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Sample records for cutaneous wound healing

  1. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Giles T. S.; Mills, Stuart J.; Cowin, Allison J.; Smith, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials. PMID:26137471

  2. Acceleration of cutaneous wound healing by brassinosteroids.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Debora; Rathinasabapathy, Thirumurugan; Schmidt, Barbara; Shakarjian, Michael P; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Raskin, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids are plant growth hormones involved in cell growth, division, and differentiation. Their effects in animals are largely unknown, although recent studies showed that the anabolic properties of brassinosteroids are possibly mediated through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling pathway. Here, we examined biological activity of homobrassinolide (HB) and its synthetic analogues in in vitro proliferation and migration assays in murine fibroblast and primary keratinocyte cell culture. HB stimulated fibroblast proliferation and migration and weakly induced keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. The effects of topical HB administration on progression of wound closure were further tested in the mouse model of cutaneous wound healing. C57BL/6J mice were given a full-thickness dermal wound, and the rate of wound closure was assessed daily for 10 days, with adenosine receptor agonist CGS-21680 as a positive control. Topical application of brassinosteroid significantly reduced wound size and accelerated wound healing in treated animals. mRNA levels of transforming growth factor beta and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 were significantly lower, while tumor necrosis factor alpha was nearly suppressed in the wounds from treated mice. Our data suggest that topical application of brassinosteroids accelerates wound healing by positively modulating inflammatory and reepithelialization phases of the wound repair process, in part by enhancing Akt signaling in the skin at the edges of the wound and enhancing migration of fibroblasts in the wounded area. Targeting this signaling pathway with brassinosteroids may represent a promising approach to the therapy of delayed wound healing.

  3. The Role of Neuromediators and Innervation in Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Mohammed; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-06-15

    The skin is densely innervated with an intricate network of cutaneous nerves, neuromediators and specific receptors which influence a variety of physiological and disease processes. There is emerging evidence that cutaneous innervation may play an important role in mediating wound healing. This review aims to comprehensively examine the evidence that signifies the role of innervation during the overlapping stages of cutaneous wound healing. Numerous neuropeptides that are secreted by the sensory and autonomic nerve fibres play an essential part during the distinct phases of wound healing. Delayed wound healing in diabetes and fetal cutaneous regeneration following wounding further highlights the pivotal role skin innervation and its associated neuromediators play in wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms via which cutaneous innervation modulates wound healing in both the adult and fetus will provide opportunities to develop therapeutic devices which could manipulate skin innervation to aid wound healing.

  4. Platelet gel for healing cutaneous chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Crovetti, Giovanni; Martinelli, Giovanna; Issi, Marwan; Barone, Marilde; Guizzardi, Marco; Campanati, Barbara; Moroni, Marco; Carabelli, Angelo

    2004-04-01

    Wound healing is a specific host immune response for restoration of tissue integrity. Experimental studies demonstrated an alteration of growth factors activity due to their reduced synthesis, increased degradation and inactivation. In wound healing platelets play an essential role since they are rich of alpha-granules growth factors (platelet derived growth factor--PDGF; transforming growth factor-beta--TGF-beta; vascular endothelial growth factor--VEGF). Topical use of platelet gel (PG), hemocomponent obtained from mix of activated platelets and cryoprecipitate, gives the exogenous and in situ adding of growth factors (GF). The hemocomponents are of autologous or homologous origin. We performed a technique based on: multicomponent apheretic procedure to obtain plasma rich platelet and cryoprecipitate; manual processing in an open system, in sterile environment, for gel activation. Every step of the gel synthesis was checked by a quality control programme. The therapeutic protocol consists of the once-weekly application of PG. Progressive reduction of the wound size, granulation tissue forming, wound bed detersion, regression and absence of infective processes were considered for evaluating clinical response to hemotherapy. 24 patients were enrolled. They had single or multiple cutaneous ulcers with different ethiopathogenesis. Only 3 patients could perform autologous withdrawal; in the others homologous hemocomponent were used, always considering suitability and traceability criteria for transfusional use of blood. Complete response was observed in 9 patients, 2 were subjected to cutaneous graft, 4 stopped treatment, 9 had partial response and are still receiving the treatment. In each case granulation tissue forming increased following to the first PG applications, while complete re-epithelization was obtained later. Pain was reduced in every treated patient. Topical haemotherapy with PG may be considered as an adjuvant treatment of a multidisciplinary process

  5. Differences in cutaneous wound healing between dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Bohling, Mark W; Henderson, Ralph A

    2006-07-01

    Regardless of the species involved, wound healing follows a predictable course of overlapping phases. In spite of these commonalities, significant species differences in cutaneous wound healing have been uncovered in the Equidae and, more recently, between the dog and cat. It has also recently been shown that the subcutaneous tissues play an important supporting role in cutaneous wound healing, which may help to ex-plain healing differences between cats and dogs. These discoveries may improve veterinarians' understanding of problem wound healing in the cat and, hopefully, lead to better strategies for wound management in this sometimes troublesome species.

  6. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Graham, John S.; Chilcott, Robert P.; Rice, Paul; Milner, Stephen M.; Hurst, Charles G.; Maliner, Beverly I.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating chemical warfare agent that primarily affects the eyes, skin, and airways. Sulfur mustard injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in significant cosmetic and/or functional deficits. Historically, blister aspiration and/or deroofing (epidermal removal), physical debridement, irrigation, topical antibiotics, and sterile dressings have been the main courses of action in the medical management of cutaneous sulfur mustard injuries. Current treatment strategy consists of symptomatic management and is designed to relieve symptoms, prevent infections, and promote healing. There are currently no standardized or optimized methods of casualty management that prevent or minimize deficits and provide for speedy wound healing. Several laboratories are actively searching for improved therapies for cutaneous vesicant injury, with the aim of returning damaged skin to optimal appearance and normal function in the shortest time. Improved treatment will result in a better cosmetic and functional outcome for the patient, and will enable the casualty to return to normal activities sooner. This editorial gives brief overviews of sulfur mustard use, its toxicity, concepts for medical countermeasures, current treatments, and strategies for the development of improved therapies. PMID:16921406

  7. Exploring the role of stem cells in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lau, Katherine; Paus, Ralf; Tiede, Stephan; Day, Philip; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2009-11-01

    The skin offers a perfect model system for studying the wound healing cascade, which involves a finely tuned interplay between several cell types, pathways and processes. The dysregulation of these factors may lead to wound healing disorders resulting in chronic wounds, as well as abnormal scars such as hypertrophic and keloid scars. As the contribution of stem cells towards tissue regeneration and wound healing is increasingly appreciated, a rising number of stem cell therapies for cutaneous wounds are currently under development, encouraged by emerging preliminary findings in both animal models and human studies. However, we still lack an in-depth understanding of the underlying mechanisms through which stem cells contribute to cutaneous wound healing. The aim of this review is, therefore, to present a critical synthesis of our current understanding of the role of stem cells in normal cutaneous wound healing. In addition to summarizing wound healing principles and related key molecular and cellular players, we discuss the potential participation of different cutaneous stem cell populations in wound healing, and list corresponding stem cells markers. In summary, this review delineates current strategies, future applications, and limitations of stem cell-based or stem cell-targeted therapy in the management of acute and chronic skin wounds.

  8. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Kenneth C; Guha, Somes Chandra

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care.[1] It is a snapshot of a patient's total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors.[2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), as used at our institution (CAMC), and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) may vary widely from country to country and payment system.[3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons.[1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise. PMID:25593414

  9. MAPKAPK-2 signaling is critical for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Thuraisingam, Thusanth; Xu, Yong Zhong; Eadie, Kalyn; Heravi, Mitra; Guiot, Marie-Cristine; Greemberg, Rony; Gaestel, Matthias; Radzioch, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process, which is heavily dependent on successful inflammatory action. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase-2 (MAPKAPK-2 or MK2), a major substrate of p38 MAPK, has been shown to be a major player in multiple inflammatory diseases, but its role in cutaneous wound healing has not yet been explored. In this study, by comparing excisional wounds made on the backs of MK2 knockout (KO) and MK2 wild-type (WT) mice, we found that the kinetics of wound healing are significantly affected by the absence of MK2 (P=0.010 to P<0.001). Histological examination showed a higher level of acanthosis of the migrating wound keratinocyte layer as well as a higher level of collagen deposition in the granulation tissue of the wounds from MK2 WT mice compared with those from MK2 KO mice. Interestingly, although MK2 did not influence macrophage and neutrophil infiltration of the wounds, the expression of many cytokines and chemokines was significantly affected at different days post wounding. Furthermore, the delayed healing rate of wounds in MK2 KO mice can be significantly improved by passive transfer of macrophages with intact MK2. Overall, these results show a critical role for MK2 gene expression in macrophages participating in the process of cutaneous wound healing.

  10. Effect of Propolis on Experimental Cutaneous Wound Healing in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates clinically the effect of propolis paste on healing of cutaneous wound in dogs. Under general anesthesia and complete aseptic conditions, two full thickness skin wounds (3 cm diameter) were created in each side of the chest in five dogs, one dorsal and one ventral, with 10 cm between them. These wounds were randomly allocated into two groups, control group (10 wounds) and propolis group (10 wounds). Both groups were represented in each dog. The wounds were cleaned with normal saline solution and dressed with macrogol ointment in control group and propolis paste in propolis group, twice daily till complete wound healing. Measurement of the wound area (cm2) was monitored planimetrically at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days after injury. The data were analyzed statistically. The results revealed a significant reduction in the wound surface area in the propolis group after 14 and 21 days compared to control group. The wound reepithelization, contraction, and total wound healing were faster in propolis group than in control group during five weeks of study. In conclusion, propolis paste has a positive impact on cutaneous wound healing and it may be suggested for treating various types of wounds in animals. PMID:26783495

  11. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah; Heath, Rebecca; Shah, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options. PMID:23162241

  12. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eunkyo; Lee, Seung Min; Jung, In-Kyung; Lim, Yunsook; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the effect of genistein on cutaneous wound healing. {yields} Genistein enhanced wound closure during the early stage of wound healing. {yields} These genistein effects on wound closure were induced by reduction of oxidative stress through increasing antioxidant capacity and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. -- Abstract: Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-{kappa}B and TNF-{alpha} expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results

  13. Dietary L-arginine and cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Naderpour, Masoud; Rad, Jafar Soleimani; Ayat, Esmail; Mesgari, Mehran; Farahani, Ramin M; Roshangar, Leila; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2008-01-01

    Skin wound healing has been the subject of extensive studies and various drugs have been used in an attempt to improve wound healing. There are conflicting data regarding the effects of L-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide, on wound healing. We examined the 1-week rate of cutaneous wound healing and collagen deposition in three groups of rats who received a (1) L-arginine (2% in drinking water)-supplemented diet from three days before until the seventh day following injury (Group 1), (2) L-arginine-supplemented diet for three days before injury (Group 2), and (3) a standard diet without L-arginine supplementation (Group 3). The wound length and width were measured each day and then the open wound area and cumulative percentage of open wound area reduction were calculated. Wound biopsy samples were examined with Trichrome-Masson stain in a subgroup of animals. Results showed that Group 1 rats had a significantly lower cumulative percentage of open wound area reduction on day 7 compared to other two groups (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.05). Relatively higher degrees of wound collagen deposit (day 7) were noted in groups 2 and 3. It may be concluded that L-arginine (2% in water) administered three days before until the seventh day following skin wound induction may diminish the rate of skin wound healing and collagen deposition.

  14. Antibodies to wounded tissue enhance cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Naomi; Ito, Sachiko; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Isobe, Ken-ichi

    2009-11-01

    The wound repair process is a highly ordered sequence of events that encompasses haemostasis, inflammatory cell infiltration, tissue regrowth and remodelling. Wound healing follows tissue destruction so we hypothesized that antibodies might bind to wounded tissues, which would facilitate the engulfment of damaged tissues by macrophages. Here, we show that B cells, which produce antibodies to damaged tissues, are engaged in the process of wound healing. Splenectomy delayed wound healing, and transfer of spleen cells into splenectomized mice recovered the delay in wound healing. Furthermore, wound healing in splenectomized nude mice was also delayed. Transfer of enriched B220(+) cells by magnetic beads accelerated wound healing in splenectomized mice. We detected immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) binding to wounded tissues by using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled anti-IgG1 6-24 hr after wounding. Splenectomy reduced the amount of IgG1 binding to wounded tissues. Immunoblotting studies revealed several bands, which were reduced by splenectomy. Using immunoprecipitation with anti-IgG bound to protein G we found that the intensity of several bands was lower in the serum from splenectomized mice than in that from sham-operated mice. These bands were matched to myosin IIA, carbamoyl-phosphate synthase, argininosuccinate synthase, actin and alpha-actinin-4 by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

  15. Cutting Edge: Regulatory T Cells Facilitate Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Nosbaum, Audrey; Prevel, Nicolas; Truong, Hong-An; Mehta, Pooja; Ettinger, Monika; Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Ali, Niwa H; Pauli, Mariela L; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) reside in tissues where they control inflammation and mediate tissue-specific functions. The skin of mice and humans contain a large number of Tregs; however, the mechanisms of how these cells function in skin remain largely unknown. In this article, we show that Tregs facilitate cutaneous wound healing. Highly activated Tregs accumulated in skin early after wounding, and specific ablation of these cells resulted in delayed wound re-epithelialization and kinetics of wound closure. Tregs in wounded skin attenuated IFN-γ production and proinflammatory macrophage accumulation. Upon wounding, Tregs induce expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Lineage-specific deletion of EGFR in Tregs resulted in reduced Treg accumulation and activation in wounded skin, delayed wound closure, and increased proinflammatory macrophage accumulation. Taken together, our results reveal a novel role for Tregs in facilitating skin wound repair and suggest that they use the EGFR pathway to mediate these effects.

  16. Cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation by BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Li, Shuoran; Xie, Michael W.; Sun, Lu; Hugo, Willy; Huang, Rong Rong; Jiao, Jing; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; Realegeno, Susan; Krystofinski, Paige; Azhdam, Ariel; Komenan, Sara Marie D.; Atefi, Mohammad; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Pellegrini, Matteo; Cochran, Alistair J.; Modlin, Robert L.; Herschman, Harvey R.; Lo, Roger S.; McBride, William H.; Segura, Tatiana; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors are highly effective therapies for the treatment of BRAFV600-mutated melanoma, with the main toxicity being a variety of hyperproliferative skin conditions due to paradoxical activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in BRAF wild-type cells. Most of these hyperproliferative skin changes improve when a MEK inhibitor is co-administered, as it blocks paradoxical MAPK activation. Here we show how the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib accelerates skin wound healing by inducing the proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. Topical treatment with vemurafenib in two wound-healing mice models accelerates cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation; addition of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor reverses the benefit of vemurafenib-accelerated wound healing. The same dosing regimen of topical BRAF inhibitor does not increase the incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in mice. Therefore, topical BRAF inhibitors may have clinical applications in accelerating the healing of skin wounds. PMID:27476449

  17. MFG-E8 Regulates Angiogenesis in Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Akihiko; Yamada, Kazuya; Ogino, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Yoko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Udey, Mark C.; Ishikawa, Osamu; Motegi, Sei-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Our research group recently demonstrated that pericytes are major sources of the secreted glycoprotein and integrin ligand lactadherin (MFG-E8) in B16 melanoma tumors, and that MFG-E8 promotes angiogenesis via enhanced PDGF–PDGFRβ signaling mediated by integrin–growth factor receptor crosstalk. However, sources of MFG-E8 and its possible roles in skin physiology are not well characterized. The objective of this study was to characterize the involvement of MFG-E8 in skin wound healing. In the dermis of normal murine and human skin, accumulations of MFG-E8 were found around CD31+ blood vessels, and MFG-E8 colocalized with PDGFRβ+, αSMA+, and NG2+ pericytes. MFG-E8 protein and mRNA levels were elevated in the dermis during full-thickness wound healing in mice. MFG-E8 was diffusely present in granulation tissue and was localized around blood vessels. Wound healing was delayed in MFG-E8 knockout mice, compared with the wild type, and myofibroblast and vessel numbers in wound areas were significantly reduced in knockout mice. Inhibition of MFG-E8 production with siRNA attenuated the formation of capillary-like structures in vitro. Expression of MFG-E8 in fibrous human granulation tissue with scant blood vessels was less than that in granulation tissue with many blood vessels. These findings suggest that MFG-E8 promotes cutaneous wound healing by enhancing angiogenesis. PMID:24838098

  18. Scar-free cutaneous wound healing in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Hanna M; Gilbert, Emily A B; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous wounds heal with two possible outcomes: scarification or near-perfect integumentary restoration. Whereas scar formation has been intensively investigated, less is known about the tissue-level events characterising wounds that spontaneously heal scar-free, particularly in non-foetal amniotes. Here, a spatiotemporal investigation of scar-free cutaneous wound healing following full-thickness excisional biopsies to the tail and body of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) is provided. All injuries healed without scarring. Cutaneous repair involves the development of a cell-rich aggregate within the wound bed, similar to scarring wounds. Unlike scar formation, scar-free healing involves a more rapid closure of the wound epithelium, and a delay in blood vessel development and collagen deposition within the wound bed. It was found that, while granulation tissue of scarring wounds is hypervascular, scar-free wound healing conspicuously does not involve a period of exuberant blood vessel formation. In addition, during scar-free wound healing the newly formed blood vessels are typically perivascular cell-supported. Immunohistochemistry revealed widespread expression of both the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor A and the anti-angiogenic factor thrombospondin-1 within the healing wound. It was found that scar-free wound healing is an intrinsic property of leopard gecko integument, and involves a modulation of the cutaneous scar repair program. This proportional revascularisation is an important factor in scar-free wound healing.

  19. The effects of ageing on cutaneous wound healing in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, G S; Horan, M A; Ferguson, M W

    1995-01-01

    The dogma that cutaneous wound healing is impaired as a function of age is largely unsubstantiated. This can be attributed to poor experimental design of human studies, the lack of subject characterisation with the exclusion of disease processes, and the study of inappropriate animal models. Structural and functional changes in skin with age have been reported, such as a decrease in dermal thickness, decline in collagen content, a subtle alteration in the glycosaminoglycan profile, and a loss of elasticity, but these reports are subject to the above criticisms in addition to the often-neglected requirement for site specificity. Wound repair can be thought of as a culmination of three major overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation and remodelling. The inflammatory process has not been studied systematically with respect to age, and despite a reported decline in cellular function and number, there is a confounding increase in the production of specific cytokines involved in the process of repair. The proliferative phase is associated with a loss of cellular responsiveness to specific cytokines with a decline in motility and proliferation; however caution in interpreting these findings is important as, for example, the definition of 'ageing' is used rather loosely with the result that neonatal versus young adult cells are compared instead of young versus old adults. During remodelling, fibronectin and collagen production may increase with age, as may wound contraction; the deposition of elastin has not been assessed and the resulting mechanical properties of the scar are controversial, not least because human in vivo studies have been ignored. The absence of a critical review on the effects of advancing age on wound healing has conspired to permit the perpetuation of the belief that well defined tenets exist. This review aims to redress this imbalance and to highlight the need for well designed research into an increasingly important field. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2

  20. The Review on Properties of Aloe Vera in Healing of Cutaneous Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyyed Abbas; Madani, Seyyed Abdollah; Abediankenari, Saied

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of wounds is very important and was subject of different investigations. In this regard, natural substance plays crucial role as complementary medicine. Various studies reported that aloe vera has useful effects on wounds especially cutaneous wounds healing. Therefore in the current review, we examined the effect of aloe vera on cutaneous wound healing and concluded that although aloe vera improves the wound healing as well as other procedures both clinically and experimentally, more studies are still needed to approve the outcomes. PMID:26090436

  1. Human skin transcriptome during superficial cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Nuutila, Kristo; Siltanen, Antti; Peura, Matti; Bizik, Jozef; Kaartinen, Ilkka; Kuokkanen, Hannu; Nieminen, Tapio; Harjula, Ari; Aarnio, Pertti; Vuola, Jyrki; Kankuri, Esko

    2012-01-01

    Healing of the epidermis is a crucial process for maintaining the skin's defense integrity and its resistance to environmental threats. Compromised wound healing renders the individual readily vulnerable to infections and loss of body homeostasis. To clarify the human response of reepithelialization, we biopsied split-thickness skin graft donor site wounds immediately before and after harvesting, as well as during the healing process 3 and 7 days thereafter. In all, 25 biopsies from eight patients qualified for the study. All samples were analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. Here, we identified the genes associated with normal skin reepithelialization over time and organized them by similarities according to their induction or suppression patterns during wound healing. Our results provide the first elaborate insight into the transcriptome during normal human epidermal wound healing. The data not only reveal novel genes associated with epidermal wound healing but also provide a fundamental basis for the translational interpretation of data acquired from experimental models.

  2. Wound healing genes and susceptibility to cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Castellucci, Léa; Jamieson, Sarra E; Almeida, Lucas; Oliveira, Joyce; Guimarães, Luiz Henrique; Lessa, Marcus; Fakiola, Michaela; de Jesus, Amélia Ribeiro; Miller, E. Nancy; Carvalho, Edgar M

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania braziliensis causes cutaneous (CL) and mucosal (ML) leishmaniasis. In the mouse, Fli1 was identified as a gene influencing enhanced wound healing and resistance to CL caused by L. major. Polymorphism at FLI1 is associated with CL caused by L. braziliensis in humans, with an inverse association observed for ML disease. Here we extend the analysis to look at other wound healing genes, including CTGF, TGFB1, TGFBR1/2, SMADS 2/3/4/7 and FLII, all functionally linked along with FLI1 in the TGF beta pathway. Haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs) were genotyped using Taqman technology in 325 nuclear families (652 CL cases; 126 ML cases) from Brazil. Robust case-pseudocontrol (CPC) conditional logistic regression analysis showed associations between CL and SNPs at CTGF (SNP rs6918698; CC genotype; OR 1.67; 95%CI 1.10–2.54; P=0.016), TGFBR2 (rs1962859; OR 1.50; 95%CI 1.12–1.99; P=0.005), SMAD2 (rs1792658; OR 1.57; 95%CI 1.04–2.38; P=0.03), SMAD7 (rs4464148; AA genotype; OR 2.80; 95%CI 1.00–7.87; P=0.05) and FLII (rs2071242; OR 1.60; 95%CI 1.14–2.24; P=0.005), and between ML and SNPs at SMAD3 (rs1465841; OR 2.15; 95%CI 1.13–4.07; P=0.018) and SMAD7 (rs2337107; TT genotype; OR 3.70; 95%CI 1.27–10.7; P=0.016). Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that all SNPs associated with CL at FLI1, CTGF, TGFBR2, and FLII showed independent effects from each other, but SNPs at SMAD2 and SMAD7 did not add independent effects to SNPs from other genes. These results suggest that TGFβ signalling via SMAD2 is important in directing events that contribute to CL, whereas signalling via SMAD3 is important in ML. Both are modulated by the inhibitory SMAD7 that acts upstream of SMAD2 and SMAD3 in this signalling pathway. Along with the published FLI1 association, these data further contribute to the hypothesis that wound healing processes are important determinants of pathology associated with cutaneous forms of leishmaniasis. PMID:22554650

  3. Plasminogen is a critical regulator of cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sulniute, Rima; Shen, Yue; Guo, Yong-Zhi; Fallah, Mahsa; Ahlskog, Nina; Ny, Lina; Rakhimova, Olena; Broden, Jessica; Boija, Hege; Moghaddam, Aliyeh; Li, Jinan; Wilczynska, Malgorzata; Ny, Tor

    2016-05-02

    Wound healing is a complicated biological process that consist of partially overlapping inflammatory, proliferation and tissue remodelling phases. A successful wound healing depends on a proper activation and subsequent termination of the inflammatory phase. The failure to terminate the inflammation halts the completion of wound healing and is a known reason for formation of chronic wounds. Previous studies have shown that wound closure is delayed in plasminogen-deficient mice, and a role for plasminogen in dissection of extracellular matrix was suggested. However, our finding that plasminogen is transported to the wound by inflammatory cells early during the healing process, where it potentiates inflammation, indicates that plasminogen may also have other roles in the wound healing process. Here we report that plasminogen-deficient mice have extensive fibrin and neutrophil depositions in the wounded area long after re-epithelialisation, indicating inefficient debridement and chronic inflammation. Delayed formation of granulation tissue suggests that fibroblast function is impaired in the absence of plasminogen. Therefore, in addition to its role in the activation of inflammation, plasminogen is also crucial for subsequent steps, including resolution of inflammation and activation of the proliferation phase. Importantly, supplementation of plasminogen-deficient mice with human plasminogen leads to a restored healing process that is comparable to that in wild-type mice. Besides of being an activator of the inflammatory phase during wound healing, plasminogen is also required for the subsequent termination of inflammation. Based on these results, we propose that plasminogen may be an important future therapeutic agent for wound treatment.

  4. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunkyo; Lee, Seung Min; Jung, In-Kyung; Lim, Yunsook; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2011-07-08

    Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-κB and TNF-α expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results suggest that genistein supplementation reduces oxidative stress by increasing antioxidant capacity and modulating proinflammatory cytokine expression during the early stage of wound healing.

  5. Cutaneous wound healing in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Freeman, L J; Hegreberg, G A; Robinette, J D

    1989-01-01

    Wound healing in five dogs and five cats affected with a connective tissue dysplasia resembling Ehlers-Danlos syndrome of humans was compared with wound healing in 10 nonaffected animals. Six skin incisions on the lateral aspects of the thorax and abdomen of each animal were sutured and assessed daily for 75 days for evidence of healing. All wounds in nonaffected dogs, affected cats, and nonaffected cats healed by first intention. Three incisions in affected dogs had dehiscence of all or part of the incision line and healed by granulation, contraction, and epithelialization. Biopsies taken at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 75 days were compared histologically to determine if there were any differences in rates of healing between affected and nonaffected animals. Epidermal thickening and scab formation were noted at days 3 and 6 in both affected and nonaffected animals. Infiltration with mononuclear cells and fibroplasia steadily increased from day 6 to day 15 in all groups. Collagen fibril formation was evident by day 9. At day 75, incision sites were recognized by fine, more compact collagen bundles and lack of adnexal structures, as compared with the adjacent dermis in both affected and nonaffected animals. Although delayed wound healing has been reported to be a complication of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in humans, using clinical and histologic criteria, wound healing in dogs and cats with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome appears to be similar to nonaffected animals.

  6. TNFα is a therapeutic target for impaired cutaneous wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, Gillian S.; Jeong, Moon-Jin; Ashworth, Jason J.; Hardman, Matthew; Jin, Wenwen; Moutsopoulos, Niki; Wild, Teresa; McCartney-Francis, Nancy; Sim, Davis; McGrady, George; Song, Xiao-yu; Wahl, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    Impaired wound healing states lead to substantial morbidity and cost with treatment resulting in an expenditure of billions of dollars per annum in the USA alone. Both chronic wounds and impaired acute wounds are characterized by excessive inflammation, enhanced proteolysis, and reduced matrix deposition. These confounding factors are exacerbated in the elderly, in part, as we report here, related to increased local and systemic tumor necrosis factor alpha(TNFα) levels. Moreover, we have used a secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor(SLPI) null mouse model of severely impaired wound healing and excessive inflammation, comparable to age-related delayed human healing, to demonstrate that topical application of anti-TNFα neutralizing antibodies blunts leukocyte recruitment and NFκB activation, alters the balance between M1 and M2 macrophages, and accelerates wound healing. Following antagonism of TNFα, matrix synthesis is enhanced, associated with suppression of both inflammatory parameters and NFκB binding activity. Our data suggest that inhibiting TNFα is a critical event in reversing the severely impaired healing response associated with the absence of SLPI, and may be applicable to prophylaxis and/or treatment of impaired wound healing states in humans. PMID:22151742

  7. Effect of Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation on Early Inflammatory Responses during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Na-Young; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Lim, Yunsook

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory response is considered the most important period that regulates the entire healing process. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a class of linoleic acid positional and geometric isomers, is well known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that dietary CLA supplementation accelerates cutaneous wound healing by regulating antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. To investigate wound closure rates and inflammatory responses, we used a full-thickness excisional wound model after 2-week treatments with control, 0.5%, or 1% CLA-supplemented diet. Mice fed dietary CLA supplementation had reduced levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers. Moreover, the wound closure rate was improved significantly in mice fed a 1% CLA-supplemented diet during early stage of wound healing (inflammatory stage). We conclude that dietary CLA supplementation enhances the early stage of cutaneous wound healing as a result of modulating oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:20871865

  8. Gonadal hormones differently modulate cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Assis de Brito, Thatiana L; Pereira, Gabriela R; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2014-02-01

    Gonadal hormones influence physiological responses to stress and cutaneous wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of gonadal hormones on cutaneous wound healing in chronically stressed mice. Male and female mice were gonadectomized, and after 25 days, they were spun daily at 115 rpm for 15 min every hour until euthanasia. Twenty-eight days after the gonadectomy, an excisional lesion was created. The animals were killed 7 or 14 days after wounding, and the lesions were collected. Myofibroblast density, macrophage number, catecholamine level, collagen deposition, and blood vessel number were evaluated. In the intact and gonadectomized groups, stress increased the plasma catecholamine levels in both genders. In intact groups, stress impaired wound contraction and re-epithelialization and increased the macrophage number in males but not in females. In addition, stress compromised myofibroblastic differentiation and blood vessel formation and decreased collagen deposition in males but not in females. In contrast to intact mice, wound healing in ovariectomized female mice was affected by stress, while wound healing in castrated male mice was not. In conclusion, gender differences contribute to the cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice. In addition, androgens contribute to the stress-induced impairment of the healing of cutaneous wounds but estrogens inhibit it.

  9. Expression and integrity of dermatopontin in chronic cutaneous wounds: a crucial factor in impaired wound healing.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Venkat Raghavan; Manikandan, Mayakannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan; Vijayaraghavan, Doraiswamy; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-12-01

    Chronic cutaneous wound (CCW) is a major health care burden wherein the healing process is slow or rather static resulting in anatomical and functional restriction of the damaged tissue. Dysregulated expression and degradation of matrix proteins, growth factors and cytokines contribute to the disrupted and uncoordinated healing process of CCW. Therefore, therapeutic approaches for effective management of CCW should be focused towards identifying and manipulating the molecular defects, such as reduced bioavailability of the pro-healing molecules and elevated activity of proteases. This study essentially deals with assessing the expression and integrity of an extracellular matrix protein, Dermatopontin (DPT), in CCW using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and immunological techniques. The results indicate that, despite DPT's high mRNA expression, the protein levels are markedly reduced in both CCW tissue and its exudate. To elucidate the cause for this contradiction in mRNA and protein levels, the stability of DPT is analyzed in the presence of wound exudates and various proteases that are naturally elevated in CCW. DPT was observed to be degraded at higher rates when incubated with certain recombinant proteases or chronic wound exudate. In conclusion, the susceptibility of DPT protein to specific proteases present at high levels in the wound milieu resulted in the degradation of DPT, thus leading to impaired healing response in CCW.

  10. AGEs Induced Autophagy Impairs Cutaneous Wound Healing via Stimulating Macrophage Polarization to M1 in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Lin, Cai; Xu, Peng; Wu, Shan; Fu, Xiujun; Xia, Weidong; Yao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is essential in physiological and pathological processes, however, the role of autophagy in cutaneous wound healing and the underlying molecular mechanism remain elusive. We hypothesized that autophagy plays an important role in regulating wound healing. Here, we show that enhanced autophagy negatively impacts on normal cutaneous healing process and is related to chronic wounds as demonstrated by the increased LC3 in diabetic mice skin or patients’ chronic wounds. In addition, inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA restores delayed healing in C57BL/6 or db/db mice, demonstrating that autophagy is involved in regulating wound healing. Furthermore, we identify that macrophage is a major cell type underwent autophagy in wounds and increased autophagy induces macrophages polarization into M1 with elevated CD11c population and gene expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. To explore the mechanism underlying autophagy-impaired wound healing, we tested the role of IRF8, a regulator of autophagy, in autophagy-modulated macrophages polarization. IRF8 activation is up-regulating autophagy and M1 polarization of macrophages after AGEs (advanced glycation endproducts) treatment, blocking the IRF8 with shIRF8 inhibits autophagic activity and M1 polarization. In summary, this study elucidates that AGEs induces autophagy and modulates macrophage polarization to M1 via IRF8 activation in impairment of cutaneous wound healing. PMID:27805071

  11. Local arginase 1 activity is required for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Laura; Saville, Charis R; Murray, Peter J; Cruickshank, Sheena M; Hardman, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Chronic nonhealing wounds in the elderly population are associated with a prolonged and excessive inflammatory response, which is widely hypothesized to impede healing. Previous studies have linked alterations in local L-arginine metabolism, principally mediated by the enzymes arginase (Arg) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), to pathological wound healing. Over subsequent years, interest in Arg/iNOS has focused on the classical versus alternatively activated (M1/M2) macrophage paradigm. Although the role of iNOS during healing has been studied, Arg contribution to healing remains unclear. Here, we report that Arg is dynamically regulated during acute wound healing. Pharmacological inhibition of local Arg activity directly perturbed healing, as did Tie2-cre-mediated deletion of Arg1, revealing the importance of Arg1 during healing. Inhibition or depletion of Arg did not alter alternatively activated macrophage numbers but instead was associated with increased inflammation, including increased influx of iNOS(+) cells and defects in matrix deposition. Finally, we reveal that in preclinical murine models reduced Arg expression directly correlates with delayed healing, and as such may represent an important future therapeutic target.

  12. Inhibition of IRF8 Negatively Regulates Macrophage Function and Impairs Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Yang, Zhiyin; Wu, Shan; Xu, Peng; Peng, Yinbo; Yao, Min

    2017-02-01

    The inflammatory response is essential for normal cutaneous wound healing. Macrophages, as critical inflammatory cells, coordinate inflammation and angiogenesis phases during wound healing. It has been reported that the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8), a member of the IRF family, plays a critical role in the development and function of macrophages and is associated with inflammation. However, the role of IRF8 in cutaneous wound healing and its underlying mechanism remain elusive. Through immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, we showed that IRF8 is involved in the wound repair process in mice and patients. Furthermore, we ascertain that the repression of IRF8 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) leads to delayed wound healing. To explore the mechanism by which IRF8 impacts wound healing, we observed its effect on macrophage-related mediators by IHC or real-time PCR. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of IRF8 decreases the mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators associated with M1 macrophage (il-1b, il-6, inos, and tnf-a) but no impact on M2 macrophage-related mediators (arg-1, mrc-1, and il-10) and the number of macrophages in the wounds. Furthermore, the inhibition of IRF8 induced apoptosis in the wounds. In summary, this study demonstrates that the down-regulation of IRF8 in the wound leads to impaired wound healing possibly through the regulation of macrophage function and apoptosis in skin wound.

  13. Electrical Stimulation and Cutaneous Wound Healing: A Review of Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ud-Din, Sara; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2014-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) has been shown to have beneficial effects in wound healing. It is important to assess the effects of ES on cutaneous wound healing in order to ensure optimization for clinical practice. Several different applications as well as modalities of ES have been described, including direct current (DC), alternating current (AC), high-voltage pulsed current (HVPC), low-intensity direct current (LIDC) and electrobiofeedback ES. However, no one method has been advocated as the most optimal for the treatment of cutaneous wound healing. Therefore, this review aims to examine the level of evidence (LOE) for the application of different types of ES to enhance cutaneous wound healing in the skin. An extensive search was conducted to identify relevant clinical studies utilising ES for cutaneous wound healing since 1980 using PubMed, Medline and EMBASE. A total of 48 studies were evaluated and assigned LOE. All types of ES demonstrated positive effects on cutaneous wound healing in the majority of studies. However, the reported studies demonstrate contrasting differences in the parameters and types of ES application, leading to an inability to generate sufficient evidence to support any one standard therapeutic approach. Despite variations in the type of current, duration, and dosing of ES, the majority of studies showed a significant improvement in wound area reduction or accelerated wound healing compared to the standard of care or sham therapy as well as improved local perfusion. The limited number of LOE-1 trials for investigating the effects of ES in wound healing make critical evaluation and assessment somewhat difficult. Further, better-designed clinical trials are needed to improve our understanding of the optimal dosing, timing and type of ES to be used. PMID:27429287

  14. Arginine Silicate Inositol Complex Accelerates Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Ali Said; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Ozdemir, Oguzhan; Orhan, Cemal; Sahin, Nurhan; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Komorowski, James Richard; Ali, Shakir; Sahin, Kazim

    2016-10-14

    Arginine silicate inositol (ASI) complex is a composition of arginine, silicon, and inositol that has been shown to have beneficial effects on vascular health. This study reports the effects of an ASI ointment on wound healing in rats. A full-thickness excision wound was created by using a disposable 5 mm diameter skin punch biopsy tool. In this placebo-controlled study, the treatment group's wound areas were covered by 4 or 10 % ASI ointments twice a day for 5, 10, or 15 days. The rats were sacrificed either 5, 10, or 15 days after the wounds were created, and biopsy samples were taken for biochemical and histopathological analysis. Granulation tissue appeared significantly faster in the ASI-treated groups than in the control groups (P < 0.05). The mean unhealed wound area was significantly smaller, and the mean percentage of total wound healing was significantly higher in ASI-treated wounds than in the control wounds. Hydroxyproline, collagen, and matrix metalloproteinases were measured in the granulated tissue and found to be affected. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), collagen, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and various cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) measured in this study showed a significant fall in expression level in ASI-treated wounds. The results suggest that topical application of ASI ointment (especially 4 % concentration) has beneficial effects on the healing response of an excisional wound.

  15. The role of iron in the skin and cutaneous wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Josephine A.; Richards, Toby; Srai, Surjit K. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article we discuss current knowledge about iron in the skin and the cutaneous wound healing process. Iron plays a key role in both oxidative stress and photo-induced skin damage. The main causes of oxidative stress in the skin include reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in the skin by ultraviolet (UVA) 320–400 nm portion of the UVA spectrum and biologically available iron. We also discuss the relationships between iron deficiency, anemia and cutaneous wound healing. Studies looking at this fall into two distinct groups. Early studies investigated the effect of anemia on wound healing using a variety of experimental methodology to establish anemia or iron deficiency and focused on wound-strength rather than effect on macroscopic healing or re-epithelialization. More recent animal studies have investigated novel treatments aimed at correcting the effects of systemic iron deficiency and localized iron overload. Iron overload is associated with local cutaneous iron deposition, which has numerous deleterious effects in chronic venous disease and hereditary hemochromatosis. Iron plays a key role in chronic ulceration and conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Lupus Erythematosus are associated with both anemia of chronic disease and dysregulation of local cutaneous iron hemostasis. Iron is a potential therapeutic target in the skin by application of topical iron chelators and novel pharmacological agents, and in delayed cutaneous wound healing by treatment of iron deficiency or underlying systemic inflammation. PMID:25071575

  16. Interactions of the Extracellular Matrix and Progenitor Cells in Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Susan W.; Iqbal, Syed Amir; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2013-01-01

    Significance Both chronic wounds and excessive scar formation after cutaneous injury create a formidable clinical problem resulting in considerable morbidity and healthcare expenditure. The deposition and remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM) components are critical processes in cutaneous healing. Understanding the role of the ECM in directing progenitor and reparative cell fate and activities during wound repair is required to improve wound-care strategies. Recent Advances In addition to providing structural integrity, the ECM is recognized to play critical roles in regulating progenitor and reparative cell behaviors such as migration, differentiation, proliferation, and survival. The ECM dictates these activities through its binding of adhesion receptors as well as its ability to regulate growth factor bioavailability and signaling. More recently, a key role for mechanical control of cell fate through interaction with the ECM has emerged. Critical Issues Despite significant advances in understanding the pathophysiology of cutaneous wound repair, problematic wounds remain a significant healthcare challenge. Regenerative medical strategies that either target endogenous stem cells or utilize applications of exogenous stem cell populations have emerged as promising approaches to pathologic wounds. However, the identification of smart biomaterials and matrices may allow for further optimization of such therapies. Future Directions An efficient and appropriate healing response in the skin postinjury is regulated by a fine balance of the quantity and quality of ECM proteins. A more complete understanding of ECM regulation of the cell fate and activities during cutaneous wound repair is vital for the development of novel treatment strategies for improvement of cutaneous healing. PMID:24527348

  17. Wound administration of M2-polarized macrophages does not improve murine cutaneous healing responses.

    PubMed

    Jetten, Nadine; Roumans, Nadia; Gijbels, Marion J; Romano, Andrea; Post, Mark J; de Winther, Menno P J; van der Hulst, Rene R W J; Xanthoulea, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in all stages of cutaneous wound healing responses and dysregulation of macrophage function can result in derailed wound repair. The phenotype of macrophages is influenced by the wound microenvironment and evolves during healing from a more pro-inflammatory (M1) profile in early stages, to a less inflammatory pro-healing (M2) phenotype in later stages of repair. The aim of the current study was to investigate the potential of exogenous administration of M2 macrophages to promote wound healing in an experimental mouse model of cutaneous injury. Bone marrow derived macrophages were stimulated in-vitro with IL-4 or IL-10 to obtain two different subsets of M2-polarized cells, M2a or M2c respectively. Polarized macrophages were injected into full-thickness excisional skin wounds of either C57BL/6 or diabetic db/db mice. Control groups were injected with non-polarized (M0) macrophages or saline. Our data indicate that despite M2 macrophages exhibit an anti-inflammatory phenotype in-vitro, they do not improve wound closure in wild type mice while they delay healing in diabetic mice. Examination of wounds on day 15 post-injury indicated delayed re-epithelialization and persistence of neutrophils in M2 macrophage treated diabetic wounds. Therefore, topical application of ex-vivo generated M2 macrophages is not beneficial and contraindicated for cell therapy of skin wounds.

  18. Valproic Acid Induces Cutaneous Wound Healing In Vivo and Enhances Keratinocyte Motility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soung-Hoon; Zahoor, Muhammad; Hwang, Jae-Kwan; Min, Do Sik; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process involving several signaling pathways such as the Wnt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used antiepileptic drug that acts on these signaling pathways; however, the effect of VPA on cutaneous wound healing is unknown. Methods and Findings We created full-thickness wounds on the backs of C3H mice and then applied VPA. After 7 d, we observed marked healing and reduced wound size in VPA-treated mice. In the neo-epidermis of the wounds, β-catenin and markers for keratinocyte terminal differentiation were increased after VPA treatment. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen I and collagen III in the wounds were significantly increased. VPA induced proliferation and suppressed apoptosis of cells in the wounds, as determined by Ki67 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining analyses, respectively. In vitro, VPA enhanced the motility of HaCaT keratinocytes by activating Wnt/β-catenin, ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)/Akt signaling pathways. Conclusions VPA enhances cutaneous wound healing in a murine model and induces migration of HaCaT keratinocytes. PMID:23144972

  19. IL-33-Dependent Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells Promote Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Rak, Gregory D; Osborne, Lisa C; Siracusa, Mark C; Kim, Brian S; Wang, Kelvin; Bayat, Ardeshir; Artis, David; Volk, Susan W

    2016-02-01

    Breaches in the skin barrier initiate an inflammatory immune response that is critical for successful wound healing. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently identified population of immune cells that reside at epithelial barrier surfaces such as the skin, lung, and gut, and promote proinflammatory or epithelial repair functions after exposure to allergens, pathogens, or chemical irritants. However, the potential role of ILCs in regulating cutaneous wound healing remains undefined. Here, we demonstrate that cutaneous injury promotes an IL-33-dependent group 2 ILC (ILC2) response and that abrogation of this response impairs re-epithelialization and efficient wound closure. In addition, we provide evidence suggesting that an analogous ILC2 response is operational in acute wounds of human skin. Together, these results indicate that IL-33-responsive ILC2s are an important link between the cutaneous epithelium and the immune system, acting to promote the restoration of skin integrity after injury.

  20. A biodegradable hydrogel system containing curcumin encapsulated in micelles for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gong, ChangYang; Wu, QinJie; Wang, YuJun; Zhang, DouDou; Luo, Feng; Zhao, Xia; Wei, YuQuan; Qian, ZhiYong

    2013-09-01

    A biodegradable in situ gel-forming controlled drug delivery system composed of curcumin loaded micelles and thermosensitive hydrogel was prepared and applied for cutaneous wound repair. Curcumin is believed to be a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. Due to its high hydrophobicity, curcumin was encapsulated in polymeric micelles (Cur-M) with high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency. Cur-M loaded thermosensitive hydrogel (Cur-M-H) was prepared and applied as wound dressing to enhance the cutaneous wound healing. Cur-M-H was a free-flowing sol at ambient temperature and instantly converted into a non-flowing gel at body temperature. In vitro studies suggested that Cur-M-H exhibited well tissue adhesiveness and could release curcumin in an extended period. Furthermore, linear incision and full-thickness excision wound models were employed to evaluate the in vivo wound healing activity of Cur-M-H. In incision model, Cur-M-H-treated group showed higher tensile strength and thicker epidermis. In excision model, Cur-M-H group exhibited enhancement of wound closure. Besides, in both models, Cur-M-H-treated groups showed higher collagen content, better granulation, higher wound maturity, dramatic decrease in superoxide dismutase, and slight increase in catalase. Histopathologic examination also implied that Cur-M-H could enhance cutaneous wound repair. In conclusion, biodegradable Cur-M-H composite might have great application for wound healing.

  1. Propranolol improves cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Nascimento, Adriana P; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2009-06-02

    Sympathetic nerve failure has been proposed as a contributing factor in impaired cutaneous wound healing in diabetes mellitus. Nevertheless, no studies have shown whether beta-adrenoceptor blockade through beta-blocker (e.g., propranolol) administration may alter healing of diabetic cutaneous lesions. This study evaluated macro- and microscopically the effects of propranolol administration on cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Acute diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin 14 days before wounding. Animals were treated with propranolol (50 mg/kg) dissolved in drinking water; controls received water only. Administration of beta-receptor antagonist began 1 day before wounding and was continued daily until euthanasia. A full-thickness excisional lesion (1 cm(2)) was created. The wound area was measured weekly and the animals were killed 14 days after wounding. Lesions and adjacent skin were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded. Sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Sirius red, and toluidine blue, and immunostained for CD-68, alpha-smooth muscle actin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. The wound area was significantly smaller in the propranolol-treated group than in the control group 7 and 14 days after wounding. Inflammatory cell numbers and metalloproteinase-9 levels were reduced in the propranolol-treated group compared to the control group 14 days after wounding. Cell proliferation, mast cell number, collagen deposition, blood vessel density, and nitric oxide levels were increased in the propranolol-treated group compared to the control group 14 days after wounding. Propranolol administration improves cutaneous wound healing of hyperglycemic diabetic rats by reducing the local inflammatory response and improving subsequent phases of the repair process.

  2. Applicability of confocal laser scanning microscopy for evaluation and monitoring of cutaneous wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne; Bob, Adrienne; Terhorst, Dorothea; Ulrich, Martina; Fluhr, Joachim; Mendez, Gil; Roewert-Huber, Hans-Joachim; Stockfleth, Eggert; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    There is a high demand for noninvasive imaging techniques for wound assessment. In vivo reflectance confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an innovative optical technique for noninvasive evaluation of normal and diseased skin in vivo at near cellular resolution. This study was designed to test the feasibility of CLSM for noninvasive analysis of cutaneous wound healing in 15 patients (7 male/8 female), including acute and chronic, superficial and deep dermal skin wounds. A commercially available CLSM system was used for the assessment of wound bed and wound margins in order to obtain descriptive cellular and morphological parameters of cutaneous wound repair noninvasively and over time. CLSM was able to visualize features of cutaneous wound repair in epidermal and superficial dermal wounds, including aspects of inflammation, neovascularisation, and tissue remodelling in vivo. Limitations include the lack of mechanic fixation of the optical system on moist surfaces restricting the analysis of chronic skin wounds to the wound margins, as well as a limited optical resolution in areas of significant slough formation. By describing CLSM features of cutaneous inflammation, vascularisation, and epithelialisation, the findings of this study support the role of CLSM in modern wound research and management.

  3. Topical application of dressing with amino acids improves cutaneous wound healing in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Giovanni; D'Antona, Giuseppe; Dioguardi, Francesco Saverio; Rezzani, Rita

    2010-09-01

    The principal goal in treating surgical and non-surgical wounds, in particular for aged skin, is the need for rapid closure of the lesion. Cutaneous wound healing processes involve four phases including an inflammatory response with the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. If inflammation develops in response to bacterial infection, it can create a problem for wound closure. Reduced inflammation accelerates wound closure with subsequent increased fibroblast function and collagen synthesis. On the contrary, prolonged chronic inflammation results in very limited wound healing. Using histological and immunohistochemical techniques, we investigated the effects of a new wound dressing called Vulnamin that contains four essential amino acids for collagen and elastin synthesis plus sodium ialuronate (Na-Ial), compared with Na-Ial alone, in closure of experimental cutaneous wounds of aged rats. Our results showed that the application of Vulnamin dressings modulated the inflammatory response with a reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) immunolocalisation, while increasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) immunolocalisation. Furthermore, the dressing increased the distribution density of fibroblasts and aided the synthesis of thin collagen fibers resulting in a reduction in healing time. The nutritive approach using this new wound dressing can provide an efficacious and safe strategy to accelerate wound healing in elderly subjects, simplifying therapeutic procedures and leading to an improved quality of life.

  4. A bioengineered drug-Eluting scaffold accelerated cutaneous wound healing In diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hao; Ding, Guoshan; Shi, Xiaoming; Guo, Wenyuan; Ni, Zhijia; Fu, Hong; Fu, Zhiren

    2016-09-01

    Hyperglycemia in diabetic patients can greatly hinder the wound healing process. In this study we investigated if the engagement of F4/80(+) murine macrophages could accelerate the cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice. To facilitate the engagement of macrophages, we engineered a drug-eluting electrospun scaffold with a payload of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). MCP-1 could be readily released from the scaffold within 3 days. The electrospun scaffold showed no cytotoxic effects on human keratinocytes in vitro. Full-thickness excisional cutaneous wound was created in diabetic mice. The wound fully recovered within 10 days in mice treated with the drug-eluting scaffold. In contrast, the wound took 14 days to fully recover in control groups. The use of drug-eluting scaffold also improved the re-epithelialization. Furthermore, we observed a larger population of F4/80(+) macrophages in the wound bed of mice treated with drug-eluting scaffolds on day 3. This marked increase of macrophages in the wound bed could have contributed to the accelerated wound healing. Our study shed new light on an immuno-engineering solution for wound healing management in diabetic patients.

  5. Early induction of NRF2 antioxidant pathway by RHBDF2 mediates rapid cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Hosur, Vishnu; Burzenski, Lisa M; Stearns, Timothy M; Farley, Michelle L; Sundberg, John P; Wiles, Michael V; Shultz, Leonard D

    2017-03-06

    Rhomboid family protein RHBDF2, an upstream regulator of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling, has been implicated in cutaneous wound healing. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still emerging. In humans, a gain-of-function mutation in the RHBDF2 gene accelerates cutaneous wound healing in an EGFR-dependent manner. Likewise, a gain-of-function mutation in the mouse Rhbdf2 gene (Rhbdf2(cub/cub)) shows a regenerative phenotype (rapid ear-hole closure) resulting from constitutive activation of the EGFR pathway. Because the RHBDF2-regulated EGFR pathway is relevant to cutaneous wound healing in humans, we used Rhbdf2(cub/cub) mice to investigate the biological networks and pathways leading to accelerated ear-hole closure, with the goal of identifying therapeutic targets potentially effective in promoting wound healing in humans. Comparative transcriptome analysis of ear pinna tissue from Rhbdf2(cub/cub) and Rhbdf2(+/+) mice at 0h, 15min, 2h, and 24h post-wounding revealed an early induction of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated anti-oxidative pathway (0h and 15min), followed by the integrin-receptor aggregation pathway (2h) as early-stage events immediately and shortly after wounding in Rhbdf2(cub/cub) mice. Additionally, we observed genes enriched for the Fc fragment of the IgG receptor IIIa (FCGR3A)-mediated phagocytosis pathway 24h post-wounding. Although cutaneous wound repair in healthy individuals is generally non-problematic, it can be severely impaired due to aging, diabetes, and chronic inflammation. This study suggests that activation of the NRF2-antioxidant pathway by rhomboid protein RHBDF2 might be beneficial in treating chronic non-healing wounds.

  6. Sodium humate accelerates cutaneous wound healing by activating TGF-β/Smads signaling pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Aijun; Chen, Xiaobin; Che, Xiaoxia; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    Sodium humate (HA-Na) has been topically used as a wound healing and anti-inflammatory agent in folk medicine. In the present study, HA-Na was investigated for cutaneous wound healing in Sprague–Dawley rats. HA-Na solution (1.0%, w/v) was topically administered to rats undergoing excision wound models. Healing was assessed with a recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor for external use as positive control. Wound healing rates were calculated on Day 3, 6, 9, 14 and 21 after injury, and tissues were also harvested after the same intervals for histological analysis. In addition, tissue hydroxyproline levels were measured. Furthermore, mRNA levels and protein expressions of transforming growth factor-β1, 2, 3 (TGF-β1, 2, 3) were determined by RT-PCR and western blot. Protein expression levels of Smad-2, -3, -4 and -7 were also detected by western blot. Our study demonstrates that HA-Na has the capacity to promote wound healing in rats via accelerated wound contraction and increased hydroxyproline content. More importantly, these wound healing effects of HA-Na might be mediated through the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. HA-Na may be an effective agent for enhanced wound healing. PMID:27006897

  7. ABCG2 deficiency in skin impairs re-epithelialization in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiao-Min; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Huang, Wei-Chao; Shen, Chia-Rui; Mao, Wan-Yu; Shen, Chia-Ning

    2016-05-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 is expressed in the interfollicular epidermis and mediates the side-population phenotype in skin cells. However, the role of ABCG2 in skin is unclear. Increased expression levels of ABCG2 were found at the basal layer of transitional epidermis adjacent to cutaneous wounds in human patients, indicating that ABCG2 may be involved in regulating the wound healing process. To investigate the role of ABCG2 in cutaneous wound healing, full-thickness skin wounds were created in ABCG2 knockout (ABCG2-KO) and wild-type mice. The healing process was analysed and revealed that ABCG2 deficiency in skin results in delays in wound closure and impairments in re-epithelialization, as evidenced by reductions in both suprabasal differentiation and in p63-expressing keratinocytes migrating from transitional epidermis to epithelial tongues. The reduction in p63-expressing cells may be due to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species in ABCG2-KO epidermis, which can cause DNA damage and lead to proliferation arrest. To determine whether ABCG2 deficiency affects the potency of epidermal stem/progenitor cells (EPCs), transplantation studies were carried out, which demonstrated that ABCG2-KO EPCs display higher levels of γH2AX and lose the capacity to differentiate into suprabasal keratinocytes. A competitive repopulation assay confirmed that ABCG2 expression is critical for the proper expansion and differentiation of EPCs in cutaneous wounds. As EPCs are known to contribute to the healing of larger wounds, the current findings imply a functional role for ABCG2 in the expansion and differentiation of p63-expressing EPCs. Thus, ABCG2 deficiency in skin impairs re-epithelialization in cutaneous wound healing.

  8. The Role of Poly N Acetyl Glucosamine Nanofibers in Cutaneous Wound Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buff-Lindner, Amanda Haley

    Treatment of cutaneous wounds with poly-N-acetyl-glucosamine nanofibers (pGlcNAc), a novel polysaccharide material derived from a marine diatom, results in increases in wound closure, antibacterial activities and innate immune responses. Treatment with nanofibers results in increased defensin, small antimicrobial peptides, expression both in vitro and in vivo. Induction of defensin expression results in bacterial clearance in a cutaneous wound model. Our data show that Akt1 plays a central role in the regulation of these activities. Interestingly, pGlcNAc treatment of cutaneous wounds in mice results in decreased scar sizes. Additionally, treatment of cutaneous wounds with pGlcNAc results in increased elasticity and a rescue of tensile strength. Masson Trichrome staining suggests that pGlcNAc treated wounds exhibit decreased collagen content as well as increased collagen alignment with collagen fibers oriented similarly to unwounded tissue. Utilizing a fibrin gel assay to analyze the effect of pGlcNAc nanofiber treatment on fibroblast alignment in vitro, pGlcNAc stimulation of embedded fibroblasts results in fibroblasts alignment as compared to untreated controls, by a process that is Akt1 dependent. Our data show that in Akt1 null animals pGlcNAc treatment does not increase tensile strength or elasticity. Taken together, our findings suggest that pGlcNAc nanofibers stimulate an Akt1 dependent pathway that results in wound closure, the proper alignment of fibroblasts, decreased scarring, and increased tensile strength during cutaneous wound healing.

  9. IL-33 accelerates cutaneous wound healing involved in upregulation of alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hui; Li, Xiangyong; Hu, Shilian; Liu, Tao; Yuan, Baohong; Gu, Hongbiao; Ni, Qian; Zhang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Fang

    2013-12-01

    IL-33 is a recently recognized member of the IL-1 family and has been best identified as a potent inducer of Th2-type immune responses. Increasing evidence, however, indicates that IL-33 also represents an important mediator of mucosal healing and epithelial restoration and repair. In this study, we further explore the potential effect of IL-33 in cutaneous wound healing. A full-thickness skin wound was generated on the back of mice and treated with IL-33 or vehicle intraperitoneally. Our results revealed that the levels of IL-33 mRNA and protein were significantly enhanced in incisional wound skin. Meantime, administration of IL-33 obviously accelerated wound healing with wounds gaping narrower and exhibiting enhanced reepithelialization. IL-33 upregulation also promoted the collagen deposition and the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated genes such as fibronectin and collagen IIIa, which implies a direct effect of IL-33 on matrix synthesis. Furthermore, IL-33 facilitated the development of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) in incisional wound tissue, which closely related to resolution of inflammation and promotion of wound repair. Taken together, these findings suggest that IL-33 may play a pivotal role in maintenance of cutaneous homeostasis and acceleration of normal wound healing.

  10. In Vivo Assessment of Protease Dynamics in Cutaneous Wound Healing by Degradomics Analysis of Porcine Wound Exudates*

    PubMed Central

    Sabino, Fabio; Hermes, Olivia; Egli, Fabian E.; Kockmann, Tobias; Schlage, Pascal; Croizat, Pierre; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N.; Smola, Hans; auf dem Keller, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Proteases control complex tissue responses by modulating inflammation, cell proliferation and migration, and matrix remodeling. All these processes are orchestrated in cutaneous wound healing to restore the skin's barrier function upon injury. Altered protease activity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of healing impairments, and proteases are important targets in diagnosis and therapy of this pathology. Global assessment of proteolysis at critical turning points after injury will define crucial events in acute healing that might be disturbed in healing disorders. As optimal biospecimens, wound exudates contain an ideal proteome to detect extracellular proteolytic events, are noninvasively accessible, and can be collected at multiple time points along the healing process from the same wound in the clinics. In this study, we applied multiplexed Terminal Amine Isotopic Labeling of Substrates (TAILS) to globally assess proteolysis in early phases of cutaneous wound healing. By quantitative analysis of proteins and protein N termini in wound fluids from a clinically relevant pig wound model, we identified more than 650 proteins and discerned major healing phases through distinctive abundance clustering of markers of inflammation, granulation tissue formation, and re-epithelialization. TAILS revealed a high degree of proteolysis at all time points after injury by detecting almost 1300 N-terminal peptides in ∼450 proteins. Quantitative positional proteomics mapped pivotal interdependent processing events in the blood coagulation and complement cascades, temporally discerned clotting and fibrinolysis during the healing process, and detected processing of complement C3 at distinct time points after wounding and by different proteases. Exploiting data on primary cleavage specificities, we related candidate proteases to cleavage events and revealed processing of the integrin adapter protein kindlin-3 by caspase-3, generating new hypotheses for protease

  11. In vivo assessment of protease dynamics in cutaneous wound healing by degradomics analysis of porcine wound exudates.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Fabio; Hermes, Olivia; Egli, Fabian E; Kockmann, Tobias; Schlage, Pascal; Croizat, Pierre; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Smola, Hans; auf dem Keller, Ulrich

    2015-02-01

    Proteases control complex tissue responses by modulating inflammation, cell proliferation and migration, and matrix remodeling. All these processes are orchestrated in cutaneous wound healing to restore the skin's barrier function upon injury. Altered protease activity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of healing impairments, and proteases are important targets in diagnosis and therapy of this pathology. Global assessment of proteolysis at critical turning points after injury will define crucial events in acute healing that might be disturbed in healing disorders. As optimal biospecimens, wound exudates contain an ideal proteome to detect extracellular proteolytic events, are noninvasively accessible, and can be collected at multiple time points along the healing process from the same wound in the clinics. In this study, we applied multiplexed Terminal Amine Isotopic Labeling of Substrates (TAILS) to globally assess proteolysis in early phases of cutaneous wound healing. By quantitative analysis of proteins and protein N termini in wound fluids from a clinically relevant pig wound model, we identified more than 650 proteins and discerned major healing phases through distinctive abundance clustering of markers of inflammation, granulation tissue formation, and re-epithelialization. TAILS revealed a high degree of proteolysis at all time points after injury by detecting almost 1300 N-terminal peptides in ∼450 proteins. Quantitative positional proteomics mapped pivotal interdependent processing events in the blood coagulation and complement cascades, temporally discerned clotting and fibrinolysis during the healing process, and detected processing of complement C3 at distinct time points after wounding and by different proteases. Exploiting data on primary cleavage specificities, we related candidate proteases to cleavage events and revealed processing of the integrin adapter protein kindlin-3 by caspase-3, generating new hypotheses for protease

  12. Modulation of cutaneous wound healing by ozone: differences between young and aged mice.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yunsook; Phung, Anh D; Corbacho, Ana M; Aung, Hnin Hnin; Maioli, Emanuela; Reznick, Abraham Z; Cross, Carroll E; Davis, Paul A; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2006-01-05

    Cutaneous tissues are frequently exposed to prooxidative environments, including UV radiation and air pollutants. Among the latter, ozone (O(3)) is of particular concern because of its high and dominating presence in photochemical smog. It is well known that O(3) depletes small molecular weight antioxidants, oxidizes proteins, induces lipid peroxidation and activates cellular responses in various tissues. Using an in vivo model (SKH-1 hairless mice), the interaction between O(3) exposure (0.5ppmx6h/day) and age was examined in relation to cutaneous wound healing. Compared to younger (8 weeks) mice, older (18 months) mice exposed to O(3) (day 0 to day 9 after wounding) exhibited delayed wound closure, increased lipid peroxidation (measured as 4-HNE protein adducts) and protein oxidation (measured as carbonyls concentration) and decreased levels of P-IkappaBalpha and TGFbeta protein. These findings support the hypothesis that oxidant pollutant exposure and age interact so as to disrupt normal wound healing processes.

