Science.gov

Sample records for cutting edge imaging

  1. Root dentine and endodontic instrumentation: cutting edge microscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Atmeh, Amre R; Watson, Timothy F

    2016-06-01

    Cutting of the dental hard tissues is an integral part of restorative dentistry. Cutting of the root dentine is also needed in preparation prior to endodontic treatment, with significant commercial investment for the development of flexible cutting instruments based around nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys. This paper describes the evolution of endodontic cutting instruments, both in materials used, e.g. the transition from stainless steel to NiTi, and the design of the actual instruments themselves and their method of activation-by hand or motor driven. We have been examining tooth-cutting interactions microscopically for over 25 years using a variety of microscopic techniques; in particular, video-rate confocal microscopy. This has given a unique insight into how many of the procedures that we take for granted are achieved in clinical practice, by showing microscopic video images of the cutting as it occurs within the tooth. This technology has now been extended to allow imaging of the endodontic instrument and the root canal wall for the first time. We are able to image dentine distortion and crack propagation during endodontic filing of the root canal space. We are also able to visualize the often claimed, but seldom seen action of contemporary endodontic instruments. PMID:27274802

  2. Root dentine and endodontic instrumentation: cutting edge microscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Atmeh, Amre R; Watson, Timothy F

    2016-06-01

    Cutting of the dental hard tissues is an integral part of restorative dentistry. Cutting of the root dentine is also needed in preparation prior to endodontic treatment, with significant commercial investment for the development of flexible cutting instruments based around nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys. This paper describes the evolution of endodontic cutting instruments, both in materials used, e.g. the transition from stainless steel to NiTi, and the design of the actual instruments themselves and their method of activation-by hand or motor driven. We have been examining tooth-cutting interactions microscopically for over 25 years using a variety of microscopic techniques; in particular, video-rate confocal microscopy. This has given a unique insight into how many of the procedures that we take for granted are achieved in clinical practice, by showing microscopic video images of the cutting as it occurs within the tooth. This technology has now been extended to allow imaging of the endodontic instrument and the root canal wall for the first time. We are able to image dentine distortion and crack propagation during endodontic filing of the root canal space. We are also able to visualize the often claimed, but seldom seen action of contemporary endodontic instruments.

  3. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging: A cutting-edge tool for fundamental and clinical histopathology.

    PubMed

    Longuespée, Rémi; Casadonte, Rita; Kriegsmann, Mark; Pottier, Charles; Picard de Muller, Gaël; Delvenne, Philippe; Kriegsmann, Jörg; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-07-01

    Histopathological diagnoses have been done in the last century based on hematoxylin and eosin staining. These methods were complemented by histochemistry, electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and molecular techniques. Mass spectrometry (MS) methods allow the thorough examination of various biocompounds in extracts and tissue sections. Today, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), and especially matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging links classical histology and molecular analyses. Direct mapping is a major advantage of the combination of molecular profiling and imaging. MSI can be considered as a cutting edge approach for molecular detection of proteins, peptides, carbohydrates, lipids, and small molecules in tissues. This review covers the detection of various biomolecules in histopathological sections by MSI. Proteomic methods will be introduced into clinical histopathology within the next few years.

  4. The Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA): A Cutting-Edge Way for Students and Teachers to Learn about Antarctica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Brian; Bindschadler, Robert

    2009-01-01

    By studying Antarctica via satellite and through ground-truthing research, we can learn where the ice is melting and why. The Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA), a new and cutting-edge way for scientists, researchers, educators, students, and the public to look at Antarctica, supports this research and allows for unprecedented views of our…

  5. Cutting-Edge Analysis of Extracellular Microparticles using ImageStreamX Imaging Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Headland, Sarah E.; Jones, Hefin R.; D'Sa, Adelina S. V.; Perretti, Mauro; Norling, Lucy V.

    2014-01-01

    Interest in extracellular vesicle biology has exploded in the past decade, since these microstructures seem endowed with multiple roles, from blood coagulation to inter-cellular communication in pathophysiology. In order for microparticle research to evolve as a preclinical and clinical tool, accurate quantification of microparticle levels is a fundamental requirement, but their size and the complexity of sample fluids present major technical challenges. Flow cytometry is commonly used, but suffers from low sensitivity and accuracy. Use of Amnis ImageStreamX Mk II imaging flow cytometer afforded accurate analysis of calibration beads ranging from 1 μm to 20 nm; and microparticles, which could be observed and quantified in whole blood, platelet-rich and platelet-free plasma and in leukocyte supernatants. Another advantage was the minimal sample preparation and volume required. Use of this high throughput analyzer allowed simultaneous phenotypic definition of the parent cells and offspring microparticles along with real time microparticle generation kinetics. With the current paucity of reliable techniques for the analysis of microparticles, we propose that the ImageStreamX could be used effectively to advance this scientific field. PMID:24913598

  6. Cutting Edge Geometry Effect on Plastic Deformation of Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, G. I.; Filippov, A. V.; Proskokov, A. V.; Gorbatenko, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents experimental studies of OT4 titanium alloy machining with cutting edges of various geometry parameters. Experiments were performed at a low speed by the scheme of free cutting. Intensity of plastic shear strain was set for defining of cutting edge geometry effect on machining. Images of chip formed are shown. Estimation of strain magnitude was accomplished with digital image correlation method. Effect of rake angle and cutting edge angle has been studied. Depth of deformed layer and the area of the plastic strain is determine. Results showed that increasing the angle of the cutting edge inclination results in a change the mechanism of chip formation.

  7. Cutting a Tapered Edge on Padding Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Resilience and flexibility of felt, rubber, or other padding materials allow them to be clamped in form block, cut straight down, and then released to produce straight clean tapered edge. With material held in slanted position, edge can be cut straight down; hence cut depth is minimum.

  8. Protease signalling: the cutting edge

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Boris; Turk, Dus̆an; Turk, Vito

    2012-01-01

    Protease research has undergone a major expansion in the last decade, largely due to the extremely rapid development of new technologies, such as quantitative proteomics and in-vivo imaging, as well as an extensive use of in-vivo models. These have led to identification of physiological substrates and resulted in a paradigm shift from the concept of proteases as protein-degrading enzymes to proteases as key signalling molecules. However, we are still at the beginning of an understanding of protease signalling pathways. We have only identified a minor subset of true physiological substrates for a limited number of proteases, and their physiological regulation is still not well understood. Similarly, links with other signalling systems are not well established. Herein, we will highlight current challenges in protease research. PMID:22367392

  9. The Cutting Edge, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting Edge, 2000

    2000-01-01

    The Cutting Edge is a bimonthly newsletter of the Regional Center for Applied Technology and Training at Danville Community College (DCC) (Virginia) that provides the latest information on a wide range of issues including technology, business, employment trends, and new legislation. Articles from the first five issues discuss: (1) the July 2000…

  10. The Cutting Edge: Workplace English. Instructional Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Paso Community Coll., TX. Literacy Center.

    The instructional guide for the Cutting Edge workplace literacy program, a cooperative project of El Paso Community College (Texas) and Levi Strauss and Company, is an expanded version of one appendix the project handbook. It describes and provides an instructional model for the three-part, job-specific, video-based program of English as a Second…

  11. Features of plastics edge cutting machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handozhko, A. V.; Shcherbakov, A. N.; Zaharov, L. A.; Gavrilenko, T. V.

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the features of pieces from thermoplastic materials in the form of electrical insulators cut by a disk edge tool. The problems in question are possible defects arising during machining and technological conditions that reduce their quantity. The necessity of required machining conditions matching substantiated in accordance with a specific grade of the material which is treated. Equipment and machining attachments, developed for experimental studies, determine the rational conditions of plastic electrical insulators machining. As a result of experiments the dependences of cut face quality parameters of plastics are obtained by machining conditions. The obtained results allowed us to make valid conclusions and recommendations.

  12. Imaging, cutting, and collecting instrument and method

    DOEpatents

    Tench, Robert J.; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.; Balooch, Mehdi; Balhorn, Rodney L.; Allen, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Instrumentation and techniques to image small objects, such as but not limited to individual human chromosomes, with nanometer resolution, to cut-off identified parts of such objects, to move around and manipulate such cut-off parts on the substrate on which they are being imaged to predetermined locations on the substrate, and to remove the cut-off parts from the substrate. This is accomplished using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and by modification of the conventional cantilever stylus assembly of an AFM, such that plural cantilevers are used with either sharp-tips or knife-edges thereon. In addition, the invention can be utilized for measuring hardness of materials.

  13. Fractal Analysis of Grain Cutting Edge Wear in Superabrasive Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Yoshio; Sato, Ryunosuke; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hiromichi

    This paper deals with a fractal analysis of the wear behavior of the grain cutting edges in superabrasive grinding. Fundamental overcut fly grinding experiments for producing individual straight grooves using a grinding tool with multiple grits are carried out to clarify the wear characteristics of the grain cutting edges in the grinding process and then the change in three-dimensional profile of the cutting edge measured with a multiprobe SEM is evaluated on the basis of fractal analysis. The main results are summarized as follows: (1) Fractal dimension for the contour line of the fine cutting edge formed by micro fracture shows a higher value than that of cutting edge formed by attritious wear or large fracture. (2) Fractal dimension for cBN grain cutting edge mainly formed by micro fracture tends to take a higher value than that for diamond grain cutting edge mainly formed by attritious wear. (3) The complex change in shape of the cutting edge with the progress of grinding process can be quantitatively evaluated by means of fractal analysis.

  14. Analysis of light scattering from a cutting tool edge.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Malacara, D

    1994-07-01

    The scattering of light from cutting tools is studied. The contribution of cutting tool edge parameters (height and width) to scattering patterns and the influence of side surface roughness on scattering patterns are investigated. An angle-limited integrated scattering method is developed and analyzed for fast determination of edge parameters.

  15. GSFC Cutting Edge Avionics Technologies for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luers, Philip J.; Culver, Harry L.; Plante, Jeannette

    1998-01-01

    With the launch of NASA's first fiber optic bus on SAMPEX in 1992, GSFC has ushered in an era of new technology development and insertion into flight programs. Predating such programs the Lewis and Clark missions and the New Millenium Program, GSFC has spearheaded the drive to use cutting edge technologies on spacecraft for three reasons: to enable next generation Space and Earth Science, to shorten spacecraft development schedules, and to reduce the cost of NASA missions. The technologies developed have addressed three focus areas: standard interface components, high performance processing, and high-density packaging techniques enabling lower cost systems. To realize the benefits of standard interface components GSFC has developed and utilized radiation hardened/tolerant devices such as PCI target ASICs, Parallel Fiber Optic Data Bus terminals, MIL-STD-1773 and AS1773 transceivers, and Essential Services Node. High performance processing has been the focus of the Mongoose I and Mongoose V rad-hard 32-bit processor programs as well as the SMEX-Lite Computation Hub. High-density packaging techniques have resulted in 3-D stack DRAM packages and Chip-On-Board processes. Lower cost systems have been demonstrated by judiciously using all of our technology developments to enable "plug and play" scalable architectures. The paper will present a survey of development and insertion experiences for the above technologies, as well as future plans to enable more "better, faster, cheaper" spacecraft. Details of ongoing GSFC programs such as Ultra-Low Power electronics, Rad-Hard FPGAs, PCI master ASICs, and Next Generation Mongoose processors.

  16. Development of Tool Edge Temperature Measurement Method in Wet Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, Hideto; Tanaka, Ryutaro; Hosokawa, Akira; Ueda, Takashi; Furumoto, Tatsuaki

    In this paper, the measurement method of tool edge temperature using a two-color pyrometer with an optical fiber in wet cutting is proposed. Using the proposed method, the high pressure air supplied from the small hole where an optical fiber is inserted prevents coolant from adhering to the optical fiber edge and makes temperature measuring possible. The influence of this supplied air pressure on the tool edge temperature is negligible in the 0.05Mpa to 0.6MPa range. In this way, the temperature of CBN and PCD tool edge is measured in wet cutting of Ti-6Al-4V. As a result, the tool edge temperature increases rapidly with the increase of cutting speed. In dry cutting, PCD tool edge temperature is almost 100 °C lower compared with CBN tool edge temperature. By coolant supply, PCD tool edge temperature decreases greatly. For example, when cutting speed is set at 300m/min, PCD tool edge temperature decreases by 350°C, while CBN tool edge temperature decreases by only 70°C.

  17. FDA: Cutting-Edge Technology Sheds Light on Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... FDA is using cutting-edge technology called whole genome sequencing (WGS). A genome is an organism’s complete set of genes. In the 20 years since the first bacterial genome was completely sequenced, the science has advanced dramatically. ...

  18. Material Behavior At The Extreme Cutting Edge In Bandsawing

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwar, Mohammed; Haider, Julfikar; Persson, Martin; Hellbergh, Haakan

    2011-01-17

    In recent years, bandsawing has been widely accepted as a favourite option for metal cutting off operations where the accuracy of cut, good surface finish, low kerf loss, long tool life and high material removal rate are required. Material removal by multipoint cutting tools such as bandsaw is a complex mechanism owing to the geometry of the bandsaw tooth (e.g., limited gullet size, tooth setting etc.) and the layer of material removed or undeformed chip thickness or depth of cut (5 {mu}m-50 {mu}m) being smaller than or equal to the cutting edge radius (5 {mu}m-15 {mu}m). This situation can lead to inefficient material removal in bandsawing. Most of the research work are concentrated on the mechanics of material removal by single point cutting tool such as lathe tool. However, such efforts are very limited in multipoint cutting tools such as in bandsaw. This paper presents the fundamental understanding of the material behaviour at the extreme cutting edge of bandsaw tooth, which would help in designing and manufacturing of blades with higher cutting performance and life. ''High Speed Photography'' has been carried out to analyse the material removal process at the extreme cutting edge of bandsaw tooth. Geometric model of chip formation mechanisms based on the evidences found during ''High Speed Photography'' and ''Quick Stop'' process is presented. Wear modes and mechanism in bimetal and carbide tipped bandsaw teeth are also presented.

  19. The cutting edge: Sharp biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, M. A.; Lin, A. Y. M.; Lin, Y. S.; Olevsky, E. A.; Georgalis, S.

    2008-03-01

    Through hundreds of millions of years of evolution, organisms have developed a myriad of ingenious solutions to ensure and optimize survival and success. Biological materials that comprise organisms are synthesized at ambient temperature and pressure and mostly in aqueous environments. This process, mediated by proteins, limits the range of materials at the disposal of nature and therefore the design plays a pivotal role. This article focuses on sharp edges and serrations as important survival and predating mechanisms in a number of plants, insects, fishes, and mammals. Some plants have sharp edges covered with serrations. The proboscis of mosquitoes and stinger of bees are examples in insects. Serrations are a prominent feature in many fish teeth, and rodents have teeth that are sharpened continuously, ensuring their sharpness and efficacy. Some current bioinspired applications will also be reviewed.

  20. Imaging, cutting, and collecting instrument and method

    DOEpatents

    Tench, R.J.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Balooch, M.; Balhorn, R.L.; Allen, M.J.

    1995-10-31

    Instrumentation and techniques are described to image small objects, such as but not limited to individual human chromosomes, with nanometer resolution. This instrument and method are also used to cut-off identified parts of objects, to move around and manipulate the cut-off parts on the substrate on which they are being imaged to predetermined locations on the substrate, and to remove the cut-off parts from the substrate. This is accomplished using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and by modification of the conventional cantilever stylus assembly of an AFM. The plural cantilevers are used with either sharp-tips or knife-edges. In addition, the invention can be utilized for measuring the hardness of materials. 10 figs.

  1. At the cutting edge of VOC destruction

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Of the 189 substances named as Hazardous Air Pollutants under Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, approximately 160 are classified as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Stationary sources producing as little as 10 tons per year of any listed substance or 25 tons per year of any combination of listed substances are subject to Title 5 permitting regulations. This shifts the focus from larger installations and means that cost-effective VOC control must be made available for sources producing flows under 5,000 cfm at concentrations less than 500 ppm. And, the VOCs must be controlled without producing high NO{sub x} emissions. In response to this need, Alzeta Corp., with support from the Gas Research Institute (GRI), has developed and is testing the Edge Plus+ family of VOC abatement devices. The systems are specially designed for low flows and low concentrations and can be configured to destroy virtually all types of VOCS. The gas-fired systems use thermal destruction units that provide greater than 99.99% destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) over a wide range of concentrations and operating conditions, thus assuring compliance with all existing and proposed regulations. They also produce less than 10 ppm NO{sub x} and CO (less than 0.01 lbs./MMbtu input).

  2. The Community College Baccalaureate Movement: Cutting-Edge Dissertation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrabak, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    In this review of dissertations, the researcher presents summaries of 10 of the most recent and cutting-edge dissertations focusing on the ever-growing and complex field of the community college baccalaureate movement. These studies focus on the gamut of specific legislation, case studies of particular programs and schools, financing of such…

  3. Information Commons Features Cutting-Edge Conservation and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilroy, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    This article features Richard J. Klarchek Information Commons (IC) at Loyola University Chicago, an all-glass library building on the shore of Chicago's Lake Michigan that is not only a state-of-the-art digital research library and study space--it also runs on cutting-edge energy technology. The building has attracted attention and visitors from…

  4. 7. View of cut stone apron sitting at edge of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of cut stone apron sitting at edge of concrete apron. Photograph taken from east side of lower dam. VIEW WEST - Loleta Recreation Area, Lower Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  5. Image recovery from edge primitives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Huck, Friedrich O.; Narayanswamy, Ramkumar

    1990-01-01

    A method for extracting edge primitives from Mach-band patterns is presented together with a method for recovering image representations of features outlined by the edge boundaries. The accuracy, stability, and resolution of these representations are assessed. Since these representations are most commonly used in characterizing targets, this method of low-level processing offers new opportunities for computer vision and high data-compressing coding. Two bandpass filters are considered, the spatially invariant Laplacian of Gaussian filter and spatially variant intensity-dependent spatial (IDS) summation. It is shown that the recovery from the IDS bandpass data is particularly advantageous in applications for which robustness to local and temporal variations in illumination is important. It is concluded that the edge primitives extracted from bandpassed images can be an efficient way to store, transmit, and represent images.

  6. Analysis of Femtosecond Laser Assisted Capsulotomy Cutting Edges and Manual Capsulorhexis Using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Sebastiano; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Desiderio, Giovanni; Buratto, Lucio; Schiano-Lomoriello, Domenico; Pileri, Marco; Lombardo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS) laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM). Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n = 5, and Victus, n = 5). In addition, five manual CCC (n = 5) were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA). Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa) and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq), were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P < 0.05) than the FS laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature. PMID:25505977

  7. Analysis of femtosecond laser assisted capsulotomy cutting edges and manual capsulorhexis using environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Sebastiano; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Desiderio, Giovanni; Buratto, Lucio; Schiano-Lomoriello, Domenico; Pileri, Marco; Lombardo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS) laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM). Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n = 5, and Victus, n = 5). In addition, five manual CCC (n = 5) were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA). Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa) and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq), were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P < 0.05) than the FS laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature.

  8. Pressure blades and total cutting edge: an experiment in lithic technology.

    PubMed

    Sheets, P D; Muto, G R

    1972-02-11

    Pressure techniques were used to remove 83 blades from a preformed obsidian core weighing 820 grams, yielding 17.32 meters of acute cutting edge. The blades represented 91 percent of the original weight (2.1 centimeters of acute cutting edge per gram of original material), thus demonstrating the efficiency of the pressure-blade techniques for the production of acute cutting edges.

  9. Growing Cutting-edge X-ray Optics

    ScienceCinema

    Ray Conley

    2016-07-12

    Ever imagined that an Xbox controller could help open a window into a world spanning just one billionth of a meter? Brookhaven Lab's Ray Conley grows cutting-edge optics called multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) one atomic layer at a time to focus high-energy x-rays to within a single nanometer. To achieve this focusing feat, Ray uses a massive, custom-built atomic deposition device, an array of computers, and a trusty Xbox controller. These lenses will be deployed at the Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source II, due to begin shining super-bright light on pressing scientific puzzles in 2015

  10. On the Cutting Edge: Workshops, Online Resources, and Community Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogk, D. W.; Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Fox, S.; Iverson, E. A. R.; Beane, R. J.; Mcconnell, D. A.; Wiese, K.; Wysession, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    On the Cutting Edge, funded by NSF since 2002, offers a comprehensive professional development program for geoscience faculty. The program includes an annual integrated in-person and virtual workshop series, has developed an extensive collection of peer-reviewed instructional activities and related online resources, and supports continuing community development through sponsorship of webinars, listservs, opportunities for community contributions, and dissemination of resources to keep faculty current in their science and pedagogic practices. On the Cutting Edge (CE) has offered more than 100 face-to-face and virtual workshops, webinars, journal clubs, and other events to more than 3000 participants. The award-winning website has more than 5000 pages including 47 modules on career management, pedagogy, and geoscience topics. It has more than 1800 instructional activities contributed by the community, the majority of which have been peer-reviewed. The website had more than one million visitors last year. We have worked to support a community in which faculty improve their teaching by designing courses using research-based methods to foster higher-order thinking, incorporate geoscience data, and address cognitive and affective aspects of learning as well as a community in which faculty are comfortable and successful in managing their careers. The program addresses the needs of faculty in all career stages at the full spectrum of institutions and covering the breadth of the geoscience curriculum. We select timely and compelling topics that attract different groups of participants. CE workshops are interactive, model best pedagogical practices, emphasize participant learning, provide opportunities for participants to share their knowledge and experience, provide high-quality resources, give participants time to reflect and to develop action plans, and help transform their ideas about teaching. On the Cutting Edge has had an impact on teaching based on data from national

  11. Growing Cutting-edge X-ray Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Conley

    2012-11-30

    Ever imagined that an Xbox controller could help open a window into a world spanning just one billionth of a meter? Brookhaven Lab's Ray Conley grows cutting-edge optics called multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) one atomic layer at a time to focus high-energy x-rays to within a single nanometer. To achieve this focusing feat, Ray uses a massive, custom-built atomic deposition device, an array of computers, and a trusty Xbox controller. These lenses will be deployed at the Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source II, due to begin shining super-bright light on pressing scientific puzzles in 2015

  12. At the cutting-edge of grape and wine biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Borneman, Anthony R; Schmidt, Simon A; Pretorius, Isak S

    2013-04-01

    Wine is arguably the oldest biotechnological endeavor, with humans having been involved in wine production for at least 7000 years. Despite the artisan nature of its production, work by pioneering scientists such as Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier and Louis Pasteur placed wine research in a prominent position for the application of cutting-edge biological and chemical sciences, a position it still holds to this day. Technologies such as whole-genome sequencing and systems biology are now revolutionizing winemaking by combining the ability to engineer phenotypes rationally, with a precise understanding of the genetic makeup and key phenotypic drivers of the key organisms that contribute to this age-old industry.

  13. The Zooniverse: Cutting Edge Scientific Research in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borden, K. A.; Whyte, L. F.; Smith, A.; Tarnoff, A.; Schmitt, H.

    2012-12-01

    Increasingly scientists and researchers from a multitude of disciplines are finding themselves inundated with more data than they could possibly interpret in a lifetime. Computers can be used entirely or partially for some data analysis; but there are some tasks that are currently best suited to human eyes, ears and brains. Zooniverse (www.zooniverse.org) invites members of the public to help researchers analyze and interpret data. To date, hundreds of thousands of volunteers have been involved in classifying images, interpreting sounds and transcribing texts. Zooniverse citizen scientists are providing valuable analyses across a variety of fields, from the hunt for exoplanets in Planet Hunters (planethunters.org) to the transcription of Greek papyri in Ancient Lives (ancientlives.org). Multiple academic publications have resulted from the combined efforts of the Zooniverse community and science teams demonstrating that citizen science is more than ever becoming a well-established method of doing research. Unlike most research projects the data, analysis and interactions with the science teams have an established and visible online presence through the project website and related discussion sites and blogs. These in themselves provide a valuable classroom resource, an opportunity for free and easy access to cutting edge scientific research. Anecdotal evidence exists that teacher can and already do use Zooniverse projects. By providing a rich and varied scaffolding to accompany the Zooniverse projects the opportunity exists for bringing citizen scientists to a wider classroom audience. An audience that may include non-specialist teachers, who require additional support to deliver challenging content, or time strapped educators who haven't the time to develop their own accompanying resources to weave Zooniverse projects into their lessons. During the session we will discuss the recent Zooniverse projects specifically designed to support and promote classroom adoption

  14. At the cutting-edge of grape and wine biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Borneman, Anthony R; Schmidt, Simon A; Pretorius, Isak S

    2013-04-01

    Wine is arguably the oldest biotechnological endeavor, with humans having been involved in wine production for at least 7000 years. Despite the artisan nature of its production, work by pioneering scientists such as Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier and Louis Pasteur placed wine research in a prominent position for the application of cutting-edge biological and chemical sciences, a position it still holds to this day. Technologies such as whole-genome sequencing and systems biology are now revolutionizing winemaking by combining the ability to engineer phenotypes rationally, with a precise understanding of the genetic makeup and key phenotypic drivers of the key organisms that contribute to this age-old industry. PMID:23218459

  15. Pressure blades and total cutting edge: an experiment in lithic technology.

    PubMed

    Sheets, P D; Muto, G R

    1972-02-11

    Pressure techniques were used to remove 83 blades from a preformed obsidian core weighing 820 grams, yielding 17.32 meters of acute cutting edge. The blades represented 91 percent of the original weight (2.1 centimeters of acute cutting edge per gram of original material), thus demonstrating the efficiency of the pressure-blade techniques for the production of acute cutting edges. PMID:17808802

  16. Edge-based correlation image registration for multispectral imaging

    DOEpatents

    Nandy, Prabal

    2009-11-17

    Registration information for images of a common target obtained from a plurality of different spectral bands can be obtained by combining edge detection and phase correlation. The images are edge-filtered, and pairs of the edge-filtered images are then phase correlated to produce phase correlation images. The registration information can be determined based on these phase correlation images.

  17. Skype Me! Astronomers, Students, and Cutting-Edge Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickox, Ryan C.; Gauthier, Adrienne J.

    2014-06-01

    A primary goal of many university science courses is to promote understanding of the process of contemporary scientific inquiry. One powerful way to achieve this is for students to explore current research and then interact directly with the leading scientist, the feasibility of which has recently increased dramatically due to free online video communication tools. We report on a program implemented at Dartmouth College in which students connect with a guest astronomer through Skype (video chat). The Skype session is wrapped in a larger activity where students explore current research articles, interact with the astronomer, and then reflect on the experience. The in-class Skype discussions require a small time commitment from scientists (20-30 minutes, with little or no need for preparation) while providing students direct access to researchers at the cutting edge of modern astronomy. We outline the procedures used to implement these discussions, and present qualitative assessments of student's understanding of the process of research, as well as feedback from the guest astronomers.

  18. Cutting-edge issues of core-collapse supernova theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kotake, Kei; Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2014-05-02

    Based on multi-dimensional neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we report several cutting-edge issues about the long-veiled explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). In this contribution, we pay particular attention to whether three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics and/or general relativity (GR) would or would not help the onset of explosions. By performing 3D simulations with spectral neutrino transport, we show that it is more difficult to obtain an explosion in 3D than in 2D. In addition, our results from the first generation of full general relativistic 3D simulations including approximate neutrino transport indicate that GR can foster the onset of neutrino-driven explosions. Based on our recent parametric studies using a light-bulb scheme, we discuss impacts of nuclear energy deposition behind the supernova shock and stellar rotation on the neutrino-driven mechanism, both of which have yet to be included in the self-consistent 3D supernova models. Finally we give an outlook with a summary of the most urgent tasks to extract the information about the explosion mechanisms from multi-messenger CCSN observables.

  19. Cutting-edge issues of core-collapse supernova theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotake, Kei; Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2014-05-01

    Based on multi-dimensional neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we report several cutting-edge issues about the long-veiled explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). In this contribution, we pay particular attention to whether three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics and/or general relativity (GR) would or would not help the onset of explosions. By performing 3D simulations with spectral neutrino transport, we show that it is more difficult to obtain an explosion in 3D than in 2D. In addition, our results from the first generation of full general relativistic 3D simulations including approximate neutrino transport indicate that GR can foster the onset of neutrino-driven explosions. Based on our recent parametric studies using a light-bulb scheme, we discuss impacts of nuclear energy deposition behind the supernova shock and stellar rotation on the neutrino-driven mechanism, both of which have yet to be included in the self-consistent 3D supernova models. Finally we give an outlook with a summary of the most urgent tasks to extract the information about the explosion mechanisms from multi-messenger CCSN observables.

  20. Development of Image Selection Method Using Graph Cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, T.; Harada, R.

    2016-06-01

    3D models have been widely used by spread of many available free-software. Additionally, enormous images can be easily acquired, and images are utilized for creating the 3D models recently. The creation of 3D models by using huge amount of images, however, takes a lot of time and effort, and then efficiency for 3D measurement are required. In the efficient strategy, the accuracy of the measurement is also required. This paper develops an image selection method based on network design that means surveying network construction. The proposed method uses image connectivity graph. The image connectivity graph consists of nodes and edges. The nodes correspond to images to be used. The edges connected between nodes represent image relationships with costs as accuracies of orientation elements. For the efficiency, the image connectivity graph should be constructed with smaller number of edges. Once the image connectivity graph is built, the image selection problem is regarded as combinatorial optimization problem and the graph cuts technique can be applied. In the process of 3D reconstruction, low quality images and similar images are also extracted and removed. Through the experiments, the significance of the proposed method is confirmed. It implies potential to efficient and accurate 3D measurement.

  1. Edge detection in microscopy images using curvelets

    PubMed Central

    Gebäck, Tobias; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite significant progress in imaging technologies, the efficient detection of edges and elongated features in images of intracellular and multicellular structures acquired using light or electron microscopy is a challenging and time consuming task in many laboratories. Results We present a novel method, based on the discrete curvelet transform, to extract a directional field from the image that indicates the location and direction of the edges. This directional field is then processed using the non-maximal suppression and thresholding steps of the Canny algorithm to trace along the edges and mark them. Optionally, the edges may then be extended along the directions given by the curvelets to provide a more connected edge map. We compare our scheme to the Canny edge detector and an edge detector based on Gabor filters, and show that our scheme performs better in detecting larger, elongated structures possibly composed of several step or ridge edges. Conclusion The proposed curvelet based edge detection is a novel and competitive approach for imaging problems. We expect that the methodology and the accompanying software will facilitate and improve edge detection in images available using light or electron microscopy. PMID:19257905

  2. Edge plasmons and cut-off behavior of graphene nano-ribbon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Haowen; Teng, Jinghua; Palacios, Tomás; Chua, Soojin

    2016-07-01

    Graphene nano-ribbon waveguides with ultra-short plasmon wavelength are a promising candidate for nanoscale photonic applications. Graphene edge plasmons are the fundamental and lowest losses mode. Through finite element method, edge plasmons show large effective refractive index and strong field confinement on nanoscale ribbons. The edge plasmons follow a k1/2 dispersion relation. The wavelengths of the edge plasmons and center plasmons differ by a fixed factor. The width of edge plasmon is inversely proportional to wave vector of edge plasmon kedge. Edge defects associate with graphene nano-ribbon induce extra losses and reduce the propagation length. Cut-off width of edge plasmons reduces with increasing frequency. Cut-off width of center plasmon is enlarged by edge component but the enlargement effect diminishing with the increase of kedge. The results are important for the application of graphene plasmon towards ultra-compact photonic devices.

  3. Visible imaging of edge turbulence in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zweben; R. Maqueda; K. Hill; D. Johnson; et al

    2000-06-13

    Edge plasma turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators is believed to cause the radical heat and particle flux across the separatrix and into the scrape-off-layers of these devices. This paper describes initial measurements of 2-D space-time structure of the edge density turbulence made using a visible imaging diagnostic in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The structure of the edge turbulence is most clearly visible using a method of gas puff imaging to locally illuminate the edge density turbulence.

  4. A beveled, conventional cutting edge surgical needle: a new innovation in wound closure.

    PubMed

    Kaulbach, H C; Towler, M A; McClelland, W A; Povinelli, K M; Becker, D G; Cantrell, R W; Edlich, R F

    1990-01-01

    A new beveled, conventional cutting edge needle has been developed with superior performance characteristics over those of other conventional cutting edge needles. It is composed of a unique stainless steel, ASTM 45500, that has been heat-treated after the curving process to enhance its resistance to bending. The angle of presentation of its cutting edges has been decreased to enhance needle sharpness. On the basis of the results of experimental and clinical investigations, this new needle is recommended for closure of lacerations. PMID:2197321

  5. An edge preserving differential image coding scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rost, Martin C.; Sayood, Khalid

    1992-01-01

    Differential encoding techniques are fast and easy to implement. However, a major problem with the use of differential encoding for images is the rapid edge degradation encountered when using such systems. This makes differential encoding techniques of limited utility, especially when coding medical or scientific images, where edge preservation is of utmost importance. A simple, easy to implement differential image coding system with excellent edge preservation properties is presented. The coding system can be used over variable rate channels, which makes it especially attractive for use in the packet network environment.

  6. Image Edge Extraction via Fuzzy Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus A. (Inventor); Klinko, Steve (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A computer-based technique for detecting edges in gray level digital images employs fuzzy reasoning to analyze whether each pixel in an image is likely on an edge. The image is analyzed on a pixel-by-pixel basis by analyzing gradient levels of pixels in a square window surrounding the pixel being analyzed. An edge path passing through the pixel having the greatest intensity gradient is used as input to a fuzzy membership function, which employs fuzzy singletons and inference rules to assigns a new gray level value to the pixel that is related to the pixel's edginess degree.

  7. An edge preserving differential image coding scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rost, Martin C.; Sayood, Khalid

    1991-01-01

    Differential encoding techniques are fast and easy to implement. However, a major problem with the use of differential encoding for images is the rapid edge degradation encountered when using such systems. This makes differential encoding techniques of limited utility especially when coding medical or scientific images, where edge preservation is of utmost importance. We present a simple, easy to implement differential image coding system with excellent edge preservation properties. The coding system can be used over variable rate channels which makes it especially attractive for use in the packet network environment.

  8. Imaging The Leading Edge Of A Weld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed optical system integrated into plasma arc welding torch provides image of leading edge of weld pool and welding-arc-initiation point. Welding torch aligned better with joint. System includes coherent bundle of optical fibers and transparent cup.

  9. New applications of Spectral Edge image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Alex E.; Montagna, Roberto; Finlayson, Graham D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present new applications of the Spectral Edge image fusion method. The Spectral Edge image fusion algorithm creates a result which combines details from any number of multispectral input images with natural color information from a visible spectrum image. Spectral Edge image fusion is a derivative-based technique, which creates an output fused image with gradients which are an ideal combination of those of the multispectral input images and the input visible color image. This produces both maximum detail and natural colors. We present two new applications of Spectral Edge image fusion. Firstly, we fuse RGB-NIR information from a sensor with a modified Bayer pattern, which captures visible and near-infrared image information on a single CCD. We also present an example of RGB-thermal image fusion, using a thermal camera attached to a smartphone, which captures both visible and low-resolution thermal images. These new results may be useful for computational photography and surveillance applications.

  10. Image sharpness function based on edge feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Ni

    2009-11-01

    Autofocus technique has been widely used in optical tracking and measure system, but it has problem that when the autofocus device should to work. So, no-reference image sharpness assessment has become an important issue. A new Sharpness Function that can estimate current frame image be in focus or not is proposed in this paper. According to current image whether in focus or not and choose the time of auto focus automatism. The algorithm measures object typical edge and edge direction, and then get image local kurtosis information to determine the degree of image sharpness. It firstly select several grads points cross the edge line, secondly calculates edge sharpness value and get the cure of the kurtosis, according the measure precision of optical-equipment, a threshold value will be set beforehand. If edge kurtosis value is more than threshold, it can conclude current frame image is in focus. Otherwise, it is out of focus. If image is out of focus, optics system then takes autofocus program. This algorithm test several thousands of digital images captured from optical tracking and measure system. The results show high correlation with subjective sharpness assessment for s images of sky object.

  11. The Location of the Maximum Temperature on the Cutting Edges of a Drill

    SciTech Connect

    Bono, M J; Ni, J

    2005-01-07

    This study analyzes the temperature profile along the cutting edges of a drill and describes how the temperature on the chisel edge can exceed the temperature on the primary cutting edges. A finite element model predicts the temperature distribution in the drill, where the heat flux loads applied to the finite element model are determined from analytical equations. The model for the heat flux loads considers both the heat generated on the shear plane and the heat generated on the rake face of the tool to determine the amount of heat flowing into the tool on each segment of the cutting edges. Contrary to the conventional belief that the maximum temperature occurs near the outer corner of the drill, the model predicts that the maximum temperature occurs on the chisel edge, which is consistent with experimental measurements of the temperature profile.

  12. Fusion Of Edge Maps In Color Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcroix, C. J.; Abidi, M. A.

    1988-10-01

    In this paper, a new analytic method for the detection, of edges in color images is presented. This method focuses on the integration of three edge maps in order to increase one's confidence about the presence/absence of edges in a depicted scene. The integration process utilizes an algorithm developed by the authors under a broader research topic: The integration of registered multisensory data. It is based on the interaction between the following two constraints: the principle of existence, which tends to maximize the value of the output edge map at a given location if one input edge map features an edge, and the principle of confirmability, which adjusts this value according to the edge contents in the other input edge map at the same location by maximiz-ing the similarity between them. The latter two maximizations are achieved using the Euler-Language Calculus of Variations equations. This algorithm, which fuses optimally two correlated edge maps with regard to the above principles is extended to the simultaneous fusion of three edge maps. Experiments were conducted using not only the red, green, and blue representation of color information but also other bases.

  13. Performance of S-cambered profiles with cut-off trailing edges

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, B.; Balabaskaran, V.; Tulapurkara, E.G.; Krishna, H.C.R. )

    1994-09-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of an S-cambered profile are studies under forward and reversed flow conditions. The profile chord is cut by 3, 6, and 9 percent of the chord at the sharp trailing edge end and the performances of these profiles are compared. It is found that with increase in length of cutting the lift coefficient increases in forward direction and decreases in reverse direction of flow. cutting off the sharp trailing edge improves the lift-drag characteristics in forward mode and deteriorates in the reverse mode.

  14. Image enhancement based on edge boosting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngernplubpla, Jaturon; Chitsobhuk, Orachat

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a technique for image enhancement based on proposed edge boosting algorithm to reconstruct high quality image from a single low resolution image is described. The difficulty in single-image super-resolution is that the generic image priors resided in the low resolution input image may not be sufficient to generate the effective solutions. In order to achieve a success in super-resolution reconstruction, efficient prior knowledge should be estimated. The statistics of gradient priors in terms of priority map based on separable gradient estimation, maximum likelihood edge estimation, and local variance are introduced. The proposed edge boosting algorithm takes advantages of these gradient statistics to select the appropriate enhancement weights. The larger weights are applied to the higher frequency details while the low frequency details are smoothed. From the experimental results, the significant performance improvement quantitatively and perceptually is illustrated. It can be seen that the proposed edge boosting algorithm demonstrates high quality results with fewer artifacts, sharper edges, superior texture areas, and finer detail with low noise.

  15. NiTinol-based cutting edges for endovascular heart valve resection: first in-vitro cutting results.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Daniel; Stühle, Sebastian; Kawa, Emilia; Thielmann, Matthias; Kipfmüller, Brigitte; Wendt, Hermann; Hauck, Florian; Vogel, Bernd; Fischer, Harald; Jakob, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Machining of shape memory alloys based on Nitinol (NiTi) creates difficulties due to its ductility and severe strain hardening. In this experiment, different cutting edges and grinding parameters were tested to optimize cutting results on NiTi-based blades intended for endovascular heart valve resection. The cutting procedure was performed using two counter-rotating circular NiTi blades of different diameter. A rotating/punching process should be performed. Different shapes (glazed, waved, and saw tooth), different grinding techniques (manual, manual grinder, and precise milling cutter) and additionally various velocities (50 and 200 rpm) were tested on specific test specimens. Cutting forces were measured and cutting quality was examined using digital microscopy. Preliminary tests with rotating blades showed superior results using cutting edges for the punching process (150 N vs. 200 N; n=7). In a second step special test specimens were tested. Maximum cutting-force was 265 N+/-20 N (mean+/-SD; n=7). Subsequently different shapes were tested at 50 and 200 rpm using the rotating/punching method regarding alternate grinding techniques. Cutting forces were 27 N+/-7.7 N for glazed blades (n=7) at 50 rpm and 18 N+/-4.7 N at 200 rpm, waved blades (n=7) required a maximum force of 18 N+/-5 N at 50 rpm and 11 N+/-3.3 N at 200 rpm, whereas saw tooth blades (n=7) needed 17 N+/-12.7 N at 50 rpm and 9 N+/-1.2 N at 200 rpm. Precise cutting quality was only seen when using glazed blades sharpened under accurate conditions with a high-speed milling cutter. Although shape memory alloys based on Nitinol are difficult to process, and well-defined grinding parameters do not exist, acceptable results can be reached using high-speed milling cutters. Best cutting quality can be observed by using glazed blades, performing a rotating/punching process at high velocities. Lower cutting forces can be observed by using other shape-types, however this leads to lower cutting quality. Therefore

  16. Rounded cutting edge model for the prediction of bone sawing forces.

    PubMed

    James, Thomas P; Pearlman, John J; Saigal, Anil

    2012-07-01

    A new analytical model to predict bone sawing forces is presented. Development of the model was based on the concept of a single tooth sawing at a depth of cut less than the cutting edge radius. A variable friction model was incorporated as well as elastic Hertzian contact stress to determine a lower bound for the integration limits. A new high speed linear apparatus was developed to simulate cutting edge speeds encountered with sagittal and reciprocating bone saws. Orthogonal cutting experiments in bovine cortical bone were conducted for comparison to the model. A design of the experiment's approach was utilized with linear cutting speeds between 2600 and 6200 mm/s for depths of cut between 2.5 and 10 μm. Resultant forces from the design of experiments were in the range of 8 to 11 N, with higher forces at greater depths of cut. Model predictions for resultant force magnitude were generally within one standard deviation of the measured force. However, the model consistently predicted a thrust to cutting force ratio that was greater than measured. Consequently, resultant force angles predicted by the model were generally 20 deg higher than calculated from experimental thrust and cutting force measurements. PMID:24763623

  17. Advantages of Picosecond Laser Machining for Cutting-Edge Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhouse, C.

    The demand to reduce the size, weight and material cost of modern electronic devices results in a requirement for precision micromachining to aid product development. Examples include making smaller and more powerful smartphones with brighter displays, eliminating the requirement for post-process cleaning and machining the latest bio- absorbable medical stents. The pace of innovation in high-tech industries has led to ultrafast (picosecond) industrial lasers becoming an important tool for many applications and the high repetition rates now available help to meet industrial throughput levels. This is due to the unique operating regime (megawatts of peak power) enabling clean cutting and patterning of sensitive materials and thin films used in a number of novel devices and allows micromachining of wide bandgap, "difficult" materials such as glass.

  18. Circumcision of pacific boys: tradition at the cutting edge.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Robert; Finau, Sitaleki; Finau, Eseta; Ahokovi, Lavili; Tameifuna, Susi

    2006-09-01

    Circumcision of neonates and young boys, is a frequently performed elective surgical procedure, and is one of the oldest known surgical procedures. When properly performed circumcision prevents phimosis, paraphimosis, and balanoposthitis and has been shown to decrease the incidence of penile among men and cervical cancer among the women sexual partners of circumcised men. It may also result in a decreased incidence of urinary tract infection, sexually transmitted infections and HIV infection. Circumcision also has its own inherent risks. The risk are mainly associated with the procedure (pain, bleeding, inflammation) also included post operative infection, poor healing, excess foreskin removed leading to minor or major loss of sensation, accidental cutting of the glan penis, and cross infection if performed with un-sterile instruments especially during ritual circumcision. To make an informed choice, parents should be given accurate and unbiased information and be provided the opportunity to discuss this decision. PMID:18181400

  19. STRUCTURAL ANNOTATION OF EM IMAGES BY GRAPH CUT

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hang; Auer, Manfred; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-05-08

    Biological images have the potential to reveal complex signatures that may not be amenable to morphological modeling in terms of shape, location, texture, and color. An effective analytical method is to characterize the composition of a specimen based on user-defined patterns of texture and contrast formation. However, such a simple requirement demands an improved model for stability and robustness. Here, an interactive computational model is introduced for learning patterns of interest by example. The learned patterns bound an active contour model in which the traditional gradient descent optimization is replaced by the more efficient optimization of the graph cut methods. First, the energy function is defined according to the curve evolution. Next, a graph is constructed with weighted edges on the energy function and is optimized with the graph cut algorithm. As a result, the method combines the advantages of the level set method and graph cut algorithm, i.e.,"topological" invariance and computational efficiency. The technique is extended to the multi-phase segmentation problem; the method is validated on synthetic images and then applied to specimens imaged by transmission electron microscopy(TEM).

  20. Images of Edge Turbulence in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; C.E. Bush; R. Maqueda; T. Munsat; D. Stotler; J. Lowrance; V. Mastracola; G. Renda

    2004-07-16

    The 2-D structure of edge plasma turbulence has been measured in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) by viewing the emission of the Da spectral line of deuterium. Images have been made at framing rates of up to 250,000 frames/sec using an ultra-high speed CCD camera developed by Princeton Scientific Instruments. A sequence of images showing the transition between L-mode and H-mode states is shown.

  1. Simultaneous laser cutting and welding of metal foil to edge of a plate

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1996-03-19

    A method is described for welding an ultra-thin foil to the edge of a thicker sheet to form a vacuum insulation panel comprising the steps of providing an ultra-thin foil having a thickness less than 0.002, providing a top plate having an edge and a bottom plate having an edge, clamping the foil to the edge of the plate wherein the clamps act as heat sinks to distribute heat through the foil, providing a laser, moving the laser relative to the foil and the plate edges to form overlapping weld beads to weld the foil to the plate edges while simultaneously cutting the foil along the weld line formed by the overlapping beads. 7 figs.

  2. Simultaneous laser cutting and welding of metal foil to edge of a plate

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, John C.; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    A method of welding an ultra-thin foil to the edge of a thicker sheet to form a vacuum insulation panel comprising the steps of providing an ultra-thin foil having a thickness less than 0.002, providing a top plate having an edge and a bottom plate having an edge, clamping the foil to the edge of the plate wherein the clamps act as heat sinks to distribute heat through the foil, providing a laser, moving the laser relative to the foil and the plate edges to form overlapping weld beads to weld the foil to the plate edges while simultaneously cutting the foil along the weld line formed by the overlapping beads.

  3. The Cutting Edge: Satellite Chamber, Lasers Spur LC Preservation Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandehoff, Susan E.

    1982-01-01

    Describes efforts to preserve important library materials at the Library of Congress through the use of two new technologies: a patented deacidification process in which books are placed in a vacuum chamber, and the use of optical disc recording techniques to miniaturize and store print and nonprint images. (JL)

  4. Faculty as Filmmakers: On the Cutting Edge of Classroom Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozensher, Susan G.

    2007-01-01

    Digital video equipment and studios newly available for faculty use can be incorporated into the technological repertoire of college faculty, enabling professors to customize and enhance the learning experience of their students. Today's students are particularly attuned to analyzing visual images and data, so the use of customized films in the…

  5. Remote laser cutting of CFRP: influence of the edge quality on fatigue strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Johannes W.; Zaeh, Michael F.; Spaeth, Justinian P.

    2014-02-01

    The additional weight of the batteries in electric cars can be compensated by using carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) for structural parts of the passenger cell. Various machining processes for CFRP are currently subject to investigations. Milling and abrasive waterjet cutting implicate fiber pull out or delamination and, thus, do not thoroughly meet the requirements for mass production. Despite this, laser beam cutting has a great potential in large scale cutting of CFRP and is a predominant research topic. Remote laser beam cutting especially provides a good cut surface quality. Currently, the correlation between cutting parameters and edge quality is not sufficiently known. In particular, studies on the dynamic strength of remote laser cut parts are missing. Therefore, fatigue testing was performed with specimens cut by laser radiation and the results were compared with others made by milling and abrasive waterjet cutting. With these experiments, a comparable study of the different methods of CFRP cutting was achieved. The influence of both the heat affected zone (HAZ) and of defects like micro-fissures on the fatigue strength were evaluated.

  6. Heuristic edge detector for noisy range images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kung C.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents a heuristic edge detector for extracting wireframe representations of objects from noisy range data. Jump and roof edges were detected successfully from range images containing additive white Gaussian noise with a standard deviation equal to as high as 1.2% of the measured range values. This represents an appreciable amount of noise since approximately 5% of the errors are greater than 12 cm and 32% of errors are greater than 6 cm at a distance of 5 meters. The noise insensitive characteristic of the heuristic edge detector enables low cost range scanners to be used for practical industrial applications. The availability of low cost active vision systems greatly broadens the horizon of integrating robotics vision systems to manufacturing automation.

  7. Edge detection of street trees in high-resolution remote sensing images using spectrum features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haohao; Xiao, Pengfeng; Feng, Xuezhi

    2013-10-01

    In this paper a method of Fourier spectrum features based edge detection of urban street trees is described. The QuickBird image was first transformed by 2-D discrete Fourier transform. Then the energy of the component in spatial frequency was calculated. The energy distribution of the angle in max energy was used for further study. Different frequency segments was analyzed, the frequency that can best describe the street tree edge was chosen as the cut-off frequency of the street trees edge. Odd Gabor filter in frequency domain with the cut-off frequency and the max-energy angle was applied for the edge detection. The road center line is extracted by a Gabor filter in frequency domain. Then the edge of the street trees is restricted by the road center line. The edge detection result is analyzed by Canny criteria, and the ΣV=1.00, and C=0.89.

  8. Lithographic imaging-driven pattern edge placement errors at the 10-nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyminski, Jacek K.; Sakamoto, Julia A.; Palmer, Shane R.; Renwick, Stephen P.

    2016-04-01

    As new microelectronic designs are being developed, the demands on image overlay and pattern dimension control are compounded by requirements that pattern edge placement errors (EPEs) be at a single-nanometer levels. Scanner performance plays a key role in determining location of the pattern edges at different device layers, not only through overlay but also through imaging performance. The imaging contributes to edge displacement through the variations of the image dimensions and by shifting the images from their target locations. We discuss various aspects of advanced image control relevant to a 10-nm node integrated circuit design. We review a range of issues of pattern edge placement directly linked to pattern imaging. We analyze the impact of different pattern design and scanner-related edge displacement drivers. We present two examples of imaging strategies to pattern logic device metal layer cuts. We analyze EPEs of the cut images resulting from optimized layout design and scanner setup, and we draw conclusions on edge placement control versus imaging performance requirements.

  9. Defects' geometric feature recognition based on infrared image edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junyan, Liu; Qingju, Tang; Yang, Wang; Yumei, Lu; Zhiping, Zhang

    2014-11-01

    Edge detection is an important technology in image segmentation, feature extraction and other digital image processing areas. Boundary contains a wealth of information in the image, so to extract defects' edges in infrared images effectively enables the identification of defects' geometric features. This paper analyzed the detection effect of classic edge detection operators, and proposed fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering-Canny operator algorithm to achieve defects' edges in the infrared images. Results show that the proposed algorithm has better effect than the classic edge detection operators, which can identify the defects' geometric feature much more completely and clearly. The defects' diameters have been calculated based on the image edge detection results.

  10. Kinect, a Novel Cutting Edge Tool in Pavement Data Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudzadeh, A.; Firoozi Yeganeh, S.; Golroo, A.

    2015-12-01

    Pavement roughness and surface distress detection is of interest of decision makers due to vehicle safety, user satisfaction, and cost saving. Data collection, as a core of pavement management systems, is required for these detections. There are two major types of data collection: traditional/manual data collection and automated/semi-automated data collection. This paper study different non-destructive tools in detecting cracks and potholes. For this purpose, automated data collection tools, which have been utilized recently are discussed and their applications are criticized. The main issue is the significant amount of money as a capital investment needed to buy the vehicle. The main scope of this paper is to study the approach and related tools that not only are cost-effective but also precise and accurate. The new sensor called Kinect has all of these specifications. It can capture both RGB images and depth which are of significant use in measuring cracks and potholes. This sensor is able to take image of surfaces with adequate resolution to detect cracks along with measurement of distance between sensor and obstacles in front of it which results in depth of defects. This technology has been very recently studied by few researchers in different fields of studies such as project management, biomedical engineering, etc. Pavement management has not paid enough attention to use of Kinect in monitoring and detecting distresses. This paper is aimed at providing a thorough literature review on usage of Kinect in pavement management and finally proposing the best approach which is cost-effective and precise.

  11. Pupillometry: Cutting Edge Biometrics for Early Intervention in Increased Intracranial Pressure.

    PubMed

    John, Jennilee St

    2015-10-01

    The pupillometer, a cutting-edge biometric device, is a valuable assessment tool that can aid in the early detection and prompt treatment of neurological abnormalities. Pupil assessment is a critical component of the neurological examination, and manual pupil assessment leaves much room for error. Automated pupillometry improves the quality and reliability of pupillary and neurological assessments, ultimately improving patient outcomes.

  12. Cutting-Edge Technologies and Social Media Use in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Vladlena, Ed.; Morgan, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of social media in higher education has transformed the way instructors teach and students learn. In order to effectively reach their students in this networked world, teachers must learn to utilize the latest technologies in their classrooms. "Cutting-Edge Technologies and Social Media Use in Higher Education" brings…

  13. Human Relations Training: The Cutting Edge of the Motivation to Learn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banaka, William H.

    This report describes a human relations training methodology which shows the basic importance of attuning students to their own private world of stimulation and is the cutting edge of the motivation to learn. The study includes four sections: (1) methodology of personal growth training, (2) an explanation of why such an intensive method of…

  14. Tapping Recent Alumni for the Development of Cutting-Edge, Investigative Teaching Laboratory Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodl, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    This project presents a model for the development of an innovative, highly-experimental teaching laboratory course that centers upon collaborative efforts between recent alumni currently enrolled in Ph. D. programs (consultants) and current faculty. Because these consultants are involved in cutting-edge research, their combined talents represent a…

  15. The Snowmastodon Project: cutting-edge science on the blade of a bulldozer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeffery S.; Miller, Ian M.; Johnson, Kirk R.

    2015-01-01

    Cutting-edge science happens at a variety of scales, from the individual and intimate to the large-scale and collaborative. The publication of a special issue of Quaternary Research in Nov. 2014 dedicated to the scientific findings of the “Snowmastodon Project” highlights what can be done when natural history museums, governmental agencies, and academic institutions work toward a common goal.

  16. Building Institutional Capacity for Data-Informed Decision Making. Cutting Edge Series. No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Agenda, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Building Institutional Capacity for Data-Informed Decision Making" is the third installment of the Cutting Edge series, which aims to help colleges engage faculty, scale successful interventions, and create a strong culture of evidence through use of data to strengthen their institutional change and student success efforts. Though the authors…

  17. What's Your Story?: Dutch Library DOK's New Cutting-Edge Community Tech Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekesteijn, Erik

    2010-01-01

    DOK, the cutting-edge library center in Delft, the Netherlands, has been finding new ways to elaborate on the social networking impulse. A good library unites people from all levels of society, and DOK's unique innovation department focuses specifically on how media can bring people together. It's doing so using technology to inspire and connect…

  18. Edge-induced narrowing of dietary diversity in leaf-cutting ants.

    PubMed

    Falcão, P F; Pinto, S R R; Wirth, R; Leal, I R

    2011-06-01

    Much of the ecological alteration faced by human-modified Neotropical forests can be assigned to edge effects, including the proliferation of some voracious herbivores such as leaf-cutting ants. However, the underlying mechanisms/impacts of tropical forest edge on herbivores performance and their foraging behaviour (e.g. dietary diversity) have rarely been investigated. The goal of this study was, therefore, to determine whether and how the annual diet (i.e. species richness, diversity and the relative proportion of pioneer versus non-pioneer species of plant materials) of Atta cephalotes colonies differs in the forest edge versus the interior zone of a large remnant of Atlantic forest in northeastern Brazil. Among the key results was a strong habitat effect on dietary diversity (explaining ca. 40-50% of the variation), which, in edge colonies, decreased approximately by one fourth compared to interior colonies (inverse of Simpson's index: 3.7±0.84 versus 4.99±0.95). There was a predominance of leaf fragments collected from pioneer species in the diet in both habitat (86% in edge and 80.4% in interior). Edge colonies collected proportionally more fragments from pioneer species than colonies located in the forest interior. Our results are the first to demonstrate an edge-mediated relaxation of dietary restrictions in leaf-cutting ants. These findings render robust support to previous evidence indicating the reduction of bottom-up forces as a key factor explaining both edge-induced hyper-abundance and increased herbivory of leaf-cutting ants in human-modified Neotropical landscapes.

  19. Bearing Abilities and Progressive Damage Analysis of Three Dimensional Four-Directional Braided Composites with Cut-Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bing; Liu, Zhenguo; Ya, Jixuan; Wang, Yibo; Li, Xiaokang

    2016-08-01

    Cut-edge is a kind of damage for the three-dimensional four-directional (3D4d) braided composites which is inevitable because of machining to meet requisite shape and working in the abominable environment. The longitudinal tensile experiment of the 3D4d braided composites with different braiding angles between cut-edge and the ones without cut-edge was conducted. Then representative volume cell (RVC) with interface zones was established to analyze the tensile properties through the fracture and damage mechanics. The periodic boundary conditions under the cut-edge and uncut-edge conditions were imposed to simulate the failure mechanism. Stress-strain distribution and the damage evolution nephogram in cut-edge condition were conducted. Numerical results were coincident with the experimental results. Finally the variation of cut-edge effect with the specimen thickness was simulated by superimposing inner cells. The consequence showed that thickness increase can effectively reduce cut-edge influence on longitudinal strength for 3D4d braided composites. Cut-edge simulation of braided composites has guiding significance on the actual engineering application.

