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Sample records for cx43 cx45 glutamate

  1. [Effect of Electroacupuncture Intervention on Expression of Cx 43 and Concentration of Glutamate in the Striatum of Rats with Parkinson's Disease].

    PubMed

    Ma Jun; Ma, Biao; Wang, Shu-ju; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yan-chun; Yu, Pei-hao; Wang, Zhong-ming

    2015-10-01

    To observe the action of electroacupuncture (EA) intervention on the expression of gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx 43) and content of glutamate (Glu) in the striatum in Parkinson's disease (PD) rats, so as to reveal its mechanism underlying improvement of PD. Forty male SD rats were randomly divided into normal control, sham operation, model and EA groups (n = 10 in each group). The PD model was duplicated by microinjection of 6-hydroxyldopamine (6-OHDA, 15 µg/rat) into the right striatum of rats (AP: 1.0, 1.0; R: 3.0, 4.5; H: 4.5, 6.0), and for control, the same dose of normal saline was injected into the right striatum for rats in the sham operation group. EA (2 Hz, 1 mA) was applied to "Fengfu" (GV 16) "Taichong" (LR 3) for 30 min, once a day for 2 weeks. The PD rats' rotational behavior changes (the numbers of rotations in 30 min) were detected following subcutaneous injection of apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg). The Glu concentration and the expression of Cx 43 in the striatum were detected by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Western blot, respectively. No significant differences were found between the model group and EA group in the number of rotations before the treatment, between the control and sham operation groups in the levels of Glu content and Cx 43 protein expression in the striatum (P > 0.05). Compared with the control group, the Glu content and Cx 43 protein expression level were significantly increased in the model group (P < 0.01), while in comparison with the model group, the number of rotations was significantly reduced in the EA group (P < 0.05). Following EA intervention, both Glu content and Cx 43 expression were considerably down-regulated in the EA group compared with the model group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). EA can improve PD rats' rotation behavior, which may be associated with its effects in down-regulating the level of Glu and Cx 43 protein expression in the striatum.

  2. Cx43 and mechanotransduction in bone

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Lilian I.; Speacht, Toni L.; Donahue, Henry J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone adaptation to changes in mechanical stimuli occurs by adjusting bone formation and resorption by osteoblasts and osteoclasts, to maintain optimal bone mass. Osteocytes coordinate the actions of these cells on the bone surface by sensing mechanical forces and producing cytokines that increase or prevent osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function. Channels formed by connexins (Cxs) and, in particular, Cx43 in osteoblasts and osteocytes are central part of this mechanism to control bone mass. Cx43 hemichannels are opened by fluid flow and mediate the anti-apoptotic effect of mechanical stimulation in vitro, suggesting that Cx43 participates in mechanotransduction. However, mice lacking Cx43 in osteoblasts and/or osteocytes show an increased anabolic response to loading, and decreased catabolic response to unloading. This evidence suggests that Cx43 channels expressed in osteoblastic cells are not required for the response to mechanical stimulation, but mediate the consequence. The molecular basis of these unexpected responses to mechanical stimulation is currently under investigation. PMID:25616771

  3. Cell-to-cell coupling in engineered pairs of rat ventricular cardiomyocytes: relation between Cx43 immunofluorescence and intercellular electrical conductance

    PubMed Central

    McCain, Megan L.; Desplantez, Thomas; Geisse, Nicholas A.; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Oberer, Helene; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2012-01-01

    Gap junctions are composed of connexin (Cx) proteins, which mediate intercellular communication. Cx43 is the dominant Cx in ventricular myocardium, and Cx45 is present in trace amounts. Cx43 immunosignal has been associated with cell-to-cell coupling and electrical propagation, but no studies have directly correlated Cx43 immunosignal to electrical cell-to-cell conductance, gj, in ventricular cardiomyocyte pairs. To assess the correlation between Cx43 immunosignal and gj, we developed a method to determine both parameters from the same cell pair. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were seeded on micropatterned islands of fibronectin. This allowed formation of cell pairs with reproducible shapes and facilitated tracking of cell pair locations. Moreover, cell spreading was limited by the fibronectin pattern, which allowed us to increase cell height by reducing the surface area of the pattern. Whole cell dual voltage clamp was used to record gj of cell pairs after 3–5 days in culture. Fixation of cell pairs before removal of patch electrodes enabled preservation of cell morphology and offline identification of patched pairs. Subsequently, pairs were immunostained, and the volume of junctional Cx43 was quantified using confocal microscopy, image deconvolution, and three-dimensional reconstruction. Our results show a linear correlation between gj and Cx43 immunosignal within a range of 8–50 nS. PMID:22081700

  4. Acetylation mediates Cx43 reduction caused by electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Meraviglia, Viviana; Azzimato, Valerio; Colussi, Claudia; Florio, Maria Cristina; Binda, Anna; Panariti, Alice; Qanud, Khaled; Suffredini, Silvia; Gennaccaro, Laura; Miragoli, Michele; Barbuti, Andrea; Lampe, Paul D.; Gaetano, Carlo; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Pompilio, Giulio; Rivolta, Ilaria; Rossini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Communication between cardiomyocytes depends upon Gap Junctions (GJ). Previous studies have demonstrated that electrical stimulation induces GJ remodeling and modifies histone acetylases (HAT) and deacetylases (HDAC) activities, although these two results have not been linked. The aim of this work was to establish whether electrical stimulation modulates GJ-mediated cardiac cell-cell communication by acetylation-dependent mechanisms. Field stimulation of HL-1 cardiomyocytes at 0.5 Hz for 24 hours significantly reduced Connexin43 (Cx43) expression and cell-cell communication. HDAC activity was down-regulated whereas HAT activity was not modified resulting in increased acetylation of Cx43. Consistent with a post-translational mechanism, we did not observe a reduction in Cx43 mRNA in electrically stimulated cells, while the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 maintained Cx43 expression. Further, the treatment of paced cells with the HAT inhibitor Anacardic Acid maintained both the levels of Cx43 and cell-cell communication. Finally, we observed increased acetylation of Cx43 in the left ventricles of dogs subjected to chronic tachypacing as a model of abnormal ventricular activation. In conclusion, our findings suggest that altered electrical activity can regulate cardiomyocyte communication by influencing the acetylation status of Cx43. PMID:26264759

  5. Functional links between Snail-1 and Cx43 account for the recruitment of Cx43-positive cells into the invasive front of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ryszawy, Damian; Sarna, Michał; Rak, Monika; Szpak, Katarzyna; Kędracka-Krok, Sylwia; Michalik, Marta; Siedlar, Maciej; Zuba-Surma, Ewa; Burda, Kvetoslava; Korohoda, Włodzimierz; Madeja, Zbigniew; Czyż, Jarosław

    2014-09-01

    Suppressive function of connexin(Cx)43 in carcinogenesis was recently contested by reports that showed a multifaceted function of Cx43 in cancer progression. These studies did not attempt to model the dynamics of intratumoral heterogeneity involved in the metastatic cascade. An unorthodox look at the phenotypic heterogeneity of prostate cancer cells in vitro enabled us to identify links between Cx43 functions and Snail-1-regulated functional speciation of invasive cells. Incomplete Snail-1-dependent phenotypic shifts accounted for the formation of phenotypically stable subclones of AT-2 cells. These subclones showed diverse predilection for invasive behavior. High Snail-1 and Cx43 levels accompanied high motility and nanomechanical elasticity of the fibroblastoid AT-2_Fi2 subclone, which determined its considerable invasiveness. Transforming growth factor-β and ectopic Snail-1 overexpression induced invasiveness and Cx43 expression in epithelioid AT-2 subclones and DU-145 cells. Functional links between Snail-1 function and Cx43 expression were confirmed by Cx43 downregulation and phenotypic shifts in AT-2_Fi2, DU-145 and MAT-LyLu cells upon Snail-1 silencing. Corresponding morphological changes and Snail-1 downregulation were seen upon Cx43 silencing in AT-2_Fi2 cells. This indicates that feedback loops between both proteins regulate cell invasive behavior. We demonstrate that Cx43 may differentially predispose prostate cancer cells for invasion in a coupling-dependent and coupling-independent manner. When extrapolated to in vivo conditions, these data show the complexity of Cx43 functions during the metastatic cascade of prostate cancer. They may explain how Cx43 confers a selective advantage during cooperative invasion of clonally evolving, invasive prostate cancer cell subpopulations.

  6. Increased expression of CX43 on stromal cells promotes leukemia apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shijie; Wen, Qin; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Maihong; Chen, Guo; Gong, Yi; Zhong, Jiangjian; Chen, Xuelian; Stucky, Andres; Zhong, Jiang F; Zhang, Xi

    2015-12-29

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) induced apoptosis has been reported in solid tumors, but the effect of Cx43 expressed by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) in leukemia has not been fully investigated. Manipulating Cx43 expression could be a potential therapeutic strategy for leukemia. Here, we investigate the effect of Cx43 expressed by BMSCs (human Umbilical Cord Stem Cells over-expressed CX43, Cx43-hUCSC) on leukemia cells. When co-cultured with Cx43-hUCSC, leukemia cells show significant lower growth rate with increasing apoptosis activity, and more leukemia cells enter S phase. Functional assays of fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP) showed improved gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) on leukemia cells when co-cultured with Cx43-hUCSC (p < 0.01). In a mouse minimal disease model, the mean survival time and mortality rate were significantly improved in mice transplanted with Cx43-hUCSC. Our results indicate that Cx43 expressed by BMSC induces apoptosis on leukemia cells. Small molecules or other pharmaceutical approaches for modulating Cx43 expression in BMSCs could be used for delaying relapse of leukemia.

  7. Aberrant expression of Cx43 is associated with the peritoneal metastasis of gastric cancer and Cx43-mediated gap junction enhances gastric cancer cell diapedesis from peritoneal mesothelium.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bo; Peng, Zhi-hong; Yu, Pei-wu; Yu, Ge; Qian, Feng; Zeng, Dong-zhu; Zhao, Yong-liang; Shi, Yan; Hao, Ying-xue; Luo, Hua-xing

    2013-01-01

    The process of peritoneal metastasis involves the diapedesis of intra-abdominal exfoliated gastric cancer cells through the mesothelial cell monolayers; however, the related molecular mechanisms for this process are still unclear. Heterocellular gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between gastric cancer cells and mesothelial cells may play an active role during diapedesis. In this study we detected the expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) in primary gastric cancer tissues, intra-abdominal exfoliated cancer cells, and matched metastatic peritoneal tissues. We found that the expression of Cx43 in primary gastric cancer tissues was significantly decreased; the intra-abdominal exfoliated cancer cells and matched metastatic peritoneal tissues exhibited increasing expression compared with primary gastric cancer tissues. BGC-823 and SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells were engineered to express Cx43 or Cx43T154A (a mutant protein that only couples gap junctions but provides no intercellular communication) and were co-cultured with human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs). Heterocellular GJIC and diapedesis through HPMC monolayers on matrigel-coated coverslips were investigated. We found that BGC-823 and SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells expressing Cx43 formed functional heterocellular gap junctions with HPMC monolayers within one hour. A significant increase in diapedesis was observed in engineered Cx43-expressing cells compared with Cx43T154A and control group cells, which suggested that the observed upregulation of diapedesis in Cx43-expressing cells required heterocellular GJIC. Further study revealed that the gastric cancer cells transmigrated through the intercellular space between the mesothelial cells via a paracellular route. Our results suggest that the abnormal expression of Cx43 plays an essential role in peritoneal metastasis and that Cx43-mediated heterocellular GJIC between gastric cancer cells and mesothelial cells may be an important regulatory

  8. Pathological implications of Cx43 down-regulation in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Rehana; Rashid, Rabiya; Andrabi, Khurshid; Parray, Fazl Q; Besina, Syed; Shah, Mohd Amin; Ul Hussain, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Connexin 43 is an important gap junction protein in vertebrates and is known for its tumor suppressive properties. Cx43 is abundantly expressed in the human intestinal epithelial cells and muscularis mucosae. To explore the role of Cx43 in the genesis of human colon cancer, we performed the expression analysis of Cx43 in 80 cases of histopathologically confirmed and clinically diagnosed human colon cancer samples and adjacent control tissue and assessed correlations with clinicopathological variables. Western blotting using anti-Cx43 antibody indicated that the expression of Cx43 was significantly down regulated (75%) in the cancer samples as compared to the adjacent control samples. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue samples confirmed the down regulation of the Cx43 in the intestinal epithelial cells. Cx43 down regulation showed significant association (p<0.05) with the histological type and tumor invasion properties of the cancer. Our data demonstrated that loss of Cx43 may be an important event in colon carcinogenesis and tumor progression, providing significant insights about the tumor suppressive properties of the Cx43 and its potential as a diagnostic marker for colon cancer.

  9. Clathrin and Cx43 gap junction plaque endoexocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Beth M.; DeFranco, B. Hewa; Gay, Vernon L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2008-10-03

    In earlier transmission electron microscopic studies, we have described pentilaminar gap junctional membrane invaginations and annular gap junction vesicles coated with short, electron-dense bristles. The similarity between these electron-dense bristles and the material surrounding clathrin-coated pits led us to suggest that the dense bristles associated with gap junction structures might be clathrin. To confirm that clathrin is indeed associated with annular gap junction vesicles and gap junction plaques, quantum dot immuno-electron microscopic techniques were used. We report here that clathrin associates with both connexin 43 (Cx43) gap junction plaques and pentilaminar gap junction vesicles. An important finding was the preferential localization of clathrin to the cytoplasmic surface of the annular or of the gap junction plaque membrane of one of the two contacting cells. This is consistent with the possibility that the direction of gap junction plaque internalization into one of two contacting cells is regulated by clathrin.

  10. Sulforaphane counteracts aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer driven by dysregulated Cx43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyao; Isayev, Orkhan; Heilmann, Katharina; Schoensiegel, Frank; Liu, Li; Nessling, Michelle; Richter, Karsten; Labsch, Sabrina; Nwaeburu, Clifford C.; Mattern, Juergen; Gladkich, Jury; Giese, Nathalia; Werner, Jens; Schemmer, Peter; Gross, Wolfgang; Gebhard, Martha M.; Gerhauser, Clarissa; Schaefer, Michael; Herr, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The extreme aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has been associated with blocked gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). We examined whether disturbed GJIC is responsible for a CSC phenotype in established and primary cancer cells and patient tissue of PDA using interdisciplinary methods based in physiology, cell and molecular biology, histology and epigenetics. Flux of fluorescent dyes and gemcitabine through gap junctions (GJs) was intact in less aggressive cells but not in highly malignant cells with morphological dysfunctional GJs. Among several connexins, only Cx43 was expressed on the cell surface of less aggressive and GJIC-competent cells, whereas Cx43 surface expression was absent in highly malignant, E-cadherin-negative and GJIC-incompetent cells. The levels of total Cx43 protein and Cx43 phosphorylated at Ser368 and Ser279/282 were high in normal tissue but low to absent in malignant tissue. si-RNA-mediated inhibition of Cx43 expression in GJIC-competent cells prevented GJIC and induced colony formation and the expression of stem cell-related factors. The bioactive substance sulforaphane enhanced Cx43 and E-cadherin levels, inhibited the CSC markers c-Met and CD133, improved the functional morphology of GJs and enhanced GJIC. Sulforaphane altered the phosphorylation of several kinases and their substrates and inhibition of GSK3, JNK and PKC prevented sulforaphane-induced CX43 expression. The sulforaphane-mediated expression of Cx43 was not correlated with enhanced Cx43 RNA expression, acetylated histone binding and Cx43 promoter de-methylation, suggesting that posttranslational phosphorylation is the dominant regulatory mechanism. Together, the absence of Cx43 prevents GJIC and enhances aggressiveness, whereas sulforaphane counteracts this process, and our findings highlight dietary co-treatment as a viable treatment option for PDA. PMID:24742583

  11. Inhibition of Cx43 mediates protective effects on hypoxic/reoxygenated human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Vicario, Nunzio; Calabrese, Giovanna; Zappalà, Agata; Parenti, Carmela; Forte, Stefano; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Vanella, Luca; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Cardile, Venera; Parenti, Rosalba

    2017-10-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), a special population of glial cells, are able to synthesise several trophic factors exerting a neuroprotective action and promoting growth and functional recovery in both in vitro and in vivo models. In the present work, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of OEC-conditioned medium (OEC-CM) on two different human neuron-like cell lines, SH-SY5Y and SK-N-SH (neuroblastoma cell lines), under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, we also focused our attention on the role of connexins (Cxs) in the neuroprotective processes. Our results confirmed OEC-CM mediated neuroprotection as shown by cell adherence, proliferation and cellular viability analyses. Reduced connexin 43 (Cx43) levels in OEC-CM compared to unconditioned cells in hypoxic conditions prompted us to investigate the role of Cx43-Gap junctions (GJs) and Cx43-hemichannels (HCs) in hypoxic/reoxygenation injury using carbenoxolone (non-selective GJ inhibitor), ioxynil octanoato (selective Cx43-GJ inhibitor) and Gap19 (selective Cx43-HC inhibitor). We found that Cx43-GJ and Cx43-HC inhibitors are able to protect SH-SY5Y and allow to these cultures to overcome the injury. Our findings support the hypothesis that both OEC-CM and the inhibition of Cx43-GJs and Cx43-HCs offer a neuroprotective effect by reducing Cx43-mediated cell-to-cell and cell-to-extracellular environment communications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  12. Regulation of gap junction conductance by calcineurin through Cx43 phosphorylation: implications for action potential conduction.

    PubMed

    Jabr, Rita I; Hatch, Fiona S; Salvage, Samantha C; Orlowski, Alejandro; Lampe, Paul D; Fry, Christopher H

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are associated with raised intracellular [Ca(2+)] and slowed action potential conduction caused by reduced gap junction (GJ) electrical conductance (Gj). Ventricular GJs are composed of connexin proteins (Cx43), with Gj determined by Cx43 phosphorylation status. Connexin phosphorylation is an interplay between protein kinases and phosphatases but the precise pathways are unknown. We aimed to identify key Ca(2+)-dependent phosphorylation sites on Cx43 that regulate cardiac gap junction conductance and action potential conduction velocity. We investigated the role of the Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin. Intracellular [Ca(2+)] was raised in guinea-pig myocardium by a low-Na solution or increased stimulation. Conduction velocity and Gj were measured in multicellular strips. Phosphorylation of Cx43 serine residues (S365 and S368) and of the intermediary regulator I1 at threonine35 was measured by Western blot. Measurements were made in the presence and absence of inhibitors to calcineurin, I1 or protein phosphatase-1 and phosphatase-2.Raised [Ca(2)(+)]i decreased Gj, reduced Cx43 phosphorylation at S365 and increased it at S368; these changes were reversed by calcineurin inhibitors. Cx43-S368 phosphorylation was reversed by the protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine. Raised [Ca(2+)]i also decreased I1 phosphorylation, also prevented by calcineurin inhibitors, to increase activity of the Ca(2+)-independent phosphatase, PPI. The PP1 inhibitor, tautomycin, prevented Cx43-365 dephosphorylation, Cx43-S368 phosphorylation and Gj reduction in raised [Ca(2+)]i. PP2A had no role. Conduction velocity was reduced by raised [Ca(2+)]i and reversed by calcineurin inhibitors. Reduced action potential conduction and Gj in raised [Ca(2+)] are regulated by calcineurin-dependent Cx43-S365 phosphorylation, leading to Cx43-S368 dephosphorylation. The calcineurin action is indirect, via I1 dephosphorylation and subsequent activation of PP1.

  13. The role of the Cx43 C-terminus in GJ plaque formation and internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Wayakanon, Praween; Bhattacharjee, Rajib; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cx43-GFP or -DsRed fusion proteins were expressed in HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Roles of C-terminus were examined using various mutants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gap junction plaque size was dependent on the length of C-terminus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-terminus dependent gap junction plaque internalization was observed. -- Abstract: Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a major gap junction (GJ) protein found in many mammalian cell types. The C-terminal (CT) domain of Cx43 has unique characteristics in terms of amino acid (aa) sequence and its length differs from other connexins. This CT domain can be associated with protein partners to regulate GJ assembly and degradation, which results in the direct control of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). However, the essential roles of the CT regions involved in these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the specific regions of Cx43CT involved in GJ formation and internalization. Wild type Cx43{sub (382aa)} and 10 CT truncated mutants were stably expressed in HeLa cells as GFP or DsRed tagged proteins. First, we found that the deletion of 235-382aa from Cx43 resulted in failure to make GJ and establish GJIC. Second, the Cx43 with 242-382aa CT deletion could form functional GJs and be internalized as annular gap junctions (AGJs). However, the plaques consisting of Cx43 with CT deletions ({Delta}242-382aa to {Delta}271-382aa) were longer than the plaques consisting of Cx43 with CT deletions ({Delta}302-382aa). Third, co-culture experiments of cells expressing wild type Cx43{sub (382)} with cells expressing Cx43CT mutants revealed that the directions of GJ internalization were dependent on the length of the respective CT. Moreover, a specific region, 325-342aa residues of Cx43, played an important role in the direction of GJ internalization. These results showed the important roles of the Cx43 C-terminus in GJ

  14. Ultrastructural demonstration of Cx43 gap junctions in induced pluripotent stem cells from human cord blood.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Anja; Schubert, Madline; Hainz, Nadine; Haase, Alexandra; Martin, Ulrich; Tschernig, Thomas; Meier, Carola

    2016-11-01

    Gap junction proteins are essential for direct intercellular communication but also influence cellular differentiation and migration. The expression of various connexin gap junction proteins has been demonstrated in embryonic stem cells, with Cx43 being the most intensely studied. As Cx43 is the most prominent gap junction protein in the heart, cardiomyocyte-differentiated stem cells have been studied intensely. To date, however, little is known about the expression and the subcellular distribution of Cx43 in undifferentiated stem cells or about the structural arrangement of channels. We, therefore, here investigate expression of Cx43 in undifferentiated human cord-blood-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (hCBiPS2). For this purpose, we carried out quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. For analysis of Cx43 ultrastructure and protein assembly, we performed freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling (FRIL). Cx43 expression was detected at mRNA and protein level in hCBIPS2 cells. For the first time, ultrastructural data are presented on gap junction morphology in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from cord blood: Our FRIL and electron microscopical analysis revealed the occurrence of gap junction plaques in undifferentiated iPS cells. In addition, these gap junctions were shown to contain the gap junction protein Cx43.

  15. [Effect of Shexiang Baoxin Pills on isoprenaline-induced myocardial cell hypertrophy and Cx43 expression].

    PubMed

    Tang, Fen; Jiang, Zhentao; Tan, Wenting; Long, Junrong; Liu, Shengquan; Chu, Chun

    2017-08-28

    To observe the effects of Shexiang Baoxin Pill (SBP) on isoprenaline (Iso)-induced changes in myocardial cell volume, shape, and connexin 43 (Cx43) expression.
 Methods: H9C2 myocardial cells were randomly divided into a control group, a Iso group and a Iso+SBP group. After 72 h of culture, the average surface area of H9C2 cells was measured under phase contrast microscope. Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay was carried out to determine the concentration of proteins. The survival rate of myocardial cells was measured by methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the Cx43 expression was detected by Western blot.
 Results: The mean surface area and Cx43 concentration in Iso-treated myocardial cells were increased under the phase contrast microscope (P<0.05). Compared with the Iso group, the mean surface area was decreased, and the Cx43 concentration was reduced in the Iso+SBP group (both P<0.05). Compared with the control group, the Cx43 expression was obviously down-regulated in the H9C2 cells of the Iso group (P<0.05); while compared with the Iso group, the Cx43 expression was obviously up-regulated in the Iso+SBP group (P<0.05).
 Conclusion: Shexiang Baoxin Pills can prevent Iso-induced myocardial hypertrophy and down-regulate Cx43 expression.

  16. Oxidized Phospholipid Species Promote in Vivo Differential Cx43 Phosphorylation and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Scott R.; Ross, Jeremy; Rizzo, Michael J.; Straub, Adam C.; Lampe, Paul D.; Leitinger, Norbert; Isakson, Brant E.

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of both the expression and function of connexins in the vascular wall is important during atherosclerosis. Progression of the disease state is marked by vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which coincides with the reduced expression levels of connexin 43 (Cx43). However, nothing is currently known about the factors that regulate post-translational modifications of Cx43 in atherogenesis, which could be of particular importance, due to the association between site-specific Cx43 phosphorylation and cellular proliferation. We compared the effects of direct carotid applications of two oxidized phospholipid derivatives, 1-palmitoyl-2-oxovaleroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (POVPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (PGPC), on Cx43 expression and phosphorylation, and on cell proliferation. Since both POVPC and PGPC have been shown to act through different intracellular pathways, we hypothesized that each oxidized phospholipid species could induce differential Cx43 phosphorylation events in the cytoplasmically located carboxyl-terminal region of the protein, which could potentially enhance cell proliferation. Application of POVPC caused a reduction in VSMC Cx43 levels, enhanced its phosphorylation at serine (pS) 279/282, and increased VSMC proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with PGPC enhanced VSMC pS368 levels with no associated change in proliferation. These oxidized phospholipid-induced Cx43 post-translational changes in VSMCs were consistent with those identified in ApoE−/− mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that post-translational phosphorylation of Cx43 could be a key factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:19608875

  17. Association of STAT3 with Cx26 and Cx43 in human uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SULKOWSKA, URSZULA; FEBP, ANDRZEJ WINCEWICZ; SULKOWSKI, STANISLAW

    2016-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) drives endometrial carcinogenesis, while signaling via gap junctions gets weakened during cancer progression. Connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43 and STAT3 were immunohistochemically evaluated in 78 endometrioid adenocarcinomas: Nuclear expression of STAT3 positively correlated with cytoplasmic immunoreactivity to Cx43 (P=0.004, r=0.318) and Cx26 (P=0.006, r=0.309). STAT3 correlated with Cx43 (P=0.022, r=0.411) and Cx26 (P=0.008 r=0.466) in G1 tumors. A statistically significant linkage remained in G2 cancers between STAT3 and Cx43 (P=0.061, r=0.262) and Cx26 (P=0.016, r=0.331); however, no correlations were observed in G3 tumors. STAT3 was significantly associated with Cx 43 (p=0.003, r=0.684) and Cx26 (p=0.049, r=0.500) in estrogen receptor (ER) negative adenocarcinomas. STAT3 did not correlate with Cx43 in ER positive adenocarcinomas; however, STAT3 expression remained correlated with Cx26 expression (P=0.035, r=0.268). In progesterone receptor negative tumors STAT3 was significantly associated with Cx43 (P=0.035, r=0.451) and Cx26 (P<0.0001, r=0.707). However, in PgR positive adenocarcinomas STAT3 correlated with Cx43 (P=0.03, r=0.290) but not with Cx26. Thus, it appears that hormone dependent acceleration of cancer growth breaks the association between STAT3 and Cx expression. These associations become weaker as the tumors dedifferentiate from G1 to G3 endometrioid adenocarcinomas. The present study provides evidence that the loss of correlation between STAT3 and selected Cx proteins occurs in tumors with more aggressive behavior. PMID:27313754

  18. Cardiomyocyte FGF signaling is required for Cx43 phosphorylation and cardiac gap junction maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takashi; Tsuchida, Mariko; Lampe, Paul D; Murakami, Masahiro

    2013-08-15

    Cardiac remodeling resulting from impairment of myocardial integrity leads to heart failure, through still incompletely understood mechanisms. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system has been implicated in tissue maintenance, but its role in the adult heart is not well defined. We hypothesized that the FGF system plays a role in the maintenance of cardiac homeostasis, and the impairment of cardiomyocyte FGF signaling leads to pathological cardiac remodeling. We showed that FGF signaling is required for connexin 43 (Cx43) localization at cell-cell contacts in isolated cardiomyocytes and COS7 cells. Lack of FGF signaling led to decreased Cx43 phosphorylation at serines 325/328/330 (S325/328/330), sites known to be important for assembly of gap junctions. Cx43 instability induced by FGF inhibition was restored by the Cx43 S325/328/330 phospho-mimetic mutant, suggesting FGF-dependent phosphorylation of these sites. Consistent with these in vitro findings, cardiomyocyte-specific inhibition of FGF signaling in adult mice demonstrated mislocalization of Cx43 at intercalated discs, whereas localization of N-cadherin and desmoplakin was not affected. This led to premature death resulting from impaired cardiac remodeling. We conclude that cardiomyocyte FGF signaling is essential for cardiomyocyte homeostasis through phosphorylation of Cx43 at S325/328/330 residues which are important for the maintenance of gap junction.

  19. Cx43-hemichannel function and regulation in physiology and pathophysiology: insights from the bovine corneal endothelial cell system and beyond

    PubMed Central

    D'hondt, Catheleyne; Iyyathurai, Jegan; Himpens, Bernard; Leybaert, Luc; Bultynck, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular communication in primary bovine corneal endothelial cells (BCECs) is mainly driven by the release of extracellular ATP through Cx43 hemichannels. Studying the characteristics of Ca2+-wave propagation in BCECs, an important form of intercellular communication, in response to physiological signaling events has led to the discovery of important insights in the functional properties and regulation of native Cx43 hemichannels. Together with ectopic expression models for Cx43 hemichannels and truncated/mutated Cx43 versions, it became very clear that loop/tail interactions play a key role in controlling the activity of Cx43 hemichannels. Interestingly, the negative regulation of Cx43 hemichannels by enhanced actin/myosin contractility seems to impinge upon loss of these loop/tail interactions essential for opening Cx43 hemichannels. Finally, these molecular insights have spurred the development of novel peptide tools that can selectively inhibit Cx43 hemichannels, but neither Cx43 gap junctions nor hemichannels formed by other Cx isoforms. These tools now set the stage to hunt for novel physiological functions for Cx43 hemichannels in primary cells and tissues and to tackle disease conditions associated with excessive, pathological Cx43-hemichannel openings. PMID:25309448

  20. Myocardial Cx43 expression in the cases of sudden death due to dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinshan; Zhang, Yigu

    2006-10-16

    Probing into myocardial connexin (Cx) 43 expression in the cases of sudden death due to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and relationship between Cx43 expression and sudden death. Myocardial Cx43 was detected with immunohistochemical staining in the cases of 11 sudden death caused by DCM and 14 cases of control group who died of violent reasons and other diseases, which were autopsied in our department from 1997 to 2003. Of 11 cases of DCM, there were 10 men and 1 woman with ranging in age from 7 to 49 years old (x (37.8) years old for 9 adult cases). Of 14 cases in the control group, there were 10 men and 4 women with ranging in age from 11 to 53 years old (x (29.9) years old for 11 adult cases). Myocardial Cx43 expression was obviously decreased in DCM group. Positive dyeing spots were different in size, distribution, color and disparity, some of them were distributed in the form of particle. Obvious change had not been observed in the cases of control group or with only slight changes in coloring degree and expressive area. The quantitative data showed that there was significant difference between two groups (p=0.0075) about Cx43 expressive area, but there was no difference between the left and right ventricles (p>0.05) in each group itself. And there was not difference between the two groups about average optical density of expression. Myocardial Cx43 expression is obviously reduced in the patients with DCM who die suddenly. The alteration of quantity and distribution of myocardial Cx43 expression is probably related to sudden death of the patients with DCM.

  1. Neurological manifestations of oculodentodigital dysplasia: a Cx43 channelopathy of the central nervous system?

    PubMed Central

    De Bock, Marijke; Kerrebrouck, Marianne; Wang, Nan; Leybaert, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The coordination of tissue function is mediated by gap junctions (GJs) that enable direct cell–cell transfer of metabolic and electric signals. GJs are formed by connexins of which Cx43 is most widespread in the human body. In the brain, Cx43 GJs are mostly found in astroglia where they coordinate the propagation of Ca2+ waves, spatial K+ buffering, and distribution of glucose. Beyond its role in direct intercellular communication, Cx43 also forms unapposed, non-junctional hemichannels in the plasma membrane of glial cells. These allow the passage of several neuro- and gliotransmitters that may, combined with downstream paracrine signaling, complement direct GJ communication among glial cells and sustain glial-neuronal signaling. Mutations in the GJA1 gene encoding Cx43 have been identified in a rare, mostly autosomal dominant syndrome called oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD). ODDD patients display a pleiotropic phenotype reflected by eye, hand, teeth, and foot abnormalities, as well as craniofacial and bone malformations. Remarkably, neurological symptoms such as dysarthria, neurogenic bladder (manifested as urinary incontinence), spasticity or muscle weakness, ataxia, and epilepsy are other prominent features observed in ODDD patients. Over 10 mutations detected in patients diagnosed with neurological disorders are associated with altered functionality of Cx43 GJs/hemichannels, but the link between ODDD-related abnormal channel activities and neurologic phenotype is still elusive. Here, we present an overview on the nature of the mutants conveying structural and functional changes of Cx43 channels and discuss available evidence for aberrant Cx43 GJ and hemichannel function. In a final step, we examine the possibilities of how channel dysfunction may lead to some of the neurological manifestations of ODDD. PMID:24133447

  2. Peptides and peptide-derived molecules targeting the intracellular domains of Cx43: gap junctions versus hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Iyyathurai, Jegan; D'hondt, Catheleyne; Wang, Nan; De Bock, Marijke; Himpens, Bernard; Retamal, Mauricio A; Stehberg, Jimmy; Leybaert, Luc; Bultynck, Geert

    2013-12-01

    About a decade ago, the molecular determinants controlling the opening and closing of Cx43 gap junction channels have been identified. Advanced biophysical approaches revealed a critical role for structural rearrangements in the cytoplasmic loop and dimerization of the C-terminal tail, resulting in binding of the C-terminal tail to the cytoplasmic loop and Cx43 gap junction channel closure during cellular acidosis. This has spurred the development of Cx43-mimetic peptides and peptidomimetics that interfere with these loop/tail interactions, thereby preventing the closure of Cx43 gap junctions, e.g. in the heart upon ischemia. Recently, we found that loop/tail interactions control Cx43-hemichannel activity but with an opposite effect. Binding of the C-terminal tail to the cytoplasmic loop is a requisite for the opening of Cx43 hemichannels in response to different stimuli, like decreased extracellular [Ca2+], increased intracellular [Ca2+], positive membrane potentials or ischemia. Strikingly, peptides that favor the open state of Cx43 gap junctions like the L2 peptide inhibit Cx43-hemichannel opening. These tools now provide unprecedented opportunities to selectively inhibit Cx43 hemichannels while maintaining Cx43 gap junction communication, impossible to achieve with siRNA or knockdown approaches both affecting gap junctions and hemichannels. These tools not only are very helpful to unravel the role of Cx43 hemichannels in complex biological systems, but also hold therapeutic potential to counteract excessive Cx43-hemichannel activity like in ischemia/reperfusion in the brain and the heart or to prevent Cx43 hemichannel-mediated gliotransmitter release in the basal amygdala during memory consolidation in response to emotional events. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Current Pharmacology of Gap Junction Channels and Hemichannels'. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Specific functional pathologies of Cx43 mutations associated with oculodentodigital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John J.; Esseltine, Jessica L.; Shao, Qing; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Sampson, Jacinda; Auranen, Mari; Bai, Donglin; Laird, Dale W.