  13. Topical Estrogen Accelerates Cutaneous Wound Healing in Aged Humans Associated with an Altered Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, Gillian S.; Greenwell-Wild, Teresa; Horan, Michael A.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Ferguson, Mark W. J.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of intrinsic aging on the cutaneous wound healing process are profound, and the resulting acute and chronic wound morbidity imposes a substantial burden on health services. We have investigated the effects of topical estrogen on cutaneous wound healing in healthy elderly men and women, and related these effects to the inflammatory response and local elastase levels, an enzyme known to be up-regulated in impaired wound healing states. Eighteen health status-defined females (mean age, 74.4 years) and eighteen males (mean age, 70.7 years) were randomized in a double-blind study to either active estrogen patch or identical placebo patch attached for 24 hours to the upper inner arm, through which two 4-mm punch biopsies were made. The wounds were excised at either day 7 or day 80 post-wounding. Compared to placebo, estrogen treatment increased the extent of wound healing in both males and females with a decrease in wound size at day 7, increased collagen levels at both days 7 and 80, and increased day 7 fibronectin levels. In addition, estrogen enhanced the strength of day 80 wounds. Estrogen treatment was associated with a decrease in wound elastase levels secondary to reduced neutrophil numbers, and decreased fibronectin degradation. In vitro studies using isolated human neutrophils indicate that one mechanism underlying the altered inflammatory response involves both a direct inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis by estrogen and an altered expression of neutrophil adhesion molecules. These data demonstrate that delays in wound healing in the elderly can be significantly diminished by topical estrogen in both male and female subjects. PMID:10514397

  14. 17β-Estradiol administration promotes delayed cutaneous wound healing in 40-week ovariectomised female mice.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kanae; Nakajima, Yukari; Urai, Tamae; Komatsu, Emi; Nasruddin; Sugama, Junko; Nakatani, Toshio

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of 17β-estradiol on wound healing in 40-week ovariectomised female mice. Thirty-six-week-old female mice were divided into three groups: medication with 17β-estradiol after ovariectomy (OVX + 17β-estradiol), ovariectomy (OVX) and sham (SHAM). The mice received two full-thickness wounds, and the OVX + 17β-estradiol group was administered 17β-estradiol at 0·01 g/day until healing. In the OVX + 17β-estradiol group, the ratio of wound area was significantly smaller than those of the OVX and SHAM groups on days 1-3, 5, 6, 8-12 and 9-12, respectively, the numbers of neutrophils and macrophages were significantly smaller than those on days 3 and 7, the ratio of re-epithelialisation was significantly higher than those on days 3 and 11, the ratio of myofibroblasts was significantly higher than those on day 11 and smaller on day 14, and the ratio of collagen fibres was significantly larger than that of the OVX group on days 7-14. We found that 17β-estradiol administration promotes cutaneous wound healing in 40-week female mice by reducing wound area, shortening inflammatory response, and promoting re-epithelialisation, collagen deposition and wound contraction. Our results suggest that cutaneous wound healing that is delayed because of ageing is promoted by exogenous and continuous 17β-estradiol administration.

  15. Nod2 deficiency impairs inflammatory and epithelial aspects of the cutaneous wound-healing response.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Laura; Williams, Helen; Crompton, Rachel A; Cruickshank, Sheena M; Hardman, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Infection is a significant causative factor in human chronic wounds that fail to heal. Complex innate host response mechanisms have evolved whereby potentially harmful pathogens are recognized by multiple host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), yet understanding of PRR function, or dysfunction, in the context of chronic wounds remains limited. NOD2, a cytoplasmic PRR, has been strongly implicated in chronic inflammation of the gut, where loss-of-function mutations have been linked to Crohn's disease; however, cutaneous Nod2 function remains poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate an important role for Nod2 in murine skin wound healing. Cutaneous Nod2 is induced in key wound cell types in response to injury. In the absence of Nod2, mice display a substantial delay in acute wound repair associated with epithelial and inflammatory changes. Specifically, Nod2-null mice display altered epidermal migration and proliferation, an initial delay in neutrophil recruitment associated with decreased expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2, and reduced numbers of alternatively activated macrophages (Ym1(+) cells). Somewhat surprisingly, these Nod2-null phenotypes were associated with little or no expression change in other PRRs, even though compensatory mechanisms have been shown to exist. In this study we show that healing in TLR2-null mice was essentially normal. These findings reveal a novel intrinsic role for Nod2 in cutaneous wound repair in addition to its role in recognizing invading pathogens.

  16. Effect of aqueous extract of Elaeagnus angustifolia fruit on experimental cutaneous wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Mehrabani Natanzi, Mahboobeh; Pasalar, Parvin; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Sharifi, Roya; Ghanadian, Naghmeh; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Gerayesh-Nejad, Siavash

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the histological changes and wound healing effect of aqueous extract of Elaeagnus angustifolia. After creating full-thickness skin wounds on the back of 45 male Sprague-Dawley rats they were randomly divided into three groups. Treated group received the extract, positive control group were treated with mupirocin ointment 2% and control group did not receive any treatment. Wound healing rates were calculated on days 3, 5, 8, 10, 12 and 15 post-wounding and the wound tissues were harvested at 5, 10, and 15 days for histological analysis and hydroxyproline content measurement. The results indicated a significant increase in the percentage of wound contraction and hydroxyproline content in the treated group comparing to the control and positive control groups. A significant increase in the assigned histological scores was observed at 10 and 15 days in the treated and positive control groups compared to the control group. The results demonstrate that aqueous extract of Elaeagnus angustifolia accelerates cutaneous wound healing, and its effect may be due to the increased re-epithelialization and collagen deposition in wound and so it can be considered as a therapeutic agent for wound healing.

  17. Nitric oxide-releasing polymer incorporated ointment for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Youngnam; Kim, Jihoon; Lee, Yeong Mi; Im, Sooseok; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-12-28

    This work demonstrates the development of nitric oxide-releasing ointment and its potential on efficient wound healing. Nitric oxide-releasing polymer was successfully synthesized, which is composed of biocompatible Pluronic F127, branched polyethylenimine and 1-substituted diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolates. The synthesized nitric oxide-releasing polymer was incorporated into the PEG-based ointment which not only facilitated nitric oxide release in a slow manner, but also served as a moisturizer to enhance the wound healing. As compared to control groups, the nitric oxide-releasing ointment showed the accelerated wound closure with enhanced re-epithelialization, collagen deposition, and blood vessel formation in vivo. Therefore, this nitric oxide-based ointment presents the promising potential for the efficient strategy to heal the cutaneous wound.

  18. Rotational stress-induced increase in epinephrine levels delays cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Otranto, Marcela; Vieira, Andreza M; Filgueiras, Cláudio C; Fierro, Iolanda M; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2010-03-01

    Stress impairs wound healing of cutaneous lesions; however, the mechanism is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of rotational stress on cutaneous wound healing in mice and propose a mechanism. Male mice were spun at 45 rpm for 15 min every hour beginning 3 days before wounding until euthanasia. Control animals were not subjected to stress. To confirm that catecholamines participate in stress-induced delay of wound healing, mice were treated daily with propranolol. An excisional lesion was created and measured. Seven and 14 days later, animals were killed and lesions collected. Sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and immunostained for alpha-smooth muscle actin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 activity, nitrite levels, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression were measured in the wounds. In addition, murine skin fibroblast cultures were treated with high levels of epinephrine and fibroblast activity was evaluated. Stressed mice exhibited reduced locomotor activity and increased normetanephrine plasma levels. Rotational stress was associated with decreased wound contraction, reduced re-epithelialization, reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activation, but with strongly increased nitrite levels. Furthermore, inflammatory cell infiltration, TNF-alpha expression, myofibroblastic differentiation, and angiogenesis were all delayed in the stress group. Propranolol administration reversed the deleterious effects of stress on wound contraction and re-epithelialization. High epinephrine concentrations increased murine skin fibroblast proliferation and nitric oxide synthesis, and strongly inhibited skin fibroblast migration and both pro- and active MMP-2. In conclusion, rotational stress impairs cutaneous wound healing due to epinephrine increased levels.

  19. In situ gel-forming AP-57 peptide delivery system for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoling; Fan, Rangrang; Tong, Aiping; Yang, Meijia; Deng, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Liangxue; Zhang, Xiaoning; Guo, Gang

    2015-11-10

    In situ gel-forming system as local drug delivery system in dermal traumas has generated a great interest. Accumulating evidence shows that antimicrobial peptides play pivotal roles in the process of wound healing. Here in this study, to explore the potential application of antimicrobial peptide in wound healing, biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid)-Pluronic L35-poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA-L35-PLLA) was developed at first. Then based on this polymer, an injectable in situ gel-forming system composed of human antimicrobial peptides 57 (AP-57) loaded nanoparticles and thermosensitive hydrogel was prepared and applied for cutaneous wound healing. AP-57 peptides were enclosed with biocompatible nanoparticles (AP-57-NPs) with high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency. AP-57-NPs were further encapsulated in a thermosensitive hydrogel (AP-57-NPs-H) to facilitate its application in cutaneous wound repair. As a result, AP-57-NPs-H released AP-57 in an extended period and exhibited quite low cytotoxicity and high anti-oxidant activity in vitro. Moreover, AP-57-NPs-H was free-flowing liquid at room temperature, and can form non-flowing gel without any crosslink agent upon applied on the wounds. In vivo wound healing assay using full-thickness dermal defect model of SD rats indicated that AP-57-NPs-H could significantly promote wound healing. At day 14 after operation, AP-57-NPs-H treated group showed nearly complete wound closure of 96.78 ± 3.12%, whereas NS, NPs-H and AP-57-NPs group recovered by about 68.78 ± 4.93%, 81.96 ± 3.26% and 87.80 ± 4.62%, respectively. Histopathological examination suggested that AP-57-NPs-H could promote cutaneous wound healing through enhancing granulation tissue formation, increasing collagen deposition and promoting angiogenesis in the wound tissue. Therefore, AP-57-NPs-H might have potential application in wound healing.

  20. Management of minor acute cutaneous wounds: importance of wound healing in a moist environment.

    PubMed

    Korting, H C; Schöllmann, C; White, R J

    2011-02-01

    Moist wound care has been established as standard therapy for chronic wounds with impaired healing. Healing in acute wounds, in particular in minor superficial acute wounds - which indeed are much more numerous than chronic wounds - is often taken for granted because it is assumed that in those wounds normal phases of wound healing should run per se without any problems. But minor wounds such as small cuts, scraps or abrasions also need proper care to prevent complications, in particular infections. Local wound care with minor wounds consists of thorough cleansing with potable tap water or normal saline followed by the application of an appropriate dressing corresponding to the principles of moist wound treatment. In the treatment of smaller superficial wounds, it appears advisable to limit the choice of dressing to just a few products that fulfil the principles of moist wound management and are easy to use. Hydroactive colloid gels combining the attributes of hydrocolloids and hydrogels thus being appropriate for dry and exuding wounds appear especially suitable for this purpose - although there is still a lack of data from systematic studies on the effectiveness of these preparations.

  1. Effect of autologous platelet-rich plasma application on cutaneous wound healing in dogs.

    PubMed

    Jee, Cho-Hee; Eom, Na-Young; Jang, Hyo-Mi; Jung, Hae-Won; Choi, Eul-Soo; Won, Jin-Hee; Hong, Il-Hwa; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Jeong, Dong Wook; Jung, Dong-In

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and efficacy of intralesional injection as a method of application to acute cutaneous wounds in dogs. Healthy adult beagles (n = 3) were used in this study. Autologous PRP was separated from anticoagulant treated whole blood in three dogs. Cutaneous wounds were created and then treated by intralesional injection of PRP in the experimental group, while they were treated with saline in the control group on days 0, 2 and 4. The healing process was evaluated by gross examination throughout the experimental period and histologic examination on day 7, 14 and 21. In PRP treated wounds, the mean diameter was smaller and the wound closure rate was higher than in the control. Histological study revealed that PRP treated wounds showed more granulation formation and angiogenesis on day 7, and faster epithelialization, more granulation formation and collagen deposition were observed on day 14 than in control wounds. On day 21, collagen deposition and epithelialization were enhanced in PRP treated groups. Overall, PRP application showed beneficial effects in wound healing, and intralesional injection was useful for application of PRP and could be a good therapeutic option for wound management in dogs.

  2. N-Acetylated Proline-Glycine-Proline Accelerates Cutaneous Wound Healing and Neovascularization by Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yang Woo; Heo, Soon Chul; Lee, Tae Wook; Park, Gyu Tae; Yoon, Jung Won; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Seung-Chul; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Ryu, Youngjae; Kang, Hyeona; Ha, Chang Man; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Jae Ho

    2017-01-01

    Human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs) are promising therapeutic resources for wound repair through stimulating neovascularization. However, the hEPCs-based cell therapy has been hampered by poor engraftment of transplanted cells. In this study, we explored the effects of N-acetylated Proline-Glycine-Proline (Ac-PGP), a degradation product of collagen, on hEPC-mediated cutaneous wound healing and neovascularization. Treatment of hEPCs with Ac-PGP increased migration, proliferation, and tube-forming activity of hEPCs in vitro. Knockdown of CXCR2 expression in hEPCs abrogated the stimulatory effects of Ac-PGP on migration and tube formation. In a cutaneous wound healing model of rats and mice, topical application of Ac-PGP accelerated cutaneous wound healing with promotion of neovascularization. The positive effects of Ac-PGP on wound healing and neovascularization were blocked in CXCR2 knockout mice. In nude mice, the individual application of Ac-PGP treatment or hEPC injection accelerated wound healing by increasing neovascularization. Moreover, the combination of Ac-PGP treatment and hEPC injection further stimulated wound healing and neovascularization. Topical administration of Ac-PGP onto wound bed stimulated migration and engraftment of transplanted hEPCs into cutaneous dermal wounds. Therefore, these results suggest novel applications of Ac-PGP in promoting wound healing and augmenting the therapeutic efficacy of hEPCs. PMID:28230162

  3. Evaluation of healing of infected cutaneous wounds treated with different energy densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Nicole R. S.; Cangussú, Maria C. T.; N. dos Santos, Jean; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2011-03-01

    We aimed assess the effects of different energy densities of the association of red/IR laser light on the healing of cutaneous wounds infected Staphylococcus aureus. Background: Wound infection is the most common complication on healing wounds and cause both vascular and cellular responses on the tissue. Several therapeutics is used for improving wound healing including the use of different light sources, such as the Laser. Some energy densities present positive photobiological effects on the healing process. Material and Methods: 24 young adult male Wistar rats, under general anesthesia, had their dorsum shaven, cleaned and a 1 x 1cm cutaneous wound created with a scalpel and left without no suturing or dressings. The wounds were infected with Staphylococcus aureus and were randomly divided in 8 subgroups of 3 animals in each: Control, Group 10J/cm2, Group 20J/cm2, and Group 30J/cm2, 7 and 14 days each group. Laser phototherapy was carried out with a diode (λ680nm/790nm, P= 30mW/40mW, CW, Laser, Ø = 3mm, PD=424mW/cm2 and 566mW/cm2, t=11.8/ 8.8 sec, E=0.35J) and started immediately after surgery and repeated at every other day during 7 days. Laser light was applied on 4 points around wounded area. The animals were killed at either 8th or 15th day after contamination. Specimens were taken, routinely cut and processed to wax, stained and underwent histological analysis. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: Both 20 and 30J/cm2 caused intense collagen deposition at the end of the experimental time. But, when 20 J/cm2 was used the fibers were also well organized. Conclusion: Our results indicate that irradiated subjects showed improved wound healing being the 20 J/cm2 the energy the caused better histological response.

  4. Antibacterial anti-oxidant electroactive injectable hydrogel as self-healing wound dressing with hemostasis and adhesiveness for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Wu, Hao; Guo, Baolin; Dong, Ruonan; Qiu, Yusheng; Ma, Peter X

    2017-04-01

    Injectable self-healing hydrogel dressing with multifunctional properties including anti-infection, anti-oxidative and conductivity promoting wound healing process will be highly desired in wound healing application and its design is still a challenge. We developed a series of injectable conductive self-healed hydrogels based on quaternized chitosan-g-polyaniline (QCSP) and benzaldehyde group functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(glycerol sebacate) (PEGS-FA) as antibacterial, anti-oxidant and electroactive dressing for cutaneous wound healing. These hydrogels presented good self-healing, electroactivity, free radical scavenging capacity, antibacterial activity, adhesiveness, conductivity, swelling ratio, and biocompatibility. Interestingly, the hydrogel with an optimal crosslinker concentration of 1.5 wt% PEGS-FA showed excellent in vivo blood clotting capacity, and it significantly enhanced in vivo wound healing process in a full-thickness skin defect model than quaternized chitosan/PEGS-FA hydrogel and commercial dressing (Tegaderm™ film) by upregulating the gene expression of growth factors including VEGF, EGF and TGF-β and then promoting granulation tissue thickness and collagen deposition. Taken together, the antibacterial electroactive injectable hydrogel dressing prolonged the lifespan of dressing relying on self-healing ability and significantly promoted the in vivo wound healing process attributed to its multifunctional properties, meaning that they are excellent candidates for full-thickness skin wound healing.

  5. Blockade of glucocorticoid receptors improves cutaneous wound healing in stressed mice.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Taís Fontoura; de Castro Pires, Taiza; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2016-02-01

    Stress is an important condition of modern life. The successful wound healing requires the execution of three major overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling, and stress can disturb this process. Chronic stress impairs wound healing through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and the glucocorticoids (GCs) hormones have been shown to delay wound closure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a GC receptor antagonist (RU486) treatment on cutaneous healing in chronically stressed mice. Male mice were submitted to rotational stress, whereas control animals were not subjected to stress. Stressed and control animals were treated with RU486. A full-thickness excisional lesion was generated, and seven days later, lesions were recovered. The RU486 treatment improves wound healing since contraction takes place earlier in RU486-treated in comparison to non-treated mice, and the RU486 treatment also improves the angiogenesis in Stress+RU486 mice when compared to stressed animals. The Stress+RU486 group showed a decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration and in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression; meanwhile, there was an increase in myofibroblasts quantity. In conclusion, blockade of GC receptors with RU486 partially ameliorates stress-impaired wound healing, suggesting that stress inhibits healing through more than one functional pathway.

  6. Monocyte/macrophage androgen receptor suppresses cutaneous wound healing in mice by enhancing local TNF-alpha expression.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jiann-Jyh; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chuang, Kuang-Hsiang; Chang, Philip; Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Wen-Jye; Chang, Chawnshang

    2009-12-01

    Cutaneous wounds heal more slowly in elderly males than in elderly females, suggesting a role for sex hormones in the healing process. Indeed, androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling has been shown to inhibit cutaneous wound healing. AR is expressed in several cell types in healing skin, including keratinocytes, dermal fibroblasts, and infiltrating macrophages, but the exact role of androgen/AR signaling in these different cell types remains unclear. To address this question, we generated and studied cutaneous wound healing in cell-specific AR knockout (ARKO) mice. General and myeloid-specific ARKO mice exhibited accelerated wound healing compared with WT mice, whereas keratinocyte- and fibroblast-specific ARKO mice did not. Importantly, the rate of wound healing in the general ARKO mice was dependent on AR and not serum androgen levels. Interestingly, although dispensable for wound closure, keratinocyte AR promoted re-epithelialization, while fibroblast AR suppressed it. Further analysis indicated that AR suppressed wound healing by enhancing the inflammatory response through a localized increase in TNF-alpha expression. Furthermore, AR enhanced local TNF-alpha expression via multiple mechanisms, including increasing the inflammatory monocyte population, enhancing monocyte chemotaxis by upregulating CCR2 expression, and enhancing TNF-alpha expression in macrophages. Finally, targeting AR by topical application of a compound (ASC-J9) that degrades AR protein resulted in accelerated healing, suggesting a potential new therapeutic approach that may lead to better treatment of wound healing.

  7. Therapeutic effects of topical application of ozone on acute cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Su; Noh, Sun Up; Han, Ye Won; Kim, Kyoung Moon; Kang, Hoon; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2009-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effects of topical ozonated olive oil on acute cutaneous wound healing in a guinea pig model and also to elucidate its therapeutic mechanism. After creating full-thickness skin wounds on the backs of guinea pigs by using a 6 mm punch biopsy, we examined the wound healing effect of topically applied ozonated olive oil (ozone group), as compared to the pure olive oil (oil group) and non-treatment (control group). The ozone group of guinea pig had a significantly smaller wound size and a residual wound area than the oil group, on days 5 (P<0.05) and 7 (P<0.01 and P<0.05) after wound surgery, respectively. Both hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson-trichrome staining revealed an increased intensity of collagen fibers and a greater number of fibroblasts in the ozone group than that in the oil group on day 7. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated upregulation of platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions, but not fibroblast growth factor expression in the ozone group on day 7, as compared with the oil group. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that topical application of ozonated olive oil can accelerate acute cutaneous wound repair in a guinea pig in association with the increased expression of PDGF, TGF-beta, and VEGF.

  8. Therapeutic Effects of Topical Application of Ozone on Acute Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Su; Noh, Sun Up; Han, Ye Won; Kim, Kyoung Moon; Kang, Hoon; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effects of topical ozonated olive oil on acute cutaneous wound healing in a guinea pig model and also to elucidate its therapeutic mechanism. After creating full-thickness skin wounds on the backs of guinea pigs by using a 6 mm punch biopsy, we examined the wound healing effect of topically applied ozonated olive oil (ozone group), as compared to the pure olive oil (oil group) and non-treatment (control group). The ozone group of guinea pig had a significantly smaller wound size and a residual wound area than the oil group, on days 5 (P<0.05) and 7 (P<0.01 and P<0.05) after wound surgery, respectively. Both hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson-trichrome staining revealed an increased intensity of collagen fibers and a greater number of fibroblasts in the ozone group than that in the oil group on day 7. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated upregulation of platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions, but not fibroblast growth factor expression in the ozone group on day 7, as compared with the oil group. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that topical application of ozonated olive oil can accelerate acute cutaneous wound repair in a guinea pig in association with the increased expression of PDGF, TGF-β, and VEGF. PMID:19543419

  9. Oxidant and antioxidant events during epidermal growth factor therapy to cutaneous wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalay, Zeynep; Cevher, Sule Coskun

    2012-08-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a highly complex process, which includes inflammation, cell proliferation, matrix deposition and remodelling phases. Various growth factors, like epidermal growth factor (EGF), play an important role during wound healing. However, little is known about relationship between EGF and oxidant-antioxidant events in cutaneous wound healing models. Thus we planned to evaluate the connection between EGF therapy and oxidative stress in dermal tissue followed by wounding. Fifty-four adult male Wistar-albino rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, untreated and topical EGF administrated group. A linear full-thickness excision of 40 mm in length on both sides of spinal cord was made on the back of each rat and sutured under anaesthesia and sterile conditions. Excision was closed with 4/0 atraumatic silk suture. EGF solution was freshly prepared at 10 ng/ml dose in thilotears gel under aseptic conditions. Following the surgery, 1 ml of EGF solution was administered to wound strips one time in everyday. The animals were euthanised and wound tissues were collected on days 1, 5, 7 and 14. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substans (TBARS), glutathione (GSH), reactive nitrogen oxide species (NOx), ascorbic acid levels and superoxide dismutase activity were measured spectrophotometrically. TBARS levels decreased and NOx levels increased on day 5 after operation, and GSH levels were increased on day 14 in EGF administered group compared with untreated group. Our data showed that EGF may act like an antioxidant by scavenging toxic oxidation products in wound tissue. In addition, it may contribute healing of the wound tissue in earlier stages and suggest a potential effective role for antioxidant therapies, especially until day 5.

  10. The role of mast cells in cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Nishikori, Yoriko; Shiota, Naotaka; Okunishi, Hideki

    2014-11-01

    Mast cells (MCs) reside in cutaneous tissue, and an increment of MCs is suggested to induce vascular regression in the process of wound healing. To clarify participation of MCs in diabetic cutaneous wound healing, we created an excisional wound on diabetic mice 4 weeks after streptozotocin injections and subsequently investigated the healing processes for 49 days, comparing them with control mice. The rate of wound closure was not markedly different between the diabetic and control mice. In the proliferative phase at days 7 and 14, neovascularization in the wound was weaker in diabetic mice than in control mice. In the remodeling phase at day 21 and afterward, rapid vascular regression occurred in control mice; however, neovascularization was still observed in diabetic mice where the number of vessels in granulation tissues was relatively higher than in control mice. In the remodeling phase of the control mice, MCs within the wound began to increase rapidly and resulted in considerable accumulation, whereas the increment of MCs was delayed in diabetic mice. In addition, the number of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)- or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-immunopositive hypertrophic fibroblast-like spindle cells and c-Kit-positive/VEGFR2-positive/FcεRIα-negative endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were higher in diabetic wounds. In conclusion, neovascularization in the proliferative phase and vascular regression in the remodeling phase were impaired in diabetic mice. The delayed increment of MCs and sustained angiogenic stimuli by fibroblast-like spindle cells and EPCs may inhibit vascular regression in the remodeling phase and impair the wound-healing process in diabetic mice.

  11. Stellera chamaejasme and its constituents induce cutaneous wound healing and anti-inflammatory activities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myungsuk; Lee, Hee Ju; Randy, Ahmad; Yun, Ji Ho; Oh, Sang-Rok; Nho, Chu Won

    2017-01-01

    Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae) is a perennial herb that is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat tumours, tuberculosis and psoriasis. S. chamaejasme extract (SCE) possesses anti-inflammatory, analgesic and wound healing activities; however, the effect of S. chamaejasme and its active compounds on cutaneous wound healing has not been investigated. We assessed full-thickness wounds of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and topically applied SCE for 2 weeks. In vitro studies were performed using HaCaT keratinocytes, Hs68 dermal fibroblasts and RAW 264.7 macrophages to determine cell viability (MTT assay), cell migration, collagen expression, nitric oxide (NO) production, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, inflammatory cytokine expression and β-catenin activation. In vivo, wound size was reduced and epithelisation was improved in SCE-treated SD rats. In vitro, SCE and its active compounds induced keratinocyte migration by regulating the β-catenin, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt signalling pathways. Furthermore, SCE and its active compounds increased mRNA expression of type I and III collagen in Hs68 fibroblasts. SCE and chamechromone inhibited NO and PGE2 release and mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators in RAW 264.7 macrophages. SCE enhances the motility of HaCaT keratinocytes and improves cutaneous wound healing in SD rats. PMID:28220834

  12. Stellera chamaejasme and its constituents induce cutaneous wound healing and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsuk; Lee, Hee Ju; Randy, Ahmad; Yun, Ji Ho; Oh, Sang-Rok; Nho, Chu Won

    2017-02-21

    Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae) is a perennial herb that is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat tumours, tuberculosis and psoriasis. S. chamaejasme extract (SCE) possesses anti-inflammatory, analgesic and wound healing activities; however, the effect of S. chamaejasme and its active compounds on cutaneous wound healing has not been investigated. We assessed full-thickness wounds of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and topically applied SCE for 2 weeks. In vitro studies were performed using HaCaT keratinocytes, Hs68 dermal fibroblasts and RAW 264.7 macrophages to determine cell viability (MTT assay), cell migration, collagen expression, nitric oxide (NO) production, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, inflammatory cytokine expression and β-catenin activation. In vivo, wound size was reduced and epithelisation was improved in SCE-treated SD rats. In vitro, SCE and its active compounds induced keratinocyte migration by regulating the β-catenin, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt signalling pathways. Furthermore, SCE and its active compounds increased mRNA expression of type I and III collagen in Hs68 fibroblasts. SCE and chamechromone inhibited NO and PGE2 release and mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators in RAW 264.7 macrophages. SCE enhances the motility of HaCaT keratinocytes and improves cutaneous wound healing in SD rats.

  13. Influence of radiation crosslinked carboxymethyl-chitosan/gelatin hydrogel on cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Zhang, Yaqing; Zhang, Xiangmei; Xu, Ling; Chen, Xin; Wei, Shicheng

    2013-12-01

    A series of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) and gelatin hydrogels were prepared by radiation crosslinking. A pre-clinical study was performed by implantation model and full-thickness cutaneous wound model in Sprague-Dawley rats to preliminarily evaluate the biocompatibility, biodegradability and effects on healing. In the implantation test, as a component of the hydrogels, CM-chitosan showed a positive effect on promoting cell proliferation and neovascularization, while gelatin was efficient to stabilize the structure and prolong the degradation time. To evaluate the function on wound healing, the hydrogels were applied to the relatively large full-thickness cutaneous wounds (Φ3.0 cm). Compared with the control groups, the hydrogel group showed significantly higher percentage of wound closure on days 9, 12 and 15 postoperatively, which was consistent with the significantly thicker granulation tissue on days 3 and 6. All results apparently revealed that the radiation crosslinked CM-chitosan/Gelatin hydrogels could induce granulation tissue formation and accelerate the wound healing.

  14. Energy metabolism in the granulation tissue of diabetic rats during cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asheesh; Raghubir, Ram

    2005-02-01

    The skin cells chiefly depend on carbohydrate metabolism for their energy requirement during cutaneous wound healing. Since the glucose metabolism is greatly hampered in diabetes and this might affect wound repair process. This prompted us to investigate the intermediate steps of energy metabolism by measuring enzyme activities in the wound tissues of normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats following excision-type of cutaneous injury. The activities of key regulatory enzymes namely hexokinase (HK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), citrate synthase (CS) and glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) have been monitored in the granulation tissues of normal and diabetic rats at different time points (2, 7, 14 and 21 days) of postwounding. Interestingly, a significant alteration in all these enzyme activities was observed in diabetic rats. The activity of PFK was increased but HK, LDH and CS showed a decreased activity in the wound tissue of diabetics as compared to normal rats. However G6PD exhibited an elevated activity only at early stage of healing in diabetic rats. Thus, the results suggest that significant alterations in the activities of energy metabolizing enzymes in the wound tissue of diabetic rats may affect the energy availability for cellular activity needed for repair process and this may perhaps be one of the factor responsible for impaired healing in these subjects.

  15. Assessment of microcirculation dynamics during cutaneous wound healing phases in vivo using optical microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Qin, Jia; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous wound healing consists of multiple overlapping phases starting with blood coagulation following incision of blood vessels. We utilized label-free optical coherence tomography and optical microangiography (OMAG) to noninvasively monitor healing process and dynamics of microcirculation system in a mouse ear pinna wound model. Mouse ear pinna is composed of two layers of skin separated by a layer of cartilage and because its total thickness is around 500 μm, it can be utilized as an ideal model for optical imaging techniques. These skin layers are identical to human skin structure except for sweat ducts and glands. Microcirculatory system responds to the wound injury by recruiting collateral vessels to supply blood flow to hypoxic region. During the inflammatory phase, lymphatic vessels play an important role in the immune response of the tissue and clearing waste from interstitial fluid. In the final phase of wound healing, tissue maturation, and remodeling, the wound area is fully closed while blood vessels mature to support the tissue cells. We show that using OMAG technology allows noninvasive and label-free monitoring and imaging each phase of wound healing that can be used to replace invasive tissue sample histology and immunochemistry technologies.

  16. Assessment of microcirculation dynamics during cutaneous wound healing phases in vivo using optical microangiography

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Siavash; Qin, Jia; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cutaneous wound healing consists of multiple overlapping phases starting with blood coagulation following incision of blood vessels. We utilized label-free optical coherence tomography and optical microangiography (OMAG) to noninvasively monitor healing process and dynamics of microcirculation system in a mouse ear pinna wound model. Mouse ear pinna is composed of two layers of skin separated by a layer of cartilage and because its total thickness is around 500 μm, it can be utilized as an ideal model for optical imaging techniques. These skin layers are identical to human skin structure except for sweat ducts and glands. Microcirculatory system responds to the wound injury by recruiting collateral vessels to supply blood flow to hypoxic region. During the inflammatory phase, lymphatic vessels play an important role in the immune response of the tissue and clearing waste from interstitial fluid. In the final phase of wound healing, tissue maturation, and remodeling, the wound area is fully closed while blood vessels mature to support the tissue cells. We show that using OMAG technology allows noninvasive and label-free monitoring and imaging each phase of wound healing that can be used to replace invasive tissue sample histology and immunochemistry technologies. PMID:25036212

  17. Assessment of microcirculation dynamics during cutaneous wound healing phases in vivo using optical microangiography.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Siavash; Qin, Jia; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang K

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous wound healing consists of multiple overlapping phases starting with blood coagulation following incision of blood vessels. We utilized label-free optical coherence tomography and optical microangiography (OMAG) to noninvasively monitor healing process and dynamics of microcirculation system in a mouse ear pinna wound model. Mouse ear pinna is composed of two layers of skin separated by a layer of cartilage and because its total thickness is around 500 μm, it can be utilized as an ideal model for optical imaging techniques. These skin layers are identical to human skin structure except for sweat ducts and glands. Microcirculatory system responds to the wound injury by recruiting collateral vessels to supply blood flow to hypoxic region. During the inflammatory phase, lymphatic vessels play an important role in the immune response of the tissue and clearing waste from interstitial fluid. In the final phase of wound healing, tissue maturation, and remodeling, the wound area is fully closed while blood vessels mature to support the tissue cells. We show that using OMAG technology allows noninvasive and label-free monitoring and imaging each phase of wound healing that can be used to replace invasive tissue sample histology and immunochemistry technologies.

  18. Bilirubin modulated cytokines, growth factors and angiogenesis to improve cutaneous wound healing process in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ram, Mahendra; Singh, Vishakha; Kumawat, Sanjay; Kant, Vinay; Tandan, Surendra Kumar; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin has shown cutaneous wound healing potential in some preliminary studies. Here we hypothesize that bilirubin facilitates wound healing in diabetic rats by modulating important healing factors/candidates and antioxidant parameters in a time-dependent manner. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by streptozotocin. In all diabetic rats wounds were created under pentobarbitone anesthesia. All the rats were divided into two groups, of which one (control) was treated with ointment base and other with bilirubin ointment (0.3%). Wound closer measurement and tissue collection were done on days 3, 7, 14 and 19 post-wounding. The relative expressions of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α), transforming growth factor- beta1 (TGF-β1()), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interlukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA and proteins and the mRNA of interlukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and matrix metalloprteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined in the wound tissues. CD-31 staining and collagen content were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and picrosirius red staining, respectively. Histopathological changes were assessed by H&E staining. The per cent wound closer was significantly higher from day 7 onwards in bilirubin-treated rats. HIF-1α, VEGF, SDF-1α, TGF-β1, IL-10 mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher on days 3, 7 and 14 in bilirubin-treated rats. The mRNA expression and protein level of TNF-α and the mRNA of IL-1β and MMP-9 were progressively and markedly reduced in bilirubin-treated rats. The collagen deposition and formation of blood vessels were greater in bilirubin-treated rats. Bilirubin markedly facilitated cutaneous wound healing in diabetic rats by modulating growth factors, cytokines, neovasculogenesis and collagen contents to the wound site. Topical application of bilirubin ointment might be of great use in cutaneous wound healing in diabetic patients.

  19. Non-invasive objective devices for monitoring the inflammatory, proliferative and remodelling phases of cutaneous wound healing and skin scarring.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Sara; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-08-01

    Objective evaluation of cutaneous wounds through the use of non-invasive devices is important for diagnosis, monitoring treatment response and can lead to the development of improved theranostic strategies. The need for objective monitoring of wound healing and scar formation is evident as this enables accurate diagnosis, evaluation and prognosis for clinicians and allows for the standardisation and validation of methodology for researchers. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the current application of non-invasive objective technologies for the assessment of wound healing through the different phases of repair. We propose that cutaneous healing parameters can be split into three core domains: anatomical, mechanical and physiological. These categories can be further subdivided with respect to specific phases of healing. There is no single instrument, which can measure all the parameters of healing simultaneously; thus, it is important to choose the correct device for the particular healing characteristics being monitored. However, multiprobe systems, which include a number of devices connected to one main unit, are useful as they enable multiple measurements of different parameters. Many of the devices have not been validated against histological examination. Additionally, some of the instruments have not been evaluated in all wound or scar types and may not be useful throughout all phases of cutaneous wound healing. In conclusion, non-invasive objective devices are useful in the assessment of cutaneous wound healing, as these tools can link the treatment and diagnosis by evaluating response to treatment and thus could aid as a marker for healing and scar maturation.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells and cutaneous wound healing: novel methods to increase cell delivery and therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dylan E; Ayoub, Nagi; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-03-09

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) (also known as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells) possess the capacity for self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation, and their ability to enhance cutaneous wound healing has been well characterized. Acting via paracrine interactions, MSCs accelerate wound closure, increase angiogenesis, promote resolution of wound inflammation, favorably regulate extracellular matrix remodeling, and encourage regeneration of skin with normal architecture and function. A number of studies have employed novel methods to amplify the delivery and efficacy of MSCs. Non-traditional sources of MSCs, including Wharton's jelly and medical waste material, have shown efficacy comparable to that of traditional sources, such as bone marrow and adipose tissue. The potential of alternative methods to both introduce MSCs into wounds and increase migration of MSCs into wound areas has also been demonstrated. Taking advantage of the associations between MSCs with M2 macrophages and microRNA, methods to enhance the immunomodulatory capacity of MSCs have shown success. New measures to enhance angiogenic capabilities have also exhibited effectiveness, often demonstrated by increased levels of proangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, hypoxia has been shown to have strong wound-healing potential in terms of increasing MSC efficacy. We have critically reviewed the results of the novel studies that show promise for the continued development of MSC-based wound-healing therapies and provide direction for continued research in this field.

  1. Effects of supplementation with different edible oils on cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Otranto, Marcela; Do Nascimento, Adriana Paulino; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acids are bioactive molecules, but their effects on cutaneous wound healing are not well understood. Our aim was to investigate the effects of supplementation with edible oils on cutaneous healing. Thirty days before wounding, rats were started on daily supplements of sunflower oil, linseed oil, fish oil, or water. Supplementation lasted until euthanasia. On day 0, an excisional wound was made on the back of each animal. Fourteen days later, the animals were euthanized, and the wound and adjacent skin were collected. Wound closure was higher in the control group compared with the other groups at days 7 and 14. Inflammatory cells were abundant in the control, linseed, and fish groups, but scarce in the sunflower group. Large numbers of myofibroblasts were observed in the control and sunflower groups. The linseed and fish groups presented a high density of dilated blood vessels. The control and sunflower groups showed a moderate density of collagen fibers; a high density of fibers was observed in the linseed and fish groups. Hydroxyproline levels were lowest in the control and sunflower groups. Supplementation with different types of edible oils delayed wound closure and affected the inflammatory infiltrate and collagen deposition.

  2. Ozonated sesame oil enhances cutaneous wound healing in SKH1 mice.

    PubMed

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Lim, Yunsook; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Miracco, Clelia; Zanardi, Iacopo; Bocci, Velio; Travagli, Valter

    2011-01-01

    Ozone is well recognized as a bactericidal agent and its beneficial effect on wound healing could be a consequence of this property. Because ozone itself does not penetrate the cells but immediately reacts with polyunsaturated fatty acids, its effects should be the results of oxidative reaction. For this reason, ozonated oils could be a way to deliver ozone messengers to the skin. This paper evaluated the therapeutic effects of three different grades of ozonated sesame oil in acute cutaneous wounds made in the skin of SKH1 mice. Specifically, wound closure rate, histological parameters, and the level of key proteins such as vascular endothelial growth factors and cyclin D1 have been analyzed in relation to the peroxide level present in the ozonated oil. Treatment with moderately ozonated sesame oil--expressed as peroxide value about 1,500)--has a faster wound closure rate in the first 7 days than treatment with oil containing either lower or higher peroxide value, and even with controls. Moreover, under the same treatment, an earlier and higher response of cells involved in wound repair, a higher angiogenesis, as well as an enhanced vascular endothelial growth factors and cyclin D1 expression were observed. The present study shows the validity of ozonated sesame oil in cutaneous wound healing and emphasizes the importance of the ozonation grade.

  3. Young coconut juice can accelerate the healing process of cutaneous wounds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Estrogen has been reported to accelerate cutaneous wound healing. This research studies the effect of young coconut juice (YCJ), presumably containing estrogen-like substances, on cutaneous wound healing in ovairectomized rats. Methods Four groups of female rats (6 in each group) were included in this study. These included sham-operated, ovariectomized (ovx), ovx receiving estradiol benzoate (EB) injections intraperitoneally, and ovx receiving YCJ orally. Two equidistant 1-cm full-thickness skin incisional wounds were made two weeks after ovariectomy. The rats were sacrificed at the end of the third and the fourth week of the study, and their serum estradiol (E2) level was measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay. The skin was excised and examined in histological sections stained with H&E, and immunostained using anti-estrogen receptor (ER-α an ER-β) antibodies. Results Wound healing was accelerated in ovx rats receiving YCJ, as compared to controls. This was associated with significantly higher density of immunostaining for ER-α an ER-β in keratinocytes, fibroblasts, white blood cells, fat cells, sebaceous gland, skeletal muscles, and hair shafts and follicles. This was also associated with thicker epidermis and dermis, but with thinner hypodermis. In addition, the number and size of immunoreactive hair follicles for both ER-α and ER-β were the highest in the ovx+YCJ group, as compared to the ovx+EB group. Conclusions This study demonstrates that YCJ has estrogen-like characteristics, which in turn seem to have beneficial effects on cutaneous wound healing. PMID:23234369

  4. Evaluation of cutaneous wound healing activity of Malva sylvestris aqueous extract in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Mohammad; Ravarian, Behdad; Zardast, Mahmoud; Moallem, Seyed Adel; Fard, Mohammad Hasanpour; Valavi, Masoomeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Malva sylvestris aqueous extract on cutaneous wound healing in BALB/c mice. Materials and Methods: Twenty seven male BALB/c mice (2.5 months of age) were used. A cut wound (superficial fascia depth) was made locally. The mice were then divided into three groups: the first, second and third groups received topical administration of M. sylvestris 1% aqueous extract, silver sulfadiazine topical cream and cold cream (positive and negative control groups), respectively. On days 4, 7 and 10 excisional biopsies were performed and wound healing was evaluated histopathologically. The data were analyzed by the ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests. Results: On days 4 and 7, the numbers of inflammatory cells in the silver sulfadiazine and M. sylvestris-treated groups were significantly lower than the control group and keratinization at the edges of the wound in both groups was significantly higher than the control group. On the tenth day of the study, the Malva-treated mice showed better healing features and less fibrosis and scar formation, and also fewer hair follicles were damaged in this group. On the tenth day of the study, the numbers of inflammatory cells in M. sylvestris and silver sulfadiazine-treated groups were significantly lower than the control group. Conclusion: The present study supports the beneficial effects of M. sylvestris on the wound healing process and suggests a potential clinical application. PMID:26221487

  5. Avocado/soybean unsaponifiables: a novel regulator of cutaneous wound healing, modelling and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Mohammadalipour, Adel; Moshiri, Ali; Tabandeh, Mohammad R

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the effects of avocado/soybean unsaponifiables (ASU) on the healing response of cutaneous wound defect in rats. Sixty male rats were randomly divided into three groups including control, vehicle and treatment (n = 20 in each group). A 2 × 2 cm(2) wound defect was made on the dorsum. The control, vehicle and treatment groups were treated daily with topical application of saline, cream and cream/ASU for 10 days, respectively. The wounds were monitored daily. The animals were euthanised at 10, 20 and 30 days post injury (D). The dry matter, hydroxyproline, collagen, n-acetyl glucosamine (NAGLA) and n-acetyl galactosamine (NAGAA) contents of the skin samples were measured and the histopathological and biomechanical characteristics of the samples were investigated. Statistics of P < 0·05 was considered significant. Treatment significantly increased tissue glycosaminoglycans and collagen contents at various stages of wound healing compared to controls. Treatment modulated inflammation, improved fibroplasia and produced high amounts of scar tissue at short term. At long term, treatment reduced the scar tissue size and increased the quality and rate of wound contraction and reepithelisation compared to controls. The treated lesions were more cosmetically pleasing and had significantly higher biomechanical characteristics than controls. ASU was effective in rat wound healing.

  6. Evaluation of Effects of Topical Estradiol Benzoate Application on Cutaneous Wound Healing in Ovariectomized Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Kanae; Urai, Tamae; Asano, Kimi; Nakajima, Yukari; Nakatani, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen promotes cutaneous wound healing in ovariectomized (OVX) female mice. However, the effects of topical estrogen application on wounds remain unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of topical estrogen application on wounds with standard treatment methods. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J female mice underwent OVX and received two full-thickness wounds four weeks later. Mice were divided into three groups: topical estradiol benzoate (EB) (0.75 μg/g/day) wound treatment, subcutaneous estradiol (E2) pellets (0.05 mg, 21 days), and topical E2 (0.01 g/day) skin application. Wound healing was observed until day 14. Wound area ratios were significantly smaller in the topical EB wound treatment group than in the subcutaneous E2 pellet group on days 1–14 (p < 0.05) and topical E2 skin application group on days 1–9 (p < 0.05). Neutrophil and macrophage numbers were significantly smaller in the topical EB wound treatment group than in the subcutaneous E2 pellet and topical E2 skin application groups on day 7 (p < 0.05). Moreover, the number of new blood vessels and ratio of myofibroblasts were significantly larger in the topical EB wound treatment group than in the subcutaneous E2 pellet and topical E2 application skin groups on day 7 (p < 0.05). These results demonstrate that the application of estrogen to wounds reduced inflammatory responses and promoted angiogenesis and wound contraction more than the two other standard treatment methods. PMID:27658263

  7. The effect of 17β-estradiol on cutaneous wound healing in protein-malnourished ovariectomized female mouse model.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kanae; Komatsu, Emi; Nakajima, Yukari; Urai, Tamae; Nasruddin; Sugama, Junko; Nakatani, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is delayed by protein malnutrition (PM). On the other hand, estrogen promotes cutaneous wound healing by its anti-inflammatory and cell proliferation effects. Therefore, we hypothesized that estrogen administration in protein-malnourished ovariectomized (OVX) female mice might improve the inflammatory response and promote cutaneous wound healing as well as normal nutrition. To test this hypothesis, we used full-thickness excisional wounds in Control SHAM, PM SHAM, PM OVX and PM OVX+17β-estradiol mice. The Control diet included 200 g/kg protein and the PM diet included 30 g/kg protein. The ratio of wound area in the Control SHAM group was significantly smaller than those in the three PM groups. In addition, microscopic findings also showed that the ratio of collagen fibers, the ratio of myofibroblasts and the number of new blood vessels in the Control SHAM group were significantly greater than those in the three PM groups. However, the number of Ym1-positive cells as an anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophage marker in the PM OVX+17β-estradiol group was significantly higher than those in the other three groups. These results indicate that the appearance of anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophages was promoted by estrogen administration; however, it could not promote cutaneous wound healing upon a low-protein diet. Therefore, it may be confirmed that nutrition is more important for promoting cutaneous wound healing than estrogen administration.

  8. The Effect of 17β-Estradiol on Cutaneous Wound Healing in Protein-Malnourished Ovariectomized Female Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Kanae; Komatsu, Emi; Nakajima, Yukari; Urai, Tamae; Nasruddin; Sugama, Junko; Nakatani, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is delayed by protein malnutrition (PM). On the other hand, estrogen promotes cutaneous wound healing by its anti-inflammatory and cell proliferation effects. Therefore, we hypothesized that estrogen administration in protein-malnourished ovariectomized (OVX) female mice might improve the inflammatory response and promote cutaneous wound healing as well as normal nutrition. To test this hypothesis, we used full-thickness excisional wounds in Control SHAM, PM SHAM, PM OVX and PM OVX+17β-estradiol mice. The Control diet included 200 g/kg protein and the PM diet included 30 g/kg protein. The ratio of wound area in the Control SHAM group was significantly smaller than those in the three PM groups. In addition, microscopic findings also showed that the ratio of collagen fibers, the ratio of myofibroblasts and the number of new blood vessels in the Control SHAM group were significantly greater than those in the three PM groups. However, the number of Ym1-positive cells as an anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophage marker in the PM OVX+17β-estradiol group was significantly higher than those in the other three groups. These results indicate that the appearance of anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophages was promoted by estrogen administration; however, it could not promote cutaneous wound healing upon a low-protein diet. Therefore, it may be confirmed that nutrition is more important for promoting cutaneous wound healing than estrogen administration. PMID:25518000

  9. Effects of acute diabetes on rat cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Komesu, Marilena Chinali; Tanga, Marcelo Benetti; Buttros, Kemli Raquel; Nakao, Cristiano

    2004-10-01

    INTRODUCTION:: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic hyperglycaemic disorder. Complicated metabolic mechanisms and increased incidence of infections are clinical hallmarks, mostly associated with its chronicity. There is little information about the early pathological processes in diabetes. The objective of our study was to evaluate the healing process during early phases of experimental diabetes on rat skin. METHODS:: Alloxan induced diabetic rats were used. Non-injected animals were used as control. Punch byopsies on dorsal skin had histopathological evaluation of the healing areas made on days 1, 3 and 7 post-surgery. RESULTS:: The results showed that: (1) in diabetics, the inflammation, the initial healing phase, has a slow beginning and tends to last longer; and (2) diabetic animals showed lower density of neutrophils in healing areas up to 3 days after surgery, and in addition, after day 3, when the neutrophils should leave the healing area, and be replaced by macrophages, compared to controls, diabetic animals showed higher numbers of neutrophils. PRINCIPAL CONCLUSION:: Although diabetes is a chronic progressive disease, acute diabetes can be associated to subclinical alterations, and responsible for deficiencies in defense cells and in repair tissue failures.

  10. Treatment with corticosterone delays cutaneous wound healing in male and female salamanders.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica R; Woodley, Sarah K

    2015-05-15

    In vertebrates, exposure to stressors and stress hormones has a number of physiological effects including modulation of immune function. These effects on immune function have been well studied in mammals, but less is known in other groups, in particular amphibians. To analyze the effects of exposure to stressors and the stress hormone corticosterone, we monitored cutaneous wound healing as a measure of integrated immunity in male and female semi-terrestrial salamanders (Desmognathus ochrophaeus) that were chased to induce endogenous release of corticosterone or were treated with physiologically relevant doses of corticosterone. As predicted, subjects treated daily with corticosterone healed more slowly than did controls. In contrast, subjects that had been chased daily healed at the same rate as controls. Surprisingly, repeated chasing did not elevate plasma corticosterone despite causing drops in body mass and survival. Additionally, females healed more slowly than males, possibly due to energetic constraints.

  11. Improved cutaneous wound healing after intraperitoneal injection of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Kênia Soares; Cantaruti, Thiago Anselmo; Azevedo, Geraldo Magela; Galdino, Daniel Antero de Almeida; Rodrigues, Claudiney Melquíades; Costa, Raquel Alves; Vaz, Nelson Monteiro; Carvalho, Cláudia Rocha

    2015-03-01

    Skin wound healing is a complex process involving many types of cells and molecules and often results in scar tissue formation in adult mammals. However, scarless healing occurs in foetal skin and minimal scars may occur after cutaneous healing in the adult with reduced inflammation. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is widely distributed within the central nervous system and in other body regions, such as the skin, and has strong anti-inflammatory activity. The aim in the present experiments was to learn whether intraperitoneal (i.p) injection of α-MSH just before skin wounds antagonize inflammation and improves skin wound healing in adult mice. C57BL/6 young adult mice received an i.p. injection of 1 mg/kg of α-MSH and, 30 min later, two circular through-and-through holes (6.5 mm diameter) were made in their dorsal skin under anaesthesia. Control mice were wounded after vehicle injection. The wound healing process was analysed macroscopically and microscopically at 3, 7, 40 and 60 days. Skin samples were fixed in formalin, embedded in paraffin, sectioned at 5 μm, stained with H&E or toluidine blue for cell analysis or Gomori's trichrome for extracellular matrix (ECM) analysis. Other samples were fixed in DMSO+methanol, embedded in paraplast and incubated with anti-CD45, antismooth muscle actin, anticollagen-I and anticollagen-III for immunofluorescence analysis. Alpha-MSH significantly reduced the number of leucocytes, mast cells and fibroblasts at 3 and 7 days after injury. On days 40 and 60, α-MSH reduced scar area and improved the organization of the collagen fibres indicating that it may direct the healing into a more-regenerative/less-scarring pathway.

  12. Enhanced Cutaneous Wound Healing In Vivo by Standardized Crude Extract of Poincianella pluviosa

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Eduarda Antunes; de Morais, Gutierrez Rodrigues; Pacheco, Isabela Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process that involves several biological events, and a delay in this process may cause economic and social problems for the patient. The search continues for new alternative treatments to aid healing, including the use of herbal medicines. Members of the genus Caesalpinia are used in traditional medicine to treat wounds. The related species Poincianella pluviosa (DC.) L.P. Queiroz increases the cell viability of keratinocytes and fibroblasts and stimulates the proliferation of keratinocytes in vitro. The crude extract (CE) from bark of P. pluviosa was evaluated in the wound-healing process in vivo, to validate the traditional use and the in vitro activity. Standardized CE was incorporated into a gel and applied on cutaneous wounds (TCEG) and compared with the formulation without CE (Control) for 4, 7, 10, or 14 days of treatment. The effects of the CE on wound re-epithelialization; cell proliferation; permeation, using photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS); and proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) were evaluated. The TCEG stimulated the migration of keratinocytes at day 4 and proliferation on the following days, with a high concentration of cells in metaphase at 7 days. Type I collagen formed more rapidly in the TCEG. PAS showed that the CE had permeated through the skin. TCEG stimulated VEGF at day 4 and SOD-2 and COX-2 at day 7. The results suggest that the CE promoted the regulation of proteins and helped to accelerate the processes involved in healing, promoting early angiogenesis. This led to an increase in the re-epithelialized surface, with significant mitotic activity. Maturation of collagen fibers was also enhanced, which may affect the resistance of the extracellular matrix. PAS indicated a correlation between the rate of diffusion and biological events during the healing process. The CE from P. pluviosa appears promising as an aid in healing. PMID

  13. Evaluation of therapeutic intervention with a natural product in cutaneous wound healing: the use of capybara oil.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Polyana Cury; Neto-Ferreira, Rodrigo; José de Carvalho, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Capybara oil is commonly used for cutaneous wound healing in traditional South American medicine, although its beneficial effect has never been experimentally proven. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the topical application of capybara oil on skin wounds in Swiss mice. The following characteristics of the wounds were observed and evaluated: wound contraction and reepithelialization, the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and mast cells, the thickness of the neoepidermis, and the distribution of collagen and elastic fibers. Our study showed that oil extracted from subcutaneous capybara fat was beneficial for wound healing, indicating that capybara oil plays an important role in promoting tissue repair.

  14. Novel locally active estrogens accelerate cutaneous wound healing. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Brufani, Mario; Ceccacci, Francesca; Filocamo, Luigi; Garofalo, Barbara; Joudioux, Roberta; La Bella, Angela; Leonelli, Francesca; Migneco, Luisa M; Bettolo, Rinaldo Marini; Farina, Paolo M; Ashcroft, Gillian S; Routley, Claire; Hardman, Matthew; Meda, Clara; Rando, Gianpaolo; Maggi, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    New 17beta-estradiol (E2) derivatives 1-11 were synthesized from an estrone derivative by addition of organometallic reagents prepared from protected alpha,omega-alkynols and further elaboration of the addition products. The estrogenic activity of these novel compounds was determined using in vitro binding competition assay and transactivation analysis. Among the E2 derivatives synthesized, compound 2 showed the highest transactivation potency and was therefore tested for its ability to modulate cutaneous wound healing in vivo. Compound 2's ability to accelerate wound healing in ovariectomized mice and decrease the production of inflammatory molecules was comparable to that of E2. However, the activity of compound 2 was not superimposable to E2 with regard to the cells involved in the wound repairing process. When locally administered, compound 2 did not show any systemic activity on ER. This class of compounds with clear beneficial effects on wound healing and suitable for topical administration may lead to the generation of innovative drugs for an area of unmet clinical need.

  15. Sodium carboxymethylation-functionalized chitosan fibers for cutaneous wound healing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dong; Zhou, Zhong-Zheng; Jiang, Chang-Qing; Cheng, Xiao-Jie; Kong, Ming; Liu, Ya; Feng, Chao; Chen, Xi-Guang

    2016-09-01

    A water absorption biomaterial, sodium carboxymethylation-functionalized chitosan fibers (Na-NOCC fibers) were prepared, applied for cutaneous wound repair, and characterized by FTIR and NMR. The water absorption of Na-NOCC fibers increased significantly with substitution degree rising, from 3.2 to 6.8 g/g, and higher than that of chitosan fibers (2.2 g/g) confirmed by swelling behavior. In the antibacterial action, the high degree of substitution of Na-NOCC fibers exhibited stronger antibacterial activities against E. coli (from 66.54% up to 88.86%). The inhibition of Na-NOCC fibers against S. aureus were above 90%, and more effective than E. coli. The cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that Na-NOCC2 fibers were no obvious cytotoxicity to mouse fibroblasts. Wound healing test and histological examination showed that significantly advanced granulation tissue and capillary formation in the healing-impaired wounds treated with Na-NOCC fibers, as compared to those treated with gauze, which demonstrated that Na- NOCC fibers could promote skin repair and might have great application for wound healing.