  20. Cutting-Edge: Integrating Students with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities into a 4-Year Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hafner, Dedra; Moffatt, Courtney; Kisa, Nutullah

    2011-01-01

    Cutting-Edge provides inclusion in college for students with intellectual disabilities (SWID). Cutting-Edge students attended college by taking undergraduate courses, resided in student housing, and engaged in student-life events as well as pursued community service, internships and employment. Undergraduate students were the best means to teach…

  1. Cleaning capacity of hybrid instrumentation technique using reamer with alternating cutting edges system files: Histological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Emilio Carlos Sponchiado; da Fonseca, Tiago Silva; da Frota, Matheus Franco; de Carvalho, Fredson Marcio Acris; Marques, André Augusto Franco; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the following study is to evaluate the cleaning capacity of a hybrid instrumentation technique using Reamer with Alternating Cutting Edges (RaCe) system files in the apical third of mesial roots of mandibular molars. Materials and Methods: Twenty teeth were selected and separated into two groups (n = 20) according to instrumentation technique as follows: BioRaCe - chemomechanical preparation with K-type files #10 and #15; and files BioRaCe BR0, BR1, BR2, BR3, and BR4; HybTec - hybrid instrumentation technique with K-type files #10 and #15 in the working length, #20 at 2 mm, #25 at 3 mm, cervical preparation with Largo burs #1 and #2; apical preparation with K-type files #15, #20, and #25 and RaCe files #25.04 and #30.04. The root canals were irrigated with 1 ml of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite at each change of instrument. The specimens were histologically processed and photographed under light optical microscope. The images were inserted onto an integration grid to count the amount of debris present in the root canal. Results: BioRaCe presented the highest percentage of debris in the apical third, however, with no statistically significant difference for HybTec (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The hybrid technique presented similar cleaning capacity as the technique recommended by the manufacturer. PMID:24963247

  2. Liquid-Crystal Light Valve Enhances Edges In Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show liquid-crystal light valve (LCLV) exhibits operating mode in which it enhances edges in images projected on it. Operates in edge-enhancing mode (or in combination of edge-enhancing and normal modes) by suitably adjusting bias voltage and frequency. Enhancement of edges one of most important preprocessing steps in optical pattern-recognition systems. Incorporated into image-processing system to enhance edges without introducing excessive optical noise.

  3. Unsupervised color image segmentation using graph cuts with multi-components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Jin, Lianghai; Song, Enmin; Dong, Zhuoli

    2013-10-01

    A novel unsupervised color image segmentation method based on graph cuts with multi-components is proposed, which finds an optimal segmentation of an image by regarding it as an energy minimization problem. First, L*a*b* color space is chosen as color feature, and the multi-scale quaternion Gabor filter is employed to extract texture feature of the given image. Then, the segmentation is formulated in terms of energy minimization with an iterative process based on graph cuts, and the connected regions in each segment are considered as the components of the segment in each iteration. In addition, canny edge detector combined with color gradient is used to remove weak edges in segmentation results with the proposed algorithm. In contrast to previous algorithms, our method could greatly reduce computational complexity during inference procedure by graph cuts. Experimental results demonstrate the promising performance of the proposed method.

  4. Gradient cuts and extremal edges in relative depth and figure-ground perception.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Tandra; Palmer, Stephen E

    2016-02-01

    Extremal edges (EEs) are borders consisting of luminance gradients along the projected edge of a partly self-occluding curved surface (e.g., a cylinder), with equiluminant contours (ELCs) that run approximately parallel to that edge. Gradient cuts (GCs) are similar luminance gradients with ELCs that intersect (are "cut" by) an edge that could be due to occlusion. EEs are strongly biased toward being seen as closer/figural surfaces (Palmer & Ghose, Psychological Science, 19(1), 77-83, 2008). Do GCs produce a complementary bias toward being seen as ground? Experiment 1 shows that, with EEs on the opposite side, GCs produce a ground bias that increases with increasing ELC angles between ELCs and the shared edge. Experiment 2 shows that, with flat surfaces on the opposite side, GCs do not produce a ground bias, suggesting that more than one factor may be operating. We suggest that two partially dissociable factors may operate for curved surfaces-ELC angle and 3-D surface convexity-that reinforce each other in the figural cues of EEs but compete with each other in GCs. Moreover, this figural bias is modulated by the presence of EEs and GCs, as specified by the ELC angle between ELCs and the shared contour.

  5. Cutting Edge Research in Homeopathy: HRI's second international research conference in Rome.

    PubMed

    Tournier, Alexander L; Roberts, E Rachel

    2016-02-01

    Rome, 3rd-5th June 2015, was the setting for the Homeopathy Research Institute's (HRI) second conference with the theme 'Cutting Edge Research in Homeopathy'. Attended by over 250 delegates from 39 countries, this event provided an intense two and a half day programme of presentations and a forum for the sharing of ideas and the creation of international scientific collaborations. With 35 oral presentations from leaders in the field, the scientific calibre of the programme was high and the content diverse. This report summarises the key themes underpinning the cutting edge data presented by the speakers, including six key-note presentations, covering advancements in both basic and clinical research. Given the clear commitment of the global homeopathic community to high quality research, the resounding success of both Barcelona 2013 and Rome 2015 HRI conferences, and the dedicated support of colleagues, the HRI moves confidently forward towards the next biennial conference.

  6. Edge detection of color images using the HSL color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, Arthur R.; Felix, Carlos E.; Myler, Harley R.

    1995-03-01

    Various edge detectors have been proposed as well as several different types of adaptive edge detectors, but the performance of many of these edge detectors depends on the features and the noise present in the grayscale image. Attempts have been made to extend edge detection to color images by applying grayscale edge detection methods to each of the individual red, blue, and green color components as well as to the hue, saturation, and intensity color components of the color image. The modulus 2(pi) nature of the hue color component makes its detection difficult. For example, a hue of 0 and 2(pi) yields the same color tint. Normal edge detection of a color image containing adjacent pixels with hue of 0 and 2(pi) could yield the presence of an edge when an edge is really not present. This paper presents a method of mapping the 2(pi) modulus hue space to a linear space enabling the edge detection of the hue color component using the Sobel edge detector. The results of this algorithm are compared against the edge detection methods using the red, blue, and green color components. By combining the hue edge image with the intensity and saturation edge images, more edge information is observed.

  7. Enameloid microstructure of the serrated cutting edges in certain fossil carcharhiniform and lamniform sharks.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Plamen S

    2010-07-01

    The triple-layered enameloid organization of neoselachian teeth has proven to be a reliable systematic character of the group. This study uses scanning electron microscopy to investigate the orientation of the parallel enameloid bundles in the area of the serrated cutting edges in certain fossil elasmobranchs. The examined teeth come from two Upper Cretaceous Squalicorax species and the Upper Miocene carcharhiniforms Galeocerdo sp., Carcharhinus sp., and Hemipristis serra. The parallel bundles are revealed by surface etching, which removes the superficial shiny-layered enameloid. In the teeth of Squalicorax, the bundles around the cutting edge bend once, before they reach the serrations. The studied carcharhiniform species show a more complicated pattern with a change of parallel bundle course inside the serrations. H. serra teeth do not display the first bending of the bundles, whereas it was present in the other two carcharhiniforms. The course of the crystalline bundles in both Squalicorax species is not affected by the presence of the serrations, regardless of the twofold difference in tooth size between them. In the carcharhiniform species, the bended bundles occur within the primary and secondary serrations and are always associated with them. This feature might have functional significance by strengthening the cutting edge or could simply develop as a consequence of the enameloid mineralization around the individual serrae.

  8. Fuzzy Index to Evaluate Edge Detection in Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Ornelas, Felicitas; Mendoza, Olivia; Melin, Patricia; Castro, Juan R.; Rodriguez-Diaz, Antonio; Castillo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    In literature, we can find different metrics to evaluate the detected edges in digital images, like Pratt's figure of merit (FOM), Jaccard’s index (JI) and Dice’s coefficient (DC). These metrics compare two images, the first one is the reference edges image, and the second one is the detected edges image. It is important to mention that all existing metrics must binarize images before their evaluation. Binarization step causes information to be lost because an incomplete image is being evaluated. In this paper, we propose a fuzzy index (FI) for edge evaluation that does not use a binarization step. In order to process all detected edges, images are represented in their fuzzy form and all calculations are made with fuzzy sets operators and fuzzy Euclidean distance between both images. Our proposed index is compared to the most used metrics using synthetic images, with good results. PMID:26115362

  9. Visible imaging of edge fluctuations in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Medley, S.S.

    1989-03-01

    Images of the visible light emission from the inner wall region of TFTR have been made using a rapidly gated, intensified TV camera. Strong ''filamentation'' of the neutral deuterium D..cap alpha.. light is observed when the camera gating time is <100 ..mu..sec during neutral-beam-heated discharges. These turbulent filaments vary in position randomly vs. time and have a poloidal wavelength of approx.3-5 cm which is much shorter than their parallel wavelength of approx.100 cm. A second and new type of edge fluctuation phenomenon, which we call a ''merfe,'' is also described. Merfes are a regular poloidal pattern of toroidally symmetric, small-scale marfes which move away from the inner midplane during the current decay after neutral beam injection. Some tentative interpretations of these two phenomena are presented. 27 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Augmented Endoscopic Images Overlaying Shape Changes in Bone Cutting Procedures

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In microendoscopic discectomy for spinal disorders, bone cutting procedures are performed in tight spaces while observing a small portion of the target structures. Although optical tracking systems are able to measure the tip of the surgical tool during surgery, the poor shape information available during surgery makes accurate cutting difficult, even if preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance images are used for reference. Shape estimation and visualization of the target structures are essential for accurate cutting. However, time-varying shape changes during cutting procedures are still challenging issues for intraoperative navigation. This paper introduces a concept of endoscopic image augmentation that overlays shape changes to support bone cutting procedures. This framework handles the history of the location of the measured drill tip as a volume label and visualizes the remains to be cut overlaid on the endoscopic image in real time. A cutting experiment was performed with volunteers, and the feasibility of this concept was examined using a clinical navigation system. The efficacy of the cutting aid was evaluated with respect to the shape similarity, total moved distance of a cutting tool, and required cutting time. The results of the experiments showed that cutting performance was significantly improved by the proposed framework. PMID:27584732

  11. Augmented Endoscopic Images Overlaying Shape Changes in Bone Cutting Procedures.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Megumi; Endo, Shota; Nakao, Shinichi; Yoshida, Munehito; Matsuda, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    In microendoscopic discectomy for spinal disorders, bone cutting procedures are performed in tight spaces while observing a small portion of the target structures. Although optical tracking systems are able to measure the tip of the surgical tool during surgery, the poor shape information available during surgery makes accurate cutting difficult, even if preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance images are used for reference. Shape estimation and visualization of the target structures are essential for accurate cutting. However, time-varying shape changes during cutting procedures are still challenging issues for intraoperative navigation. This paper introduces a concept of endoscopic image augmentation that overlays shape changes to support bone cutting procedures. This framework handles the history of the location of the measured drill tip as a volume label and visualizes the remains to be cut overlaid on the endoscopic image in real time. A cutting experiment was performed with volunteers, and the feasibility of this concept was examined using a clinical navigation system. The efficacy of the cutting aid was evaluated with respect to the shape similarity, total moved distance of a cutting tool, and required cutting time. The results of the experiments showed that cutting performance was significantly improved by the proposed framework. PMID:27584732

  12. [Modern hearing-aids at the cutting edge of microelectronics. Increased possibilities for individual customization].

    PubMed

    Arlinger, S

    1999-08-25

    The development of modern hearing aids has been so great that they now represent the cutting edge of micro-electronics. Flexibility has been enhanced by computer-aided programming of the devices, and particularly by digital signal processing, developments which enable improved customization. Increased knowledge of the pathophysiology of the auditory system, fundamental processes in central auditory pathways, and cognitive function enable technological developments to be exploited, thus enhancing our ability to cope with an increasingly broad spectrum of hearing impairment, ranging from mild high-frequency loss to severe loss across the entire frequency range.

  13. Cornea and Ocular Surface Disease: Application of Cutting Edge Optometric Research

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Danielle M.; Alexander, Larry J.; Bonanno, Joseph A.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.; McNamara, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Clinician-scientists bridge the gap between basic research and patient care. At the 2012 Annual Meeting, a symposium highlighting the application of cutting edge optometric research within the anterior segment was held to present and discuss some of the recent basic scientific advances that will both shape and guide the development of future clinical care practices. This paper summarizes this work, bringing together four experts, all clinician-scientists in the field of cornea and ocular surface. Collectively, this work provides new insights to clinicians and researchers alike, as well as brings forth a greater appreciation of the impact of on-going optometric bench research in advancing clinical care. PMID:24658300

  14. Distribution of contact loads over the flank-land of the cutter with a rounded cutting edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V.; Gerasimov, A.; Kim, A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, contact conditions between a tool and a workpiece material for wear-simulating turning by a cutter with a sharp-cornered edge and with a rounded cutting edge are analysed. The results of the experimental study of specific contact load distribution over the artificial flank wear-land of the cutter in free orthogonal turning of the disk from titanium alloy (Ti6Al2Mo2Cr), ductile (63Cu) and brittle (57Cu1Al3Mn) brasses are described. Investigations were carried out by the method of ‘split cutter’ and by the method of the artificial flank-land of variable width. The experiments with a variable feed rate and a cutting speed show that in titanium alloy machining with a sharp-cornered cutting edge the highest normal contact load (σh max = 3400…2200 MPa) is observed immediately at the cutting edge, and the curve has a horizontal region with the length of 0.2… 0.6 mm. At a distance from the cutting edge, the value of specific normal contact load is dramatically reduced to 1100…500 MPa. The character of normal contact load for a rounded cutting edge is different -it is uniform, and its value is approximately 2 times smaller compared to machining with a sharp-cornered cutting edge. In author’s opinion it is connected with generation of a seizure zone in a chip formation region and explains the capacity of highly worn-out cutting tools for titanium alloys machining. The paper analyses the distribution of tangential contact loads over the flank land, which pattern differs considerably for machining with a sharp-cornered edge and with a rounded cutting edge. Abbreviation and symbols: m/s - meter per second (cutting speed v); mm/r - millimeter per revolution (feed rate f); MPa - mega Pascal (specific contact load as a stress σ or τ) hf - the width of the flank wear land (chamfer) of the cutting tool, flank wear land can be natural or artificial like the one in this paper [mm]; xh - distance from the cutting edge on the surface of the flank-land [mm

  15. Power spectrum weighted edge analysis for straight edge detection in images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvir, Hrishikesh V.; Skipper, Julie A.

    2007-04-01

    Most man-made objects provide characteristic straight line edges and, therefore, edge extraction is a commonly used target detection tool. However, noisy images often yield broken edges that lead to missed detections, and extraneous edges that may contribute to false target detections. We present a sliding-block approach for target detection using weighted power spectral analysis. In general, straight line edges appearing at a given frequency are represented as a peak in the Fourier domain at a radius corresponding to that frequency, and a direction corresponding to the orientation of the edges in the spatial domain. Knowing the edge width and spacing between the edges, a band-pass filter is designed to extract the Fourier peaks corresponding to the target edges and suppress image noise. These peaks are then detected by amplitude thresholding. The frequency band width and the subsequent spatial filter mask size are variable parameters to facilitate detection of target objects of different sizes under known imaging geometries. Many military objects, such as trucks, tanks and missile launchers, produce definite signatures with parallel lines and the algorithm proves to be ideal for detecting such objects. Moreover, shadow-casting objects generally provide sharp edges and are readily detected. The block operation procedure offers advantages of significant reduction in noise influence, improved edge detection, faster processing speed and versatility to detect diverse objects of different sizes in the image. With Scud missile launcher replicas as target objects, the method has been successfully tested on terrain board test images under different backgrounds, illumination and imaging geometries with cameras of differing spatial resolution and bit-depth.

  16. Bacterial foraging based edge detection for cell image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongsheng; Zhou, Tao; Xia, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Edge detection is the most popular and common choices for cell image segmentation, in which local searching strategies are commonly used. In spite of their computational efficiency, traditional edge detectors, however, may either produce discontinued edges or rely heavily on initializations. In this paper, we propose a bacterial foraging based edge detection (BFED) algorithm for cell image segmentation. We model the gradients of intensities as the nutrient concentration and propel bacteria to forage along nutrient-rich locations via mimicking the behavior of Escherichia coli, including the chemotaxis, swarming, reproduction, elimination and dispersal. As a nature-inspired evolutionary technique, this algorithm can identify the desired edges and mark them as the tracks of bacteria. We have evaluated the proposed algorithm against the Canny, SUSAN, Verma's and an active contour model (ACM) based edge detectors on both synthetic and real cell images. Our results suggest that the BFED algorithm can identify boundaries more effectively and provide more accurate cell image segmentation. PMID:26737139

  17. Method for edge detection in images using fuzzy relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieradka, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    Edge detection is one of the most important tasks in machine vision and image processing. The paper presents novel approach to construction of algorithm for detection edges in images. In order to solve the problem the concepts of the fuzzy similarity relation and homogeneity region were exploited. The results of application of the proposed edge calculation method are presented in this paper. Additionally, this paper presents an interesting artistic effect obtained by application of the image processing method based on such the detection of edges. Possible artistic effects of application of this algorithm are exemplified.

  18. A lossless encryption method for medical images using edge maps.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yicong; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos

    2009-01-01

    Image encryption is an effective approach for providing security and privacy protection for medical images. This paper introduces a new lossless approach, called EdgeCrypt, to encrypt medical images using the information contained within an edge map. The algorithm can fully protect the selected objects/regions within medical images or the entire medical images. It can also encrypt other types of images such as grayscale images or color images. The algorithm can be used for privacy protection in the real-time medical applications such as wireless medical networking and mobile medical services.

  19. Spectral segmentation of polygonized images with normalized cuts

    SciTech Connect

    Matsekh, Anna; Skurikhin, Alexei; Rosten, Edward

    2009-01-01

    We analyze numerical behavior of the eigenvectors corresponding to the lowest eigenvalues of the generalized graph Laplacians arising in the Normalized Cuts formulations of the image segmentation problem on coarse polygonal grids.

  20. Efficient method of image edge detection based on FSVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Aiping; Xiong, Xiaomei

    2013-07-01

    For efficient object cover edge detection in digital images, this paper studied traditional methods and algorithm based on SVM. It analyzed Canny edge detection algorithm existed some pseudo-edge and poor anti-noise capability. In order to provide a reliable edge extraction method, propose a new detection algorithm based on FSVM. Which contains several steps: first, trains classify sample and gives the different membership function to different samples. Then, a new training sample is formed by increase the punishment some wrong sub-sample, and use the new FSVM classification model for train and test them. Finally the edges are extracted of the object image by using the model. Experimental result shows that good edge detection image will be obtained and adding noise experiments results show that this method has good anti-noise.

  1. Line Edge Detection and Characterization in SEM Images using Wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W; Romagnoli, J A; Tringe, J W; L?tant, S E; Stroeve, P; Palazoglu, A

    2008-10-07

    Edge characterization has become increasingly important in nanotechnology due to the growing demand for precise nanoscale structure fabrication and assembly. Edge detection is often performed by thresholding the spatial information of a top-down image obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) or other surface characterization techniques. Results are highly dependent on an arbitrary threshold value, which makes it difficult to reveal the nature of the real surface and to compare results among images. In this paper, we present an alternative edge boundary detection technique based on the wavelet framework. Our results indicate that the method facilitates nano-scale edge detection and characterization, by providing a systematic threshold determination step.

  2. Teaching about Climate Change and Energy with Online Materials and Workshops from On the Cutting Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, K. B.; Manduca, C. A.; Myers, J. D.; Loxsom, F.

    2009-12-01

    Global climate change and energy use are among the most relevant and pressing issues in today’s science curriculum, yet they are also complex topics to teach. The underlying science spans multiple disciplines and is quickly evolving. Moreover, a comprehensive treatment of climate change and energy use must also delve into perspectives not typically addressed in geosciences courses, such as public policy and economics. Thus, faculty attempting to address these timely issues face many challenges. To support faculty in teaching these subjects, the On the Cutting Edge faculty development program has created a series of websites and workshop opportunities to provide faculty with information and resources for teaching about climate and energy. A web-based collection of teaching materials was developed in conjunction with the On the Cutting Edge workshops “Teaching about Energy in Geoscience Courses: Current Research and Pedagogy.” The website is designed to provide faculty with examples, references and ideas for either incorporating energy topics into existing geoscience courses or for designing or refining a course about energy. The website contains a collection of over 30 classroom and lab activities contributed by faculty and covering such diverse topics as renewable energy, energy policy and energy conservation. Course descriptions and syllabi for energy courses address audiences ranging from introductory courses to advanced seminars. Other materials available on the website include a collection of visualizations and animations, a catalog of recommended books, presentations and related references from the teaching energy workshops, and ideas for novel approaches or new topics for teaching about energy in the geosciences. The Teaching Climate Change website hosts large collections of teaching materials spanning many different topics within climate change, climatology and meteorology. Classroom activities highlight diverse pedagogic approaches such as role

  3. Robust edge-directed interpolation of magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Zhenhua; Rajan, Jeny; Verhoye, Marleen; Sijbers, Jan

    2011-11-01

    Image interpolation is intrinsically a severely under-determined inverse problem. Traditional non-adaptive interpolation methods do not account for local image statistics around the edges of image structures. In practice, this results in artifacts such as jagged edges, blurring and/or edge halos. To overcome this shortcoming, edge-directed interpolation has been introduced in different forms. One variant, new edge-directed interpolation (NEDI), has successfully exploited the 'geometric duality' that links the low-resolution image to its corresponding high-resolution image. It has been demonstrated that for scalar images, NEDI is able to produce better results than non-adaptive traditional methods, both visually and quantitatively. In this work, we return to the root of NEDI as a least-squares estimation method of neighborhood patterns and propose a robust scheme to improve it. The improvement is twofold: firstly, a robust least-squares technique is used to improve NEDI's performance to outliers and noise; secondly, the NEDI algorithm is extended with the recently proposed non-local mean estimation scheme. Moreover, the edge-directed concept is applied to the interpolation of multi-valued diffusion-weighted images. The framework is tested on phantom scalar images and real diffusion images, and is shown to achieve better results than the non-adaptive methods as well as NEDI, in terms of visual quality as well as quantitative measures.

  4. Virtual Workshop Experiences for Faculty: Lessons Learned from On the Cutting Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Kirk, K. B.; Mogk, D. W.; Bruckner, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    The On the Cutting Edge professional development program for geoscience faculty has begun offering online workshops as a supplement to its face-to-face workshop series. Following a few initial forays since 2005, Cutting Edge launched a suite of four virtual workshops in 2010: Teaching Geoscience with Service Learning, Understanding the Deep Earth, Designing Effective and Innovative Courses in the Geosciences, and Teaching Geoscience Online. Each workshop was presented over 1-2 weeks and included pre-workshop web postings, synchronous whole-group presentations, live small-group discussions, asynchronous input via threaded discussions or editable web pages, and personal time for reflection and writing. Synchronous sessions were facilitated through the Elluminate software platform which includes tools for viewing presentations, screen sharing, real-time participant response, and an ongoing chat-room discussion. Audio was provided through a separate telephone conference service. In addition, many asynchronous conversations on workshop topics were held via a threaded discussion board on the Cutting Edge website and in Wiki-like, editable web pages designed to support collaborative work. A number of challenges to running online workshops exist, primarily involving participants’ time management. It is difficult for participants to set aside enough time to complete workshop activities when they are still enmeshed in their everyday lives. It also requires new skills for speakers, participants and support staff to prepare web-based materials and navigate the technology required for the online presentations. But there are also a number of opportunities presented by these experiences. With no travel needed, an online workshop is less expensive for participants, which allows Cutting Edge to extend its commitment to providing workshop materials to a wider audience of interested faculty. Also, synchronous sessions can be recorded and posted on the website for broader community

  5. Using quantum filters as edge detectors in infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaños Marín, Daniela

    2014-06-01

    Some new filters inspired in quantum models are used as edge detectors in infrared images. In this case, Bessel, Hermite and Morse filters will be applied to detect edges and fibrillar structures in infrared images. The edge detectors will be built by the Laplacian of the mentioned quantum filters. Furthermore, using curvature operators, curvature detectors and amplifiers of contrast will be constructed to analyze infrared images. The quantum filter prototyping will be done using computer algebra software, specifically Maple and its package, ImageTools. The quantum filters will be applied to infrared images using the technique of convolutions and blurred derivatives. It is expected that designed quantum filters will be useful for analysis and processing of infrared images. As future investigations, we propose to design plugins with the quantum filters that can be incorporated into the program ImageJ, which will facilitate the use of the quantum filters for the infrared image processing.

  6. Tool holder for preparation and inspection of a radiused edge cutting tool

    DOEpatents

    Asmanes, Charles

    1979-01-01

    A tool holding fixture is provided for removably holding a radiused edge cutting tool in a tool edge lapping apparatus. The fixture allows the operator to preset the lapping radius and angle before the tool holder is placed in the fixture and the holder may be removed from the lapping apparatus to inspect the tool and simply replaced in the fixture to continue lapping in accordance with a precise alignment without realignment of the tool relative to the lap. The tool holder includes a pair of self aligning bearings in the form of precision formed steel balls connected together by a rigid shaft. The tool is held by an arm extending from the shaft and the balls set in fixed position bearing cups and the holder is oscillated back and forth about a fixed axis of rotation to lap the tool radius by means of a reversibly driven belt-pulley arrangement coupled to the shaft between the bearings. To temporarily remove the holder, the drive belt is slipped over the rearward end of the holder and the holder is lifted out of the bearing cups.

  7. Edge enhancement nucleus and cytoplast contour detector of cervical smear images.

    PubMed

    Yang-Mao, Shys-Fan; Chan, Yung-Kuan; Chu, Yen-Ping

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents an edge enhancement nucleus and cytoplast contour (EENCC) detector to enable cutting the nucleus and cytoplast from a cervical smear cell image. To clean up noises from an image, this paper proposes a trim-meaning filter that can effectively remove impulse and Gaussian noises but still preserves the sharpness of object boundaries. In addition, a bigroup enhancer is proposed to make a clear-cut separation of the pixels lying in-between two objects. A mean vector difference enhancer is presented to suppress the gradients of noises and also to brighten the gradients of object contours. What is more, a relative-distance-error measure is put forward to evaluate the segmentation error between the extracted and target object contours. The experimental results show that all the aforementioned techniques proposed have performed impressively. Other than for cervical smear images, these proposed techniques can also be utilized in object segmentation of other images.

  8. Procedural guidance using advance imaging techniques for percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Quaife, Robert A; Salcedo, Ernesto E; Carroll, John D

    2014-02-01

    The complexity of structural heart disease interventions such as edge-to edge mitral valve repair requires integration of multiple highly technical imaging modalities. Real time imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography is a relatively new technique that first, allows clear volumetric imaging of target structures such as the mitral valve for both pre-procedural diagnosis and planning in patients with degenerative or functional mitral valve regurgitation. Secondly it provides intra-procedural, real-time panoramic volumetric 3D view of structural heart disease targets that facilitates eye-hand coordination while manipulating devices within the heart. X-ray fluoroscopy and RT 3D TEE images are used in combination to display specific targets and movement of catheter based technologies in 3D space. This integration requires at least two different image display monitors and mentally fusing the individual datasets by the operator. Combined display technology such as this, allow rotation and orientation of both dataset perspectives necessary to define targets and guidance of structural disease device procedures. The inherently easy concept of direct visual feedback and eye-hand coordination allows safe and efficient completion of MitraClip procedures. This technology is now merged into a single structural heart disease guidance mode called EchoNavigator(TM) (Philips Medical Imaging Andover, MA). These advanced imaging techniques have revolutionized the field of structural heart disease interventions and this experience is exemplified by a cooperative imaging approach used for guidance of edge-to-edge mitral valve repair procedures.

  9. Edge-Based Image Compression with Homogeneous Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainberger, Markus; Weickert, Joachim

    It is well-known that edges contain semantically important image information. In this paper we present a lossy compression method for cartoon-like images that exploits information at image edges. These edges are extracted with the Marr-Hildreth operator followed by hysteresis thresholding. Their locations are stored in a lossless way using JBIG. Moreover, we encode the grey or colour values at both sides of each edge by applying quantisation, subsampling and PAQ coding. In the decoding step, information outside these encoded data is recovered by solving the Laplace equation, i.e. we inpaint with the steady state of a homogeneous diffusion process. Our experiments show that the suggested method outperforms the widely-used JPEG standard and can even beat the advanced JPEG2000 standard for cartoon-like images.

  10. Blind Image Inpainting Based on TV Model and Edge Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Yu; Deng, Liang-Jian

    Blind image inpainting is an approach to estimate the original image, when there is no or little knowledge of the degraded process. In this paper, the algorithm of blind image inpainting is based on edge detection methods to generate one inpainting mask H automatically. And then we combine the inpainting mask H with a TV model to get image blind inpainted. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed algorithms is effective with application to both the synthetic and real-world images.

  11. Tangential 2-D Edge Imaging for GPI and Edge/Impurity Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ricardo Maqueda; Dr. Fred M. Levinton

    2011-12-23

    Nova Photonics, Inc. has a collaborative effort at the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This collaboration, based on fast imaging of visible phenomena, has provided key insights on edge turbulence, intermittency, and edge phenomena such as edge localized modes (ELMs) and multi-faceted axisymmetric radiation from the edge (MARFE). Studies have been performed in all these areas. The edge turbulence/intermittency studies make use of the Gas Puff Imaging diagnostic developed by the Principal Investigator (Ricardo Maqueda) together with colleagues from PPPL. This effort is part of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) edge, scrape-off layer and divertor group joint activity (DSOL-15: Inter-machine comparison of blob characteristics). The edge turbulence/blob study has been extended from the current location near the midplane of the device to the lower divertor region of NSTX. The goal of this effort was to study turbulence born blobs in the vicinity of the X-point region and their circuit closure on divertor sheaths or high density regions in the divertor. In the area of ELMs and MARFEs we have studied and characterized the mode structure and evolution of the ELM types observed in NSTX, as well as the study of the observed interaction between MARFEs and ELMs. This interaction could have substantial implications for future devices where radiative divertor regions are required to maintain detachment from the divertor plasma facing components.

  12. PET image reconstruction with anatomical edge guided level set prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng-Liao, Jinxiu; Qi, Jinyi

    2011-11-01

    Acquiring both anatomical and functional images during one scan, PET/CT systems improve the ability to detect and localize abnormal uptakes. In addition, CT images provide anatomical boundary information that can be used to regularize positron emission tomography (PET) images. Here we propose a new approach to maximum a posteriori reconstruction of PET images with a level set prior guided by anatomical edges. The image prior models both the smoothness of PET images and the similarity between functional boundaries in PET and anatomical boundaries in CT. Level set functions (LSFs) are used to represent smooth and closed functional boundaries. The proposed method does not assume an exact match between PET and CT boundaries. Instead, it encourages similarity between the two boundaries, while allowing different region definition in PET images to accommodate possible signal and position mismatch between functional and anatomical images. While the functional boundaries are guaranteed to be closed by the LSFs, the proposed method does not require closed anatomical boundaries and can utilize incomplete edges obtained from an automatic edge detection algorithm. We conducted computer simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Two digital phantoms were constructed based on the Digimouse data and a human CT image, respectively. Anatomical edges were extracted automatically from the CT images. Tumors were simulated in the PET phantoms with different mismatched anatomical boundaries. Compared with existing methods, the new method achieved better bias-variance performance. The proposed method was also applied to real mouse data and achieved higher contrast than other methods.

  13. Pixon Based Image Denoising Scheme by Preserving Exact Edge Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikrishna, Atluri; Reddy, B. Eswara; Pompapathi, Manasani

    2016-09-01

    Denoising of an image is an essential step in many image processing applications. In any image de-noising algorithm, it is a major concern to keep interesting structures of the image like abrupt changes in image intensity values (edges). In this paper an efficient algorithm for image de-noising is proposed that obtains integrated and consecutive original image from noisy image using diffusion equations in pixon domain. The process mainly consists of two steps. In first step, the pixons for noisy image are obtained by using K-means clustering process and next step includes applying diffusion equations on the pixonal model of the image to obtain new intensity values for the restored image. The process has been applied on a variety of standard images and the objective fidelity has been compared with existing algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has a better performance by preserving edge details compared in terms of Figure of Merit and improved Peak-to-Signal-Noise-Ratio value. The proposed method brings out a denoising technique which preserves edge details.

  14. Application of edge field analysis to a blurred image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2007-02-01

    This paper introduces a method for quasi-motion extraction from a blurred image utilizing edge field analysis (EFA). Exposing a film for a certain time, we can directly photograph the trajectory of the moving object as an edge in a blurred image. As the edge trajectories are not exactly the same but similar to the optical flows, they allow us to treat the edge image as a pseudo-vector field. We define three line integrals in the edge image on closed curve similar to vector analysis. These integrals correspond to three flow primitives of the scene such as the translation, rotation and divergence. As the images, we utilized some images such as the storm, the bottle rocket and a moving object with random patterns. In order to evaluate the proposed method, we conducted the experiments of estimating the eye of the storm, the center of the explosion in terms of bottle rocket, and the centers of the rotation and divergence of the moving object.

  15. A Cutting-Edge Education: Incorporating Nano into the Undergraduate Curricula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenner, Greta M.

    2008-03-01

    The Interdisciplinary Education Group (IEG) of the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) on Nanostructured Interfaces at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW) develops and uses hands-on, interactive education and outreach materials to engage a variety of audiences in learning about nanotechnology and advanced materials. Many of the education products created are inspired by UW MRSEC research; and faculty, staff, and students regularly contribute to the IEG's work to share nanotechnology with a broader audience. The UW MRSEC has developed numerous teaching modules, labs, and education resources devoted to nanotechnology concepts, and many of these materials have been integrated into key introductory and advanced undergraduate courses at UW and other institutions, including small liberal arts colleges and community colleges. This effort has taken place through both the creation of new courses and the modification of existing courses to include cutting-edge content based on current research and emerging applications in nanotechnology. In this talk, I will present some of the new instructional materials we have developed based on advances in nanoscale science and technology, the implementation and integration of these materials into undergraduate curricula, and an overview of the UW MRSEC education efforts.

  16. Automatic comic page image understanding based on edge segment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Yongtao; Tang, Zhi; Li, Luyuan; Gao, Liangcai

    2013-12-01

    Comic page image understanding aims to analyse the layout of the comic page images by detecting the storyboards and identifying the reading order automatically. It is the key technique to produce the digital comic documents suitable for reading on mobile devices. In this paper, we propose a novel comic page image understanding method based on edge segment analysis. First, we propose an efficient edge point chaining method to extract Canny edge segments (i.e., contiguous chains of Canny edge points) from the input comic page image; second, we propose a top-down scheme to detect line segments within each obtained edge segment; third, we develop a novel method to detect the storyboards by selecting the border lines and further identify the reading order of these storyboards. The proposed method is performed on a data set consisting of 2000 comic page images from ten printed comic series. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves satisfactory results on different comics and outperforms the existing methods.

  17. Edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) for MRI-CT image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Bigong; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate the joint/simultaneous X-ray CT and MRI image reconstruction. In particular, a novel algorithm is proposed for MRI image reconstruction from highly under-sampled MRI data and CT images. It consists of two steps. First, a training dataset is generated from a series of well-registered MRI and CT images on the same patients. Then, an initial MRI image of a patient can be reconstructed via edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) based on the training dataset and a CT image of the patient. Second, an MRI image is reconstructed using the dictionary learning (DL) algorithm from highly under-sampled k-space data and the initial MRI image. Our algorithm can establish a one-to-one correspondence between the two imaging modalities, and obtain a good initial MRI estimation. Both noise-free and noisy simulation studies were performed to evaluate and validate the proposed algorithm. The results with different under-sampling factors show that the proposed algorithm performed significantly better than those reconstructed using the DL algorithm from MRI data alone.

  18. Edge-Preserving Decomposition-Based Single Image Haze Removal.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengguo; Zheng, Jinghong

    2015-12-01

    Single image haze removal is under-constrained, because the number of freedoms is larger than the number of observations. In this paper, a novel edge-preserving decomposition-based method is introduced to estimate transmission map for a haze image so as to design a single image haze removal algorithm from the Koschmiedars law without using any prior. In particular, weighted guided image filter is adopted to decompose simplified dark channel of the haze image into a base layer and a detail layer. The transmission map is estimated from the base layer, and it is applied to restore the haze-free image. The experimental results on different types of images, including haze images, underwater images, and normal images without haze, show the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  19. Liver ultrasound image classification by using fractal dimension of edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Moraru, Luminita

    2012-08-01

    Medical ultrasound image edge detection is an important component in increasing the number of application of segmentation, and hence it has been subject of many studies in the literature. In this study, we have classified the liver ultrasound images (US) combining Canny and Sobel edge detectors with fractal analysis in order to provide an indicator about of the US images roughness. We intend to provide a classification rule of the focal liver lesions as: cirrhotic liver, liver hemangioma and healthy liver. For edges detection the Canny and Sobel operators were used. Fractal analyses have been applied for texture analysis and classification of focal liver lesions according to fractal dimension (FD) determined by using the Box Counting method. To assess the performance and accuracy rate of the proposed method the contrast-to-noise (CNR) is analyzed.

  20. Edge-Preserving PET Image Reconstruction Using Trust Optimization Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-01-01

    Iterative image reconstruction for positron emission tomography (PET) can improve image quality by using spatial regularization. The most commonly used quadratic penalty often over-smoothes sharp edges and fine features in reconstructed images, while non-quadratic penalties can preserve edges and achieve higher contrast recovery. Existing optimization algorithms such as the expectation maximization (EM) and preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) algorithms work well for the quadratic penalty, but are less efficient for high-curvature or non-smooth edge-preserving regularizations. This paper proposes a new algorithm to accelerate edge-preserving image reconstruction by using two strategies: trust surrogate and optimization transfer descent. Trust surrogate approximates the original penalty by a smoother function at each iteration, but guarantees the algorithm to descend monotonically; Optimization transfer descent accelerates a conventional optimization transfer algorithm by using conjugate gradient and line search. Results of computer simulations and real 3D data show that the proposed algorithm converges much faster than the conventional EM and PCG for smooth edge-preserving regularization and can also be more efficient than the current state-of-art algorithms for the non-smooth ℓ1 regularization. PMID:25438302

  1. On the Cutting Edge Professional Development Program - An effective model built from years of experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, M. Z.; Macdonald, H.; Beane, R. J.; Manduca, C. A.; Mcconnell, D. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Wiese, K.; Wysession, M. E.; Iverson, E. A. R.; Fox, S.

    2015-12-01

    The On the Cutting Edge (CE) program offers a successful model for designing and convening professional development events. Information about the model is now available on the CE website. The program model has evolved from more than 12 years of experience, building with input from strong leaders and participants. CE offers face-to-face, virtual, and hybrid events, and features a rich website that supports these professional development events as well as a growing community with a shared interest in effective geoscience teaching. Data from national surveys, participant feedback, and self-report data indicate the program's success in improving undergraduate geoscience education. Successes are also demonstrated in classroom observations using RTOP, indicating a significant difference in teaching style among participants and non-participants. A suite of web pages, with a planning timeline, provides guidance to those interested in designing and convening face-to-face or virtual events based on the CE model. The pages suggest ways to develop robust event goals and evaluation tools, how to choose strong leaders and recruit diverse participants, advice for designing effective event programs that utilize participant expertise, websites, and web tools, and suggestions for effectively disseminating event results and producing useful products. The CE model has been successfully transferred to projects that vary in scale and discipline. Best practices from the CE model include (1) thinking of the workshop as shared enterprise among conveners and participants; (2) incorporating conveners and participants who bring diverse viewpoints and approaches; (3) promoting structured discussions that utilize participants' expertise; (4) emphasizing practical strategies to effect change; and (5) using the website as a platform to prepare for the workshop, share ideas, and problem-solve challenges. Learn more about how to utilize this model for your project at:serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/workshops/convene

  2. WWBT? What Would Ben Think about Killer Apps, Cutting Edges, and Tipping Points in the History of Weather and Climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    This paper examines the history of weather and climate since 1706 along three intertwined analytical axes: technology (killer apps), science (cutting edges), and social issues (tipping points). For example, Franklin's best-known killer app, the lightning rod, gains added significance when seen in light of his cutting edge contributions to the science of electricity, his lifelong promotion of useful knowledge, and the societal tipping point his work triggered in our relationship to the sky. Subsequently, other major tipping points and conceptual shifts followed the introduction of telegraphy, radio, television, digital computers, and rocketry into meteorology. Following an analysis of the career and contributions of Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), the paper examines later historical moments and watersheds, not merely in retrospect, but from the perspective of leading participants at the time. It focuses on technologies of significant promise, especially those involving electro- magnetism, up to and including the dawn of the twenty-first century, and asks playfully, "What would Ben think?"

  3. Optical Image Acquisition by Vibrating KNIFE Edge Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, Scott A.

    Traditional optical microscopes have inherent limitations in their attainable resolution. These shortcomings are a result of non-propagating evanescent waves being created by the small details in the specimen to be imaged. These problems are circumvented in the Near-field Scanning Optical Microscope (NSOM). Previous NSOMs use physical apertures to sample the optical field created by the specimen. By scanning a sub-wavelength-sized aperture past the specimen, very minute details may be imaged. In this thesis, a new method for obtaining images of various objects is studied. The method is a derivative of scanned knife edge techniques commonly used in optical laboratories. The general setup consists of illuminating a vibrating optically-opaque knife edge placed in close proximity to the object. By detecting only the time-varying optical power and utilizing various signal processing techniques, including computer-subtraction, beat frequency detection, and tomographic reconstruction, two-dimensional images of the object may be formed. In essence, a sampler similar to the aperture NSOMs is created. Mathematics, computer simulations, and low-resolution experiments are used to verify the thesis. Various aspects associated with improving the resolution with regards to NSOM are discussed, both theoretically and practically. The vibrating knife edge as a high- resolution sampler is compared to the physically -small NSOM aperture. Finally, future uses of the vibrating knife edge techniques and further research are introduced. Applicable references and computer programs are listed in appendices.

  4. Teaching Service Learning in the Geosciences: An On the Cutting Edge Workshop Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, M. Z.; Laine, E. P.; Mogk, D. W.; O'Connell, S.; Kirk, K. B.

    2010-12-01

    Service learning is an instructional method that combines community service and academic instruction within the context of an established academic course. It is a particularly effective approach that uses active and experiential learning to develop the academic skills required of a course of study and to simultaneously address authentic community needs. Service learning projects can energize and motivate students by engaging a sense of civic responsibility by working in concert with community partners. The geosciences provide abundant opportunities to develop service learning projects on topics related to natural hazards, resources, land use, water quality, community planning, public policy, and education (K-12 and public outreach). To explore the opportunities of teaching service learning in the geosciences, the On the Cutting Edge program convened an online workshop in February 2010. The goals of the workshop were to: 1) introduce the principles and practices of effective service learning instructional activities; 2) provide examples of successful service learning projects and practical advice about "what works;" 3) provide participants with the opportunity to design, develop, and refine their own service learning courses or projects; 4) develop collections of supporting resources related to the pedagogy of service learning; and 5) support a community of scholars interested in continued work on service learning in the geoscience curriculum. The workshop consisted of a series of web-based synchronous and asynchronous sessions, including presentations from experienced practitioners of service learning, panel discussions, threaded discussions, and editable web pages used to develop new material for the website. Time was also provided for small group and individual work and for participants to peer-review each others' service learning projects and to revise their own activities based on reviewer comments. Insights from the workshop were integrated into new web pages

  5. Image compression using a novel edge-based coding algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keissarian, Farhad; Daemi, Mohammad F.

    2001-08-01

    In this paper, we present a novel edge-based coding algorithm for image compression. The proposed coding scheme is the predictive version of the original algorithm, which we presented earlier in literature. In the original version, an image is block coded according to the level of visual activity of individual blocks, following a novel edge-oriented classification stage. Each block is then represented by a set of parameters associated with the pattern appearing inside the block. The use of these parameters at the receiver reduces the cost of reconstruction significantly. In the present study, we extend and improve the performance of the existing technique by exploiting the expected spatial redundancy across the neighboring blocks. Satisfactory coded images at competitive bit rate with other block-based coding techniques have been obtained.

  6. Edge adaptive intra field de-interlacing of video images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachine, Vladimir; Smith, Gregory; Lee, Louie

    2013-02-01

    Expanding image by an arbitrary scale factor and thereby creating an enlarged image is a crucial image processing operation. De-interlacing is an example of such operation where a video field is enlarged in vertical direction with 1 to 2 scale factor. The most advanced de-interlacing algorithms use a few consequent input fields to generate one output frame. In order to save hardware resources in video processors, missing lines in each field may be generated without reference to the other fields. Line doubling, known as "bobbing", is the simplest intra field de-interlacing method. However, it may generate visual artifacts. For example, interpolation of an inserted line from a few neighboring lines by vertical filter may produce such visual artifacts as "jaggies." In this work we present edge adaptive image up-scaling and/or enhancement algorithm, which can produce "jaggies" free video output frames. As a first step, an edge and its parameters in each interpolated pixel are detected from gradient squared tensor based on local signal variances. Then, according to the edge parameters including orientation, anisotropy and variance strength, the algorithm determines footprint and frequency response of two-dimensional interpolation filter for the output pixel. Filter's coefficients are defined by edge parameters, so that quality of the output frame is controlled by local content. The proposed method may be used for image enlargement or enhancement (for example, anti-aliasing without resampling). It has been hardware implemented in video display processor for intra field de-interlacing of video images.

  7. Improving Climate Science Education by Supporting Faculty: Climate Programs from On the Cutting Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, K.; Kirk, K. B.; Manduca, C. A.; Shellito, L. J.; Sztein, E.; Bruckner, M. Z.

    2011-12-01

    Students arrive in our classrooms with a wide range of viewpoints on climate change. Some carry misconceptions resulting from media portrayal of the subject; others have strong feelings about the policy of climate change that overshadow their understanding of the science; while some already grasp the basics of climate science and are thirsty for a more in-depth treatment. In any of these cases, the topic of climate change is likely to be of high interest to students and will challenge faculty to be well-versed in the science, the policy, and in effective pedagogic strategies. The On the Cutting Edge project continues its emphasis on climate science, climate change and energy resources with ongoing professional development events. An underlying theme of all of these events is to help faculty be more effective teachers by providing up-to-date science, examples of promising pedagogies and a forum to network with others who teach similar subjects. A monthly webinar and book club series about teaching climate and energy was offered throughout the 2010-2011 academic year. These one-hour events allowed faculty a convenient way to learn about science topics such as carbon capture and storage, nuclear energy, thermohaline circulation, alternative energy, or the energy-water nexus. Some of the webinars focused on pedagogic approaches, including teaching with climate models, dealing with misconceptions, or using local energy issues for a semester-long jigsaw project. Webinar participants reported that they could expand their teaching to include these topics, they increased their comfort level in presenting those subjects and answering student questions, and they learned where to turn for additional references. An online workshop, Teaching about Earth's Climate Using Data and Numerical Models, was held in October 2010. Participants learned about different types of models, the strategies for teaching with models and how to use online datasets. The workshop also provided

  8. Detecting Edges in Images by Use of Fuzzy Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Jesus A.; Klinko, Steve

    2003-01-01

    A method of processing digital image data to detect edges includes the use of fuzzy reasoning. The method is completely adaptive and does not require any advance knowledge of an image. During initial processing of image data at a low level of abstraction, the nature of the data is indeterminate. Fuzzy reasoning is used in the present method because it affords an ability to construct useful abstractions from approximate, incomplete, and otherwise imperfect sets of data. Humans are able to make some sense of even unfamiliar objects that have imperfect high-level representations. It appears that to perceive unfamiliar objects or to perceive familiar objects in imperfect images, humans apply heuristic algorithms to understand the images

  9. Superpixel Cut for Figure-Ground Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Michael Ying; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2016-06-01

    Figure-ground image segmentation has been a challenging problem in computer vision. Apart from the difficulties in establishing an effective framework to divide the image pixels into meaningful groups, the notions of figure and ground often need to be properly defined by providing either user inputs or object models. In this paper, we propose a novel graph-based segmentation framework, called superpixel cut. The key idea is to formulate foreground segmentation as finding a subset of superpixels that partitions a graph over superpixels. The problem is formulated as Min-Cut. Therefore, we propose a novel cost function that simultaneously minimizes the inter-class similarity while maximizing the intra-class similarity. This cost function is optimized using parametric programming. After a small learning step, our approach is fully automatic and fully bottom-up, which requires no high-level knowledge such as shape priors and scene content. It recovers coherent components of images, providing a set of multiscale hypotheses for high-level reasoning. We evaluate our proposed framework by comparing it to other generic figure-ground segmentation approaches. Our method achieves improved performance on state-of-the-art benchmark databases.

  10. Edge-supressed color clustering for image thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celenk, Mehmet; Uijt de Haag, Maarten

    2000-03-01

    This paper discusses the development of an iterative algorithm for fully automatic (gross or fine) segmentation of color images. The basic idea here is to automate segmentation for on-line operations. This is needed for such critical applications as internet communication, video indexing, target tracking, visual guidance, remote control, and motion detection. The method is composed of an edge-suppressed clustering (learning) and principal component thresholding (classification) step. In the learning phase, image clusters are well formed in the (R,G,B) space by considering only the non-edge points. The unknown number (N) of mutually exclusive image segments is learned in an unsupervised operation mode developed based on the cluster fidelity measure and K-means algorithm. The classification phase is a correlation-based segmentation strategy that operates in the K-L transform domain using the Otsu thresholding principal. It is demonstrated experimentally that the method is effective and efficient for color images of natural scenes with irregular textures and objects of varying sizes and dimension.

  11. Cutting Edge Technologies Presentation: An Overview of Developing Sensor Technology Directions and Possible Barriers to New Technology Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2007-01-01

    The aerospace industry requires the development of a range of chemical sensor technologies for such applications as leak detection, emission monitoring, fuel leak detection, environmental monitoring, and fire detection. A range of chemical sensors are being developed based on micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate microsensors with minimal size, weight, and power consumption; and the use of nanomaterials and structures to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity, However, individual sensors are limited in the amount of information that they can provide in environments that contain multiple chemical species. Thus, sensor arrays are being developed to address detection needs in such multi-species environments. These technologies and technical approaches have direct relevance to breath monitoring for clinical applications. This presentation gives an overview of developing cutting-edge sensor technology and possible barriers to new technology implementation. This includes lessons learned from previous microsensor development, recent work in development of a breath monitoring system, and future directions in the implementation of cutting edge sensor technology.

  12. Joint graph cut and relative fuzzy connectedness image segmentation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Krzysztof Chris; Miranda, Paulo A V; Falcão, Alexandre X; Udupa, Jayaram K

    2013-12-01

    We introduce an image segmentation algorithm, called GC(sum)(max), which combines, in novel manner, the strengths of two popular algorithms: Relative Fuzzy Connectedness (RFC) and (standard) Graph Cut (GC). We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that GC(sum)(max) preserves robustness of RFC with respect to the seed choice (thus, avoiding "shrinking problem" of GC), while keeping GC's stronger control over the problem of "leaking though poorly defined boundary segments." The analysis of GC(sum)(max) is greatly facilitated by our recent theoretical results that RFC can be described within the framework of Generalized GC (GGC) segmentation algorithms. In our implementation of GC(sum)(max) we use, as a subroutine, a version of RFC algorithm (based on Image Forest Transform) that runs (provably) in linear time with respect to the image size. This results in GC(sum)(max) running in a time close to linear. Experimental comparison of GC(sum)(max) to GC, an iterative version of RFC (IRFC), and power watershed (PW), based on a variety medical and non-medical images, indicates superior accuracy performance of GC(sum)(max) over these other methods, resulting in a rank ordering of GC(sum)(max)>PW∼IRFC>GC.

  13. Edge turbulence measurements in NSTX by gas puff imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqueda, R. J.; Wurden, G. A.; Zweben, S.; Roquemore, L.; Kugel, H.; Johnson, D.; Kaye, S.; Sabbagh, S.; Maingi, R.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulent filaments in visible light emission corresponding mainly to density fluctuations at the edge have been observed in large aspect ratio tokamaks: TFTR, ASDEX, Alcator C-Mod, and DIII-D. This article reports on similar turbulent structures observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) using a fast-framing, intensified, digital visible camera. These filaments were previously detected mainly in high recycling regions, such as at limiters or antennas, where the line emission from neutral atoms was modulated by the fluctuations in local plasma density. However, by introducing controlled edge gas puffs, i.e., gas puff imaging, we have increased the brightness and contrast in the fluctuation images and allowed the turbulent structure to be measured independently of the recycling. A set discrete fiber-optically coupled sight-lines also measured the frequency spectra of these light fluctuations with a 200 kHz bandwidth. Initial results in NSTX show that the turbulent filaments are well aligned with the magnetic field which can be up to 45° from the horizontal at the outer midplane of NSTX. The dominant wavelength perpendicular to the magnetic field is ˜7-11 cm, corresponding to a k⊥ ρs of ˜0.3 at an assumed Te=25 eV, and the frequency spectra has a typical broad shape characteristic of edge turbulence extending to about 100 kHz. By imaging a He gas puff along a magnetic field line the characteristic radial scalelength appears to be in the 3-5 cm range.

  14. Edge Turbulence Imaging on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; R.A. Maqueda; J.L. Terry; B. Bai; C.J. Boswell; C.E. Bush; D. D'Ippolito; E.D. Fredrickson; M. Greenwald; K. Hallatschek; S. Kaye; B. LaBombard; R. Maingi; J. Myra; W.M. Nevins; B.N. Rogers; D.P. Stotler; J. Wilgen; and X.Q. Xu

    2002-07-10

    Edge turbulence images have been made using an ultra-high speed CCD camera on both NSTX and Alcator C-Mod. In both cases, the D-alpha or HeI (587.6 nm) line emission from localized deuterium or helium gas puffs was viewed along a local magnetic field line near the outer midplane. Fluctuations in this line emission reflect fluctuations in electron density and/or electron temperature through the atomic excitation rates, which can be modeled using the DEGAS-2 code. The 2-D structure of the measured turbulence can be compared with theoretical simulations based on 3-D fluid models.

  15. 2D Doppler backscattering using synthetic aperture microwave imaging of MAST edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. A.; Brunner, K. J.; Freethy, S. J.; Huang, B. K.; Shevchenko, V. F.; Vann, R. G. L.

    2016-02-01

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is already established as a powerful diagnostic; its extension to 2D enables imaging of turbulence characteristics from an extended region of the cut-off surface. The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic has conducted proof-of-principle 2D DBS experiments of MAST edge plasma. SAMI actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (±40° vertical and horizontal) and tuneable (10-34.5 GHz) beam. The Doppler backscattered signal is digitised in vector form using an array of eight Vivaldi PCB antennas. This allows the receiving array to be focused in any direction within the field of view simultaneously to an angular range of 6-24° FWHM at 10-34.5 GHz. This capability is unique to SAMI and is a novel way of conducting DBS experiments. In this paper the feasibility of conducting 2D DBS experiments is explored. Initial observations of phenomena previously measured by conventional DBS experiments are presented; such as momentum injection from neutral beams and an abrupt change in power and turbulence velocity coinciding with the onset of H-mode. In addition, being able to carry out 2D DBS imaging allows a measurement of magnetic pitch angle to be made; preliminary results are presented. Capabilities gained through steering a beam using a phased array and the limitations of this technique are discussed.

  16. Soft, cutting edge of environmentalism: why and how the appropriate-technology notion is changing the movement

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, D.E.

    1980-04-01

    The central theme of hard, or centralized, technology versus soft, or small and disperse, technology is traced through two stages of development that the author terms enthusiasm and realism. The overlap between the environmental movement and the soft-technology movement has given the appropriate-technology movement a broad base of ideological support. Soft-technology thinking in environmentalism is broadening its concerns. This trend tends to increase what to date has been environmentalism's rather marginal relevance and legitimacy in the original and still-central domain of the soft-technolgoy movement, namely the developing countries. The small is beautiful concept will force environmentalists to question their commitments to political ideologies as well as environmentalism when faced with achieving environmental reform in the context of achieving greater social equity through redistribution. According to the author, the soft-technology vision of transformation to a soft society is the cutting edge of thought in environmentalism. 45 footnotes, 1 table. (SAC)

  17. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the MARGINS-GeoPRISMS Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. K.; Costa, A.; Goodliffe, A. M.; Marshall, J. S.; Iverson, E. A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes, organized around four initiatives: (1) chemical cycling in subduction zones (SubFac), (2) seismogenic zone processes at subduction zones (SEIZE), (3) rupturing continental lithosphere (RCL), and (4) source to sink sediment cycling at continental margins (S2S). The outcomes of this research provided critical new observations and insights into fundamental geologic processes along continental margins, and associated geologic hazards and economic resources. The transition to the successor GeoPRISMS Program provided a unique opportunity to identify and synthesize the highlights of MARGINS research, and to disseminate this knowledge to educators and students who will carry out the next phase of cutting-edge scientific research. The NSF TUES Program funded a two-year project entitled: "Bringing NSF MARGINS Continental Margins Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum," enabling development of ~15 mini-lessons drawing on key MARGINS results and data sets. The mini-lesson development team consists of 18 educators and scientists, grouped by initiative, and guided by experts in MARGINS science and current educational research and practices. Webinars and virtual check-ins enable team interactions and exchange of ideas and experiences; in person workshops solidified pedagogical approaches and assessment strategies, as well as initiative frameworks for the mini-lessons. Field testing by team members and outside volunteers during AY 2013-14 identified challenges and opportunities, guiding mini-lesson revision and finalization. The MARGINS mini-lessons define coordinated, data-rich educational resources, easy to access and free to the public, ready to be incorporated into multiple common geoscience course frameworks, taking the first step toward building a community of practice of scientists and curriculum specialists with the shared goal of moving cutting-edge science into undergraduate

  18. A textural approach based on Gabor functions for texture edge detection in ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Chen, C M; Lu, H H; Han, K C

    2001-04-01

    Edge detection is an important, but difficult, step in quantitative ultrasound (US) image analysis. In this paper, we present a new textural approach for detecting a class of edges in US images; namely, the texture edges with a weak regional mean gray-level difference (RMGD) between adjacent regions. The proposed approach comprises a vision model-based texture edge detector using Gabor functions and a new texture-enhancement scheme. The experimental results on the synthetic edge images have shown that the performances of the four tested textural and nontextural edge detectors are about 20%-95% worse than that of the proposed approach. Moreover, the texture enhancement may improve the performance of the proposed texture edge detector by as much as 40%. The experiments on 20 clinical US images have shown that the proposed approach can find reasonable edges for real objects of interest with the performance of 0.4 +/- 0.08 in terms of the Pratt's figure.