    2016-01-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is a rare genetic disease that affects the development of multiple organs in the human body. More than 70 mutations in the gap junction connexin43 (Cx43) gene, GJA1, are associated with ODDD, most of which are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Many patients exhibit similar clinical presentations. However, there is high intrafamilial and interfamilial phenotypic variability. To better understand this variability, we established primary human dermal fibroblast cultures from several ODDD patients and unaffected controls. In the present study, we characterized three fibroblast lines expressing heterozygous p.L7V, p.G138R, and p.G143S Cx43 variants. All ODDD fibroblasts exhibited slower growth, reduced migration, and defective cell polarization, traits common to all ODDD fibroblasts studied so far. However, we found striking differences in overall expression levels, with p.L7V down-regulated at the mRNA and protein level. Although all of the Cx43 variants could traffic to the cell surface, there were stark differences in gap junction plaque formation, gap junctional intercellular communication, Cx43 phosphorylation, and hemichannel activity among Cx43 variants, as well as subtle differences in myofibroblast differentiation. Together these findings enabled us to discover mutation-specific pathologies that may help to predict future clinical outcomes. PMID:27226478

  4. Laminin-111 Stimulates Proliferation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Through a Reduction of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication via RhoA-Mediated Cx43 Phosphorylation and Dissociation of Cx43/ZO-1/Drebrin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Han Na; Kim, Mi Ok

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Gap junctions within extracellular matrix (ECM)-defined boundaries ensure synchronous activity between cells destined to become functional mediators that regulate cell behavior. However, the role of ECM in connexin (Cx) function in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) has not been elucidated. Therefore, we examined the role of laminin-111 in the control of Cx43 functions and related signal pathways in mESCs. ECM components (laminin-111, fibronectin, and collagen I) increased Cx43 phosphorylation and decreased Lucifer yellow (Ly) diffusion. In addition, laminin-111 increased the proliferation index through reduction of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), which was confirmed by 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18α-GA). Laminin-111 increased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/Src and protein kinase C (PKC), which were inhibited by integrin β1 antibody (Ab) and laminin receptor-1 (LR-1) Ab, respectively. In addition, inhibition of both FAK/Src and PKC blocked Cx43 phosphorylation. Laminin-111 increased the Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) activation, which was blocked by FAK/Src and PKC inhibitors, suggesting the existence of parallel pathways that merge at RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA reversed the laminin-111-induced increase of Cx43 phosphorylation and reduction of GJIC. Laminin-111 also stimulated the dissociation of Cx43/ZO-1 complex followed by disruption of Cx43/drebrin and Cx43/F-actin complexes, which were reversed by C3 (RhoA inhibitor). ZO-1 small interfering (si) RNA significantly decreased Ly diffusion. Moreover, laminin-111 decreased Cx43 labeling at the intercellular junction, whereas pretreatment with degradation inhibitors (lysosomal protease inhibitor, chloroquine; proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin) increased Cx43 expression, reversely. In conclusion, laminin-111 stimulated mESC proliferation through a reduction of GJIC via RhoA-mediated Cx43 phosphorylation and Cx43/ZO-1/drebrin complex instability-mediated Cx43

  5. Dynamic changes in protein interaction between AKAP95 and Cx43 during cell cycle progression of A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoxuan; Kong, Xiangyu; Zhuang, Wenxin; Teng, Bogang; Yu, Xiuyi; Hua, Suhang; Wang, Su; Liang, Fengchao; Ma, Dan; Zhang, Suhui; Zou, Xuan; Dai, Yue; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Yongxing

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that A-kinase anchoring protein 95 (AKAP95) and connexin 43 (Cx43) dynamically interact during cell cycle progression of lung cancer A549 cells. Interaction between AKAP95 and Cx43 at different cell cycle phases was examined by tandem mass spectrometry(MS/MS), confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, Western blot, and co-immunoprecipitation(Co-IP). Over the course of a complete cell cycle, interaction between AKAP95 and Cx43 occurred in two stages: binding stage from late G1 to metaphase, and separating stage from anaphase to late G1. The binding stage was further subdivided into complex binding to DNA in interphase and complex separating from DNA in metaphase. In late G1, Cx43 translocated to the nucleus via AKAP95; in anaphase, Cx43 separated from AKAP95 and aggregated between two daughter nuclei. In telophase, Cx43 aggregated at the membrane of the cleavage furrow. After mitosis, Cx43 was absent from the furrow membrane and was located in the cytoplasm. Binding between AKAP95 and Cx43 was reduced by N-(2-[P-Bromocinnamylamino]-ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonmide (H89) treatment and enhanced by Forskolin. dynamic interaction between AKAP95 and Cx43 varies with cell cycle progression to regulate multiple biological processes. PMID:26880274

  6. Roles of Cx43 and AKAP95 in ovarian cancer tissues in G1/S phase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhi; Hua, Suhang; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Yangyang; Yang, Jinghui; Deng, Jiali; Huo, Yunjie; Chen, Xiaoxuan; Teng, Bogang; Yu, Xiuyi; Zhang, Yongxing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of A-kinase anchor protein 95 (AKAP95), cell cycle protein E1 (cyclinE1) and D1 (cyclinD1), and gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) in ovarian cancer tissues, the relationship between four proteins and clinicopathologic parameters, and the correlation between these proteins. Methods: The expression of proteins in 54 cases of ovarian cancer tissues was detected by immunohistochemical method. Results: The positive expression rates of AKAP95, cyclinD1 and cyclinE1 in ovarian cancer tissues were 72.22%, 66.67% and 79.63%, respectively, which were higher than that of ovarian pericarcinoma tissues expressing as 33.33%, 25% and 8.30% (P<0.05). The positive expression rate of Cx43 in ovarian cancer tissues was 40.74%, which was lower than that of ovarian pericarcinoma tissues expressing as 75%; respectively, and the difference was statistically significant between groups (P<0.05). The expression of cyclinD1 in ovarian cancer tissues was related to the histologic type (P<0.05) while it showed no correlation with the degree of differentiation (P>0.05). Additionally, the expression of AKAP95, Cx43 and cyclinE1 in ovarian cancer tissues showed no correlation with the degree of differentiation or the histologic type (P>0.05). Protein expressions of AKAP95, Cx43 and cyclinE1 were correlated with each other (P<0.05), and the expressions of cyclinD1, cyclinE1 and Cx43 were also correlated with each other (P<0.05). However, AKAP95 and cyclinD1 showed no correlation (P>0.05). Conclusion: AKAP95, cyclinD1 and cyclinE1 play an important role in promoting the process of ovarian cancer formation. The tumor inhibitory effects of Cx43 protein on the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer were weakened. The expression of cyclinD1 in ovarian cancer tissues is related to the histologic type while it shows no correlation with the degree of differentiation. Additionally, the expression of AKAP95, Cx43 and cyclinE1 in ovarian

  7. A Dominant Loss-of-Function GJA1 (Cx43) Mutant Impairs Parturition in the Mouse1

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Dan; Lu, Xuerong; Wang, Hong-Xing; Plante, Isabelle; Lui, Ed; Laird, Dale W.; Bai, Donglin; Kidder, Gerald M.

    2009-01-01

    Expression of GJA1 (commonly known as connexin43 or Cx43), a major myometrial gap junction protein, is upregulated before the onset of delivery, suggesting an essential role for Cx43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in normal uterine contraction during parturition. To determine how a disease-linked Cx43 mutation affects myometrial function, we studied a mutant mouse model carrying an autosomal dominant mutation (Gja1Jrt) in the gene encoding Cx43 that displays features of the human genetic disease oculodentodigital dysplasia. We found that Cx43 level, specifically the phosphorylated species of the protein, is significantly reduced in the myometrium of the mutant mice (Gja1Jrt/+), as revealed by Western blotting and immunostaining. Patch-clamp electrophysiological measurements demonstrated that coupling between myometrial smooth muscle cells is reduced to <15% of wild-type, indicating that the mutant protein acts dominantly on its wild-type counterpart. The phosphorylated species of Cx43 in the mutant myometrium failed to increase prior to parturition as well as in response to exogenous estrogen. Correspondingly, in vitro experiments with uterine strips revealed weaker contraction of the mutant myometrium and reduced responsiveness to oxytocin, providing an explanation for the prolonged gestation and presence of suffocated fetuses in the uteri that were observed in some of the mutant mice. We conclude that the Gja1Jrt mutation has a dominant-negative effect on Cx43 function in the myometrium, severely reducing GJIC, leading to impaired parturition. PMID:19176884

  8. Intracellular Cleavage of the Cx43 C-Terminal Domain by Matrix-Metalloproteases: A Novel Contributor to Inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    De Bock, Marijke; Wang, Nan; Decrock, Elke; Bultynck, Geert; Leybaert, Luc

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of tissue function is mediated by gap junctions (GJs) that enable direct cell-cell transfer of metabolic and electric signals. GJs are formed by connexin (Cx) proteins of which Cx43 is most widespread in the human body. Beyond its role in direct intercellular communication, Cx43 also forms nonjunctional hemichannels (HCs) in the plasma membrane that mediate the release of paracrine signaling molecules in the extracellular environment. Both HC and GJ channel function are regulated by protein-protein interactions and posttranslational modifications that predominantly take place in the C-terminal domain of Cx43. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a major group of zinc-dependent proteases, known to regulate not only extracellular matrix remodeling, but also processing of intracellular proteins. Together with Cx43 channels, both GJs and HCs, MMPs contribute to acute inflammation and a small number of studies reports on an MMP-Cx43 link. Here, we build further on these reports and present a novel hypothesis that describes proteolytic cleavage of the Cx43 C-terminal domain by MMPs and explores possibilities of how such cleavage events may affect Cx43 channel function. Finally, we set out how aberrant channel function resulting from cleavage can contribute to the acute inflammatory response during tissue injury. PMID:26424967

  9. Structural Studies of the Nedd4 WW Domains and Their Selectivity for the Connexin43 (Cx43) Carboxyl Terminus.

    PubMed

    Spagnol, Gaelle; Kieken, Fabien; Kopanic, Jennifer L; Li, Hanjun; Zach, Sydney; Stauch, Kelly L; Grosely, Rosslyn; Sorgen, Paul L

    2016-04-01

    Neuronal precursor cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 4 (Nedd4) was the first ubiquitin protein ligase identified to interact with connexin43 (Cx43), and its suppressed expression results in accumulation of gap junction plaques at the plasma membrane. Nedd4-mediated ubiquitination of Cx43 is required to recruit Eps15 and target Cx43 to the endocytic pathway. Although the Cx43 residues that undergo ubiquitination are still unknown, in this study we address other unresolved questions pertaining to the molecular mechanisms mediating the direct interaction between Nedd4 (WW1-3 domains) and Cx43 (carboxyl terminus (CT)). All three WW domains display a similar three antiparallel β-strand structure and interact with the same Cx43CT(283)PPXY(286)sequence. Although Tyr(286)is essential for the interaction, MAPK phosphorylation of the preceding serine residues (Ser(P)(279)and Ser(P)(282)) increases the binding affinity by 2-fold for the WW domains (WW2 > WW3 ≫ WW1). The structure of the WW2·Cx43CT(276-289)(Ser(P)(279), Ser(P)(282)) complex reveals that coordination of Ser(P)(282)with the end of β-strand 3 enables Ser(P)(279)to interact with the back face of β-strand 3 (Tyr(286)is on the front face) and loop 2, forming a horseshoe-shaped arrangement. The close sequence identity of WW2 with WW1 and WW3 residues that interact with the Cx43CT PPXY motif and Ser(P)(279)/Ser(P)(282)strongly suggests that the significantly lower binding affinity of WW1 is the result of a more rigid structure. This study presents the first structure illustrating how phosphorylation of the Cx43CT domain helps mediate the interaction with a molecular partner involved in gap junction regulation.

  10. Functional expression of Ca²⁺ dependent mammalian transmembrane gap junction protein Cx43 in slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Stefan; Weiss, Ingrid M; Eckstein, Volker; Tanaka, Motomu

    2012-03-09

    In this paper, we expressed murine gap junction protein Cx43 in Dictyostelium discoideum by introducing the specific vector pDXA. In the first step, the successful expression of Cx43 and Cx43-eGFP was verified by (a) Western blot (anti-Cx43, anti-GFP), (b) fluorescence microscopy (eGFP-Cx43 co-expression, Cx43 immunostaining), and (c) flow cytometry analysis (eGFP-Cx43 co-expression). Although the fluorescence signals from cells expressing Cx43-eGFP detected by fluorescence microscopy seem relatively low, analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated that more than 60% of cells expressed Cx43-eGFP. In order to evaluate the function of expressed Cx43 in D. discoideum, we examined the hemi-channel function of Cx43. In this series of experiments, the passive uptake of carboxyfluorescein was monitored using flow cytometric analysis. A significant number of the transfected cells showed a prominent dye uptake in the absence of Ca(2+). The dye uptake by transfected cells in the presence of Ca(2+) was even lower than the non-specific dye uptake by non-transformed Ax3 orf+ cells, confirming that Cx43 expressed in D. discoideum retains its Ca(2+)-dependent, specific gating function. The expression of gap junction proteins expressed in slime molds opens a possibility to the biological significance of intercellular communications in development and maintenance of multicellular organisms.

  11. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channel activity in brain cells of adult offspring mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Juan A; Busso, Dolores; Ramírez, Gigliola; Campos, Marlys; Rigotti, Attilio; Eugenín, Jaime; von Bernhardi, Rommy

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine, the most important neuroteratogen of tobacco smoke, can reproduce brain and cognitive disturbances per se when administered prenatally. However, it is still unknown if paracrine signaling among brain cells participates in prenatal nicotine-induced brain impairment of adult offspring. Paracrine signaling is partly mediated by unopposed channels formed by connexins hemichannels (HCs) and pannexins serving as aqueous pores permeable to ions and small signaling molecules, allowing exchange between the intra- and extracellular milieus. Our aim was to address whether prenatal nicotine exposure changes the activity of those channels in adult mice offspring under control conditions or subjected to a second challenge during young ages: high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet. To induce prenatal exposure to nicotine, osmotic minipumps were implanted in CF1 pregnant mice at gestational day 5 to deliver nicotine bitartrate or saline (control) solutions. After weaning, offspring of nicotine-treated or untreated pregnant mice were fed ad libitum with chow or HFC diets for 8 weeks. The functional state of connexin 43 (Cx43) and pannexin 1 (Panx1) unopposed channels was evaluated by dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices from 11-week-old mice. We found that prenatal nicotine increased the opening of Cx43 HCs in astrocytes, and Panx1 channels in microglia and neurons only if offspring mice were fed with HFC diet. Blockade of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and prostaglandin E receptor 1 (EP1), ionotropic ATP receptor type 7 (P2X7) and NMDA receptors, showed differential inhibition of prenatal nicotine-induced channel opening in glial cells and neurons. Importantly, inhibition of the above mentioned enzymes and receptors, or blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channels greatly reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and glutamate release from hippocampal slices of prenatally nicotine-exposed offspring. We propose that unregulated gliotransmitter

  12. Defective cancellous bone structure and abnormal response to PTH in cortical bone of mice lacking Cx43 cytoplasmic C-terminus domain.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; Davis, Hannah M; Sorenson, Chad; Hon, Mary C; Hassan, Iraj; Reginato, Rejane D; Allen, Matthew R; Bellido, Teresita; Plotkin, Lilian I

    2015-12-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) forms gap junction channels and hemichannels that allow the communication among osteocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts. Cx43 carboxy-terminal (CT) domain regulates channel opening and intracellular signaling by acting as a scaffold for structural and signaling proteins. To determine the role of Cx43 CT domain in bone, mice in which one allele of full length Cx43 was replaced by a mutant lacking the CT domain (Cx43(ΔCT/fl)) were studied. Cx43(ΔCT/fl) mice exhibit lower cancellous bone volume but higher cortical thickness than Cx43(fl/fl) controls, indicating that the CT domain is involved in normal cancellous bone gain but opposes cortical bone acquisition. Further, Cx43(ΔCT) is able to exert the functions of full length osteocytic Cx43 on cortical bone geometry and mechanical properties, demonstrating that domains other than the CT are responsible for Cx43 function in cortical bone. In addition, parathyroid hormone (PTH) failed to increase endocortical bone formation or energy to failure, a mechanical property that indicates resistance to fracture, in cortical bone in Cx43(ΔCT) mice with or without osteocytic full length Cx43. On the other hand, bone mass and bone formation markers were increased by the hormone in all mouse models, regardless of whether full length or Cx43(ΔCT) were or not expressed. We conclude that Cx43 CT domain is involved in proper bone acquisition; and that Cx43 expression in osteocytes is dispensable for some but not all PTH anabolic actions.

  13. Effects of substitution of Cx43 by Cx32 on myocardial energy metabolism, tolerance to ischaemia and preconditioning protection

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Sinovas, Antonio; Sánchez, Jose A; González-Loyola, Alejandra; Barba, Ignasi; Morente, Miriam; Aguilar, Rio; Agulló, Esperanza; Miró-Casas, Elisatet; Esquerda, Neus; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; García-Dorado, David

    2010-01-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) plays an important role in cardioprotective signalling by mechanisms at least in part independent of gap junctional communication. To investigate whether this role is related to specific properties of this connexin isoform, we used a knock-in mouse model in which the coding region of Cx43 is replaced by that of Cx32. Homozygous Cx43KI32 mice showed reduced cell-to-cell Lucifer Yellow transfer (P < 0.01), but QRS duration and left ventricular fractional shortening (echocardiography) were similar to those in wild-type animals. NMR spectroscopy detected reduced ATP and increased lactate content in myocardium from homozygous Cx43KI32 animals (P < 0.05). Despite this, isolated homozygous Cx43KI32 hearts showed smaller infarcts after ischaemia–reperfusion (40 min/60 min) as compared to hearts from heterozygous and wild-type animals (13 and 31% reduction, respectively, P < 0.05). Cardiac myocytes isolated from Cx43KI32 mouse hearts also showed a reduced rate of cell death after simulated ischaemia–reperfusion. In a separate series of experiments, both ischaemic (4 cycles of 3.5 min of ischaemia and 5 min of reperfusion) and pharmacological (50 μmol l−1 diazoxide, 10 min) preconditioning reduced infarct size in hearts from wild-type mice (by 24.84 and 26.63%, respectively, P < 0.05), but only ischaemic preconditioning was effective in hearts from heterozygous animals and both preconditioning strategies failed to protect Cx43KI32 homozygous hearts. These results demonstrate that Cx43 has an important and previously unknown modulatory effect in myocardial energy metabolism and tolerance to ischaemia, and plays a critical role in preconditioning protection, by mechanisms that are specific for this connexin isoform. PMID:20156849

  14. The Cx43-like connexin protein Cx40.8 is differentially localized during fin ontogeny and fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gerhart, Sarah V; Eble, Diane M; Burger, R Michael; Oline, Stefan N; Vacaru, Ana; Sadler, Kirsten C; Jefferis, Rebecca; Iovine, M Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Connexins (Cx) are the subunits of gap junctions, membraneous protein channels that permit the exchange of small molecules between adjacent cells. Cx43 is required for cell proliferation in the zebrafish caudal fin. Previously, we found that a Cx43-like connexin, cx40.8, is co-expressed with cx43 in the population of proliferating cells during fin regeneration. Here we demonstrate that Cx40.8 exhibits novel differential subcellular localization in vivo, depending on the growth status of the fin. During fin ontogeny, Cx40.8 is found at the plasma membrane, but Cx40.8 is retained in the Golgi apparatus during regeneration. We next identified a 30 amino acid domain of Cx40.8 responsible for its dynamic localization. One possible explanation for the differential localization is that Cx40.8 contributes to the regulation of Cx43 in vivo, perhaps modifying channel activity during ontogenetic growth. However, we find that the voltage-gating properties of Cx40.8 are similar to Cx43. Together our findings reveal that Cx40.8 exhibits differential subcellular localization in vivo, dependent on a discrete domain in its carboxy terminus. We suggest that the dynamic localization of Cx40.8 differentially influences Cx43-dependent cell proliferation during ontogeny and regeneration.

  15. The Cx43-like Connexin Protein Cx40.8 Is Differentially Localized during Fin Ontogeny and Fin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gerhart, Sarah V.; Eble, Diane M.; Burger, R. Michael; Oline, Stefan N.; Vacaru, Ana; Sadler, Kirsten C.; Jefferis, Rebecca; Iovine, M. Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Connexins (Cx) are the subunits of gap junctions, membraneous protein channels that permit the exchange of small molecules between adjacent cells. Cx43 is required for cell proliferation in the zebrafish caudal fin. Previously, we found that a Cx43-like connexin, cx40.8, is co-expressed with cx43 in the population of proliferating cells during fin regeneration. Here we demonstrate that Cx40.8 exhibits novel differential subcellular localization in vivo, depending on the growth status of the fin. During fin ontogeny, Cx40.8 is found at the plasma membrane, but Cx40.8 is retained in the Golgi apparatus during regeneration. We next identified a 30 amino acid domain of Cx40.8 responsible for its dynamic localization. One possible explanation for the differential localization is that Cx40.8 contributes to the regulation of Cx43 in vivo, perhaps modifying channel activity during ontogenetic growth. However, we find that the voltage-gating properties of Cx40.8 are similar to Cx43. Together our findings reveal that Cx40.8 exhibits differential subcellular localization in vivo, dependent on a discrete domain in its carboxy terminus. We suggest that the dynamic localization of Cx40.8 differentially influences Cx43-dependent cell proliferation during ontogeny and regeneration. PMID:22347467

  16. Sustained Release of Cx43 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides from Coated Collagen Scaffolds Promotes Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Daniel J; Soon, Allyson; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Phillips, Anthony R J; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Becker, David L

    2016-07-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the mRNA of the gap junction protein Cx43 promote tissue repair in a variety of different wounds. Delivery of the antisense drug has most often been achieved by a thermoreversible hydrogel, Pluronic F-127, which is very effective in the short term but does not allow for sustained delivery over several days. For chronic wounds that take a long time to heal, repeated dosing with the drug may be desirable but is not always compatible with conventional treatments such as the weekly changing of compression bandages on venous leg ulcers. Here the coating of collagen scaffolds with antisense oligonucleotides is investigated and a way to provide protection of the oligodeoxynucleotide drug is found in conjunction with sustained release over a 7 d period. This approach significantly reduces the normal foreign body reaction to the scaffold, which induces an increase of Cx43 protein and an inhibition of healing. As a result of the antisense integration into the scaffold, inflammation is reduced with the rate of wound healing and contracture is significantly improved. This coated scaffold approach may be very useful for treating venous leg ulcers and also for providing a sustained release of any other types of oligonucleotide drugs that are being developed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating a Cx43-Mimetic Peptide in Cutaneous Scarring.

    PubMed

    Grek, Christina L; Montgomery, Jade; Sharma, Meenakshi; Ravi, A; Rajkumar, J S; Moyer, Kurtis E; Gourdie, Robert G; Ghatnekar, Gautam S

    2017-03-01

    The transmembrane protein Cx43 has key roles in fibrogenic processes including inflammatory signaling and extracellular matrix composition. aCT1 is a Cx43 mimetic peptide that in preclinical studies accelerated wound closure, decreased inflammation and granulation tissue area, and normalized mechanical properties after cutaneous injury. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of aCT1 in the reduction of scar formation in human incisional wounds. In a prospective, multicenter, within-participant controlled trial, patients with bilateral incisional wounds (≥10 mm) after laparoscopic surgery were randomized to receive acute treatment (immediately after wounding and 24 hours later) with an aCT1 gel formulation plus conventional standard of care protocols, involving moisture-retentive occlusive dressing, or standard of care alone. The primary efficacy endpoint was average scarring score using visual analog scales evaluating incision appearance and healing progress over 9 months. There was no significant difference in scar appearance between aCT1- or control-treated incisions after 1 month. At month 9, aCT1-treated incisions showed a 47% improvement in scar scores over controls (Vancouver Scar Scale; P = 0.0045), a significantly higher Global Assessment Scale score (P = 0.0009), and improvements in scar pigmentation, thickness, surface roughness, and mechanical suppleness. Adverse events were similar in both groups. aCT1 has potential to improve scarring outcome after surgery. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CX43 expression, phosphorylation, and distribution in the normal and autoimmune orchitic testis with a look at gap junctions joining germ cell to germ cell.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, R-Marc; Akpovi, Casimir D; Chen, Li; Day, Robert; Vitale, María L

    2011-01-01

    Spermatogenesis requires connexin 43 (Cx43).This study examines normal gene transcription, translation, and phosphorylation of Cx43 to define its role on germ cell growth and Sertoli cell's differentiation, and identifies abnormalities arising from spontaneous autoimmune orchitis (AIO) in mink, a seasonal breeder and a natural model for autoimmunity. Northern blot analysis detected 2.8- and a 3.7-kb Cx43 mRNA bands in seminiferous tubule-enriched fractions. Cx43 mRNA increased in seminiferous tubule-enriched fractions throughout development and then seasonally with the completion of spermatogenesis. Cx43 protein levels increased transiently during the colonization of the tubules by the early-stage spermatocytes. Cx43 phosphorylated (PCx43) and nonphosphorylated (NPCx43) in Ser368 decreased during the periods of completion of meiosis and Sertoli cell differentiation, while Cx43 mRNA remained elevated throughout. PCx43 labeled chiefly the plasma membrane except by stage VII when vesicles were also labeled in Sertoli cells. Vesicles and lysosomes in Sertoli cells and the Golgi apparatus in the round spermatids were NPCx43 positive. A decrease in Cx43 gene expression was matched by a Cx43 protein increase in the early, not the late, phase of AIO. Total Cx43 and PCx43 decreased with the advance of orchitis. The study makes a novel finding of gap junctions connecting germ cells. The data indicate that Cx43 protein expression and phosphorylation in Ser368 are stage-specific events that may locally influence the acquisition of meiotic competence and the Sertoli cell differentiation in normal testis. AIO modifies Cx43 levels, suggesting changes in Cx43-mediated intercommunication and spermatogenic activity in response to cytokines imbalances in Sertoli cells.

  19. Interacting Network of the Gap Junction (GJ) Protein Connexin43 (Cx43) is Modulated by Ischemia and Reperfusion in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Martins-Marques, Tania; Anjo, Sandra Isabel; Pereira, Paulo; Manadas, Bruno; Girão, Henrique

    2015-11-01

    The coordinated and synchronized cardiac muscle contraction relies on an efficient gap junction-mediated intercellular communication (GJIC) between cardiomyocytes, which involves the rapid anisotropic impulse propagation through connexin (Cx)-containing channels, namely of Cx43, the most abundant Cx in the heart. Expectedly, disturbing mechanisms that affect channel activity, localization and turnover of Cx43 have been implicated in several cardiomyopathies, such as myocardial ischemia. Besides gap junction-mediated intercellular communication, Cx43 has been associated with channel-independent functions, including modulation of cell adhesion, differentiation, proliferation and gene transcription. It has been suggested that the role played by Cx43 is dictated by the nature of the proteins that interact with Cx43. Therefore, the characterization of the Cx43-interacting network and its dynamics is vital to understand not only the molecular mechanisms underlying pathological malfunction of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication, but also to unveil novel and unanticipated biological functions of Cx43. In the present report, we applied a quantitative SWATH-MS approach to characterize the Cx43 interactome in rat hearts subjected to ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion. Our results demonstrate that, in the heart, Cx43 interacts with proteins related with various biological processes such as metabolism, signaling and trafficking. The interaction of Cx43 with proteins involved in gene transcription strengthens the emerging concept that Cx43 has a role in gene expression regulation. Importantly, our data shows that the interactome of Cx43 (Connexome) is differentially modulated in diseased hearts. Overall, the characterization of Cx43-interacting network may contribute to the establishment of new therapeutic targets to modulate cardiac function in physiological and pathological conditions. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002331. © 2015 by

  20. Infection by Cx43 adenovirus increased chemotherapy sensitivity in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells: not involving in induction of cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Zhou, Hongfeng; Wu, Jin; Liu, Wentao; Li, Yongqing; Shi, Guangyue; Yue, Xiaolong; Sun, Xiwen; Zhao, Yanbin; Hu, Xiaowei; Wang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Xufeng

    2015-12-15

    There is a lower basal expression of Connexin43 (Cx43) in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells. In the present study, BGC-823 cells were transfected with recombinant Cx43 adenovirus plasmid vector, and we explored the influences of Cx43 expression on cell proliferation, chemo-sensitivity, colony forming ability, invasion ability and apoptosis. Moreover, we also determined the expression of Pgp, Cx43, as well as apoptosis-related proteins (bcl-2, bax, caspase3 and caspase 9). MTT assay was performed to determine the proliferation of BGC-823 cells before and after Cx43 transfection. The influences of Cx43 infection on sensitivity of chemotherapy (including Doxorubicin, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin) were detected by MTT assay. Expression levels of Pgp, Cx43, as well as apoptosis-related proteins (bcl-2, bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9) in BGC-823 cells were determined by Western blotting analysis before and after the infection with Cx43 adenovirus. MDR expression was determined by RT-PCR before and after Cx43 infection. Invasive ability was detected by invasion chamber. Influence of Cx43 adenovirus infection on apoptosis of BGC-823 cells was determined by flow cytometry. After infection by Cx43 adenovirus, colony forming rate and invasive ability of BGC-823 cells were decreased. Flow cytometry results revealed that cell apoptosis were insignificantly increased. The data of MTT assay revealed that infection with Cx43 adenovirus, cell proliferation ability decreased and sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs (including doxorubicin, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin) increased. Results of Western blotting analysis revealed that increasing expression levels of Cx43, decreasing expression levels of Pgp, and insignificant changes of bcl-2, bax, caspase3 and caspase 9 were detected. RT-PCR revealed the expression of MDR1 gene, the gene encoding Pgp, decreased significantly (p<0.05). The human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells were infected with Cx43-IRES2-EGFP recombinant adenovirus vector. Colony

  1. Cx43 expressed on bone marrow stromal cells plays an essential role in multiple myeloma cell survival and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Connexin-43 (Cx43), a connexin constituent of gap junctions (GJs) is mainly expressed in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and played a important role on hematopoiesis. In this study, we explored the role of gap junctions (GJs) formed by Cx43 between BMSCs and multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Material and methods qPCR and western blot assays were employed to assay Cx43 expression in three MM cell lines (RPMI 8266, U266, and XG7), freshly isolated MM cells, and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Cx43 mRNA and proteins were detected in all three MM cell lines and six out of seven freshly isolated MM cells. Resuths The BMSCs from MM patients expressed Cx43 at higher levels than of normal donor (ND-BMSCs). Dye transfer assays demonstrated that gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) occurring via Cx43 situated between MM and BMSCs is functional. Cytometry beads array (CBA) assays showed that cytokines production changed when the ND-BMSCs were co-cultured with MM cells, especially the levels of IL-6, SDF-1α and IL-10 were higher than those the cells cultured alone and decreased significantly in the presence of GJ inhibitor heptanol. Our results demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of BTZ to MM cells decreased significantly in the presence of BMSCs, an effect that was partially recovered in the presence of GJ inhibitor. Conclusions Our data suggest that GJIC between MM and BMSCs is a critical factor in tumor cell proliferation and drug sensitivity, and is implicated in MM pathogenesis. PMID:28144277

  2. Influence of the antiandrogen flutamide on connexin 43 (Cx43) gene and protein expression in the porcine placenta and uterus during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wieciech, Iwona; Grzesiak, Małgorzata; Knapczyk-Stwora, Katarzyna; Pytlik, Anna; Słomczynska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The study focuses on the expression of connexin 43 (Cx43), a gap junctional protein in the porcine placenta and uterus. The aim was to examine Cx43 mRNA and protein expression after antiandrogen flutamide treatment. Flutamide was injected into pregnant gilts at a daily dose of 50 mg/kg body weight at different stages of pregnancy: between days 43-49 (50 dpc), 83-89 (90 dpc) and 101-107 (108 dpc) of gestation. The animals were sacrificed and tissues were collected one day after the last injection. Cx43 immunostaining was observed in epithelial and stromal cells of the fetal part of the placenta; luminal and glandular epithelial cells of maternal part of the placenta and myometrium of the uterus within placentation sites. Cx43 was also found in glandular epithelium and myometrium of non-placental uterus. Flutamide treatment caused fluctuations in Cx43 expression especially before parturition. Although significant changes in Cx43 mRNA expression were observed only in the fetal part of the placenta, Cx43 protein level was affected within the maternal part of the placenta and non-placental uterus. These results suggest the involvement of androgens in the regulation of Cx43 expression within the feto-maternal compartment in pigs. However, androgen deficiency caused pronounced changes during late pregnancy and before parturition. These results are interesting due to the functional changes in the porcine uterus during the preparturient period that is determined by Cx43 protein.

  3. Synergistic effects of AKAP95, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cx43 in the development of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Fengjie; Yuan, Yangyang; Zhi, Xuehong; Huang, Qian; Chen, Yuexin; Zhuang, Wenxin; Zhang, Dengcheng; Teng, Bogang; Kong, Xiangyu; Zhang, Yongxing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression of A-kinase anchor protein 95 (AKAP95), Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Connexin43 (Cx43) in rectal cancer tissues and assess the associations between each of the proteins and pathological parameters, as well as their inter-relationships. Methods: AKAP95, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cx43 protein expression rates were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 50 rectal cancer specimens and 16 pericarcinoma tissues. Results: The positive rates of AKAP95, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin D1 proteins were 54.00 vs. 18.75%, 62.00 vs. 6.25%, and 72.00 vs. 31.25% in rectal cancer specimens and pericarcinoma tissues, respectively, representing statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). The positive rate of Cx43 protein expression in rectal cancer tissues was 44.00% and 62.50% in pericarcinoma tissues, and the difference between them was not significant (P > 0.05). No significant associations were found between protein expression of AKAP95, Cyclin E1, Cyclin D1, and Cx43, and the degree of differentiation, histological type, and lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer (P > 0.05). However, significant correlations were obtained between the expression rates of AKAP95 and Cyclin E1, Cyclin E1 and Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1 and Cx43 protein, and Cyclin D1 and Cx43, respectively (P < 0.05). Conclusion: AKAP95, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin D1 protein expression rates were significantly higher in rectal cancer tissues compared with pericarcinoma samples, suggesting an association between these proteins and the development and progression of rectal cancer. In addition, the significant correlations between the proteins (AKAP95 and Cyclin E1, Cyclin E1 and Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1 and Cx43 protein, and Cyclin D1 and Cx43) indicate the possible synergistic effects of these factors in the development and progression of rectal cancer. PMID:25973052

  4. Astrocytic Cx 43 and Cx 40 in the mouse hippocampus during and after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Wu, X L; Tang, Y C; Lu, Q Y; Xiao, X L; Song, T B; Tang, F R

    2015-05-01

    Astrocytes have now been well accepted to play important roles in epileptogenesis by controlling gliotransmitter release and neuronal excitability, contributing to blood-brain barrier dysfunction and involving in brain inflammation. Recent studies indicate that abnormal expression of gap junction protein connexin (Cx) may also be a contributing factor for seizure generation. To further address this issue, we investigated the progressive changes of Cx 43 and Cx 40 in the mouse hippocampus at 4 h, 1 day, 1 week and 2 months during and after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (PISE). The co-localization of Cx 43 and Cx 40 with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was also examined. We observed that Cx 43 and Cx 40 protein expression remained unaltered at 4 h during and at 1 day (acute stage) after PISE. However, their expression was significantly increased in CA1 and CA3 areas and in the dentate gyrus at 1 week (latent stage) and 2 months (chronic stage) after PISE. Double immunofluorescence labeling indicated the localization of Cx 43 and Cx 40 in astrocytes. Combined with progressive neuronal loss in the mouse hippocampus, our results suggest that the increase in gap junctions in the neuronoglial syncytium of reactive astrocytes may be implicated in synchronization of hippocampal hyperactivity leading to neuronal loss and epileptogenesis.