  16. Development of a Novel, Highly Quantitative In Vivo Model for the Study of Biofilm-Impaired Cutaneous Wound Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    that in addition to hypoxia, ischemia- reperfusion injury, and intrinsic host factors, bacterial biofilms represent a fourth major pillar in chronic ...specifically contributes to profound cutaneous wound healing impairment. Our model highlights the importance of bacterial biofilms in chronic wound...The result is a chronic inflammatory cycle causing injury to host tissues over time.2 In recent years the wound bed of compromised skin has been

  17. Wound healing genes and susceptibility to cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil: Role of COL1A1

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Lucas; Oliveira, Joyce; Guimarães, Luiz Henrique; Carvalho, Edgar M; Blackwell, Jenefer M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for wound healing genes in resolution of cutaneous lesions caused by Leishmania spp. in both mice and humans, including the gene FLI1 encoding Friend leukaemia virus integration 1. Reduction of Fli1 expression in mice has been shown to result in up-regulation of collagen type I alpha 1 (Col1a1) and alpha 2 (Col1a2) genes and, conversely, in down-regulation of the matrix metalloproteinase 1 (Mmp1) gene, suggesting that Fli1 suppression is involved in activation of the profibrotic gene program. Here we examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes as risk factors for cutaneous (CL) and mucosal leishmaniasis (ML), and leishmaniasis per se, caused by L. braziliensis in humans. SNPs were genotyped in 168 nuclear families (250 CL; 87 ML cases) and replicated in 157 families (402 CL; 39 ML cases). Family-based association tests (FBAT) showed the strongest association between SNPs rs1061237 (combined P=0.002) and rs2586488 (combined P=0.027) at COL1A1 and CL disease. This contributes to our further understanding of the role of wound healing in the resolution of CL disease, providing potential for therapies modulating COL1A1 via drugs acting on FLI1. PMID:25562121

  18. Exosomes derived from human adipose mensenchymal stem cells accelerates cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Li; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Xin; Xiong, Zehuan; Zhao, Jiajia; Yu, Ran; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Handong; Chen, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged healing and scar formation are two major challenges in the treatment of soft tissue trauma. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) play an important role in tissue regeneration, and recent studies have suggested that exosomes secreted by stem cells may contribute to paracrine signaling. In this study, we investigated the roles of ASCs-derived exosomes (ASCs-Exos) in cutaneous wound healing. We found that ASCs-Exos could be taken up and internalized by fibroblasts to stimulate cell migration, proliferation and collagen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with increased genes expression of N-cadherin, cyclin-1, PCNA and collagen I, III. In vivo tracing experiments demonstrated that ASCs-Exos can be recruited to soft tissue wound area in a mouse skin incision model and significantly accelerated cutaneous wound healing. Histological analysis showed increased collagen I and III production by systemic administration of exosomes in the early stage of wound healing, while in the late stage, exosomes might inhibit collagen expression to reduce scar formation. Collectively, our findings indicate that ASCs-Exos can facilitate cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts. Our results provide a new perspective and therapeutic strategy for the use of ASCs-Exos in soft tissue repair. PMID:27615560

  19. Topically Applied Connective Tissue Growth Factor/CCN2 Improves Diabetic Preclinical Cutaneous Wound Healing: Potential Role for CTGF in Human Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing

    PubMed Central

    Henshaw, F. R.; Boughton, P.; Lo, L.; McLennan, S. V.; Twigg, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis. Topical application of CTGF/CCN2 to rodent diabetic and control wounds was examined. In parallel research, correlation of CTGF wound fluid levels with healing rate in human diabetic foot ulcers was undertaken. Methods. Full thickness cutaneous wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic control rats were treated topically with 1 μg rhCTGF or vehicle alone, on 2 consecutive days. Wound healing rate was observed on day 14 and wound sites were examined for breaking strength and granulation tissue. In the human study across 32 subjects, serial CTGF regulation was analyzed longitudinally in postdebridement diabetic wound fluid. Results. CTGF treated diabetic wounds had an accelerated closure rate compared with vehicle treated diabetic wounds. Healed skin withstood more strain before breaking in CTGF treated rat wounds. Granulation tissue from CTGF treatment in diabetic wounds showed collagen IV accumulation compared with nondiabetic animals. Wound α-smooth muscle actin was increased in CTGF treated diabetic wounds compared with untreated diabetic wounds, as was macrophage infiltration. Endogenous wound fluid CTGF protein rate of increase in human diabetic foot ulcers correlated positively with foot ulcer healing rate (r = 0.406; P < 0.001). Conclusions/Interpretation. These data collectively increasingly substantiate a functional role for CTGF in human diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:25789327

  20. Engineered Pullulan–Collagen Composite Dermal Hydrogels Improve Early Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Victor W.; Rustad, Kristine C.; Galvez, Michael G.; Neofytou, Evgenios; Glotzbach, Jason P.; Januszyk, Michael; Major, Melanie R.; Sorkin, Michael; Longaker, Michael T.; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2011-01-01

    New strategies for skin regeneration are needed to address the significant medical burden caused by cutaneous wounds and disease. In this study, pullulan–collagen composite hydrogel matrices were fabricated using a salt-induced phase inversion technique, resulting in a structured yet soft scaffold for skin engineering. Salt crystallization induced interconnected pore formation, and modification of collagen concentration permitted regulation of scaffold pore size. Hydrogel architecture recapitulated the reticular distribution of human dermal matrix while maintaining flexible properties essential for skin applications. In vitro, collagen hydrogel scaffolds retained their open porous architecture and viably sustained human fibroblasts and murine mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial cells. In vivo, hydrogel-treated murine excisional wounds demonstrated improved wound closure, which was associated with increased recruitment of stromal cells and formation of vascularized granulation tissue. In conclusion, salt-induced phase inversion techniques can be used to create modifiable pullulan–collagen composite dermal scaffolds that augment early wound healing. These novel biomatrices can potentially serve as a structured delivery template for cells and biomolecules in regenerative skin applications. PMID:20919949

  1. How wounds heal

    MedlinePlus

    ... care to prevent infection. Continue Reading Stages of Wound Healing Wounds heal in stages. The smaller the wound, ... How lacerations heal References Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound healing. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox ...

  2. Assessment of laser photobiomodulation and polarized light on the healing of cutaneous wounds on euthyroid and hypothyroid induced rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Weyll, Barbara Mayoral Pedroso; da Costa Lino, Maíra Dória M.; Ramalho, Maria Jose Pedreira; Barbosa Pinheiro, Antonio Luis

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) or polarized light (PL) in cutaneous wound healing of hypothyroid rats at dosages of 20 or 40J/cm2. Bioestimulatory effects of Laser radiation and Polarized light are recognized alternative therapies to improve healing on systemic disease patients, but their usefulness in the improvement of hypothyroidism healing impairment is uncertain till date. Forty Wistar rats were used in this study. Hypothyroidism was propylthiouracil- induced. Standard excisional cutaneous wounds were created without suturing and LLLT (λ660nm, 30mW, φ 3mm) or PL (λ 400-2000nm, 40mW, φ 10mm) was applied every 48 hours up to seven days on experimental groups. The rats were killed on the eighth day when wound contraction was assessed. The healing features were evaluated by light microscopy (H/E and Sirius Red). The cutaneous wounds of hypothyroid rats showed delayed healing process characterized by reduced thickness of epithelial layers, incipient formation of disorganized collagen fibers and wound contraction to a lesser extent (FISHER, p=0.0276), when compared to the euthyroid group. The use of both the Laser and Polarized Light on hypothyroid rats increased the amount of fibroblasts and the thickness of collagen fibers, especially on the L 20J/cm2 group. Euthyroid rats have still demonstrated more regular collagen fibers pattern than hypothyroid rats. It was therefore concluded that hypothyroidism delays wound healing and both Laser photobiomodulation and Polarized Light at 20j/cm2 dosages had improved the healing process in hypothyroid rats.

  3. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin accelerated the cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kant, Vinay; Gopal, Anu; Pathak, Nitya N; Kumar, Pawan; Tandan, Surendra K; Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-06-01

    Prolonged inflammation and increased oxidative stress impairs healing in diabetics and application of curcumin, a well known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, could be an important strategy in improving impaired healing in diabetics. So, the present study was conducted to evaluate the cutaneous wound healing potential of topically applied curcumin in diabetic rats. Open excision skin wound was created in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats and wounded rats were divided into three groups; i) control, ii) gel-treated and iii) curcumin-treated. Pluronic F-127 gel (25%) and curcumin (0.3%) in pluronic gel were topically applied in the gel- and curcumin-treated groups, respectively, once daily for 19 days. Curcumin application increased the wound contraction and decreased the expressions of inflammatory cytokines/enzymes i.e. tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Curcumin also increased the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine i.e. IL-10 and antioxidant enzymes i.e. superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Histopathologically, the curcumin-treated wounds showed better granulation tissue dominated by marked fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition, and wounds were covered by thick regenerated epithelial layer. These findings reveal that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential of curcumin caused faster and better wound healing in diabetic rats and curcumin could be an additional novel therapeutic agent in the management of impaired wound healing in diabetics.

  4. Embryonic stem cell-derived M2-like macrophages delay cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dreymueller, Daniela; Denecke, Bernd; Ludwig, Andreas; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2013-01-01

    In adults, repair of deeply injured skin wounds results in the formation of scar tissue, whereas in embryos wounds heal almost scar-free. Macrophages are important mediators of wound healing and secrete cytokines and tissue remodeling enzymes. In contrast to host defense mediated by inflammatory M1 macrophages, wound healing and tissue repair involve regulatory M2/M2-like macrophages. Embryonic/fetal macrophages are M2-like, and this may promote scar-free wound healing. In the present study, we asked whether atopical application of ex vivo generated, embryonic stem cell-derived macrophages (ESDM) improve wound healing in mice. ESDM were tested side by side with bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Compared to BMDM, ESDM resembled a less inflammatory and more M2-like macrophage subtype as indicated by their reduced responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide, reduced expression of Toll-like receptors, and reduced bacterial phagocytosis. Despite this anti-inflammatory phenotype in cell culture, ESDM prolonged the healing of deep skin wounds even more than BMDM. Healed wounds had more scar formation compared to wounds receiving BMDM or cell-free treatment. Our data indicate that atopical application of ex vivo generated macrophages is not a suitable cell therapy of dermal wounds.

  5. Nicotine effect on inflammatory and growth factor responses in murine cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Xanthoulea, Sofia; Deliaert, An; Romano, Andrea; Rensen, Sander S; Buurman, Wim A; van der Hulst, Rene' R W J

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of nicotine in an experimental mouse model of cutaneous injury and healing responses, during the inflammatory phase of repair. Nicotine injection in full-thickness excisional skin wounds minimally affected inflammatory mediators like TNF, IL-6 and IL-12 while it induced a down-regulation in the expression of growth factors like VEGF, PDGF, TGF-β1 and TGF-β2, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Analysis of wound closure rate indicated no significant differences between nicotine and saline injected controls. In-vitro studies using bone marrow derived macrophages, resident peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicated that nicotine down-regulates TNF production. Moreover, nicotine was shown to down-regulate VEGF, PDGF and TGF-β1 in both bone marrow derived macrophages and RAW 264.7 cells. Using an NF-κB luciferase reporter RAW 264.7 cell line, we show that nicotine effects are minimally dependent on NF-κB inhibition. Moreover, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit expression analyses indicated that while β2 nAChR subunit is expressed in mouse macrophages, α7 nAChR is not. In conclusion, while skin inflammatory parameters were not significantly affected by nicotine, a down-regulation of growth factor expression in both mouse skin and macrophages was observed. Reduced growth factor expression by nicotine might contribute, at least in part, to the overall detrimental effects of tobacco use in wound healing and skin diseases.

  6. Exogenous Tryptophan Promotes Cutaneous Wound Healing of Chronically Stressed Mice through Inhibition of TNF-α and IDO Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Luana Graziella; Bortolot, Beatriz Salari; Cecatto, Matheus Jorand; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Romana-Souza, Bruna

    2015-01-01

    Stress prolongs the inflammatory response compromising the dermal reconstruction and wound closure. Acute stress-induced inflammation increases indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase-stimulated tryptophan catabolism. To investigate the role of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression and tryptophan administration in adverse effects of stress on cutaneous wound healing, mice were submitted to chronic restraint stress and treated with tryptophan daily until euthanasia. Excisional lesions were created on each mouse and 5 or 7 days later, the lesions were analyzed. In addition, murine skin fibroblasts were exposed to elevated epinephrine levels plus tryptophan, and fibroblast activity was evaluated. Tryptophan administration reversed the reduction of the plasma tryptophan levels and the increase in the plasma normetanephrine levels induced by stress 5 and 7 days after wounding. Five days after wounding, stress-induced increase in the protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, and this was inhibited by tryptophan. Stress-induced increase in the lipid peroxidation and the amount of the neutrophils, macrophages and T cells number was reversed by tryptophan 5 days after wounding. Tryptophan administration inhibited the reduction of myofibroblast density, collagen deposition, re-epithelialization and wound contraction induced by stress 5 days after wounding. In dermal fibroblast culture, the tryptophan administration increased the cell migration and AKT phosphorylation in cells treated with high epinephrine levels. In conclusion, tryptophan-induced reduction of inflammatory response and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression may have accelerated cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice. PMID:26057238

  7. Exogenous Tryptophan Promotes Cutaneous Wound Healing of Chronically Stressed Mice through Inhibition of TNF-α and IDO Activation.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Luana Graziella; Bortolot, Beatriz Salari; Cecatto, Matheus Jorand; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Romana-Souza, Bruna

    2015-01-01

    Stress prolongs the inflammatory response compromising the dermal reconstruction and wound closure. Acute stress-induced inflammation increases indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase-stimulated tryptophan catabolism. To investigate the role of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression and tryptophan administration in adverse effects of stress on cutaneous wound healing, mice were submitted to chronic restraint stress and treated with tryptophan daily until euthanasia. Excisional lesions were created on each mouse and 5 or 7 days later, the lesions were analyzed. In addition, murine skin fibroblasts were exposed to elevated epinephrine levels plus tryptophan, and fibroblast activity was evaluated. Tryptophan administration reversed the reduction of the plasma tryptophan levels and the increase in the plasma normetanephrine levels induced by stress 5 and 7 days after wounding. Five days after wounding, stress-induced increase in the protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, and this was inhibited by tryptophan. Stress-induced increase in the lipid peroxidation and the amount of the neutrophils, macrophages and T cells number was reversed by tryptophan 5 days after wounding. Tryptophan administration inhibited the reduction of myofibroblast density, collagen deposition, re-epithelialization and wound contraction induced by stress 5 days after wounding. In dermal fibroblast culture, the tryptophan administration increased the cell migration and AKT phosphorylation in cells treated with high epinephrine levels. In conclusion, tryptophan-induced reduction of inflammatory response and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression may have accelerated cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice.

  8. Comparison of EGF with VEGF Non-Viral Gene Therapy for Cutaneous Wound Healing of Streptozotocin Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Junghae; Jun, Haejung; Chung, Hyesook; Yoon, Changshin; Kim, Taekyoon; Kwon, Minjeong; Lee, Soonhee; Jung, Soojin; Kim, Mikyung

    2011-01-01

    Background To accelerate the healing of diabetic wounds, various kinds of growth factors have been employed. It is the short half-life of administered growth factors in hostile wound beds that have limited wide-spread clinical usage. To overcome this limitation, growth factor gene therapy could be an attractive alternative rather than direct application of factors onto the wound beds. We administered two growth factor DNAs, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into a cutaneous wound on diabetic mice. We compared the different characteristics of the healing wounds. Methods Streptozotocin was injected intraperitoneally to induce diabetes into C57BL/6J mice. The ultrasound micro-bubble destruction method with SonoVue as a bubbling agent was used for non-viral gene delivery of EGF828 and VEGF165 DNAs. Each gene was modified for increasing efficacy as FRM-EGF828 or minicircle VEGF165. The degree of neoangiogenesis was assessed using qualitative laser Doppler flowmetry. We compared wound size and histological findings of the skin wounds in each group. Results In both groups, accelerated wound closure was observed in the mice receiving gene therapy compared with non treated diabetic control mice. Blood flow detected by laser doppler flowmetry was better in the VEGF group than in the EGF group. Wound healing rates and histological findings were more accelerated in the EGF gene therapy group than the VEGF group, but were not statistically significant. Conclusion Both non-viral EGF and VEGF gene therapy administrations could improve the speed and quality of skin wound healing. However, the detailed histological characteristics of the healing wounds were different. PMID:21785742

  9. miR-155 promotes cutaneous wound healing through enhanced keratinocytes migration by MMP-2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Longlong; Zheng, Zhao; Zhou, Qin; Bai, Xiaozhi; Fan, Lei; Yang, Chen; Su, Linlin; Hu, Dahai

    2017-04-01

    Inflammation, re-epithelization and tissue remodeling are three essential steps during wound healing. The re-epithelization process plays the most important role which mainly involves keratinocyte proliferation and migration. miR-155 has been reported to participate in cell migration and transformation, however, its function in skin wound healing is largely unknown. Here we hypothesize that overexpression of miR-155 at wound edges could accelerate wound healing mediated by enhanced keratinocyte migration. To test this hypothesis, direct local injection of miR-155 expression plasmid to wound edges was conducted to overexpress miR-155 in vivo. Results shown that miR-155 significantly promoted wound healing and re-epithelization compared to control, while did not affect wound contraction. Also, miR-155 overexpression accelerated primarily cultured keratinocyte migration in vitro, but had no effect on cell proliferation. Importantly, western blot analysis shown that MMP-2 was significantly upregulated whiles its inhibitor TIMP-1 downregulated after miR-155 treatment. Moreover, the use of ARP-101, an MMP-2 inhibitor, effectively attenuated the accelerative effects on cell migration induced by miR-155. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-155 has the promote effect on wound healing that is probably mediated by accelerating keratinocyte migration via upregulated MMP-2 level. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic effect of miR-155 on wound healing.

  10. A synthetic uric acid analog accelerates cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Mughal, Mohamed R; Chan, Sic L; Arumugam, Thiruma V; Baharani, Akanksha; Tang, Sung-Chun; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Holloway, Harold W; Wheeler, Ross; Poosala, Suresh; Greig, Nigel H; Mattson, Mark P

    2010-04-06

    Wound healing is a complex process involving intrinsic dermal and epidermal cells, and infiltrating macrophages and leukocytes. Excessive oxidative stress and associated inflammatory processes can impair wound healing, and antioxidants have been reported to improve wound healing in animal models and human subjects. Uric acid (UA) is an efficient free radical scavenger, but has a very low solubility and poor tissue penetrability. We recently developed novel UA analogs with increased solubility and excellent free radical-scavenging properties and demonstrated their ability to protect neural cells against oxidative damage. Here we show that the uric acid analog (6, 8 dithio-UA, but not equimolar concentrations of UA or 1, 7 dimethyl-UA) modified the behaviors of cultured vascular endothelial cells, keratinocytes and fibroblasts in ways consistent with enhancement of the wound healing functions of all three cell types. We further show that 6, 8 dithio-UA significantly accelerates the wound healing process when applied topically (once daily) to full-thickness wounds in mice. Levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase were increased in wound tissue from mice treated with 6, 8 dithio-UA compared to vehicle-treated mice, suggesting that the UA analog enhances endogenous cellular antioxidant defenses. These results support an adverse role for oxidative stress in wound healing and tissue repair, and provide a rationale for the development of UA analogs in the treatment of wounds and for modulation of angiogenesis in other pathological conditions.

  11. Application of a partial-thickness human ex vivo skin culture model in cutaneous wound healing study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Jong Hong, Seok; Jia, Shengxian; Zhao, Yanan; Galiano, Robert D; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2012-04-01

    A number of in vivo and ex vivo skin models have been applied to human wound healing studies. A reliable skin model, which recapitulates the features of human wound repair, is essential for the clinical and mechanical investigation of human cutaneous wound healing. Full-skin ex vivo culture systems have been used in wound healing studies. However, important structures of the skin, such as the differentiation of keratinocytes and epidermis-dermis junction, are poorly characterized in this model. This study aims to develop an optimized partial-thickness human ex vivo skin culture (HESC) model to maintain human skin characteristics in vitro. During our culture, the basal layer, suprabasal layer, and stratum granulosum layer of epidermis were preserved until day 8. Analyses of hemidesmosome proteins, bullous pemphigoid antigen 1 (BP180) and 2 (BP230), showed that the integrity of the basement membrane of the epidermis was well preserved in the HESC model. In contrast, an organotypic culture with human keratinocytes and fibroblasts failed to show an integrated basement membrane. Maintenance of skin structure by histological analysis and proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes by Ki67 staining were observed in our model for 12 days. Complete re-epithelialization of the wounding area was observed at day 6 post wounding when a superficial incisional wound was created. The expression of Ki-67 and keratin 6, indicators of activated keratinocytes in epidermis, was significantly upregulated and new collagen synthesis was found in the dermis during the wound healing process. As control, we also used organotypic culture in studying the differentiation of the keratinocyte layers and incisional wound repair. It turned out that our model has advantage in these study fields. The results suggest that our HESC model retains important elements of in vivo skin and has significant advantages for the wound healing studies in vitro.

  12. A Comparison of the Effects of Alpha and Medical-Grade Honey Ointments on Cutaneous Wound Healing in Rats.

    PubMed

    Paydar, Shahram; Akrami, Majid; Dehghanian, Amirreza; Alavi Moghadam, Roshanak; Heidarpour, Mohsen; Bahari Khoob, Amir; Dalfardi, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study compared the healing efficacy and possible adverse effects of topical Alpha and medical-grade honey ointments on cutaneous wounds in rats. Methods. To conduct the study, 22 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into two equal groups: (1) rats with Alpha ointment applied to the wound surface area and (2) rats with medical-grade honey ointment applied to their wounds. The ointments were applied daily during the 21-day study period. Wound contraction was examined photographically with images taken on days 0, 7, and 21 after wounding. The healing process was histopathologically assessed using skin biopsies taken from the wound sites on days 7 and 21. Results. No statistically significant difference in mean wound surface area was observed between the two study groups. According to histopathological assessment, a significant reduction in the amount of collagen deposition (P value: 0.007) and neovascularisation (P value: 0.002) was seen in the Alpha-treated rats on day 21. No tissue necrosis occurred following the application of Alpha ointment. Conclusion. Daily topical usage of Alpha ointment on a skin wound can negatively affect the healing process by inhibiting neovascularization. Topical Alpha ointment can reduce the possibility of excessive scar formation by reducing collagen deposition.

  13. A Comparison of the Effects of Alpha and Medical-Grade Honey Ointments on Cutaneous Wound Healing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Paydar, Shahram; Akrami, Majid; Dehghanian, Amirreza; Alavi Moghadam, Roshanak; Heidarpour, Mohsen; Bahari Khoob, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study compared the healing efficacy and possible adverse effects of topical Alpha and medical-grade honey ointments on cutaneous wounds in rats. Methods. To conduct the study, 22 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into two equal groups: (1) rats with Alpha ointment applied to the wound surface area and (2) rats with medical-grade honey ointment applied to their wounds. The ointments were applied daily during the 21-day study period. Wound contraction was examined photographically with images taken on days 0, 7, and 21 after wounding. The healing process was histopathologically assessed using skin biopsies taken from the wound sites on days 7 and 21. Results. No statistically significant difference in mean wound surface area was observed between the two study groups. According to histopathological assessment, a significant reduction in the amount of collagen deposition (P value: 0.007) and neovascularisation (P value: 0.002) was seen in the Alpha-treated rats on day 21. No tissue necrosis occurred following the application of Alpha ointment. Conclusion. Daily topical usage of Alpha ointment on a skin wound can negatively affect the healing process by inhibiting neovascularization. Topical Alpha ointment can reduce the possibility of excessive scar formation by reducing collagen deposition. PMID:27885353

  14. Regulation of extracellular matrix proteins and integrin cell substratum adhesion receptors on epithelium during cutaneous human wound healing in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Juhasz, I.; Murphy, G. F.; Yan, H. C.; Herlyn, M.; Albelda, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    Although changes in extracellular matrix proteins during wound healing have been well documented, little is known about the regulation of corresponding extracellular matrix adhesion receptors (integrins). To study this process in a human in vivo model, full thickness human skin grafts were transplanted onto severe combined immunodeficient mice and deep excisional wounds involving both the epidermal and dermal layers were then made. The changes in the expression of cell matrix proteins and epithelial integrins over time were analyzed with specific antibodies using immunohistochemistry. Wounding was associated with alterations in extracellular matrix proteins, namely, loss of laminin and type IV collagen in the region of the wound and expression of tenascin and fibronectin. Changes were also noted in the integrins on the migrating keratinocytes. There was marked up-regulation of the alpha v subunit and de novo expression of the fibronectin receptor (alpha 5 beta 1) during the stage of active migration (days 1 to 3 after wounding). In the later stages of wound healing, after epithelial integrity had been established, redistribution of the alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 6, and beta 4 collagen/laminin-binding integrin subunits to suprabasal epidermal layers was noted. Thus, during cutaneous wound healing, keratinocytes up-regulate fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding integrins and redistribute collagen/laminin-binding integrins. This study demonstrates that the human skin/severe combined immunodeficient chimera provides a useful model to study events during human wound repair. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7694470

  15. Wound healing: a new approach to the topical wound care.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ferdi; Ermertcan, Aylin Türel

    2011-06-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex and well-coordinated interaction between inflammatory cells and mediators, establishing significant overlap between the phases of wound healing. Wound healing is divided into three major phases: inflammatory phase, proliferative phase, and remodeling phase. Unlike the acute wound, the nonhealing wound is arrested in one of the phases of healing, typically the inflammatory phase. A systematic approach to the management of the chronic nonhealing wound emphasizes three important elements of wound bed preparation in chronic wounds: debridement, moisture, and countering bacterial colonization and infection. In this article, wound-healing process and new approaches to the topical wound care have been reviewed.

  16. Evaluation of the effects of a combination of Japanese honey and hydrocolloid dressing on cutaneous wound healing in male mice.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kanae; Koike, Miki; Nakamura, Saki; Kawaguchi, Yuka; Katagiri, Fumika; Nojiri, Saki; Yamada, Yuki; Miyajima, Eri; Matsumoto, Mayuko; Komatsu, Emi; Nakajima, Yukari; Urai, Tamae; Murakado, Naoko; Nakatani, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the combined use of Japanese honey and hydrocolloid dressing (HCD) on cutaneous wound healing. Mice were divided into four groups: the Acacia (Japan) + HCD, Manuka (New Zealand) + HCD, Chinese milk vetch (Japan) + HCD, and HCD (control) groups. The mice received two full-thickness wounds. The wounds of the HCD group were covered with HCD, whereas those of the other groups were treated with 0.1 mL of the relevant type of honey, before being covered with HCD. Wound area was significantly smaller in the HCD group than in the Acacia + HCD and Manuka + HCD groups on day 13 and days 8-14, respectively. Moreover, compared with the HCD group, reepithelialization was delayed in the Acacia + HCD group and reepithelialization and collagen deposition were delayed in the Chinese milk vetch + HCD and Manuka + HCD groups. These results indicate that the combined use of Japanese honey and HCD does not promote cutaneous wound healing compared with the use of HCD alone. Thus, this method is probably not useful for promoting healing.

  17. CXC chemokines and their receptors: a case for a significant biological role in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Richmond, Ann

    2008-11-01

    Wound healing requires a complex series of reactions and interactions among cells and their mediators, resulting in an overlapping series of events including coagulation, inflammation, epithelialization, formation of granulation tissue, matrix and scar formation. Cytokines and chemokines promote inflammation, angiogenesis, facilitate the passage of leukocytes from circulation into the tissue, and contribute to the regulation of epithelialization. They integrate inflammatory events and reparative processes that are important for modulating wound healing. Thus both cytokines and chemokines are important targets for therapeutic intervention. The chemokine-mediated regulation of angiogenesis is highly sophisticated, fine tuned, and involves pro-angiogenic chemokines, including CXCL1-3, 5-8 and their receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2. CXCL1 and CXCR2 are expressed in normal human epidermis and are further induced during the wound healing process of human burn wounds, especially during the inflammatory, epithelialization and angiogenic processes. Human skin explant studies also show CXCR2 is expressed in wounded keratinocytes and Th/1/Th2 cytokine modulation of CXCR2 expression correlates with proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. Murine excision wound healing, chemical burn wounds and skin organ culture systems are valuable models for examining the role of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in wound healing.

  18. Oral L-glutamine administration attenuated cutaneous wound healing in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Saurabh; Kandhare, Amit; Zanwar, Anand A; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar V; Bodhankar, Subhash L; Shinde, Sudhir; Deshmukh, Shahaji; Kharat, Ravindran

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the wound healing potential of L-glutamine in laboratory rats using excision and incision wound models. Excision wounds of size 500 mm(2) and depth 2 mm were made on the dorsal portion of male Wistar rats (230-250 g) and were used for the study of oral L-glutamine (1 g/kg) treatment on the rate of contraction of wound and epithelisation. Histological evaluation of wound tissue was also performed. Six-centimetre-long two linear-paravertebral incisions in male Wistar rats (230-250 g) were used to study the effect of L-glutamine (1 g/kg, p.o.) treatment on tensile strength, total protein and hydroxyproline content in the incision model. Oral administration of L-glutamine (1 g/kg) significantly decreased wound area, epithelisation period and wound index, whereas the rate of wound contraction significantly increased (P < 0·001) when compared with vehicle control rats in the excision wound model. Tensile strength, hydroxyproline content and protein level were significantly increased (P < 0·001) in L-glutamine (1 g/kg, p.o.)-treated rats when compared with vehicle control rats in the incision wound model. Histological evaluation of wound tissue from L-glutamine (1 g/kg, p.o.)-treated rats showed complete epithelialisation with new blood vessel formation and high fibrous tissues in the excision wound model. In conclusion, oral administration of l-glutamine (1 g/kg) promotes wound healing by acting on various stages of wound healing such as collagen synthesis, wound contraction and epithelialisation.

  19. Synergistic Effect of Honey and Propolis on Cutaneous Wound Healing in Rats.

    PubMed

    Takzaree, Nasrin; Hadjiakhondi, Abbas; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Rouini, Mohammad Reza; Manayi, Azadeh

    2016-04-01

    Accelerating wound healing is now considered as a principle clinical treatment and increasing the quality and speed of healing which has always been emphasized by the scientists. Propolis and honey are natural bee products with wide range of biological and medicinal properties. This study was aimed to determine the synergistic effect of honey and propolis in wound healing of rat skin. A total of 75 Wistar rats weighing 200-250 gr were placed under general anesthesia and sterile conditions. Then a square shape wound with 1.5*1.5 mm dimension was made on the back of the neck. Animals were randomly divided into control, honey, propolis, combined honey propolis and phenytoin 1% groups, respectively. Rats were randomly divided into the following groups: 4th, 7th and, 14th days of treatment in each period of study. Wound area in the experimental group was covered once daily with a fixed amount of thyme honey, propolis, propolis and honey and phenytoin cream (1%), the control group did not receive any treatment. For histological studies, during the fourth, seventh and fourteenth day's rats were sacrificed and samples were taken from the wound and adjacent skin. After histological staining fibroblast, neutrophils, macrophages and vascular sections were counted in the wound bed. The macroscopic and microscopic evaluations showed that the percentage of wound healing on different days in the experimental and control groups were significant (P<0.05). The macroscopic and microscopic evaluation showed that the percentage of wound healing on different days in combined propolis and honey experimental group was significantly different from the control group (Multivariate ANOVA test) (P<0.05). Combined application of propolis and honey on the open wound healing in rats has a synergistic effect.

  20. Fibronectin and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Grinnell, F

    1984-01-01

    I have tried to briefly review the evidence (summarized in Table II) indicating that fibronectin is important in cutaneous wound healing. Fibronectin appears to be an important factor throughout this process. It promotes the spreading of platelets at the site of injury, the adhesion and migration of neutrophils, monocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells into the wound region, and the migration of epidermal cells through the granulation tissue. At the level of matrix synthesis, fibronectin appears to be involved both in the organization of the granulation tissue and basement membrane. In terms of tissue remodeling, fibronectin functions as a nonimmune opsonin for phagocytosis of debris by fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and under some circumstances, macrophages. Fibronectin also enhances the phagocytosis of immune-opsonized particles by monocytes, but whether this includes phagocytosis of bacteria remains to be determined. In general, phagocytosis of bacteria has not appeared to involve fibronectin. On the contrary, the presence of fibronectin in the wound bed may promote bacterial attachment and infection. Because of the ease of experimental manipulations, wound healing experiments have been carried out on skin more frequently than other tissues. As a result, the possible role of fibronectin has not been investigated thoroughly in the repair of internal organs and tissues. Nevertheless, it seems reasonable to speculate that fibronectin plays a central role in all wound healing situations. Finally, the wound healing problems of patients with severe factor XIII deficiencies may occur because of their inability to incorporate fibronectin into blood clots.

  1. Short term supplementation of dietary antioxidants selectively regulates the inflammatory responses during early cutaneous wound healing in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot ulcers are serious complications for diabetic patients, yet the precise mechanism that underlines the treatment of these diabetic complications remains unclear. We hypothesized that dietary antioxidant supplementation with vitamin C, combined either with vitamin E or with vitamin E and NAC, improves delayed wound healing through modulation of blood glucose levels, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response. Methods Diabetes was induced by administration of alloxan monohydrate. Mice were divided into 4 groups; CON (non-diabetic control mice fed AIN 93 G purified rodent diet), DM (diabetic mice fed AIN 93 G purified rodent diet), VCE (diabetic mice fed 0.5% vitamin C and 0.5% vitamin E supplemented diet), and Comb (diabetic mice fed 0.5% vitamin C, 0.5% vitamin E, and 2.5% NAC supplemented diet). After 10 days of dietary antioxidant supplementation, cutaneous full-thickness excisional wounds were performed, and the rate of wound closure was examined. TBARS as lipid peroxidation products and vitamin E levels were measured in the liver. Expression levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory response related proteins were measured in the cutaneous wound site. Results Dietary antioxidant supplementation improved blood glucose levels and wound closure rate and increased liver vitamin E, but not liver TBARS levels in the diabetic mice as compared to those of the CON. In addition, dietary antioxidant supplementation modulated the expression levels of pIκBα, HO-1, CuZnSOD, iNOS and COX-2 proteins in the diabetic mice. Conclusions These findings demonstrated that delayed wound healing is associated with an inflammatory response induced by hyperglycaemia, and suggests that dietary antioxidant supplementation may have beneficial effects on wound healing through selective modulation of blood glucose levels, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response. PMID:22088091

  2. Effectiveness of indonesian honey on the acceleration of cutaneous wound healing: an experimental study in mice.

    PubMed

    Haryanto, Haryanto; Urai, Tamae; Mukai, Kanae; Gontijo Filho, Paulo P; Suriadi, Suriadi; Sugama, Junko; Nakatani, Toshio

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of Indonesian honey in wound healing compared to Tegaderm hydrocolloid dressing and Manuka honey. Three groups of male mice were treated to produce 2 circular, full-thickness skin wounds on the dorsum. They were then randomly allocated to receive daily Indonesian honey, Manuka honey, or hydrocolloid (control). Macroscopic findings were observed from day 0 to 14 after wounding. Microscopic findings on days 3, 7, 11, and 14 after wounding were obtained. The ratios of wound areas for honey groups on day 3 were smaller than those of the control group. Wound areas of honey groups gradually decreased to almost the same wound area as the control group on day 14, while the control group wound area peaked on day 5 and rapidly decreased until day 14. On day 3, myofibroblasts and new blood capillaries in wound tissue of honey groups were observed, but were not seen in the control group. After day 7, microscopic findings were almost the same among the 3 groups. These results indicate that Indonesian honey is almost as effective for wound healing as Manuka honey and hydrocolloid dressing. .

  3. Assessment of the effects of laser or LED photobiomodulation on hypothyroid rats of cutaneous wound healing: A morphometric study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Castro, Isabele Cardoso Vieira; Paraguassú, Gardênia Matos; dod Reis Júnior, João Alves; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino; Rodriguez, Tânia Tavares; Ramalho, Maria José Pedreira; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira

    2012-09-01

    Hypothyroid has been associated to a disruption of the body's metabolism, including the healing process. Laser and LED have been shown to be effective on improving healing in many situations, but their benefit in the improvement of healing on hypothyroidism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess, morphometrically, the influence of Laser (λ660nm, 24 J/cm2, 40mW, CW, spot output= 4mm2;) and LED (λ630nm ± 20, 24 J/cm2, 150mW, CW, spot output= 0.5 cm2) on the wound healing of rats with Hypothyroid. Under general anesthesia, a standard surgical wound (1cm2) was created on the dorsum of 72 male Wistar rats divided into 6 groups of 12 animals each: G1: Euthyroid; G2: Euthyroid + Laser; G3: Euthyroid + LED; G4: Hypothyroid; G5: Hypothyroid + Laser and G6: Hypothyroid + LED. Hypothyroidism was induced in rats with propylthiouracil (0.05g/100mL) administered orally for 4 weeks and maintained until the end of the experiment. Rats were irradiated after surgery each 48h then killed after 7 and 14 days. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. Hypothyroid rats with phototherapy laser or LED showed significant less wound contraction than euthyroid's rats at the 7th day (p<0.05). At the 14th day, the longitudinal measurement was significantly higher in euthyroids (control and irradiated with laser) when compared to the hypothyroid group (p <0.05). This study has shown that hypothyroidism delays wound healing and Laser and LED photobiomodulation using 24 J/cm2 per session improved cutaneous wound healing in hypothyroid rats.

  4. Noninvasive red and near-infrared wavelength-induced photobiomodulation: promoting impaired cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anju; Gupta, Asheesh

    2017-01-01

    The innumerable intricacies associated with chronic wounds have made the development of new painless, noninvasive, biophysical therapeutic interventions as the focus of current biomedical research. Red and near-infrared light-induced photobiomodulation therapy appears to emerge as a promising drug-free approach for promoting wound healing, reduction in inflammation, pain and restoration of function owing to penetration power in conjunction with their ability to positively modulate the biochemical and molecular responses. This review will describe the physical properties of red and near-infrared light and their interaction with skin and highlight their efficacy of wound repair and regeneration. Near-infrared (800-830 nm) was found to be the most effective and widely studied wavelength range followed by red (630-680 nm) and 904 nm superpulsed light exhibiting beneficial photobiomodulatory effects on impaired dermal wound healing.

  5. Deletion of the α2A/α2C-adrenoceptors accelerates cutaneous wound healing in mice

    PubMed Central

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Nascimento, Adriana P; Brum, Patricia C; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2014-01-01

    The α2-adrenoceptors regulate the sympathetic nervous system, controlling presynaptic catecholamine release. However, the role of the α2-adrenoceptors in cutaneous wound healing is poorly understood. Mice lacking both the α2A/α2C-adrenoceptors were used to evaluate the participation of the α2-adrenoceptor during cutaneous wound healing. A full-thickness excisional lesion was performed on the dorsal skin of the α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor knockout and wild-type mice. Seven or fourteen days later, the animals were euthanized and the lesions were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded or frozen. Murine skin fibroblasts were also isolated from α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor knockout and wild-type mice, and fibroblast activity was evaluated. The in vivo study demonstrated that α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor depletion accelerated wound contraction and re-epithelialization. A reduction in the number of neutrophils and macrophages was observed in the α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. In addition, α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor depletion enhanced the levels of nitrite and hydroxyproline, and the protein expression of transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor. Furthermore, α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor depletion accelerated blood vessel formation and myofibroblast differentiation. The in vitro study demonstrated that skin fibroblasts isolated from α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor knockout mice exhibited enhanced cell migration, α-smooth muscle actin _protein expression and collagen deposition compared with wild-type skin fibroblasts. In conclusion, α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor deletion accelerates cutaneous wound healing in mice. PMID:25186490

  6. Deletion of the α2A/α2C-adrenoceptors accelerates cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Nascimento, Adriana P; Brum, Patricia C; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2014-10-01

    The α2-adrenoceptors regulate the sympathetic nervous system, controlling presynaptic catecholamine release. However, the role of the α2-adrenoceptors in cutaneous wound healing is poorly understood. Mice lacking both the α2A/α2C-adrenoceptors were used to evaluate the participation of the α2-adrenoceptor during cutaneous wound healing. A full-thickness excisional lesion was performed on the dorsal skin of the α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor knockout and wild-type mice. Seven or fourteen days later, the animals were euthanized and the lesions were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded or frozen. Murine skin fibroblasts were also isolated from α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor knockout and wild-type mice, and fibroblast activity was evaluated. The in vivo study demonstrated that α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor depletion accelerated wound contraction and re-epithelialization. A reduction in the number of neutrophils and macrophages was observed in the α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. In addition, α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor depletion enhanced the levels of nitrite and hydroxyproline, and the protein expression of transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor. Furthermore, α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor depletion accelerated blood vessel formation and myofibroblast differentiation. The in vitro study demonstrated that skin fibroblasts isolated from α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor knockout mice exhibited enhanced cell migration, α-smooth muscle actin _protein expression and collagen deposition compared with wild-type skin fibroblasts. In conclusion, α2A/α2C-adrenoceptor deletion accelerates cutaneous wound healing in mice.

  7. The matricellular protein CCN1 mediates neutrophil efferocytosis in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Jun, Joon-Il; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Lau, Lester F

    2015-06-16

    Neutrophil infiltration constitutes the first step in wound healing, although their timely clearance by macrophage engulfment, or efferocytosis, is critical for efficient tissue repair. However, the specific mechanism for neutrophil clearance in wound healing remains undefined. Here we uncover a key role for CCN1 in neutrophil efferocytosis by acting as a bridging molecule that binds phosphatidylserine, the 'eat-me' signal on apoptotic cells and integrins αvβ3/αvβ5 in macrophages to trigger efferocytosis. Both knockin mice expressing a mutant CCN1 that is unable to bind αvβ3/αvβ5 and mice with Ccn1 knockdown are defective in neutrophil efferocytosis, resulting in exuberant neutrophil accumulation and delayed healing. Treatment of wounds with CCN1 accelerates neutrophil clearance in both Ccn1 knockin mice and diabetic Lepr(db/db) mice, which suffer from neutrophil persistence and impaired healing. These findings establish CCN1 as a critical opsonin in skin injury and suggest a therapeutic potential for CCN1 in certain types of non-healing wounds.

  8. The Matricellular Protein CCN1 Mediates Neutrophil Efferocytosis in Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Joon-Il; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Lau, Lester F.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil infiltration constitutes the first step in wound healing, although their timely clearance by macrophage engulfment, or efferocytosis, is critical for efficient tissue repair. However, the specific mechanism for neutrophil clearance in wound healing remains undefined. Here we uncover a key role for CCN1 in neutrophil efferocytosis by acting as a bridging molecule that binds phosphatidylserine, the “eat-me” signal on apoptotic cells, and integrins αvβ3/αvβ5 in macrophages to trigger efferocytosis. Both knockin mice expressing a mutant CCN1 that is unable to bind αvβ3/αvβ5 and mice with Ccn1 knockdown are defective in neutrophil efferocytosis, resulting in exuberant neutrophil accumulation and delayed healing. Treatment of wounds with CCN1 accelerates neutrophil clearance in both Ccn1 knockin mice and diabetic Leprdb/db mice, which suffer from neutrophil persistence and impaired healing. These findings establish CCN1 as a critical opsonin in skin injury and suggest a therapeutic potential for CCN1 in certain types of non-healing wounds. PMID:26077348

  9. Knockout of Endothelial Cell-Derived Endothelin-1 Attenuates Skin Fibrosis but Accelerates Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Katsunari; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Aoi, Jun; Kajihara, Ikko; Makino, Takamitsu; Fukushima, Satoshi; Sakai, Keisuke; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Emoto, Noriaki; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1 is known for the most potent vasoconstrictive peptide that is released mainly from endothelial cells. Several studies have reported ET-1 signaling is involved in the process of wound healing or fibrosis as well as vasodilation. However, little is known about the role of ET-1 in these processes. To clarify its mechanism, we compared skin fibrogenesis and wound repair between vascular endothelial cell-specific ET-1 knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Bleomycin-injected fibrotic skin of the knockout mice showed significantly decreased skin thickness and collagen content compared to that of wild-type mice, indicating that bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis is attenuated in the knockout mice. The mRNA levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β were decreased in the bleomycin-treated skin of ET-1 knockout mice. On the other hand, skin wound healing was accelerated in ET-1 knockout mice, which was indicated by earlier granulation tissue reduction and re-epithelialization in these mice. The mRNA levels of TGF-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were reduced in the wound of ET-1 knockout mice. In endothelial ET-1 knockout mouse, the expression of TNF-α, CTGF and TGF-β was down-regulated. Bosentan, an antagonist of dual ET receptors, is known to attenuate skin fibrosis and accelerate wound healing in systemic sclerosis, and such contradictory effect may be mediated by above molecules. The endothelial cell-derived ET-1 is the potent therapeutic target in fibrosis or wound healing, and investigations of the overall regulatory mechanisms of these pathological conditions by ET-1 may lead to a new therapeutic approach. PMID:24853267

  10. Multifunctional skin-like electronics for quantitative, clinical monitoring of cutaneous wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Falgout, Leo; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sung -Young; Poon, Emily; Lee, Jung Woo; Na, Ilyoun; Geisler, Amelia; Sadhwani, Divya; Zhang, Yihui; Su, Yewang; Wang, Xiaoqi; Liu, Zhuangjian; Xia, Jing; Cheng, Huanyu; Webb, R. Chad; Bonifas, Andrew P.; Won, Philip; Jeong, Jae -Woong; Jang, Kyung -In; Song, Young Min; Nardone, Beatrice; Nodzenski, Michael; Fan, Jonathan A.; Huang, Yonggang; West, Dennis P.; Paller, Amy S.; Alam, Murad; Yeo, Woon -Hong; Rogers, John A.

    2014-03-26

    Non-invasive, biomedical devices have the potential to provide important, quantitative data for the assessment of skin diseases and wound healing. Traditional methods either rely on qualitative visual and tactile judgments of a professional and/or data obtained using instrumentation with forms that do not readily allow intimate integration with sensitive skin near a wound site. In this paper, an electronic sensor platform that can softly and reversibly laminate perilesionally at wounds to provide highly accurate, quantitative data of relevance to the management of surgical wound healing is reported. Clinical studies on patients using thermal sensors and actuators in fractal layouts provide precise time-dependent mapping of temperature and thermal conductivity of the skin near the wounds. Analytical and simulation results establish the fundamentals of the sensing modalities, the mechanics of the system, and strategies for optimized design. The use of this type of “epidermal” electronics system in a realistic clinical setting with human subjects establishes a set of practical procedures in disinfection, reuse, and protocols for quantitative measurement. Finally, the results have the potential to address important unmet needs in chronic wound management.

  11. Multifunctional Skin-like Electronics for Quantitative, Clinical Monitoring of Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Falgout, Leo; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sung-Young; Poon, Emily; Lee, Jung Woo; Na, Ilyoun; Geisler, Amelia; Sadhwani, Divya; Zhang, Yihui; Su, Yewang; Wang, Xiaoqi; Liu, Zhuangjian; Xia, Jing; Cheng, Huanyu; Webb, R. Chad; Bonifas, Andrew P.; Won, Philip; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Jang, Kyung-In; Song, Young Min; Nardone, Beatrice; Nodzenski, Michael; Fan, Jonathan A.; Huang, Yonggang; West, Dennis P.; Paller, Amy S.; Alam, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive, biomedical devices have the potential to provide important, quantitative data for the assessment of skin diseases and wound healing. Traditional methods either rely on qualitative visual and tactile judgments of a professional and/or data obtained using instrumentation with forms that do not readily allow intimate integration with sensitive skin near a wound site. Here we report a skin-like electronics platform that can softly and reversibly laminate perilesionally at wounds to provide highly accurate, quantitative data of relevance to the management of surgical wound healing. Clinical studies on patients using thermal sensors and actuators in fractal layouts provide precise time-dependent mapping of temperature and thermal conductivity of the skin near the wounds. Analytical and simulation results establish the fundamentals of the sensing modalities, the mechanics of the system, and strategies for optimized design. The use of this type of ‘epidermal’ electronics system in a realistic, clinical setting with human subjects establishes a set of practical procedures in disinfection, reuse, and protocols for quantitative measurement. The results have the potential to address important unmet needs in chronic wound management. PMID:24668927

  12. Multifunctional skin-like electronics for quantitative, clinical monitoring of cutaneous wound healing

    DOE PAGES

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Falgout, Leo; Lee, Woosik; ...

    2014-03-26

    Non-invasive, biomedical devices have the potential to provide important, quantitative data for the assessment of skin diseases and wound healing. Traditional methods either rely on qualitative visual and tactile judgments of a professional and/or data obtained using instrumentation with forms that do not readily allow intimate integration with sensitive skin near a wound site. In this paper, an electronic sensor platform that can softly and reversibly laminate perilesionally at wounds to provide highly accurate, quantitative data of relevance to the management of surgical wound healing is reported. Clinical studies on patients using thermal sensors and actuators in fractal layouts providemore » precise time-dependent mapping of temperature and thermal conductivity of the skin near the wounds. Analytical and simulation results establish the fundamentals of the sensing modalities, the mechanics of the system, and strategies for optimized design. The use of this type of “epidermal” electronics system in a realistic clinical setting with human subjects establishes a set of practical procedures in disinfection, reuse, and protocols for quantitative measurement. Finally, the results have the potential to address important unmet needs in chronic wound management.« less

  13. Systemic Wound Healing Associated with local sub-Cutaneous Mechanical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Nardini, Christine; Devescovi, Valentina; Liu, Yuanhua; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Lu, Youtao; Dent, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    Degeneration is a hallmark of autoimmune diseases, whose incidence grows worldwide. Current therapies attempt to control the immune response to limit degeneration, commonly promoting immunodepression. Differently, mechanical stimulation is known to trigger healing (regeneration) and it has recently been proposed locally for its therapeutic potential on severely injured areas. As the early stages of healing consist of altered intra- and inter-cellular fluxes of soluble molecules, we explored the potential of this early signal to spread, over time, beyond the stimulation district and become systemic, to impact on distributed or otherwise unreachable injured areas. We report in a model of arthritis in rats how stimulations delivered in the subcutaneous dorsal tissue result, over time, in the control and healing of the degeneration of the paws’ joints, concomitantly with the systemic activation of wound healing phenomena in blood and in correlation with a more eubiotic microbiome in the gut intestinal district. PMID:28008941

  14. Brazilian red propolis improves cutaneous wound healing suppressing inflammation-associated transcription factor NFκB.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Flavia Regina Sobreira; Schanuel, Fernanda Seabra; Moura-Nunes, Nathalia; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Daleprane, Julio Beltrame

    2017-02-01

    The use of natural products in wound healing has been extensively studied in the context of complementary and alternative medicine. Propolis, a natural product, is a polyphenol-rich resin used for this purpose. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Brazilian Red Propolis Extract (BRPE) on inflammation and wound healing in mice, using a tissue repair model. The BRPE polyphenol content was analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS). A full-thickness excision lesion was created, and mice were treated orally with daily doses of vehicle solution (water-alcohol solution containing 2% of ethanol, control group) or 100mg/kg of BRPE (P100 group) during nine consecutive days. BRPE chemical composition analysis showed that this complex matrix contains several phenolic compounds such as phenolic acids, phenolic terpenes and flavonoids (especially catechins, flavonols, chalcones, isoflavones, isoflavans, pterocarpans and bioflavonoids). After BRPE administration, it was observed that, when compared to the control group, P100 group presented faster wound closure (p<0.001); less neutrophils per mm(2) (p<0.05) and macrophages (p<0.01) in tissue analyses, down regulation of the inflammatory transcription factor pNF-κB protein expression, and reduced production of inflammatory cytokine, such as TGF-β, TNF-α (p<0.0001), and IL-6 (p<0.001). These findings suggest a positive role of BRPE oral administration in the wound healing process via suppressing the inflammatory response during tissue repair.

  15. Expression of VEGFR-3 and 5'-nase in regenerating lymphatic vessels of the cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ji, Rui-Cheng; Miura, Masahiro; Qu, Peng; Kato, Seiji

    2004-06-15

    The vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C), a specific lymphangiogenic growth factor, raises new questions and perspectives in studying lymphatic development and regeneration. Wound healing skins in mice were processed for 5'-nucleotidase (5'-Nase) and VEGFR-3 (the receptor of VEGF-C) histochemical staining to distinguish lymphatics from blood capillaries and to analyze lymphangiogenesis. In the wounds of 3-5 days after injury, anti-VEGFR-3 immunopositive signals unevenly appeared in 5'-Nase-positive lymphatic vessels in the subcutaneous tissue. A few small circular and irregular lymphatic-like structures with VEGFR-3 expression scattered in the dermal and subcutaneous tissues. Between days 7 and 15 of the wounds, numerous accumulated vasculatures were stained for 5'-Nase and PECAM-1, extending irregularly along the wound edge. Von Willebrand factor was expressed in the endothelial cells of blood vessels and lymphatics in the subcutaneous tissue. Ultrastructural changes of lymphatic vessels developed at different stages, from lymphatic-like structures to newly formed lymphatic vessels with an extremely thin and indented wall. Endothelial cells of the lymphatic vessel were eventually featured by typical intercellular junctions, which deposited with reaction products of VEGFR-3 and 5'-Nase-cerium but lacked VEGF-C expression. The present findings indicate that VEGF-C-induced lymphangiogenesis occurs from the subcutaneous to the dermis along the wound healing edge, especially in the dermal-subcutaneous transitional area, favorable to growth of regenerating lymphatic vessels.

  16. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) accelerates cutaneous wound healing and inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Gürgen, Seren Gülşen; Sayın, Oya; Cetin, Ferihan; Tuç Yücel, Ayşe

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and other common treatment methods used in the process of wound healing in terms of the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In the study, 24 female and 24 male adult Wistar-Albino rats were divided into five groups: (1) the non-wounded group having no incision wounds, (2) the control group having incision wounds, (3) the TENS (2 Hz, 15 min) group, (4) the physiological saline (PS) group and (5) the povidone iodine (PI) group. In the skin sections, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assessed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemical methods. In the non-wounded group, the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α signaling molecules was weaker in the whole tissue; however, in the control group, significant inflammatory response occurred, and strong cytokine expression was observed in the dermis, granulation tissue, hair follicles, and sebaceous glands (P < 0.05). In the TENS group, the decrease in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 immunoreaction in the skin was significant compared to the other forms of treatment (P < 0.05). Distinctive decreases of pro-inflammatory cytokines observed in the dermis in the TENS group suggest that TENS shortened the healing process by inhibating the inflammation phase.

  17. Effects of flavonoids from Martynia annua and Tephrosia purpurea on cutaneous wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Lodhi, Santram; Jain, Avijeet; Jain, Alok Pal; Pawar, Rajesh Singh; Singhai, Abhay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Martynia annua L. (M. annua), (Martyniaccae) has been traditionally used in the treatment of epilepsy, sore throat and inflammatory disorders. The leaf paste is used topically on Tuberculosis of the lymphatic glands and wounds of domestic animals. Tephrosia purpurea (T. purpurea), (Fabaceae) has been used traditionally as a remedy for asthma, gonorrhea, rheumatism and ulcers. This study aimed to evaluate the potential wound healing effects of different fractions ofethanol extract of M. annua leaves and aerial parts of T. purpurea. Materials and Methods: Methanol fraction of M. annua (MAF-C) and ethyl acetate fraction of T. purpurea (TPF-A) were evaluated for healing potential in dead-space and burn wound models. An ointment (5% w/w) of MAF-C and TPF-A, pongamol (0.2 and 0.5% w/w) and luteolin (0.2 and 0.5% w/w) was applied topically twice a day. The effects were compared with Povidone Iodine ointment with respect to protein, collagen content, enzymatic assay and histopathological finding of granuloma tissues. Results: Ethanol extracts of M. annua and T. purpureawere exhibited total flavonoid contents of 126.2 ± 4.69 and 171.6 ± 6.38 mg (quercetin equivalent), respectively. HPLC fingerprinting confirmed the presence of luteolin in M. annua and quercetin in T. purpurea. TPF-A and MAF-C ointments (5% w/w) significantly increases the hydroxyproline and protein contents. Luteolin and pongamol ointments were also found to be effective in both wound models. Conclusion: Our findings suggested that 5% w/w ointment of TPF-A and MAF-C fractions were more effective than isolated flavonoids in wound healing which may be due to synergistic interactions between the flavonoids and other constituents. PMID:27761428

  18. Imaging Mass Spectrometry for Assessing Cutaneous Wound Healing: Analysis of Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) was employed for the analysis of frozen skin biopsies to investigate the differences between stage IV pressure ulcers that remain stalled, stagnant, and unhealed versus those exhibiting clinical and histological signs of improvement. Our data reveal a rich diversity of proteins that are dynamically modulated, and we selectively highlight a family of calcium binding proteins (S-100 molecules) including calcyclin (S100-A6), calgranulins A (S100-A8) and B (S100-A9), and calgizzarin (S100-A11). IMS allowed us to target three discrete regions of interest: the wound bed, adjacent dermis, and hypertrophic epidermis. Plots derived using unsupervised principal component analysis of the global protein signatures within these three spatial niches indicate that these data from wound signatures have potential as a prognostic tool since they appear to delineate wounds that are favorably responding to therapeutic interventions versus those that remain stagnant or intractable in their healing status. Our discovery-based approach with IMS augments current knowledge of the molecular signatures within pressure ulcers while providing a rationale for a focused examination of the role of calcium modulators within the context of impaired wound healing. PMID:25488653

  19. Exosomes Derived from Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells Accelerate Cutaneous Wound Healing by Promoting Angiogenesis Through Erk1/2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jieyuan; Chen, Chunyuan; Hu, Bin; Niu, Xin; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Guowei; Zhang, Changqing; Li, Qing; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic skin wounds represent one of the most common and disabling complications of diabetes. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are precursors of endothelial cells and can enhance diabetic wound repair by facilitating neovascularization. Recent studies indicate that the transplanted cells exert therapeutic effects primarily via a paracrine mechanism and exosomes are an important paracrine factor that can be directly used as therapeutic agents for regenerative medicine. However, application of exosomes in diabetic wound repair has been rarely reported. In this study, we demonstrated that the exosomes derived from human umbilical cord blood-derived EPCs (EPC-Exos) possessed robust pro-angiogenic and wound healing effects in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. By using a series of in vitro functional assays, we found that EPC-Exos could be incorporated into endothelial cells and significantly enhance endothelial cells' proliferation, migration, and angiogenic tubule formation. Moreover, microarray analyses indicated that exosomes treatment markedly altered the expression of a class of genes involved in Erk1/2 signaling pathway. It was further confirmed with functional study that this signaling process was the critical mediator during the exosomes-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells. Therefore, EPC-Exos are able to stimulate angiogenic activities of endothelial cells by activating Erk1/2 signaling, which finally facilitates cutaneous wound repair and regeneration. PMID:27994512

  20. Activation of the δ-opioid receptor promotes cutaneous wound healing by affecting keratinocyte intercellular adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Bigliardi, P L; Neumann, C; Teo, Y L; Pant, A; Bigliardi-Qi, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE In addition to its analgesic functions, the peripheral opioid receptor system affects skin homeostasis by influencing cell differentiation, migration and adhesion; also, wound healing is altered in δ-opioid receptor knockout mice (DOPr–/–). Hence, we investigated δ-opioid receptor effects on the expression of several proteins of the desmosomal junction complex and on the migratory behaviour of keratinocytes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression levels of desmosomal cadherins in wild-type and DOPr–/– mice, and the morphology of intercellular adhesion in human keratinocytes were analysed by immunofluorescence. To investigate the δ-opioid receptor activation pathway, protein expression was studied using Western blot and its effect on cellular migration determined by in vitro live cell migration recordings from human keratinocytes. KEY RESULTS Expression of the desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins 1 and 4, was up-regulated in skin from DOPr–/– mice, and down-regulated in δ-opioid receptor-overexpressing human keratinocytes. The localization of desmoplakin expression was rearranged from linear arrays emanating from cell borders to puncta in cell periphery, resulting in less stable intercellular adhesion. Migration and wound recovery were enhanced in human keratinocyte monolayers overexpressing δ-opioid receptors in vitro. These δ-opioid receptor effects were antagonized by specific PKCα/β inhibition indicating they were mediated through the PKC signalling pathway. Finally, cells overexpressing δ-opioid receptors developed characteristically long but undirected protrusions containing filamentous actin and δ-opioid receptors, indicating an enhanced migratory phenotype. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Opioid receptors affect intercellular adhesion and wound healing mechanisms, underlining the importance of a cutaneous neuroendocrine system in wound healing and skin homeostasis. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on

  1. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Wound Healing and Care KidsHealth > For Teens > Wound Healing and Care Print A A A What's in ... mouth, or sunken eyes. There's good news about wound healing when you're a teen: Age is on ...

  2. Thrombin as important factor for cutaneous wound healing: comparison of fibrin biomatrices in vitro and in a rat excisional wound healing model.

    PubMed

    Gugerell, Alfred; Pasteiner, Waltraud; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Kober, Johanna; Meinl, Alexandra; Pfeifer, Sabine; Hartinger, Joachim; Wolbank, Susanne; Goppelt, Andreas; Redl, Heinz; Mittermayr, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Fibrin biomatrices have been used for many years for hemostasis and sealing and are a well-established surgical tool. The objective of the present study was to compare two commercially available fibrin biomatrices regarding the effect of their thrombin concentration on keratinocytes and wound healing in vitro and in vivo. Keratinocytes showed significant differences in adhesion, viability, and morphology in the presence of the fibrin matrices in vitro. A high thrombin concentration (800-1,200 IU/mL) caused deteriorated cell compatibility. By using a thrombin inhibitor, those differences could be reversed. In a rat excisional wound healing model, we observed more rapid wound closure and less wound severity in wounds treated with a fibrin matrix containing a lower concentration of thrombin (4 IU/mL). Furthermore, fewer new functional vessels and a lower level of vascular endothelial growth factor were measured in wounds after 7 days treated with the matrix with higher thrombin concentration. These in vivo results may be partially explained by the in vitro biocompatibility data. Additionally, results show that low thrombin biomatrices were degraded faster than the high thrombin material. Hence, we conclude that the composition of fibrin biomatrices influences keratinocytes and therefore has an impact on wound healing.