  19. Fuzzy Logic Based Edge Detection in Smooth and Noisy Clinical Images

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Izhar

    2015-01-01

    Edge detection has beneficial applications in the fields such as machine vision, pattern recognition and biomedical imaging etc. Edge detection highlights high frequency components in the image. Edge detection is a challenging task. It becomes more arduous when it comes to noisy images. This study focuses on fuzzy logic based edge detection in smooth and noisy clinical images. The proposed method (in noisy images) employs a 3×3 mask guided by fuzzy rule set. Moreover, in case of smooth clinical images, an extra mask of contrast adjustment is integrated with edge detection mask to intensify the smooth images. The developed method was tested on noise-free, smooth and noisy images. The results were compared with other established edge detection techniques like Sobel, Prewitt, Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG), Roberts and Canny. When the developed edge detection technique was applied to a smooth clinical image of size 270×290 pixels having 24 dB ‘salt and pepper’ noise, it detected very few (22) false edge pixels, compared to Sobel (1931), Prewitt (2741), LOG (3102), Roberts (1451) and Canny (1045) false edge pixels. Therefore it is evident that the developed method offers improved solution to the edge detection problem in smooth and noisy clinical images. PMID:26407133

  20. Fuzzy Logic Based Edge Detection in Smooth and Noisy Clinical Images.

    PubMed

    Haq, Izhar; Anwar, Shahzad; Shah, Kamran; Khan, Muhammad Tahir; Shah, Shaukat Ali

    2015-01-01

    Edge detection has beneficial applications in the fields such as machine vision, pattern recognition and biomedical imaging etc. Edge detection highlights high frequency components in the image. Edge detection is a challenging task. It becomes more arduous when it comes to noisy images. This study focuses on fuzzy logic based edge detection in smooth and noisy clinical images. The proposed method (in noisy images) employs a 3 × 3 mask guided by fuzzy rule set. Moreover, in case of smooth clinical images, an extra mask of contrast adjustment is integrated with edge detection mask to intensify the smooth images. The developed method was tested on noise-free, smooth and noisy images. The results were compared with other established edge detection techniques like Sobel, Prewitt, Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG), Roberts and Canny. When the developed edge detection technique was applied to a smooth clinical image of size 270 × 290 pixels having 24 dB 'salt and pepper' noise, it detected very few (22) false edge pixels, compared to Sobel (1931), Prewitt (2741), LOG (3102), Roberts (1451) and Canny (1045) false edge pixels. Therefore it is evident that the developed method offers improved solution to the edge detection problem in smooth and noisy clinical images.

  1. An investigation of the use of discriminant analysis for the classification of blade edge type from cut marks made by metal and bamboo blades.

    PubMed

    Bonney, Heather

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of cut marks in bone is largely limited to two dimensional qualitative description. Development of morphological classification methods using measurements from cut mark cross sections could have multiple uses across palaeoanthropological and archaeological disciplines, where cutting edge types are used to investigate and reconstruct behavioral patterns. An experimental study was undertaken, using porcine bone, to determine the usefulness of discriminant function analysis in classifying cut marks by blade edge type, from a number of measurements taken from their cross-sectional profile. The discriminant analysis correctly classified 86.7% of the experimental cut marks into serrated, non-serrated and bamboo blade types. The technique was then used to investigate a series of cut marks of unknown origin from a collection of trophy skulls from the Torres Strait Islands, to investigate whether they were made by bamboo or metal blades. Nineteen out of twenty of the cut marks investigated were classified as bamboo which supports the non-contemporaneous ethnographic accounts of the knives used for trophy taking and defleshing remains. With further investigation across a variety of blade types, this technique could prove a valuable tool in the interpretation of cut mark evidence from a wide variety of contexts, particularly in forensic anthropology where the requirement for presentation of evidence in a statistical format is becoming increasingly important. PMID:24919872

  2. Coastline Extraction from Aerial Images Based on Edge Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paravolidakis, V.; Moirogiorgou, K.; Ragia, L.; Zervakis, M.; Synolakis, C.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays coastline extraction and tracking of its changes become of high importance because of the climate change, global warming and rapid growth of human population. Coastal areas play a significant role for the economy of the entire region. In this paper we propose a new methodology for automatic extraction of the coastline using aerial images. A combination of a four step algorithm is used to extract the coastline in a robust and generalizable way. First, noise distortion is reduced in order to ameliorate the input data for the next processing steps. Then, the image is segmented into two regions, land and sea, through the application of a local threshold to create the binary image. The result is further processed by morphological operators with the aim that small objects are being eliminated and only the objects of interest are preserved. Finally, we perform edge detection and active contours fitting in order to extract and model the coastline. These algorithmic steps are illustrated through examples, which demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology.

  3. Very Early In-Utero Diagnosis of Walker-Warburg Phenotype: The Cutting Edge of Technology

    PubMed Central

    Achiron, R.; Katorza, E.; Reznik-Wolf, H.; Pras, E.; Kidron, D.; Berkenstadtt, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Walker-Warburg phenotype is a severe and lethal autosomal recessive disorder, belonging to a group of congenital malformations defined as abnormal pial basement membrane formation. So far, prenatal diagnosis was considered possible only during late pregnancy. Methods: First trimester assessment of a pregnancy suspected to be affected by Walker-Warburg phenotype, using a high-resolution transvaginal ultrasound probe (6–12 MHz), T2 MR imaging (1.5T), molecular genetics and histopathology. Results: Very early diagnosis of the Walker-Warburg phenotype at 11 weeks of gestation proved possible by depicting the classic signs of this entity, confirmed by molecular genetics, post-abortion MR imaging and histopathology. Conclusion: Advancements in ultrasound equipment and technology, molecular genetics and histopathology have made very early detection of this syndrome possible, thus shedding new light on the natural history of this malformation.

  4. Remote Sensing Forage Quality for Browsing Herbivores: A Case Study of Cutting Edge Koala Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngentob, K. N.; Au, J.; Held, A. A.; Foley, W. J.; Possingham, H. P.

    2014-12-01

    Managing landscapes for conservation requires a capacity to measure habitat quality. Although multiple factors are often responsible for the distribution and abundance of herbivores, spatial variations in the quality and quantity of plant forage are known to be important for many species. While we cannot see the chemical complexity of landscapes with our naked-eye, advances in imaging spectroscopy are making it possible to assess the quality of forage on a landscape-scale. Much research in this area has focused on the ability to estimate foliar nitrogen (N), because N is believed to be a limiting nutrient for many leaf eating animals. However, the total quantity of foliar N does not necessarily reflect the amount of N that can be utilized by herbivores. Available nitrogen (AvailN) is an invitro measure of forage quality that integrates the influence of tannins and fibre on the amount of foliar N that is available for digestion by herbivores. This may be a more meaningful measure of forage quality than total N for the many herbivorous species that are sensitive to the effects of tannins. Our previous research has demonstrated that it is possible to estimate this integrated measure of foliar nutritional quality at an individual tree crown level across multiple tree species using imaging spectroscopy (HyMap). Here we present a case study of how this remote sensing data is being used to help inform landscape management and conservation decisions for an iconic Australian species, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). We review the methods involved in developing maps of integrated measures of foliar nutritional quality for browsing herbivores with airborne imaging spectroscopy data and discuss their applications for wildlife management.

  5. A weighted mean shift, normalized cuts initialized color gradient based geodesic active contour model: applications to histopathology image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Janowczyk, Andrew; Chandran, Sharat; Madabhushi, Anant

    2010-03-01

    While geodesic active contours (GAC) have become very popular tools for image segmentation, they are sensitive to model initialization. In order to get an accurate segmentation, the model typically needs to be initialized very close to the true object boundary. Apart from accuracy, automated initialization of the objects of interest is an important pre-requisite to being able to run the active contour model on very large images (such as those found in digitized histopathology). A second limitation of GAC model is that the edge detector function is based on gray scale gradients; color images typically being converted to gray scale prior to computing the gradient. For color images, however, the gray scale gradient results in broken edges and weak boundaries, since the other channels are not exploited for the gradient determination. In this paper we present a new geodesic active contour model that is driven by an accurate and rapid object initialization scheme-weighted mean shift normalized cuts (WNCut). WNCut draws its strength from the integration of two powerful segmentation strategies-mean shift clustering and normalized cuts. WNCut involves first defining a color swatch (typically a few pixels) from the object of interest. A multi-scale mean shift coupled normalized cuts algorithm then rapidly yields an initial accurate detection of all objects in the scene corresponding to the colors in the swatch. This detection result provides the initial boundary for GAC model. The edge-detector function of the GAC model employs a local structure tensor based color gradient, obtained by calculating the local min/max variations contributed from each color channel (e.g. R,G,B or H,S,V). Our color gradient based edge-detector function results in more prominent boundaries compared to classical gray scale gradient based function. We evaluate segmentation results of our new WNCut initialized color gradient based GAC (WNCut-CGAC) model against a popular region-based model (Chan

  6. Improving radiotherapy planning, delivery accuracy, and normal tissue sparing using cutting edge technologies.

    PubMed

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K; Chetty, Indrin J

    2014-04-01

    In the United States, more than half of all new invasive cancers diagnosed are non-small cell lung cancer, with a significant number of these cases presenting at locally advanced stages, resulting in about one-third of all cancer deaths. While the advent of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR, also known as stereotactic body radiotherapy, or SBRT) for early-staged patients has improved local tumor control to >90%, survival results for locally advanced stage lung cancer remain grim. Significant challenges exist in lung cancer radiation therapy including tumor motion, accurate dose calculation in low density media, limiting dose to nearby organs at risk, and changing anatomy over the treatment course. However, many recent technological advancements have been introduced that can meet these challenges, including four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and volumetric cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to enable more accurate target definition and precise tumor localization during radiation, respectively. In addition, advances in dose calculation algorithms have allowed for more accurate dosimetry in heterogeneous media, and intensity modulated and arc delivery techniques can help spare organs at risk. New delivery approaches, such as tumor tracking and gating, offer additional potential for further reducing target margins. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) introduces the potential for individualized plan adaptation based on imaging feedback, including bulky residual disease, tumor progression, and physiological changes that occur during the treatment course. This review provides an overview of the current state of the art technology for lung cancer volume definition, treatment planning, localization, and treatment plan adaptation.

  7. Transition-edge sensor imaging arrays for astrophysics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burney, Jennifer Anne

    Many interesting objects in our universe currently elude observation in the optical band: they are too faint or they vary rapidly and thus any structure in their radiation is lost over the period of an exposure. Conventional photon detectors cannot simultaneously provide energy resolution and time-stamping of individual photons at fast rates. Superconducting detectors have recently made the possibility of simultaneous photon counting, imaging, and energy resolution a reality. Our research group has pioneered the use of one such detector, the Transition-Edge Sensor (TES). TES physics is simple and elegant. A thin superconducting film, biased at its critical temperature, can act as a particle detector: an incident particle deposits energy and drives the film into its superconducting-normal transition. By inductively coupling the detector to a SQUID amplifier circuit, this resistance change can be read out as a current pulse, and its energy deduced by integrating over the pulse. TESs can be used to accurately time-stamp (to 0.1 [mu]s) and energy-resolve (0.15 eV at 1.6 eV) near-IR/visible/near-UV photons at rates of 30~kHz. The first astronomical observations using fiber-coupled detectors were made at the Stanford Student Observatory 0.6~m telescope in 1999. Further observations of the Crab Pulsar from the 107" telescope at the University of Texas McDonald Observatory showed rapid phase variations over the near-IR/visible/near-UV band. These preliminary observations provided a glimpse into a new realm of observations of pulsars, binary systems, and accreting black holes promised by TES arrays. This thesis describes the development, characterization, and preliminary use of the first camera system based on Transition-Edge Sensors. While single-device operation is relatively well-understood, the operation of a full imaging array poses significant challenges. This thesis addresses all aspects related to the creation and characterization of this cryogenic imaging

  8. On the Cutting Edge Workshop on Effective and Innovative Course Design: A Model for Designing Rigorous Introductory Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewksbury, B. J.; MacDonald, R. H.

    2004-12-01

    As part of a professional development program for faculty in the geosciences, the NSF-funded program On the Cutting Edge (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/) has developed and offered workshops for geoscience faculty that guide participants through a stimulating process designed to help faculty members articulate goals and design effective and innovative courses that both meet those goals and assess outcomes. Of approximately 150 faculty members who have participated in the workshops, more than 120 have designed introductory courses in topics ranging from physical geology to Earth systems to historical geology to oceanography. The method of course design taught through these workshops leads to the development of rigorous, student-centered introductory courses. Our method of course design begins, not with a list of content items, but with setting goals by answering the question, "What do I want my students to be able to do on their own when they are done with my class?", rather than the question, "What do I want my students to know in this subject?" Focusing on what faculty members want students to be able to do, rather than on what topics should be covered by the faculty member, promotes designing courses in which students are actively engaged in doing geoscience. This course design method emphasizes setting goals for students involving higher order thinking skills (e.g., analysis, synthesis, design, formulation, prediction, interpretation, evaluation), rather than lower order thinking skills (e.g., identification, description, recognition, classification). For example, the goal of having students be able to evaluate the geologic hazards in an unfamiliar region involves higher order thinking skills and engages the student in deeper analysis than simply asking students to recall and describe examples of geologic hazards covered in class. This goal also has imbedded in it many lower order thinking skills tasks (e.g., identification, description). Rigor comes in

  9. MGDS: Free, on-line, cutting-edge tools to enable the democratisation of geoscience data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Ryan, W. B.; O'Hara, S.; Ferrini, V.; Arko, R. A.; Coplan, J.; Chan, S.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Bonczkowski, J.; Morton, J. J.; Weissel, R.; Leung, A.

    2010-12-01

    The availability of user-friendly, effective cyber-information resources for accessing and manipulating geoscience data has grown rapidly in recent years. Based at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory the MGDS group has developed a number of free tools that have wide application across the geosciences for both educators and researchers. A simple web page (http://www.marine-geo.org/) allows users to search for and download many types of data by key word, geographical region, or published citation. The popular Create Maps and Grids function and the downloadable Google Earth-compatible KML files appeal to a wide user base. MGDS MediaBank galleries (http://media.marine-geo.org/) enable users to view and download compelling images that are purposefully selected for their educational value from NSF-funded field programs. GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), a free map-based interactive tool that works on any machine, is increasingly being adopted across a broad suite of users from middle school students to university researchers. GeoMapApp allows users to plot, manipulate and present data in an intuitive geographical reference frame. GeoMapApp offers a convenient way to explore the wide range of built-in data sets, to quickly generate maps and images that aid visualisation and, when importing their own gridded and tabular data sets, to access the same rich built-in functionality. A user guide, short multi-media tutorials, and webinar are available on-line. The regularly-updated Global Multi-Resolution Topography (GMRT) Synthesis is used as the default GeoMapApp base map and is an increasingly popular means to rapidly create location maps. Additionally, the layer manager offers a fast way to overlay and compare multiple data sets and is augmented by the ability to alter layer transparency so that underlying layers become visible. Examples of GeoMapApp built-in data sets include high-resolution land topography and ocean floor bathymetry derived from satellite and multi

  10. Algorithm for image retrieval based on edge gradient orientation statistical code.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jiexian; Zhao, Yonggang; Li, Weiye; Fu, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Image edge gradient direction not only contains important information of the shape, but also has a simple, lower complexity characteristic. Considering that the edge gradient direction histograms and edge direction autocorrelogram do not have the rotation invariance, we put forward the image retrieval algorithm which is based on edge gradient orientation statistical code (hereinafter referred to as EGOSC) by sharing the application of the statistics method in the edge direction of the chain code in eight neighborhoods to the statistics of the edge gradient direction. Firstly, we construct the n-direction vector and make maximal summation restriction on EGOSC to make sure this algorithm is invariable for rotation effectively. Then, we use Euclidean distance of edge gradient direction entropy to measure shape similarity, so that this method is not sensitive to scaling, color, and illumination change. The experimental results and the algorithm analysis demonstrate that the algorithm can be used for content-based image retrieval and has good retrieval results.

  11. Understanding the Deep Earth: Slabs, Drips, Plumes and More - An On the Cutting Edge Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. L.; Mogk, D. W.; McDaris, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Exciting new science is emerging from the study of the deep Earth using a variety of approaches: observational instrumentation (e.g. EarthScope’s USArray; IRIS), analysis of rocks (xenoliths, isotopic tracers), experimental methods (COMPRES facilities), and modeling (physical and computational, e.g. CIG program). New images and models of active faults, subducting plates, mantle drips, and rising plumes are spurring a new excitement about deep Earth processes and connections between Earth’s internal systems, the plate tectonic system, and the physiography of Earth’s surface. The integration of these lines of research presents unique opportunities and also challenges in geoscience education. How can we best teach about the architecture, composition, and processes of Earth where it is hidden from direct observation. How can we make deep Earth science relevant and meaningful to students across the geoscience curriculum? And how can we use the exciting new discoveries about Earth processes to attract new students into science? To explore the intersection of research and teaching about the deep Earth, a virtual workshop was convened in February 2010 for experts in deep Earth research and undergraduate geoscience education. The six-day workshop consisted of online plenary talks, large and small group discussions, asynchronous contributions using threaded listservs and web-based work spaces, as well as development and review of new classroom and laboratory activities. The workshop goals were to: 1) help participants stay current about data, tools, services, and research related to the deep earth, 2) address the "big science questions" related to deep earth (e.g. plumes, slabs, drips, post-perovskite, etc.) and explore exciting new scientific approaches, 3) to consider ways to effectively teach about "what can't be seen", at least not directly, and 4) develop and review classroom teaching activities for undergraduate education using these data, tools, services, and

  12. GeoMapApp, Virtual Ocean and Other Cutting-Edge Resources for Representing Geoscience Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Ryan, W. B.; Coplan, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; O'Hara, S.; Ferrini, V.; Bonczkowski, J.; Chan, S.; Weissel, R.; Morton, J. J.; de Leonardo, S.; Leung, A.

    2009-12-01

    bathymetry and high-resolution grids in the oceans, with highly-detailed land elevations to produce a seamless physiographic earth representation. The use of the GMRT base map provides a high visual impact. These tools are being developed by the Marine Geoscience Data System group, http://www.marine-geo.org/ . Other resources for enhancing the representation of data include a suite of KML files created to allow users to view a number of MGDS-related data sets using Google Earth™ (http://www.marine-geo.org/tools/kmls.php). MediaBank (http://media.marine-geo.org/), an on-line image and video gallery, contains many images - life forms around hydrothermal vents, for example - purposefully selected for use in education and communication with the general public. Examples will be shown of using these resources to effectively represent and analyse data.

  13. Picasso at the Nanoscale: The Art of Using Cutting-Edge Science to Understand Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Scientists are using high-energy X-ray instruments to solve mysteries behind art masterpieces, including artwork by Picasso. Learn how Argonne National Laboratory is working with major art institutions, such as The Art Institute of Chicago and Smithsonian Institute, to unlock groundbreaking information about art, the artist, and our cultural heritage. A deep connection to our past and shared cultural heritage must be preserved to foster a balanced society where all humanity can thrive. This talk will describe analysis of paint materials used by Pablo Picasso at the nanoscale, as only possible at the brightest synchrotron sources. It will highlight how new imaging techniques can reveal the invisible, bringing to light underlying compositions of old masters' paintings. This in turn enables the writing of new art history and provides important material clues that can assist with attribution and authentication. We will explain how the use of new technology can lead to new discoveries, which, in turn, can change the public's and the specialists' perception of great works of art. In collaboration with scientists from The Art Institute of Chicago we have teamed up to study the chemical make up of zinc oxide pigments used in artworks by Pablo Picasso. We will show how highly focused X-ray beams with nanoscale spatial resolution and trace element sensitivity have helped to determine that Picasso has used conventional house paint in some of his paintings. Surprisingly, the study gives also new insights into the pigment material zinc oxide, which has also great potential in a variety of applications such as in spintronics or as transparent electrodes in solar panels. Work at the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract DEAC02-06CH11357.

  14. GeoMapApp and MARGINS Mini-Lessons: Cutting-Edge Resources for Modern Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Ryan, W. B.; Coplan, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; O'Hara, S.; Ferrini, V.; Bonczkowski, J.; Chan, S.; Weissel, R.; Morton, J. J.; de Leonardo, S.; Leung, A.

    2009-12-01

    are available and contain examples of using these resources in MARGINS mini-lessons. MARGINS MediaBank (http://media.marine-geo.org/album/margins), an on-line gallery, uses web technology to serve a number of downloadable, searchable images from the NSF MARGINS project. Examples of MARGINS mini-lessons, GeoMapApp and MARGINS MediaBank will be shown.

  15. Getting to low-cost algal biofuels: A monograph on conventional and cutting-edge harvesting and extraction technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Coons, James E.; Kalb, Daniel M.; Dale, Taraka; Marrone, Babetta L.

    2014-08-31

    Among the most formidable challenges to algal biofuels is the ability to harvest algae and extract intracellular lipids at low cost and with a positive energy balance. Here, we construct two paradigms that contrast energy requirements and costs of conventional and cutting-edge Harvesting and Extraction (H&E) technologies. By application of the parity criterion and the moderate condition reference state, an energy–cost paradigm is created that allows 1st stage harvesting technologies to be compared with easy reference to the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) target of $0.013/gallon of gasoline equivalent (GGE) and to the U.S. DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office 2022 cost metrics. Drawing from the moderate condition reference state, a concentration-dependency paradigm is developed for extraction technologies, making easier comparison to the National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap (NABTR) target of less than 10% total energy. This monograph identifies cost-bearing factors for a variety of H&E technologies, describes a design basis for ultrasonic harvesters, and provides a framework to measure future technological advancements toward reducing H&E costs. Finally, we show that ultrasonic harvesters and extractors are uniquely capable of meeting both NAABB and NABTR targets. Ultrasonic technologies require further development and scale-up before they can achieve low-cost performance at industrially relevant scales. But, the advancement of this technology would greatly reduce H&E costs and accelerate the commercial viability of algae-based biofuels.

  16. Iterative edge- and wavelet-based image registration of AVHRR and GOES satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeMoigne, Jacqueline; El-Saleous, Nazmi; Vermote, Eric

    1997-01-01

    Most automatic registration methods are either correlation-based, feature-based, or a combination of both. Examples of features which can be utilized for automatic image registration are edges, regions, corners, or wavelet-extracted features. In this paper, we describe two proposed approaches, based on edge or edge-like features, which are very appropriate to highlight regions of interest such as coastlines. The two iterative methods utilize the Normalized Cross-Correlation of edge and wavelet features and are applied to such problems as image-to-map registration, landmarking, and channel-to-channel co-registration, utilizing test data, AVHRR data, as well as GOES image data.

  17. Cutting Edge EDU. @ USC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosher, Diana

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the principles and components of the University of Southern California's "smart building": the Marshall School of Business. The building's design, learning environment, use of high-tech learning tools, audio/video teleconferencing, and more than 1,100 data/power hookups, making it the most technologically advanced in the country, are…

  18. Riding the Cutting Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freit-Hammes, Lori

    2007-01-01

    When Western Wisconsin Technical College created the Health Benefits Improvement Team, they had no experience with the complexity and ever-changing demands of health care and its associated costs. See how they've embraced their mission and are changing the way business is done in their community.

  19. Cutting Edge Cable Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peach, Roger

    1997-01-01

    Describes how one school district was able to efficiently install fragile telecommunication cabling throughout its high school and save thousands of dollars. Discusses solutions to some common cable-management problems. (GR)

  20. Markov random field model-based edge-directed image interpolation.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents an edge-directed image interpolation algorithm. In the proposed algorithm, the edge directions are implicitly estimated with a statistical-based approach. In opposite to explicit edge directions, the local edge directions are indicated by length-16 weighting vectors. Implicitly, the weighting vectors are used to formulate geometric regularity (GR) constraint (smoothness along edges and sharpness across edges) and the GR constraint is imposed on the interpolated image through the Markov random field (MRF) model. Furthermore, under the maximum a posteriori-MRF framework, the desired interpolated image corresponds to the minimal energy state of a 2-D random field given the low-resolution image. Simulated annealing methods are used to search for the minimal energy state from the state space. To lower the computational complexity of MRF, a single-pass implementation is designed, which performs nearly as well as the iterative optimization. Simulation results show that the proposed MRF model-based edge-directed interpolation method produces edges with strong geometric regularity. Compared to traditional methods and other edge-directed interpolation methods, the proposed method improves the subjective quality of the interpolated edges while maintaining a high PSNR level.

  1. Edge extraction of CT medical image based on wavelet transform algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Li, Xinzheng; Lai, Weidong

    2011-06-01

    Since computer tomography (CT) image has been widely applied in clinic diagnostics, while for many applications the information directly provided by CT images is incomplete corrupted by noise or instrument defect, there has great demand to further the processing methods for improving the CT image quality. Among all image features, the edge profile of clinic focus has obvious influence on accurately translating CT image. In this paper, the wavelet filtering algorithm based on modulus maximum method is put forward to extract and enhance the CT image edges. Edges in the brain lobe CT image can be outlined after wavelet transform, during which the wavelet assigned as the first order derivative of Gauss function. Further manipulation through maximum threshold checking to the modulus have been attenuated the pseudo-edges. After segmented with the original CT image, the edge structure has been distinctly enhanced, and high contrast is achieved between the brain lobe microstructure and the artificially established edges. The proposed algorithm is more efficient than the common first order differential operator, for the latter it even deteriorates the edge features. The algorithm proposed in this article can be integrated in medical image analyzing software to obtain higher accuracy for symptom interpretation.

  2. Cytoplasm segmentation on cervical cell images using graph cut-based approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Kong, Hui; Chin, Chien Ting; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to segment the cytoplasm in cervical cell images using graph cut-based algorithm. First, the A* channel in CIE LAB color space is extracted for contrast enhancement. Then, in order to effectively extract cytoplasm boundaries when image histograms present non-bimodal distribution, Otsu multiple thresholding is performed on the contrast enhanced image to generate initial segments, based on which the segments are refined by the multi-way graph cut method. We use 21 cervical cell images with non-ideal imaging condition to evaluate cytoplasm segmentation performance. The proposed method achieved a 93% accuracy which outperformed state-of-the-art works.

  3. Comparison of iodine K-edge subtraction and fluorescence subtraction imaging in an animal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Zhu, Y.; Bewer, B.; Zhang, L.; Korbas, M.; Pickering, I. J.; George, G. N.; Gupta, M.; Chapman, D.

    2008-09-01

    K-Edge Subtraction (KES) utilizes the discontinuity in the X-ray absorption across the absorption edge of the selected contrast element and creates an image of the projected density of the contrast element from two images acquired just above and below the K-edge of the contrast element. KES has proved to be powerful in coronary angiography, micro-angiography, bronchography, and lymphatic imaging. X-ray fluorescence imaging is a successful technique for the detection of dilute quantities of elements in specimens. However, its application at high X-ray energies (e.g. at the iodine K-edge) is complicated by significant Compton background, which may enter the energy window set for the contrast material's fluorescent X-rays. Inspired by KES, Fluorescence Subtraction Imaging (FSI) is a technique for high-energy (>20 keV) fluorescence imaging using two different incident beam energies just above and below the absorption edge of a contrast element (e.g. iodine). The below-edge image can be assumed as a "background" image, which includes Compton scatter and fluorescence from other elements. The above-edge image will contain nearly identical spectral content as the below-edge image but will contain the additional fluorescence of the contrast element. This imaging method is especially promising with thick objects with dilute contrast materials, significant Compton background, and/or competing fluorescence lines from other materials. A quality factor is developed to facilitate the comparison. The theoretical value of the quality factor sets the upper limit that an imaging method can achieve when the noise is Poisson limited. The measured value of this factor makes two or more imaging methods comparable. Using the Hard X-ray Micro-Analysis (HXMA) beamline at the Canadian Light Source (CLS), the techniques of FSI and KES were critically compared, with reference to radiation dose, image acquisition time, resolution, signal-to-noise ratios, and quality factor.

  4. Edge Detection on Images of Pseudoimpedance Section Supported by Context and Adaptive Transformation Model Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawalec-Latała, Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Most of underground hydrocarbon storage are located in depleted natural gas reservoirs. Seismic survey is the most economical source of detailed subsurface information. The inversion of seismic section for obtaining pseudoacoustic impedance section gives the possibility to extract detailed subsurface information. The seismic wavelet parameters and noise briefly influence the resolution. Low signal parameters, especially long signal duration time and the presence of noise decrease pseudoimpedance resolution. Drawing out from measurement or modelled seismic data approximation of distribution of acoustic pseuoimpedance leads us to visualisation and images useful to stratum homogeneity identification goal. In this paper, the improvement of geologic section image resolution by use of minimum entropy deconvolution method before inversion is applied. The author proposes context and adaptive transformation of images and edge detection methods as a way to increase the effectiveness of correct interpretation of simulated images. In the paper, the edge detection algorithms using Sobel, Prewitt, Robert, Canny operators as well as Laplacian of Gaussian method are emphasised. Wiener filtering of image transformation improving rock section structure interpretation pseudoimpedance matrix on proper acoustic pseudoimpedance value, corresponding to selected geologic stratum. The goal of the study is to develop applications of image transformation tools to inhomogeneity detection in salt deposits.

  5. Getting Started in Academic Careers: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, R.; Ormand, C.; Manduca, C. A.; Wright-Dunbar, R.; Allen-King, R.

    2007-12-01

    The professional development program,'On the Cutting Edge', offers on-line resources and annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Pre- workshop surveys reveal that early career faculty, post-docs, and graduate students have many questions about teaching (e.g., what are effective teaching strategies, how to design a course, how to prepare a syllabus, how to teach large courses), research (e.g., initiate and fund future research, set up and manage a lab, obtain equipment), and career management (e.g., understand tenure requirements, balance all it all). The graduate students and post-docs also have questions about jobs and the job search process. Their questions show a lack of familiarity with the nature of academic positions at different kinds of educational institutions (two-year colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, and research universities). In particular, they are uncertain about what educational setting will best fit their values and career goals and how teaching loads and research expectations vary by institution. Common questions related to the job search process include where to find job listings (the most common question in recent years), when to start the job search process, how to stand out as an applicant, and how to prepare for interviews. Both groups have questions about how to develop new skills: how to develop, plan and prepare a new course (without it taking all of their time), how to expand beyond their PhD (or postdoc) research projects, how to develop a research plan, and where to apply for funding. These are important topics for advisors to discuss with all of their students and postdocs who are planning on careers in academia. On the Cutting Edge offers workshops and web resources to help current and future faculty navigate these critical stages of their careers. The four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your

  6. Getting to low-cost algal biofuels: A monograph on conventional and cutting-edge harvesting and extraction technologies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coons, James E.; Kalb, Daniel M.; Dale, Taraka; Marrone, Babetta L.

    2014-08-31

    Among the most formidable challenges to algal biofuels is the ability to harvest algae and extract intracellular lipids at low cost and with a positive energy balance. Here, we construct two paradigms that contrast energy requirements and costs of conventional and cutting-edge Harvesting and Extraction (H&E) technologies. By application of the parity criterion and the moderate condition reference state, an energy–cost paradigm is created that allows 1st stage harvesting technologies to be compared with easy reference to the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) target of $0.013/gallon of gasoline equivalent (GGE) and to the U.S. DOE's Bioenergy Technologiesmore » Office 2022 cost metrics. Drawing from the moderate condition reference state, a concentration-dependency paradigm is developed for extraction technologies, making easier comparison to the National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap (NABTR) target of less than 10% total energy. This monograph identifies cost-bearing factors for a variety of H&E technologies, describes a design basis for ultrasonic harvesters, and provides a framework to measure future technological advancements toward reducing H&E costs. Finally, we show that ultrasonic harvesters and extractors are uniquely capable of meeting both NAABB and NABTR targets. Ultrasonic technologies require further development and scale-up before they can achieve low-cost performance at industrially relevant scales. But, the advancement of this technology would greatly reduce H&E costs and accelerate the commercial viability of algae-based biofuels.« less

  7. Enhancing your Teaching and Developing New Leadership: Impact of the On the Cutting Edge Professional Development Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, E.; Manduca, C.; McLaughlin, J. A.; MacDonald, H.

    2005-12-01

    The goal of the On the Cutting Edge faculty professional development program is to improve geoscience education by keeping geoscience faculty up to date with changes in content and teaching methods. Six workshops each year focus on emerging themes in pedagogy and content; teaching upper division courses in the major; course design; teaching, research and career management for early career faculty; and preparing for an academic career. To date over 500 faculty, post-docs, and graduate students have participated in one or more workshops. To determine the impact of the workshops and associated websites, evaluators interviewed 54 of the program's participants and conducted an online survey for which nearly 50% of all participants responded. The interviews and related survey indicate four major areas of impact: 1) a change in participants' focus from "what do I teach" to "what are they learning"; 2) introduction of new teaching methods into courses; 3) increased emphasis in course content on emerging geoscience research (emerging theme workshop participants) and connections between geoscience and humans; 4) increased confidence, new skills, and new connections that enable participants to expand their sphere of influence and take on leadership positions in a wide range of venues (e.g. campus, regional, national, international) and in new professional areas (e.g. geoscience education, teacher preparation). Both the workshops and the associated websites are viewed as important resources in enabling these changes. The websites have played an important role in allowing participants to share what they have learned with colleagues both on campus and beyond. In sum, most participants believe that the workshops are of high value and can articulate important changes in their professional work that resulted from their participation.

  8. Lung vessel segmentation in CT images using graph-cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Zhiwei; Staring, Marius; Stoel, Berend C.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate lung vessel segmentation is an important operation for lung CT analysis. Filters that are based on analyzing the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix are popular for pulmonary vessel enhancement. However, due to their low response at vessel bifurcations and vessel boundaries, extracting lung vessels by thresholding the vesselness is not sufficiently accurate. Some methods turn to graph-cuts for more accurate segmentation, as it incorporates neighbourhood information. In this work, we propose a new graph-cuts cost function combining appearance and shape, where CT intensity represents appearance and vesselness from a Hessian-based filter represents shape. Due to the amount of voxels in high resolution CT scans, the memory requirement and time consumption for building a graph structure is very high. In order to make the graph representation computationally tractable, those voxels that are considered clearly background are removed from the graph nodes, using a threshold on the vesselness map. The graph structure is then established based on the remaining voxel nodes, source/sink nodes and the neighbourhood relationship of the remaining voxels. Vessels are segmented by minimizing the energy cost function with the graph-cuts optimization framework. We optimized the parameters used in the graph-cuts cost function and evaluated the proposed method with two manually labeled sub-volumes. For independent evaluation, we used 20 CT scans of the VESSEL12 challenge. The evaluation results of the sub-volume data show that the proposed method produced a more accurate vessel segmentation compared to the previous methods, with F1 score 0.76 and 0.69. In the VESSEL12 data-set, our method obtained a competitive performance with an area under the ROC curve of 0.975, especially among the binary submissions.

  9. Lithographic imaging-driven pattern edge placement errors at 10nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyminski, Jacek K.; Renwick, Stephen P.; Palmer, Shane R.; Sakamoto, Julia A.; Slonaker, Steven D.

    2016-03-01

    Demand for ever increasing level of microelectronics integration continues unabated, driving the reduction of the integrated circuit critical dimensions, and escalating requirements for image overlay and pattern dimension control. The challenges to meet these demands are compounded by requirement that pattern edge placement errors be at single nanometer levels. Layout design together with the patterning tools performance play key roles in determining location of the pattern edges at different device layers. However, complexities of the layout design often lead to stringent tradeoffs for viable optical proximity correction and imaging strategy solutions. As a result, in addition to scanner overlay performance, pattern imaging plays a key role in the pattern edge placement. The imaging contributes to edge displacement by impacting the image dimensions and by shifting the images relative to their target locations. In this report we discuss various aspects of advanced image control at 10 nm integrated circuit design rules. We analyze the impact of pattern design and scanner performance on pattern edges. We present an example of complex, three step litho-etch patterning involving immersion scanners. We draw conclusion on edge placement control when complex images interact with wafer topography.

  10. A computer program for automated step edge motion analysis from scanning probe microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Brittany D.; Hu, Xiaoming; Higgins, Steven R.

    2009-04-01

    A computer algorithm was developed to automatically track the displacement of straight step edges between sequential scanning probe microscopy images of single-crystal surfaces. The program utilizes the Canny edge detection algorithm followed by the Hough Transform of the edge map to identify step edges according to their direction, relative to the image axes, and according to their displacement, relative to the image origin. The tracking of individual steps is facilitated by the fact that straight edges in general maintain their direction and therefore, steps of similar displacement but different direction can be sorted. The algorithm is based on the assumption that the rate of image acquisition is much greater than the rate of (mono)layer growth/dissolution, requiring that changes in step displacement are small in successive images. The change in step displacement in sequential images leads directly to the calculation of the step speed. By tabulating all changes in step displacement through a sequence of images, a statistical representation of the step edge data is produced. The program was evaluated using a sequence of 20 atomic force microscopy images from a calcite (104) surface growing from a supersaturated aqueous solution. The program required, in total, 5 CPU-minutes running on a Pentium 4 processor to compute the mean step speed with 60% precision whereas the equivalent number of measurements performed "by hand" required 6 person-hours at 70% precision. For comparable output, the computer program therefore represents a factor of about 100 decrease in required effort.

  11. Laser cutting of graphite anodes for automotive lithium-ion secondary batteries: investigations in the edge geometry and heat-affected zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Benjamin

    2012-03-01

    To serve the high need of lithium-ion secondary batteries of the automobile industry in the next ten years it is necessary to establish highly reliable, fast and non abrasive machining processes. In previous works [1] it was shown that high cutting speeds with several meters per second are achievable. For this, mainly high power single mode fibre lasers with up to several kilo watts were used. Since lithium-ion batteries are very fragile electro chemical systems, the cutting speed is not the only thing important. To guarantee a high cycling stability and a long calendrical life time the edge quality and the heat affected zone (HAZ) are equally important. Therefore, this paper tries to establish an analytical model for the geometry of the cutting edge based on the ablation thresholds of the different materials. It also deals with the composition of the HAZ in dependence of the pulse length, generated by laser remote cutting with pulsed fibre laser. The characterisation of the HAZ was done by optical microscopy, SEM, EDX and Raman microscopy.

  12. Postmortem Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Guide the Pathological Cut: Individualized, 3D-Printed Cutting Boxes for Fixed Brains

    PubMed Central

    Absinta, Martina; Nair, Govind; Filippi, Massimo; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Reyes-Mantilla, Maria I.; Pardo, Carlos A.; Reich, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Interfacing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathology is critically important for understanding the pathological basis of MRI signal changes in vivo and for clinicopathological correlations. Postmortem MRI is an intermediate step in this process; unfortunately, however, relating the data to standard pathological sections, which are relatively thick and often non-parallel, is both time consuming and insufficiently accurate. The aim of this project was to develop technology to integrate postmortem, high-resolution, whole-brain MRI into the planning and execution of the pathological analysis through precise localization of the target and coordinates of cut. Compared to standard pathological sectioning, the use of an individualized 3D-printed cutting-box, designed based on postmortem MRI of formalin-fixed whole brains, improved the speed, quality, and accuracy of radiological-pathological correlation and, specifically, the histopathological localization of imaging findings. The technology described herein is easily implemented, applicable to any brain disorder, and potentially extendable to other organs. From the point of view of the pathologist this technique can improve localization of small or subtle abnormalities, whereas from the point of view of the radiologist it has the potential to improve understanding of MRI signal changes observed in disease. PMID:25007244

  13. Impact of the REVEL Project: How Do Science Teachers Change by Doing Cutting-Edge Oceanographic Research?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windschitl, M. A.; Robigou, V.

    2005-12-01

    high-tech, high-communication, fast-paced, collaborative, cutting-edge research on teachers' ability to transfer today's scientific process to students and how this might spark students' interest in science or improve their confidence or their reasoning skills are poorly understood.

  14. On the Cutting Edge Professional Development Program: Workshop and Web Resources for Current and Future Geoscience Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, R.; Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    Recognizing that many college and university faculty receive little formal training in teaching, are largely unaware of advances in research on teaching and learning, and face a variety of challenges in advancing in academic careers, the National Science Foundation-funded program On the Cutting Edge provides professional development for current and future faculty in the geosciences at various stages in their careers. The program includes a series of six multi-day workshops, sessions and one-day workshops at professional meetings, and a website with information about workshop opportunities and a variety of resources that bring workshop content to faculty (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops). The program helps faculty improve their teaching and their job satisfaction by providing resources on instructional methods, geoscience content, and strategies for career planning. Workshop and website resources address innovative and effective practices in teaching, course design, delivery of instructional materials, and career planning, as well as approaches for teaching particular topics and strategies for starting and maintaining a research program in various institutional settings. Each year, special workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in academic careers and for early career faculty complement offerings on course design and emerging topics that are open to the full geoscience community. These special workshops include sessions on topics such as dual careers, gender issues, family-work balance, interviewing and negotiating strategies. The workshops serve as opportunities for networking and community building, with participants building connections with other participants as well as workshop leaders. Workshop participants reflect the full range of institutional diversity as well as ethnic and racial diversity beyond that of the geoscience faculty workforce. More than 40 percent of the faculty participants are female. Of the faculty

  15. On the Cutting Edge: Face-to-Face and Virtual Professional Development for Current and Future Geoscience Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Iverson, E. A.; Kirk, K. B.; Beane, R. J.; McConnell, D.; Wiese, K.; Wysession, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    On the Cutting Edge, a comprehensive, discipline-wide professional development program for current and future geoscience faculty, aims to develop a geoscience professoriate committed to high-quality instruction based on currency in scientific knowledge, good pedagogic practice, and research on learning. Our program provides an integrated workshop series and online teaching resources. Since 2002, we have offered more than 80 face-to-face workshops, virtual workshops and webinars, and hybrid events. Participants come from two-year colleges and four-year colleges and universities. The workshop series is designed to address the needs of faculty in all career stages at the full spectrum of institutions and covering the breadth of the geoscience curriculum. We select timely and compelling topics and create opportunities of interest to faculty. We offer workshops on course design, new geoscience research and pedagogical topics, core geoscience curriculum topics, and introductory courses as well as workshops for early career faculty and for future faculty. Our workshops are designed to model good teaching practice. We set workshop goals that guide workshop planning and evaluation. Workshops are interactive, emphasize participant learning, provide opportunities for participants to interact and share experience/knowledge, provide good resources, give participants time to reflect and to develop action plans, and help transform their ideas about teaching. We emphasize the importance of adaptation in the context of their specific situations. For virtual workshops and webinars we use icebreakers and other structured interactions to build a comfortable workshop community; promote interaction through features on webinar software, chat-aided question and answer, small-group synchronous interactions, and/or discussion boards; plan detailed schedules for workshop events; use asynchronous discussions and recordings of synchronous events given that participants are busy with their

  16. Color Image Segmentation Based on Different Color Space Models Using Automatic GrabCut

    PubMed Central

    Ebied, Hala Mousher; Hussein, Ashraf Saad; Tolba, Mohamed Fahmy

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study using different color spaces to evaluate the performance of color image segmentation using the automatic GrabCut technique. GrabCut is considered as one of the semiautomatic image segmentation techniques, since it requires user interaction for the initialization of the segmentation process. The automation of the GrabCut technique is proposed as a modification of the original semiautomatic one in order to eliminate the user interaction. The automatic GrabCut utilizes the unsupervised Orchard and Bouman clustering technique for the initialization phase. Comparisons with the original GrabCut show the efficiency of the proposed automatic technique in terms of segmentation, quality, and accuracy. As no explicit color space is recommended for every segmentation problem, automatic GrabCut is applied with RGB, HSV, CMY, XYZ, and YUV color spaces. The comparative study and experimental results using different color images show that RGB color space is the best color space representation for the set of the images used. PMID:25254226

  17. Liver Segmentation Based on Snakes Model and Improved GrowCut Algorithm in Abdominal CT Image

    PubMed Central

    He, Baochun; Ma, Zhiyuan; Zong, Mao; Zhou, Xiangrong; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel method based on Snakes Model and GrowCut algorithm is proposed to segment liver region in abdominal CT images. First, according to the traditional GrowCut method, a pretreatment process using K-means algorithm is conducted to reduce the running time. Then, the segmentation result of our improved GrowCut approach is used as an initial contour for the future precise segmentation based on Snakes model. At last, several experiments are carried out to demonstrate the performance of our proposed approach and some comparisons are conducted between the traditional GrowCut algorithm. Experimental results show that the improved approach not only has a better robustness and precision but also is more efficient than the traditional GrowCut method. PMID:24066017

  18. Image-Data Compression Using Edge-Optimizing Algorithm for WFA Inference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culik, Karel II; Kari, Jarkko

    1994-01-01

    Presents an inference algorithm that produces a weighted finite automata (WFA), in particular, the grayness functions of graytone images. Image-data compression results based on the new inference algorithm produces a WFA with a relatively small number of edges. Image-data compression results alone and in combination with wavelets are discussed.…

  19. Image embedded coding with edge preservation based on local variance analysis for mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gaoyong; Osypiw, David

    2006-02-01

    Transmitting digital images via mobile device is often subject to bandwidth which are incompatible with high data rates. Embedded coding for progressive image transmission has recently gained popularity in image compression community. However, current progressive wavelet-based image coders tend to send information on the lowest-frequency wavelet coefficients first. At very low bit rates, images compressed are therefore dominated by low frequency information, where high frequency components belonging to edges are lost leading to blurring the signal features. This paper presents a new image coder employing edge preservation based on local variance analysis to improve the visual appearance and recognizability of compressed images. The analysis and compression is performed by dividing an image into blocks. Fast lifting wavelet transform is developed with the advantages of being computationally efficient and boundary effects minimized by changing wavelet shape for handling filtering near the boundaries. A modified SPIHT algorithm with more bits used to encode the wavelet coefficients and transmitting fewer bits in the sorting pass for performance improvement, is implemented to reduce the correlation of the coefficients at scalable bit rates. Local variance estimation and edge strength measurement can effectively determine the best bit allocation for each block to preserve the local features by assigning more bits for blocks containing more edges with higher variance and edge strength. Experimental results demonstrate that the method performs well both visually and in terms of MSE and PSNR. The proposed image coder provides a potential solution with parallel computation and less memory requirements for mobile applications.

  20. Application of Reflectance Transformation Imaging Technique to Improve Automated Edge Detection in a Fossilized Oyster Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djuricic, Ana; Puttonen, Eetu; Harzhauser, Mathias; Dorninger, Peter; Székely, Balázs; Mandic, Oleg; Nothegger, Clemens; Molnár, Gábor; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The world's largest fossilized oyster reef is located in Stetten, Lower Austria excavated during field campaigns of the Natural History Museum Vienna between 2005 and 2008. It is studied in paleontology to learn about change in climate from past events. In order to support this study, a laser scanning and photogrammetric campaign was organized in 2014 for 3D documentation of the large and complex site. The 3D point clouds and high resolution images from this field campaign are visualized by photogrammetric methods in form of digital surface models (DSM, 1 mm resolution) and orthophoto (0.5 mm resolution) to help paleontological interpretation of data. Due to size of the reef, automated analysis techniques are needed to interpret all digital data obtained from the field. One of the key components in successful automation is detection of oyster shell edges. We have tested Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) to visualize the reef data sets for end-users through a cultural heritage viewing interface (RTIViewer). The implementation includes a Lambert shading method to visualize DSMs derived from terrestrial laser scanning using scientific software OPALS. In contrast to shaded RTI no devices consisting of a hardware system with LED lights, or a body to rotate the light source around the object are needed. The gray value for a given shaded pixel is related to the angle between light source and the normal at that position. Brighter values correspond to the slope surfaces facing the light source. Increasing of zenith angle results in internal shading all over the reef surface. In total, oyster reef surface contains 81 DSMs with 3 m x 2 m each. Their surface was illuminated by moving the virtual sun every 30 degrees (12 azimuth angles from 20-350) and every 20 degrees (4 zenith angles from 20-80). This technique provides paleontologists an interactive approach to virtually inspect the oyster reef, and to interpret the shell surface by changing the light source direction

  1. A moving ship detection based on edge information of single image and background subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Tingyan; Yang, Lichun; Liu, Zhicheng

    2013-10-01

    Ship detection based on video is important in the application of surveillance and marine safety, the detection results of tradition methods, such as background subtraction, have much noise because of background noise such as ocean wave. In this paper we present a simple but efficient method for ship detection, It is based on the edge information of single image and movement information of multi images. Firstly, detect those movement pixels used the background subtraction to the video image, and the distance transformation is operation on the difference images; Secondly, we detect the edge of video image used Canny detector , and morphological operation on the edge image, lastly, eliminate the movement pixels if their distance transformation value is bigger than the threshold. The experimental results demonstrate that is efficient to eliminate the background noise and detect the real target.

  2. Lesion edge preserved direct average strain estimation for ultrasound elasticity imaging.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohammad Arafat; Alam, Farzana; Rupa, Sharmin Akhtar; Awwal, Rayhana; Lee, Soo Yeol; Hasan, Md Kamrul

    2014-01-01

    Elasticity imaging techniques with built-in or regularization-based smoothing feature for ensuring strain continuity are not intelligent enough to prevent distortion or lesion edge blurring while smoothing. This paper proposes a novel approach with built-in lesion edge preservation technique for high quality direct average strain imaging. An edge detection scheme, typically used in diffusion filtering is modified here for lesion edge detection. Based on the extracted edge information, lesion edges are preserved by modifying the strain determining cost function in the direct-average-strain-estimation (DASE) method. The proposed algorithm demonstrates approximately 3.42-4.25 dB improvement in terms of edge-mean-square-error (EMSE) than the other reported regularized or average strain estimation techniques in finite-element-modeling (FEM) simulation with almost no sacrifice in elastographic-signal-to-noise-ratio (SNRe) and elastographic-contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNRe) metrics. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is also tested for the experimental phantom data and in vivo breast data. The results reveal that the proposed method can generate a high quality strain image delineating the lesion edge more clearly than the other reported strain estimation techniques that have been designed to ensure strain continuity. The computational cost, however, is little higher for the proposed method than the simpler DASE and considerably higher than that of the 2D analytic minimization (AM2D) method.

  3. BgCut: automatic ship detection from UAV images.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Zhang, Dongping; Zhang, Zhengning; Feng, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Ship detection in static UAV aerial images is a fundamental challenge in sea target detection and precise positioning. In this paper, an improved universal background model based on Grabcut algorithm is proposed to segment foreground objects from sea automatically. First, a sea template library including images in different natural conditions is built to provide an initial template to the model. Then the background trimap is obtained by combing some templates matching with region growing algorithm. The output trimap initializes Grabcut background instead of manual intervention and the process of segmentation without iteration. The effectiveness of our proposed model is demonstrated by extensive experiments on a certain area of real UAV aerial images by an airborne Canon 5D Mark. The proposed algorithm is not only adaptive but also with good segmentation. Furthermore, the model in this paper can be well applied in the automated processing of industrial images for related researches.

  4. BgCut: automatic ship detection from UAV images.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Zhang, Dongping; Zhang, Zhengning; Feng, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Ship detection in static UAV aerial images is a fundamental challenge in sea target detection and precise positioning. In this paper, an improved universal background model based on Grabcut algorithm is proposed to segment foreground objects from sea automatically. First, a sea template library including images in different natural conditions is built to provide an initial template to the model. Then the background trimap is obtained by combing some templates matching with region growing algorithm. The output trimap initializes Grabcut background instead of manual intervention and the process of segmentation without iteration. The effectiveness of our proposed model is demonstrated by extensive experiments on a certain area of real UAV aerial images by an airborne Canon 5D Mark. The proposed algorithm is not only adaptive but also with good segmentation. Furthermore, the model in this paper can be well applied in the automated processing of industrial images for related researches. PMID:24977182

  5. BgCut: Automatic Ship Detection from UAV Images

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengning; Feng, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Ship detection in static UAV aerial images is a fundamental challenge in sea target detection and precise positioning. In this paper, an improved universal background model based on Grabcut algorithm is proposed to segment foreground objects from sea automatically. First, a sea template library including images in different natural conditions is built to provide an initial template to the model. Then the background trimap is obtained by combing some templates matching with region growing algorithm. The output trimap initializes Grabcut background instead of manual intervention and the process of segmentation without iteration. The effectiveness of our proposed model is demonstrated by extensive experiments on a certain area of real UAV aerial images by an airborne Canon 5D Mark. The proposed algorithm is not only adaptive but also with good segmentation. Furthermore, the model in this paper can be well applied in the automated processing of industrial images for related researches. PMID:24977182

  6. Device for cutting protrusions

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2011-07-05

    An apparatus for clipping a protrusion of material is provided. The protrusion may, for example, be a bolt head, a nut, a rivet, a weld bead, or a temporary assembly alignment tab protruding from a substrate surface of assembled components. The apparatus typically includes a cleaver having a cleaving edge and a cutting blade having a cutting edge. Generally, a mounting structure configured to confine the cleaver and the cutting blade and permit a range of relative movement between the cleaving edge and the cutting edge is provided. Also typically included is a power device coupled to the cutting blade. The power device is configured to move the cutting edge toward the cleaving edge. In some embodiments the power device is activated by a momentary switch. A retraction device is also generally provided, where the retraction device is configured to move the cutting edge away from the cleaving edge.

  7. Image analysis tools to quantify cell shape and protein dynamics near the leading edge.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Gillian L; Watanabe, Naoki; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of flexible image analysis tools to analyze dynamics of cell shape and protein concentrations near the leading edge of cells adhered to glass coverslips. Plugins for ImageJ streamline common analyses of microscopic images of cells, including the calculation of leading edge speeds, total and average intensities of fluorescent markers, and retrograde flow rate measurements of fluorescent single-molecule speckles. We also provide automated calculations of auto- and cross-correlation functions between velocity and intensity measurements. The application of the methods is illustrated on images of XTC cells.

  8. Cutting tool form compensaton system and method

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, William E.; Babelay, Jr., Edwin F.; Klages, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    A compensation system for a computer-controlled machining apparatus having a controller and including a cutting tool and a workpiece holder which are movable relative to one another along a preprogrammed path during a machining operation utilizes a camera and a vision computer for gathering information at a preselected stage of a machining operation relating to the actual shape and size of the cutting edge of the cutting tool and for altering the preprogrammed path in accordance with detected variations between the actual size and shape of the cutting edge and an assumed size and shape of the cutting edge. The camera obtains an image of the cutting tool against a background so that the cutting tool and background possess contrasting light intensities, and the vision computer utilizes the contrasting light intensities of the image to locate points therein which correspond to points along the actual cutting edge. Following a series of computations involving the determining of a tool center from the points identified along the tool edge, the results of the computations are fed to the controller where the preprogrammed path is altered as aforedescribed.

  9. Cutting tool form compensation system and method

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, W.E.; Babelay, E.F. Jr.; Klages, E.J.

    1993-10-19

    A compensation system for a computer-controlled machining apparatus having a controller and including a cutting tool and a workpiece holder which are movable relative to one another along a preprogrammed path during a machining operation utilizes a camera and a vision computer for gathering information at a preselected stage of a machining operation relating to the actual shape and size of the cutting edge of the cutting tool and for altering the preprogrammed path in accordance with detected variations between the actual size and shape of the cutting edge and an assumed size and shape of the cutting edge. The camera obtains an image of the cutting tool against a background so that the cutting tool and background possess contrasting light intensities, and the vision computer utilizes the contrasting light intensities of the image to locate points therein which correspond to points along the actual cutting edge. Following a series of computations involving the determining of a tool center from the points identified along the tool edge, the results of the computations are fed to the controller where the preprogrammed path is altered as aforedescribed. 9 figures.

  10. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-06-01

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation.

  11. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall.

    PubMed

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation. PMID:27312315

  12. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The AB–BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation. PMID:27312315

  13. The registration of dual-modality ship target images based on edge extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Risheng; Zhou, Fugen

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of visible and IR(infrared) ship target image registration with scale changes. We mainly focus on the infrared and visible image feature extraction and matching method. A method based on Force Field Transformation is used to determine the ship target contour area. Canny edge detection method is applied to obtain the edge features. During the process of image registration, we take the cross-correlation as the similarity measure and propose an improved Powell algorithm based on multi-scale searching to optimize the registration parameters. Through the edge fusion results, we can see the corresponding edges are almost overlapped, indicating that the method could achieve satisfying results. Also the average error distance of match is less than one pixel.

  14. Multispectral image sharpening using a shift-invariant wavelet transform and adaptive processing of multiresolution edges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, G.P.; Rahman, Z.-U.; Schowengerdt, R.A.; Reichenbach, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced false color images from mid-IR, near-IR (NIR), and visible bands of the Landsat thematic mapper (TM) are commonly used for visually interpreting land cover type. Described here is a technique for sharpening or fusion of NIR with higher resolution panchromatic (Pan) that uses a shift-invariant implementation of the discrete wavelet transform (SIDWT) and a reported pixel-based selection rule to combine coefficients. There can be contrast reversals (e.g., at soil-vegetation boundaries between NIR and visible band images) and consequently degraded sharpening and edge artifacts. To improve performance for these conditions, I used a local area-based correlation technique originally reported for comparing image-pyramid-derived edges for the adaptive processing of wavelet-derived edge data. Also, using the redundant data of the SIDWT improves edge data generation. There is additional improvement because sharpened subband imagery is used with the edge-correlation process. A reported technique for sharpening three-band spectral imagery used forward and inverse intensity, hue, and saturation transforms and wavelet-based sharpening of intensity. This technique had limitations with opposite contrast data, and in this study sharpening was applied to single-band multispectral-Pan image pairs. Sharpening used simulated 30-m NIR imagery produced by degrading the spatial resolution of a higher resolution reference. Performance, evaluated by comparison between sharpened and reference image, was improved when sharpened subband data were used with the edge correlation.

  15. Edge guided image reconstruction in linear scan CT by weighted alternating direction TV minimization.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ailong; Wang, Linyuan; Zhang, Hanming; Yan, Bin; Li, Lei; Xi, Xiaoqi; Li, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Linear scan computed tomography (CT) is a promising imaging configuration with high scanning efficiency while the data set is under-sampled and angularly limited for which high quality image reconstruction is challenging. In this work, an edge guided total variation minimization reconstruction (EGTVM) algorithm is developed in dealing with this problem. The proposed method is modeled on the combination of total variation (TV) regularization and iterative edge detection strategy. In the proposed method, the edge weights of intermediate reconstructions are incorporated into the TV objective function. The optimization is efficiently solved by applying alternating direction method of multipliers. A prudential and conservative edge detection strategy proposed in this paper can obtain the true edges while restricting the errors within an acceptable degree. Based on the comparison on both simulation studies and real CT data set reconstructions, EGTVM provides comparable or even better quality compared to the non-edge guided reconstruction and adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets method. With the utilization of weighted alternating direction TV minimization and edge detection, EGTVM achieves fast and robust convergence and reconstructs high quality image when applied in linear scan CT with under-sampled data set.

