggested there is a critical volume individual myonuclei can support efficiently. The large MNDs found in fast muscles of Mstn(-/-) mice were correlated with the decrement in specific force and myosin content in Mstn(-/-) muscles. Thus, myostatin inhibition may not be able to maintain the appropriate MND for optimal function.

  6. Injection of duck recombinant follistatin fusion protein into duck muscle tissues stimulates satellite cell proliferation and muscle fiber hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Liu, He-he; Wang, Ji-wen; Yu, Hai-yue; Zhang, Rong-ping; Chen, Xi; Jin, Hai-bo; Dai, Fei; Li, Liang; Xu, Feng

    2012-06-01

    Follistatin (FST) can inhibit the expression of myostatin, which is a predominant inhibitor of muscle development. The potential application of myostatin-based technology has been prompted in different ways in agriculture. We previously constructed an expression vector of duck FST and isolated the FST fusion protein. After the protein was purified and refolded, it was added to the medium of duck myoblasts cultured in vitro. The results show that the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide value of the myoblasts in the duck FST treatment group is higher than that in the control group, which indicates that the duck FST fusion protein exhibits the biological activities that can accelerate myoblast proliferation. To further investigate the roles of duck FST on muscle development, we injected the protein into the duck muscle tissues in vivo. The results show that both the duck muscle fiber cross-sectional area and the satellite cell activation frequency are influenced more in the FST treatment group than they are in the control group. In addition to these phenomena, expression of MyoD and Myf5 were increased, and the expression of myostatin was decreased. Together, these results suggest the potential for using duck FST fusion protein to inhibit myostatin activity and subsequently to enhance muscle growth in vivo. The mechanism by which FST regulates muscle development in the duck is similar to that in mammals and fishes.

  7. Protein Supplementation Does Not Further Increase Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Fiber Hypertrophy after Eight Weeks of Resistance Training in Novice Subjects, but Partially Counteracts the Fast-to-Slow Muscle Fiber Transition.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Antonio; Pacelli, Quirico F; Cancellara, Pasqua; Toniolo, Luana; Moro, Tatiana; Canato, Marta; Miotti, Danilo; Neri, Marco; Morra, Aldo; Quadrelli, Marco; Reggiani, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    The response to resistance training and protein supplementation in the latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) has never been investigated. We investigated the effects of resistance training (RT) and protein supplementation on muscle mass, strength, and fiber characteristics of the LDM. Eighteen healthy young subjects were randomly assigned to a progressive eight-week RT program with a normal protein diet (NP) or high protein diet (HP) (NP 0.85 vs. HP 1.8 g of protein·kg(-1)·day(-1)). One repetition maximum tests, magnetic resonance imaging for cross-sectional muscle area (CSA), body composition, and single muscle fibers mechanical and phenotype characteristics were measured. RT induced a significant gain in strength (+17%, p < 0.0001), whole muscle CSA (p = 0.024), and single muscle fibers CSA (p < 0.05) of LDM in all subjects. Fiber isometric force increased in proportion to CSA (+22%, p < 0.005) and thus no change in specific tension occurred. A significant transition from 2X to 2A myosin expression was induced by training. The protein supplementation showed no significant effects on all measured outcomes except for a smaller reduction of 2X myosin expression. Our results suggest that in LDM protein supplementation does not further enhance RT-induced muscle fiber hypertrophy nor influence mechanic muscle fiber characteristics but partially counteracts the fast-to-slow fiber shift.

  8. Protein Supplementation Does Not Further Increase Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Fiber Hypertrophy after Eight Weeks of Resistance Training in Novice Subjects, but Partially Counteracts the Fast-to-Slow Muscle Fiber Transition

    PubMed Central

    Paoli, Antonio; Pacelli, Quirico F.; Cancellara, Pasqua; Toniolo, Luana; Moro, Tatiana; Canato, Marta; Miotti, Danilo; Neri, Marco; Morra, Aldo; Quadrelli, Marco; Reggiani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The response to resistance training and protein supplementation in the latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) has never been investigated. We investigated the effects of resistance training (RT) and protein supplementation on muscle mass, strength, and fiber characteristics of the LDM. Eighteen healthy young subjects were randomly assigned to a progressive eight-week RT program with a normal protein diet (NP) or high protein diet (HP) (NP 0.85 vs. HP 1.8 g of protein·kg−1·day−1). One repetition maximum tests, magnetic resonance imaging for cross-sectional muscle area (CSA), body composition, and single muscle fibers mechanical and phenotype characteristics were measured. RT induced a significant gain in strength (+17%, p < 0.0001), whole muscle CSA (p = 0.024), and single muscle fibers CSA (p < 0.05) of LDM in all subjects. Fiber isometric force increased in proportion to CSA (+22%, p < 0.005) and thus no change in specific tension occurred. A significant transition from 2X to 2A myosin expression was induced by training. The protein supplementation showed no significant effects on all measured outcomes except for a smaller reduction of 2X myosin expression. Our results suggest that in LDM protein supplementation does not further enhance RT-induced muscle fiber hypertrophy nor influence mechanic muscle fiber characteristics but partially counteracts the fast-to-slow fiber shift. PMID:27258300

  9. Selective cortical control of information flow through different intraspinal collaterals of the same muscle afferent fiber.

    PubMed

    Eguibar, J R; Quevedo, J; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1994-04-18

    We have analyzed in the anesthetized cat the effects of electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex on the intraspinal threshold of two collaterals belonging to the same muscle spindle or tendon organ afferent fiber. The results obtained provide, for the first time, direct evidence showing that the motor cortex is able to modify, in a highly selective manner, the synaptic effectiveness of individual collaterals of the same primary afferent fiber. This presynaptic control could function as a mechanism that allows funneling of information to specific groups of spinal neurons in the presence of extensive intraspinal branching of the afferent fibers.

  10. Controlled chaos: three-dimensional kinematics, fiber histochemistry, and muscle contractile dynamics of autotomized lizard tails.

    PubMed

    Higham, Timothy E; Lipsett, Kathryn R; Syme, Douglas A; Russell, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    The ability to shed an appendage occurs in both vertebrates and invertebrates, often as a tactic to avoid predation. The tails of lizards, unlike most autotomized body parts of animals, exhibit complex and vigorous movements once disconnected from the body. Despite the near ubiquity of autotomy across groups of lizards and the fact that this is an extraordinary event involving the self-severing of the spinal cord, our understanding of why and how tails move as they do following autotomy is sparse. We herein explore the histochemistry and physiology of the tail muscles of the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), a species that exhibits vigorous and variable tail movements following autotomy. To confirm that the previously studied tail movements of this species are generally representative of geckos and therefore suitable for in-depth muscle studies, we quantified the three-dimensional kinematics of autotomized tails in three additional species. The movements of the tails of all species were generally similar and included jumps, flips, and swings. Our preliminary analyses suggest that some species of gecko exhibit short but high-frequency movements, whereas others exhibit larger-amplitude but lower-frequency movements. We then compared the ATPase and oxidative capacity of muscle fibers and contractile dynamics of isolated muscle bundles from original tails, muscle from regenerate tails, and fast fibers from an upper limb muscle (iliofibularis) of the leopard gecko. Histochemical analysis revealed that more than 90% of the fibers in original and regenerate caudal muscles had high ATPase but possessed a superficial layer of fibers with low ATPase and high oxidative capacity. We found that contraction kinetics, isometric force, work, power output, and the oscillation frequency at which maximum power was generated were lowest in the original tail, followed by the regenerate tail and then the fast fibers of the iliofibularis. Muscle from the original tail exhibited

  11. Effects of Morphological Characteristics of Muscle Fibers on Porcine Growth Performance and Pork Quality

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Mo; Ryu, Youn Chul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of morphological characteristics of porcine muscle fibers on growth performance, muscle fiber characteristics, and pork quality taken from the longissimus dorsi muscle. A total of 239 crossbred pigs (164 castrated males and 75 females) were used in this study. Experimental pigs were categorized by the total number of muscle fiber (TNF: High and Low) and cross sectional area of muscle fiber (CSAF: Large, Middle, and Small). Their combinations were classified into six groups (High-Large, HL; High-Middle, HM; High-Small, HS; Low-Large, LL; Low-Middle, LM; Low-Small, LS). The TNF and CSAF were significantly (p<0.05) correlated with growth rate and carcass productivity, while the only of the type I number had no meaningful relationships excluding the correlation with loin area (p<0.001). The proportion of type I area was positively correlated with pH45 min while the proportion of type IIB area was negatively correlated with pH45 min and pH24 h (p<0.05). Drip loss and protein denaturation had strong relationships with the proportion of type IIB number or area. The HL group exhibited the greatest growth performance. In addition, the HL group had significantly greater values in protein solubility than the other groups. In conclusion, this study suggest that high TNF combined to large CSAF improve the ultimate lean meat productivity and assure normal meat quality simultaneously with increased both proportion of number and area of type I, type IIA muscle fibers and lowered proportion of number and area of type IIB. PMID:27857533

  12. Functional properties of slow and fast gastrocnemius muscle fibers after a 17-day spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Romatowski, J. G.; Norenberg, K. M.; Knuth, S. T.; Bain, J. L.; Riley, D. A.; Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Costill, D. L.; Fitts, R. H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the effects of a 17-day spaceflight on the contractile properties of individual fast- and slow-twitch fibers isolated from biopsies of the fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle of four male astronauts. Single chemically skinned fibers were studied during maximal Ca2+-activated contractions with fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression subsequently determined by SDS gel electrophoresis. Spaceflight had no significant effect on the mean diameter or specific force of single fibers expressing type I, IIa, or IIa/IIx MHC, although a small reduction in average absolute force (P(o)) was observed for the type I fibers (0.68 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.02 mN, P < 0.05). Subject-by-flight interactions indicated significant intersubject variation in response to the flight, as postflight fiber diameter and P(o) where significantly reduced for the type I and IIa fibers obtained from one astronaut and for the type IIa fibers from another astronaut. Average unloaded shortening velocity [V(o), in fiber lengths (FL)/s] was greater after the flight for both type I (0.60 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.76 +/- 0.02 FL/s) and IIa fibers (2.33 +/- 0.25 vs. 3.10 +/- 0.16 FL/s). Postflight peak power of the type I and IIa fibers was significantly reduced only for the astronaut experiencing the greatest fiber atrophy and loss of P(o). These results demonstrate that 1) slow and fast gastrocnemius fibers show little atrophy and loss of P(o) but increased V(o) after a typical 17-day spaceflight, 2) there is, however, considerable intersubject variation in these responses, possibly due to intersubject differences in in-flight physical activity, and 3) in these four astronauts, fiber atrophy and reductions in P(o) were less for slow and fast fibers obtained from the phasic fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle compared with slow and fast fibers obtained from the slow antigravity soleus [J. J. Widrick, S. K. Knuth, K. M. Norenberg, J. G. Romatowski, J. L. W. Bain, D. A

  13. Creatine Supplementation Induces Alteration in Cross-Sectional Area in Skeletal Muscle Fibers of Wistar Rats Under Swimming Training

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fernando Farias Dos; Moura, José A. A.; Curi, Rui; Fernandes, Luiz C.

    2002-01-01

    Creatine has been shown to increase the total muscle mass. In this study, we investigated the effect of oral creatine monohydrate supplementation on cross-sectional area of type I, IIA and IIB fibers of gastrocnemius, extensor digitorum longus - EDL and soleus muscles from male Wistar rats subjected to swimming training for 33 days. Four groups were set up: sedentary with no supplementation (CON), sedentary with creatine supplementation (3.3 mg creatine per g chow) (CR), exercised with no supplementation (EX) and exercised with supplementation (CREX). The rats performed in a special swimming pool and swam five times a week for 1 hour each day, with a extra lead weight corresponding to 15% of their body weight. At the end of 33 days, skeletal muscles of the animals were dissected and the samples got immediately frozen using liquid nitrogen. Muscle samples were allocated to slices of 10 μm by a cryostat at -20°C, which was followed by histochemical analysis in order to identify fiber types of the muscles, and morphometrical analysis to calculate the muscle fiber areas. All groups gained body weight at the end of 33 days but there was no statistical difference among them. The EX and CREX rats had a larger food intake than the sedentary groups (CON and CR), and the CREX group had a larger food intake than CR rats. The cross-sectional area of type I and IIA fibers of the soleus muscle, type IIA and IIB fibers of EDL muscle and type IIA and IIB fibers of the white portion of gastrocnemius muscle were greater in the EX and CREX groups in comparison to sedentary rats. In addition, these fibers were greater in the CREX rats than in the EX group. There was no change in the cross sectional area of type I fibers in EDL muscle among all groups studied. Our results suggest that creatine supplementation enhances the exercise related muscle fiber hypertrophy in rodents. PMID:24701129

  14. Efficient delivery of human single fiber-derived muscle precursor cells via biocompatible scaffold.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, Luisa; Malerba, Alberto; Vitiello, Libero; Cimetta, Elisa; Piccoli, Martina; Messina, Chiara; Gamba, Pier Giorgio; Elvassore, Nicola; De Coppi, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    The success of cell therapy for skeletal muscle disorders depends upon two main factors: the cell source and the method of delivery. In this work we have explored the therapeutic potential of human muscle precursor cells (hMPCs), obtained from single human muscle fibers, implanted in vivo via micropatterned scaffolds. hMPCs were initially expanded and characterized in vitro by immunostaining and flow cytometric analysis. For in vivo studies, hMPCs were seeded onto micropatterned poly-lactic-glycolic acid 3D-scaffolds fabricated using soft-lithography and thermal membrane lamination. Seeded scaffolds were then implanted in predamaged tibialis anterior muscles of CD1 nude mice; hMPCs were also directly injected in contralateral limbs as controls. Similarly to what we previously described with mouse precursors cells, we found that hMPCs were able to participate in muscle regeneration and scaffold-implanted muscles contained a greater number of human nuclei, as revealed by immunostaining and Western blot analyses. These results indicate that hMPCs derived from single fibers could be a good and reliable cell source for the design of therapeutic protocols and that implantation of cellularized scaffolds is superior to direct injection for the delivery of myogenic cells into regenerating skeletal muscle.

  15. Influence of Fiber-Type Composition on Recovery from Tourniquet-Induced Skeletal Muscle Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-11

    free flaps . J. Surg. Res. 55: 193–200. doi:10.1006/jsre.1993.1129. PMID:8412099. Locke, M., and Tanguay, R.M. 1996. Increased HSF activation in muscles...Influence of fiber-type composition on recovery from tourniquet-induced skeletal muscle ischemia –reperfusion injury Thomas J. Walters, John F. Kragh...of predominantly different fiber types occurs following extended periods of ischemia . We hypothe- sized that the soleus (Sol) muscle, a predominantly

  16. Alteration of inflammatory cytokines, energy metabolic regulators, and muscle fiber type in the skeletal muscle of postweaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Li, F; Li, Y; Tan, B; Wang, J; Duan, Y; Guo, Q; Liu, Y; Kong, X; Li, T; Tang, Y; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine the alterations of inflammatory cytokines, energy metabolic regulators, and muscle fiber type in the LM of the piglets postweaning. Crossbred piglets (Landrace × Large White) weaned at 14 d age were randomly selected from 8 litters and slaughtered at 0 (W0), 1 (W1), 3 (W3), 5 (W5), or 7 (W7) days postweaning. The glycogen content, free glucose concentration, and enzyme activities, including ATPase (Na/K, Ca/Mg), creatine kinase, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), were detected in the skeletal muscle tissue. Concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), were measured in serum. The mRNA abundance of the above cytokines, energy metabolic regulators, and muscle fiber type related genes were determined via real-time quantitative PCR analysis. The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) signaling was measured by Western blot analysis. Our results showed ATPase activities were lower on W7 d but LDH activity was higher on W3 d after weaning ( < 0.05). Serum TNF-α concentration was markedly increased on W1 d, then returned to the value of preweaning ( < 0.05), and almost all the values of inflammatory cytokines were reduced to a low point on W5 d after weaning. Additionally, the IL-6 mRNA abundance was upregulated during W3 to W7 d, but cytokine TNF-α was upregulated just on W7 d ( < 0.05). The mRNA abundance of AMPKα and uncoupling protein (UCP) 3 were both higher on W1 and W3 d, and UCP2 was higher on W7 d postweaning ( < 0.05). Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) I and MyHC IIx-type fibers were enhanced on W1 d, then returned to the value of preweaning, and the MyHC IIb-type fiber was significantly increased on W5 and W7 d ( < 0.05). Meanwhile, the value of P-AMPKα/T-AMPKα increased on W3 d postweaning ( < 0.05) compared with that on W0 d. These results indicate

  17. Experiment K-6-07. Metabolic and morphologic properties of muscle fibers after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, R.; Miu, B.; Martin, Thomas P.; Roy, R.; Marini, J.; Leger, J. J.; Oganov, V.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E.

    1990-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that the general capability of skeletal muscle to maintain its proteins decreases rapidly in response to space flight. The present findings suggest further that the magnitude of enzymatic and cell volumes changes in response to space flight depend on several factors including the muscle and its fiber type composition. It appears that in order to associate physiological relevance to the observed enzymatic changes, cell volume should be considered also. Although it remains unclear as to the stimulus, or lack of stimulus, that triggers the rapid changes in muscle proteins in response to space flight, ground-based models of muscle atrophy suggest that the reduction in mechanical loading of muscle may be more important than the total amount of activation over a 24-hr period.

  18. Fiber type specific expression of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-18 in human skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Plomgaard, Peter; Penkowa, Milena; Pedersen, Bente K

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is now recognized as an endocrine organ with the capacity to produce signal peptides in response to muscle contractions. Here we demonstrate that resting healthy human muscles express cytokines in a fiber type specific manner. Human muscle biopsies from seven healthy young males were obtained from m. triceps, m. quadriceps vastus lateralis and m. soleus. Type I fibers contributed (mean +/- SE) 24.0 +/- 2.5% in triceps of total fibers, 51.3 +/- 2.4% in vastus and 84.9 +/- 22% in soleus. As expected, differences in the fiber type composition were accompanied by marked differences between the three muscles with regard to MHC I and MHC IIa mRNA expression. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-18 were solely expressed by type II fibers, whereas the expression of IL-6 was more prominent in type I compared to type II fibers. The fiber type specificity was found in triceps, vastus and soleus indicating that the level of daily muscle activity did not influence basal cytokine expression. The specificity of cytokine expression in different muscle fiber types in healthy young males suggests that cytokines may play specific regulatory roles in normal physiology.

  19. Effects of electrical stimulation on histochemical muscle fiber staining, quality, and composition of camel and cattle Longissimus thoracis muscles.

    PubMed

    Kadim, I T; Mahgoub, O; Al-Marzooqi, W; Khalaf, S K; Mansour, M H; Al-Sinani, S S H; Al-Amri, I S

    2009-01-01

    The effects of electrical stimulation on muscle fiber type, meat quality, and composition of Longissimus thoracis muscles from one-humped camels and Dofari Omani cattle of a comparable age range were investigated. A low-voltage electrical stimulation with 90 V, 14 Hz (pulse of 7.5-millisecond duration every 70 milliseconds) 20 min postmortem was applied. Samples from the left muscle were collected from 20 (2 to 3 y) camels and 24 cattle (1 to 3 y). For chemical composition, muscle samples were dried in a freeze dryer, and then ground to determine moisture, protein, fat, and ash. Macro- and micro-minerals were determined using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometer. Quality characteristics of the meat were evaluated using shear force value, pH, sarcomere, myofibrillar fragmentation index, expressed juice, cooking loss percent, and CIE L*, a*, b* color values. Electrical stimulation resulted in a significantly (P < 0.05) more rapid pH fall in the muscle during the first 24 h after slaughter in both species. Muscles from electrically stimulated carcasses had significantly (P < 0.05) lower ultimate pH, longer sarcomere, and lower shear force values than those from nonstimulated carcasses. Lightness (L*), myofibrillar fragmentation, and expressed juice were significantly (P < 0.05) higher for stimulated than for nonstimulated muscles. Muscles of camels had significantly (P < 0.05) higher expressed juice, cooking loss percent, redness color (a*), and lower fat, Mg, K, and P than those from cattle. Electrical stimulation improved quality characteristics of meat from both species. This indicates that meat quality of local camel and cattle can be improved by electrical stimulation and consequently improves their acceptability to consumers and better marketability.

  20. Mouse skeletal muscle fiber-type specific macroautophagy and muscle wasting is regulated by a Fyn/STAT3/Vps34 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Eijiro; Bastie, Claire C.; Koga, Hiroshi; Wang, Yichen; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Pessin, Jeffrey E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Skeletal muscle atrophy induced by aging (sarcopenia), inactivity and prolonged fasting states (starvation) is predominantly restricted to glycolytic type II muscle fibers and typical spares oxidative type I fibers. However, the mechanisms accounting for muscle fiber type specificity of atrophy have remained enigmatic. In the current study, we that although the Fyn tyrosine kinase activated the mTORC1 signaling complex, it also induced marked atrophy of glycolytic fibers with relatively less effect on oxidative muscle fibers. This was due to inhibition of macroautophagy via an mTORC1-independent but STAT3-dependent reduction in Vps34 protein levels and decreased Vps34/p150/Beclin1/Atg14 complexes. Physiologically, in the fed sate endogenous Fyn kinase activity was increased in glycolytic but not oxidative skeletal muscle. In parallel, Y705-STAT3 phosphorylation increased with decreased Vps34 protein levels. Moreover, fed/starved regulation of Y705-STAT3 phosphorylation and Vps34 protein levels was prevented in skeletal muscle of Fyn null mice. These data demonstrate a novel Fyn/STAT3/Vps34 pathway that is responsible for fiber type specific regulation of macroautophagy and skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:22745922

  1. Very low force-generating ability and unusually high temperature dependency in hummingbird flight muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Peter J; Welch, Kenneth C; Suarez, Raul K; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2013-06-15

    Hummingbird flight muscle is estimated to have among the highest mass-specific power output among vertebrates, based on aerodynamic models. However, little is known about the fundamental contractile properties of their remarkable flight muscles. We hypothesized that hummingbird pectoralis fibers generate relatively low force when activated in a tradeoff for high shortening speeds associated with the characteristic high wingbeat frequencies that are required for sustained hovering. Our objective was to measure maximal force-generating ability (maximal force/cross-sectional area, Po/CSA) in single, skinned fibers from the pectoralis and supracoracoideus muscles, which power the wing downstroke and upstroke, respectively, in hummingbirds (Calypte anna) and in another similarly sized species, zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), which also has a very high wingbeat frequency during flight but does not perform a sustained hover. Mean Po/CSA in hummingbird pectoralis fibers was very low - 1.6, 6.1 and 12.2 kN m(-2), at 10, 15 and 20°C, respectively. Po/CSA in finch pectoralis fibers was also very low (for both species, ~5% of the reported Po/CSA of chicken pectoralis fast fibers at 15°C). Q10-force (force generated at 20°C/force generated at 10°C) was very high for hummingbird and finch pectoralis fibers (mean=15.3 and 11.5, respectively) compared with rat slow and fast fibers (1.8 and 1.9, respectively). Po/CSA in hummingbird leg fibers was much higher than in pectoralis fibers at each temperature, and the mean Q10-force was much lower. Thus, hummingbird and finch pectoralis fibers have an extremely low force-generating ability compared with other bird and mammalian limb fibers, and an extremely high temperature dependence of force generation. However, the extrapolated maximum force-generating ability of hummingbird pectoralis fibers in vivo (~48 kN m(-2)) is substantially higher than the estimated requirements for hovering flight of C. anna. The unusually low Po

  2. Using vertebral movement and intact paraspinal muscles to determine the distribution of intrafusal fiber innervation of muscle spindle afferents in the anesthetized cat.

    PubMed

    Reed, William R; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Ge, Weiqing; Pickar, Joel G

    2013-03-01

    Increasing our knowledge regarding intrafusal fiber distribution and physiology of paraspinal proprioceptors may provide key insights regarding proprioceptive deficits in trunk control associated with low back pain and lead to more effective clinical intervention. The use of vertebral movement as a means to reliably stretch paraspinal muscles would greatly facilitate physiological study of paraspinal muscle proprioceptors where muscle tendon isolation is either very difficult or impossible. The effects of succinylcholine (SCh) on 194 muscle spindle afferents from lumbar longissimus or multifidus muscles in response to computer-controlled, ramp-and-hold movements of the L(6) vertebra were investigated in anesthetized cats. Paraspinal muscles were stretched by moving the L(6) vertebra 1.5-1.7 mm in the dorsal-ventral direction. Initial frequency (IF), dynamic difference (DD), their changes (∆) following SCh injection (100-400 μg kg(-1)), and post-SCh dynamic difference (SChDD) were measured. Muscle spindle intrafusal fiber terminations were classified as primary or secondary fibers as well as bag(1) (b(1)c), bag(2) (b(2)c), b(1)b(2)c, or chain (c) fibers. Intrafusal fiber subpopulations were distinguished using logarithmic transformation of SChDD and ∆IF distributions as established by previous investigators. Increases in DD indicate strength of b(1)c influence while increases in IF indicate strength of b(2)c influence. Out of 194 afferents, 46.9 % of afferents terminated on b(2)c fibers, 46.4 % on b(1)b(2)c fibers, 1 % on b(1)c fibers, and 5.7 % terminated on c fibers. Based on these intrafusal fiber subpopulation distributions, controlled vertebral movement can effectively substitute for direct tendon stretch and allow further investigation of paraspinal proprioceptors in this anatomically complex body region.