  3. A pilot trial using topical regular crystalline insulin vs. aqueous zinc solution for uncomplicated cutaneous wound healing: Impact on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Attia, Enas A S; Belal, Dina M I; El Samahy, May H; El Hamamsy, Manal H

    2014-01-01

    When wounds are treated with regular insulin, they are also being treated with zinc; used in the formula to crystallize insulin molecules. It is not clear if regular insulin-accelerated wound healing is due to insulin, the zinc it contains, or both. Thus, we aimed to compare topical regular crystalline insulin (containing zinc) vs. aqueous zinc chloride solution to controls, on healing of open uncomplicated cutaneous wounds. In this randomized controlled pilot study, 90 nondiabetic patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups depending on the twice daily applications received; group I: regular insulin; group II: aqueous zinc chloride solution, and group III: 0.9% saline (control). A questionnaire was used to determine the effect of wounds on the quality of life. Both topical regular crystalline insulin (containing zinc) and aqueous zinc chloride solution enhanced healing of uncomplicated cutaneous wounds of nondiabetic patients, than control (p < 0.001), and hence improved patients' quality of life. However, regular insulin showed better results than aqueous zinc solution (p = 0.015), probably due to synergistic effect between insulin and zinc of its formulation. Healing rate was significantly higher in acute than chronic wounds (p < 0.001), in those ≤40 years than those >40 (p = 0.004), and in upper body wounds than lower body (p = 0.015).

  4. Wound healing response is a major contributor to the severity of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the ear model of infection.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, T; Sakthianandeswaren, A; Curtis, J M; Kumar, B; Smyth, G K; Foote, S J; Handman, E

    2007-10-01

    In the conventional mouse model for cutaneous leishmaniasis involving infection with stationary phase Leishmania major promastigotes at the base of the tail, mice congenic for leishmaniasis resistance loci designated lmr1,2,3 cured their lesions more rapidly and laid down more ordered collagen fibres than the susceptible parental BALB/c mice, while the opposite was the case for the congenic mice carrying the susceptibility loci on the resistant C57BL/6 background. In that model, we showed that wound healing and not T cell responses played a major role in determining the resolution of skin infection. Here, we show a similar disease phenotype in the mouse model that mimics more closely the situation in humans, that is, strictly intradermal infection in the ear pinna with small numbers of metacyclic promastigotes. The data show that at the site of infection the innate and adaptive immune responses act in concert to clear parasites, and induce tissue repair and wound healing. Importantly, the data show that the host responses controlled by the lmr loci, which act locally to control infection in the skin, are distinct from the host responses operating systemically in the draining lymph node.

  5. Loss of integrin alpha9beta1 results in defects in proliferation, causing poor re-epithelialization during cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purva; Chen, Chun; Pal-Ghosh, Sonali; Stepp, Mary Ann; Sheppard, Dean; Van De Water, Livingston

    2009-01-01

    The wound microenvironment comprises constituents, such as the extracellular matrix (ECM), that regulate with temporal and spatial precision, the migratory, proliferative, and contractility of wound cells. Prompt closure of the wound is an early and critical phase of healing and beta1 integrins are important in this process. We previously reported a marked increase in integrin alpha9beta1 expression in epidermal keratinocytes in cutaneous and corneal wounds. However, the functional role of keratinocyte alpha9beta1 during re-epithelialization is unknown and analysis has been precluded by the lethal phenotype of integrin alpha9beta1 knockout mice. We now report that in conditional integrin alpha9 knockout (K14-alpha9 null) mice, normal proliferation occurs in epidermal keratinocytes and corneal basal cells. Normal epidermal keratinocyte morphology is also retained. However, corneal basal cell morphology and epithelial thickness are altered, suggesting that loss of integrin alpha9beta1 results in abnormal corneal differentiation. In cutaneous wounds, the number of proliferating epidermal keratinocytes is significantly reduced in K14-alpha9 null mice compared with alpha9(fl/-) mice, but not in Cre (control) mice. The decreased keratinocyte proliferation observed in K14-alpha9 null mice negatively impacts healing, resulting in a thinner migrating epithelium, demonstrating that alpha9beta1 is crucial for efficient and proper re-epithelialization during cutaneous wound healing.

  6. [Wound healing and wound dressing].

    PubMed

    Eitel, F; Sklarek, J

    1988-01-01

    This review article intends to discuss the clinical management of wounds in respect to a pathophysiological background. Recent results of research in the field of wound healing are demonstrated. Wound healing can be seen as aseptic inflammatory response to a traumatic stimulus. The activation of the clotting cascade by the trauma induces a sequence of humoral and cellular reactions. Platelets, granulocytes and macrophages are activated stepwisely. In the first phase of wound healing the wounded tissue area will be prepared for phagocytosis by enzymatic degradation of ground substance and depolymerisation of protein macromolecules (wound edema). Following the phagocytic microdebridement mesenchymal cells proliferate and produce matrix substance. Microcirculation within the traumatized area will be restored by angiogenesis, macroscopically observed as new formed granulation tissue. This leads to the wound healing phase of scar tissue formation. In this complexity of reactions naturally many possibilities of impairment are given. The most common complication during wound healing is the infection. It can be seen as self reinforcing process. The therapy of the impairment of wound healing consists in the disruption of the specific vicious circle, in the case of an osseus infection that would be a macrodebridement (that is necrectomy) and biomechanical stabilization. The surgical management of wounds principally consists in ensuring an undisturbed sequence of the healing process. This can be done by the wound excision that supports the phagocytic microdebridement. A further possibility is to avoid overwhelming formation of edema by eliminating the traumatic stimulus, by immobilization of the injured region and by ensuring a physiological microenvironment with a primary suture if possible. There are up to the present no drugs available to enhance cell proliferation and to regulate wound healing but it seems that experimental research is successful in characterizing

  7. Wound healing in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Schreml, Stephan; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Prantl, Lukas; Landthaler, Michael; Babilas, Philipp

    2010-11-01

    Delayed wound healing is one of the major therapeutic and economic issues in medicine today. Cutaneous wound healing is an extremely well-regulated and complex process basically divided into 3 phases: inflammation, proliferation, and tissue remodeling. Unfortunately, we still do not understand this process precisely enough to give direction effectively to impaired healing processes. There have been many new developments in wound healing that provide fascinating insights and may improve our ability to manage clinical problems. Our goal is to acquaint the reader with selected major novel findings about cutaneous wound healing that have been published since the beginning of the new millennium. We discuss advances in areas such as genetics, proteases, cytokines, chemokines, and regulatory peptides, as well as therapeutic strategies, all set in the framework of the different phases of wound healing.

  8. Studies on Wound Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    therapy on wound repair have been amply demonstrated. Increased oxygen supply promotes wound healing whereas decreased oxygen supply retards repair...appmarn as early as 6 hms afte the a~ddton of DMF (Figl. 2). The increase was linea during the 24 hrs period of observaumoe in order toconfimn if the...Examine the effect of superoxide on collagen synthesis in vivo, * Examine the effect of increased superoxide levels on wound healing , and * Develop strategies to administer superoxide to wounds.

  9. Increased cutaneous wound healing effect of biodegradable liposomes containing madecassoside: preparation optimization, in vitro dermal permeation, and in vivo bioevaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zehao; Liu, Meifeng; Wang, Huijuan; Du, Song

    2016-01-01

    Madecassoside (MA) is highly potent in treating skin disorders such as wounds and psoriasis. However, the topical wound healing effect of MA was hampered by its poor membrane permeability. In order to overcome this shortcoming, MA liposomes were designed and prepared by a double-emulsion method to enhance transdermal and wound healing effects. In this study, response surface methodology was adopted to yield the optimal preparation conditions of MA double-emulsion liposomes with average particle size of 151 nm and encapsulation efficiency of 70.14%. Moreover, MA double-emulsion liposomes demonstrated superior stability and homogeneous appearance in 5 months; their leakage rate was <12% even at 37°C and <5% at 4°C within 1 month. In vitro skin permeation, skin distribution, and burn wound healing of MA liposomal formulations were conducted for the first time to evaluate MA delivery efficiency and wound healing effect. The transdermal property and wound cure effect of MA double-emulsion liposomes were superior to those of MA film dispersion liposomes, and both the methods were endowed with an excellent performance by polyethylene glycol modification. In conclusion, double-emulsion liposome formulation was an applicable and promising pharmaceutical preparation for enhancing MA delivery toward wound healing effect and improving wound-healing progress.

  10. Increased cutaneous wound healing effect of biodegradable liposomes containing madecassoside: preparation optimization, in vitro dermal permeation, and in vivo bioevaluation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zehao; Liu, Meifeng; Wang, Huijuan; Du, Song

    2016-01-01

    Madecassoside (MA) is highly potent in treating skin disorders such as wounds and psoriasis. However, the topical wound healing effect of MA was hampered by its poor membrane permeability. In order to overcome this shortcoming, MA liposomes were designed and prepared by a double-emulsion method to enhance transdermal and wound healing effects. In this study, response surface methodology was adopted to yield the optimal preparation conditions of MA double-emulsion liposomes with average particle size of 151 nm and encapsulation efficiency of 70.14%. Moreover, MA double-emulsion liposomes demonstrated superior stability and homogeneous appearance in 5 months; their leakage rate was <12% even at 37°C and <5% at 4°C within 1 month. In vitro skin permeation, skin distribution, and burn wound healing of MA liposomal formulations were conducted for the first time to evaluate MA delivery efficiency and wound healing effect. The transdermal property and wound cure effect of MA double-emulsion liposomes were superior to those of MA film dispersion liposomes, and both the methods were endowed with an excellent performance by polyethylene glycol modification. In conclusion, double-emulsion liposome formulation was an applicable and promising pharmaceutical preparation for enhancing MA delivery toward wound healing effect and improving wound-healing progress. PMID:27486319

  11. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  12. Quercetin accelerated cutaneous wound healing in rats by increasing levels of VEGF and TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, A; Ram, M; Kumawat, S; Tandan, Sk; Kumar, D

    2016-03-01

    Quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-penthydroxyflavone)-induced biological effects have been beneficial in various disease conditions. In this study, wound healing potential of quercetin was evaluated in a time-dependent manner in open excision wounds in adult Wistar rats. Experimentally-wounded rats were divided into two groups namely, control and quercetin-treated. Wounds were photographed and the area was measured on the day of wounding and on days 3, 7, 11 and 14 post-wounding. The granulation/healing tissue was collected on days 3, 7, 11 and 14 post-wounding for cytokine/growth factor measurements and histology/immunohistochemistry studies. There was significant time-dependent increase in wound closure in quercetin-treated rats. Vascular endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor-β1 expressions were significantly upregulated in quercetin-treated rats, whereas tumor necrosis factor-α level was markedly reduced. Interleukin- 10 levels and CD31 stained vessels were markedly higher on day 3 and on day 7, respectively, in quercetin-treated rats. In H & E stained sections, quercetin-treated group showed less inflammatory cells, more fibroblast proliferation, increased microvessel density, better reepithelialization and more regular collagen deposition, as compared to control. The results suggest that topical application of quercetin promotes wound healing by effectively modulating the cytokines, growth factors and cells involved in inflammatory and proliferative phases of healing.

  13. Stress and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I

    1979-01-01

    An experiment was performed to compare the effects of stressors--cold, heat and noise--on primary wound activity (i.e., wound closure in the first 24 h after wound infliction) and on rate of healing in mice. A significant correlation was found between reduced primary wound activity and a faster rate of healing. Conversely, a correlation was found between relatively greater primary wound activity and a slower rate of healing. A possible explanation of this correlation is a compensatory mechanism inherent to the skin healing process. This mechanism is visualized as (1) stress exposure affecting the skin by (a) causing it to become thinner and tauter and (b) causing it to have less elastic recoil; therefore, (2) when a square wound is produced in stressed skin, (a) the wound does not recoil readily or gapes soon after cutting and (b) a longer wound perimeter results. Because there is evidence that rate of healing is governed by cells on the wound perimeter, the greater the perimeter, the greater the number of cells that will undergo rapid mitosis and the faster will be the rate of healing. Therefore, stressed skin will heal at a faster rate, compensating for the loss of elasticity and cellular depletion caused by stress. This study is of interest to anthropology because it deals with dynamic adaptation, trying to grasp the meaning of the elusive endocrine interface between environmental stimulation and a measurable physical entity like healing. This work may have revealed a functional complex that is common to the healing of all mammalian skin, whereby retarding effects of stress on the healing process are obviated.

  14. Gamma-tocopherol supplementation ameliorated hyper-inflammatory response during the early cutaneous wound healing in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jihyun; Yang, Soo Jin; Lim, Yunsook

    2017-03-01

    Delayed wound healing is one of the major diabetic complications. During wound healing process, the early inflammatory stage is important for better prognosis. One of antioxidant nutrient, gamma-tocopherol (GT) is considered to regulate inflammatory conditions. This study investigated the effect of GT supplementation on mechanism associated with inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis during early cutaneous wound healing in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced by alloxan injection in ICR mice. All mice were divided into three groups: non-diabetic control mice (CON), diabetic control mice (DMC), and diabetic mice supplemented with GT (GT). After two weeks of GT supplementation, excisional wounds were made by biopsy punches (4 mm). Diabetic mice showed increases in fasting blood glucose (FBG) level, hyper-inflammatory response, oxidative stress, and delayed wound closure rate compared to non-diabetic mice. However, GT supplementation reduced FBG level and accelerated wound closure rate by regulation of inflammatory response-related proteins such as nuclear factor kappa B, interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and c-reactive protein, and oxidative stress-related markers including nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2)-like 2, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone1, heme oxygenase-1, manganese superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase and apoptosis-related markers such as sirtuin-1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1- α, and p53 in diabetic mice. Taken together, GT would be a potential therapeutic to prevent diabetes-induced delayed wound healing by regulation of inflammatory response, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Impact statement Gamma tocopherol has shown ameliorative effect on diabetic wound healing by regulation of inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis demonstrated by nuclear factor kappa B, nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2)-like 2, and sirtuin-1.

  15. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

  16. Human platelet-rich plasma- and extracellular matrix-derived peptides promote impaired cutaneous wound healing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N; Wolf, Lindsey; Deckenback, Jeffry; Hamblin, Michael R; Herman, Ira M

    2012-01-01

    Previous work in our laboratory has described several pro-angiogenic short peptides derived from endothelial extracellular matrices degraded by bacterial collagenase. Here we tested whether these peptides could stimulate wound healing in vivo. Our experiments demonstrated that a peptide created as combination of fragments of tenascin X and fibrillin 1 (comb1) applied into cranial dermal wounds created in mice treated with cyclophosphamide to impair wound healing, can improve the rate of wound closure. Furthermore, we identify and characterize a novel peptide (UN3) created and modified from two naturally-occurring peptides, which are present in human platelet-rich plasma. In vitro testing of UN3 demonstrates that it causes a 50% increase in endothelial proliferation, 250% increase in angiogenic response and a tripling of epithelial cell migration in response to injury. Results of in vivo experiments where comb1 and UN3 peptides were added together to cranial wounds in cyclophosphamide-treated mice leads to improvement of wound vascularization as shown by an increase of the number of blood vessels present in the wound beds. Application of the peptides markedly promotes cellular responses to injury and essentially restores wound healing dynamics to those of normal, acute wounds in the absence of cyclophosphamide impairment. Our current work is aimed at understanding the mechanisms underlying the stimulatory effects of these peptides as well as identification of the cellular receptors mediating these effects.

  17. Fibrin structure and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Laurens, N; Koolwijk, P; de Maat, M P M

    2006-05-01

    Fibrinogen and fibrin play an important role in blood clotting, fibrinolysis, cellular and matrix interactions, inflammation, wound healing, angiogenesis, and neoplasia. The contribution of fibrin(ogen) to these processes largely depends not only on the characteristics of the fibrin(ogen) itself, but also on interactions between specific-binding sites on fibrin(ogen), pro-enzymes, clotting factors, enzyme inhibitors, and cell receptors. In this review, the molecular and cellular biology of fibrin(ogen) is reviewed in the context of cutaneous wound repair. The outcome of wound healing depends largely on the fibrin structure, such as the thickness of the fibers, the number of branch points, the porosity, and the permeability. The binding of fibrin(ogen) to hemostasis proteins and platelets as well as to several different cells such as endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, leukocytes, and keratinocytes is indispensable during the process of wound repair. High-molecular-weight and low-molecular-weight fibrinogen, two naturally occurring variants of fibrin, are important determinants of angiogenesis and differ in their cell growth stimulation, clotting rate, and fibrin polymerization characteristics. Fibrin sealants have been investigated as matrices to promote wound healing. These sealants may also be an ideal delivery vehicle to deliver extra cells for the treatment of chronic wounds.

  18. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries: Strategies for the Development of Improved Therapies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-05

    of much greater potency that would likely be very efficacious if used early in the lesion development stage, such as betamethasone dipropionate ...Hunt Valley, MD. pp. 1179- 1186. 108. Miller TL, Graham JS, Hayes TL, Reid FM. Stability of sulfur mustard in vehicles suitable for cutaneous

  19. Histopathological and clinical evaluation of Kombucha tea and Nitrofurazone on cutaneous full-thickness wounds healing in rats: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Kombucha, a fermented tea (KT) is claimed to possess many beneficial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and histopathological alterations of Kombucha tea and Nitrofurazone on cutaneous full-thickness wounds healing in rat. Methods In present study 24 Wister -albino rats weighing 150–200 g were selected and divided to two treatment groups as Nitrofurazone ointment (0.2%) and Kombucha tea. Subsequently, the anesthesia was exerted by Ketamin hydrochloride 10% (40 mg/kg) and Xylasine (2 mg/kg) through intra muscular (IM) route. Furthermore, upon preparation of dorsal region of the animal for surgery, a piece of full-thickness skin removed (2 × 2 cm). In order to comparing wounds healing clinically and histologically, once every four days from the commencement, the wounds were photographed and the healed surface was measured by Scion image software. Result The clinical findings indicated that the Kombucha fungus resulted in precipitating healing than Nitrofurazone; however, it was not significant (p > 0.05). In order to pathological comparing of wound healing process, several wound biopsies were taken on 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20th days. Additionally, the histopathological results demonstrated that there was inflammation in Nitrofurazone group through twelveth day, somehow the epithelium was formed and abundant vessels were visible. Although on 16th day and the previous days the healing condition of Kombucha fungus was considered as minimal rate, revealing it is similar to Nitrofurazone group on 20th day. Conclusions To wrap up. These observations suggest that the Kombucha fungus healing quality was rapid from 12th day to the end of the research, whereas no significant difference was observed. Virtual slide The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1107407136102196 PMID:23866960

  20. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... of collagen. So they're tougher and less flexible than the skin around them. Caring for Serious Wounds at Home Serious wounds don't heal overnight. It can take weeks for the body to build new tissue. So after you leave ...

  1. Local delivery of allogeneic bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for cutaneous wound healing in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Summer E; Kleinbeck, Kyle R; Cantu, David; Kim, Jaeyhup; Bentz, Michael L; Faucher, Lee D; Kao, W John; Hematti, Peiman

    2016-02-01

    Wound healing remains a major challenge in modern medicine. Bone marrow- (BM) and adipose tissue- (AT) derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are of great interest for tissue reconstruction due to their unique immunological properties and regenerative potential. The purpose of this study was to characterize BM and AT-MSCs and evaluate their effect when administered in a porcine wound model. MSCs were derived from male Göttingen Minipigs and characterized according to established criteria. Allogeneic BM- or AT-MSCs were administered intradermally (1 x 10(6) cells) into partial-thickness wounds created on female animals, and covered with Vaseline® gauze or fibrin in a randomized pattern. Animals were euthanized at 7, 10, 14 and 21 days. Tissues were analyzed visually for healing and by microscopic examination for epidermal development and remodelling. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the presence of male DNA in the specimens. All wounds were healed by 14 days. MSC-injected wounds were associated with improved appearance and faster re-epithelialization compared to saline controls. Evaluation of rete ridge depth and architecture showed that MSC treatment promoted a faster rate of epidermal maturation. Male DNA was detected in all samples at days 7 and 10, suggesting the presence of MSCs. We showed the safety, feasibility and potential efficacy of local injection of allogeneic BM- and AT-MSCs for treatment of wounds in a preclinical model. Our data in this large animal model support the potential use of BM- and AT-MSC for treatment of cutaneous wounds through modulation of healing and epithelialization.

  2. Comparative study of the effects of the use of the CO2 laser and of cholorhexidine on the healing of cutaneous wounds infected by the staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos de Oliveira, Marcos A.; Barbosa Pinheiro, Antonio L.; Azevedo Moreira, Ana C.; Pedreira Ramalho, Luciana M.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Costa Lima, Taciano L.

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare histologic and microbiogically the use of the CO2 Laser and Chlorohexidine Gluconate (0.5% and 2%) on cutaneous wounds infected by Staphylococcus aureus. Wound infection constitutes a risk for the patients and it is usually associated to increase morbidity, mortality and hospital costs. It is accepted that local treatment of these infections is effective. Standardised wounds created on the dorsum of Wistar rats were infected with Staphylococcus aureus and treated as follows: Group 1: control; Group 2: Chlorohexidien Gluconate (0.5%), 1 min, six days; Group 3: Chlorohexidine Gluconate (2%), 1 min, six days; Group 4: CO2 Laser, CW, RSP, 8W, 10s, single application, maintaining surface debris; Group 5: CO2 Laser, CW, RSP, 8W, 10s, single application, removing surface debris. Eight days after wounding material from the surface of the wound was collected for microbiology and the animals were sacrificed and specimens taken for light microscopy. Microbiological examinations showed that on group 2 the bacteria were not found on 50% of the animals. On group 3 83% were germ-free, on group 4 50% and on group 5 66%. Histological examination showed a better result for CO2 laser treated wounds compared to others. It is concluded that the use of a 2% Cholohexidine solution was more effective on decontaminating the wounds. However, wounds treated with the CO2 laer and with the removal of surface debris healed better than the others.

  3. Fetal skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Edward P; Longaker, Michael T; Lorenz, H Peter

    2009-01-01

    The developing fetus has the ability to heal wounds by regenerating normal epidermis and dermis with restoration of the extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture, strength, and function. In contrast, adult wounds heal with fibrosis and scar. Scar tissue remains weaker than normal skin with an altered ECM composition. Despite extensive investigation, the mechanism of fetal wound healing remains largely unknown. We do know that early in gestation, fetal skin is developing at a rapid pace and the ECM is a loose network facilitating cellular migration. Wounding in this unique environment triggers a complex cascade of tightly controlled events culminating in a scarless wound phenotype of fine reticular collagen and abundant hyaluronic acid. Comparison between postnatal and fetal wound healing has revealed differences in inflammatory response, cellular mediators, cytokines, growth factors, and ECM modulators. Investigation into cell signaling pathways and transcription factors has demonstrated differences in secondary messenger phosphorylation patterns and homeobox gene expression. Further research may reveal novel genes essential to scarless repair that can be manipulated in the adult wound and thus ameliorate scar.

  4. Innovation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith

    2015-04-01

    Innovation in medicine requires unique partnerships between academic research, biotech or pharmaceutical companies, and health-care providers. While innovation in medicine has greatly increased over the past 100 years, innovation in wound care has been slow, despite the fact that chronic wounds are a global health challenge where there is a need for technical, process and social innovation. While novel partnerships between research and the health-care system have been created, we still have much to learn about wound care and the wound-healing processes.

  5. MicroRNA Let-7b inhibits keratinocyte migration in cutaneous wound healing by targeting IGF2BP2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Zhong, Julia Li; Hou, Ning; Sun, Yaolan; Ma, Benting; Nisar, Muhammad Farrukh; Teng, Yan; Tan, Zhaoli; Chen, Keping; Wang, Youliang; Yang, Xiao

    2017-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex process which involves proliferation and migration of keratinocyte for closure of epidermal injuries. A member of microRNA family, let-7b, has been expressed in mammalian skin, but its exact role in keratinocyte migration is still not in knowledge. Here, we showed that let-7b regulates keratinocyte migration by targeting the insulin-like growth factor IGF2BP2. Overexpression of let-7b led to reduced HaCaT cell migration, while knockdown of let-7b resulted in enhanced migration. Furthermore, let-7b was decreased during wound healing in wild-type mice, which led us to construct the transgenic mice with overexpression of let-7b in skin. The re-epithelialization of epidermis of let-7b transgenic mice was reduced during wound healing. Using bioinformatics prediction software and a reporter gene assay, we found that IGF2BP2 was a target of let-7b, which contributes to keratinocyte migration. Introduction of an expression vector of IGF2BP2 also rescued let-7b-induced migration deficiency, which confirms that IGF2BP2 is an important target for let-7b regulation. Our findings suggest that let-7b significantly delayed the re-epithelialization possibly due to reduction of keratinocyte migration and restraints IGF2BP2 during skin wound healing.

  6. An experimental study of the effects of Matricaria chamomilla extract on cutaneous burn wound healing in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Jarrahi, Morteza

    2008-03-20

    Previous studies conducted on the anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects of Matricaria chamomilla (chamomile) extract led us to study the effect of topical chamomile extract on burn wound healing in albino rats. Thirty male albino rats (250-300 g) were randomly divided into three groups, as control, vehicle, and treatment. Second-degree burning was induced in 20% of whole surface area of animal body by placing the back of animal into boiling water for 8s. Animals of control group received no treatment. Animals of vehicle and treatment groups were treated topically by olive oil and extract dissolved in olive oil twice a day respectively from the first day of burn induction to complete wound healing. The percentage of wound healing was calculated weekly. The results showed that there was significant difference (p < 0.05) between vehicle and treatment groups. So we concluded that the chamomile extract in the form of rubbing oil had a good potential for acceleration of burn wound healing in rats.

  7. Phytochemicals in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Sharad, Shashwat; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Traditional therapies, including the use of dietary components for wound healing and skin regeneration, are very common in Asian countries such as China and India. The increasing evidence of health-protective benefits of phytochemicals, components derived from plants is generating a lot of interest, warranting further scientific evaluation and mechanistic studies. Recent Advances: Phytochemicals are non-nutritive substances present in plants, and some of them have the potential to provide better tissue remodeling when applied on wounds and to also act as proangiogenic agents during wound healing. Critical Issues: In this review, we briefly discuss the current understanding, important molecular targets, and mechanism of action(s) of some of the phytochemicals such as curcumin, picroliv, and arnebin-1. We also broadly review the multiple pathways that these phytochemicals regulate to enhance wound repair and skin regeneration. Future Directions: Recent experimental data on the effects of phytochemicals on wound healing and skin regeneration establish the potential clinical utility of plant-based compounds. Additional research in order to better understand the exact mechanism and potential targets of phytochemicals in skin regeneration is needed. Human studies a2nd clinical trials are pivotal to fully understand the benefits of phytochemicals in wound healing and skin regeneration. PMID:27134766

  8. Characterization of EPC Mobilization Following Cutaneous Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Lee M.; Klanke, Charles A.; Lang, Stephanie A.; Pokall, Stefan; Maldonado, Arturo R.; Vuletin, Jose F.; Alaee, Datis; Keswani, Sundeep G.; Lim, Foong-Yen; Crombleholme, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are known to play an important role in neovascularization and wound healing. We investigated the temporal effects of cutaneous wounding on EPC surface markers within the peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM), and better understand the role of the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis on EPC mobilization after wounding. FVB/NJ mice were administered bilateral 8mm circular full thickness skin wounds. PB and BM were isolated at daily intervals post wounding through day 7 for EPC mobilization characteristics and levels of SDF-1α. Cutaneous wounding was found to cause a transient increase in EPC mobilization that peaked on day 3. In contrast, SDF-1α protein within blood plasma was observed to significantly decrease on days 3, 4, and 7 following cutaneous wounding. BM levels of SDF-1α protein decreased to a nadir on day 3, the same day as peak mobilization was observed to occur. The decrease in BM SDF-1α protein levels was also associated with a decrease in SDF-1α mRNA suggesting transcriptional down regulation as a contributing factor. This study for the first time characterizes EPC mobilization following cutaneous wounding in mice and supports a major role for the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis in regulating mobilization within the BM, without evidence for systemic increases in SDF-1α. PMID:20546555

  9. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

  10. Image-guided plasma therapy of cutaneous wound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwu; Ren, Wenqi; Yu, Zelin; Zhang, Shiwu; Yue, Ting; Xu, Ronald

    2014-02-01

    The wound healing process involves the reparative phases of inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Interrupting any of these phases may result in chronically unhealed wounds, amputation, or even patient death. Despite the clinical significance in chronic wound management, no effective methods have been developed for quantitative image-guided treatment. We integrated a multimodal imaging system with a cold atmospheric plasma probe for image-guided treatment of chronic wound. Multimodal imaging system offers a non-invasive, painless, simultaneous and quantitative assessment of cutaneous wound healing. Cold atmospheric plasma accelerates the wound healing process through many mechanisms including decontamination, coagulation and stimulation of the wound healing. The therapeutic effect of cold atmospheric plasma is studied in vivo under the guidance of a multimodal imaging system. Cutaneous wounds are created on the dorsal skin of the nude mice. During the healing process, the sample wound is treated by cold atmospheric plasma at different controlled dosage, while the control wound is healed naturally. The multimodal imaging system integrating a multispectral imaging module and a laser speckle imaging module is used to collect the information of cutaneous tissue oxygenation (i.e. oxygen saturation, StO2) and blood perfusion simultaneously to assess and guide the plasma therapy. Our preliminary tests show that cold atmospheric plasma in combination with multimodal imaging guidance has the potential to facilitate the healing of chronic wounds.

  11. Healing Invisible Wounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual…

  12. Placenta Growth Factor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cianfarani, Francesca; Zambruno, Giovanna; Brogelli, Laura; Sera, Francesco; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Failla, Cristina Maria; Napolitano, Monica; Odorisio, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Reduced microcirculation and diminished expression of growth factors contribute to wound healing impairment in diabetes. Placenta growth factor (PlGF), an angiogenic mediator promoting pathophysiological neovascularization, is expressed during cutaneous wound healing and improves wound closure by enhancing angiogenesis. By using streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, we here demonstrate that PlGF induction is strongly reduced in diabetic wounds. Diabetic transgenic mice overexpressing PlGF in the skin displayed accelerated wound closure compared with diabetic wild-type littermates. Moreover, diabetic wound treatment with an adenovirus vector expressing the human PlGF gene (AdCMV.PlGF) significantly accelerated the healing process compared with wounds treated with a control vector. The analysis of treated wounds showed that PlGF gene transfer improved granulation tissue formation, maturation, and vascularization, as well as monocytes/macrophages local recruitment. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels were increased in AdCMV.PlGF-treated wounds, possibly enhancing PlGF-mediated effects. Finally, PlGF treatment stimulated cultured dermal fibroblast migration, pointing to a direct role of PlGF in accelerating granulation tissue maturation. In conclusion, our data indicate that reduced PlGF expression contributes to impaired wound healing in diabetes and that PlGF gene transfer to diabetic wounds exerts therapeutic activity by promoting different aspects of the repair process. PMID:17003476

  13. Honey and Wound Healing: An Update.

    PubMed

    Saikaly, Sami K; Khachemoune, Amor

    2017-04-01

    For centuries, honey has been utilized for wound healing purposes. In recent times, this specific topic has become a field of interest, possibly due to the advent of antibiotic resistance in microbial pathogens. With constant technological advancement, the information regarding honey's mechanisms of action on wound healing has accumulated at a rapid pace. Similarly, clinical studies comparing honey with traditional wound care therapies are steadily emerging. As a follow-up to a previous review published in the journal in 2011, the current review article outlines publications regarding honey and wound healing that have been published between June 2010 and August 2016. Here we describe the most recent evidence regarding multiple types of honey and their mechanisms of action as antimicrobial agents, immunologic modulators, and physiologic mediators. In addition, outcomes of clinical studies involving a multitude of cutaneous wounds are also examined.

  14. Multimodal imaging of cutaneous wound tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Huang, Jiwei; Ren, Wenqi; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of wound tissue ischemia, perfusion, and inflammation provides critical information for appropriate detection, staging, and treatment of chronic wounds. However, few methods are available for simultaneous assessment of these tissue parameters in a noninvasive and quantitative fashion. We integrated hyperspectral, laser speckle, and thermographic imaging modalities in a single-experimental setup for multimodal assessment of tissue oxygenation, perfusion, and inflammation characteristics. Algorithms were developed for appropriate coregistration between wound images acquired by different imaging modalities at different times. The multimodal wound imaging system was validated in an occlusion experiment, where oxygenation and perfusion maps of a healthy subject's upper extremity were continuously monitored during a postocclusive reactive hyperemia procedure and compared with standard measurements. The system was also tested in a clinical trial where a wound of three millimeters in diameter was introduced on a healthy subject's lower extremity and the healing process was continuously monitored. Our in vivo experiments demonstrated the clinical feasibility of multimodal cutaneous wound imaging.

  15. Biomaterials and Nanotherapeutics for Enhancing Skin Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhamoy; Baker, Aaron B.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is an intricate process that requires complex coordination between many cell types and an appropriate extracellular microenvironment. Chronic wounds often suffer from high protease activity, persistent infection, excess inflammation, and hypoxia. While there has been intense investigation to find new methods to improve cutaneous wound care, the management of chronic wounds, burns, and skin wound infection remain challenging clinical problems. Ideally, advanced wound dressings can provide enhanced healing and bridge the gaps in the healing processes that prevent chronic wounds from healing. These technologies have great potential for improving outcomes in patients with poorly healing wounds but face significant barriers in addressing the heterogeneity and clinical complexity of chronic or severe wounds. Active wound dressings aim to enhance the natural healing process and work to counter many aspects that plague poorly healing wounds, including excessive inflammation, ischemia, scarring, and wound infection. This review paper discusses recent advances in the development of biomaterials and nanoparticle therapeutics to enhance wound healing. In particular, this review focuses on the novel cutaneous wound treatments that have undergone significant preclinical development or are currently used in clinical practice. PMID:27843895

  16. Platelets Regulate the Migration of Keratinocytes via Podoplanin/CLEC-2 Signaling during Cutaneous Wound Healing in Mice.

    PubMed

    Asai, Jun; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Sakabe, Jun-ichi; Kishida, Tsunao; Wada, Makoto; Nakamura, Naomi; Takenaka, Hideya; Mazda, Osam; Urano, Tetsumei; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Tokura, Yoshiki; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin is an endogenous ligand for C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2), which is expressed on platelets. Recent evidence indicates that this specific marker of lymphatic endothelial cells is also expressed by keratinocytes at the edge of wounds. However, whether podoplanin or platelets play a role in keratinocyte activity during wound healing remains unknown. We evaluated the effect of podoplanin expression levels on keratinocyte motility using cultured primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs). Down-regulation of podoplanin in NHEKs via transfection with podoplanin siRNA inhibited their migration, indicating that podoplanin plays a mandatory role in this process. In addition, down-regulation of podoplanin was correlated with up-regulation of E-cadherin, suggesting that podoplanin-mediated stimulation of keratinocyte migration is associated with a loss of E-cadherin. Both the addition of platelets and treatment with CLEC-2 inhibited the migration of NHEKs. The down-regulation of RhoA activity and the up-regulation of E-cadherin in keratinocytes were also induced by CLEC-2. In conclusion, these results suggest that podoplanin/CLEC-2 signaling regulates keratinocyte migration via modulating E-cadherin expression through RhoA signaling. Altering the regulation of keratinocyte migration by podoplanin might be a novel therapeutic approach to improve wound healing.

  17. Cellular and molecular facets of keratinocyte reepithelization during wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, Massimo M. . E-mail: msantoro@unipmn.it; Gaudino, Giovanni

    2005-03-10

    Cutaneous wound healing is a highly coordinated physiological process that rapidly and efficiently restores skin integrity. Reepithelization is a crucial step during wound healing, which involves migration and proliferation of keratinocytes to cover the denuded dermal surface. Recent advances in wound biology clarified the molecular pathways governing keratinocyte reepithelization at wound sites. These new findings point towards novel therapeutic targets and provide suitable methods to promote faster tissue regeneration in vivo.

  18. Topical androgen antagonism promotes cutaneous wound healing without systemic androgen deprivation by blocking β-catenin nuclear translocation and cross-talk with TGF-β signaling in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Toraldo, Gianluca; Bhasin, Shalender; Bakhit, Mena; Guo, Wen; Serra, Carlo; Safer, Joshua D; Bhawan, Jag; Jasuja, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Orchidectomy in rodents and lower testosterone levels in men are associated with improved cutaneous wound healing. However, due to the adverse effects on skeletal and sexual tissues, systemic androgen blockade is not a viable therapeutic intervention. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that topical application of an androgen antagonist would elicit accelerated wound healing without systemic androgen antagonism. Full-thickness cutaneous wounds were created on adult C57BL6/J mice. Daily topical application of androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide, resulted in improved gap closure similar to orchiectomized controls and faster than orchidectomized mice treated with topical testosterone. In vivo data showed that the effects of androgen antagonism on wound closure primarily accelerate keratinocytes migration without effecting wound contraction. Consequently, mechanisms of testosterone action on reepithelialization were investigated in vitro by scratch wounding assays in confluent keratinocytes. Testosterone inhibited keratinocyte migration and this effect was in part mediated through promotion of nuclear translocation of β-catenin and by attenuating transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling through β-catenin. The link between Wnt and TGF beta signaling was confirmed by blocking β-catenin and by following TGF-β-induced transcription of a luciferase reporter gene. Together, these data show that blockade of β-catenin can, as a potential target for novel therapeutic interventions, accelerate cutaneous wound healing.

  19. Cell therapy for wound healing.

    PubMed

    You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-03-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include utilization of the safest and least invasive methods with goals of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced wound healing technology has triggered the use of cells to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of this review is to provide information on clinically available cell-based treatment options for healing of acute and chronic wounds. Compared with a variety of conventional methods, such as skin grafts and local flaps, the cell therapy technique is simple, less time-consuming, and reduces the surgical burden for patients in the repair of acute wounds. Cell therapy has also been developed for chronic wound healing. By transplanting cells with an excellent wound healing capacity profile to chronic wounds, in which wound healing cannot be achieved successfully, attempts are made to convert the wound bed into the environment where maximum wound healing can be achieved. Fibroblasts, keratinocytes, adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells, bone marrow stem cells, and platelets have been used for wound healing in clinical practice. Some formulations are commercially available. To establish the cell therapy as a standard treatment, however, further research is needed.

  20. Wound healing after laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, D A; Meyers, A

    1995-10-01

    Compared with scalpel wounds, CO2 laser wounds show delays in inflammation, collagen production, reepithelialization, and tensile strength in the early stages of healing. Some of these delays are similar to those seen with electrocautery and burn wounds. Later stages compensate for these early deficiencies, because scalpel and laser wounds become more similar in epithelialization and wound strength over time. Healed CO2 laser wounds tend to have less scar contraction than scalpel wounds. Débridement of initial laser wound char, tissue cooling techniques during lasering, and pulsed modes of laser delivery all seem to result in more rapid, favorable healing. Similar wound healing trends have been seen with the CO2 laser in bone, with other lasers, and with laser vascular and neural anastomosis. Biostimulation with low-level laser energy is a complex subject of ongoing investigations.

  1. Exogenous calreticulin improves diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Greives, Matthew R; Samra, Fares; Pavlides, Savvas C; Blechman, Keith M; Naylor, Sara-Megumi; Woodrell, Christopher D; Cadacio, Caprice; Levine, Jamie P; Bancroft, Tara A; Michalak, Marek; Warren, Stephen M; Gold, Leslie I

    2012-01-01

    A serious consequence of diabetes mellitus is impaired wound healing, which largely resists treatment. We previously reported that topical application of calreticulin (CRT), an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein, markedly enhanced the rate and quality of wound healing in an experimental porcine model of cutaneous repair. Consistent with these in vivo effects, in vitro CRT induced the migration and proliferation of normal human cells critical to the wound healing process. These functions are particularly deficient in poor healing diabetic wounds. Using a genetically engineered diabetic mouse (db/db) in a full-thickness excisional wound healing model, we now show that topical application of CRT induces a statistically significant decrease in the time to complete wound closure compared with untreated wounds by 5.6 days (17.6 vs. 23.2). Quantitative analysis of the wounds shows that CRT increases the rate of reepithelialization at days 7 and 10 and increases the amount of granulation tissue at day 7 persisting to day 14. Furthermore, CRT treatment induces the regrowth of pigmented hair follicles observed on day 28. In vitro, fibroblasts isolated from diabetic compared with wild-type mouse skin and human fibroblasts cultured under hyperglycemic compared with normal glucose conditions proliferate and strongly migrate in response to CRT compared with untreated controls. The in vitro effects of CRT on these functions are consistent with CRT's potent effects on wound healing in the diabetic mouse. These studies implicate CRT as a potential powerful topical therapeutic agent for the treatment of diabetic and other chronic wounds.

  2. Wound Healing Devices Brief Vignettes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Caesar A.; Hare, Marc A.; Perdrizet, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The demand for wound care therapies is increasing. New wound care products and devices are marketed at a dizzying rate. Practitioners must make informed decisions about the use of medical devices for wound healing therapy. This paper provides updated evidence and recommendations based on a review of recent publications. Recent Advances: The published literature on the use of medical devices for wound healing continues to support the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, and most recently electrical stimulation. Critical Issue: To inform wound healing practitioners of the evidence for or against the use of medical devices for wound healing. This information will aid the practitioner in deciding which technology should be accepted or rejected for clinical use. Future Directions: To produce high quality, randomized controlled trials or acquire outcome-based registry databases to further test and improve the knowledge base as it relates to the use of medical devices in wound care. PMID:27076996

  3. Circadian rhythms accelerate wound healing in female Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Cable, Erin J; Onishi, Kenneth G; Prendergast, Brian J

    2017-03-15

    Circadian rhythms (CRs) provide temporal regulation and coordination of numerous physiological traits, including immune function. CRs in multiple aspects of immune function are impaired in rodents that have been rendered circadian-arrhythmic through various methods. In Siberian hamsters, circadian arrhythmia can be induced by disruptive light treatments (DPS). Here we examined CRs in wound healing, and the effects of circadian disruption on wound healing in DPS-arrhythmic hamsters. Circadian entrained/rhythmic (RHYTH) and behaviorally-arrhythmic (ARR) female hamsters were administered a cutaneous wound either 3h after light onset (ZT03) or 2h after dark onset (ZT18); wound size was quantified daily using image analyses. Among RHYTH hamsters, ZT03 wounds healed faster than ZT18 wounds, whereas in ARR hamsters, circadian phase did not affect wound healing. In addition, wounds healed slower in ARR hamsters. The results document a clear CR in wound healing, and indicate that the mere presence of organismal circadian organization enhances this aspect of immune function. Faster wound healing in CR-competent hamsters may be mediated by CR-driven coordination of the temporal order of mechanisms (inflammation, leukocyte trafficking, tissue remodeling) underlying cutaneous wound healing.

  4. Wound healing activity of honey: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vijaya, Kumari K; Nishteswar, K

    2012-07-01

    Vrana (wound) and its sequels play a major concern in the field of surgery as Vrana Ropana (wound healing) requires uneventful healing. The aim of the study was to evaluate the changes in physical and morphological properties due to topical application of Madhu (honey) on fresh traumatic wounds or cutaneous wounds. Ten patients of wounds of either sex were randomly selected. Site of the wound, shape, size, floor, and margin were recorded on day 0 and observed on day 7, 15, 20, and till the end of the healing for the progression of granulation, scar type, shape, size, and clinical symptoms. There was significant improvement in the healing process as Madhu possesses antibacterial, wound cleansing, wound healing properties and showed beneficiary effects.

  5. Rapid Healing of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis by High-Frequency Electrocauterization and Hydrogel Wound Care with or without DAC N-055: A Randomized Controlled Phase IIa Trial in Kabul

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Reto; Wentker, Pia; Mahfuz, Farouq; Stahl, Hans-Christian; Amin, Faquir Mohammad; Bogdan, Christian; Stahl, Kurt-Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Background Anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) due to Leishmania (L.) tropica infection is a chronic, frequently disfiguring skin disease with limited therapeutic options. In endemic countries healing of ulcerative lesions is often delayed by bacterial and/or fungal infections. Here, we studied a novel therapeutic concept to prevent superinfections, accelerate wound closure, and improve the cosmetic outcome of ACL. Methodology/Principal Findings From 2004 to 2008 we performed a two-armed, randomized, double-blinded, phase IIa trial in Kabul, Afghanistan, with patients suffering from L. tropica CL. The skin lesions were treated with bipolar high-frequency electrocauterization (EC) followed by daily moist-wound-treatment (MWT) with polyacrylate hydrogel with (group I) or without (group II) pharmaceutical sodium chlorite (DAC N-055). Patients below age 5, with facial lesions, pregnancy, or serious comorbidities were excluded. The primary, photodocumented outcome was the time needed for complete lesion epithelialization. Biopsies for parasitological and (immuno)histopathological analyses were taken prior to EC (1st), after wound closure (2nd) and after 6 months (3rd). The mean duration for complete wound closure was short and indifferent in group I (59 patients, 43.1 d) and II (54 patients, 42 d; p = 0.83). In patients with Leishmania-positive 2nd biopsies DAC N-055 caused a more rapid wound epithelialization (37.2 d vs. 58.3 d; p = 0.08). Superinfections occurred in both groups at the same rate (8.8%). Except for one patient, reulcerations (10.2% in group I, 18.5% in group II; p = 0.158) were confined to cases with persistent high parasite loads after healing. In vitro, DAC N-055 showed a leishmanicidal effect on pro- and amastigotes. Conclusions/Significance Compared to previous results with intralesional antimony injections, the EC plus MWT protocol led to more rapid wound closure. The tentatively lower rate of relapses and the acceleration of

  6. Wound healing: immunological aspects.

    PubMed

    Tsirogianni, Afrodite K; Moutsopoulos, Niki Maria; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M

    2006-04-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process, comprised of a series of a sequential events aiming to repair injured tissue. The role of the immune system in this process is not only to recognise and combat the newly presented antigens at the site of injury, but also to participate in the debridement of the damaged area and to contribute to the process of healing. In this review, we discuss the molecules and cells of the immune system that participate in tissue repair. We describe the mechanisms of immune recognition during initial insult and the innate and adaptive immune responses to injury. Finally, we address the role of the immune system in regeneration and repair.

  7. Wound healing in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tisi, Alessandra; Angelini, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Copper amine oxidases (CuAO) and flavin-containing amine oxidases (PAO) are hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing enzymes responsible for the oxidative de-amination of polyamines. Currently, a key role has been ascribed to apoplastic amine oxidases in plants, i.e., to behave as H2O2-delivering systems in the cell wall during cell growth and differentiation as well as in the context of host-pathogen interactions. Indeed, H2O2 is the co-substrate for the peroxidase-driven reactions during cell-wall maturation and a key signalling molecule in defence mechanisms. We recently demonstrated the involvement of an apoplastic PAO in the wound-healing process of the Zea mays mesocotyl. Experimental evidence indicated a similar role for an apoplastic PAO in Nicotiana tabacum. In this addendum we suggest that a CuAO activity is also involved in this healing event. PMID:19704660

  8. Nutritional support for wound healing.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Douglas; Miller, Alan L

    2003-11-01

    Healing of wounds, whether from accidental injury or surgical intervention, involves the activity of an intricate network of blood cells, tissue types, cytokines, and growth factors. This results in increased cellular activity, which causes an intensified metabolic demand for nutrients. Nutritional deficiencies can impede wound healing, and several nutritional factors required for wound repair may improve healing time and wound outcome. Vitamin A is required for epithelial and bone formation, cellular differentiation, and immune function. Vitamin C is necessary for collagen formation, proper immune function, and as a tissue antioxidant. Vitamin E is the major lipid-soluble antioxidant in the skin; however, the effect of vitamin E on surgical wounds is inconclusive. Bromelain reduces edema, bruising, pain, and healing time following trauma and surgical procedures. Glucosamine appears to be the rate-limiting substrate for hyaluronic acid production in the wound. Adequate dietary protein is absolutely essential for proper wound healing, and tissue levels of the amino acids arginine and glutamine may influence wound repair and immune function. The botanical medicines Centella asiatica and Aloe vera have been used for decades, both topically and internally, to enhance wound repair, and scientific studies are now beginning to validate efficacy and explore mechanisms of action for these botanicals. To promote wound healing in the shortest time possible, with minimal pain, discomfort, and scarring to the patient, it is important to explore nutritional and botanical influences on wound outcome.

  9. Honey: a potent agent for wound healing?

    PubMed

    Lusby, P E; Coombes, A; Wilkinson, J M

    2002-11-01

    Although honey has been used as a traditional remedy for burns and wounds, the potential for its inclusion in mainstream medical care is not well recognized. Many studies have demonstrated that honey has antibacterial activity in vitro, and a small number of clinical case studies have shown that application of honey to severely infected cutaneous wounds is capable of clearing infection from the wound and improving tissue healing. The physicochemical properties (eg, osmotic effects and pH) of honey also aid in its antibacterial actions. Research has also indicated that honey may possess antiinflammatory activity and stimulate immune responses within a wound. The overall effect is to reduce infection and to enhance wound healing in burns, ulcers, and other cutaneous wounds. It is also known that honeys derived from particular floral sources in Australia and New Zealand (Leptospermum spp) have enhanced antibacterial activity, and these honeys have been approved for marketing as therapeutic honeys (Medihoney and Active Manuka honey). This review outlines what is known about the medical properties of honey and indicates the potential for honey to be incorporated into the management of a large number of wound types.

  10. CEACAM1 deficiency delays important wound healing processes.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Sarah; Arabzadeh, Azadeh; Benlolo, Samantha; Breton, Valérie; Turbide, Claire; Beauchemin, Nicole; Nouvion, Anne-Laure

    2011-11-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process that requires the coordination of many cell types to achieve proper tissue repair. Four major overlapping processes have been identified in wound healing: hemostasis, inflammation, reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is a glycoprotein expressed in epithelial, endothelial, lymphoid, and myeloid cells. Given its known roles in angiogenesis, cell migration, and immune functions, we hypothesized that CEACAM1 might also be involved in cutaneous wound healing and that a number of relevant CEACAM1-positive cell types might contribute to wound healing. To evaluate the role of CEACAM1 in these processes, 6-mm-diameter skin wounds were inflicted on Ceacam1(-/-) and wild-type mice. Herein, we demonstrate that CEACAM1 deletion indeed affects wound healing in three key ways. Infiltration of F4/80(+) macrophages was decreased in Ceacam1(-/-) wounds, altering inflammatory processes. Reepithelialization in Ceacam1(-/-) wounds was delayed. Furthermore, the vascular density of the granulation tissue in Ceacam1(-/-) wounds was significantly diminished. These results confirm CEACAM1's role as an important regulator of key processes in cutaneous wound healing, although whether this works via a specific cell type or alterations in the functioning of multiple processes remains to be determined.

  11. Laser biostimulation of wound healing: bioimpedance measurements support histology.

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Hakan; Dervisoglu, Sergulen; Gulsoy, Murat; Ulgen, Yekta

    2016-11-01

    Laser biostimulation in medicine has become widespread supporting the idea of therapeutic effects of photobiomodulation in biological tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the biostimulation effect of laser irradiation on healing of cutaneous skin wounds, in vivo, by means of bioimpedance measurements and histological examinations. Cutaneous skin wounds on rats were subjected to 635 nm diode laser irradiations at two energy densities of 1 and 3 J/cm(2) separately. Changes in the electrical properties of the wound sites were examined with multi-frequency electrical impedance measurements performed on the 3rd, 7th, 10th, and 14th days following the wounding. Tissue samples were both morphologically and histologically examined to determine the relationship between electrical properties and structure of tissues during healing. Laser irradiations of both energy densities stimulated the wound healing process. In particular, laser irradiation of lower energy density had more evidence especially for the first days of healing process. On the 7th day of healing, 3 J/cm(2) laser-irradiated tissues had significantly smaller wound areas compared to non-irradiated wounds (p < 0.05). The electrical impedance results supported the idea of laser biostimulation on healing of cutaneous skin wounds. Thus, bioimpedance measurements may be considered as a non-invasive supplementary method for following the healing process of laser-irradiated tissues.

  12. Effect of gallium-arsenide laser, gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser and healing ointment on cutaneous wound healing in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, R V; Mezêncio, J M S; Benevides, G P; Matta, S L P; Neves, C A; Sarandy, M M; Vilela, E F

    2010-04-01

    This study determined the effects of gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser (GaAlAs), gallium-arsenide laser (GaAs) and Dersani healing ointment on skin wounds in Wistar rats. The parameters analyzed were: type I and III collagen fiber concentrations as well as the rate of wound closure. Five wounds, 12 mm in diameter, were made on the animals' backs. The depth of the surgical incision was controlled by removing the epithelial tissue until the dorsal muscular fascia was exposed. The animals were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine via intraperitoneal injection. The rats were randomly divided into five groups of 6 animals each, according to the treatment received. Group 1 (L4): GaAs laser (4 J/cm(2)); group 2 (L30): GaAlAs laser (30 J/cm(2)); group 3 (L60): GaAlAs laser (60 J/cm(2)); group 4 (D): Dersani ointment; group 5 (control): 0.9% saline. The applications were made daily over a period of 20 days. Tissue fragments were stained with picrosirius to distinguish type I collagen from type III collagen. The collagen fibers were photo-documented and analyzed using the Quantum software based on the primary color spectrum (red, yellow and blue). Significant results for wound closing rate were obtained for group 1 (L4), 7.37 mm/day. The highest concentration of type III collagen fibers was observed in group 2 (L30; 37.80 + or - 7.10%), which differed from control (29.86 + or - 5.15%) on the 20th day of treatment. The type I collagen fibers of group 1 (L4; 2.67 + or - 2.23%) and group 2 (L30; 2.87 + or - 2.40%) differed significantly from control (1.77 + or - 2.97%) on the 20th day of the experiment.

  13. Wound healing: part II. Clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Janis, Jeffrey; Harrison, Bridget

    2014-03-01

    Treatment of all wounds requires adequate wound bed preparation, beginning with irrigation and débridement. Complicated or chronic wounds may also require treatment adjuncts or specialized wound healing products. An extensive body of research and development has introduced novel wound healing therapies and scar management options. In this second of a two-part continuing medical education series on wound healing, the reader is offered an update on current wound healing technologies and recommendations for obtaining optimal outcomes.

  14. Comparative wound healing--are the small animal veterinarian's clinical patients an improved translational model for human wound healing research?

    PubMed

    Volk, Susan W; Bohling, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Despite intensive research efforts into understanding the pathophysiology of both chronic wounds and scar formation, and the development of wound care strategies to target both healing extremes, problematic wounds in human health care remain a formidable challenge. Although valuable fundamental information regarding the pathophysiology of problematic wounds can be gained from in vitro investigations and in vivo studies performed in laboratory animal models, the lack of concordance with human pathophysiology has been cited as a major impediment to translational research in human wound care. Therefore, the identification of superior clinical models for both chronic wounds and scarring disorders should be a high priority for scientists who work in the field of human wound healing research. To be successful, translational wound healing research should function as an intellectual ecosystem in which information flows from basic science researchers using in vitro and in vivo models to clinicians and back again from the clinical investigators to the basic scientists. Integral to the efficiency of this process is the incorporation of models which can accurately predict clinical success. The aim of this review is to describe the potential advantages and limitations of using clinical companion animals (primarily dogs and cats) as translational models for cutaneous wound healing research by describing comparative aspects of wound healing in these species, common acute and chronic cutaneous wounds in clinical canine and feline patients, and the infrastructure that currently exists in veterinary medicine which may facilitate translational studies and simultaneously benefit both veterinary and human wound care patients.

  15. Neutrophil depletion in the early inflammatory phase delayed cutaneous wound healing in older rats: improvements due to the use of un-denatured camel whey protein

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While it is known that advanced age alters the recruitment of neutrophils during wound healing, thereby delaying the wound healing process, little is known about prolonged wound healing in advanced ages. Thus, we investigated the correlation of neutrophil recruitment with healing events, and the impact of whey protein (WP) on neutrophil activation. Methods The animals were allocated into wounded young group, wounded older group and wounded older rats with daily treatment of WP at a dose of 100 mg/kg of body weight. Results Our results pointed to a marked deficiency in the number of neutrophils in the wounds of older rats, which was accompanied with impairment of the healing process. In the group of older rats, phagocytic activity, as tested by fluorescence microscopy, declined throughout the first 24 hours after wounding. Both the neutrophil number and the phagocytic activity recovered in older rats which received WP supplementation. Interestingly, WP was found to significantly up-regulate the MIP-1α and CINC-1 mRNA expression in old rats. On the other hand, the wound size in older rats was significantly higher than that in younger ones. Blood angiogenesis was also significantly delayed in the older group as opposed to the young rats. WP, however, was found to return these indices to normal levels in the older rats. Proliferation and epidermal migration of the keratinocytes and the collagen deposition were also returned to the normal rates. Conclusions This data confirms the critical role of neutrophil recruitment in the early inflammatory phase of wound healing in older rats. In addition, WP protein was used to improve neutrophil function in older rats, healing events returned to a more normal profile. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2100966986117779. PMID:24593823

  16. Histological evaluation of the healing properties of Dead Sea black mud on full-thickness excision cutaneous wounds in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Abu-al-Basal, Mariam A

    2012-04-01

    Dead Sea (DS) mud and salts are known for their therapeutic and cosmetic properties. Previous studies confirmed their efficacy in treating the more frequent skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the wound healing potential of natural and compounded skin-care product (facial mask) of DS black mud in BALB/c mice. Two full-thickness excision round wounds were created on the dorsum region of mouse. Each wound of mice test group were treated topically with 50 microL of 0.1% natural or compounded DS black mud or 50 microL of 0.2% nitrofurazone once a day for 2 consecutive days and the mice control group were left untreated. Healing was assessed by measuring the granulation tissue weight and percentage of wound contraction at day 3, 7, 14 and 21 after wounding. In addition to period of epithelialization and histological evaluation of the regenerated wound area at day 7 and 14 after wounding. Results revealed that DS black mud accelerate wound healing process by enhancing granulation, wound contraction, epithelialization, angiogenesis and collagen deposition. This may be due to high content of minerals and trace elements that possibly act as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant with enhancement effect on cell proliferation, migration and fibroblast cellular activity. However, the healing property of DS black mud compounded in skin-care product was greater than that of natural black mud, when compared to reference drug, nitrofurazone.

  17. Multimodal imaging of cutaneous wound tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Huang, Jiwei; Ren, Wenqi; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Quantitative assessment of wound tissue ischemia, perfusion, and inflammation provides critical information for appropriate detection, staging, and treatment of chronic wounds. However, few methods are available for simultaneous assessment of these tissue parameters in a noninvasive and quantitative fashion. We integrated hyperspectral, laser speckle, and thermographic imaging modalities in a single-experimental setup for multimodal assessment of tissue oxygenation, perfusion, and inflammation characteristics. Algorithms were developed for appropriate coregistration between wound images acquired by different imaging modalities at different times. The multimodal wound imaging system was validated in an occlusion experiment, where oxygenation and perfusion maps of a healthy subject’s upper extremity were continuously monitored during a postocclusive reactive hyperemia procedure and compared with standard measurements. The system was also tested in a clinical trial where a wound of three millimeters in diameter was introduced on a healthy subject’s lower extremity and the healing process was continuously monitored. Our in vivo experiments demonstrated the clinical feasibility of multimodal cutaneous wound imaging. PMID:25604545

  18. [Specificities in children wound healing].