  5. Presence of Cx43 in extracellular vesicles reduces the cardiotoxicity of the anti-tumour therapeutic approach with doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Marques, Tania; Pinho, Maria Joao; Zuzarte, Monica; Oliveira, Carla; Pereira, Paulo; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Gomes, Celia; Girao, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are major conveyors of biological information, mediating local and systemic cell-to-cell communication under physiological and pathological conditions. These endogenous vesicles have been recognized as prominent drug delivery vehicles of several therapeutic cargoes, including doxorubicin (dox), presenting major advantages over the classical approaches. Although dox is one of the most effective anti-tumour agents in the clinical practice, its use is very often hindered by its consequent dramatic cardiotoxicity. Despite significant advances witnessed in the past few years, more comprehensive studies, supporting the therapeutic efficacy of EVs, with decreased side effects, are still scarce. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the role of the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) in mediating the release of EV content into tumour cells. Moreover, we investigated whether Cx43 improves the efficiency of dox-based anti-tumour treatment, with a concomitant decrease of cardiotoxicity. In the present report, we demonstrate that the presence of Cx43 in EVs increases the release of luciferin from EVs into tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, using cell-based approaches and a subcutaneous mouse tumour model, we show that the anti-tumour effect of dox incorporated into EVs is similar to the administration of the free drug, regardless the presence of Cx43. Strikingly, we demonstrate that the presence of Cx43 in dox-loaded EVs reduces the cardiotoxicity of the drug. Altogether, these results bring new insights into the concrete potential of EVs as therapeutic vehicles and open new avenues toward the development of strategies that help to reduce unwanted side effects. PMID:27702427

  6. Deletion of Cx43 from osteocytes results in defective bone material properties but does not decrease extrinsic strength in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Bivi, Nicoletta; Nelson, Mark T; Faillace, Meghan E; Li, Jiliang; Miller, Lisa M; Plotkin, Lilian I

    2012-09-01

    Deletion of connexin (Cx) 43 from osteoblasts and osteocytes (OCN-Cre;Cx43(fl/-) mice) or from osteocytes only (DMP1-8kb-Cre;Cx43(fl/fl) mice) results in increased cortical, but not cancellous, osteocyte apoptosis and widening of the femoral midshaft without changes in cortical thickness. Despite the consequent larger moment of inertia, stiffness and ultimate load, measures of mechanical strength assessed by three-point bending, are not higher in either model of Cx43 deficiency due to reduced Young's modulus, a measure of the stiffness of the material per unit of area. In OCN-Cre;Cx43(fl/-) mice, this was accompanied by a reduced ratio of nonreducible/reducible collagen cross-links as assessed by Fourier transformed infrared imaging (FTIRI) in the femoral diaphysis. On the other hand, DMP1-8kb-Cre;Cx43(fl/fl) mice did not show a significant reduction in collagen maturation in the same skeletal site, but a small decrease in mineralization was detected by FTIRI. Remarkably, both osteoblastic and osteocytic cells lacking Cx43 expressed lower mRNA levels of lysyl oxidase, a crucial enzyme involved in collagen maturation. These findings suggest that Cx43 expression in osteoblasts is involved in maintaining the quality of the bone matrix in cortical bone through the maturation of collagen cross-links. Osteocytic Cx43 expression is important also to maintain the stiffness of the bone material, where Cx43 deficiency results in local reduction in mineralization, possibly due to osteocyte apoptosis.

  7. To beat or not to beat: degradation of Cx43 imposes the heart rhythm.

    PubMed

    Martins-Marques, Tânia; Catarino, Steve; Marques, Carla; Pereira, Paulo; Girão, Henrique

    2015-06-01

    The main function of the heart is to pump blood to the different parts of the organism, a task that is efficiently accomplished through proper electric and metabolic coupling between cardiac cells, ensured by gap junctions (GJ). Cardiomyocytes are the major cell population in the heart, and as cells with low mitotic activity, are highly dependent upon mechanisms of protein degradation. In the heart, both the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy participate in the fine-tune regulation of cardiac remodelling and function, either in physiological or pathological conditions. Indeed, besides controlling cardiac signalling pathways, UPS and autophagy have been implicated in the turnover of several myocardial proteins. Degradation of Cx43, the major ventricular GJ protein, has been associated to up-regulation of autophagy at the onset of heart ischemia and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), which can have profound implications upon cardiac function. In this review, we present recent studies devoted to the involvement of autophagy and UPS in heart homoeostasis, with a particular focus on GJ.

  8. Enhanced expression of Cx43 and gap junction communication in vascular smooth muscle cells of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Jie; Liu, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Liang; Ma, Ke-Tao; Zhao, Lei; Shi, Wen-Yan; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Wang, Ying-Zi; Li, Li; Si, Jun-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Niflumic acid (NFA) is a novel gap junction (GJ) inhibitor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of NFA on GJ communication and the expression of connexin (Cx) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of mesenteric arterioles of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Whole-cell patch clamp recording demonstrated that NFA at 1×10–4 M significantly inhibited the inward current and its effect was reversible. The time for charging and discharging of cell membrane capacitance (Cinput) reduced from 9.73 to 0.48 ms (P<0.05; n=6). Pressure myograph measurement showed that NFA at 3×10-4 M fully neutralized the contraction caused by phenylephrine. The relaxation responses of normotensive control Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were significantly higher, compared with those of the SHRs (P<0.05; n=6). Western blot and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of Cx43 of the third-level branch of mesenteric arterioles of the SHRs and WKY rats were higher, compared with those of the first-level branch. The mRNA and protein expression levels of Cx43 of the primary and third-level branches of the mesenteric arterioles in the SHRs were higher, compared with those in the WKY rats (P<0.05; n=6). The mRNA levels of Cx43 in the mesenteric arterioles were significantly downregulated by NFA in a concentration-dependent manner (P<0.01; n=6). The protein levels of Cx43 in primary cultured VSMCs isolated from the mesenteric arterioles were also significantly downregulated by NFA in a concentration-dependent manner (P<0.01; n=6). These results showed that the vasorelaxatory effects of GJ inhibitors were reduced in the SHRs, which was associated with a higher protein expression level of Cx43 in the mesenteric arterioles of the SHRs. NFA also relaxed the mesenteric arterioles by reducing the expression of Cx43, which decreased blood pressure. Therefore, regulation of the expression of GJs may be a

  9. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown of the gap junction protein, Cx43, attenuates the development of vascular restenosis following balloon injury

    PubMed Central

    HAN, XIAO-JIAN; CHEN, MIN; HONG, TAO; ZHU, LING-YU; HE, DAN; FENG, JIU-GENG; JIANG, LI-PING

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)] has been developed into a mature interventional treatment for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, the long-term therapeutic effect is compromised by the high incidence of vascular restenosis following angioplasty, and the underlying mechanisms of vascular restenosis have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of the gap junction (GJ) protein, connexin 43 (Cx43), in the development of vascular restenosis. To establish vascular restenosis, rat carotid arteries were subjected to balloon angioplasty injury. At 0, 7, 14 and 2 days following balloon injury, the arteries were removed, and the intimal/medial area of the vessels was measured to evaluate the degree of restenosis. We found that the intimal area gradually increased following balloon injury. Intimal hyperplasia and restenosis were particularly evident at 14 and 28 days after injury. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of Cx43 was temporarily decreased at 7 days, and subsequently increased at 14 and 28 days following balloon injury, as shown by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. To determine the involvement of Cx43 in vascular restenosis, the lentivirus vector expressing shRNA targeting Cx43, Cx43-RNAi-LV, was used to silence Cx43 in the rat carotid arteries. The knockdown of Cx43 effectively attenuated the development of intimal hyperplasia and vascular restenosis following balloon injury. Thus, our data indicate the vital role of the GJ protein, Cx43, in the development of vascular restenosis, and provide new insight into the pathogenesis of vascular reste-nosis. Cx43 may prove to be a novel potential pharmacological target for the prevention of vascular restenosis following PCI. PMID:25625334

  10. Diabetes Increases Cryoinjury Size with Associated Effects on Cx43 Gap Junction Function and Phosphorylation in the Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Palatinus, Joseph A.; Gourdie, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients develop larger myocardial infarctions and have an increased risk of death following a heart attack. The poor response to myocardial injury in the diabetic heart is likely related to the many metabolic derangements from diabetes that create a poor substrate in general for wound healing, response to injury and infection. Studies in rodents have implicated a role for the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) in regulating the injury response in diabetic skin wounds. In this study, we sought to determine whether diabetes alters Cx43 molecular interactions or intracellular communication in the cryoinjured STZ type I diabetic mouse heart. We found that epicardial cryoinjury size is increased in diabetic mice and this increase is prevented by preinjury insulin administration. Consistent with these findings, we found that intercellular coupling via gap junctions is decreased after insulin administration in diabetic and nondiabetic mice. This decrease in coupling is associated with a concomitant increase in phosphorylation of Cx43 at serine 368, a residue known to decrease channel conductance. Taken together, our results suggest that insulin regulates both gap junction-mediated intercellular communication and injury propagation in the mouse heart. PMID:27034963

  11. Connexin 43 mimetic peptide Gap27 reveals potential differences in the role of Cx43 in wound repair between diabetic and non-diabetic cells.

    PubMed

    Pollok, Simone; Pfeiffer, Ann-Catherine; Lobmann, Ralf; Wright, Catherine S; Moll, Ingrid; Martin, Patricia E M; Brandner, Johanna M

    2011-04-01

    During early wound healing (WH) events Connexin 43 (Cx43) is down-regulated at wound margins. In chronic wound margins, including diabetic wounds, Cx43 expression is enhanced suggesting that down-regulation is important for WH. We previously reported that the Cx43 mimetic peptide Gap27 blocks Cx43 mediated intercellular communication and promotes skin cell migration of infant cells in vitro. In the present work we further investigated the molecular mechanism of Gap27 action and its therapeutic potential to improve WH in skin tissue and diabetic and non-diabetic cells. Ex vivo skin, organotypic models and human keratinocytes/fibroblasts of young and old donors and of diabetic and non-diabetic origin were used to assess the impact of Gap27 on cell migration, proliferation, Cx43 expression, localization, phosphorylation and hemichannel function. Exposure of ex vivo WH models to Gap27 decreased dye spread, accelerated WH and elevated cell proliferation. In non-diabetic cell cultures Gap27 decreased dye uptake through Cx hemichannels and after scratch wounding cells showed enhanced migration and proliferation. Cells of diabetic origin were less susceptible to Gap27 during early passages. In late passages these cells showed responses comparable to non-diabetic cells. The cause of the discrepancy between diabetic and non-diabetic cells correlated with decreased Cx hemichannel activity in diabetic cells but excluded differences in Cx43 expression, localization and Ser368-phosphorylation. These data emphasize the importance of Cx43 in WH and support the concept that Gap27 could be a beneficial therapeutic to accelerate normal WH. However, its use in diabetic WH may be restricted and our results highlight differences in the role of Cx43 in skin cells of different origin.

  12. [Relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and expression of connexin (Cx) 32 and Cx43 genes in gastric cancer and gastric precancerous lesions].

    PubMed

    Xu, Can-Xia; Jia, Yan; Yang, Wen-Bin; Wang, Fen; Shen, Shou-Rong

    2008-06-10

    To investigate the expression of connexin (Cx)32 and Cx43 genes in gastric cancer and precancerous lesion, and to investigate the relation between the changes of expression of Cx32 and Cx43 genes and Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection. Gastroscopy and biopsy of gastric mucosa were conducted on 33 patients with chronic superficial gastritis (CSG), 88 with precancerous lesion, and 70 with gastric cancer. Hp was detected by rapid urease test, basic fuchsin staining, and 14C-urea breath test. The CagA gene of Hp was determined by PCR. SABC immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression of Cx32 and Cx43 genes in gastric mucosa biopsy specimens. The positive expression rates of Cx32 and Cx43 genes were 15.7% and 32.9% respectively in the gastric cancer patients, 51.1% and 54.5% in the patients with precancerous lesion, and 100.0% and 93.9% in the CSG patients. The positive Cx32 and Cx43 expression rates of the gastric cancer and precancerous lesion patients were significantly lower than those of the CSG patients (all P < 0.05). The positive Cx32 expression rate of the gastric cancer patients with Hp infection was 16.7%, not significantly different from that of the gastric cancer patients without Hp infection (13.6%). The positive Cx43 expression rate of the gastric cancer patients with Hp infection was 25%, significantly lower than that of the gastric cancer patients without Hp infection (50%, P = 0.039). The positive Cx32 and Cx43 expression rates and expression intensity of the precancerous lesion patients with Hp infection were all significantly lower than those of the precancerous lesion patients without Hp infection (all P < 0.05). The positive Cx43 expression rate of the gastric cancer patients with CagA+ Hp infection was 17.9%, significantly lower than that of the CagA- Hp group (55.6%, P = 0.027), however, the positive Cx32 expression rate of the gastric cancer patients with CagA+ Hp infection was 12.8%, not significantly different from that of the

  13. Effects of Cx43 gene modification on the proliferation and migration of the human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226.

    PubMed

    Zang, J-P; Wei, R

    2015-10-27

    In this study, the human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226 was transfected with the recombinant plasmid pBudCE4.1_Cx43 to explore the role of the Cx43 gene in cell growth, cell cycle, and tumor migration. pBudCE4.1-Cx43 was transfected into human lung squamous carcinoma NCI-H226 cells using Lipofectamine TM2000. The mRNA and protein expressions of Cx43 in the transfected cells were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The cell-cell communication was detected using the scratch dye tracer method and the cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. The CCK-8 proliferation, scratch healing, and cell invasion assays were performed to evaluate the effect of the Cx43 gene transfection on the proliferation, migration, and invasive abilities of NCI-H226 cells. Cx43 mRNA and protein expressions and the fluorescence intensity in the scratch healing test were significantly higher in the experimental group than those in the control and blank groups (P < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively). The CCK-8 proliferation assay and the scratch healing experiment revealed significantly inhibited NCI-H226 cell proliferation (especially 72 h after incubation) and cell migration, respectively, in the experimental group, compared to the control and blank groups (P < 0.001 and <0.05, respectively). The transwell chamber test showed a statistically significant decrease in the invasive ability of NCI-H226 cells in the experimental group (P < 0.05). Therefore, Cx43 gene transfection could inhibit the migration of human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226, thereby inhibiting tumor cell proliferation.

  14. Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome-associated Cx26 mutants produce nonfunctional gap junctions but hyperactive hemichannels when co-expressed with wild type Cx43.

    PubMed

    García, Isaac E; Maripillán, Jaime; Jara, Oscar; Ceriani, Ricardo; Palacios-Muñoz, Angelina; Ramachandran, Jayalakshmi; Olivero, Pablo; Perez-Acle, Tomas; González, Carlos; Sáez, Juan C; Contreras, Jorge E; Martínez, Agustín D

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in Cx26 gene are found in most cases of human genetic deafness. Some mutations produce syndromic deafness associated with skin disorders, like the Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome (KID). Because in the human skin connexin 26 (Cx26) is co-expressed with other connexins, like Cx43 and Cx30, and as the KID syndrome is inherited as autosomal dominant condition, it is possible that KID mutations change the way Cx26 interacts with other co-expressed connexins. Indeed, some Cx26 syndromic mutations showed gap junction dominant negative effect when co-expressed with wild-type connexins, including Cx26 and Cx43. The nature of these interactions and the consequences on hemichannels and gap junction channel (GJC) functions remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that syndromic mutations, at the N terminus segment of Cx26, change connexin oligomerization compatibility, allowing aberrant interactions with Cx43. Strikingly, heteromeric oligomer formed by Cx43/Cx26 (syndromic mutants) shows exacerbated hemichannel activity but nonfunctional GJCs; this also occurs for those Cx26 KID mutants that do not show functional homomeric hemichannels. Heterologous expression of these hyperactive heteromeric hemichannels increases cell membrane permeability, favoring ATP release and Ca(2+) overload. The functional paradox produced by oligomerization of Cx43 and Cx26 KID mutants could underlie the severe syndromic phenotype in human skin.

  15. Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome-associated Cx26 mutants produce nonfunctional gap junctions but hyperactive hemichannels when co-expressed with wild type Cx43

    PubMed Central

    García, Isaac E.; Maripillán, Jaime; Jara, Oscar; Ceriani, Ricardo; Palacios-Muñoz, Angelina; Ramachandran, Jayalakshimi; Olivero, Pablo; Pérez-Acle, Tomás; González, Carlos; Sáez, Juan C.; Contreras, Jorge E.; Martínez, Agustín D.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in Cx26 gene are found in most cases of human genetic deafness. Some mutations produce syndromic deafness associated with skin disorders, like Keratitis Ichthyosis Deafness syndrome (KID). Because in the human skin Cx26 is co-expressed with other connexins, like Cx43 and Cx30, and since KID syndrome is inherited as autosomal dominant condition, it is possible that KID mutations change the way Cx26 interacts with other co-expressed connexins. Indeed, some Cx26 syndromic mutations showed gap junction dominant negative effect when co-expressed with wild type connexins, including Cx26 and Cx43. The nature of these interactions and the consequences on hemichannels and gap junction channels functions remain unknown. In this study we demonstrate that syndromic mutations at the N-terminus segment of Cx26, change connexin oligomerization compatibility, allowing aberrant interactions with Cx43. Strikingly, heteromeric oligomer formed by Cx43/Cx26 (syndromic mutants) show exacerbated hemichannel activity, but nonfunctional gap junction channels; this also occurs for those Cx26 KID mutants that do not show functional homomeric hemichannels. Heterologous expression of these hyperactive heteromeric hemichannels increases cell membrane permeability, favoring ATP release and Ca2+ overload. The functional paradox produced by oligomerization of Cx43 and Cx26 KID mutants could underlie the severe syndromic phenotype in human skin. PMID:25625422

  16. Spatiotemporal changes in Cx30 and Cx43 expression during neuronal differentiation of P19 EC and NT2/D1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Carthur K; O'Carroll, Simon J; Kim, Sue-Ling; Green, Colin R; Nicholson, Louise F B

    2013-12-01

    While connexins (Cxs) are thought to be involved in differentiation, their expression and role has yet to be fully elucidated. We investigated the temporal expression of Cx30, Cx36 and Cx43 in two in vitro models of neuronal differentiation: human NT2/D1 and murine P19 cells, and the spatial localisation of Cx30 and Cx43 in these models. A temporal Cx43 downregulation was confirmed in both cell lines during RA-induced neuronal differentiation using RT-PCR (P < 0.05) preceding an increase in neuronal doublecortin protein. RT-PCR showed Cx36 was upregulated twofold in NT2/D1 cells (P < 0.05) and sixfold in P19 cells (P < 0.001) during neuronal differentiation. Cx30 exhibited a transient peak in expression midway through the timecourse of differentiation increasing threefold in NT2/D1 cells (P < 0.001) and eightfold in P19 cells (P < 0.01). Qualitative immunocytochemistry was used to examine spatiotemporal patterns of Cx protein distribution alongside neuronal differentiation markers. The temporal immunolabelling pattern was similar to that seen using RT-PCR. Cx43 was observed intracellularly and on cell surfaces, while Cx30 was seen as puncta. Spatially Cx43 was seen on doublecortin-negative cells, which may indicate Cx43 downregulation is requisite for differentiation in these models. Conversely, Cx30 puncta were observed on doublecortin-positive and -negative cells in NT2/D1 cells and examination of the Cx30 peak showed puncta also localized to nestin-positive cells, with few puncta on MAP2-positive cells. In P19 cells Cx30 was localized on clusters of cells surrounded by MAP2- and doublecortin-positive processes. The expression pattern of Cx30 indicates a role in neuronal differentiation; the nature of that role warrants future investigation.

  17. Changes in Cx43 and NaV1.5 expression precede the occurrence of substantial fibrosis in calcineurin-induced murine cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Magda S C; Raaijmakers, Antonia J A; van Doorn, Tessa; Kok, Bart; Nieuwenhuis, Sylvia; van der Nagel, Roel; Vos, Marc A; de Boer, Teun P; van Rijen, Harold V M; Bierhuizen, Marti F A

    2014-01-01

    In mice, the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin A (CnA) induces a transcriptional pathway leading to pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Interestingly, induction of CnA has been frequently noticed in human hypertrophic and failing hearts. Independently, the arrhythmia vulnerability of such hearts has been regularly associated with remodeling of parameters determining electrical conduction (expression level of connexin43 (Cx43) and NaV1.5, connective tissue architecture), for which the precise molecular basis and sequence of events is still unknown. Recently, we observed reduced Cx43 and NaV1.5 expression in 4-week old mouse hearts, overexpressing a constitutively active form of CnA (MHC-CnA model), but the order of events is still unknown. Therefore, three key parameters of conduction (Cx43, NaV1.5 and connective tissue expression) were characterized in MHC-CnA ventricles versus wild-type (WT) during postnatal development on a weekly basis. At postnatal week 1, CnA overexpression induced cardiac hypertrophy in MHC-CnA. Moreover, protein and RNA levels of both Cx43 and NaV1.5 were reduced by at least 50% as compared to WT. Cx43 immunoreactive signal was reduced at week 2 in MHC-CnA. At postnatal week 3, Cx43 was less phosphorylated and RNA level of Cx43 normalized to WT values, although the protein level was still reduced. Additionally, MHC-CnA hearts displayed substantial fibrosis relative to WT, which was accompanied by increased RNA levels for genes previously associated with fibrosis such as Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Tgfb1, Ctgf, Timp1 and microRNA miR-21. In MHC-CnA, reduction in Cx43 and NaV1.5 expression thus coincided with overexpression of CnA and hypertrophy development and preceded significant presence of fibrosis. At postnatal week 4 the alterations in conductional parameters observed in the MHC-CnA model lead to abnormal conduction and arrhythmias, similar to those observed in cardiac remodeling in heart failure patients. The MHC-CnA model, therefore

  18. Connexin-deficiency affects expression levels of glial glutamate transporters within the cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Unger, Tina; Bette, Stefanie; Zhang, Jiong; Theis, Martin; Engele, Jürgen

    2012-01-06

    The glial glutamate transporter subtypes, GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1 clear the bulk of extracellular glutamate and are severely dysregulated in various acute and chronic brain diseases. Despite the previous identification of several extracellular factors modulating glial glutamate transporter expression, our knowledge of the regulatory network controlling glial glutamate transport in health and disease still remains incomplete. In studies with cultured cortical astrocytes, we previously obtained evidence that glial glutamate transporter expression is also affected by gap junctions/connexins. To assess whether gap junctions would likewise control the in vivo expression of glial glutamate transporters, we have now assessed their expression levels in brains of conditional Cx43 knockout mice, total Cx30 knockouts, as well as Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts. We found that either knocking out Cx30, Cx43, or both increases GLT-1/EAAT-2 protein levels in the cerebral cortex to a similar extent. By contrast, GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels maximally increased in cerebral cortices of Cx30/Cx43 double knockouts, implying that gap junctions differentially affect the expression of GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1. Quantitative PCR analysis further revealed that increases in glial glutamate transporter expression are brought about by transcriptional and translational/posttranslational processes. Moreover, GLT-1/EAAT-2- and GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels remained unchanged in the hippocampi of Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts when compared to Cx43fl/fl controls, indicating brain region-specific effects of gap junctions on glial glutamate transport. Since astrocytic gap junction coupling is affected in various forms of brain injuries, our findings point to gap junctions/connexins as important regulators of glial glutamate turnover in the diseased cerebral cortex.

  19. Cx43 Mediates Resistance against MPP+-Induced Apoptosis in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells via Modulating the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Su; Ganesan, Palanivel; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal apoptosis in the substantia nigra par compacta (SNpc) appears to play an essential role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. However, the mechanisms responsible for the death of dopaminergic neurons are not fully understood yet. To explore the apoptotic mechanisms, we used a well-known parkinsonian toxin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+), to induce neuronal apoptosis in the human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cell line. The most common method of interaction between cells is gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) mediated by gap junctions (GJs) formed by transmembrane proteins called connexins (Cx). Modulation of GJIC affects cell viability or growth, implying that GJIC may have an important role in maintaining homeostasis in various organs. Here, we hypothesized that increasing the level of the gap junction protein Cx43 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells could provide neuroprotection. First, our experiments demonstrated that knocking down Cx43 protein by using Cx43-specific shRNA in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells potentiated MPP+-induced neuronal apoptosis evident from decreased cell viability. In another experiment, we demonstrated that over-expression of Cx43 in the SH-SY5Y cell system decreased MPP+-induced apoptosis based on the MTT assay and reduced the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the release of cytochrome C based on Western blot analysis. Taken together, our results suggest that Cx43 could mediate resistance against MPP+-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells via modulating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. PMID:27809287

  20. Decreased mRNA levels of cardiac Cx43 and ZO1 in sudden cardiac death related to coronary atherosclerosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ye; Zhao, Rui; Du, Si-Hao; Zhao, Dong; Li, Dong-Ri; Xu, Jing-Tao; Xie, Xiao-Li; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the most frequent cause of sudden unexplained death in forensic practice. The most common cause of SCD is coronary artery disease related to coronary atherosclerosis. Previous study suggested the possible application of connexin 43 (Cx43) and zonula occludens-1 (ZO1) immunostaining in the early diagnosis of myocardial ischemia. However, there appears to be insufficient data with regard to their mRNA levels. The present study investigated the cardiac mRNA levels of Cx43 and ZO1, using forensic autopsy materials consisting of 41 control cases without any disease or structural abnormality of the heart (group 1), 32 deaths due to acute ischemic heart disease related to coronary atherosclerosis without apparent myocardial necrosis (group 2), and 29 traumatic deaths with coronary atherosclerosis (group 3). Ten candidate reference genes were evaluated in the left ventricles of 10 forensic autopsy cases. EEF1A1, PPIA, TPT1, and RPL13A were identified as the most stable reference genes. Using these validated reference genes, mRNA levels of Cx43 and ZO1 were examined in the bilateral ventricles and atria of the heart. Relative mRNA quantification demonstrated decreased calibrated normalized relative quantity (CNRQ) values of Cx43 and ZO1 in bilateral ventricles of group 2. When using one conventional reference gene (GAPDH or ACTB) for normalization, nearly no difference was detected among the three groups. These findings indicate that ventricular gap junction remodeling may be a key contributor to rhythm disturbances. Analysis of cardiac Cx43 and ZO1 using real-time PCR is useful in diagnosis of SCD, and validation of reference genes is crucial.

  1. Ultrafine carbon black induces glutamate and ATP release by activating connexin and pannexin hemichannels in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongying; Deng, Furong; Chen, Yiyong; Qin, Yu; Hao, Yu; Guo, Xinbiao

    2014-09-02

    Ultrafine particles could enter central nervous system and were associated with brain damage. The underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Glutamate and ATP are important signaling molecules in brain physiology and pathology. We investigated whether ultrafine carbon black (ufCB) could regulate the release of glutamate and ATP from cultured cortical astrocytes and the involvement of hemichannels in the release mechanism. Our results showed that ufCB dose-dependently increased glutamate and ATP release and activated hemichannels in astrocytes. ufCB-activated hemichannels were attributed to the activation of both connexin 43 (Cx43) and pannexin1 (Panx1) hemichannels, which was based on the finding of increased protein expression and distribution on cell surface of Cx43 and Panx1, and the inhibiting effects of hemichannel inhibitor carbenoxolone, Cx43 hemichannel inhibitor (43)Gap27 and Panx1 hemichannel inhibitor (10)Panx1 on hemichannel activation. Furthermore, ufCB-induced glutamate and ATP release were dependent on Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels, because carbenoxolone and (43)Gap27 inhibited ufCB-induced glutamate and ATP release, and (10)Panx1 inhibited ufCB-induced ATP release. Taken together, we demonstrated, for the first time, that ufCB could induce glutamate and ATP release by activating Cx43 and Panx1 hemchannels in astrocytes. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism for neurotoxicity caused by ultrafine particles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Real-time proliferation of porcine cumulus cells is related to the protein levels and cellular distribution of Cdk4 and Cx43.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Bartosz; Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Piotrowska, Hanna; Zawierucha, Piotr; Antosik, Paweł; Bukowska, Dorota; Ciesiółka, Sylwia; Jaśkowski, Jędrzej M; Brüssow, Klaus P; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2013-09-01

    The proper maturation of cumulus somatic cells depends on bidirectional communication between the oocyte and the surrounding cumulus cells (CCs). The aim of this study was (i) to investigate maturation markers, such as Cx43 and Cdk4 protein levels, and (ii) to analyze the distribution of these two proteins in CCs cultured for 44, 88, 132, and 164 hours in both separated and cumulus-enclosed oocyte cultures. CCs were isolated from porcine ovarian follicles after the treatment of the recovered COCs with collagenase. Then, the separated CCs were cultured in TCM-199 for 0 to 164 hours, using a real-time cellular analyzer; however, the immunostaining was performed only after 44, 88, and 132 hours. The protein levels and distribution were analyzed using confocal microscopy. After the CCs underwent in vitro cultivation (IVC) for 25 hours, a logarithmically increasing normalized proliferation index was found throughout the entire 164 hours cultivation time. The Cx43 and Cdk4 proteins were observed at higher levels after 44 hours of culture than before IVC. After 88 and 132 hours of IVC, no significant alterations in either mRNA or protein levels of Cx43 and Cdk4 were found. Cx43 and Cdk4 were localized in the cell nucleus before IVC, whereas after 44, 88, and 132 hours of IVC, both proteins translocated to the cytoplasm. In cumulus-enclosed oocyte cultures, Cdk4 was localized both in the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas Cx43 was only in the cytoplasm. Additionally, only low levels of the cumulus expansion markers MIS and SNAT3 were observed. In summary, we could demonstrate that the in vitro cultivation of CCs was associated with cell proliferation and that Cx43 and Cdk4 gene expression was upregulated after IVC, resulting in significantly higher protein levels. Moreover, the two proteins translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of the CCs during IVC. The protein distribution is presumably related to different protein functions during bidirectional communication via

  3. Prenatal exposure to inflammatory conditions increases Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channel opening and activation of astrocytes in the offspring effect on neuronal survival.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, Beatriz C; Montero, Trinidad D; Chávez, Carolina E; von Bernhardi, Rommy; Orellana, Juan A

    2015-06-19

    Several epidemiological studies indicate that children born from mothers exposed to infections during gestation, have an increased risk to develop neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, autism and cerebral palsy. Given that it is unknown if astrocytes and their crosstalk with neurons participate in the above mentioned brain pathologies, the aim of this work was to address if astroglial paracrine signaling mediated by Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channels could be affected in the offspring of LPS-exposed dams during pregnancy. Ethidium uptake experiments showed that prenatal LPS-exposure increases the activity of astroglial Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channels in the offspring. Induction of unopposed channel opening by prenatal LPS exposure depended on intracellular Ca(2+) levels, cytokine production and activation of p38 MAP kinase/iNOS pathway. Biochemical assays and Fura-2AM/DAF-FM time-lapse fluorescence images revealed that astrocytes from the offspring of LPS-exposed dams displayed increased spontaneous Ca(2+) dynamics and NO production, whereas iNOS levels and release of IL-1β/TNF-α were also increased. Interestingly, we found that prenatal LPS exposure enhanced the release of ATP through astroglial Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channels in the offspring, resulting in an increased neuronal death mediated by the activation of neuronal P2X7 receptors and Panx1 channels. Altogether, this evidence suggests that astroglial Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channel opening induced by prenatal LPS exposure depended on the inflammatory activation profile and the activation pattern of astrocytes. The understanding of the mechanism underlying astrocyte-neuron crosstalk could contribute to the development of new strategies to ameliorate the brain abnormalities induced in the offspring by prenatal inflammation. GLIA 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effect of FSH and LH hormones on oocyte maturation of buffalo and gene expression analysis of their receptors and Cx43 in maturing oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Alok; Gupta, S C; Gupta, Neelam

    2010-08-01

    Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are commonly added to maturation media to improve cumulus expansion known to be a predictor of oocyte maturation. Therefore, effects of various concentrations of FSH (1000 ng/ml), LH (1000 ng/ml) and FSH + LH (1000 ng/ml each) in comparison with control (without FSH + LH) cultured oocytes were investigated. FSH and LH (1000 ng/ml each) induced significantly more cumulus expansion and polar body numbers, as compared with control and treatments of 1000 ng/ml FSH and 1000 ng/ml LH alone. Expression of FSH receptor (r), LHr and Cx43 mRNAs was determined by real-time PCR in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) and denuded oocytes at different maturation times. Expression of all three genes was higher in COCs compared with denuded oocytes, confirming the importance of cumulus cells in oocyte maturation. FSHr and connexin 43 (Cx43) mRNA abundance in both COCs and denuded oocytes was highest at 0-6 h of maturation and decreased subsequently. However, LHr mRNA abundance increased from 6 h up to 24 h of maturation. The study concluded that FSH, LH receptors and Cx43 gene expression regulation is an index related to oocyte maturation.

  5. All-trans retinoic acid restores gap junctional intercellular communication between oral cancer cells with upregulation of Cx32 and Cx43 expressions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Dai, Yaohui; Huang, Yulei; Chen, Xiaohua; Wang, Hong; Hong, Yun; Xia, Juan; Cheng, Bin

    2013-07-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been demonstrated to inhibit tumor growth by restoration of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) via upregulation of connexin (Cx) expression in some solid tumors. However, the relationship between ATRA and GJIC remains unclear in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ATRA on the GJIC function of OSCC. We measured the effects of ATRA on the viability and cell cycle distribution of SCC9 and Tca8113 OSCC cells. The GJIC function was observed using the scrape-loading dye transfer technique, and the mRNA and protein levels of Cx32 and Cx43 were detected by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence assays. ATRA inhibited the growth of OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P <0.05) and caused cell cycle arrest. ATRA-treated cells showed a 2.69-fold and 2.06-fold enhancement of GJIC in SCC9 and Tca8113 cells, respectively (P <0.05). Moreover, ATRA induced upregulation of Cx32 and Cx43 at both the mRNA and protein levels in OSCC cells. Our results indicated that restoration of GJIC via enhanced Cx32 and Cx43 expression might serve as a novel mechanism for the anti-tumor effect of ATRA in OSCC.