  3. Skeletal fiber types and spindle distribution in limb and jaw muscles of the adult and neonatal opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Sciote, J J; Rowlerson, A

    1998-08-01

    The South American opossum, Monodelphis domestica, is very immature at birth, and we wished to assess its potential for studies of jaw muscle development. Given the lack of prior information about any Monodelphis fiber types or spindles, our study aimed to identify for the first time fiber types in both adult and neonatal muscles and the location of spindles in the jaw muscles. Fiber types were identified in frozen sections of adult and 6-day-old jaw and limb muscles by using myosin ATPase and metabolic enzyme histochemistry and by immunostaining for myosin isoforms. The distribution of fiber types and muscle spindles throughout the jaw-closer muscles was identified by immunostaining of sections of methacarnoy-fixed, wax-embedded heads. Most muscles contained one slow (type I) and two fast fiber types (equivalent to types IIA and IIX), which were similar to those in eutherian muscle, and an additional (non-IIB) fast type. In jaw-closer muscles, the main extrafusal fiber type was IIM (characteristic of these muscles in some eutherians), and almost all spindles were concentrated in four restricted areas: one in masseter and three in temporalis. Six-day neonatal muscles were very immature, but future spindle-rich areas were revealed by immunostaining and corresponded in position to the adult areas. Extrafusal and spindle fiber types in Monodelphis share many similarities with eutherian mammalian muscle. This finding, along with the immaturity of myosin isoform expression observed 6 days postnatally, indicates that Monodelphis could provide a valuable model for studying early developmental events in the jaw-closer muscles and their spindles.

  4. An image processing pipeline to detect and segment nuclei in muscle fiber microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanen; Xu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yaming; Xia, Shunren; Yang, Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Muscle fiber images play an important role in the medical diagnosis and treatment of many muscular diseases. The number of nuclei in skeletal muscle fiber images is a key bio-marker of the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. In nuclei segmentation one primary challenge is to correctly separate the clustered nuclei. In this article, we developed an image processing pipeline to automatically detect, segment, and analyze nuclei in microscopic image of muscle fibers. The pipeline consists of image pre-processing, identification of isolated nuclei, identification and segmentation of clustered nuclei, and quantitative analysis. Nuclei are initially extracted from background by using local Otsu's threshold. Based on analysis of morphological features of the isolated nuclei, including their areas, compactness, and major axis lengths, a Bayesian network is trained and applied to identify isolated nuclei from clustered nuclei and artifacts in all the images. Then a two-step refined watershed algorithm is applied to segment clustered nuclei. After segmentation, the nuclei can be quantified for statistical analysis. Comparing the segmented results with those of manual analysis and an existing technique, we find that our proposed image processing pipeline achieves good performance with high accuracy and precision. The presented image processing pipeline can therefore help biologists increase their throughput and objectivity in analyzing large numbers of nuclei in muscle fiber images.

  5. Effect of Tongue Exercise on Protrusive Force and Muscle Fiber Area in Aging Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Jackson, Michelle A.; Mann, Laura; Kluender, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related changes in tongue function may contribute to dysphagia in elderly people. The authors' purpose was to investigate whether aged rats that have undergone tongue exercise would manifest increased protrusive tongue forces and increased genioglossus (GG) muscle fiber cross-sectional areas. Method: Forty-eight young adult,…

  6. Skeletal muscle diffusion tensor-MRI fiber tracking: rationale, data acquisition and analysis methods, applications and future directions.

    PubMed

    Damon, Bruce M; Froeling, Martijn; Buck, Amanda K W; Oudeman, Jos; Ding, Zhaohua; Nederveen, Aart J; Bush, Emily C; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical functions of muscles involve the generation of force and the actuation of movement by shortening or lengthening under load. These functions are influenced, in part, by the internal arrangement of muscle fibers with respect to the muscle's mechanical line of action. This property is known as muscle architecture. In this review, we describe the use of diffusion tensor (DT)-MRI muscle fiber tracking for the study of muscle architecture. In the first section, the importance of skeletal muscle architecture to function is discussed. In addition, traditional and complementary methods for the assessment of muscle architecture (brightness-mode ultrasound imaging and cadaver analysis) are presented. Next, DT-MRI is introduced and the structural basis for the reduced and anisotropic diffusion of water in muscle is discussed. The third section discusses issues related to the acquisition of skeletal muscle DT-MRI data and presents recommendations for optimal strategies. The fourth section discusses methods for the pre-processing of DT-MRI data, the available approaches for the calculation of the diffusion tensor and the seeding and propagating of fiber tracts, and the analysis of the tracking results to measure structural properties pertinent to muscle biomechanics. Lastly, examples are presented of how DT-MRI fiber tracking has been used to provide new insights into how muscles function, and important future research directions are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The combined influence of stretch, mobility and electrical stimulation in the prevention of muscle fiber atrophy caused hypokinesia and hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldspink, G.; Goldspink, D.; Loughna, P.

    1984-01-01

    The morphological and biochemical changes which occur in the hind limb muscles of the rat in response to hypokinesia and hypodynamia were investigated. Hind limb cast fixation and suspension techniques were employed to study the musclar atrophy after five days of hypokinesia and hypodynamia induced by suspension, appreciable muscular atrophy was apparent, particularly in the anti-gravity muscles. The effect of passive stretching and electrical stimulation on muscle atrophy was studied. Changes in muscle protein mass were assessed with spectrophotometric and radioactive techniques. Passive stretch is shown to counteract muscle disuse atrophy. The change in the numbers of specific muscle fibers in atrophied muscles is discussed.

  8. Endothermic force generation in fast and slow mammalian (rabbit) muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, K W

    1996-01-01

    Isometric tension responses to rapid temperature jumps (T-jumps) of 3-7 degrees C were examined in single skinned fibers isolated from rabbit psoas (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles. T-jumps were induced by an infrared laser pulse (wavelength 1.32 microns, pulse duration 0.2 ms) obtained from a Nd-YAG laser, which heated the fiber and bathing buffer solution in a 50-microliter trough. After a T-jump, the temperature near the fiber remained constant for approximately 0.5 s, and the temperature could be clamped for longer periods by means of Peltier units assembled on the back trough wall. A T-jump produced a step decrease in tension in both fast and slow muscle fibers in rigor, indicating thermal expansion. In maximally Ca-activated (pCa approximately 4) fibers, the increase of steady tension with heating (3-35 degrees C) was approximately sigmoidal, and a T-jump at any temperature induced a more complex tension transient than in rigor fibers. An initial (small amplitude) step decrease in tension followed by a rapid recovery (tau(1); see Davis and Harrington, 1993) was seen in some records from both fiber types, which presumably was an indirect consequence of thermal expansion. The net rise in tension after a T-jump was biexponential, and its time course was characteristically different in the two fibers. At approximately 12 degrees C the reciprocal time constants for the two exponential components (tau(2) and tau(3), respectively, were approximately 70.s(-1) and approximately 15.s(-1) in fast fibers and approximately 20.s(-1) and approximately 3.s(-1) in slow fibers. In both fibers, tau(2) ("endothermic force regeneration") became faster with an increase in temperature. Furthermore, tau(3) was temperature sensitive in slow fibers but not in fast fibers. The results are compared and contrasted with previous findings from T-jump experiments on fast fibers. It is observed that the fast/slow fiber difference in the rate of endothermic force generation (three- to

  9. Severe insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus in patients with congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, H; Klein, H H; Hansen, T; Müller, J; Skovby, F; Bjørbaek, C; Røder, M E; Pedersen, O

    1995-04-01

    Congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy (CFTDM) is a chronic, nonprogressive muscle disorder characterized by universal muscle hypotrophy and growth retardation. Histomorphometric examination of muscle shows a preponderance of smaller than normal type 1 fibers and overall fiber size heterogeneity. Concomitant endocrine dysfunctions have not been described. We report the findings of altered insulin secretion and insulin action in two brothers affected with CFTDM and glucose intolerance as well as in their nonconsanguineous glucose-tolerant parents. Results are compared with those of six normoglycemic control subjects. All study participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test to estimate insulin secretion. The oldest boy and his parents volunteered for studies of whole-body insulin sensitivity consisting of a 4-h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp in combination with indirect calorimetry. Insulin receptor function and glycogen synthase (GS) activity and expression were examined in biopsies of vastus lateralis muscle. Despite a 45-90-fold increase in both fasting and postprandial serum insulin levels, both CFTDM patients had diabetes mellitus. Clamp studies revealed that the oldest boy had severe insulin resistance of both liver and peripheral tissues. The impaired insulin-stimulated glucose disposal to peripheral tissues was primarily due to reduced nonoxidative glucose metabolism. These changes were paralleled by reduced basal values of muscle GS total activity, allosterical activation of GS by glucose-6-phosphate, GS protein, and GS mRNA. The father expressed a lesser degree of insulin resistance, and studies of muscle insulin receptor function showed a severe impairment of receptor kinase activity. In conclusion, CFTDM is a novel form of severe hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Whether insulin resistance is causally related to the muscle disorder awaits to be clarified.

  10. Some properties of different skeletal muscle fiber types: comparison of reference bases.

    PubMed

    Kelso, T B; Hodgson, D R; Visscher, A R; Gollnick, P D

    1987-04-01

    Several biochemical components of the white portion of the gastrocnemius (WGM), plantaris (PM), and soleus (SM) muscles of the rat and middle gluteal (MGM) muscle of the horse were compared based on wet and dry weight, protein, and total creatine concentrations ([TCr]). The water content was similar for the rat hindlimb muscles, however, the concentrations of protein, ATP, phosphocreatine (PCr), creatine, and glycogen ranked as SM less than PM less than WGM for all reference bases except total creatine. In contrast, concentrations of ATP, creatine, and PCr were similar in all muscles studied when expressed as ratios of [TCr]. Horse MGM had the lowest percent of water and protein per gram wet or dry weight but highest glycogen concentration of the muscles studied, irrespective of the reference base used to express concentrations. Coefficients of variation were lowest when muscle constituents were related to [TCr]. It is concluded that expressing muscle constituents relative to total creatine results in the smallest variation and is a good method for making comparisons between muscles of similar fiber composition. However, essential information concerning different types of muscle may be lost when this reference base is used.

  11. An unusual myopathy: speckled muscle fibers due to enlarged mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jeffree, Rosalind L; Wills, Edward J; Harper, Clive

    2007-07-01

    We report a 52-year-old woman who presented with a 6-month history of proximal muscle weakness, elevated serum creatine kinase, and myopathic pattern on electromyography (EMG). Histology of the muscle shows a speckled pattern due to clustering of enlarged mitochondria. The pathology resembles that of selenium deficiency. The patient was found to have borderline low serum selenium and also low vitamin D and thyroid-stimulating hormone. The cause of this unusual myopathy is probably multifactorial. This case is important because the unusual pathological picture represents a potentially treatable myopathy. In addition, we hope that publication of the complex clinical and biochemical abnormalities of this case, in conjunction with other case reports, may facilitate future elucidation of muscle mitochondrial function and dysfunction.

  12. Artificial muscles made of chiral two-way shape memory polymer fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qianxi; Fan, Jizhou; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the unusual improvement of the tensile actuation of hierarchically chiral structured artificial muscle made of two-way shape memory polymer (2W-SMP) fiber. Experimental results show that the chemically cross-linked poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) 2W-SMP fibers possess an average negative coefficient of thermal expansion (NCTE) that is at least one order higher than that of the polyethylene fiber used previously. As expected, the increase in axial thermal contraction of the precursor fiber leads to an increase in the recovered torque ( 4.4 Nmm ) of the chiral fiber and eventually in the tensile actuation of the twisted-then-coiled artificial muscle ( 67.81 ±1.82 % ). A mechanical model based on Castigliano's second theorem is proposed, and the calculated result is consistent with the experimental result (64.17% tensile stroke). The model proves the significance of the NCTE and the recovered torque on tensile actuation of the artificial muscle and can be used as a guidance for the future design.

  13. Mathematical modeling and fluorescence imaging to study the Ca2+ turnover in skinned muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Uttenweiler, D; Weber, C; Fink, R H

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the simulation of the spatial and temporal time course of Ca2+ ion movement in caffeine-induced calcium transients of chemically skinned muscle fiber preparations. Our model assumes cylindrical symmetry and quantifies the radial profile of Ca2+ ion concentration by solving the diffusion equations for Ca2+ ions and various mobile buffers, and the rate equations for Ca2+ buffering (mobile and immobile buffers) and for the release and reuptake of Ca2+ ions by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), with a finite-difference algorithm. The results of the model are compared with caffeine-induced spatial Ca2+ transients obtained from saponin skinned murine fast-twitch fibers by fluorescence photometry and imaging measurements using the ratiometric dye Fura-2. The combination of mathematical modeling and digital image analysis provides a tool for the quantitative description of the total Ca2+ turnover and the different contributions of all interacting processes to the overall Ca2+ transient in skinned muscle fibers. It should thereby strongly improve the usage of skinned fibers as quantitative assay systems for many parameters of the SR and the contractile apparatus helping also to bridge the gap to the intact muscle fiber. PMID:9545029

  14. Segmental distribution of myosin heavy chain isoforms within single muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Gould, Maree

    2017-02-18

    Despite many studies looking at the distribution of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms across a transverse section of muscle, knowledge of MHC distribution along the longitudinal axis of a single skeletal muscle fiber has been relatively overlooked. Immunocytochemistry was performed on serial sections of rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle to identify MHC types I, IIA, IIX, IIY and IIB. Sixteen fascicles which contained a total of 362 fibers were randomly and systematically sampled from the 3 EDL muscles. All MHC type I and type II isoforms were expressed. Segmental expression occurred within a very limited segment. MHC isoform expression followed the accepted traditional order from I&cenveo_unknown_entity_wingdings_F0F3;IIA&cenveo_unknown_entity_wingdings_F0F3;IIX&cenveo_unknown_entity_wingdings_F0F3;IIB, however in some samples expression of an isoform was circumvented from IIB to I or from I to IIB directly. Segmental distribution of MHC isoforms along a single muscle fiber may be due to the myonuclear domain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of diltiazem on skinned skeletal muscle fibers of the African clawed toad.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, T; Endo, M

    1983-02-01

    To examine the effects of diltiazem and its l-cis isomer (which possesses only a weak Ca++-antagonistic action) on the contractile system and the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle, we used skinned fibers isolated from iliofibularis muscle of the African clawed toad, Xenopus laevis. Diltiazem showed the following effects: an increase in the Ca++ sensitivity of the contractile system, a decrease in the maximal tension developed in a saturating concentration of Ca++, an inhibition of Ca++ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum, an inhibition of Ca++ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum by caffeine, and an increase in the Ca++ permeability of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. The effects of the l-cis isomer were similar to those of diltiazem, and the potencies of the two substances were nearly equal, except with respect to the effect on the Ca++ release induced by caffeine: the l-cis isomer potentiated this type of Ca++ release. Diltiazem's effects on amphibian skinned skeletal muscle fibers may not be related qualitatively or quantitatively to the Ca++-antagonistic actions of the drug on mammalian cardiac and smooth muscles. The pharmacological spectrum of diltiazem on skinned skeletal muscle fibers is similar to that of some local anesthetics.

  16. Decrease of muscle fiber conduction velocity correlates with strength loss after an endurance run.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Dardanello, Davide; Tarperi, Cantor; Rosso, Valeria; Festa, Luca; La Torre, Antonio; Pellegrini, Barbara; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring surface electromyographic (EMG) signals can provide useful insights for characterizing muscle fatigue, which is defined as an exercise-induced strength loss. This experiment investigated the muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV) changes induced by an endurance run. The day before and immediately after a half-marathon run (21.097 km) 11 amateur runners performed maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs) of knee extensor muscles. During the MVC, multichannel EMG was recorded from the vastus lateralis and EMG amplitude and CV were calculated. After the run, knee extensors showed a decreased strength (-13  ±  9%, p  =  0.001) together with a reduction in EMG amplitude (-13  ±  10%, p  =  0.003) and in CV (-6  ±  8%, p  =  0.032). Knee extensor strength loss positively correlated with vastus lateralis CV differences (r  =  0.76, p  =  0.006). Thus, the exercises-induced muscle fatigue was associated not only with a decrease in EMG amplitude, but also with a reduction in CV. This finding suggests that muscle fibers with higher CV (i.e. those with greater fiber size) were the most impaired during strength production after an endurance run.

  17. Comparative analysis of fiber-type composition in the iliofibularis muscle of phrynosomatid lizards (Squamata).

    PubMed

    Bonine, K E; Gleeson, T T; Garland, T

    2001-12-01

    The lizard family Phrynosomatidae comprises three subclades: the closely related sand and horned lizards, and their relatives the Sceloporus group. This family exhibits great variation in ecology, behavior, and general body plan. Previous studies also show that this family exhibits great diversity in locomotor performance abilities; as measured on a high-speed treadmill, sand lizards are exceptionally fast sprinters, members of the Sceloporus group are intermediate, and horned lizards are slowest. These differences are paralleled by differences in relative hindlimb span. To determine if muscle fiber-type composition also varies among the three subclades, we examined the iliofibularis (IF), a hindlimb muscle used in lizard locomotion, in 11 species of phrynosomatid lizards. Using histochemical assays for myosin ATPase, an indicator of fast-twitch capacity, and succinic dehydrogenase, denoting oxidative capacity, we classified fiber types into three categories based on existing nomenclature: fast-twitch glycolytic (FG), fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic (FOG), and slow-twitch oxidative (SO). Sand lizards have a high proportion of FG fibers (64-70%) and a low proportion of FOG fibers (25-33%), horned lizards are the converse (FG fibers 25-31%, FOG fibers 56-66%), and members of the Sceloporus group are intermediate for both FG (41-48%) and FOG (42-45%) content. Hence, across all 11 species %FOG and %FG are strongly negatively correlated. Analysis with phylogenetically independent contrasts indicate that this negative relationship is entirely attributable to the divergence between sand and horned lizards. The %SO also varies among the three subclades. Results from conventional nested ANCOVA (with log body mass as a covariate) indicate that the log mean cross-sectional area of individual muscle fibers differs among species and is positively correlated with body mass across species, but does not differ significantly among subclades. The log cross-sectional area of the IF

  18. Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to muscle fiber to model Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chal, Jérome; Oginuma, Masayuki; Al Tanoury, Ziad; Gobert, Bénédicte; Sumara, Olga; Hick, Aurore; Bousson, Fanny; Zidouni, Yasmine; Mursch, Caroline; Moncuquet, Philippe; Tassy, Olivier; Vincent, Stéphane; Miyanari, Ayako; Bera, Agata; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Guevara, Getzabel; Hestin, Marie; Kennedy, Leif; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Drayton, Bernadette; Cherrier, Thomas; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Gussoni, Emanuela; Relaix, Frédéric; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Pourquié, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    During embryonic development, skeletal muscles arise from somites, which derive from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Using PSM development as a guide, we establish conditions for the differentiation of monolayer cultures of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into PSM-like cells without the introduction of transgenes or cell sorting. We show that primary and secondary skeletal myogenesis can be recapitulated in vitro from the PSM-like cells, providing an efficient, serum-free protocol for the generation of striated, contractile fibers from mouse and human pluripotent cells. The mouse ES cells also differentiate into Pax7(+) cells with satellite cell characteristics, including the ability to form dystrophin(+) fibers when grafted into muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Fibers derived from ES cells of mdx mice exhibit an abnormal branched phenotype resembling that described in vivo, thus providing an attractive model to study the origin of the pathological defects associated with DMD.

  19. MicroRNA-206 is highly expressed in newly formed muscle fibers: implications regarding potential for muscle regeneration and maturation in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Katsutoshi; Hagiwara, Yasuko; Ando, Masanori; Nakamura, Akinori; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Hijikata, Takao

    2008-01-01

    miR-1, miR-133a, and miR-206 are muscle-specific microRNAs expressed in skeletal muscles and have been shown to contribute to muscle development. To gain insight into the pathophysiological roles of these three microRNAs in dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy, their expression in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of mdx mice and CXMD(J) dogs were evaluated by semiquantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. Their temporal and spatial expression patterns were also analyzed in C2C12 cells during muscle differentiation and in cardiotoxin (CTX)-injured TA muscles to examine how muscle degeneration and regeneration affect their expression. In dystrophic TA muscles of mdx mice, miR-206 expression was significantly elevated as compared to that in control TA muscles of age-matched B10 mice, whereas there were no differences in miR-1 or miR-133a expression between B10 and mdx TA muscles. On in situ hybridization analysis, intense signals for miR-206 probes were localized in newly formed myotubes with centralized nuclei, or regenerating muscle fibers, but not in intact pre-degenerated fibers or numerous small mononucleated cells, possibly proliferating myoblasts and inflammatory infiltrates. Similar increased expression of miR-206 was also found in C2C12 differentiation and CTX-induced regeneration, in which differentiated myotubes or regenerating fibers showed abundant expression of miR-206. However, CXMD(J) TA muscles contained smaller amounts of miR-206, miR-1, and miR-133a than controls. They exhibited more severe and more progressive degenerative alterations than mdx TA muscles. Taken together, these observations indicated that newly formed myotubes showed markedly increased expression of miR-206, which might reflect active regeneration and efficient maturation of skeletal muscle fibers.

  20. Quantitative PCR Analysis of Laryngeal Muscle Fiber Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Daele, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    Voice and swallowing dysfunction as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis can be improved with vocal fold injections or laryngeal framework surgery. However, denervation atrophy can cause late-term clinical failure. A major determinant of skeletal muscle physiology is myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and previous protein analyses…

  1. A potential material to cut down infection caused by application of artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang-Ning; Li, Xiao-Rong; Wang, De-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    Artificial muscles are so important that can be used to cure prosthetic limbs. A new kind of taurine Schiff base sodium was synthesized by a series of chemical reactions, which may be applied to strengthen antibacterial activity of artificial muscle. The bioactivity of this material was screened by cytotoxicity test, antibacterial test, and thermal gravity test and so on. All results told us that this material had low toxicity, high antibacterial activity and thermal stability. Combine our deep studies on pharmacological activity of the active material with our knowledge on artificial muscles; we want to know if we can put this material into the content of artificial muscle, in order to strengthen its antimicrobial activity, so that the pains of the patients who were applied artificial muscle would be relieved.

  2. Transduction of skeletal muscles with common reporter genes can promote muscle fiber degeneration and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Winbanks, Catherine E; Beyer, Claudia; Qian, Hongwei; Gregorevic, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV vectors) are promising tools for delivering transgenes to skeletal muscle, in order to study the mechanisms that control the muscle phenotype, and to ameliorate diseases that perturb muscle homeostasis. Many studies have employed rAAV vectors carrying reporter genes encoding for β-galactosidase (β-gal), human placental alkaline phosphatase (hPLAP), and green fluorescent protein (GFP) as experimental controls when studying the effects of manipulating other genes. However, it is not clear to what extent these reporter genes can influence signaling and gene expression signatures in skeletal muscle, which may confound the interpretation of results obtained in experimentally manipulated muscles. Herein, we report a strong pro-inflammatory effect of expressing reporter genes in skeletal muscle. Specifically, we show that the administration of rAAV6:hPLAP vectors to the hind limb muscles of mice is associated with dose- and time-dependent macrophage recruitment, and skeletal muscle damage. Dose-dependent expression of hPLAP also led to marked activity of established pro-inflammatory IL-6/Stat3, TNFα, IKKβ and JNK signaling in lysates obtained from homogenized muscles. These effects were independent of promoter type, as expression cassettes featuring hPLAP under the control of constitutive CMV and muscle-specific CK6 promoters both drove cellular responses when matched for vector dose. Importantly, the administration of rAAV6:GFP vectors did not induce muscle damage or inflammation except at the highest doses we examined, and administration of a transgene-null vector (rAAV6:MCS) did not cause damage or inflammation at any of the doses tested, demonstrating that GFP-expressing, or transgene-null vectors may be more suitable as experimental controls. The studies highlight the importance of considering the potential effects of reporter genes when designing experiments that examine gene manipulation in vivo.

  3. [Ultrastructure of the blood vessels and muscle fibers in the skeletal muscle of rats flown on the Kosmos-605 and Kosmos-782 biosatellites].

    PubMed

    Savik, Z F; Rokhlenko, K D

    1981-01-01

    Electron microscopy was used to study ultrastructures of the wall of blood vessels and muscle fibers of the red (soleus) and mixed (gastrocnemius) muscles of rats flown on Cosmos-605 for 22.5 days and on Cosmos-782 for 19,5 days and sacrificed 4-6 hours, 48 hours and 25-27 days postflight. It was demonstrated that the orbital flight did not induce significant changes in the ultrastructure of blood vessels of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles but caused atrophy of muscle fibers and reduction of the number of functioning capillaries. Readaptation of the soleus vascular system to 1 g led to degradation of permeability of capillary and venular walls and development of edema of the perivascular connective tissue. This may be one of the factors responsible for dystrophic changes in muscle fibers.