  16. Algorithm for Image Retrieval Based on Edge Gradient Orientation Statistical Code

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jiexian; Zhao, Yonggang; Li, Weiye

    2014-01-01

    Image edge gradient direction not only contains important information of the shape, but also has a simple, lower complexity characteristic. Considering that the edge gradient direction histograms and edge direction autocorrelogram do not have the rotation invariance, we put forward the image retrieval algorithm which is based on edge gradient orientation statistical code (hereinafter referred to as EGOSC) by sharing the application of the statistics method in the edge direction of the chain code in eight neighborhoods to the statistics of the edge gradient direction. Firstly, we construct the n-direction vector and make maximal summation restriction on EGOSC to make sure this algorithm is invariable for rotation effectively. Then, we use Euclidean distance of edge gradient direction entropy to measure shape similarity, so that this method is not sensitive to scaling, color, and illumination change. The experimental results and the algorithm analysis demonstrate that the algorithm can be used for content-based image retrieval and has good retrieval results. PMID:24892074

  17. Semi-automatic breast ultrasound image segmentation based on mean shift and graph cuts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Weiwei; Wu, Shuicai; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Chung-Chih; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Tianfu

    2014-10-01

    Computerized tumor segmentation on breast ultrasound (BUS) images remains a challenging task. In this paper, we proposed a new method for semi-automatic tumor segmentation on BUS images using Gaussian filtering, histogram equalization, mean shift, and graph cuts. The only interaction required was to select two diagonal points to determine a region of interest (ROI) on an input image. The ROI image was shrunken by a factor of 2 using bicubic interpolation to reduce computation time. The shrunken image was smoothed by a Gaussian filter and then contrast-enhanced by histogram equalization. Next, the enhanced image was filtered by pyramid mean shift to improve homogeneity. The object and background seeds for graph cuts were automatically generated on the filtered image. Using these seeds, the filtered image was then segmented by graph cuts into a binary image containing the object and background. Finally, the binary image was expanded by a factor of 2 using bicubic interpolation, and the expanded image was processed by morphological opening and closing to refine the tumor contour. The method was implemented with OpenCV 2.4.3 and Visual Studio 2010 and tested for 38 BUS images with benign tumors and 31 BUS images with malignant tumors from different ultrasound scanners. Experimental results showed that our method had a true positive rate (TP) of 91.7%, a false positive (FP) rate of 11.9%, and a similarity (SI) rate of 85.6%. The mean run time on Intel Core 2.66 GHz CPU and 4 GB RAM was 0.49 ± 0.36 s. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method may be useful in BUS image segmentation.

  18. Semi-automatic breast ultrasound image segmentation based on mean shift and graph cuts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Weiwei; Wu, Shuicai; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Chung-Chih; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Tianfu

    2014-10-01

    Computerized tumor segmentation on breast ultrasound (BUS) images remains a challenging task. In this paper, we proposed a new method for semi-automatic tumor segmentation on BUS images using Gaussian filtering, histogram equalization, mean shift, and graph cuts. The only interaction required was to select two diagonal points to determine a region of interest (ROI) on an input image. The ROI image was shrunken by a factor of 2 using bicubic interpolation to reduce computation time. The shrunken image was smoothed by a Gaussian filter and then contrast-enhanced by histogram equalization. Next, the enhanced image was filtered by pyramid mean shift to improve homogeneity. The object and background seeds for graph cuts were automatically generated on the filtered image. Using these seeds, the filtered image was then segmented by graph cuts into a binary image containing the object and background. Finally, the binary image was expanded by a factor of 2 using bicubic interpolation, and the expanded image was processed by morphological opening and closing to refine the tumor contour. The method was implemented with OpenCV 2.4.3 and Visual Studio 2010 and tested for 38 BUS images with benign tumors and 31 BUS images with malignant tumors from different ultrasound scanners. Experimental results showed that our method had a true positive rate (TP) of 91.7%, a false positive (FP) rate of 11.9%, and a similarity (SI) rate of 85.6%. The mean run time on Intel Core 2.66 GHz CPU and 4 GB RAM was 0.49 ± 0.36 s. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method may be useful in BUS image segmentation. PMID:24759696

  19. Color image super-resolution reconstruction based on POCS with edge preserving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Liang, Ying; Liang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    A color image super-resolution (SR) reconstruction based on an improved Projection onto Convex Sets (POCS) in YCbCr space is proposed. Compared with other methods, the POCS method is more intuitive and generally simple to implement. However, conventional POCS algorithm is strict to the accuracy of movement estimation and it is not conducive to the resumption of the edge and details of images. Addressed to these two problems, we on one hand improve the LOG operator to detect edges with the directions of +/-0°, +/-45°, +/-90°, +/-135° in order to inhibit the edge degradation. Then, by using the edge information, we proposed a self-adaptive edge-directed interpolation and a modified adaptive direction PSF to construct a reference image as well as to reduce the edge oscillation when revising the reference respectively. On the other hand, instead of block-matching, the Speeded up Robust Feature (SURF) matching algorithm, which can accurately extract the feature points with invariant to affine transform, rotation, scale, illumination changes, are utilized to improve the robustness and real-time in motion estimation. The performance of the proposed approach has been tested on several images and the obtained results demonstrate that it is competitive or rather better in quality and efficiency in comparison with the traditional POCS.

  20. Multispectral image sharpening using wavelet transform techniques and spatial correlation of edges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, George P.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Several reported image fusion or sharpening techniques are based on the discrete wavelet transform (DWT). The technique described here uses a pixel-based maximum selection rule to combine respective transform coefficients of lower spatial resolution near-infrared (NIR) and higher spatial resolution panchromatic (pan) imagery to produce a sharpened NIR image. Sharpening assumes a radiometric correlation between the spectral band images. However, there can be poor correlation, including edge contrast reversals (e.g., at soil-vegetation boundaries), between the fused images and, consequently, degraded performance. To improve sharpening, a local area-based correlation technique originally reported for edge comparison with image pyramid fusion is modified for application with the DWT process. Further improvements are obtained by using redundant, shift-invariant implementation of the DWT. Example images demonstrate the improvements in NIR image sharpening with higher resolution pan imagery.

  1. Spectral edge: gradient-preserving spectral mapping for image fusion.

    PubMed

    Connah, David; Drew, Mark S; Finlayson, Graham D

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to image fusion for color display. Our goal is to generate an output image whose gradient matches that of the input as closely as possible. We achieve this using a constrained contrast mapping paradigm in the gradient domain, where the structure tensor of a high-dimensional gradient representation is mapped exactly to that of a low-dimensional gradient field which is then reintegrated to form an output. Constraints on output colors are provided by an initial RGB rendering. Initially, we motivate our solution with a simple "ansatz" (educated guess) for projecting higher-D contrast onto color gradients, which we expand to a more rigorous theorem to incorporate color constraints. The solution to these constrained optimizations is closed-form, allowing for simple and hence fast and efficient algorithms. The approach can map any N-D image data to any M-D output and can be used in a variety of applications using the same basic algorithm. In this paper, we focus on the problem of mapping N-D inputs to 3D color outputs. We present results in five applications: hyperspectral remote sensing, fusion of color and near-infrared or clear-filter images, multilighting imaging, dark flash, and color visualization of magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-tensor imaging. PMID:26831392

  2. Edge detection and image segmentation of space scenes using fractal analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, Timothy F.; Fuller, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    A method was developed for segmenting images of space scenes into manmade and natural components, using fractal dimensions and lacunarities. Calculations of these parameters are presented. Results are presented for a variety of aerospace images, showing that it is possible to perform edge detections of manmade objects against natural background such as those seen in an aerospace environment.

  3. Sensitivity of edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Diemoz, P. C.; Endrizzi, M.; Bravin, A.; Robinson, I. K.; Olivo, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we developed a theoretical model that can predict the signal-to-noise ratio for edge-like features in phase-contrast images. This model was then applied for the estimation of the sensitivity of three different X-ray phase-contrast techniques: propagation-based imaging, analyser-based imaging and grating interferometry. We show here how the same formalism can be used also in the case of the edge illumination (EI) technique, providing results that are consistent with those of a recently developed method for the estimation of noise in the retrieved refraction image. The new model is then applied to calculate, in the case of a given synchrotron radiation set-up, the optimum positions of the pre-sample aperture and detector edge to maximize the sensitivity. Finally, an example of the extremely high angular resolution achievable with the EI technique is presented. PMID:24470420

  4. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once.

    PubMed

    Tsutakawa, Susan E; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Tainer, John A

    2014-07-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by James Watson and Francis Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure

  5. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once

    PubMed Central

    Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien

    2014-01-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by Watson-Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure twice these nucleases

  6. Edge-preserving image denoising via optimal color space projection.

    PubMed

    Lian, Nai-Xiang; Zagorodnov, Vitali; Tan, Yap-Peng

    2006-09-01

    Denoising of color images can be done on each color component independently. Recent work has shown that exploiting strong correlation between high-frequency content of different color components can improve the denoising performance. We show that for typical color images high correlation also means similarity, and propose to exploit this strong intercolor dependency using an optimal luminance/color-difference space projection. Experimental results confirm that performing denoising on the projected color components yields superior denoising performance, both in peak signal-to-noise ratio and visual quality sense, compared to that of existing solutions. We also develop a novel approach to estimate directly from the noisy image data the image and noise statistics, which are required to determine the optimal projection.

  7. High contrast 2D visualization of edge plasma instabilities by ECE imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, G. S.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    High contrast high resolution 2D images of edge MHD instabilities have been obtained for the KSTAR H-mode plasmas in 2010 using an electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging system. A fast structural evolution of the edge instabilities has been identified where the validity of the observed structures, i.e., the local measurement is ensured by the high contrast. On the other hand, the exact interpretation of the ECE intensity (Trad) is not straightforward due to the marginal optical depth ( ~ 1) in the plasma edge region. The effect of the electron temperature (Te) and density (ne) profiles in the edge region on the ECE localization and intensity have been evaluated for typical KSTAR H-mode discharges.

  8. Reconstruction of static line images with reduced speckle using interlaced holograms for holographic laser cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwihyeong; Park, Sangwoo; Jeon, Byoung Goo; Kong, Hong Jin

    2016-07-01

    A hologram can be used for high-power laser processing applications such as cutting, drilling, patterning, or welding. However, not much progress has been made in cutting application compared to the others, because it requires optical reconstruction of static and uniform line images using holograms which have a high damage threshold. These static and uniform line images are difficult to be reconstructed with a single hologram, since they usually suffer from speckle between neighboring spots. We propose a method to reconstruct reduced-speckle static line images using two interlaced holograms which reconstruct odd and even pixel line images, corresponding to two orthogonal polarizations. Then, the two orthogonally polarized line images are superposed for interlacing in the image plane. The proposed method was studied by numerical simulations and demonstrated experimentally. The experimental results show that speckle contrast decreased by about one-third, compared to that of a non-interlaced hologram. This method can be applied also for complex-shaped images which include curved lines as well as straight lines, and we have a plan for laser cutting with this method in the near future.

  9. Combining volumetric edge display and multiview display for expression of natural 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Ryota; Matsuda, Isamu; Kakeya, Hideki

    2006-02-01

    In the present paper the authors present a novel stereoscopic display method combining volumetric edge display technology and multiview display technology to realize presentation of natural 3D images where the viewers do not suffer from contradiction between binocular convergence and focal accommodation of the eyes, which causes eyestrain and sickness. We adopt volumetric display method only for edge drawing, while we adopt stereoscopic approach for flat areas of the image. Since focal accommodation of our eyes is affected only by the edge part of the image, natural focal accommodation can be induced if the edges of the 3D image are drawn on the proper depth. The conventional stereo-matching technique can give us robust depth values of the pixels which constitute noticeable edges. Also occlusion and gloss of the objects can be roughly expressed with the proposed method since we use stereoscopic approach for the flat area. We can attain a system where many users can view natural 3D objects at the consistent position and posture at the same time in this system. A simple optometric experiment using a refractometer suggests that the proposed method can give us 3-D images without contradiction between binocular convergence and focal accommodation.

  10. An enhancement algorithm for low quality fingerprint image based on edge filter and Gabor filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jun-tao; Liu, Jie; Liu, Zheng-guang

    2009-07-01

    On account of restriction of man-made and collection environment, the fingerprint image generally has low quality, especially a contaminated background. In this paper, an enhancement algorithm based on edge filter and Gabor filter is proposed to solve this kind of fingerprint image. Firstly, a gray-based algorithm is used to enhance the edge and segment the image. Then, a multilevel block size method is used to extract the orientation field from segmented fingerprint image. Finally, Gabor filter is used to fulfill the enhancement of the fingerprint image. The experiment results show that the proposed enhancement algorithm is effective than the normal Gabor filter algorithm. The fingerprint image enhance by our algorithm has better enhancement effect, so it is helpful for the subsequent research, such as classification, feature exaction and identification.

  11. Bladder segmentation in MR images with watershed segmentation and graph cut algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaffert, Thomas; Renisch, Steffen; Schadewaldt, Nicole; Schulz, Heinrich; Wiemker, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    Prostate and cervix cancer diagnosis and treatment planning that is based on MR images benefit from superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT images. For these images an automatic delineation of the prostate or cervix and the organs at risk such as the bladder is highly desirable. This paper describes a method for bladder segmentation that is based on a watershed transform on high image gradient values and gray value valleys together with the classification of watershed regions into bladder contents and tissue by a graph cut algorithm. The obtained results are superior if compared to a simple region-after-region classification.

  12. Automatic Assessment and Reduction of Noise using Edge Pattern Analysis in Non-Linear Image Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2004-01-01

    Noise is the primary visibility limit in the process of non-linear image enhancement, and is no longer a statistically stable additive noise in the post-enhancement image. Therefore novel approaches are needed to both assess and reduce spatially variable noise at this stage in overall image processing. Here we will examine the use of edge pattern analysis both for automatic assessment of spatially variable noise and as a foundation for new noise reduction methods.

  13. Edge-on illumination photon-counting for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doni, M.; Visser, J.; Koffeman, E.; Herrmann, C.

    2015-08-01

    In medical X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) a silicon based sensor (300-1000 μm) in face-on configuration does not collect the incoming X-rays effectively because of their high energy (40-140 keV). For example, only 2% of the incoming photons at 100 keV are stopped by a 500 μm thick silicon layer. To increase the efficiency, one possibility is to use materials with higher Z (e.g. GaAs, CZT), which have some drawbacks compared to silicon, such as short carrier lifetime or low mobility. Therefore, we investigate whether illuminating silicon edge-on instead of face-on is a solution. Aim of the project is to find and take advantage of the benefits of this new geometry when used for a pixel detector. In particular, we employ a silicon hybrid pixel detector, which is read out by a chip from the Medipix family. Its capabilities to be energy selective will be a notable advantage in energy resolved (spectral) X-ray CT.

  14. Multiscale Edge Detection Using a Finite Element Framework for Hexagonal Pixel-Based Images.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bryan; Coleman, Sonya A; Scotney, Bryan W

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the processing of hexagonal pixel-based images has been investigated, and as a result, a number of edge detection algorithms for direct application to such image structures have been developed. We build on this paper by presenting a novel and efficient approach to the design of hexagonal image processing operators using linear basis and test functions within the finite element framework. Development of these scalable first order and Laplacian operators using this approach presents a framework both for obtaining large-scale neighborhood operators in an efficient manner and for obtaining edge maps at different scales by efficient reuse of the seven-point linear operator. We evaluate the accuracy of these proposed operators and compare the algorithmic performance using the efficient linear approach with conventional operator convolution for generating edge maps at different scale levels. PMID:26890865

  15. Assessment of transmitral flow after mitral valve edge-to-edge repair using High-speed particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyhani, Morteza; Shahriari, Shahrokh; Labrosse, Michel; Kadem, Lyes

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 500,000 people in North America suffer from mitral valve regurgitation (MR). MR is a disorder of the heart in which the mitral valve (MV) leaflets do not close securely during systole. Edge-to-edge repair (EtER) technique can be used to surgically treat MR. This technique produces a double-orifice configuration for the MV. Under these un-physiological conditions, flow downstream of the MV forms a double jet structure that may disturb the intraventricular hemodynamics. Abnormal flow patterns following EtER are mainly characterized by high-shear stress and stagnation zones in the left ventricle (LV), which increase the potential of blood component damage. In this study, a custom-made prosthetic bicuspid MV was used to analyze the LV flow patterns after EtER by means of digital particle image velocimetry (PIV). Although the repair of a MV using EtER technique is an effective approach, this study confirms that EtER leads to changes in the LV flow field, including the generation of a double mitral jet flow and high shear stress regions.

  16. Radiation dose reduction in CBCT imaging using K-edge filtering and energy weighting.

    PubMed

    Kang, Se-Ryong; Lee, Woo-Jin; Woo, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dae-Seung; Yi, Won-Jin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents K-edge filtering and energy weighting methods which enhance the contrast with less radiation does. Usually, energy weighting methods are used with photon-counting detector based CT for each energy bin data obtained to enhance the quality of image. However, we used these methods combine with K-edge filtering in energy-integrating detector. Using K-edge filtering, different energy bin data for energy weighting methods were obtained, and then energy weighting factors were calculated to enhance the contrast of image. We report an evaluation of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of reconstructed image with and without these two methods. This evaluation was proceeded with two phantoms; one is the phantom created personally, and the other is Sendentexct IQ dental CBCT (SENDENTEXCT, EU). As for the phantom created personally, the CNR of images reconstructed with these methods were increased than CNR of standard images. It was seen that 31% to 81% in each energy weighting method for optimizing each material (cortical bone, inner bone, soft tissue, iodine (18.5 g/l), iodine (37 g/l)). In conclusion, we can enhance the contrast of CT images with less radiation dose using K-edge filtering and energy weighting method. PMID:25571149

  17. Digital TV image quality improvement considering distributions of edge characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sang-Gi; Kim, Jae-Chul; Park, Jong-Hyun

    2003-12-01

    Sharpness enhancement is widely used technique for improving the perceptual quality of an image by emphasizing its high-frequency component. In this paper, a psychophysical experiment is conducted by the 20 observers with simple linear unsharp masking for sharpness enhancement. The experimental result is extracted using z-score analysis and linear regression. Finally using this result we suggest observer preferable sharpness enhancement method for digital television.

  18. Two-dimensional image edge enhancement in the two-phonon diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, V M; Averin, S V; Shkerdin, G N; Voronko, A I

    2010-06-23

    We suggest using the two-phonon Bragg scattering regime for two-dimensional image edge enhancement by means of acousto-optic (AO) diffraction on a single sound wave. Image edge enhancement is demonstrated in the first diffraction order by using an AO cell made of the TeO{sub 2} single crystal. To explain this effect, a three-dimensional model of AO interaction is proposed, which takes into account the angular selectivity of diffraction both in the plane of Bragg scattering and in the plane orthogonal to it. (optical data processing)

  19. Penalized likelihood PET image reconstruction using patch-based edge-preserving regularization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2012-12-01

    Iterative image reconstruction for positron emission tomography (PET) can improve image quality by using spatial regularization that penalizes image intensity difference between neighboring pixels. The most commonly used quadratic penalty often oversmoothes edges and fine features in reconstructed images. Nonquadratic penalties can preserve edges but often introduce piece-wise constant blocky artifacts and the results are also sensitive to the hyper-parameter that controls the shape of the penalty function. This paper presents a patch-based regularization for iterative image reconstruction that uses neighborhood patches instead of individual pixels in computing the nonquadratic penalty. The new regularization is more robust than the conventional pixel-based regularization in differentiating sharp edges from random fluctuations due to noise. An optimization transfer algorithm is developed for the penalized maximum likelihood estimation. Each iteration of the algorithm can be implemented in three simple steps: an EM-like image update, an image smoothing and a pixel-by-pixel image fusion. Computer simulations show that the proposed patch-based regularization can achieve higher contrast recovery for small objects without increasing background variation compared with the quadratic regularization. The reconstruction is also more robust to the hyper-parameter than conventional pixel-based nonquadratic regularizations. The proposed regularization method has been applied to real 3-D PET data.

  20. Face recognition via edge-based Gabor feature representation for plastic surgery-altered images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chude-Olisah, Chollette C.; Sulong, Ghazali; Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A. K.; Hashim, Siti Z. M.

    2014-12-01

    Plastic surgery procedures on the face introduce skin texture variations between images of the same person (intra-subject), thereby making the task of face recognition more difficult than in normal scenario. Usually, in contemporary face recognition systems, the original gray-level face image is used as input to the Gabor descriptor, which translates to encoding some texture properties of the face image. The texture-encoding process significantly degrades the performance of such systems in the case of plastic surgery due to the presence of surgically induced intra-subject variations. Based on the proposition that the shape of significant facial components such as eyes, nose, eyebrow, and mouth remains unchanged after plastic surgery, this paper employs an edge-based Gabor feature representation approach for the recognition of surgically altered face images. We use the edge information, which is dependent on the shapes of the significant facial components, to address the plastic surgery-induced texture variation problems. To ensure that the significant facial components represent useful edge information with little or no false edges, a simple illumination normalization technique is proposed for preprocessing. Gabor wavelet is applied to the edge image to accentuate on the uniqueness of the significant facial components for discriminating among different subjects. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated on the Georgia Tech (GT) and the Labeled Faces in the Wild (LFW) databases with illumination and expression problems, and the plastic surgery database with texture changes. Results show that the proposed edge-based Gabor feature representation approach is robust against plastic surgery-induced face variations amidst expression and illumination problems and outperforms the existing plastic surgery face recognition methods reported in the literature.

  1. Performance of an edge block used in a configuration detector: Image quality measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Jung-Whan; Kim, Ki-Won; Seoung, Youl-Hun; Kim, Jung-Min; Choi, In-Seok; Jeong, Hoi-Woun; Son, Soon-Yong; Kim, Sang-Young; Lee, Do-Wan; Choe, Bo-Young

    2014-03-01

    In megavoltage X-ray imaging (MVI), computed radiography (CR) has required a very simple and general quality assurance (QA) method based on a radiotherapy imaging technique. The purpose of this study was to develop a general QA method for evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for MVI. Thus, a simple and compact edge block made of tungsten, with dimensions of 19 × 10 × 1 cm3, was efficiently designed and developed. The pre-sampling MTF was evaluated with the following settings: a 6 megavoltage (MV) energy, four different types of detectors, CR-IP (image plate: photo-stimulable phosphor screen), CR-IP-Lead (image plate + lead screen), CR-IP-Regular (fast front screen + image plate + fast front screen) and CR-IP-Fast (fast back screen + image plate + fast front screen). The MTF values at 1 mm-1 for CR-IP-Regular showed the highest resolution of 0.18. The best noise distribution was observed in the measurement of the NPS with CR-IP-Regular. With increasing spatial frequency, our results showed that value of the DQE for the four types of detectors was approximately 1.0 mm-1, which is comparable to the values reported in the literature. In this report, measurements for megavoltage imaging based on line-pair modulations by using an edge block are presented. When the wide side of the tungsten block was reduced, the accuracy of the edge measurement was improved to match those offered by edge techniques. The present study demonstrates that the QA method with our home-made edge block can be used to evaluate the MTF, NPS and DQE for MVI.

  2. EVolution: an edge-based variational method for non-rigid multi-modal image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Senneville, B. Denis; Zachiu, C.; Ries, M.; Moonen, C.

    2016-10-01

    Image registration is part of a large variety of medical applications including diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and/or treatment effectiveness and, more recently, therapy guidance. Such applications usually involve several imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, x-ray or magnetic resonance imaging, either separately or combined. In the current work, we propose a non-rigid multi-modal registration method (namely EVolution: an edge-based variational method for non-rigid multi-modal image registration) that aims at maximizing edge alignment between the images being registered. The proposed algorithm requires only contrasts between physiological tissues, preferably present in both image modalities, and assumes deformable/elastic tissues. Given both is shown to be well suitable for non-rigid co-registration across different image types/contrasts (T1/T2) as well as different modalities (CT/MRI). This is achieved using a variational scheme that provides a fast algorithm with a low number of control parameters. Results obtained on an annotated CT data set were comparable to the ones provided by state-of-the-art multi-modal image registration algorithms, for all tested experimental conditions (image pre-filtering, image intensity variation, noise perturbation). Moreover, we demonstrate that, compared to existing approaches, our method possesses increased robustness to transient structures (i.e. that are only present in some of the images).

  3. Edge pixel response studies of edgeless silicon sensor technology for pixellated imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneuski, D.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Doonan, K.; Eklund, L.; Gimenez, E. N.; Hynds, D.; Kachkanov, S.; Kalliopuska, J.; McMullen, T.; O'Shea, V.; Tartoni, N.; Plackett, R.; Vahanen, S.; Wraight, K.

    2015-03-01

    Silicon sensor technologies with reduced dead area at the sensor's perimeter are under development at a number of institutes. Several fabrication methods for sensors which are sensitive close to the physical edge of the device are under investigation utilising techniques such as active-edges, passivated edges and current-terminating rings. Such technologies offer the goal of a seamlessly tiled detection surface with minimum dead space between the individual modules. In order to quantify the performance of different geometries and different bulk and implant types, characterisation of several sensors fabricated using active-edge technology were performed at the B16 beam line of the Diamond Light Source. The sensors were fabricated by VTT and bump-bonded to Timepix ROICs. They were 100 and 200 μ m thick sensors, with the last pixel-to-edge distance of either 50 or 100 μ m. The sensors were fabricated as either n-on-n or n-on-p type devices. Using 15 keV monochromatic X-rays with a beam spot of 2.5 μ m, the performance at the outer edge and corners pixels of the sensors was evaluated at three bias voltages. The results indicate a significant change in the charge collection properties between the edge and 5th (up to 275 μ m) from edge pixel for the 200 μ m thick n-on-n sensor. The edge pixel performance of the 100 μ m thick n-on-p sensors is affected only for the last two pixels (up to 110 μ m) subject to biasing conditions. Imaging characteristics of all sensor types investigated are stable over time and the non-uniformities can be minimised by flat-field corrections. The results from the synchrotron tests combined with lab measurements are presented along with an explanation of the observed effects.

  4. Direct imaging of topological edge states in cold-atom systems.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Nathan; Dalibard, Jean; Dauphin, Alexandre; Gerbier, Fabrice; Lewenstein, Maciej; Zoller, Peter; Spielman, Ian B

    2013-04-23

    Detecting topological order in cold-atom experiments is an ongoing challenge, the resolution of which offers novel perspectives on topological matter. In material systems, unambiguous signatures of topological order exist for topological insulators and quantum Hall devices. In quantum Hall systems, the quantized conductivity and the associated robust propagating edge modes--guaranteed by the existence of nontrivial topological invariants--have been observed through transport and spectroscopy measurements. Here, we show that optical-lattice-based experiments can be tailored to directly visualize the propagation of topological edge modes. Our method is rooted in the unique capability for initially shaping the atomic gas and imaging its time evolution after suddenly removing the shaping potentials. Our scheme, applicable to an assortment of atomic topological phases, provides a method for imaging the dynamics of topological edge modes, directly revealing their angular velocity and spin structure.

  5. Automatic CME front edge detection from STEREO white-light coronagraph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirnosov, Vladimir; Chang, Lin-Ching; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2015-08-01

    The coronagraph images captured by a Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) Ahead/Behind (A/B) spacecraft allow tracking of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from two different viewpoints and reconstructing its propagation in three-dimensional space. The reconstruction can be done using a triangulation technique that requires a CME front edge location. There are currently no robust automatic CME front edge detection methods that can be integrated with the triangulation technique. In this paper, we propose a novel automatic method to detect the front edge of the CME using STEREO coronagraph 2 red-colored Red, Green, Blue color model images. Our method consists of two modules: preprocessing and classification. The preprocessing module decomposes each coronagraph image into its three channels and uses only the red channel image for CME segmentation. The output of the preprocessing module is a set of segmented running-difference binary images which is fed into the classification module. These images are then transformed into polar coordinates followed by CME front edge detection based on the distance that CME travels in the field of view. The proposed method was validated against a manual method using total 56 CME events, 28 from STEREO A and 28 from STEREO B, captured in the period from 1 January 2008 to 16 August 2009. The results show that the proposed method is effective for CME front edge detection. The proposed method is useful in quantitative CME processing and analysis and will be immediately applicable to assist automatic triangulation method for real-time space weather forecasting.

  6. X-ray Phase Imaging Microscopy with Two-Dimensional Knife-Edge Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaeho; Park, Yong-Sung

    2012-04-01

    A novel scheme of X-ray differential phase imaging was implemented with an array source and a two-dimensional Foucault knife-edge (2DFK). A pinhole array lens was employed to manipulate the X-ray beam on the Fourier space. An emerging biaxial scanning procedure was also demonstrated with the periodic 2DFK. The differential phase images (DPIs) of the midrib in a leaf of a rose bush were visualized to verify the phase imaging of biological specimens by the proposed method. It also has features of depicting multiple-stack phase images, and rendering morphological DPIs, because it acquires pure phase information.

  7. Differential near-edge coherent diffractive imaging using a femtosecond high-harmonic XUV light source.

    PubMed

    Weise, Fabian; Neumark, Daniel M; Leone, Stephen R; Gessner, Oliver

    2012-11-19

    Element-specific contrast enhancement in tabletop coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is demonstrated by employing an ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light source with tunable photon energy. By combining two measurements performed at energies below and above the Al L(2,3) absorption edge, the spatial autocorrelation function of a micron-scale double pinhole in a 300 nm thick aluminum foil is retrieved despite a dominant background signal from directly transmitted light across the entire range of detectable diffraction angles. The fringe visibility in the diffraction patterns is 0 below the Al L(2,3) edge, 0.53 ± 0.06 above the edge, and 0.73 ± 0.08 in the differential image that combines the two measurements. The proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates that the variations of XUV optical constants in the vicinity of an inner-shell absorption edge can be utilized to improve the chemical sensitivity and image reconstruction quality of laboratory-based ultrafast imaging experiments.

  8. Two-layer competitive based Hopfield neural network for medical image edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chuan Y.; Chung, Pau-Choo

    2000-03-01

    In medical applications, the detection and outlining of boundaries of organs and tumors in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images are prerequisite. A two-layer Hopfield neural network called the competitive Hopfield edge-finding neural network (CHEFNN) is presented for finding the edges of CT and MRI images. Different from conventional 2D Hopfield neural networks, the CHEFNN extends the one-layer 2D Hopfield network at the original image plane a two-layer 3D Hopfield network with edge detection to be implemented on its third dimension. With the extended 3D architecture, the network is capable of incorporating a pixel's contextual information into a pixel- labeling procedure. As a result, the effect of tiny details or noises will be effectively removed by the CHEFNN and the drawback of disconnected fractions can be overcome. Furthermore, by making use of the competitive learning rule to update the neuron states, the problem of satisfying strong constraints can be alleviated and results in a fast convergence. Our experimental results show that the CHEFNN can obtain more appropriate, more continued edge points than the Laplacian-based, Marr-Hildreth, Canny, and wavelet-based methods.

  9. Edge-enhanced imaging with polyvinyl alcohol/acrylamide photopolymer gratings.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Andrés; Neipp, Cristian; Beléndez, Augusto; Gallego, Sergi; Ortuño, Manuel; Pascual, Inmaculada

    2003-09-01

    We demonstrate edge-enhanced imaging produced by volume phase gratings recorded on a polyvinyl alcohol/acrylamide photopolymer. Bragg diffraction, exhibited by volume gratings, modifies the impulse response of the imaging system, facilitating spatial filtering operations with no need for a physical Fourier plane. We demonstrate that Kogelnik's coupled-wave theory can be used to calculate the transfer function for the transmitted and the diffracted orders. The experimental and simulated results agree, and they demonstrate the feasibility of our proposal.

  10. X-ray imaging with ``edge-on'' microchannel plate detector: first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Molloi, Sabee

    2003-09-01

    A novel scanning slit X-ray imaging system based on an "edge-on" microchannel plate detector was developed and tested. Images were acquired at 50 kV(p) X-ray tube voltage with a limiting spatial resolution of 7 lp/mm. The pixel noise was measured to be 0.3 count/pixel/s for a 50×70 μm 2 pixel size. This photon counting detector can be considered to be virtually noise free.

  11. Automatic Generation of Wide Dynamic Range Image without Pseudo-Edge Using Integration of Multi-Steps Exposure Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migiyama, Go; Sugimura, Atsuhiko; Osa, Atsushi; Miike, Hidetoshi

    Recently, digital cameras are offering technical advantages rapidly. However, the shot image is different from the sight image generated when that scenery is seen with the naked eye. There are blown-out highlights and crushed blacks in the image that photographed the scenery of wide dynamic range. The problems are hardly generated in the sight image. These are contributory cause of difference between the shot image and the sight image. Blown-out highlights and crushed blacks are caused by the difference of dynamic range between the image sensor installed in a digital camera such as CCD and CMOS and the human visual system. Dynamic range of the shot image is narrower than dynamic range of the sight image. In order to solve the problem, we propose an automatic method to decide an effective exposure range in superposition of edges. We integrate multi-step exposure images using the method. In addition, we try to erase pseudo-edges using the process to blend exposure values. Afterwards, we get a pseudo wide dynamic range image automatically.

  12. Multiresolution edge detection using enhanced fuzzy c-means clustering for ultrasound image speckle reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tsantis, Stavros; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Hazle, John D.; Kagadis, George C. E-mail: George.Kagadis@med.upatras.gr

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Speckle suppression in ultrasound (US) images of various anatomic structures via a novel speckle noise reduction algorithm. Methods: The proposed algorithm employs an enhanced fuzzy c-means (EFCM) clustering and multiresolution wavelet analysis to distinguish edges from speckle noise in US images. The edge detection procedure involves a coarse-to-fine strategy with spatial and interscale constraints so as to classify wavelet local maxima distribution at different frequency bands. As an outcome, an edge map across scales is derived whereas the wavelet coefficients that correspond to speckle are suppressed in the inverse wavelet transform acquiring the denoised US image. Results: A total of 34 thyroid, liver, and breast US examinations were performed on a Logiq 9 US system. Each of these images was subjected to the proposed EFCM algorithm and, for comparison, to commercial speckle reduction imaging (SRI) software and another well-known denoising approach, Pizurica's method. The quantification of the speckle suppression performance in the selected set of US images was carried out via Speckle Suppression Index (SSI) with results of 0.61, 0.71, and 0.73 for EFCM, SRI, and Pizurica's methods, respectively. Peak signal-to-noise ratios of 35.12, 33.95, and 29.78 and edge preservation indices of 0.94, 0.93, and 0.86 were found for the EFCM, SIR, and Pizurica's method, respectively, demonstrating that the proposed method achieves superior speckle reduction performance and edge preservation properties. Based on two independent radiologists’ qualitative evaluation the proposed method significantly improved image characteristics over standard baseline B mode images, and those processed with the Pizurica's method. Furthermore, it yielded results similar to those for SRI for breast and thyroid images significantly better results than SRI for liver imaging, thus improving diagnostic accuracy in both superficial and in-depth structures. Conclusions: A new wavelet

  13. No-Reference Depth Assessment Based on Edge Misalignment Errors for T+D Images.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Sen; Yu, Li; Chen, Chang Wen

    2016-03-01

    The quality of depth is crucial in all depth-based applications. Unfortunately, the error-free ground truth is often unattainable for depth. Therefore, no-reference quality assessment is very much desired. This paper presents a novel depth quality assessment scheme that is completely different from conventional approaches. In particular, this scheme focuses on depth edge misalignment errors in texture-plus-depth (T + D) images and develops a robust method to detect them. Based on the detected misalignments, a no-reference metric is calculated to evaluate the quality of depth maps. In the proposed scheme, misalignments are detected by matching texture and depth edges through three constraints: 1) spatial similarity; 2) edge orientation similarity; and 3) segment length similarity. Furthermore, the matching is performed on edge segments instead of individual pixels, which enables robust edge matching. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can detect misalignment errors accurately. The proposed no-reference depth quality metric is highly consistent with the full-reference metric, and is also well-correlated with the quality of synthesized virtual views. Moreover, the proposed scheme can also use the detected edge misalignments to facilitate depth enhancement in various practical texture-plus-depth-based applications. PMID:26841393

  14. The use of atlas registration and graph cuts for prostate segmentation in magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Korsager, Anne Sofie Østergaard, Lasse Riis; Fortunati, Valerio; Lijn, Fedde van der; Niessen, Wiro; Walsum, Theo van; Carl, Jesper

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: An automatic method for 3D prostate segmentation in magnetic resonance (MR) images is presented for planning image-guided radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: A spatial prior based on intersubject atlas registration is combined with organ-specific intensity information in a graph cut segmentation framework. The segmentation is tested on 67 axial T{sub 2}-weighted MR images in a leave-one-out cross validation experiment and compared with both manual reference segmentations and with multiatlas-based segmentations using majority voting atlas fusion. The impact of atlas selection is investigated in both the traditional atlas-based segmentation and the new graph cut method that combines atlas and intensity information in order to improve the segmentation accuracy. Best results were achieved using the method that combines intensity information, shape information, and atlas selection in the graph cut framework. Results: A mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.88 and a mean surface distance (MSD) of 1.45 mm with respect to the manual delineation were achieved. Conclusions: This approaches the interobserver DSC of 0.90 and interobserver MSD 0f 1.15 mm and is comparable to other studies performing prostate segmentation in MR.

  15. Prototype of Partial Cutting Tool of Geological Map Images Distributed by Geological Web Map Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonogaki, S.; Nemoto, T.

    2014-12-01

    Geological maps and topographical maps play an important role in disaster assessment, resource management, and environmental preservation. These map information have been distributed in accordance with Web services standards such as Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) recently. In this study, a partial cutting tool of geological map images distributed by geological WMTS was implemented with Free and Open Source Software. The tool mainly consists of two functions: display function and cutting function. The former function was implemented using OpenLayers. The latter function was implemented using Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). All other small functions were implemented by PHP and Python. As a result, this tool allows not only displaying WMTS layer on web browser but also generating a geological map image of intended area and zoom level. At this moment, available WTMS layers are limited to the ones distributed by WMTS for the Seamless Digital Geological Map of Japan. The geological map image can be saved as GeoTIFF format and WebGL format. GeoTIFF is one of the georeferenced raster formats that is available in many kinds of Geographical Information System. WebGL is useful for confirming a relationship between geology and geography in 3D. In conclusion, the partial cutting tool developed in this study would contribute to create better conditions for promoting utilization of geological information. Future work is to increase the number of available WMTS layers and the types of output file format.

  16. Reduction of blocking artifact based on edge information in discrete cosine transform-coded images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Goo-Rak; Lama, Ramesh Kumar; Pyun, Jae-Young; Lee, Sang-Woong

    2011-09-01

    We propose new method for the reduction of blocking artifacts present in low bit-rate coded images. This algorithm performs the deblocking operation in two modes that are determined by the number of edge pixels around the block boundary. The number of edge pixels is calculated by applying the Roberts edge filter. An appropriate filtering operation is performed for each mode in both the horizontal and vertical directions. First, when the mode is associated with a smooth region, a strong filtering operation is applied because flat regions are more sensitive to the human visual system. In the second mode, an adaptive low-pass filter that is based on pixel behavior around the block boundaries is applied. This filter reduces the blocking artifact without introducing undesired blurring effects, while the original image edge is preserved. Although the proposed approach is simple and operates in the spatial domain, experimental results show that it improves both the subjective and objective qualities of the coded image with various features.

  17. Edge co-occurrences can account for rapid categorization of natural versus animal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrinet, Laurent U.; Bednar, James A.

    2015-06-01

    Making a judgment about the semantic category of a visual scene, such as whether it contains an animal, is typically assumed to involve high-level associative brain areas. Previous explanations require progressively analyzing the scene hierarchically at increasing levels of abstraction, from edge extraction to mid-level object recognition and then object categorization. Here we show that the statistics of edge co-occurrences alone are sufficient to perform a rough yet robust (translation, scale, and rotation invariant) scene categorization. We first extracted the edges from images using a scale-space analysis coupled with a sparse coding algorithm. We then computed the “association field” for different categories (natural, man-made, or containing an animal) by computing the statistics of edge co-occurrences. These differed strongly, with animal images having more curved configurations. We show that this geometry alone is sufficient for categorization, and that the pattern of errors made by humans is consistent with this procedure. Because these statistics could be measured as early as the primary visual cortex, the results challenge widely held assumptions about the flow of computations in the visual system. The results also suggest new algorithms for image classification and signal processing that exploit correlations between low-level structure and the underlying semantic category.

  18. HST/WFC3 Imaging and Multi-Wavelength Characterization of Edge-On Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Carolina; Duchene, Gaspard; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Menard, Francois; Padgett, Deborah; Perrin, Marshall D.; Pinte, Christophe; Wolff, Schuyler

    2016-06-01

    Edge-on views of protoplanetary disk systems provide a unique observing opportunity to assess the vertical dust structure of the disk, an opportunity that is not possible at any other viewing angle due to projection effects and the acute brightness of the central star. Comparing high-resolution scattered light images of edge-on disks with synthetic images from radiative transfer modeling is a powerful approach to constrain the disk mass, structure and dust content, although analyses based on single-wavelength images lead to ambiguous conclusions. In order to resolve these ambiguities, and to probe the most tenuous regions at high elevation above the disk midplane, it is critical to obtain high-resolution images of such objects at the shortest possible wavelengths, where dust opacity is maximized. In this contribution, we present new WFC3 F475W Hubble Space Telescope images of 6 known edge-on protoplanetary disks. We produced color maps across the visible band to identify and characterize wavelength-dependent properties of these disks. In turn, these allow us to differentiate features that are related to the dust properties (opacity, scattering phase function) from those tracing the physical structure of the disk (in particular its vertical density profile). By probing a diverse set of disks with a uniform approach, we will be able to probe possible signs of evolution in this critical stage of planet formation.

  19. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Kim, J. B.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Tobias, B.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.

    2010-10-15

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donneet al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfven eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  20. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuationsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Kim, J. B.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Tobias, B.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Donné, A. J. H.

    2010-10-01

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donné et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfvén eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  1. Super-resolving barcode images with an edge-preserving variational Bayesian framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Renchao; Zhao, Shengrong; Xu, Xiangyang; Song, Enmin; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Limited resolution, blurring, warping, and additive noise associated with image acquisition and storage often make the barcode image degraded, generating low-resolution (LR) barcode images. Barcodes in degraded LR images are difficult to recognize. The goal of this paper is to introduce the potential of super-resolution (SR) technique in conquering the aforementioned challenges, and a variational Bayesian SR method is proposed in this work. Different from the previous work, here, the high-resolution barcode image is estimated through its corresponding posterior probability distribution. The barcode image is made of some homogeneous regions separated by sharp edges, and sometimes it is anisotropic. A universal prior probability distribution was proposed for the barcode image by considering these characteristics. Mathematically, the efficiency of this prior distribution is demonstrated, which can preserve sharp edges and suppress artifacts in the reconstructed barcode images. Moreover, by using the variational Bayesian framework, the motion parameters and hyperparameters can be estimated accurately and efficiently, ensuring the success of the SR technique. In order to overcome the difficulty caused by nonlinearity, the Taylor expansion method is introduced to solve the proposed SR problem. Eventually, the simulated and real data experiments show the encouraging performance of the proposed SR method. It increases certainly the reconstruction quality, and could be considerably robust against blur and noise. It is believed that the variational SR technique in the barcode auto-identification technique should open a further perspective of coping with technology challenge.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: High-speed imaging in plasma arc cutting: a review and new developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, V.; Concetti, A.; Ghedini, E.; Dallavalle, S.; Vancini, M.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: (i) to review all the achievements in our understanding of the phenomena related to plasma arc cutting (PAC) technology by means of high-speed camera (HSC) imaging and flow visualization techniques and (ii) to report on new studies that make use of recent and advanced instrumentation for HSC diagnostics, also highlighting some previously uncovered research subjects. In the last decade HSC imaging and flow visualization techniques have progressed considerably as a powerful qualitative diagnostic technique for investigating some of the fundamental phenomena typically occurring in PAC technology. More recently, HSC imaging has also been used to investigate pre-cut phases in PAC analysis, such as pilot arcing and piercing of mild steel and stainless steel plates with dual gas torches in various operating conditions, providing new insight into the process and highlighting some interesting plasma behaviour. HSC imaging of pilot arcing has been used to investigate the influence of the arc current, plasma pressure and swirl strength on the shape of the arc, on the type of the rotational motion of its attachment on the nozzle tip and to track trajectories and velocities of hafnium particles emitted from the electrode insert during that phase. HSC imaging can also highlight the behaviour of the arc during piercing phases and the possible presence of short non-destructive double arcing, otherwise impossible to recognize.

  3. Automatic graph-cut based segmentation of bones from knee magnetic resonance images for osteoarthritis research

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jeff W.; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new, fully automated, content-based system is proposed for knee bone segmentation from magnetic resonance images (MRI). The purpose of the bone segmentation is to support the discovery and characterization of imaging biomarkers for the incidence and progression of osteoarthritis, a debilitating joint disease, which affects a large portion of the aging population. The segmentation algorithm includes a novel content-based, two-pass disjoint block discovery mechanism, which is designed to support automation, segmentation initialization, and post processing. The block discovery is achieved by classifying the image content to bone and background blocks according to their similarity to the categories in the training data collected from typical bone structures. The classified blocks are then used to design an efficient graph-cut based segmentation algorithm. This algorithm requires constructing a graph using image pixel data followed by applying a maximum-flow algorithm which generates a minimum graph-cut that corresponds to an initial image segmentation. Content-based refinements and morphological operations are then applied to obtain the final segmentation. The proposed segmentation technique does not require any user interaction and can distinguish between bone and highly similar adjacent structures, such as fat tissues with high accuracy. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated by testing it on 376 MR images from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) database. This database included a selection of single images containing the femur and tibia from 200 subjects with varying levels of osteoarthritis severity. Additionally, a full three-dimensional segmentation of the bones from ten subjects with 14 slices each, and synthetic images with background having intensity and spatial characteristics similar to those of bone are used to assess the robustness and consistency of the developed algorithm. The results show an automatic bone detection rate of

  4. Second Generation Gold Nanobeacons for Robust K-Edge Imaging with Multi-Energy CT

    PubMed Central

    Schirra, Carsten O.; Senpan, Angana; Roessl, Ewald; Thran, Axel; Stacy, Allen J.; Wu, Lina; Proska, Roland; Pan, Dipanjan

    2012-01-01

    Spectral CT is the newest advancement in CT imaging technology, which enhances traditional CT images with the capability to image and quantify certain elements based on their distinctive K-edge energies. K-edge imaging feature recognizes high accumulations of targeted elements and presents them as colorized voxels against the normal grayscale X-ray background offering promise to overcome the relatively low inherent contrast within soft tissue and distinguish the high attenuation of calcium from contrast enhanced targets. Towards this aim, second generation gold nanobeacons (GNB2), which incorporate at least five times more metal than the previous generation was developed. The particles were synthesized as lipid-encapsulated, vascularly constrained (>120 nm) nanoparticle incorporating tiny gold nanoparticles (2–4 nm) within a polysorbate core. The choice of core material dictated to achieve a higher metal loading. The particles were thoroughly characterized by physicochemical techniques. This study reports one of the earlier examples of spectral CT imaging with gold nanoparticles demonstrating the potential for targeted in vitro and in vivo imaging and eliminates calcium interference with CT. The use of statistical image reconstruction shows high SNR may allow dose reduction and/or faster scan times. PMID:23185109

  5. Single-image phase retrieval using an edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup

    PubMed Central

    Diemoz, Paul C.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Coan, Paola; Brun, Emmanuel; Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K.; Bravin, Alberto; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed which enables the retrieval of the thickness or of the projected electron density of a sample from a single input image acquired with an edge illumination phase-contrast imaging setup. The method assumes the case of a quasi-homogeneous sample, i.e. a sample with a constant ratio between the real and imaginary parts of its complex refractive index. Compared with current methods based on combining two edge illumination images acquired in different configurations of the setup, this new approach presents advantages in terms of simplicity of acquisition procedure and shorter data collection time, which are very important especially for applications such as computed tomography and dynamical imaging. Furthermore, the fact that phase information is directly extracted, instead of its derivative, can enable a simpler image interpretation and be beneficial for subsequent processing such as segmentation. The method is first theoretically derived and its conditions of applicability defined. Quantitative accuracy in the case of homogeneous objects as well as enhanced image quality for the imaging of complex biological samples are demonstrated through experiments at two synchrotron radiation facilities. The large range of applicability, the robustness against noise and the need for only one input image suggest a high potential for investigations in various research subjects. PMID:26134813

  6. Automatic Liver Segmentation on Volumetric CT Images Using Supervoxel-Based Graph Cuts

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weiwei; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Zhang, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of liver from abdominal CT scans is critical for computer-assisted diagnosis and therapy. Despite many years of research, automatic liver segmentation remains a challenging task. In this paper, a novel method was proposed for automatic delineation of liver on CT volume images using supervoxel-based graph cuts. To extract the liver volume of interest (VOI), the region of abdomen was firstly determined based on maximum intensity projection (MIP) and thresholding methods. Then, the patient-specific liver VOI was extracted from the region of abdomen by using a histogram-based adaptive thresholding method and morphological operations. The supervoxels of the liver VOI were generated using the simple linear iterative clustering (SLIC) method. The foreground/background seeds for graph cuts were generated on the largest liver slice, and the graph cuts algorithm was applied to the VOI supervoxels. Thirty abdominal CT images were used to evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect the liver accurately with significant reduction of processing time, especially when dealing with diseased liver cases. PMID:27127536

  7. Cumulative sums for edge determination of a single object in PET and SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protonotarios, Nicholas E.; Spyrou, George M.; Kastis, George A.

    2016-08-01

    The issue of edge determination of a single object in reconstructed nuclear medicine images has been examined thoroughly in the past, nevertheless most of the investigation has focused on the concepts of either numerical sinogram differentiation or segmentation. This work aims to develop an automated method for determining the contour of a single convex object in PET and SPECT reconstructed images, which can be used for computing body edges for attenuation correction, as well as for eliminating streak artifacts outside the specific object. This was accomplished by implementing a modified cumulative sums (CUSUM) scheme in the sinogram. Our method can automatically detect the object's boundary in the reconstructed image. This approach has been tested in simulated as well as real phantoms and it performed efficiently for all convex objects. We were able to detect the contour of a single object in the image space, which in turn enabled us to eliminate streak artifacts outside and thus to obtain body edges necessary for attenuation correction.

  8. Detection of decay in fresh-cut lettuce using hyperspectral imaging and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fresh-cut lettuce sold in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) is a desirable, but highly perishable product. Decay of tissue can start a few days after processing and may be difficult to detect by quick visual observation. A system for early detection of decay and gradual evaluation of its progress ...

  9. At the coalface and the cutting edge: general practitioners’ accounts of the rewards of engaging with HIV medicine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV has become a chronic manageable infection in the developed world, and early and lifelong treatment has the potential to significantly reduce transmission rates in the community. A skilled and motivated HIV medical workforce will be required to achieve these health management and prevention outcomes, but concerns have been noted in a number of settings about the challenges of recruiting a new generation of clinicians to HIV medicine. Methods As part of a larger qualitative study of the HIV general practice workforce in Australia, in-depth interviews were conducted with 31 general practitioners accredited to prescribe HIV medications in community settings. A thematic analysis was conducted of the de-identified transcripts, and this paper describes and interprets accounts of the rewards of pursuing and sustaining an engagement with HIV medicine in general practice settings. Results The rewards of initially becoming involved in providing care to people living with HIV were described as interest and inspiration, community calling and right place, right time. The rewards which then supported and sustained that engagement over time were described as challenge and change, making a difference and enhanced professional identity. Participants viewed the role of primary care doctor with special expertise in HIV as occupying an ideal interface between the ‘coalface’ and the ‘cutting edge’, and offering a unique opportunity for general practitioners to feel intimately connected to both community needs and scientific change. Conclusions Approaches to recruiting and retaining the HIV medical workforce should build upon the intellectual and social rewards of this work, as well as the sense of professional belonging and connection which is imbued between both doctors and patients and across the global and national networks of HIV clinicians. Insights regarding the rewards of engaging with HIV medicine may also be useful in enhancing the prospect of general

  10. Measurements for displacement and deformation at high temperature by using edge detection of digital image.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhe; Fang, Xufei; Su, Honghong; Feng, Xue

    2015-10-10

    In this work, we propose a structural deformation measuring method based on structural feature processing (straight line/edge detection) of the recorded digital images for specimens subjected to a high-temperature environment. Both radiation light and oxidation at high temperatures challenge the optics-based measurements. The images of a rectangular piece of copper specimen are obtained by using a bandpass filtering method at high temperatures, then all the edges are detected by using an edge detection operator, and then a Hough transform is conducted to search the straight edges for the calculation of deformation. Especially, due to the severe oxidation, a special seed strategy is adopted to reduce the oxidation effect and obtain an accurate result. For validation, the structural thermal deformation and the values of coefficients of thermal expansion for the copper specimen are measured and compared with data in the literature. The results reveal that the proposed method is accurate to measure the deformation of the structures at high temperatures. PMID:26479811

  11. Characterisation and modelling of transition edge sensor distributed read-out imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen J.; Whitford, Chris H.; Fraser, George W.; Goldie, David J.

    2006-04-01

    We report on the experimental characterisation and modelling of Transition Edge Sensor (TES)-based Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs), for use as position-sensitive detectors in X-ray astronomy. Latest experimental results from prototype DROIDs using Ir TESs with Au absorbers are reported. Through modelling and the development of signal processing algorithms we are able to design the DROID for optimum spectral and spatial resolution depending upon application.

  12. Two-dimensional image edge enhancement by two-phonon Bragg diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, V M; Shkerdin, G N; Bulyuk, A N

    2011-12-31

    A model of acousto-optic interaction is developed for describing two-phonon Bragg diffraction in a gyrotropic single TeO{sub 2} crystal, which makes allowance for ellipticity of crystal optical eigenwaves. Formation of a two-dimensional edge of an image in the first diffraction order is explained by invoking a three-dimensional description for the wave surfaces of optical eigenwaves.

  13. Transoral robotic surgery in head and neck cancer: what radiologists need to know about the cutting edge.

    PubMed

    Loevner, Laurie A; Learned, Kim O; Mohan, Suyash; O'Malley, Bert W; Scanlon, Mary H; Rassekh, Christopher H; Weinstein, Gregory S

    2013-10-01

    The evolution of oncologic surgical technology has moved toward reducing patient morbidity and mortality without compromising oncologic resection or oncologic outcomes. The goals in treating head and neck cancer are to cure patients, as well as to provide quality of life by improving functional and social outcomes through organ-preservation therapies, which may include surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation therapy. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is an emerging technique that provides several benefits over existing treatment regimens and over open surgery for head and neck cancer, including reductions in operative times, blood loss, intensive care unit stays, and overall duration of patient hospitalization. Transoral robotic techniques allow wide-view, high-resolution, magnified three-dimensional optics for visualization of the mucosal surfaces of the head and neck through an endoscope, while avoiding the extensive external cervical incisions often required for open surgeries. Radiologists play an important role in the successful outcome of these procedures, both before and after TORS. Determining a cancer patient's surgical candidacy for TORS requires a thorough preoperative radiologic evaluation, coupled with clinical and intraoperative assessment. Radiologists must pay particular attention to important anatomic landmarks that are clinical blind spots for surgeons. Knowledge of the expected postoperative imaging appearances, so that they can be distinguished from recurrent disease and second primary tumors, is essential for all radiologists involved in the care of these patients.

  14. High dynamic range infrared images detail enhancement based on local edge preserving filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qiong; Wang, Yuehuan; Bai, Kun

    2016-07-01

    In the field of infrared (IR) image processing, displaying a high dynamic range (HDR) image on a low dynamic range display equipment with a natural visual effect, clear details on local areas and less artifacts is an important issue. In this paper, we present a new approach to display HDR IR images with contrast enhancement. First, the local edge-preserving filter (LEPF) is utilized to separate the image into a base layer and detail layer(s). After the filtering procedure, we use an adaptive Gamma transformation to adjust the gray distribution of the base layer, and stretch the detail layer based on a human visual effect principle. Then, we recombine the detail layer and base layer to obtain the enhance output. Finally, we adjust the luminance of output by applying multiple exposure fusion method. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method can provide a significant performance in terms of enhancing details and less artifacts than the state of the arts.

  15. Semi-Supervised Segmentation of Ultrasound Images Based on Patch Representation and Continuous Min Cut

    PubMed Central

    Ciurte, Anca; Bresson, Xavier; Cuisenaire, Olivier; Houhou, Nawal; Nedevschi, Sergiu; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound segmentation is a challenging problem due to the inherent speckle and some artifacts like shadows, attenuation and signal dropout. Existing methods need to include strong priors like shape priors or analytical intensity models to succeed in the segmentation. However, such priors tend to limit these methods to a specific target or imaging settings, and they are not always applicable to pathological cases. This work introduces a semi-supervised segmentation framework for ultrasound imaging that alleviates the limitation of fully automatic segmentation, that is, it is applicable to any kind of target and imaging settings. Our methodology uses a graph of image patches to represent the ultrasound image and user-assisted initialization with labels, which acts as soft priors. The segmentation problem is formulated as a continuous minimum cut problem and solved with an efficient optimization algorithm. We validate our segmentation framework on clinical ultrasound imaging (prostate, fetus, and tumors of the liver and eye). We obtain high similarity agreement with the ground truth provided by medical expert delineations in all applications (94% DICE values in average) and the proposed algorithm performs favorably with the literature. PMID:25010530

  16. Region-based snake with edge constraint for segmentation of lymph nodes on CT images.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peicong; Poh, Chueh Loo

    2015-05-01

    Lymph nodes segmentation is a tedious process with large inter-user variability when performed manually. To facilitate lymph nodes assessment for lung cancer patient, we present an automatic and improved snake segmentation method for thoracic lymph nodes on CT images in this paper. We first investigated the performance of both edge-based and region-based snake algorithms for the segmentation task, using a B-spline contour parameterization. The effect of the number of B-spline control points on the snake performance was also examined. Both edge-based and region-based snakes were found to have their own advantages and disadvantages for lymph nodes segmentation. We further developed a method of region-based snake with edge constraint, which utilizes a self-adjusting mechanism to integrate both edge and region information in a constructive manner. The average Dice Similarity Coefficient obtained was 0.853 ± 0.059 and 0.841 ± 0.108 for the baseline and follow-up lymph nodes respectively using the proposed method. The method was found to be an effective lymph node segmentation method and would potentially be useful to help with treatment response evaluations in the clinical practice.

  17. WE-D-9A-04: Improving Multi-Modality Image Registration Using Edge-Based Transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y; Tyagi, N; Veeraraghavan, H; Deasy, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Multi-modality deformable image registration (DIR) for head and neck (HN) radiotherapy is difficult, particularly when matching computed tomography (CT) scans with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. We hypothesized that the ‘shared information’ between images of different modalities was to be found in some form of edge-based transformation, and that novel edge-based DIR methods might outperform standard DIR methods. Methods: We propose a novel method that combines gray-scale edge-based morphology and mutual information (MI) in two stages. In the first step, we applied a modification of a previously published mathematical morphology method as an efficient gray scale edge estimator, with denoising function. The results were fed into a MI-based solver (plastimatch). The method was tested on 5 HN patients with pretreatment CT and MR datasets and associated follow-up weekly MR scans. The followup MRs showed significant regression in tumor and normal structure volumes as compared to the pretreatment MRs. The MR images used in this study were obtained using fast spin echo based T2w images with a 1 mm isotropic resolution and FOV matching the CT scan. Results: In all cases, the novel edge-based registration method provided better registration quality than MI-based DIR using the original CT and MRI images. For example, the mismatch in carotid arteries was reduced from 3–5 mm to within 2 mm. The novel edge-based method with different registration regulation parameters did not show any distorted deformations as compared to the non-realistic deformations resulting from MI on the original images. Processing time was 1.3 to 2 times shorter (edge vs. non-edge). In general, we observed quality improvement and significant calculation time reduction with the new method. Conclusion: Transforming images to an ‘edge-space,’ if designed appropriately, greatly increases the speed and accuracy of DIR.