  6. Co-regulation of multiple signaling mechanisms in pp60v-src induced closure of Cx43 Gap junction channels

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Siddhartha S.; Xu, Ji; Nicholson, Bruce J.

    2012-01-01

    Attenuation in gap junctional coupling has consistently been associated with induction of rapid or synchronous cell division in normal and pathological conditions. In the case of the v-src oncogene, gating of Cx43 gap junction channels has been linked to both direct phosphorylation of tyrosines (Y247 and 265) and phosphorylation of serine target of Erk1/2 (S255, 279, and 282) on the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain of Cx43. However, only the latter has been associated with acute rather than chronic gating of the channels immediately after v-src expression, a process that is mediated through a “ball and chain” type mechanism. In this study we show that while ERK1/2 is necessary for acute closure of gap junction channels, it is not sufficient. Rather, multiple pathways converge to regulate Cx43 coupling in response to expression of v-src, including parallel signaling through PKC and MEK1/2, with additional positive and negative regulatory effects mediated by PI3kinase, distinguished by the involvement of Akt. PMID:22965738

  7. Cx43-Dependent Skeletal Phenotypes Are Mediated by Interactions between the Hapln1a-ECM and Sema3d during Fin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Jayalakshmi; Tun, Kyaw Min; Iovine, M. Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal development is a tightly regulated process and requires proper communication between the cells for efficient exchange of information. Analysis of fin length mutants has revealed that the gap junction protein Connexin43 (Cx43) coordinates cell proliferation (growth) and joint formation (patterning) during zebrafish caudal fin regeneration. Previous studies have shown that the extra cellular matrix (ECM) protein Hyaluronan and Proteoglycan Link Protein1a (Hapln1a) is molecularly and functionally downstream of Cx43, and that hapln1a knockdown leads to reduction of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan. Here we find that the proteoglycan aggrecan is similarly reduced following Hapln1a knockdown. Notably, we demonstrate that both hyaluronan and aggrecan are required for growth and patterning. Moreover, we provide evidence that the Hapln1a-ECM stabilizes the secreted growth factor Semaphorin3d (Sema3d), which has been independently shown to mediate Cx43 dependent phenotypes during regeneration. Double knockdown of hapln1a and sema3d reveal synergistic interactions. Further, hapln1a knockdown phenotypes were rescued by Sema3d overexpression. Therefore, Hapln1a maintains the composition of specific components of the ECM, which appears to be required for the stabilization of at least one growth factor, Sema3d. We propose that the Hapln1a dependent ECM provides the required conditions for Sema3d stabilization and function. Interactions between the ECM and signaling molecules are complex and our study demonstrates the requirement for components of the Hapln1a-ECM for Sema3d signal transduction. PMID:26828861

  8. Disaggregation of HeLa-Cx43- and HeLa-spheroids induced by PUVA and photo-oxidized psoralen (POP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenko, Eugene P.; Pliquett, Fritz; Wunderlich, Siegfried; Potapenko, Alexander Y.

    2003-10-01

    To investigate the effects of PUVA (psoralen + UVA-irradiation) and photooxidized psoralen (POP) on cell-cell junctions, two kinds of multicellular spheroids, which were grown from HeLa cells of epithelioid human cervix carcinoma, were used as a model systems: i) defective in intercellular communication through gap junctions (HeLa-spheroids) and ii) transfected with coding sequences of murine connexin Cx43 with restored gap-junction coupling (HeLa-Cx43-spheroids). It was been found that both PUVA and POP induced disaggregation of HeLa-spheroids as well as HeLa-Cx43-spheroids. It implies that gap-junction plaques are not, apparently, critical targets in psoralen-photosensitized disaggregation. The rate of disaggregation was estimated as inverse time of disaggregation of 50% or 100% spheroids in suspensions (1/t50 or 1/t100, respectively). The rate of PUVA-induced disaggregation was found to increase with the increase of UVA-fluence up to 85 kJ/m2. Photosensitization coefficient was highest at low UVA-fluences (4-6 kJ/m2) and significantly decreased with increase in UVA-fluence. The viability of cells in spheroids was estimated with the use of trypan blue stain. At low UVA-fluences, the process of disaggregation was found to occur without the formation of trypan positive cells in spheroids. Results obtained evidence that PUVA-induced disaggregation of spheroids may occur, at least partially, through the action of POP-products.

  9. Cx43-Dependent Skeletal Phenotypes Are Mediated by Interactions between the Hapln1a-ECM and Sema3d during Fin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Jayalakshmi; Tun, Kyaw Min; Iovine, M Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal development is a tightly regulated process and requires proper communication between the cells for efficient exchange of information. Analysis of fin length mutants has revealed that the gap junction protein Connexin43 (Cx43) coordinates cell proliferation (growth) and joint formation (patterning) during zebrafish caudal fin regeneration. Previous studies have shown that the extra cellular matrix (ECM) protein Hyaluronan and Proteoglycan Link Protein1a (Hapln1a) is molecularly and functionally downstream of Cx43, and that hapln1a knockdown leads to reduction of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan. Here we find that the proteoglycan aggrecan is similarly reduced following Hapln1a knockdown. Notably, we demonstrate that both hyaluronan and aggrecan are required for growth and patterning. Moreover, we provide evidence that the Hapln1a-ECM stabilizes the secreted growth factor Semaphorin3d (Sema3d), which has been independently shown to mediate Cx43 dependent phenotypes during regeneration. Double knockdown of hapln1a and sema3d reveal synergistic interactions. Further, hapln1a knockdown phenotypes were rescued by Sema3d overexpression. Therefore, Hapln1a maintains the composition of specific components of the ECM, which appears to be required for the stabilization of at least one growth factor, Sema3d. We propose that the Hapln1a dependent ECM provides the required conditions for Sema3d stabilization and function. Interactions between the ECM and signaling molecules are complex and our study demonstrates the requirement for components of the Hapln1a-ECM for Sema3d signal transduction.

  10. [Expression of Myocardial Specificity Markers MEF-2C and Cx43 in Rat Bone Marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by Electrical Stimulation In Vitro].

    PubMed

    Tang, Min; Yang, Gang; Jiang, Jian; He, Xueling; Li, Huiming; Zhang, Mengying; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing; Li, Liang

    2015-06-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) for repairing damaged heart tissue are a new kind of important treatment options because of their potential to differentiate into cardiomyocytes. We in this experiment investigated the effect of different electrical stimulation time on the expression of myocardial specificity gene and protein in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) in vitro. The rBMSCs of second or third generation were randomly divided into three groups, i.e, electrical stimulation (ES) group, 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza) group and the control group. The rBMSCs in the ES groups with complete medium were exposed to 2 V, 2 Hz, 5 ms electrical stimulation for 0. 5 h, 2 h, 4 h, and 6 h respectively every day for 10 days. Those in the 5-Aza group were induced by 5-Aza (10 μmol/L) for 24 h, and then cultured with complete medium for 10 days. Those in the control group were only cultured with complete medium, without any treatment, for 10 days. The rBMSCs' morphological feature in each group was observed with inverted phase microscope. The mRNA expression of myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF-2C) and connexin 43 (Cx43) were examined with Real-Time quantitative PCR and the protein expression of MEF-2C, Cx43 were detected with Western Blot method. The results showed that the mRNA expression level of the MEF-2C, Cx43 and the protein expression level of MEF-2C, Cx43 were significantly higher in the ES group and 5-Aza group than those in the relative control group (P < 0.05). It suggests that electrical stimulation could play a part of role in the induction of the rBMSCs to differentiate into the cariomyocyte-like cells in vitro and the effectiveness of the electrical stimulation with 2 h/d had the best in our experiment. But the mechanism how electrical stimulation promotes the differentiation of rBMSC into cardiomyocyte is still unclear.

  11. Polymorphisms in FGF12, VCL, CX43 and VAX1 in Brazilian patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    de Aquino, Sibele Nascimento; Messetti, Ana Camila; Bagordakis, Elizabete; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; Swerts, Mario Sergio Oliveira; Graner, Edgard; Coletta, Ricardo D

    2013-05-16

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is the most common orofacial birth defect with a wide range prevalence among different populations. Previous association studies with populations from Europe and Asia have identified putative susceptibility markers for NSCL/P in fibroblast growth factor 12 (FGF12), vinculin (VCL), connexin 43 (CX43) and in a region close to the ventral anterior homeobox 1 (VAX1) gene. However, there have thus far been no studies of these markers in NSCL/P Brazilian patients, and as the genetic ancestry of the Brazilian population is highly varied, the predisposition to those disease markers can be different. Herein we conducted a structured association study conditioned on the individual ancestry proportions to determine the role of 16 polymorphic markers within those genes in 300 patients with NSCL/P and 385 unaffected controls. None of the alleles and genotypes showed association with NSCL/P, though there was a significant association of the haplotype formed by VAX1 rs10787760, rs6585429 and rs1871345 polymorphisms with NSCL/P that did not persist Bonferroni correction for multiple tests. Our results are consistent with a lack of involvement of FGF12, VCL and CX43 variants with NSCL/P pathogenesis in Brazilian patients. Furthermore, the higher frequency of a haplotype of VAX1 with NSCL/P patients suggests a low penetrant gene for oral cleft, and warrants further studies.

  12. Permeability of R6G across Cx43 hemichannels through a novel combination of patch clamp and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan Nair, C.; Sabna, C.; Murty, K. V. G. K.; Ramanan, S. V.

    2005-10-01

    We have measured the permeability of rhodamine-6G across Cx43 hemichannels reconstituted on a pipette tip. Cx43 hemichannels were overexpressed in Sf9 cells, and affinity-purified. The hemichannels were reconstituted in a lipid bilayer on a pipette tip by the tip-dip method. R6G in the pipette permeated across the channels into the bath. The permeability of R6G was quantified by measuring R6G concentration in the bath after several hours by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with 100 nm silver colloid particles. The ratio of the permeability of dye to salt, as extracted by this combined electrical-SERS technique, is compatible with similar ratios for other dyes across whole gap junction channels. The results for the permeability ratio were further compared to fluorescence measurements. The novel combination of patch and SERS techniques can be extended to quantifying the transport of biologically significant non-fluorescent molecules, such as cAMP and IP3, across 1 nm sized pores, such as the gap junction channel.

  13. Non-dioxin-like organic toxicant PCB153 modulates sphingolipid metabolism in liver progenitor cells: its role in Cx43-formed gap junction impairment.

    PubMed

    Pierucci, F; Frati, A; Squecco, R; Lenci, E; Vicenti, C; Slavik, J; Francini, F; Machala, M; Meacci, E

    2017-02-01

    The non-dioxin-like environmental toxicant 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153), member of a group of persistent organic pollutants wide-spread throughout the environment, reduces gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), an event possibly associated with tumor promotion. Since very few studies have investigated the signaling effectors and mode(s) of action of PCB153, and it is known that the gap junction (GJ) protein Cx43 can be regulated by the bioactive sphingolipid (SL) sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), this in vitro study mainly addresses whether SL metabolism is affected by PCB153 in rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells. PCB153 treatment obtained significant changes in the S1P/ceramide (Cer) ratio, known to be crucial in determining cell fate. In particular, an increase in S1P at 30 min and a decrease of the bioactive lipid at 3 h were observed, whereas Cer level increased at 1 h and 24 h. Notably, a time-dependent modulation of sphingosine kinase (SphK), the enzyme responsible for S1P synthesis, and of its regulators, ERK1/2 and protein phosphatase PP2A, supports the involvement of these signaling effectors in PCB153 toxicity. Electrophysiological analyses, furthermore, indicated that the lipophilic environmental toxicant significantly reduced GJ biophysical properties, affecting both voltage-dependent (such as those formed by Cx43 and/or Cx32) and voltage-independent channels, thereby demonstrating that PCB153 may act differently on GJs formed by distinct Cx isoforms. SphK down-regulation alone induced GJIC impairment, and, when combined with PCB153, the acute effect on GJ suppression was additive. Moreover, after enzyme-specific gene silencing, the SphK1 isoform appears to be responsible for down-regulating Cx43 expression, while being the target of PCB153 at short-term exposure. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence of novel effectors in PCB153 toxic action in rat liver stem-like cells, leading us to consider SLs as potential markers

  14. Short-term cultivation of porcine cumulus cells influences the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) and connexin 43 (Cx43) protein expression--a real-time cell proliferation approach.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Bartosz; Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Piotrowska, Hanna; Ciesiółka, Sylwia; Antosik, Paweł; Bukowska, Dorota; Zawierucha, Piotr; Woźna, Magdalena; Jaśkowski, Jędrzej M; Brüssow, Klaus P; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    The CC (cumulus cell) proliferation index in relation to the expression and distribution of Cdk4 and Cx43 proteins, which are crucial factors for oocyte maturation, was investigated. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were recovered from pubertal crossbred Landrace gilts and treated with collagenase, and separated CCs were cultured in standard TCM199 medium for 44 h. At each step of in vitro cultivation (IVC) of CCs (0, 12, 24 and 44 h), a normalized proliferation index was assessed. Cdk4 and Cx43 protein expression and the CC-specific cellular distribution were analyzed by confocal microscopic observation. The normalized proliferation index (number of cells attached, measured by impedance) was increased in the first 12 h of IVC (P<0.01) and differed between 12 h and 24 h of cultivation (P<0.001). Later, between 24 h-44 h of IVC, the CC proliferation rate was stable, and no significant differences were observed. Based on the confocal microscopic observation, increased expression of both Cdk4 and Cx43 was found after 44 h of IVC compared with the expression of these proteins before IVC. Moreover, after IVC, a substantial translocation of Cdk4 and Cx43 was noted from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of CCs. In conclusion, it was demonstrated for the first time that CCs can be cultured in vitro separately without oocytes and that the proliferation index was significantly increased in the first 12 h of IVC, which may reflect the process of ordinary cumulus cell expansion. Furthermore, the expression of both Cdk4 and Cx43 in CCs suggested that these proteins may be regarded as markers not only of proper oocyte maturation but also of CC differentiation. Translocation of these proteins into the cytoplasm of CCs after 44 h of IVC may be related to the expansion process.

  15. Connexin45 interacts with zonula occludens-1 in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laing, J. G.; Manley-Markowski, R. N.; Koval, M.; Civitelli, R.; Steinberg, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) and Cx45 are co-expressed in a number of different tissues. Studies demonstrated that Cx45 transfected ROS (ROS/Cx45) cells, were less permeable to low molecular weight dyes than untransfected ROS cells, that have gap junctions made of Cx43. This suggests that there may be a functionally important interaction between Cx43 and Cx45 in these cells. One way in which these proteins may interact is by associating with the same set of proteins. In order to isolate connexin interacting proteins, we isolated Cx45 from Cx45 transfected ROS cells (ROS/Cx45 cells) under mild detergent conditions. These studies showed that Cx45 co-purified with the tight junction protein, ZO-1. Immunofluorescence studies of ROS/Cx45 cells simultaneously stained with polyclonal Cx45 antibody and a monoclonal ZO-1 antibody showed that Cx45 and ZO-1 colocalized in ROS/Cx45 cells. Furthermore we found that ZO-1 could bind to peptides derived from the carboxyl terminal of Cx45 that had been covalently bound to an agarose resin. These data suggests that Cx45 and ZO-1 directly interact in ROS/Cx45 cells.

  16. Connexin45 interacts with zonula occludens-1 in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laing, J. G.; Manley-Markowski, R. N.; Koval, M.; Civitelli, R.; Steinberg, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) and Cx45 are co-expressed in a number of different tissues. Studies demonstrated that Cx45 transfected ROS (ROS/Cx45) cells, were less permeable to low molecular weight dyes than untransfected ROS cells, that have gap junctions made of Cx43. This suggests that there may be a functionally important interaction between Cx43 and Cx45 in these cells. One way in which these proteins may interact is by associating with the same set of proteins. In order to isolate connexin interacting proteins, we isolated Cx45 from Cx45 transfected ROS cells (ROS/Cx45 cells) under mild detergent conditions. These studies showed that Cx45 co-purified with the tight junction protein, ZO-1. Immunofluorescence studies of ROS/Cx45 cells simultaneously stained with polyclonal Cx45 antibody and a monoclonal ZO-1 antibody showed that Cx45 and ZO-1 colocalized in ROS/Cx45 cells. Furthermore we found that ZO-1 could bind to peptides derived from the carboxyl terminal of Cx45 that had been covalently bound to an agarose resin. These data suggests that Cx45 and ZO-1 directly interact in ROS/Cx45 cells.

  17. Dexamethasone-induced muscular atrophy is mediated by functional expression of connexin-based hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Cea, Luis A; Balboa, Elisa; Puebla, Carlos; Vargas, Aníbal A; Cisterna, Bruno A; Escamilla, Rosalba; Regueira, Tomás; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-10-01

    Long-term treatment with high glucocorticoid doses induces skeletal muscle atrophy. However, the molecular mechanism of such atrophy remains unclear. We evaluated the possible involvement of connexin-based hemichannels (Cx HCs) in muscle atrophy induced by dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, on control (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl)) and Cx43/Cx45 expression-deficient (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre) skeletal myofibers. Myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice treated with DEX (5h) expressed several proteins that form non-selective membrane channels (Cx39, Cx43, Cx45, Panx1, P2X7 receptor and TRPV2). After 5h DEX treatment in vivo, myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice showed Evans blue uptake, which was absent in myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice. Similar results were obtained in vitro using ethidium as an HC permeability probe, and DEX-induced dye uptake in control myofibers was blocked by P2X7 receptor inhibitors. DEX also induced a significant increase in basal intracellular Ca(2+) signal and a reduction in resting membrane potential in Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) myofibers, changes that were not elicited by myofibers deficient in Cx43/Cx45 expression. Moreover, treatment with DEX induced NFκB activation and increased mRNA levels of TNF-α in control but not in Cx43/Cx45 expression-deficient myofibers. Finally, a prolonged DEX treatment (7days) increased atrogin-1 and Murf-1 and reduced the cross sectional area of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) myofibers, but these parameters remained unaffected in Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre myofibers. Therefore, DEX-induced expression of Cx43 and Cx45 plays a critical role in early sarcolemma changes that lead to atrophy. Consequently, this side effect of chronic glucocorticoid treatment might be avoided by co-administration with a Cx HC blocker. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Connexin43 expression levels influence intercellular coupling and cell proliferation of native murine cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Kanter, Evelyn M; Laing, James G; Aprhys, Colette; Johns, David C; Kardami, Elissavet; Yamada, Kathryn A

    2008-09-01

    Little is known about connexin expression and function in murine cardiac fibroblasts. The authors isolated native ventricular fibroblasts from adult mice and determined that although they expressed both connexin43 (Cx43) and connexin45 (Cx45), the relative abundance of Cx45 was greater than that of Cx43 in fibroblasts compared to myocytes, and the electrophoretic mobility of both Cx43 and Cx45 differed in fibroblasts and in myocytes. Increasing Cx43 expression by adenoviral infection increased intercellular coupling, whereas decreasing Cx43 expression by genetic ablation decreased coupling. Interestingly, increasing Cx43 expression reduced fibroblast proliferation, whereas decreasing Cx43 expression increased proliferation. These data demonstrate that native fibroblasts isolated from the mouse heart exhibit intercellular coupling via gap junctions containing both Cx43 and Cx45. Fibroblast proliferation is inversely related to the expression level of Cx43. Thus, connexin expression and remodeling is likely to alter fibroblast function, maintenance of the extracellular matrix, and ventricular remodeling in both normal and diseased hearts.

  19. Connexin43 with a cytoplasmic loop deletion inhibits the function of several connexins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Martínez, Agustín D.; Berthoud, Viviana M.; Seul, Kyung H.; Gemel, Joanna; Valiunas, Virginijus; Kumari, Sindhu; Brink, Peter R.; Beyer, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Connexins (Cx) form gap junction channels mediating direct intercellular communication. To study the role of amino acids within the cytoplasmic loop, we produced a recombinant adenovirus containing Cx43 with a deletion of amino acids 130–136 (Cx43del130–136). Cx43del130–136 expressed alone in HeLa cells localized within the cytoplasm and did not allow transfer of ions, neurobiotin or Lucifer yellow. When co-expressed with wild type Cx43, Cx43del130–136 blocked electrical coupling and transfer of neurobiotin or Lucifer yellow. Cx43del130–136 and Cx43 co-localized by immunofluorescence and were co-purified from Triton X-100-solubilized cell extracts. Intercellular transfer mediated by Cx37 and Cx45 (but not Cx26 or Cx40) was inhibited when co-expressed with Cx43del130–136. Cx43del130–136 co-localized with Cx37, Cx40, or Cx45, but not Cx26. These data suggest that Cx43del130–136 produces connexin-specific inhibition of intercellular communication through formation of heteromeric connexons that are non-functional and/or retained in the cytoplasm. PMID:15979566

  20. Mono-Heteromeric Configurations of Gap Junction Channels Formed by Connexin43 and Connexin45 Reduce Unitary Conductance and Determine both Voltage Gating and Metabolic Flux Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guoqiang; Akoum, Nazem; Appadurai, Daniel A; Hayrapetyan, Volodya; Ahmed, Osman; Martinez, Agustin D; Beyer, Eric C; Moreno, Alonso P

    2017-01-01

    In cardiac tissues, the expression of multiple connexins (Cx40, Cx43, Cx45, and Cx30.2) is a requirement for proper development and function. Gap junctions formed by these connexins have distinct permeability and gating mechanisms. Since a single cell can express more than one connexin isoform, the formation of hetero-multimeric gap junction channels provides a tissue with an enormous repertoire of combinations to modulate intercellular communication. To study further the perm-selectivity and gating properties of channels containing Cx43 and Cx45, we studied two monoheteromeric combinations in which a HeLa cell co-transfected with Cx43 and Cx45 was paired with a cell expressing only one of these connexins. Macroscopic measurements of total conductance between cell pairs indicated a drastic reduction in total conductance for mono-heteromeric channels. In terms of Vj dependent gating, Cx43 homomeric connexons facing heteromeric connexons only responded weakly to voltage negativity. Cx45 homomeric connexons exhibited no change in Vj gating when facing heteromeric connexons. The distributions of unitary conductances (γj) for both mono-heteromeric channels were smaller than predicted, and both showed low permeability to the fluorescent dyes Lucifer yellow and Rhodamine123. For both mono-heteromeric channels, we observed flux asymmetry regardless of dye charge: flux was higher in the direction of the heteromeric connexon for MhetCx45 and in the direction of the homomeric Cx43 connexon for MhetCx43. Thus, our data suggest that co-expression of Cx45 and Cx43 induces the formation of heteromeric connexons with greatly reduced permeability and unitary conductance. Furthermore, it increases the asymmetry for voltage gating for opposing connexons, and it favors asymmetric flux of molecules across the junction that depends primarily on the size (not the charge) of the crossing molecules.

  1. Mono-Heteromeric Configurations of Gap Junction Channels Formed by Connexin43 and Connexin45 Reduce Unitary Conductance and Determine both Voltage Gating and Metabolic Flux Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Guoqiang; Akoum, Nazem; Appadurai, Daniel A.; Hayrapetyan, Volodya; Ahmed, Osman; Martinez, Agustin D.; Beyer, Eric C.; Moreno, Alonso P.

    2017-01-01

    In cardiac tissues, the expression of multiple connexins (Cx40, Cx43, Cx45, and Cx30.2) is a requirement for proper development and function. Gap junctions formed by these connexins have distinct permeability and gating mechanisms. Since a single cell can express more than one connexin isoform, the formation of hetero-multimeric gap junction channels provides a tissue with an enormous repertoire of combinations to modulate intercellular communication. To study further the perm-selectivity and gating properties of channels containing Cx43 and Cx45, we studied two monoheteromeric combinations in which a HeLa cell co-transfected with Cx43 and Cx45 was paired with a cell expressing only one of these connexins. Macroscopic measurements of total conductance between cell pairs indicated a drastic reduction in total conductance for mono-heteromeric channels. In terms of Vj dependent gating, Cx43 homomeric connexons facing heteromeric connexons only responded weakly to voltage negativity. Cx45 homomeric connexons exhibited no change in Vj gating when facing heteromeric connexons. The distributions of unitary conductances (γj) for both mono-heteromeric channels were smaller than predicted, and both showed low permeability to the fluorescent dyes Lucifer yellow and Rhodamine123. For both mono-heteromeric channels, we observed flux asymmetry regardless of dye charge: flux was higher in the direction of the heteromeric connexon for MhetCx45 and in the direction of the homomeric Cx43 connexon for MhetCx43. Thus, our data suggest that co-expression of Cx45 and Cx43 induces the formation of heteromeric connexons with greatly reduced permeability and unitary conductance. Furthermore, it increases the asymmetry for voltage gating for opposing connexons, and it favors asymmetric flux of molecules across the junction that depends primarily on the size (not the charge) of the crossing molecules. PMID:28611680

  2. Mechanisms of glutamate transport.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Robert J; Ryan, Renae M

    2013-10-01

    L-Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system and plays important roles in a wide variety of brain functions, but it is also a key player in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders. The control of glutamate concentrations is critical to the normal functioning of the central nervous system, and in this review we discuss how glutamate transporters regulate glutamate concentrations to maintain dynamic signaling mechanisms between neurons. In 2004, the crystal structure of a prokaryotic homolog of the mammalian glutamate transporter family of proteins was crystallized and its structure determined. This has paved the way for a better understanding of the structural basis for glutamate transporter function. In this review we provide a broad perspective of this field of research, but focus primarily on the more recent studies with a particular emphasis on how our understanding of the structure of glutamate transporters has generated new insights.

  3. SLC1 Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Grewer, Christof; Gameiro, Armanda; Rauen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane transporters for the neurotransmitter glutamate belong to the solute carrier 1 (SLC1) family. They are secondary active transporters, taking up glutamate into the cell against a substantial concentration gradient. The driving force for concentrative uptake is provided by the cotransport of Na+ ions and the countertransport of one K+ in a step independent of the glutamate translocation step. Due to eletrogenicity of transport, the transmembrane potential can also act as a driving force. Glutamate transporters are expressed in many tissues, but are of particular importance in the brain, where they contribute to the termination of excitatory neurotransmission. Glutamate transporters can also run in reverse, resulting in glutamate release from cells. Due to these important physiological functions, glutamate transporter expression and, therefore, the transport rate, are tightly regulated. This review summarizes recent literature on the functional and biophysical properties, structure-function relationships, regulation, physiological significance, and pharmacology of glutamate transporters. Particular emphasis is on the insight from rapid kinetic and electrophysiological studies, transcriptional regulation of transporter expression, and reverse transport and its importance for pathophysiological glutamate release under ischemic conditions. PMID:24240778

  4. Glutamate and Neurodegenerative Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Eric; Duplantier, Allen

    As the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate is critically involved in most aspects of CNS function. Given this critical role, it is not surprising that glutamatergic dysfunction is associated with many CNS disorders. In this chapter, we review the literature that links aberrant glutamate neurotransmission with CNS pathology, with a focus on neurodegenerative diseases. The biology and pharmacology of the various glutamate receptor families are discussed, along with data which links these receptors with neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, we review progress that has been made in developing small molecule modulators of glutamate receptors and transporters, and describe how these compounds have helped us understand the complex pharmacology of glutamate in normal CNS function, as well as their potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Connexin45 is expressed in vascular smooth muscle but its function remains elusive.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Volker J; Jobs, Alexander; von Maltzahn, Julia; Wörsdörfer, Philipp; Willecke, Klaus; de Wit, Cor

    2012-01-01

    Connexins (Cx) form gap junctions and allow the coordination of cellular behaviour. In vessels, expression of Cx40, Cx37, and Cx43 is well established and specifically Cx40 serves important functions in endothelial cells. In contrast, expression and physiological functions of Cx45 is unclear although its expression has been suggested in vascular smooth muscle (VSM). Therefore, we studied expression and function of Cx45 in vessels using different mice models allowing to identify and delete Cx45. Smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific deletion was achieved by the Cre/loxP system using Cre-recombinase driven by a Nestin promoter. Deletion of Cx45 leads concomitantly to the expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) in these mice. Conduction of vasomotor responses was studied in cremasteric arterioles using intravital microscopy and arterial pressure was measured telemetrically. Cx45 is transcriptionally expressed in VSM as detected by EGFP expression in SMC-specific Cx45-deficient mice (Cx45fl/fl:Nestin-Cre) but not in endothelial cells (Cx45fl/fl:TIE2-Cre). Moreover, EGFP was located at VSM cell borders in arterioles of transgenic mice carrying an EGFP-tagged Cx45. Expectedly, arteriolar conduction of dilations evoked by the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine were not different between Cx45fl/fl:Nestin-Cre mice and controls carrying homozygously a floxed Cx45 gene (Cx45fl/fl). Surprisingly, the amplitude of locally initiated endothelium-independent constrictions (K(+)) and dilations (adenosine) declined similarly with distance in both genotypes indicating an intact VSM conduction pathway also in mice being deficient for Cx45 in VSM. Arterial pressure was not different between freely moving Cx45fl/fl and Cx45fl/fl:Nestin-Cre mice during day or night. We conclude that Cx45 is physiologically expressed in VSM, but not in EC in murine arterioles. However, Cx45 is dispensable for the conduction of vasomotor responses along these arterioles. Possibly

  6. Fast skeletal myofibers of mdx mouse, model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, express connexin hemichannels that lead to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cea, Luis A; Puebla, Carlos; Cisterna, Bruno A; Escamilla, Rosalba; Vargas, Aníbal A; Frank, Marina; Martínez-Montero, Paloma; Prior, Carmen; Molano, Jesús; Esteban-Rodríguez, Isabel; Pascual, Ignacio; Gallano, Pía; Lorenzo, Gustavo; Pian, Héctor; Barrio, Luis C; Willecke, Klaus; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscles of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) show numerous alterations including inflammation, apoptosis, and necrosis of myofibers. However, the molecular mechanism that explains these changes remains largely unknown. Here, the involvement of hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx HCs) was evaluated in skeletal muscle of mdx mouse model of DMD. Fast myofibers of mdx mice were found to express three connexins (39, 43 and 45) and high sarcolemma permeability, which was absent in myofibers of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice (deficient in skeletal muscle Cx43/Cx45 expression). These myofibers did not show elevated basal intracellular free Ca(2+) levels, immunoreactivity to phosphorylated p65 (active NF-κB), eNOS and annexin V/active Caspase 3 (marker of apoptosis) but presented dystrophin immunoreactivity. Moreover, muscles of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice exhibited partial decrease of necrotic features (big cells and high creatine kinase levels). Accordingly, these muscles showed similar macrophage infiltration as control mdx muscles. Nonetheless, the hanging test performance of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice was significantly better than that of control mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice. All three Cxs found in skeletal muscles of mdx mice were also detected in fast myofibers of biopsy specimens from patients with muscular dystrophy. Thus, reduction of Cx expression and/or function of Cx HCs may be potential therapeutic approaches to abrogate myofiber apoptosis in DMD.

  7. Connexin hemichannels explain the ionic imbalance and lead to atrophy in denervated skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Cisterna, Bruno A; Vargas, Aníbal A; Puebla, Carlos; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-11-01

    Denervated fast skeletal muscles undergo atrophy, which is associated with an increase in sarcolemma permeability and protein imbalance. However, the mechanisms responsible for these alterations remain largely unknown. Recently, a close association between de novo expression of hemichannels formed by connexins 43 and 45 and increase in sarcolemma permeability of denervated fast skeletal myofibers was demonstrated. However, it remains unknown whether these connexins cause the ionic imbalance of denervates fast myofibers. To elucidate the latter and the role of hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx HCs) in denervation-induced atrophy, skeletal myofibers deficient in Cx43 and Cx45 expression (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice) and control (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice) were denervated and several muscle features were systematically analyzed at different post-denervation (PD) times (1, 3, 5, 7 and 14days). The following sequence of events was found in denervated myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice: 1) from day 3 PD, increase in sarcolemmal permeability, 2) from day 5 PD, increases of intracellular Ca(2+) and Na(+) signals as well as a significant increase in protein synthesis and degradation, yielding a negative protein balance and 3) from day 7 PD, a fall in myofibers cross-section area. All the above alterations were either absent or drastically reduced in denervated myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice. Thus, the denervation-induced Cx HCs expression is an early event that precedes the electrochemical gradient dysregulation across the sarcolemma and critically contributes to the progression of skeletal muscle atrophy. Consequently, Cx HCs could be a therapeutic target to drastically prevent the denervation-induced atrophy of fast skeletal muscles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. History of glutamate production.

    PubMed

    Sano, Chiaki

    2009-09-01

    In 1907 Kikunae Ikeda, a professor at the Tokyo Imperial University, began his research to identify the umami component in kelp. Within a year, he had succeeded in isolating, purifying, and identifying the principal component of umami and quickly obtained a production patent. In 1909 Saburosuke Suzuki, an entrepreneur, and Ikeda began the industrial production of monosodium l-glutamate (MSG). The first industrial production process was an extraction method in which vegetable proteins were treated with hydrochloric acid to disrupt peptide bonds. l-Glutamic acid hydrochloride was then isolated from this material and purified as MSG. Initial production of MSG was limited because of the technical drawbacks of this method. Better methods did not emerge until the 1950s. One of these was direct chemical synthesis, which was used from 1962 to 1973. In this procedure, acrylonitrile was the starting material, and optical resolution of dl-glutamic acid was achieved by preferential crystallization. In 1956 a direct fermentation method to produce glutamate was introduced. The advantages of the fermentation method (eg, reduction of production costs and environmental load) were large enough to cause all glutamate manufacturers to shift to fermentation. Today, total world production of MSG by fermentation is estimated to be 2 million tons/y (2 billion kg/y). However, future production growth will likely require further innovation.

  9. Glutamate and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Blandini, F; Porter, R H; Greenamyre, J T

    1996-02-01

    Altered glutamatergic neurotransmission and neuronal metabolic dysfunction appear to be central to the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). The substantia nigra pars compacta--the area where the primary pathological lesion is located--is particularly exposed to oxidative stress and toxic and metabolic insults. A reduced capacity to cope with metabolic demands, possibly related to impaired mitochondrial function, may render nigral highly vulnerable to the effects of glutamate, which acts as a neurotoxin in the presence of impaired cellular energy metabolism. In this way, glutamate may participate in the pathogenesis of PD. Degeneration of dopamine nigral neurons is followed by striatal dopaminergic denervation, which causes a cascade of functional modifications in the activity of basal ganglia nuclei. As an excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate plays a pivotal role in normal basal ganglia circuitry. With nigrostriatal dopaminergic depletion, the glutamatergic projections from subthalamic nucleus to the basal ganglia output nuclei become overactive and there are regulatory changes in glutamate receptors in these regions. There is also evidence of increased glutamatergic activity in the striatum. In animal models, blockade of glutamate receptors ameliorates the motor manifestations of PD. Therefore, it appears that abnormal patterns of glutamatergic neurotransmission are important in the symptoms of PD. The involvement of the glutamatergic system in the pathogenesis and symptomatology of PD provides potential new targets for therapeutic intervention in this neurodegenerative disorder.