  4. Arrest is a regulator of fiber-specific alternative splicing in the indirect flight muscles of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Oas, Sandy T; Bryantsev, Anton L; Cripps, Richard M

    2014-09-29

    Drosophila melanogaster flight muscles are distinct from other skeletal muscles, such as jump muscles, and express several uniquely spliced muscle-associated transcripts. We sought to identify factors mediating splicing differences between the flight and jump muscle fiber types. We found that the ribonucleic acid-binding protein Arrest (Aret) is expressed in flight muscles: in founder cells, Aret accumulates in a novel intranuclear compartment that we termed the Bruno body, and after the onset of muscle differentiation, Aret disperses in the nucleus. Down-regulation of the aret gene led to ultrastructural changes and functional impairment of flight muscles, and transcripts of structural genes expressed in the flight muscles became spliced in a manner characteristic of jump muscles. Aret also potently promoted flight muscle splicing patterns when ectopically expressed in jump muscles or tissue culture cells. Genetically, aret is located downstream of exd (extradenticle), hth (homothorax), and salm (spalt major), transcription factors that control fiber identity. Our observations provide insight into a transcriptional and splicing regulatory network for muscle fiber specification.

  5. Muscle-fiber conduction velocity during concentric and eccentric actions on a flywheel exercise device.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Marco; Alkner, Björn; Norrbrand, Lena; Farina, Dario; Tesch, Per A

    2006-08-01

    A gravity-independent flywheel exercise device (FWED) has been proven effective as a countermeasure to loss of strength and muscle atrophy induced by simulated microgravity. This study assessed muscle-fiber conduction velocity (CV) and surface EMG instantaneous mean power spectral frequency (iMNF) during brief bouts of fatiguing concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) exercise on a FWED in order to identify electromyographic (EMG) variables that can be used to provide objective indications of muscle status when exercising with a FWED. Multichannel surface EMG signals were recorded from vastus lateralis and medialis muscles of nine men during: (1) isometric, 60-s action at 50% of maximum voluntary action (MVC); (2) two isometric, linearly increasing force ramps (0-100% MVC); and (3) dynamic CON/ECC coupled actions on the FWED. Muscle-fiber CV and iMNF were computed over time during the three tasks. During ramps, CV, but not iMNF, increased with force (P < 0.001). Conduction velocity and iMNF decreased with the same normalized rate of change in constant-force actions. During CON/ECC actions, the normalized rate of change over time was larger for CV than iMNF (P < 0.05). These results suggest that, during fatiguing, dynamic, variable-force tasks, changes in CV cannot be indirectly inferred by EMG spectral analysis. This underlines the importance of measuring both CV and spectral variables for muscle assessment in dynamic tasks.

  6. Structural dynamics of the skeletal muscle fiber by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2008-02-01

    The high degree of structural order in skeletal muscle allows imaging of this tissue by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG). As previously found (Vanzi et al., J. Muscle Cell Res. Motil. 2006) by fractional extraction of proteins, myosin is the source of SHG signal. A full characterization of the polarization-dependence of the SHG signal can provide very selective information on the orientation of the emitting proteins and their dynamics during contraction. We developed a line scan polarization method, allowing measurements of a full polarization curve in intact muscle fibers from skeletal muscle of the frog to characterize the SHG polarization dependence on different physiological states (resting, rigor and isometric tetanic contraction). The polarization data have been interpreted by means of a model in terms of the average orientation of SHG emitters.The different physiological states are characterized by distinct patterns of SHG polarization. The variation of the orientation of emitting molecules in relation to the physiological state of the muscle demonstrates that one part of SHG signal arises from the globular head of the myosin molecule that cross-links actin and myosin filaments. The dependence of the SHG modulation on the degree of overlap between actin and myosin filaments during an isometric contraction, provides the constraints to estimate the fraction of myosin heads generating the isometric force in the active muscle fiber.

  7. One-dimensional chain of quantum molecule motors as a mathematical physics model for muscle fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Tie-Yan

    2015-12-01

    A quantum chain model of multiple molecule motors is proposed as a mathematical physics theory for the microscopic modeling of classical force-velocity relation and tension transients in muscle fibers. The proposed model was a quantum many-particle Hamiltonian to predict the force-velocity relation for the slow release of muscle fibers, which has not yet been empirically defined and was much more complicated than the hyperbolic relationships. Using the same Hamiltonian model, a mathematical force-velocity relationship was proposed to explain the tension observed when the muscle was stimulated with an alternative electric current. The discrepancy between input electric frequency and the muscle oscillation frequency could be explained physically by the Doppler effect in this quantum chain model. Further more, quantum physics phenomena were applied to explore the tension time course of cardiac muscle and insect flight muscle. Most of the experimental tension transient curves were found to correspond to the theoretical output of quantum two- and three-level models. Mathematical modeling electric stimulus as photons exciting a quantum three-level particle reproduced most of the tension transient curves of water bug Lethocerus maximus. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Foundation for the Central Universities of China.

  8. Thin filament diversity and physiological properties of fast and slow fiber types in astronaut leg muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L W.; Thompson, Joyce L.; Fitts, Robert H.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Trappe, Scott W.; Trappe, Todd A.; Costill, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Slow type I fibers in soleus and fast white (IIa/IIx, IIx), fast red (IIa), and slow red (I) fibers in gastrocnemius were examined electron microscopically and physiologically from pre- and postflight biopsies of four astronauts from the 17-day, Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Shuttle Transport System-78 mission. At 2.5-microm sarcomere length, thick filament density is approximately 1,012 filaments/microm(2) in all fiber types and unchanged by spaceflight. In preflight aldehyde-fixed biopsies, gastrocnemius fibers possess higher percentages (approximately 23%) of short thin filaments than soleus (9%). In type I fibers, spaceflight increases short, thin filament content from 9 to 24% in soleus and from 26 to 31% in gastrocnemius. Thick and thin filament spacing is wider at short sarcomere lengths. The Z-band lattice is also expanded, except for soleus type I fibers with presumably stiffer Z bands. Thin filament packing density correlates directly with specific tension for gastrocnemius fibers but not soleus. Thin filament density is inversely related to shortening velocity in all fibers. Thin filament structural variation contributes to the functional diversity of normal and spaceflight-unloaded muscles.

  9. Effect of 23-day muscle disuse on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ properties and contractility in human type I and type II skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Lamboley, C R; Wyckelsma, V L; Perry, B D; McKenna, M J; Lamb, G D

    2016-08-01

    Inactivity negatively impacts on skeletal muscle function mainly through muscle atrophy. However, recent evidence suggests that the quality of individual muscle fibers is also altered. This study examined the effects of 23 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) on specific force and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content in individual skinned muscle fibers. Muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis were taken from six young healthy adults prior to and following ULLS. After disuse, the endogenous SR Ca(2+) content was ∼8% lower in type I fibers and maximal SR Ca(2+) capacity was lower in both type I and type II fibers (-11 and -5%, respectively). The specific force, measured in single skinned fibers from three subjects, decreased significantly after ULLS in type II fibers (-23%) but not in type I fibers (-9%). Western blot analyses showed no significant change in the amounts of myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and MHC IIa following the disuse, whereas the amounts of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 1 (SERCA1) and calsequestrin increased by ∼120 and ∼20%, respectively, and the amount of troponin I decreased by ∼21%. These findings suggest that the decline in force and power occurring with muscle disuse is likely to be exacerbated in part by reductions in maximum specific force in type II fibers, and in the amount of releasable SR Ca(2+) in both fiber types, the latter not being attributable to a reduced calsequestrin level. Furthermore, the ∼3-wk disuse in human elicits change in SR properties, in particular a more than twofold upregulation in SERCA1 density, before any fiber-type shift.

  10. Protein-coated poly(L-lactic acid) fibers provide a substrate for differentiation of human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Elizabeth M; Thurmond, Frederick A; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Williams, R Sanders; Wright, Woodring E; Nelson, Kevin D; Garner, Harold R

    2004-06-01

    Tissue engineering represents a potential method for repairing damaged skeletal muscle tissue. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins were evaluated for their ability to aid in cell attachment, whereas a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fiber scaffold was tested as a substrate for the differentiation of human skeletal muscle cells. In comparison to uncoated or gelatin-coated PLLA films, cell attachment increased significantly (p < 0.001) on PLLA films coated with ECM gel, fibronectin, or laminin. Myoblasts differentiated into multinucleated myofibers on ECM gel-coated PLLA fibers, and expressed muscle markers such as myosin and alpha-actinin. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis showed similar gene expression profiles for human skeletal muscle cells on ECM gel-coated PLLA fibers as to that observed for myofibers on tissue culture plates. Therefore, PLLA fibers coated with ECM proteins provide a scaffold for the development of skeletal muscle tissue for tissue engineering and cell transplantation applications.

  11. Longitudinal decline of lower extremity muscle power in healthy and mobility-limited older adults: influence of muscle mass, strength, composition, neuromuscular activation and single fiber contractile properties

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kieran F.; Pasha, Evan; Doros, Gheorghe; Clark, David J.; Patten, Carolynn; Phillips, Edward M.; Frontera, Walter R.; Fielding, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This longitudinal study examined the major physiological mechanisms that determine the age-related loss of lower extremity muscle power in two distinct groups of older humans. We hypothesized that after ~ 3 years of follow-up, mobility-limited older adults (mean age: 77.2 ± 4, n = 22, 12 females) would have significantly greater reductions in leg extensor muscle power compared to healthy older adults (74.1 ± 4, n = 26, 12 females). Methods Mid-thigh muscle size and composition were assessed using computed tomography. Neuromuscular activation was quantified using surface electromyography and vastus lateralis single muscle fibers were studied to evaluate intrinsic muscle contractile properties. Results At follow-up, the overall magnitude of muscle power loss was similar between groups: mobility-limited: −8.5% vs. healthy older: −8.8%, P > 0.8. Mobility-limited elders had significant reductions in muscle size (−3.8%, P< 0.01) and strength (−5.9%, P< 0.02), however, these parameters were preserved in healthy older (P ≥ 0.7). Neuromuscular activation declined significantly within healthy older but not in mobility-limited participants. Within both groups, the cross sectional areas of type I and type IIA muscle fibers were preserved while substantial increases in single fiber peak force ( > 30%), peak power (> 200%) and unloaded shortening velocity (>50%) were elicited at follow-up. Conclusion Different physiological mechanisms contribute to the loss of lower extremity muscle power in healthy older and mobility-limited older adults. Neuromuscular changes may be the critical early determinant of muscle power deficits with aging. In response to major whole muscle decrements, major compensatory mechanisms occur within the contractile properties of surviving single muscle fibers in an attempt to restore overall muscle power and function with advancing age. PMID:24122149

  12. Cutting the fat: artificial muscle oscillators for lighter, cheaper, and slimmer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2012-04-01

    Artificial muscles based on dielectric elastomers show enormous promise for a wide range of applications and are slowly moving from the lab to industry. One problem for industrial uptake is the expensive, rigid, heavy and bulky high voltage driver, sensor and control circuitry that artificial muscle devices currently require. One recent development, the Dielectric Elastomer Switch(es) (DES), shows promise for substantially reducing auxiliary circuitry and helping to mature the technology. DES are piezoresistive elements that can be used to form logic, driver, and sensor circuitry. One particularly useful feature of DES is their ability to embed oscillatory behaviour directly into an artificial muscle device. In this paper we will focus on how DES oscillators can break down the barriers to industrial adoption for artificial muscle devices. We have developed an improved artificial muscle ring oscillator and applied it to form a mechanosensitive conveyor. The free running oscillator ran at 4.4 Hz for 1056 cycles before failing due to electrode degradation. With better materials artificial muscle oscillators could open the door to robots with increased power to weight ratios, simple-to-control peristaltic pumps, and commercially viable artificial muscle motors.

  13. The human tongue slows down to speak: muscle fibers of the human tongue.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Ira; Mu, Liancai; Amirali, Asif; Su, Hungxi; Sobotka, Stanislaw

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about the specializations of human tongue muscles. In this study, myofibrillar adenosine triphosphatase (mATPase) histochemical staining was used to study the percentage and distribution of slow twitch muscle fibers (slow MFs) within tongue muscles of four neurologically normal human adults and specimens from a 2-year-old human, a newborn human, an adult with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), and a macaque monkey. The average percentage of slow MFs in adult and the 2-year-old muscle specimens was 54%, the IPD was 45%, while the neonatal human (32%) and macaque monkey (28%) had markedly fewer slow MFs. In contrast, the tongue muscles of the rat and cat have been reported to have no slow MFs. There was a marked spatial gradient in the distribution of slow MFs with the highest percentages found medially and posteriorly. Normal adult tongue muscles were found to have a variety of uniquely specialized features including MF-type grouping (usually found in neuromuscular disorders), large amounts of loose connective tissue, and short branching MFs. In summary, normal adult human tongue muscles have by far the highest proportion of slow MFs of any mammalian tongue studied to date. Moreover, adult human tongue muscles have multiple unique anatomic features. As the tongue shape changes that are seen during speech articulation are unique to humans, we hypothesize that the large proportion of slow MFs and the anatomical specializations observed in the adult human tongue have evolved to perform these movements.

  14. X-Lase CoreScriber, Picosecond Fiber Laser Tool for High-Precision Scribing and Cutting of Transparent Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivistö, S.; Amberla, T.; Konnunaho, T.; Kangastupa, J.; Sillanpää, J.

    We have developed various industrial transparent material scribing processes and a laser tool, picosecond MHz-range all- fiber laser X-Lase CoreScriber. The remarkably high peak power, exceptionally good beam quality, and integrability of the X-Lase CoreScriber combined with high achievable material processing speeds provide tempting solutions for high- precision glass processing. Here presented sapphire and Gorilla glass dicing processes are based on transparent material internal modification with short and intense high repetition rate ps-laser pulses. Increased processing speeds and cutting qualities in comparison to other conventional processing methods are presented.

  15. Relation between muscle fiber conduction velocity and exerted dynamic characteristics of muscular tension in patients with hemiplegia caused by stroke

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Kenichi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Sato, Yoichiro; Sakurai, Kentaro; Abe, Chie

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the relationships among muscle fiber conduction velocity, time-force characteristics of muscle force production, and voluntary movement in patients with hemiplegia. [Subjects and Methods] The participants in the present study were 13 patients with hemiplegia. Muscle fiber conduction velocity, deep temperature of muscles and muscle thickness were measured for the tibialis anterior, and a time force curve was obtained from dorsiflexion of the ankle and lower thigh girth (maximum, minimum) for both sides. The maximum torque rate of change and maximum torque were calculated from the force-time curve. In addition, Brunnstrom Recovery Stage was used to evaluate the function of the hemiplegic side. [Results] In all the measurement items, significant differences were observed between the hemiplegic side and the healthy side. The maximum torque rate of change and Brunnstrom Recovery Stage showed a high degree of correlation. The muscle fiber conduction velocity and maximum torque rate of change or maximum torque showed a medium degree of correlation. However, muscle fiber conduction velocity was not significantly correlated with Brunnstrom Recovery Stage. [Conclusion] Brunnstrom Recovery Stage was good as a determination factor for the maximum torque rate of change. In addition, in patients with hemiplegia, it became clear that relationship is between muscle fiber conduction velocity and time-force characteristics of muscle force production as in healthy persons. PMID:27821946

  16. Relation between muscle fiber conduction velocity and exerted dynamic characteristics of muscular tension in patients with hemiplegia caused by stroke.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kenichi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Sato, Yoichiro; Sakurai, Kentaro; Abe, Chie

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the relationships among muscle fiber conduction velocity, time-force characteristics of muscle force production, and voluntary movement in patients with hemiplegia. [Subjects and Methods] The participants in the present study were 13 patients with hemiplegia. Muscle fiber conduction velocity, deep temperature of muscles and muscle thickness were measured for the tibialis anterior, and a time force curve was obtained from dorsiflexion of the ankle and lower thigh girth (maximum, minimum) for both sides. The maximum torque rate of change and maximum torque were calculated from the force-time curve. In addition, Brunnstrom Recovery Stage was used to evaluate the function of the hemiplegic side. [Results] In all the measurement items, significant differences were observed between the hemiplegic side and the healthy side. The maximum torque rate of change and Brunnstrom Recovery Stage showed a high degree of correlation. The muscle fiber conduction velocity and maximum torque rate of change or maximum torque showed a medium degree of correlation. However, muscle fiber conduction velocity was not significantly correlated with Brunnstrom Recovery Stage. [Conclusion] Brunnstrom Recovery Stage was good as a determination factor for the maximum torque rate of change. In addition, in patients with hemiplegia, it became clear that relationship is between muscle fiber conduction velocity and time-force characteristics of muscle force production as in healthy persons.

  17. Experimental comparison of the oxygen-assist laser cutting with a fiber and CO2-laser under the condition of minimal roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orishich, A. M.; Shulyatyev, V. B.; Malikov, A. G.; Golyshev, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    The conditions of minimal-roughness surface production were studied experimentally in the process of the oxygenassisted laser cutting with the fiber and СО2 lasers. The coefficient of the laser radiation absorption in the cut channel during the cutting process was measured as the sheet thickness varied from 3 to 16 mm. It is demonstrated that the cutting conditions with the minimal roughness can be formulated for the two laser types with the same generalized parameters, i.e. dimensionless absorbed laser power and Peclet number (dimensionless speed). Numerical values of these parameters were found experimentally. The optimum Peclet number is 0.5 for the СО2-laser cutting, and 0.35 when the fiber laser is used.

  18. Capillary-to-fiber ratio of hind limb muscles in the male Syrian golden hamster.

    PubMed

    Swisher, Anne K; Alway, Stephen E; Yeater, Rachel

    2004-04-01

    The hamster has been the accepted model of emphysema since the 1970s, demonstrating disease-related effects on respiratory skeletal muscle. However, there is scant information available about the model's ability to replicate the peripheral skeletal muscle changes seen in human disease, such as alterations in capillarity. The present study described the capillary-to-fiber ratio (C/F) of normal hamster plantaris, gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles in eight animals. C/F was 1.72 +/- 0.38 for plantaris, 1.95 +/- 0.40 for gastrocnemius, and 2.22 +/- 0.43 for soleus. C/F of soleus was significantly greater (P < 0.01) than plantaris. The C/F of hamster hindlimb muscles varies from those seen in rat species, and having baseline data on hamsters makes it possible to determine the effects of emphysema on C/F in this model.

  19. History dependence of human muscle-fiber conduction velocity during voluntary isometric contractions

    PubMed Central

    Lateva, Zoia C.

    2011-01-01

    The conduction velocity (CV) of a muscle fiber is affected by the fiber's discharge history going back ∼1 s. We investigated this dependence by measuring CV fluctuations during voluntary isometric contractions of the human brachioradialis muscle. We recorded electromyogram (EMG) signals simultaneously from multiple intramuscular electrodes, identified potentials belonging to the same motor unit using EMG decomposition, and estimated the CV of each discharge from the interpotential interval. In 12 of 14 subjects, CV increased by ∼10% during the first second after recruitment and then fluctuated by about ±2% in a way that mirrored the fluctuations in the instantaneous firing rate. The CV profile could be precisely described in terms of the discharge history by a simple mathematical model. In the other two subjects, and one subject retested after cooling the arm, the CV fluctuations were inversely correlated with instantaneous firing rate. In all subjects, CV was additionally affected by very short interdischarge intervals (<25 ms): it was increased in doublets at recruitment, but decreased in doublets during continuous firing and after short interdischarge intervals in doubly innervated fibers. CV also exhibited a slow trend of about −0.05%/s that did not depend on the immediate discharge history. We suggest that measurements of CV fluctuations during voluntary contractions, or during stimulation protocols that involve longer and more complex stimulation patterns than are currently being used, may provide a sensitive approach for estimating the dynamic characteristics of ion channels in the human muscle-fiber membrane. PMID:21565985

  20. Aging Enhances Indirect Flight Muscle Fiber Performance yet Decreases Flight Ability in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mark S.; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2008-10-02

    We investigated the effects of aging on Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle from the whole organism to the actomyosin cross-bridge. Median-aged (49-day-old) flies were flight impaired, had normal myofilament number and packing, barely longer sarcomeres, and slight mitochondrial deterioration compared with young (3-day-old) flies. Old (56-day-old) flies were unable to beat their wings, had deteriorated ultrastructure with severe mitochondrial damage, and their skinned fibers failed to activate with calcium. Small-amplitude sinusoidal length perturbation analysis showed median-aged indirect flight muscle fibers developed greater than twice the isometric force and power output of young fibers, yet cross-bridge kinetics were similar. Large increases in elastic and viscous moduli amplitude under active, passive, and rigor conditions suggest that median-aged fibers become stiffer longitudinally. Small-angle x-ray diffraction indicates that myosin heads move increasingly toward the thin filament with age, accounting for the increased transverse stiffness via cross-bridge formation. We propose that the observed protein composition changes in the connecting filaments, which anchor the thick filaments to the Z-disk, produce compensatory increases in longitudinal stiffness, isometric tension, power and actomyosin interaction in aging indirect flight muscle. We also speculate that a lack of MgATP due to damaged mitochondria accounts for the decreased flight performance.

  1. Gas7-Deficient Mouse Reveals Roles in Motor Function and Muscle Fiber Composition during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo-Tsang; Chang, Pu-Yuan; Su, Ching-Hua; Chao, Chuck C.-K.; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Background Growth arrest-specific gene 7 (Gas7) has previously been shown to be involved in neurite outgrowth in vitro; however, its actual role has yet to be determined. To investigate the physiological function of Gas7 in vivo, here we generated a Gas7-deficient mouse strain with a labile Gas7 mutant protein whose functions are similar to wild-type Gas7. Methodology/Principal Findings Our data show that aged Gas7-deficient mice have motor activity defects due to decreases in the number of spinal motor neurons and in muscle strength, of which the latter may be caused by changes in muscle fiber composition as shown in the soleus. In cross sections of the soleus of Gas7-deficient mice, gross morphological features and levels of myosin heavy chain I (MHC I) and MHC II markers revealed significantly fewer fast fibers. In addition, we found that nerve terminal sprouting, which may be associated with slow and fast muscle fiber composition, was considerably reduced at neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) during aging. Conclusions/Significance These findings indicate that Gas7 is involved in motor neuron function associated with muscle strength maintenance. PMID:22662195

  2. Relationship between innervation zone width and mean muscle fiber conduction velocity during a sustained isometric contraction

    PubMed Central

    Ye, X.; Beck, T.W.; Wages, N.P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relationship between the biceps brachii muscle innervation zone (IZ) width and the mean muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) during a sustained isometric contraction. Methods: Fifteen healthy men performed a sustained isometric elbow flexion exercise at their 60% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) until they could not maintain the target force. Mean MFCV was estimated through multichannel surface electromyographic recordings from a linear electrode array. Before exercise, IZ width was quantified. Separate non-parametric one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to examine whether there was a difference in each mean MFCV variable among groups with different IZ width. In addition, separate bivariate correlations were also performed to examine the relationships between the IZ width and the mean MFCV variables during the fatiguing exercise. Results: There was a significant difference in the percent decline of mean MFCV (%ΔMFCV) among groups with different IZ width (χ2 (3)=11.571, p=0.009). In addition, there was also a significant positive relationship between the IZ width and the %ΔMFCV (Kendall’s tau= 0.807; p<0.001). Conclusions: We believe that such relationship is likely influenced by both muscle fiber size and the muscle fiber type composition. PMID:25730657

  3. Early detection of denervated muscle fibers in hindlimb muscles after sciatic nerve transection in wild type mice and in the G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, T; Ly, V; Hegedus, J; Tyreman, N

    2009-02-01

    The cell adhesion molecule N-CAM is localized to the adult neuromuscular junction but is also expressed in the extrajunctional membrane of denervated muscles concurrent with extrajunctional acetylcholine receptors. Here we used N-CAM immunohistochemistry to determine whether we could detect early denervation in hindlimb muscles of the G93A transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In denervated wild type mouse muscles, N-CAM immunoreactivity on the sarcolemma of all fiber types and within the sarcoplasm of only type IIA fibers was detected at day 2: approximately 30% of the muscle fibers in cross-section were fully circumscribed by N-CAM immunoreactivity and approximately 25% of fibers were incompletely circumscribed. The proportion of the latter fibers remained constant over the next 8 days as the proportions of the former fibers increased exponentially. Thereafter, fully circumscribed muscle fibers increased to a maximum by 30 days with a concomitant fall in the incompletely circumscribed fibers. Hence, early muscle denervation was detected by the incomplete circumscription of fiber membranes by N-CAM immunoreactivity with full circumscription and intracellular localization indicating more long-term denervation. In the G93A transgenic mouse, rapid denervation of fast-twitch muscles was readily detected by a corresponding proportion of muscle fibers in cross-section with positive N-CAM immunoreactivity. The proportions of incompletely and completely circumscribed muscle fibers corresponded well with the rate of decline in intact motor units and reduced muscle contractile forces. Progressively more fully circumscribed muscle fibers became evident with age. We conclude that the N-CAM immunoreactivity on muscle fiber membranes in muscle cross-sections provides a sensitive means of detecting early muscle fiber denervation.