    PubMed

    Sanchez, J; Antonicelli, F; Tuton, D; Mazouz Dorval, S; François, C

    2016-10-01

    Children have specific characteristics of wound healing. The aim of this study was to describe the specific clinical characteristics of wounds healing in children and to present the current knowledge on the specific mechanisms with regard to infant age. The tissue insult or injury in fetus can heal without scar, mainly due to reduced granulation tissue associated to diminished or even no inflammatory phase, modified extracellular matrix such as the concentration of hyaluronic acid in amniotic liquid, expression and arrangement of collagen and tenascin. Thickness of children skin is a serious negative factor in case of trauma, whereas poor co-morbidities and efficient growth tissue mechanisms are beneficial to good evolution, even in cases of extensive damage and loss of tissue. The subsequent tissue mechanical forces, wound healing during childhood, spanning from the age of 2 until the end of puberty, is associated with more hypertrophic scars, both in duration and in intensity. Consequently, unnecessary surgery has to be avoided during this period when possible, and children with abnormal or pathologic wound healing should benefit from complementary treatments (hydration, massage, brace, silicone, hydrotherapy…), which represent efficient factors to minimize tissue scarring. After wound healing, the growth body rate can be responsible for specific complications, such as contractures, alopecia, and scar intussusceptions. Its evolutionary character implies the need of an attentive follow-up until adult age. Psychologic repercussions, as a consequence of pathologic scars, must be prevented and investigated by the surgeon.

  19. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects.

  20. Healing in the irradiated wound

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.H.; Rudolph, R. )

    1990-07-01

    Poor or nonhealing of irradiated wounds has been attributed to progressive obliterative endarteritis. Permanently damaged fibroblasts may also play an important part in poor healing. Regardless of the cause, the key to management of irradiated skin is careful attention to prevent its breakdown and conservative, but adequate, treatment when wounds are minor. When wounds become larger and are painful, complete excision of the wound or ulcer is called for and coverage should be provided by a well-vascularized nonparasitic distant flap.16 references.

  1. Current concepts in wound management and wound healing products.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    Current concepts in wound management are summarized. The emphasis is on selection of the contact layer of the bandage to promote a moist wound environment. Selection of an appropriate contact layer is based on the stage of wound healing and the amount of wound exudate. The contact layer can be used to promote autolytic debridement and enhance wound healing.

  2. Progress in corneal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-01-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal epithelium, and

  3. Chitosan-alginate membranes accelerate wound healing.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Guilherme Ferreira; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Leite, Marcel Nani; Bueno, Cecilia Zorzi; Moraes, Ângela Maria; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chitosan-alginate membrane to accelerate wound healing in experimental cutaneous wounds. Two wounds were performed in Wistar rats by punching (1.5 cm diameter), treated with membranes moistened with saline solution (CAM group) or with saline only (SL group). After 2, 7, 14, and 21 days of surgery, five rats of each group were euthanized and reepithelialization was evaluated. The wounds/scars were harvested for histological, flow cytometry, neutrophil infiltrate, and hydroxyproline analysis. CAM group presented higher inflammatory cells recruitment as compared to SL group on 2(nd) day. On the 7(th) day, CAM group showed higher CD11b(+) level and lower of neutrophils than SL group. The CAM group presented higher CD4(+) cells influx than SL group on 2(nd) day, but it decreased during the follow up and became lower on 14(th) and 21(st) days. Higher fibroplasia was noticed on days 7 and 14 as well as higher collagenesis on 21(st) in the CAM group in comparison to SL group. CAM group showed faster reepithelialization on 7(th) day than SL group, although similar in other days. In conclusion, chitosan-alginate membrane modulated the inflammatory phase, stimulated fibroplasia and collagenesis, accelerating wound healing process in rats.

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone can accelerate cutaneous wound healing through myofibroblast differentiation in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Asada, Mayumi; Nagase, Takashi; Akase, Tomoko; Huang, Lijuan; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Ohta, Yasunori; Sanada, Hiromi

    2011-07-01

    Quorum sensing is a cell density-dependent gene regulation system in bacteria. N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) is used in the las quorum-sensing system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is an opportunistic pathogen that causes many human diseases. Although many studies have investigated the sole effects of quorum sensing on several types of mammalian cells, including lung cells, little is known about the effects of quorum sensing on the cells associated with wound healing. To better understand the mechanism of bacterial wound infection, we investigated the effects of 3-oxo-C12-HSL on cells using a rat full-thickness wound-healing model. We found that the wound contraction was significantly increased at 24 h after the administration of 3-oxo-C12-HSL to the surface of granulation tissue. Differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts was induced in the in vivo wound-healing model and was confirmed in vitro using the rat fibroblastic cell line Rat-1. Cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2 expression was also induced in Rat-1 cells by 3-oxo-C12-HSL. This finding suggested that Cox-2 upregulation may be related to the inflammatory findings in the histological examinations, in which infiltrating polymorphonuclear neutrophils were observed at the wound site. Taken together, these results imply that mammals have a potential defense system against invading pathogens by responding to the presence of 3-oxo-C12-HSL and inducing the differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts as well as inflammation for accelerating wound healing.

  5. [Physiology and pathophysiology of wound healing of wound defects].

    PubMed

    Mutschler, W

    2012-09-01

    Understanding wound healing involves more than simply stating that there are the three phases of inflammation, proliferation and maturation. Wound healing is a complex series of actions, reactions and interactions among cells and mediators in a sequential and simultaneously ongoing temporal process within a spatial frame. At first this article will attempt to provide a concise summary of the events, cellular components and main influential mediators of wound healing over time. Secondly, the pathophysiology of chronic non-healing wounds is described where an imbalance of stimulating and inhibiting factors causes failure of healing. The most relevant extrinsic and intrinsic determinants are described and related to the cellular and molecular level of disturbed wound healing. A basic understanding of wound healing is a prerequisite for any prophylactic or therapeutic maneuver to maintain or re-establish wound equilibrium to give a satisfactory healing trajectory.

  6. Sirtuin-6 deficiency exacerbates diabetes induced impairment of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Garikipati, Venkata Naga Srikanth; Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Babu, Sahana Suresh; Jeyabal, Prince; Verma, Suresh K; Mackie, Alexander R; Khan, Mohsin; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Watanabe, Kenichi; Kishore, Raj; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Delayed wound healing is one of the major complications in diabetes and is characterized by chronic proinflammatory response, and abnormalities in angiogenesis and collagen deposition. Sirtuin family proteins regulate numerous pathophysiological processes, including those involved in promotion of longevity, DNA repair, glycolysis and inflammation. However the role of sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), a NAD+-dependent nuclear deacetylase, in wound healing specifically under diabetic condition remains unclear. To analyze the role of SIRT6 in cutaneous wound healing, paired 6 mm stented wound were created in diabetic db/db mice and injected siRNA against SIRT6 in the wound margins (transfection agent alone and non-sensed siRNA served as controls). Wound time to closure was assessed by digital planimetry, and wounds were harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. SIRT6-siRNA treated diabetic wound showed impaired healing, which was associated with reduced capillary density (CD31 staining vessels) when compared to control treatment. Interestingly, SIRT6 deficiency decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and proliferation markers in the wounds. Furthermore, SIRT6 ablation in diabetic wound promotes nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) activation resulting in increased expression of proinflammatory markers (intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) and increased oxidative stress. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that loss of SIRT6 in cutaneous wound aggravates proinflammatory response by increasing NF-kB activation, oxidative stress and decrease in angiogenesis in the diabetic mice. Based on these findings, we speculate that activation of SIRT6 signaling might be a potential therapeutic approach for promoting wound healing in diabetics. PMID:26010430

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen and wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Sourabh; Vishwanath, Guruswamy

    2012-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is the use of 100% oxygen at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. Today several approved applications and indications exist for HBOT. HBOT has been successfully used as adjunctive therapy for wound healing. Non-healing wounds such as diabetic and vascular insufficiency ulcers have been one major area of study for hyperbaric physicians where use of HBOT as an adjunct has been approved for use by way of various studies and trials. HBOT is also indicated for infected wounds like clostridial myonecrosis, necrotising soft tissue infections, Fournier's gangrene, as also for traumatic wounds, crush injury, compartment syndrome, compromised skin grafts and flaps and thermal burns. Another major area of application of HBOT is radiation-induced wounds, specifically osteoradionecrosis of mandible, radiation cystitis and radiation proctitis. With the increase in availability of chambers across the country, and with increasing number of studies proving the benefits of adjunctive use for various kinds of wounds and other indications, HBOT should be considered in these situations as an essential part of the overall management strategy for the treating surgeon. PMID:23162231

  8. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing.

  9. 635nm diode laser biostimulation on cutaneous wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmaz, Hakan; Gülsoy, Murat; Ülgen, Yekta

    2014-05-01

    Biostimulation is still a controversial subject in wound healing studies. The effect of laser depends of not only laser parameters applied but also the physiological state of the target tissue. The aim of this project is to investigate the biostimulation effects of 635nm laser irradiation on the healing processes of cutaneous wounds by means of morphological and histological examinations. 3-4 months old male Wistar Albino rats weighing 330 to 350 gr were used throughout this study. Low-level laser therapy was applied through local irradiation of red light on open skin excision wounds of 5mm in diameter prepared via punch biopsy. Each animal had three identical wounds on their right dorsal part, at which two of them were irradiated with continuous diode laser of 635nm in wavelength, 30mW of power output and two different energy densities of 1 J/cm2 and 3 J/cm2. The third wound was kept as control group and had no irradiation. In order to find out the biostimulation consequences during each step of wound healing, which are inflammation, proliferation and remodeling, wound tissues removed at days 3, 7, 10 and 14 following the laser irradiation are morphologically examined and than prepared for histological examination. Fragments of skin including the margin and neighboring healthy tissue were embedded in paraffin and 6 to 9 um thick sections cut are stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Histological examinations show that 635nm laser irradiation accelerated the healing process of cutaneous wounds while considering the changes of tissue morphology, inflammatory reaction, proliferation of newly formed fibroblasts and formation and deposition of collagen fibers. The data obtained gives rise to examine the effects of two distinct power densities of low-level laser irradiation and compare both with the non-treatment groups at different stages of healing process.

  10. Influence of oxygen on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Yip, Wai Lam

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen has an important role in normal wound healing. This article reviews the evidence concerning the role of oxygen in wound healing and its influence on the different stages of wound healing. The evidence reviewed has demonstrated that improving oxygenation may be helpful in limiting wound infection, although there is a lack of good quality studies on the role of oxygen in the proliferative phase and in reepithelialisation. Overall, the relationship between oxygen and wound healing is complex. Knowledge of this aspect is important as many treatment modalities for refractory wounds are based on these principles.

  11. Wound Healing Problems in the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Politis, Constantinus; Schoenaers, Joseph; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Agbaje, Jimoh O.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a primary survival mechanism that is largely taken for granted. The literature includes relatively little information about disturbed wound healing, and there is no acceptable classification describing wound healing process in the oral region. Wound healing comprises a sequence of complex biological processes. All tissues follow an essentially identical pattern to complete the healing process with minimal scar formation. The oral cavity is a remarkable environment in which wound healing occurs in warm oral fluid containing millions of microorganisms. The present review provides a basic overview of the wound healing process and with a discussion of the local and general factors that play roles in achieving efficient would healing. Results of oral cavity wound healing can vary from a clinically healed wound without scar formation and with histologically normal connective tissue under epithelial cells to extreme forms of trismus caused by fibrosis. Many local and general factors affect oral wound healing, and an improved understanding of these factors will help to address issues that lead to poor oral wound healing. PMID:27853435

  12. Enhancement of wound healing by shikonin analogue 93/637 in normal and impaired healing.

    PubMed

    Mani, H; Sidhu, G S; Singh, A K; Gaddipati, J; Banaudha, K K; Raj, K; Maheshwari, R K

    2004-01-01

    Wound healing is a complicated biological process, which involves interactions of multiple cell types, various growth factors, their mediators and the extracellular matrix proteins. In this study, we evaluated the effects of shikonin analogue 93/637 (SA), derived from the plant Arnebia nobilis, on normal and hydrocortisone-induced impaired healing in full thickness cutaneous punch wounds in rats. SA (0.1%) was applied topically daily as an ointment in polyethylene glycol base on wounds. SA treatment significantly accelerated healing of wounds, as measured by wound contraction compared to controls in hydrocortisone-impaired animals. SA treatment promoted formation of granulation tissue including cell migration and neovascularization, collagenization and reepithelialization. The expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was higher as revealed by immunohistochemistry in treated wounds compared to controls. However, the expression of transforming growth factor-beta(1) was not affected by SA treatment. Since bFGF is known to accelerate wound healing, the increased expression of bFGF by SA may be partly responsible for the enhancement of wound healing. These studies suggest that SA could be further studied for clinical use to enhance wound healing.

  13. A potential wound healing-promoting peptide from frog skin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Mu, Lixian; Tang, Jing; Shen, Chuanbin; Gao, Chen; Rong, Mingqiang; Zhang, Zhiye; Liu, Jie; Wu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Haining; Lai, Ren

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a dynamic, complex, and well-organized process that requires the orchestration of many different cell types and cellular processes. Transforming growth factor β1 is an important factor that plays a key role during wound healing. Amphibian skin has been proven to possess excellent wound healing ability, whilst no bioactive substrate related to it has ever been identified. Here, a potential wound healing-promoting peptide (AH90, ATAWDFGPHGLLPIRPIRIRPLCG) was identified from the frog skin of Odorrana grahami. It showed potential wound healing-promoting activity in a murine model with full thickness dermal wound. AH90 promoted release of transforming growth factor β1 through activation of nuclear factor-κB and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathways, while inhibitors of nuclear factor-κB and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibited the process. In addition, the effects of AH90 on Smads family proteins, key regulators in transforming growth factor β1 signaling pathways, could also be inhibited by transforming growth factor β1 antibody. Altogether, this indicated that AH90 promoted wound healing by inducing the release of transforming growth factor β1. This current study may facilitate the understanding of effective factors involved in the wound repair of amphibians and the underlying mechanisms as well. Considering its favorable traits as a small peptide that greatly promoting generation of endogenous wound healing agents (transforming growth factor β1) without mitogenic effects, AH90 might be an excellent template for the future development of novel wound-healing agents.

  14. Phases of the wound healing process.

    PubMed

    Brown, Annemarie

    This is the first in a six-part series on wound management. It describes the stages of the wound healing process and explains how they relate to nursing practice. Nurses need to know how to recognise and understand the different phases so they can identify whether wounds are healing normally and apply the appropriate treatments to remove the barriers to healing. Part 2 (page 14) focuses on wound assessment.

  15. Platelets and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T; Nurden, Paquita; Sanchez, Mikel; Andia, Isabel; Anitua, Eduardo

    2008-05-01

    Platelets help prevent blood loss at sites of vascular injury. To do this, they adhere, aggregate and form a procoagulant surface favoring thrombin generation and fibrin formation. In addition, platelets express and release substances that promote tissue repair and influence processes such as angiogenesis, inflammation and the immune response. They contain large secretable pools of biologically active proteins, while newly synthesized active metabolites are also released. Although anucleate, activated platelets possess a spliceosome and can synthesize tissue factor and interleukin-1beta. The binding of secreted proteins within a developing fibrin mesh or to the extracellular matrix can create chemotactic gradients favoring the recruitment of stem cells, stimulating cell migration and differentiation, and promoting repair. The therapeutic use of platelets in a fibrin clot has a positive influence in clinical situations requiring rapid healing. Dental implant surgery, orthopaedic surgery, muscle and tendon repair, skin ulcers, hole repair in eye surgery and cardiac surgery are situations where the use of autologous platelets accelerates healing. We now review the ways in which platelets participate in these processes.

  16. Epidermal Smad4 deletion results in aberrant wound healing.

    PubMed

    Owens, Philip; Engelking, Erin; Han, Gangwen; Haeger, Sarah M; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we assessed the role of Smad4, a component of the transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway, in cutaneous wound repair. Interestingly, when Smad4 was deleted in the epidermis, several defects in wound healing were observed in non-keratinocyte compartments. In comparison with wounded wild-type mouse skin, Smad4-deficient wounds had delayed wound closure and remodeling. Increased angiogenesis and inflammation were found in Smad4-deficient skin; these effects were exacerbated throughout the entire wound healing process. In addition, increased numbers of myofibroblasts but reduced collagen levels were found in Smad4-deficient wounds in comparison with wild-type wounds. Since Smad4 is not a secreted protein, we assessed if the above non-cell autonomous alterations were the result of molecular alterations in Smad4-deficient keratinocytes, which exert paracrine effects on wound stroma. Smad4-deficient skin and wounds had elevated levels of transforming growth factor-beta1, which have been shown to induce similar phenotypes, as well as of several transforming growth factor-beta1 target genes, such as matrix metalloproteinases, vascular endothelial growth factor-A, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5. Furthermore, the above pathological and molecular alterations were exacerbated in skin cancer lesions that spontaneously developed from Smad4-deficient skin. Therefore, loss of Smad4 in the epidermis appears to significantly affect the microenvironment during wound healing and carcinogenesis.

  17. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers.

  18. Delayed wound healing in CXCR2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Devalaraja, R M; Nanney, L B; Du, J; Qian, Q; Yu, Y; Devalaraja, M N; Richmond, A

    2000-08-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the CXC chemokine, MGSA/GRO-alpha and its receptor, CXCR2, are expressed during wound healing by keratinocytes and endothelial cells at areas where epithelialization and neovascularization occur. The process of wound healing is dependent on leukocyte recruitment, keratinocyte proliferation and migration, and angiogenesis. These processes may be mediated in part by CXC chemokines, such as interleukin-8 and MGSA/GRO-alpha. To examine further the significance of CXC chemokines in wound healing, full excisional wounds were created on CXCR2 wild-type (+/+), heterozygous (+/-), or knockout (-/-) mice. Wounds were histologically analyzed for neutrophil and monocyte infiltration, neovascularization and epithelialization at days 3, 5, 7, and 10 postwounding. The CXCR2 -/- mice exhibited defective neutrophil recruitment, an altered temporal pattern of monocyte recruitment, and altered secretion of interleukin-1beta. Significant delays in wound healing parameters, including epithelialization and decreased neovascularization, were also observed in CXCR2 -/- mice. In vitro wounding experiments with cultures of keratinocytes established from -/- and +/+ mice revealed a retardation in wound closure in CXCR2 -/- keratinocytes, suggesting a role for this receptor on keratinocytes in epithelial resurfacing that is independent of neutrophil recruitment. These in vitro and in vivo studies further establish a pathophysiologic role for CXCR2 during cutaneous wound repair.

  19. Amyloidogenesis in Healing Wound

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Ken; Brownstein, Martin H.

    1972-01-01

    Clinically and histologically typical skin lesions of macular and lichenoid amyloidoses were biopsied. Rebiopsies were performed after 2 to 16 weeks, and the sequence of amyloid reproduction in granulation tissue was followed. Initially, medium electron-dense proteinaceous substance with fine filaments was produced within or in close relation to the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum of fibroblasts and subsequently discharged. Typical amyloid filaments emerged within and in the vicinity of this substance. A significant number of collagen fibrils were admixed in the centers of some amyloid islands. Predominantly amorphous amyloid substance was seen in contact with the basal laminae. No plasma cells were observed in foci of amyloid. Nonepithelialized wounds did not contain amyloid. It was suggested that, in the primary skin amyloidoses, abnormal dermal fibroblasts produce amyloid precursors under the influence of the epidermis. ImagesFig 9Fig 10Fig 4Fig 5Fig 11Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 1Fig 2Fig 8Fig 3 PMID:5049430

  20. Autologous bone marrow-derived cultured mesenchymal stem cells delivered in a fibrin spray accelerate healing in murine and human cutaneous wounds.

    PubMed

    Falanga, Vincent; Iwamoto, Satori; Chartier, Molly; Yufit, Tatyana; Butmarc, Janet; Kouttab, Nicholas; Shrayer, David; Carson, Polly

    2007-06-01

    The nonhematopoietic component of bone marrow includes multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) capable of differentiating into fat, bone, muscle, cartilage, and endothelium. In this report, we describe the cell culture and characterization, delivery system, and successful use of topically applied autologous MSC to accelerate the healing of human and experimental murine wounds. A single bone marrow aspirate of 35-50 mL was obtained from patients with acute wounds (n = 5) from skin cancer surgery and from patients with chronic, long-standing, nonhealing lower extremity wounds (n = 8). Cells were grown in vitro under conditions favoring the propagation of MSC, and flow cytometry and immunostaining showed a profile (CD29+, CD44+, CD105+, CD166+, CD34-, CD45-) highly consistent with published reports of human MSC. Functional induction studies confirmed that the MSC could differentiate into bone, cartilage, and adipose tissue. The cultured autologous MSC were applied up to four times to the wounds using a fibrin polymer spray system with a double-barreled syringe. Both fibrinogen (containing the MSC) and thrombin were diluted to optimally deliver a polymerized gel that immediately adhered to the wound, without run-off, and yet allowing the MSC to remain viable and migrate from the gel. Sequential adjacent sections from biopsy specimens of the wound bed after MSC application showed elongated spindle cells, similar to their in vitro counterparts, which immunostained for MSC markers. Generation of new elastic fibers was evident by both special stains and antibodies to human elastin. The application of cultured cells was safe, without treatment-related adverse events. A strong direct correlation was found between the number of cells applied (greater than 1 x 10(6) cells per cm2 of wound area) and the subsequent decrease in chronic wound size (p = 0.0058). Topical application of autologous MSC also stimulated closure of full-thickness wounds in diabetic mice (db

  1. Mitogenic whey extract stimulates wound repair activity in vitro and promotes healing of rat incisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Rayner, T E; Cowin, A J; Robertson, J G; Cooter, R D; Harries, R C; Regester, G O; Smithers, G W; Goddard, C; Belford, D A

    2000-06-01

    The ability of single growth factors to promote healing of normal and compromised wounds has been well described, but wound healing is a process requiring the coordinated action of multiple growth factors. Only the synergistic effect on wound healing of combinations containing at most two individual growth factors has been reported. We sought to assess the ability of a novel milk-derived growth factor-enriched preparation ¿mitogenic bovine whey extract (MBWE), which contains six known growth factors, to promote repair processes in organotypic in vitro models and incisional wounds in vivo. MBWE stimulated the contraction of fibroblast-populated collagen lattices in a dose-dependent fashion and promoted the closure of excisional wounds in embryonic day 17 fetal rat skin. Application of MBWE increased incisional wound strength in normal animals on days 3, 5, 7, and 10 and reversed the decrease in wound strength observed following steroid treatment. Wound histology showed increased fibroblast numbers in wounds from normal and steroid-compromised animals. These data suggest the mixture of factors present in bovine milk exerts a direct action on the cells of cutaneous wound repair to enhance both normal and compromised healing.

  2. The role of nuclear hormone receptors in cutaneous wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Sandra; Zhao, Hengguang; Martin, Paige; Abe, Koichiro; Lisse, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The cutaneous wound repair process involves balancing a dynamic series of events ranging from inflammation, oxidative stress, cell migration, proliferation, survival and differentiation. A complex series of secreted trophic factors, cytokines, surface and intracellular proteins are expressed in a temporospatial manner to restore skin integrity after wounding. Impaired initiation, maintenance or termination of the tissue repair processes can lead to perturbed healing, necrosis, fibrosis or even cancer. Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in the cutaneous environment regulate tissue repair processes such as fibroplasia and angiogenesis. Defects in functional NHRs and their ligands are associated with the clinical phenotypes of chronic non-healing wounds and skin endocrine disorders. The functional relationship between NHRs and skin niche cells such as epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts is pivotal for successful wound closure and permanent repair. The aim of this review is to delineate the cutaneous effects and cross-talk of various nuclear receptors upon injury towards functional tissue restoration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25529612

  3. Basics in nutrition and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wild, Thomas; Rahbarnia, Arastoo; Kellner, Martina; Sobotka, Lubos; Eberlein, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Wound healing is a process that can be divided into three different phases (inflammatory, proliferative, and maturation). Each is characterized by certain events that require specific components. However, wound healing is not always a linear process; it can progress forward and backward through the phases depending on various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. If the wound-healing process is affected negatively, this can result in chronic wounds. Chronic wounds demand many resources in the clinical daily routine. Therefore, local wound management and good documentation of the wound is essential for non-delayed wound healing and prevention of the development of chronic wounds. During the wound-healing process much energy is needed. The energy for the building of new cells is usually released from body energy stores and protein reserves. This can be very challenging for undernourished and malnourished patients. Malnutrition is very common in geriatric patients and patients in catabolic phases of stress such as after injury or surgery. For that reason a close survey of the nutritional status of patients is necessary to start supplementation quickly, if applicable. Wound healing is indeed a very complex process that deserves special notice. There are some approaches to develop guidelines but thus far no golden standard has evolved. Because wounds, especially chronic wounds, cause also an increasing economic burden, the development of guidelines should be advanced.

  4. Electrical Activation of Wound-Healing Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Penninger, Josef; Isseroff, Roslyn Rivkah

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective wound healing has been a lasting and challenging topic in health care. Various strategies have been used to accelerate and perfect the healing process. One such strategy has involved the application of an exogenous electrical stimulus to chronic wounds with the aim of stimulating healing responses. The Problem The biology of electric stimulation to instigate healing, however, is very poorly understood. How does electric stimulation induce healing responses? Basic/Clinical Science Advances Recent research shows that the electric fields (EFs) activate multiple signaling pathways that are critical for wound healing. Importantly, the EFs provide a powerful, sometimes an overriding, directional signal for cell migration in wound healing. Unlike other stimuli, EFs have the intrinsic property of being directional. The EF-directed cell migration (electrotaxis/galvanotaxis) appears to be a consequence of EF-induced polarized signaling of epidermal growth factor receptors, integrins, and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/Pten, and may be mediated by protein kinase C, intracellular Ca2+, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Because directional cell migration is a key component in wound healing, galvanotaxis may represent an important mechanism of wound healing. Clinical Care Relevance With the constantly enlarging diabetic and aging population, chronic or nonhealing wounds pose increasing health and economic problems, and currently there is no effective therapy available. Electric stimulation activates important intracellular signaling pathways that are polarized in the EF direction, resulting in enhanced and stimulated directional cell migration. Electric stimulation offers a novel approach to achieve better and accelerated wound healing. Conclusion Experimental evidence suggests a significant role of endogenous EFs in cell migration in wound healing. Most importantly, EFs are a very powerful signal to direct cell migration. Electric stimulation therefore

  5. The Role of Chemokines in Fibrotic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Main dermal forms of fibroproliferative disorders are hypertrophic scars (HTS) and keloids. They often occur after cutaneous wound healing after skin injury, or keloids even form spontaneously in the absence of any known injury. HTS and keloids are different in clinical performance, morphology, and histology, but they all lead to physical and psychological problems for survivors. Recent Advances: Although the mechanism of wound healing at cellular and tissue levels has been well described, the molecular pathways involved in wound healing, especially fibrotic healing, is incompletely understood. Critical Issues: Abnormal scars not only lead to increased health-care costs but also cause significant psychological problems for survivors. A plethora of therapeutic strategies have been used to prevent or attenuate excessive scar formation; however, most therapeutic approaches remain clinically unsatisfactory. Future Directions: Effective care depends on an improved understanding of the mechanisms that cause abnormal scars in patients. A thorough understanding of the roles of chemokines in cutaneous wound healing and abnormal scar formation will help provide more effective preventive and therapeutic strategies for dermal fibrosis as well as for other proliferative disorders. PMID:26543681

  6. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Laura E; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components, and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves toward precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered.

  7. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Laura E.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components, and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves toward precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered. PMID:27547189

  8. Overview of Wound Healing and Management.

    PubMed

    Childs, Dylan R; Murthy, Ananth S

    2017-02-01

    Wound healing is a highly complex chain of events, and although it may never be possible to eliminate the risk of experiencing a wound, clinicians' armamentarium continues to expand with methods to manage it. The phases of wound healing are the inflammatory phase, the proliferative phase, and the maturation phase. The pathway of healing is determined by characteristics of the wound on initial presentation, and it is vital to select the appropriate method to treat the wound based on its ability to avoid hypoxia, infection, excessive edema, and foreign bodies.

  9. Current management of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gottrup, F; Karlsmark, T

    2009-06-01

    While the understanding of wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades the improvements in clinical treatment has occurred to a minor degree. During the last years, however, new trends and initiatives have been launched, and we will continue to attain new information in the next decade. It is the hope that increasing parts of the new knowledge from basic wound healing research will be implemented in daily clinical practice. The development of new treatment products will also continue, and especially new technologies with combined types of dressing materials or dressing containing active substances will be accentuated. Further developments in the management structure and education will also continue and consensus of treatment guidelines, recommendations and organization models will hopefully be achieved.

  10. Current wound healing procedures and potential care

    PubMed Central

    Dreifke, Michael B.; Jayasuriya, Amil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting micro RNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage micro environment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection – all in the hopes of early detection of complications. PMID:25579968

  11. Current wound healing procedures and potential care.

    PubMed

    Dreifke, Michael B; Jayasuriya, Amil A; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C

    2015-03-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting microRNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage microenvironment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection - all in the hopes of early detection of complications.

  12. [Perioperative hypothermia. Impact on wound healing].

    PubMed

    Pietsch, A P; Lindenblatt, N; Klar, E

    2007-09-01

    Mild perioperative hypothermia is a common complication of anesthesia and surgery associated with several adverse effects including impaired wound healing and more frequently leads to wound infections. Perioperative hypothermia affects the hemostasis and various immune functions and therefore interferes with the initial phases of the wound healing process. Furthermore, perioperative hypothermia contributes to wound complications by inhibition of deposition of collagen and prolongation of postoperative catabolism. Wound complications prolong hospitalization and substantially increase medical costs. Thus, maintaining normothermia perioperatively is essential to reduce the number of wound complications.

  13. Acceleration Of Wound Healing Ny Photodynamic Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R.; Trauner, Kenneth

    2000-08-22

    Disclosed is a method for accelerating wound healing in a mammal. The method includes identifying an unhealed wound site or partially-healed wound site in a mammal; administering a photosensitizer to the mammal; waiting for a time period wherein the photosensitizer reaches an effective tissue concentration at the wound site; and photoactivating the photosensitizer at the wound site. The dose of photodynamic therapy is selected to stimulate the production of one or more growth factor by cells at the wound site, without causing tissue destruction.

  14. Use of the wound healing trajectory as an outcome determinant for acute wound healing.

    PubMed

    Franz, M G; Kuhn, M A; Wright, T E; Wachtel, T L; Robson, M C

    2000-01-01

    Accurate and clinically practical methods for measuring the progress of acute wound healing is necessary before interventions designed to optimize and even accelerate acute wound healing can be applied. Complete wound closure rates and operative wound closure severity are irrelevant to most acute wounds since most are closed at the time of primary tissue repair and remain closed throughout healing. Analogous to chronic wound closure, the rate of increase of incision tensile strength progressively decreases as time passes and 100% unwounded tissue strength is never achieved making the endpoint definition of "healed" vague. Conceptualizing acute wound healing in terms of its design elements with reintegration into a final outcome lends itself to the description of acute wound healing as a mathematical trajectory. Frequently such an equation is a rate expressing the change in an acute healing parameter, most often tensile strength, over time. Such an approach also normalizes misinterpretations in analysis or errors in theory developed by measuring healing parameters at fixed points in time. Distributions of fractional strength gain times (e.g., 85% normal strength) can be determined using statistical methodology similar that used for failure time of survival analysis. Preclinical studies show that acute wound healing trajectories can be shifted to the left from a "normal" or "impaired" curve to an accelerated or more "ideal" curve. A useful method for measuring acute wound healing outcomes is therefore required before the basic science of acute wound healing is inevitably applied to the problem of acute surgical wounds.

  15. Wound cleaning and wound healing: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Robert G; Unverdorben, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Chronic wounds present a significant societal burden in their cost of care, and they reduce patient quality of life. Key components of wound care include such measures as debridement, irrigation, and wound cleaning. Appropriate care removes necrotic tissue and reduces wound bioburden to enhance wound healing. Physical cleaning with debridement and irrigation is of documented efficacy. Wounds may be washed with water, saline, or Ringer's solution or cleaned with active ingredients, such as hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, acetic acid, alcohol, ionized silver preparations, chlorhexidine, polyhexanide/betaine solution, or povidone-iodine--the majority of which are locally toxic and of limited or no proven efficacy in enhancing wound healing. Although the consensus opinion is that these topical cleaning agents should not be routinely used, recent clinical evidence suggests that polyhexanide/betaine may be nontoxic and effective in enhancing wound healing. Further well-designed studies are needed.

  16. The Four-Herb Chinese Medicine Formula Tuo-Li-Xiao-Du-San Accelerates Cutaneous Wound Healing in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats through Reducing Inflammation and Increasing Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Na; Ma, Ze-Jun; Wang, Ying; Li, Yu-Zhu; Sun, Bei; Guo, Xin; Pan, Cong-Qing; Chen, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Impaired wound healing in diabetic patients is a serious complication that often leads to amputation or even death with limited effective treatments. Tuo-Li-Xiao-Du-San (TLXDS), a traditional Chinese medicine formula for refractory wounds, has been prescribed for nearly 400 years in China and shows good efficacy in promoting healing. In this study, we explored the effect of TLXDS on healing of diabetic wounds and investigated underlying mechanisms. Four weeks after intravenous injection of streptozotocin, two full-thickness excisional wounds were created with a 10 mm diameter sterile biopsy punch on the back of rats. The ethanol extract of TLXDS was given once daily by oral gavage. Wound area, histological change, inflammation, angiogenesis, and collagen synthesis were evaluated. TLXDS treatment significantly accelerated healing of diabetic rats and improved the healing quality. These effects were associated with reduced neutrophil infiltration and macrophage accumulation, enhanced angiogenesis, and increased collagen deposition. This study shows that TLXDS improves diabetes-impaired wound healing.

  17. Wound Healing Activity of Silibinin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Rojalini; Pattnaik, Ashok K.; Pradhan, Kishanta K.; Mehta, Beena K.; Pattanayak, Shakti P.; Banerjee, Sugato

    2016-01-01

    Background: Silibinin is a semi-purified fraction of silymarin contained in milk thistle (Silybum marianum Asteraceae). Primarily known for its hepatoprotective actions, silymarin may also stimulate epithelialization and reduce inflammation in excision wound. Previous studies show antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial actions of silibinin. However, wound healing property of silibinin is not well studied. Objective: This study investigates wound healing activity of silibinin topical formulation. Materials and Methods: Wound healing activity of 0.2% silibinin gel was assessed by incision and excision wound models in mice. Animals were divided into gel base, silibinin gel, and Mega Heal gel® treated groups with six animals in each group. Wound contraction, wound tissue tensile strength, and hydroxyproline content were measured, and histopathological evaluation of wound tissue of all the above treatment groups was carried out. Results: Application of 0.2% silibinin hydrogel for 8 days led to 56.3% wound contraction compared to 64.6% using standard Mega Heal gel with a subsequent increase in hydroxyproline content, which was significantly higher (P < 0.001) over control animals showing 33.2% contraction. After 14 days, percentage of contraction reached 96.1%, 97.6%, and 86.7%, respectively. Wound tissue tensile strength with silibinin (223.55 ± 3.82 g) and standard (241.38 ± 2.49 g) was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than control (174.06 ± 5.75 g). Histopathology of silibinin and standard gel treated wound tissue showed more fibroblasts, fewer macrophage infiltration, and well-formed collagen fibers. Conclusion: Here, we show potent wound healing activity of silibinin hydrogel formulation. SUMMARY 0.2% silibinin hydrogel showed potent wound healing activity in incision and excision wound models in mice. Abbreviations Used: ROS: Reactive oxygen species PMID:27695272

  18. Stem Cells in Skin Wound Healing: Are We There Yet?

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Mariana Teixeira; Pirraco, Rogério Pedro; Marques, Alexandra Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous wound healing is a serious problem worldwide that affects patients with various wound types, resulting from burns, traumatic injuries, and diabetes. Despite the wide range of clinically available skin substitutes and the different therapeutic alternatives, delayed healing and scarring are often observed. Recent Advances: Stem cells have arisen as powerful tools to improve skin wound healing, due to features such as effective secretome, self-renewal, low immunogenicity, and differentiation capacity. They represent potentially readily available biological material that can particularly target distinct wound-healing phases. In this context, mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote cell migration, angiogenesis, and a possible regenerative rather than fibrotic microenvironment at the wound site, mainly through paracrine signaling with the surrounding cells/tissues. Critical Issues: Despite the current insights, there are still major hurdles to be overcome to achieve effective therapeutic effects. Limited engraftment and survival at the wound site are still major concerns, and alternative approaches to maximize stem cell potential are a major demand. Future Directions: This review emphasizes two main strategies that have been explored in this context. These comprise the exploration of hypoxic conditions to modulate stem cell secretome, and the use of adipose tissue stromal vascular fraction as a source of multiple cells, including stem cells and factors requiring minimal manipulation. Nonetheless, the attainment of these approaches to target successfully skin regeneration will be only evident after a significant number of in vivo works in relevant pre-clinical models. PMID:27076994

  19. Epidermal T cells and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Havran, Wendy L; Jameson, Julie M

    2010-05-15

    The murine epidermis contains resident T cells that express a canonical gammadelta TCR. These cells arise from fetal thymic precursors and use a TCR that is restricted to the skin in adult animals. These cells assume a dendritic morphology in normal skin and constitutively produce low levels of cytokines that contribute to epidermal homeostasis. When skin is wounded, an unknown Ag is expressed on damaged keratinocytes. Neighboring gammadelta T cells then round up and contribute to wound healing by local production of epithelial growth factors and inflammatory cytokines. In the absence of skin gammadelta T cells, wound healing is impaired. Similarly, epidermal T cells from patients with healing wounds are activated and secreting growth factors. Patients with nonhealing wounds have a defective epidermal T cell response. Information gained on the role of epidermal-resident T cells in the mouse may provide information for development of new therapeutic approaches to wound healing.

  20. Spectroscopic Biomarkers for Monitoring Wound Healing and Infection in Wounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    civilian trauma center. The parameters bearing the most weight will be used to diagnose trauma wounds and predict patient outcome. 15. SUBJECT TERMS...are most important for a correct initial assessment of the wound along with a more accurate wound healing prediction. The parameters bearing the

  1. Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

    1983-10-01

    The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

  2. The role of hyaluronan in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Joseph S

    2014-04-01

    The polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) (synonyms - hyaluronic acid, hyaluronate) is a versatile, polymorphic, glycosoaminoglycan with vast biological functions. HA is found throughout the body, primarily residing in skin, thus playing an important role in wound healing. Research regarding HA's function has changed over the years, primarily focussing on a particular aspect or function. The contribution of HA in each stage of normal wound healing as well as its clinical wound dressing applications will be examined.

  3. Rapid identification of slow healing wounds.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kenneth; Covington, Scott; Sen, Chandan K; Januszyk, Michael; Kirsner, Robert S; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing wounds have a prevalence of 2% in the United States, and cost an estimated $50 billion annually. Accurate stratification of wounds for risk of slow healing may help guide treatment and referral decisions. We have applied modern machine learning methods and feature engineering to develop a predictive model for delayed wound healing that uses information collected during routine care in outpatient wound care centers. Patient and wound data was collected at 68 outpatient wound care centers operated by Healogics Inc. in 26 states between 2009 and 2013. The dataset included basic demographic information on 59,953 patients, as well as both quantitative and categorical information on 180,696 wounds. Wounds were split into training and test sets by randomly assigning patients to training and test sets. Wounds were considered delayed with respect to healing time if they took more than 15 weeks to heal after presentation at a wound care center. Eleven percent of wounds in this dataset met this criterion. Prognostic models were developed on training data available in the first week of care to predict delayed healing wounds. A held out subset of the training set was used for model selection, and the final model was evaluated on the test set to evaluate discriminative power and calibration. The model achieved an area under the curve of 0.842 (95% confidence interval 0.834-0.847) for the delayed healing outcome and a Brier reliability score of 0.00018. Early, accurate prediction of delayed healing wounds can improve patient care by allowing clinicians to increase the aggressiveness of intervention in patients most at risk.

  4. Biomarkers for wound healing and their evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Maheshwari, A; Chandra, A

    2016-01-01

    A biological marker (biomarker) is a substance used as an indicator of biological state. Advances in genomics, proteomics and molecular pathology have generated many candidate biomarkers with potential clinical value. Research has identified several cellular events and mediators associated with wound healing that can serve as biomarkers. Macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts and platelets release cytokines molecules including TNF-α, interleukins (ILs) and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) holds the greatest importance. As a result, various white cells and connective tissue cells release both matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Studies have demonstrated that IL-1, IL-6, and MMPs, levels above normal, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio are often present in non-healing wounds. Clinical examination of wounds for these mediators could predict which wounds will heal and which will not, suggesting use of these chemicals as biomarkers of wound healing. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will alleviate the recuperating process of chronic, non-healing wounds. Finding a specific biomarker for wound healing status would be a breakthrough in this field and helping treat impaired wound healing.

  5. Wound Healing Effect of Curcumin: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tejada, Silvia; Manayi, Azadeh; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Hajheydari, Zohreh; Gortzi, Olga; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-07-21

    Wound healing is a complex process that consists of several phases that range from coagulation, inflammation, accumulation of radical substances, to proliferation, formation of fibrous tissues and collagen, contraction of wound with formation of granulation tissue and scar. Since antiquity, vegetable substances have been used as phytotherapeutic agents for wound healing, and more recently natural substances of vegetable origin have been studied with the attempt to show their beneficial effect on wound treatment. Curcumin, the most active component of rhizome of Curcuma longa L. (common name: turmeric), has been studied for many years due to its bio-functional properties, especially antioxidant, radical scavenger, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, which play a crucial role in the wound healing process. Moreover, curcumin stimulated the production of the growth factors involved in the wound healing process, and so curcumin also accelerated the management of wound restoration. The aim of the present review is collecting and evaluating the literature data regarding curcumin properties potentially relevant for wound healing. Moreover, the investigations on the wound healing effects of curcumin are reported. In order to produce a more complete picture, the chemistry and sources of curcumin are also discussed.

  6. Curcumin enhances wound healing in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats and genetically diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, G S; Mani, H; Gaddipati, J P; Singh, A K; Seth, P; Banaudha, K K; Patnaik, G K; Maheshwari, R K

    1999-01-01

    Tissue repair and wound healing are complex processes that involve inflammation, granulation and tissue remodeling. Interactions of different cells, extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors are involved in wound healing, and are mediated by cytokines and growth factors. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a natural product obtained from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa, enhanced cutaneous wound healing in rats and guinea pigs. In this study, we have evaluated the efficacy of curcumin treatment by oral and topical applications on impaired wound healing in diabetic rats and genetically diabetic mice using a full thickness cutaneous punch wound model. Wounds of animals treated with curcumin showed earlier re-epithelialization, improved neovascularization, increased migration of various cells including dermal myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, and macrophages into the wound bed, and a higher collagen content. Immunohistochemical localization showed an increase in transforming growth factor-beta1 in curcumin-treated wounds compared to controls. Enhanced transforming growth factor-beta1 mRNA expression in treated wounds was confirmed by in situ hybridization, and laser scan cytometry. A delay in the apoptosis patterns was seen in diabetic wounds compared to curcumin treated wounds as shown by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridyl triphosphate nick end labeling analysis. Curcumin was effective both orally and topically. These results show that curcumin enhanced wound repair in diabetic impaired healing, and could be developed as a pharmacological agent in such clinical settings.

  7. Monitoring diabetic wound healing by NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Zubkov, Leonid; Zhu, Linda; Weingarten, Michael S; Tyagi, Som; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2005-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Lack of quantitative assessment of healing progress makes diabetic wound management a clinical challenge. We constructed an optical device based on near infrared diffuse optical spectroscopy and monitored the change in wound optical properties during healing. A single source, four detector frequency domain instrument with multiple wavelengths was employed in a streptozotocin induced diabetic rat animal model. Optical properties including absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were measured. Our results show that there is significant difference in the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient of the wounds between diabetic and controls rats, and such difference persists throughout the healing period. Our technique would be highly useful in monitoring and quantifying the wound healing process.

  8. Skin wound healing modulation by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2010-07-25

    Skin wound healing is a multi stage phenomenon that requires the activation, recruitment or activity of numerous cell types as keratinocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblast and inflammatory cells. Among the latter, macrophages appear to be central to this process. They colonize the wound at its very early stage and in addition to their protective immune role seem to organize the activity of other cell types at the following stages of the healing. Their benefit to this process is however controversial, as macrophages are described to promote the speed of healing but may also favour the fibrosis resulting from it in scars. Moreover wound healing defects are associated with abnormalities in the inflammatory phase. In this review, we summarise our knowledge on what are the Wound Associated Macrophages, and how they interact with the other cell types to control the reepithelisation, angiogenesis and the extracellular matrix remodelling. We believe this knowledge may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention on skin wounds.

  9. Low level diode laser accelerates wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Munqith S; Salman, Saif Dawood

    2013-05-01

    The effect of wound illumination time by pulsed diode laser on the wound healing process was studied in this paper. For this purpose, the original electronic drive circuit of a 650-nm wavelength CW diode laser was reconstructed to give pulsed output laser of 50 % duty cycle and 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Twenty male mice, 3 months old were used to follow up the laser photobiostimulation effect on the wound healing progress. They were subdivided into two groups and then the wounds were made on the bilateral back sides of each mouse. Two sessions of pulsed laser therapy were carried along 15 days. Each mice group wounds were illuminated by this pulsed laser for 12 or 18 min per session during these 12 days. The results of this study were compared with the results of our previous wound healing therapy study by using the same type of laser. The mice wounds in that study received only 5 min of illumination time therapy in the first and second days of healing process. In this study, we found that the wounds, which were illuminated for 12 min/session healed in about 3 days earlier than those which were illuminated for 18 min/session. Both of them were healed earlier in about 10-11 days than the control group did.

  10. Diabetic wound healing in a MMP9-/- mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongkwan; Balaji, Swathi; Hone, Natalie L; Moles, Chad M; Sheikh, Abdul Q; Crombleholme, Timothy M; Keswani, Sundeep G; Narmoneva, Daria A

    2016-09-01

    Reduced mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) from the bone marrow (BM) and impaired EPC recruitment into the wound represent a fundamental deficiency in the chronic ulcers. However, mechanistic understanding of the role of BM-derived EPCs in cutaneous wound neovascularization and healing remains incomplete, which impedes development of EPC-based wound healing therapies. The objective of this study was to determine the role of EPCs in wound neovascularization and healing both under normal conditions and using single deficiency (EPC) or double-deficiency (EPC + diabetes) models of wound healing. MMP9 knockout (MMP9 KO) mouse model was utilized, where impaired EPC mobilization can be rescued by stem cell factor (SCF). The hypotheses were: (1) MMP9 KO mice exhibit impaired wound neovascularization and healing, which are further exacerbated with diabetes; (2) these impairments can be rescued by SCF administration. Full-thickness excisional wounds with silicone splints to minimize contraction were created on MMP9 KO mice with/without streptozotocin-induced diabetes in the presence or absence of tail-vein injected SCF. Wound morphology, vascularization, inflammation, and EPC mobilization and recruitment were quantified at day 7 postwounding. Results demonstrate no difference in wound closure and granulation tissue area between any groups. MMP9 deficiency significantly impairs wound neovascularization, increases inflammation, decreases collagen deposition, and decreases peripheral blood EPC (pb-EPC) counts when compared with wild-type (WT). Diabetes further increases inflammation, but does not cause further impairment in vascularization, as compared with MMP9 KO group. SCF improves neovascularization and increases EPCs to WT levels (both nondiabetic and diabetic MMP9 KO groups), while exacerbating inflammation in all groups. SCF rescues EPC-deficiency and impaired wound neovascularization in both diabetic and nondiabetic MMP9 KO mice. Overall, the

  11. Loss of Innervation and Axon Plasticity Accompanies Impaired Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chu; Kan, Michelle; Martinez, Jose A.; Zochodne, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of cutaneous innervation from sensory neuropathy is included among mechanisms for impaired healing of diabetic skin wounds. The relationships between cutaneous axons and their local microenvironment during wound healing are challenged in diabetes. Here, we show that secondary wound closure of the hairy dorsal skin of mice is delayed by diabetes and is associated with not only a pre-existing loss of cutaneous axons but substantial retraction of axons around the wound. At 7d following a 3mm punch wound, a critical period of healing and reinnervation, both intact skin nearby the wound and skin directly at the wound margins had over 30-50% fewer axons and a larger deficit of ingrowing axons in diabetics. These findings contrasted with a pre-existing 10-15% deficit in axons. Moreover, new diabetic ingrowing axons had less evidence of plasticity. Unexpectedly, hair follicles adjacent to the wounds had a 70% reduction in their innervation associated with depleted expression of hair follicular stem cell markers. These impairments were associated with the local upregulation of two established axon regenerative ‘roadblocks’: PTEN and RHOA, potential but thus far unexplored mediators of these changes. The overall findings identify striking and unexpected superimposed cutaneous axon loss or retraction beyond that expected of diabetic neuropathy alone, associated with experimental diabetic skin wounding, a finding that prompts new considerations in diabetic wounds. PMID:24098736

  12. Low-intensity vibration improves angiogenesis and wound healing in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M; Judex, Stefan; Ennis, William J; Koh, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent a significant health problem, especially in diabetic patients. In the current study, we investigated a novel therapeutic approach to wound healing--whole body low-intensity vibration (LIV). LIV is anabolic for bone, by stimulating the release of growth factors, and modulating stem cell proliferation and differentiation. We hypothesized that LIV improves the delayed wound healing in diabetic mice by promoting a pro-healing wound environment. Diabetic db/db mice received excisional cutaneous wounds and were subjected to LIV (0.4 g at 45 Hz) for 30 min/d or a non-vibrated sham treatment (controls). Wound tissue was collected at 7 and 15 d post-wounding and wound healing, angiogenesis, growth factor levels and wound cell phenotypes were assessed. LIV increased angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation at day 7, and accelerated wound closure and re-epithelialization over days 7 and 15. LIV also reduced neutrophil accumulation and increased macrophage accumulation. In addition, LIV increased expression of pro-healing growth factors and chemokines (insulin-like growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor and monocyte chemotactic protein-1) in wounds. Despite no evidence of a change in the phenotype of CD11b+ macrophages in wounds, LIV resulted in trends towards a less inflammatory phenotype in the CD11b- cells. Our findings indicate that LIV may exert beneficial effects on wound healing by enhancing angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation, and these changes are associated with increases in pro-angiogenic growth factors.

  13. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jumaat Mohd. Yussof; Omar, Effat; Pai, Dinker R.; Sood, Suneet

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs) and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth factors initiate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation. Inflammation is followed by the proliferation of fibroblasts, which lay down the extracellular matrix. Simultaneously, various white cells and other connective tissue cells release both the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of these metalloproteinases (TIMPs). MMPs remove damaged structural proteins such as collagen, while the fibroblasts lay down fresh extracellular matrix proteins. Fluid collected from acute, healing wounds contains growth factors, and stimulates fibroblast proliferation, but fluid collected from chronic, nonhealing wounds does not. Fibroblasts from chronic wounds do not respond to chronic wound fluid, probably because the fibroblasts of these wounds have lost the receptors that respond to cytokines and growth factors. Nonhealing wounds contain high levels of IL1, IL6, and MMPs, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio. Clinical examination of wounds inconsistently predicts which wounds will heal when procedures like secondary closure are planned. Surgeons therefore hope that these chemicals can be used as biomarkers of wounds which have impaired ability to heal. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will help the healing of chronic, nonhealing wounds. PMID:23162220

  14. Honey: an immunomodulator in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Majtan, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Honey is a popular natural product that is used in the treatment of burns and a broad spectrum of injuries, in particular chronic wounds. The antibacterial potential of honey has been considered the exclusive criterion for its wound healing properties. The antibacterial activity of honey has recently been fully characterized in medical-grade honeys. Recently, the multifunctional immunomodulatory properties of honey have attracted much attention. The aim of this review is to provide closer insight into the potential immunomodulatory effects of honey in wound healing. Honey and its components are able to either stimulate or inhibit the release of certain cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6) from human monocytes and macrophages, depending on wound condition. Similarly, honey seems to either reduce or activate the production of reactive oxygen species from neutrophils, also depending on the wound microenvironment. The honey-induced activation of both types of immune cells could promote debridement of a wound and speed up the repair process. Similarly, human keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cell responses (e.g., cell migration and proliferation, collagen matrix production, chemotaxis) are positively affected in the presence of honey; thus, honey may accelerate reepithelization and wound closure. The immunomodulatory activity of honey is highly complex because of the involvement of multiple quantitatively variable compounds among honeys of different origins. The identification of these individual compounds and their contributions to wound healing is crucial for a better understanding of the mechanisms behind honey-mediated healing of chronic wounds.

  15. Practices in Wound Healing Studies of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Rupesh; Jain, Nitika; Pathak, Raghvendra; Sandhu, Sardul Singh

    2011-01-01

    Wounds are the result of injuries to the skin that disrupt the other soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and protracted process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. Various plant products have been used in treatment of wounds over the years. Wound healing herbal extracts promote blood clotting, fight infection, and accelerate the healing of wounds. Phytoconstituents derived from plants need to be identified and screened for antimicrobial activity for management of wounds. The in vitro assays are useful, quick, and relatively inexpensive. Small animals provide a multitude of model choices for various human wound conditions. The study must be conducted after obtaining approval of the Ethics Committee and according to the guidelines for care and use of animals. The prepared formulations of herbal extract can be evaluated by various physicopharmaceutical parameters. The wound healing efficacies of various herbal extracts have been evaluated in excision, incision, dead space, and burn wound models. In vitro and in vivo assays are stepping stones to well-controlled clinical trials of herbal extracts. PMID:21716711

  16. Dendritic epidermal T cells facilitate wound healing in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyang; Xu, Yingbin; Chen, Lei; Xie, Julin; Tang, Jinming; Zhao, Jingling; Shu, Bin; Qi, Shaohai; Chen, Jian; Liang, Guangping; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun; He, Weifeng; Liu, Xusheng

    2016-01-01

    The impairment of skin repair in diabetic patients can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Proper proliferation, apoptosis and migration in keratinocytes are vital for skin repair, but in diabetic patients, hyperglycemia impairs this process. Dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) are an important part of the resident cutaneous immunosurveillance program. We observed a reduction in the number of DETCs in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model. This reduction in DETCs resulted in decreased IGF-1 and KGF production in the epidermis, which is closely associated with diabetic delayed wound closure. DETCs ameliorated the poor wound-healing conditions in diabetic mice by increasing keratinocyte migration and proliferation and decreasing keratinocyte apoptosis in diabetes-like microenvironments. Our results elucidate a new mechanism for diabetic delayed wound closure and point to a new strategy for the treatment of wounds in diabetic patients. PMID:27347345

  17. Regeneration: the ultimate example of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Murawala, Prayag; Tanaka, Elly M; Currie, Joshua D

    2012-12-01

    The outcome of wound repair in mammals is often characterized by fibrotic scaring. Vertebrates such as zebrafish, frogs, and salamanders not only heal scarlessly, but also can regenerate lost appendages. Decades of study on the process of animal regeneration has produced key insights into the mechanisms of how complex tissue is restored. By examining our current knowledge of regeneration, we can draw parallels with mammalian wound healing to identify the molecular determinants that produce such differing outcomes.

  18. Trehalose lyophilized platelets for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Pietramaggiori, Giorgio; Kaipainen, Arja; Ho, David; Orser, Cindy; Pebley, Walter; Rudolph, Alan; Orgill, Dennis P

    2007-01-01

    Fresh platelet preparations are utilized to treat a wide variety of wounds, although storage limitations and mixed results have hampered their clinical use. We hypothesized that concentrated lyophilized and reconstituted platelet preparations, preserved with trehalose, maintain and possibly enhance fresh platelets' ability to improve wound healing. We studied the ability of a single dose of trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets to enhance wound healing when topically applied on full-thickness wounds in the genetically diabetic mouse. We compared these results with the application of multiple doses of fresh platelet preparations and trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets as well as multiple doses of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and wounds left untreated. Trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets, in single and multiple applications, multiple applications of fresh platelets and multiple applications of VEGF increased granulation tissue deposition, vascularity, and proliferation when compared with untreated wounds, as assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Wounds treated with multiple doses of VEGF and a single dose of freeze-dried platelets reached 90% closure faster than wounds left untreated. A single administration of trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelet preparations enhanced diabetic wound healing, therefore representing a promising strategy for the treatment of nonhealing wounds.

  19. Using behavior modification to promote wound healing.

    PubMed

    Rivera, E; Walsh, A; Bradley, M

    2000-10-01

    Successfully caring for patients with wounds under PPS demands that current practice approaches must change. Instead of focusing on dressings and techniques alone, this article describes how first addressing patients' psychological readiness for change can move them quickly to self-care and enhance wound healing, which results in cost savings and better outcomes.

  20. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  1. Computational Modeling of Inflammation and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Mi, Qi; An, Gary; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Objective Inflammation is both central to proper wound healing and a key driver of chronic tissue injury via a positive-feedback loop incited by incidental cell damage. We seek to derive actionable insights into the role of inflammation in wound healing in order to improve outcomes for individual patients. Approach To date, dynamic computational models have been used to study the time evolution of inflammation in wound healing. Emerging clinical data on histo-pathological and macroscopic images of evolving wounds, as well as noninvasive measures of blood flow, suggested the need for tissue-realistic, agent-based, and hybrid mechanistic computational simulations of inflammation and wound healing. Innovation We developed a computational modeling system, Simple Platform for Agent-based Representation of Knowledge, to facilitate the construction of tissue-realistic models. Results A hybrid equation–agent-based model (ABM) of pressure ulcer formation in both spinal cord-injured and -uninjured patients was used to identify control points that reduce stress caused by tissue ischemia/reperfusion. An ABM of arterial restenosis revealed new dynamics of cell migration during neointimal hyperplasia that match histological features, but contradict the currently prevailing mechanistic hypothesis. ABMs of vocal fold inflammation were used to predict inflammatory trajectories in individuals, possibly allowing for personalized treatment. Conclusions The intertwined inflammatory and wound healing responses can be modeled computationally to make predictions in individuals, simulate therapies, and gain mechanistic insights. PMID:24527362

  2. Mechanoregulation of Wound Healing and Skin Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rosińczuk, Joanna; Taradaj, Jakub; Dymarek, Robert; Sopel, Mirosław

    2016-01-01

    Basic and clinical studies on mechanobiology of cells and tissues point to the importance of mechanical forces in the process of skin regeneration and wound healing. These studies result in the development of new therapies that use mechanical force which supports effective healing. A better understanding of mechanobiology will make it possible to develop biomaterials with appropriate physical and chemical properties used to treat poorly healing wounds. In addition, it will make it possible to design devices precisely controlling wound mechanics and to individualize a therapy depending on the type, size, and anatomical location of the wound in specific patients, which will increase the clinical efficiency of the therapy. Linking mechanobiology with the science of biomaterials and nanotechnology will enable in the near future precise interference in abnormal cell signaling responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and restoration of the biological balance. The objective of this study is to point to the importance of mechanobiology in regeneration of skin damage and wound healing. The study describes the influence of rigidity of extracellular matrix and special restrictions on cell physiology. The study also defines how and what mechanical changes influence tissue regeneration and wound healing. The influence of mechanical signals in the process of proliferation, differentiation, and skin regeneration is tagged in the study. PMID:27413744

  3. Mechanoregulation of Wound Healing and Skin Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rosińczuk, Joanna; Taradaj, Jakub; Dymarek, Robert; Sopel, Mirosław

    2016-01-01

    Basic and clinical studies on mechanobiology of cells and tissues point to the importance of mechanical forces in the process of skin regeneration and wound healing. These studies result in the development of new therapies that use mechanical force which supports effective healing. A better understanding of mechanobiology will make it possible to develop biomaterials with appropriate physical and chemical properties used to treat poorly healing wounds. In addition, it will make it possible to design devices precisely controlling wound mechanics and to individualize a therapy depending on the type, size, and anatomical location of the wound in specific patients, which will increase the clinical efficiency of the therapy. Linking mechanobiology with the science of biomaterials and nanotechnology will enable in the near future precise interference in abnormal cell signaling responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and restoration of the biological balance. The objective of this study is to point to the importance of mechanobiology in regeneration of skin damage and wound healing. The study describes the influence of rigidity of extracellular matrix and special restrictions on cell physiology. The study also defines how and what mechanical changes influence tissue regeneration and wound healing. The influence of mechanical signals in the process of proliferation, differentiation, and skin regeneration is tagged in the study.