  10. Cytokine Effects on Gap Junction Communication and Connexin Expression in Human Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells and Suburothelial Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Marco; Oberbach, Andreas; Schlichting, Nadine; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Background The last decade identified cytokines as one group of major local cell signaling molecules related to bladder dysfunction like interstitial cystitis (IC) and overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is essential for the coordination of normal bladder function and has been found to be altered in bladder dysfunction. Connexin (Cx) 43 and Cx45 are the most important gap junction proteins in bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC) and suburothelial myofibroblasts (hsMF). Modulation of connexin expression by cytokines has been demonstrated in various tissues. Therefore, we investigate the effect of interleukin (IL) 4, IL6, IL10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFβ1) on GJIC, and Cx43 and Cx45 expression in cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC) and human suburothelial myofibroblasts (hsMF). Methodology/Principal Findings HBSMC and hsMF cultures were set up from bladder tissue of patients undergoing cystectomy. In cytokine stimulated cultured hBSMC and hsMF GJIC was analyzed via Fluorescence Recovery after Photo-bleaching (FRAP). Cx43 and Cx45 expression was assessed by quantitative PCR and confocal immunofluorescence. Membrane protein fraction of Cx43 and Cx45 was quantified by Dot Blot. Upregulation of cell-cell-communication was found after IL6 stimulation in both cell types. In hBSMC IL4 and TGFβ1 decreased both, GJIC and Cx43 protein expression, while TNFα did not alter communication in FRAP-experiments but increased Cx43 expression. GJ plaques size correlated with coupling efficacy measured, while Cx45 expression did not correlate with modulation of GJIC. Conclusions/Significance Our finding of specific cytokine effects on GJIC support the notion that cytokines play a pivotal role for pathophysiology of OAB and IC. Interestingly, the effects were independent from the classical definition of pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines. We conclude, that connexin

  11. Glucose replaces glutamate as energy substrate to fuel glutamate uptake in glutamate dehydrogenase-deficient astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nissen, Jakob D; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-07-01

    Cultured astrocytes treated with siRNA to knock down glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were used to investigate whether this enzyme is important for the utilization of glutamate as an energy substrate. By incubation of these cells in media containing different concentrations of glutamate (range 100-500 µM) in the presence or in the absence of glucose, the metabolism of these substrates was studied by using tritiated glutamate or 2-deoxyglucose as tracers. In addition, the cellular contents of glutamate and ATP were determined. The astrocytes were able to maintain physiological levels of ATP regardless of the expression level of GDH and the incubation condition, indicating a high degree of flexibility with regard to regulatory mechanisms involved in maintaining an adequate energy level in the cells. Glutamate uptake was found to be increased in these cells when exposed to increasing levels of extracellular glutamate independently of the GDH expression level. Moreover, increased intracellular glutamate content was observed in the GDH-deficient cells after a 2-hr incubation in the presence of 100 µM glutamate. It is significant that GDH-deficient cells exhibited an increased utilization of glucose in the presence of 250 and 500 µM glutamate, monitored as an increase in the accumulation of tritiated 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate. These findings underscore the importance of the expression level of GDH for the ability to utilize glutamate as an energy source fueling its own energy-requiring uptake.

  12. Visualization of glutamate as a volume transmitter.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Yohei; Iino, Masamitsu

    2011-02-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Although glutamate mediates synaptically confined point-to-point transmission, it has been suggested that under certain conditions glutamate may escape from the synaptic cleft (glutamate spillover), accumulate in the extrasynaptic space, and mediate volume transmission to regulate important brain functions. However, the inability to directly measure glutamate dynamics around active synapses has limited our understanding of glutamatergic volume transmission. The recent development of a family of fluorescent glutamate indicators has enabled the visualization of extrasynaptic glutamate dynamics in brain tissues. In this topical review, we examine glutamate as a volume transmitter based on novel results of glutamate imaging in the brain.

  13. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, James; Franks, Christopher J.; Murray, Caitriona; Edwards, Richard J.; Calahorro, Fernando; Ishihara, Takeshi; Katsura, Isao; Holden-Dye, Lindy; O'Connor, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission is evolutionarily conserved across animal phyla. A major class of glutamate receptors consists of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). In C. elegans, three mGluR genes, mgl-1, mgl-2, and mgl-3, are organized into three subgroups, similar to their mammalian counterparts. Cellular reporters identified expression of the mgls in the nervous system of C. elegans and overlapping expression in the pharyngeal microcircuit that controls pharyngeal muscle activity and feeding behavior. The overlapping expression of mgls within this circuit allowed the investigation of receptor signaling per se and in the context of receptor interactions within a neural network that regulates feeding. We utilized the pharmacological manipulation of neuronally regulated pumping of the pharyngeal muscle in the wild-type and mutants to investigate MGL function. This defined a net mgl-1-dependent inhibition of pharyngeal pumping that is modulated by mgl-3 excitation. Optogenetic activation of the pharyngeal glutamatergic inputs combined with electrophysiological recordings from the isolated pharyngeal preparations provided further evidence for a presynaptic mgl-1-dependent regulation of pharyngeal activity. Analysis of mgl-1, mgl-2, and mgl-3 mutant feeding behavior in the intact organism after acute food removal identified a significant role for mgl-1 in the regulation of an adaptive feeding response. Our data describe the molecular and cellular organization of mgl-1, mgl-2, and mgl-3. Pharmacological analysis identified that, in these paradigms, mgl-1 and mgl-3, but not mgl-2, can modulate the pharyngeal microcircuit. Behavioral analysis identified mgl-1 as a significant determinant of the glutamate-dependent modulation of feeding, further highlighting the significance of mGluRs in complex C. elegans behavior. PMID:25869139

  14. Disease mutations in desmoplakin inhibit Cx43 membrane targeting mediated by desmoplakin-EB1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipal M; Dubash, Adi D; Kreitzer, Geri; Green, Kathleen J

    2014-09-15

    Mechanisms by which microtubule plus ends interact with regions of cell-cell contact during tissue development and morphogenesis are not fully understood. We characterize a previously unreported interaction between the microtubule binding protein end-binding 1 (EB1) and the desmosomal protein desmoplakin (DP), and demonstrate that DP-EB1 interactions enable DP to modify microtubule organization and dynamics near sites of cell-cell contact. EB1 interacts with a region of the DP N terminus containing a hotspot for pathogenic mutations associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC). We show that a subset of AC mutations, in addition to a mutation associated with skin fragility/woolly hair syndrome, impair gap junction localization and function by misregulating DP-EB1 interactions and altering microtubule dynamics. This work identifies a novel function for a desmosomal protein in regulating microtubules that affect membrane targeting of gap junction components, and elucidates a mechanism by which DP mutations may contribute to the development of cardiac and cutaneous diseases.

  15. Regulation of Cx43 gap junctions: the gatekeeper and the password.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Z; Boynton, A L

    2000-10-17

    Gap junctions are regulatable pores that connect the cytoplasms of neighboring cells. Hossain and Boynton focus on connexin 43 gap junctions and their regulation by changing the phosphorylation status of the COOH-terminal domain of connexin 43 or by altering protein-protein interactions in this region. The COOH-terminal domain of connexin 43 appears to be a key player in regulating gap junctional communication (GJC) because many divergent signals in many different cell types modify this domain to inhibit GJC.

  16. Disease mutations in desmoplakin inhibit Cx43 membrane targeting mediated by desmoplakin–EB1 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipal M.; Dubash, Adi D.; Kreitzer, Geri

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms by which microtubule plus ends interact with regions of cell–cell contact during tissue development and morphogenesis are not fully understood. We characterize a previously unreported interaction between the microtubule binding protein end-binding 1 (EB1) and the desmosomal protein desmoplakin (DP), and demonstrate that DP–EB1 interactions enable DP to modify microtubule organization and dynamics near sites of cell–cell contact. EB1 interacts with a region of the DP N terminus containing a hotspot for pathogenic mutations associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC). We show that a subset of AC mutations, in addition to a mutation associated with skin fragility/woolly hair syndrome, impair gap junction localization and function by misregulating DP–EB1 interactions and altering microtubule dynamics. This work identifies a novel function for a desmosomal protein in regulating microtubules that affect membrane targeting of gap junction components, and elucidates a mechanism by which DP mutations may contribute to the development of cardiac and cutaneous diseases. PMID:25225338

  17. The action of antidepressants on the glutamate system: regulation of glutamate release and glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Treccani, Giulia; Mallei, Alessandra; Popoli, Maurizio

    2013-06-15

    Recent compelling evidence has suggested that the glutamate system is a primary mediator of psychiatric pathology and also a target for rapid-acting antidepressants. Clinical research in mood and anxiety disorders has shown alterations in levels, clearance, and metabolism of glutamate and consistent volumetric changes in brain areas where glutamate neurons predominate. In parallel, preclinical studies with rodent stress and depression models have found dendritic remodeling and synaptic spines reduction in corresponding areas, suggesting these as major factors in psychopathology. Enhancement of glutamate release/transmission, in turn induced by stress/glucocorticoids, seems crucial for structural/functional changes. Understanding mechanisms of maladaptive plasticity may allow identification of new targets for drugs and therapies. Interestingly, traditional monoaminergic-based antidepressants have been repeatedly shown to interfere with glutamate system function, starting with modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Subsequently, it has been shown that antidepressants reduce glutamate release and synaptic transmission; in particular, it was found antidepressants prevent the acute stress-induced enhancement of glutamate release. Additional studies have shown that antidepressants may partly reverse the maladaptive changes in synapses/circuitry in stress and depression models. Finally, a number of studies over the years have shown that these drugs regulate glutamate receptors, reducing the function of NMDA receptors, potentiating the function of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptors, and, more recently, exerting variable effects on different subtypes of metabotropic glutamate receptors. The development of NMDA receptor antagonists has opened new avenues for glutamatergic, rapid acting, antidepressants, while additional targets in the glutamate synapse await development of new compounds for better, faster antidepressant action

  18. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 and glutamate signaling in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Jin; Shin, Seung-Shick; Lee, Hwa Jin; Marín, Yarí E; Wall, Brian A; Goydos, James S; Chen, Suzie

    2007-03-01

    Recently, several laboratories have started to investigate the involvement of glutamate signaling in cancer. In previous studies, we reported on a transgenic mouse model that develops melanoma spontaneously. Subsequent studies in these mice identified that the aberrant expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1) in melanocytes played a critical role in the onset of melanoma. Confirmation of the etiologic role of GRM1 in melanoma development was shown in a second transgenic line with GRM1 expression under the regulation of a melanocyte-specific dopachrome tautomerase promoter. Ectopic expression of GRM1 was also detected in a subset of human melanoma cell lines and biopsies, suggesting that aberrant expression of GRM1 in melanocytes may contribute to the development of human melanoma. GRM1, a seven-transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptor, is normally expressed and functional in neuronal cells, and its ligand, glutamate, is the major excitatory neurotransmitter. Human melanoma cells are shown here to release elevated levels of glutamate, implying a possible autocrine loop. Treatment of GRM1-expressing human melanoma cells with a GRM1 antagonist (LY367385 or BAY36-7620) or a glutamate release inhibitor (riluzole) leads to a suppression of cell proliferation as well as a decrease in levels of extracellular glutamate. Treatment of human melanoma cell xenografts with riluzole for 18 days via p.o. gavage or i.v. injection leads to inhibition of tumor growth by 50% in comparison with controls. These data suggest the importance of glutamate signaling in human melanoma and imply that the suppression of glutamate signaling may be a new target for melanoma therapy.

  19. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed. PMID:24227952

  20. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  1. Computational Studies of Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Setiadi, Jeffry; Heinzelmann, Germano; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the human brain whose binding to receptors on neurons excites them while excess glutamate are removed from synapses via transporter proteins. Determination of the crystal structures of bacterial aspartate transporters has paved the way for computational investigation of their function and dynamics at the molecular level. Here, we review molecular dynamics and free energy calculation methods used in these computational studies and discuss the recent applications to glutamate transporters. The focus of the review is on the insights gained on the transport mechanism through computational methods, which otherwise is not directly accessible by experimental probes. Recent efforts to model the mammalian glutamate and other amino acid transporters, whose crystal structures have not been solved yet, are included in the review. PMID:26569328

  2. Glutamate pays its own way in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mary C

    2013-12-16

    In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that glutamate can be oxidized for energy by brain astrocytes. The ability to harvest the energy from glutamate provides astrocytes with a mechanism to offset the high ATP cost of the uptake of glutamate from the synaptic cleft. This brief review focuses on oxidative metabolism of glutamate by astrocytes, the specific pathways involved in the complete oxidation of glutamate and the energy provided by each reaction.

  3. Prefrontal cortex glutamate and extraversion

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Florian; Jaedke, Maren; Gallinat, Jürgen; Bajbouj, Malek

    2012-01-01

    Extraversion is considered one of the core traits of personality. Low extraversion has been associated with increased vulnerability to affective and anxiety disorders. Brain imaging studies have linked extraversion, approach behaviour and the production of positive emotional states to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and glutamatergic neurotransmission. However, the relationship between extraversion and glutamate in the DLPFC has not been investigated so far. In order to address this issue, absolute glutamate concentrations in the DLPFC and the visual cortex as a control region were measured by 3-Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in 29 subjects with high and low extraversion. We found increased glutamate levels in the DLPFC of introverts as compared with extraverts. The increased glutamate concentration was specific for the DLPFC and negatively associated with state anxiety. Although preliminary, results indicate altered top-down control of DLPFC due to reduced glutamate concentration as a function of extraversion. Glutamate measurement with 1H-MRS may facilitate the understanding of biological underpinnings of personality traits and psychiatric diseases associated with dysfunctions in approach behaviour and the production of positive emotional states. PMID:22016442

  4. Prefrontal cortex glutamate and extraversion.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Simone; Schubert, Florian; Jaedke, Maren; Gallinat, Jürgen; Bajbouj, Malek

    2012-10-01

    Extraversion is considered one of the core traits of personality. Low extraversion has been associated with increased vulnerability to affective and anxiety disorders. Brain imaging studies have linked extraversion, approach behaviour and the production of positive emotional states to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and glutamatergic neurotransmission. However, the relationship between extraversion and glutamate in the DLPFC has not been investigated so far. In order to address this issue, absolute glutamate concentrations in the DLPFC and the visual cortex as a control region were measured by 3-Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in 29 subjects with high and low extraversion. We found increased glutamate levels in the DLPFC of introverts as compared with extraverts. The increased glutamate concentration was specific for the DLPFC and negatively associated with state anxiety. Although preliminary, results indicate altered top-down control of DLPFC due to reduced glutamate concentration as a function of extraversion. Glutamate measurement with 1H-MRS may facilitate the understanding of biological underpinnings of personality traits and psychiatric diseases associated with dysfunctions in approach behaviour and the production of positive emotional states.

  5. Genotoxicity of monosodium glutamate.

    PubMed

    Ataseven, Nazmiye; Yüzbaşıoğlu, Deniz; Keskin, Ayten Çelebi; Ünal, Fatma

    2016-05-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is one of the most widely used flavor enhancers throughout the world. The aim of this study is to investigate the genotoxic potential of MSG by using chromosome aberrations (CAs), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs), cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN), and random amplified polymorphic DNA-polimerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) in cultured human lymphocytes and alkaline comet assays in isolated human lymphocytes, which were incubated with six concentrations (250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000 and 8000 μg/mL) of MSG. The result of this study indicated that MSG significantly and dose dependently increased the frequencies of CAs, SCE and MN in all treatments and times, compared with control. However, the replication (RI) and nuclear division indices (NDI) were not affected. In this paper, in vitro genotoxic effects of the MSG was also investigated on human peripheral lymphocytes by analysing the RAPD-PCR with arbitrary 10-mer primers. The changes occurring in RAPD profiles after MSG treatment include increase or decrease in band intensity and gain or loss of bands. In the comet assay, this additive caused DNA damage at all concentrations in isolated human lymphocytes after 1-h in vitro exposure. Our results demonstrate that MSG is genotoxic to the human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro.

  6. Bicyclic glutamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Udo; Bisel, Philippe; Weckert, Edgar; Frahm, August Wilhelm

    2006-05-15

    For the second-generation asymmetric synthesis of the trans-tris(homoglutamic) acids via Strecker reaction of chiral ketimines, the cyanide addition as the key stereodifferentiating step produces mixtures of diastereomeric alpha-amino nitrile esters the composition of which is independent of the reaction temperature and the type of the solvent, respectively. The subsequent hydrolysis is exclusively achieved with concentrated H(2)SO(4) yielding diastereomeric mixtures of three secondary alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters and two diastereomeric cis-fused angular alpha-carbamoyl gamma-lactams as bicyclic glutamic acid derivatives, gained from in situ stereomer differentiating cyclisation of the secondary cis-alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters. Separation was achieved by CC. The pure secondary trans-alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters cyclise on heating and treatment with concentrated H(2)SO(4), respectively, to diastereomeric cis-fused angular secondary alpha-amino imides. Their hydrogenolysis led to the enantiomeric cis-fused angular primary alpha-amino imides. The configuration of all compounds was completely established by NMR methods, CD-spectra, and by X-ray analyses of the (alphaR,1R,5R)-1-carbamoyl-2-(1-phenylethyl)-2-azabicyclo[3.3.0]octan-3-one and of the trans-alphaS,1S,2R-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-1-(1-phenylethylamino)cyclopentanecarboxamide.

  7. The impact of caffeine on connexin expression in the embryonic chick cardiomyocyte micromass culture system.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2016-07-01

    Cardiomyocytes are electrically coupled by gap junctions, defined as clusters of low-resistance multisubunit transmembrane channels composed of connexins (Cxs). The expression of Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45, which are present in cardiomyocytes, is known to be developmentally regulated. This study investigates the premise that alterations in gap junction proteins are one of the mechanisms by which teratogens may act. Specifically, those molecules known to be teratogenic in humans could cause their effects via disruption of cell-to-cell communication pathways, resulting in an inability to co-ordinate tissue development. Caffeine significantly inhibited contractile activity at concentrations above and including 1500 μm (P < 0.05), while not affecting cell viability and total protein, in the embryonic chick cardiomyocyte micromass culture system. The effects of caffeine on key cardiac gap junction protein (Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45) expression were analysed using immunocytochemistry and in-cell Western blotting. The results indicated that caffeine altered the expression pattern of Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45 at non-cytotoxic concentrations (≥2000 μm), i.e., at concentrations that did not affect total cell protein and cell viability. In addition the effects of caffeine on cardiomyocyte formation and function (contractile activity score) were correlated with modulation of Cxs (Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45) expression, at above and including 2000 μm caffeine concentrations (P < 0.05). These experiments provide evidence that embryonic chick cardiomyocyte micromass culture may be a useful in vitro method for mechanistic studies of perturbation of embryonic heart development. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Altered Connexin 43 and Connexin 45 protein expression in the heart as a function of social and environmental stress in the prairie vole.

    PubMed

    Grippo, Angela J; Moffitt, Julia A; Henry, Matthew K; Firkins, Rachel; Senkler, Jonathan; McNeal, Neal; Wardwell, Joshua; Scotti, Melissa-Ann L; Dotson, Ashley; Schultz, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to social and environmental stressors may influence behavior as well as autonomic and cardiovascular regulation, potentially leading to depressive disorders and cardiac dysfunction including elevated sympathetic drive, reduced parasympathetic function, and ventricular arrhythmias. The cellular mechanisms that underlie these interactions are not well understood. One mechanism may involve alterations in the expression of Connexin43 (Cx43) and Connexin45 (Cx45), gap junction proteins in the heart that play an important role in ensuring efficient cell-to-cell coupling and the maintenance of cardiac rhythmicity. The present study investigated the hypothesis that long-term social isolation, combined with mild environmental stressors, would produce both depressive behaviors and altered Cx43 and Cx45 expression in the left ventricle of prairie voles - a socially monogamous rodent model. Adult, female prairie voles were exposed to either social isolation (n = 22) or control (paired, n = 23) conditions (4 weeks), alone or in combination with chronic mild stress (CMS) (1 week). Social isolation, versus paired control conditions, produced significantly (p < 0.05) increased depressive behaviors in a 5-min forced swim test, and CMS exacerbated (p < 0.05) these behaviors. Social isolation (alone) reduced (p < 0.05) total Cx43 expression in the left ventricle; whereas CMS (but not isolation) increased (p < 0.05) total Cx45 expression and reduced (p < 0.05) the Cx43/Cx45 ratio, measured via Western blot analysis. The present findings provide insight into potential cellular mechanisms underlying altered cardiac rhythmicity associated with social and environmental stress in the prairie vole.

  9. Altered Connexin 43 and Connexin 45 Protein Expression in the Heart as a Function of Social and Environmental Stress in the Prairie Vole

    PubMed Central

    Grippo, Angela J.; Moffitt, Julia A.; Henry, Matthew K.; Firkins, Rachel; Senkler, Jonathan; McNeal, Neal; Wardwell, Joshua; Scotti, Melissa-Ann L.; Dotson, Ashley; Schultz, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to social and environmental stressors may influence behavior as well as autonomic and cardiovascular regulation, potentially leading to depressive disorders and cardiac dysfunction including elevated sympathetic drive, reduced parasympathetic function, and ventricular arrhythmias. The cellular mechanisms that underlie these interactions are not well understood. One mechanism may involve alterations in the expression of Connexin43 (Cx43) and Connexin45 (Cx45), gap junction proteins in the heart that play an important role in ensuring efficient cell-to-cell coupling and the maintenance of cardiac rhythmicity. The present study investigated the hypothesis that long-term social isolation, combined with mild environmental stressors, would produce both depressive behaviors and altered Cx43 and Cx45 expression in the left ventricle of prairie voles – a socially monogamous rodent model. Adult, female prairie voles were exposed to either social isolation (n=22) or control (paired, n=23) conditions (4 weeks), alone or in combination with chronic mild stress (1 week). Social isolation, versus paired control conditions, produced significantly (P < 0.05) increased depressive behaviors in a 5-min forced swim test, and chronic mild stress exacerbated (P < 0.05) these behaviors. Social isolation (alone) reduced (P < 0.05) total Cx43 expression in the left ventricle; whereas chronic mild stress (but not isolation) increased (P < 0.05) total Cx45 expression and reduced (P < 0.05) the Cx43/Cx45 ratio, measured via Western blot analysis. The present findings provide insight into potential cellular mechanisms underlying altered cardiac rhythmicity associated with social and environmental stress in the prairie vole. PMID:25338193

  10. Glutamate ameliorates experimental vincristine neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Boyle, F M; Wheeler, H R; Shenfield, G M

    1996-10-01

    The dose-limiting toxicity of the chemotherapeutic agent vincristine is peripheral neuropathy, for which there is no established therapy. The amino acid glutamate has been proposed as a neuroprotectant for vincristine, but a full preclinical evaluation of its efficacy, safety and mechanism of action has been hampered by a lack of suitable animal models. We report the development of a Dark Agouti rat model of sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, to investigate the neurotoxicity of cytotoxic drugs. Neuropathy was manifested as gait disturbance in 100% of vincristine-treated animals (n = 12), significant elevation of the tail-flick threshold (5.1 +/- 2 sec) and significantly impaired mean Rotarod times (55 +/- 41 sec) developing after administration of 1.5 mg/kg vincristine over 2 weeks. Among vincristine-treated animals supplemented p.o. with sodium glutamate (500 mg/kg/day in drinking water) from 24 hr before vincristine treatment, only one (8%, P = .01) developed gait disturbance, the tall-flick threshold was not significantly different from controls and the mean Rotarod score was 188 +/- 18 sec (P = .004). Glutamate thus significantly protected against both sensory and motor neuropathy. We observed no intrinsic neurotoxicity with glutamate and no interference with the cytotoxic efficacy of vincristine against a transplantable rat mammary adenocarcinoma grown s.c. in Dark Agouti rats. Our findings suggest that glutamate is likely to be a safe and effective neuroprotectant for patients receiving vincristine, and it warrants further clinical evaluation. The mechanism of this selective neuroprotection by glutamate remains to be elucidated. Our rat model may be of use in determining whether glutamate offers protection from other neurotoxic drugs.

  11. Abnormalities in glutamate metabolism and excitotoxicity in the retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    In the physiological condition, glutamate acts as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the retina. However, excessive glutamate can be toxic to retinal neurons by overstimulation of the glutamate receptors. Glutamate excess is primarily attributed to perturbation in the homeostasis of the glutamate metabolism. Major pathway of glutamate metabolism consists of glutamate uptake by glutamate transporters followed by enzymatic conversion of glutamate to nontoxic glutamine by glutamine synthetase. Glutamate metabolism requires energy supply, and the energy loss inhibits the functions of both glutamate transporters and glutamine synthetase. In this review, we describe the present knowledge concerning the retinal glutamate metabolism under the physiological and pathological conditions.

  12. Metabotropic glutamate receptors in cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lumeng J; Wall, Brian A; Wangari-Talbot, Janet; Chen, Suzie

    2016-02-16

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are widely known for their roles in synaptic signaling. However, accumulating evidence suggests roles of mGluRs in human malignancies in addition to synaptic transmission. Somatic cell homeostasis presents intriguing possibilities of mGluRs and glutamate signaling as novel targets for human cancers. More recently, aberrant glutamate signaling has been shown to participate in the transformation and maintenance of various cancer types, including glioma, melanoma skin cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer, indicating that genes encoding mGluRs, GRMs, can function as oncogenes. Here, we provide a review on the interactions of mGluRs and their ligand, glutamate, in processes that promote the growth of tumors of neuronal and non-neuronal origins. Further, we discuss the evolution of riluzole, a glutamate release inhibitor approved for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but now fashioned as an mGluR1 inhibitor for melanoma therapy and as a radio-sensitizer for tumors that have metastasized to the brain. With the success of riluzole, it is not far-fetched to believe that other drugs that may act directly or indirectly on other mGluRs can be beneficial for multiple applications.

  13. Glutamate receptors at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Mark L.

    2010-12-03

    At synapses throughout the brain and spinal cord, the amino-acid glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter. During evolution, a family of glutamate-receptor ion channels seems to have been assembled from a kit consisting of discrete ligand-binding, ion-channel, modulatory and cytoplasmic domains. Crystallographic studies that exploit this unique architecture have greatly aided structural analysis of the ligand-binding core, but the results also pose a formidable challenge, namely that of resolving the allosteric mechanisms by which individual domains communicate and function in an intact receptor.

  14. Glutamate: a truly functional amino acid.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, John T; Brosnan, Margaret E

    2013-09-01

    Glutamate is one of the most abundant of the amino acids. In addition to its role in protein structure, it plays critical roles in nutrition, metabolism and signaling. Post-translational carboxylation of glutamyl residues increases their affinity for calcium and plays a major role in hemostasis. Glutamate is of fundamental importance to amino acid metabolism, yet the great bulk of dietary glutamate is catabolyzed within the intestine. It is necessary for the synthesis of key molecules, such as glutathione and the polyglutamated folate cofactors. It plays a major role in signaling. Within the central nervous system, glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter and its product, GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. Glutamate interaction with specific taste cells in the tongue is a major component of umami taste. The finding of glutamate receptors throughout the gastrointestinal tract has opened up a new vista in glutamate function. Glutamate is truly a functional amino acid.

  15. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or...

  17. Imaging extrasynaptic glutamate dynamics in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Hirokazu; Iinuma, Sho; Yamasaki, Miwako; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hirose, Kenzo; Iino, Masamitsu

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate is the major neurotransmitter in the brain, mediating point-to-point transmission across the synaptic cleft in excitatory synapses. Using a glutamate imaging method with fluorescent indicators, we show that synaptic activity generates extrasynaptic glutamate dynamics in the vicinity of active synapses. These glutamate dynamics had magnitudes and durations sufficient to activate extrasynaptic glutamate receptors in brain slices. We also observed crosstalk between synapses—i.e., summation of glutamate released from neighboring synapses. Furthermore, we successfully observed that sensory input from the extremities induced extrasynaptic glutamate dynamics within the appropriate sensory area of the cerebral cortex in vivo. Thus, the present study clarifies the spatiotemporal features of extrasynaptic glutamate dynamics, and opens up an avenue to directly visualizing synaptic activity in live animals. PMID:20308566

  18. Interactions of connexins with other membrane channels and transporters

    PubMed Central

    Chanson, Marc; Kotsias, Basilio A.; Peracchia, Camillo; O’Grady, Scott M.

    2009-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication through gap junctions exists in most animal cells and is essential for many important biological processes including rapid transmission of electric signals to coordinate contraction of cardiac and smooth muscle, the intercellular propagation of Ca2+ waves and synchronization of physiological processes between adjacent cells within a tissue. Recent studies have shown that connexins can have either direct or indirect interactions with other plasma membrane ion channels or membrane transport proteins with important functional consequences. For example, in tissues most severely affected by cystic fibrosis, activation of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) has been shown to influence connexin function. Moreover, a direct interaction between Cx45.6 and the Major Intrinsic Protein/AQP0 in lens appears to influence the process of cell differentiation whereas interactions between aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and Cx43 in mouse astrocytes may coordinate the intercellular movement of ions and water between astrocytes. In this review, we discuss evidence supporting interactions between connexins and membrane channels/transporters including CFTR, aquaporins, ionotropic glutamate receptors, and between pannexin1, another class of putative gap-junction-forming proteins, and Kvβ3, a regulatory β-subunit of voltage gated potassium channels. Although the precise molecular nature of these interactions has yet to be defined, their consequences may be critical for normal tissue homeostasis. PMID:17475311

  19. Connexin 43 is not essential for the control of renin synthesis and secretion.

    PubMed

    Gerl, Melanie; Kurt, Birgül; Kurtz, Armin; Wagner, Charlotte

    2014-05-01

    The juxtaglomerular areas of mammalian kidneys express the gap junction proteins connexin 37, 40, 43, and 45. Among these, Cx40 plays a major role for the function of juxtaglomerular renin-expressing cells, while Cx37 and Cx45 appear to be less relevant in this context. Since the role of the remaining Cx43 for the function of renin expression is not well understood, this study aimed to systematically characterize the direct role of Cx43 for renin expression and secretion. For this aim, we generated mice with endothelium and with renin cell-specific deletions of Cx43, and we characterized the regulation of renin expression and renin secretion in the kidneys of these mice on normal salt diet and during chronic challenge of the renin system by pretreatment of mice with a low-salt diet in combination with an angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor. We found that renal renin mRNA abundance, plasma renin concentration, and systolic blood pressure did not differ between wild-type, Cx43(fl/fl) Ren1d(+/Cre) mice as well as Cx43(fl/fl) Tie-2(+/Cre) mice under basal conditions nor under chronic stimulation by salt depletion. The localization of renin-expressing cells was also regular in kidneys of all genotypes, and moreover, regulation of renin secretion by beta-adrenergic stimulation and renal perfusion pressure measured in isolated perfused kidneys of Cx43(fl/fl) Ren1d(+/Cre) and Cx43(fl/fl) Tie-2(+/Cre) mice was not different from control. We infer from these results that Cx43 plays if at all only a minor role for the functional control of renin-producing cells in the kidney.

  20. Ciprofloxacin triggered glutamate production by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Dorit; Wendisch, Volker F

    2016-10-07

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a well-studied bacterium which naturally overproduces glutamate when induced by an elicitor. Glutamate production is accompanied by decreased 2-oxoglutatate dehydrogenase activity. Elicitors of glutamate production by C. glutamicum analyzed to molecular detail target the cell envelope. Ciprofloxacin, an inhibitor of bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, was shown to inhibit growth of C. glutamicum wild type with concomitant excretion of glutamate. Enzyme assays showed that 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity was decreased due to ciprofloxacin addition. Transcriptome analysis revealed that this inhibitor of DNA gyrase increased RNA levels of genes involved in DNA synthesis, repair and modification. Glutamate production triggered by ciprofloxacin led to glutamate titers of up to 37 ± 1 mM and a substrate specific glutamate yield of 0.13 g/g. Even in the absence of the putative glutamate exporter gene yggB, ciprofloxacin effectively triggered glutamate production. When C. glutamicum wild type was cultivated under nitrogen-limiting conditions, 2-oxoglutarate rather than glutamate was produced as consequence of exposure to ciprofloxacin. Recombinant C. glutamicum strains overproducing lysine, arginine, ornithine, and putrescine, respectively, secreted glutamate instead of the desired amino acid when exposed to ciprofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin induced DNA synthesis and repair genes, reduced 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity and elicited glutamate production by C. glutamicum. Production of 2-oxoglutarate could be triggered by ciprofloxacin under nitrogen-limiting conditions.

  1. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This...

  2. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) [Reserved] (c) Limitations, restrictions, or...

  3. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as...

  4. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This...

  5. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This...

  6. Modes of glutamate receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Gabriela K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The time course of excitatory synaptic currents, the major means of fast communication between neurons of the central nervous system, is encoded in the dynamic behaviour of post-synaptic glutamate-activated channels. First-pass attempts to explain the glutamate-elicited currents with mathematical models produced reaction mechanisms that included only the most basic functionally defined states: resting vs. liganded, closed vs. open, responsive vs. desensitized. In contrast, single-molecule observations afforded by the patch-clamp technique revealed an unanticipated kinetic multiplicity of transitions: from microseconds-lasting flickers to minutes-long modes. How these kinetically defined events impact the shape of the synaptic response, how they relate to rearrangements in receptor structure, and whether and how they are physiologically controlled represent currently active research directions. Modal gating, which refers to the slowest, least frequently observed ion-channel transitions, has been demonstrated for representatives of all ion channel families. However, reaction schemes have been largely confined to the short- and medium-range time scales. For glutamate receptors as well, modal gating has only recently come under rigorous scrutiny. This article reviews the evidence for modal gating of glutamate receptors and the still developing hypotheses about the mechanism(s) by which modal shifts occur and the ways in which they may impact the time course of synaptic transmission. PMID:22106181

  7. Characterization of the Connexin45 Carboxyl-Terminal Domain Structure and Interactions with Molecular Partners

    PubMed Central

    Kopanic, Jennifer L.; Al-mugotir, Mona H.; Kieken, Fabien; Zach, Sydney; Trease, Andrew J.; Sorgen, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the initiation and persistence of lethal cardiac rhythms are of significant clinical and scientific interests. Gap junctions are principally involved in forming the electrical connections between myocytes, and changes in distribution, density, and properties are consistent characteristics in arrhythmic heart disease. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of gap junctions during normal and abnormal impulse propagation are essential in the control of arrhythmias. For example, Cx45 is predominately expressed in the specialized myocytes of the impulse generation and conduction system. In both ventricular and atrial human working myocytes, Cx45 is present in very low quantities. However, a reduction in Cx43 coupled with an increased Cx45 protein levels within the ventricles have been observed after myocardial infarction and end-stage heart failure. Cx45 may influence electrical and/or metabolic coupling as a result of pathophysiological overexpression. Our goal was to identify mechanisms that could cause cellular coupling to be different between the cardiac connexins. Based upon the conserved transmembrane and extracellular loop segments, our focus was on identifying features within the divergent cytoplasmic portions. Here, we biophysically characterize the carboxyl-terminal domain of Cx45 (Cx45CT). Purification revealed the possibility of oligomeric species, which was confirmed by analytical ultracentrifugation experiments. Sedimentation equilibrium and circular dichroism studies of different Cx45CT constructs identified one region of α-helical structure (A333-N361) that mediates CT dimerization through hydrophobic contacts. Interestingly, the binding affinity of Cx45CT dimerization is 1000-fold stronger than Cx43CT dimerization. Cx45CT resonance assignments were also used to identify the binding sites and affinities of molecular partners involved in the Cx45 regulation; although none disrupted dimerization, many of these proteins

  8. Effect of ambient extracellular glutamate on Drosophila glutamate receptor trafficking and function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaiyun; Augustin, Hrvoje; Featherstone, David E

    2009-01-01

    Measurements suggest that the hemolymph glutamate concentrations in Drosophila are relatively high. This raises the possibility that extracellular glutamate could be an important regulator of glutamatergic transmission in vivo. Using voltage clamp electrophysiology, we found that synaptic currents in D. melanogaster larval neuromuscular junctions are reduced by extracellular glutamate (EC50: approximately 0.4 mM), such that only 10-30% of receptors were functionally available in 1 mM extracellular glutamate. The kinetics of synaptic currents were also slowed in a dose-dependent fashion (EC50: approximately 1 mM), consistent with the idea that extracellular glutamate preferentially removes the fastest-desensitizing receptors from the functional pool. Prolonged exposure (several hours) to extracellular glutamate also triggers loss of glutamate receptor immunoreactivity from neuromuscular junctions. To determine whether this receptor loss requires that glutamate bind directly to the lost receptors, we examined glutamate-dependent loss of receptor immunoreactivity in larvae with glutamate receptor ligand binding mutations. Our results suggest that glutamate-dependent receptor loss requires binding of glutamate directly to the lost receptors. To determine whether lost receptor protein is degraded or merely redistributed, we used immunoblots. Results suggest that glutamate receptor protein is redistributed, but not degraded, after prolonged exposure to high extracellular glutamate.