  4. Diaphragm Muscle Fiber Weakness and Ubiquitin–Proteasome Activation in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hooijman, Pleuni E.; Beishuizen, Albertus; Witt, Christian C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Spoelstra-de Man, Angelique M. E.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Manders, Emmy; van Hees, Hieronymus W. H.; van den Brom, Charissa E.; Silderhuis, Vera; Lawlor, Michael W.; Labeit, Siegfried; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Hartemink, Koen J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Heunks, Leo M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The clinical significance of diaphragm weakness in critically ill patients is evident: it prolongs ventilator dependency, and increases morbidity and duration of hospital stay. To date, the nature of diaphragm weakness and its underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. Objectives: We hypothesized that diaphragm muscle fibers of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients display atrophy and contractile weakness, and that the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated in the diaphragm. Methods: We obtained diaphragm muscle biopsies from 22 critically ill patients who received mechanical ventilation before surgery and compared these with biopsies obtained from patients during thoracic surgery for resection of a suspected early lung malignancy (control subjects). In a proof-of-concept study in a muscle-specific ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1) knockout mouse model, we evaluated the role of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in the development of contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Measurements and Main Results: Both slow- and fast-twitch diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients had approximately 25% smaller cross-sectional area, and had contractile force reduced by half or more. Markers of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway were significantly up-regulated in the diaphragm of critically ill patients. Finally, MuRF-1 knockout mice were protected against the development of diaphragm contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Conclusions: These findings show that diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients display atrophy and severe contractile weakness, and in the diaphragm of critically ill patients the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated. This study provides rationale for the development of treatment strategies that target the contractility of diaphragm fibers to facilitate weaning. PMID:25760684

  5. Expression of a Dominant Negative CELF Protein In Vivo Leads to Altered Muscle Organization, Fiber Size, and Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Dara S.; Moyer, Michelle; Kliment, Gregory M.; van Lunteren, Erik; Ladd, Andrea N.

    2011-01-01

    Background CUG-BP and ETR-3-like factor (CELF) proteins regulate tissue- and developmental stage-specific alternative splicing in striated muscle. We previously demonstrated that heart muscle-specific expression of a nuclear dominant negative CELF protein in transgenic mice (MHC-CELFΔ) effectively disrupts endogenous CELF activity in the heart in vivo, resulting in impaired cardiac function. In this study, transgenic mice that express the dominant negative protein under a skeletal muscle-specific promoter (Myo-CELFΔ) were generated to investigate the role of CELF-mediated alternative splicing programs in normal skeletal muscle. Methodology/Principal Findings Myo-CELFΔ mice exhibit modest changes in CELF-mediated alternative splicing in skeletal muscle, accompanied by a reduction of endomysial and perimysial spaces, an increase in fiber size variability, and an increase in slow twitch muscle fibers. Weight gain and mean body weight, total number of muscle fibers, and overall muscle strength were not affected. Conclusions/Significance Although these findings demonstrate that CELF activity contributes to the normal alternative splicing of a subset of muscle transcripts in vivo, the mildness of the effects in Myo-CELFΔ muscles compared to those in MHC-CELFΔ hearts suggests CELF activity may be less determinative for alternative splicing in skeletal muscle than in heart muscle. Nonetheless, even these small changes in CELF-mediated splicing regulation were sufficient to alter muscle organization and muscle fiber properties affected in myotonic dystrophy. This lends further evidence to the hypothesis that dysregulation of CELF-mediated alternative splicing programs may be responsible for the disruption of these properties during muscle pathogenesis. PMID:21541285

  6. Distinctive genes determine different intramuscular fat and muscle fiber ratios of the longissimus dorsi muscles in Jinhua and landrace pigs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting; Zhang, Zhenhai; Yuan, Zhangqin; Lo, Li Jan; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yizhen; Peng, Jinrong

    2013-01-01

    Meat quality is determined by properties such as carcass color, tenderness and drip loss. These properties are closely associated with meat composition, which includes the types of muscle fiber and content of intramuscular fat (IMF). Muscle fibers are the main contributors to meat mass, while IMF not only contributes to the sensory properties but also to the plethora of physical, chemical and technological properties of meat. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that determine meat composition in different pig breeds. In this report we show that Jinhua pigs, a Chinese breed, contains much higher levels of IMF than do Landrace pigs, a Danish breed. We analyzed global gene expression profiles in the longissimus dorsi muscles in Jinhua and Landrace breeds at the ages of 30, 90 and 150 days. Cross-comparison analysis revealed that genes that regulate fatty acid biosynthesis (e.g., fatty acid synthase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase) are expressed at higher levels in Jinhua pigs whereas those that regulate myogenesis (e.g., myogenic factor 6 and forkhead box O1) are expressed at higher levels in Landrace pigs. Among those genes which are highly expressed in Jinhua pigs at 90 days (d90), we identified a novel gene porcine FLJ36031 (pFLJ), which functions as a positive regulator of fat deposition in cultured intramuscular adipocytes. In summary, our data showed that the up-regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis regulatory genes such as pFLJ and myogenesis inhibitory genes such as myostatin in the longissimus dorsi muscles of Jinhua pigs could explain why this local breed produces meat with high levels of IMF.

  7. Prevention of muscle fibers atrophy during gravitational unloading: The effect of L-arginine administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashkina, N.; Lomonosova, Y.; Shevchenko, T. F.; Bugrova, A. E.; Turtikova, O. V.; Kalamkarov, G. R.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.

    2011-05-01

    Gravitational unloading results in pronounced atrophy of m.soleus. Probably, the output of NO is controlled by the muscle activity. We hypothesized that NO may be involved in the protein metabolism and increase of its concentration in muscle can prevent atrophic changes induced by gravitational unloading. In order to test the hypothesis we applied NO donor L-arginine during gravitational unloading. 2.5-month-old male Wistar rats weighing 220-230g were divided into sedentary control group (CTR, n=7), 14-day hindlimb suspension (HS, n=7), 14 days of hindlimb suspension+ L-arginine (HSL, n=7) (with a daily supplementation of 500 mg/kg wt L-arginine) and 14 days of hindlimb suspension+ L-NAME (HSN, n=7) (90 mg/kg wt during 14 days). Cross sectional area (CSA) of slow twitch (ST) and fast twitch (FT) soleus muscle fibers decreased by 45% and 28% in the HS group ( p<0.05) and 40% and 25% in the HSN group, as compared to the CTR group ( p<0.05), respectively. CSA of ST and FT muscle fibers were 25% and 16% larger in the HSL group in comparison with the HS group ( p<0.05), respectively. The atrophy of FT muscle fibers in the HSL group was completely prevented since FT fiber CSA had no significant differences from the CTR group. In HS group, the percentage of fibers revealing either gaps/disruption of the dystrophin layer of the myofiber surface membrane increased by 27% and 17%, respectively, as compared to the controls (CTR group, p<0.05). The destructions in dystrophin layer integrity and reductions of desmin content were significantly prevented in HSL group. NO concentration decreased by 60% in the HS group (as well as HSN group) and at the same time no changes were detectable in the HSL group. This fact indicates the compensation of NO content in the unloaded muscle under L-arginine administration. The levels of atrogin-1 mRNA were considerably altered in suspended animals (HS group: plus 27%, HSL group: minus 13%) as compared to the control level. Conclusion: L

  8. Therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic muscles after local injection of fragmented fibers with loaded traditional Chinese medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huiyan; Wan, Huiying; Xia, Tian; Chen, Maohua; Zhang, Yun; Luo, Xiaoming; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis remains the most effective method to re-establish a proper blood flow in ischemic tissues. There is a great clinical need to identify an injectable format to achieve a well accumulation following local administration and a sustained delivery of biological factors at the ischemic sites. In the current study, fragmented nanofibers with loaded traditional Chinese medicines, astragaloside IV (AT), the main active ingredient of astragalus, and ferulic acid (FA), the main ingredient of angelica, were proposed to promote the microvessel formation after intramuscular injection into ischemic hindlimbs. Fragmented fibers with average lengths of 5 (FF-5), 20 (FF-20) and 80 μm (FF-80) were constructed by the cryocutting of aligned electrospun fibers. Their dispersion in sodium alginate solution (0.2%) indicated good injectability. After injection into the quadriceps muscles of the hindlimbs, FF-20 and FF-80 fiber fragments showed higher tissue retentions than FF-5, and around 90% of the injected doses were determined after 7 days. On a hindlimb ischemia model established by ligating the femoral arteries, intramuscular injection of the mixtures of FA-loaded and AT-loaded FF-20 fiber fragments substantially reduced the muscle degeneration with minimal fibrosis formation, significantly enhanced the neovessel formation and hindlimb perfusion in the ischemic tissues, and efficiently promoted the limb salvage with few limb losses. Along with the easy manipulation and lower invasiveness for in vivo administration, fragmented fibers should become potential drug carriers for disease treatment, wound recovery and tissue repair after local injection.

  9. The Mode of Transverse Spread of Contraction Initiated by Local Activation in Single Crayfish Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Haruo; Ochi, Rikuo

    1967-01-01

    Isolated single crayfish muscle fibers were locally activated by applying negative current pulses to a pipette whose tip was in contact with the fiber surface. The contraction initiated by a moderate depolarization spread inwards in a graded manner according to the magnitude and duration of depolarization. Increase of the depolarized area increased the distance of the inward spread for a given amount of depolarization. If a large area of the surface membrane was depolarized with a large pipette for a sufficiently long time, the contraction spread not only inwards, but further transversely passing through the center of the fiber. Successive brief depolarizations given at an appropriate interval could produce contraction more effectively for a given amount of total current than did a prolonged depolarization. On the other hand, the contraction initiated by a strong negative current was observed to spread around the whole perimeter but not through the center of the fiber. Each type of local contraction always spread along the striation pattern and not longitudinally. Possible mechanisms of these responses are discussed in connection with the transverse tubular system of the muscle fibers. PMID:19873574

  10. Identification of a Novel Slow-Muscle-Fiber Enhancer Binding Protein, MusTRD1

    PubMed Central

    O’Mahoney, John V.; Guven, Kim L.; Lin, Jia; Joya, Josephine E.; Robinson, C. Stephen; Wade, Robert P.; Hardeman, Edna C.

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms which are responsible for restricting skeletal muscle gene expression to specific fiber types, either slow or fast twitch, are unknown. As a first step toward defining the components which direct slow-fiber-specific gene expression, we identified the sequence elements of the human troponin I slow upstream enhancer (USE) that bind muscle nuclear proteins. These include an E-box, a MEF2 element, and two other elements, USE B1 and USE C1. In vivo analysis of a mutation that disrupts USE B1 binding activity suggested that the USE B1 element is essential for high-level expression in slow-twitch muscles. This mutation does not, however, abolish slow-fiber specificity. A similar analysis indicated that the USE C1 element may play only a minor role. We report the cloning of a novel human USE B1 binding protein, MusTRD1 (muscle TFII-I repeat domain-containing protein 1), which is expressed predominantly in skeletal muscle. Significantly, MusTRD1 contains two repeat domains which show remarkable homology to the six repeat domains of the recently cloned transcription factor TFII-I. Furthermore, both TFII-I and MusTRD1 bind to similar but distinct sequences, which happen to conform with the initiator (Inr) consensus sequence. Given the roles of MEF2 and basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins in muscle gene expression, the similarity of TFII-I and MusTRD1 is intriguing, as TFII-I is believed to coordinate the interaction of MADS-box proteins, bHLH proteins, and the general transcription machinery. PMID:9774679

  11. Co-Expression of SERCA Isoforms, Phospholamban and Sarcolipin in Human Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, Val A.; Bombardier, Eric; Vigna, Chris; Devji, Tahira; Bloemberg, Darin; Gamu, Daniel; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Quadrilatero, Joe; Tupling, A. Russell

    2013-01-01

    Sarcolipin (SLN) and phospholamban (PLN) inhibit the activity of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCAs) by reducing their apparent affinity for Ca2+. A ternary complex between SLN, PLN, and SERCAs results in super-inhibition of SERCA activity. Analysis of skeletal muscle homogenate has limited our current understanding of whether SLN and PLN regulate SERCA1a, SERCA2a, or both in skeletal muscle and whether SLN and PLN are co-expressed in skeletal muscle fibers. Biopsies from human vastus lateralis were analyzed through single fiber Western blotting and immunohisto/fluorescence staining to circumvent this limitation. With a newly generated SLN antibody, we report for the first time that SLN protein is present in human skeletal muscle. Addition of the SLN antibody (50 µg) to vastus lateralis homogenates increased the apparent Ca2+ affinity of SERCA (KCa, pCa units) (-Ab, 5.85 ± 0.02 vs. +Ab, 5.95 ± 0.02) and maximal SERCA activity (μmol/g protein/min) (-Ab, 122 ± 6.4 vs. +Ab, 159 ± 11) demonstrating a functional interaction between SLN and SERCAs in human vastus lateralis. Specifically, our results suggest that although SLN and PLN may preferentially regulate SERCA1a, and SERCA2a, respectively, physiologically they both may regulate either SERCA isoform. Furthermore, we show that SLN and PLN co-immunoprecipitate in human vastus lateralis homogenate and are simultaneously expressed in 81% of the fibers analyzed with Western blotting which implies that super-inhibition of SERCA may exist in human skeletal muscle. Finally, we demonstrate unequivocally that mouse soleus contains PLN protein suggesting that super-inhibition of SERCA may also be important physiologically in rodent skeletal muscle. PMID:24358354

  12. Abnormal Skeletal Muscle Regeneration plus Mild Alterations in Mature Fiber Type Specification in Fktn-Deficient Dystroglycanopathy Muscular Dystrophy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Steven J.; Modi, Jill N.; Melick, Garrett A.; Abousaud, Marin I.; Luan, Junna; Fortunato, Marisa J.; Beedle, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylated α-dystroglycan provides an essential link between extracellular matrix proteins, like laminin, and the cellular cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. In secondary dystroglycanopathy muscular dystrophy, glycosylation abnormalities disrupt a complex O-mannose glycan necessary for muscle structural integrity and signaling. Fktn-deficient dystroglycanopathy mice develop moderate to severe muscular dystrophy with skeletal muscle developmental and/or regeneration defects. To gain insight into the role of glycosylated α-dystroglycan in these processes, we performed muscle fiber typing in young (2, 4 and 8 week old) and regenerated muscle. In mice with Fktn disruption during skeletal muscle specification (Myf5/Fktn KO), newly regenerated fibers (embryonic myosin heavy chain positive) peaked at 4 weeks old, while total regenerated fibers (centrally nucleated) were highest at 8 weeks old in tibialis anterior (TA) and iliopsoas, indicating peak degeneration/regeneration activity around 4 weeks of age. In contrast, mature fiber type specification at 2, 4 and 8 weeks old was relatively unchanged. Fourteen days after necrotic toxin-induced injury, there was a divergence in muscle fiber types between Myf5/Fktn KO (skeletal-muscle specific) and whole animal knockout induced with tamoxifen post-development (Tam/Fktn KO) despite equivalent time after gene deletion. Notably, Tam/Fktn KO retained higher levels of embryonic myosin heavy chain expression after injury, suggesting a delay or abnormality in differentiation programs. In mature fiber type specification post-injury, there were significant interactions between genotype and toxin parameters for type 1, 2a, and 2x fibers, and a difference between Myf5/Fktn and Tam/Fktn study groups in type 2b fibers. These data suggest that functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan has a unique role in muscle regeneration and may influence fiber type specification post-injury. PMID:26751696

  13. Ultrastructure of skeletal muscle fibers studied by a plunge quick freezing method: myofilament lengths.

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, H; Popp, D; Ouyang, G; Huxley, H E

    1994-01-01

    We have set up a system to rapidly freeze muscle fibers during contraction to investigate by electron microscopy the ultrastructure of active muscles. Glycerinated fiber bundles of rabbit psoas muscles were frozen in conditions of rigor, relaxation, isometric contraction, and active shortening. Freezing was carried out by plunging the bundles into liquid ethane. The frozen bundles were then freeze-substituted, plastic-embedded, and sectioned for electron microscopic observation. X-ray diffraction patterns of the embedded bundles and optical diffraction patterns of the micrographs resemble the x-ray diffraction patterns of unfixed muscles, showing the ability of the method to preserve the muscle ultrastructure. In the optical diffraction patterns layer lines up to 1/5.9 nm-1 were observed. Using this method we have investigated the myofilament lengths and concluded that there are no major changes in length in either the actin or the myosin filaments under any of the conditions explored. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:7918996

  14. Mechanical, electrical, and morphological characteristics of skeletal muscle fibers from Xenopus and other species of frogs.

    PubMed

    Oba, T; Yamamoto, M; Aoki, T; Hotta, K

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical, electrical, and morphological properties of iliofibularis or semitendinosus of Xenopus laevis, Rana catesbeiana, and Rana nigromaculata were investigated in an attempt to find out the differences between them which will give the basic knowledge for the study of excitation-contraction coupling. With application of electrical stimulation, a single muscle fiber from Xenopus contracted at a faster rate of rise than did the other muscles tested. The maximum rate of rise (Tmax) of tension was in the order of Xenopus, R. catesbeiana, and R. nigromaculata. Ca2+ sensitivity and Tmax of mechanically skinned fibers of Xenopus resembled those of R. catesbeiana. Xenopus muscle had a small cross-sectional area of T-tubule compared with that in other species and the action potential exhibited a small positive-going hump. The volume density of the terminal cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) to the myofibril was the largest in the Xenopus muscle, with a statistically significant difference. Therefore, the Xenopus muscle appears to be good material for investigation of mechanisms related to Ca2+ release from SR, as elicited by the excitation of T-tubules.

  15. Plantar Loading During Cutting While Wearing a Rigid Carbon Fiber Insert

    PubMed Central

    Queen, Robin M.; Abbey, Alicia N.; Verma, Ravi; Butler, Robert J.; Nunley, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Context Stress fractures are one of the most common injuries in sports, accounting for approximately 10% of all overuse injuries. Treatment of fifth metatarsal stress fractures involves both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Fifth metatarsal stress fractures are difficult to treat because of the risks of delayed union, nonunion, and recurrent injuries. Most of these injuries occur during agility tasks, such as those performed in soccer, basketball, and lacrosse. Objective: To examine the effect of a rigid carbon graphite footplate on plantar loading during 2 agility tasks. Design:  Crossover study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 19 recreational male athletes with no history of lower extremity injury in the past 6 months and no previous metatarsal stress fractures were tested. Main Outcome Measure(s):  Seven 45° side-cut and crossover-cut tasks were completed in a shoe with or without a full-length rigid carbon plate. Testing order between the shoe conditions and the 2 cutting tasks was randomized. Plantar-loading data were recorded using instrumented insoles. Peak pressure, maximum force, force-time integral, and contact area beneath the total foot, the medial and lateral midfoot, and the medial, middle, and lateral forefoot were analyzed. A series of paired t tests was used to examine differences between the footwear conditions (carbon graphite footplate, shod) for both cutting tasks independently (α = .05). Results: During the side-cut task, the footplate increased total foot and lateral midfoot peak pressures while decreasing contact area and lateral midfoot force-time integral. During the crossover-cut task, the footplate increased total foot and lateral midfoot peak pressure and lateral forefoot force-time integral while decreasing total and lateral forefoot contact area. Conclusions: Although a rigid carbon graphite footplate altered some aspects of the plantar-pressure profile during cutting in uninjured

  16. Regulation of the muscle fiber microenvironment by activated satellite cells during hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Fry, Christopher S; Lee, Jonah D; Jackson, Janna R; Kirby, Tyler J; Stasko, Shawn A; Liu, Honglu; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2014-04-01

    Our aim in the current study was to determine the necessity of satellite cells for long-term muscle growth and maintenance. We utilized a transgenic Pax7-DTA mouse model, allowing for the conditional depletion of > 90% of satellite cells with tamoxifen treatment. Synergist ablation surgery, where removal of synergist muscles places functional overload on the plantaris, was used to stimulate robust hypertrophy. Following 8 wk of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle demonstrated an accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and fibroblast expansion that resulted in reduced specific force of the plantaris. Although the early growth response was normal, an attenuation of hypertrophy measured by both muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area occurred in satellite cell-depleted muscle. Isolated primary myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs) negatively regulated fibroblast ECM mRNA expression in vitro, suggesting a novel role for activated satellite cells/MPCs in muscle adaptation. These results provide evidence that satellite cells regulate the muscle environment during growth.

  17. Fiber size, type, and myosin heavy chain content in rhesus hindlimb muscles after 2 weeks at 2 G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavakol, Morteza; Roy, Roland R.; Kim, Jung A.; Zhong, Hui; Hodgson, John A.; Hoban-Higgins, Tana M.; Fuller, Charles A.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fiber atrophy and an increase in the percentage of fast fibers have been observed in Rhesus leg muscles after spaceflight. Hypothesis: Hypergravity will result in muscle fiber hypertrophy and an increase in the percentage of slow fibers. METHODS: Open muscle biopsies were obtained from Rhesus soleus, medial gastrocnemius (MG), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles before and after 14 d of centrifugation (2 G) and in time-matched controls. Cage activity levels were measured by telemetry. RESULTS: Based on monoclonal antibody binding for myosin heavy chains (MHC), the fastest region of soleus contained a higher proportion of type I+II (27 vs. 13%) and had a tendency for a lower proportion of type I (38 vs. 61%, p = 0.10) fibers after than before centrifugation. There was a higher proportion of type I+II fibers in post- vs. pre-2 G (10 vs. 0.6%) MG biopsies. Fiber type distribution and MHC composition were unaffected in the TA. Overall, mean fiber sizes were unaffected by centrifugation. Average cage activity levels were 36% lower during than before 2 G. CONCLUSIONS: Our hypothesis was rejected. The changes in the proportion of fibers expressing type I MHC are the reverse of that expected with chronic loading of extensors and, paradoxically, are similar to changes observed with chronic unloading, such as occurs during spaceflight, in this primate model. The data are consistent with the observed decrease in total daily activity levels.

  18. Morphology of nerve fiber regeneration along a biodegradable poly (DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide filled with fresh skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Varejão, Artur S P; Cabrita, António M; Meek, Marcel F; Fornaro, Michele; Geuna, Stefano; Giacobini-Robecchi, Maria G

    2003-01-01

    Previous morphological and morphometrical studies showed that fresh-skeletal-muscle-enriched vein segments are good conduits for leading peripheral nerve regeneration. In the present study, we investigated the morphological features of peripheral nerve fibers regenerated along a 10-mm-long biodegradable poly (DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide enriched with fresh skeletal muscle, comparing them to nerve fiber regeneration along 10-mm-long phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-enriched poly (DLLA-epsilon-CL) tubes. Repaired nerves were analyzed at weeks 6 and 24 postoperatively. Structural and ultrastructural observation showed that good nerve fiber regeneration occurred in both PBS-enriched and fresh-skeletal-muscle-enriched nerve guides, and histomorphometrical analysis of regenerated myelinated fibers revealed no statistically significant differences between the two experimental groups at week 24 after surgery. The employment of fresh-muscle-enriched conduits for the repair of nerve defects is critically discussed in the light of these results.

  19. Micro-RNA expression in muscle and fiber morphometry in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Fritegotto, Chiara; Ferrati, Chiara; Pegoraro, Valentina; Angelini, Corrado

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to explore the cellular action of micro-RNAs that are non-coding-RNAs modulating gene expression, whose expression is dysregulated in myotonic dystrophy (DM1). Basic procedure was to measure the levels of muscle-specific myo-miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133a/b, miR-206) in muscle of 12 DM1 patients. Muscle fiber morphometry and a new grading of histopathological severity score were used to compare specific myo-miRNA level and fiber atrophy. We found that the levels of miR-1 and miR-133a/b were significantly decreased, while miR-206 was significantly increased as compared to controls. The histopathological score did not significantly correlate with the levels of myo-miRNAs, even if the lowest levels of miRNA-1 and miRNA-133a/b, and the highest levels of miRNA-206 were observed in patients with either severe histopathological scores or long disease duration. The histopathological score was inversely correlated with disease duration. Nowadays that DM1 muscle biopsies are scanty, since patients are usually diagnosed by genetic analysis, our study offers a unique opportunity to present miRNA expression profiles in muscle and correlate them to muscle morphology in this rare multisystem disorder. Our molecular and morphologic data suggest a post-transcriptional regulatory action of myo-miRNA in DM1, highlighting their potential role as biomarkers of muscle plasticity.