  4. [Actin in the wound healing process].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dorota; Popow-Woźniak, Agnieszka; Raźnikiewicz, Linda; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is an important biological process of crucial value for organisms survival and retention of its proper functions. The recognition of molecular mechanisms of these phenomenon is still under investigation. The transition of mesenchymal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a key point in wound healing. The contraction ability of myofibroblast enables the shrinkage of a wound and closes its edges. Alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), one of six actin isoforms, is a marker of compeletely differentiated myofibroblast. The regulation of differentiation process depends on many growth factors (especially TGF beta 1), the level of active thymosin beta 4, extracellular matrix proteins--including fibronectin, and also on specificity of microenvironment. Thymosin beta 4 is responsible for maintenance of pool of monomeric actin and actin filaments depolymerization. It can also act as a transcription factor, migration stimulator and immunomodulator, so this protein deserves for more attention in wound healing research field.

  5. Host Defense Peptides in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Koehler, Till; Jacobsen, Frank; Daigeler, Adrien; Goertz, Ole; Langer, Stefan; Kesting, Marco; Steinau, Hans; Eriksson, Elof; Hirsch, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Host defense peptides are effector molecules of the innate immune system. They show broad antimicrobial action against gram-positive and -negative bacteria, and they likely play a key role in activating and mediating the innate as well as adaptive immune response in infection and inflammation. These features make them of high interest for wound healing research. Non-healing and infected wounds are a major problem in patient care and health care spending. Increasing infection rates, growing bacterial resistance to common antibiotics, and the lack of effective therapeutic options for the treatment of problematic wounds emphasize the need for new approaches in therapy and pathophysiologic understanding. This review focuses on the current knowledge of host defense peptides affecting wound healing and infection. We discuss the current data and highlight the potential future developments in this field of research. PMID:18385817

  6. Curcumin-encapsulated nanoparticles as innovative antimicrobial and wound healing agent.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Aimee E; Adler, Brandon L; Cabral, Vitor; Navati, Mahantesh; Doerner, Jessica; Charafeddine, Rabab A; Chandra, Dinesh; Liang, Hongying; Gunther, Leslie; Clendaniel, Alicea; Harper, Stacey; Friedman, Joel M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    Burn wounds are often complicated by bacterial infection, contributing to morbidity and mortality. Agents commonly used to treat burn wound infection are limited by toxicity, incomplete microbial coverage, inadequate penetration, and rising resistance. Curcumin is a naturally derived substance with innate antimicrobial and wound healing properties. Acting by multiple mechanisms, curcumin is less likely than current antibiotics to select for resistant bacteria. Curcumin's poor aqueous solubility and rapid degradation profile hinder usage; nanoparticle encapsulation overcomes this pitfall and enables extended topical delivery of curcumin. In this study, we synthesized and characterized curcumin nanoparticles (curc-np), which inhibited in vitro growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in dose-dependent fashion, and inhibited MRSA growth and enhanced wound healing in an in vivo murine wound model. Curc-np may represent a novel topical antimicrobial and wound healing adjuvant for infected burn wounds and other cutaneous injuries.

  7. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  8. Nanotechnology-Driven Therapeutic Interventions in Wound Healing: Potential Uses and Applications.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Suzana; Pastar, Irena; Drakulich, Stefan; Dikici, Emre; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Deo, Sapna; Daunert, Sylvia

    2017-03-22

    The chronic nature and associated complications of nonhealing wounds have led to the emergence of nanotechnology-based therapies that aim at facilitating the healing process and ultimately repairing the injured tissue. A number of engineered nanotechnologies have been proposed demonstrating unique properties and multiple functions that address specific problems associated with wound repair mechanisms. In this outlook, we highlight the most recently developed nanotechnology-based therapeutic agents and assess the viability and efficacy of each treatment, with emphasis on chronic cutaneous wounds. Herein we explore the unmet needs and future directions of current technologies, while discussing promising strategies that can advance the wound-healing field.

  9. Nanotechnology-Driven Therapeutic Interventions in Wound Healing: Potential Uses and Applications

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The chronic nature and associated complications of nonhealing wounds have led to the emergence of nanotechnology-based therapies that aim at facilitating the healing process and ultimately repairing the injured tissue. A number of engineered nanotechnologies have been proposed demonstrating unique properties and multiple functions that address specific problems associated with wound repair mechanisms. In this outlook, we highlight the most recently developed nanotechnology-based therapeutic agents and assess the viability and efficacy of each treatment, with emphasis on chronic cutaneous wounds. Herein we explore the unmet needs and future directions of current technologies, while discussing promising strategies that can advance the wound-healing field. PMID:28386594

  10. Nutrient support of the healing wound.

    PubMed

    Meyer, N A; Muller, M J; Herndon, D N

    1994-05-01

    Wound healing is a series of complex physicochemical interactions that require various micronutrients at every step. In the critically ill or severely injured patient, wound healing is impaired by the protein-catabolic, hypermetabolic response to stress. The hypothalamus responds to cytokine stimulation by increasing the thermoregulatory set-point and by augmenting elaboration of stress hormones (catecholamines, cortisol, and glucagon). In turn, the stress hormones induce thermogenic futile substrate cycling, lipolysis, and proteolysis. Increased glucose production results at the expense of skeletal muscle degradation, producing amino acid substrate for hepatic gluconeogenesis. Nutritional support of the hypermetabolic state is an essential part of ensuring efficient wound healing in these patients. Protein catabolism cannot be reversed by increased amino acid availability alone, due partly to a defect in amino acid transport. This defect can be reversed by anabolic agents, such as growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1. Growth hormone treatment dramatically improves wound healing in severely burned children. Supplementation with protein and vitamins, specifically arginine and vitamins A, B, and C, provides optimum nutrient support of the healing wound.

  11. Efficacy of Jasminum grandiflorum L. leaf extract on dermal wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Adya P; Kumar, Mohan; Tripathi, Yamini B

    2013-12-01

    Wound healing is a fundamental response to tissue injury and natural products accelerate the healing process. Here, we have explored the efficacy of topical administration of an ointment, prepared by methanolic extract of Jasminum grandiflorum L. (Oleaceae) leaves, on cutaneous wound healing in rats. The topical application of the Jasminum ointment on full thickness excision wounds accelerated the healing process. Tissue growth and collagen synthesis were significantly higher determined by total hydroxyl proline, hexosamine, protein and DNA content. The response was concentration- and time-dependent, when observed on days 4, 8 and 12 after wound creation. The rate of wound healing was faster as determined by wound contraction, tensile strength and other histopathological changes. In addition, this ointment also raised the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) with high GSH content and low lipid peroxidation products in wound tissue. Thus, it could be suggested that the ointment from the methanolic extract of J. grandiflorum leaf improves the rate of wound healing by enhancing the rate of collagen synthesis and also by improving the antioxidant status in the newly synthesised healing wound tissue.

  12. Nutritional Aspects of Gastrointestinal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Kaushik; Kavalukas, Sandra L.; Barbul, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Although the wound healing cascade is similar in many tissues, in the gastrointestinal tract mucosal healing is critical for processes such as inflammatory bowel disease and ulcers and healing of the mucosa, submucosa, and serosal layers is needed for surgical anastomoses and for enterocutaneous fistula. Failure of wound healing can result in complications including infection, prolonged hospitalization, critical illness, organ failure, readmission, new or worsening enterocutaneous fistula, and even death. Recent Advances: Recent advances are relevant for the role of specific micronutrients, such as vitamin D, trace elements, and the interplay between molecules with pro- and antioxidant properties. Our understanding of the role of other small molecules, genes, proteins, and macronutrients is also rapidly changing. Recent work has elucidated relationships between oxidative stress, nutritional supplementation, and glucose metabolism. Thresholds have also been established to define adequate preoperative nutritional status. Critical Issues: Further work is needed to establish standards and definitions for measuring the extent of wound healing, particularly for inflammatory bowel disease and ulcers. In addition, a mounting body of evidence has determined the need for adequate preoperative nutritional supplementation for elective surgical procedures. Future Directions: A large portion of current work is restricted to model systems in rodents. Therefore, additional clinical and translational research is needed in this area to promote gastrointestinal wound healing in humans, particularly those suffering from critical illness, patients with enterocutaneous fistula, inflammatory bowel disease, and ulcers, and those undergoing surgical procedures. PMID:27867755

  13. New developments in wound healing relevant to facial plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hom, David B

    2008-01-01

    To review new advances in wound healing over the last decade relevant to facial plastic surgery, recent studies in wound healing and its clinical implications were evaluated. New biological and clinical products in wound healing have implications in facial plastic surgery. These products will alter the method with which we approach normal and poorly healing wounds. The US Food and Drug Administration approval of growth factor products signifies the beginning of a new age for actively promoting the healing of wounds for the surgeon. Some of these recent discoveries in wound healing relevant to the facial plastic surgeon are described.

  14. Evaluation of dense collagen matrices as medicated wound dressing for the treatment of cutaneous chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Helary, Christophe; Abed, Aicha; Mosser, Gervaise; Louedec, Liliane; Letourneur, Didier; Coradin, Thibaud; Giraud-Guille, Marie Madeleine; Meddahi-Pellé, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Cutaneous chronic wounds are characterized by an impaired wound healing which may lead to infection and amputation. When current treatments are not effective enough, the application of wound dressings is required. To date, no ideal biomaterial is available. In this study, highly dense collagen matrices have been evaluated as novel medicated wound dressings for the treatment of chronic wounds. For this purpose, the structure, mechanical properties, swelling ability and in vivo stability of matrices concentrated from 5 to 40 mg mL(-1) were tested. The matrix stiffness increased with the collagen concentration and was associated with the fibril density and thickness. Increased collagen concentration also enhanced the material resistance against accelerated digestion by collagenase. After subcutaneous implantation in rats, dense collagen matrices exhibited high stability without any degradation after 15 days. The absence of macrophages and neutrophils evidenced their biocompatibility. Subsequently, dense matrices at 40 mg mL(-1) were evaluated as drug delivery system for ampicillin release. More concentrated matrices exhibited the best swelling abilities and could absorb 20 times their dry weight in water, allowing for an efficient antibiotic loading from their dried form. They released efficient doses of antibiotics that inhibited the bacterial growth of Staphylococcus Aureus over 3 days. In parallel, they show no cytotoxicity towards human fibroblasts. These results show that dense collagen matrices are promising materials to develop medicated wound dressings for the treatment of chronic wounds.

  15. Wound Healing and the Dressing*

    PubMed Central

    Scales, John T.

    1963-01-01

    The evolution of surgical dressings is traced from 1600 b.c. to a.d. 1944. The availability of an increasing variety of man-made fibres and films from 1944 onwards has stimulated work on wound dressings, and some of the more important contributions, both clinical and experimental, are discussed. The functions of a wound dressing and the properties which the ideal wound dressing should possess are given. The necessity for both histological and clinical evaluation of wound dressings in animals and in man is stressed. Wound dressings are the most commonly used therapeutic agents, but there is no means whereby their performance can be assessed. An attempt should be made either nationally or internationally to establish a standard method of assessing the performance of wound dressings. For this it is necessary to have an internationally agreed standard dressing which could be used as a reference or control dressing in all animal and human work. The only animal with skin morphologically similar to that of man is the domestic pig. Three types of wounds could be used: (1) partial-thickness wounds; (2) full-thickness excisions; and (3) third-degree burns. The development of standard techniques for the assessment of the efficiency of wound dressings would be of considerable benefit to the research worker, the medical profession, the patient, and the surgical dressings industry. PMID:13976490

  16. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) promote early wound healing and myofibroblast proliferation in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Cheing, Gladys Lai-Ying; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Lin; Kwan, Rachel Lai-Chu; Cheung, Kwok-Kuen

    2014-04-01

    Reduced collagen deposition possibly leads to slow recovery of tensile strength in the healing process of diabetic cutaneous wounds. Myofibroblasts are transiently present during wound healing and play a key role in wound closure and collagen synthesis. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) have been shown to enhance the tensile strength of diabetic wounds. In this study, we examined the effect of PEMF on wound closure and the presence of myofibroblasts in Sprague-Dawley rats after diabetic induction using streptozotocin. A full-thickness square-shaped dermal wound (2 cm × 2 cm) was excised aseptically on the shaved dorsum. The rats were randomly divided into PEMF-treated (5 mT, 25 Hz, 1 h daily) and control groups. The results indicated that there were no significant differences between the groups in blood glucose level and body weight. However, PEMF treatment significantly enhanced wound closure (days 10 and 14 post-wounding) and re-epithelialization (day 10 post-wounding), although these improvements were no longer observed at later stages of the wound healing process. Using immunohistochemistry against α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), we demonstrated that significantly more myofibroblasts were detected on days 7 and 10 post-wounding in the PEMF group when compared to the control group. We hypothesized that PEMF would increase the myofibroblast population, contributing to wound closure during diabetic wound healing.

  17. The Four-Herb Chinese Medicine Formula Tuo-Li-Xiao-Du-San Accelerates Cutaneous Wound Healing in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats through Reducing Inflammation and Increasing Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-na; Ma, Ze-jun; Wang, Ying; Li, Yu-zhu; Sun, Bei; Guo, Xin; Pan, Cong-qing; Chen, Li-ming

    2016-01-01

    Impaired wound healing in diabetic patients is a serious complication that often leads to amputation or even death with limited effective treatments. Tuo-Li-Xiao-Du-San (TLXDS), a traditional Chinese medicine formula for refractory wounds, has been prescribed for nearly 400 years in China and shows good efficacy in promoting healing. In this study, we explored the effect of TLXDS on healing of diabetic wounds and investigated underlying mechanisms. Four weeks after intravenous injection of streptozotocin, two full-thickness excisional wounds were created with a 10 mm diameter sterile biopsy punch on the back of rats. The ethanol extract of TLXDS was given once daily by oral gavage. Wound area, histological change, inflammation, angiogenesis, and collagen synthesis were evaluated. TLXDS treatment significantly accelerated healing of diabetic rats and improved the healing quality. These effects were associated with reduced neutrophil infiltration and macrophage accumulation, enhanced angiogenesis, and increased collagen deposition. This study shows that TLXDS improves diabetes-impaired wound healing. PMID:27057551

  18. Hair follicle units promote re-epithelialization in chronic cutaneous wounds: A clinical case series study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Qi; Zhao, Kong-Bo; Feng, Zi-Hao; Qi, Fa-Zhi

    2015-07-01

    Chronic cutaneous wounds are one of the most unfavorable pathophysiological processes in routine practice. However, developments in hair follicle unit therapy may aid the treatment of these wounds. The aim of the present study was to investigate the function of hair follicle units in chronic cutaneous wound re-epithelialization and to develop an effective protocol for wound treatment. A total of 14 patients, of which nine were male and five were female, with a mean age of 60.71 years (range, 19-76 years) and a mean wound area of 74.14 cm(2), were treated in the study. The hair follicle units were dissected from a scalp graft and transplanted into the chronic cutaneous wound bed, after which clinical evaluation was performed. Images of the recipient site were captured at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 and 14 weeks following transplantation. In addition, histological examinations were conducted postoperatively at week 16. Total wound re-epithelialization was observed in all the patients. Histological analysis revealed that the epidermis and papillary dermis were present in the wound area. Adnexal structures and the reticular dermis were also observed. Therefore, the present study demonstrated the ability of hair follicle units to promote chronic cutaneous wound healing.

  19. Wound Healing Delay in the ZDSD Rat

    PubMed Central

    A. SUCKOW, MARK; A. GOBBETT, TROY; G. PETERSON, RICHARD

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of diabetic delayed wound healing are essential to the development of strategies to improve clinical approaches for human patients. The Zucker diabetic Sprague Dawley (ZDSD) rat has proved to be an accurate model of diet-induced obesity and diabetes and we evaluated the utility of the ZDSD rat as a model for delayed wound healing associated with diabetes and obesity. Groups of ZDSD and Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were placed on a diabetogenic diet and evaluated two weeks later for hyperglycemia, as a sign of diabetes. Rats with blood glucose levels of >300 mg/dl were considered diabetic and those with blood glucose of <180 mg/dl were considered non-diabetic. All SD rats were non-diabetic. A full-thickness excisional skin wound was created in anesthetized rats using a punch biopsy and wound diameter measured on days 1, 4, 7, 9 and 11. Blood glucose levels and body weights were measured periodically before and after wounding. Diabetic ZDSD rats had significantly greater blood glucose levels than non-diabetic ZDSD and SD rats within 10 days of being placed on the diabetogenic diet. Furthermore, diabetic ZDSD rats initially weighed more than non-diabetic ZDSD and SD rats, however, by the end of the study there was no significant difference in body weight between the ZDSD groups. By day nine, wounds in ZDSD rats were significantly larger than those in SD rats and this persisted until the end of the study at day fourteen. Wounds from all groups were characterized histologically by abundant fibroblast cells, collagen deposition and macrophages. These results demonstrate delayed wound healing in both diabetic and non-diabetic ZDSD rats and suggest that obesity or metabolic syndrome are important factors in wound healing delay. PMID:28064221

  20. Effects of psychological stress and housing conditions on the delay of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Vegas, Óscar; VanBuskirk, JoAnne; Richardson, Steven; Parfitt, David; Helmreich, Dana; Rempel, Max; Moynihan, Jan; Tausk, Francisco

    2012-11-01

    This study explores the effects of stress and housing conditions on the healing of cutaneous wounds and its relationship with circulating levels of corticosterone. Specifically, we set out to examine the effect of combined physical (restraint stress and ultrasound) and psychological (predator scent) stressors on the cutaneous wound healing of female mice that had been housed either in groups (with social support; n= 16) or individually (without social support; n= 16). In contrast with other studies, the model of multiple ethological mild stressors utilized in this study significantly increased the levels of corticosterone, but failed to dramatically alter the healing of skin wounds. However, the results of this study provide evidence of the importance of housing conditions, suggesting that positive social interactions in females accelerate the rate of wound healing, and reduce levels of anxiety and circulating corticosterone. The level of anxiety, as well as the basal levels of corticosterone, proved to be valid predictors of the healing rates during different stages of cutaneous wound healing.

  1. Laser Biostimulation Of Wound Healing In Arteriopatic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallarida, G.; Baldoni, F.; Raimondi, G.; Massaro, M.; Peruzzi, G.; Bertolotti, M.; Ferrari, A.; Scudieri, F.

    1981-05-01

    Low-power laser irradiation has been employed in the attempt to accelerate the wound-healing of ischemic cutaneous ulcerations with threatening or manifest gangrene due to arteriosclerosis obliterans of the lower limbs. Irradiation was performed by using a low-power He-Ne gas laser of 6328 Å wavelength and was concentrated at the peripheral zone of the lesions. The preliminary results of the study indicate that laser stimulation might be new approach in the conservative menagement of the ischemic ulcers in patients with severe peripheral obstructive arteriopaties not suited for arterial reconstruction.

  2. Microgravity and the implications for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Ramin Mostofizadeh; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2008-10-01

    Wound healing is a sophisticated response ubiquitous to various traumatic stimuli leading to an anatomical/functional disruption. The aim of present article was to review the current evidence regarding the effects of microgravity on wound healing dynamics. Modulation of haemostatic phase because of alteration of platelet quantity and function seems probable. Furthermore, production of growth factors that are released from activated platelets and infiltration/function of inflammatory cells seem to be impaired by microgravity. Proliferation of damaged structures is dependent on orchestrated function of various growth factors, for example transforming growth factors, platelet-derived growth factor and epidermal growth factor, all of which are affected by microgravitational status. Moreover, gravity-induced alterations of gap junction, neural inputs, and cell populations have been reported. It may be concluded that different cellular and extracellular element involved in the healing response are modified through effect of microgravity which may lead to impairment in healing dynamics.

  3. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and “purse-string” contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate. PMID:27340423

  4. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugués, Agustí; Anon, Ester; Conte, Vito; Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and `purse-string’ contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate.

  5. Epithelialization in Wound Healing: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie C.; Ramirez, Horacio; Nusbaum, Aron G.; Sawaya, Andrew; Patel, Shailee B.; Khalid, Laiqua; Isseroff, Rivkah R.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Keratinocytes, a major cellular component of the epidermis, are responsible for restoring the epidermis after injury through a process termed epithelialization. This review will focus on the pivotal role of keratinocytes in epithelialization, including cellular processes and mechanisms of their regulation during re-epithelialization, and their cross talk with other cell types participating in wound healing. Recent Advances: Discoveries in epidermal stem cells, keratinocyte immune function, and the role of the epidermis as an independent neuroendocrine organ will be reviewed. Novel mechanisms of gene expression regulation important for re-epithelialization, including microRNAs and histone modifications, will also be discussed. Critical Issues: Epithelialization is an essential component of wound healing used as a defining parameter of a successful wound closure. A wound cannot be considered healed in the absence of re-epithelialization. The epithelialization process is impaired in all types of chronic wounds. Future Directions: A comprehensive understanding of the epithelialization process will ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to promote wound closure. PMID:25032064

  6. Epithelialization in Wound Healing: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie C; Ramirez, Horacio; Nusbaum, Aron G; Sawaya, Andrew; Patel, Shailee B; Khalid, Laiqua; Isseroff, Rivkah R; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-07-01

    Significance: Keratinocytes, a major cellular component of the epidermis, are responsible for restoring the epidermis after injury through a process termed epithelialization. This review will focus on the pivotal role of keratinocytes in epithelialization, including cellular processes and mechanisms of their regulation during re-epithelialization, and their cross talk with other cell types participating in wound healing. Recent Advances: Discoveries in epidermal stem cells, keratinocyte immune function, and the role of the epidermis as an independent neuroendocrine organ will be reviewed. Novel mechanisms of gene expression regulation important for re-epithelialization, including microRNAs and histone modifications, will also be discussed. Critical Issues: Epithelialization is an essential component of wound healing used as a defining parameter of a successful wound closure. A wound cannot be considered healed in the absence of re-epithelialization. The epithelialization process is impaired in all types of chronic wounds. Future Directions: A comprehensive understanding of the epithelialization process will ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to promote wound closure.

  7. Wound re-epithelialization: modulating keratinocyte migration in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Raja; Sivamani, K; Garcia, Miki Shirakawa; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2007-05-01

    An essential feature of a healed wound is the restoration of an intact epidermal barrier through wound epithelialization, also known as re-epithelialization. The directed migration of keratinocytes is critical to wound epithelialization and defects in this function are associated with the clinical phenotype of chronic non-healing wounds. A complex balance of signaling factors and surface proteins are expressed and regulated in a temporospatial manner that promote keratinocyte motility and survival to activate wound re-epithelialization. The majority of this review focuses on the mechanisms that regulate keratinocyte migration in the re-epithelialization process. This includes a review of cell attachments via desmosomes, hemidesmosomes, and integrins, the expression of keratins, the role of growth factors, cytokines and chemokines, eicosanoids, oxygen tension, antimicrobial peptides, and matrix metalloproteinases. Also reviewed are recently emerging novel mediators of keratinocyte motility including the role of electric fields, and signaling via the acetylcholine and beta-adrenergic receptors. These multiple regulators impact the ability of keratinocytes to migrate from the wound edge or other epidermal reservoirs to efficiently re-epithelialize a breach in the integrity of the epidermis. New discoveries will continue to uncover the elegant network of events that result in restoration of epidermal integrity and complete the wound repair process.

  8. Alkyl ferulates in wound healing potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Bernards, M A; Lewis, N G

    1992-10-01

    Seven ferulic acid esters of 1-alkanols ranging in carbon length from C16 to C28 were synthesized and an HPLC protocol for their separation developed. Extracts prepared from wound healing potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers and analysed by HPLC indicated that alkyl ferulate esters begin to accumulate 3-7 days after wound treatment. Of the nine esters identified by EIMS, (including two esters of odd chain length alkanols) hexadecyl and octadecyl ferulates were predominant. Alkyl ferulate esters were restricted to the wound periderm.

  9. Wound healing: a paradigm for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wong, Victor W; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T

    2013-09-01

    Human skin is a remarkably plastic organ that sustains insult and injury throughout life. Its ability to expeditiously repair wounds is paramount to survival and is thought to be regulated by wound components such as differentiated cells, stem cells, cytokine networks, extracellular matrix, and mechanical forces. These intrinsic regenerative pathways are integrated across different skin compartments and are being elucidated on the cellular and molecular levels. Recent advances in bioengineering and nanotechnology have allowed researchers to manipulate these microenvironments in increasingly precise spatial and temporal scales, recapitulating key homeostatic cues that may drive regeneration. The ultimate goal is to translate these bench achievements into viable bedside therapies that address the growing global burden of acute and chronic wounds. In this review, we highlight current concepts in cutaneous wound repair and propose that many of these evolving paradigms may underlie regenerative processes across diverse organ systems.

  10. Identification of Biomarkers Associated with the Healing of Chronic Wounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    biochemistry from thermally injured swine to that from normally- healing human wound fluid from Phase I of the study. Phase I Technical Objectives 1, 2...Compare wound fluid biochemistry from thermally injured swine to that of normally- healing human wound fluid from Phase I of the study Porcine wound...TITLE: Identification of Biomarkers Associated with the Healing of Chronic Wounds PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura E. Edsberg, Ph.D

  11. Cold temperature delays wound healing in postharvest sugarbeet roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage temperature affects the rate and extent of wound-healing in a number of root and tuber crops. The effect of storage temperature on wound-healing in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots, however, is largely unknown. Wound-healing of sugarbeet roots was investigated using surface-abraded roots s...

  12. Understanding the role of immune regulation in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Park, Julie E; Barbul, Adrian

    2004-05-01

    The immune system plays an integral role in successful wound healing. In addition to contributing to host defenses and inflammation, immune cells are critical regulators of wound healing through the secretion of cytokines, lymphokines, and growth factors. We review the mechanisms by which the immune system regulates wound healing.

  13. Biodegradable Gelatin Microcarriers Facilitate Re-Epithelialization of Human Cutaneous Wounds - An In Vitro Study in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Lönnqvist, Susanna; Rakar, Jonathan; Briheim, Kristina; Kratz, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to use a suspended tridimensional matrix as scaffolding for re-epithelialization of in vitro cutaneous wounds was investigated with the aid of a human in vitro wound healing model based on viable full thickness skin. Macroporous gelatin microcarriers, CultiSpher-S, were applied to in vitro wounds and cultured for 21 days. Tissue sections showed incorporation of wound edge keratinocytes into the microcarriers and thicker neoepidermis in wounds treated with microcarriers. Thickness of the neoepidermis was measured digitally, using immunohistochemical staining of keratins as epithelial demarcation. Air-lifting of wounds enhanced stratification in control wounds as well as wounds with CultiSpher-S. Immunohistochemical staining revealed expression of keratin 5, keratin 10, and laminin 5 in the neoepidermal component. We conclude that the CultiSpher-S microcarriers can function as tissue guiding scaffold for re-epithelialization of cutaneous wounds. PMID:26061630

  14. Biodegradable Gelatin Microcarriers Facilitate Re-Epithelialization of Human Cutaneous Wounds - An In Vitro Study in Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Lönnqvist, Susanna; Rakar, Jonathan; Briheim, Kristina; Kratz, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to use a suspended tridimensional matrix as scaffolding for re-epithelialization of in vitro cutaneous wounds was investigated with the aid of a human in vitro wound healing model based on viable full thickness skin. Macroporous gelatin microcarriers, CultiSpher-S, were applied to in vitro wounds and cultured for 21 days. Tissue sections showed incorporation of wound edge keratinocytes into the microcarriers and thicker neoepidermis in wounds treated with microcarriers. Thickness of the neoepidermis was measured digitally, using immunohistochemical staining of keratins as epithelial demarcation. Air-lifting of wounds enhanced stratification in control wounds as well as wounds with CultiSpher-S. Immunohistochemical staining revealed expression of keratin 5, keratin 10, and laminin 5 in the neoepidermal component. We conclude that the CultiSpher-S microcarriers can function as tissue guiding scaffold for re-epithelialization of cutaneous wounds.

  15. Wound healing: an overview of acute, fibrotic and delayed healing.

    PubMed

    Diegelmann, Robert F; Evans, Melissa C

    2004-01-01

    Acute wounds normally heal in a very orderly and efficient manner characterized by four distinct, but overlapping phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and remodeling. Specific biological markers characterize healing of acute wounds. Likewise, unique biologic markers also characterize pathologic responses resulting in fibrosis and chronic non-healing ulcers. This review describes the major biological processes associated with both normal and pathologic healing. The normal healing response begins the moment the tissue is injured. As the blood components spill into the site of injury, the platelets come into contact with exposed collagen and other elements of the extracellular matrix. This contact triggers the platelets to release clotting factors as well as essential growth factors and cytokines such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). Following hemostasis, the neutrophils then enter the wound site and begin the critical task of phagocytosis to remove foreign materials, bacteria and damaged tissue. As part of this inflammatory phase, the macrophages appear and continue the process of phagocytosis as well as releasing more PDGF and TGF beta. Once the wound site is cleaned out, fibroblasts migrate in to begin the proliferative phase and deposit new extracellular matrix. The new collagen matrix then becomes cross-linked and organized during the final remodeling phase. In order for this efficient and highly controlled repair process to take place, there are numerous cell-signaling events that are required. In pathologic conditions such as non-healing pressure ulcers, this efficient and orderly process is lost and the ulcers are locked into a state of chronic inflammation characterized by abundant neutrophil infiltration with associated reactive oxygen species and destructive enzymes. Healing proceeds only after the inflammation is controlled. On the opposite end of the spectrum, fibrosis is characterized by

  16. Management of Chronic Non-healing Wounds by Hirudotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Arsheed; Jan, Afroza; Wajid, MA; Tariq, Sheikh

    2017-01-01

    A chronic wound is a wound that does not heal in an orderly set of stages and in a predictable amount of time or wounds that do not heal within three months are often considered chronic. Chronic wounds often remain in the inflammatory stage for too long and may never heal or may take years. Chronic wound patients often report pain as dominant in their lives. Persistent pain is the main problem for patients with chronic ulcers. Many wounds pose no challenge to the body’s innate ability to heal; some wounds, however, may not heal easily either because of the severity of the wounds themselves or because of the poor state of health of the individual. Any wound that does not heal within a few weeks should be examined by a healthcare professional because it might be infected, might reflect an underlying disease. PMID:28289608

  17. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Joseph C.; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  18. A comprehensive review of advanced biopolymeric wound healing systems.

    PubMed

    Mayet, Naeema; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; Du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2014-08-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that involves the mediation of many initiators effective during the healing process such as cytokines, macrophages and fibroblasts. In addition, the defence mechanism of the body undergoes a step-by-step but continuous process known as the wound healing cascade to ensure optimal healing. Thus, when designing a wound healing system or dressing, it is pivotal that key factors such as optimal gaseous exchange, a moist wound environment, prevention of microbial activity and absorption of exudates are considered. A variety of wound dressings are available, however, not all meet the specific requirements of an ideal wound healing system to consider every aspect within the wound healing cascade. Recent research has focussed on the development of smart polymeric materials. Combining biopolymers that are crucial for wound healing may provide opportunities to synthesise matrices that are inductive to cells and that stimulate and trigger target cell responses crucial to the wound healing process. This review therefore outlines the processes involved in skin regeneration, optimal management and care required for wound treatment. It also assimilates, explores and discusses wound healing drug-delivery systems and nanotechnologies utilised for enhanced wound healing applications.

  19. Fibrin sealant combined with fibroblasts and platelet-derived growth factor enhance wound healing in excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Mogford, Jon E; Tawil, Bill; Jia, Shengxian; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that the fibrinogen-thrombin formulation of fibrin sealant combined with fibroblasts and PDGF-BB enhance cutaneous wound healing. Four formulations varying in fibrinogen and thrombin concentration were applied to full-thickness biopsy wounds in the rabbit ear cutaneous wound healing model with or without cultured rabbit dermal fibroblasts (RDFs; 3 x 10(5) cells/wound) embedded in the fibrinogen component. At post-wounding day 7, there was no difference in the diluted vs. non-diluted formulations for either the promotion of granulation tissue coverage of the open wounds or total granulation tissue area when tested without embedded cells. Including the RDFs, the highest degree of wound coverage by granulation tissue was observed in the combined dilution formulation (17.3 mg/mL fibrinogen, 167 U/mL thrombin; n=10 wounds) that was 167% (p<0.05) of the nondiluted FS containing cells (50 mg/mL fibrinogen, 250 U/mL thrombin; n=10 wounds). Inclusion of fibroblasts increased granulation tissue area within the wounds vs. FS alone (p<0.05) for each diluted formulation although no differences in this parameter were observed within each group (FS alone or with embedded cells). However, addition of the vulnerary growth factor PDGF-BB (3 mg; n=4) with the embedded RDFs in the combined dilution formulation increased granulation tissue area over two-fold (p<0.01) over FS alone. Additionally, the presence of the RDFs promoted incorporation of the granulation tissue with and epithelial migration over the FS suggesting an active interaction between cells delivered to the wound by FS and the host repair cells. The findings suggest the progress of cutaneous defect repair can be enhanced by ex vivo cell delivery in fibrin sealant.

  20. Functional poly(ε-caprolactone)/chitosan dressings with nitric oxide-releasing property improve wound healing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Wang, He; Zhang, Jimin; Li, Xuemei; Wu, Yifan; Wei, Yongzhen; Ji, Shenglu; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang

    2017-03-09

    Wound healing dressings are increasingly needed clinically due to the large number of skin damage annually. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in promoting wound healing, thus biomaterials with NO-releasing property receive increasing attention as ideal wound dressing. In present study, we prepared a novel functional wound dressing by combining electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nonwoven mat with chitosan-based NO-releasing biomaterials (CS-NO). As-prepared PCL/CS-NO dressing released NO sustainably under the physiological conditions, which was controlled by the catalysis of β-galactosidase. In vivo wound healing characteristics were further evaluated on full-thickness cutaneous wounds in mice. Results showed that PCL/CS-NO wound dressings remarkably accelerated wound healing process through enhancing re-epithelialization and granulation formation and effectively improved the organization of regenerated tissues including epidermal-dermal junction, which could be ascribed to the pro-angiogenesis, immunomodulation, and enhanced collagen synthesis provided by the sustained release of NO. Therefore, PCL/CS-NO may be a promising candidate for wound dressings, especially for the chronic wound caused by the ischemia.

  1. Photobiomodulation of wound healing via visible and infrared laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Hakan; Ulgen, Yekta; Gulsoy, Murat

    2017-03-20

    Fibroblast cells are known to be one of the key elements in wound healing process, which has been under the scope of research for decades. However, the exact mechanism of photobiomodulation on wound healing is not fully understood yet. Photobiomodulation of 635 and 809 nm laser irradiation at two different energy densities were investigated with two independent experiments; first, in vitro cell proliferation and then in vivo wound healing. L929 mouse fibroblast cell suspensions were exposed with 635 and 809 nm laser irradiations of 1 and 3 J/cm(2) energy densities at 50 mW output power separately for the investigation of photobiomodulation in vitro. Viabilities of cells were examined by means of MTT assays performed at the 24th, 48th, and 72nd hours following the laser irradiations. Following the in vitro experiments, 1 cm long cutaneous incisional skin wounds on Wistar albino rats (n = 24) were exposed with the same laser sources and doses in vivo. Wound samples were examined on 3rd, 5th, and 7th days of healing by means of mechanical tensile strength tests and histological examinations. MTT assay results showed that 635 nm laser irradiation of both energy densities after 24 h were found to be proliferative. One joule per square centimeter laser irradiation results also had positive effect on cell proliferation after 72 h. However, 809 nm laser irradiation at both energy densities had neither positive nor negative affects on cell viability. In vivo experiment results showed that, 635 nm laser irradiation of both energy densities stimulated wound healing in terms of tensile strength, whereas 809 nm laser stimulation did not cause any stimulative effect. The results of mechanical tests were compatible with the histological evaluations. In this study, it is observed that 635 nm laser irradiations of low energy densities had stimulative effects in terms of cell proliferation in vitro and mechanical strength of incisions in vivo. However, 809 nm laser

  2. Mechanoregulation of Angiogenesis in Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Lancerotto, Luca; Orgill, Dennis P

    2014-10-01

    Significance: Mechanical forces are important regulators of cell and tissue function. Endothelial cells proliferate in response to tissue stretch and the mechanical properties of the environment direct capillary sprouting and growth. As the vascular network is a key factor in physiology and disease, control of the vascularity by means of mechanical forces could lead to the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Recent Advances: Increased understanding of mechanobiology has stimulated translational research and allowed the development and optimization of clinical devices that exploit mechanical forces for the treatment of diseases, in particular in the field of wound healing. Stretching in distraction osteogenesis and tissue expansion induces neogenesis of well-vascularized tissues. In micro-deformational wound therapy, micro-mechanical distortions of the wound bed stimulate cell proliferation and angiogenesis by stretching resident cells to improve healing of difficult wounds. Relief from tension antagonizes proliferation and angiogenesis in primarily closed wounds allowing for better scar quality. Critical Issues: The integration of mechanobiology into traditional cell biology and pathophysiology in general is not yet complete and further research is needed to fill existing gaps, in particular in the complexity of in vivo conditions. Future Directions: Still largely unexplored approaches based on mechanical perturbation of the micro-/macro-environment can be devised to overcome the limits of current strategies in a broad spectrum of clinical conditions.

  3. Quantifying cell behaviors during embryonic wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashburn, David; Ma, Xiaoyan; Crews, Sarah; Lynch, Holley; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2011-03-01

    During embryogenesis, internal forces induce motions in cells leading to widespread motion in tissues. We previously developed laser hole-drilling as a consistent, repeatable way to probe such epithelial mechanics. The initial recoil (less than 30s) gives information about physical properties (elasticity, force) of cells surrounding the wound, but the long-term healing process (tens of minutes) shows how cells adjust their behavior in response to stimuli. To study this biofeedback in many cells through time, we developed tools to quantify statistics of individual cells. By combining watershed segmentation with a powerful and efficient user interaction system, we overcome problems that arise in any automatic segmentation from poor image quality. We analyzed cell area, perimeter, aspect ratio, and orientation relative to wound for a wide variety of laser cuts in dorsal closure. We quantified statistics for different regions as well, i.e. cells near to and distant from the wound. Regional differences give a distribution of wound-induced changes, whose spatial localization provides clues into the physical/chemical signals that modulate the wound healing response. Supported by the Human Frontier Science Program (RGP0021/2007 C).

  4. Foxo1 inhibits diabetic mucosal wound healing but enhances healing of normoglycemic wounds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fanxing; Othman, Badr; Lim, Jason; Batres, Angelika; Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Zhang, Chenying; Yi, Leah; Liu, Jian; Tian, Chen; Hameedaldeen, Alhassan; Alsadun, Sarah; Tarapore, Rohinton; Graves, Dana T

    2015-01-01

    Re-epithelialization is an important part in mucosal wound healing. Surprisingly little is known about the impact of diabetes on the molecular events of mucosal healing. We examined the role of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (Foxo1) in oral wounds of diabetic and normoglycemic mice with keratinocyte-specific Foxo1 deletion. Diabetic mucosal wounds had significantly delayed healing with reduced cell migration and proliferation. Foxo1 deletion rescued the negative impact of diabetes on healing but had the opposite effect in normoglycemic mice. Diabetes in vivo and in high glucose conditions in vitro enhanced expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) and interleukin-36γ (IL-36γ) in a Foxo1-dependent manner. High glucose-stimulated Foxo1 binding to CCL20 and IL-36γ promoters and CCL20 and IL-36γ significantly inhibited migration of these cells in high glucose conditions. In normal healing, Foxo1 was needed for transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression, and in standard glucose conditions, TGF-β1 rescued the negative effect of Foxo1 silencing on migration in vitro. We propose that Foxo1 under diabetic or high glucose conditions impairs healing by promoting high levels of CCL20 and IL-36γ expression but under normal conditions, enhances it by inducing TGF-β1. This finding provides mechanistic insight into how Foxo1 mediates the impact of diabetes on mucosal wound healing.

  5. Re-epithelialization of cutaneous wounds in adult zebrafish combines mechanisms of wound closure in embryonic and adult mammals.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Rebecca; Metzger, Manuel; Knyphausen, Philipp; Ramezani, Thomas; Slanchev, Krasimir; Kraus, Christopher; Schmelzer, Elmon; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2016-06-15

    Re-epithelialization of cutaneous wounds in adult mammals takes days to complete and relies on numerous signalling cues and multiple overlapping cellular processes that take place both within the epidermis and in other participating tissues. Re-epithelialization of partial- or full-thickness skin wounds of adult zebrafish, however, is extremely rapid and largely independent of the other processes of wound healing. Live imaging after treatment with transgene-encoded or chemical inhibitors reveals that re-epithelializing keratinocytes repopulate wounds by TGF-β- and integrin-dependent lamellipodial crawling at the leading edges of the epidermal tongue. In addition, re-epithelialization requires long-range epithelial rearrangements, involving radial intercalations, flattening and directed elongation of cells - processes that are dependent on Rho kinase, JNK and, to some extent, planar cell polarity within the epidermis. These rearrangements lead to a massive recruitment of keratinocytes from the adjacent epidermis and make re-epithelialization independent of keratinocyte proliferation and the mitogenic effect of FGF signalling, which are only required after wound closure, allowing the epidermis outside the wound to re-establish its normal thickness. Together, these results demonstrate that the adult zebrafish is a valuable in vivo model for studying and visualizing the processes involved in cutaneous wound closure, facilitating the dissection of direct from indirect and motogenic from mitogenic effects of genes and molecules affecting wound re-epithelialization.

  6. Effects of glutamine on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kesici, Ugur; Kesici, Sevgi; Ulusoy, Hulya; Yucesan, Fulya; Turkmen, Aygen U; Besir, Ahmet; Tuna, Verda

    2015-06-01

    Studies reporting the need for replacing amino acids such as glutamine (Gln), hydroxymethyl butyrate (HMB) and arginine (Arg) to accelerate wound healing are available in the literature. The primary objective of this study was to present the effects of Gln on tissue hydroxyproline (OHP) levels in wound healing. This study was conducted on 30 female Sprague Dawley rats with a mean weight of 230 ± 20 g. Secondary wounds were formed by excising 2 × 1 cm skin subcutaneous tissue on the back of the rats. The rats were divided into three equal groups. Group C (Control): the group received 1 ml/day isotonic solution by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. Group A (Abound): the group received 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Gln, 0·052 g/kg/day/ml HMB and 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Arg by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. Group R (Resource): the group received 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Gln by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. The OHP levels of the tissues obtained from the upper half region on the 8th day and the lower half region on the 21st day from the same rats in the groups were examined. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistics program SPSS version 17.0. No statistically significant differences were reported with regard to the OHP measurements on the 8th and 21st days (8th day: F = 0·068, P = 0·935 > 0·05; 21st day: F = 0·018, P = 0·983 > 0·05). The increase in mean OHP levels on the 8th and 21st days within each group was found to be statistically significant (F = 1146·34, P = 0·000 < 0·001). We conclude that in adults who eat healthy food, who do not have any factor that can affect wound healing negatively and who do not have large tissue loss at critical level, Gln, Arg and HMB support would not be required to accelerate secondary wound healing.

  7. Chitosan-based copper nanocomposite accelerates healing in excision wound model in rats.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Anu; Kant, Vinay; Gopalakrishnan, Anu; Tandan, Surendra K; Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-05-15

    Copper possesses efficacy in wound healing which is a complex phenomenon involving various cells, cytokines and growth factors. Copper nanoparticles modulate cells, cytokines and growth factors involved in wound healing in a better way than copper ions. Chitosan has been shown to be beneficial in healing because of its antibacterial, antifungal, biocompatible and biodegradable polymeric nature. In the present study, chitosan-based copper nanocomposite (CCNC) was prepared by mixing chitosan and copper nanoparticles. CCNC was applied topically to evaluate its wound healing potential and to study its effects on some important components of healing process in open excision wound model in adult Wistar rats. Significant increase in wound contraction was observed in the CCNC-treated rats. The up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor-beta1(TGF-β1) by CCNC-treatment revealed its role in facilitating angiogenesis, fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition. The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, in CCNC-treated rats. Histological evaluation showed more fibroblast proliferation, collagen deposition and intact re-epithelialization in CCNC-treated rats. Immunohistochemistry of CD31 revealed marked increase in angiogenesis. Thus, we concluded that chitosan-based copper nanocomposite efficiently enhanced cutaneous wound healing by modulation of various cells, cytokines and growth factors during different phases of healing process.

  8. Reduced neutrophil chemotaxis and infiltration contributes to delayed resolution of cutaneous wound infection with advanced age.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Aleah L; Rendon, Juan L; Ramirez, Luis; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2013-02-15

    Advanced age is associated with alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses, which contribute to an increased risk of infection in elderly patients. Coupled with this immune dysfunction, elderly patients demonstrate impaired wound healing with elevated rates of wound dehiscence and chronic wounds. To evaluate how advanced age alters the host immune response to cutaneous wound infection, we developed a murine model of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in young (3-4 mo) and aged (18-20 mo) BALB/c mice. Aged mice exhibit increased bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure over time compared with young mice. These differences were not attributed to alterations in wound neutrophil or macrophage TLR2 or FcγRIII expression, or age-related changes in phagocytic potential and bactericidal activity. To evaluate the role of chemotaxis in our model, we first examined in vivo chemotaxis in the absence of wound injury to KC, a neutrophil chemokine. In response to a s.c. injection of KC, aged mice recruited fewer neutrophils at increasing doses of KC compared with young mice. This paralleled our model of wound infection, where diminished neutrophil and macrophage recruitment was observed in aged mice relative to young mice despite equivalent levels of KC, MIP-2, and MCP-1 chemokine levels at the wound site. This reduced leukocyte accumulation was also associated with lower levels of ICAM-1 in wounds from aged mice at early time points. These age-mediated defects in early neutrophil recruitment may alter the dynamics of the inflammatory phase of wound healing, impacting macrophage recruitment, bacterial clearance, and wound closure.

  9. Design of a portable imager for near-infrared visualization of cutaneous wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhaoqiang; Zhou, Jun; Dacy, Ashley; Zhao, Deyin; Kearney, Vasant; Zhou, Weidong; Tang, Liping; Hu, Wenjing

    2017-01-01

    A portable imager developed for real-time imaging of cutaneous wounds in research settings is described. The imager consists of a high-resolution near-infrared CCD camera capable of detecting both bioluminescence and fluorescence illuminated by an LED ring with a rotatable filter wheel. All external components are integrated into a compact camera attachment. The device is demonstrated to have competitive performance with a commercial animal imaging enclosure box setup in beam uniformity and sensitivity. Specifically, the device was used to visualize the bioluminescence associated with increased reactive oxygen species activity during the wound healing process in a cutaneous wound inflammation model. In addition, this device was employed to observe the fluorescence associated with the activity of matrix metalloproteinases in a mouse lipopolysaccharide-induced infection model. Our results support the use of the portable imager design as a noninvasive and real-time imaging tool to assess the extent of wound inflammation and infection.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells: potential for therapy and treatment of chronic non-healing skin wounds

    PubMed Central

    Marfia, Giovanni; Navone, Stefania Elena; Di Vito, Clara; Ughi, Nicola; Tabano, Silvia; Miozzo, Monica; Tremolada, Carlo; Bolla, Gianni; Crotti, Chiara; Ingegnoli, Francesca; Rampini, Paolo; Riboni, Laura; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Campanella, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    abstract Wound healing is a complex physiological process including overlapping phases (hemostatic/inflammatory, proliferating and remodeling phases). Every alteration in this mechanism might lead to pathological conditions of different medical relevance. Treatments for chronic non-healing wounds are expensive because reiterative treatments are needed. Regenerative medicine and in particular mesenchymal stem cells approach is emerging as new potential clinical application in wound healing. In the past decades, advance in the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying wound healing process has led to extensive topical administration of growth factors as part of wound care. Currently, no definitive treatment is available and the research on optimal wound care depends upon the efficacy and cost-benefit of emerging therapies. Here we provide an overview on the novel approaches through stem cell therapy to improve cutaneous wound healing, with a focus on diabetic wounds and Systemic Sclerosis-associated ulcers, which are particularly challenging. Current and future treatment approaches are discussed with an emphasis on recent advances. PMID:26652928

  11. Wound healing and treating wounds: Differential diagnosis and evaluation of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Morton, Laurel M; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    Wounds are an excellent example of how the field of dermatology represents a cross-section of many medical disciplines. For instance, wounds may be caused by trauma, vascular insufficiency, and underlying medical conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension, and rheumatologic and inflammatory disease. This continuing medical education article provides an overview of wound healing and the pathophysiology of chronic wounds and reviews the broad differential diagnosis of chronic wounds. It also describes the initial steps necessary in evaluating a chronic wound and determining its underlying etiology.

  12. Angiogenesis Is Induced and Wound Size Is Reduced by Electrical Stimulation in an Acute Wound Healing Model in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ud-Din, Sara; Sebastian, Anil; Giddings, Pamela; Colthurst, James; Whiteside, Sigrid; Morris, Julie; Nuccitelli, Richard; Pullar, Christine; Baguneid, Mo; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for wound healing. Insufficient angiogenesis can result in impaired wound healing and chronic wound formation. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been shown to enhance angiogenesis. We previously showed that ES enhanced angiogenesis in acute wounds at one time point (day 14). The aim of this study was to further evaluate the role of ES in affecting angiogenesis during the acute phase of cutaneous wound healing over multiple time points. We compared the angiogenic response to wounding in 40 healthy volunteers (divided into two groups and randomised), treated with ES (post-ES) and compared them to secondary intention wound healing (control). Biopsy time points monitored were days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14. Objective non-invasive measures and H&E analysis were performed in addition to immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB). Wound volume was significantly reduced on D7, 10 and 14 post-ES (p = 0.003, p = 0.002, p<0.001 respectively), surface area was reduced on days 10 (p = 0.001) and 14 (p<0.001) and wound diameter reduced on days 10 (p = 0.009) and 14 (p = 0.002). Blood flow increased significantly post-ES on D10 (p = 0.002) and 14 (p = 0.001). Angiogenic markers were up-regulated following ES application; protein analysis by IHC showed an increase (p<0.05) in VEGF-A expression by ES treatment on days 7, 10 and 14 (39%, 27% and 35% respectively) and PLGF expression on days 3 and 7 (40% on both days), compared to normal healing. Similarly, WB demonstrated an increase (p<0.05) in PLGF on days 7 and 14 (51% and 35% respectively). WB studies showed a significant increase of 30% (p>0.05) on day 14 in VEGF-A expression post-ES compared to controls. Furthermore, organisation of granulation tissue was improved on day 14 post-ES. This randomised controlled trial has shown that ES enhanced wound healing by reduced wound dimensions and increased VEGF-A and PLGF expression in acute cutaneous wounds, which further substantiates the role of ES in up

  13. Wound healing - A literature review*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ana Cristina de Oliveira; Costa, Tila Fortuna; Andrade, Zilton de Araújo; Medrado, Alena Ribeiro Alves Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration and tissue repair processes consist of a sequence of molecular and cellular events which occur after the onset of a tissue lesion in order to restore the damaged tissue. The exsudative, proliferative, and extracellular matrix remodeling phases are sequential events that occur through the integration of dynamic processes involving soluble mediators, blood cells, and parenchymal cells. Exsudative phenomena that take place after injury contribute to the development of tissue edema. The proliferative stage seeks to reduce the area of tissue injury by contracting myofibroblasts and fibroplasia. At this stage, angiogenesis and reepithelialization processes can still be observed. Endothelial cells are able to differentiate into mesenchymal components, and this difference appears to be finely orchestrated by a set of signaling proteins that have been studied in the literature. This pathway is known as Hedgehog. The purpose of this review is to describe the various cellular and molecular aspects involved in the skin healing process. PMID:27828635

  14. The regenerative potential of fibroblasts in a new diabetes-induced delayed humanised wound healing model.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Santamaría, Lucía; Conti, Claudio J; Llames, Sara; García, Eva; Retamosa, Luisa; Holguín, Almudena; Illera, Nuria; Duarte, Blanca; Camblor, Lino; Llaneza, José M; Jorcano, José L; Larcher, Fernando; Meana, Álvaro; Escámez, María J; Del Río, Marcela

    2013-03-01

    Cutaneous diabetic wounds greatly affect the quality of life of patients, causing a substantial economic impact on the healthcare system. The limited clinical success of conventional treatments is mainly attributed to the lack of knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms related to chronic ulceration. Therefore, management of diabetic ulcers remains a challenging clinical issue. Within this context, reliable animal models that recapitulate situations of impaired wound healing have become essential. In this study, we established a new in vivo humanised model of delayed wound healing in a diabetic context that reproduces the main features of the human disease. Diabetes was induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin in bioengineered human-skin-engrafted immunodeficient mice. The significant delay in wound closure exhibited in diabetic wounds was mainly attributed to alterations in the granulation tissue formation and resolution, involving defects in wound bed maturation, vascularisation, inflammatory response and collagen deposition. In the new model, a cell-based wound therapy consisting of the application of plasma-derived fibrin dermal scaffolds containing fibroblasts consistently improved the healing response by triggering granulation tissue maturation and further providing a suitable matrix for migrating keratinocytes during wound re-epithelialisation. The present preclinical wound healing model was able to shed light on the biological processes responsible for the improvement achieved, and these findings can be extended for designing new therapeutic approaches with clinical relevance.

  15. Low-output carbon dioxide laser for cutaneous wound closure of scalpel incisions: comparative tensile strength studies of the laser to the suture and staple for wound closure

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, J.M.; Robinson, J.K.; Taute, P.M.; Lautenschlager, E.P.; Leibovich, S.J.; Hartz, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The low-output carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) laser was used for cutaneous wound closure of scalpel incisions. Cutaneous scalpel incisions were placed over the dorsum of three minipigs and were then closed by either the laser, sutures, or staples. At multiple time points after wound closure, up to day 90, the tensile strengths of these wounds were comparatively evaluated. All wounds, including those closed with the laser, clinically appeared to heal similarly with no evidence of wound dehiscence or infection. Tensile strength studies revealed similar sigmoid curves for all wound closure modalities with low initial tensile strengths up to days 14 to 21, which afterwards increased rapidly, with a plateau toward day 90. From our study, it appears that the CO/sub 2/ laser, in the low-output mode, can be used for cutaneous wound closure and that similar clinical healing and tensile strength measurements are obtained relative to the conventional cutaneous wound closure modalities of the suture or staple.

  16. Signals involved in tuber wound-healing

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, Jeffrey C

    2009-01-01

    The induction and regulation of wound-healing (WH) processes in potato tubers and other vegetables are of great nutritional and economic importance. The rapid accumulation of waxes to restrict water vapor loss and formation of suberin barriers to block infection are crucial components of WH. Recently we determined the regulatory involvement of abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene in WH. In this addendum we integrate and interpret features from this recent research with additional information on ABA and data on the association of jasmonic acid (JA) in tuber WH. Results show that wounding dramatically increased tuber ethylene production and ABA and JA content. Blockage of wound-induced ABA biosynthesis and ethylene action/biosynthesis showed that ABA is a potent regulator in reduction of water vapor loss and hastening of suberization while ethylene had no discernable effect. The collective results also imply that ethylene has no effect on ABA regulation of WH. JA content in dormant and non-dormant minitubers is very low (≤l ng gFW−1) but rapidly increases upon wounding then decreases, all before wound-induced ABA or ethylene accumulation reach their maxima. Results gathered to date do not support a role for ethylene in potato tuber WH but do implicate ABA in this process. Although JA content increases rapidly after wounding, its role in tuber WH remains speculative. PMID:19820323

  17. In-vivo monitoring rat skin wound healing using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing; Guo, Chungen; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) was employed for imaging and evaluating the wound healing process on rat skin in vivo. From the high-resolution nonlinear optical images, the morphology and distribution of specific biological markers in cutaneous wound healing such as fibrin clot, collagens, blood capillaries, and hairs were clearly observed at 1, 5 and 14 days post injury. We found that the disordered collagen in the fibrin clot at day 1 was replaced by regenerative collagen at day 5. By day 14, the thick collagen with well-network appeared at the original margin of the wound. These findings suggested that NLOM is ideal for noninvasively monitoring the progress of wound healing in vivo.

  18. Wound healing properties of Hylocereus undatus on diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Perez G, R M; Vargas S, R; Ortiz H, Y D

    2005-08-01

    Aqueous extracts of leaves, rind, fruit pulp and flowers of Hylocereus undatus were studied for their wound healing properties. Wound healing effects were studied on incision (skin breaking strength), excision (percent wound contraction) and the nature of wound granulation tissues, which were removed on day 7 and the collagen, hexosamine, total proteins and DNA contents were determined, in addition to the rates of wound contraction and the period of epithelialization. In streptozotocin diabetic rats, where healing is delayed, topical applications of H. undatus produced increases in hydroxyproline, tensile strength, total proteins, DNA collagen content and better epithelization thereby facilitating healing. H. undatus had no hypoglycemic activity.

  19. Effect of fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Jang, Joon Chul; Choi, Rak-Jun; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2015-04-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include use of the safest and least invasive methods with a goal of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced technology in wound healing has triggered the use of cells and/or biological dermis to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis on wound healing efficacy.Ten nude mice were used in this study. Four full-thickness 6-mm punch wounds were created on the dorsal surface of each mouse (total, 40 wounds). The wounds were randomly assigned to one of the following 4 treatments: topical application of Dulbecco phosphate-buffered saline (control), human fibroblasts (FB), artificial dermis (AD), and human fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis (AD with FB). On the 14th day after treatment, wound healing rate and wound contraction, which are the 2 main factors determining wound healing efficacy, were evaluated using a stereoimage optical topometer system, histomorphological analysis, and immunohistochemistry.The results of the stereoimage optical topometer system demonstrated that the FB group did not have significant influence on wound healing rate and wound contraction. The AD group showed reduced wound contraction, but wound healing was delayed. The AD with FB group showed decreased wound contraction without significantly delayed wound healing. Histomorphological analysis exhibited that more normal skin structure was regenerated in the AD with FB group. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the AD group and the AD with FB group produced less α-smooth muscle actin than the control group, but this was not shown in the FB group.Fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis may minimize wound contraction without significantly delaying wound healing in the treatment of skin and soft tissue defects.

  20. Wound Healing Activity of Elaeis guineensis Leaf Extract Ointment

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Sreenivasan; Logeswaran, Selvarasoo; Latha, Lachimanan Yoga

    2012-01-01

    Elaeis guineensis of the Arecaceae family is widely used in the traditional medicine of societies in West Africa for treating various ailments. To validate the ethnotherapeutic claims of the plant in skin diseases, wound healing activity was studied. The results showed that E. guineensis leaf extract had potent wound healing capacity as evident from the better wound closure (P < 0.05), improved tissue regeneration at the wound site, and supporting histopathological parameters pertaining to wound healing. Matrix metalloproteinases expression correlated well with the results thus confirming efficacy of E. guineensis in the treatment of the wound. E. guineensis accelerated wound healing in rats, thus supporting its traditional use. The result of this study suggested that, used efficiently, oil palm leaf extract is a renewable resource with wound healing properties. PMID:22312255

  1. The Efficacy of Gelam Honey Dressing towards Excisional Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mui Koon; Hasan Adli, Durriyyah Sharifah; Tumiran, Mohd Amzari; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Yusoff, Kamaruddin Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Honey is one of the oldest substances used in wound management. Efficacy of Gelam honey in wound healing was evaluated in this paper. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups of 24 rats each (untreated group, saline group, Intrasite Gel group, and Gelam honey group) with 2 cm by 2 cm full thickness, excisional wound created on neck area. Wounds were dressed topically according to groups. Rats were sacrificed on days 1, 5, 10, and 15 of treatments. Wounds were then processed for macroscopic and histological observations. Gelam-honey-dressed wounds healed earlier (day 13) than untreated and saline treated groups, as did wounds treated with Intrasite Gel. Honey-treated wounds exhibited less scab and only thin scar formations. Histological features demonstrated positive effects of Gelam honey on the wounds. This paper showed that Gelam honey dressing on excisional wound accelerated the process of wound healing.

  2. A potential wound-healing-promoting peptide from salamander skin.

    PubMed

    Mu, Lixian; Tang, Jing; Liu, Han; Shen, Chuanbin; Rong, Mingqiang; Zhang, Zhiye; Lai, Ren

    2014-09-01

    Although it is well known that wound healing proceeds incredibly quickly in urodele amphibians, such as newts and salamanders, little is known about skin-wound healing, and no bioactive/effector substance that contributes to wound healing has been identified from these animals. As a step toward understanding salamander wound healing and skin regeneration, a potential wound-healing-promoting peptide (tylotoin; KCVRQNNKRVCK) was identified from salamander skin of Tylototriton verrucosus. It shows comparable wound-healing-promoting ability (EC50=11.14 μg/ml) with epidermal growth factor (EGF; NSDSECPLSHDGYCLHDGVCMYIEALDKYACNCVVGYIGERCQYRDLKWWELR) in a murine model of full-thickness dermal wound. Tylotoin directly enhances the motility and proliferation of keratinocytes, vascular endothelial cells, and fibroblasts, resulting in accelerated reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation in the wound site. Tylotoin also promotes the release of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), which are essential in the wound healing response. Gene-encoded tylotoin secreted in salamander skin is possibly an effector molecule for skin wound healing. This study may facilitate understanding of the cellular and molecular events that underlie quick wound healing in salamanders.