  18. Cutting stems before relaxing xylem tension induces artefacts in Vitis coignetiae, as evidenced by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ogasa, Mayumi Y; Utsumi, Yasuhiro; Miki, Naoko H; Yazaki, Kenichi; Fukuda, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    It was recently reported that cutting artefacts occur in some species when branches under tension are cut, even under water. We used non-destructive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate the change in xylem water distribution at the cellular level in Vitis coignetiae standing stems before and after relaxing tension. Less than 3% of vessels were cavitated when stems under tension were cut under water at a position shorter than the maximum vessel length (MVL) from the MRI point, in three of four plants. The vessel contents remained at their original status, and cutting artefact vessel cavitation declined to <1% when stems were cut at a position farther than the MVL from the MRI point. Water infiltration into the originally cavitated vessels after cutting the stem, i.e. vessel refilling, was found in <1% of vessels independent of cutting position on three of nine plants. The results indicate that both vessel cavitation and refilling occur in xylem tissue under tension following stem cutting, but its frequency is quite small, and artefacts can be minimized altogether if the distance between the monitoring position and the cutting point is longer than the MVL.

  19. Edge-preserving image denoising via group coordinate descent on the GPU

    PubMed Central

    McGaffin, Madison G.; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Image denoising is a fundamental operation in image processing, and its applications range from the direct (photographic enhancement) to the technical (as a subproblem in image reconstruction algorithms). In many applications, the number of pixels has continued to grow, while the serial execution speed of computational hardware has begun to stall. New image processing algorithms must exploit the power offered by massively parallel architectures like graphics processing units (GPUs). This paper describes a family of image denoising algorithms well-suited to the GPU. The algorithms iteratively perform a set of independent, parallel one-dimensional pixel-update subproblems. To match GPU memory limitations, they perform these pixel updates inplace and only store the noisy data, denoised image and problem parameters. The algorithms can handle a wide range of edge-preserving roughness penalties, including differentiable convex penalties and anisotropic total variation (TV). Both algorithms use the majorize-minimize (MM) framework to solve the one-dimensional pixel update subproblem. Results from a large 2D image denoising problem and a 3D medical imaging denoising problem demonstrate that the proposed algorithms converge rapidly in terms of both iteration and run-time. PMID:25675454

  20. Edge-preserving image denoising via group coordinate descent on the GPU.

    PubMed

    McGaffin, Madison Gray; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2015-04-01

    Image denoising is a fundamental operation in image processing, and its applications range from the direct (photographic enhancement) to the technical (as a subproblem in image reconstruction algorithms). In many applications, the number of pixels has continued to grow, while the serial execution speed of computational hardware has begun to stall. New image processing algorithms must exploit the power offered by massively parallel architectures like graphics processing units (GPUs). This paper describes a family of image denoising algorithms well-suited to the GPU. The algorithms iteratively perform a set of independent, parallel 1D pixel-update subproblems. To match GPU memory limitations, they perform these pixel updates in-place and only store the noisy data, denoised image, and problem parameters. The algorithms can handle a wide range of edge-preserving roughness penalties, including differentiable convex penalties and anisotropic total variation. Both algorithms use the majorize-minimize framework to solve the 1D pixel update subproblem. Results from a large 2D image denoising problem and a 3D medical imaging denoising problem demonstrate that the proposed algorithms converge rapidly in terms of both iteration and run-time.

  1. The Role of Dafachronic Acid Signaling in Development and Longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans: Digging Deeper Using Cutting-Edge Analytical Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Aguilaniu, Hugo; Fabrizio, Paola; Witting, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormones regulate physiological processes in species ranging from plants to humans. A wide range of steroid hormones exist, and their contributions to processes, such as growth, reproduction, development, and aging, is almost always complex. Understanding the biosynthetic pathways that generate steroid hormones and the signaling pathways that mediate their effects is thus of fundamental importance. In this work, we review recent advances in (i) the biological role of steroid hormones in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans and (ii) the development of novel methods to facilitate the detection and identification of these molecules. Our current understanding of steroid signaling in this simple organism serves to illustrate the challenges we face moving forward. First, it seems clear that we have not yet identified all of the enzymes responsible for steroid biosynthesis and/or degradation. Second, perturbation of steroid signaling affects a wide range of phenotypes, and subtly different steroid molecules can have distinct effects. Finally, steroid hormone levels are critically important, and minute variations in quantity can profoundly impact a phenotype. Thus, it is imperative that we develop innovative analytical tools and combine them with cutting-edge approaches including comprehensive and highly selective liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry based on new methods such as supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (SFC-MS) if we are to obtain a better understanding of the biological functions of steroid signaling. PMID:26903948

  2. The Role of Dafachronic Acid Signaling in Development and Longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans: Digging Deeper Using Cutting-Edge Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Aguilaniu, Hugo; Fabrizio, Paola; Witting, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormones regulate physiological processes in species ranging from plants to humans. A wide range of steroid hormones exist, and their contributions to processes, such as growth, reproduction, development, and aging, is almost always complex. Understanding the biosynthetic pathways that generate steroid hormones and the signaling pathways that mediate their effects is thus of fundamental importance. In this work, we review recent advances in (i) the biological role of steroid hormones in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans and (ii) the development of novel methods to facilitate the detection and identification of these molecules. Our current understanding of steroid signaling in this simple organism serves to illustrate the challenges we face moving forward. First, it seems clear that we have not yet identified all of the enzymes responsible for steroid biosynthesis and/or degradation. Second, perturbation of steroid signaling affects a wide range of phenotypes, and subtly different steroid molecules can have distinct effects. Finally, steroid hormone levels are critically important, and minute variations in quantity can profoundly impact a phenotype. Thus, it is imperative that we develop innovative analytical tools and combine them with cutting-edge approaches including comprehensive and highly selective liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry based on new methods such as supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (SFC-MS) if we are to obtain a better understanding of the biological functions of steroid signaling.

  3. Automatic segmentation of nerve structures in ultrasound images using Graph Cuts and Gaussian processes.

    PubMed

    Gil González, Julián; Álvarez, Mauricio A; Orozco, Álvaro A

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral Nerve Blocking (PNB), is a procedure used for performing regional anesthesia, that comprises the administration of anesthetic in the proximity of a nerve. Several techniques have been used with the purpose of locating nerve structures when the PNB procedure is performed: anatomical surface landmarks, elicitation of paresthesia, nerve stimulation and ultrasound imaging. Among those, ultrasound imaging has gained great attention because it is not invasive and offers an accurate location of the nerve and the structures around it. However, the segmentation of nerve structures in ultrasound images is a difficult task for the specialist, since such images are affected by echo perturbations and speckle noise. The development of systems for the automatic segmentation of nerve structures can aid the specialist for locating nerve structures accurately. In this paper we present a methodology for the automatic segmentation of nerve structures in ultrasound images. An initial step is carried out using Graph Cut segmentation in order to generate regions of interest; we then use machine learning techniques with the aim of segmenting the nerve structure; here, a specific non-linear Wavelet transform is used for the feature extraction stage, and Gaussian processes for the classification step. The methodology performance is measured in terms of accuracy and the dice coefficient. Results show that the implemented methodology can be used for automatically segmenting nerve structures. PMID:26736945

  4. Automatic segmentation of nerve structures in ultrasound images using Graph Cuts and Gaussian processes.

    PubMed

    Gil González, Julián; Álvarez, Mauricio A; Orozco, Álvaro A

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral Nerve Blocking (PNB), is a procedure used for performing regional anesthesia, that comprises the administration of anesthetic in the proximity of a nerve. Several techniques have been used with the purpose of locating nerve structures when the PNB procedure is performed: anatomical surface landmarks, elicitation of paresthesia, nerve stimulation and ultrasound imaging. Among those, ultrasound imaging has gained great attention because it is not invasive and offers an accurate location of the nerve and the structures around it. However, the segmentation of nerve structures in ultrasound images is a difficult task for the specialist, since such images are affected by echo perturbations and speckle noise. The development of systems for the automatic segmentation of nerve structures can aid the specialist for locating nerve structures accurately. In this paper we present a methodology for the automatic segmentation of nerve structures in ultrasound images. An initial step is carried out using Graph Cut segmentation in order to generate regions of interest; we then use machine learning techniques with the aim of segmenting the nerve structure; here, a specific non-linear Wavelet transform is used for the feature extraction stage, and Gaussian processes for the classification step. The methodology performance is measured in terms of accuracy and the dice coefficient. Results show that the implemented methodology can be used for automatically segmenting nerve structures.

  5. Edge effects in a small pixel CdTe for X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, D. D.; Bell, S. J.; Lipp, J.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Baker, M. A.; Sellin, P. J.; Kachkanov, V.; Sawhney, K. J. S.

    2013-10-01

    Large area detectors capable of operating with high detection efficiency at energies above 30 keV are required in many contemporary X-ray imaging applications. The properties of high Z compound semiconductors, such as CdTe, make them ideally suitable to these applications. The STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory has developed a small pixel CdTe detector with 80 × 80 pixels on a 250 μm pitch. Historically, these detectors have included a 200 μm wide guard band around the pixelated anode to reduce the effect of defects in the crystal edge. The latest version of the detector ASIC is capable of four-side butting that allows the tiling of N × N flat panel arrays. To limit the dead space between modules to the width of one pixel, edgeless detector geometries have been developed where the active volume of the detector extends to the physical edge of the crystal. The spectroscopic performance of an edgeless CdTe detector bump bonded to the HEXITEC ASIC was tested with sealed radiation sources and compared with a monochromatic X-ray micro-beam mapping measurements made at the Diamond Light Source, U.K. The average energy resolution at 59.54 keV of bulk and edge pixels was 1.23 keV and 1.58 keV, respectively. 87% of the edge pixels present fully spectroscopic performance demonstrating that edgeless CdTe detectors are a promising technology for the production of large panel radiation detectors for X-ray imaging.

  6. Dual transmission grating based imaging radiometer for tokamak edge and divertor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Deepak; Clayton, Daniel J.; Parman, Matthew; Stutman, Dan; Tritz, Kevin; Finkenthal, Michael

    2012-10-15

    The designs of single transmission grating based extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) imaging spectrometers can be adapted to build an imaging radiometer for simultaneous measurement of both spectral ranges. This paper describes the design of such an imaging radiometer with dual transmission gratings. The radiometer will have an XUV coverage of 20-200 A with a {approx}10 A resolution and a VUV coverage of 200-2000 A with a {approx}50 A resolution. The radiometer is designed to have a spatial view of 16 Degree-Sign , with a 0.33 Degree-Sign resolution and a time resolution of {approx}10 ms. The applications for such a radiometer include spatially resolved impurity monitoring and electron temperature measurements in the tokamak edge and the divertor. As a proof of principle, the single grating instruments were used to diagnose a low temperature reflex discharge and the relevant data is also included in this paper.

  7. Moving beyond the Cutting Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffe, Robert F.

    Following a nationwide drought in 1982, the Australian government instituted the National Property Management Planning program to build skills in the rural community to better manage the farm business, including the need to manage change. In Victoria, the program is delivered through the Farm$mart project. Farm$mart is: learner centered; involves…

  8. IBFAN: on the cutting edge.

    PubMed

    Allain, A

    1989-01-01

    The story of IBFAN, the International Baby Food Action Network, from its beginning with 6 members in 1979, to its status of 140 groups worldwide in 1989 is told by its founder, Annelies Allain. IBFAN celebrated its 10th anniversary in October 1989 with a week-long Forum of 350 organizers from 67 countries. IBFAN is a single-tissue grass-roots organization, almost entirely women: the issue is that bottle-feeding kills babies. It has mounted a successful campaign ending in passage of the WHO/UNICEF International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes in 1981. With this success, the political power of the "third system," of people, as opposed to government and transnational corporations, was recognized. The most important fundamental activity of IBFAN is to amass information to make its point that million of babies, primarily in developing countries, have died from consuming powdered formula instead of breast milk. IBFAN also set out to show that milk companies have influenced medical school training, health care providers, UN and WHO policies, and governments of developing countries through advertising and tax income. IBFAN's methods are boycott, corporate marketing analysis, shareholder, resolutions, and numerous strategies invented by local activists. The baby food industry responded by forming the International Council of Infant Food Industries, headed by a former WHO Assistant Director General, and applied for registration as an official NGO with the WHO. Again in 1987 they formed the Infant Food Manufacturers Associations, headed by a former WHO staff member, and gained WHO NGO status, claiming to advance infant nutrition and adhere to the WHO Code. Ibfan's current emphasis is on combatting free infant formula given out at maternity hospitals, the most effective way to block successful lactation, is developed as well as developing countries. An effort to monitor this activity will mark the 10th anniversary of the Code in 1991. PMID:12343253

  9. Alternative Education: The Cutting Edge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Jay

    2004-01-01

    Miami Valley Career Technology Youth Connections, an alternative high school located in Dayton, Ohio, has an enrollment of 160 students and was created as a joint venture among local politicians to address the high dropout rates in Montgomery County, Ohio. To achieve this, the Montgomery County commissioners created a task force to develop…

  10. A Bremsstrahlung spectrometer using k-edge and differential filters with image plate dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. D.; Porkolab, M.; King, J. A.; Beg, F. N.; Key, M. H.; Chen, H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Patel, P. K.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Freeman, R. R.; Link, A.; Van Woerkom, L. D.

    2008-10-15

    A Bremsstrahlung spectrometer using k-edge and differential filtering has been used with image plate dosimeters to measure the x-ray fluence from short-pulse laser/target interactions. An electron spectrometer in front of the Bremsstrahlung spectrometer deflects electrons from the x-ray line of sight and simultaneously measures the electron spectrum. The response functions were modeled with the Monte Carlo code INTEGRATED TIGER SERIES 3.0 and the dosimeters calibrated with radioactive sources. An electron distribution with a slope temperature of 1.3 MeV is inferred from the Bremsstrahlung spectra.

  11. A Bremsstrahlung Spectrometer using k-edge and Differential Filters with Image plate dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C; Mackinnon, A; Beg, F; Chen, H; Key, M; King, J A; Link, A; MacPhee, A; Patel, P; Porkolab, M; Stephens, R; VanWoerkom, L; Akli, K; Freeman, R

    2008-05-02

    A Bremsstrahlung spectrometer using k-edge and differential filtering has been used with Image Plate dosimeters to measure the x-ray fluence from short-pulse laser/target interactions. An electron spectrometer in front of the Bremsstrahlung spectrometer deflects electrons from the x-ray line of sight and simultaneously measures the electron spectrum. The response functions were modeled with the Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series 3.0 and the dosimeters calibrated with radioactive sources. Electron distributions with slope temperatures in the MeV range are inferred from the Bremsstrahlung spectra.

  12. Reconstruction of binary geological images using analytical edge and object models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahifard, Mohammad J.; Ahmadi, Sadegh

    2016-04-01

    Reconstruction of fields using partial measurements is of vital importance in different applications in geosciences. Solving such an ill-posed problem requires a well-chosen model. In recent years, training images (TI) are widely employed as strong prior models for solving these problems. However, in the absence of enough evidence it is difficult to find an adequate TI which is capable of describing the field behavior properly. In this paper a very simple and general model is introduced which is applicable to a fairly wide range of binary images without any modifications. The model is motivated by the fact that nearly all binary images are composed of simple linear edges in micro-scale. The analytic essence of this model allows us to formulate the template matching problem as a convex optimization problem having efficient and fast solutions. The model has the potential to incorporate the qualitative and quantitative information provided by geologists. The image reconstruction problem is also formulated as an optimization problem and solved using an iterative greedy approach. The proposed method is capable of recovering the image unknown values with accuracies about 90% given samples representing as few as 2% of the original image.

  13. Edge detection methods applied to the analysis of spherical raindrop images.

    PubMed

    Saylor, J R; Sivasubramanian, N A

    2007-08-01

    Optical imaging of raindrops provides important information on the statistical distribution of raindrop size and raindrop shape. These distributions are critical for extracting rainfall rates from both dual- and single-polarization radar signals. A large number of raindrop images are required to obtain these statistics, necessitating automatic processing of the imagery. The accuracy of the measured drop size depends critically on the characteristics of the digital image processing algorithm used to identify and size the drop. Additionally, the algorithm partially determines the effective depth of field of the camera/image processing system. Because a large number of drop images are required to obtain accurate statistics, a large depth of field is needed, which tends to increase errors in drop size measurement. This trade-off between accuracy and depth of field (dof) is also affected by the algorithm used to identify the drop outline. In this paper, eight edge detection algorithms are investigated and compared to determine which is best suited for accurately extracting the drop outline and measuring the diameter of an imaged raindrop while maintaining a relatively large depth of field. The algorithm which overall gave the largest dof along with the most accurate estimate of the size of the drop was the Hueckel algorithm [J. Assoc. Comput. Mach. 20, 634 (1973)].

  14. Blob birth and transport in the tokamak edge plasma: Analysis of imaging data

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Menard, J. E.; Maqueda, R. J.; Boedo, J.

    2006-09-15

    High-speed high-spatial-resolution data obtained by the gas puff imaging (GPI) diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell et al. Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 45, A335 (2003).] is analyzed and interpreted in light of recent theoretical models for electrostatic edge turbulence and blob propagation. The experiment is described in terms of theoretical regimes that predict different dependencies for the radial velocity of blob convection. Using the GPI data, atomic physics analysis, and blob tracking on a restricted dataset, it is shown that the observed blob velocities in the scrape-off layer are bounded by a theory-based minimum velocity associated with the sheath-connected regime. A similar maximum velocity bound associated with the resistive-ballooning regime is also observed. Turning to the question of blob creation, it is shown that blobs are born with a density and temperature characteristic of the plasma conditions where underlying linear edge drift-curvature instabilities are localized. Finally, statistical variations in blob properties and in the radial blob velocity for given edge conditions are significant, and tend to mask any systematic changes among discharges with different conditions.

  15. High-speed imaging investigation of transient phenomena impacting plasma arc cutting process optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, M.; Colombo, V.; Ghedini, E.; Gherardi, M.; Rotundo, F.; Sanibondi, P.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we report on the investigation of selected transient phenomena taking place in plasma arc cutting (PAC) that are relevant for process optimization. High-speed imaging diagnostics is exploited for the characterization of different technological solutions in order to provide deeper insights into torch and process design. In particular, the pilot arc start-up phase is analysed for a 250 A automatic dual-gas torch equipped with electrodes with different shapes of the initial insert recess, revealing that there is no influence of the recess depth on the time for the stabilization of the pilot arc attachment on the cathode insert. The influence of different insert materials, including Ag-Hf and Cu-Zr binary alloys, on erosion during the shut-down phase is investigated at 120 A and reduced emission of material and faster shut-down is found for alloy inserts compared with standard Hf inserts. The start-up and shut-down transients are also investigated during transferred arc operation using a modified nozzle that comprises a viewing port on one side of the nozzle, and pulsing arc behaviour inside the plasma chamber that is correlated with cathode-nozzle voltage oscillations at a frequency of 7.7 kHz is found. Finally, results regarding the influence of different plasma gas diffusers on the arc stability during the cutting initiation phase in a 100 A mono-gas manual torch are reported.

  16. Effect of antibrowning agents on fresh-cut potato tubers using frequency filtering of biospeckle images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minz, Preeti D.; Zaheer Ansari, Md; Nirala, A. K.

    2015-04-01

    Our present work aims to study the physiological changes of chemically treated fresh-cut potato tubers and then to correlate such changes with the results of the non destructive and non invasive laser biospeckle technique. The effect of chemically treated (citric acid (CA-0.5% and 1.0%) and citric acid + sodium chloride (CS-0.5% and 1.0%)) fresh-cut potato tubers on physiological activities such as the respiration rate and weight loss at cold storage has been studied for eight consecutive days. In addition, biospeckle recording has been carried out for eight consecutive days for all the chemically treated samples and from captured images, and the numerical results (inertia moment (IM)) with and without frequency filtering have been obtained. A comparatively higher respiration rate and lower weight loss is observed for CS treated samples than that of CA treated samples. The results of the IM obtained with the exclusion of the higher frequency show a similar nature to the respiration rate and also, separations of the respiration curves at two concentrations for both the treated samples were well correlated with the IM curves. The concentration effect for both the treatments on the IM value with the exclusion of lower frequencies has also been presented. Thus the IM method with filtration of particular bands is able to separate the different physiological phenomena with one another and is also able to differentiate the chemical effect on the samples.

  17. Investigation of the near and far wake of a bluff airfoil model with trailing edge modifications using time-resolved particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krentel, Daniel; Nitsche, Wolfgang

    2013-07-01

    Experimental investigations on the topology and the structure of the near and far wake of a quasi-2D blunt NACA0012 airfoil cut at 80 % of the original chord length c master have been performed by means of time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The experiments took place in a closed-loop water tunnel at a model-thickness H-based Reynolds number of Re H = 44,000. The periodic and alternating vortex formation process at the base of the bluff model with a dimensionless frequency of Sr h = 0.2 (relating to the trailing edge height h) was investigated in detail. Subsequently, four modifications of the trailing edge geometry (broken trailing edge, square-wave base, stepped afterbody and extension of the reference model by Δ c/c_master = 7.5 %) have been investigated in order to mitigate the periodic vortex formation and the alternating shedding process. In the far wake, a considerable decrease in momentum loss and resulting drag force in the range of 29 % has been achieved for this specific Reynolds number. Investigations of the time-resolved flow field proved that the periodic, alternating flow separation can be attenuated resulting in an optimized recirculation region and a low-loss wake. It can be inferred that passive flow control means like modifications of the rear end geometry of quasi-2D blunt models are a capable method to improve the flow field with respect to a minimization of momentum losses in the wake.

  18. Multi-exponential analysis of magnitude MR images using a quantitative multispectral edge-preserving filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, Jean-Marie; Boespflug-Tanguly, Odile; Zanca, Michel; Renou, Jean-Pierre

    2003-03-01

    A solution for discrete multi-exponential analysis of T2 relaxation decay curves obtained in current multi-echo imaging protocol conditions is described. We propose a preprocessing step to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and thus lower the signal-to-noise ratio threshold from which a high percentage of true multi-exponential detection is detected. It consists of a multispectral nonlinear edge-preserving filter that takes into account the signal-dependent Rician distribution of noise affecting magnitude MR images. Discrete multi-exponential decomposition, which requires no a priori knowledge, is performed by a non-linear least-squares procedure initialized with estimates obtained from a total least-squares linear prediction algorithm. This approach was validated and optimized experimentally on simulated data sets of normal human brains.

  19. Edge preserved enhancement of medical images using adaptive fusion-based denoising by shearlet transform and total variation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Deep; Anand, Radhey Shyam; Tyagi, Barjeev

    2013-10-01

    Edge preserved enhancement is of great interest in medical images. Noise present in medical images affects the quality, contrast resolution, and most importantly, texture information and can make post-processing difficult also. An enhancement approach using an adaptive fusion algorithm is proposed which utilizes the features of shearlet transform (ST) and total variation (TV) approach. In the proposed method, three different denoised images processed with TV method, shearlet denoising, and edge information recovered from the remnant of the TV method and processed with the ST are fused adaptively. The result of enhanced images processed with the proposed method helps to improve the visibility and detectability of medical images. For the proposed method, different weights are evaluated from the different variance maps of individual denoised image and the edge extracted information from the remnant of the TV approach. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by conducting various experiments on both the standard images and different medical images such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound. Experiments show that the proposed method provides an improvement not only in noise reduction but also in the preservation of more edges and image details as compared to the others.

  20. Multiscale registration of medical images based on edge preserving scale space with application in image-guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dengwang; Li, Hongsheng; Wan, Honglin; Chen, Jinhu; Gong, Guanzhong; Wang, Hongjun; Wang, Liming; Yin, Yong

    2012-08-01

    Mutual information (MI) is a well-accepted similarity measure for image registration in medical systems. However, MI-based registration faces the challenges of high computational complexity and a high likelihood of being trapped into local optima due to an absence of spatial information. In order to solve these problems, multi-scale frameworks can be used to accelerate registration and improve robustness. Traditional Gaussian pyramid representation is one such technique but it suffers from contour diffusion at coarse levels which may lead to unsatisfactory registration results. In this work, a new multi-scale registration framework called edge preserving multiscale registration (EPMR) was proposed based upon an edge preserving total variation L1 norm (TV-L1) scale space representation. TV-L1 scale space is constructed by selecting edges and contours of images according to their size rather than the intensity values of the image features. This ensures more meaningful spatial information with an EPMR framework for MI-based registration. Furthermore, we design an optimal estimation of the TV-L1 parameter in the EPMR framework by training and minimizing the transformation offset between the registered pairs for automated registration in medical systems. We validated our EPMR method on both simulated mono- and multi-modal medical datasets with ground truth and clinical studies from a combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner. We compared our registration framework with other traditional registration approaches. Our experimental results demonstrated that our method outperformed other methods in terms of the accuracy and robustness for medical images. EPMR can always achieve a small offset value, which is closer to the ground truth both for mono-modality and multi-modality, and the speed can be increased 5-8% for mono-modality and 10-14% for multi-modality registration under the same condition. Furthermore, clinical application by adaptive

  1. Random Walk and Graph Cut for Co-Segmentation of Lung Tumor on PET-CT Images.

    PubMed

    Ju, Wei; Xiang, Dehui; Xiang, Deihui; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Lirong; Kopriva, Ivica; Chen, Xinjian

    2015-12-01

    Accurate lung tumor delineation plays an important role in radiotherapy treatment planning. Since the lung tumor has poor boundary in positron emission tomography (PET) images and low contrast in computed tomography (CT) images, segmentation of tumor in the PET and CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we effectively integrate the two modalities by making fully use of the superior contrast of PET images and superior spatial resolution of CT images. Random walk and graph cut method is integrated to solve the segmentation problem, in which random walk is utilized as an initialization tool to provide object seeds for graph cut segmentation on the PET and CT images. The co-segmentation problem is formulated as an energy minimization problem which is solved by max-flow/min-cut method. A graph, including two sub-graphs and a special link, is constructed, in which one sub-graph is for the PET and another is for CT, and the special link encodes a context term which penalizes the difference of the tumor segmentation on the two modalities. To fully utilize the characteristics of PET and CT images, a novel energy representation is devised. For the PET, a downhill cost and a 3D derivative cost are proposed. For the CT, a shape penalty cost is integrated into the energy function which helps to constrain the tumor region during the segmentation. We validate our algorithm on a data set which consists of 18 PET-CT images. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is superior to the graph cut method solely using the PET or CT is more accurate compared with the random walk method, random walk co-segmentation method, and non-improved graph cut method.

  2. Accuracy of an automatic patient-positioning system based on the correlation of two edge images in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Cheong, Minho; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong

    2011-04-01

    We have clinically evaluated the accuracy of an automatic patient-positioning system based on the image correlation of two edge images in radiotherapy. Ninety-six head & neck images from eight patients undergoing proton therapy were compared with a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of planning CT. Two edge images, a reference image and a test image, were extracted by applying a Canny edge detector algorithm to a DRR and a 2D X-ray image, respectively, of each patient before positioning. In a simulation using a humanoid phantom, performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, no registration errors were observed for given ranges of rotation, pitch, and translation in the x, y, and z directions. For real patients, however, there were discrepancies between the automatic positioning method and manual positioning by physicians or technicians. Using edged head coronal- and sagittal-view images, the average differences in registration between these two methods for the x, y, and z directions were 0.11 cm, 0.09 cm and 0.11 cm, respectively, whereas the maximum discrepancies were 0.34 cm, 0.38 cm, and 0.50 cm, respectively. For rotation and pitch, the average registration errors were 0.95° and 1.00°, respectively, and the maximum errors were 3.6° and 2.3°, respectively. The proposed automatic patient-positioning system based on edge image comparison was relatively accurate for head and neck patients. However, image deformation during treatment may render the automatic method less accurate, since the test image many differ significantly from the reference image.

  3. Segmentation of confocal Raman microspectroscopic imaging data using edge-preserving denoising and clustering.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Theodore; Lasch, Peter

    2013-06-18

    Over the past decade, confocal Raman microspectroscopic (CRM) imaging has matured into a useful analytical tool to obtain spatially resolved chemical information on the molecular composition of biological samples and has found its way into histopathology, cytology, and microbiology. A CRM imaging data set is a hyperspectral image in which Raman intensities are represented as a function of three coordinates: a spectral coordinate λ encoding the wavelength and two spatial coordinates x and y. Understanding CRM imaging data is challenging because of its complexity, size, and moderate signal-to-noise ratio. Spatial segmentation of CRM imaging data is a way to reveal regions of interest and is traditionally performed using nonsupervised clustering which relies on spectral domain-only information with the main drawback being the high sensitivity to noise. We present a new pipeline for spatial segmentation of CRM imaging data which combines preprocessing in the spectral and spatial domains with k-means clustering. Its core is the preprocessing routine in the spatial domain, edge-preserving denoising (EPD), which exploits the spatial relationships between Raman intensities acquired at neighboring pixels. Additionally, we propose to use both spatial correlation to identify Raman spectral features colocalized with defined spatial regions and confidence maps to assess the quality of spatial segmentation. For CRM data acquired from midsagittal Syrian hamster ( Mesocricetus auratus ) brain cryosections, we show how our pipeline benefits from the complex spatial-spectral relationships inherent in the CRM imaging data. EPD significantly improves the quality of spatial segmentation that allows us to extract the underlying structural and compositional information contained in the Raman microspectra. PMID:23701523

  4. New design of a gamma camera detector with reduced edge effect for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeon Hwang, Ji; Lee, Seung-Jae; Baek, Cheol-Ha; Hyun Kim, Kwang; Hyun Chung, Yong

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in developing small gamma cameras dedicated to breast imaging. We designed a new detector with trapezoidal shape to expand the field of view (FOV) of camera without increasing its dimensions. To find optimal parameters, images of point sources at the edge area as functions of the angle and optical treatment of crystal side surface were simulated by using a DETECT2000. Our detector employs monolithic CsI(Tl) with dimensions of 48.0×48.0×6.0 mm coupled to an array of photo-sensors. Side surfaces of crystal were treated with three different surface finishes: black absorber, metal reflector and white reflector. The trapezoidal angle varied from 45° to 90° in steps of 15°. Gamma events were generated on 15 evenly spaced points with 1.0 mm spacing in the X-axis starting 1.0 mm away from the side surface. Ten thousand gamma events were simulated at each location and images were formed by calculating the Anger-logic. The results demonstrated that all the 15 points could be identified only for the crystal with trapezoidal shape having 45° angle and white reflector on the side surface. In conclusion, our new detector proved to be a reliable design to expand the FOV of small gamma camera for breast imaging.

  5. Investigation of physical image characteristics and phenomenon of edge enhancement by phase contrast using equipment typical for mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2008-11-15

    A technique called phase contrast mammography (PCM) has only recently been applied in clinical examination. In this application, PCM images are acquired at a 1.75x magnification using an x-ray tube for clinical use, and then reduced to the real size of the object by image processing. The images showed enhanced object edges; reportedly, this enhancement occurred because of the refraction of x rays through a cylindrical object. The authors measured the physical image characteristics of PCM to compare the image characteristics of PCM with those of conventional mammography. More specifically, they measured the object-edge-response characteristics and the noise characteristics in the spatial frequency domain. The results revealed that the edge-response characteristics of PCM outperformed those of conventional mammography. In addition, the characteristics changed with the object-placement conditions and the object shapes. The noise characteristics of PCM were better than those of conventional mammography. Subsequently, to verify why object edges were enhanced in PCM images, the authors simulated image profiles that would be obtained if the x rays were refracted and totally reflected by using not only a cylindrical substance but also a planar substance as the object. So, they confirmed that the object edges in PCM images were enhanced because x rays were refracted irrespective of the object shapes. Further, they found that the edge enhancements depended on the object shapes and positions. It was also proposed that the larger magnification than 1.75 in the commercialized system might be more suitable for PCM. Finally, the authors investigated phase-contrast effects to breast tissues by the simulation and demonstrated that PCM would be helpful in the diagnoses of mammography.

  6. SU-E-I-12: Characterization of Edge Effects in a Commercial Low-Dose Image Processing System

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R; Silosky, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Minimizing radiation dose while preserving image quality is critical in fluoroscopic imaging. One recent development is a noise reduction system (Allura Clarity) offered by Philips. Others have reported approximately 50% reduction in air kerma when using Clarity. These studies, however, provide only a cursory look at how the Clarity system affects image quality. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of Clarity on the appearance of high-frequency image information. Methods: A lead attenuator with a smooth edge was imaged on two Philips Allura FD20 detectors: one with Clarity and one without. The edge was positioned in the center of the field of view and images were obtained under the following conditions: 40cm and 11cm fields of view, single shot and continuous fluoroscopy modes, and using abdomen and cardiac protocols, for a total of sixteen imaging conditions. Profiles were drawn perpendicular to the edge across 80% of its length, averaged to reduce noise, normalized to the maximum pixel value, and plotted as a function of distance. Results: For all single-shot acquisitions and most fluoroscopic images, overshoot of the edge was observed. This effect was more substantial for single-shot acquisitions (∼20%) than for fluoroscopic images (∼50%). For fluoroscopic acquisition, the overshoot decayed more quickly with the Clarity system. However, the system with Clarity introduced a ringing effect for both single-shot and fluoroscopic images that is not present on the non-Clarity system. Conclusion: Previous reports have demonstrated a substantial dose reduction when using Clarity but the impact this has on image appearance has not been characterized. One demonstrated difference is the change in appearance of high-frequency image information. It remains to be determined whether this effect may impact clinical images adversely.

  7. Involving Minority High School Students in Cutting Edge Research through C-DEBI, an NSF-National Science and Technology Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, E.; Edwards, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) was established as a National Science and Technology Center (NTC) funded by NSF in 2009. Its mission is to explore life beneath the seafloor and make transformative discoveries that advance science, benefit society, and inspire people of all ages and origins. Thanks to the multi-institutional character of C-DEBI, the Center has not only started a collaborative framework for experimental and exploratory research, but also targets education programs at the K-12, undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral levels involving biogeochemists, microbiologists, geochemists and geologists. An example for this is the introduction of deep biosphere research into the K-12 classroom. In this context, C-DEBI has collaborated with teachers from the Animo Leadership High School in Inglewood, which is ranked 27th within California and has a total minority enrollment of 99%, to adapt Marine Biology classes and introduce latest Deep Biosphere Science discoveries. Three high school students participated in a pilot project over 6 months to gain hands-on experience in an ongoing study in a Marine Microbiology laboratory at University of Southern California. Graduate and postdoctoral students from the Departments of Biological and Earth Sciences supervised theory, praxis and project design, which was aimed at culturing strains of Marinobacter, one of the most ubiquitous marine microbial genera, and preparing extracted DNA for sequencing using the latest Ion Torrent Technology. Students learned about the interdisciplinary global context of the study and gained experience in laboratory procedures, including basic aseptical techniques, molecular biology methods, and cutting-edge sequencing Technology, as well as problem-solving and creative thinking in project preparation and conduction. This hands-on training included discussions about the 'Whys' and 'Hows' in today's research with respect to their specific project, but also from a

  8. Three dimensional mapping of strontium in bone by dual energy K-edge subtraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, D. M. L.; Chapman, L. D.; Carter, Y.; Wu, Y.; Panahifar, A.; Britz, H. M.; Bewer, B.; Zhouping, W.; Duke, M. J. M.; Doschak, M.

    2012-09-01

    The bones of many terrestrial vertebrates, including humans, are continually altered through an internal process of turnover known as remodeling. This process plays a central role in bone adaptation and disease. The uptake of fluorescent tetracyclines within bone mineral is widely exploited as a means of tracking new tissue formation. While investigation of bone microarchitecture has undergone a dimensional shift from 2D to 3D in recent years, we lack a 3D equivalent to fluorescent labeling. In the current study we demonstrate the ability of synchrotron radiation dual energy K-edge subtraction (KES) imaging to map the 3D distribution of elemental strontium within rat vertebral samples. This approach has great potential for ex vivo analysis of preclinical models and human tissue samples. KES also represents a powerful tool for investigating the pharmokinetics of strontium-based drugs recently approved in many countries around the globe for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  9. The influence of edge detection algorithms on the estimation of the fractal dimension of binary digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahammer, Helmut; DeVaney, Trevor T. J.

    2004-03-01

    The boundary of a fractal object, represented in a two-dimensional space, is theoretically a line with an infinitely small width. In digital images this boundary or contour is limited to the pixel resolution of the image and the width of the line commonly depends on the edge detection algorithm used. The Minkowski dimension was evaluated by using three different edge detection algorithms (Sobel, Roberts, and Laplace operator). These three operators were investigated because they are very widely used and because their edge detection result is very distinct concerning the line width. Very common fractals (Sierpinski carpet and Koch islands) were investigated as well as the binary images from a cancer invasion assay taken with a confocal laser scanning microscope. The fractal dimension is directly proportional to the width of the contour line and the fact, that in practice very often the investigated objects are fractals only within a limited resolution range is considered too.

  10. Refrigerated cutting tools improve machining of superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    Freon-12 applied to tool cutting edge evaporates quickly, leaves no residue, and permits higher cutting rate than with conventional coolants. This technique increases cutting rate on Rene-41 threefold and improves finish of machined surface.

  11. New multiscale speckle suppression and edge enhancement with nonlinear diffusion and homomorphic filtering for medical ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jinbum; Yoo, Yangmo

    2014-03-01

    Speckle, shown as a granular pattern, considerably degrades the image quality of ultrasound B-mode imaging and lowers the performance of image segmentation and registration techniques. Thus, speckle reduction while preserving the tissue structure (e.g., edges and boundaries of lesions) is important for ultrasound B-mode imaging. In this paper, a new approach for speckle reduction and edge enhancement based on laplacian pyramid nonlinear diffusion and homomorphic filtering (LPNDHF) is proposed for ultrasound B-mode imaging. In LPNDHF, nonlinear diffusion with a weighting factor is applied in multi-scale domain (i.e., laplacian pyramid) for effectively suppressing the speckle. In addition, in order to overcome the drawback from the previous LPND method, i.e., blurred edges, homomorphic filtering for edge and contrast enhancement is also applied from a finer scale to a coarser scale. From the simulation study, the proposed LPNDHF method showed the higher edge preservation and structure similarity values compared to the LPND and LPND with shock filtering (LPNDSF). Also, the LPNDHF provided the higher CNR values compared to LPND and LPNDSF, i.e., 5.02 vs. 3.66 and 2.91, respectively. From the tissue mimicking phantom study, the similar improvement in CNR was achieved from the LPNDHF over LPND and LPNDSF, i.e., 2.35 vs. 1.83 and 1.30. Moreover, the consistent results were obtained with the in vivo abdominal study. These preliminary results demonstrate that the proposed LPNDHF can improve the image quality of ultrasound B-mode imaging by increasing contrast and enhancing the specific signal details while effectively suppressing speckle.

  12. Edge fluctuation measurements by phase contrast imaging on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coda, S.; Porkolab, M.

    1994-05-01

    A novel CO2 laser phase contrast imaging diagnostic has been developed for the DIII-D tokamak, where it is being employed to investigate density fluctuations at the outer edge of the plasma. This system generates 16-point, 1-D images of a 7.6 cm wide region in the radial direction, and is characterized by long wavelength (7.6 cm) and high frequency (100 MHz) capability, as well as excellent sensitivity (bar-n is approximately greater than 10(exp 9) cm(sup -3)). The effects of vertical line integration have been studied in detail, both analytically and numerically with actual flux surface geometries generated by the EFITD magnetic equilibrium code. It is shown that in the present configuration the measurement is mostly sensitive to radial wave vectors. Experimental results on fluctuation suppression at the L- to H-mode transition and on the L-mode wave number spectrum are discussed briefly. Finally, future plans for extending the measurement to the core of the plasma and for investigating externally launched fast waves are presented.

  13. Analysis of the temperature of the hot tool in the cut of woven fabric using infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borelli, Joao E.; Verderio, Leonardo A.; Gonzaga, Adilson; Ruffino, Rosalvo T.

    2001-03-01

    Textile manufacture occupies a prominence place in the national economy. By virtue of its importance researches have been made on the development of new materials, equipment and methods used in the production process. The cutting of textiles starts in the basic stage, to be followed within the process of the making of clothes and other articles. In the hot cutting of fabric, one of the variables of great importance in the control of the process is the contact temperature between the tool and the fabric. The work presents a technique for the measurement of the temperature based on the processing of infrared images. For this a system was developed composed of an infrared camera, a framegrabber PC board and software that analyzes the punctual temperature in the cut area enabling the operator to achieve the necessary control of the other variables involved in the process.

  14. Edge Based 3d Indoor Corridor Modeling Using a Single Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baligh Jahromi, A.; Sohn, G.

    2015-08-01

    Reconstruction of spatial layout of indoor scenes from a single image is inherently an ambiguous problem. However, indoor scenes are usually comprised of orthogonal planes. The regularity of planar configuration (scene layout) is often recognizable, which provides valuable information for understanding the indoor scenes. Most of the current methods define the scene layout as a single cubic primitive. This domain-specific knowledge is often not valid in many indoors where multiple corridors are linked each other. In this paper, we aim to address this problem by hypothesizing-verifying multiple cubic primitives representing the indoor scene layout. This method utilizes middle-level perceptual organization, and relies on finding the ground-wall and ceiling-wall boundaries using detected line segments and the orthogonal vanishing points. A comprehensive interpretation of these edge relations is often hindered due to shadows and occlusions. To handle this problem, the proposed method introduces virtual rays which aid in the creation of a physically valid cubic structure by using orthogonal vanishing points. The straight line segments are extracted from the single image and the orthogonal vanishing points are estimated by employing the RANSAC approach. Many scene layout hypotheses are created through intersecting random line segments and virtual rays of vanishing points. The created hypotheses are evaluated by a geometric reasoning-based objective function to find the best fitting hypothesis to the image. The best model hypothesis offered with the highest score is then converted to a 3D model. The proposed method is fully automatic and no human intervention is necessary to obtain an approximate 3D reconstruction.

  15. Dependence Image Quality On The Type Of Filter And The Cut-Off Value in SPECT Reconstruction Using FBP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alireza, Sadremomtaz; Payvand, Taherparvar

    2011-12-01

    Image reconstruction is an important part of nuclear medicare imagmg technique. Different types of image reconstruction have been used for this propose. Despite of the fact that there are new techniques of image reconstruction, still filtered back projection method is widely used due to its simplicity and speed. Since nuclear medicine images are noisy due to less available photon statistics in the acquired images, therefore using proper filter to reduce the noise with keeping the proper signal is important. Two important parameters in most filters are the cut-off frequency and (in some cases of filters) the orders of the filter function Determining the optimal cut-off frequency for use in low pass filtering is an important part of establishing an image reconstruction strategy for clinical use. In this paper we present the result of examined filters which provide the best image quality by calculation of FWHM 1 -Line source and 2-Line sources. With this result, the best filter with specific parameter for LSF and 2-line sources is selected and the results are interpreted.

  16. Computationally efficient nonlinear edge preserving smoothing of n-D medical images via scale-space fingerprint analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, B.W.; Algazi, V.R.; Huesman, R.H.

    2000-10-11

    Nonlinear edge preserving smoothing often is performed prior to medical image segmentation. The goal of the nonlinear smoothing is to improve the accuracy of the segmentation by preserving changes in image intensity at the boundaries of structures of interest, while smoothing random variations due to noise in the interiors of the structures. Methods include median filtering and morphology operations such as gray scale erosion and dilation, as well as spatially varying smoothing driven by local contrast measures. Rather than irreversibly altering the image data prior to segmentation, the approach described here has the potential to unify nonlinear edge preserving smoothing with segmentation based on differential edge detection at multiple scales. The analysis of n-D image data is decomposed into independent 1-D problems that can be solved quickly. Smoothing in various directions along 1-D profiles through the n-D data is driven by a measure of local structure separation, rather than by a local contrast measure. Isolated edges are preserved independent of their contrast, given an adequate contrast to noise ratio.

  17. Three-dimensional labeling of newly formed bone using synchrotron radiation barium K-edge subtraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahifar, Arash; Swanston, Treena M.; Pushie, M. Jake; Belev, George; Chapman, Dean; Weber, Lynn; Cooper, David M. L.

    2016-07-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue which exhibits complex patterns of growth as well as continuous internal turnover (i.e. remodeling). Tracking such changes can be challenging and thus a high resolution imaging-based tracer would provide a powerful new perspective on bone tissue dynamics. This is, particularly so if such a tracer can be detected in 3D. Previously, strontium has been demonstrated to be an effective tracer which can be detected by synchrotron-based dual energy K-edge subtraction (KES) imaging in either 2D or 3D. The use of strontium is, however, limited to very small sample thicknesses due to its low K-edge energy (16.105 keV) and thus is not suitable for in vivo application. Here we establish proof-of-principle for the use of barium as an alternative tracer with a higher K-edge energy (37.441 keV), albeit for ex vivo imaging at the moment, which enables application in larger specimens and has the potential to be developed for in vivo imaging of preclinical animal models. New bone formation within growing rats in 2D and 3D was demonstrated at the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy bending magnet (BMIT-BM) beamline of the Canadian Light Source synchrotron. Comparative x-ray fluorescence imaging confirmed those patterns of uptake detected by KES. This initial work provides a platform for the further development of this tracer and its exploration of applications for in vivo development.

  18. Application of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging and hyperspectral imaging in evaluation of decay in fresh-cut lettuce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is commercially the most popular leafy vegetable whose leaves are usually consumed raw. Cleaned, cored, and chopped (fresh-cut) lettuce is a desirable, but highly perishable product. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) has been introduced to maintain quality of fresh-cut ...

  19. Edge Density Imaging: Mapping the Anatomic Embedding of the Structural Connectome Within the White Matter of the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Julia P.; Chang, Yi-Shin; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2015-01-01

    The structural connectome has emerged as a powerful tool to characterize the network architecture of the human brain and shows great potential for generating important new biomarkers for neurologic and psychiatric disorders. The edges of the cerebral graph traverse white matter to interconnect cortical and subcortical nodes, although the anatomic embedding of these edges is generally overlooked in the literature. Mapping the paths of the connectome edges could elucidate the relative importance of individual white matter tracts to the overall network topology of the brain and also lead to a better understanding of the effect of regionally-specific white matter pathology on cognition and behavior. In this work, we introduce edge density imaging (EDI), which maps the number of network edges that pass through every white matter voxel. Test-retest analysis shows good to excellent reliability for edge density (ED) measurements, with consistent results using different cortical and subcortical parcellation schemes and different diffusion MR imaging acquisition parameters. We also demonstrate that ED yields complementary information to both traditional and emerging voxel-wise metrics of white matter microstructure and connectivity, including fractional anisotropy, track density, fiber orientation dispersion and neurite density. Our results demonstrate spatially ordered variations of ED throughout the white matter, notably including greater ED in posterior than anterior cerebral white matter. The EDI framework is employed to map the white matter regions that are enriched with pathways connecting rich club nodes and also those with high densities of intra-modular and inter-modular edges. We show that periventricular white matter has particularly high ED and high densities of rich club edges, which is significant for diseases in which these areas are selectively affected, ranging from white matter injury of prematurity in infants to leukoaraiosis in the elderly. Using edge

  20. Quantitative Analysis Of Sperm Motion Kinematics From Real-Time Video-Edge Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Russell O...; Katz, David F.

    1988-02-01

    A new model of sperm swimming kinematics, which uses signal processing methods and multivariate statistical techniques to identify individual cell-motion parameters and unique cell populations, is presented. Swimming paths of individual cells are obtained using real-time, video-edge digitization. Raw paths are adaptively filtered to identify average paths, and measurements of space-time oscillations about average paths are made. Time-dependent frequency information is extracted from spatial variations about average paths using harmonic analysis. Raw-path and average-path measures such as curvature, curve length, and straight-line length, and measures of oscillations about average paths such as time-dependent amplitude and frequency variations, are used in a multivariate, cluster analysis to identify unique cell populations. The entire process, including digitization of sperm video images, is computer-automated. Preliminary results indicate that this method of tracking, digitization, and kinematic analysis accurately identifies unique cell subpopulations, including: the relative numbers of cells in each subpopulation, how subpopulations differ, and the extent and significance of such differences. With appropriate work, this approach may be useful for clinical discrimination between normal and abnormal semen specimens.

  1. A preliminary assessment of using a white light confocal imaging profiler for cut mark analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christopher W; Moore, Christopher R; Leifheit, Randell

    2012-01-01

    White light confocal microscopy creates detailed 3D representations of microsurfaces that can be qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. The study describes its application to the analysis of cut marks on bone, particularly when discerning cuts made by steel tools from those made by stone. The process described comes from a study where cuts were manually made on a cow rib with seven cutting tools, four stone (an unmodified chert flake, a chert biface, a bifacially ground slate fragment, and an unsharpened piece of slate), and three steel (a Swiss Army Knife, a serrate steak knife, and a serrate saw). Kerfs were magnified ×20 and 3D data clouds were generated using a Sensofar(®) White Light Confocal Profiler (WLCP). Kerf profiles and surface areas, volumes, mean depths, and maximum depths were calculated with proprietary software (SensoScan(®) and SolarMap(®)). For the most part, the stone tools make shallower and wider cuts. Kerf floors can be studied at higher magnifications; they were viewed at ×100. When comparing the kerf floors of the unsharpened slate and the serrate steak knife it was found that the slate floor was more uneven, but the serrate steak knife generated more overall relief. Although preliminary, the approach described here successfully distinguishes stone and steel tools; the authors conclude that the WLCP is a promising technology for cut mark analysis because of the very detailed 3D representations it creates and the numerous avenues of analysis it provides.

  2. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Yun, G. S. Lee, J. E.; Kim, M.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Park, Y. S.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.

    2014-06-15

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α{sub *} of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α{sub *} is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  3. A robust active contour edge detection algorithm based on local Gaussian statistical model for oil slick remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yu; Wang, Yaxuan; Liu, Jianxin; Liu, Zhaoxia

    2015-08-01

    Edge detection is a crucial method for the location and quantity estimation of oil slick when oil spills on the sea. In this paper, we present a robust active contour edge detection algorithm for oil spill remote sensing images. In the proposed algorithm, we define a local Gaussian data fitting energy term with spatially varying means and variances, and this data fitting energy term is introduced into a global minimization active contour (GMAC) framework. The energy function minimization is achieved fast by a dual formulation of the weighted total variation norm. The proposed algorithm avoids the existence of local minima, does not require the definition of initial contour, and is robust to weak boundaries, high noise and severe intensity inhomogeneity exiting in oil slick remote sensing images. Furthermore, the edge detection of oil slick and the correction of intensity inhomogeneity are simultaneously achieved via the proposed algorithm. The experiment results have shown that a superior performance of proposed algorithm over state-of-the-art edge detection algorithms. In addition, the proposed algorithm can also deal with the special images with the object and background of the same intensity means but different variances.

  4. Optical processing of color images with incoherent illumination: orientation-selective edge enhancement using a modified liquid-crystal display.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel; Alonso, Julia R; Flores, Jorge L; Ayubi, Gastón A; Di Martino, J Matías; Ferrari, José A

    2011-10-10

    We present a novel optical method for edge enhancement in color images based on the polarization properties of liquid-crystal displays (LCD). In principle, a LCD generates simultaneously two color-complementary, orthogonally polarized replicas of the digital image used as input. The currently viewed image in standard LCD monitors and cell phone's screens -which we will refer as the "positive image or true-color image"- is the one obtained by placing an analyzer in front of the LCD, in cross configuration to the back polarizer of the display. The orthogonally polarized replica of this image -the "negative image or complementary-color image"- is absorbed by the front polarizer. In order to generate the positive and negative replica with a slight displacement between them, we used a LCD monitor whose analyzer (originally a linear polarizer) was replaced by a calcite crystal acting as beam displacer. When both images are superimposed laterally displaced across the image plane, one obtains an image with enhanced first-order derivatives along a specific direction. The proposed technique works under incoherent illumination and does not require precise alignment, and thus, it could be potentially useful for processing large color images in real-time applications. Validation experiments are presented.

  5. Laser Prepared Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Wegener; Claus, Dold; Marcel, Henerichs; Christian, Walter

    Laser pulses with a pulsewidth of a few picoseconds have recently received a lot of attention, solving the problem of manufacturing tools for new materials of superior mechanical properties. Processing thermally sensitive material, such as diamond and CBN structures, can be done without major material deterioration effects. The breakthrough of this new technology becomes possible, if the accuracy and life time requirements of those tools are met. The paper shows in three applications the potential of laser manufacturing of cutting tools. Manufacturing of cutting edges for CFRP cutting needs sharp and stable cutting edges, which are prepared in PCD tools by laser sources in the picosecond pulsewidth regime. Profiling of hybrid bond grinding wheels yields geometric flexibility, which is impossible by mechanical treatment so far. Touch dressing of grinding wheels substantially reduces cutting forces.

  6. Automated tru-cut imaging-guided core needle biopsy of canine orbital neoplasia. A prospective feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cirla, A.; Rondena, M.; Bertolini, G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of imaging-guided core needle biopsy for canine orbital mass diagnosis. A second excisional biopsy obtained during surgery or necropsy was used as the reference standard. A prospective feasibility study was conducted in 23 canine orbital masses at a single centre. A complete ophthalmic examination was always followed by orbital ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) examination of the head. All masses were sampled with the patient still on the CT table using ultrasound (US) guided automatic tru-cut device. The most suitable sampling approach to the orbit was chosen each time based on the CT image analysis. One of the following different approaches was used: trans-orbital, trans-conjunctival or trans-masseteric. In all cases, the imaging-guided biopsy provided a sufficient amount of tissue for the histopathological diagnosis, which concurred with the biopsies obtained using the excisional technique. CT examination was essential for morphological diagnosis and provided detailed topographic information that allowed us to choose the safest orbital approach for the biopsy. US guided automatic tru-cut biopsy based on CT images, performed with patient still on the CT table, resulted in a minimally invasive, relatively easy, and accurate diagnostic procedure in dogs with orbital masses. PMID:27540512

  7. Ultra-High-Speed Observation of Cutting of Failure Phenomenon in Thin Metallic Lamina by Punch and Measurement of Displacements by Digital Image Correlation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Toshihisa; Iwawaki, Takashi; Fujimoto, Takehiro; Kashiwara, Yoshiyuki

    Machine components of industrial products are often produced by press cutting. However, the mechanism of cutting (ductile fracture of metals) is not perfectly understood. In order to clarify this mechanism, cutting processes were observed by an ultrahigh-speed camera. The ultrahigh-speed camera is capable of recording maximum record rate 1,000,000 frames per second (preserved images102 frames); each frame has 80,000 pixels. Therefore, this ultrahigh-speed camera is currently the world's most advanced camera in terms of spatial and time resolutions. A detailed movie of the cutting process was recorded. The details of the cutting process include the crack length versus time, crack tip opening angle, and fracture path. The crack tip opening angles were evaluated approximately 0.1 mm behind the tip of the propagating crack. The CTOA criterion was found to be almost valid during the cutting process. Furthermore, in order to use the image correlation method, random patterns were generated by spraying paint onto the metal sections. Images of a specimen section were taken after punching the sheet metal. The distributions of displacements were evaluated by the digital image correlation method. We found smoothly cut sections and rough surfaces. A smoothly cut section is very important for industrial products. In this study, the optimal speed of punching and punch-die clearances were examined. The ductile fracture criterion determined in this study is extremely useful for fabricating machine components by press cutting because it can be used for simulations without the need for a cutting system. The data of the image correlation method can be used for an intelligent hybrid method that can provide very accurate strain and stress distributions and fracture parameters such as the T* integral, which is the most promising fracture parameter for assessing the quality of metallic materials.

  8. High-Throughput Method for Automated Colony and Cell Counting by Digital Image Analysis Based on Edge Detection

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Counting cells and colonies is an integral part of high-throughput screens and quantitative cellular assays. Due to its subjective and time-intensive nature, manual counting has hindered the adoption of cellular assays such as tumor spheroid formation in high-throughput screens. The objective of this study was to develop an automated method for quick and reliable counting of cells and colonies from digital images. For this purpose, I developed an ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge and a CellProfiler Pipeline Cell Colony Counting, and compared them to other open-source digital methods and manual counts. The ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge is valuable in counting cells and colonies, and measuring their area, volume, morphology, and intensity. In this study, I demonstrate that Cell Colony Edge is superior to other open-source methods, in speed, accuracy and applicability to diverse cellular assays. It can fulfill the need to automate colony/cell counting in high-throughput screens, colony forming assays, and cellular assays. PMID:26848849

  9. Evaluating the impact of red-edge band from Rapideye image for classifying insect defoliation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelabu, Samuel; Mutanga, Onisimo; Adam, Elhadi

    2014-09-01

    The prospect of regular assessments of insect defoliation using remote sensing technologies has increased in recent years through advances in the understanding of the spectral reflectance properties of vegetation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the red edge channel of Rapideye imagery to discriminate different levels of insect defoliation in an African savanna by comparing the results of obtained from two classifiers. Random Forest and Support vector machine classification algorithms were applied using different sets of spectral analysis involving the red edge band. Results show that the integration of information from red edge increases classification accuracy of insect defoliation levels in all analysis performed in the study. For instance, when all the 5 bands of Rapideye imagery were used for classification, the overall accuracies increases about 19% and 21% for SVM and RF, respectively, as opposed to when the red edge channel was excluded. We also found out that the normalized difference red-edge index yielded a better accuracy result than normalized difference vegetation index. We conclude that the red-edge channel of relatively affordable and readily available high-resolution multispectral satellite data such as Rapideye has the potential to considerably improve insect defoliation classification especially in sub-Saharan Africa where data availability is limited.