  20. Nitrate Intake Promotes Shift in Muscle Fiber Type Composition during Sprint Interval Training in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Stefan; Van Thienen, Ruud; Deldicque, Louise; James, Ruth; Sale, Craig; Bishop, David J.; Hespel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the effect of sprint interval training (SIT) in normoxia, vs. SIT in hypoxia alone or in conjunction with oral nitrate intake, on buffering capacity of homogenized muscle (βhm) and fiber type distribution, as well as on sprint and endurance performance. Methods: Twenty-seven moderately-trained participants were allocated to one of three experimental groups: SIT in normoxia (20.9% FiO2) + placebo (N), SIT in hypoxia (15% FiO2) + placebo (H), or SIT in hypoxia + nitrate supplementation (HN). All participated in 5 weeks of SIT on a cycle ergometer (30-s sprints interspersed by 4.5 min recovery-intervals, 3 weekly sessions, 4–6 sprints per session). Nitrate (6.45 mmol NaNO3) or placebo capsules were administered 3 h before each session. Before and after SIT participants performed an incremental VO2max-test, a 30-min simulated cycling time-trial, as well as a 30-s cycling sprint test. Muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis. Results: SIT decreased the proportion of type IIx muscle fibers in all groups (P < 0.05). The relative number of type IIa fibers increased (P < 0.05) in HN (P < 0.05 vs. H), but not in the other groups. SIT had no significant effect on βhm. Compared with H, SIT tended to enhance 30-s sprint performance more in HN than in H (P = 0.085). VO2max and 30-min time-trial performance increased in all groups to a similar extent. Conclusion: SIT in hypoxia combined with nitrate supplementation increases the proportion of type IIa fibers in muscle, which may be associated with enhanced performance in short maximal exercise. Compared with normoxic training, hypoxic SIT does not alter βhm or endurance and sprinting exercise performance. PMID:27378942

  1. Myostatin regulates fiber-type composition of skeletal muscle by regulating MEF2 and MyoD gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hennebry, Alex; Berry, Carole; Siriett, Victoria; O'Callaghan, Paul; Chau, Linda; Watson, Trevor; Sharma, Mridula; Kambadur, Ravi

    2009-03-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a secreted growth factor belonging to the tranforming growth factor (TGF)-beta superfamily. Inactivation of murine Mstn by gene targeting, or natural mutation of bovine or human Mstn, induces the double muscling (DM) phenotype. In DM cattle, Mstn deficiency increases fast glycolytic (type IIB) fiber formation in the biceps femoris (BF) muscle. Using Mstn null ((-/-)) mice, we suggest a possible mechanism behind Mstn-mediated fiber-type diversity. Histological analysis revealed increased type IIB fibers with a concomitant decrease in type IIA and type I fibers in the Mstn(-/-) tibialis anterior and BF muscle. Functional electrical stimulation of Mstn(-/-) BF revealed increased fatigue susceptibility, supporting increased type IIB fiber content. Given the role of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) in oxidative type I fiber formation, MEF2 levels in Mstn(-/-) tissue were quantified. Results revealed reduced MEF2C protein in Mstn(-/-) muscle and myoblast nuclear extracts. Reduced MEF2-DNA complex was also observed in electrophoretic mobility-shift assay using Mstn(-/-) nuclear extracts. Furthermore, reduced expression of MEF2 downstream target genes MLC1F and calcineurin were found in Mstn(-/-) muscle. Conversely, Mstn addition was sufficient to directly upregulate MLC promoter-enhancer activity in cultured myoblasts. Since high MyoD levels are seen in fast fibers, we analyzed MyoD levels in the muscle. In contrast to MEF2C, MyoD levels were increased in Mstn(-/-) muscle. Together, these results suggest that while Mstn positively regulates MEF2C levels, it negatively regulates MyoD expression in muscle. We propose that Mstn could regulate fiber-type composition by regulating the expression of MEF2C and MyoD during myogenesis.

  2. Localized nuclear and perinuclear Ca2+ signals in intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Tihomir; Svirin, Mikhail; Jaimovich, Enrique; Fink, Rainer H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Ca2+ is important for the regulation of several nuclear processes such as gene expression. Localized Ca2+ signals (LCSs) in skeletal muscle fibers of mice have been mainly studied as Ca2+ release events from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Their location with regard to cell nuclei has not been investigated. Our study is based on the hypothesis that LCSs associated with nuclei are present in skeletal muscle fibers of adult mice. Therefore, we carried out experiments addressing this question and we found novel Ca2+ signals associated with nuclei of skeletal muscle fibers (with possibly attached satellite cells). We measured localized nuclear and perinuclear Ca2+ signals (NLCSs and PLCSs) alongside cytosolic localized Ca2+ signals (CLCSs) during a hypertonic treatment. We also observed NLCSs under isotonic conditions. The NLCSs and PLCSs are Ca2+ signals in the range of micrometer [FWHM (full width at half maximum): 2.75 ± 0.27 μm (NLCSs) and 2.55 ± 0.17 μm (PLCSs), S.E.M.]. Additionally, global nuclear Ca2+ signals (NGCSs) were observed. To investigate which type of Ca2+ channels contribute to the Ca2+ signals associated with nuclei in skeletal muscle fibers, we performed measurements with the RyR blocker dantrolene, the DHPR blocker nifedipine or the IP3R blocker Xestospongin C. We observed Ca2+ signals associated with nuclei in the presence of each blocker. Nifedipine and dantrolene had an inhibitory effect on the fraction of fibers with PLCSs. The situation for the fraction of fibers with NLCSs is more complex indicating that RyR is less important for the generation of NLCSs compared to the generation of PLCSs. The fraction of fibers with NLCSs and PLCSs is not reduced in the presence of Xestospongin C. The localized perinuclear and intranuclear Ca2+ signals may be a powerful tool for the cell to regulate adaptive processes as gene expression. The intranuclear Ca2+ signals may be particularly interesting in this respect. PMID:26483696

  3. Muscle Fiber Characteristics, Satellite Cells and Soccer Performance in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, Thomas I.; Mandroukas, Athanasios; Vamvakoudis, Efstratios; Kotoglou, Kostas; Ekblom, Björn; Mandroukas, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed to examine the muscle fiber type, composition and satellite cells in young male soccer players and to correlate them to cardiorespiratory indices and muscle strength. The participants formed three Groups: Group A (n = 13), 11.2 ± 0.4yrs, Group B (n=10), 13.1 ± 0.5yrs and Group C (n = 9), 15.2 ± 0.6yrs. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. Peak torque values of the quadriceps and hamstrings were recorded and VO2max was measured on the treadmill. Group C had lower type I percentage distribution compared to A by 21.3% (p < 0.01), while the type IIA relative percentage was higher by 18.1% and 18.4% than in Groups A and B (p < 0.05). Groups B and C had higher cross-sectional area (CSA) values in all fiber types than in Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001). The number of satellite cells did not differ between the groups. Groups B and C had higher peak torque at all angular velocities and absolute VO2max in terms of ml·min-1 than Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001). It is concluded that the increased percentage of type IIA muscle fibers noticed in Group C in comparison to the Groups A and B should be mainly attributed to the different workload exercise and training programs. The alteration of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms composition even in children is an important mechanism for skeletal muscle characteristics. Finally, CSA, isokinetic muscle strength and VO2max values seems to be expressed according to age. Key Points Fifteen years old soccer players have higher IIA percentage distribution than the younger players by approximately 18%. The age and the training status play a crucial role in muscle fibers co-expression. Specific training in young athletes seems to alter significantly the muscular metabolic profile. PMID:25177173

  4. Direct observation of failing fibers in muscles of dystrophic mice provides mechanistic insight into muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Claflin, Dennis R; Brooks, Susan V

    2008-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by the absence of the protein dystrophin. Dystrophin's function is not known, but its cellular location and associations with both the force-generating contractile core and membrane-spanning entities suggest a role in mechanically coupling force from its intracellular origins to the fiber membrane and beyond. We report here the presence of destructive contractile activity in lumbrical muscles from dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice during nominally quiescent periods following exposure to mechanical stress. The ectopic activity, which was observable microscopically, resulted in longitudinal separation and clotting of fiber myoplasm and was absent when calcium (Ca(2+)) was removed from the bathing medium. Separation and clotting of myoplasm were also produced in dystrophin-deficient muscles by local application of a Ca(2+) ionophore to create membrane breaches in the absence of mechanical stress, whereas muscles from control mice tolerated ionophore-induced entry of Ca(2+) without damage. These observations suggest a failure cascade in dystrophin-deficient fibers that 1) is initiated by a stress-induced influx of extracellular Ca(2+), causing localized activation to continue after cessation of stimulation, and 2) proceeds as the persistent local activation, combined with reduced lateral mechanical coupling between the contractile core and the extracellular matrix, results in longitudinal separation of myoplasm in nonactivated regions of the fiber. This mechanism invokes both the membrane stabilization and the mechanical coupling functions frequently proposed for dystrophin and suggests that, whereas the absence of either function alone is not sufficient to cause fiber failure, their combined absence is catastrophic.

  5. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): metabolism, inflammation, and skeletal muscle fiber characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, M; Pötzelsberger, B; Scheiber, P; Bergdahl, A; Hansen, C N; Andersen, J L; Narici, M; Salvioli, S; Conte, M; Müller, E; Dela, F

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the effect of alpine skiing for 12 weeks on skeletal muscle characteristics and biomarkers of glucose homeostasis and cardiovascular risk factors. Twenty-three patients with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were studied 2.9 ± 0.9 years (mean ± SD) after the operation. Fourteen patients participated in the intervention group (IG) and nine in the control group (CG). Blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before (PRE) and 7.3 ± 0.8 days after (POST) the intervention, and blood samples again after a retention (RET) phase of 8 weeks. With skiing, glucose homeostasis improved in IG (decrease in fasting insulin, increase in muscle glycogen) but not in CG. Fiber type distribution and size, as well as capillary density and number of capillaries around the fibers (CAF), were not different between the operated and the non-operated leg in either group. The relative number of type I fibers increased with skiing in IG with no change in CG. Inflammatory biomarkers, plasma lipids, and mitochondrial proteins and activity did not change. Alpine skiing is metabolically beneficial and can be used as a training modality by elderly people with TKA.

  6. A Physiological Neural Controller of a Muscle Fiber Oculomotor Plant in Horizontal Monkey Saccades

    PubMed Central

    Enderle, John D.

    2014-01-01

    A neural network model of biophysical neurons in the midbrain is presented to drive a muscle fiber oculomotor plant during horizontal monkey saccades. Neural circuitry, including omnipause neuron, premotor excitatory and inhibitory burst neurons, long lead burst neuron, tonic neuron, interneuron, abducens nucleus, and oculomotor nucleus, is developed to examine saccade dynamics. The time-optimal control strategy by realization of agonist and antagonist controller models is investigated. In consequence, each agonist muscle fiber is stimulated by an agonist neuron, while an antagonist muscle fiber is unstimulated by a pause and step from the antagonist neuron. It is concluded that the neural network is constrained by a minimum duration of the agonist pulse and that the most dominant factor in determining the saccade magnitude is the number of active neurons for the small saccades. For the large saccades, however, the duration of agonist burst firing significantly affects the control of saccades. The proposed saccadic circuitry establishes a complete model of saccade generation since it not only includes the neural circuits at both the premotor and motor stages of the saccade generator, but also uses a time-optimal controller to yield the desired saccade magnitude. PMID:24944832

  7. Fiber type and metabolic characteristics of lion (Panthera leo), caracal (Caracal caracal) and human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Tertius Abraham; Burroughs, Richard; Hartman, Marthinus Jacobus; Noakes, Timothy David

    2011-06-01

    Lion (Panthera leo) and caracal (Caracal caracal) skeletal muscle samples from Vastus lateralis, Longissimus dorsi and Gluteus medius were analyzed for fiber type and citrate synthase (CS; EC 2.3.3.1), 3-hydroxyacyl Co A dehydrogenase (3HAD; EC 1.1.1.35), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK; EC 2.7.1.11), creatine kinase (CK; EC 2.7.3.2), phosphorylase (PHOS; EC 2.4.1.1) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) activities and compared to human runners, the latter also serving as validation of methodology. Both felids had predominantly type IIx fibers (range 50-80%), whereas human muscle had more types I and IIa. Oxidative capacity of both felids (CS: 5-9 μmol/min/g ww and 3HAD: 1.4-2.6 μmol/min/g ww) was lower than humans, whereas the glycolytic capacity was elevated. LDH activity of caracal (346 ± 81) was higher than lion (227 ± 62 μmol/min/g ww), with human being the lowest (55 ± 17). CK and PHOS activities were also higher in caracal and lion compared to human, but PFK was lower in both felid species. The current data and past research are illustrated graphically showing a strong relationship between type II fibers and sprinting ability in various species. These data on caracal and lion muscles confirm their sprinting behavior.

  8. Alterations in the functional properties of skinned fibers from denervated rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Trachez, M M; Sudo, R T; Suarez-Kurtz, G

    1990-09-01

    Isometric tension was recorded in vitro from chemically skinned fibers obtained from normal and 14-day-denervated extensor digitorum longus muscles of the rabbit. Denervation potentiated the tensions elicited by pCa 6.0 but did not modify the pCa value (5.6) required for maximum tension. Ca2+ transport across the membranes of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was markedly affected by denervation. Thus the rate of ATP-dependent net Ca2+ uptake increased significantly, and the spontaneous release ("leakage") of the Ca2+ stored in the SR was significantly reduced in denervated fibers. These effects lead to increased accumulation of Ca2+ in the lumen of the SR. The dose-response curve for the halothane-induced contractures of Ca2(+)-loaded skinned fibers was displaced to the left after denervation. Thus 0.7 mM halothane, a concentration that elicited no tension in 10 control fibers, induced contractures in the 10 denervated fibers tested. The potentiation of the halothane-induced tensions is attributed mainly to the larger stores of Ca2+ in the SR of denervated fibers. The possibility that denervation may also affect the interaction of halothane with the SR membranes is discussed.

  9. Muscle enzyme and fiber type-specific sarcomere protein increases in serum after inertial concentric-eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Carmona, G; Guerrero, M; Cussó, R; Padullés, J M; Moras, G; Lloret, M; Bedini, J L; Cadefau, J A

    2015-12-01

    Muscle damage induced by inertial exercise performed on a flywheel device was assessed through the serum evolution of muscle enzymes, interleukin 6, and fiber type-specific sarcomere proteins such as fast myosin (FM) and slow myosin (SM). We hypothesized that a model of muscle damage could be constructed by measuring the evolution of serum concentration of muscle proteins following inertial exercise, according to their molecular weight and the fiber compartment in which they are located. Moreover, by measuring FM and SM, the type of fibers that are affected could be assessed. Serum profiles were registered before and 24, 48, and 144 h after exercise in 10 healthy and recreationally active young men. Creatine kinase (CK) and CK-myocardial band isoenzyme increased in serum early (24 h) and returned to baseline values after 48 h. FM increased in serum late (48 h) and remained elevated 144 h post-exercise. The increase in serum muscle enzymes suggests increased membrane permeability of both fast and slow fibers, and the increase in FM reveals sarcomere disruption as well as increased membrane permeability of fast fibers. Consequently, FM could be adopted as a fiber type-specific biomarker of muscle damage.

  10. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  11. Muscle fiber-type variation in lizards (Squamata) and phylogenetic reconstruction of hypothesized ancestral states.

    PubMed

    Bonine, Kevin E; Gleeson, Todd T; Garland, Theodore

    2005-12-01

    Previously, we found that phrynosomatid lizards, a diverse group common in the southwestern USA, vary markedly in fiber-type composition of the iliofibularis (a hindlimb muscle important in locomotion). Phrynosomatidae comprises three subclades: the closely related sand and horned lizards, and their relatives the Sceloporus group. The variation in muscle fiber-type composition for 11 phrynosomatid species is attributable mainly to differences between the sand- and horned-lizard subclades. Here, we expand the phrynosomatid database with three additional species and compare these results with data collected for 10 outgroup (distantly related) species. Our goal was to determine if the patterns found in Phrynosomatidae hold across a broader phylogenetic range of the extant lizards and to elucidate the evolution of muscle fiber-type composition and related traits. To allow for meaningful comparisons, data were collected from species that are primarily terrestrial and relatively small in size (3.5-65 g body mass). Results indicate that the fiber-type variation observed within the Phrynosomatidae almost spans the range of variation observed in our sample of 24 species from eight families. However, one species of Acanthodactylus (Lacertidae) had a consistent region of large tonic fibers (that did not stain darkly for either succinic dehydrogenase or myosin ATPase activity), a fiber-type only occasionally seen in the other 23 species examined. Many species have a large proportion of either fast-twitch glycolytic (FG; e.g. sand lizards and Aspidoscelis) or fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic (FOG) fibers (e.g. horned lizards), with the slow-oxidative proportion occupying only 1-17% of the iliofibularis. Importantly, the negative relationship between FG and FOG composition observed in Phrynosomatidae appears to be a characteristic of lizards in general, and could lead to functional trade-offs in aspects of locomotor performance, as has previously been reported for Lacertidae

  12. An image processing approach to analyze morphological features of microscopic images of muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Comin, Cesar Henrique; Xu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yaming; da Fontoura Costa, Luciano; Yang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    We present an image processing approach to automatically analyze duo-channel microscopic images of muscular fiber nuclei and cytoplasm. Nuclei and cytoplasm play a critical role in determining the health and functioning of muscular fibers as changes of nuclei and cytoplasm manifest in many diseases such as muscular dystrophy and hypertrophy. Quantitative evaluation of muscle fiber nuclei and cytoplasm thus is of great importance to researchers in musculoskeletal studies. The proposed computational approach consists of steps of image processing to segment and delineate cytoplasm and identify nuclei in two-channel images. Morphological operations like skeletonization is applied to extract the length of cytoplasm for quantification. We tested the approach on real images and found that it can achieve high accuracy, objectivity, and robustness. PMID:25124286

  13. Muscle fibers from senescent mice retain excitation-contraction coupling properties in culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Min; Zheng, Zhenlin; Messi, María L; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, we test the hypothesis that mouse skeletal muscle in culture retains the fundamental properties of excitation-sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release coupling reported for young-adult (3-4 mo) and senescent (22-23) mice. Dissociated flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles from young-adult and senescent mice were cultured for 7 d in a serum-free medium. During this period, the overall morphology of cultured fibers resembled that exhibited by acutely dissociated cells. In addition, survival analysis revealed that more than 70% of the fibers from both young and old mice remained suitable for electrophysiological studies during this same culture period. Charge movement and intracellular Ca(2+) recordings in FDB fibers, voltage clamped in the whole cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique, reproduced the maximal values, and voltage dependence similarly displayed by acutely dissociated cells for both parameters in young-adult and senescent mice. The analysis of the dihydropyridine receptor by immunoblots confirmed, in the culture system, the age-dependent decrease in the expression of this protein. In conclusion, FDB fibers from young-adult and old mice retain the excitation-contraction coupling phenotype during the course of a week in serum-free medium culture.

  14. Action potentials of isolated single muscle fibers recorded by potential-sensitive dyes

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, S.; Gilai, A.

    1980-01-01

    Light transmission changes upon massive stimulation of single muscle fibers of Xenopus were studied with the potential-sensitive nonpermeant dyes, merocyanine rhodanine (WW375) and merocyanine oxazolone (NK2367). Upon stimulation an absorption change (wave a) occurred, which probably represents the sum of action potentials in the transverse tubules and surface membrane. In WW375-stained fibers wave a is a decrease in transmission over the range of 630 to 730 nm (with NK2367, over the range of 590 to 700 nm) but becomes an increase outside this range, thus showing a triphasic spectral pattern. This spectrum differs from that of the squid axon, in which depolarization produces only an increase in transmission over the whole range of wavelengths (Ross et al. 1977. J. Membr. Biol. 33:141-183). When wave a was measured at the edge of the fiber to obtain more signal from the surface membrane, the spectrum did not seem to differ markedly from that obtained from the entire width of the fiber. Thus, the difference in the spectrum between the squid axon and the vertebrate muscle cannot be attributed to the presence of the tubular system. PMID:10822501

  15. Differential Expression of NADPH Oxidases Depends on Skeletal Muscle Fiber Type in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Adriano César Carneiro; do Rêgo-Monteiro, Igor Coutinho; Louzada, Ruy A.; Ortenzi, Victor Hugo; de Aguiar, Angélica Ponte; de Abreu, Ewerton Sousa; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Hecht, Fabio; de Oliveira, Ariclécio Cunha; Ceccatto, Vânia Marilande; Fortunato, Rodrigo S.

    2016-01-01

    NADPH oxidases (NOX) are important sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skeletal muscle, being involved in excitation-contraction coupling. Thus, we aimed to investigate if NOX activity and expression in skeletal muscle are fiber type specific and the possible contribution of this difference to cellular oxidative stress. Oxygen consumption rate, NOX activity and mRNA levels, and the activity of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as the reactive protein thiol levels, were measured in the soleus (SOL), red gastrocnemius (RG), and white gastrocnemius (WG) muscles of rats. RG showed higher oxygen consumption flow than SOL and WG, while SOL had higher oxygen consumption than WG. SOL showed higher NOX activity, as well as NOX2 and NOX4 mRNA levels, antioxidant enzymatic activities, and reactive protein thiol contents when compared to WG and RG. NOX activity and NOX4 mRNA levels as well as antioxidant enzymatic activities were higher in RG than in WG. Physical exercise increased NOX activity in SOL and RG, specifically NOX2 mRNA levels in RG and NOX4 mRNA levels in SOL. In conclusion, we demonstrated that NOX activity and expression differ according to the skeletal muscle fiber type, as well as antioxidant defense. PMID:27847553

  16. Differential Expression of NADPH Oxidases Depends on Skeletal Muscle Fiber Type in Rats.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Adriano César Carneiro; do Rêgo-Monteiro, Igor Coutinho; Louzada, Ruy A; Ortenzi, Victor Hugo; de Aguiar, Angélica Ponte; de Abreu, Ewerton Sousa; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Hecht, Fabio; de Oliveira, Ariclécio Cunha; Ceccatto, Vânia Marilande; Fortunato, Rodrigo S; Carvalho, Denise P

    2016-01-01

    NADPH oxidases (NOX) are important sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skeletal muscle, being involved in excitation-contraction coupling. Thus, we aimed to investigate if NOX activity and expression in skeletal muscle are fiber type specific and the possible contribution of this difference to cellular oxidative stress. Oxygen consumption rate, NOX activity and mRNA levels, and the activity of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as the reactive protein thiol levels, were measured in the soleus (SOL), red gastrocnemius (RG), and white gastrocnemius (WG) muscles of rats. RG showed higher oxygen consumption flow than SOL and WG, while SOL had higher oxygen consumption than WG. SOL showed higher NOX activity, as well as NOX2 and NOX4 mRNA levels, antioxidant enzymatic activities, and reactive protein thiol contents when compared to WG and RG. NOX activity and NOX4 mRNA levels as well as antioxidant enzymatic activities were higher in RG than in WG. Physical exercise increased NOX activity in SOL and RG, specifically NOX2 mRNA levels in RG and NOX4 mRNA levels in SOL. In conclusion, we demonstrated that NOX activity and expression differ according to the skeletal muscle fiber type, as well as antioxidant defense.

  17. Monovalent cationic channel activity in the inner membrane of nuclei from skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Yarotskyy, Viktor; Dirksen, Robert T

    2014-11-04

    Nuclear ion channels remain among the least studied and biophysically characterized channels. Although considerable progress has been made in characterizing calcium release channels in the nuclear membrane, very little is known regarding the properties of nuclear monovalent cationic channels. Here, we describe a method to isolate nuclei from adult skeletal muscle fibers that are suitable for electrophysiological experiments. Using this approach, we show for the first time, to our knowledge, that a nuclear monovalent cationic channel (NMCC) is prominently expressed in the inner membrane of nuclei isolated from flexor digitorum brevis skeletal muscle fibers of adult mice. In isotonic 140 mM KCl, the skeletal muscle NMCC exhibits a unitary conductance of ?160 pS and high, voltage-independent open probability. Based on single-channel reversal potential measurements, NMCCs are slightly more permeable to potassium ions over sodium (PK/PNa = 2.68 ± 0.21) and cesium (PK/PCs = 1.39 ± 0.03) ions. In addition, NMCCs do not permeate divalent cations, are inhibited by calcium ions, and demonstrate weak rectification in asymmetric Ca(2+)-containing solutions. Together, these studies characterize a voltage-independent NMCC in skeletal muscle, the properties of which are ideally suited to serve as a countercurrent mechanism during calcium release from the nuclear envelope.

  18. The relationships among jaw-muscle fiber architecture, jaw morphology, and feeding behavior in extant apes and modern humans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrea B; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    The jaw-closing muscles are responsible for generating many of the forces and movements associated with feeding. Muscle physiologic cross-sectional area (PCSA) and fiber length are two architectural parameters that heavily influence muscle function. While there have been numerous comparative studies of hominoid and hominin craniodental and mandibular morphology, little is known about hominoid jaw-muscle fiber architecture. We present novel data on masseter and temporalis internal muscle architecture for small- and large-bodied hominoids. Hominoid scaling patterns are evaluated and compared with representative New- (Cebus) and Old-World (Macaca) monkeys. Variation in hominoid jaw-muscle fiber architecture is related to both absolute size and allometry. PCSAs scale close to isometry relative to jaw length in anthropoids, but likely with positive allometry in hominoids. Thus, large-bodied apes may be capable of generating both absolutely and relatively greater muscle forces compared with smaller-bodied apes and monkeys. Compared with extant apes, modern humans exhibit a reduction in masseter PCSA relative to condyle-M1 length but retain relatively long fibers, suggesting humans may have sacrificed relative masseter muscle force during chewing without appreciably altering muscle excursion/contraction velocity. Lastly, craniometric estimates of PCSAs underestimate hominoid masseter and temporalis PCSAs by more than 50% in gorillas, and overestimate masseter PCSA by as much as 30% in humans. These findings underscore the difficulty of accurately estimating jaw-muscle fiber architecture from craniometric measures and suggest models of fossil hominin and hominoid bite forces will be improved by incorporating architectural data in estimating jaw-muscle forces.