  3. Elements affecting wound healing time: An evidence based analysis.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hanan; Cullen, Marianne; Chambers, Helen; Carroll, Matthew; Walker, Judi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the predominant client factors and comorbidities that affected the time taken for wounds to heal. A prospective study design used the Mobile Wound Care (MWC) database to capture and collate detailed medical histories, comorbidities, healing times and consumable costs for clients with wounds in Gippsland, Victoria. There were 3,726 wounds documented from 2,350 clients, so an average of 1.6 wounds per client. Half (49.6%) of all clients were females, indicating that there were no gender differences in terms of wound prevalence. The clients were primarily older people, with an average age of 64.3 years (ranging between 0.7 and 102.9 years). The majority of the wounds (56%) were acute and described as surgical, crush and trauma. The MWC database categorized the elements that influenced wound healing into 3 groups--factors affecting healing (FAH), comorbidities, and medications known to affect wound healing. While there were a multitude of significant associations, multiple linear regression identified the following key elements: age over 65 years, obesity, nonadherence to treatment plan, peripheral vascular disease, specific wounds associated with pressure/friction/shear, confirmed infection, and cerebrovascular accident (stroke). Wound healing is a complex process that requires a thorough understanding of influencing elements to improve healing times.© 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  4. US-National Institutes of Health-funded research for cutaneous wounds in 2012.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Nicholas A; Lamel, Sonia A; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Martins-Green, Manuela; Sen, Chandan K; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Vivas, Alejandra C; Braun, Liza R; Kirsner, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    Chronic cutaneous wounds are a major burden on patients, healthcare providers, and the US healthcare system. This study, carried out in part by the Wound Healing Society's Government Regulatory Committee, aimed to evaluate the current state of National Institutes of Health funding of cutaneous wound healing-related research projects. National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools Expenditures & Results system was used to identify wound healing projects funded by the National Institutes of Health in the 2012 fiscal year. Research projects focusing on cutaneous wound prevention/education, mechanisms, complications, treatment, or imaging/monitoring were included in the analysis. Ninety-one projects were identified, totaling a collective funding of $29,798,991 and median funding of $308,941. Thirteen institutes/centers from the National Institutes of Health were responsible for awarding funds; three of which (National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) accounted for 60.4% of the grant funding. The predominant funding mechanisms included R01 (48.3%), R43 (14.3%), and R21 (9.9%). New applications and pre-existing applications accounted for 39.6 and 55.0% of the awarded grants, respectively. Grants awarded to investigators affiliated with universities accounted for 68.1% of grants and 25.3% were to investigators in the private sector. This analysis of current National Institutes of Health funding may facilitate more transparency of National Institutes of Health-allocated research funds and serve as an impetus to procure additional support for the field of wound healing.

  5. Endothelial Antioxidant-1: a Key Mediator of Copper-dependent Wound Healing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Das, Archita; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Chen, Gin-Fu; Kim, Ha Won; Youn, Seock-Won; Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; Yang, Jay; Kweon, Junghun; Surenkhuu, Bayasgalan; Ushio-Fukai, Masuko; Fukai, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu), an essential nutrient, promotes wound healing, however, target of Cu action and underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Cu chaperone Antioxidant-1 (Atox1) in the cytosol supplies Cu to the secretory enzymes such as lysyl oxidase (LOX), while Atox1 in the nucleus functions as a Cu-dependent transcription factor. Using mouse cutaneous wound healing model, here we show that Cu content (by X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy) and nuclear Atox1 are increased after wounding, and that wound healing with and without Cu treatment is impaired in Atox1−/− mice. Endothelial cell (EC)-specific Atox1−/− mice and gene transfer of nuclear-target Atox1 in Atox1−/− mice reveal that Atox1 in ECs as well as transcription factor function of Atox1 are required for wound healing. Mechanistically, Atox1−/− mice show reduced Atox1 target proteins such as p47phox NADPH oxidase and cyclin D1 as well as extracellular matrix Cu enzyme LOX activity in wound tissues. This in turn results in reducing O2− production in ECs, NFkB activity, cell proliferation and collagen formation, thereby inhibiting angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment and extracellular matrix maturation. Our findings suggest that Cu-dependent transcription factor/Cu chaperone Atox1 in ECs plays an important role to sense Cu to accelerate wound angiogenesis and healing. PMID:27666810

  6. Endothelial Antioxidant-1: A key mediator of Copper-dependent wound healing in vivo

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Archita; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Chen, Gin -Fu; ...

    2016-09-26

    Here, Copper (Cu), an essential nutrient, promotes wound healing, however, target of Cu action and underlying mechanisms remains elusive. Cu chaperone Antioxidant-1 (Atox1) in the cytosol supplies Cu to the secretory enzymes such as lysyl oxidase (LOX) while Atox1 in the nucleus functions as a Cu-dependent transcription factor. Using cutaneous wound healing model, here we show that Cu content (by X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy) and nuclear Atox1 are increased after wounding, and that wound healing with and without Cu treatment is impaired in Atox1-/- mice. Experiments using endothelial cell (EC)-specific Atox1-/- mice and gene transfer of nuclear-target Atox1 in Atox1-/- micemore » reveal that Atox1 in ECs as well as transcription factor function of Atox1 are required for wound healing. Mechanistically, Atox1-/- mice show reduced Atox1 target proteins such as p47phox NADPH oxidase and cyclin D1 as well as extracellular matrix Cu enzyme LOX activity in wound tissues. This in turn results in reducing O2- production in ECs, NFkB activity, cell proliferation and collagen formation, thereby inhibiting angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment and extracellular matrix maturation. Our findings suggest that Cu-dependent transcription factor/Cu chaperone Atox1 in ECs plays an essential role to sense Cu to accelerate wound angiogenesis and healing.« less

  7. Delayed wound healing in diabetic (db/db) mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm challenge: a model for the study of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ge; Hochwalt, Phillip C; Usui, Marcia L; Underwood, Robert A; Singh, Pradeep K; James, Garth A; Stewart, Philip S; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major clinical problem that lead to considerable morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that an important factor in the failure of chronic wounds to heal was the presence of microbial biofilm resistant to antibiotics and protected from host defenses. A major difficulty in studying chronic wounds is the absence of suitable animal models. The goal of this study was to create a reproducible chronic wound model in diabetic mice by the application of bacterial biofilm. Six-millimeter punch biopsy wounds were created on the dorsal surface of diabetic (db/db) mice, subsequently challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) biofilms 2 days postwounding, and covered with semiocclusive dressings for 2 weeks. Most of the control wounds were epithelialized by 28 days postwounding. In contrast, none of biofilm-challenged wounds were closed. Histological analysis showed extensive inflammatory cell infiltration, tissue necrosis, and epidermal hyperplasia adjacent to challenged wounds-all indicators of an inflammatory nonhealing wound. Quantitative cultures and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the majority of bacteria were in the scab above the wound bed rather than in the wound tissue. The model was reproducible, allowed localized cutaneous wound infections without high mortality, and demonstrated delayed wound healing following a biofilm challenge. This model may provide an approach to study the role of microbial biofilms in chronic wounds as well as the effect of specific biofilm therapy on wound healing.

  8. A Primer on Wound Healing in Colorectal Surgery in the Age of Bioprosthetic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lundy, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex, dynamic process that is vital for closure of cutaneous injuries, restoration of abdominal wall integrity after laparotomy closure, and to prevent anastomotic dehiscence after bowel surgery. Derangements in healing have been described in multiple processes including diabetes mellitus, corticosteroid use, irradiation for malignancy, and inflammatory bowel disease. A thorough understanding of the process of healing is necessary for clinical decision making and knowledge of the current state of the science may lead future researchers in developing methods to enable our ability to modulate healing, ultimately improving outcomes. An exciting example of this ability is the use of bioprosthetic materials used for abdominal wall surgery (hernia repair/reconstruction). These bioprosthetic meshes are able to regenerate and remodel from an allograft or xenograft collagen matrix into site-specific tissue; ultimately being degraded and minimizing the risk of long-term complications seen with synthetic materials. The purpose of this article is to review healing as it relates to cutaneous and intestinal trauma and surgery, factors that impact wound healing, and wound healing as it pertains to bioprosthetic materials. PMID:25435821

  9. [Autoinflammatory diseases as cause of wound healing defects].

    PubMed

    Löhrer, R; Eming, R; Wolfrum, N; Krieg, T; Eming, S A

    2011-07-01

    Ulcerations of the skin and mucosal membranes are a common feature of autoinflammatory diseases. They can give raise to chronic wound healing defects and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic skin ulcers. The increased activation of the innate immune system in the absence of an apparent provocation for inflammation is a hallmark of autoinflammatory diseases. Mutations and alterations of signaling pathways regulating the innate immune response to physical trauma/tissue damage result into an unrestrained activation of the inflammasome, which leads to increased activation of Interleukin-1. Uncontrolled recruitment and activation of myeloid effector cells within the wound site lead to the release of potent proteases that cause the degradation of structural components of the skin. The majority of these diseases respond well to immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory treatment regimes. Therapeutic resistance converts the acute inflammatory response into a chronic and non-resolving inflammatory process that leads to tissue degeneration. In this article we will focus on the review of those autoinflammatory diseases that often display ulcerative cutaneous and aphthous lesions including pyoderma gangrenosum, Behçet disease, PAPA syndrome and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS). Furthermore, the article will be complemented by an overview of those inflammatory diseases that are associated with non-ulcerative cutaneous manifestations.

  10. IL-33 promotes Staphylococcus aureus-infected wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hui; Li, Xiangyong; Hu, Shilian; Liu, Tao; Yuan, Baohong; Ni, Qian; Lan, Fang; Luo, Xiaochun; Gu, Hongbiao; Zheng, Fang

    2013-10-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33, a newly identified member of IL-1 family of cytokines, plays a crucial role in polarizing Th2-associated immune responses. Recently growing evidence indicates that IL-33 also represents an important mediator of mucosal healing and epithelial restoration. In this study, we investigated the effect of IL-33 on antimicrobial infection and wound healing using a Staphylococcus aureus-infected incision model in mice. Our findings showed that the expression of IL-33 mRNA and protein was promptly increased in cutaneous wound tissues when challenged by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). At the same time, exogenous IL-33 administration profoundly inhibited MRSA colonization and accelerated cutaneous wound repair. IL-33 upregulation promoted the proliferation of neutrophils and CXCR2 expression, which is related to augmented neutrophil trafficking into infectious sites for bactericidal effect. In addition, the beneficial effect of IL-33 is also implicated in enhancement of collagen deposition and the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated genes such as fibronectin and collagen IIIa, which implies a potential effect of IL-33 on matrix synthesis and reepithelialization during the wound repair process. All together, these findings reveal that IL-33 plays an essential effect in maintenance of cutaneous homeostasis and improvement of infectious wound healing.

  11. Self-healing juvenile cutaneous mucinosis.

    PubMed

    Kołodziejczyk, Beata; Gazda, Agnieszka; Hernik, Elżbieta; Szczygielska, Izabela; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia; Koprowska, Marta Legatowicz

    2017-01-01

    Girl, aged 4 years old, began the disease with pain of the lower extremities, fever up to 38°C and signs of upper airway infection. Then the patient developed oedema and redness of the whole face, thickened skin, subcutaneous nodular foldings of the frontal, occipital, cervical and axillary regions, extensor areas of the joints; fine, hard whitish nodules in the frontal region and over interphalangeal joints of the hands, pruritus; oedemas of the ankles, knees and joints of the hands, cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatomegaly. Blood tests at the moment of the diagnosis revealed elevation of markers of inflammation as ESR and CRP, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, hypoalbuminemia, and hyper-alfa-2-globulinemia. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy specimen and subcutaneous tissue revealed myxoid subcutaneous tissue located under the dermis and a section consisting of myxoid mesenchymal tissue with inflammatory infiltration by histiocytic cells. The presence of acid mucopolysaccharides in fields of the myxoid tissue was also observed. The self-healing juvenile cutaneous mucinosis (SJCM) was diagnosed.

  12. Self-healing juvenile cutaneous mucinosis

    PubMed Central

    Kołodziejczyk, Beata; Gazda, Agnieszka; Hernik, Elżbieta; Szczygielska, Izabela; Koprowska, Marta Legatowicz

    2017-01-01

    Girl, aged 4 years old, began the disease with pain of the lower extremities, fever up to 38°C and signs of upper airway infection. Then the patient developed oedema and redness of the whole face, thickened skin, subcutaneous nodular foldings of the frontal, occipital, cervical and axillary regions, extensor areas of the joints; fine, hard whitish nodules in the frontal region and over interphalangeal joints of the hands, pruritus; oedemas of the ankles, knees and joints of the hands, cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatomegaly. Blood tests at the moment of the diagnosis revealed elevation of markers of inflammation as ESR and CRP, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, hypoalbuminemia, and hyper-alfa-2-globulinemia. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy specimen and subcutaneous tissue revealed myxoid subcutaneous tissue located under the dermis and a section consisting of myxoid mesenchymal tissue with inflammatory infiltration by histiocytic cells. The presence of acid mucopolysaccharides in fields of the myxoid tissue was also observed. The self-healing juvenile cutaneous mucinosis (SJCM) was diagnosed. PMID:28386144

  13. [Stem cells and growth factors in wound healing].

    PubMed

    Pikuła, Michał; Langa, Paulina; Kosikowska, Paulina; Trzonkowski, Piotr

    2015-01-02

    Wound healing is a complex process which depends on the presence of various types of cells, growth factors, cytokines and the elements of extracellular matrix. A wound is a portal of entry for numerous pathogens, therefore during the evolution wound healing process has formed very early, being critical for the survival of every individual. Stem cells, which give rise to their early descendants progenitor cells and subsequently differentiated cells, play a specific role in the process of wound healing. Among the most important cells which take part in wound healing the following cells need to be distinguished: epidermal stem cells, dermal precursor of fibroblasts, adipose-derived stem cells as well as bone marrow cells. The activity of these cells is strictly regulated by various growth factors, inter alia epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor (TGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Any disorders in functioning of stem cells and biological activity of growth factors may lead to the defects in wound healing, for instance delayed wound healing or creation of hypertrophic scars. Therefore, knowledge concerning the mechanisms of wound healing is extremely essential from clinical point of view. In this review the current state of the knowledge of the role of stem cells and growth factors in the process of wound healing has been presented. Moreover, some clinical aspects of wound healing as well as the possibility of the therapy based on stem cells and growth factors have included.

  14. CD19, a response regulator of B lymphocytes, regulates wound healing through hyaluronan-induced TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yohei; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Komura, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Fumihide; Hara, Toshihide; Muroi, Eiji; Bae, Sangjae; Takenaka, Motoi; Yukami, Toru; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Tomita, Yasushi; Tedder, Thomas F; Sato, Shinichi

    2009-08-01

    Immune cells are critical to the wound-healing process, through both cytokine and growth factor secretion. Although previous studies have revealed that B cells are present within wound tissue, little is known about the role of B cells in wound healing. To clarify this, we investigated cutaneous wound healing in mice either lacking or overexpressing CD19, a critical positive-response regulator of B cells. CD19 deficiency inhibited wound healing, infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages, and cytokine expression, including basic and acidic fibroblast growth factor, interleukin-6, platelet-derived growth factor, and transforming growth factor-beta. By contrast, CD19 overexpression enhanced wound healing and cytokine expression. Hyaluronan (HA), an endogenous ligand for toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, stimulated B cells, which infiltrates into wounds to produce interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-beta through TLR4 in a CD19-dependent manner. CD19 expression regulated TLR4 signaling through p38 activation. HA accumulation was increased in injured skin tissue relative to normal skin, and exogenous application of HA promoted wound repair in wild-type but not CD19-deficient mice, suggesting that the beneficial effects of HA to the wound-healing process are CD19-dependent. Collectively, these results suggest that increased HA accumulation in injured skin induces cytokine production by stimulating B cells through TLR4 in a CD19-dependent manner. Thus, this study is the first to reveal a critical role of B cells and novel mechanisms in wound healing.

  15. Influence of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) flavone on dermal wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asheesh; Kumar, Ratan; Pal, Karan; Singh, Virendra; Banerjee, Pratul K; Sawhney, Ramesh C

    2006-10-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to determine the efficacy of topical administration of flavone of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) on cutaneous wound healing in rats. Four full-thickness excision wounds were created on the back of rat and 1.0% w/v flavone prepared in propylene glycol was applied topically. Control animals received the vehicle alone in an identical manner. The healing of the wound was assessed by the rate of wound contraction, period of epithelialization, hydroxyproline, hexosamine, antioxidants estimation and histopathology of the granulation tissue. The sea buckthorn flavone promoted the wound healing activity as indicated by improved rate of wound contraction, decreased time taken for epithelialization (16.3 days versus 24.8 days in controls) and significant increase in hydroxyproline (26.0%) and hexosamine (30.0%) content. These findings were also confirmed by histopathological examinations. In addition, it was observed that sea buckthorn flavone possesses potent antioxidant properties as evidenced by significant increase in reduced glutathione (55.0%), vitamin C (70.0%) and catalase (20.0%) activities in wound granulation tissue. The flavone treatment also resulted in significant decrease in lipid peroxide levels (39.0%). The results suggest that the sea buckthorn flavone promotes wound healing activity.

  16. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in the Exotic Pets

    PubMed Central

    Mickelson, Megan A.; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regards to the animal’s temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency towards secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately impact wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that impact healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. PMID:26611923

  17. Initial Characterization of the Pig Skin Bacteriome and Its Effect on In Vitro Models of Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Matthew K.; Peacock, Trent J.; Akers, Kevin S.

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the roles and composition of the human skin microbiome has revealed a delicate interplay between resident microbes and wound healing. Evolutionarily speaking, normal cutaneous flora likely has been selected for because it potentiates or, at minimum, does not impede wound healing. While pigs are the gold standard model for wound healing studies, the porcine skin microbiome has not been studied in detail. Herein, we performed 16S rDNA sequencing to characterize the pig skin bacteriome at several anatomical locations. Additionally, we used bacterial conditioned-media with in vitro techniques to examine the paracrine effects of bacterial-derived proteins on human keratinocytes (NHEK) and fibroblasts (NHDF). We found that at the phyla level, the pig skin bacteriome is similar to that of humans and largely consists of Firmicutes (55.6%), Bacteroidetes (20.8%), Actinobacteria (13.3%), and Proteobacteria (5.1%) however species-level differences between anatomical locations exist. Studies of bacterial supernatant revealed location-dependent effects on NHDF migration and NHEK apoptosis and growth factor release. These results expand the limited knowledge of the cutaneous bacteriome of healthy swine, and suggest that naturally occurring bacterial flora affects wound healing differentially depending on anatomical location. Ultimately, the pig might be considered the best surrogate for not only wound healing studies but also the cutaneous microbiome. This would not only facilitate investigations into the microbiome’s role in recovery from injury, but also provide microbial targets for enhancing or accelerating wound healing. PMID:27824921

  18. Initial Characterization of the Pig Skin Bacteriome and Its Effect on In Vitro Models of Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Matthew K; Peacock, Trent J; Akers, Kevin S; Burmeister, David M

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the roles and composition of the human skin microbiome has revealed a delicate interplay between resident microbes and wound healing. Evolutionarily speaking, normal cutaneous flora likely has been selected for because it potentiates or, at minimum, does not impede wound healing. While pigs are the gold standard model for wound healing studies, the porcine skin microbiome has not been studied in detail. Herein, we performed 16S rDNA sequencing to characterize the pig skin bacteriome at several anatomical locations. Additionally, we used bacterial conditioned-media with in vitro techniques to examine the paracrine effects of bacterial-derived proteins on human keratinocytes (NHEK) and fibroblasts (NHDF). We found that at the phyla level, the pig skin bacteriome is similar to that of humans and largely consists of Firmicutes (55.6%), Bacteroidetes (20.8%), Actinobacteria (13.3%), and Proteobacteria (5.1%) however species-level differences between anatomical locations exist. Studies of bacterial supernatant revealed location-dependent effects on NHDF migration and NHEK apoptosis and growth factor release. These results expand the limited knowledge of the cutaneous bacteriome of healthy swine, and suggest that naturally occurring bacterial flora affects wound healing differentially depending on anatomical location. Ultimately, the pig might be considered the best surrogate for not only wound healing studies but also the cutaneous microbiome. This would not only facilitate investigations into the microbiome's role in recovery from injury, but also provide microbial targets for enhancing or accelerating wound healing.

  19. A short peptide from frog skin accelerates diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Duan, Zilei; Tang, Jing; Lv, Qiumin; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2014-10-01

    Delayed wound healing will result in the development of chronic wounds in some diseases, such as diabetes. Amphibian skins possess excellent wound-healing ability and represent a resource for prospective wound-healing promoting compounds. A potential wound-healing promoting peptide (CW49; amino acid sequence APFRMGICTTN) was identified from the frog skin of Odorrana grahami. It promotes wound healing in a murine model with a full-thickness dermal wound in both normal and diabetic animals. In addition to its strong angiogenic ability with respect to the upregulation of some angiogenic proteins, CW49 also showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect in diabetic wounds, which was very important for healing chronic wounds. CW49 had little effect on re-epithelialization, resulting in no significant effect on wound closure rate compared to a vehicle control. Altogether, this indicated that CW49 might accelerate diabetic wound healing by promoting angiogenesis and preventing any excessive inflammatory response. Considering its favorable traits as a small peptide that significantly promotes angiogenesis, CW49 might be an excellent candidate or template for the development of a drug for use in the treatment of diabetic wounds.

  20. Novel hydrocolloid-sheet as wound dressing to stimulate healing-impaired wound healing in diabetic db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Yanagibayashi, Satoshi; Kishimoto, Satoko; Ishihara, Masayuki; Murakami, Kaoru; Aoki, Hiroshi; Takikawa, Megumi; Fujita, Masanori; Sekido, Mitsuru; Kiyosawa, Tomoharu

    2012-01-01

    To create a moist environment for wound healing, a hydrocolloid-sheet composed of alginate, chitin/chitosan and fucoidan (ACF-HS) has been developed as a functional wound dressing. ACF-HS gradually adsorbed medium without any maceration and the medium adsorption in vitro reached constant after 18 h. ACF-HS could effectively interact with and protect a healing-impaired wound in diabetic db/db mice, providing a good moist healing environment with exudate. Furthermore, the wound dressing could have other properties like ease of application and removal, and proper adherence. The aim of this study was to evaluate an accelerating effect of ACF-HS on wound healing for healing-impaired wounds in diabetic db/db mice. Round full-thickness skin defects (12 mm in diameter) were made on the back of db/db mice to prepare healing-impaired wounds. After applying ACF-HS to the wounds, the mice were later killed and histological sections of the wound were prepared. Histological examinations showed significantly advanced granulation tissue and capillary formations in the wounds treated with ACF-HS on days 4, 9 and 14 compared with those in commercially available hydrocolloid wound dressing and non-treatment (control). Thus, ACF-HS may serve as a new wound dressing for diabetic healing-impaired wounds.

  1. New insights into microRNAs in skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Fahs, Fatima; Bi, Xinling; Yu, Fu-Shin; Zhou, Li; Mi, Qing-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Chronic wounds are a major burden to overall healthcare cost and patient morbidity. Chronic wounds affect a large portion of the US, and billions of healthcare dollars are spent in their treatment and management. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding double-stranded RNAs that post-transcriptionally downregulate the expression of protein-coding genes. Studies have identified miRNAs involved in all three phases of wound healing including inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Some miRNAs have been demonstrated in vitro with primary keratinocyte wound healing model and in vivo with mouse wound healing model through regulation of miRNA expression to affect the wound healing process. This review updates the current miRNAs involved in wound healing and discusses the future therapeutic implications and research directions.

  2. Growth factors and cytokines in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Stephan; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Golinko, Michael S; Brem, Harold; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2008-01-01

    Wound healing is an evolutionarily conserved, complex, multicellular process that, in skin, aims at barrier restoration. This process involves the coordinated efforts of several cell types including keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, macrophages, and platelets. The migration, infiltration, proliferation, and differentiation of these cells will culminate in an inflammatory response, the formation of new tissue and ultimately wound closure. This complex process is executed and regulated by an equally complex signaling network involving numerous growth factors, cytokines and chemokines. Of particular importance is the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) family, fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), interleukin (IL) family, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha family. Currently, patients are treated by three growth factors: PDGF-BB, bFGF, and GM-CSF. Only PDGF-BB has successfully completed randomized clinical trials in the Unites States. With gene therapy now in clinical trial and the discovery of biodegradable polymers, fibrin mesh, and human collagen serving as potential delivery systems other growth factors may soon be available to patients. This review will focus on the specific roles of these growth factors and cytokines during the wound healing process.

  3. Delayed wound healing in Mac-1-deficient mice is associated with normal monocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Sisco, Mark; Chao, Jerome D; Kim, Injoong; Mogford, Jon E; Mayadas, Tanya N; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    The Mac-1 integrin is an important mediator of migration and inflammatory activation of neutrophils and monocytes. However, the role of Mac-1 in modulating macrophage emigration and activation and its subsequent impact on cutaneous wound healing have not been fully elucidated. To examine the significance of Mac-1 to murine wound healing, we measured epithelialization and granulation tissue formation in partial-thickness ear wounds and full-thickness head wounds, respectively, in Mac-1-deficient mice. Wounds were histologically analyzed at postwounding days 3, 5, and 7. The gap measured between the leading edges of inward-migrating granulation tissue was significantly increased in knockout mice compared with control animals at day 5 (3.8+/-0.3 vs. 2.6+/-0.5 mm; p<0.001) and day 7 (2.2+/-0.4 vs. 0.96+/-0.73 mm; p=0.005). Epithelial gap measurements were also increased in knockout mice vs. wild-type controls at days 3 (0.62+/-0.02 vs. 0.54+/-0.07 mm; p<0.05) and 5 (0.58+/-0.06 vs. 0.39+/-0.08 mm; p<0.001). Immunohistochemistry showed equal numbers of macrophages in knockout and control wounds. These findings show that Mac-1 is required for normal wound healing but that the attenuation in the deposition of granulation tissue and wound epithelialization in Mac-1 knockout mice is not associated with decreased monocyte migration into the wound.

  4. Chemokine Involvement in Fetal and Adult Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Swathi; Watson, Carey L.; Ranjan, Rajeev; King, Alice; Bollyky, Paul L.; Keswani, Sundeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Fetal wounds heal with a regenerative phenotype that is indistinguishable from surrounding skin with restored skin integrity. Compared to this benchmark, all postnatal wound healing is impaired and characterized by scar formation. The biologic basis of the fetal regenerative phenotype can serve as a roadmap to recapitulating regenerative repair in adult wounds. Reduced leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated, in part, through changes in the chemokine milieu, is a fundamental feature of fetal wound healing. Recent Advances: The contributions of chemokines to wound healing are a topic of active investigation. Recent discoveries have opened the possibility of targeting chemokines therapeutically to treat disease processes and improve healing capability, including the possibility of achieving a scarless phenotype in postnatal wounds. Critical Issues: Successful wound healing is a complex process, in which there is a significant interplay between multiple cell types, signaling molecules, growth factors, and extracellular matrix. Chemokines play a crucial role in this interplay and have been shown to have different effects in various stages of the healing process. Understanding how these chemokines are locally produced and regulated during wound healing and how the chemokine milieu differs in fetal versus postnatal wounds may help us identify ways in which we can target chemokine pathways. Future Directions: Further studies on the role of chemokines and their role in the healing process will greatly advance the potential for using these molecules as therapeutic targets. PMID:26543680

  5. Low intensity laser therapy speeds wound healing in hemophilia by enhancing platelet procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Maureane; Monroe, Dougald M

    2012-01-01

    Our group has previously shown that cutaneous wound healing is delayed and histologically abnormal in a mouse model of hemophilia. Hemostasis is not only required to stop bleeding at the time of wounding, but also produces bioactive substances that promote appropriate inflammatory and proliferative responses during healing. Low intensity laser therapy (LILT) has been reported to enhance impaired wound healing in a variety of animal and human studies. The current studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that LILT can improve healing in a hemophilia B mouse model. Three daily treatments with 12 J/sq cm of 650 nm laser illumination reduced the time to closure of a 3-mm cutaneous punch biopsy wound in the hemophilic mice. All wounds were closed at 13 days in the sham-treated hemophilic mice, compared with 10 days in the LILT-treated hemophilic mice, and 9 days in wild-type mice. While LILT can speed healing by enhancing proliferation of cutaneous cells, we found that an additional mechanism likely contributes to the efficacy of LILT in the hemophilic mice. LILT enhanced the mechanical rigidity and platelet activity of clots formed from human platelet-rich plasma. Illumination of isolated platelets increased the mitochondrial membrane potential and enhanced binding of coagulation factors to the surface of activated platelets. Thus, while LILT can directly promote proliferative responses during healing, it also appears to enhance hemostasis in an animal model with impaired coagulation. These data suggest that trials of LILT as an adjunct to the usual hemostatic therapies in hemophilia are warranted.

  6. [Wound healing and induced resistance in potato tubers].

    PubMed

    Ozeretskovskaia, O L; Vasiukova, N I; Chalenko, G I; Gerasimova, N G; Revina, T A; Valueva, T A

    2009-01-01

    It was demonstrated that biogenic elicitors, arachidonic acid and chitosan, locally and systemically stimulated wound healing in potato tuber tissues by increasing the number of wound periderm layers, accelerating the development of cork cambium (phellogen), and inducing proteinase inhibitors. The signal molecules, jasmonic and salicylic acids, had different effects on the development of wound periderm: jasmonic acid locally and systemically stimulated potato wound healing and elevated the level of proteinase inhibitors, whereas salicylic acid did not have any effect on wound healing and even blocked the formation of proteinase inhibitors.

  7. Collagen-Based Biomaterials for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Sayani; Raines, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    With its wide distribution in soft and hard connective tissues, collagen is the most abundant of animal proteins. In vitro, natural collagen can be formed into highly organized, three-dimensional scaffolds that are intrinsically biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic upon exogenous application, and endowed with high tensile strength. These attributes make collagen the material of choice for wound healing and tissue engineering applications. In this article, we review the structure and molecular interactions of collagen in vivo; the recent use of natural collagen in sponges, injectables, films and membranes, dressings, and skin grafts; and the on-going development of synthetic collagen mimetic peptides as pylons to anchor cytoactive agents in wound beds. PMID:24633807

  8. Epithelial mechanobiology, skin wound healing, and the stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard O C; Healy, Eugene; Thurner, Philipp J; Man, Yu Hin

    2013-12-01

    Skin wound healing is a vital process that is important for re-establishing the epithelial barrier following disease or injury. Aberrant or delayed skin wound healing increases the risk of infection, causes patient morbidity, and may lead to the formation of scar tissue. One of the most important events in wound healing is coverage of the wound with a new epithelial layer. This occurs when keratinocytes at the wound periphery divide and migrate to re-populate the wound bed. Many approaches are under investigation to promote and expedite this process, including the topical application of growth factors and the addition of autologous and allogeneic tissue or cell grafts. The mechanical environment of the wound site is also of fundamental importance for the rate and quality of wound healing. It is known that mechanical stress can influence wound healing by affecting the behaviour of cells within the dermis, but it remains unclear how mechanical forces affect the healing epidermis. Tensile forces are known to affect the behaviour of cells within epithelia, however, and the material properties of extracellular matrices, such as substrate stiffness, have been shown to affect the morphology, proliferation, differentiation and migration of many different cell types. In this review we will introduce the structure of the skin and the process of wound healing. We will then discuss the evidence for the effect of tissue mechanics in re-epithelialisation and, in particular, on stem cell behaviour in the wound microenvironment and in intact skin. We will discuss how the elasticity, mechanical heterogeneity and topography of the wound extracellular matrix impact the rate and quality of wound healing, and how we may exploit this knowledge to expedite wound healing and mitigate scarring.

  9. Sex dimorphism in wound healing: the roles of sex steroids and macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Gilliver, Stephen C; Ruckshanthi, Jayalath P D; Hardman, Matthew J; Nakayama, Toshinori; Ashcroft, Gillian S

    2008-11-01

    That endogenous sex steroid hormones profoundly influence the response to cutaneous injury is well established. How they and other factors combine to direct repair in male and female animals is much less well understood. Using a murine incisional wound-healing model, we investigated the roles of circulating sex steroids, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) (the mediator of delayed healing in ovariectomized animals), and hormone- and MIF-independent factors in controlling repair. We report that d 3 wounds, of comparable size in intact male and female mice, are significantly larger in ovariectomized female animals than in castrated males, suggesting that native sex hormones mask inherent underlying differences in the ways in which males and females respond to wounding. Wound MIF levels were comparable in intact male and female mice but greater in ovariectomized females than castrated males. Furthermore, wound levels of Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1), a key factor by which MIF activates intracellular responses, were increased through ovariectomy and greater in ovariectomized females than castrated males. This difference in wound JAB1 levels may underscore the marked sex difference we observed in the responses of MIF knockout mice to the local application of MIF: healing was impaired in ovariectomized females but not castrated males. Separately, systemic treatment with androgens and estrogens yielded contrasting effects on repair in male and female animals. Collectively, the presented data indicate sex divergence in wound healing to be multifaceted, being strongly influenced by MIF and seemingly limited by the combined actions of gonadal steroids.

  10. Incisional wound healing in transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Koch, R M; Roche, N S; Parks, W T; Ashcroft, G S; Letterio, J J; Roberts, A B

    2000-01-01

    Expression of endogenous transforming growth factor-beta1 is reduced in many animal models of impaired wound healing, and addition of exogenous transforming growth factor-beta has been shown to improve healing. To test the hypothesis that endogenous transforming growth factor-beta1 is essential for normal wound repair, we have studied wound healing in mice in which the transforming growth factor-beta1 gene has been deleted by homologous recombination. No perceptible differences were observed in wounds made in 3-10-day-old neonatal transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice compared to wild-type littermates. To preclude interference from maternally transferred transforming growth factor-beta1, cutaneous wounds were also made on the backs of 30-day-old transforming growth factor-beta1 null and littermate control mice treated with rapamycin, which extends their lifetime and suppresses the inflammatory response characteristic of the transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice. Again, no impairment in healing was seen in transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice. Instead these wounds showed an overall reduction in the amount of granulation tissue and an increased rate of epithelialization compared to littermate controls. Our data suggest that release of transforming growth factor-beta1 from degranulating platelets or secretion by infiltrating macrophages and fibroblasts is not critical to initiation or progression of tissue repair and that endogenous transforming growth factor-beta1 may actually function to increase inflammation and retard wound closure.

  11. The wound healing, chronic fibrosis, and cancer progression triad

    PubMed Central

    Rybinski, Brad; Franco-Barraza, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    For decades tumors have been recognized as “wounds that do not heal.” Besides the commonalities that tumors and wounded tissues share, the process of wound healing also portrays similar characteristics with chronic fibrosis. In this review, we suggest a tight interrelationship, which is governed as a concurrence of cellular and microenvironmental reactivity among wound healing, chronic fibrosis, and cancer development/progression (i.e., the WHFC triad). It is clear that the same cell types, as well as soluble and matrix elements that drive wound healing (including regeneration) via distinct signaling pathways, also fuel chronic fibrosis and tumor progression. Hence, here we review the relationship between fibrosis and cancer through the lens of wound healing. PMID:24520152

  12. Inflammation and wound healing: the role of the macrophage.

    PubMed

    Koh, Timothy J; DiPietro, Luisa Ann

    2011-07-11

    The macrophage is a prominent inflammatory cell in wounds, but its role in healing remains incompletely understood. Macrophages have many functions in wounds, including host defence, the promotion and resolution of inflammation, the removal of apoptotic cells, and the support of cell proliferation and tissue restoration following injury. Recent studies suggest that macrophages exist in several different phenotypic states within the healing wound and that the influence of these cells on each stage of repair varies with the specific phenotype. Although the macrophage is beneficial to the repair of normally healing wounds, this pleotropic cell type may promote excessive inflammation or fibrosis under certain circumstances. Emerging evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is a component of the pathogenesis of nonhealing and poorly healing wounds. As a result of advances in the understanding of this multifunctional cell, the macrophage continues to be an attractive therapeutic target, both to reduce fibrosis and scarring, and to improve healing of chronic wounds.

  13. Carboxymethylcellulose film for bacterial wound infection control and healing.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tin Wui; Ramli, Nor Amlizan

    2014-11-04

    Infection control and wound healing profiles of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) films were investigated as a function of their anti-bacterial action, physical structures, polymer molecular weights and carboxymethyl substitution degrees. The films were prepared with in vitro polymer/film and in vivo microbe-colonized wound healing/systemic infection profiles examined. Adhesive high carboxymethyl substituted SCMC films aided healing via attaching to microbes and removing them from wound. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was removed via encapsulating in gelling low molecular weight SCMC film, whereas Staphylococcus aureus was trapped in tight folds of high molecular weight SCMC film. Incomplete microbe removal from wound did not necessary translate to inability to heal as microbe remnant at wound induced fibroblast migration and aided tissue reconstruction. Using no film nonetheless will cause systemic blood infection. SCMC films negate infection and promote wound healing via specific polymer-microbe adhesion, and removal of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa requires films of different polymer characteristics.

  14. Computer-assisted surgical techniques evaluated with wound-healing-impaired animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Lou; West, Courtney; Rivas, Mike; Patil, Yash; Ossoff, Robert H.

    1996-04-01

    As part of our computer assisted surgical techniques (CAST) program, we use computers to assist in the guidance of surgical lasers. The computer helps to create laser incisions with minimal widths, a reduction of collateral thermal damage, and regulates the rate of tissue ablation. Previous studies have compared laser incisions under manual control to incisions made with the CAST system. These studies were carried out with healthy animals. In this study, we compare the manual and CAST laser incisions on rats with induced diabetes. The diabetic rats have impaired wound healing and make a better model for our wound healing studies. Cutaneous incisions were made on the dorsal pelt using a carbon dioxide laser. The incisions were sutured and allowed to heal for 3, 7, 14, and 21 days. Wounds were analyzed histologically and with tensiometry. We have found definite advantages to the CAST program.

  15. Connexin43 carboxyl-terminal peptides reduce scar progenitor and promote regenerative healing following skin wounding

    PubMed Central

    Ghatnekar, Gautam S; O’Quinn, Michael P; Jourdan, L Jane; Gurjarpadhye, Abhijit A; Draughn, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    Aim Gap-junctional connexin43 (Cx43) has roles in multiple aspects of skin wound healing – including scarring. The aim here was to study the effects of a cell-permeant peptide from the Cx43 carboxyl-terminus (CT) on scarring and regeneration following cutaneous injury. Materials & methods The effects of Cx43 CT peptide were studied in mouse and pig models of cutaneous injury. The parameters assessed included neutrophil density, wound closure, granulation, regeneration and skin tensile properties. Results Cx43 CT-peptide prompted decreases in area of scar progenitor tissue and promoted restoration of dermal histoarchitecture and mechanical strength following wounding of skin. These changes in healing were preceded by peptide-induced reduction in inflammatory neutrophil infiltration and alterations in the organization of epidermal Cx43, including increased connexon aggregation. Conclusion Cx43 CT peptide promotes regenerative healing of cutaneous wounds and may have applications in tissues other than skin, including heart, cornea and spinal cord. PMID:19317641

  16. Wound healing properties and kill kinetics of Clerodendron splendens G. Don, a Ghanaian wound healing plant

    PubMed Central

    Gbedema, Stephen Y.; Emelia, Kisseih; Francis, Adu; Kofi, Annan; Eric, Woode

    2010-01-01

    As part of our general objective of investigating indigenous plants used in wound healing in Ghana, we hereby report our findings from some in vitro and in vivo studies related to wound healing activities of Clerodendron splendens G. Don (Verbanaceae). Methanolic extract of the aerial parts of the plant was tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Micrococcus flavus, as well as resistant strains of Staph. aureus SA1199B, RN4220 and XU212), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteous mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and Candida albicans using the micro-well dilution method. Survivor–time studies of the microorganisms, radical scavenging activity using 2,2’-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and various in vivo wound healing activity studies were also conducted on the extract. The extract exhibited biostatic action against all the test microorganisms with a Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC) ranging between 64 and 512 μg/ml and a free radical scavenging property with an IC50 value of 103.2 μg/ml. The results of the in vivo wound healing tests showed that upon application of C. splendens ointment, there was a reduction in the epithelization period from 26.7 days (control) to 13.6 days along with a marked decrease in the scar area from 54.2 mm2 (control) to 25.2 mm2. Significant increase in the tensile strength and hydroxyproline content were also observed as compared to the control and was comparable to nitrofurazone. The above results appear to justify the traditional use of C. splendens in wound healing and treatment of skin infections in Ghana. PMID:21808542

  17. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rúben F.; Bártolo, Paulo J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the healthcare, and allowing overcoming some limitations associated to the modern products and therapies, such as the high costs, the long manufacturing times, and the increase in the bacterial resistance. This article gives a general overview about the recent advances in traditional therapies for skin wound healing, focusing on the therapeutic activity, action mechanisms, and clinical trials of the most commonly used natural compounds. New insights in the combination of traditional products with modern treatments and future challenges in the field are also highlighted. Recent Advances: Natural compounds have been used in skin wound care for many years due to their therapeutic activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and cell-stimulating properties. The clinical efficacy of these compounds has been investigated through in vitro and in vivo trials using both animal models and humans. Besides the important progress regarding the development of novel extraction methods, purification procedures, quality control assessment, and treatment protocols, the exact mechanisms of action, side effects, and safety of these compounds need further research. Critical Issues: The repair of skin lesions is one of the most complex biological processes in humans, occurring throughout an orchestrated cascade of overlapping biochemical and cellular events. To stimulate the regeneration process and prevent the wound to fail the healing, traditional therapies and natural products have been used

  18. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rúben F; Bártolo, Paulo J

    2016-05-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the healthcare, and allowing overcoming some limitations associated to the modern products and therapies, such as the high costs, the long manufacturing times, and the increase in the bacterial resistance. This article gives a general overview about the recent advances in traditional therapies for skin wound healing, focusing on the therapeutic activity, action mechanisms, and clinical trials of the most commonly used natural compounds. New insights in the combination of traditional products with modern treatments and future challenges in the field are also highlighted. Recent Advances: Natural compounds have been used in skin wound care for many years due to their therapeutic activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and cell-stimulating properties. The clinical efficacy of these compounds has been investigated through in vitro and in vivo trials using both animal models and humans. Besides the important progress regarding the development of novel extraction methods, purification procedures, quality control assessment, and treatment protocols, the exact mechanisms of action, side effects, and safety of these compounds need further research. Critical Issues: The repair of skin lesions is one of the most complex biological processes in humans, occurring throughout an orchestrated cascade of overlapping biochemical and cellular events. To stimulate the regeneration process and prevent the wound to fail the healing, traditional therapies and natural products have been used

  19. Platelet-rich plasma gel promotes differentiation and regeneration during equine wound healing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Charleata A; Jolly, David G; Worden, Charles E; Hendren, Dennis G; Kane, Cynthia J M

    2003-06-01

    Nonhealing wounds of the lower equine limb represent a challenging model. The platelet is a natural source of a myriad of growth factors and cytokines that promote wound healing. This study evaluates the potential of platelet derived factors to enhance wound healing in the lower equine limb. Platelets were isolated from horse blood and activated with thrombin, a process known to induce growth factor release. This produced a platelet gel composed of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). To test this all-natural wound healant, 2.5-cm(2) full thickness cutaneous wounds were created below the knee and hock of a thoroughbred horse. Wounds were treated with PRP gel or left untreated. Sequential wound biopsies collected at Days 7, 36, and 79 postwounding permitted comparison of the temporal expression of differentiation markers and wound repair. To test the hypothesis that wounds treated with PRP gel exhibit more rapid epithelial differentiation and enhanced organization of dermal collagen compared to controls, tissues were stained for cytokeratin 10, a suprabasal differentiation marker, and the reestablishment of collagen was evaluated by trichrome staining. PRP gel-treated wounds at Day 7 expressed intense cytokeratin 10 staining near the wound junction in suprabasal epidermal layers, while staining in control tissues was less intense and restricted to apical epidermal layers distal to the wound junction. By Day 79, the staining was equal in both groups. However, PRP gel-treated wounds at Day 79 contained abundant, dense collagen bundles oriented parallel to each other and to the overlying epithelium, whereas control tissues contained fewer collagen fibers that were oriented randomly. Thus, treatment of wounds with PRP gel induced accelerated epithelial differentiation and produced tissue with organized, interlocking collagen bundles. This study reveals that this novel all-natural wound healant induced wound repair in injuries previously deemed untreatable.

  20. A small peptide with potential ability to promote wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Liu, Han; Gao, Chen; Mu, Lixian; Yang, Shilong; Rong, Mingqiang; Zhang, Zhiye; Liu, Jie; Ding, Qiang; Lai, Ren

    2014-01-01

    Wound-healing represents a major health burden, such as diabetes-induced skin ulcers and burning. Many works are being tried to find ideal clinical wound-healing biomaterials. Especially, small molecules with low cost and function to promote production of endogenous wound healing agents (i.e. transforming growth factor beta, TGF-β) are excellent candidates. In this study, a small peptide (tiger17, c[WCKPKPKPRCH-NH2]) containing only 11 amino acid residues was designed and proved to be a potent wound healer. It showed strong wound healing-promoting activity in a murine model of full thickness dermal wound. Tiger17 exerted significant effects on three stages of wound healing progresses including (1) the induction of macrophages recruitment to wound site at inflammatory reaction stage; (2) the promotion of the migration and proliferation both keratinocytes and fibroblasts, leading to reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation; and (3) tissue remodeling phase, by promoting the release of transforming TGF-β1 and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in murine macrophages and activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways. Considering its easy production, store and transfer and function to promote production of endogenous wound healing agents (TGF-β), tiger17 might be an exciting biomaterial or template for the development of novel wound-healing agents.

  1. A Small Peptide with Potential Ability to Promote Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Lixian; Yang, Shilong; Rong, Mingqiang; Zhang, Zhiye; Liu, Jie; Ding, Qiang; Lai, Ren

    2014-01-01

    Wound-healing represents a major health burden, such as diabetes-induced skin ulcers and burning. Many works are being tried to find ideal clinical wound-healing biomaterials. Especially, small molecules with low cost and function to promote production of endogenous wound healing agents (i.e. transforming growth factor beta, TGF-β) are excellent candidates. In this study, a small peptide (tiger17, c[WCKPKPKPRCH-NH2]) containing only 11 amino acid residues was designed and proved to be a potent wound healer. It showed strong wound healing-promoting activity in a murine model of full thickness dermal wound. Tiger17 exerted significant effects on three stages of wound healing progresses including (1) the induction of macrophages recruitment to wound site at inflammatory reaction stage; (2) the promotion of the migration and proliferation both keratinocytes and fibroblasts, leading to reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation; and (3) tissue remodeling phase, by promoting the release of transforming TGF-β1 and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in murine macrophages and activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways. Considering its easy production, store and transfer and function to promote production of endogenous wound healing agents (TGF-β), tiger17 might be an exciting biomaterial or template for the development of novel wound-healing agents. PMID:24647450

  2. Redefining the Chronic-Wound Microbiome: Fungal Communities Are Prevalent, Dynamic, and Associated with Delayed Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kalan, Lindsay; Loesche, Michael; Hodkinson, Brendan P.; Heilmann, Kristopher; Ruthel, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic nonhealing wounds have been heralded as a silent epidemic, causing significant morbidity and mortality especially in elderly, diabetic, and obese populations. Polymicrobial biofilms in the wound bed are hypothesized to disrupt the highly coordinated and sequential events of cutaneous healing. Both culture-dependent and -independent studies of the chronic-wound microbiome have almost exclusively focused on bacteria, omitting what we hypothesize are important fungal contributions to impaired healing and the development of complications. Here we show for the first time that fungal communities (the mycobiome) in chronic wounds are predictive of healing time, associated with poor outcomes, and form mixed fungal-bacterial biofilms. We longitudinally profiled 100, nonhealing diabetic-foot ulcers with high-throughput sequencing of the pan-fungal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) locus, estimating that up to 80% of wounds contain fungi, whereas cultures performed in parallel captured only 5% of colonized wounds. The “mycobiome” was highly heterogeneous over time and between subjects. Fungal diversity increased with antibiotic administration and onset of a clinical complication. The proportions of the phylum Ascomycota were significantly greater (P = 0.015) at the beginning of the study in wounds that took >8 weeks to heal. Wound necrosis was distinctly associated with pathogenic fungal species, while taxa identified as allergenic filamentous fungi were associated with low levels of systemic inflammation. Directed culturing of wounds stably colonized by pathogens revealed that interkingdom biofilms formed between yeasts and coisolated bacteria. Combined, our analyses provide enhanced resolution of the mycobiome during impaired wound healing, its role in chronic disease, and impact on clinical outcomes. PMID:27601572

  3. Different wound healing properties of dermis, adipose, and gingiva mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Boink, Mireille A; van den Broek, Lenie J; Roffel, Sanne; Nazmi, Kamran; Bolscher, Jan G M; Gefen, Amit; Veerman, Enno C I; Gibbs, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with better scar quality than skin wounds. Deep skin wounds where adipose tissue is exposed, have a greater risk of forming hypertrophic scars. Differences in wound healing and final scar quality might be related to differences in mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and their ability to respond to intrinsic (autocrine) and extrinsic signals, such as human salivary histatin, epidermal growth factor, and transforming growth factor beta1. Dermis-, adipose-, and gingiva-derived MSC were compared for their regenerative potential with regards to proliferation, migration, and matrix contraction. Proliferation was assessed by cell counting and migration using a scratch wound assay. Matrix contraction and alpha smooth muscle actin was assessed in MSC populated collagen gels, and also in skin and gingival full thickness tissue engineered equivalents (reconstructed epithelium on MSC populated matrix). Compared to skin-derived MSC, gingiva MSC showed greater proliferation and migration capacity, and less matrix contraction in full thickness tissue equivalents, which may partly explain the superior oral wound healing. Epidermal keratinocytes were required for enhanced adipose MSC matrix contraction and alpha smooth muscle actin expression, and may therefore contribute to adverse scarring in deep cutaneous wounds. Histatin enhanced migration without influencing proliferation or matrix contraction in all three MSC, indicating that salivary peptides may have a beneficial effect on wound closure in general. Transforming growth factor beta1 enhanced contraction and alpha smooth muscle actin expression in all three MSC types when incorporated into collagen gels. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the superior oral wound healing will aid us to develop advanced strategies for optimal skin regeneration, wound healing and scar formation.

  4. Application of hyaluronic acid in the healing of non-experimental open wounds: A pilot study on 12 wounds in 10 client-owned dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Roberta; Boracchi, Patrizia; Romussi, Stefano; Ravasio, Giuliano; Stefanello, Damiano

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Veterinarians have frequently to deal with wounds to the skin, subcutis, and underlying muscle. The aim was to explore the application of hyaluronic acid (HA)-containing dressing on open skin wounds in dogs. The progress of healing was assessed by wound area reduction and two scoring scales applied in human medicine. Materials and Methods: Ten client-owned dogs with 12 cutaneous open wounds healed by the second intention were included. All wounds were treated using available in commerce HA-containing wound dressing from admission to complete re-epithelialization. At every clinical examination, wound area and scale scoring assessments were performed. Results: After debridement, an increased wound size was obtained while an improvement was determined by both grading systems. The median numbers of return to the clinic for bandage change were 5 times. The median time to complete wound healing was 34.5 days. The mean wound area at day 7, 14, 21, and 28 were, respectively, 90.4%, 47.7%, 22.4%, and 14.8% of the original size (for linear measurement) and 95.5%, 54.4%, 23.10%, and 14.8% of the original size (for software measurement). Regarding wound healing assessment tools, the agreement between two operators was considered high for both scales. Conclusions: HA-containing dressing may be a possible wound treatment for cutaneous open wounds in dogs. The assessment of wound quality using scale scoring system could be useful especially in the 1st week and to direct clinical decision-making process. PMID:27047026

  5. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. Methods and Results We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Conclusion PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction

  6. Full-thickness splinted skin wound healing models in db/db and heterozygous mice: implications for wound healing impairment.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Ae; Teixeira, Leandro B C; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Covert, Jill; Dubielzig, Richard R; Isseroff, Roslyn Rivkah; Schurr, Michael; Abbott, Nicholas L; McAnulty, Jonathan; Murphy, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    The excisional dorsal full-thickness skin wound model with or without splinting is widely utilized in wound healing studies using diabetic or normal mice. However, the effects of splinting on dermal wound healing have not been fully characterized, and there are limited data on the direct comparison of wound parameters in the splinted model between diabetic and normal mice. We compared full-thickness excisional dermal wound healing in db/db and heterozygous mice by investigating the effects of splinting, semi-occlusive dressing, and poly(ethylene glycol) treatment. Two 8-mm full-thickness wounds were made with or without splinting in db/db and heterozygous mice. Body weights, splint maintenance, wound contraction, wound closure, and histopathological parameters including reepithelialization, wound bed collagen deposition, and inflammation were compared between groups. Our results show that silicone splint application effectively reduced wound contraction in heterozygous and db/db mice. Splinted wounds, as opposed to nonsplinted wounds, exhibited no significant differences in wound closure between heterozygous and db/db mice. Finally, polyethylene glycol and the noncontact dressing had no significant effect on wound healing in heterozygous or db/db mice. We believe these findings will help investigators in selection of the appropriate wound model and data interpretation with fully defined parameters.

  7. Fibrin/platelet plug counteracts cutaneous wound contraction: the hypothesis of "skipping stone".

    PubMed

    Farahani, Ramin Mostofi Zadeh

    2007-01-01

    Cutaneous wound contraction and epithelialization act collaboratively to minimize the exposed wound surface. However excessive wound contraction is undesirable due to the resultant disfigurement and scarring. Fibrin clot has greater stiffness than surrounding tissue and mechanical strain further enhances its stiffness. On the contrary, skin exhibits diminished stiffness when affected by high strain rates. Therefore during early stages of wound healing, the contractile wound border is confronted by fibrin clot forming a high strain region in the interface of contractile tissue and fibrin clot--which is evidenced by computer simulation. Due to the stress relaxation property of skin, the contractile strain is partly neutralized. Meanwhile, gradually the stiffness of fibrin clot decreases which is followed by another cycle of wound contraction. This cyclic pattern of contraction resembles the movement of a stone over water or "skipping stone". The stone bounces repeatedly when thrown across the surface of water with reduction of jumping altitude with each bounce till the stone stops completely. This hypothesis is further supported by the observed initial delay in wound contraction and the chronological correlation of enhanced wound contraction with loss of superficial eschar and substitution of fibrin clot with granulation tissue. Also there is evidence that fibrin inhibits fibroblast-mediated contraction of collagen. Furthermore, modest increase in wound contraction rate in fibrinogen deficient mice and fibrin-mediated diminished wound contraction are agreement with the proposed hypothesis.

  8. Re-Epithelialization of Pathological Cutaneous Wounds Is Improved by Local Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Tuan; Farman, Nicolette; Maubec, Eve; Nassar, Dany; Desposito, Dorinne; Waeckel, Ludovic; Aractingi, Sélim; Jaisser, Frederic

    2016-10-01

    Impaired cutaneous wound healing is a social burden. It occurs as a consequence of glucocorticoid treatment in several pathologies. Glucocorticoids (GC) bind not only to the glucocorticoid receptor but also to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), both expressed by keratinocytes. In addition to its beneficial effects through the glucocorticoid receptor, GC exposure may lead to inappropriate MR occupancy. We hypothesized that dermatological use of MR antagonists (MRA) might be beneficial by overcoming the negative impact of GC treatment on pathological wounds. The potent GC clobetasol, applied as an ointment to mouse skin, or added to cultured human skin explants, induced delayed wound closure and outgrowth of epidermis with reduced proliferation of keratinocytes. Delayed wound re-epithelialization was rescued by local MRA application. Normal skin was unaffected by MRA. The benefit of MR blockade is explained by the increased expression of MR in clobetasol-treated mouse skin. Blockade of the epithelial sodium channel by phenamil also rescued cultured human skin explants from GC-impaired growth of the epidermis. MRA application over post-biopsy wounds of clobetasol-treated skin zones of healthy volunteers (from the Interest of Topical Spironolactone's Administration to Prevent Corticoid-induced Epidermal Atrophy clinical trial) also accelerated wound closure. In conclusion, we propose repositioning MRA for cutaneous application to improve delayed wound closure occurring in pathology.

  9. Wound healing and all-cause mortality in 958 wound patients treated in home care.

    PubMed

    Zarchi, Kian; Martinussen, Torben; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2015-09-01

    Skin wounds are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Data are, however, not readily available for benchmarking, to allow prognostic evaluation, and to suggest when involvement of wound-healing experts is indicated. We, therefore, conducted an observational cohort study to investigate wound healing and all-cause mortality associated with different types of skin wounds. Consecutive skin wound patients who received wound care by home-care nurses from January 2010 to December 2011 in a district in Eastern Denmark were included in this study. Patients were followed until wound healing, death, or the end of follow-up on December 2012. In total, 958 consecutive patients received wound care by home-care nurses, corresponding to a 1-year prevalence of 1.2% of the total population in the district. During the study, wound healing was achieved in 511 (53.3%), whereas 90 (9.4%) died. During the first 3 weeks of therapy, healing was most likely to occur in surgical wounds (surgical vs. other wounds: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 2.21, 95% confidence interval 1.50-3.23), while from 3 weeks to 3 months of therapy, cancer wounds, and pressure ulcers were least likely to heal (cancer vs. other wounds: AHR 0.12, 0.03-0.50; pressure vs. other wounds: AHR 0.44, 0.27-0.74). Cancer wounds and pressure ulcers were further associated with a three times increased probability of mortality compared with other wounds (cancer vs. other wounds: AHR 3.19, 1.35-7.50; pressure vs. other wounds: AHR 2.91, 1.56-5.42). In summary, the wound type was found to be a significant predictor of healing and mortality with cancer wounds and pressure ulcers being associated with poor prognosis.

  10. Diabetes medications: Impact on inflammation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Jay J; Ennis, William J; Koh, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a common complication in patients with diabetes that often lead to amputation. These non-healing wounds are described as being stuck in a persistent inflammatory state characterized by accumulation of pro-inflammatory macrophages, cytokines and proteases. Some medications approved for management of type 2 diabetes have demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties independent of their marketed insulinotropic effects and thus have underappreciated potential to promote wound healing. In this review, the potential for insulin, metformin, specific sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors to promote healing is evaluated by reviewing human and animal studies on inflammation and wound healing. The available evidence indicates that diabetic medications have potential to prevent wounds from becoming arrested in the inflammatory stage of healing and to promote wound healing by downregulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, upregulating growth factors, lowering matrix metalloproteinases, stimulating angiogenesis, and increasing epithelization. However, no clinical recommendations currently exist on the potential for specific diabetic medications to impact healing of chronic wounds. Thus, we encourage further research that may guide physicians on providing personalized diabetes treatments that achieve glycemic goals while promoting healing in patients with chronic wounds.

  11. Potato tuber wounding induces responses associated with various healing processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wounding induces an avalanche of biological responses involved in the healing and protection of internal tuber tissues exposed by mechanical damage and seed cutting. Collectively, our studies have framed a portrait of the mechanisms and regulation of potato tuber wound-healing, but much more is req...

  12. Hyperbaric Oxygen, Vasculogenic Stem Cells, and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Fosen, Katina M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is recognized as playing a role in stem cell mobilization from peripheral sites and also cell function. Recent Advances: This review focuses on the impact of hyperoxia on vasculogenic stem cells and elements of wound healing. Critical Issues: Components of the wound-healing process in which oxidative stress has a positive impact on the various cells involved in wound healing are highlighted. A slightly different view of wound-healing physiology is adopted by departing from the often used notion of sequential stages: hemostatic, inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling and instead organizes the cascade of wound healing as overlapping events or waves pertaining to reactive oxygen species, lactate, and nitric oxide. This was done because hyperoxia has effects of a number of cell signaling events that converge to influence cell recruitment/chemotaxis and gene regulation/protein synthesis responses which mediate wound healing. Future Directions: Our alternative perspective of the stages of wound healing eases recognition of the multiple sites where oxidative stress has an impact on wound healing. This aids the focus on mechanistic events and the interplay among various cell types and biochemical processes. It also highlights the areas where additional research is needed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1634–1647. PMID:24730726

  13. [To ponder the key issues in achieving wound healing].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuliang

    2014-04-01

    The understanding of the mechanism of wound healing is deepening. Key issues in the process of wound healing need to be seriously considered, i.e. how to establish the concept of application of phasic and selective means to promote wound healing according to the characteristics of a network and sequential process; to correctly assess the function and status of macrophages in wound healing and to explore the conditions of regulating timely infiltration of macrophages, as well as the phasic and orderly expression of type Iand type II macrophages; to properly understand the role and status of extracellular matrix components or the three-dimensional structure and morphology in wound healing; to elucidate the effects of wound microenvironment on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells; to find out the intrinsic mechanism of negative pressure in the process of wound healing. The understanding of the above problems are of great value for us to grasp the intrinsic mechanism of wound healing in order to establish a more effective and rational treatment of wound.