  10. Localization and segmentation of optic disc in retinal images using circular Hough transform and grow-cut algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Muhammad; Barman, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Automated retinal image analysis has been emerging as an important diagnostic tool for early detection of eye-related diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, we have presented a robust methodology for optic disc detection and boundary segmentation, which can be seen as the preliminary step in the development of a computer-assisted diagnostic system for glaucoma in retinal images. The proposed method is based on morphological operations, the circular Hough transform and the grow-cut algorithm. The morphological operators are used to enhance the optic disc and remove the retinal vasculature and other pathologies. The optic disc center is approximated using the circular Hough transform, and the grow-cut algorithm is employed to precisely segment the optic disc boundary. The method is quantitatively evaluated on five publicly available retinal image databases DRIVE, DIARETDB1, CHASE_DB1, DRIONS-DB, Messidor and one local Shifa Hospital Database. The method achieves an optic disc detection success rate of 100% for these databases with the exception of 99.09% and 99.25% for the DRIONS-DB, Messidor, and ONHSD databases, respectively. The optic disc boundary detection achieved an average spatial overlap of 78.6%, 85.12%, 83.23%, 85.1%, 87.93%, 80.1%, and 86.1%, respectively, for these databases. This unique method has shown significant improvement over existing methods in terms of detection and boundary extraction of the optic disc. PMID:27190713

  11. Iterative image reconstruction for cerebral perfusion CT using a pre-contrast scan induced edge-preserving prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Yang; Huang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Feng, Qianjing; Chen, Wufan

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral perfusion x-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging, which detects and characterizes the ischemic penumbra, and assesses blood-brain barrier permeability with acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases, has been developed extensively over the past decades. However, due to its sequential scan protocol, the associated radiation dose has raised significant concerns to patients. Therefore, in this study we developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) principle to yield a clinically acceptable cerebral PCT image with lower milliampere-seconds (mA s). To preserve the edges of the reconstructed image, an edge-preserving prior was designed using a normal-dose pre-contrast unenhanced scan. For simplicity, the present algorithm was termed as ‘MAP-ndiNLM’. Evaluations with the digital phantom and the simulated low-dose clinical brain PCT datasets clearly demonstrate that the MAP-ndiNLM method can achieve more significant gains than the existing FBP and MAP-Huber algorithms with better image noise reduction, low-contrast object detection and resolution preservation. More importantly, the MAP-ndiNLM method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the MAP-Huber method.

  12. Iterative image reconstruction for cerebral perfusion CT using pre-contrast scan induced edge-preserving prior

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Yang; Huang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Feng, Qianjing; Chen, Wufan

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion X-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging, which detects and characterizes the ischemic penumbra, and assesses blood-brain barrier permeability with acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases, has been developed extensively over the past decades. However, due to its sequential scan protocol, the associated radiation dose has raised significant concerns to patients. Therefore, in this study we developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) principle to yield a clinically acceptable cerebral PCT image with lower milliampere seconds (mAs). To preserve the edges of the reconstructed image, an edge-preserving prior was designed using a normal-dose pre-contrast unenhanced scan. For simplicity, the present algorithm was termed as “MAP-ndiNLM”. Evaluations with the digital phantom and the simulated low-dose clinical brain PCT datasets clearly demonstrate that the MAP-ndiNLM method can achieve more significant gains than the existing FBP and MAP-Huber algorithms with better image noise reduction, low-contrast object detection and resolution preservation. More importantly, the MAP-ndiNLM method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the MAP-Huber method. PMID:23104003

  13. The aerodynamics of Manduca sexta: digital particle image velocimetry analysis of the leading-edge vortex.

    PubMed

    Bomphrey, Richard J; Lawson, Nicholas J; Harding, Nicholas J; Taylor, Graham K; Thomas, Adrian L R

    2005-03-01

    Here we present the first digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) analysis of the flow field around the wings of an insect (the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta, tethered to a 6-component force-moment balance in a wind tunnel). A leading-edge vortex (LEV) is present above the wings towards the end of the downstroke, as the net upward force peaks. Our DPIV analyses and smoke visualisations match the results of previous flow visualisation experiments at midwing, and we extend the experiments to provide the first analysis of the flow field above the thorax. Detailed DPIV measurements show that towards the end of the downstroke, the LEV structure is consistent with that recently reported in free-flying butterflies and dragonflies: the LEV is continuous across the thorax and runs along each wing to the wingtip, where it inflects to form the wingtip trailing vortices. The LEV core is 2-3 mm in diameter (approximately 10% of local wing chord) both at the midwing position and over the centreline at 1.2 m s(-1) and at 3.5 m s(-1) flight speeds. At 1.2 m s(-1) the measured LEV circulation is 0.012+/-0.001 m(2) s(-1) (mean +/-S.D.) at the centreline and 0.011+/-0.001 m(2) s(-1) halfway along the wing. At 3.5 m s(-1) LEV circulation is 0.011+/-0.001 m(2) s(-1) at the centreline and 0.020+/-0.004 m(2) s(-1) at midwing. The DPIV measurements suggest that if there is any spanwise flow in the LEV towards the end of the downstroke its velocity is less than 1 m s(-1). Estimates of force production show that the LEV contributes significantly to supporting body weight during bouts of flight at both speeds (more than 10% of body weight at 1.2 m s(-1) and 35-65% of body weight at 3.5 m s(-1)).

  14. Development of a new metal artifact reduction algorithm by using an edge preserving method for CBCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juhye; Nam, Haewon; Lee, Rena

    2015-07-01

    CT (computed tomography) images, metal materials such as tooth supplements or surgical clips can cause metal artifact and degrade image quality. In severe cases, this may lead to misdiagnosis. In this research, we developed a new MAR (metal artifact reduction) algorithm by using an edge preserving filter and the MATLAB program (Mathworks, version R2012a). The proposed algorithm consists of 6 steps: image reconstruction from projection data, metal segmentation, forward projection, interpolation, applied edge preserving smoothing filter, and new image reconstruction. For an evaluation of the proposed algorithm, we obtained both numerical simulation data and data for a Rando phantom. In the numerical simulation data, four metal regions were added into the Shepp Logan phantom for metal artifacts. The projection data of the metal-inserted Rando phantom were obtained by using a prototype CBCT scanner manufactured by medical engineering and medical physics (MEMP) laboratory research group in medical science at Ewha Womans University. After these had been adopted the proposed algorithm was performed, and the result were compared with the original image (with metal artifact without correction) and with a corrected image based on linear interpolation. Both visual and quantitative evaluations were done. Compared with the original image with metal artifacts and with the image corrected by using linear interpolation, both the numerical and the experimental phantom data demonstrated that the proposed algorithm reduced the metal artifact. In conclusion, the evaluation in this research showed that the proposed algorithm outperformed the interpolation based MAR algorithm. If an optimization and a stability evaluation of the proposed algorithm can be performed, the developed algorithm is expected to be an effective tool for eliminating metal artifacts even in commercial CT systems.

  15. Localisation of luminal epithelium edge in digital histopathology images of IHC stained slides of endometrial biopsies.

    PubMed

    Li, Guannan; Sanchez, Victor; Patel, Gnyaneshwari; Quenby, Siobhan; Rajpoot, Nasir

    2015-06-01

    Diagnosis of recurrent miscarriage due to abnormally high number of uterine natural killer (uNK) cells has recently been made possible by a protocol devised by Quenby et al. Hum Reprod 2009;24(1):45-54. The diagnosis involves detection and counting of stromal and uNK cell nuclei in endometrial biopsy slides immunohistochemically stained with haematoxylin for staining cell nuclei and CD56 as a marker for the uNK cells. However, manual diagnosis is a laborious process, fraught with subjective errors. In this paper, we present a novel method for detection of uterine natural killer (uNK) cells in the human female uterus lining and localisation of the luminal epithelium edge in endometrial biopsies. Specifically, we employ a local phase symmetry based method to detect stromal cell nuclei and propose an adaptive background removal method that significantly eases the segmentation of uNK cell nuclei regions. We also propose a novel method using alpha shapes for the identification of epithelial cell nuclei and B-Spline curve fitting on identified cell nuclei to localise the luminal epithelium edge. The objective of edge localisation is to avoid cell nuclei near the luminal epithelium edge being counted in the diagnosis process due to their non-relevance to the calculation of stromal to uNK cell ratio that determines the diagnosis of recurrent miscarriages in the end. The resulting algorithm offers a promising potential for computer-assisted diagnosis of recurrent miscarriage due to its high accuracy.

  16. Automated kidney morphology measurements from ultrasound images using texture and edge analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravishankar, Hariharan; Annangi, Pavan; Washburn, Michael; Lanning, Justin

    2016-04-01

    In a typical ultrasound scan, a sonographer measures Kidney morphology to assess renal abnormalities. Kidney morphology can also help to discriminate between chronic and acute kidney failure. The caliper placements and volume measurements are often time consuming and an automated solution will help to improve accuracy, repeatability and throughput. In this work, we developed an automated Kidney morphology measurement solution from long axis Ultrasound scans. Automated kidney segmentation is challenging due to wide variability in kidney shape, size, weak contrast of the kidney boundaries and presence of strong edges like diaphragm, fat layers. To address the challenges and be able to accurately localize and detect kidney regions, we present a two-step algorithm that makes use of edge and texture information in combination with anatomical cues. First, we use an edge analysis technique to localize kidney region by matching the edge map with predefined templates. To accurately estimate the kidney morphology, we use textural information in a machine learning algorithm framework using Haar features and Gradient boosting classifier. We have tested the algorithm on 45 unseen cases and the performance against ground truth is measured by computing Dice overlap, % error in major and minor axis of kidney. The algorithm shows successful performance on 80% cases.

  17. Imaging of whole tumor cut sections using a novel scanning beam confocal fluorescence MACROscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Paul; Vukovic, Vojislav; Haugland, Hans K.; Nicklee, Trudey; Hedley, David W.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2001-07-01

    Hypoxia caused by inadequate structure and function of the tumor vasculature has been found to negatively determine the prognosis of cancer patients. Hence, understanding the biological basis of tumor hypoxia is of significant clinical interest. To study solid tumor microenvironments in sufficient detail, large areas (several mm in diameter) need to be imaged at micrometers resolutions. We have used a novel confocal scanning laser MACROscopeTM (CSLM) capable of acquiring images over fields of view up to 2 cm X 2 cm. To demonstrate its performance, frozen sections from a cervical carcinoma xenograft were triple labeled for tissue hypoxia, blood vessels and hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1 alpha (HIF-1(alpha) ), imaged using the CSLM and compared to images obtained using a standard epifluorescence microscope imaging system. The results indicate that the CSLM is a useful instrument for imaging tissue-based fluorescence at resolutions comparable to standard low-power microscope objectives.

  18. A New Method for Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) Imaging via Wavelet Decomposition-Dependented Edge Matching Interpolation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zeyu; Chen, Yimin; Zhao, Yan; Zhu, Lifeng; Lv, Shengqing; Lu, Jiahui

    2016-08-01

    The interpolation technique of computed tomography angiography (CTA) image provides the ability for 3D reconstruction, as well as reduces the detect cost and the amount of radiation. However, most of the image interpolation algorithms cannot take the automation and accuracy into account. This study provides a new edge matching interpolation algorithm based on wavelet decomposition of CTA. It includes mark, scale and calculation (MSC). Combining the real clinical image data, this study mainly introduces how to search for proportional factor and use the root mean square operator to find a mean value. Furthermore, we re- synthesize the high frequency and low frequency parts of the processed image by wavelet inverse operation, and get the final interpolation image. MSC can make up for the shortage of the conventional Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI) examination. The radiation absorption and the time to check through the proposed synthesized image were significantly reduced. In clinical application, it can help doctor to find hidden lesions in time. Simultaneously, the patients get less economic burden as well as less radiation exposure absorbed. PMID:27307267

  19. Edge detection, color quantization, segmentation, texture removal, and noise reduction of color image using quaternion iterative filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yu-Zhe; Pei, Soo-Chang

    2014-07-01

    Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is a simple, local, adaptive, and efficient method for nonlinear and nonstationary signal analysis. However, for dealing with multidimensional signals, EMD and its variants such as bidimensional EMD (BEMD) and multidimensional EMD (MEMD) are very slow due to the needs of a large amount of envelope interpolations. Recently, a method called iterative filtering has been proposed. This filtering-based method is not as precise as EMD but its processing speed is very fast and can achieve comparable results as EMD does in many image and signal processing applications. We combine quaternion algebra and iterative filtering to achieve the edge detection, color quantization, segmentation, texture removal, and noise reduction task of color images. We can obtain similar results by using quaternion combined with EMD; however, as mentioned before, EMD is slow and cumbersome. Therefore, we propose to use quaternion iterative filtering as an alternative method for quaternion EMD (QEMD). The edge of color images can be detected by using intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and the color quantization results can be obtained from residual image. The noise reduction algorithm of our method can be used to deal with Gaussian, salt-and-pepper, speckle noise, etc. The peak signal-to-noise ratio results are satisfactory and the processing speed is also very fast. Since textures in a color image are high-frequency components, we also can use quaternion iterative filtering to decompose a color image into many high- and low-frequency IMFs and remove textures by eliminating high-frequency IMFs.

  20. Extracting a symbolic object description from gray-level images using a Kalman-filter-based contour tracer combined with a complex edge-operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Markus; Ley, Dietmar

    1992-11-01

    Usually, gray-level images are arranged as two-dimensional (NxM)-matrices. Tracing its contours is a common way to obtain information about an imaged object, such as position and orientation, or for purposes of object recognition. This paper describes the generation of contour-based object descriptions by edge-detection and contour-tracing. A complex differential operator is used to detect edges in the image. In addition to the gradient, also the local orientation of edges can be computed with an accuracy of approximately 5 degree(s). This edge-oriented description, which is still arranged as a two-dimensional matrix, occupies twice as much memory as the original gray-level image (gradient plus orientation) and there is no knowledge about the course of the contour. In addition to that, in most cases this edge-oriented image is fragmentary, due to illumination restrictions and shades. For this reason the imaged contour is traced using a Kalman-filter-based algorithm. The contour tracer connects and completes these edge fragments. The algorithm is able to follow the course of a contour without any prior knowledge, even if its direction changes erratically. It has been tested successfully in several applications in industrial production testing (for example for controlling an optical range sensor of a 3-D-measurement system in assembly lines).

  1. Reducing radiation dose by application of optimized low-energy x-ray filters to K-edge imaging with a photon counting detector.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yu-Na; Lee, Seungwan; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-01-21

    K-edge imaging with photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) can improve image quality compared with conventional energy integrating detectors. However, low-energy x-ray photons below the K-edge absorption energy of a target material do not contribute to image formation in the K-edge imaging and are likely to be completely absorbed by an object. In this study, we applied x-ray filters to the K-edge imaging with a PCXD based on cadmium zinc telluride for reducing radiation dose induced by low-energy x-ray photons. We used aluminum (Al) filters with different thicknesses as the low-energy x-ray filters and implemented the iodine K-edge imaging with an energy bin of 34-48 keV at the tube voltages of 50, 70 and 90 kVp. The effects of the low-energy x-ray filters on the K-edge imaging were investigated with respect to signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and figure of merit (FOM). The highest value of SDNR was observed in the K-edge imaging with a 2 mm Al filter, and the SDNR decreased as a function of the filter thicknesses. Compared to the K-edge imaging with a 2 mm Al filter, the ESAK was reduced by 66%, 48% and 39% in the K-edge imaging with a 12 mm Al filter for 50 kVp, 70 kVp and 90 kVp, respectively. The FOM values, which took into account the ESAK and SDNR, were maximized for 8, 6 to 8 and 4 mm Al filters at 50 kVp, 70 kVp and 90 kVp, respectively. We concluded that the use of an optimal low-energy filter thickness, which was determined by maximizing the FOM, could significantly reduce radiation dose while maintaining image quality in the K-edge imaging with the PCXD.

  2. Reducing radiation dose by application of optimized low-energy x-ray filters to K-edge imaging with a photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yu-Na; Lee, Seungwan; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-01-01

    K-edge imaging with photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) can improve image quality compared with conventional energy integrating detectors. However, low-energy x-ray photons below the K-edge absorption energy of a target material do not contribute to image formation in the K-edge imaging and are likely to be completely absorbed by an object. In this study, we applied x-ray filters to the K-edge imaging with a PCXD based on cadmium zinc telluride for reducing radiation dose induced by low-energy x-ray photons. We used aluminum (Al) filters with different thicknesses as the low-energy x-ray filters and implemented the iodine K-edge imaging with an energy bin of 34-48 keV at the tube voltages of 50, 70 and 90 kVp. The effects of the low-energy x-ray filters on the K-edge imaging were investigated with respect to signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and figure of merit (FOM). The highest value of SDNR was observed in the K-edge imaging with a 2 mm Al filter, and the SDNR decreased as a function of the filter thicknesses. Compared to the K-edge imaging with a 2 mm Al filter, the ESAK was reduced by 66%, 48% and 39% in the K-edge imaging with a 12 mm Al filter for 50 kVp, 70 kVp and 90 kVp, respectively. The FOM values, which took into account the ESAK and SDNR, were maximized for 8, 6 to 8 and 4 mm Al filters at 50 kVp, 70 kVp and 90 kVp, respectively. We concluded that the use of an optimal low-energy filter thickness, which was determined by maximizing the FOM, could significantly reduce radiation dose while maintaining image quality in the K-edge imaging with the PCXD.

  3. Color canals modification with canny edge detection and morphological reconstruction for cell nucleus segmentation and area measurement in normal Pap smear images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riana, Dwiza; Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti Octorina; Widyantoro, Dwi H.; Mengko, Tati Latifah R.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a cell nucleus segmentation and area measurement of Pap smear images by means of modification of color canals with Canny edge detection and morphological reconstruction methods. Cell nucleus characterization plays an important role for classifying the degree of abnormality in cervical cancer. The aim of this work is to find the matched measurement method with the manual nucleus area measurement. In this work, we utilized pap smear single cell images from Herlev data bank in RGB mode. The cell images were selected from 90 normal class subjects that include: Normal Superficial, Normal Intermediate, and Normal Columnar classes. The nucleus of each cell image was cropped manually to localize from the cytoplasm. The color canals modification was performed on each cropped nucleus image by, first, separating each R, G, B, and grayscale canals, then implementing addition operation based on color canals (R+G+B, R+G, R+B, G+B, and grayscale). The Canny edge detection was applied on those modifications resulting in binary edge images. The nucleus segmentation was implemented on the edge images by performing region filling based on morphological reconstruction. The area property was calculated based on the segmented nucleus area. The nucleus area from the proposed method was verified to the existing manual measurement (ground truth) of the Herlev data bank. Based on thorough observation upon the selected color canals and Canny edge detection. It can be concluded that Canny edge detection with R+G+B canal is the most significant for all Normal classes (r 0,305, p-value 0.05). While for Normal Superficial and Normal Intermediate, Canny edge detection is significant for all RGB modifications with (r 0.414 - 0.817 range, , p-value 0.05), and for Normal Columnar, Canny edge detection is significant for R+B canal (r 0.505, p-value 0.05).

  4. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Deck-Edge Columnar Vortex Generators on Aircraft Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landman, Drew; Lamar, John E.; Swift, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Candidate passive flow control devices were chosen from a NASA flow visualization study to investigate their effectiveness at improving flow quality over a flat-top carrier model. Flow over the deck was analyzed using a particle image velocimeter and a 1/120th scaled carrier model in a low-speed wind tunnel. Baseline (no devices) flow quality was compared to flow quality from combinations of bow and deck-edge devices at both zero and 20 degrees yaw. Devices included plain flaps and spiral cross-section columnar vortex generators attached in various combinations to the front and sides of the deck. Centerline and cross plane measurements were made with velocity and average turbulence measurements reported. Results show that the bow/deck-edge flap and bow/deck-edge columnar vortex generator pairs reduce flight deck turbulence both at zero yaw and at 20 degrees yaw by a factor of approximately 20. Of the devices tested, the most effective bow-only device appears to be the plain flap.

  5. Measurement of the modulation transfer function of a charge-coupled device array by the combination of the self-imaging effect and slanted edge method.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Sedigheh; Madanipour, Khosro

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, by a combination of the self-imaging effect for Ronchi gratings and the standard slanted edge modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement method for CCD cameras, the MTF of the CCD array without optics is measured. For this purpose, a Ronchi-type grating is illuminated by an expanded He-Ne laser. A self-image of the grating appears without optics on the CCD array that is located on the Talbot distance. The lines of the self-image of the grating are used as a slanted edge array. This method has all the advantages of the slanted edge method, and also since the array of the edge is ready, the total area of the CCD can be tested. The measured MTF is related to the CCD array without optics. PMID:23842271

  6. Use of IRS-P4 Ocean Color Monitor (OCM) images for tracing the red edge of the terrestrial vegetation reflectance spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhuri, B.

    2016-04-01

    A methodology is put forward to retrieve the red edge for terrestrial vegetated regions of IRS P4 Ocean Color Monitor (OCM) images. The objective is to utilize land-related portions of the archived OCM images that contain a significant amount of digital information on land cover. OCM band data were simulated from spectroradiometric reflectance of fresh green leaves and hyperspectral reflectance of vegetated regions derived from EO-1 Hyperion images. The red edge recovered from these model data using numerical techniques of Lagrange interpolation and inverted Gaussian was compared with the original one and reasonable accuracy was obtained. The technique was then applied to the actual red and near-infrared bands of OCM images, and red edge reflectance curves were computed for evergreen, deciduous and mangrove forest regions of the images for winter and spring seasons. Consistent results were obtained for seasonal changes, and vegetated and non-vegetated areas could be distinguished.

  7. Automated segmentation of synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography biomedical images using Graph Cuts and neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarenga de Moura Meneses, Anderson; Giusti, Alessandro; de Almeida, André Pereira; Parreira Nogueira, Liebert; Braz, Delson; Cely Barroso, Regina; deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR) X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) enables magnified images to be used as a non-invasive and non-destructive technique with a high space resolution for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of biomedical samples. The research on applications of segmentation algorithms to SR-μCT is an open problem, due to the interesting and well-known characteristics of SR images for visualization, such as the high resolution and the phase contrast effect. In this article, we describe and assess the application of the Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts (EMvGC) algorithm for the segmentation of SR-μCT biomedical images acquired at the Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beam line at the Elettra Laboratory (Trieste, Italy). We also propose a method using EMvGC with Artificial Neural Networks (EMANNs) for correcting misclassifications due to intensity variation of phase contrast, which are important effects and sometimes indispensable in certain biomedical applications, although they impair the segmentation provided by conventional techniques. Results demonstrate considerable success in the segmentation of SR-μCT biomedical images, with average Dice Similarity Coefficient 99.88% for bony tissue in Wistar Rats rib samples (EMvGC), as well as 98.95% and 98.02% for scans of Rhodnius prolixus insect samples (Chagas's disease vector) with EMANNs, in relation to manual segmentation. The techniques EMvGC and EMANNs cope with the task of performing segmentation in images with the intensity variation due to phase contrast effects, presenting a superior performance in comparison to conventional segmentation techniques based on thresholding and linear/nonlinear image filtering, which is also discussed in the present article.

  8. Cutting thin sections of bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, W. W.

    1972-01-01

    Medical equipment for obtaining repetitive planoparallel sections of bone to study healing of bone structure under high gravity stress is described. Device consists of modified saw with diamond cutting edges. Construction of device and manner of use are explained.

  9. 3D Imaging of Nickel Oxidation States using Full Field X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Nanotomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, George; Harris, William; Izzo, John; Grew, Kyle N.

    2012-01-20

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) cycling of the nickel electrocatalyst phase in the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode can lead to performance degradation and cell failure. A greater understanding of nickel redox mechanisms at the microstructural level is vital to future SOFC development. Transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) provides several key techniques for exploring oxidation states within SOFC electrode microstructure. Specifically, x-ray nanotomography and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy have been applied to study samples of varying nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) compositions. The imaged samples are treated as mock SOFC anodes containing distinct regions of the materials in question. XANES spectra presented for the individual materials provide a basis for the further processing and analysis of mixed samples. Images of composite samples obtained are segmented, and the distinct nickel and nickel oxide phases are uniquely identified using full field XANES spectroscopy. Applications to SOFC analysis are discussed.

  10. Patellar segmentation from 3D magnetic resonance images using guided recursive ray-tracing for edge pattern detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ruida; Jackson, Jennifer N.; McCreedy, Evan S.; Gandler, William; Eijkenboom, J. J. F. A.; van Middelkoop, M.; McAuliffe, Matthew J.; Sheehan, Frances T.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents an automatic segmentation methodology for the patellar bone, based on 3D gradient recalled echo and gradient recalled echo with fat suppression magnetic resonance images. Constricted search space outlines are incorporated into recursive ray-tracing to segment the outer cortical bone. A statistical analysis based on the dependence of information in adjacent slices is used to limit the search in each image to between an outer and inner search region. A section based recursive ray-tracing mechanism is used to skip inner noise regions and detect the edge boundary. The proposed method achieves higher segmentation accuracy (0.23mm) than the current state-of-the-art methods with the average dice similarity coefficient of 96.0% (SD 1.3%) agreement between the auto-segmentation and ground truth surfaces.

  11. Launching an Academic Career: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Geoscience Graduate Students, Post-doctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, R. M.; Ormand, C. J.; MacDonald, H.; Dunbar, R. W.; Allen-King, R. M.; Manduca, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Launching an academic career presents a number of challenges. A recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education depicts academia as an “ivory sweatshop,” citing rising standards for tenure. Most graduate programs provide minimal training for life beyond graduate school. The professional development program “On the Cutting Edge” fills this gap by providing workshops and web resources on academic careers for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and early career faculty. These workshops and web resources address a wide range of topics related to teaching, research, and managing one’s career, tailored for each group. The Preparing for an Academic Career in the Geosciences workshop to help graduate students and postdoctoral fellows make the transition into an academic career has been offered annually since 2003. It provides a panel on academic careers in different institutional settings, sessions on research on learning, various teaching strategies, design of effective teaching activities, moving research forward to new settings, effective teaching and research statements, the job search process, negotiation, and presenting oneself to others. Complementary online resources (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/careerprep/index.html) focus on these topics. The workshops and web resources offer guidance for each step of the job search process, for developing and teaching one’s own courses, and for making the transition from being a research student to being in charge of a research program. Online resources also include case studies of successful dual career couples, documenting their job search strategies. A four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career, offered annually since 1999, provides sessions on teaching strategies, course design, developing a strategic plan for research, supervising student researchers, navigating departmental and institutional politics, preparing for tenure, time and

  12. Laboratory implementation of edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging with energy-resolved detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemoz, P. C.; Endrizzi, M.; Vittoria, F. A.; Hagen, C. K.; Kallon, G.; Basta, D.; Marenzana, M.; Delogu, P.; Vincenzi, A.; De Ruvo, L.; Spandre, G.; Brez, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Olivo, A.

    2015-03-01

    Edge illumination (EI) X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) has potential for applications in different fields of research, including materials science, non-destructive industrial testing, small-animal imaging, and medical imaging. One of its main advantages is the compatibility with laboratory equipment, in particular with conventional non-microfocal sources, which makes its exploitation in normal research laboratories possible. In this work, we demonstrate that the signal in laboratory implementations of EI can be correctly described with the use of the simplified geometrical optics. Besides enabling the derivation of simple expressions for the sensitivity and spatial resolution of a given EI setup, this model also highlights the EI's achromaticity. With the aim of improving image quality, as well as to take advantage of the fact that all energies in the spectrum contribute to the image contrast, we carried out EI acquisitions using a photon-counting energy-resolved detector. The obtained results demonstrate that this approach has great potential for future laboratory implementations of EI.

  13. Scatter kernel estimation with an edge-spread function method for cone-beam computed tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Heng; Mohan, Radhe; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2008-12-01

    The clinical applications of kilovoltage x-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) have been compromised by the limited quality of CBCT images, which typically is due to a substantial scatter component in the projection data. In this paper, we describe an experimental method of deriving the scatter kernel of a CBCT imaging system. The estimated scatter kernel can be used to remove the scatter component from the CBCT projection images, thus improving the quality of the reconstructed image. The scattered radiation was approximated as depth-dependent, pencil-beam kernels, which were derived using an edge-spread function (ESF) method. The ESF geometry was achieved with a half-beam block created by a 3 mm thick lead sheet placed on a stack of slab solid-water phantoms. Measurements for ten water-equivalent thicknesses (WET) ranging from 0 cm to 41 cm were taken with (half-blocked) and without (unblocked) the lead sheet, and corresponding pencil-beam scatter kernels or point-spread functions (PSFs) were then derived without assuming any empirical trial function. The derived scatter kernels were verified with phantom studies. Scatter correction was then incorporated into the reconstruction process to improve image quality. For a 32 cm diameter cylinder phantom, the flatness of the reconstructed image was improved from 22% to 5%. When the method was applied to CBCT images for patients undergoing image-guided therapy of the pelvis and lung, the variation in selected regions of interest (ROIs) was reduced from >300 HU to <100 HU. We conclude that the scatter reduction technique utilizing the scatter kernel effectively suppresses the artifact caused by scatter in CBCT.

  14. Image synthesis with graph cuts: a fast model proposal mechanism in probabilistic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahner, Tobias; Lochbühler, Tobias; Mariethoz, Grégoire; Linde, Niklas

    2016-02-01

    Geophysical inversion should ideally produce geologically realistic subsurface models that explain the available data. Multiple-point statistics is a geostatistical approach to construct subsurface models that are consistent with site-specific data, but also display the same type of patterns as those found in a training image. The training image can be seen as a conceptual model of the subsurface and is used as a non-parametric model of spatial variability. Inversion based on multiple-point statistics is challenging due to high nonlinearity and time-consuming geostatistical resimulation steps that are needed to create new model proposals. We propose an entirely new model proposal mechanism for geophysical inversion that is inspired by texture synthesis in computer vision. Instead of resimulating pixels based on higher-order patterns in the training image, we identify a suitable patch of the training image that replace a corresponding patch in the current model without breaking the patterns found in the training image, that is, remaining consistent with the given prior. We consider three cross-hole ground-penetrating radar examples in which the new model proposal mechanism is employed within an extended Metropolis Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion. The model proposal step is about 40 times faster than state-of-the-art multiple-point statistics resimulation techniques, the number of necessary MCMC steps is lower and the quality of the final model realizations is of similar quality. The model proposal mechanism is presently limited to 2-D fields, but the method is general and can be applied to a wide range of subsurface settings and geophysical data types.

  15. Medical image segmentation by combining graph cuts and oriented active appearance models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinjian; Udupa, Jayaram K; Bagci, Ulas; Zhuge, Ying; Yao, Jianhua

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method based on a strategic combination of the active appearance model (AAM), live wire (LW), and graph cuts (GCs) for abdominal 3-D organ segmentation. The proposed method consists of three main parts: model building, object recognition, and delineation. In the model building part, we construct the AAM and train the LW cost function and GC parameters. In the recognition part, a novel algorithm is proposed for improving the conventional AAM matching method, which effectively combines the AAM and LW methods, resulting in the oriented AAM (OAAM). A multiobject strategy is utilized to help in object initialization. We employ a pseudo-3-D initialization strategy and segment the organs slice by slice via a multiobject OAAM method. For the object delineation part, a 3-D shape-constrained GC method is proposed. The object shape generated from the initialization step is integrated into the GC cost computation, and an iterative GC-OAAM method is used for object delineation. The proposed method was tested in segmenting the liver, kidneys, and spleen on a clinical CT data set and also on the MICCAI 2007 Grand Challenge liver data set. The results show the following: 1) The overall segmentation accuracy of true positive volume fraction TPVF > 94.3% and false positive volume fraction can be achieved; 2) the initialization performance can be improved by combining the AAM and LW; 3) the multiobject strategy greatly facilitates initialization; 4) compared with the traditional 3-D AAM method, the pseudo-3-D OAAM method achieves comparable performance while running 12 times faster; and 5) the performance of the proposed method is comparable to state-of-the-art liver segmentation algorithm. The executable version of the 3-D shape-constrained GC method with a user interface can be downloaded from http://xinjianchen.wordpress.com/research/. PMID:22311862

  16. Novel VLSI architecture for edge detection and image enhancement on video camera chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammadou, Tarik; Bouzerdoum, Abdesselam; Bermak, Amine; Boussaid, Farid; Biglari, Moteza

    2001-05-01

    In this paper an image enhancing technique is described. It is based on Shunting Inhibitory Cellular Neural Networks. As the limitation of the linear approaches to image coding, enhancement, and feature extraction became apparent, research in image processing began to disperse into the three goal-driven directions. However SICNNs model simultaneously addresses the three problems of coding, enhancement, and extraction as it acts to compress the dynamic range, reorganize the signal to improve visibility, suppress noise, and identify local features. The algorithm we are describing is simple and cost-effective, and can be easily applied in real-time processing for digital still camera application.

  17. Asymmetric masks for laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging with edge illumination

    PubMed Central

    Endrizzi, Marco; Astolfo, Alberto; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Millard, Thomas P.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We report on an asymmetric mask concept that enables X-ray phase-contrast imaging without requiring any movement in the system during data acquisition. The method is compatible with laboratory equipment, namely a commercial detector and a rotating anode tube. The only motion required is that of the object under investigation which is scanned through the imaging system. Two proof-of-principle optical elements were designed, fabricated and experimentally tested. Quantitative measurements on samples of known shape and composition were compared to theory with good agreement. The method is capable of measuring the attenuation, refraction and (ultra-small-angle) X-ray scattering, does not have coherence requirements and naturally adapts to all those situations in which the X-ray image is obtained by scanning a sample through the imaging system. PMID:27145924

  18. Asymmetric masks for laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging with edge illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrizzi, Marco; Astolfo, Alberto; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Millard, Thomas P.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    We report on an asymmetric mask concept that enables X-ray phase-contrast imaging without requiring any movement in the system during data acquisition. The method is compatible with laboratory equipment, namely a commercial detector and a rotating anode tube. The only motion required is that of the object under investigation which is scanned through the imaging system. Two proof-of-principle optical elements were designed, fabricated and experimentally tested. Quantitative measurements on samples of known shape and composition were compared to theory with good agreement. The method is capable of measuring the attenuation, refraction and (ultra-small-angle) X-ray scattering, does not have coherence requirements and naturally adapts to all those situations in which the X-ray image is obtained by scanning a sample through the imaging system.

  19. Broadband X-ray edge-enhancement imaging of a boron fibre on lithium fluoride thin film detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichelatti, E.; Bonfigli, F.; Vincenti, M. A.; Cecilia, A.; Vagovič, P.; Baumbach, T.; Montereali, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    The white beam (∼6-80 keV) available at the TopoTomo X-ray beamline of the ANKA synchrotron facility (KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany) was used to perform edge-enhancement imaging tests on lithium fluoride radiation detectors. The diffracted X-ray image of a microscopic boron fibre, consisting of tungsten wire wrapped by boron cladding, was projected onto lithium fluoride thin films placed at several distances, from contact to 1 m . X-ray photons cause the local formation of primary and aggregate colour centres in lithium fluoride; these latter, once illuminated under blue light, luminesce forming visible-light patterns-acquired by a confocal laser scanning microscope-that reproduce the intensity of the X-ray diffracted images. The tests demonstrated the excellent performances of lithium fluoride films as radiation detectors at the investigated photon energies. The experimental results are here discussed and compared with those calculated with a model that takes into account all the processes that concern image formation, storing and readout.

  20. Submicrometer hyperspectral X-ray imaging of heterogeneous rocks and geomaterials: applications at the Fe k-edge.

    PubMed

    De Andrade, Vincent; Susini, Jean; Salomé, Murielle; Beraldin, Olivier; Rigault, Cecile; Heymes, Thomas; Lewin, Eric; Vidal, Olivier

    2011-06-01

    Because of their complex genesis, rocks and geomaterials are commonly polycrystalline heterogeneous systems, with various scale-level chemical and structural heterogeneities. Like most other μ-analytical techniques relying on scanning instruments with pencil-beam, the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) technique allows elemental oxidation states to be probed with high spatial resolution but suffers from long acquisition times, imposing practical limits on the field of view. Now, regions of interest of sample are generally several orders of magnitude larger than the beam size. Here, we show the potential of coupling XANES and full-field absorption radiographies with a large hard X-ray beam. Thanks to a new setup, which allows both the acquisition of a XANES image stack and the execution of polarization contrast imaging, 1 to 4 mega-pixel crystallographic orientations and Fe oxidation state mapping corrected from polarization effects are obtained in a couple of hours on polycrystalline materials with submicrometric resolution. The demonstration is first carried out on complex metamorphic rocks, where Fe(3+)/Fe(total) images reveal subtle redox variations within single mineralogical phases. A second application concerns a bentonite analogue considered for nuclear waste and CO(2) storage. Proportion mappings of finely mixed phases are extracted from hyperspectral data, imaging the spatial progress of reaction processes essential for the safety of such storage systems.

  1. Edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildreth, E. C.

    1985-09-01

    For both biological systems and machines, vision begins with a large and unwieldly array of measurements of the amount of light reflected from surfaces in the environment. The goal of vision is to recover physical properties of objects in the scene such as the location of object boundaries and the structure, color and texture of object surfaces, from the two-dimensional image that is projected onto the eye or camera. This goal is not achieved in a single step: vision proceeds in stages, with each stage producing increasingly more useful descriptions of the image and then the scene. The first clues about the physical properties of the scene are provided by the changes of intensity in the image. The importance of intensity changes and edges in early visual processing has led to extensive research on their detection, description and use, both in computer and biological vision systems. This article reviews some of the theory that underlies the detection of edges, and the methods used to carry out this analysis.

  2. A Novel Cloning Template Designing Method by Using an Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm for Edge Detection of CNN Based Imaging Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Parmaksızoğlu, Selami; Alçı, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Cellular Neural Networks (CNNs) have been widely used recently in applications such as edge detection, noise reduction and object detection, which are among the main computer imaging processes. They can also be realized as hardware based imaging sensors. The fact that hardware CNN models produce robust and effective results has attracted the attention of researchers using these structures within image sensors. Realization of desired CNN behavior such as edge detection can be achieved by correctly setting a cloning template without changing the structure of the CNN. To achieve different behaviors effectively, designing a cloning template is one of the most important research topics in this field. In this study, the edge detecting process that is used as a preliminary process for segmentation, identification and coding applications is conducted by using CNN structures. In order to design the cloning template of goal-oriented CNN architecture, an Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm which is inspired from the foraging behavior of honeybees is used and the performance analysis of ABC for this application is examined with multiple runs. The CNN template generated by the ABC algorithm is tested by using artificial and real test images. The results are subjectively and quantitatively compared with well-known classical edge detection methods, and other CNN based edge detector cloning templates available in the imaging literature. The results show that the proposed method is more successful than other methods. PMID:22163903

  3. Segmentation of the thalamus in multi-spectral MR images using a combination of atlas-based and gradient graph cut methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datteri, Ryan; Barillot, Christian; Dawant, Benoit M.; Lecoeur, Jeremy

    2010-03-01

    Two popular segmentation methods used today are atlas based and graph cut based segmentation techniques. The atlas based method deforms a manually segmented image onto a target image, resulting in an automatic segmentation. The graph cut segmentation method utilizes the graph cut paradigm by treating image segmentation as a max-flow problem. A specialized form of this algorithm was developed by Lecoeur et al [1], called the spectral graph cut algorithm. The goal of this paper is to combine both of these methods, creating a more stable atlas based segmentation algorithm that is less sensitive to the initial manual segmentation. The registration algorithm is used to automate and initialize the spectral graph cut algorithm as well as add needed spatial information, while the spectral graph cut algorithm is used to increase the robustness of the atlas method. To calculate the sensitivity of the algorithms, the initial manual segmentation of the atlas was both dilated and eroded 2 mm and the segmentation results were calculated. Results show that the atlas based segmentation segments the thalamus well with an average Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 0.87. The spectral graph cut method shows similar results with an average DSC measure of 0.88, with no statistical difference between the two methods. The atlas based method's DSC value, however, was reduced to 0.76 and 0.67 when dilated and eroded respectively, while the combined method retained a DSC value of 0.81 and 0.74, with a statistical difference found between the two methods.

  4. Cutting edge: retrobulbar inflammation, adipogenesis, and acute orbital congestion in a preclinical female mouse model of Graves' orbitopathy induced by thyrotropin receptor plasmid-in vivo electroporation.

    PubMed

    Moshkelgosha, Sajad; So, Po-Wah; Deasy, Neil; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Banga, J Paul

    2013-09-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is a complication in Graves' disease (GD) but mechanistic insights into pathogenesis remain unresolved, hampered by lack of animal model. The TSH receptor (TSHR) and perhaps IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) are considered relevant antigens. We show that genetic immunization of human TSHR (hTSHR) A-subunit plasmid leads to extensive remodeling of orbital tissue, recapitulating GO. Female BALB/c mice immunized with hTSHR A-subunit or control plasmids by in vivo muscle electroporation were evaluated for orbital remodeling by histopathology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Antibodies to TSHR and IGF-1R were present in animals challenged with hTSHR A-subunit plasmid, with predominantly TSH blocking antibodies and were profoundly hypothyroid. Orbital pathology was characterized by interstitial inflammation of extraocular muscles with CD3+ T cells, F4/80+ macrophages, and mast cells, accompanied by glycosaminoglycan deposition with resultant separation of individual muscle fibers. Some animals showed heterogeneity in orbital pathology with 1) large infiltrate surrounding the optic nerve or 2) extensive adipogenesis with expansion of retrobulbar adipose tissue. A striking finding that underpins the new model were the in vivo MRI scans of mouse orbital region that provided clear and quantifiable evidence of orbital muscle hypertrophy with protrusion (proptosis) of the eye. Additionally, eyelid manifestations of chemosis, including dilated and congested orbital blood vessels, were visually apparent. Immunization with control plasmids failed to show any orbital pathology. Overall, these findings support TSHR as the pathogenic antigen in GO. Development of a new preclinical model will facilitate molecular investigations on GO and evaluation of new therapeutic interventions.

  5. A guided ultrasonic imaging approach in isotropic plate structures using edge reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimkhanlou, Arvin; Dubuc, Brennan; Salamone, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an imaging technique to locate damage in plate-like structures by permanently attached piezoelectric transducers (PZT) capable to generate and receive guided ultrasonic waves. The technique is based on a model capable of predicting envelope of scattered waves. Correlations between the estimated scattered waves and experimental data are used for image reconstruction. The approach is validated on an aluminum plate and results are compared with two common imaging algorithms, that is, Delay and Sum (DS) and Minimum Variance (MV). Damage is simulated by placing two magnets on sides of the plate. It is shown that the inclusion of Lamb wave reflections improves the localization accuracy while making use of fewer number of sensors possible.

  6. Real-space imaging of a topologically protected edge state with ultracold atoms in an amplitude-chirped optical lattice

    PubMed Central

    Leder, Martin; Grossert, Christopher; Sitta, Lukas; Genske, Maximilian; Rosch, Achim; Weitz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    To describe a mobile defect in polyacetylene chains, Su, Schrieffer and Heeger formulated a model assuming two degenerate energy configurations that are characterized by two different topological phases. An immediate consequence was the emergence of a soliton-type edge state located at the boundary between two regions of different configurations. Besides giving first insights in the electrical properties of polyacetylene materials, interest in this effect also stems from its close connection to states with fractional charge from relativistic field theory. Here, using a one-dimensional optical lattice for cold rubidium atoms with a spatially chirped amplitude, we experimentally realize an interface between two spatial regions of different topological order in an atomic physics system. We directly observe atoms confined in the edge state at the intersection by optical real-space imaging and characterize the state as well as the size of the associated energy gap. Our findings hold prospects for the spectroscopy of surface states in topological matter and for the quantum simulation of interacting Dirac systems. PMID:27767054

  7. Comparison of beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging edge fluctuation measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T.; Smith, D.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the close physical proximity of the Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) is leveraged to directly compare fluctuation measurements, and to study the local effects of the GPI neutral deuterium puff during H-mode plasmas without large Edge Localized Modes. The GPI and BES views on NSTX provide partially overlapping coverage of the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) regions above the outboard midplane. The separation in the toroidal direction is 16°, and field lines passing through diagnostic views are separated by ∼20 cm in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. Strong cross-correlation is observed, and strong cross-coherence is seen for frequencies between 5 and 15 kHz. Also, probability distribution functions of fluctuations measured ∼3 cm inside the separatrix exhibit only minor deviations from a normal distribution for both diagnostics, and good agreement between correlation length estimates, decorrelation times, and structure velocities is found at the ±40% level. While the two instruments agree closely in many respects, some discrepancies are observed. Most notably, GPI normalized fluctuation levels exceed BES fluctuations by a factor of ∼9. BES mean intensity is found to be sensitive to the GPI neutral gas puff, and BES normalized fluctuation levels for frequencies between 1 and 10 kHz are observed to increase during the GPI puff.

  8. Superpixel edges for boundary detection

    DOEpatents

    Moya, Mary M.; Koch, Mark W.

    2016-07-12

    Various embodiments presented herein relate to identifying one or more edges in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image comprising a plurality of superpixels. Superpixels sharing an edge (or boundary) can be identified and one or more properties of the shared superpixels can be compared to determine whether the superpixels form the same or two different features. Where the superpixels form the same feature the edge is identified as an internal edge. Where the superpixels form two different features, the edge is identified as an external edge. Based upon classification of the superpixels, the external edge can be further determined to form part of a roof, wall, etc. The superpixels can be formed from a speckle-reduced SAR image product formed from a registered stack of SAR images, which is further segmented into a plurality of superpixels. The edge identification process is applied to the SAR image comprising the superpixels and edges.

  9. Large-area PSPMT based gamma-ray imager with edge reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, K-P; Nakae, L

    2000-09-21

    We describe a coded aperture, gamma-ray imager which uses a CsI(Na) scintillator coupled to an Hamamatsu R3292 position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) as the position-sensitive detector. We have modified the normal resistor divider readout of the PSPMT to allow use of nearly the full 10 cm diameter active area of the PSPMT with a single scintillator crystal one centimeter thick. This is a significant performance improvement over that obtained with the standard readout technique where the linearity and position resolution start to degrade at radii as small as 3.5 cm with a crystal 0.75 crn thick. This represents a recovery of over 60% of the PSPMT active area. The performance increase allows the construction of an imager with a field of view 20 resolution elements in diameter with useful quantum efficiency from 60-700 keV. In this paper we describe the readout technique, its implementation in a coded aperture imager and the performance of that imager.

  10. Laser cutting of Kevlar laminates and thermal stress formed at cutting sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Akhtar, S. S.

    2012-02-01

    Laser cutting of Kevlar laminates is carried out and thermal stress field developed in the cutting region is predicted using the finite element code. Temperature predictions are validated through the thermocouple data. The morphological changes in the cutting section are examined by incorporating optical and scanning electron microscopes. It is found that temperature predictions agree well with the thermocouple data. High values of von Mises stress are observed at the cutting edges and at the mid-thickness of the Kevlar laminate due to thermal compression formed in this region. The laser cut edges are free from whiskers; however, striation formation and some small sideways burning is observed at the kerf edges.

  11. Edge Density Imaging Measurements of DIII-D Tokamak Plasmas using a Lithium Beam Probe and High Resolution Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M. F.; Stoschus, H.; Thomas, D. M.; Pace, D. C.

    2012-10-01

    The Lithium Atomic Beam (LIBEAM) used on DIII-D has shown considerable potential to diagnose the density profile ne(r) with a radial resolution of δr = 0.5 cm within the pedestal region. The LIBEAM parameters are E < 30 keV and ˜10 mA of equivalent neutral lithium current. Through the use of a filtered high resolution PCO Pixelfly CCD camera, the spectroscopic emission of the 670.8 nm Li[2p-2s] transition due to collisional excitation of the neutral lithium atoms is captured and analyzed. By appropriate image analysis, a high resolution profile of the beam intensity Ib can be discerned. Through the use of this beam intensity profile and collisional radiative models (CRM) the fine scale structure of the edge density profile ne(r) can be observed.

  12. Sensitivity of F-106B Leading-Edge-Vortex Images to Flight and Vapor-Screen Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Johnson, Thomas D., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A flight test was undertaken at NASA Langley Research Center with vapor-screen and image-enhancement techniques to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about near-field vortex flows above the wings of fighter aircraft. In particular, the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on the vortex system over an angle-of-attack range were sought. The relevance of these flows stems from their present and future use at many points in the flight envelope, especially during transonic maneuvers. The aircraft used in this flight program was the F-106B because it was available and had sufficient wing sweep (60 deg) to generate a significant leading-edge vortex system. The sensitivity of the visual results to vapor screen hardware and to onset flow changes is discussed.

  13. Edge-preserving traveltime tomography with a sparse multiscale imaging constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mengyao; Zhang, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Solving the near-surface statics problem is often the first step in land or shallow marine seismic data processing. Near-surface velocity structures can be very complex, with large velocity contrasts within a small depth range. First-arrival traveltime tomography is a common approach for near-surface imaging. However, first-arrival traveltime tomography generally produces smooth model solutions due to the Tikhonov regularization, which constrains the model for minimum structures. Failing to resolve high velocity contrasts may result in inaccurate static values for reflection imaging. In this study, we develop a sparse multiscale imaging constraint for traveltime tomography to address this issue. In this method, we assume that the velocity model is sparse under a known wavelet basis. According to the model sparse representation, we first obtain the low wavenumber velocity structures, followed by the finer features, by alternately solving two sets of inversion problems. The synthetic tests and two real data applications show that this method exhibits better performance in reconstructing near-surface models with high velocity contrasts.

  14. Cutting assembly. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Treuhaft, M.B.; Oser, M.S.

    1981-06-25

    A mining auger comprises a cutting head carried at one end of a tubular shaft and a plurality of wall segments which in a first position thereof are disposed side by side around said shaft and in a second position thereof are disposed oblique to said shaft. A vane projects outwardly from each wall segment. When the wall segments are in their first position, the vanes together form a substantially continuous helical wall. A cutter is mounted on the peripheral edge of each of the vanes. When the wall segments are in their second position, the cutters on the vanes are disposed radially outward from the perimeter of the cutting head.

  15. On the Cutting Edge with Gene Splicing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrman, Patrick; Fritz, Lucie

    1989-01-01

    Describes a program in which second-year biology students use plasmid isolation to remove DNA from Escherichia coli bacteria and subsequently ligate and transform it into other E. coli bacteria. Cites ways teachers can get involved in current research that allows student participation. (RT)

  16. Cutting Edge Technology: Inspiration or Irritation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tichenor, Stuart

    This paper asserts that all the praise currently being lavished upon computer technology in the writing classroom should be tempered with realistic criticism. In addition to making research easier for students, the Internet makes plagiarism very easy. The author stresses that this plagiarism problem is not limited to the composition classroom, and…

  17. The Cutting Edge for Counselors: Licensure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Dean

    General Practice Counselors are not licensed in California. The only legislation that regulates counselors in California was enacted in 1964 to license one specialty of counseling, that of marriage, family, and child counseling. California has never licensed general practice counselors or other counseling specialties at the master's level.…

  18. Biotechnology at the Cutting Edge - Keasling

    ScienceCinema

    Keasling, Jay

    2016-07-12

    Jay Keasling, Berkeley Lab ALD for Biosciences and CEO of the Joint BioEnergy Institute, appears in a video on biotechnology at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. The video is part of en exhibit titled "Science in American Life," which examines the relationship between science, technology, progress and culture through artifacts, historical photographs and multimedia technology.

  19. Self-Determination and Disclosure. Cutting Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschamps, Ann

    2001-01-01

    The disclosure provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act raise issues for persons with hidden disabilities in the workplace and classroom regarding if, when, and how much to disclose. Educators should prepare students to address the disclosure issue and secure the accommodations they need. (SK)

  20. The Saturn School: Technology's Cutting Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Challenged by General Motors' creation of the Saturn automobile, St. Paul (Minnesota) educators created a new school by blending the best practices of existing schools with the most powerful and useful emerging technologies. In the Saturn School's learner-centered environment, each student develops a personal growth plan including academic,…

  1. Science versus News: On the Cutting Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, A. L.; French, V.; Villard, R.; Maran, S. P.

    1998-12-01

    This session is to aid communication between scientists and journalists, to motivate astronomers to be active in communicating their science to the public via the press, and to help both astronomers and journalists to understand the constraints under which the other group is operating. The session consists of two talks of about 20 minutes, followed by a panel discussion. The first talk is "What Makes a Topic News?" This segment, by Miles O'Brien of CNN News, takes the AAS audiences behind the scenes in the world of producing science news stories. --- What drives selection of assignments? How does the science reporter convince their editor to cover a story? What factors about television producing help and also hurt getting science subjects across to the public? The second talk is "Public Knowledge on Science: The Growing Gap Between Scientists and the Taxpayer." This presentation by Jon Miller, a public opinion expert will emphasize the problems scientists and society, face in communicating to the public. --- What does the public know about science and scientific method? How much translation is required to communicate with the public to engage their interest without unacceptable compromise of scientific accuracy? The final segment is a panel of both science journalists and astronomers moderated by Steve Maran. Together they will tackle a question that gets to the heart of the Science-Vs-News controversies, "When Should Results Go Public?" Published too soon, science is called "hype"; Published too late, it is no longer "news." Should all results be peer reviewed first, and is that a satisfactory prerequisite? Do scientists take self-serving advantage of the public interest by making announcements before results appear in journals? How do we address the public desire to experience science unfolding and to see real-time data such as planetary science missions? The panelists are Dr. David Helfand, from Columbia University, Dr. Bruce Margon, from the University of Washington, Mr. Thomas Siegfried, from The Dallas Daily News, Ms. Kathy Sawyer, from The Washington Post, Mr. John Noble Wilford from The New York Times, and Ms. Ann Kellan from CNN.

  2. Cosmetology: A Career on the Cutting Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittelhauser, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Cosmetology presents a complicated labor market, consisting of many people entering and leaving the field. Employment opportunities seem to be plentiful, but cosmetology is characterized by low earnings and an unusually high proportion of part-time jobs. (JOW)

  3. WCCC's Cutting-Edge Cosmetology Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Peg

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how a relatively small southwest Ohio career and technical education (CTE) school is making a big impression on students, their future employees, and the industry with its near 100 percent passage rate of the Ohio Board of Cosmetology exam every year and a matching placement rate. With a mission to prepare youths and adults…

  4. College Mental Health at the Cutting Edge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    As someone who has been involved in college mental health in three different roles, the author would say those who work in this field inhabit a strange space. College mental health centers are generally seen as somewhat peripheral to the core mission of universities by upper administration. Counseling centers do not reside within academic…

  5. At the Cutting Edge of the Impossible

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Igor E.

    2009-01-01

    Vladimir P. Demikhov (1916–1998) performed the world's first experimental intrathoracic transplantations and coronary artery bypass operation. His successes heralded the era of modern heart and lung transplantation and the surgical treatment of coronary artery disease. Even though he was one of the greatest experimental surgeons of the 20th century, his international isolation fueled speculation, suppositions, and myths. Ironically, his transplantation of a dog's head drew more publicity than did his pioneering thoracic surgical accomplishments, and he became an easy target for criticism. An account of Demikhov's life and work is presented herein. PMID:19876428

  6. Biotechnology at the Cutting Edge - Keasling

    SciTech Connect

    Keasling, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Jay Keasling, Berkeley Lab ALD for Biosciences and CEO of the Joint BioEnergy Institute, appears in a video on biotechnology at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. The video is part of en exhibit titled "Science in American Life," which examines the relationship between science, technology, progress and culture through artifacts, historical photographs and multimedia technology.

  7. Cutting Edge RFID Technologies for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the use of Radio-frequency identification (RFID) for NASA applications. Some of the uses reviewed are: inventory management in space; potential RFID uses in a remote human outpost; Ultra-Wideband RFID for tracking; Passive, wireless sensors in NASA applications such as Micrometeoroid impact detection and Sensor measurements in environmental facilities; E-textiles for wireless and RFID.

  8. New insights from the cutting edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Duncan

    2003-03-01

    The paper explores some lessons for third-level electronic engineering education based on the experience of an engineer who has migrated from electrical and electronic engineering into telecommunications. An introduction in telecommunications began in Queens University of Belfast B.Eng studies. A PhD course in the Optoelectronics Department of Strathclyde University followed investigating novel methods of equalising the output of erbium-doped fibre devices. The experience and technical knowledge gained helped obtain employment at Kymata Limited working in R&D. This career path may be typical of a new generation of electronics engineers. The first part of the paper explores the limitations and advantages of professional development outside of a planned educational programme in telecommunications. The second part of the paper describes the excellent optics R&D development base of Scottish Universities that offer a model perhaps for Ireland and the rest of the world. In this competitive age the time taken to bring a device to production specifications can be critical to the on-going survival of small companies. The paper ends by attempting to tie together a number of strands in an overview that may help develop the ongoing debate into the evolution of electronic engineering in third level education.

  9. Cutting Edge Technologies in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlacher, Ervin L., Ed.

    This collection of essays provides case studies of current uses of technology in community colleges and projections for the future. The collection includes: (1) "Education and Curriculum Futures: Impacts from Technological Advances and Global Trends," by Earl C. Joseph; (2) "The Sociological Implications of the New Technology," by Bernard G.…

  10. Quality Education: On the Cutting Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Today's Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This article explores current trends in various areas of education--mathematics, reading, literature, vocational education, science, elementary education, home economics, social studies, writing, library media, computers, industrial arts, visual arts, health, physical education, performing arts, special education, foreign languages,…

  11. From image edges to geons to viewpoint-invariant object models: a neural net implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biederman, Irving; Hummel, John E.; Gerhardstein, Peter C.; Cooper, Eric E.

    1992-03-01

    Three striking and fundamental characteristics of human shape recognition are its invariance with viewpoint in depth (including scale), its tolerance of unfamiliarity, and its robustness with the actual contours present in an image (as long as the same convex parts [geons] can be activated). These characteristics are expressed in an implemented neural network model (Hummel & Biederman, 1992) that takes a line drawing of an object as input and generates a structural description of geons and their relations which is then used for object classification. The model's capacity for structural description derives from its solution to the dynamic binding problem of neural networks: independent units representing an object's parts (in terms of their shape attributes and interrelations) are bound temporarily when those attributes occur in conjunction in the system's input. Temporary conjunctions of attributes are represented by synchronized activity among the units representing those attributes. Specifically, the model induces temporal correlation in the firing of activated units to: (1) parse images into their constituent parts; (2) bind together the attributes of a part; and (3) determine the relations among the parts and bind them to the parts to which they apply. Because it conjoins independent units temporarily, dynamic binding allows tremendous economy of representation, and permits the representation to reflect an object's attribute structure. The model's recognition performance conforms well to recent results from shape priming experiments. Moreover, the manner in which the model's performance degrades due to accidental synchrony produced by an excess of phase sets suggests a basis for a theory of visual attention.

  12. Tracking of Ice Edges and Ice Floes by Wavelet Analysis of SAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Martin, Seelye; Kwok, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of wavelet transforms in the tracking of sequential ice features in the ERS-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, especially in situations where feature correlation techniques fail to yield reasonable results. Examples include the evolution of the St. Lawrence polynya and summer sea ice change in the Beaufort Sea. For the polynya, the evolution of the region of young ice growth surrounding a polynya can be easily tracked by wavelet analysis due to the large backscatter difference between the young and old ice. Also within the polynya, a 2D fast Fourier transform (FFT) is used to identify the extent of the Langmuir circulation region, which is coincident with the wave-agitated frazil ice growth region, where the sea ice experiences its fastest growth. Therefore, the combination of wavelet and FFT analysis of SAR images provides for the large-scale monitoring of different polynya features. For summer ice, previous work shows that this is the most difficult period for ice trackers due to the lack of features on the sea ice cover. The multiscale wavelet analysis shows that this method delineates the detailed floe shapes during this period, so that between consecutive images, the floe translation and rotation can be estimated.

  13. Application of digital particle image velocimetry to insect aerodynamics: measurement of the leading-edge vortex and near wake of a Hawkmoth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomphrey, Richard J.; Lawson, Nicholas J.; Taylor, Graham K.; Thomas, Adrian L. R.