  19. Carnitine supplementation to obese Zucker rats prevents obesity-induced type II to type I muscle fiber transition and favors an oxidative phenotype of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that carnitine supplementation counteracts obesity-induced muscle fiber transition from type I to type II. Methods 24 obese Zucker rats were randomly divided into two groups of 12 rats each (obese control, obese carnitine) and 12 lean Zucker rats were selected for lean control group. A control diet was given to both control groups and a carnitine supplemented diet (3 g/kg diet) was given to obese carnitine group for 4 wk. Components of the muscle fiber transformation in skeletal muscle were examined. Results The plasma level of carnitine were lower in the obese control group compared to the lean control group and higher in the obese carnitine group than in the other groups (P < 0.05). Plasma concentrations of triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids were increased in obese animals compared to lean animals and the obese carnitine group had lower level compared to the obese control group (P < 0.05). The obese carnitine group had an increased number of type I muscle fibers and higher mRNA levels of type I fiber-specific myosin heavy chain, regulators of muscle fiber transition and of genes involved in carnitine uptake, fatty acid transport, β-oxidation, angiogenesis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and thermo genesis in M. rectus femoris compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion The results demonstrate that carnitine supplementation to obese Zucker a rat counteracts the obesity-induced muscle fiber transition and restores the muscle oxidative metabolic phenotype. Carnitine supplementation is supposed to be beneficial for the treatment of elevated levels of plasma lipids during obesity or diabetes. PMID:23842456

  20. Morphometric analysis of somatotropic cells of the adenohypophysis and muscle fibers of the psoas muscle in the process of aging in humans.

    PubMed

    Antić, Vladimir M; Stefanović, Natalija; Jovanović, Ivan; Antić, Milorad; Milić, Miroslav; Krstić, Miljan; Kundalić, Braca; Milošević, Verica

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this research was to quantify changes of the adenohypophyseal somatotropes and types 1 and 2 muscle fibers with aging, as well as to establish mutual interactions and correlations with age. Material was samples of hypophysis and psoas major muscle of 27 cadavers of both genders, aged from 30 to 90 years. Adenohypophyseal and psoas major tissue sections were immunohistochemically processed and stained by anti-human growth hormone and anti-fast myosin antibodies, respectively. Morphometric analysis was performed by ImageJ. Results of morphometric analysis showed a significant increase in the somatotrope area, and significant decrease in somatotrope volume density and nucleocytoplasmic ratio with age. Cross-sectional areas of types 1 and 2, and volume density of type 2 muscle fibers decreased significantly with age. One Way ANOVA showed that the latter cited changes in the somatotropes and types 1 and 2 muscle fibers mostly become significant after the age of 70. Significant positive correlation was observed between the area of the somatotropes and volume density of type 2 muscle fibers. A significant negative correlation was detected between the nucleocytoplasmic ratio of the somatotropes and cross-sectional areas of types 1 and 2 muscle fibers. So, it can be concluded that after the age of 70, there is significant loss of the anterior pituitary's somatotropes associated with hypertrophy and possible functional decline of the remained cells. Age-related changes in the somatotropes are correlated with the simultaneous atrophy of type 1, as well as with the atrophy and loss of type 2 muscle fibers.

  1. Defective Acetylcholine Receptor Subunit Switch Precedes Atrophy of Slow-Twitch Skeletal Muscle Fibers Lacking ERK1/2 Kinases in Soleus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Seaberg, Bonnie; Paez-Colasante, Ximena; Rimer, Mendell

    2016-01-01

    To test the role of extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in slow-twitch, type 1 skeletal muscle fibers, we studied the soleus muscle in mice genetically deficient for myofiber ERK1/2. Young adult mutant soleus was drastically wasted, with highly atrophied type 1 fibers, denervation at most synaptic sites, induction of “fetal” acetylcholine receptor gamma subunit (AChRγ), reduction of “adult” AChRε, and impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and function. In weanlings, fiber morphology and mitochondrial markers were mostly normal, yet AChRγ upregulation and AChRε downregulation were observed. Synaptic sites with fetal AChRs in weanling muscle were ~3% in control and ~40% in mutants, with most of the latter on type 1 fibers. These results suggest that: (1) ERK1/2 are critical for slow-twitch fiber growth; (2) a defective γ/ε-AChR subunit switch, preferentially at synapses on slow fibers, precedes wasting of mutant soleus; (3) denervation is likely to drive this wasting, and (4) the neuromuscular synapse is a primary subcellular target for muscle ERK1/2 function in vivo. PMID:27934942

  2. Adaptation of rat jaw muscle fibers in postnatal development with a different food consistency: an immunohistochemical and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Kinouchi, Nao; Kawakami, Emi; Tanne, Kazuo; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanaka, Eiji

    2010-06-01

    The development of the craniofacial system occurs, among other reasons, as a response to functional needs. In particular, the deficiency of the proper masticatory stimulus affects the growth. The purpose of this study was to relate alterations of muscle activity during postnatal development to adaptational changes in the muscle fibers. Fourteen 21-day-old Wistar strain male rats were randomly divided into two groups and fed on either a solid (hard-diet group) or a powder (soft-diet group) diet for 63 days. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time), the total burst number and their average length exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining and their cross-sectional area was measured. All muscle fibers were identified as slow type I and fast type IIA, IIX or IIB (respectively, with increasing twitch contraction speed and fatigability). At lower activity levels (exceeding 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle was significantly higher in the soft-diet group than in the hard-diet group (P < 0.05). At higher activity levels (exceeding 20 and 50% of the peak activity), the duty time of the superficial masseter muscle in the soft-diet group was significantly lower than that in the hard-diet group (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the duty time of the anterior temporalis muscle at any muscle activity level. The percentage of type IIA fibers of the superficial masseter muscle in the soft-diet group was significantly lower than that in the hard-diet group (P < 0.01) and the opposite was true with regard to type IIB fibers (P < 0

  3. Nicorandil improves post-fatigue tension in slow skeletal muscle fibers by modulating glutathione redox state.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Duarte, E; Trujillo, X; Cortés-Rojo, C; Saavedra-Molina, A; Camargo, G; Hernández, L; Huerta, M; Montoya-Pérez, R

    2017-04-01

    Fatigue is a phenomenon in which force reduction has been linked to impairment of several biochemical processes. In skeletal muscle, the ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP) are actively involved in myoprotection against metabolic stress. They are present in sarcolemma and mitochondria (mitoKATP channels). K(+) channel openers like nicorandil has been recognized for their ability to protect skeletal muscle from ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, the effects of nicorandil on fatigue in slow skeletal muscle fibers has not been explored, being the aim of this study. Nicorandil (10 μM), improved the muscle function reversing fatigue as increased post-fatigue tension in the peak and total tension significantly with respect to the fatigued condition. However, this beneficial effect was prevented by the mitoKATP channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD, 500 μM) and by the free radical scavenger N-2-mercaptopropionyl glycine (MPG, 1 mM), but not by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 μM). Nicorandil also decreased lipid peroxidation and maintained both reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and an elevated GSH/GSSG ratio, whereas total glutathione (TGSH) remained unaltered during post-fatigue tension. In addition, NO production, measured through nitrite concentrations was significantly increased with nicorandil during post-fatigue tension; this increase remained unaltered in the presence of nicorandil plus L-NAME, nonetheless, this effect was reversed with nicorandil plus MPG. Hence, these results suggest that nicorandil improves the muscle function reversing fatigue in slow skeletal muscle fibers of chicken through its effects not only as a mitoKATP channel opener but also as NO donor and as an antioxidant.

  4. Titin-based stiffening of muscle fibers in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.; Voermans, Nicol C.; Hudson, Bryan D.; Irving, Thomas; Stienen, Ger J.M.; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Granzier, Henk

    2012-05-09

    Tenascin-X (TNX) is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein whose absence leads to Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS). TNX-deficient EDS patients present with joint hypermobility and muscle weakness attributable to increased compliance of the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that in response to the increased compliance of the extracellular matrix in TNX-deficient EDS patients, intracellular adaptations take place in the elastic properties of the giant muscle protein titin. We performed extensive single muscle fiber mechanical studies to determine active and passive properties in TNX-deficient EDS patients. Gel-electrophoresis, Western blotting, and microarray studies were used to evaluate titin expression and phosphorylation. X-ray diffraction was used to measure myofilament lattice spacing. Passive tension of muscle fibers from TNX-deficient EDS patients was markedly increased. Myofilament extraction experiments indicated that the increased passive tension is attributable to changes in the properties of the sarcomeric protein titin. Transcript and protein data indicated no changes in titin isoform expression. Instead, differences in posttranslational modifications within titin's elastic region were found. In patients, active tension was not different at maximal activation level, but at submaximal activation level it was augmented attributable to increased calcium sensitivity. This increased calcium sensitivity might be attributable to stiffer titin molecules. In response to the increased compliance of the extracellular matrix in muscle of TNX-deficient EDS patients, a marked intracellular stiffening occurs of the giant protein titin. The stiffening of titin partly compensates for the muscle weakness in these patients by augmenting submaximal active tension generation.

  5. Distance of myofilament sliding per ATP molecule in skeletal muscle fibers studied using laser flash photolysis of caged ATP.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Abe, O; Kobayashi, T; Sugi, H

    1993-01-01

    We studied the distance of myofilament sliding per hydrolysis of one ATP molecule by recording shortening of single glycerinated muscle fibers induced by laser flash photolysis of caged ATP, diffusion of photochemically released ATP out of the fiber being prevented by surrounding the fiber with silicone oil. With 75 microM ATP released (one half of the total myosin head concentration within the fiber), the fiber showed the minimum shortening (10 +/- 2 nm/half sarcomere, n = 10) taking place uniformly in each sarcomere in the fiber. Comparison of the initial flash-induced shortening velocity with the force-velocity relation of maximally Ca(2+)-activated fibers indicated that the above minimum fiber shortening took place under an internal load nearly equal to Po. These results may be taken to indicate that, under a nearly isometric condition, the distance of myofilament sliding per hydrolysis of one ATP molecule is of the order of 10 nm.

  6. Cutting Management Effects on Yield, Fiber, and Protein Degradability of Red Clover Conserved as Silage.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With adequate soil moisture, forage yields of red clover can equal or exceed alfalfa in many temperate regions. Red clover also boasts superior fiber digestibility and greater rumen-undegradable protein than alfalfa, but milk yields from cattle fed red clover diets are often below expectations. Coup...

  7. Single fiber analyses of glycogen-related proteins reveal their differential association with glycogen in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robyn M; Xu, Hongyang; Latchman, Heidy; Larkins, Noni T; Gooley, Paul R; Stapleton, David I

    2012-12-01

    To understand how glycogen affects skeletal muscle physiology, we examined enzymes essential for muscle glycogen synthesis and degradation using single fibers from quiescent and stimulated rat skeletal muscle. Presenting a shift in paradigm, we show these proteins are differentially associated with glycogen granules. Protein diffusibility and/or abundance of glycogenin, glycogen branching enzyme (GBE), debranching enzyme (GDE), phosphorylase (GP), and synthase (GS) were examined in fibers isolated from rat fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus (SOL) muscle. GDE and GP proteins were more abundant (~10- to 100-fold) in fibers from EDL compared with SOL muscle. GS and glycogenin proteins were similar between muscles while GBE had an approximately fourfold greater abundance in SOL muscle. Mechanically skinned fibers exposed to physiological buffer for 10 min showed ~70% total pools of GBE and GP were diffusible (nonbound), whereas GDE and GS were considerably less diffusible. Intense in vitro stimulation, sufficient to elicit a ~50% decrease in intracellular glycogen, increased diffusibility of GDE, GP, and GS (~15-60%) and decreased GBE diffusibility (~20%). Amylase treatment, which breaks α-1,4 linkages of glycogen, indicated differential diffusibilities and hence glycogen associations of GDE and GS. Membrane solubilization (1% Triton-X-100) allowed a small additional amount of GDE and GS to diffuse from fibers, suggesting the majority of nonglycogen-associated GDE/GS is associated with myofibrillar/contractile network of muscle rather than membranes. Given differences in enzymes required for glycogen metabolism, the current findings suggest glycogen particles have fiber-type-dependent structures. The greater catabolic potential of glycogen breakdown in fast-twitch fibers may account for different contraction induced rates of glycogen utilization.

  8. Denervation and castration effects on the cross-sectional area of pubococcygeus muscle fibers in male rats.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Mayvi; Lara-García, Miguel; Cuevas, Estela; Berbel, Pere; Pacheco, Pablo

    2013-10-01

    The number of fibers in skeletal muscles changes little through life; however, the cross-sectional area of its fibers is modified as result of denervation and in some muscles by castration. The pubococcygeus muscle (Pcm) participates in micturition and ejaculatory processes and its fibers cross-sectional area is reduced in castrated rats, but denervation effects remained unknown. Here, we used a model in which unilateral denervation of this muscle in gonadally intact and castrated male rats, allowed us to explore the neural and gonadal hormone effects on the cross-sectional area of its fibers. Denervation significantly reduced the mean cross-sectional area values; likewise, the percentage distribution of its fibers. We found that castration had a greater effect than denervation. Castration resulted in a lack of fibers from 2,000 to 3,999 μm(2) , while in denervation it was from 2,500 to 3,999 μm(2) . It was interpreted that the castration effect was due to a lack of the direct gonadal hormone effect on muscle fibers, and to a reduction of the indirect hormonal action in its neuromuscular complex. In denervated Pcm of gonadally intact animals these effects were present; however, in denervated but castrated animals these were absent. Thus, combined surgeries resulted in the lowest mean cross-sectional area values with a restricted fiber distribution from 500 to 1,499 μm(2) . In conclusion, the study in this important muscle showed that cross-sectional area of its fibers depends on neural and direct/indirect gonadal hormone effects.

  9. Reptilian skeletal muscle: contractile properties of identified, single fast-twitch and slow fibers from the lizard Dipsosaurus dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, T T; Johnston, I A

    1987-06-01

    Contractile properties and innervation patterns were determined in identified single fibers from the iliofibularis muscle of the desert iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Single fibers from both the red and white regions of the iliofibularis muscle were dissected along their length under oil and a portion was mounted on transducers for determination of maximum isometric tension (Po) and unloaded shortening velocity (Vmax) using the slack test method. Fibers were chemically skinned and activated by high Ca++. The remaining portion of the muscle fiber was mounted on a glass slide and histochemically treated to demonstrate myosin ATPase activity. Fibers studied functionally could therefore be classified as fast or slow according to their myosin ATPase activity, and they could also be classified metabolically according to the region of the muscle from which they were dissected. Fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers from the white region and fast-twitch oxidative, glycolytic (FOG) and slow fibers from the red region had shortening velocities at 25 degrees C of 7.5, 4.4, and 1.5 l X s-1, respectively. Po did not differ in the three fiber types, averaging 279 kN X m-2. In a second experiment, 10 microns sections were examined every 30 microns through the proximal-most 7.5 mm of the iliofibularis muscle for motor endplates. Sections were stained to demonstrate regions of acetylcholinesterase activity. Fibers with visible endplates were classified in serial sections by histochemical treatment for myosin ATPase and succinic dehydrogenase. All slow fibers examined (n = 22) exhibited multiple endplates, averaging one every 725 microns.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Water in barnacle muscle. III. NMR studies of fresh fibers and membrane-damaged fibers equilibrated with selected solutes.

    PubMed Central

    Burnell, E E; Clark, M E; Hinke, J A; Chapman, N R

    1981-01-01

    Water in barnacle muscle has been studied using NMR techniques. Fresh fibers are compared with membrane-damaged fibers treated with solutes that greatly alter fixed charge and total water content. Both water (97%) and solute (3%) protons are visible in continuous wave spectra of oriented fresh fibers. No local field inhomogeneities were detected, nor are cell solutes significantly bound. In pulse experiments, all cell water is visible and exhibits a single exponential decay. In fresh fibers, T2 approximately or equal to 40 ms; faster decaying signals are assigned to immobile and mobile protons on macromolecules. T1 and T1p are frequency dependent. Using equations derived for a two-compartment model with fast exchange, we calculate the following: tau b, the correlation time for anisotropic rotational motion of bound water; Sb, its order parameter; tau ex, the correlation time for exchange between bound and free fractions; f, the fraction of water bound; and Hr, the grams of water bound per gram of macromolecule. Whereas f varies inversely with total water content, the other parameters are virtually constant, with values: tau b approximately or equal to 1.3 X 10(-8) S; tau ex approximately or equal to 8 X 10(-6) s; Sb approximately or equal to 0.06; and Hr approximately or equal to 0.1g H2O/g macromolecule. Thus, the NMR relaxation detectable properties of water bound to macromolecules are unaffected by solutes that greatly alter the macromolecular surface charge. PMID:7272435

  11. Electrophysiological Studies of the Antrum Muscle Fibers of the Guinea Pig Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, H.; Osa, T.; Tasaki, H.

    1970-01-01

    The membrane potentials of single smooth muscle fibers of various regions of the stomach were measured, and do not differ from those measured in intestinal muscle. Spontaneous slow waves with superimposed spikes could be recorded from the longitudinal and circular muscle of the antrum. The development of tension was preceded by spikes but often tension appeared only when the slow waves were generated. Contracture in high K solution developed at a critical membrane potential of -42 mv. MnCl2 blocked the spike generation, then lowered the amplitude of the slow wave. On the other hand, withdrawal of Na+, or addition of atropine and tetrodotoxin inhibited the generation of most of the slow waves but a spike could still be elicited by electrical stimulation. Prostigmine enhanced and prolonged the slow wave; acetylcholine depolarized the membrane without change in the frequency of the slow waves. Chronaxie for the spike generation in the longitudinal muscle of the antrum was 30 msec and conduction velocity was 1.2 cm/sec. The time constant of the foot of the propagated spike was 28 msec. The space constants measured from the longitudinal and circular muscles of the antrum were 1.1 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively. PMID:5410489

  12. Polynomial fitting of DT-MRI fiber tracts allows accurate estimation of muscle architectural parameters.

    PubMed

    Damon, Bruce M; Heemskerk, Anneriet M; Ding, Zhaohua

    2012-06-01

    Fiber curvature is a functionally significant muscle structural property, but its estimation from diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging fiber tracking data may be confounded by noise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of polynomial fitting of fiber tracts for improving the accuracy and precision of fiber curvature (κ) measurements. Simulated image data sets were created in order to provide data with known values for κ and pennation angle (θ). Simulations were designed to test the effects of increasing inherent fiber curvature (3.8, 7.9, 11.8 and 15.3 m(-1)), signal-to-noise ratio (50, 75, 100 and 150) and voxel geometry (13.8- and 27.0-mm(3) voxel volume with isotropic resolution; 13.5-mm(3) volume with an aspect ratio of 4.0) on κ and θ measurements. In the originally reconstructed tracts, θ was estimated accurately under most curvature and all imaging conditions studied; however, the estimates of κ were imprecise and inaccurate. Fitting the tracts to second-order polynomial functions provided accurate and precise estimates of κ for all conditions except very high curvature (κ=15.3 m(-1)), while preserving the accuracy of the θ estimates. Similarly, polynomial fitting of in vivo fiber tracking data reduced the κ values of fitted tracts from those of unfitted tracts and did not change the θ values. Polynomial fitting of fiber tracts allows accurate estimation of physiologically reasonable values of κ, while preserving the accuracy of θ estimation.

  13. Polynomial Fitting of DT-MRI Fiber Tracts Allows Accurate Estimation of Muscle Architectural Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Damon, Bruce M.; Heemskerk, Anneriet M.; Ding, Zhaohua

    2012-01-01

    Fiber curvature is a functionally significant muscle structural property, but its estimation from diffusion-tensor MRI fiber tracking data may be confounded by noise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of polynomial fitting of fiber tracts for improving the accuracy and precision of fiber curvature (κ) measurements. Simulated image datasets were created in order to provide data with known values for κ and pennation angle (θ). Simulations were designed to test the effects of increasing inherent fiber curvature (3.8, 7.9, 11.8, and 15.3 m−1), signal-to-noise ratio (50, 75, 100, and 150), and voxel geometry (13.8 and 27.0 mm3 voxel volume with isotropic resolution; 13.5 mm3 volume with an aspect ratio of 4.0) on κ and θ measurements. In the originally reconstructed tracts, θ was estimated accurately under most curvature and all imaging conditions studied; however, the estimates of κ were imprecise and inaccurate. Fitting the tracts to 2nd order polynomial functions provided accurate and precise estimates of κ for all conditions except very high curvature (κ=15.3 m−1), while preserving the accuracy of the θ estimates. Similarly, polynomial fitting of in vivo fiber tracking data reduced the κ values of fitted tracts from those of unfitted tracts and did not change the θ values. Polynomial fitting of fiber tracts allows accurate estimation of physiologically reasonable values of κ, while preserving the accuracy of θ estimation. PMID:22503094

  14. Frequency dependence of power and its implications for contractile function of muscle fibers from the digital flexors of horses

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Michael T.; Bertram, John E.A.; Syme, Douglas A.; Hermanson, John W.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The digital flexors of horses must produce high force to support the body weight during running, and a need for these muscles to generate power is likely limited during locomotion over level ground. Measurements of power output from horse muscle fibers close to physiological temperatures, and when cyclic strain is imposed, will help to better understand the in vivo performance of the muscles as power absorbers and generators. Skinned fibers from the deep (DDF) and superficial (SDF) digital flexors, and the soleus (SOL) underwent sinusoidal oscillations in length over a range of frequencies (0.5–16 Hz) and strain amplitudes (0.01–0.06) under maximum activation (pCa 5) at 30°C. Results were analyzed using both workloop and Nyquist plot analyses to determine the ability of the fibers to absorb or generate power and the frequency dependence of those abilities. Power absorption was dominant at most cycling frequencies and strain amplitudes in fibers from all three muscles. However, small amounts of power were generated (0.002–0.05 Wkg−1) at 0.01 strain by all three muscles at relatively slow cycling frequencies: DDF (4–7 Hz), SDF (4–5 Hz) and SOL (0.5–1 Hz). Nyquist analysis, reflecting the influence of cross‐bridge kinetics on power generation, corroborated these results. The similar capacity for power generation by DDF and SDF versus lower for SOL, and the faster frequency at which this power was realized in DDF and SDF fibers, are largely explained by the fast myosin heavy chain isoform content in each muscle. Contractile function of DDF and SDF as power absorbers and generators, respectively, during locomotion may therefore be more dependent on their fiber architectural arrangement than on the physiological properties of their muscle fibers. PMID:25293602

  15. Calcium transients in single fibers of low-frequency stimulated fast-twitch muscle of rat.

    PubMed

    Carroll, S; Nicotera, P; Pette, D

    1999-12-01

    Ca(2+) transients were investigated in single fibers isolated from rat extensor digitorum longus muscles exposed to chronic low-frequency stimulation for different time periods up to 10 days. Approximately 2.5-fold increases in resting Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) were observed 2 h after stimulation onset and persisted throughout the stimulation period. The elevated [Ca(2+)] levels were in the range characteristic of slow-twitch fibers from soleus muscle. In addition, we noticed a transitory elevation of the integral [Ca(2+)] per pulse with a maximum ( approximately 5-fold) after 1 day. Steep decreases in rate constant of [Ca(2+)] decay could be explained by an immediate impairment of Ca(2+) uptake and, with longer stimulation periods, by an additional loss of cytosolic Ca(2+) binding capacity resulting from a decay in parvalbumin content. A partial recovery of the rate constant of [Ca(2+)] decay in 10-day stimulated muscle could be explained by an increasing mitochondrial contribution to Ca(2+) sequestration.