  9. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory syn-aptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  10. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2010-01-01

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:19184587

  11. Extrasynaptic glutamate release through cystine/glutamate antiporter contributes to ischemic damage

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Federico N.; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Martin, Abraham; Gona, Kiran Babu; Llop, Jordi; Szczupak, Boguslaw; Chara, Juan Carlos; Matute, Carlos; Domercq, María

    2014-01-01

    During brain ischemia, an excessive release of glutamate triggers neuronal death through the overactivation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs); however, the underlying pathways that alter glutamate homeostasis and whether synaptic or extrasynaptic sites are responsible for excess glutamate remain controversial. Here, we monitored ischemia-gated currents in pyramidal cortical neurons in brain slices from rodents in response to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) as a real-time glutamate sensor to identify the source of glutamate release and determined the extent of neuronal damage. Blockade of excitatory amino acid transporters or vesicular glutamate release did not inhibit ischemia-gated currents or neuronal damage after OGD. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of the cystine/glutamate antiporter dramatically attenuated ischemia-gated currents and cell death after OGD. Compared with control animals, mice lacking a functional cystine/glutamate antiporter exhibited reduced anoxic depolarization and neuronal death in response to OGD. Furthermore, glutamate released by the cystine/glutamate antiporter activated extrasynaptic, but not synaptic, NMDARs, and blockade of extrasynaptic NMDARs reduced ischemia-gated currents and cell damage after OGD. Finally, PET imaging showed increased cystine/glutamate antiporter function in ischemic rats. Altogether, these data suggest that cystine/glutamate antiporter function is increased in ischemia, contributing to elevated extracellular glutamate concentration, overactivation of extrasynaptic NMDARs, and ischemic neuronal death. PMID:25036707

  12. Connexin43 null mice reveal that astrocytes express multiple connexins.

    PubMed

    Dermietzel, R; Gao, Y; Scemes, E; Vieira, D; Urban, M; Kremer, M; Bennett, M V; Spray, D C

    2000-04-01

    The gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) is the primary component of intercellular channels in cardiac tissue and in astrocytes, the most abundant type of glial cells in the brain. Mice in which the gene for Cx43 is deleted by homologous recombination die at birth, due to profound hypertrophy of the ventricular outflow tract and stenosis of the pulmonary artery. Despite this significant cardiovascular abnormality, brains of connexin43 null [Cx43 (-/-)] animals are shown to be macroscopically normal and to display a pattern of cortical lamination that is not detectably different from wildtype siblings. Presence of Cx40 and Cx45 in brains and astrocytes cultured from both Cx43 (-/-) mice and wildtype littermates was confirmed by RT-PCR, Northern blot analyses and by immunostaining; Cx46 was detected by RT-PCR and Northern blot analyses. Presence of Cx26 in astrocyte cultures was indicated by RT-PCR and by Western blot analysis, although we were unable to resolve whether it was contributed by contaminating cells; Cx30 mRNA was detected by Northern blot in long term (2 weeks) but not fresh cultures of astrocytes. These studies thus reveal that astrocyte gap junctions may be formed of multiple connexins. Presumably, the metabolic and ionic coupling provided by these diverse gap junction types may functionally compensate for the absence of the major astrocyte gap junction protein in Cx43 (-/-) mice, providing whatever intercellular signaling is necessary for brain development and cortical lamination.

  13. Impact of obesity on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced altered ovarian connexin gap junction proteins in female mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shanthi Nteeba, Jackson Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-01-01

    The ovarian gap junction proteins alpha 4 (GJA4 or connexin 37; CX37), alpha 1 (GJA1 or connexin 43; CX43) and gamma 1 (GJC1 or connexin 45; CX45) are involved in cell communication and folliculogenesis. 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) alters Cx37 and Cx43 expression in cultured neonatal rat ovaries. Additionally, obesity has an additive effect on DMBA-induced ovarian cell death and follicle depletion, thus, we investigated in vivo impacts of obesity and DMBA on CX protein levels. Ovaries were collected from lean and obese mice aged 6, 12, 18, or 24 wks. A subset of 18 wk old mice (lean and obese) were dosed with sesame oil or DMBA (1 mg/kg; ip) for 14 days and ovaries collected 3 days thereafter. Cx43 and Cx45 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 18 wks while Cx37 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 24 wks in obese ovaries. Cx37 mRNA and antral follicle protein staining intensity were reduced (P < 0.05) by obesity while total CX37 protein was reduced (P < 0.05) in DMBA exposed obese ovaries. Cx43 mRNA and total protein levels were decreased (P < 0.05) by DMBA in both lean and obese ovaries while basal protein staining intensity was reduced (P < 0.05) in obese controls. Cx45 mRNA, total protein and protein staining intensity level were decreased (P < 0.05) by obesity. These data support that obesity temporally alters gap junction protein expression and that DMBA-induced ovotoxicity may involve reduced gap junction protein function. - Highlights: • Ovarian gap junction proteins are affected by ovarian aging and obesity. • DMBA exposure negatively impacts gap junction proteins. • Altered gap junction proteins may contribute to infertility.

  14. Gap junction proteins in the light-damaged albino rat

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cindy X.; Tran, Henry; Green, Colin R.; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Changes in connexin expression are associated with many pathological conditions seen in animal models and in humans. We hypothesized that gap junctions are important mediators in tissue dysfunction and injury processes in the retina, and therefore, we investigated the pattern of connexin protein expression in the light-damaged albino rat eye. Methods Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to intense light for 24 h. The animals were euthanized, and ocular tissue was harvested at 0 h, 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 7 days after light damage. The tissues were processed for immunohistochemistry and western blotting to analyze the expression of the gap junction proteins in the light-damaged condition compared to the non-light-damaged condition. Cell death was detected using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) technique. Results Intense light exposure caused increased TUNEL labeling of photoreceptor cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed that connexin 36 (Cx36) was significantly increased in the inner plexiform layer and Cx45 was significantly decreased in the light-damaged retina. The pattern of Cx36 and Cx45 labeling returned to normal 7 days after light damage. Cx43 significantly increased in the RPE and the choroid in the light-damaged tissue, and decreased but not significantly in the retina. This elevated Cx43 expression in the choroid colocalized with markers of nitration-related oxidative stress (nitrotyrosine) and inflammation (CD45 and ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule-1) in the choroid. Conclusions The results suggest that connexins are regulated differently in the retina than in the choroid in response to photoreceptor damage. Changes in connexins, including Cx36, Cx43, and Cx45, may contribute to the damage process. Specifically, Cx43 was associated with inflammatory damage. Therefore, connexins may be candidate targets for treatment for ameliorating disease progression. PMID:24883012

  15. Impact of obesity on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced altered ovarian connexin gap junction proteins in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Nteeba, Jackson; Keating, Aileen F.

    2014-01-01

    The ovarian gap junction proteins alpha 4 (GJA4 or connexin 37; CX37), alpha 1 (GJA1 or connexin 43; CX43) and gamma 1 (GJC1 or connexin 45; CX45) are involved in cell communication and folliculogenesis. 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) alters Cx37 and Cx43 expression in cultured neonatal rat ovaries. Additionally, obesity has an additive effect on DMBA-induced ovarian cell death and follicle depletion, thus, we investigated in vivo impacts of obesity and DMBA on CX protein levels. Ovaries were collected from lean and obese mice aged 6, 12, 18, or 24 wks. A subset of 18 wk old mice (lean and obese) were dosed with sesame oil or DMBA (1mg/kg; ip) for 14 days and ovaries collected 3 days thereafter. Cx43 and Cx45 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 18 wks while Cx37 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 24 wks in obese ovaries. Cx37 mRNA and antral follicle protein staining intensity were reduced (P < 0.05) by obesity while total CX37 protein was reduced (P < 0.05) in DMBA exposed obese ovaries. Cx43 mRNA and total protein levels were decreased (P < 0.05) by DMBA in both lean and obese ovaries while basal protein staining intensity was reduced (P < 0.05) in obese controls. Cx45 mRNA, total protein and protein staining intensity level were decreased (P < 0.05) by obesity. These data support that obesity temporally alters gap junction protein expression and that DMBA-induced ovotoxicity may involve reduced gap junction protein function. PMID:25447408

  16. Impact of obesity on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced altered ovarian connexin gap junction proteins in female mice.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Nteeba, Jackson; Keating, Aileen F

    2015-01-01

    The ovarian gap junction proteins alpha 4 (GJA4 or connexin 37; CX37), alpha 1 (GJA1 or connexin 43; CX43) and gamma 1 (GJC1 or connexin 45; CX45) are involved in cell communication and folliculogenesis. 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) alters Cx37 and Cx43 expression in cultured neonatal rat ovaries. Additionally, obesity has an additive effect on DMBA-induced ovarian cell death and follicle depletion, thus, we investigated in vivo impacts of obesity and DMBA on CX protein levels. Ovaries were collected from lean and obese mice aged 6, 12, 18, or 24 wks. A subset of 18 wk old mice (lean and obese) were dosed with sesame oil or DMBA (1mg/kg; ip) for 14days and ovaries collected 3days thereafter. Cx43 and Cx45 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P<0.05) after 18 wks while Cx37 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P<0.05) after 24 wks in obese ovaries. Cx37 mRNA and antral follicle protein staining intensity were reduced (P<0.05) by obesity while total CX37 protein was reduced (P<0.05) in DMBA exposed obese ovaries. Cx43 mRNA and total protein levels were decreased (P<0.05) by DMBA in both lean and obese ovaries while basal protein staining intensity was reduced (P<0.05) in obese controls. Cx45 mRNA, total protein and protein staining intensity level were decreased (P<0.05) by obesity. These data support that obesity temporally alters gap junction protein expression and that DMBA-induced ovotoxicity may involve reduced gap junction protein function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Many Roles of Glutamate in Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid glutamate is a major metabolic hub in many organisms and as such is involved in diverse processes in addition to its role in protein synthesis. Nitrogen assimilation, nucleoside, amino acid, and cofactor biosynthesis, as well as secondary natural product formation all utilize glutamate in some manner. Glutamate also plays a role in the catabolism of certain amines. Understanding glutamate's role in these various processes can aid in genome mining for novel metabolic pathways or the engineering of pathways for bioremediation or chemical production of valuable compounds. PMID:26323613

  18. Synaptic glutamate spillover due to impaired glutamate uptake mediates heroin relapse.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao-wei; Scofield, Michael D; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W

    2014-04-16

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration.

  19. Synaptic Glutamate Spillover Due to Impaired Glutamate Uptake Mediates Heroin Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Scofield, Michael D.; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration. PMID:24741055

  20. Using glutamate homeostasis as a target for treating addictive disorders.

    PubMed

    Reissner, Kathryn J; Kalivas, Peter W

    2010-09-01

    Well-developed cellular mechanisms exist to preserve glutamate homeostasis and regulate extrasynaptic glutamate levels. Accumulating evidence indicates that disruptions in glutamate homeostasis are associated with addictive disorders. The disruptions in glutamate concentrations observed after prolonged exposure to drugs of abuse are associated with changes in the function and activity of several key components within the homeostatic control mechanism, including the cystine/glutamate exchanger xc(-) and the glial glutamate transporter, EAAT2/GLT-1. Changes in the balance between synaptic and extrasynaptic glutamate levels in turn influence signaling through presynaptic and postsynaptic glutamate receptors, and thus affect synaptic plasticity and circuit-level activity. In this review, we describe the evidence for impaired glutamate homeostasis as a critical mediator of long-term drug-seeking behaviors, how chronic neuroadaptations in xc(-) and the glutamate transporter, GLT-1, mediate a disruption in glutamate homeostasis, and how targeting these components restores glutamate levels and inhibits drug-seeking behaviors.

  1. Glutamate: Tastant and Neuromodulator in Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2016-07-01

    In taste buds, glutamate plays a double role as a gustatory stimulus and neuromodulator. The detection of glutamate as a tastant involves several G protein-coupled receptors, including the heterodimer taste receptor type 1, member 1 and 3 as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR4). Both receptor types participate in the detection of glutamate as shown with knockout animals and selective antagonists. At the basal part of taste buds, ionotropic glutamate receptors [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA] are expressed and participate in the modulation of the taste signal before its transmission to the brain. Evidence suggests that glutamate has an efferent function on taste cells and modulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as serotonin and ATP. This short article reviews the recent developments in the field with regard to glutamate receptors involved in both functions as well as the influence of glutamate on the taste signal. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Glutamate Transporter-Mediated Glutamate Secretion in the Mammalian Pineal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mean-Hwan; Uehara, Shunsuke; Muroyama, Akiko; Hille, Bertil; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Koh, Duk-Su

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are expressed throughout the central nervous system where their major role is to clear released glutamate from presynaptic terminals. Here we report a novel function of the transporter in rat pinealocytes. This electrogenic transporter conducted inward current in response to L-glutamate and L- or D-aspartate and depolarized the membrane in patch clamp experiments. Ca2+ imaging demonstrated that the transporter-mediated depolarization induced a significant Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The Ca2+ rise finally evoked glutamate exocytosis as detected by carbon-fiber amperometry and by high-performance liquid chromatography. In pineal slices with densely packed pinealocytes, glutamate released from the cells effectively activated glutamate transporters in neighboring cells. The Ca2+ signal generated by KCl depolarization or acetylcholine propagated through several cell layers by virtue of the regenerative ‘glutamate-induced glutamate release’. Therefore we suggest that glutamate transporters mediate synchronized elevation of L-glutamate and thereby efficiently down-regulate melatonin secretion via previously identified inhibitory metabotropic glutamate receptors in the pineal gland. PMID:18945893

  3. Glutamate Fermentation-2: Mechanism of L-Glutamate Overproduction in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Takashi; Wachi, Masaaki

    The nonpathogenic coryneform bacterium, Corynebacterium glutamicum, was isolated as an L-glutamate-overproducing microorganism by Japanese researchers and is currently utilized in various amino acid fermentation processes. L-Glutamate production by C. glutamicum is induced by limitation of biotin and addition of fatty acid ester surfactants and β-lactam antibiotics. These treatments affect the cell surface structures of C. glutamicum. After the discovery of C. glutamicum, many researchers have investigated the underlying mechanism of L-glutamate overproduction with respect to the cell surface structures of this organism. Furthermore, metabolic regulation during L-glutamate overproduction by C. glutamicum, particularly, the relationship between central carbon metabolism and L-glutamate biosynthesis, has been investigated. Recently, the role of a mechanosensitive channel protein in L-glutamate overproduction has been reported. In this chapter, mechanisms of L-glutamate overproduction by C. glutamicum have been reviewed.

  4. Kanamycin ototoxicity in glutamate transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Hakuba, Nobuhiro; Hyodo, Jun; Taniguchi, Masafumi; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2005-06-03

    Glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST), a powerful glutamate uptake system, removes released glutamate from the synaptic cleft and facilitates the re-use of glutamate as a neurotransmitter recycling system. Aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss is mediated via a glutamate excitotoxic process. We investigated the effect of aminoglycoside ototoxicity in GLAST knockout mice using the recorded auditory brainstem response (ABR) and number of hair cells in the cochlea. Kanamycin (100 mg/mL) was injected directly into the posterior semicircular canal of mice. Before the kanamycin treatment, there was no difference in the ABR threshold average between the wild-type and knockout mice. Kanamycin injection aggravated the ABR threshold in the GLAST knockout mice compared with the wild-type mice, and the IHC degeneration was more severe in the GLAST knockout mice. These findings suggest that GLAST plays an important role in preventing the degeneration of inner hair cells in aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

  5. Glutamate-based antidepressants: preclinical psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Pilc, Andrzej; Wierońska, Joanna M; Skolnick, Phil

    2013-06-15

    Over the past 20 years, converging lines of evidence have both linked glutamatergic dysfunction to the pathophysiology of depression and demonstrated that the glutamatergic synapse presents multiple targets for developing novel antidepressants. The robust antidepressant effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists ketamine and traxoprodil provide target validation for this family of ionotropic glutamate receptors. This article reviews the preclinical evidence that it may be possible to develop glutamate-based antidepressants by not only modulating ionotropic (N-methyl-D-aspartate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid) and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors, including mGlu2/3, mGLu5 and mGlu7 receptors, but also by altering synaptic concentrations of glutamate via specialized transporters such as glial glutamate transporter 1 (excitatory amino-acid transporter 2).

  6. Using glutamate homeostasis as a target for treating addictive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Reissner, Kathryn J.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    Well-developed cellular mechanisms exist to preserve glutamate homeostasis and regulate extrasynaptic glutamate levels. Accumulating evidence indicates that disruptions in glutamate homeostasis are associated with addictive disorders. The disruptions in glutamate concentrations observed following prolonged exposure to drugs of abuse are associated with changes in the function and activity of several key components within the homeostatic control mechanism, including the cystine/glutamate exchanger xc− and the glial glutamate transporter EAAT2/GLT-1. Changes in the balance between synaptic and extrasynaptic glutamate levels in turn influence signaling through pre- and postsynaptic glutamate receptors, and thus affect synaptic plasticity and circuit-level activity. In this review we describe the evidence for impaired glutamate homestasis as a critical mediator of long-term drug-seeking behaviors, how chronic neuroadaptations in xc− and GLT-1 mediate a disruption in glutamate homeostasis, and how targeting these components restores glutamate levels and inhibits drug-seeking behaviors. PMID:20634691

  7. Spatially and temporally distinct expression of fibroblast connexins after sheep ventricular infarction.

    PubMed

    Camelliti, Patrizia; Devlin, Gerard P; Matthews, Kenneth G; Kohl, Peter; Green, Colin R

    2004-05-01

    Myocardial infarction leads to extensive changes in the organization of cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts, and changes in gap junction protein expression. In the immediate period following ischemia, reperfusion causes hypercontraction, spreading the necrotic lesion. Further progressive infarction continues over several weeks. In reperfusion injury, the nonspecific gap junction channel uncoupler heptanol limits necrosis. We hypothesize that gap junction coupling and fibroblast invasion provide a substrate for progressive infarction via a gap junction mediated bystander effect. A sheep coronary occlusion infarct model was used with samples collected at 12, 24 and 48 h, and 6, 12 and 30 d (days) post-infarction. Immunohistochemical labelling of gap junction connexins Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45 was combined with cell-specific markers for fibroblasts (anti-vimentin) and myocytes (anti-myomesin). Double and triple immunolabelling and confocal microscopy were used to follow changes in cardiac myocyte morphology, fibroblast content and gap junction expression after myocardial infarction. Gap junction protein levels and fibroblast numbers were quantified. Within 12 h of ischemia, myocyte viability is impaired within small islands in the ischemic region. These islands spread and fuse into larger infarct zones until 12 d post-infarction. Thereafter, surviving myocytes within the infarct and in the border-zone appear to become stabilized. Distant from the infarct, continuing myocyte disruption is regularly observed, even after 30 d. Cx43 becomes redistributed from intercalated discs to the lateral surface of structurally compromised myocytes within 12 d. Cx45 expressing fibroblasts infiltrate the damaged region within 24 h, becoming most numerous at 6-12 d post-infarction, with peak Cx45 levels at 6 d. Later, Cx43 expressing fibroblasts are observed, and the related Cx43 label increases over the 30 d observation period, even though fibroblast numbers decline after 12 d. Cx40 was only

  8. Fate of glutamate carbon and nitrogen in isolated guinea-pig kidney-cortex tubules. Evidence for involvement of glutamate dehydrogenase in glutamine sythesis from glutamate.

    PubMed

    Baverel, G; Genoux, C; Forissier, M; Pellet, M

    1980-06-15

    1. The pathways and the fate of glutamate carbon and nitrogen were investigated in isolated guinea-pig kidney-cortex tubules. 2. At low glutamate concentration (1 mM), the glutamate carbon skeleton was either completely oxidized or converted into glutamine. At high glutamate concentration (5 mM), glucose, lactate and alanine were additional products of glutamate metabolism. 3. At neither concentration of glutamate was there accumulation of ammonia. 4. Nitrogen-balance calculations and the release of 14CO2 from L-[1-14C]glutamate (which gives an estimation of the flux of glutamate carbon skeleton through alpha-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase) clearly indicated that, despite the absence of ammonia accumulation, glutamate metabolism was initiated by the action of glutamate dehydrogenase and not by transamination reactions as suggested by Klahr, Schoolwerth & Bourgoignie [(1972) Am. J. Physiol. 222, 813-820] and Preuss [(1972) Am. J. Physiol. 222, 1395-1397]. Additional evidence for this was obtained by the use of (i) amino-oxyacetate, an inhibitor of transaminases, which did not decrease glutamate removal, or (ii) L-methionine DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, which caused an accumulation of ammonia from glutamate. 5. Addition of NH4Cl plus glutamate caused an increase in both glutamate removal and glutamine synthesis, demonstrating that the supply of ammonia via glutamate dehydrogenase is the rate-limiting step in glutamine formation from glutamate. NH4Cl also inhibited the flux of glutamate through glutamate dehydrogenase and the formation of glucose, alanine and lactate. 6. The activities of enzymes possibly involved in the glutamate conversion into pyruvate were measured in guinea-pig renal cortex. 7. Renal arteriovenous-difference measurements revealed that in vivo the guinea-pig kidney adds glutamine and alanine to the circulating blood.

  9. Glutamate and Brain Glutaminases in Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Javier; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Peñalver, Ana; Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Blanco, Eduardo; Alonso, Francisco J; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez

    2017-03-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and its actions are related to the behavioral effects of psychostimulant drugs. In the last two decades, basic neuroscience research and preclinical studies with animal models are suggesting a critical role for glutamate transmission in drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse. Although most of the interest has been centered in post-synaptic glutamate receptors, the presynaptic synthesis of glutamate through brain glutaminases may also contribute to imbalances in glutamate homeostasis, a key feature of the glutamatergic hypothesis of addiction. Glutaminases are the main glutamate-producing enzymes in brain and dysregulation of their function have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders; however, the possible implication of these enzymes in drug addiction remains largely unknown. This mini-review focuses on brain glutaminase isozymes and their alterations by in vivo exposure to drugs of abuse, which are discussed in the context of the glutamate homeostasis theory of addiction. Recent findings from mouse models have shown that drugs induce changes in the expression profiles of key glutamatergic transmission genes, although the molecular mechanisms that regulate drug-induced neuronal sensitization and behavioral plasticity are not clear.

  10. Cocaine-induced neuroadaptations in glutamate transmission

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Heath D.; Pierce, R. Christopher

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that repeated exposure to cocaine leads to profound changes in glutamate transmission in limbic nuclei, particularly the nucleus accumbens. This review focuses on preclinical studies of cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity, including behavioral sensitization, self-administration, and the reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Behavioral, pharmacological, neurochemical, electrophysiological, biochemical, and molecular biological changes associated with cocaine-induced plasticity in glutamate systems are reviewed. The ultimate goal of these lines of research is to identify novel targets for the development of therapies for cocaine craving and addiction. Therefore, we also outline the progress and prospects of glutamate modulators for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:20201846

  11. Computational simulations of asymmetric fluxes of large molecules through gap junction channel pores.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Abhijit; Appadurai, Daniel A; Akoum, Nazem W; Sachse, Frank B; Moreno, Alonso P

    2017-01-07

    Gap junction channels are formed out of connexin isoforms, which enable molecule and ion selective diffusion amongst neighboring cells. HeLa cells expressing distinct connexins (Cx) allow the formation of heterotypic channels, where we observed a molecular charge-independent preferential flux of large fluorescent molecules in the Cx45 to Cx43 direction. We hypothesize that the pore's shape is a significant factor along-side charge and transjunctional voltages for this asymmetric flux. To test this hypothesis, we developed a 3D computational model simulating Brownian diffusion of large molecules in a gap junction channel pore. The basic pore contour was derived from x-ray crystallographic structures of Cx43 and Cx26 and approximated using basic geometric shapes. Lucifer yellow dye molecules and cesium counter-ions were modeled as spheres using their respective Stokes radii. Our simulation results from simple diffusion and constant concentration gradient experiments showed that only charged particles yield asymmetric fluxes in heterotypic pores. While increasing the inner mouth size resulted in a near-quadratic rise in flux, the rise was asymptotic for outer mouth radii increase. Probability maps and average force per particle per pore section explain the asymmetric flux with variation in pore shape. Furthermore, the simulation results are in agreement with our in vitro experimental results with HeLa cells in Cx43-Cx45 heterotypic configurations. The presence of asymmetric fluxes can help us to understand effects of the molecular structure of the pore and predict potential differences in vivo.

  12. Metabolic fate and function of dietary glutamate in the gut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glutamate is a major constituent of dietary protein and is also consumed in many prepared foods as an additive in the form of monosodium glutamate. Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that glutamate is a major oxidative fuel for the gut and that dietary glutamate is extensively metabol...

  13. Emerging aspects of dietary glutamate metabolism in the developing gut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glutamate is a major constituent of dietary protein and is also consumed in many prepared foods as a flavour additive in the form of monosodium glutamate (MSG). Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that glutamate is the major oxidative fuel for the gut and that dietary glutamate is exten...

  14. Construction of a potentiometric glutamate biosensor for determination of glutamate in some real samples.

    PubMed

    Y Lmaz, Demet; Karaku, Emine

    2011-12-01

    The potentiometric glutamate biosensor based on ammonium-selective poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) membrane electrode was constructed by chemically immobilizing glutamate oxidase. Ammonium ions produced after an enzymatic reaction were determined potentiometrically. We determined the optimum working conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, lifetime, response time, linear working range, kinetic constants (K(m) and V(max)) of glutamate oxidase enzyme used for biosensor construction values, and other response characteristics. Additionally, glutamate assay in some real samples such as chicken bullion, healthy human serum, and commercial multipower amino acid mixture were also successfully carried out. The results showed good agreement with previously reported values.

  15. Modulation of metabolic communication through gap junction channels by transjunctional voltage; synergistic and antagonistic effects of gating and ionophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Prado, Nicolás; Bukauskas, Feliksas F.

    2011-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) channels assembled from connexin (Cx) proteins provide a structural basis for direct electrical and metabolic cell-cell communication. Here, we focus on gating and permeability properties of Cx43/Cx45 heterotypic GJs exhibiting asymmetries of both voltage-gating and transjunctional flux (Jj) of fluorescent dyes depending on transjunctional voltage (Vj). Relatively small differences in the resting potential of communicating cells can substantially reduce or enhance this flux at relative negativity or positivity on Cx45 side, respectively. Similarly, series of Vj pulses resembling bursts of action potentials (APs) reduce Jj when APs initiate in the cell expressing Cx43 and increase Jj when APs initiate in the cell expressing Cx45. Jj of charged fluorescent dyes is affected by ionophoresis and Vj-gating and the asymmetry of Jj-Vj dependence in heterotypic GJs is enhanced or reduced when ionophoresis and Vj-gating work in a synergistic or antagonistic manner, respectively. Modulation of cell-to-cell transfer of metabolites and signaling molecules by Vj may occur in excitable as well as non-excitable tissues and may be more expressed in the border between normal and pathological regions where intercellular gradients of membrane potential and concentration of ions are substantially altered. PMID:21930112

  16. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions.

    PubMed

    Plesa, C; van Loo, N; Dekker, C

    2015-08-28

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate solutions. We show that it has a linear response at typical voltages and can be used to detect DNA translocations through a nanopore. The glutamate anion also acts as a redox-capable thickening agent, with high-viscosity solutions capable of slowing down the DNA translocation process by up to 11 times, with a corresponding 7 time reduction in signal. These results demonstrate that glutamate can replace chloride as the primary anion in nanopore resistive pulse sensing.

  17. Glutamate Receptor Dynamics in Dendritic Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Newpher, Thomas M.; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Among diverse factors regulating excitatory synaptic transmission, the abundance of postsynaptic glutamate receptors figures prominently in molecular memory and learning-related synaptic plasticity. To allow for both long-term maintenance of synaptic transmission and acute changes in synaptic strength, the relative rates of glutamate receptor insertion and removal must be tightly regulated. Interactions with scaffolding proteins control the targeting and signaling properties of glutamate receptors within the postsynaptic membrane. In addition, extrasynaptic receptor populations control the equilibrium of receptor exchange at synapses and activate distinct signaling pathways involved in plasticity. Here, we review recent findings that have shaped our current understanding of receptor mobility between synaptic and extrasynaptic compartments at glutamatergic synapses, focusing on AMPA and NMDA receptors. We also examine the cooperative relationship between intracellular trafficking and surface diffusion of glutamate receptors that underlies the expression of learning-related synaptic plasticity. PMID:18498731

  18. Glutamate and dopamine components in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Seeman, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of schizophrenia for the last half century has been with dopamine (DA) D2 receptor blockers, implicating a hyperdopamine basis for psychosis. However, a 2007 report found that the glutamate agonist LY404039 was effective in schizophrenia, suggesting a hypoglutamate state for the illness. Although phencyclidine psychosis also supports a hypoglutamate cause, assessing the basic and clinical findings shows that phencyclidine has DA D2 agonist actions as well. Accurate Dreiding models of phencyclidine and the LY glutamate agonists precisely fit the known tetrahedral model of the D2 receptor that accommodates all DA agonists. A further view is that metabotropic glutamate agonists also exert D2 agonism, and their antipsychotic doses (about 100 mg/d) are predicted by their dissociation constants (about 20 nM) for D2. Hence, the clinical antipsychotic action of a glutamate agonist may depend on its ability to interfere with DA neurotransmission by its DA partial agonism. PMID:19270765

  19. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, C.; van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-08-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate solutions. We show that it has a linear response at typical voltages and can be used to detect DNA translocations through a nanopore. The glutamate anion also acts as a redox-capable thickening agent, with high-viscosity solutions capable of slowing down the DNA translocation process by up to 11 times, with a corresponding 7 time reduction in signal. These results demonstrate that glutamate can replace chloride as the primary anion in nanopore resistive pulse sensing.

  20. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  1. [Glutamate neurotransmission, stress and hormone secretion].

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Vigas, M

    1995-11-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission has been investigated in relation to several physiological processes (learning, memory) as well as to neurodegenerative and other disorders. Little attention has been paid to its involvement in neuroendocrine response during stress. Penetration of excitatory amino acids from blood to the brain is limited by the blood-brain barrier. As a consequence, several toxic effects but also bioavailability for therapeutic purposes are reduced. A free access to circulating glutamate is possible only in brain structures lacking the blood-brain barrier or under conditions of its increased permeability. Excitatory amino acids were shown to stimulate the pituitary hormone release, though the mechanism of their action is still not fully understood. Stress exposure in experimental animals induced specific changes in mRNA levels coding the glutamate receptor subunits in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. The results obtained with the use of glutamate receptor antagonists indicate that a number of specific receptor subtypes contribute to the stimulation of ACTH release during stress. The authors provided also data on the role of NMDA receptors in the control of catecholamine release, particularly in stress-induced secretion of epinephrine. These results were the first piece of evidence on the involvement of endogenous excitatory amino acids in neuroendocrine activation during stress. Neurotoxic effects of glutamate in animals are well described, especially after its administration in the neonatal period. In men, glutamate toxicity and its use as a food additive are a continuous subject of discussions. The authors found an increase in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine, but not epinephrine and prolactin, in response to the administration of a high dose of glutamate. It cannot be excluded that these effects might be induced even by lower doses in situations with increased vulnerability to glutamate action (age, individual variability). (Tab. 1, Fig. 6, Ref. 44.).

  2. Activation of Pedunculopontine Glutamate Neurons Is Reinforcing.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Zell, Vivien; Wu, Johnathan; Punta, Cindy; Ramajayam, Nivedita; Shen, Xinyi; Faget, Lauren; Lilascharoen, Varoth; Lim, Byung Kook; Hnasko, Thomas S

    2017-01-04

    Dopamine transmission from midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons underlies behavioral processes related to motivation and drug addiction. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) is a brainstem nucleus containing glutamate-, acetylcholine-, and GABA-releasing neurons with connections to basal ganglia and limbic brain regions. Here we investigated the role of PPTg glutamate neurons in reinforcement, with an emphasis on their projections to VTA dopamine neurons. We used cell-type-specific anterograde tracing and optogenetic methods to selectively label and manipulate glutamate projections from PPTg neurons in mice. We used anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays to determine their patterns of connectivity and ascribe functional roles in reinforcement. We found that photoactivation of PPTg glutamate cell bodies could serve as a direct positive reinforcer on intracranial self-photostimulation assays. Further, PPTg glutamate neurons directly innervate VTA; photostimulation of this pathway preferentially excites VTA dopamine neurons and is sufficient to induce behavioral reinforcement. These results demonstrate that ascending PPTg glutamate projections can drive motivated behavior, and PPTg to VTA synapses may represent an important target relevant to drug addiction and other mental health disorders.