    2006-04-01

    Some insects use leading-edge vortices to generate high lift forces, as has been inferred from qualitative smoke visualisations of the flow around their wings. Here we present the first Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) data and quantitative analysis of an insect’s leading-edge vortex and near wake at two flight speeds. This allows us to describe objectively 2D slices through the flow field of a tethered Tobacco Hawkmoth ( Manduca sexta). The near-field vortex wake appears to braodly resemble elliptical vortex loops. The presence of a leading-edge vortex towards the end of the downstroke is found to coincide with peak upward force production measured by a six-component force-moment balance. The topology of Manduca’s leading-edge vortex differs from that previously described because late in the downstroke, the structure extends continuously from wingtip across the thorax to the other wingtip.

  14. A new three-component signal model to objectively select power Doppler wall filter cut-off velocity for quantitative microvascular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfarnawany, Mai; Lacefield, James C.

    2013-03-01

    The wall-filter selection curve (WFSC) method was developed to automatically select cut-off velocities for high-frequency power Doppler imaging. Selection curves are constructed by plotting color pixel density (CPD) as a function of wall filter cut-off velocity. A new three-component mathematical model is developed to guide the design of an online implementation of the method for in vivo imaging. The model treats Doppler imaging as a signal detection task in which the scanner must distinguish intravascular pixels from perivascular and extravascular pixels and includes a cost function to identify the optimum cut-off velocity that provides accurate vascular quantification and minimizes the effect of color pixel artifacts on visualization of vascular structures. The goodness of fit of the three-component model to flow-phantom data is significantly improved compared to a previous two-component model (F test, p < 0:005). Simulations using the new model indicate that selection curves should be sampled using at least 100 cut-off velocities to ensure robust performance of the automated WFSC method and determine an upper bound on CPD variability that ensures reliable vascular quantification accuracy, defined as CPD within 5% of the reference vascular volume fraction. Results of the simulations also provide evidence that limiting the selection of the cut-off velocity to a binary choice between the middle and right end of the characteristic interval is sufficient to meet the quantification accuracy goal. The model provides an intuitive, empirical description of the relationship between system settings and blood-flow detection performance in power Doppler imaging.

  15. Absorption edge imaging of sporocide-treated and non-treated bacterial spores

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.; Tortora, G.T.; Warren, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    When deprived of nutrients, spore forming bacilli produce endospores which are remarkably resistant to chemical sterilization. Little is known about the morphology and response fo these spores following exposure to sporocidal agents. Light microscopy does not provide sufficient resolution for studying the rupture of the spore coat and fate of intracellular material. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy offer superior resolution but require specimen preparation methods that induce physiologic as well as morphologic changes in the spores, thereby making accurate interpretation of micrographs difficult. To eliminate the possible artifacts induced by chemical fixation, dehydration, embeddment, staining and sectioning, treated and non-sporocide-treated endospores of B. thuringiensis and B. subtilis were imaged by x-ray contact microscopy using monochromatic x-rays. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  16. DT-MRI segmentation using graph cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2007-03-01

    An important problem in medical image analysis is the segmentation of anatomical regions of interest. Once regions of interest are segmented, one can extract shape, appearance, and structural features that can be analyzed for disease diagnosis or treatment evaluation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is a relatively new medical imaging modality that captures unique water diffusion properties and fiber orientation information of the imaged tissues. In this paper, we extend the interactive multidimensional graph cuts segmentation technique to operate on DT-MRI data by utilizing latest advances in tensor calculus and diffusion tensor dissimilarity metrics. The user interactively selects certain tensors as object ("obj") or background ("bkg") to provide hard constraints for the segmentation. Additional soft constraints incorporate information about both regional tissue diffusion as well as boundaries between tissues of different diffusion properties. Graph cuts are used to find globally optimal segmentation of the underlying 3D DT-MR image among all segmentations satisfying the constraints. We develop a graph structure from the underlying DT-MR image with the tensor voxels corresponding to the graph vertices and with graph edge weights computed using either Log-Euclidean or the J-divergence tensor dissimilarity metric. The topology of our segmentation is unrestricted and both obj and bkg segments may consist of several isolated parts. We test our method on synthetic DT data and apply it to real 2D and 3D MRI, providing segmentations of the corpus callosum in the brain and the ventricles of the heart.

  17. K-edge imaging with quasi-monochromatic LCS X-ray source on the basis of S-band compact electron linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, R.; Taira, Y.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Yamada, K.

    2014-07-01

    A quasi-monochromatic hard X-ray source via laser Compton scattering (LCS) was developed on the basis of an S-band compact electron linac at AIST. The total number of photons generated and the maximum X-ray energy were ∼107 photons/s and 41 keV, respectively, when a 42-MeV electron beam was collided with an 800-nm Ti:sapphire laser at a 15° collision angle. We successfully demonstrated K-edge imaging using these LCS X-rays for the high-contrast observation of a human phantom with barium sulfate-concentrated blood vessels. In this paper, we describe the results of the K-edge imaging and analytical estimates of the contrast enhancement effect for the energy range ∼37 keV, which corresponds to the K-edge energy of barium.

  18. SU-C-207-06: In Vivo Quantification of Gold Nanoparticles Using K-Edge Imaging Via Spectrum Shaping by Gold Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Cormack, R; Bhagwat, M; Berbeco, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) are multifunctional platforms ideal for drug delivery, targeted imaging and radiosensitization. We have investigated quantitative imaging of AuNPs using on board imager (OBI) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). To this end, we also present, for the first time, a novel method for k-edge imaging of AuNP by filter-based spectral shaping. Methods: We used a digital 25 cm diameter water phantom, embedded with 3 cm spheres filled with AuNPs of different concentrations (0 mg/ml – 16 mg/ml). A poly-energetic X-ray spectrum of 140 kVp from a conventional X-ray tube is shaped by balanced K-edge filters to create an excess of photons right above the K-edge of gold at 80.7 keV. The filters consist of gold, tin, copper and aluminum foils. The phantom with appropriately assigned attenuation coefficients is forward projected onto a detector for each energy bin and then integrated. FKD reconstruction is performed on the integrated projections. Scatter, detector efficiency and noise are included. Results: We found that subtracting the results of two filter sets (Filter A:127 µm gold foil with 254 µm tin, 330 µm copper and 1 mm aluminum, and Filter B: 635 µm tin with 264 µm copper and 1 mm aluminum), provides substantial image contrast. The resulting filtered spectra match well below 80.7 keV, while maintaining sufficient X-ray quanta just above that. Voxel intensities of AuNP containing spheres increase linearly with AuNP concentration. K-edge imaging provides 18% more sensitivity than the tin filter alone, and 38% more sensitivity than the gold filter alone. Conclusion: We have shown that it is feasible to quantitatively detect AuNP distributions in a patient-sized phantom using clinical CBCT and K-edge spectral shaping.

  19. Extended Klein edges in graphene.

    PubMed

    He, Kuang; Robertson, Alex W; Lee, Sungwoo; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Gun-Do; Warner, Jamie H

    2014-12-23

    Graphene has three experimentally confirmed periodic edge terminations, zigzag, reconstructed 5-7, and arm-chair. Theory predicts a fourth periodic edge of graphene called the extended Klein (EK) edge, which consists of a series of single C atoms protruding from a zigzag edge. Here, we confirm the existence of EK edges in both graphene nanoribbons and on the edge of bulk graphene using atomic resolution imaging by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. The formation of the EK edge stems from sputtering and reconstruction of the zigzag edge. Density functional theory reveals minimal energy for EK edge reconstruction and bond distortion both in and out of plane, supporting our TEM observations. The EK edge can now be included as the fourth member of observed periodic edge structures in graphene.

  20. Experimental Comparison of Knife-Edge and Multi-Parallel Slit Collimators for Prompt Gamma Imaging of Proton Pencil Beams.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Julien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Janssens, Guillaume; Perali, Irene; Celani, Andrea; Fiorini, Carlo; Freud, Nicolas; Testa, Etienne; Prieels, Damien

    2016-01-01

    More and more camera concepts are being investigated to try and seize the opportunity of instantaneous range verification of proton therapy treatments offered by prompt gammas emitted along the proton tracks. Focusing on one-dimensional imaging with a passive collimator, the present study experimentally compared in combination with the first, clinically compatible, dedicated camera device the performances of instances of the two main options: a knife-edge slit (KES) and a multi-parallel slit (MPS) design. These two options were experimentally assessed in this specific context as they were previously demonstrated through analytical and numerical studies to allow similar performances in terms of Bragg peak retrieval precision and spatial resolution in a general context. Both collimators were prototyped according to the conclusions of Monte Carlo optimization studies under constraints of equal weight (40 mm tungsten alloy equivalent thickness) and of the specificities of the camera device under consideration (in particular 4 mm segmentation along beam axis and no time-of-flight discrimination, both of which less favorable to the MPS performance than to the KES one). Acquisitions of proton pencil beams of 100, 160, and 230 MeV in a PMMA target revealed that, in order to reach a given level of statistical precision on Bragg peak depth retrieval, the KES collimator requires only half the dose the present MPS collimator needs, making the KES collimator a preferred option for a compact camera device aimed at imaging only the Bragg peak position. On the other hand, the present MPS collimator proves more effective at retrieving the entrance of the beam in the target in the context of an extended camera device aimed at imaging the whole proton track within the patient.

  1. Experimental Comparison of Knife-Edge and Multi-Parallel Slit Collimators for Prompt Gamma Imaging of Proton Pencil Beams

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Julien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Janssens, Guillaume; Perali, Irene; Celani, Andrea; Fiorini, Carlo; Freud, Nicolas; Testa, Etienne; Prieels, Damien

    2016-01-01

    More and more camera concepts are being investigated to try and seize the opportunity of instantaneous range verification of proton therapy treatments offered by prompt gammas emitted along the proton tracks. Focusing on one-dimensional imaging with a passive collimator, the present study experimentally compared in combination with the first, clinically compatible, dedicated camera device the performances of instances of the two main options: a knife-edge slit (KES) and a multi-parallel slit (MPS) design. These two options were experimentally assessed in this specific context as they were previously demonstrated through analytical and numerical studies to allow similar performances in terms of Bragg peak retrieval precision and spatial resolution in a general context. Both collimators were prototyped according to the conclusions of Monte Carlo optimization studies under constraints of equal weight (40 mm tungsten alloy equivalent thickness) and of the specificities of the camera device under consideration (in particular 4 mm segmentation along beam axis and no time-of-flight discrimination, both of which less favorable to the MPS performance than to the KES one). Acquisitions of proton pencil beams of 100, 160, and 230 MeV in a PMMA target revealed that, in order to reach a given level of statistical precision on Bragg peak depth retrieval, the KES collimator requires only half the dose the present MPS collimator needs, making the KES collimator a preferred option for a compact camera device aimed at imaging only the Bragg peak position. On the other hand, the present MPS collimator proves more effective at retrieving the entrance of the beam in the target in the context of an extended camera device aimed at imaging the whole proton track within the patient. PMID:27446802

  2. Experimental Comparison of Knife-Edge and Multi-Parallel Slit Collimators for Prompt Gamma Imaging of Proton Pencil Beams.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Julien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Janssens, Guillaume; Perali, Irene; Celani, Andrea; Fiorini, Carlo; Freud, Nicolas; Testa, Etienne; Prieels, Damien

    2016-01-01

    More and more camera concepts are being investigated to try and seize the opportunity of instantaneous range verification of proton therapy treatments offered by prompt gammas emitted along the proton tracks. Focusing on one-dimensional imaging with a passive collimator, the present study experimentally compared in combination with the first, clinically compatible, dedicated camera device the performances of instances of the two main options: a knife-edge slit (KES) and a multi-parallel slit (MPS) design. These two options were experimentally assessed in this specific context as they were previously demonstrated through analytical and numerical studies to allow similar performances in terms of Bragg peak retrieval precision and spatial resolution in a general context. Both collimators were prototyped according to the conclusions of Monte Carlo optimization studies under constraints of equal weight (40 mm tungsten alloy equivalent thickness) and of the specificities of the camera device under consideration (in particular 4 mm segmentation along beam axis and no time-of-flight discrimination, both of which less favorable to the MPS performance than to the KES one). Acquisitions of proton pencil beams of 100, 160, and 230 MeV in a PMMA target revealed that, in order to reach a given level of statistical precision on Bragg peak depth retrieval, the KES collimator requires only half the dose the present MPS collimator needs, making the KES collimator a preferred option for a compact camera device aimed at imaging only the Bragg peak position. On the other hand, the present MPS collimator proves more effective at retrieving the entrance of the beam in the target in the context of an extended camera device aimed at imaging the whole proton track within the patient. PMID:27446802

  3. Using edge-preserving algorithm with non-local mean for significantly improved image-domain material decomposition in dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Tianye; Xing, Lei; Xie, Yaoqin; Xiong, Guanglei; Elmore, Kimberly; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Luyao; Min, James K

    2016-02-01

    Increased noise is a general concern for dual-energy material decomposition. Here, we develop an image-domain material decomposition algorithm for dual-energy CT (DECT) by incorporating an edge-preserving filter into the Local HighlY constrained backPRojection reconstruction (HYPR-LR) framework. With effective use of the non-local mean, the proposed algorithm, which is referred to as HYPR-NLM, reduces the noise in dual-energy decomposition while preserving the accuracy of quantitative measurement and spatial resolution of the material-specific dual-energy images. We demonstrate the noise reduction and resolution preservation of the algorithm with an iodine concentrate numerical phantom by comparing the HYPR-NLM algorithm to the direct matrix inversion, HYPR-LR and iterative image-domain material decomposition (Iter-DECT). We also show the superior performance of the HYPR-NLM over the existing methods by using two sets of cardiac perfusing imaging data. The DECT material decomposition comparison study shows that all four algorithms yield acceptable quantitative measurements of iodine concentrate. Direct matrix inversion yields the highest noise level, followed by HYPR-LR and Iter-DECT. HYPR-NLM in an iterative formulation significantly reduces image noise and the image noise is comparable to or even lower than that generated using Iter-DECT. For the HYPR-NLM method, there are marginal edge effects in the difference image, suggesting the high-frequency details are well preserved. In addition, when the search window size increases from to , there are no significant changes or marginal edge effects in the HYPR-NLM difference images. The reference drawn from the comparison study includes: (1) HYPR-NLM significantly reduces the DECT material decomposition noise while preserving quantitative measurements and high-frequency edge information, and (2) HYPR-NLM is robust with respect to parameter selection.

  4. Using edge-preserving algorithm with non-local mean for significantly improved image-domain material decomposition in dual-energy CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Tianye; Xing, Lei; Xie, Yaoqin; Xiong, Guanglei; Elmore, Kimberly; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Luyao; Min, James K.

    2016-02-01

    Increased noise is a general concern for dual-energy material decomposition. Here, we develop an image-domain material decomposition algorithm for dual-energy CT (DECT) by incorporating an edge-preserving filter into the Local HighlY constrained backPRojection reconstruction (HYPR-LR) framework. With effective use of the non-local mean, the proposed algorithm, which is referred to as HYPR-NLM, reduces the noise in dual-energy decomposition while preserving the accuracy of quantitative measurement and spatial resolution of the material-specific dual-energy images. We demonstrate the noise reduction and resolution preservation of the algorithm with an iodine concentrate numerical phantom by comparing the HYPR-NLM algorithm to the direct matrix inversion, HYPR-LR and iterative image-domain material decomposition (Iter-DECT). We also show the superior performance of the HYPR-NLM over the existing methods by using two sets of cardiac perfusing imaging data. The DECT material decomposition comparison study shows that all four algorithms yield acceptable quantitative measurements of iodine concentrate. Direct matrix inversion yields the highest noise level, followed by HYPR-LR and Iter-DECT. HYPR-NLM in an iterative formulation significantly reduces image noise and the image noise is comparable to or even lower than that generated using Iter-DECT. For the HYPR-NLM method, there are marginal edge effects in the difference image, suggesting the high-frequency details are well preserved. In addition, when the search window size increases from 11× 11 to 19× 19 , there are no significant changes or marginal edge effects in the HYPR-NLM difference images. The reference drawn from the comparison study includes: (1) HYPR-NLM significantly reduces the DECT material decomposition noise while preserving quantitative measurements and high-frequency edge information, and (2) HYPR-NLM is robust with respect to parameter selection.

  5. The Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    6 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the edge (running diagonally from the lower left to the upper right) of a trough, which is part of a large pit crater complex in Noachis Terra. This type of trough forms through the collapse of surface materials into the subsurface, and often begins as a series of individual pit craters. Over time, continued collapse increases the diameter of individual pits until finally, adjacent pits merge to form a trough such as the one captured in this image. The deep shadowed area is caused in part by an overhang; layered rock beneath this overhang is less resistant to erosion, and thus has retreated tens of meters backward, beneath the overhang. A person could walk up inside this 'cave' formed by the overhanging layered material.

    Location near: 47.0oS, 355.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  6. Cutting Forces Analysis in Whirling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jae Hwan; Han, Chang Woo; Kim, Sun Il; Jung, Hee Chul; Lee, Young Moon

    Whirling is a cutting process in which a series of cutting edges remove material by turning over the rotating workpiece. In this process, the whirling ring with a number of cutting teeth combined with the rotation and advancement of workpiece, produces pitches of worm. Mechanics of chip formation of the process, however, has not been fully estabilished. To estimate the cutting force during the process, the kinematics and the maximum undeformed chip thickness to be removed by each cutting edge should be thoroughly analyzed. In this study, using the recently developed model of undeformed chip thickness and the DEFORM software, cutting forces of the whirling process are estimated. The effects of cutting forces on tool are analyzed using the ADAMS software. The validity of the simulations has been verified with a series of cutting experiments.

  7. The effect of sidewall roughness on line edge roughness in top-down scanning electron microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verduin, T.; Lokhorst, S. R.; Kruit, P.; Hagen, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated in a numerical study the determination of sidewall roughness (SWR) from top down scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. In a typical metrology application, top-down SEM images are acquired in a (critical-dimension) SEM and the roughness is analyzed. However, the true size, shape and roughness characteristics of resist features are not fully investigated in the analysis of top-down SEM images. In reality, rough resist features are complex three-dimensional structures and the characterization naturally extends to the analysis of SWR. In this study we randomly generate images of rough lines and spaces, where the lines are made of PMMA on a silicon substrate. The lines that we study have a length of 2 µm, a width of 32nm and a height of 32 nm. The SWR is modeled by using the power spectral density (PSD) function of Palasantzas, which characterizes roughness by the standard deviation σ, correlation length ξ and roughness exponent α . The actual roughness is generated by application of the method of Thorsos in two dimensions. The images are constructed by using a home-built program for simulating electron-specimen interactions. The program that we have developed is optimized for complex arbitrary geometries and large number of incident low energy primary electrons by using multi-core CPUs and GPUs. The program uses the dielectric function model for inelastic scattering events and has an implementation specifically for low energy electrons. A satisfactory comparison is made between the secondary electron yields from the home-built program and another program found in literature. In order to reduce the risk of shrinkage, we use a beam energy of 300 eV and a spot size of 3 nm. Each pixel is exposed with 20 electrons on average (≍ 276 µC/cm2), following the Poisson distribution to account for illumination shot noise. We have assumed that the detection of electrons is perfect and does not introduce additional noise. We measure line edge

  8. Imaging of quantum Hall edge states under quasiresonant excitation by a near-field scanning optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Shibata, Y.; Mamyoda, S.; Ootuka, Y.; Nomura, S.; Kashiwaya, S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Akazaki, T.; Tamura, H.

    2013-12-04

    A high resolution mapping of quantum Hall edge states has been performed by locally creating electrons with small excess energies with a near-field scanning optical microscope in a dilution refrigerator. We have observed fine structures parallel to the edge in photovoltage signals, which appear only at low temperature. The observed fine structures near sample edges have been seen to shift inward with increase in magnetic field in accordance with Chklovskii Shklovskii, and Glazman model.

  9. Optimal Elasticity cut-off value for discriminating Healthy to Pathological Fibrotic patients employing Fuzzy C-Means automatic segmentation in Liver Shear Wave Elastography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatos, Ilias; Tsantis, Stavros; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Theotokas, Ioannis; Zoumpoulis, Pavlos S.; Kagadis, George C.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine an optimal elasticity cut-off value for discriminating Healthy from Pathological fibrotic patients by means of Fuzzy C-Means automatic segmentation and maximum participation cluster mean value employment in Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) images. The clinical dataset comprised 32 subjects (16 Healthy and 16 histological or Fibroscan verified Chronic Liver Disease). An experienced Radiologist performed SWE measurement placing a region of interest (ROI) on each subject's right liver lobe providing a SWE image for each patient. Subsequently Fuzzy C-Means clustering was performed on every SWE image utilizing 5 clusters. Mean Stiffness value and pixels number of each cluster were calculated. The mean stiffness value feature of the cluster with maximum pixels number was then fed as input for ROC analysis. The selected Mean Stiffness value feature an Area Under the Curve (AUC) of 0.8633 with Optimum Cut-off value of 7.5 kPa with sensitivity and specificity values of 0.8438 and 0.875 and balanced accuracy of 0.8594. Examiner's classification measurements exhibited sensitivity, specificity and balanced accuracy value of 0.8125 with 7.1 kPa cutoff value. A new promising automatic algorithm was implemented with more objective criteria of defining optimum elasticity cut-off values for discriminating fibrosis stages for SWE. More subjects are needed in order to define if this algorithm is an objective tool to outperform manual ROI selection.

  10. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOEpatents

    Lindroth, David P.; Morrell, Roger J.; Blair, James R.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy by full-field X-ray microscopy of a thin graphite flake: Imaging and electronic structure via the carbon K-edge

    PubMed Central

    Hitchock, Adam P; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ewels, Chris P; Guttmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Summary We demonstrate that near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure spectra combined with full-field transmission X-ray microscopy can be used to study the electronic structure of graphite flakes consisting of a few graphene layers. The flake was produced by exfoliation using sodium cholate and then isolated by means of density-gradient ultracentrifugation. An image sequence around the carbon K-edge, analyzed by using reference spectra for the in-plane and out-of-plane regions of the sample, is used to map and spectrally characterize the flat and folded regions of the flake. Additional spectral features in both π and σ regions are observed, which may be related to the presence of topological defects. Doping by metal impurities that were present in the original exfoliated graphite is indicated by the presence of a pre-edge signal at 284.2 eV. PMID:23016137

  12. A Monte Carlo simulation study of an improved K-edge log-subtraction X-ray imaging using a photon counting CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Amy Candy; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-09-01

    Recently, significant effort has been spent on the development of photons counting detector (PCD) based on a CdTe for applications in X-ray imaging system. The motivation of developing PCDs is higher image quality. Especially, the K-edge subtraction (KES) imaging technique using a PCD is able to improve image quality and useful for increasing the contrast resolution of a target material by utilizing contrast agent. Based on above-mentioned technique, we presented an idea for an improved K-edge log-subtraction (KELS) imaging technique. The KELS imaging technique based on the PCDs can be realized by using different subtraction energy width of the energy window. In this study, the effects of the KELS imaging technique and subtraction energy width of the energy window was investigated with respect to the contrast, standard deviation, and CNR with a Monte Carlo simulation. We simulated the PCD X-ray imaging system based on a CdTe and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom which consists of the various iodine contrast agents. To acquired KELS images, images of the phantom using above and below the iodine contrast agent K-edge absorption energy (33.2 keV) have been acquired at different energy range. According to the results, the contrast and standard deviation were decreased, when subtraction energy width of the energy window is increased. Also, the CNR using a KELS imaging technique is higher than that of the images acquired by using whole energy range. Especially, the maximum differences of CNR between whole energy range and KELS images using a 1, 2, and 3 mm diameter iodine contrast agent were acquired 11.33, 8.73, and 8.29 times, respectively. Additionally, the optimum subtraction energy width of the energy window can be acquired at 5, 4, and 3 keV for the 1, 2, and 3 mm diameter iodine contrast agent, respectively. In conclusion, we successfully established an improved KELS imaging technique and optimized subtraction energy width of the energy window, and based on

  13. Benefits of Red-Edge Spectral Band and Texture Features for the Object-based Classification using RapidEye sSatellite Image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. O.; Yeom, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Space-based remote sensing in agriculture is particularly relevant to issues such as global climate change, food security, and precision agriculture. Recent satellite missions have opened up new perspectives by offering high spatial resolution, various spectral properties, and fast revisit rates to the same regions. Here, we examine the utility of broadband red-edge spectral information in multispectral satellite image data for classifying paddy rice crops in South Korea. Additionally, we examine how object-based spectral features affect the classification of paddy rice growth stages. For the analysis, two seasons of RapidEye satellite image data were used. The results showed that the broadband red-edge information slightly improved the classification accuracy of the crop condition in heterogeneous paddy rice crop environments, particularly when single-season image data were used. This positive effect appeared to be offset by the multi-temporal image data. Additional texture information brought only a minor improvement or a slight decline, although it is well known to be advantageous for object-based classification in general. We conclude that broadband red-edge information derived from conventional multispectral satellite data has the potential to improve space-based crop monitoring. Because the positive or negative effects of texture features for object-based crop classification could barely be interpreted, the relationships between the textual properties and paddy rice crop parameters at the field scale should be further examined in depth.

  14. Comparison of Different Edge Detections and Noise Reduction on Ultrasound Images of Carotid and Brachial Arteries Using a Speckle Reducing Anisotropic Diffusion Filter

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, Mehravar; Arabfard, Masoud; Rafati-Rahimzadeh, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Common carotid artery (CCA) ultrasound with measurement of intima-media thickness (IMT) is a safe and noninvasive technique for assessing subclinical atherosclerosis and determining cardiovascular risks. Moreover, the pattern of wall thickening in the brachial artery (BA) is rather diffuse compared to the carotid artery and may be a more sensitive indicator of long-term systemic exposure to risk factors. Therefore noninvasive evaluation of mechanical parameters changes of both arteries has gained the attention of researchers. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare different edge detection techniques with speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD) de-noising filter in ultrasound images of both arteries. Patients and Methods: In a cross-sectional design, an examination was performed on ten men with mean age of 40 ± 5 years from September 2012 to March 2013 through random sampling. An ultrasonic examination of the left CCA and BA was performed. The program was designed in the MATLAB software to extract consecutive images in JPEG format from the AVI. Another program was designed in the MATLAB software to apply regions of interest (ROI) on the IMT of the posterior wall of common carotid and brachial arteries. Next, different edge detections and SRAD filter were applied to the ROI, separately. Finally, the program measured mean-squared error (MSE) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR). Results: The lowest values of MSE and highest values of PSNR were achieved by Canny edge detection with de-noising SRAD filter for IMT of left CCA and BA in 90 frames. Conclusions: Based on the result, by measuring the MSE and PSNR, this study showed Canny edge detection with SRAD filter is better than other edge detections in terms of speckle suppression and details preservation in CCA and BA ultrasound images. PMID:25593716

  15. Cutting assembly

    DOEpatents

    Racki, Daniel J.; Swenson, Clark E.; Bencloski, William A.; Wineman, Arthur L.

    1984-01-01

    A cutting apparatus includes a support table mounted for movement toward and away from a workpiece and carrying a mirror which directs a cutting laser beam onto the workpiece. A carrier is rotatably and pivotally mounted on the support table between the mirror and workpiece and supports a conduit discharging gas toward the point of impingement of the laser beam on the workpiece. Means are provided for rotating the carrier relative to the support table to place the gas discharging conduit in the proper positions for cuts made in different directions on the workpiece.

  16. SU-E-J-28: Gantry Speed Significantly Affects Image Quality and Imaging Dose for 4D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography On the Varian Edge Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, A; Song, K; Gardner, S; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4D-CBCT facilitates assessment of tumor motion at treatment position. We investigated the effect of gantry speed on 4D-CBCT image quality and dose using the Varian Edge On-Board Imager (OBI). Methods: A thoracic protocol was designed using a 125 kVp spectrum. Image quality parameters were obtained via 4D acquisition using a Catphan phantom with a gating system. A sinusoidal waveform was executed with a five second period and superior-inferior motion. 4D-CBCT scans were sorted into 4 and 10 phases. Image quality metrics included spatial resolution, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), uniformity index (UI), Hounsfield unit (HU) sensitivity, and RMS error (RMSE) of motion amplitude. Dosimetry was accomplished using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films within a CIRS Thorax phantom. This was placed on the gating phantom using the same motion waveform. Results: High contrast resolution decreased linearly from 5.93 to 4.18 lp/cm, 6.54 to 4.18 lp/cm, and 5.19 to 3.91 lp/cm for averaged, 4 phase, and 10 phase 4DCBCT volumes respectively as gantry speed increased from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec. CNRs decreased linearly from 4.80 to 1.82 as the gantry speed increased from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec, respectively. No significant variations in UIs, HU sensitivities, or RMSEs were observed with variable gantry speed. Ion chamber measurements compared to film yielded small percent differences in plastic water regions (0.1–9.6%), larger percent differences in lung equivalent regions (7.5–34.8%), and significantly larger percent differences in bone equivalent regions (119.1–137.3%). Ion chamber measurements decreased from 17.29 to 2.89 cGy with increasing gantry speed from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec. Conclusion: Maintaining technique factors while changing gantry speed changes the number of projections used for reconstruction. Increasing the number of projections by decreasing gantry speed decreases noise, however, dose is increased. The future of 4DCBCT’s clinical utility relies on further

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanometric cutting mechanisms of amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peng-Zhe; Qiu, Chen; Fang, Feng-Zhou; Yuan, Dan-Dan; Shen, Xue-Cen

    2014-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to study the nanometric cutting process of Cu50Zr50 amorphous alloy. The effects of cutting depth, cutting speed and tool edge radius on the cutting force, workpiece pile-up and temperature of the cutting region are studied to investigate the mechanisms of the material removal and surface formation in the nanometric cutting process. It is found that the material removal of amorphous alloy workpiece is mainly based on extrusion at the nanoscale instead of shearing at the macroscale. The plastic deformation of amorphous alloy is mainly due to the formation of shear transformation zones during the nanometric cutting process. The results also suggest that bigger cutting depth and cutting speed will lead to larger tangential force and normal force. However, the tool edge radius has a negligible effect on the tangential force although the normal force increases with the increase of tool edge radius. The workpiece pile-up increases with an increase of the cutting depth, but decreases with an increase of the edge radius of the tool. The workpiece pile-up is not significantly affected by the cutting speed. It is also found that larger cutting depth and cutting speed will result in higher temperature in the cutting region of workpiece and the average Newtonian layer temperature of the tool. Tool edge radius has no significant effect on the temperature distribution of the workpiece and the average Newtonian layer temperature of the tool.

  18. Cutting Candles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranucci, Ernest R.

    1973-01-01

    Different regular-polygon-shaped candles wound with a sheet of paper are cut through obliquely. When the papers are unwound, unique patterns are revealed. Investigation of these patterns leads to the discovery of geometric concepts. (JP)

  19. Tubing and cable cutting tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsmith, D. D.; Richardson, J. I. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hand held hydraulic cutting tool was developed which is particularly useful in deactivating ejection seats in military aircraft rescue operations. The tool consists primarily of a hydraulic system composed of a fluid reservoir, a pumping piston, and an actuator piston. Mechanical cutting jaws are attached to the actuator piston rod. The hydraulic system is controlled by a pump handle. As the pump handle is operated the actuator piston rod is forced outward and thus the cutting jaws are forced together. The frame of the device is a flexible metal tubing which permits easy positioning of the tool cutting jaws in remote and normally inaccessible locations. Bifurcated cutting edges ensure removal of a section of the tubing or cable to thereby reduce the possibility of accidental reactivation of the tubing or cable being severed.

  20. Effective SAR Image Segmentation in Analysis of Sea Ice Floe Distribution (FSD) Using Graph-cut Based Feature Extraction and Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhalkar, S.

    2014-12-01

    Soumitra Sakhalkar1, Jinchang Ren1 and Byong Jun Hwang21 Centre for excellence in Signal & Image Processing (CeSIP), Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XQ, UK.2 Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS), Oban, PA37 1QA, UK.Sea ices that grow in the open seas are characteristically different in forms and shapes from the largely smooth sea ice that grows in calm inlets. For example, strong force from winds and waves fractures the thick sea ice into pieces or floes, which then collide with each other. In studies of the Polar Regions with satellite SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery, identification of ice floes and their distribution is particularly important for examining for both large and small scale applications.In this paper, a Graph-Cut (GC) based feature extraction and fusion technique has been proposed for effective segmentation of SAR images and following on FSD analysis. Though GC based approach has been used in the segmentation of natural images, the application of it on SAR image in this context is rare. Based on an energy minimization process, the GC technique has utilized a graph based representation in grouping pixels for segmentation. To deal with sparkle noise, effective pre-processing and image filter is also applied.To validate the efficacy of the proposed approach, real SAR images with a high resolution of 16k by 16k are used for both visual assessment and quantitative analysis. In comparison to several state-of-the-art algorithms such as watershed and K-means it is found kernel based GC approach yields the most accurate results as shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 1: One example image (t-l) and its ground truth (t-m) along with results of segmentation using graph cut (t-r) and (b-l), watershed (b-m) and K-means (b-r).

  1. Influences of sequential cuts on micro-cutting process studied by smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongwei; Liu, Chuang; Cui, Tao; Tian, Ye; Shi, Chengli; Li, Jianping; Huang, Hu

    2013-11-01

    Machined surface properties have a great influence on the service life of component. The residual stress in machined surface layer is affected by the micro-cutting process. Sequential cuts influence the machined surface layer. In this paper, a mesh-less method called SPH (smooth particle hydrodynamic) is used to investigate the effect of sequential cuts and residual stress on chip formation, cutting force and the residual stress in machined surface for oxygen-free high-conductivity copper (OFHC). In micro-cutting process the cutting edge radius plays a crucial role. The effect of the cutting edge radius on residual stress is also investigated in this paper. The simulation results showed that the chip curled severely and the minimum chip thickness decreased in the second cut because of residual stress in the machined surface after the first cut. Meanwhile, the cutting force in the second cut was smaller than the first cut, while the thrust force was nearly the same during two cuts. In addition, the tensile residual stress beneath the machined surface layer would change to compressive stress after the second cut. Therefore, the residual stress in machined surface can be changed through sequential cuts with proper machining parameters to get high quality machined surface.

  2. Automated Laser Cutting In Three Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, Lisa T.; Yvanovich, Mark A.; Angell, Terry R.; Bishop, Patricia J.; Dai, Weimin; Dobbs, Robert D.; He, Mingli; Minardi, Antonio; Shelton, Bret A.

    1995-01-01

    Computer-controlled machine-tool system uses laser beam assisted by directed flow of air to cut refractory materials into complex three-dimensional shapes. Velocity, position, and angle of cut varied. In original application, materials in question were thermally insulating thick blankets and tiles used on space shuttle. System shapes tile to concave or convex contours and cuts beveled edges on blanket, without cutting through outer layer of quartz fabric part of blanket. For safety, system entirely enclosed to prevent escape of laser energy. No dust generated during cutting operation - all material vaporized; larger solid chips dislodged from workpiece easily removed later.

  3. Cutting edge: cutting edge commentary: a Copernican revolution? Doubts about the danger theory.

    PubMed

    Vance, R E

    2000-08-15

    The immune system is often said to function by "self-nonself" discrimination. Recently, some have argued that it actually detects "danger" or "strangers". There are problems with all of these points of view. Given that the immune system has been cobbled together throughout evolution and uses a diverse array of innate and adaptive defense mechanisms, it may not be possible to account for immunity within one "paradigm" or another. PMID:10925247

  4. The Edge supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  5. Concept of contrast transfer function for edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging and its comparison with the free-space propagation technique.

    PubMed

    Diemoz, Paul C; Vittoria, Fabio A; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-16

    Previous studies on edge illumination (EI) X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCi) have investigated the nature and amplitude of the signal provided by this technique. However, the response of the imaging system to different object spatial frequencies was never explicitly considered and studied. This is required in order to predict the performance of a given EI setup for different classes of objects. To this scope, in the present work we derive analytical expressions for the contrast transfer function of an EI imaging system, using the approximation of near-field regime, and study its dependence upon the main experimental parameters. We then exploit these results to compare the frequency response of an EI system with respect of that of a free-space propagation XPCi one. The results achieved in this work can be useful for predicting the signals obtainable for different types of objects and also as a basis for new retrieval methods. PMID:27409946

  6. Concept of contrast transfer function for edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging and its comparison with the free-space propagation technique.

    PubMed

    Diemoz, Paul C; Vittoria, Fabio A; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-16

    Previous studies on edge illumination (EI) X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCi) have investigated the nature and amplitude of the signal provided by this technique. However, the response of the imaging system to different object spatial frequencies was never explicitly considered and studied. This is required in order to predict the performance of a given EI setup for different classes of objects. To this scope, in the present work we derive analytical expressions for the contrast transfer function of an EI imaging system, using the approximation of near-field regime, and study its dependence upon the main experimental parameters. We then exploit these results to compare the frequency response of an EI system with respect of that of a free-space propagation XPCi one. The results achieved in this work can be useful for predicting the signals obtainable for different types of objects and also as a basis for new retrieval methods.

  7. Automatic registration between 3D intra-operative ultrasound and pre-operative CT images of the liver based on robust edge matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Woo Hyun; Kang, Dong-Goo; Lee, Duhgoon; Lee, Jae Young; Ra, Jong Beom

    2012-01-01

    The registration of a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) image with a computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance image is beneficial in various clinical applications such as diagnosis and image-guided intervention of the liver. However, conventional methods usually require a time-consuming and inconvenient manual process for pre-alignment, and the success of this process strongly depends on the proper selection of initial transformation parameters. In this paper, we present an automatic feature-based affine registration procedure of 3D intra-operative US and pre-operative CT images of the liver. In the registration procedure, we first segment vessel lumens and the liver surface from a 3D B-mode US image. We then automatically estimate an initial registration transformation by using the proposed edge matching algorithm. The algorithm finds the most likely correspondences between the vessel centerlines of both images in a non-iterative manner based on a modified Viterbi algorithm. Finally, the registration is iteratively refined on the basis of the global affine transformation by jointly using the vessel and liver surface information. The proposed registration algorithm is validated on synthesized datasets and 20 clinical datasets, through both qualitative and quantitative evaluations. Experimental results show that automatic registration can be successfully achieved between 3D B-mode US and CT images even with a large initial misalignment.

  8. Studies of Radial Correlations of Edge Turbulence by Laser Imaging in DIII--D: Evidence of Radial Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coda, Stefano

    1997-11-01

    Turbulence associated with electrostatic modes, especially ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) instabilities, is believed to be a primary cause of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Considerable theoretical and numerical work has been devoted to this topic, particularly in an effort to identify the mechanisms for nonlinear saturation of the turbulence. One such mechanism is shear decorrelation by nonlinearly generated, turbulent poloidal sheared flows. In recent years, computer simulations have shown that these ``radial modes'' with low poloidal and toroidal wave numbers can strongly regulate ITG turbulence and the associated transport.(R.E. Waltz, G.D. Kerbel, and J. Milovich, Phys. Plasmas 1,) 2229 (1994). Here, we report on the first experimental observation and characterization of these modes. Measurements of density fluctuations have been carried out at the outer edge of the DIII--D tokamak with a CO_2--laser imaging system employing the Zernike phase-contrast technique. This diagnostic was developed specifically to investigate radially propagating modes with high radial (0.5 cm) and temporal (0.5 μs) resolution, and is restricted to fluctuations with poloidal wave number k_θ~= 0 (with an uncertainty of ~ 0.4 cm-1). The radial-wave-number spectrum of the modes, determined by correlation analysis, is found to peak at nonzero values of k_r, both positive and negative, of the order of 1/(2ρ_s) (where ρs is the ion sound gyroradius), in accordance with simulations; by contrast, finite-k_θ spectra are generally reported to peak at k_r=0. Further agreement is obtained on the spectral width Δ k_r, which is of the same order as the peak value. We have performed an extensive experimental investigation of the properties of radial modes beyond those addressed by computational analysis thus far. Both the peak value k_0r and the width Δ kr increase at the L--H transition. The

  9. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mengjiao Yu; Ramadan Ahmed; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Aimee Washington; Crystal Redden

    2003-09-30

    The Quarter began with installing the new drill pipe, hooking up the new hydraulic power unit, completing the pipe rotation system (Task 4 has been completed), and making the SWACO choke operational. Detailed design and procurement work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. The prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed by Temco and delivered. Work is currently underway to calibrate the system. Literature review and preliminary model development for cuttings transportation with polymer foam under EPET conditions are in progress. Preparations for preliminary cuttings transport experiments with polymer foam have been completed. Two nuclear densitometers were re-calibrated. Drill pipe rotation system was tested up to 250 RPM. Water flow tests were conducted while rotating the drill pipe up to 100 RPM. The accuracy of weight measurements for cuttings in the annulus was evaluated. Additional modifications of the cuttings collection system are being considered in order to obtain the desired accurate measurement of cuttings weight in the annular test section. Cutting transport experiments with aerated fluids are being conducted at EPET, and analyses of the collected data are in progress. The printed circuit board is functioning with acceptable noise level to measure cuttings concentration at static condition using ultrasonic method. We were able to conduct several tests using a standard low pass filter to eliminate high frequency noise. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications to the DTF have almost been completed. A stop-flow cell is being designed for the DTF, the ACTF and Foam Generator/Viscometer which will allow us to capture bubble images without the need for ultra fast shutter speeds or microsecond flash system.

  10. Shape-dependent canny edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, Karen A.; Agaian, Sos S.; Nercessian, Shahan C.; Almunstashri, Ali A.

    2011-08-01

    Edges characterize the boundaries of objects in images and are informative structural cues for computer vision and target/object detection and recognition systems. The Canny edge detector is widely regarded as the edge detection standard. It is fairly adaptable to different environments, as its parametric nature attempts to tailor the detection of edges based on image-dependent characteristics or the particular requirements of a given implementation. Though it has been used in a myriad of image processing tasks, the Canny edge detector is still vulnerable to edge losses, localization errors, and noise sensitivity. These issues are largely due to the key tradeoff made in the scale and size of the edge detection filters used by the algorithm. Small-scaled filters are sensitive to edges but also to noise, whereas large-scaled filters are robust to noise but could filter out fine details. In this paper, novel edge detection kernel generalizations and a shape-dependent edge detector are introduced to alleviate these shortcomings. While most standard edge detection algorithms are based on convolving the input image with fixed size square kernels, this paper will illustrate the benefits of different filter sizes, and more importantly, different kernel shapes for edge detection. Moreover, new edge fusion methods are introduced to more effectively combine the individual edge responses. Existing edge detectors, including the Canny edge detector, can be obtained from the generalized edge detector by specifying corresponding parameters and kernel shapes. The proposed representations and edge detector have been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on several different types of image data. Computer simulations demonstrate that nonsquare kernel approaches can outperform square kernel approaches such as Canny, Sobel, Prewitt, Roberts, and others, providing better tradeoffs between noise rejection, accurate edge localization, and resolution. Where possible, Pratt's figure of

  11. Qualitative and quantitative effects of harmonic echocardiographic imaging on endocardial edge definition and side-lobe artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Yazbek, N.; Garcia, M. J.; Stewart, W. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Harmonic imaging is a new ultrasonographic technique that is designed to improve image quality by exploiting the spontaneous generation of higher frequencies as ultrasound propagates through tissue. We studied 51 difficult-to-image patients with blinded side-by-side cineloop evaluation of endocardial border definition by harmonic versus fundamental imaging. In addition, quantitative intensities from cavity versus wall were compared for harmonic versus fundamental imaging. Harmonic imaging improved left ventricular endocardial border delineation over fundamental imaging (superior: harmonic = 71.1%, fundamental = 18.7%; similar: 10.2%; P <.001). Quantitative analysis of 100 wall/cavity combinations demonstrated brighter wall segments and more strikingly darker cavities during harmonic imaging (cavity intensity on a 0 to 255 scale: fundamental = 15.6 +/- 8.6; harmonic = 6.0 +/- 5.3; P <.0001), which led to enhanced contrast between the wall and cavity (1.89 versus 1.19, P <.0001). Harmonic imaging reduces side-lobe artifacts, resulting in a darker cavity and brighter walls, thereby improving image contrast and endocardial delineation.

  12. Electrosurgical device for both mechanical cutting and coagulation of bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, J.D.; Mc Cabe, C.W.

    1987-03-24

    A surgical instrument is described for cutting and coagulating tissue, the surgical instrument comprising in combination: means for pressure cutting, the pressuring cutting means serving as a first electrode and having a leading edge and a cutting surface, the leading edge of the means for pressure cutting forming the forward portion of the cutting surface; second electrode means set apart from and electrically insulated from the pressure cutting means on the side of the pressure cutting means opposite the cutting surface thereof; means for attaching the second electrode means to the pressure cutting means; and means for providing a voltage between the pressure cutting means the second electrode means whereby an electric current can be made to flow between a portion of the side of the pressure cutting means opposite the cutting surface thereof and the second electrode means, and between the leading edge of the pressure cutting means and the second electrode means through tissue which is located therebetween. The current has sufficient amplitude to cause coagulation therein.

  13. Edge Bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chien-Chi

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in a genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance

  14. Edge Bioinformatics

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in amore » genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance« less

  15. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING PROTOTYPE BEGUN APRIL 1988 METHOD OF CUTTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING PROTOTYPE BEGUN APRIL 1988 METHOD OF CUTTING GLASS, "PERFECT TIN? MACHINE." MANUFACTURED IN DALLAS, TEXAS AND USED FOR CUTTING GLASS WITH A FINISHED EDGE. - Chambers-McKee Window Glass Company, Cutting House, Clay Avenue Extension, Jeannette, Westmoreland County, PA

  16. Modified soldering iron speeds cutting of synthetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, W. G., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Modified soldering iron cuts large lots of synthetic materials economically without leaving frayed or jagged edges. The soldering iron is modified by machining an axial slot in its heating element tip and mounting a cutting disk in it. An alternate design has an axially threaded bore in the tip to permit the use of various shapes of cutting blades.

  17. Time-resolved imaging of prompt-gamma rays for proton range verification using a knife-edge slit camera based on digital photon counters.

    PubMed

    Cambraia Lopes, Patricia; Clementel, Enrico; Crespo, Paulo; Henrotin, Sebastien; Huizenga, Jan; Janssens, Guillaume; Parodi, Katia; Prieels, Damien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Smeets, Julien; Stichelbaut, Frederic; Schaart, Dennis R

    2015-08-01

    Proton range monitoring may facilitate online adaptive proton therapy and improve treatment outcomes. Imaging of proton-induced prompt gamma (PG) rays using a knife-edge slit collimator is currently under investigation as a potential tool for real-time proton range monitoring. A major challenge in collimated PG imaging is the suppression of neutron-induced background counts. In this work, we present an initial performance test of two knife-edge slit camera prototypes based on arrays of digital photon counters (DPCs). PG profiles emitted from a PMMA target upon irradiation with a 160 MeV proton pencil beams (about 6.5 × 10(9) protons delivered in total) were measured using detector modules equipped with four DPC arrays coupled to BGO or LYSO : Ce crystal matrices. The knife-edge slit collimator and detector module were placed at 15 cm and 30 cm from the beam axis, respectively, in all cases. The use of LYSO : Ce enabled time-of-flight (TOF) rejection of background events, by synchronizing the DPC readout electronics with the 106 MHz radiofrequency signal of the cyclotron. The signal-to-background (S/B) ratio of 1.6 obtained with a 1.5 ns TOF window and a 3 MeV-7 MeV energy window was about 3 times higher than that obtained with the same detector module without TOF discrimination and 2 times higher than the S/B ratio obtained with the BGO module. Even 1 mm shifts of the Bragg peak position translated into clear and consistent shifts of the PG profile if TOF discrimination was applied, for a total number of protons as low as about 6.5 × 10(8) and a detector surface of 6.6 cm × 6.6 cm.

  18. Cutting food in terrestrial carnivores and herbivores.

    PubMed

    Sanson, Gordon

    2016-06-01

    Insects and mammals cut their food up into small pieces to facilitate ingestion and chemical digestion. Teeth and jaws act as cutting tools, but, unlike engineering tools designed for a specific purpose, must generally cope with substantial variation in food properties and work at many scales. Knowing how teeth and jaws work effectively requires an understanding of the cutting on the edges and the mechanisms that remove cut material. Variability and heterogeneity of diet properties are not well known, and, for example, may be higher and overlap more in the browsing and grazing categories of plant diets. A reinterpretation of tooth function in large mammal browsers and grazers is proposed. PMID:27274799

  19. Wear mechanism of diamond coated cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Leyendecker, T.; Lemmer, O.; Esser, S.

    1995-12-31

    Since Diamond Coatings were introduced into the market in 1989, five years experience in industrial applications of diamond coated cutting tools enables to present an overview of tool life and wear behavior of diamond coated cutting tools due to different cutting conditions and workpiece-materials. Machining reinforced plastics, presintered ceramic compacts, aluminum alloys, metal-matrix composites and graphite, different wear behavior occurs at the cutting edges of diamond coated tools. Having a good adhesion fatigue and chemical wear of Diamond coatings determines life time of the tools. By a profound pretreatment procedure CVD Diamond coated tools can compete with conventional PCD-tools.

  20. Identification of column edges of DNA fragments by using K-means clustering and mean algorithm on lane histograms of DNA agarose gel electrophoresis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turan, Muhammed K.; Sehirli, Eftal; Elen, Abdullah; Karas, Ismail R.

    2015-07-01

    Gel electrophoresis (GE) is one of the most used method to separate DNA, RNA, protein molecules according to size, weight and quantity parameters in many areas such as genetics, molecular biology, biochemistry, microbiology. The main way to separate each molecule is to find borders of each molecule fragment. This paper presents a software application that show columns edges of DNA fragments in 3 steps. In the first step the application obtains lane histograms of agarose gel electrophoresis images by doing projection based on x-axis. In the second step, it utilizes k-means clustering algorithm to classify point values of lane histogram such as left side values, right side values and undesired values. In the third step, column edges of DNA fragments is shown by using mean algorithm and mathematical processes to separate DNA fragments from the background in a fully automated way. In addition to this, the application presents locations of DNA fragments and how many DNA fragments exist on images captured by a scientific camera.

  1. Rock Segmentation through Edge Regrouping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Rockster is an algorithm that automatically identifies the locations and boundaries of rocks imaged by the rover hazard cameras (hazcams), navigation cameras (navcams), or panoramic cameras (pancams). The software uses edge detection and edge regrouping to identify closed contours that separate the rocks from the background.

  2. Cross-Cutting Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows cross-cutting fault scarps among graben features in northern Tempe Terra. Graben form in regions where the crust of the planet has been extended; such features are common in the regions surrounding the vast 'Tharsis Bulge' on Mars.

    Location near: 43.7oN, 90.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  3. Development of image mappers for hyperspectral biomedical imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Kester, Robert T.; Gao, Liang; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2010-01-01

    A new design and fabrication method is presented for creating large-format (>100 mirror facets) image mappers for a snapshot hyperspectral biomedical imaging system called an image mapping spectrometer (IMS). To verify this approach a 250 facet image mapper with 25 multiple-tilt angles is designed for a compact IMS that groups the 25 subpupils in a 5 × 5 matrix residing within a single collecting objective's pupil. The image mapper is fabricated by precision diamond raster fly cutting using surface-shaped tools. The individual mirror facets have minimal edge eating, tilt errors of <1 mrad, and an average roughness of 5.4 nm. PMID:20357875

  4. A case of "atypical homicidal" cut-throat injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar S, Ajay; Kumar Ms, Vinay; Babu, Yp Raghavendra; Prasad, Mahadeshwara

    2016-09-01

    Cut-throats can be of homicidal, suicidal or accidental origin. In cases of death from a cut-throat, distinguishing the cause is one of the important functions in crime investigation. The features that differentiate suicidal and homicidal cut-throat injuries are the presence of hesitation cuts, depth of wound, signs of struggle, edges of the wound, etc. In the case of a suicidal cut-throat, it is not uncommon to find hesitation cuts but in a homicidal cut-throat, it is uncommon. We present a case of a homicidal cut-throat injury but with hesitation cuts and tailing over the neck, unlike the classical description of homicidal cut-throat injury. This resulted from a curved, sharp and moderately heavy weapon. PMID:27381317

  5. A case of "atypical homicidal" cut-throat injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar S, Ajay; Kumar Ms, Vinay; Babu, Yp Raghavendra; Prasad, Mahadeshwara

    2016-09-01

    Cut-throats can be of homicidal, suicidal or accidental origin. In cases of death from a cut-throat, distinguishing the cause is one of the important functions in crime investigation. The features that differentiate suicidal and homicidal cut-throat injuries are the presence of hesitation cuts, depth of wound, signs of struggle, edges of the wound, etc. In the case of a suicidal cut-throat, it is not uncommon to find hesitation cuts but in a homicidal cut-throat, it is uncommon. We present a case of a homicidal cut-throat injury but with hesitation cuts and tailing over the neck, unlike the classical description of homicidal cut-throat injury. This resulted from a curved, sharp and moderately heavy weapon.

  6. Real-time prompt γ monitoring in spot-scanning proton therapy using imaging through a knife-edge-shaped slit.

    PubMed

    Bom, Victor; Joulaeizadeh, Leila; Beekman, Freek

    2012-01-21

    In this paper we report on Monte Carlo simulations to investigate real-time monitoring of the track depth profile in particle therapy by measuring prompt gamma ray emissions: a high sensitivity imaging system employing a knife-edge-shaped slit combined with a position-sensitive gamma detector was evaluated. Calculations to test this new concept were performed for a head-sized software phantom. Clear spatial correlation is shown between the distribution of gamma rays detected with energies above 1.5 MeV and the distribution of prompt gamma rays emitted from the phantom. The number of neutrons originating from nuclear reactions in the phantom that are detected at these high energies is small. Most importantly it is shown that under common therapy conditions enough data may be collected during one spot-step (of the order of 10 ms) to locate the distal dose edge with a 1σ accuracy of better than 1 mm. This indicates that simple slit cameras have high potential for accurate real-time particle therapy adjustment and may become a practical way to improve particle therapy accuracy.

  7. Cutting Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 November 2003

    The rims of two old and degraded impact craters are intersected by a graben in this THEMIS image taken near Mangala Fossa. Yardangs and low-albedo wind streaks are observed at the top of the image as well as interesting small grooves on the crater floor. The origin of these enigmatic grooves may be the result of mud or lava and volatile interactions. Variable surface textures observed in the bottom crater floor are the result of different aged lava flows.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -15.2, Longitude 219.2 East (140.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Gear-Cutting Tool for Screw-Compressor Rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Katsumi; Kawasaki, Kazumasa; Tamura, Hisashi

    A built-up hob for a screw-compressor rotor is proposed. The hob is composed of cutter blades and a hob head. The blade is cut out from a tempered planar plate of high speed tool steel by wire-cut electrodischarge machining (EDM). During the wire cutting process, the wire electrode has a fixed angle to ensure both the side and the end relief angle of the cutting edge, so that the rake face regrinding sharpens the cutting edge without changing the profile of the rake face. In other words, theoretically, the hob has no accuracy deterioration due to rake face regrinding. The formulae of rack tooth profile are derived from the female rotor tooth profile experssed by numerical formulae. Next, the fundamental helicoid of the hob the profile of the cutting edge of the blade are calculated. The hob was fabricated and the rotor hobbing was carried out.

  9. Two-dimensional imaging of edge-localized modes in KSTAR plasmas unperturbed and perturbed by n=1 external magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, J.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Tobias, B.; Donne, A. J. H.; Lee, J. H.; Jeon, Y. M.; Yoon, S. W.; Collaboration: KSTAR Team

    2012-05-15

    The temporal evolution of edge-localized modes (ELMs) has been studied using a 2-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system in the KSTAR tokamak. The ELMs are observed to evolve in three distinctive stages: the initial linear growth of multiple filamentary structures having a net poloidal rotation, the interim state of regularly spaced saturated filaments, and the final crash through a short transient phase characterized by abrupt changes in the relative amplitudes and distance among filaments. The crash phase, typically consisted of multiple bursts of a single filament, involves a complex dynamics, poloidal elongation of the bursting filament, development of a fingerlike bulge, and fast localized burst through the finger. Substantial alterations of the ELM dynamics, such as mode number, poloidal rotation, and crash time scale, have been observed under external magnetic perturbations with the toroidal mode number n= 1.

  10. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Imaging of Spherical and Flat Counterfaces of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Tribological Contacts: A Correlation of Surface Chemistry and Friction

    SciTech Connect

    A Konicek; C Jaye; M Hamilton; W Sawyer; D Fischer; R Carpick

    2011-12-31

    A recently installed synchrotron radiation near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) full field imaging electron spectrometer was used to spatially resolve the chemical changes of both counterfaces from an ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) tribological contact. A silicon flat and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sphere were both coated with UNCD, and employed to form two wear tracks on the flat in a linear reciprocating tribometer. The first wear track was produced using a new, unconditioned sphere whose surface was thus conditioned during this first experiment. This led to faster run-in and lower friction when producing a second wear track using the conditioned sphere. The large depth of field of the magnetically guided NEXAFS imaging detector enabled rapid, large area spectromicroscopic imaging of both the spherical and flat surfaces. Laterally resolved NEXAFS data from the tribological contact area revealed that both substrates had an as-grown surface layer that contained a higher fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon and oxygen which was mechanically removed. Unlike the flat, the film on the sphere showed evidence of having graphitic character, both before and after sliding. These results show that the graphitic character of the sphere is not solely responsible for low friction and short run-in. Rather, conditioning the sphere, likely by removing asperities and passivating dangling bonds, leads to lower friction with less chemical modification of the substrate in subsequent tests. The new NEXAFS imaging spectroscopy detector enabled a more complete understanding of the tribological phenomena by imaging, for the first time, the surface chemistry of the spherical counterface which had been in continual contact during wear track formation.

  11. General-purpose adaptive edge detector based on an empirical edge model

    SciTech Connect

    Breedlove, J.R. Jr.; Cantoni, V.

    1982-01-01

    We present a new approach to computer edge detection for image mensuration. Our technique uses data from the actual image to build an edge-detector template for a matched filtering algorithm. We show that the procedure is superior to classical, template matching techniques for a computer-generated image and for a very noisy x-ray image.