  16. Voluntary activation level and muscle fiber recruitment of human quadriceps during lengthening contractions.

    PubMed

    Beltman, J G M; Sargeant, A J; van Mechelen, W; de Haan, A

    2004-08-01

    Voluntary activation levels during lengthening, isometric, and shortening contractions (angular velocity 60 degrees/s) were investigated by using electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve (triplet, 300 Hz) superimposed on maximal efforts. Recruitment of fiber populations was investigated by using the phosphocreatine-to-creatine ratio (PCr/Cr) of single characterized muscle fibers obtained from needle biopsies at rest and immediately after a series of 10 lengthening, isometric, and shortening contractions (1 s on/1 s off). Maximal voluntary torque was significantly higher during lengthening (270 +/- 55 N.m) compared with shortening contractions (199 +/- 47 N.m, P < 0.05) but was not different from isometric contractions (252 +/- 47 N.m). Isometric torque was higher than torque during shortening (P < 0.05). Voluntary activation level during maximal attempted lengthening contractions (79 +/- 8%) was significantly lower compared with isometric (93 +/- 5%) and shortening contractions (92 +/- 3%, P < 0.05). Mean PCr/Cr values of all fibers from all subjects at rest were 2.5 +/- 0.6, 2.0 +/- 0.7, and 2.0 +/- 0.7, respectively, for type I, IIa, and IIax fibers. After 10 contractions, the mean PCr/Cr values for grouped fiber populations (regardless of fiber type) were all significantly different from rest (1.3 +/- 0.2, 0.7 +/- 0.3, and 0.8 +/- 0.6 for lengthening, isometric, and shortening contractions, respectively; P < 0.05). The cumulative distributions of individual fiber populations after either contraction mode were significantly different from rest (P < 0.05). Curves after lengthening contractions were less shifted compared with curves from isometric and shortening contractions (P < 0.05), with a smaller shift for the type IIax compared with type I fibers in the lengthening contractions. The results indicate a reduced voluntary drive during lengthening contractions. PCr/Cr values of single fibers indicated a hierarchical order of recruitment of all fiber

  17. Effect of endurance and/or strength training on muscle fiber size, oxidative capacity, and capillarity in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael I; Fournier, Mario; Wang, Huiyuan; Storer, Thomas W; Casaburi, Richard; Kopple, Joel D

    2015-10-15

    We previously reported reduced limb muscle fiber succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity and capillarity density and increased cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of all fiber types in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients compared with matched controls that may contribute to their effort intolerance and muscle weakness. This study evaluated whether endurance training (ET), strength training (ST), or their combination (EST) alters these metabolic and morphometric aberrations as a mechanism for functional improvement. Five groups were evaluated: 1) controls; 2) MHD/no training; 3) MHD/ET; 4) MHD/ST; and 5) MHD/EST. Training duration was 21.5 ± 0.7 wk. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained after HD at baseline and at study end. Muscle fibers were classified immunohistochemically, and fiber CSAs were computed. Individual fiber SDH activity was determined by a microdensitometric assay. Capillaries were identified using antibodies against endothelial cells. Type I and IIA fiber CSAs decreased significantly (10%) with EST. In the ET group, SDH activity increased 16.3% in type IIA and 19.6% in type IIX fibers. Capillary density increased significantly by 28% in the EST group and 14.3% with ET. The number of capillaries surrounding individual fiber type increased significantly in EST and ET groups. Capillary-to-fiber ratio increased significantly by 11 and 9.6% in EST and ET groups, respectively. We conclude that increments in capillarity and possibly SDH activity in part underlie improvements in endurance of MHD patients posttraining. We speculate that improved specific force and/or neural adaptations to exercise underlie improvements in limb muscle strength of MHD patients.

  18. Effect of endurance and/or strength training on muscle fiber size, oxidative capacity, and capillarity in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Mario; Wang, Huiyuan; Storer, Thomas W.; Casaburi, Richard; Kopple, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported reduced limb muscle fiber succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity and capillarity density and increased cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of all fiber types in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients compared with matched controls that may contribute to their effort intolerance and muscle weakness. This study evaluated whether endurance training (ET), strength training (ST), or their combination (EST) alters these metabolic and morphometric aberrations as a mechanism for functional improvement. Five groups were evaluated: 1) controls; 2) MHD/no training; 3) MHD/ET; 4) MHD/ST; and 5) MHD/EST. Training duration was 21.5 ± 0.7 wk. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained after HD at baseline and at study end. Muscle fibers were classified immunohistochemically, and fiber CSAs were computed. Individual fiber SDH activity was determined by a microdensitometric assay. Capillaries were identified using antibodies against endothelial cells. Type I and IIA fiber CSAs decreased significantly (10%) with EST. In the ET group, SDH activity increased 16.3% in type IIA and 19.6% in type IIX fibers. Capillary density increased significantly by 28% in the EST group and 14.3% with ET. The number of capillaries surrounding individual fiber type increased significantly in EST and ET groups. Capillary-to-fiber ratio increased significantly by 11 and 9.6% in EST and ET groups, respectively. We conclude that increments in capillarity and possibly SDH activity in part underlie improvements in endurance of MHD patients posttraining. We speculate that improved specific force and/or neural adaptations to exercise underlie improvements in limb muscle strength of MHD patients. PMID:26183484

  19. Removal of Viruses in Drinking Water- Ultrafiltration Module with a Cut Fiber, Dow Chemical Company - Dow Water & Process Solutions, SFD-2880 - Ultrafiltration Module

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this verification was a cut fiber challenge study for the Dow Chemical Company SFD-2880 UF membrane module. MS2 coliphage virus was the surrogate challenge organism. The challenge tests followed the requirements of the Department of Health Victoria (Australia) Dr...

  20. Reduced Appendicular Lean Body Mass, Muscle Strength, and Size of Type II Muscle Fibers in Patients with Spondyloarthritis versus Healthy Controls: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to investigate body composition, muscle function, and muscle morphology in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Methods. Ten male SpA patients (mean ± SD age 39 ± 4.1 years) were compared with ten healthy controls matched for sex, age, body mass index, and self-reported level of physical exercise. Body composition was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Musculus quadriceps femoris (QF) strength was assessed by maximal isometric contractions prior to test of muscular endurance. Magnetic resonance imaging of QF was used to measure muscle size and calculate specific muscle strength. Percutaneous needle biopsy samples were taken from m. vastus lateralis. Results. SpA patients presented with significantly lower appendicular lean body mass (LBM) (p = 0.02), but there was no difference in bone mineral density, fat mass, or total LBM. Absolute QF strength was significantly lower in SpA patients (p = 0.03) with a parallel trend for specific strength (p = 0.08). Biopsy samples from the SpA patients revealed significantly smaller cross-sectional area (CSA) of type II muscle fibers (p = 0.04), but no difference in CSA type I fibers. Conclusions. Results indicate that the presence of SpA disease is associated with reduced appendicular LBM, muscle strength, and type II fiber CSA. PMID:27672678

  1. Reduced Appendicular Lean Body Mass, Muscle Strength, and Size of Type II Muscle Fibers in Patients with Spondyloarthritis versus Healthy Controls: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Røren Nordén, Kristine; Dagfinrud, Hanne; Løvstad, Amund; Raastad, Truls

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to investigate body composition, muscle function, and muscle morphology in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Methods. Ten male SpA patients (mean ± SD age 39 ± 4.1 years) were compared with ten healthy controls matched for sex, age, body mass index, and self-reported level of physical exercise. Body composition was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Musculus quadriceps femoris (QF) strength was assessed by maximal isometric contractions prior to test of muscular endurance. Magnetic resonance imaging of QF was used to measure muscle size and calculate specific muscle strength. Percutaneous needle biopsy samples were taken from m. vastus lateralis. Results. SpA patients presented with significantly lower appendicular lean body mass (LBM) (p = 0.02), but there was no difference in bone mineral density, fat mass, or total LBM. Absolute QF strength was significantly lower in SpA patients (p = 0.03) with a parallel trend for specific strength (p = 0.08). Biopsy samples from the SpA patients revealed significantly smaller cross-sectional area (CSA) of type II muscle fibers (p = 0.04), but no difference in CSA type I fibers. Conclusions. Results indicate that the presence of SpA disease is associated with reduced appendicular LBM, muscle strength, and type II fiber CSA.

  2. Effects of ACL reconstruction surgery on muscle activity of the lower limb during a jump-cut maneuver in males and females

    PubMed Central

    Coats-Thomas, Margaret S.; Miranda, Daniel L.; Badger, Gary J.; Fleming, Braden C.

    2013-01-01

    We compared muscle activity of the quadriceps, hamstring, and gastrocnemius muscles when ACL-intact (ACLINT) and ACL-reconstructed (ACLREC) male and female subjects performed a jump-cut task. Surface electromyography sensors were used to evaluate time to peak muscle activity and muscle activity ratios. Rectus femoris (RF) and vastus medialis (VM) peak timing was 71 ms and 78 ms earlier in ACLINT than in ACLREC subjects, respectively. Biceps femoris (BF) peak timing was 90 ms earlier in ACLINT than in ACLREC subjects and 75 ms earlier in females than in males. Medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle peak timing was 77 ms earlier in ACLINT than in ACLREC subjects. Lateral gastrocnemius (LG) and MG muscle peak times were 106 ms and 87 ms earlier in females than in males, respectively. The RF, VM, BF and MG peaked later in ACLREC than in ACLINT subjects. There was evidence suggesting that the loading phase quadriceps:hamstring (quad:ham) muscle activity ratio was greater in ACLREC than in ACLINT subjects. Finally, the injury risk phase quad:ham muscle activity ratio was found to be 4.8 times greater in females than in males. In conclusion, there are differences in muscle activity related to ACL status and sex that could potentially help explain graft failure risk and the sex bias. PMID:23966333

  3. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei; Ouyang, Pin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  4. Effects of muscle fiber type on glycolytic potential and meat quality traits in different Tibetan pig muscles and their association with glycolysis-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shen, L Y; Luo, J; Lei, H G; Jiang, Y Z; Bai, L; Li, M Z; Tang, G Q; Li, X W; Zhang, S H; Zhu, L

    2015-11-13

    The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition, glycolytic potential, mitochondrial content, and gene expression related to energy metabolism were analyzed in eight muscles from Tibetan pigs, to study how meat quality develops in different muscle tissues. The muscles were classified into three clusters, based on MyHC composition: masseter, trapezius, and latissimus dorsi as 'slow-oxidative-type'; psoas major and semimembranosus as 'intermediate-type'; and longissimus dorsi, obliquus externus abdominis, and semitendinosus as 'fast-glycolytic-type'. The 'slow-oxidative-type' muscles had the highest MyHC I and MyHC IIA content (P < 0.01); 'intermediate-type' muscles, the highest MyHC IIx content (P < 0.01); and 'fast-glycolytic-type' muscles, the highest MyHC IIb content (P < 0.01). The pH values measured in 'slow-oxidative-type' muscles were higher than those in the other clusters were; however, the color of 'fast-glycolytic-type' muscles was palest (P < 0.01). Mitochondrial content increased in the order: fast-glycolytic-type < intermediate-type < slow-oxidative-type. In the 'slow-oxidative-type' muscles, the expression levels of genes related to ATP synthesis were higher, but were lower for those related to glycogen synthesis and glycolysis. Mitochondrial content was significantly positively correlated with MyHC I content, but negatively correlated with MyHC IIb content. MyHC I and mitochondrial content were both negatively correlated with glycolytic potential. Overall, muscles used frequently in exercise had a higher proportion of type I fibers. 'Slow-oxidative-type' muscles, rich in type I fibers with higher mitochondrial and lower glycogen and glucose contents, had a higher ATP synthesis efficiency and lower glycolytic capacity, which contributed to their superior meat quality.

  5. Single myosin lever arm orientation in a muscle fiber detected with photoactivatable GFP.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Thomas P; Li, Jinhui; Ajtai, Katalin

    2009-02-03

    Myosin 2 is the molecular motor in muscle. It binds actin and executes a power stroke by rotating its lever arm through an angle of approximately 70 degrees to translate actin against resistive force. Myosin 2 has evolved to function optimally under crowded conditions where rates and equilibria of macromolecular reactions undergo major shifts relative to those measured in dilute solution. Hence, an important research objective is to detect in situ the lever arm orientation. Single-molecule measurements are preferred because they clarify ambiguities that are unavoidable with ensemble measurements; however, detecting single molecules in the condensed tissue medium where the myosin concentration exceeds 100 muM is challenging. A myosin light chain (MLC) tagged with photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (PAGFP) was constructed. The recombinant MLC physically and functionally replaced native MLC on the myosin lever arm in a permeabilized skeletal muscle fiber. Probe illumination volume was minimized using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and PAGFP was sparsely photoactivated such that polarized fluorescence identified a single probe orientation. Several physiological states of the muscle fiber were characterized, revealing two distinct orientation populations in all states called straight and bent conformations. Conformation occupancy probability varies among fiber states with rigor and isometric contraction at extremes where straight and bent conformations predominate, respectively. Comparison to previous work on single rigor cross-bridges at the A-band periphery where the myosin concentration is low suggests molecular crowding in the A-band promotes occupancy of the straight myosin conformation [Burghardt, T. P., et al. (2007) Biophys. J. 93, 2226]. The latter may have a role in contraction because it provides additional free energy favoring completion of the cross-bridge power stroke.

  6. Patterns of Intersecting Fiber Arrays Revealed in Whole Muscle with Generalized Q-Space Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Erik N.; Hoffman, Matthew P.; Aninwene, George E.; Gilbert, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The multiscale attributes of mammalian muscle confer significant challenges for structural imaging in vivo. To achieve this, we employed a magnetic resonance method, termed “generalized Q-space imaging”, that considers the effect of spatially distributed diffusion-weighted magnetic field gradients and diffusion sensitivities on the morphology of Q-space. This approach results in a subvoxel scaled probability distribution function whose shape correlates with local fiber orientation. The principal fiber populations identified within these probability distribution functions can then be associated by streamline methods to create multivoxel tractlike constructs that depict the macroscale orientation of myofiber arrays. We performed a simulation of Q-space input parameters, including magnetic field gradient strength and direction, diffusion sensitivity, and diffusional sampling to determine the optimal achievable fiber angle separation in the minimum scan time. We applied this approach to resolve intravoxel crossing myofiber arrays in the setting of the human tongue, an organ with anatomic complexity based on the presence of hierarchical arrays of intersecting myocytes. Using parameters defined by simulation, we imaged at 3T the fanlike configuration of the human genioglossus and the laterally positioned merging fibers of the styloglossus, inferior longitudinalis, chondroglossus, and verticalis. Comparative scans of the excised mouse tongue at 7T demonstrated similar midline and lateral crossing fiber patterns, whereas histological analysis confirmed the presence and distribution of these myofiber arrays at the microscopic scale. Our results demonstrate a magnetic resonance method for acquiring and displaying diffusional data that defines highly ordered myofiber patterns in architecturally complex tissue. Such patterns suggest inherent multiscale fiber organization and provide a basis for structure-function analyses in vivo and in model tissues. PMID:26039175

  7. Skeletal muscle fiber type composition and performance during repeated bouts of maximal, concentric contractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, E. B.; Dudley, G. A.; Tesch, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Force output and fatigue and recovery patterns were studied during intermittent short-term exercise. 27 men performed three bouts of 30 maximal unilateral knee extensions on 2 different occasions. Blood flow was maintained or occluded during recovery periods (60 s). Blood flow was restricted by inflating a pneumatic cuff placed around the proximal thigh. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis were analyzed for identification of fast twitch (FT) and slow twitch (ST) fibers and relative FT area. Peak torque decreased during each bout of exercise and more when blood flow was restricted during recovery. Initial peak torque (IPT) and average peak torque (APT) decreased over the three exercise bouts. This response was 3 fold greater without than with blood flow during recovery. IPT and APT decreased more in individuals with mainly FT fibers than in those with mainly ST fibers. It is suggested that performance during repeated bouts of maximal concentric contractions differs between individuals with different fiber type composition. Specifically, in high intensity, intermittent exercise with emphasis on anaerobic energy release a high FT composition may not necessarily be advantageous for performance.

  8. Electrically controllable twisted-coiled artificial muscle actuators using surface-modified polyester fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungwoo; Yoo, Ji Wang; Seo, Hee Won; Lee, Youngkwan; Suhr, Jonghwan; Moon, Hyungpil; Koo, Ja Choon; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk; Hunt, Robert; Kim, Kwang Jin; Kim, Soo Hyun; Nam, Jae-Do

    2017-03-01

    As a new class of thermally activated actuators based on polymeric fibers, we investigated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) yarns for the development of a twisted-coiled polymer fiber actuator (TCA). The PET yarn TCA exhibited the maximum linear actuation up to 8.9% by external heating at above the glass transition temperature, 160 °C–180 °C. The payload of the actuator was successfully correlated with the preload and training-load conditions by an empirical equation. Furthermore, the PET-based TCA was electrically driven by Joule heating after the PET surface was metallization with silver. For the fast and precise control of PET yarn TCA, electroless silver plating was conducted to form electrical conductive layers on the PET fiber surface. The silver plated PET-based TCA was tested by Joule heating and the tensile actuation was increased up to 12.1% (6 V) due to the enhanced surface hardness and slippage of PET fibers. Overall, silver plating of the polymeric yarn provided a fast actuation speed and enhanced actuation performance of the TCA actuator by Joule heating, providing a great potential for being used in artificial muscle for biomimetic machines including robots, industrial actuators and powered exoskeletons.

  9. Sarcomere lengthening and tension drop in the latent period of isolated frog skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Haugen, P; Sten-Knudsen, O

    1976-09-01

    A laser diffraction technique has been developed for registering small changes in sarcomere length. The technique is capable of resolving changes as small as 0.2 A in isolated frog skeletal muscle fibers. The small sarcomere lengthening that accompanies the drop in tension in the latent period of contraction was investigated. We suggest this lengthening be named latency elongation (LE). The LE is present in a completely slack fiber and must, therefore, be caused by a forcible lengthening process. Furthermore, the LE is dependent on the existence of an overlap between thin and tick filaments. The rate of elongation and the time interval between stimulation and maximum elongation may vary along the fiber. The maximum elongation was 3-5 A per sarcomere. At any instant the drop in tension is a product of the sum of sarcomere lengthenings along the fiber and the slope stiffness of the series elasticity. The latency relaxation (LR) could be registered in the sarcomere length range from 2.2 mum to 3.6-3.7 mum. The amplitude went through a sharp maximum at 3.0-3.1 mum. In the sarcomere length range from 2.2 to 2.8 mum the delay from onset to maximum LR was nearly proportional to the distance from the Z-line to the overlap zone. A working hypothesis is presented. It is suggested that the LE is caused by a lengthening of the thin filaments.

  10. Effect of gonadal hormones on the cross-sectional area of pubococcygeus muscle fibers in male rat.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Mayvi; Cuevas, Estela; Lara-García, Miguel; Camacho, Miguel; Carrillo, Porfirio; Hudson, Robyn; Pacheco, Pablo

    2008-05-01

    Effects of gonadal hormones on dimorphic striated muscles such as the bulbocavernosus/levator ani complex related to male penile erection have been widely studied. However, the action of these hormones on pelvic nondimorphic muscles is not known. In the present study, the sensitivity of the male rat pubococcygeus muscle (Pcm) to gonadal hormones was studied measuring the cross-sectional area (CSA) of its fibers. For this, two experiments were done: in the first, the effect of castration, and in the second the effect of gonadal hormone administration was analyzed. We found that castration after 6 weeks significantly reduced the average CSA of the fibers of this muscle and that castration after 2 or 6 weeks reduced the percentage of fibers with higher CSAs, but only castration after 6 weeks increased the percentage of fibers with the lowest CSA. In comparison with castrated animals implanted with an empty Silastic capsule, Silastic implants of testosterone propionate or dihydrotestosterone significantly increased the average CSA of Pcm fibers, and the treatment with testosterone propionate, estradiol benzoate, or dihydrotestosterone decreased the percentage of fibers with low CSAs and increased the percentage with larger CSAs. Our results could be considered for therapy in patients with damage of the Pcm, and suffering urinary incontinence or ejaculatory dysfunctions.

  11. Lattice spacing changes accompanying isometric tension development in intact single muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Bagni, M A; Cecchi, G; Griffiths, P J; Maéda, Y; Rapp, G; Ashley, C C

    1994-11-01

    The myosin lattice spacing of single intact muscle fibers of the frog, Rana temporaria, was studied in Ringer's solution (standard osmolarity 230 mOsm) and hyper- and hypotonic salines (1.4 and 0.8 times standard osmolarity respectively) in the relaxed state, during "fixed end" tetani, and during shortening, using synchrotron radiation. At standard tonicity, a tetanus was associated with an initial brief lattice expansion (and a small amount of sarcomere shortening), followed by a slow compression (unaccompanied by sarcomere length changes). In hypertonic saline (myosin lattice compressed by 8.1%), these spacing changes were suppressed, in hypotonic saline (lattice spacing increased by 7.5%), they were enhanced. During unloaded shortening of activated fibers, a rapid lattice expansion occurred at all tonicities, but became larger as tonicity was reduced. This expansion was caused in part by the change in length of the preparation, but also by a recoil of a stressed radial compliance associated with axial force. The lattice spacing during unloaded shortening was equal to or occasionally greater than predicted for a relaxed fiber at that sarcomere length, indicating that the lattice compression associated with activation is rapidly reversed upon loss of axial force. Lattice recompression occurred upon termination of shortening under standard and hypotonic conditions, but was almost absent under hypertonic conditions. These observations indicate that axial cross-bridge tension is associated with a compressive radial force in intact muscle fibers at full overlap; however, this radial force exhibits a much greater sensitivity to lattice spacing than does the axial force.

  12. Black and White race differences in aerobic capacity, muscle fiber type, and their influence on metabolic processes.

    PubMed

    Ceaser, Tyrone; Hunter, Gary

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is a known risk factor for cardiometabolic disease. Increasing aerobic capacity (VO2max) reduces adiposity, maintains weight, and reduces the risk of developing obesity and cardiometabolic disease. Two major determinants of aerobic capacity are the metabolic properties specific to a particular muscle fiber type and the capacity of the cardiorespiratory system to deliver nutrient-rich content to the muscle. Recent research suggests that some race/ethnic groups, particularly non-Hispanic Black subjects, are predisposed to a reduced VO2max by way of muscle fiber type. Combined with insufficient physical activity, these characteristics place non-Hispanic Black subjects at an increased risk for obesity and other adverse health outcomes when compared with other race/ethnic groups. The purpose of this review was to suggest a model for explaining how skeletal muscle fiber type may contribute to reduced aerobic capacity and obesity among non-Hispanic Black subjects. Our review indicates that metabolic properties of type II skeletal muscle (e.g. reduced oxidative capacity, capillary density) are related to various cardiometabolic diseases. Based on the review, non-Hispanic Black subjects appear to have a lower maximal aerobic capacity and a greater percentage of type II skeletal muscle fibers. Combined with reduced energy expenditure and reduced hemoglobin concentration, non-Hispanic Black subjects may be inherently predisposed to a reduced maximal aerobic capacity compared with non-Hispanic White subjects, thereby increasing the risk for obesity and related metabolic diseases.

  13. Differential epigenetic modifications of histones at the myosin heavy chain genes in fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers and in response to muscle unloading.

    PubMed

    Pandorf, Clay E; Haddad, Fadia; Wright, Carola; Bodell, Paul W; Baldwin, Kenneth M

    2009-07-01

    Recent advances in chromatin biology have enhanced our understanding of gene regulation. It is now widely appreciated that gene regulation is dependent upon post-translational modifications to the histones which package genes in the nucleus of cells. Active genes are known to be associated with acetylation of histones (H3ac) and trimethylation of lysine 4 in histone H3 (H3K4me3). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we examined histone modifications at the myosin heavy chain (MHC) genes expressed in fast vs. slow fiber-type skeletal muscle, and in a model of muscle unloading, which results in a shift to fast MHC gene expression in slow muscles. Both H3ac and H3K4me3 varied directly with the transcriptional activity of the MHC genes in fast fiber-type plantaris and slow fiber-type soleus. During MHC transitions with muscle unloading, histone H3 at the type I MHC becomes de-acetylated in correspondence with down-regulation of that gene, while upregulation of the fast type IIx and IIb MHCs occurs in conjunction with enhanced H3ac in those MHCs. Enrichment of H3K4me3 is also increased at the type IIx and IIb MHCs when these genes are induced with muscle unloading. Downregulation of IIa MHC, however, was not associated with corresponding loss of H3ac or H3K4me3. These observations demonstrate the feasibility of using the ChIP assay to understand the native chromatin environment in adult skeletal muscle, and also suggest that the transcriptional state of types I, IIx and IIb MHC genes are sensitive to histone modifications both in different muscle fiber-types and in response to altered loading states.

  14. Functional pools of oxidative and glycolytic fibers in human muscle observed by /sup 31/P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Brown, R.L.; Park, C.R.; McCully, K.; Cohn, M.; Haselgrove, J.; Chance, B.

    1987-12-01

    Quantitative probing of heterogeneous regions in muscle is feasible with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy because of the differentiation of metabolic patterns of glycolytic and oxidative fibers. A differential recruitment of oxidative and glycolytic fibers during exercise was demonstrated in 4 of 10 untrained young men by following changes in phosphate metabolites. Concentrations of inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), phosphocreatine, and ATP were estimated in the wrist flexor muscles of the forearm at rest, during two cycles of three grades of exercise, and in recovery. At high work levels (40% of maximum strength), two distinct P/sub i/ peaks were observed and identified with P/sub i/ pools at pH 6.9 and pH 5.9-6.4, respectively. These could be accounted for as follows. At the lowest level of work (using 20% of maximum strength), early recruitment primarily of oxidative (type I) and possibly some intermediate (type IIA) muscle fibers occurs with relatively little net lactate production and consequently little decrease in pH. At higher work loads, however, primarily glycolytic (type IIB) muscle fibers are recruited, which have relatively high net lactate production and therefore generate a second pool of P/sub i/ at low pH. These observations indicated exhaustion of glycolytic type IIB fibers, removal of lactate by high local blood flow, and sustained contractions largely by oxidative type I and IIA fibers. A functional differentiation of fiber types could also be demonstrated during recovery if exercise was stopped while two pools of P/sub i/ were still apparent. The potential of magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize oxidative and glycolytic fibers, predict capacity for aerobic performance, and signal the presence of muscle pathology is discussed.