  3. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors & CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are complex disease states that represent a major challenge for modern medicine. Although etiology is often unknown, it is established that multiple factors such as defects in genetics and/or epigenetics, the environment as well as imbalance in neurotransmitter receptor systems are all at play in determining an individual’s susceptibility to disease. Gene therapy is currently not available and therefore, most conditions are treated with pharmacological agents that modify neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Here, I provide a review of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and the roles they fulfill in numerous CNS disorders. Specifically, I argue that our understanding of iGluRs has reached a critical turning point to permit, for the first time, a comprehensive re-evaluation of their role in the cause of disease. I illustrate this by highlighting how defects in AMPA receptor trafficking are important to Fragile X mental retardation and ectopic expression of kainate (KA) receptor synapses contributes to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, I discuss how parallel advances in studies of other neurotransmitter systems may allow pharmacologists to work towards a cure for many CNS disorders rather than developing drugs to treat their symptoms. PMID:18537642

  4. Intracellular synthesis of glutamic acid in Bacillus methylotrophicus SK19.001, a glutamate-independent poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yingyun; Zhang, Tao; Mu, Wanmeng; Miao, Ming; Jiang, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Bacillus methylotrophicus SK19.001 is a glutamate-independent strain that produces poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA), a polymer of D- and L-glutamic acids that possesses applications in food, the environment, agriculture, etc. This study was undertaken to explore the synthetic pathway of intracellular L- and D-glutamic acid in SK19.001 by investigating the effects of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and different amino acids as metabolic precursors on the production of γ-PGA and analyzing the activities of the enzymes involved in the synthesis of L- and D-glutamate. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids could participate in the synthesis of γ-PGA via independent pathways in SK19.001. L-Aspartate aminotransferase, L-glutaminase and L-glutamate synthase were the enzymatic sources of L-glutamate. Glutamate racemase was responsible for the formation of D-glutamate for the synthesis of γ-PGA, and the synthetase had stereoselectivity for glutamate substrate. The enzymatic sources of L-glutamate were investigated for the first time in the glutamate-independent γ-PGA-producing strain, and multiple enzymatic sources of L-glutamate were verified in SK19.001, which will benefit efforts to improve production of γ-PGA with metabolic engineering strategies. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Glutamate formation via the leucine-to-glutamate pathway of rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schachter, David; Buteau, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The leucine-to-glutamate (Leu→Glu) pathway, which metabolizes the carbon atoms of l-leucine to form l-glutamate, was studied by incubation of rat tissue segments with l-[U-(14)C]leucine and estimation of the [(14)C]glutamate formed. Metabolism of the leucine carbon chain occurs in most rat tissues, but maximal activity of the Leu→Glu pathway for glutamate formation is limited to the thoracic aorta and pancreas. In rat aorta, the Leu→Glu pathway functions to relax the underlying smooth muscle; its functions in the pancreas are unknown. This report characterizes the Leu→Glu pathway of rat pancreas and develops methods to examine its functions. Pancreatic segments effect net formation of glutamate on incubation with l-leucine, l-glutamine, or a mix of 18 other plasma amino acids at their concentrations in normal rat plasma. Glutamate formed from leucine remains mainly in the tissue, whereas that from glutamine enters the medium. The pancreatic Leu→Glu pathway uses the leucine carbons for net glutamate formation; the α-amino group is not used; the stoichiometry is as follows: 1 mol of leucine yields 2 mol of glutamate (2 leucine carbons per glutamate) plus 2 mol of CO2. Comparison of the Leu→Glu pathway in preparations of whole pancreatic segments, isolated acini, and islets of Langerhans localizes it in the acini; relatively high activity is found in cultures of the AR42J cell line and very little in the INS-1 832/13 cell line. Pancreatic tissue glutamate concentration is homeostatically regulated in the range of ∼1-3 μmol/g wet wt. l-Valine and leucine ethyl, benzyl, and tert-butyl esters inhibit the Leu→Glu pathway without decreasing tissue total glutamate.

  6. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  7. A Novel Amperometric Glutamate Biosensor Based on Glutamate Oxidase Adsorbed on Silicalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatkina, O. V.; Soldatkin, O. O.; Kasap, B. Ozansoy; Kucherenko, D. Yu.; Kucherenko, I. S.; Kurc, B. Akata; Dzyadevych, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we developed a new amperometric biosensor for glutamate detection using a typical method of glutamate oxidase (GlOx) immobilization via adsorption on silicalite particles. The disc platinum electrode ( d = 0.4 mm) was used as the amperometric sensor. The procedure of biosensor preparation was optimized. The main parameters of modifying amperometric transducers with a silicalite layer were determined along with the procedure of GlOx adsorption on this layer. The biosensors based on GlOx adsorbed on silicalite demonstrated high sensitivity to glutamate. The linear range of detection was from 2.5 to 450 μM, and the limit of glutamate detection was 1 μM. It was shown that the proposed biosensors were characterized by good response reproducibility during hours of continuous work and operational stability for several days. The developed biosensors could be applied for determination of glutamate in real samples.

  8. Glutamate Metabolism in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Chadi G.; Jiang, Lihong; De Feyter, Henk M.; Fasula, Madonna; Krystal, John H.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Mason, Graeme F.; Sanacora, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Objective Emerging evidence suggests abnormalities in amino acid neurotransmitter function and impaired energy metabolism contribute to the underlying pathophysiology of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). To test whether impairments in energetics and glutamate neurotransmitter cycling are present in MDD we used in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) to measure these fluxes in individuals diagnosed with MDD relative to non-depressed subjects. Method 1H MRS and 13C MRS data were collected on 23 medication-free MDD and 17 healthy subjects. 1H MRS provided total glutamate and GABA concentrations, and 13C MRS, coupled with intravenous infusion of [1-13C]-glucose, provided measures of the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle (VTCAN) for mitochondrial energy production, GABA synthesis, and glutamate/glutamine cycling, from voxels placed in the occipital cortex. Results Our main finding was that mitochondrial energy production of glutamatergic neurons was reduced by 26% in MDD subjects (t = 2.57, p = 0.01). Paradoxically we found no difference in the rate of glutamate/glutamine cycle (Vcycle). We also found a significant correlation between glutamate concentrations and Vcycle considering the total sample. Conclusions We interpret the reduction in mitochondrial energy production as being due to either mitochondrial dysfunction or a reduction in proper neuronal input or synaptic strength. Future MRS studies could help distinguish these possibilities. PMID:25073688

  9. Characterization of a plant glutamate receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Teardo, Enrico; Segalla, Anna; Formentin, Elide; Zanetti, Manuela; Marin, Oriano; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella; Zoratti, Mario; Szabò, Ildikò

    2010-01-01

    Bioinformatic approaches have allowed the identification of twenty genes, grouped into three subfamilies, encoding for homologues of animal ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGLRs) in the Arabidopsis thaliana model plant. Indirect evidence suggests that plant iGLRs function as non-selective cation channels. In the present work we provide biochemical and electrophysiological evidences for the chloroplast localization of glutamate receptor(s) of family 3 (iGLR3) in spinach. A specific antibody, recognizing putative receptors of family 3 locates iGLR3 to the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. In planar lipid bilayer experiments, purified inner envelope vesicles from spinach display a cation-selective electrophysiological activity which is inhibited by DNQX (6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione), considered to act as an inhibitor on both animal and plant iGLRs. These results identify for the first time the intracellular localization of plant glutamate receptor(s) and a DNQX-sensitive, glutamate-gated activity at single channel level in native membrane with properties compatible with those predicted for plant glutamate receptors. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Presynaptic glutamate receptors: physiological functions and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Paulo S; Mulle, Christophe

    2008-06-01

    Glutamate acts on postsynaptic glutamate receptors to mediate excitatory communication between neurons. The discovery that additional presynaptic glutamate receptors can modulate neurotransmitter release has added complexity to the way we view glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we review evidence of a physiological role for presynaptic glutamate receptors in neurotransmitter release. We compare the physiological roles of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors in short- and long-term regulation of synaptic transmission. Furthermore, we discuss the physiological conditions that are necessary for their activation, the source of the glutamate that activates them, their mechanisms of action and their involvement in higher brain function.

  11. Monitoring of the velocity of high-affinity glutamate uptake by isolated brain nerve terminals using amperometric glutamate biosensor.

    PubMed

    Soldatkin, O; Nazarova, A; Krisanova, N; Borуsov, A; Kucherenko, D; Kucherenko, I; Pozdnyakova, N; Soldatkin, A; Borisova, T

    2015-04-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, which is involved in the main aspects of normal brain functioning. High-affinity Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters is key proteins, which transport extracellular glutamate to the cytoplasm of nerve cells, thereby preventing continuous activation of glutamate receptors, and thus the development of neurotoxicity. Disturbance in glutamate uptake is involved in the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. Amperometric biosensors are the most promising and successful among electrochemical biosensors. In this study, we developed (1) amperometric glutamate biosensor, (2) methodological approach for the analysis of glutamate uptake in liquid samples of isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes). The basal level of glutamate, the initial velocity of glutamate uptake and time-dependent accumulation of glutamate by synaptosomes were determined using developed glutamate biosensor. Comparative analysis of the data with those obtained by radioactive analysis, spectrofluorimetry and ion exchange chromatography was performed. Therefore, the methodological approach for monitoring of the velocity of glutamate uptake, which takes into consideration the definite level of endogenous glutamate in nerve terminals, was developed using glutamate biosensor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Towards a glutamate hypothesis of depression

    PubMed Central

    Sanacora, Gerard; Treccani, Giulia; Popoli, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Half a century after the first formulation of the monoamine hypothesis, compelling evidence implies that long-term changes in an array of brain areas and circuits mediating complex cognitive-emotional behaviors represent the biological underpinnings of mood/anxiety disorders. A large number of clinical studies suggest that pathophysiology is associated with dysfunction of the predominant glutamatergic system, malfunction in the mechanisms regulating clearance and metabolism of glutamate, and cytoarchitectural/morphological maladaptive changes in a number of brain areas mediating cognitive-emotional behaviors. Concurrently, a wealth of data from animal models have shown that different types of environmental stress enhance glutamate release/transmission in limbic/cortical areas and exert powerful structural effects, inducing dendritic remodeling, reduction of synapses and possibly volumetric reductions resembling those observed in depressed patients. Because a vast majority of neurons and synapses in these areas and circuits use glutamate as neurotransmitter, it would be limiting to maintain that glutamate is in some way ‘involved’ in mood/anxiety disorders; rather it should be recognized that the glutamatergic system is a primary mediator of psychiatric pathology and, potentially, also a final common pathway for the therapeutic action of antidepressant agents. A paradigm shift from a monoamine hypothesis of depression to a neuroplasticity hypothesis focused on glutamate may represent a substantial advancement in the working hypothesis that drives research for new drugs and therapies. Importantly, despite the availability of multiple classes of drugs with monoamine-based mechanisms of action, there remains a large percentage of patients who fail to achieve a sustained remission of depressive symptoms. The unmet need for improved pharmacotherapies for treatment-resistant depression means there is a large space for the development of new compounds with novel

  13. Hetero-oligomerization of neuronal glutamate transporters.

    PubMed

    Nothmann, Doreen; Leinenweber, Ariane; Torres-Salazar, Delany; Kovermann, Peter; Hotzy, Jasmin; Gameiro, Armanda; Grewer, Christof; Fahlke, Christoph

    2011-02-04

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) mediate the uptake of glutamate into neuronal and glial cells of the mammalian central nervous system. Two transporters expressed primarily in glia, EAAT1 and EAAT2, are crucial for glutamate homeostasis in the adult mammalian brain. Three neuronal transporters (EAAT3, EAAT4, and EAAT5) appear to have additional functions in regulating and processing cellular excitability. EAATs are assembled as trimers, and the existence of multiple isoforms raises the question of whether certain isoforms can form hetero-oligomers. Co-expression and pulldown experiments of various glutamate transporters showed that EAAT3 and EAAT4, but neither EAAT1 and EAAT2, nor EAAT2 and EAAT3 are capable of co-assembling into heterotrimers. To study the functional consequences of hetero-oligomerization, we co-expressed EAAT3 and the serine-dependent mutant R501C EAAT4 in HEK293 cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes and studied glutamate/serine transport and anion conduction using electrophysiological methods. Individual subunits transport glutamate independently of each other. Apparent substrate affinities are not affected by hetero-oligomerization. However, polarized localization in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells was different for homo- and hetero-oligomers. EAAT3 inserts exclusively into apical membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells when expressed alone. Co-expression with EAAT4 results in additional appearance of basolateral EAAT3. Our results demonstrate the existence of heterotrimeric glutamate transporters and provide novel information about the physiological impact of EAAT oligomerization.

  14. De novo expression of connexin hemichannels in denervated fast skeletal muscles leads to atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cea, Luis A; Cisterna, Bruno A; Puebla, Carlos; Frank, Marina; Figueroa, Xavier F; Cardozo, Christopher; Willecke, Klaus; Latorre, Ramón; Sáez, Juan C

    2013-10-01

    Denervation of skeletal muscles induces atrophy, preceded by changes in sarcolemma permeability of causes not yet completely understood. Here, we show that denervation-induced Evans blue dye uptake in vivo of fast, but not slow, myofibers was acutely inhibited by connexin (Cx) hemichannel/pannexin1 (Panx1) channel and purinergic ionotropic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) blockers. Denervated myofibers showed up-regulation of Panx1 and de novo expression of Cx39, Cx43, and Cx45 hemichannels as well as P2X7Rs and transient receptor potential subfamily V, member 2, channels, all of which are permeable to small molecules. The sarcolemma of freshly isolated WT myofibers from denervated muscles also showed high hemichannel-mediated permeability that was slightly reduced by blockade of Panx1 channels or the lack of Panx1 expression, but was completely inhibited by Cx hemichannel or P2X7R blockers, as well as by degradation of extracellular ATP. However, inhibition of transient receptor potential subfamily V, member 2, channels had no significant effect on membrane permeability. Moreover, activation of the transcription factor NFκB and higher mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) were found in denervated WT but not Cx43/Cx45-deficient muscles. The atrophy observed after 7 d of denervation was drastically reduced in Cx43/Cx45-deficient but not Panx1-deficient muscles. Therefore, expression of Cx hemichannels and P2X7R promotes a feed-forward mechanism activated by extracellular ATP, most likely released through hemichannels, that activates the inflammasome. Consequently, Cx hemichannels are potential targets for new therapeutic agents to prevent or reduce muscle atrophy induced by denervation of diverse etiologies.

  15. De novo expression of connexin hemichannels in denervated fast skeletal muscles leads to atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cea, Luis A.; Cisterna, Bruno A.; Puebla, Carlos; Frank, Marina; Figueroa, Xavier F.; Cardozo, Christopher; Willecke, Klaus; Latorre, Ramón; Sáez, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Denervation of skeletal muscles induces atrophy, preceded by changes in sarcolemma permeability of causes not yet completely understood. Here, we show that denervation-induced Evans blue dye uptake in vivo of fast, but not slow, myofibers was acutely inhibited by connexin (Cx) hemichannel/pannexin1 (Panx1) channel and purinergic ionotropic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) blockers. Denervated myofibers showed up-regulation of Panx1 and de novo expression of Cx39, Cx43, and Cx45 hemichannels as well as P2X7Rs and transient receptor potential subfamily V, member 2, channels, all of which are permeable to small molecules. The sarcolemma of freshly isolated WT myofibers from denervated muscles also showed high hemichannel-mediated permeability that was slightly reduced by blockade of Panx1 channels or the lack of Panx1 expression, but was completely inhibited by Cx hemichannel or P2X7R blockers, as well as by degradation of extracellular ATP. However, inhibition of transient receptor potential subfamily V, member 2, channels had no significant effect on membrane permeability. Moreover, activation of the transcription factor NFκB and higher mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) were found in denervated WT but not Cx43/Cx45-deficient muscles. The atrophy observed after 7 d of denervation was drastically reduced in Cx43/Cx45-deficient but not Panx1-deficient muscles. Therefore, expression of Cx hemichannels and P2X7R promotes a feed-forward mechanism activated by extracellular ATP, most likely released through hemichannels, that activates the inflammasome. Consequently, Cx hemichannels are potential targets for new therapeutic agents to prevent or reduce muscle atrophy induced by denervation of diverse etiologies. PMID:24043768

  16. Combining Ca2+ imaging with -glutamate photorelease

    PubMed Central

    Canepari, Marco; De Waard, Michel; Ogden, David

    2013-01-01

    We describe simple configurations and methods to measure optical Ca2+ signals in response to photorelease of L-glutamate. This photostimulation allows activation of postsynaptic glutamate receptors without activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels permitting the separation and the analysis of different Ca2+ components. We give details of basic microscopy configurations and of tools to efficiently illuminate the preparation while preserving the healthy conditions of the tissues. We also suggest methodological procedures and we discuss protocols of linear optics to achieve simultaneous imaging and uncaging in relation to protocols using two photon illumination. PMID:24298028

  17. Molecular physiology of vesicular glutamate transporters in the digestive system.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Ghishan, Fayez-K; Bai, Liqun

    2005-03-28

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Packaging and storage of glutamate into glutamatergic neuronal vesicles require ATP-dependent vesicular glutamate uptake systems, which utilize the electrochemical proton gradient as a driving force. Three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) have been recently identified from neuronal tissue where they play a key role to maintain the vesicular glutamate level. Recently, it has been demonstrated that glutamate signaling is also functional in peripheral neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and occurs in sites of pituitary, adrenal, pineal glands, bone, GI tract, pancreas, skin, and testis. The glutamate receptors and VGLUTs in digestive system have been found in both neuronal and endocrinal cells. The glutamate signaling in the digestive system may have significant relevance to diabetes and GI tract motility disorders. This review will focus on the most recent update of molecular physiology of digestive VGLUTs.

  18. Artifactual Depression of Serum Glutamic Oxaloacetic Transaminase by Metronidazole

    PubMed Central

    Rissing, J. Peter; Newman, Cheryl; Moore, William L.

    1978-01-01

    Eighteen patients developed abnormally low serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase values during metronidazole therapy. Metronidazole absorbs at 340 nm, simulating reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, which is the final colorimetric product of the serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase assay. PMID:214030

  19. Epigallocatechin-3 gallate, a green tea catechin, attenuated the downregulation of the cardiac gap junction induced by high glucose in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu; Zhao, Yanbo; Fan, Youqi; Wang, Min; Xu, Shengjie; Fu, Guosheng

    2010-01-01

    The remodeling of cardiac gap junctions has been postulated to contribute to the arrhythmias in a diabetic heart. Epigallocatechin-3 gallate (EGCG), a green tea catechin, has recently been recognized for its protection in cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effect of EGCG on the possible remodeling of gap junctions under high glucose in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes pre-incubated with high glucose (30mM) were co-treated by EGCG. The expression of Connexin43 (Cx43), Cx40 and Cx45 were determined by Western blot and real-time RT-PCR. The function of cells coupling was evaluated by scrape loading dye transfer study. The Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) were quantified by Western blot. The protein expression of Cx43 was reduced by high glucose (30mM, 72h). Addition of EGCG to high glucose treated cardiomyocytes attenuated the Cx43 reduction in a dose- and time-dependent manner and also recovered the reduced function of cells coupling. The mRNA or protein level of Cx40 and Cx45 showed no significant change by high glucose (30mM, 72h) or EGCG co-treatment (40microM, 24h). Nor did the Cx43 mRNA level. EGCG (40muM) activated the time-dependent phosphorylated Erk, JNK and p38 MAPK. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 (10microM), however, attenuated the protective effect of EGCG. EGCG could attenuate the downregulation of gap junction induced by high glucose in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. The p38 MAPK pathway was partly involved in this effect of EGCG. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This...

  1. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b...

  2. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b...

  3. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b...

  4. Ceftriaxone restores glutamate homeostasis and prevents relapse to cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Knackstedt, Lori A; Melendez, Roberto I; Kalivas, Peter W

    2010-01-01

    The cystine-glutamate exchanger is downregulated after chronic cocaine, resulting in reduced extracellular levels of nucleus accumbens glutamate. The importance of cocaine-induced loss of glutamate homeostasis is revealed by N-acetylcysteine restoring cystine-glutamate exchange and attenuating reinstatement to cocaine seeking. Another regulator of extracellular glutamate is the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1. We hypothesized that cocaine self-administration reduces GLT-1 and that GLT-1 upregulation inhibits cocaine seeking. We measured [(3)H] glutamate uptake and protein expression of GLT-1 and xCT, the catalytic subunit of the cystine-glutamate exchanger, following cocaine self-administration and 3 weeks of extinction training. We also examined the affect of ceftriaxone (previously shown to increase GLT-1) and N-acetylcysteine treatment on the expression of GLT-1 and xCT. Ceftriaxone was also tested for the capacity to inhibit cue- and cocaine-induced relapse. Cocaine self-administration reduced glutamate uptake and the expression of both GLT-1 and xCT. Ceftriaxone restored GLT-1 and xCT levels and prevented cue- and cocaine-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. N-acetylcysteine also restored GLT-1 and xCT levels. These results indicate that glutamate transport and cystine-glutamate exchange may be coregulated and provide further evidence that targeting glutamate homeostasis is a potential method for treating cocaine relapse.

  5. Localization of L-glutamate and glutamate-like receptors at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Di Cosmo, A; Nardi, G; Di Cristo, C; De Santis, A; Messenger, J B

    1999-08-28

    HPLC analysis of the amino acid contents of the second- and third-order giant fibres at the giant synapse in the stellate ganglion of the squid Loligo vulgaris shows that there are significantly higher amounts of L-glutamate and L-aspartate in the second-order (presynaptic) fibre than in the third-order (postsynaptic) fibre. Immunocytochemical staining of sections of the ganglion with an antibody raised against L-glutamate produces specific positive staining in the synaptic region of the second-order fibre. In contrast, staining with antibodies raised against glutamate-receptors (mammalian GluR1 with GluR2/3) produces positive staining in the third-order fibre at the postsynaptic region. These data provide further evidence for the hypothesis that L-glutamate is an excitatory transmitter at the giant synapse.

  6. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose Food...

  8. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium...

  9. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose Food...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose Food...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose Food...

  13. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food...

  14. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food...

  15. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose Food...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food...

  18. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose Food...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose Food...

  1. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose Food...

  3. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium...

  4. Glutamate Transmission Enhancement for Treatment of PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    sessions or more of approximately 1h each to achieve significant beneficial effects. Thus, treatments that enhance the efficacy of extinction therapies...term medication. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that glutamate transmission in the amygdala is necessary for long term extinction of...fearmemories. Furthermore, d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial NMDA receptor agonist acting on the glycine modulator site, significantly enhances fear extinction

  5. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  6. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  7. Direct effect of neuroleptics on glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Sherman, A D; Mott, J

    1984-11-01

    In studies designed to assess the pre-synaptic effects of neuroleptics in vitro, synaptosomes were prepared from several regions of rat brain. These preparations were incubated in the presence of a representative of each of the major classes of neuroleptic--chlorpromazine, haloperidol, or clozapine, or with (+) or (-)butaclamol. The calcium-specific release of endogenous glutamic acid was reduced only in synaptosomes derived from the amygdala. In this area, each of these agents [except (-)butaclamol] reduced the release of glutamic acid to a maximum of 40% in a concentration-dependent manner. When [3H]glutamine was included in the incubation media, a reduction in the released [3H]glutamate was present with 10(-8) M haloperidol, and 5 X 10(-8) M (+)butaclamol, clozapine, or chlorpromazine. (-)Butaclamol was inactive at 10(-5) M, a concentration producing complete blockade of the release of [3H]glutamic acid when active agents were included. Again, the effects were observed only in the amygdala. All agents, including (-)butaclamol blocked the uptake of [3H]glutamine into depolarized synaptosomes.

  8. ¹³C-metabolic enrichment of glutamate in glutamate dehydrogenase mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yijin; Sieg, Alex; Trotter, Pamela J

    2011-10-20

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH) interconvert α-ketoglutarate and glutamate. In yeast, NADP-dependent enzymes, encoded by GDH1 and GDH3, are reported to synthesize glutamate from α-ketoglutarate, while an NAD-dependent enzyme, encoded by GDH2, catalyzes the reverse. Cells were grown in acetate/raffinose (YNAceRaf) to examine the role(s) of these enzymes during aerobic metabolism. In YNAceRaf the doubling time of wild type, gdh2Δ, and gdh3Δ cells was comparable at ∼4 h. NADP-dependent GDH activity (Gdh1p+Gdh3p) in wild type, gdh2Δ, and gdh3Δ was decreased ∼80% and NAD-dependent activity (Gdh2p) in wild type and gdh3Δ was increased ∼20-fold in YNAceRaf as compared to glucose. Cells carrying the gdh1Δ allele did not divide in YNAceRaf, yet both the NADP-dependent (Gdh3p) and NAD-dependent (Gdh2p) GDH activity was ∼3-fold higher than in glucose. Metabolism of [1,2-(13)C]-acetate and analysis of carbon NMR spectra were used to examine glutamate metabolism. Incorporation of (13)C into glutamate was nearly undetectable in gdh1Δ cells, reflecting a GDH activity at <15% of wild type. Analysis of (13)C-enrichment of glutamate carbons indicates a decreased rate of glutamate biosynthesis from acetate in gdh2Δ and gdh3Δ strains as compared to wild type. Further, the relative complexity of (13)C-isotopomers at early time points was noticeably greater in gdh3Δ as compared to wild type and gdh2Δ cells. These in vivo data show that Gdh1p is the primary GDH enzyme and Gdh2p and Gdh3p play evident roles during aerobic glutamate metabolism.

  9. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection.

  10. Product Inhibition of the Fermentative Formation of Glutamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Nunheimer, T. D.; Birnbaum, J.; Ihnen, E. D.; Demain, A. L.

    1970-01-01

    The addition of penicillin to cells of Corynebacterium glutamicum growing in 5-liter fermentors initiated the excretion of glutamic acid. The rate of glutamate production in fermentors declined continuously with time and reached 75% of the initial rate in 24 hr after penicillin had been added. The addition of glutamate to resting cell suspensions had only a slight effect on sugar utilization but caused a marked decrease in glutamate excretion. It is suggested that the high level of glutamate accumulating in the fermentation broth is responsible for inhibiting its own production. PMID:5480097

  11. Understanding safety of glutamate in food and brain.

    PubMed

    Mallick, H N

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate is ubiquitous in nature and is present in all living organisms. It is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in central nervous system. Glutamate is being used as food additive for enhancing flavour for over last 1200 years imparting a unique taste known as "umami" in Japanese. It is being marketed for about last 100 years. The taste of umami is now recognized as the fifth basic taste. Many of the foods used in cooking for enhancing flavour contain high amount of glutamate. Breast milk has the highest concentration of glutamate amongst all amino acids. Glutamate in high doses as gavage or parenteral injection have been reported to produce neurodegeneration in infant rodents. The neurodegeneration was not produced when gluamate was given with food. The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, based on enumerable scientific evidence, has declared that, "glutamate as an additive in food" is not an health hazard to human being. Glutamate is used as signaling molecule not only in neuronal but also in non-neuronal tissues. Excessive accumulation of glutamate in the synaptic cleft has been associated with excitotoxicty and glutamate is implicated in number of neurological disorders. Excessive accumulation could be attributed to increase release, failure of transport system for uptake mechanism, neuronal injury due to hypoxia-ischemia, trauma and associated metabolic failures. The role blood brain barrier, vesicular glutamate and sodium dependent excitatory amino acid transporters in glutamate homeostasis are emphasized in the review.

  12. Ibogaine alters synaptosomal and glial glutamate release and uptake.

    PubMed

    Leal, M B; Emanuelli, T; Porciúncula, L D; Souza, D O; Elisabetsky, E

    2001-02-12

    Ibogaine has aroused expectations as a potentially innovative medication for drug addiction. It has been proposed that antagonism of the NMDA receptor by ibogaine may be one of the mechanisms underlying its antiaddictive properties; glutamate has also been implicated in ibogaine-induced neurotoxicity. We here report the effects of ibogaine on [3H]glutamate release and uptake in cortical and cerebellar synaptosomes, as well as in cortical astrocyte cultures, from mice and rats. Ibogaine (2-1000 microM) had no effects on glutamate uptake or release by rat synaptosomes. However, ibogaine (500-1000 microM) significantly inhibited the glutamate uptake and stimulated the release of glutamate by cortical (but not cerebellar) synaptosomes of mice. In addition, ibogaine (1000 microM) nearly abolished glutamate uptake by cortical astrocyte cultures from rats and mice. The data provide direct evidence of glutamate involvement in ibogaine-induced neurotoxicity.

  13. Targeting glutamate homeostasis for potential treatment of nicotine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Al-Rejaie, Salim S.; AlSharari, Shakir D.; Sari, Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Several studies demonstrated that impairment in glutamatergic neurotransmission is linked to drug dependence and drug-seeking behavior. Increased extracellular glutamate concentration in mesocorticolimbic regions has been observed in animals developing nicotine dependence. Changes in glutamate release might be associated with stimulatory effect of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) via nicotine exposure. We and others have shown increased extracellular glutamate concentration, which was associated with downregulation of the major glutamate transporter, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1), in brain reward regions of animals exposed to drug abuse, including nicotine and ethanol. Importantly, studies from our laboratory and others showed that upregulation of GLT-1 expression in the mesocorticolimbic brain regions may have potential therapeutic effects in drug dependence. In this review article, we discussed the effect of antagonizing presynaptic nAChRs in glutamate release, the upregulatory effect in GLT-1 expression and the role of glutamate receptors antagonists in the treatment of nicotine dependence. PMID:26589642

  14. Microsensors for in vivo Measurement of Glutamate in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Si; van der Zeyden, Miranda; Oldenziel, Weite H.; Cremers, Thomas I.F.H.; Westerink, Ben H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Several immobilized enzyme-based electrochemical biosensors for glutamate detection have been developed over the last decade. In this review, we compare first and second generation sensors. Structures, working mechanisms, interference prevention, in vitro detection characteristics and in vivo performance are summarized here for those sensors that have successfully detected brain glutamate in vivo. In brief, first generation sensors have a simpler structure and are faster in glutamate detection. They also show a better sensitivity to glutamate during calibration in vitro. For second generation sensors, besides their less precise detection, their fabrication is difficult to reproduce, even with a semi-automatic dip-coater. Both generations of sensors can detect glutamate levels in vivo, but the reported basal levels are different. In general, second generation sensors detect higher basal levels of glutamate compared with the results obtained from first generation sensors. However, whether the detected glutamate is indeed from synaptic sources is an issue that needs further attention. PMID:27873904

  15. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  16. Glutamate alteration of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in GABAergic neurons: the role of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Monnerie, Hubert; Le Roux, Peter D

    2008-09-01

    Brain cell vulnerability to neurologic insults varies greatly, depending on their neuronal subpopulation. Among cells that survive a pathological insult such as ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that could compromise brain function. We previously reported that surviving cortical GABAergic neurons exposed to glutamate in vitro displayed an NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated alteration in the levels of the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67) [Monnerie, H., Le Roux, P., 2007. Reduced dendrite growth and altered glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65- and 67-kDa isoform protein expression from mouse cortical GABAergic neurons following excitotoxic injury in vitro. Exp. Neurol. 205, 367-382]. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which glutamate excitotoxicity caused a change in cortical GABAergic neurons' GAD protein levels. Removing extracellular calcium prevented the NMDAR-mediated decrease in GAD protein levels, measured using Western blot techniques, whereas inhibiting calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels had no effect. Glutamate's effect on GAD protein isoforms was significantly attenuated by preincubation with the cysteine protease inhibitor N-Acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-norleucinal (ALLN). Using class-specific protease inhibitors, we observed that ALLN's effect resulted from the blockade of calpain and cathepsin protease activities. Cell-free proteolysis assay confirmed that both proteases were involved in glutamate-induced alteration in GAD protein levels. Together these results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic stimulation of NMDAR in cultured cortical neurons leads to altered GAD protein levels from GABAergic neurons through intracellular calcium increase and protease activation including calpain and cathepsin. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered balance between excitation

  17. Modafinil attenuates reinstatement of cocaine seeking: role for cystine-glutamate exchange and metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Stephen V; Hensley-Simon, Megan; Tahsili-Fahadan, Pouya; LaLumiere, Ryan T; Thomas, Charles; Fallon, Rebecca V; Kalivas, Peter W; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Modafinil may be useful for treating stimulant abuse, but the mechanisms by which it acts to do so are unknown. Indeed, a primary effect of modafinil is to inhibit dopamine transport, which typically promotes rather than inhibits motivated behavior. Therefore, we examined the role of nucleus accumbens extracellular glutamate and the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) in modafinil effects. One group of rats was trained to self-administer cocaine for 10 days and extinguished, then given priming injections of cocaine to elicit reinstatement. Modafinil (300 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) inhibited reinstated cocaine seeking (but did not alter extinction responding by itself), and this effect was prevented by pre-treatment with bilateral microinjections of the mGluR2/3 antagonist LY-341495 (LY) into nucleus accumbens core. No reversal of modafinil effects was seen after unilateral accumbens core LY, or bilateral LY in the rostral pole of accumbens. Next, we sought to explore effects of modafinil on extracellular glutamate levels in accumbens after chronic cocaine. Separate rats were administered non-contingent cocaine, and after 3 weeks of withdrawal underwent accumbens microdialysis. Modafinil increased extracellular accumbens glutamate in chronic cocaine, but not chronic saline-pre-treated animals. This increase was prevented by reverse dialysis of cystine-glutamate exchange or voltage-dependent calcium channel antagonists. Voltage-dependent sodium channel blockade partly attenuated the increase in glutamate, but mGluR1 blockade did not. We conclude that modafinil increases extracellular glutamate in nucleus accumbens from glial and neuronal sources in cocaine-exposed rats, which may be important for its mGluR2/3-mediated antirelapse properties. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  18. Modafinil Attenuates Reinstatement of Cocaine Seeking: Role for Cystine-Glutamate Exchange and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Stephen V; Hensley-Simon, Megan; Tahsili-Fahadan, Pouya; LaLumiere, Ryan T; Thomas, Charles; Fallon, Rebecca V; Kalivas, Peter W; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Modafinil may be useful for treating stimulant abuse, but the mechanisms by which it does so are unknown. Indeed, a primary effect of modafinil is to inhibit dopamine transport, which typically promotes rather than inhibits motivated behavior. Therefore, we examined the role of nucleus accumbens extracellular glutamate and the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) in modafinil effects. One group of rats was trained to self-administer cocaine for 10 days and extinguished, then given priming injections of cocaine to elicit reinstatement. Modafinil (300 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited reinstated cocaine-seeking (but did not alter extinction responding by itself), and this effect was prevented by pretreatment with bilateral microinjections of the mGluR2/3 antagonist LY-341495 (LY) into nucleus accumbens core. No reversal of modafinil effects was seen after unilateral accumbens core LY, or bilateral LY in the rostral pole of accumbens. Next, we sought to explore effects of modafinil on extracellular glutamate levels in accumbens after chronic cocaine. Separate rats were administered non-contingent cocaine, and after 3 weeks of withdrawal underwent accumbens microdialysis. Modafinil increased extracellular accumbens glutamate in chronic cocaine, but not chronic saline pretreated animals. This increase was prevented by reverse dialysis of cystine-glutamate exchange or voltage-dependent calcium channel antagonists. Voltage-dependent sodium channel blockade partly attenuated the increase in glutamate, but mGluR1 blockade did not. We conclude that modafinil increases extracellular glutamate in nucleus accumbens from glial and neuronal sources in cocaine-exposed rats, which may be important for its mGluR2/3-mediated anti-relapse properties. PMID:23017017

  19. Sertraline reduces glutamate uptake in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Débora Olmedo; Bristot, Ivi Juliana; Klamt, Fábio; Frizzo, Marcos Emílio

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial damage and declines in ATP levels have been recently attributed to sertraline. The effects of sertraline on different parameters were investigated in washed platelets from 18 healthy male volunteers, after 24h of drug exposure. Sertraline toxicity was observed only at the highest concentrations, 30 and 100 μM, which significantly reduced platelet viability to 76 ± 3% and 20 ± 2%, respectively. The same concentrations significantly decreased total ATP to 73 ± 3% and 13 ± 2%, respectively. Basal values of glycogen were not significantly affected by sertraline treatment. Glutamate uptake was significantly reduced after treatment with 3, 30 and 100 μM, by 28 ± 6%, 32 ± 5% and 54 ± 4%, respectively. Our data showed that sertraline at therapeutic concentrations does not compromise platelet viability and ATP levels, but they suggest that in a situation where extracellular glutamate levels are potentially increased, sertraline might aggravate an excitotoxic condition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Physiology, Pharmacology, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Niswender, Colleen M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are family C G-protein-coupled receptors that participate in the modulation of synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability throughout the central nervous system. The mGluRs bind glutamate within a large extracellular domain and transmit signals through the receptor protein to intracellular signaling partners. A great deal of progress has been made in determining the mechanisms by which mGluRs are activated, proteins with which they interact, and orthosteric and allosteric ligands that can modulate receptor activity. The widespread expression of mGluRs makes these receptors particularly attractive drug targets, and recent studies continue to validate the therapeutic utility of mGluR ligands in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia. PMID:20055706

  1. Three Distinct Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a widely conserved signaling molecule that in animals has been adapted as a neurotransmitter. GABA is synthesized from the amino acid glutamate by the action of glutamate decarboxylases (GADs). Two vertebrate genes, GAD1 and GAD2, encode distinct GAD proteins: GAD67 and GAD65, respectively. We have identified a third vertebrate GAD gene, GAD3. This gene is conserved in fishes as well as tetrapods. We analyzed protein sequence, gene structure, synteny, and phylogenetics to identify GAD3 as a homolog of GAD1 and GAD2. Interestingly, we found that GAD3 was lost in the hominid lineage. Because of the importance of GABA as a neurotransmitter, GAD3 may play important roles in vertebrate nervous systems. PMID:27461130

  2. Striatal glutamate antagonism induces contralateral neglect.

    PubMed

    Schuller, J J; Tran, D D; Marshall, J F

    1998-03-30

    To assess the role of striatal glutamatergic synapses in mediating sensorimotor orientation behavior, glutamate receptor antagonists were infused into the left striatum of awake rats and behavioral orientation to contralateral and ipsilateral stimuli were quantified. The AMPA-kainate antagonist, DNQX, and the NMDA antagonist, CPP, both induced a large asymmetry in responding, such that the rats oriented much less to stimuli presented contralateral to the antagonist infusions. Furthermore, intrastriatal glutamate antagonist infusions increased the occurrence of incorrect responses, or turning away from a contralaterally-presented stimulus. In a separate experiment, intrastriatal DNQX was shown to block kainic acid (KA)-induced Fos expression in the striatum, but not in adjacent cerebral cortex, suggesting that the diffusion of this drug is restricted to the striatum.