  12. Time-resolved imaging of prompt-gamma rays for proton range verification using a knife-edge slit camera based on digital photon counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambraia Lopes, Patricia; Clementel, Enrico; Crespo, Paulo; Henrotin, Sebastien; Huizenga, Jan; Janssens, Guillaume; Parodi, Katia; Prieels, Damien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Smeets, Julien; Stichelbaut, Frederic; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2015-08-01

    Proton range monitoring may facilitate online adaptive proton therapy and improve treatment outcomes. Imaging of proton-induced prompt gamma (PG) rays using a knife-edge slit collimator is currently under investigation as a potential tool for real-time proton range monitoring. A major challenge in collimated PG imaging is the suppression of neutron-induced background counts. In this work, we present an initial performance test of two knife-edge slit camera prototypes based on arrays of digital photon counters (DPCs). PG profiles emitted from a PMMA target upon irradiation with a 160 MeV proton pencil beams (about 6.5   ×   109 protons delivered in total) were measured using detector modules equipped with four DPC arrays coupled to BGO or LYSO : Ce crystal matrices. The knife-edge slit collimator and detector module were placed at 15 cm and 30 cm from the beam axis, respectively, in all cases. The use of LYSO : Ce enabled time-of-flight (TOF) rejection of background events, by synchronizing the DPC readout electronics with the 106 MHz radiofrequency signal of the cyclotron. The signal-to-background (S/B) ratio of 1.6 obtained with a 1.5 ns TOF window and a 3 MeV-7 MeV energy window was about 3 times higher than that obtained with the same detector module without TOF discrimination and 2 times higher than the S/B ratio obtained with the BGO module. Even 1 mm shifts of the Bragg peak position translated into clear and consistent shifts of the PG profile if TOF discrimination was applied, for a total number of protons as low as about 6.5   ×   108 and a detector surface of 6.6 cm  ×  6.6 cm.

  13. Quantum Max-flow/Min-cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shawn X.; Freedman, Michael H.; Sattath, Or; Stong, Richard; Minton, Greg

    2016-06-01

    The classical max-flow min-cut theorem describes transport through certain idealized classical networks. We consider the quantum analog for tensor networks. By associating an integral capacity to each edge and a tensor to each vertex in a flow network, we can also interpret it as a tensor network and, more specifically, as a linear map from the input space to the output space. The quantum max-flow is defined to be the maximal rank of this linear map over all choices of tensors. The quantum min-cut is defined to be the minimum product of the capacities of edges over all cuts of the tensor network. We show that unlike the classical case, the quantum max-flow=min-cut conjecture is not true in general. Under certain conditions, e.g., when the capacity on each edge is some power of a fixed integer, the quantum max-flow is proved to equal the quantum min-cut. However, concrete examples are also provided where the equality does not hold. We also found connections of quantum max-flow/min-cut with entropy of entanglement and the quantum satisfiability problem. We speculate that the phenomena revealed may be of interest both in spin systems in condensed matter and in quantum gravity.

  14. Edge conduction in vacuum glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Simko, T.M.; Collins, R.E.; Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-03-01

    Vacuum glazing is a form of low-conductance double glazing using in internal vacuum between the two glass sheets to eliminate heat transport by gas conduction and convection. An array of small support pillars separates the sheets; fused solder glass forms the edge seal. Heat transfer through the glazing occurs by radiation across the vacuum gap, conduction through the support pillars, and conduction through the bonded edge seal. Edge conduction is problematic because it affects stresses in the edge region, leading to possible failure of the glazing; in addition, excessive heat transfer because of thermal bridging in the edge region can lower overall window thermal performance and decrease resistance to condensation. Infrared thermography was used to analyze the thermal performance of prototype vacuum glazings, and, for comparison, atmospheric pressure superwindows. Research focused on mitigating the edge effects of vacuum glazings through the use of insulating trim, recessed edges, and framing materials. Experimentally validated finite-element and finite-difference modeling tools were used for thermal analysis of prototype vacuum glazing units and complete windows. Experimental measurements of edge conduction using infrared imaging were found to be in good agreement with finite-element modeling results for a given set of conditions. Finite-element modeling validates an analytic model developed for edge conduction.

  15. Micromachined cutting blade formed from {211}-oriented silicon

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Montague, Stephen

    2003-09-09

    A cutting blade is disclosed fabricated of micromachined silicon. The cutting blade utilizes a monocrystalline silicon substrate having a {211} crystalline orientation to form one or more cutting edges that are defined by the intersection of {211} crystalline planes of silicon with {111} crystalline planes of silicon. This results in a cutting blade which has a shallow cutting-edge angle .theta. of 19.5.degree.. The micromachined cutting blade can be formed using an anisotropic wet etching process which substantially terminates etching upon reaching the {111} crystalline planes of silicon. This allows multiple blades to be batch fabricated on a common substrate and separated for packaging and use. The micromachined cutting blade, which can be mounted to a handle in tension and optionally coated for increased wear resistance and biocompatibility, has multiple applications including eye surgery (LASIK procedure).

  16. Micromachined cutting blade formed from {211}-oriented silicon

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Fleming, legal representative, Carol; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Montague, Stephen

    2011-08-09

    A cutting blade is disclosed fabricated of micromachined silicon. The cutting blade utilizes a monocrystalline silicon substrate having a {211} crystalline orientation to form one or more cutting edges that are defined by the intersection of {211} crystalline planes of silicon with {111} crystalline planes of silicon. This results in a cutting blade which has a shallow cutting-edge angle .theta. of 19.5.degree.. The micromachined cutting blade can be formed using an anisotropic wet etching process which substantially terminates etching upon reaching the {111} crystalline planes of silicon. This allows multiple blades to be batch fabricated on a common substrate and separated for packaging and use. The micromachined cutting blade, which can be mounted to a handle in tension and optionally coated for increased wear resistance and biocompatibility, has multiple applications including eye surgery (LASIK procedure).

  17. Saddle-node dynamics for edge detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Y.F.

    1994-09-01

    The author demonstrates how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, this scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  18. An Efficient Ant-Based Edge Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydın, Doğan

    An efficient ant-based edge detector is presented. It is based on the distribution of ants on an image, ants try to find possible edges by using a state transition function based on 5x5 edge structures. Visual comparisons show that the proposed method gives finer details and thinner edges at lesser computational times when compared to earlier ant-based approaches. When compared to standard edge detectors, it shows robustness to Gaussian and Salt & Pepper noise and provides finer details than others with same parameter set in both clear and noisy images.

  19. SU-E-J-13: Six Degree of Freedom Image Fusion Accuracy for Cranial Target Localization On the Varian Edge Stereotactic Radiosurgery System: Comparison Between 2D/3D and KV CBCT Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H; Song, K; Chetty, I; Kim, J; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the 6 degree of freedom systematic deviations between 2D/3D and CBCT image registration with various imaging setups and fusion algorithms on the Varian Edge Linac. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with radio opaque targets embedded was scanned with CT slice thicknesses of 0.8, 1, 2, and 3mm. The 6 DOF systematic errors were assessed by comparing 2D/3D (kV/MV with CT) with 3D/3D (CBCT with CT) image registrations with different offset positions, similarity measures, image filters, and CBCT slice thicknesses (1 and 2 mm). The 2D/3D registration accuracy of 51 fractions for 26 cranial SRS patients was also evaluated by analyzing 2D/3D pre-treatment verification taken after 3D/3D image registrations. Results: The systematic deviations of 2D/3D image registration using kV- kV, MV-kV and MV-MV image pairs were within ±0.3mm and ±0.3° for translations and rotations with 95% confidence interval (CI) for a reference CT with 0.8 mm slice thickness. No significant difference (P>0.05) on target localization was observed between 0.8mm, 1mm, and 2mm CT slice thicknesses with CBCT slice thicknesses of 1mm and 2mm. With 3mm CT slice thickness, both 2D/3D and 3D/3D registrations performed less accurately in longitudinal direction than thinner CT slice thickness (0.60±0.12mm and 0.63±0.07mm off, respectively). Using content filter and using similarity measure of pattern intensity instead of mutual information, improved the 2D/3D registration accuracy significantly (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively). For the patient study, means and standard deviations of residual errors were 0.09±0.32mm, −0.22±0.51mm and −0.07±0.32mm in VRT, LNG and LAT directions, respectively, and 0.12°±0.46°, −0.12°±0.39° and 0.06°±0.28° in RTN, PITCH, and ROLL directions, respectively. 95% CI of translational and rotational deviations were comparable to those in phantom study. Conclusion: 2D/3D image registration provided on the Varian Edge radiosurgery, 6 DOF

  20. Cross-Cutting Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 25 August 2003

    The several linear cross-cutting grabens and collapse features observed in this THEMIS image illustrate the relative timing of a series of complex geologic processes as more recent events produce features that overlap and intersect older ones. Some impact craters are observed to be cut grabens, suggesting an older impact event compared to impact craters that appear fresh and unmodified.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 14.1, Longitude 236.3 East (123.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Making the Cut: Lattice Kirigami Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, Toen; Cho, Yigil; Gong, Xingting; Jung, Euiyeon; Sussman, Daniel M.; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall D.

    2014-12-01

    In this Letter we explore and develop a simple set of rules that apply to cutting, pasting, and folding honeycomb lattices. We consider origami-like structures that are extrinsically flat away from zero-dimensional sources of Gaussian curvature and one-dimensional sources of mean curvature, and our cutting and pasting rules maintain the intrinsic bond lengths on both the lattice and its dual lattice. We find that a small set of rules is allowed providing a framework for exploring and building kirigami—folding, cutting, and pasting the edges of paper.

  2. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    SciTech Connect

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-09-29

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  3. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    SciTech Connect

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2006-06-30

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  4. USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-02-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper

  5. AMBER-NACO aperture-synthesis imaging of the half-obscured central star and the edge-on disk of the red giant L2 Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Schertl, D.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Weigelt, G.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: The red giant L2 Pup started a dimming event in 1994, which is considered to be caused by the ejection of dust clouds. We present near-IR aperture-synthesis imaging of L2 Pup achieved by combining data from VLT/NACO and the AMBER instrument of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Our aim is to spatially resolve the innermost region of the circumstellar environment. Methods: We carried out speckle interferometric observations at 2.27 μm with VLT/NACO and long-baseline interferometric observations with VLTI/AMBER at 2.2-2.35 μm with baselines of 15-81 m. We also extracted an 8.7 μm image from the mid-IR VLTI instrument MIDI. Results: The diffraction-limited image obtained by bispectrum speckle interferometry with NACO with a spatial resolution of 57 mas shows an elongated component. The aperture-synthesis imaging combining the NACO speckle data and AMBER data with a spatial resolution of 5.6 × 7.3 mas further resolves not only this elongated component, but also the central star. The reconstructed image reveals that the elongated component is a nearly edge-on disk with a size of ~180 × 50 mas lying in the E-W direction, and furthermore, that the southern hemisphere of the central star is severely obscured by the equatorial dust lane of the disk. The angular size of the disk is consistent with the distance that the dust clouds that were ejected at the onset of the dimming event should have traveled by the time of our observations, if we assume that the dust clouds moved radially. This implies that the formation of the disk may be responsible for the dimming event. The 8.7 μm image with a spatial resolution of 220 mas extracted from the MIDI data taken in 2004 (seven years before the AMBER and NACO observations) shows an approximately spherical envelope without a signature of the disk. This suggests that the mass loss before the dimming event may have been spherical. Based on AMBER, NACO, and MIDI observations made with the Very Large Telescope

  6. Fast tracking using edge histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, Przemyslaw

    1997-04-01

    This paper proposes a new algorithm for tracking objects and objects boundaries. This algorithm was developed and applied in a system used for compositing computer generated images and real world video sequences, but can be applied in general in all tracking systems where accuracy and high processing speed are required. The algorithm is based on analysis of histograms obtained by summing along chosen axles pixels of edge segmented images. Edge segmentation is done by spatial convolution using gradient operator. The advantage of such an approach is that it can be performed in real-time using available on the market hardware convolution filters. After edge extraction and histograms computation, respective positions of maximums in edge intensity histograms, in current and previous frame, are compared and matched. Obtained this way information about displacement of histograms maximums, can be directly converted into information about changes of target boundaries positions along chosen axles.

  7. Optimal edge filters explain human blur detection.

    PubMed

    McIlhagga, William H; May, Keith A

    2012-01-01

    Edges are important visual features, providing many cues to the three-dimensional structure of the world. One of these cues is edge blur. Sharp edges tend to be caused by object boundaries, while blurred edges indicate shadows, surface curvature, or defocus due to relative depth. Edge blur also drives accommodation and may be implicated in the correct development of the eye's optical power. Here we use classification image techniques to reveal the mechanisms underlying blur detection in human vision. Observers were shown a sharp and a blurred edge in white noise and had to identify the blurred edge. The resultant smoothed classification image derived from these experiments was similar to a derivative of a Gaussian filter. We also fitted a number of edge detection models (MIRAGE, N(1), and N(3)(+)) and the ideal observer to observer responses, but none performed as well as the classification image. However, observer responses were well fitted by a recently developed optimal edge detector model, coupled with a Bayesian prior on the expected blurs in the stimulus. This model outperformed the classification image when performance was measured by the Akaike Information Criterion. This result strongly suggests that humans use optimal edge detection filters to detect edges and encode their blur. PMID:22984222

  8. Corn stalk orientation effect on mechanical cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Igathinathane, C.; Womac, A.R.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2010-07-01

    Research efforts that increase the efficiency of size reduction of biomass can lead to a significant energy saving. This paper deals with the determination of the effect of sample orientation with respect to cutting element and quantify the possible cutting energy reduction, utilising dry corn stalks as the test material (15%e20% wet basis). To evaluate the mechanical cutting characteristics of corn stalks, a Warnere Bratzler device was modified by replacing its blunt edged cutting element with one having a 30_ single bevel sharp knife edge. Cutting force-deformation characteristics obtained with a universal testing machine were analysed to evaluate the orientation effects at perpendicular (90o), inclined (45o), and parallel (0o) orientations on internodes and nodes for cutting force, energy, ultimate stress, and specific energy of corn stalks. The corn stalks cutting force-displacement characteristics were found to differ with orientation, and internode and node material difference. Overall, the peak failure force, and the total cutting energy of internodes and nodes varied significantly (P < 0.05) with stalk cross-sectional area. The specific energy values (total energy per unit cut area) of dry corn stalk internodes ranged from 11.3 to 23.5 kN m_1, and nodes from 8.6 to 14.0 kN m_1. The parallel orientation (along grain) compared to perpendicular (across grain) produced a significant reduction of the cutting stress and the specific energy to one tenth or better for internodes, and to about one-fifth for nodes.

  9. Images Revealing More Than a Thousand Words

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A unique sensor developed by ProVision Technologies, a NASA Commercial Space Center housed by the Institute for Technology Development, produces hyperspectral images with cutting-edge applications in food safety, skin health, forensics, and anti-terrorism activities. While hyperspectral imaging technology continues to make advances with ProVision Technologies, it has also been transferred to the commercial sector through a spinoff company, Photon Industries, Inc.

  10. Edge of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    On the night of 4 December 2013, a sequence of polar cap patches was captured by an all-sky airglow imager (ASI) in Longyearbyen, Norway (78.1°N, 15.5°E). The 630.0 nm airglow images from the ASI of 4 second exposure time, oversampled the emission of natural lifetime (with quenching) of at least ˜30 sec, introduce no observational blurring effects. By using such high-quality ASI images, we succeeded in visualizing an asymmetry in the gradients between the leading/trailing edges of the patches in a 2-D fashion. The gradient in the leading edge was found to be 2-3 times steeper than that in the trailing edge. We also identified fingerlike structures, appearing only along the trailing edge of the patches, whose horizontal scale size ranged from 55 to 210 km. These fingers are considered to be manifestations of plasma structuring through the gradient-drift instability (GDI), which is known to occur only along the trailing edge of patches. That is, the current 2-D observations visualized, for the first time, how GDI stirs the patch plasma and such a mixing process makes the trailing edge more gradual. This result strongly implies a close connection between the GDI-driven plasma stirring and the asymmetry in the large-scale shape of patches and then suggests that the fingerlike structures can be used as markers to estimate the fine-scale structure in the plasma flow within patches.

  11. Defect characterization in the diamond cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Zeren, Muzaffer . E-mail: zeren@kou.edu.tr; Karagoez, Sadi

    2006-08-15

    In this study, a general defect characterization in the diamond cutting tools used in natural stone cutting has been investigated. Transverse rupture tests were carried out with different matrix and diamond compositions. In these defect characterization studies on diamond cutting tool materials various microstructural analyses were performed using the techniques of light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersed X-ray spectrography (EDX) and image analysis (IA)

  12. Computing the Edge-Neighbour-Scattering Number of Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zongtian; Qi, Nannan; Yue, Xiaokui

    2013-11-01

    A set of edges X is subverted from a graph G by removing the closed neighbourhood N[X] from G. We denote the survival subgraph by G=X. An edge-subversion strategy X is called an edge-cut strategy of G if G=X is disconnected, a single vertex, or empty. The edge-neighbour-scattering number of a graph G is defined as ENS(G) = max{ω(G/X)-|X| : X is an edge-cut strategy of G}, where w(G=X) is the number of components of G=X. This parameter can be used to measure the vulnerability of networks when some edges are failed, especially spy networks and virus-infected networks. In this paper, we prove that the problem of computing the edge-neighbour-scattering number of a graph is NP-complete and give some upper and lower bounds for this parameter.

  13. Unified EDGE

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-18

    UEDGE is an interactive suite of physics packages using the Python or BASIS scripting systems. The plasma is described by time-dependent 2D plasma fluid equations that include equations for density, velocity, ion temperature, electron temperature, electrostatic potential, and gas density in the edge region of a magnetic fusion energy confinement device. Slab, cylindrical, and toroidal geometries are allowed, and closed and open magnetic field-line regions are included. Classical transport is assumed along magnetic field lines, and anomalous transport is assumed across field lines. Multi-charge state impurities can be included with the corresponding line-radiation energy loss. Although UEDGE is written in Fortran, for efficient execution and analysis of results, it utilizes either Python or BASIS scripting shells. Python is easily available for many platforms (http://www.Python.org/). The features and availability of BASIS are described in “Basis Manual Set” by P.F. Dubois, Z.C. Motteler, et al., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report UCRL-MA-1 18541, June, 2002 and http://basis.llnl.gov. BASIS has been reviewed and released by LLNL for unlimited distribution. The Python version utilizes PYBASIS scripts developed by D.P. Grote, LLNL. The Python version also uses MPPL code and MAC Perl script, available from the public-domain BASIS source above. The Forthon version of UEDGE uses the same source files, but utilizes Forthon to produce a Python-compatible source. Forthon has been developed by D.P. Grote at LBL (see http://hifweb.lbl.gov/Forthon/ and Grote et al. in the references below), and it is freely available. The graphics can be performed by any package importable to Python, such as PYGIST.

  14. Unified EDGE

    2007-06-18

    UEDGE is an interactive suite of physics packages using the Python or BASIS scripting systems. The plasma is described by time-dependent 2D plasma fluid equations that include equations for density, velocity, ion temperature, electron temperature, electrostatic potential, and gas density in the edge region of a magnetic fusion energy confinement device. Slab, cylindrical, and toroidal geometries are allowed, and closed and open magnetic field-line regions are included. Classical transport is assumed along magnetic field lines,more » and anomalous transport is assumed across field lines. Multi-charge state impurities can be included with the corresponding line-radiation energy loss. Although UEDGE is written in Fortran, for efficient execution and analysis of results, it utilizes either Python or BASIS scripting shells. Python is easily available for many platforms (http://www.Python.org/). The features and availability of BASIS are described in “Basis Manual Set” by P.F. Dubois, Z.C. Motteler, et al., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report UCRL-MA-1 18541, June, 2002 and http://basis.llnl.gov. BASIS has been reviewed and released by LLNL for unlimited distribution. The Python version utilizes PYBASIS scripts developed by D.P. Grote, LLNL. The Python version also uses MPPL code and MAC Perl script, available from the public-domain BASIS source above. The Forthon version of UEDGE uses the same source files, but utilizes Forthon to produce a Python-compatible source. Forthon has been developed by D.P. Grote at LBL (see http://hifweb.lbl.gov/Forthon/ and Grote et al. in the references below), and it is freely available. The graphics can be performed by any package importable to Python, such as PYGIST.« less

  15. Optimization of the K-edge imaging for vulnerable plaques using gold nanoparticles and energy-resolved photon counting detectors: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Alivov, Yahya; Baturin, Pavlo; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of different imaging parameters such as dose, beam energy, energy resolution, and number of energy bins on image quality of K-edge spectral computed tomography (CT) of gold nanoparticles (GNP) accumulated in an atherosclerotic plaque. Maximum likelihood technique was employed to estimate the concentration of GNP, which served as a targeted intravenous contrast material intended to detect the degree of plaque's inflammation. The simulations studies used a single slice parallel beam CT geometry with an X-ray beam energy ranging between 50 and 140 kVp. The synthetic phantoms included small (3 cm in diameter) cylinder and chest (33x24 cm2) phantom, where both phantoms contained tissue, calcium, and gold. In the simulation studies GNP quantification and background (calcium and tissue) suppression task were pursued. The X-ray detection sensor was represented by an energy resolved photon counting detector (e.g., CdZnTe) with adjustable energy bins. Both ideal and more realistic (12% FWHM energy resolution) implementations of photon counting detector were simulated. The simulations were performed for the CdZnTe detector with pixel pitch of 0.5-1 mm, which corresponds to the performance without significant charge sharing and cross-talk effects. The Rose model was employed to estimate the minimum detectable concentration of GNPs. A figure of merit (FOM) was used to optimize the X-ray beam energy (kVp) to achieve the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with respect to patient dose. As a result, the successful identification of gold and background suppression was demonstrated. The highest FOM was observed at 125 kVp X-ray beam energy. The minimum detectable GNP concentration was determined to be approximately 1.06 μmol/mL (0.21 mg/mL) for an ideal detector and about 2.5 μmol/mL (0.49 mg/mL) for more realistic (12% FWHM) detector. The studies show the optimal imaging parameters at lowest patient dose using an energy resolved photon counting detector

  16. Precision laser cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D.D.; Anglin, C.D.; Ramos, T.J.

    1990-01-19

    Many materials that are otherwise difficult to fabricate can be cut precisely with lasers. This presentation discusses the advantages and limitations of laser cutting for refractory metals, ceramics, and composites. Cutting in these materials was performed with a 400-W, pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Important cutting parameters such as beam power, pulse waveforms, cutting gases, travel speed, and laser coupling are outlined. The effects of process parameters on cut quality are evaluated. Three variables are used to determine the cut quality: kerf width, slag adherence, and metallurgical characteristics of recast layers and heat-affected zones around the cuts. Results indicate that ductile materials with good coupling characteristics (such as stainless steel alloys and tantalum) cut well. Materials lacking one or both of these properties (such as tungsten and ceramics) are difficult to cut without proper part design, stress relief, or coupling aids. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Portable cutting apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, R.F.

    1984-07-17

    A remotely operable, portable cutting apparatus detachably secured to the workpiece by laterally spaced clamp assemblies engagable with the workpiece on opposite sides of the intended line of cut. A reciprocal cutter head is mounted between the clamp assemblies and is provided with a traveling abrasive cutting wire adapted to sever the workpiece normal to the longitudinal axis thereof. Dust and debris are withdrawn from the cutting area by a vacuum force through a nozzle mounted on the cutting head.

  18. Plywood Inlays Thourgh CO2 Laser Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Margarida C.; Araujo, J. L.; Teixeira, M. Ribau; Rodrigues, F. Carvalho

    1989-07-01

    Furniture with inlays is rather expensive. This is so on two accounts: Firstly, furniture with inlays is generally manufactured with solid wood.Secondly,wood carving and figure cutting are both time consuming and they produce a high rate of rejections. To add to it all the cutting and carving of minute figures requires an outstanding craftmanship. In fact the craftman is in most instance the artist and also the manufacturer. While desiring that the high artistic level is maintained in the industry the search for new method to produce inlays for furniture in not son expensive materials and to produce them in a repetitive and flexible way laser cutting of plywood was found to be quite suitable. This paper presents the charts for CO2 laser cutting of both positive and negatives in several types of plywood. The main problem is not so much the cutting of the positive and negatives pieces but to be able to cut the piece in a way that the fitting is done without any problems caused by the ever present charring effect, which takes palce at the edges of the cut pieces. To minimise this aspect positive and negative pieces have to be cut under stringent focusing conditions and with slight different scales. The condittions for our machine are presented.

  19. A new method of edge detection for object recognition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maddox, Brian G.; Rhew, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    Traditional edge detection systems function by returning every edge in an input image. This can result in a large amount of clutter and make certain vectorization algorithms less accurate. Accuracy problems can then have a large impact on automated object recognition systems that depend on edge information. A new method of directed edge detection can be used to limit the number of edges returned based on a particular feature. This results in a cleaner image that is easier for vectorization. Vectorized edges from this process could then feed an object recognition system where the edge data would also contain information as to what type of feature it bordered.

  20. Hydrogen-free graphene edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kuang; Lee, Gun-Do; Robertson, Alex W.; Yoon, Euijoon; Warner, Jamie H.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene edges and their functionalization influence the electronic and magnetic properties of graphene nanoribbons. Theoretical calculations predict saturating graphene edges with hydrogen lower its energy and form a more stable structure. Despite the importance, experimental investigations of whether graphene edges are always hydrogen-terminated are limited. Here we study graphene edges produced by sputtering in vacuum and direct measurements of the C-C bond lengths at the edge show ~86% contraction relative to the bulk. Density functional theory reveals the contraction is attributed to the formation of a triple bond and the absence of hydrogen functionalization. Time-dependent images reveal temporary attachment of a single atom to the arm-chair C-C bond in a triangular configuration, causing expansion of the bond length, which then returns back to the contracted value once the extra atom moves on and the arm-chair edge is returned. Our results provide confirmation that non-functionalized graphene edges can exist in vacuum.

  1. Hydrogen-free graphene edges.

    PubMed

    He, Kuang; Lee, Gun-Do; Robertson, Alex W; Yoon, Euijoon; Warner, Jamie H

    2014-01-01

    Graphene edges and their functionalization influence the electronic and magnetic properties of graphene nanoribbons. Theoretical calculations predict saturating graphene edges with hydrogen lower its energy and form a more stable structure. Despite the importance, experimental investigations of whether graphene edges are always hydrogen-terminated are limited. Here we study graphene edges produced by sputtering in vacuum and direct measurements of the C-C bond lengths at the edge show ~86% contraction relative to the bulk. Density functional theory reveals the contraction is attributed to the formation of a triple bond and the absence of hydrogen functionalization. Time-dependent images reveal temporary attachment of a single atom to the arm-chair C-C bond in a triangular configuration, causing expansion of the bond length, which then returns back to the contracted value once the extra atom moves on and the arm-chair edge is returned. Our results provide confirmation that non-functionalized graphene edges can exist in vacuum.

  2. Cutting state identification

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, B.S.; Minis, I.; Rokni, M.

    1997-12-31

    Cutting states associated with the orthogonal cutting of stiff cylinders are identified through an analysis of the singular values of a Toeplitz matrix of third order cumulants of acceleration measurements. The ratio of the two pairs of largest singular values is shown to differentiate between light cutting, medium cutting, pre-chatter and chatter states. Sequences of cutting experiments were performed in which either depth of cut or turning frequency was varied. Two sequences of experiments with variable turning frequency and five with variable depth of cut, 42 cutting experiments in all, provided a database for the calculation of third order cumulants. Ratios of singular values of cumulant matrices find application in the analysis of control of orthogonal cutting.

  3. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi

    2004-07-31

    We have tested the loop elevation system. We raised the mast to approximately 25 to 30 degrees from horizontal. All went well. However, while lowering the mast, it moved laterally a couple of degrees. Upon visual inspection, severe spalling of the concrete on the face of the support pillar, and deformation of the steel support structure was observed. At this time, the facility is ready for testing in the horizontal position. A new air compressor has been received and set in place for the ACTS test loop. A new laboratory has been built near the ACTS test loop Roughened cups and rotors for the viscometer (RS300) were obtained. Rheologies of aqueous foams were measured using three different cup-rotor assemblies that have different surface roughness. The relationship between surface roughness and foam rheology was investigated. Re-calibration of nuclear densitometers has been finished. The re-calibration was also performed with 1% surfactant foam. A new cuttings injection system was installed at the bottom of the injection tower. It replaced the previous injection auger. A mechanistic model for cuttings transport with aerated mud has been developed. Cuttings transport mechanisms with aerated water at various conditions were experimentally investigated. A total of 39 tests were performed. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental measurements show a satisfactory agreement. Results from the ultrasonic monitoring system indicated that we could distinguish between different sand levels. We also have devised ways to achieve consistency of performance by securing the sensors in the caps in exactly the same manner as long as the sensors are not removed from the caps. A preliminary test was conducted on the main flow loop at 100 gpm flow rate and 20 lb/min cuttings injection rate. The measured bed thickness using the ultrasonic method showed a satisfactory agreement with nuclear densitometer readings. Thirty different data points were collected after the test

  4. Vision-based Nano Robotic System for High-throughput Non-embedded Cell Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Wanfeng; Lu, Haojian; Wan, Wenfeng; Fukuda, Toshio; Shen, Yajing

    2016-03-01

    Cell cutting is a significant task in biology study, but the highly productive non-embedded cell cutting is still a big challenge for current techniques. This paper proposes a vision-based nano robotic system and then realizes automatic non-embedded cell cutting with this system. First, the nano robotic system is developed and integrated with a nanoknife inside an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Then, the positions of the nanoknife and the single cell are recognized, and the distance between them is calculated dynamically based on image processing. To guarantee the positioning accuracy and the working efficiency, we propose a distance-regulated speed adapting strategy, in which the moving speed is adjusted intelligently based on the distance between the nanoknife and the target cell. The results indicate that the automatic non-embedded cutting is able to be achieved within 1–2 mins with low invasion benefiting from the high precise nanorobot system and the sharp edge of nanoknife. This research paves a way for the high-throughput cell cutting at cell’s natural condition, which is expected to make significant impact on the biology studies, especially for the in-situ analysis at cellular and subcellular scale, such as cell interaction investigation, neural signal transduction and low invasive cell surgery.

  5. Vision-based Nano Robotic System for High-throughput Non-embedded Cell Cutting

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Wanfeng; Lu, Haojian; Wan, Wenfeng; Fukuda, Toshio; Shen, Yajing

    2016-01-01

    Cell cutting is a significant task in biology study, but the highly productive non-embedded cell cutting is still a big challenge for current techniques. This paper proposes a vision-based nano robotic system and then realizes automatic non-embedded cell cutting with this system. First, the nano robotic system is developed and integrated with a nanoknife inside an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Then, the positions of the nanoknife and the single cell are recognized, and the distance between them is calculated dynamically based on image processing. To guarantee the positioning accuracy and the working efficiency, we propose a distance-regulated speed adapting strategy, in which the moving speed is adjusted intelligently based on the distance between the nanoknife and the target cell. The results indicate that the automatic non-embedded cutting is able to be achieved within 1–2 mins with low invasion benefiting from the high precise nanorobot system and the sharp edge of nanoknife. This research paves a way for the high-throughput cell cutting at cell’s natural condition, which is expected to make significant impact on the biology studies, especially for the in-situ analysis at cellular and subcellular scale, such as cell interaction investigation, neural signal transduction and low invasive cell surgery. PMID:26941071

  6. Vision-based Nano Robotic System for High-throughput Non-embedded Cell Cutting.

    PubMed

    Shang, Wanfeng; Lu, Haojian; Wan, Wenfeng; Fukuda, Toshio; Shen, Yajing

    2016-01-01

    Cell cutting is a significant task in biology study, but the highly productive non-embedded cell cutting is still a big challenge for current techniques. This paper proposes a vision-based nano robotic system and then realizes automatic non-embedded cell cutting with this system. First, the nano robotic system is developed and integrated with a nanoknife inside an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Then, the positions of the nanoknife and the single cell are recognized, and the distance between them is calculated dynamically based on image processing. To guarantee the positioning accuracy and the working efficiency, we propose a distance-regulated speed adapting strategy, in which the moving speed is adjusted intelligently based on the distance between the nanoknife and the target cell. The results indicate that the automatic non-embedded cutting is able to be achieved within 1-2 mins with low invasion benefiting from the high precise nanorobot system and the sharp edge of nanoknife. This research paves a way for the high-throughput cell cutting at cell's natural condition, which is expected to make significant impact on the biology studies, especially for the in-situ analysis at cellular and subcellular scale, such as cell interaction investigation, neural signal transduction and low invasive cell surgery. PMID:26941071

  7. Comparative Investigation of Guided Fuzzy Clustering and Mean Shift Clustering for Edge Detection in Electrical Resistivity Tomography Images of Mineral Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Wil; Wilkinson, Paul; Chambers, Jon; Bai, Li

    2014-05-01

    Geophysical surveying using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be used as a rapid non-intrusive method to investigate mineral deposits [1]. One of the key challenges with this approach is to find a robust automated method to assess and characterise deposits on the basis of an ERT image. Recent research applying edge detection techniques has yielded a framework that can successfully locate geological interfaces in ERT images using a minimal assumption data clustering technique, the guided fuzzy clustering method (gfcm) [2]. Non-parametric clustering techniques are statistically grounded methods of image segmentation that do not require any assumptions about the distribution of data under investigation. This study is a comparison of two such methods to assess geological structure based on the resistivity images. In addition to gfcm, a method called mean-shift clustering [3] is investigated with comparisons directed at accuracy, computational expense, and degree of user interaction. Neither approach requires the number of clusters as input (a common parameter and often impractical), rather they are based on a similar theory that data can be clustered based on peaks in the probability density function (pdf) of the data. Each local maximum in these functions represents the modal value of a particular population corresponding to a cluster and as such the data are assigned based on their relationships to these model values. The two methods differ in that gfcm approximates the pdf using kernel density estimation and identifies population means, assigning cluster membership probabilities to each resistivity value in the model based on its distance from the distribution averages. Whereas, in mean-shift clustering, the density function is not calculated, but a gradient ascent method creates a vector that leads each datum towards high density distributions iteratively using weighted kernels to calculate locally dense regions. The only parameter needed in both methods

  8. Efficient edge-guided full-waveform inversion by Canny edge detection and bilateral filtering algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shiming; Zhang, Haijiang

    2016-11-01

    It is known full-waveform inversion (FWI) is generally ill-conditioned and various strategies including pre-conditioning and regularizing the inversion system have been proposed to obtain a reliable estimation of the velocity model. Here, we propose a new edge-guided strategy for FWI in frequency domain to efficiently and reliably estimate velocity models with structures of the size similar to the seismic wavelength. The edges of the velocity model at the current iteration are first detected by the Canny edge detection algorithm that is widely used in image processing. Then, the detected edges are used for guiding the calculation of FWI gradient as well as enforcing edge-preserving total variation (TV) regularization for next iteration of FWI. Bilateral filtering is further applied to remove noise but keep edges of the FWI gradient. The proposed edge-guided FWI in the frequency domain with edge-guided TV regularization and bilateral filtering is designed to preserve model edges that are recovered from previous iterations as well as from lower frequency waveforms when FWI is conducted from lower to higher frequencies. The new FWI method is validated using the complex Marmousi model that contains several steeply dipping fault zones and hundreds of horizons. Compared to FWI without edge guidance, our proposed edge-guided FWI recovers velocity model anomalies and edges much better. Unlike previous image-guided FWI or edge-guided TV regularization strategies, our method does not require migrating seismic data, thus is more efficient for real applications.

  9. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy imaging for laterally resolved speciation of selenium in fresh roots and leaves of wheat and rice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Menzies, Neal W.; Lombi, Enzo; McKenna, Brigid A.; James, Simon; Tang, Caixian; Kopittke, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of selenium (Se) species within plant tissues will assist in understanding the mechanisms of Se uptake and translocation, but in situ analysis of fresh and highly hydrated plant tissues is challenging. Using synchrotron-based fluorescence X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) imaging to provide laterally resolved data, the speciation of Se in fresh roots and leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) supplied with 1 μM of either selenate or selenite was investigated. For plant roots exposed to selenate, the majority of the Se was efficiently converted to C-Se-C compounds (i.e. methylselenocysteine or selenomethionine) as selenate was transported radially through the root cylinder. Indeed, even in the rhizodermis which is exposed directly to the bulk solution, only 12–31% of the Se was present as uncomplexed selenate. The C-Se-C compounds were probably sequestered within the roots, whilst much of the remaining uncomplexed Se was translocated to the leaves—selenate accounting for 52–56% of the total Se in the leaves. In a similar manner, for plants exposed to selenite, the Se was efficiently converted to C-Se-C compounds within the roots, with only a small proportion of uncomplexed selenite observed within the outer root tissues. This resulted in a substantial decrease in translocation of Se from the roots to leaves of selenite-exposed plants. This study provides important information for understanding the mechanisms responsible for the uptake and subsequent transformation of Se in plants. PMID:26019258

  10. BREAKS IN THIN AND THICK DISKS OF EDGE-ON GALAXIES IMAGED IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Comeron, Sebastien; Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Laine, Jarkko; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Knapen, Johan H.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Sheth, Kartik; Munoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Hinz, Joannah L.; Regan, Michael W.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Seibert, Mark; Ho, Luis C.; Mizusawa, Trisha; Holwerda, Benne

    2012-11-10

    Breaks in the radial luminosity profiles of galaxies have until now been mostly studied averaged over disks. Here, we study separately breaks in thin and thick disks in 70 edge-on galaxies using imaging from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. We built luminosity profiles of the thin and thick disks parallel to midplanes and we found that thin disks often truncate (77%). Thick disks truncate less often (31%), but when they do, their break radius is comparable with that in the thin disk. This suggests either two different truncation mechanisms-one of dynamical origin affecting both disks simultaneously and another one only affecting the thin disk-or a single mechanism that creates a truncation in one disk or in both depending on some galaxy property. Thin disks apparently antitruncate in around 40% of galaxies. However, in many cases, these antitruncations are an artifact caused by the superposition of a thin disk and a thick disk, with the latter having a longer scale length. We estimate the real thin disk antitruncation fraction to be less than 15%. We found that the ratio of the thick and thin stellar disk mass is roughly constant (0.2 < M{sub T} /M{sub t} < 0.7) for circular velocities v{sub c} > 120 km s{sup -1}, but becomes much larger at smaller velocities. We hypothesize that this is due to a combination of a high efficiency of supernova feedback and a slower dynamical evolution in lower-mass galaxies causing stellar thin disks to be younger and less massive than in higher-mass galaxies.

  11. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy imaging for laterally resolved speciation of selenium in fresh roots and leaves of wheat and rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Menzies, Neal W; Lombi, Enzo; McKenna, Brigid A; James, Simon; Tang, Caixian; Kopittke, Peter M

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of selenium (Se) species within plant tissues will assist in understanding the mechanisms of Se uptake and translocation, but in situ analysis of fresh and highly hydrated plant tissues is challenging. Using synchrotron-based fluorescence X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) imaging to provide laterally resolved data, the speciation of Se in fresh roots and leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) supplied with 1 μM of either selenate or selenite was investigated. For plant roots exposed to selenate, the majority of the Se was efficiently converted to C-Se-C compounds (i.e. methylselenocysteine or selenomethionine) as selenate was transported radially through the root cylinder. Indeed, even in the rhizodermis which is exposed directly to the bulk solution, only 12-31% of the Se was present as uncomplexed selenate. The C-Se-C compounds were probably sequestered within the roots, whilst much of the remaining uncomplexed Se was translocated to the leaves-selenate accounting for 52-56% of the total Se in the leaves. In a similar manner, for plants exposed to selenite, the Se was efficiently converted to C-Se-C compounds within the roots, with only a small proportion of uncomplexed selenite observed within the outer root tissues. This resulted in a substantial decrease in translocation of Se from the roots to leaves of selenite-exposed plants. This study provides important information for understanding the mechanisms responsible for the uptake and subsequent transformation of Se in plants.

  12. Detection of Subsurface Material Separation in Shuttle Orbiter Slip-Side Joggle Region of the Wing Leading Edge using Infrared Imaging Data from Arc Jet Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Walker, Sandra P.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether infrared imaging (IR) surface temperature data obtained during arc-jet tests of Space Shuttle Orbiter s reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) wing leading edge panel slip-side joggle region could be used to detect presence of subsurface material separation, and if so, to determine when separation occurs during the simulated entry profile. Recent thermostructural studies have indicated thermally induced interlaminar normal stress concentrations at the substrate/coating interface in the curved joggle region can result in local subsurface material separation, with the separation predicted to occur during approach to peak heating during reentry. The present study was an attempt to determine experimentally when subsurface material separations occur. A simplified thermal model of a flat RCC panel with subsurface material separation was developed and used to infer general surface temperature trends due to the presence of subsurface material separation. IR data from previously conducted arc-jet tests on three test specimens were analyzed: one without subsurface material separation either pre or post test, one with pre test separation, and one with separation developing during test. The simplified thermal model trend predictions along with comparison of experimental IR data of the three test specimens were used to successfully infer material separation from the arc-jet test data. Furthermore, for the test specimen that had developed subsurface material separation during the arc-jet tests, the initiation of separation appeared to occur during the ramp up to the peak heating condition, where test specimen temperature went from 2500 to 2800 F.

  13. Cuts and puncture wounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... MINOR CUTS Wash your hands with soap or antibacterial cleanser to prevent infection. Then, wash the cut ... Use direct pressure to stop the bleeding. Apply antibacterial ointment and a clean bandage that will not ...

  14. Differential Search Algorithm Based Edge Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunen, M. A.; Civicioglu, P.; Beşdok, E.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new method has been presented for the extraction of edge information by using Differential Search Optimization Algorithm. The proposed method is based on using a new heuristic image thresholding method for edge detection. The success of the proposed method has been examined on fusion of two remote sensed images. The applicability of the proposed method on edge detection and image fusion problems have been analysed in detail and the empirical results exposed that the proposed method is useful for solving the mentioned problems.

  15. Mall Schools: A New Era for Cutting Edge Alternative Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalker, Christopher Scott; Stelsel, Kirk

    2008-01-01

    Education Resource Centers (ERCs) were established by the Simon Youth Foundation (SYF) as a means of providing economic opportunities and life choices for youth considered at risk through focused programs and initiatives with public school partners. In the current academic year there are 21 ERCs operating primarily in Simon Property Group (SPG)…

  16. Sport and Technology: Ethics on the Cutting Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, William H.

    This paper deals with growing ethical dilemmas in sport as technology advances. Three aspects of sport are discussed: (l) the perpetual conflict between process (training) and product (the actual contest); (2) technophobia, the fear of the new world of technology; and (3) "technosport" or technological training. It is necessary to understand that…

  17. Strengths-Based Education: Probing Its Limits. The Cutting Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clabaugh, Gary K.

    2005-01-01

    Except for Timothy Hodges and James Harter's restrained research summary, the feature articles in this issue are evangelical in their praise of strengths-based education. It is, they assure us, a major innovation. English teacher Alexis Onishi writes that StrengthsQuest, a specific strengths-based approach, will have "a lifelong impact on how…

  18. Our experience on Actovegin, is it cutting edge?

    PubMed

    Lee, P; Rattenberry, A; Connelly, S; Nokes, L

    2011-04-01

    Muscle injuries are one of the most common sport related injuries, their incidence varying from 30-55% in all sports injuries. They account for the loss of 90 training days and 15 matches per club per season in elite football (soccer). In recent years, the use of Actovegin® in sports medicine has caused a lot of controversy in many sports disciplines. Although it is unlikely for this deproteinised substance to have oxygen-enhancing capacity, there is an anecdotal belief that Actovegin® can increase an athlete's performance. Actovegin® is produced by Nycomed Austria GmbH and has been used by doctors across Europe, China and Russia for over 60 years. Nevertheless, very little is known regarding the effects of Actovegin on muscle injuries. This article reviews the current evidence on Actovegin®, its legal status with sports governing bodies and its potential role in sport injuries. We will also report our experience with this drug in treating muscle injuries. In this pilot study, players in the Actovegin treatment group were able to return to play 8 days earlier (95% CI -1.249 to -14.7510) compared to physiotherapy alone (p=0.033). No adverse reactions were recorded in any of the participants. PMID:21271496

  19. Mobile Learning on Campus: Balancing on the Cutting Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2010-01-01

    As soon as the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) announced last May that it would be giving all 400 incoming freshmen Apple iPads, a lively debate broke out online at TUAW.com (The Unofficial Apple Weblog) between people who saw it as a marketing gimmick to attract students and others who believed it was an honest attempt to implement a new…

  20. New Glass Serves as Window to Cutting-edge Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Since 1997, Marshall Space Flight Center s Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) facility has been used to study the characteristics of new metals, ceramics, and glass compounds - in both their hot molten states and as they are cooled to form solid materials. The ESL provides a unique way to test such substances without having to make contact with a container or crucible that would contaminate the sample. Simply put, objects analyzed in the levitator's chamber float in mid-air with no visible means of support or containment, suspended only by static electricity. While a sample object is levitated, a laser beam heats it until it melts so that scientists can measure its physical properties without interference from a container.

  1. The surgeon and self-harm: at the cutting edge.

    PubMed

    Kinahan, James C; MacHale, Siobhan

    2014-12-01

    Surgeons frequently treat the consequences of self-harm. Self-harm is a common problem and presentations to Irish hospitals are increasing. It increases the risk of suicide and is associated with long term morbidity. Appropriate management can improve the prognosis. Surgeons require a number of skills to appropriately manage patients who self-harm. In this review we outline those skills including diagnosis, communication, capacity and risk assessment.

  2. Boys Booked on Barbershops: A Cutting-Edge Literacy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinson, Sabrina A.

    2007-01-01

    The barbershop is a community institution, one of the most familiar and stable businesses in any neighborhood. Men and boys frequent barbershops, and barbers get to know their customers by name and personality. Boys Booked on Barbershops (B-BOB) is an innovative literacy program designed to make the most of a naturally occurring opportunity: the…

  3. Microtubule-severing enzymes at the cutting edge

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, David J.; Ross, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-dependent severing of microtubules was first reported in Xenopus laevis egg extracts in 1991. Two years later this observation led to the purification of the first known microtubule-severing enzyme, katanin. Katanin homologs have now been identified throughout the animal kingdom and in plants. Moreover, members of two closely related enzyme subfamilies, spastin and fidgetin, have been found to sever microtubules and might act alongside katanins in some contexts (Roll-Mecak and McNally, 2010; Yu et al., 2008; Zhang et al., 2007). Over the past few years, it has become clear that microtubule-severing enzymes contribute to a wide range of cellular activities including mitosis and meiosis, morphogenesis, cilia biogenesis and disassembly, and migration. Thus, this group of enzymes is revealing itself to be among the most important of the microtubule regulators. This Commentary focuses on our growing understanding of how microtubule-severing enzymes contribute to the organization and dynamics of diverse microtubule arrays, as well as the structural and biophysical characteristics that afford them the unique capacity to catalyze the removal of tubulin from the interior microtubule lattice. Our goal is to provide a broader perspective, focusing on a limited number of particularly informative, representative and/or timely findings. PMID:22595526

  4. Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer: The cutting-edge

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lian-Wen; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer cells differs from that of normal epithelial cells. Upregulated aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) in gastric cancer meeting the demands of cell proliferation is associated with genetic mutations, epigenetic modification and proteomic alteration. Understanding the mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis may contribute to our knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis. Metabolomic studies offer novel, convenient and practical tools in the search for new biomarkers for early detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and chemosensitivity prediction of gastric cancer. Interfering with the process of glycolysis in cancer cells may provide a new and promising therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer. In this article, we present a brief review of recent studies of glucose metabolism in gastric cancer, with primary focus on the clinical applications of new biomarkers and their potential therapeutic role in gastric cancer. PMID:26877609

  5. Cutting Edge: IL-36 Receptor Promotes Resolution of Intestinal Damage.

    PubMed

    Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Harusato, Akihito; Nishio, Hikaru; Flannigan, Kyle L; Ngo, Vu; Leoni, Giovanna; Neumann, Philipp-Alexander; Geem, Duke; Lili, Loukia N; Ramadas, Ravisankar A; Chassaing, Benoit; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Kohlmeier, Jacob E; Parkos, Charles A; Towne, Jennifer E; Nusrat, Asma; Denning, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    IL-1 family members are central mediators of host defense. In this article, we show that the novel IL-1 family member IL-36γ was expressed during experimental colitis and human inflammatory bowel disease. Germ-free mice failed to induce IL-36γ in response to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced damage, suggesting that gut microbiota are involved in its induction. Surprisingly, IL-36R-deficient (Il1rl2(-/-)) mice exhibited defective recovery following DSS-induced damage and impaired closure of colonic mucosal biopsy wounds, which coincided with impaired neutrophil accumulation in the wound bed. Failure of Il1rl2(-/-) mice to recover from DSS-induced damage was associated with a profound reduction in IL-22 expression, particularly by colonic neutrophils. Defective recovery of Il1rl2(-/-) mice could be rescued by an aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist, which was sufficient to restore IL-22 expression and promote full recovery from DSS-induced damage. These findings implicate the IL-36/IL-36R axis in the resolution of intestinal mucosal wounds.

  6. The Cutting Edge: Workplace English. Section I: Project Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Paso Community Coll., TX. Literacy Center.

    A model workplace literacy program of El Paso Community College (Texas), in cooperation with Levi Strauss and Company, is described. The partnership designed a three-part, job-specific, video-based curriculum in English as a Second Language (ESL) for garment industry workers, implemented in seven local plants. The 18-month program had these goals:…

  7. The Cutting Edge Technology Report: Designing Smarter Schools. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This videotape highlights the extent to which school buildings are deteriorating in America and the problems this causes for teaching and learning, describes the Energy Smart School campaign, and details the factors needed in building an Energy Smart School. To build schools that last and to recoup some of the building expense, it suggests…

  8. Non-coding RNAs, the cutting edge of histone messages

    PubMed Central

    Köhn, Marcel; Hüttelmaier, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In metazoan the 3′-end processing of histone mRNAs is a conserved process involving the concerted action of many protein factors and the non-coding U7 snRNA. Recently, we identified that the processing of histone pre-mRNAs is promoted by an additional ncRNA, the Y3-derived Y3** RNA. U7 modulates the association of the U7 snRNP whereas Y3** promotes recruitment of CPSF (cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor) proteins to nascent histone transcripts at histone locus bodies (HLBs) in mammals. This enhances the 3′-end cleavage of nascent histone pre-mRNAs and modulates HLB assembly. Here we discuss new insights in the role of ncRNAs in the spatiotemporal control of histone synthesis. We propose that ncRNAs scaffold the formation of functional protein-RNA complexes and their sequential deposition on nascent histone pre-mRNAs at HLBs. These findings add to the multiple roles of ncRNAs in controlling gene expression and may provide new avenues for targeting histone synthesis in cancer. PMID:26909464

  9. EPA's Research at the Cutting Edge of Exposure Science

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) serves as the lead for exposure science across U.S. Federal agencies. Exposure science has gained importance with increased appreciation of environmental influences on population disease burden. At a time when population ...

  10. Continuing Education at the Cutting Edge: Promoting Transformative Knowledge Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, Carol L.

    2007-01-01

    As the evidence-based practice movement gains momentum, continuing education practitioners increasingly confront the challenge of developing and conducting opportunities for achieving research uptake. Recent thinking invites new approaches to continuing education for health professionals, with due consideration of what knowledge merits uptake by…

  11. Gesture Is at the Cutting Edge of Early Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozcaliskan, S.; Goldin-Meadow, S.

    2005-01-01

    Children who produce one word at a time often use gesture to supplement their speech, turning a single word into an utterance that conveys a sentence-like meaning ('eat'+point at cookie). Interestingly, the age at which children first produce supplementary gesture-speech combinations of this sort reliably predicts the age at which they first…

  12. Cutting edge science: Laser surgery illuminates viscoelasticity of merotelic kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence in eukaryotic cells suggests that mechanical forces are essential for building a robust mitotic apparatus and correcting inappropriate chromosome attachments. In this issue, Cojoc et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol., http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201506011) use laser microsurgery in vivo to measure and study the viscoelastic properties of kinetochores. PMID:27002164

  13. The Educational Legacy of Ronald Reagan. The Cutting Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clabaugh, Gary K.

    2004-01-01

    At this writing former President Reagan has just been interred with much pomp, plus hours of nationally televised praise. Some enthusiasts have even proposed carving the former president's countenance into Mount Rushmore. History will decide whether or not Mr. Reagan ranks as a great, or even good, president. But the indecorous rush to laud his…

  14. Cutting edge science: Laser surgery illuminates viscoelasticity of merotelic kinetochores.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Simon; Gachet, Yannick; Tournier, Sylvie

    2016-03-28

    Increasing evidence in eukaryotic cells suggests that mechanical forces are essential for building a robust mitotic apparatus and correcting inappropriate chromosome attachments. In this issue, Cojoc et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol., http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201506011) use laser microsurgery in vivo to measure and study the viscoelastic properties of kinetochores.

  15. The Cutting Edge of High-Temperature Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA s Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program was formed in 1999 at Glenn Research Center to manage an important national propulsion program for the Space Agency. The UEET program s focus is on developing innovative technologies to enable intelligent, environmentally friendly, and clean-burning turbine engines capable of reducing harmful emissions while maintaining high performance and increasing reliability. Seven technology projects exist under the program, with each project working towards specific goals to provide new technology for propulsion. One of these projects, Materials and Structures for High Performance, is concentrating on developing and demonstrating advanced high-temperature materials to enable high-performance, high-efficiency, and environmentally compatible propulsion systems. Materials include ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor liners and turbine vanes, disk alloys, turbine airfoil material systems, high-temperature polymer matrix composites, and lightweight materials for static engine structures.

  16. The Cutting Edge: Sharpening Faculty Skills in a Changing World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, Rosemary G.; Forester, Glenn

    As part of its faculty development efforts, Brevard Community College (BCC) offers a 4- to 6-week Return To Industry (RTI) summer program for faculty interested in updating and expanding their skills and knowledge base in order to remain current with changing technology. The RTI program has the following characteristics: (1) it is open to faculty…

  17. Edge-Aware BMA Filters.

    PubMed

    Guang Deng

    2016-01-01

    There has been continuous research in edge-aware filters which have found many applications in computer vision and image processing. In this paper, we propose a principled-approach for the development of edge-aware filters. The proposed approach is based on two well-established principles: 1) optimal parameter estimation and 2) Bayesian model averaging (BMA). Using this approach, we formulate the problem of filtering a pixel in a local pixel patch as an optimal estimation problem. Since a pixel belongs to multiple local patches, there are multiple estimates of the same pixel. We combine these estimates into a final estimate using BMA. We demonstrate the versatility of this approach by developing a family of BMA filters based on different settings of cost functions and log-likelihood and log-prior functions. We also present a new interpretation of the guided filter and develop a BMA guided filter which includes the guided filter as a special case. We show that BMA filters can produce similar smoothing results as those of the state-of-the-art edge-aware filters. Two BMA filters are computationally as efficient as the guided filter which is one of the fastest edge-aware filters. We also demonstrate that the BMA guided filter is better than the guided filter in preserving sharp edges. A new feature of the BMA guided filter is that the filtered image is similar to that produced by a clustering process.

  18. Comparison of edges detected at different polarisations in MAESTRO data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, Ronald G.; Harley, Peter J.; Quegan, Shaun

    1992-01-01

    Edge detection would appear to be a crucial tool for analyzing multi-polarized, multi-frequency, and multi-temporal Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. Edge structure provides a simple means for comparing different polarizations and frequencies, and for detecting changes over time. Due to the fact that edges and segments (homogeneous regions) are dual concepts, edge detection has an important role to play in identifying segments within which mean backscatter measurements for use in image classification can be made. As part of a general investigation into edge detection in SAR imagery, an initial investigation was carried out into the detectability and nature of edges in multi-polarized and multi-frequency SAR images. The contrast ratio (CR) operator was used to detect edges. This operator was previously shown to perform well at detecting edges in single-polarized and single-frequency SAR images.

  19. Depth-of-Interaction Compensation Using a Focused-Cut Scintillator for a Pinhole Gamma Camera.

    PubMed

    Alhassen, Fares; Kudrolli, Haris; Singh, Bipin; Kim, Sangtaek; Seo, Youngho; Gould, Robert G; Nagarkar, Vivek V

    2011-06-01

    Preclinical SPECT offers a powerful means to understand the molecular pathways of drug interactions in animal models by discovering and testing new pharmaceuticals and therapies for potential clinical applications. A combination of high spatial resolution and sensitivity are required in order to map radiotracer uptake within small animals. Pinhole collimators have been investigated, as they offer high resolution by means of image magnification. One of the limitations of pinhole geometries is that increased magnification causes some rays to travel through the detection scintillator at steep angles, introducing parallax errors due to variable depth-of-interaction in scintillator material, especially towards the edges of the detector field of view. These parallax errors ultimately limit the resolution of pinhole preclinical SPECT systems, especially for higher energy isotopes that can easily penetrate through millimeters of scintillator material. A pixellated, focused-cut (FC) scintillator, with its pixels laser-cut so that they are collinear with incoming rays, can potentially compensate for these parallax errors and thus improve the system resolution. We performed the first experimental evaluation of a newly developed focused-cut scintillator. We scanned a Tc-99m source across the field of view of pinhole gamma camera with a continuous scintillator, a conventional "straight-cut" (SC) pixellated scintillator, and a focused-cut scintillator, each coupled to an electron-multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) detector by a fiber-optic taper, and compared the measured full-width half-maximum (FWHM) values. We show that the FWHMs of the focused-cut scintillator projections are comparable to the FWHMs of the thinner SC scintillator, indicating the effectiveness of the focused-cut scintillator in compensating parallax errors.

  20. Edge-on!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    Peering at Uranus's Rings as they Swing Edge-on to Earth for the First Time Since their Discovery in 1977 As Uranus coasts through a brief window of time when its rings are edge-on to Earth - a view of the planet we get only once every 42 years - astronomers peering at the rings with ESO's Very Large Telescope and other space or ground-based telescopes are getting an unprecedented view of the fine dust in the system, free from the glare of the bright rocky rings. They may even find a new moon or two. ESO PR Photo 37/07 ESO PR Photo 37/07 The Uranus System "ESO's VLT took data at the precise moment when the rings were edge-on to Earth," said Imke de Pater, of University of California, Berkeley who coordinated the worldwide campaign. She worked with two team members observing in Chile: Daphne Stam of the Technical University Delft in the Netherlands and Markus Hartung of ESO. The observations were done with NACO, one of the adaptive optics instruments installed at the VLT. With adaptive optics, it is possible to obtain images almost free from the blurring effect of the atmosphere. It is as if the 8.2-m telescope were observing from space. Observations were also done with the Keck telescope in Hawaii, the Hubble Space Telescope, and at the Palomar Observatory. "Using different telescopes around the world allows us to observe as much of the changes during the ring-plane crossing as possible: when Uranus sets as seen from the VLT, it can still be observed by the Keck," emphasised Stam. Uranus orbits the Sun in 84 years. Twice during a Uranian year, the rings appear edge-on to Earth for a brief period. The rings were discovered in 1977, so this is the first time for a Uranus ring-crossing to be observed from Earth. The advantage of observations at a ring-plane crossing is that it becomes possible to look at the rings from the shadowed or dark side. From that vantage point, the normally bright outer rings grow fainter because their centimetre- to metre-sized rocks obscure