  14. In vivo wound-healing effects of novel benzalkonium chloride-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Dong-Wuk; Li, Dong Xun; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the wound-healing effects of a novel benzalkonium chloride (BC)-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing (HCD). A BC-loaded HCD was prepared with various constituents using a hot melting method, and its mechanical properties and antimicrobial activities were assessed. The in vivo wound healings of the BC-loaded HCD in various would models were evaluated in rats compared with a commercial wound dressing, Duoderm™. This BC-loaded HCD gave better skin adhesion, swelling, mechanical strength, and flexibility compared with the commercial wound dressing. It showed excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, as compared with the commercial wound dressing, it showed more improved wound healings and tissue restoration effect on the excision, infection, and abrasion wounds in rats. Thus, this novel BC-loaded HCD would be an excellent alternative to the commercial wound dressing for treatment of various wounds.

  15. Melatonin promotes diabetic wound healing in vitro by regulating keratinocyte activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ruipeng; Ren, Lijun; Ma, Haoli; Hu, Ruijing; Gao, Honghong; Wang, Li; Chen, Xuehui; Zhao, Zhigang; Liu, Jialin

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients are at high risk of developing delayed cutaneous wound healing. Proper keratinocyte proliferation and migration are crucial steps during re-epithelialization. Melatonin (Mel) accelerates wound repair in full-thickness incisional wounds; however, its role in diabetic wound healing is unknown. This study explored the role of Mel in diabetic wound healing in vitro by using high glucose (HG)-cultured keratinocytes. Mel reduced the HG-induced mRNA expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8, in keratinocytes. Mel inhibited oxidative stress, as evidenced by reduced production of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde and increased activity of superoxide dismutase in HG-stimulated keratinocytes. Mel also inhibited HG-induced nucleotide binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 inflammasome activation in keratinocytes. HG-induced reduced migration and proliferation and increased apoptosis of keratinocytes were counteracted by Mel treatment. The pro-proliferative, pro-migratory, and anti-apoptotic effects of Mel on HG-treated keratinocytes were mediated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. Results collectively suggested that Mel is an alternative therapeutic strategy to ameliorate poor condition for diabetic wound healing by regulating keratinocyte activity. PMID:27904671

  16. Wound healing activity of the inflorescence of Typha elephantina (Cattail).

    PubMed

    Panda, Vandana; Thakur, Tejas

    2014-03-01

    Methanolic extracts of Typha elephantina inflorescence (TE) and its bandage were screened for wound healing by incision and excision wound models in Wistar rats. In the incision wound model, incision wounds were topically treated with TE gel (2.0% [w/w], 3.0% [w/w], and 5.0% [w/w]), Typha elephantina inflorescence bandage, and the reference standard 5.0% w/w povidone iodine for a period of 10 days. When the wounds healed thoroughly, sutures were removed on the 8th postwounding day, and the tensile strength of the skin was measured on the 10th day. In the excision wound model, excision wounds were treated with TE gel (3.0% [w/w] and 5.0% [w/w]), inflorescence bandage, and 5.0% w/w povidone iodine till the wounds completely healed. Epithelization time, wound contraction, hydroxyproline and hexosamine content of the scab, and ascorbic acid and malondialdehyde content of the plasma were determined in this model. In the incision wound model, high tensile strength of the skin of the healed wound was observed in rats treated with the TE gels and the inflorescence bandage when compared with wounded control rats. The increase in tensile strength indicates a promotion of collagen fibers and a firm knitting of the disrupted wound surfaces by collagen. In the excision wound model, higher rate of wound contraction, decreased period of epithelization, elevated hydroxyproline, hexosamine, and ascorbic acid levels, and a significant decrease in malondialdehyde content was observed in treated groups when compared with the wounded control animals. It may be concluded that the inflorescence of Typha elephantina possesses a potent wound healing activity, which may be due to an underlying antioxidant mechanism.

  17. Predicting complex acute wound healing in patients from a wound expertise centre registry: a prognostic study.

    PubMed

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Lindeboom, Robert; Eskes, Anne M; Brull, Huub; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-10-01

    It is important for caregivers and patients to know which wounds are at risk of prolonged wound healing to enable timely communication and treatment. Available prognostic models predict wound healing in chronic ulcers, but not in acute wounds, that is, originating after trauma or surgery. We developed a model to detect which factors can predict (prolonged) healing of complex acute wounds in patients treated in a large wound expertise centre (WEC). Using Cox and linear regression analyses, we determined which patient- and wound-related characteristics best predict time to complete wound healing and derived a prediction formula to estimate how long this may take. We selected 563 patients with acute wounds, documented in the WEC registry between 2007 and 2012. Wounds had existed for a median of 19 days (range 6-46 days). The majority of these were located on the leg (52%). Five significant independent predictors of prolonged wound healing were identified: wound location on the trunk [hazard ratio (HR) 0·565, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·405-0·788; P = 0·001], wound infection (HR 0·728, 95% CI 0·534-0·991; P = 0·044), wound size (HR 0·993, 95% CI 0·988-0·997; P = 0·001), wound duration (HR 0·998, 95% CI 0·996-0·999; P = 0·005) and patient's age (HR 1·009, 95% CI 1·001-1·018; P = 0·020), but not diabetes. Awareness of the five factors predicting the healing of complex acute wounds, particularly wound infection and location on the trunk, may help caregivers to predict wound healing time and to detect, refer and focus on patients who need additional attention.

  18. [Comparative description and retrospective analisis of modern methods of surgical wounds closure for intraoperative prophylaxis of development of pathologic cutaneous cicatrices].

    PubMed

    Stavyts'kyĭ, S O; Avetikov, D S; Lokes, K P; Rozkolupa, O O; Boĭko, I V

    2014-05-01

    The experience of application of various methods of closure was presented for the head and neck cutaneous wound surfaces after elective operative interventions. The variant of the postoperative results estimation and optimization of the wounds healing by primary closure was proposed.

  19. HoxD3 accelerates wound healing in diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Scott L.; Myers, Connie A.; Charboneau, Aubri; Young, David M.; and Boudreau, Nancy

    2003-12-01

    Poorly healing diabetic wounds are characterized by diminished collagen production and impaired angiogenesis. HoxD3, a homeobox transcription factor that promotes angiogenesis and collagen synthesis, is up-regulated during normal wound repair whereas its expression is diminished in poorly healing wounds of the genetically diabetic (db/db) mouse. To determine whether restoring expression of HoxD3 would accelerate diabetic wound healing, we devised a novel method of gene transfer, which incorporates HoxD3 plasmid DNA into a methylcellulose film that is placed on wounds created on db/db mice. The HoxD3 transgene was expressed in endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes of the wounds for up to 10 days. More importantly, a single application of HoxD3 to db/db mice resulted in a statistically significant acceleration of wound closure compared to control-treated wounds. Furthermore, we also observed that the HoxD3-mediated improvement in diabetic wound repair was accompanied by increases in mRNA expression of the HoxD3 target genes, Col1A1 and beta 3-integrin leading to enhanced angiogenesis and collagen deposition in the wounds. Although HoxD3-treated wounds also show improved re-epithelialization as compared to control db/db wounds, this effect was not due to direct stimulation of keratinocyte migration by HoxD3. Finally, we show that despite the dramatic increase in collagen synthesis and deposition in HoxD3-treated wounds, these wounds showed normal remodeling and we found no evidence of abnormal wound healing. These results indicate that HoxD3 may provide a means to directly improve collagen deposition, angiogenesis and closure in poorly healing diabetic wounds.

  20. Promising role of ANGPTL4 gene in diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Arya, Awadhesh K; Tripathi, Kamlakar; Das, Parimal

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the severe metabolic disorders of carbohydrate metabolism worldwide. Developing countries are at higher risk of DM, and there is significant evidence that it is epidemic in many economically developing and newly industrialized countries. Among all other complications associated with DM, delayed wound healing is a major concern in diabetic patients. Wound healing is a natural healing process that starts immediately after injury. This involves interaction of a complex cascade of cellular events that generates resurfacing, reconstitution, and restoration of the tensile strength of injured skin. There are multiple factors responsible for delayed wound healing among which the contribution of DM has been well documented. The wound healing process is also delayed by the metabolic, vascular, neurological, and inflammatory alterations, which are well known in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Keratinocytes are crucial for wound re-epithelialization, and defects in directed migration of keratinocytes due to DM are associated with the delayed wound healing process. Many factors responsible for re-epithelialization have been identified, characterized, and well described; however, the genes responsible for the healing process have only partially been illustrated. This article will therefore focus on the efficacy of ANGPTL4 (angiopoietin-like 4) gene, which plays a novel role in keratinocyte migration during wound healing.

  1. Potential dermal wound healing agent in Blechnum orientale Linn

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Blechnum orientale Linn. (Blechnaceae) is used ethnomedicinally to treat wounds, boils, blisters or abscesses and sores, stomach pain and urinary bladder complaints. The aim of the study was to validate the ethnotherapeutic claim and to evaluate the effects of B. orientale water extract on wound healing activity. Methods Water extract of B. orientale was used. Excision wound healing activity was examined on Sprague-Dawley rats, dressed with 1% and 2% of the water extract. Control groups were dressed with the base cream (vehicle group, negative control) and 10% povidone-iodine (positive control) respectively. Healing was assessed based on contraction of wound size, mean epithelisation time, hydroxyproline content and histopathological examinations. Statistical analyses were performed using one way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test. Results Wound healing study revealed significant reduction in wound size and mean epithelisation time, and higher collagen synthesis in the 2% extract-treated group compared to the vehicle group. These findings were supported by histolopathological examinations of healed wound sections which showed greater tissue regeneration, more fibroblasts and angiogenesis in the 2% extract-treated group. Conclusions The ethnotherapeutic use of this fern is validated. The water extract of B. orientale is a potential candidate for the treatment of dermal wounds. Synergistic effects of both strong antioxidant and antibacterial activities in the extract are deduced to have accelerated the wound repair at the proliferative phase of the healing process. PMID:21835039

  2. Wound Healing Effects of Curcumin: A Short Review.

    PubMed

    Tejada, Silvia; Manayi, Azadeh; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed F; Sureda, Antoni; Hajheydari, Zohreh; Gortzi, Olga; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza; Nabavi, Seyed M

    Wound healing is a complex process that consists of several phases that range from coagulation, inflammation, accumulation of radical substances, to proliferation, formation of fibrous tissues and collagen, contraction of wound with formation of granulation tissue and scar. Since antiquity, vegetable substances have been used as phytotherapeutic agents for wound healing, and more recently natural substances of vegetable origin have been studied with the attempt to show their beneficial effect on wound treatment. Curcumin, the most active component of rhizome of Curcuma longa L. (common name: turmeric), has been studied for many years due to its bio-functional properties, especially antioxidant, radical scavenger, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, which play a crucial role in the wound healing process. Moreover, curcumin stimulated the production of the growth factors involved in the wound healing process, and so curcumin also accelerated the management of wound restoration. The aim of the present review is collecting and evaluating the literature data regarding curcumin properties potentially relevant for wound healing. Moreover, the investigations on the wound healing effects of curcumin are reported. In order to produce a more complete picture, the chemistry and sources of curcumin are also discussed.

  3. A review of genetic engineering biotechnologies for enhanced chronic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sessions, John W; Armstrong, David G; Hope, Sandra; Jensen, Brian D

    2017-02-01

    Traditional methods for addressing chronic wounds focus on correcting dysfunction by controlling extracellular elements. This review highlights technologies that take a different approach - enhancing chronic wound healing by genetic modification to wound beds. Featured cutaneous transduction/transfection methods include viral modalities (ie adenoviruses, adeno-associated viruses, retroviruses and lentiviruses) and conventional non-viral modalities (ie naked DNA injections, microseeding, liposomal reagents, particle bombardment and electroporation). Also explored are emerging technologies, focusing on the exciting capabilities of wound diagnostics such as pyrosequencing as well as site-specific nuclease editing tools such as CRISPR-Cas9 used to both transiently and permanently genetically modify resident wound bed cells. Additionally, new non-viral transfection methods (ie conjugated nanoparticles, multi-electrode arrays, and microfabricated needles and nanowires) are discussed that can potentially facilitate more efficient and safe transgene delivery to skin but also represent significant advances broadly to tissue regeneration research.

  4. Wound Healing and Anti-Inflammatory Effect in Animal Models of Calendula officinalis L. Growing in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Parente, Leila Maria Leal; Lino Júnior, Ruy de Souza; Tresvenzol, Leonice Manrique Faustino; Vinaud, Marina Clare; de Paula, José Realino; Paulo, Neusa Margarida

    2012-01-01

    Calendula officinalis is an annual herb from Mediterranean origin which is popularly used in wound healing and as an anti-inflammatory agent. In this study, the ethanolic extract, the dichloromethane, and hexanic fractions of the flowers from plants growing in Brazil were produced. The angiogenic activity of the extract and fractions was evaluated through the chorioallantoic membrane and cutaneous wounds in rat models. The healing activity of the extract was evaluated by the same cutaneous wounds model through macroscopic, morphometric, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical analysis. The antibacterial activity of the extract and fractions was also evaluated. This experimental study revealed that C. officinalis presented anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities as well as angiogenic and fibroplastic properties acting in a positive way on the inflammatory and proliferative phases of the healing process. PMID:22315631

  5. An Assessment of Wound Healing Potential of Argyreia speciosa Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Narayan Prasad; Rawat, Bindu; Rai, Vineet Kumar; Shanker, Karuna; Venkateswara Rao, Chandana

    2014-01-01

    In North India, poultice of young unfolded leaves of Argyreia speciosa Linn. (Convolvulaceae) is used for healing wounds. In order to find scientific evidence for the traditional utilization of leaves of A. speciosa in wound healing, this investigation was carried out. A linear incision wound of about 3 cm in length and 2 mm in depth and circular excision wound of 177 mm2 full thickness were made on the dorsal region of separate groups (n = 5) of anesthetized Swiss albino mice. A simple ointment, developed by including ethanol, ethanol-water, and water extracts (10% each, separately) of A. speciosa, was applied topically to mice once daily for 14 days after wounding. To evaluate the effect of each extract, wound contraction, epithelization period, wound breaking strength, and hydroxyproline content were determined. The water extract of A. speciosa showed accelerated wound healing activity as evidenced by fast wound contraction (96.30 ± 0.52%; P < 0.01), rapid epithelization period (11.40 ± 0.60 days; P < 0.001), greater wound breaking strength (376.56 ± 21.16 g; P < 0.001), and higher hydroxyproline content (16.49 ± 1.12 mg/g; P < 0.05) of granulation tissue. The present report supports the traditional use of Argyreia speciosa leaves for wound healing and signify its relevant therapeutic potential. PMID:24688387

  6. Macrophage PPARγ and impaired wound healing in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Rita E; Fang, Milie M; Novak, Margaret L; Urao, Norifumi; Sui, Audrey; Ennis, William J; Koh, Timothy J

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages undergo a transition from pro-inflammatory to healing-associated phenotypes that is critical for efficient wound healing. However, the regulation of this transition during normal and impaired healing remains to be elucidated. In our studies, the switch in macrophage phenotypes during skin wound healing was associated with up-regulation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ and its downstream targets, along with increased mitochondrial content. In the setting of diabetes, up-regulation of PPARγ activity was impaired by sustained expression of IL-1β in both mouse and human wounds. In addition, experiments with myeloid-specific PPARγ knockout mice indicated that loss of PPARγ in macrophages is sufficient to prolong wound inflammation and delay healing. Furthermore, PPARγ agonists promoted a healing-associated macrophage phenotype both in vitro and in vivo, even in the diabetic wound environment. Importantly, topical administration of PPARγ agonists improved healing in diabetic mice, suggesting an appealing strategy for down-regulating inflammation and improving the healing of chronic wounds.

  7. Topical application of substance P promotes wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kant, Vinay; Kumar, Dinesh; Kumar, Dhirendra; Prasad, Raju; Gopal, Anu; Pathak, Nitya N; Kumar, Pawan; Tandan, Surender K

    2015-05-01

    Substance P (SP) is known to stimulate angiogenesis, fibroblasts proliferation and expressions of cytokines and growth factors involved in wound healing. However, SP level reduces in dermis in diabetics and, hence, it was hypothesized that exogenously applied SP could be helpful in improving wound healing in diabetic rats. Excision skin wound was created on the back of diabetic rats and rats were divided into three groups i.e. (i) saline-, (ii) gel- and (iii) SP-treated. Normal saline, pluronic gel and SP (10(-6)M) in gel were topically applied once daily for 19days. SP treatment significantly increased the wound closure, levels of interleukin-10, and expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta1, heme oxygenase-1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, whereas it significantly decreased the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta and matrix metalloproteinases-9 in the granulation/healing tissue. The inflammatory cells were present for long time in normal saline-treated group. Histological evaluation revealed better extracellular matrix formation with marked fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition in SP-treated group. Early epithelial layer formation, increased microvessel density and greater growth associated protein-43 positive nerve fibers were also evidenced in SP-treated group. In conclusion, SP treatment markedly accelerated cutaneous wound healing in diabetic rats.

  8. Thrombomodulin promotes diabetic wound healing by regulating toll-like receptor 4 expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Lai, Chao-Han; Chen, Po-Ku; Cho, Chia-Fong; Hsu, Yun-Yan; Wang, Kuan-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Ling; Chang, Bi-Ing; Liu, Shi-Kai; Wu, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Keratinocyte-expressed thrombomodulin (TM) and the released soluble TM (sTM) have been demonstrated to promote wound healing. However, the effects of high glucose on TM expression in keratinocytes and the role of TM in diabetic ulcer remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that expressions of TM and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were both downregulated in high-glucose cultured human keratinocytes and in skin keratinocytes of diabetic patients. In addition, the wound-triggered upregulation of TM and sTM production was abolished in both high-glucose cultured human keratinocytes and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse skin. Furthermore, supplementation of recombinant sTM could increase TLR4 expression and promote cutaneous wound healing in both high-glucose cultured human keratinocytes and diabetic mice. However, in Tlr4-deleted mice, which exhibited delayed wound healing, the therapeutic benefit of recombinant sTM was abrogated. Moreover, our results showed that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression in keratinocytes was dose-dependently upregulated by glucose, and TNF-α treatment downregulated the expression of TM and TLR4. Taken together, high-glucose environment reduces the expression of TM and TLR4 in keratinocytes possibly through the action of TNF-α, and recombinant sTM can increase the TLR4 expression and promote wound healing under diabetic condition.

  9. β-Catenin–regulated myeloid cell adhesion and migration determine wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Amini-Nik, Saeid; Cambridge, Elizabeth; Yu, Winston; Guo, Anne; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puviindran; Poon, Raymond; Hinz, Boris; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    A β-catenin/T cell factor–dependent transcriptional program is critical during cutaneous wound repair for the regulation of scar size; however, the relative contribution of β-catenin activity and function in specific cell types in the granulation tissue during the healing process is unknown. Here, cell lineage tracing revealed that cells in which β-catenin is transcriptionally active express a gene profile that is characteristic of the myeloid lineage. Mice harboring a macrophage-specific deletion of the gene encoding β-catenin exhibited insufficient skin wound healing due to macrophage-specific defects in migration, adhesion to fibroblasts, and ability to produce TGF-β1. In irradiated mice, only macrophages expressing β-catenin were able to rescue wound-healing deficiency. Evaluation of scar tissue collected from patients with hypertrophic and normal scars revealed a correlation between the number of macrophages within the wound, β-catenin levels, and cellularity. Our data indicate that β-catenin regulates myeloid cell motility and adhesion and that β-catenin–mediated macrophage motility contributes to the number of mesenchymal cells and ultimate scar size following cutaneous injury. PMID:24837430

  10. β-Catenin-regulated myeloid cell adhesion and migration determine wound healing.

    PubMed

    Amini-Nik, Saeid; Cambridge, Elizabeth; Yu, Winston; Guo, Anne; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puviindran; Poon, Raymond; Hinz, Boris; Alman, Benjamin A

    2014-06-01

    A β-catenin/T cell factor-dependent transcriptional program is critical during cutaneous wound repair for the regulation of scar size; however, the relative contribution of β-catenin activity and function in specific cell types in the granulation tissue during the healing process is unknown. Here, cell lineage tracing revealed that cells in which β-catenin is transcriptionally active express a gene profile that is characteristic of the myeloid lineage. Mice harboring a macrophage-specific deletion of the gene encoding β-catenin exhibited insufficient skin wound healing due to macrophage-specific defects in migration, adhesion to fibroblasts, and ability to produce TGF-β1. In irradiated mice, only macrophages expressing β-catenin were able to rescue wound-healing deficiency. Evaluation of scar tissue collected from patients with hypertrophic and normal scars revealed a correlation between the number of macrophages within the wound, β-catenin levels, and cellularity. Our data indicate that β-catenin regulates myeloid cell motility and adhesion and that β-catenin-mediated macrophage motility contributes to the number of mesenchymal cells and ultimate scar size following cutaneous injury.

  11. α-Gal Nanoparticles in Wound and Burn Healing Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Galili, Uri

    2017-01-01

    Significance: Rapid recruitment and activation of macrophages may accelerate wound healing. Such accelerated healing was observed in wounds and burns of experimental animals treated with α-gal nanoparticles. Recent Advances: α-Gal nanoparticles present multiple α-gal epitopes (Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R). α-Gal nanoparticles applied to wounds bind anti-Gal (the most abundant antibody in humans) and generate chemotactic complement peptides, which rapidly recruit macrophages. Fc/Fc receptor interaction between anti-Gal coating the α-gal nanoparticles and recruited macrophages activates macrophages to produce cytokines that accelerate healing. α-Gal nanoparticles applied to burns and wounds in mice and pigs producing anti-Gal, decreased healing time by 40–60%. In mice, this accelerated healing avoided scar formation. α-Gal nanoparticle-treated wounds, in diabetic mice producing anti-Gal, healed within 12 days, whereas saline-treated wounds became chronic wounds. α-Gal nanoparticles are stable for years and may be applied dried, in suspension, aerosol, ointments, or within biodegradable materials. Critical Issues: α-Gal nanoparticle therapy can be evaluated only in mammalian models producing anti-Gal, including α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout mice and pigs or Old World primates. Traditional experimental animal models synthesize α-gal epitopes and lack anti-Gal. Future Directions: Since anti-Gal is naturally produced in all humans, it is of interest to determine safety and efficacy of α-gal nanoparticles in accelerating wound and burn healing in healthy individuals and in patients with impaired wound healing such as diabetic patients and elderly individuals. In addition, efficacy of α-gal nanoparticle therapy should be studied in healing and regeneration of internal injuries such as surgical incisions, ischemic myocardium following myocardial infarction, and injured nerves. PMID:28289553

  12. Development of a wound healing index for patients with chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Horn, Susan D; Fife, Caroline E; Smout, Randall J; Barrett, Ryan S; Thomson, Brett

    2013-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials in wound care generalize poorly because they exclude patients with significant comorbid conditions. Research using real-world wound care patients is hindered by lack of validated methods to stratify patients according to severity of underlying illnesses. We developed a comprehensive stratification system for patients with wounds that predicts healing likelihood. Complete medical record data on 50,967 wounds from the United States Wound Registry were assigned a clear outcome (healed, amputated, etc.). Factors known to be associated with healing were evaluated using logistic regression models. Significant variables (p < 0.05) were determined and subsequently tested on a holdout sample of data. A different model predicted healing for each wound type. Some variables predicted significantly in nearly all models: wound size, wound age, number of wounds, evidence of bioburden, tissue type exposed (Wagner grade or stage), being nonambulatory, and requiring hospitalization during the course of care. Variables significant in some models included renal failure, renal transplant, malnutrition, autoimmune disease, and cardiovascular disease. All models validated well when applied to the holdout sample. The "Wound Healing Index" can validly predict likelihood of wound healing among real-world patients and can facilitate comparative effectiveness research to identify patients needing advanced therapeutics.

  13. Effect of chitosan acetate bandage on wound healing in infected and noninfected wounds in mice

    PubMed Central

    Burkatovskaya, Marina; Castano, Ana P.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    HemCon® bandage is an engineered chitosan acetate preparation designed as a hemostatic dressing, and is under investigation as a topical antimicrobial dressing. We studied its effects on healing of excisional wounds that were or were not infected with Staphylococcus aureus, in normal mice or mice previously pretreated with cyclophosphamide (CY). CY significantly suppressed wound healing in both the early and later stages, while S. aureus alone significantly stimulated wound healing in the early stages by preventing the initial wound expansion. CY plus S. aureus showed an advantage in early stages by preventing expansion, but a significant slowing of wound healing in later stages. In order to study the conflicting clamping and stimulating effects of chitosan acetate bandage on normal wounds, we removed the bandage from wounds at times after application ranging from 1 hour to 9 days. Three days application gave the earliest wound closure, and all application times gave a faster healing slope after removal compared with control wounds. Chitosan acetate bandage reduced the number of inflammatory cells in the wound at days 2 and 4, and had an overall beneficial effect on wound healing especially during the early period where its antimicrobial effect is most important. PMID:18471261

  14. Potential of oncostatin M to accelerate diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo Hye; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2014-08-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional cytokine found in a variety of pathologic conditions, which leads to excessive collagen deposition. Current studies demonstrate that OSM is also a mitogen for fibroblasts and has an anti-inflammatory action. It was therefore hypothesised that OSM may play an important role in healing of chronic wounds that usually involve decreased fibroblast function and persist in the inflammatory stage for a long time. In a previous in vitro study, the authors showed that OSM increased wound healing activities of diabetic dermal fibroblasts. However, wound healing in vivo is a complex process involving multiple factors. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of OSM on diabetic wound healing in vivo. Five diabetic mice were used in this study. Four full-thickness round wounds were created on the back of each mouse (total 20 wounds). OSM was applied on the two left-side wounds (n = 10) and phosphate-buffered saline was applied on the two right-side wounds (n = 10). After 10 days, unhealed wound areas of the OSM and control groups were compared using the stereoimage optical topometer system. Also, epithelialisation, wound contraction and reduction in wound volume in each group were compared. The OSM-treated group showed superior results in all of the tested parameters. In particular, the unhealed wound area and the reduction in wound volume demonstrated statistically significant differences (P < 0·05). The results of this study indicate that topical application of OSM may have the potential to accelerate healing of diabetic wounds.

  15. Role of adipose-derived stem cells in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Waqar Ul; Greiser, Udo; Wang, Wenxin

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing remains a challenge to date and causes debilitating effects with tremendous suffering. Recent advances in tissue engineering approaches in the area of cell therapy have provided promising treatment options to meet the challenges of impaired skin wound healing such as diabetic foot ulcers. Over the last few years, stem cell therapy has emerged as a novel therapeutic approach for various diseases including wound repair and tissue regeneration. Several different types of stem cells have been studied in both preclinical and clinical settings such as bone marrow-derived stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), circulating angiogenic cells (e.g., endothelial progenitor cells), human dermal fibroblasts, and keratinocytes for wound healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown an improved outcome in wound healing studies. ASCs are pluripotent stem cells with the ability to differentiate into different lineages and to secrete paracrine factors initiating tissue regeneration process. The abundant supply of fat tissue, ease of isolation, extensive proliferative capacities ex vivo, and their ability to secrete pro-angiogenic growth factors make them an ideal cell type to use in therapies for the treatment of nonhealing wounds. In this review, we look at the pathogenesis of chronic wounds, role of stem cells in wound healing, and more specifically look at the role of ASCs, their mechanism of action and their safety profile in wound repair and tissue regeneration.

  16. Wounding the Cornea to Learn How it Heals

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Mary Ann; Zieske, James D.; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Kyne, Briana; Pal-Ghosh, Sonali; Tadvalkar, Gauri; Pajoohesh-Ganji, Ahdeah

    2014-01-01

    Corneal wound healing studies have a long history and rich literature that describes the data obtained over the past 70 years using many different species of animals and methods of injury. These studies have lead to reduced suffering and provided clues to treatments that are now helping patients live more productive lives. In spite of the progress made, further research is required since blindness and reduced quality of life due to corneal scarring still happens. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is known about different types of wound and animal models used to study corneal wound healing. The subject of corneal wound healing is broad and includes chemical and mechanical wound models. This review focuses on mechanical injury models involving debridement and keratectomy wounds to reflect the authors’ expertise. PMID:24607489

  17. Broad-Spectrum Inhibition of the CC-Chemokine Class Improves Wound Healing and Wound Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ridiandries, Anisyah; Bursill, Christina; Tan, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Angiogenesis is involved in the inflammation and proliferation stages of wound healing, to bring inflammatory cells to the wound and provide a microvascular network to maintain new tissue formation. An excess of inflammation, however, leads to prolonged wound healing and scar formation, often resulting in unfavourable outcomes such as amputation. CC-chemokines play key roles in the promotion of inflammation and inflammatory-driven angiogenesis. Therefore, inhibition of the CC-chemokine class may improve wound healing. We aimed to determine if the broad-spectrum CC-chemokine inhibitor “35K” could accelerate wound healing in vivo in mice. In a murine wound healing model, 35K protein or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, control) were added topically daily to wounds. Cohorts of mice were assessed in the early stages (four days post-wounding) and in the later stages of wound repair (10 and 21 days post-wounding). Topical application of the 35K protein inhibited CC-chemokine expression (CCL5, CCL2) in wounds and caused enhanced blood flow recovery and wound closure in early-mid stage wounds. In addition, 35K promoted neovascularisation in the early stages of wound repair. Furthermore, 35K treated wounds had significantly lower expression of the p65 subunit of NF-κB, a key inflammatory transcription factor, and augmented wound expression of the pro-angiogenic and pro-repair cytokine TGF-β. These findings show that broad-spectrum CC-chemokine inhibition may be beneficial for the promotion of wound healing. PMID:28098795

  18. Broad-Spectrum Inhibition of the CC-Chemokine Class Improves Wound Healing and Wound Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ridiandries, Anisyah; Bursill, Christina; Tan, Joanne

    2017-01-13

    Angiogenesis is involved in the inflammation and proliferation stages of wound healing, to bring inflammatory cells to the wound and provide a microvascular network to maintain new tissue formation. An excess of inflammation, however, leads to prolonged wound healing and scar formation, often resulting in unfavourable outcomes such as amputation. CC-chemokines play key roles in the promotion of inflammation and inflammatory-driven angiogenesis. Therefore, inhibition of the CC-chemokine class may improve wound healing. We aimed to determine if the broad-spectrum CC-chemokine inhibitor "35K" could accelerate wound healing in vivo in mice. In a murine wound healing model, 35K protein or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, control) were added topically daily to wounds. Cohorts of mice were assessed in the early stages (four days post-wounding) and in the later stages of wound repair (10 and 21 days post-wounding). Topical application of the 35K protein inhibited CC-chemokine expression (CCL5, CCL2) in wounds and caused enhanced blood flow recovery and wound closure in early-mid stage wounds. In addition, 35K promoted neovascularisation in the early stages of wound repair. Furthermore, 35K treated wounds had significantly lower expression of the p65 subunit of NF-κB, a key inflammatory transcription factor, and augmented wound expression of the pro-angiogenic and pro-repair cytokine TGF-β. These findings show that broad-spectrum CC-chemokine inhibition may be beneficial for the promotion of wound healing.

  19. An innovative bi-layered wound dressing made of silk and gelatin for accelerated wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kanokpanont, Sorada; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2012-10-15

    In this study, the novel silk fibroin-based bi-layered wound dressing was developed. Wax-coated silk fibroin woven fabric was introduced as a non-adhesive layer while the sponge made of sericin and glutaraldehyde-crosslinked silk fibroin/gelatin was fabricated as a bioactive layer. Wax-coated silk fibroin fabrics showed improved mechanical properties compared with the non-coated fabrics, but less adhesive than the commercial wound dressing mesh. This confirmed by results of peel test on both the partial- and full-thickness wounds. The sericin-silk fibroin/gelatin spongy bioactive layers showed homogeneous porous structure and controllable biodegradation depending on the degree of crosslinking. The bi-layered wound dressings supported the attachment and proliferation of L929 mouse fibroblasts, particularly for the silk fibroin/gelatin ratio of 20/80 and 0.02% GA crosslinked. Furthermore, we proved that the bi-layered wound dressings promoted wound healing in full-thickness wounds, comparing with the clinically used wound dressing. The wounds treated with the bi-layered wound dressings showed the greater extent of wound size reduction, epithelialization, and collagen formation. The superior properties of the silk fibroin-based bi-layered wound dressings compared with those of the clinically used wound dressings were less adhesive and had improved biological functions to promote cell activities and wound healing. This novel bi-layered wound dressing should be a good candidate for the healing of full-thickness wounds.

  20. Chitosan as a starting material for wound healing applications.

    PubMed

    Patrulea, V; Ostafe, V; Borchard, G; Jordan, O

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan and its derivatives have attracted great attention due to their properties beneficial for application to wound healing. The main focus of the present review is to summarize studies involving chitosan and its derivatives, especially N,N,N-trimethyl-chitosan (TMC), N,O-carboxymethyl-chitosan (CMC) and O-carboxymethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl-chitosan (CMTMC), used to accelerate wound healing. Moreover, formulation strategies for chitosan and its derivatives, as well as their in vitro, in vivo and clinical applications in wound healing are described.

  1. Increased inflammation delays wound healing in mice deficient in collagenase-2 (MMP-8)

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Inada, Masaki; Balbín, Milagros; Fueyo, Antonio; Pitiot, Ana S.; Astudillo, Aurora; Hirose, Kenji; Hirata, Michiko; Shapiro, Steven D.; Noël, Agnès; Werb, Zena; Krane, Stephen M.; López-Otín, Carlos; Puente, Xose S.

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in numerous tissue-remodeling processes. The finding that mice deficient in collagenase-2 (MMP-8) are more susceptible to develop skin cancer, prompted us to investigate the role of this protease in cutaneous wound healing. We have observed a significant delay in wound closure in MMP8−/− mice and an altered inflammatory response in their wounds, with a delay of neutrophil infiltration during the first days and a persistent inflammation at later time points. These changes were accompanied by alterations in the TGF-β1 signaling pathway and by an apoptosis defect in MMP8−/− mice. The delay in wound healing observed in MMP8−/− mice was rescued by bone marrow transplantation from wild-type mice. Analysis of other MMPs showed that MMP8−/− mice had a significant increase in the expression of MMP-9, suggesting that both proteases might act coordinately in this process. This possibility was further supported by the novel finding that MMP-8 and MMP-9 form specific complexes in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that MMP-8 participates in wound repair by contributing to the resolution of inflammation and open the possibility to develop new strategies for treating wound healing defects. PMID:17392479

  2. Stem Cells in Skin Regeneration, Wound Healing, and Their Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ojeh, Nkemcho; Pastar, Irena; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Stojadinovic, Olivera

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body and has an array of functions. Skin compartments, epidermis, and hair follicles house stem cells that are indispensable for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also contribute to wound repair, resulting in restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unsuccessful wound healing processes often lead to non-healing wounds. Chronic wounds are caused by depletion of stem cells and a variety of other cellular and molecular mechanisms, many of which are still poorly understood. Current chronic wound therapies are limited, so the search to develop better therapeutic strategies is ongoing. Adult stem cells are gaining recognition as potential candidates for numerous skin pathologies. In this review, we will discuss epidermal and other stem cells present in the skin, and highlight some of the therapeutic applications of epidermal stem cells and other adult stem cells as tools for cell/scaffold-based therapies for non-healing wounds and other skin disorders. We will also discuss emerging concepts and offer some perspectives on how skin tissue-engineered products can be optimized to provide efficacious therapy in cutaneous repair and regeneration. PMID:26512657

  3. Evaluation of Tectona grandis leaves for wound healing activity.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Mrityunjoy; Nayeem, Naira; Kamath, Jagadish V; Asad, Mohammed

    2007-04-01

    The frontal leaves of Tectona grandis (Verabinaceae) are widely used in the folklore for the treatment of various kinds of wounds, especially burn wound. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of hydrochloric extract of Tectona grandis on experimentally induced wounds in rats and compare the effects observed with a known wound healing agent, Aloe vera. The models selected were excision wound, incision wound, burn wound and dead space wound. A suitable gel formulation was selected for the application using cellophane membrane penetration. In the excision wound and burn wound models, animals treated with Tectona grandis leaf extract showed significant reduction in period of epithelisation and wound contraction 50%. In the incision wound model, a significant increase in the breaking strength was observed. Tectona grandis leaf extract treatment orally produced a significant increase in the breaking strength, dry weight and hydroxyproline content of the granulation tissue in dead space wound. It was concluded that Tectona grandis leaf extract applied topically (5% and 10% gel formulation) or administered orally (250 mg and 500 mg/kg body weight) possesses wound healing activity.

  4. Catecholamine stress alters neutrophil trafficking and impairs wound healing by β2-adrenergic receptor-mediated upregulation of IL-6.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Gorouhi, Farzam; Ramirez, Sandra; Granick, Jennifer L; Byrne, Barbara A; Soulika, Athena M; Simon, Scott I; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2014-03-01

    Stress-induced hormones can alter the inflammatory response to tissue injury; however, the precise mechanism by which epinephrine influences inflammatory response and wound healing is not well defined. Here we demonstrate that epinephrine alters the neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN))-dependent inflammatory response to a cutaneous wound. Using noninvasive real-time imaging of genetically tagged PMNs in a murine skin wound, chronic, epinephrine-mediated stress was modeled by sustained delivery of epinephrine. Prolonged systemic exposure of epinephrine resulted in persistent PMN trafficking to the wound site via an IL-6-mediated mechanism, and this in turn impaired wound repair. Further, we demonstrate that β2-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation of proinflammatory macrophages is critical for epinephrine-mediated IL-6 production. This study expands our current understanding of stress hormone-mediated impairment of wound healing and provides an important mechanistic link to explain how epinephrine stress exacerbates inflammation via increased number and lifetime of PMNs.

  5. Loss of epithelial hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase 2 accelerates skin wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Kalucka, Joanna; Ettinger, Andreas; Franke, Kristin; Mamlouk, Soulafa; Singh, Rashim Pal; Farhat, Katja; Muschter, Antje; Olbrich, Susanne; Breier, Georg; Katschinski, Dörthe M; Huttner, Wieland; Weidemann, Alexander; Wielockx, Ben

    2013-09-01

    Skin wound healing in mammals is a complex, multicellular process that depends on the precise supply of oxygen. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) serves as a crucial oxygen sensor and may therefore play an important role during reepithelialization. Hence, this study was aimed at understanding the role of PHD2 in cutaneous wound healing using different lines of conditionally deficient mice specifically lacking PHD2 in inflammatory, vascular, or epidermal cells. Interestingly, PHD2 deficiency only in keratinocytes and not in myeloid or endothelial cells was found to lead to faster wound closure, which involved enhanced migration of the hyperproliferating epithelium. We demonstrate that this effect relies on the unique expression of β3-integrin in the keratinocytes around the tip of the migrating tongue in an HIF1α-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show enhanced proliferation of these cells in the stratum basale, which is directly related to their attenuated transforming growth factor β signaling. Thus, loss of the central oxygen sensor PHD2 in keratinocytes stimulates wound closure by prompting skin epithelial cells to migrate and proliferate. Inhibition of PHD2 could therefore offer novel therapeutic opportunities for the local treatment of cutaneous wounds.

  6. Deficiency in the LIM-only protein Fhl2 impairs skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wixler, Viktor; Hirner, Stephanie; Müller, Judith M; Gullotti, Lucia; Will, Carola; Kirfel, Jutta; Günther, Thomas; Schneider, Holm; Bosserhoff, Anja; Schorle, Hubert; Park, Jung; Schüle, Roland; Buettner, Reinhard

    2007-04-09

    After skin wounding, the repair process is initiated by the release of growth factors, cytokines, and bioactive lipids from injured vessels and coagulated platelets. These signal molecules induce synthesis and deposition of a provisional extracellular matrix, as well as fibroblast invasion into and contraction of the wounded area. We previously showed that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) triggers a signal transduction cascade mediating nuclear translocation of the LIM-only protein Fhl2 in response to activation of the RhoA GTPase (Muller, J.M., U. Isele, E. Metzger, A. Rempel, M. Moser, A. Pscherer, T. Breyer, C. Holubarsch, R. Buettner, and R. Schule. 2000. EMBO J. 19:359-369; Muller, J.M., E. Metzger, H. Greschik, A.K. Bosserhoff, L. Mercep, R. Buettner, and R. Schule. 2002. EMBO J. 21:736-748.). We demonstrate impaired cutaneous wound healing in Fhl2-deficient mice rescued by transgenic expression of Fhl2. Furthermore, collagen contraction and cell migration are severely impaired in Fhl2-deficient cells. Consequently, we show that the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, which is regulated by Fhl2, is reduced and delayed in wounds of Fhl2-deficient mice and that the expression of p130Cas, which is essential for cell migration, is reduced in Fhl2-deficient cells. In summary, our data demonstrate a function of Fhl2 as a lipid-triggered signaling molecule in mesenchymal cells regulating their migration and contraction during cutaneous wound healing.

  7. Loss of Epithelial Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase 2 Accelerates Skin Wound Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kalucka, Joanna; Ettinger, Andreas; Franke, Kristin; Mamlouk, Soulafa; Singh, Rashim Pal; Farhat, Katja; Muschter, Antje; Olbrich, Susanne; Breier, Georg; Katschinski, Dörthe M.; Huttner, Wieland; Weidemann, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Skin wound healing in mammals is a complex, multicellular process that depends on the precise supply of oxygen. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) serves as a crucial oxygen sensor and may therefore play an important role during reepithelialization. Hence, this study was aimed at understanding the role of PHD2 in cutaneous wound healing using different lines of conditionally deficient mice specifically lacking PHD2 in inflammatory, vascular, or epidermal cells. Interestingly, PHD2 deficiency only in keratinocytes and not in myeloid or endothelial cells was found to lead to faster wound closure, which involved enhanced migration of the hyperproliferating epithelium. We demonstrate that this effect relies on the unique expression of β3-integrin in the keratinocytes around the tip of the migrating tongue in an HIF1α-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show enhanced proliferation of these cells in the stratum basale, which is directly related to their attenuated transforming growth factor β signaling. Thus, loss of the central oxygen sensor PHD2 in keratinocytes stimulates wound closure by prompting skin epithelial cells to migrate and proliferate. Inhibition of PHD2 could therefore offer novel therapeutic opportunities for the local treatment of cutaneous wounds. PMID:23798557

  8. RGTA OTR 4120, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan mimetic, increases wound breaking strength and vasodilatory capability in healing rat full-thickness excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Tong, Miao; Zbinden, Mariken M; Hekking, Ineke J M; Vermeij, Marcel; Barritault, Denis; van Neck, Johan W

    2008-01-01

    ReGeneraTing Agents (RGTAs), a family of polymers engineered to protect and stabilize heparin-binding growth factors, have been shown to promote tissue repair and regeneration. In this study, the effects of one of these polymers, RGTA OTR4120, on healing of full-thickness excisional wounds in rats were investigated. Two 1.5 cm diameter circular full-thickness excisional wounds were created on the dorsum of a rat. After creation of the wounds, RGTA OTR4120 was applied. The progress of healing was assessed quantitatively by evaluating the wound closure rate, vasodilatory capability, and wound breaking strength. The results showed a triple increase of the local vascular response to heat provocation in the RGTA OTR4120-treated wounds as compared with vehicle-treated wounds. On days 14 and 79 after surgery, the wounds treated with RGTA OTR4120 gained skin strength 12% and 48% of the unwounded skin, respectively, and displayed a significantly increased gain in skin strength when compared with control animals. These results raise the possibility of efficacy of RGTA OTR4120 in accelerating surgically cutaneous wound healing by enhancing the wound breaking strength and improving the microcirculation.

  9. Healing of Chronic Wounds through Systemic Effects of Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañedo, L.; Trigos, I.; García-Cantú, R.; Godina-Nava, J. J.; Serrano, G.

    2002-08-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF) were configured to interact with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). These ELF were applied in the arm to five patients with chronic wounds resistant to medical and surgical treatment. Wound healing began in all patients during the first two weeks after ELF exposure permiting their previously unresponsive chronic wounds to function as internal controls. All lesions were cured or healed >70% in less than four months. Systemic effects were explained by ELF activation of PBMC and their transportation through the blood to the affected site. This therapy is effective in selected patients with chronic wounds.

  10. Benefits of oral and topical administration of ROQUETTE Chlorella sp. on skin inflammation and wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Lucas, Sophie; Bisson, Jean-Francois; Duffaud, Anais; Nejdi, Amine; Guerin-Deremaux, Laetitia; Baert, Blandine; Saniez-Degrave, Marie-Helene; Rozan, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The human body is constantly exposed to the risk of traumatic lesions. Chlorella is a green microalgae enriched with nutrients, vitamins, minerals and chlorophyll. In some communities, Chlorella is a traditional medicinal plant used for the management of inflammation-related diseases. ROQUETTE Chlorella sp. (RCs) was investigated by oral administration (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) and cutaneous application (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0%) to evaluate its impact in two dermatological disorder models in mice: skin inflammation and wound healing. For skin inflammation, it was administered during 14 days starting one week before the induction of chronic skin inflammation by repeated cutaneous application of 12-Otetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). For wound healing the microalgae was administered by topical application after scarification of the skin until complete wound healing. Results indicated that oral and topical administrations of the two higher doses of RCs had significant effects on macroscopic score of skin inflammation with an efficient effect on microscopic score with cutaneous application. The microalgae had also efficient effect on healing process and duration of wound healing for both administration routes and particularly at the two highest doses of RCs. These findings suggest that administration of RCs by both oral and topical routes appeared to have beneficial effects on skin lesions.

  11. Wound Healing Potential of Formulated Extract from Hibiscus Sabdariffa Calyx

    PubMed Central

    Builders, P. F.; Kabele-Toge, B.; Builders, M.; Chindo, B. A.; Anwunobi, Patricia A.; Isimi, Yetunde C.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing agents support the natural healing process, reduce trauma and likelihood of secondary infections and hasten wound closure. The wound healing activities of water in oil cream of the methanol extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae) was evaluated in rats with superficial skin excision wounds. Antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Echerichia coli were determined. The total flavonoid content, antioxidant properties and thin layer chromatographic fingerprints of the extract were also evaluated. The extract demonstrated antioxidant properties with a total flavonoid content of 12.30±0.09 mg/g. Six reproducible spots were obtained using methanol:water (95:5) as the mobile phase. The extract showed no antimicrobial activity on the selected microorganisms, which are known to infect and retard wound healing. Creams containing H. sabdariffa extract showed significant (P<0.05) and concentration dependent wound healing activities. There was also evidence of synergism with creams containing a combination of gentamicin and H. sabdariffa extract. This study, thus, provides evidence of the wound healing potentials of the formulated extract of the calyces of H. sabdariffa and synergism when co-formulated with gentamicin. PMID:23901160

  12. Loss of protein kinase Cepsilon results in impaired cutaneous wound closure and myofibroblast function.

    PubMed

    Leask, Andrew; Shi-Wen, Xu; Khan, Korsa; Chen, Yunliang; Holmes, Alan; Eastwood, Mark; Denton, Christopher P; Black, Carol M; Abraham, David J

    2008-10-15

    Cutaneous wound repair requires the de novo induction of a specialized form of fibroblast, the alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA)-expressing myofibroblast, which migrates into the wound where it adheres to and contracts extracellular matrix (ECM), resulting in wound closure. Persistence of the myofibroblast results in scarring and fibrotic disease. In this report, we show that, compared with wild-type littermates, PKCepsilon-/- mice display delayed impaired cutaneous wound closure and a reduction in myofibroblasts. Moreover, both in the presence and absence of TGFbeta, dermal fibroblasts from PKCepsilon-/- mice cultured on fibronectin show impaired abilities to form ;supermature' focal adhesions and alpha-SMA stress fibers, and reduced pro-fibrotic gene expression. Smad3 phosphorylation in response to TGFbeta1 was impaired in PKCepsilon-/- fibroblasts. PKCepsilon-/- fibroblasts show reduced FAK and Rac activation, and adhesive, contractile and migratory abilities. Overexpressing constitutively active Rac1 rescues the defective FAK phosphorylation, cell migration, adhesion and stress fiber formation of these PKCepsilon-/- fibroblasts, indicating that Rac1 operates downstream of PKCepsilon, yet upstream of FAK. These results suggest that loss of PKCepsilon severely impairs myofibroblast formation and function, and that targeting PKCepsilon may be beneficial in selectively modulating wound healing and fibrotic responses in vivo.

  13. Naturally Occurring Wound Healing Agents: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Karapanagioti, E G; Assimopoulou, A N

    2016-01-01

    Nature constitutes a pool of medicines for thousands of years. Nowadays, trust in nature is increasingly growing, as many effective medicines are naturally derived. Over the last decades, the potential of plants as wound healing agents is being investigated. Wounds and ulcers affect the patients' life quality and often lead to amputations. Approximately 43,000,000 patients suffer from diabetic foot ulcers worldwide. Annually, $25 billion are expended for the treatment of chronic wounds, with the number growing due to aging population and increased incidents of diabetes and obesity. Therefore a timely, orderly and effective wound management and treatment is crucial. This paper aims to systematically review natural products, mainly plants, with scientifically well documented wound healing activity, focusing on articles based on animal and clinical studies performed worldwide and approved medicinal products. Moreover, a brief description of the wound healing mechanism is presented, to provide a better understanding. Although a plethora of natural products are in vitro and in vivo evaluated for wound healing activity, only a few go through clinical trials and even fewer launch the market as approved medicines. Most of them rely on traditional medicine, indicating that ethnopharmacology is a successful strategy for drug development. Since only 6% of plants have been systematically investigated pharmacologically, more intensified efforts and emerging advancements are needed to exploit the potentials of nature for the development of novel medicines. This paper aims to provide a reliable database and matrix for thorough further investigation towards the discovery of wound healing agents.

  14. Dermal wound healing is subject to redox control

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Nallu, Kishore; Hunt, Thomas K.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2006-01-01

    Previously we have reported in vitro evidence suggesting that that H2O2 may support wound healing by inducing VEGF expression in human keratinocytes (JBC 277: 33284–90). Here, we test the significance of H2O2 in regulating wound healing in vivo. Using the Hunt-Schilling cylinder approach we present first evidence that the wound site contains micromolar concentration of H2O2. At the wound site, low concentrations of H2O2 supported the healing process especially in p47phox and MCP-1 deficient mice where endogenous H2O2 generation is impaired. Higher doses of H2O2 adversely influenced healing. At low concentrations, H2O2 facilitated wound angiogenesis in vivo. H2O2 induced FAK phosphorylation both in wound-edge tissue in vivo as well as in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC). H2O2 induced site-specific (Tyr-925 & Tyr-861) phosphorylation of FAK. Other sites, including the Tyr-397 autophosphorylation site, were insensitive to H2O2. Adenoviral gene delivery of catalase impaired wound angiogenesis and closure. Catalase over-expression slowed tissue remodeling as evident by a more incomplete narrowing of the hyperproliferative epithelium region and incomplete eschar formation. Taken together, this work presents the first in vivo evidence indicating that strategies to influence the redox environment of the wound site may have a bearing on healing outcomes. PMID:16126008

  15. Muscle wound healing in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J G; Andersen, E W; Ersbøll, B K; Nielsen, M E

    2016-01-01

    We followed the progression of healing of deep excisional biopsy punch wounds over the course of 365 days in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by monitoring visual wound healing and gene expression in the healing muscle at regular intervals (1, 3, 7, 14, 38 and 100 days post-wounding). In addition, we performed muscle texture analysis one year after wound infliction. The selected genes have all previously been investigated in relation to vertebrate wound healing, but only few specifically in fish. The selected genes were interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and -β3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -9 and -13, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), fibronectin (FN), tenascin-C (TN-C), prolyl 4-hydroxylase α1-chain (P4Hα1), lysyl oxidase (LOX), collagen type I α1-chain (ColIα1), CD41 and CD163. Wound healing progressed slowly in the presented study, which is at least partially due to the low temperature of about 8.5 °C during the first 100 days. The inflammation phase lasted more than 14 days, and the genes relating to production and remodeling of new extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibited a delayed but prolonged upregulation starting 1-2 weeks post-wounding and lasting until at least 100 days post-wounding. The gene expression patterns and histology reveal limited capacity for muscle regeneration in rainbow trout, and muscle texture analyses one year after wound infliction confirm that wounds heal with fibrosis. At 100 dpw epidermis had fully regenerated, and dermis partially regenerated. Scales had not regenerated even after one year. CD163 is a marker of "wound healing"-type M2c macrophages in mammals. M2 macrophage markers are as yet poorly described in fish. The pattern of CD163 expression in the present study is consistent with the expected timing of presence of M2c macrophages in the wound. CD163 may thus potentially prove a valuable marker of M2 macrophages - or a subset hereof - in fish. We subjected a group of fish to

  16. Non-Coding RNAs: New Players in Skin Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Herter, Eva K.; Xu Landén, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Significance: Wound healing is a basic physiological process that is utilized to keep the integrity of the skin. Impaired wound repair, such as chronic wounds and pathological scars, presents a major health and economic burden worldwide. To date, efficient targeted treatment for these wound disorders is still lacking, which is largely due to our limited understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying these diseases. Research driven around discovering new therapies for these complications is, therefore, an urgent need. Recent Advances: The vast majority of the human genome is transcribed to RNAs that lack protein-coding capacity. Intensive research in the recent decade has revealed that these non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) function as important regulators of cellular physiology and pathology, which makes them promising therapeutic and diagnostic entities. Critical Issues: A class of short ncRNAs, microRNAs, has been found to be indispensable for all the phases of skin wound healing and plays important roles in the pathogenesis of wound complications. The role of long ncRNAs (lncRNA) in skin wound healing remains largely unexplored. Recent studies revealed the essential role of lncRNAs in epidermal differentiation and stress response, indicating their potential importance for skin wound healing, which warrants future research. Future Directions: An investigation of ncRNAs will add new layers of complexity to our understanding of normal skin wound healing as well as to the pathogenesis of wound disorders. Development of ncRNA-based biomarkers and treatments is an interesting and important avenue for future research on wound healing. PMID:28289554

  17. Non-Coding RNAs: New Players in Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Herter, Eva K; Xu Landén, Ning

    2017-03-01

    Significance: Wound healing is a basic physiological process that is utilized to keep the integrity of the skin. Impaired wound repair, such as chronic wounds and pathological scars, presents a major health and economic burden worldwide. To date, efficient targeted treatment for these wound disorders is still lacking, which is largely due to our limited understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying these diseases. Research driven around discovering new therapies for these complications is, therefore, an urgent need. Recent Advances: The vast majority of the human genome is transcribed to RNAs that lack protein-coding capacity. Intensive research in the recent decade has revealed that these non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) function as important regulators of cellular physiology and pathology, which makes them promising therapeutic and diagnostic entities. Critical Issues: A class of short ncRNAs, microRNAs, has been found to be indispensable for all the phases of skin wound healing and plays important roles in the pathogenesis of wound complications. The role of long ncRNAs (lncRNA) in skin wound healing remains largely unexplored. Recent studies revealed the essential role of lncRNAs in epidermal differentiation and stress response, indicating their potential importance for skin wound healing, which warrants future research. Future Directions: An investigation of ncRNAs will add new layers of complexity to our understanding of normal skin wound healing as well as to the pathogenesis of wound disorders. Development of ncRNA-based biomarkers and treatments is an interesting and important avenue for future research on wound healing.

  18. Astragaloside IV enhances diabetic wound healing involving upregulation of alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaochun; Huang, Ping; Yuan, Baohong; Liu, Tao; Lan, Fang; Lu, Xiaoyan; Dai, Liangcheng; Liu, Yunjun; Yin, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active compounds extracted from Astragali Radix, has been used experimentally for its potent antiinflammatory and immunoregulatory activities. In this study, we further investigate the potential efficacy of AS-IV on impaired wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. A full-thickness skin wound was produced on the back of diabetic mice and treated with AS-IV or vehicle topically. Our results showed that AS-IV application promoted diabetic wound repair with wounds gaping narrower and exhibiting augmented reepithelialization. AS-IV enhanced the collagen deposition and the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM)-related genes such as fibronectin and collagen IIIa, which implies a direct effect of AS-IV on matrix synthesis. AS-IV also improved the new blood vessel formation in wound tissue with increased numbers of endothelial cells and enhanced expression of VEGF and vWF. Moreover, the beneficial effect of AS-IV was related to the development of polarized alternatively activated macrophages, which involved in resolution of inflammation and facilitation of wound repair. All together, these findings suggest that AS-IV may play a potential effect on maintenance of cutaneous homeostasis and acceleration of diabetic wound healing.

  19. Investigating Wound Healing in Plant Cells: This Spud's for You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Norm

    2000-01-01

    Presents classroom inquiry-based investigations to investigate wound healing in plant tissues and cells. Students create their own research problems and the investigations can be related to the National Science Standards. (SAH)

  20. Wound-healing error model for radon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Sohei

    1995-12-31

    Epidemiological studies of lung cancer in uranium miners exposed to radon suggest that radon is a tumor promoter. I will refine this notion by applying the wound-healing error model proposed for radiation carcinogenesis in general.

  1. Role of macrophages in normal wound healing: an overview.

    PubMed

    Adamson, R

    2009-08-01

    Macrophages play an essential role during inflammation in normal wound healing. They promote the recruitment and proliferation of fibroblasts, and express some of the key growth factors that stimulate angiogenesis.

  2. Epidermal Graft Accelerates the Healing of Acute Wound: A Self-controlled Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bystrzonowski, Nicola; Hachach-Haram, Nadine; Richards, Toby; Mosahebi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Wound care represents a significant socioeconomic burden, with over half of chronic wounds taking up to a year to heal. Measures to accelerate wound healing are beneficial to patients and also reduce the cost and burden of wound management. Epidermal grafting (EG) is an emerging option for autologous skin grafting in the outpatient setting to improve wound healing. Although several case series have previously reported good clinical outcome with EG, the healing rate in comparison to conservative wound management is not known. In this report, we compare the weekly healing rate of 2 separate wounds in the same patient, one treated with EG and the other with dressings. The treated wound showed accelerated healing, with the healing rate being the highest at the first 2 weeks after EG. The average healing time of the treated wound was 40% faster compared with the control wound. EG accelerates healing of acute wounds, potentially reducing the healthcare cost and surgical burden. PMID:27975024

  3. Monitoring wound healing in the home health arena.

    PubMed

    Eager, C A

    1997-09-01

    To determine the type and quality of documentation in home health care agencies in the United States, a 15-question survey was sent to 500 agencies. The returned surveys revealed the following: (1) narrative notes were the most consistently used documentation tool; (2) 74% of agencies take photographs of the wound as part of their documentation; (3) 87% of agencies stage pressure ulcers according to the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) staging system; (4) 7% use reverse staging to document improvement in wounds; (5) 32% use standard protocols to treat different types of wounds; (6) 96% to 98% monitored healing by measuring length times width, as well as drainage and wound bed changes. The results indicate that most home health care agencies use the NPUAP staging system but do not track healing in a consistent way. They do not follow a consistent documentation standard, nor do their wound assessments bring together all the monitored factors indicative of healing progress.

  4. The role of skin substitutes in the management of chronic cutaneous wounds.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Nicholas S; Iqbal, Syed A; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds, including diabetic and venous ulcers, represent disruption of normal healing processes resulting in a pathological state of nonhealing cutaneous inflammation. They place an increasingly significant economic burden on healthcare providers as their prevalence is rising in keeping with an aging population. Current treatment modalities are slow acting and resource intensive. Bioengineered skin substitutes from autogenic, allogenic, or xenogenic sources have emerged as a new and alternative therapeutic option. A range of such products is licensed for clinical use, which differ in terms of structure and cellular content. Placed directly onto a prepared wound bed, skin substitutes may stimulate or accelerate healing by promoting revascularization, cellular migration,