  15. Calcium-binding properties of troponin C in detergent-skinned heart muscle fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, B.S.; Solaro, R.J.

    1987-06-05

    In order to obtain information with regard to behavior of the Ca/sup 2 +/ receptor, troponin C (TnC), in intact myofilament lattice of cardiac muscle, we investigated Ca/sup 2 +/-binding properties of canine ventricular muscle fibers skinned with Triton X-100. Analysis of equilibrium Ca/sup 2 +/-binding data of the skinned fibers in ATP-free solutions suggested that there were two distinct classes of binding sites which were saturated over the physiological range of negative logarithm of free calcium concentration (pCa): class I (KCa = 7.4 X 10(7) M-1, KMg = 0.9 X 10(3) M-1) and class II (KCa = 1.2 X 10(6) M-1, KMg = 1.1 X 10(2) M-1). The class I and II were considered equivalent, respectively, to the Ca/sup 2 +/-Mg/sup 2 +/ and Ca/sup 2 +/-specific sites of TnC. The assignments were supported by TnC content of the skinned fibers determined by electrophoresis and /sup 45/Ca autoradiograph of electroblotted fiber proteins. Dissociation of rigor complexes by ATP caused a downward shift of the binding curve between pCa 7 and 5, an effect which could be largely accounted for by lowering of KCa of the class II sites. When Ca/sup 2 +/ binding and isometric force were measured simultaneously, it was found that the threshold pCa for activation corresponds to the range of pCa where class II sites started to bind Ca/sup 2 +/ significantly. We concluded that the low affinity site of cardiac TnC plays a key role in Ca/sup 2 +/ regulation of contraction under physiological conditions, just as it does in the regulation of actomyosin ATPase. Study of kinetics of /sup 45/Ca washout from skinned fibers and myofibrils revealed that cardiac TnC in myofibrils contains Ca/sup 2 +/-binding sites whose off-rate constant for Ca/sup 2 +/ is significantly lower than the Ca/sup 2 +/ off-rate constant hitherto documented for the divalent ion-binding sites of either cardiac/slow muscle TnC or fast skeletal TnC.

  16. Use it or Lose It: Tonic Activity of Slow Motoneurons Promotes Their Survival and Preferentially Increases Slow Fiber-Type Groupings in Muscles of Old Lifelong Recreational Sportsmen

    PubMed Central

    Mosole, Simone; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Loefler, Stefan; Zampieri, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Histochemistry, immuno-histochemistry, gel electrophoresis of single muscle fibers and electromyography of aging muscles and nerves suggest that: i) denervation contributes to muscle atrophy, ii) impaired mobility accelerates the process, and iii) lifelong running protects against loss of motor units. Recent corroborating results on the muscle effects of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) of aged muscles will be also mentioned, but we will in particular discuss how and why a lifelong increased physical activity sustains reinnervation of muscle fibers. By analyzing distribution and density of muscle fibers co-expressing fast and slow Myosin Heavy Chains (MHC) we are able to distinguish the transforming muscle fibers due to activity related plasticity, to those that adapt muscle fiber properties to denervation and reinnervation. In muscle biopsies from septuagenarians with a history of lifelong high-level recreational activity we recently observed in comparison to sedentary seniors: 1. decreased proportion of small-size angular myofibers (denervated muscle fibers); 2. considerable increase of fiber-type groupings of the slow type (reinnervated muscle fibers); 3. sparse presence of muscle fibers co-expressing fast and slow MHC. Immuno-histochemical characteristics fluctuate from those with scarce fiber-type modulation and groupings to almost complete transformed muscles, going through a process in which isolated fibers co-expressing fast and slow MHC fill the gaps among fiber groupings. Data suggest that lifelong high-level exercise allows the body to adapt to the consequences of the age-related denervation and that it preserves muscle structure and function by saving otherwise lost muscle fibers through recruitment to different slow motor units. This is an opposite behavior of that described in long term denervated or resting muscles. These effects of lifelong high level activity seems to act primarily on motor neurons, in particular on those always more active

  17. Effect of Resistance Training on Capillary Density Around Slow and Fast Twitch Muscle Fibers in Diabetic and Normal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Karimian, Jahangir; Khazaei, Majid; Shekarchizadeh, Parivash

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is well accepted that skeletal muscle conforms to exercise stimulus by increasing capillary density and angiogenesis, but there is less evidence regarding the effect of resistance training on capillary density in flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and soleus muscle. Objectives: In this study, we evaluated the effect of resistance training on capillary density around soleus and FHL muscles in type 1 diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six male rats were divided into four groups: (1) control; (2) diabetic; (3) diabetic trained and (4) control trained (n = 9 each). A Single intraperitoneal injection of Streptozotocin at a dose of 55 mg/kg was used for induction of diabetes. The rats in the trained group undertook one training session per day for 3 days/week. Training was done with the use of a 1 meter high ladder inclined at 80°. After 4 weeks, the plasma nitrite concentrations were measured. Capillary/fiber ratio was determined around soleus and FHL muscles by immunohistochemistry. Results: Plasma Nitric Oxide (NO) concentration was increased after resistance training in diabetic animals (P < 0.05). Capillary/fiber ratio around the soleus muscle of diabetic group was more than control rats. Resistance training did not alter capillary/fiber ratio in diabetic animals (1.00 ± 0.6 vs. 1.07 ± 0.07, respectively). Capillary/fiber ratio around FHL muscle was significantly different between diabetic and control and did not alter after exercise (diabetes: 1.1702 ± 0.09; diabetic trained: 1.1714 ± 0.08; control: 0.79 ± 0.08; control trained: 0.73 ± 0.03). There was a positive correlation between plasma NO concentration and capillary density in the soleus muscle (R2 = 0.65). Conclusions: Resistance training could not improve capillary/fiber ratio in soleus and FHL muscle of diabetic animals in spite of increase in some angiogenic factors including NO. PMID:26715966

  18. Action Potential-Evoked Calcium Release Is Impaired in Single Skeletal Muscle Fibers from Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Quiñonez, Marbella; Shieh, Perry; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Cruz, Daniel; Deng, Mario C.; Vergara, Julio L.; Middlekauff, Holly R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF) has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+) release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers. Methods and Findings Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms) was markedly (2.6-fold) and significantly (p<0.05) smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms). This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers. Conclusions These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients. PMID:25310188

  19. Fiber-type composition in the perivertebral musculature of lizards: Implications for the evolution of the diapsid trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Sabine; Schilling, Nadja

    2013-03-01

    The perivertebral musculature of lizards is critical for the stabilization and the mobilization of the trunk during locomotion. Some trunk muscles are also involved in ventilation. This dual function of trunk muscles in locomotion and ventilation leads to a biomechanical conflict in many lizards and constrains their ability to breathe while running ("axial constraint") which likely is reflected by their high anaerobic scope. Furthermore, different foraging and predator-escape strategies were shown to correlate with the metabolic profile of locomotor muscles in lizards. Because knowledge of muscle's fiber-type composition may help to reveal a muscle's functional properties, we investigated the distribution pattern of muscle fiber types in the perivertebral musculature in two small lizard species with a generalized body shape and subjected to the axial constraint (Dipsosaurus dorsalis, Acanthodactylus maculatus) and one species that circumvents the axial constraint by means of gular pumping (Varanus exanthematicus). Additionally, these species differ in their predator-escape and foraging behaviors. Using refined enzyme-histochemical protocols, muscle fiber types were differentiated in serial cross-sections through the trunk, maintaining the anatomical relationships between the skeleton and the musculature. The fiber composition in Dipsosaurus and Acanthodactylus showed a highly glycolytic profile, consistent with their intermittent locomotor style and reliance on anaerobic metabolism during activity. Because early representatives of diapsids resemble these two species in several postcranial characters, we suggest that this glycolytic profile represents the plesiomorphic condition for diapsids. In Varanus, we found a high proportion of oxidative fibers in all muscles, which is in accordance with its high aerobic scope and capability of sustained locomotion.

  20. Impaired Organization and Function of Myofilaments in Single Muscle Fibers from a Mouse Model of Pompe Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; Galperin, M; Melvin, G; Horowits, R; Raben, N; Plotz, P; Yu, L

    2010-01-01

    Pompe disease, a deficiency of lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase, is a disorder of glycogen metabolism that can affect infants, children, or adults. In all forms of the disease, there is progressive muscle pathology leading to premature death. The pathology is characterized by accumulation of glycogen in lysosomes, autophagic buildup, and muscle atrophy. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if myofibrillar dysfunction in Pompe disease contributes to muscle weakness beyond that attributed to atrophy. The study was performed on isolated myofibers dissected from severely affected fast glycolytic muscle in the {alpha}-glucosidase knockout mouse model. Psoas muscle fibers were first permeabilized, so that the contractile proteins could be directly relaxed or activated by control of the composition of the bathing solution. When normalized by cross-sectional area, single fibers from knockout mice produced 6.3 N/cm{sup 2} of maximum Ca{sup 2+}-activated tension compared with 12.0 N/cm{sup 2} produced by wild-type fibers. The total protein concentration was slightly higher in the knockout mice, but concentrations of the contractile proteins myosin and actin remained unchanged. Structurally, X-ray diffraction showed that the actin and myosin filaments, normally arranged in hexagonal arrays, were disordered in the knockout muscle, and a lower fraction of myosin cross bridges was near the actin filaments in the relaxed muscle. The results are consistent with a disruption of actin and myosin interactions in the knockout muscles, demonstrating that impaired myofibrillar function contributes to weakness in the diseased muscle fibers.

  1. Effects of Mechanical Overloading on the Properties of Soleus Muscle Fibers, with or without Damage in MDX and Wild Type Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Takashi; Oke, Yoshihiko; Nakai, Naoya; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Effects of mechanical overloading on the characteristics of regenerating or not-regenerating soleus muscle fibers were studied. The muscle fibers of mdx mice were characterized by the localization of myonuclei. Muscle damage was also induced in wild type (WT) mice by injection of cardiotoxin (CTX) into soleus muscle. Overloading was applied for 14 days to the left soleus muscle in mdx and intact and CTX-injected WT mice by removing the distal tendons of plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles. The contralateral muscle served as the normal control. These animals were then allowed ambulation recovery in the cage. Central myonuclei were noted in many fibers of mdx and CTX-injected mice with or without overloading. In general, the fibers with central nuclei were considered as regenerating fibers. The fibers with more central nuclei were increased in mdx mice, but the fibers with more peripheral nuclei were increased in CTX-injected WT mice by overloading. The muscle satellite cells, neuromuscular junctions (NMJ), and myonuclei were stained. Most of the properties, such as number of myonuclei and satellite cells, size of NMJ, and fiber length, were not influenced by mechanical overloading in all mice. Approximately 0.6% branched fibers were seen in the intact soleus of mdx mice, although these fibers were not detected in WT mice. However, the percentage of these fibers was increased by overloading especially in mdx mice (~50% vs. ~2.5% in WT). In CTX-injected WT mice, these fibers were ~15% with or without overloading. The fiber cross sectional area in normal WT, but not in mdx and CTX-injected WT mice, was increased by overloading (p<0.05). These results suggested that the functional overload induced muscle damage in mdx mice, but promoted the regeneration in CTX-injected WT mice.

  2. A new method to study in vivo protein synthesis in slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibers and initial measurements in humans.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, J M; Lee, J D; Sullivan, B E; Harber, M P; Trappe, S W; Trappe, T A

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an approach to directly assess protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) in isolated human muscle fibers in a fiber type-specific fashion. Individual muscle fibers were isolated from biopsies of the vastus lateralis (VL) and soleus (SOL) obtained from eight young men during a primed, continuous infusion of [5,5,5-(2)H3]leucine performed under basal conditions. To determine mixed protein FSR, a portion of each fiber was used to identify fiber type, fibers of the same type were pooled, and the [5,5,5-(2)H3]leucine enrichment was determined via GC-MS. Processing isolated slow-twitch [myosin heavy chain (MHC) I] and fast-twitch (MHC IIa) fibers for mixed protein bound [5,5,5-(2)H3]leucine enrichment yielded mass ion chromatographic peaks that were similar in shape, abundance, and measurement reliability as tissue homogenates. In the VL, MHC I fibers exhibited a 33% faster (P<0.05) mixed protein FSR compared with MHC IIa fibers (0.068+/-0.006 vs. 0.051+/-0.003%/h). MHC I fibers from the SOL (0.060+/-0.005%/h) and MHC I fibers from the VL displayed similar (P>0.05) mixed protein FSR. Feasibility of processing isolated human muscle fibers for analysis of myofibrillar protein [5,5,5-(2)H3]leucine enrichment was also confirmed in non-fiber-typed pooled fibers from the VL. These methods can be applied to the study of fiber type-specific responses in human skeletal muscle. The need for this level of investigation is underscored by the different contributions of each fiber type to whole muscle function and the numerous distinct adaptive functional and metabolic changes in MHC I and MHC II fibers originating from the same muscle.

  3. Ephrin-A3 promotes and maintains slow muscle fiber identity during postnatal development and reinnervation

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Danny A.; Coffey, Nathan J.; Pancoast, Hannah R.; Arnold, Laura L.; Walker, J. Peyton D.; Vallée, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard; Garcia, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Each adult mammalian skeletal muscle has a unique complement of fast and slow myofibers, reflecting patterns established during development and reinforced via their innervation by fast and slow motor neurons. Existing data support a model of postnatal "matching" whereby predetermined myofiber type identity promotes pruning of inappropriate motor axons, but no molecular mechanism has yet been identified. We present evidence that fiber type–specific repulsive interactions inhibit innervation of slow myofibers by fast motor axons during both postnatal maturation of the neuromuscular junction and myofiber reinnervation after injury. The repulsive guidance ligand ephrin-A3 is expressed only on slow myofibers, whereas its candidate receptor, EphA8, localizes exclusively to fast motor endplates. Adult mice lacking ephrin-A3 have dramatically fewer slow myofibers in fast and mixed muscles, and misexpression of ephrin-A3 on fast myofibers followed by denervation/reinnervation promotes their respecification to a slow phenotype. We therefore conclude that Eph/ephrin interactions guide the fiber type specificity of neuromuscular interactions during development and adult life. PMID:26644518

  4. Supercharging accelerates T-tubule membrane potential changes in voltage clamped frog skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Kim, A M; Vergara, J L

    1998-10-01

    In voltage-clamp studies of single frog skeletal muscle fibers stained with the potentiometric indicator 1-(3-sulfonatopropyl)-4-[beta[2-(di-n-octylamino)-6-naphthyl] vinyl]pyridinium betaine (di-8 ANEPPS), fluorescence transients were recorded in response to both supercharging and step command pulses. Several illumination paradigms were utilized to study global and localized regions of the transverse tubule system (T-system). The rising phases of transients obtained from global illumination regions showed distinct accelerations when supercharging pulses were applied (95% of steady-state fluorescence achieved in 1.5 ms with supercharging pulses versus 14.6 ms with step pulses). When local transients were recorded at the edge of the muscle fiber, their kinetics resembled those of the applied waveform, but a similar relationship was not observed in transients from regions near the edge chosen to minimize the surface membrane contribution. We developed a model of the T-system capable of simulating membrane potential changes as a function of time and distance along the T-system cable and the associated fluorescence changes in regions corresponding to the experimental illumination strategies. A critical parameter was the access resistance term, for which values of 110-150 Omega.cm2 were adequate to fit the data. The results suggest that the primary mechanism through which supercharging pulses boost the kinetics of T-system voltage changes most likely involves their compensating the voltage attenuation across the access resistance at the mouth of the T-tubule.

  5. Structural and molecular conformation of myosin in intact muscle fibers by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, the use of Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) for imaging biological samples has been explored with regard to intrinsic SHG in highly ordered biological samples. As shown by fractional extraction of proteins, myosin is the source of SHG signal in skeletal muscle. SHG is highly dependent on symmetries and provides selective information on the structural order and orientation of the emitting proteins and the dynamics of myosin molecules responsible for the mechano-chemical transduction during contraction. We characterise the polarization-dependence of SHG intensity in three different physiological states: resting, rigor and isometric tetanic contraction in a sarcomere length range between 2.0 μm and 4.0 μm. The orientation of motor domains of the myosin molecules is dependent on their physiological states and modulate the SHG signal. We can discriminate the orientation of the emitting dipoles in four different molecular conformations of myosin heads in intact fibers during isometric contraction, in resting and rigor. We estimate the contribution of the myosin motor domain to the total second order bulk susceptibility from its molecular structure and its functional conformation. We demonstrate that SHG is sensitive to the fraction of ordered myosin heads by disrupting the order of myosin heads in rigor with an ATP analog. We estimate the fraction of myosin motors generating the isometric force in the active muscle fiber from the dependence of the SHG modulation on the degree of overlap between actin and myosin filaments during an isometric contraction.

  6. Laser ablation of Drosophila embryonic motoneurons causes ectopic innervation of target muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. N.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    We have tested the effects of neuromuscular denervation in Drosophila by laser-ablating the RP motoneurons in intact embryos before synaptogenesis. We examined the consequences of this ablation on local synaptic connectivity in both 1st and 3rd instar larvae. We find that the partial or complete loss of native innervation correlates with the appearance of alternate inputs from neighboring motor endings and axons. These collateral inputs are found at ectopic sites on the denervated target muscle fibers. The foreign motor endings are electrophysiologically functional and are observed on the denervated muscle fibers by the 1st instar larval stage. Our data are consistent with the existence of a local signal from the target environment, which is regulated by innervation and influences synaptic connectivity. Our results show that, despite the stereotypy of Drosophila neuromuscular connections, denervation can induce local changes in connectivity in wild-type Drosophila, suggesting that mechanisms of synaptic plasticity may also be involved in normal Drosophila neuromuscular development.

  7. Ephrin-A3 promotes and maintains slow muscle fiber identity during postnatal development and reinnervation.

    PubMed

    Stark, Danny A; Coffey, Nathan J; Pancoast, Hannah R; Arnold, Laura L; Walker, J Peyton D; Vallée, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard; Garcia, Michael L; Cornelison, D D W

    2015-12-07

    Each adult mammalian skeletal muscle has a unique complement of fast and slow myofibers, reflecting patterns established during development and reinforced via their innervation by fast and slow motor neurons. Existing data support a model of postnatal "matching" whereby predetermined myofiber type identity promotes pruning of inappropriate motor axons, but no molecular mechanism has yet been identified. We present evidence that fiber type-specific repulsive interactions inhibit innervation of slow myofibers by fast motor axons during both postnatal maturation of the neuromuscular junction and myofiber reinnervation after injury. The repulsive guidance ligand ephrin-A3 is expressed only on slow myofibers, whereas its candidate receptor, EphA8, localizes exclusively to fast motor endplates. Adult mice lacking ephrin-A3 have dramatically fewer slow myofibers in fast and mixed muscles, and misexpression of ephrin-A3 on fast myofibers followed by denervation/reinnervation promotes their respecification to a slow phenotype. We therefore conclude that Eph/ephrin interactions guide the fiber type specificity of neuromuscular interactions during development and adult life.

  8. Evidence TRPV4 contributes to mechanosensitive ion channels in mouse skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tiffany C; Horn, Natalie A; Huynh, Tuan; Kelava, Lucy; Lansman, Jeffry B

    2012-01-01

    We recorded the activity of single mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels from membrane patches on single muscle fibers isolated from mice. We investigated the actions of various TRP (transient receptor potential) channel blockers on MS channel activity. 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) neither inhibited nor facilitated single channel activity at submillimolar concentrations. The absence of an effect of 2-APB indicates MS channels are not composed purely of TRPC or TRPV1, 2 or 3 proteins. Exposing patches to 1-oleolyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), a potent activator of TRPC channels, also had no effect on MS channel activity. In addition, flufenamic acid and spermidine had no effect on the activity of single MS channels. By contrast, SKF-96365 and ruthenium red blocked single-channel currents at micromolar concentrations. SKF-96365 produced a rapid block of the open channel current. The blocking rate depended linearly on blocker concentration, while the unblocking rate was independent of concentration, consistent with a simple model of open channel block. A fit to the concentration-dependence of block gave k(on) = 13 x 10 ( 6) M (-1) s (-1) and k(off) = 1609 sec (-1) with K(D) = ~124 µM. Block by ruthenium red was complex, involving both reduction of the amplitude of the single-channel current and increased occupancy of subconductance levels. The reduction in current amplitude with increasing concentration of ruthenium red gave a K(D) = ~49 µM. The high sensitivity of MS channels to block by ruthenium red suggests MS channels in skeletal muscle contain TRPV subunits. Recordings from skeletal muscle isolated from TRPV4 knockout mice failed to show MS channel activity, consistent with a contribution of TRPV4. In addition, exposure to hypo-osmotic solutions increases opening of MS channels in muscle. Our results provide evidence TRPV4 contributes to MS channels in skeletal muscle.

  9. Helicoids in the T system and striations of frog skeletal muscle fibers seen by high voltage electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Peachey, L D; Eisenberg, B R

    1978-01-01

    Reconstruction from thick serial transverse slices of frog skeletal muscle fibers stained with peroxidase and examined by high-voltage electron microscopy has revealed that the T system networks at successive sarcomeres are connected together in a helicoidal fashion. From zero to eight helicoids have been found in each of a group of 21 fibers reconstructed in cross section. Helicoids can have either right- or left-handed screw senses, and both senses can be found in one fiber cross section. Because the T system maintains a relatively precise alignment with the myofibrillar striations, it follows that the striations must also have a helicoidal arrangement. This has been found before, but has not been widely accepted in recent times. The presence of helicoids in the bands and membrane networks is not thought per se to alter very much our thinking about excitation and contraction mechanisms in skeletal muscle fibers. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:306839

  10. Skeletal muscle myostatin mRNA expression is fiber-type specific and increases during hindlimb unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, C. J.; Booth, F. W.; Gordon, S. E.

    1999-01-01

    Transgenic mice lacking a functional myostatin (MSTN) gene demonstrate greater skeletal muscle mass resulting from muscle fiber hypertrophy and hyperplasia (McPherron, A. C., A. M. Lawler, and S. -J. Lee. Nature 387: 83-90, 1997). Therefore, we hypothesized that, in normal mice, MSTN may act as a negative regulator of muscle mass. Specifically, we hypothesized that the predominately slow (type I) soleus muscle, which demonstrates greater atrophy than the fast (type II) gastrocnemius-plantaris complex (Gast/PLT), would show more elevation in MSTN mRNA abundance during hindlimb unloading (HU). Surprisingly, MSTN mRNA was not detectable in weight-bearing or HU soleus muscle, which atrophied 42% by the 7th day of HU in female ICR mice. In contrast, MSTN mRNA was present in weight-bearing Gast/PLT muscle and was significantly elevated (67%) at 1 day but not at 3 or 7 days of HU. However, the Gast/PLT muscle had only atrophied 17% by the 7th day of HU. Because the soleus is composed only of type I and IIa fibers, whereas the Gast/PLT expresses type IId/x and IIb in addition to type I and IIa, it was necessary to perform a more careful analysis of the relationship between MSTN mRNA levels and myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoform expression (as a marker of fiber type). A significant correlation (r = 0.725, P < 0. 0005) was noted between the percentage of MHC isoform IIb expression and MSTN mRNA abundance in several muscles of the mouse hindlimb. These results indicate that MSTN expression is not strongly associated with muscle atrophy induced by HU; however, it is strongly associated with MHC isoform IIb expression in normal muscle.

  11. Hormonal Treatment Effects on the Cross-sectional Area of Pubococcygeus Muscle Fibers After Denervation and Castration in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Lara-García, Miguel; Alvarado, Mayvi; Cuevas, Estela; Lara-García, Omar; Sengelaub, Dale R; Pacheco, Pablo

    2017-02-08

    We explore the interaction of muscle innervation and gonadal hormone action in the pubococcygeus muscle (Pcm) after castration and hormone replacement. Male Wistar rats were castrated and the Pcm was unilaterally denervated; after 2 or 6 weeks, the cross-sectional area (CSA) of Pcm fibers was assessed. Additional groups of castrated rats were used to examine the effects of hormone replacement. At 2 weeks post surgeries, rats were implanted with Silastic capsules containing either dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estradiol benzoate (EB) or both hormones, and the CSA of Pcm fibers was assessed after 4 weeks of hormone treatment. At 2 weeks post surgeries, gonadectomy without hormone replacement resulted in reductions in the CSA of Pcm fibers, and denervation combined with castration increased the magnitude of this effect; further reductions in CSA were present at 6 weeks post surgeries, but again denervation combined with castration increased the magnitude of this effect. Hormone replacement with DHT resulted in hypertrophy in the CSA of nondenervated muscles compared to those of intact normal males, but this effect was attenuated in denervated muscles. Hormone replacement with EB treatment prevented further castration-induced reductions in CSA of nondenervated muscles, but denervation prevented this effect. Similar to that seen with treatment with EB alone, combined treatment with both DHT and EB prevented further reductions in CSA of Pcm fibers in nondenervated muscles, but again denervation attenuated this effect. Thus, while hormone replacement can reverse or prevent further castration-induced atrophy of Pcm fibers, these effects are dependent on muscle innervation. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.