  3. Glutamate Neurocircuitry: Theoretical Underpinnings in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Thomas L.; Sachdeva, Shilpa; Stahl, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    The Dopamine Hypothesis of Schizophrenia is actively being challenged by the NMDA Receptor Hypofunctioning Hypothesis of Schizophrenia. The latter hypothesis may actually be the starting point in neuronal pathways that ultimately modifies dopamine pathways involved in generating both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia postulated by the former hypothesis. The authors suggest that even this latter, NMDA receptor-based, hypothesis is likely too narrow and offer a review of typical glutamate and dopamine-based neurocircuitry, propose genetic vulnerabilities impacting glutamate neurocircuitry, and provide a broad interpretation of a possible etiology of schizophrenia. In conclusion, there is a brief review of potential schizophrenia treatments that rely on the etiologic theory provided in the body of the paper. PMID:23189055

  4. Kinetic studies of dogfish liver glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Electricwala, A H; Dickinson, F M

    1979-01-01

    Initial-rate studies were made of the oxidation of L-glutamate by NAD+ and NADP+ catalysed by highly purified preparations of dogfish liver glutamate dehydrogenase. With NAD+ as coenzyme the kinetics show the same features of coenzyme activation as seen with the bovine liver enzyme [Engel & Dalziel (1969) Biochem. J. 115, 621--631]. With NADP+ as coenzyme, initial rates are much slower than with NAD+, and Lineweaver--Burk plots are linear over extended ranges of substrate and coenzyme concentration. Stopped-flow studies with NADP+ as coenzyme give no evidence for the accumulation of significant concentrations of NADPH-containing complexes with the enzyme in the steady state. Protection studies against inactivation by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate indicate that NAD+ and NADP+ give the same degree of protection in the presence of sodium glutarate. The results are used to deduce information about the mechanism of glutamate oxidation by the enzyme. Initial-rate studies of the reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate by NADH and NADPH catalysed by dogfish liver glutamate dehydrogenase showed that the kinetic features of the reaction are very similar with both coenzymes, but reactions with NADH are much faster. The data show that a number of possible mechanisms for the reaction may be discarded, including the compulsory mechanism (previously proposed for the enzyme) in which the sequence of binding is NAD(P)H, NH4+ and 2-oxoglutarate. The kinetic data suggest either a rapid-equilibrium random mechanism or the compulsory mechanism with the binding sequence NH4+, NAD(P)H, 2-oxoglutarate. However, binding studies and protection studies indicate that coenzyme and 2-oxoglutarate do bind to the free enzyme. PMID:35153

  5. Mechanism of glutamate uptake in Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed Central

    Ruhrmann, J; Krämer, R

    1992-01-01

    The energetics of the anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Zymomonas mobilis, a well-known ethanol-producing organism, is based solely on synthesis of 1 mol of ATP per mol of glucose by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. When grown in the presence of glucose as a carbon and energy source, Z. mobilis had a cytosolic ATP content of 3.5 to 4 mM. Because of effective pH homeostasis, the components of the proton motive force strongly depended on the external pH. At pH 5.5, i.e., around the optimal pH for growth, the proton motive force was about -135 mV and was composed of a pH gradient of 0.6 pH units (internal pH 6.1) and a membrane potential of about -100 mV. Measurement of these parameters was complicated since ionophores and lipophilic probes were ineffective in this organism. So far, only glucose transport by facilitated diffusion is well characterized for Z. mobilis. We investigated a constitutive secondary glutamate uptake system. Glutamate can be used as a nitrogen source for Z. mobilis. Transport of glutamate at pH 5.5 shows a relatively high Vmax of 40 mumol.min-1.g (dry mass) of cells-1 and a low affinity (Km = 1.05 mM). Glutamate is taken up by a symport with two H+ ions, leading to substantial accumulation in the cytosol at low pH values. PMID:1332937

  6. Blocking glutamate carboxypeptidase II inhibits glutamate excitotoxicity and regulates immune responses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Danbee; Bing, So Jin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Jinhee; Cho, Jinhee; Kim, Areum; Herath, Kalahe H I N M; Yu, Hak Sun; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Jee, Youngheun

    2016-09-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an inflammatory disease in the murine central nervous system (CNS) and recapitulates the clinical and pathological features of human multiple sclerosis (MS). Glutamate carboxipeptidase II (GCPII), an enzyme expressed exclusively on astrocytes, is known to affect the disease progression of various neurological disorders by producing glutamate. Despite several findings indicating possible link between glutamate and MS/EAE, however, the involvement of astrocyte or GCPII on glutamate excitotoxicity has not received much attention in MS/EAE. When we examined GCPII expression during EAE progression in this study, we observed significantly elevated GCPII expression in peak stage of disease localized mainly in astrocytes. Intrigued by these results, we tried a potent GCPII inhibitor, 2-phosphonomethyl pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA), on EAE mice and noticed markedly attenuated EAE clinical signs along with significantly inhibited infiltration of inflammatory cells into CNS. Furthermore, 2-PMPA dampened the function of Th1 cell lineage and down-regulated mGluR1 expression in both periphery and CNS contributing to glutamate-mediated immune regulation. Our observations identify a sequence of events triggering EAE through GCPII overexpression, which may offer a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of MS. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in Bacillus licheniformis WX-02: Enzymatic properties and specific functions in glutamic acid synthesis for poly-γ-glutamic acid production.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guangming; Wang, Qin; Wei, Xuetuan; Ma, Xin; Chen, Shouwen

    2017-04-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA), a natural biopolymer, is widely used in cosmetics, medicine, food, water treatment, and agriculture owing to its features of moisture sequestration, cation chelation, non-toxicity and biodegradability. Intracellular glutamic acid, the substrate of γ-PGA, is a limiting factor for high yield in γ-PGA production. Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis are both important γ-PGA producing strains, and B. subtilis synthesizes glutamic acid in vivo using the unique GOGAT/GS pathway. However, little is known about the glutamate synthesis pathway in B. licheniformis. The aim of this work was to characterize the glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in glutamic acid synthesis from B. licheniformis with both in vivo and in vitro experiments. By re-directing the carbon flux distribution, the rocG gene deletion mutant WX-02ΔrocG produced intracellular glutamic acid with a concentration of 90ng/log(CFU), which was only 23.7% that of the wild-type WX-02 (380ng/log(CFU)). Furthermore, the γ-PGA yield of mutant WX-02ΔrocG was 5.37g/L, a decrease of 45.3% compared to the wild type (9.82g/L). In vitro enzymatic assays of RocG showed that RocG has higher affinity for 2-oxoglutarate than glutamate, and the glutamate synthesis rate was far above degradation. This is probably the first study to reveal the glutamic acid synthesis pathway and the specific functions of RocG in B. licheniformis. The results indicate that γ-PGA production can be enhanced through improving intracellular glutamic acid synthesis.

  8. Ketamine and other potential glutamate antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arpan; McKie, Shane; Deakin, J F William

    2015-01-30

    The need for rapid acting antidepressants is widely recognised. There has been much interest in glutamate mechanisms in major depressive disorder (MDD) as a promising target for the development of new antidepressants. A single intravenous infusion of ketamine, a N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist anaesthetic agent, can alleviate depressive symptoms in patients within hours of administration. The mechanism of action appears to be in part through glutamate release onto non-NMDA receptors including α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and metabotropic receptors. However these are also reported effects on 5-HT, dopamine and intracellular effects on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The effects of SSRI (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor) antidepressants may also involve alterations in NMDA function. The article reviews the effect of current antidepressants on NMDA and examines the efficacy and mechanism of ketamine. Response to ketamine is also discussed and comparison with other glutamate drugs including lamotrigine, amantadine, riluzole, memantine, traxoprodil, GLYX-13, MK-0657, RO4917523, AZD2066 and Coluracetam. Future studies need to link the rapid antidepressant effects seen with ketamine to inflammatory theories in MDD.

  9. Secretion of L-glutamate from osteoclasts through transcytosis

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Riyo; Uehara, Shunsuke; Yatsushiro, Shouki; Juge, Narinobu; Hua, Zhaolin; Senoh, Shigenori; Echigo, Noriko; Hayashi, Mitsuko; Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Ninomiya, Tadashi; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Omote, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Edwards, Robert H; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2006-01-01

    Osteoclasts are involved in the catabolism of the bone matrix and eliminate the resulting degradation products through transcytosis, but the molecular mechanism and regulation of transcytosis remain poorly understood. Upon differentiation, osteoclasts express vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), which is essential for vesicular storage and subsequent exocytosis of glutamate in neurons. VGLUT1 is localized in transcytotic vesicles and accumulates L-glutamate. Osteoclasts secrete L-glutamate and the bone degradation products upon stimulation with KCl or ATP in a Ca2+-dependent manner. KCl- and ATP-dependent secretion of L-glutamate was absent in osteoclasts prepared from VGLUT1−/− knockout mice. Osteoclasts express mGluR8, a class III metabotropic glutamate receptor. Its stimulation by a specific agonist inhibits secretion of L-glutamate and bone degradation products, whereas its suppression by a specific antagonist stimulates bone resorption. Finally, it was found that VGLUT1−/− mice develop osteoporosis. Thus, in bone-resorbing osteoclasts, L-glutamate and bone degradation products are secreted through transcytosis and the released L-glutamate is involved in autoregulation of transcytosis. Glutamate signaling may play an important role in the bone homeostasis. PMID:16957773

  10. Glutamate involvement in calcium-dependent migration of astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hamadi, Abdelkader; Giannone, Grégory; Takeda, Kenneth; Rondé, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytoma are known to have altered glutamate machinery that results in the release of large amounts of glutamate into the extracellular space but the precise role of glutamate in favoring cancer processes has not yet been fully established. Several studies suggested that glutamate might provoke active killing of neurons thereby producing space for cancer cells to proliferate and migrate. Previously, we observed that calcium promotes disassembly of integrin-containing focal adhesions in astrocytoma, thus providing a link between calcium signaling and cell migration. The aim of this study was to determine how calcium signaling and glutamate transmission cooperate to promote enhanced astrocytoma migration. The wound-healing model was used to assay migration of human U87MG astrocytoma cells and allowed to monitor calcium signaling during the migration process. The effect of glutamate on calcium signaling was evaluated together with the amount of glutamate released by astrocytoma during cell migration. We observed that glutamate stimulates motility in serum-starved cells, whereas in the presence of serum, inhibitors of glutamate receptors reduce migration. Migration speed was also reduced in presence of an intracellular calcium chelator. During migration, cells displayed spontaneous Ca(2+) transients. L-THA, an inhibitor of glutamate re-uptake increased the frequency of Ca(2+) oscillations in oscillating cells and induced Ca(2+) oscillations in quiescent cells. The frequency of migration-associated Ca(2+) oscillations was reduced by prior incubation with glutamate receptor antagonists or with an anti-β1 integrin antibody. Application of glutamate induced increases in internal free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Finally we found that compounds known to increase [Ca(2+)]i in astrocytomas such as thapsigagin, ionomycin or the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist t-ACPD, are able to induce glutamate release. Our data demonstrate that glutamate increases migration

  11. A novel glutamate transport system in poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Dan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2011-08-01

    Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833 is a poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA)-producing strain. It has the capacity to tolerate high concentration of extracellular glutamate and to utilize glutamate actively. Such a high uptake capacity was owing to an active transport system for glutamate. Therefore, a specific transport system for L-glutamate has been observed in this strain. It was a novel transport process in which glutamate was symported with at least two protons, and an inward-directed sodium gradient had no stimulatory effect on it. K(m) and V(m) for glutamate transport were estimated to be 67 μM and 152 nmol⁻¹ min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ of protein, respectively. The transport system showed structural specificity and stereospecificity and was strongly dependent on extracellular pH. Moreover, it could be stimulated by Mg²⁺, NH₄⁺, and Ca²⁺. In addition, the glutamate transporter in this strain was studied at the molecular level. As there was no important mutation of the transporter protein, it appeared that the differences of glutamate transporter properties between this strain and other B. subtilis strains were not due to the differences of the amino acid sequence and the structure of transporter protein. This is the first extensive report on the properties of glutamate transport system in γ-PGA-producing strain.

  12. Protons Regulate Vesicular Glutamate Transporters through an Allosteric Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jacob; Chang, Roger; McGregor, Matt; Silm, Katlin; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Edwards, Robert H

    2016-05-18

    The quantal nature of synaptic transmission requires a mechanism to transport neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles without promoting non-vesicular efflux across the plasma membrane. Indeed, the vesicular transport of most classical transmitters involves a mechanism of H(+) exchange, which restricts flux to acidic membranes such as synaptic vesicles. However, vesicular transport of the principal excitatory transmitter glutamate depends primarily on membrane potential, which would drive non-vesicular efflux, and the role of protons is unclear. Adapting electrophysiology to record currents associated with the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), we characterize a chloride conductance that is gated by lumenal protons and chloride and supports glutamate uptake. Rather than coupling stoichiometrically to glutamate flux, lumenal protons and chloride allosterically activate vesicular glutamate transport. Gating by protons serves to inhibit what would otherwise be substantial non-vesicular glutamate efflux at the plasma membrane, thereby restricting VGLUT activity to synaptic vesicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Determination of glutamic acid in biological material by capillary electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Narezhnaya, E; Krukier, I; Avrutskaya, V; Degtyareva, A; Igumnova, E A

    2015-01-01

    The conditions for the identification and determination of Glutamic acid by capillary zone electrophoresis without their preliminary derivatization have been optimized. The effect of concentration of buffer electrolyte and pH on determination of Glutamic acid has been investigated. It is shown that the 5 Mm borate buffer concentration and a pH 9.15 are optimal. Quantitative determination of glutamic acid has been carried out using a linear dependence between the concentration of the analyte and the area of the peak. The accuracy and reproducibility of the determination are confirmed by the method "introduced - found". Glutamic acid has been determined in the placenta homogenate. The duration of analysis doesn't exceed 30 minutes. The results showed a decrease in the level of glutamic acid in cases of pregnancy complicated by placental insufficiency compared with the physiological, and this fact allows to consider the level of glutamic acid as a possible marker of complicated pregnancy.

  14. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  15. Regulation of Glutamate Transport in Developing Rat Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    DeSilva, Tara M.; Kabakov, Anatoli Y.; Goldhoff, Patricia E.; Volpe, Joseph J.; Rosenberg, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate released from synaptic vesicles mediates excitatory neurotransmission by stimulating glutamate receptors. Glutamate transporters maintain low synaptic glutamate levels critical for this process, a role primarily attributed to astrocytes. Recently, vesicular release of glutamate from unmyelinated axons in the rat corpus callosum has been shown to elicit AMPA receptor-mediated currents in glial progenitor cells. Glutamate transporters are the only mechanism of glutamate clearance, yet very little is known about the role of glutamate transporters in normal development of oligodendrocytes (OLs) or in excitotoxic injury to OLs. We found that OLs in culture are capable of sodium-dependent glutamate uptake with a Km of 10 ± 2 μm and a Vmax of 2.6, 5.0, and 3.8 nmol · min−1 · mg−1 for preoligodendrocytes, immature, and mature OLs, respectively. Surprisingly, EAAC1, thought to be exclusively a neuronal transporter, contributes more to [3H]l-glutamate uptake in OLs than GLT1 or GLAST. These data suggest that glutamate transporters on oligodendrocytes may serve a critical role in maintaining glutamate homeostasis at a time when unmyelinated callosal axons are engaging in glutamatergic signaling with glial progenitors. Furthermore, GLT1 was significantly increased in cultured mature OLs contrary to in vivo data in which we have shown that, although GLT1 is present on developing OLs when unmyelinated axons are prevalent in the developing rat corpus callosum, after myelination, GLT1 is not expressed on mature OLs. The absence of GLT1 in mature OLs in the rat corpus callosum and its presence in mature rat cultured OLs may indicate that a signaling process in vivo is not activated in vitro. PMID:19535601

  16. Exercise increases mitochondrial glutamate oxidation in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Eric A F; Holloway, Graham P

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigated the impact of acute exercise on stimulating mitochondrial respiratory function in mouse cerebral cortex. Where pyruvate-stimulated respiration was not affected by acute exercise, glutamate respiration was enhanced following the exercise bout. Additional assessment revealed that this affect was dependent on the presence of malate and did not occur when substituting glutamine for glutamate. As such, our results suggest that glutamate oxidation is enhanced with acute exercise through activation of the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  17. Ketosis and brain handling of glutamate, glutamine, and GABA.

    PubMed

    Yudkoff, Marc; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Horyn, Oksana; Nissim, Ilana; Nissim, Itzhak

    2008-11-01

    We hypothesize that one mechanism of the anti-epileptic effect of the ketogenic diet is to alter brain handling of glutamate. According to this formulation, in ketotic brain astrocyte metabolism is more active, resulting in enhanced conversion of glutamate to glutamine. This allows for: (a) more efficient removal of glutamate, the most important excitatory neurotransmitter; and (b) more efficient conversion of glutamine to GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter.

  18. Relationship between Increase in Astrocytic GLT-1 Glutamate Transport and Late-LTP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na[superscript +]-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early…

  19. Relationship between Increase in Astrocytic GLT-1 Glutamate Transport and Late-LTP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na[superscript +]-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early…

  20. CONTROL OF GLUTAMATE OXIDATION IN BRAIN AND LIVER MITOCHONDRIAL SYSTEMS.

    PubMed

    BALAZS, R

    1965-05-01

    1. Glutamate oxidation in brain and liver mitochondrial systems proceeds mainly through transamination with oxaloacetate followed by oxidation of the alpha-oxoglutarate formed. Both in the presence and absence of dinitrophenol in liver mitochondria this pathway accounted for almost 80% of the uptake of glutamate. In brain preparations the transamination pathway accounted for about 90% of the glutamate uptake. 2. The oxidation of [1-(14)C]- and [5-(14)C]-glutamate in brain preparations is compatible with utilization through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, either after the formation of alpha-oxoglutarate or after decarboxylation to form gamma-aminobutyrate. There is no indication of gamma-decarboxylation of glutamate. 3. The high respiratory control ratio obtained with glutamate as substrate in brain mitochondrial preparations is due to the low respiration rate in the absence of ADP: this results from the low rate of formation of oxaloacetate under these conditions. When oxaloacetate is made available by the addition of malate or of NAD(+), the respiration rate is increased to the level obtained with other substrates. 4. When the transamination pathway of glutamate oxidation was blocked with malonate, the uptake of glutamate was inhibited in the presence of ADP or ADP plus dinitrophenol by about 70 and 80% respectively in brain mitochondrial systems, whereas the inhibition was only about 50% in dinitrophenol-stimulated liver preparations. In unstimulated liver mitochondria in the presence of malonate there was a sixfold increase in the oxidation of glutamate by the glutamate-dehydrogenase pathway. Thus the operating activity of glutamate dehydrogenase is much less than the ;free' (non-latent) activity. 5. The following explanation is put forward for the control of glutamate metabolism in liver and brain mitochondrial preparations. The oxidation of glutamate by either pathway yields alpha-oxoglutarate, which is further metabolized. Since aspartate aminotransferase is

  1. Glutamate. Its applications in food and contribution to health.

    PubMed

    Jinap, S; Hajeb, P

    2010-08-01

    This article reviews application of glutamate in food and its benefits and role as one of the common food ingredients used. Monosodium glutamate is one of the most abundant naturally occurring amino acids which frequently added as a flavor enhancer. It produced a unique taste that cannot be provided by other basic taste (saltiness, sourness, sweetness and bitterness), referred to as a fifth taste (umami). Glutamate serves some functions in the body as well, serving as an energy source for certain tissues and as a substrate for glutathione synthesis. Glutamate has the potential to enhance food intake in older individuals and dietary free glutamate evoked a visceral sensation from the stomach, intestine and portal vein. Small quantities of glutamate used in combination with a reduced amount of table salt during food preparation allow for far less salt to be used during and after cooking. Because glutamate is one of the most intensely studied food ingredients in the food supply and has been found safe, the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization placed it in the safest category for food additives. Despite a widespread belief that glutamate can elicit asthma, migraine headache and Chinese Restaurant Syndrome (CRS), there are no consistent clinical data to support this claim. In addition, findings from the literature indicate that there is no consistent evidence to suggest that individuals may be uniquely sensitive to glutamate. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis and biological activity of glutamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Receveur, J M; Guiramand, J; Récasens, M; Roumestant, M L; Viallefont, P; Martinez, J

    1998-01-20

    In order to develop new specific glutamate analogues at metabotropic glutamate receptors, Diels-Alder, 1-4 ionic and radical reactions were performed starting from (2S)-4-methyleneglutamic acid. Preliminary pharmacological evaluation by measuring IP accumulation using rat forebrain synaptoneurosomes has shown that (2S)-4-(2-phthalimidoethyl)glutamic acid (3a), (2S)-4-(4-phthalimidobutyl)glutamic acid (3b) and 1-[(S)-2-amino-2-carboxyethyl]-3,4-dimethylcyclohex-3-ene-1-carbox ylic acid (8) presented moderate antagonist activities.

  3. D-Glutamate is metabolized in the heart mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Ariyoshi, Makoto; Katane, Masumi; Hamase, Kenji; Miyoshi, Yurika; Nakane, Maiko; Hoshino, Atsushi; Okawa, Yoshifumi; Mita, Yuichiro; Kaimoto, Satoshi; Uchihashi, Motoki; Fukai, Kuniyoshi; Ono, Kazunori; Tateishi, Syuhei; Hato, Daichi; Yamanaka, Ryoetsu; Honda, Sakiko; Fushimura, Yohei; Iwai-Kanai, Eri; Ishihara, Naotada; Mita, Masashi; Homma, Hiroshi; Matoba, Satoaki

    2017-01-01

    D-Amino acids are enantiomers of L-amino acids and have recently been recognized as biomarkers and bioactive substances in mammals, including humans. In the present study, we investigated functions of the novel mammalian mitochondrial protein 9030617O03Rik and showed decreased expression under conditions of heart failure. Genomic sequence analyses showed partial homology with a bacterial aspartate/glutamate/hydantoin racemase. Subsequent determinations of all free amino acid concentrations in 9030617O03Rik-deficient mice showed high accumulations of D-glutamate in heart tissues. This is the first time that a significant amount of D-glutamate was detected in mammalian tissue. Further analysis of D-glutamate metabolism indicated that 9030617O03Rik is a D-glutamate cyclase that converts D-glutamate to 5-oxo-D-proline. Hence, this protein is the first identified enzyme responsible for mammalian D-glutamate metabolism, as confirmed in cloning analyses. These findings suggest that D-glutamate and 5-oxo-D-proline have bioactivities in mammals through the metabolism by D-glutamate cyclase. PMID:28266638

  4. Diagnostic and pathogenic significance of glutamate receptor autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Pleasure, David

    2008-05-01

    Autoantibodies against glutamate receptors, first reported in Rasmussen encephalitis, have been observed in other focal epilepsies, central nervous system ischemic infarcts, transient ischemic attacks, sporadic olivopontocerebellar atrophy, systemic lupus erythematosus, and paraneoplastic encephalopathies. The detection of glutamate receptor autoantibodies is not useful in the evaluation of Rasmussen encephalitis but may be a biomarker for brain ischemia, and it is helpful in diagnosing certain paraneoplastic encephalopathies. Passive transfer of glutamate receptor autoantibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or paraneoplastic encephalopathy suggests that glutamate receptor autoantibodies can actively contribute to neurologic dysfunction.

  5. How Glutamate Is Managed by the Blood–Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Richard A.; Viña, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    A facilitative transport system exists on the blood–brain barrier (BBB) that has been tacitly assumed to be a path for glutamate entry to the brain. However, glutamate is a non-essential amino acid whose brain content is much greater than plasma, and studies in vivo show that glutamate does not enter the brain in appreciable quantities except in those small regions with fenestrated capillaries (circumventricular organs). The situation became understandable when luminal (blood facing) and abluminal (brain facing) membranes were isolated and studied separately. Facilitative transport of glutamate and glutamine exists only on the luminal membranes, whereas Na+-dependent transport systems for glutamate, glutamine, and some other amino acids are present only on the abluminal membrane. The Na+-dependent cotransporters of the abluminal membrane are in a position to actively transport amino acids from the extracellular fluid (ECF) into the endothelial cells of the BBB. These powerful secondary active transporters couple with the energy of the Na+-gradient to move glutamate and glutamine into endothelial cells, whereupon glutamate can exit to the blood on the luminal facilitative glutamate transporter. Glutamine may also exit the brain via separate facilitative transport system that exists on the luminal membranes, or glutamine can be hydrolyzed to glutamate within the BBB, thereby releasing ammonia that is freely diffusible. The γ-glutamyl cycle participates indirectly by producing oxoproline (pyroglutamate), which stimulates almost all secondary active transporters yet discovered in the abluminal membranes of the BBB. PMID:27740595

  6. Glutamate mediates platelet activation through the AMPA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Craig N.; Sun, Henry; Ikeda, Masahiro; Beique, Jean-Claude; Swaim, Anne Marie; Mason, Emily; Martin, Tanika V.; Thompson, Laura E.; Gozen, Oguz; Ampagoomian, David; Sprengel, Rolf; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Faraday, Nauder; Huganir, Richard; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter that binds to the kainate receptor, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor (AMPAR). Each receptor was first characterized and cloned in the central nervous system (CNS). Glutamate is also present in the periphery, and glutamate receptors have been identified in nonneuronal tissues, including bone, heart, kidney, pancreas, and platelets. Platelets play a central role in normal thrombosis and hemostasis, as well as contributing greatly to diseases such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Despite the presence of glutamate in platelet granules, the role of glutamate during hemostasis is unknown. We now show that activated platelets release glutamate, that platelets express AMPAR subunits, and that glutamate increases agonist-induced platelet activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that glutamate binding to the AMPAR increases intracellular sodium concentration and depolarizes platelets, which are important steps in platelet activation. In contrast, platelets treated with the AMPAR antagonist CNQX or platelets derived from GluR1 knockout mice are resistant to AMPA effects. Importantly, mice lacking GluR1 have a prolonged time to thrombosis in vivo. Our data identify glutamate as a regulator of platelet activation, and suggest that the AMPA receptor is a novel antithrombotic target. PMID:18283118

  7. Glutamate and neurotrophic factors in neuronal plasticity and disease.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Mark P

    2008-11-01

    Glutamate's role as a neurotransmitter at synapses has been known for 40 years, but glutamate has since been shown to regulate neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and neuron survival in the developing and adult mammalian nervous system. Cell-surface glutamate receptors are coupled to Ca(2+) influx and release from endoplasmic reticulum stores, which causes rapid (kinase- and protease-mediated) and delayed (transcription-dependent) responses that change the structure and function of neurons. Neurotrophic factors and glutamate interact to regulate developmental and adult neuroplasticity. For example, glutamate stimulates the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which, in turn, modifies neuronal glutamate sensitivity, Ca(2+) homeostasis, and plasticity. Neurotrophic factors may modify glutamate signaling directly, by changing the expression of glutamate receptor subunits and Ca(2+)-regulating proteins, and also indirectly by inducing the production of antioxidant enzymes, energy-regulating proteins, and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members. Excessive activation of glutamate receptors, under conditions of oxidative and metabolic stress, may contribute to neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in diseases ranging from stroke and Alzheimer's disease to psychiatric disorders. By enhancing neurotrophic factor signaling, environmental factors such as exercise and dietary energy restriction, and chemicals such as antidepressants may optimize glutamatergic signaling and protect against neurological disorders.

  8. Direct stimulation of pituitary prolactin release by glutamate.

    PubMed

    Login, I S

    1990-01-01

    The ability of glutamate and other excitatory amino acids to stimulate prolactin secretion when administered to adult animals is hypothesized to depend on a central site of action in the brain, but there are no data to support this position. An alternative hypothesis was tested that glutamate would stimulate prolactin release when applied directly to primary cultures of dispersed adult female rat anterior pituitary cells studied in a perifusion protocol. Glutamate increased the rate of prolactin release within two minutes in a self-limited manner. Glutamate-stimulated prolactin release was augmented about 4-fold by elimination of magnesium from the perfusate and was associated with stimulation of pituitary calcium flux. Ketamine and MK-801 both reduced the basal rate of prolactin release and abolished the effects of glutamate. Pituitary cells of 10-day-old rats responded similarly to glutamate. Exposure to glutamate did not influence subsequent responses to physiological hypothalamic secretagogues, thus the likelihood of toxicity was minimized. These results suggest that the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subclass of the glutamate receptor complex is involved. Prolactin secretion may be regulated physiologically through a functional glutamate receptor on pituitary cells.

  9. Pentameric assembly of a neuronal glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, S; Kreman, M; Kavanaugh, M P; Wright, E M; Zampighi, G A

    2000-07-18

    Freeze-fracture electron microscopy was used to study the structure of a human neuronal glutamate transporter (EAAT3). EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and its function was correlated with the total number of transporters in the plasma membrane of the same cells. Function was assayed as the maximum charge moved in response to a series of transmembrane voltage pulses. The number of transporters in the plasma membrane was determined from the density of a distinct 10-nm freeze-fracture particle, which appeared in the protoplasmic face only after EAAT3 expression. The linear correlation between EAAT3 maximum carrier-mediated charge and the total number of the 10-nm particles suggested that this particle represented functional EAAT3 in the plasma membrane. The cross-sectional area of EAAT3 in the plasma membrane (48 +/- 5 nm(2)) predicted 35 +/- 3 transmembrane alpha-helices in the transporter complex. This information along with secondary structure models (6-10 transmembrane alpha-helices) suggested an oligomeric state for EAAT3. EAAT3 particles were pentagonal in shape in which five domains could be identified. They exhibited fivefold symmetry because they appeared as equilateral pentagons and the angle at the vertices was 110 degrees. Each domain appeared to contribute to an extracellular mass that projects approximately 3 nm into the extracellular space. Projections from all five domains taper toward an axis passing through the center of the pentagon, giving the transporter complex the appearance of a penton-based pyramid. The pentameric structure of EAAT3 offers new insights into its function as both a glutamate transporter and a glutamate-gated chloride channel.

  10. Red nucleus glutamate facilitates neuropathic allodynia induced by spared nerve injury through non-NMDA and metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Ding, Cui-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Tao; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Jun-Yang

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that glutamate plays an important role in the development of pathological pain. This study investigates the expression changes of glutamate and the roles of different types of glutamate receptors in the red nucleus (RN) in the development of neuropathic allodynia induced by spared nerve injury (SNI). Immunohistochemistry indicated that glutamate was constitutively expressed in the RN of normal rats. After SNI, the expression levels of glutamate were significantly increased in the RN at 1 week and reached the highest level at 2 weeks postinjury compared with sham-operated and normal rats. The RN glutamate was colocalized with neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes but not microglia under physiological and neuropathic pain conditions. To elucidate further the roles of the RN glutamate and different types of glutamate receptors in the development of neuropathic allodynia, antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), non-NMDA, or metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) were microinjected into the RN contralateral to the nerve-injury side of rats with SNI, and the paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) was dynamically assessed with von Frey filaments. Microinjection of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 into the RN did not show any effect on SNI-induced mechanical allodynia. However, microinjection of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3(1H,4H)-dione or the mGluR antagonist (±)-α-methyl-(4-carboxyphenyl) glycine into the RN significantly increased the PWT and alleviated SNI-induced mechanical allodynia. These findings suggest that RN glutamate is involved in regulating neuropathic pain and facilitates the development of SNI-induced neuropathic allodynia. The algesic effect of glutamate is transmitted by the non-NMDA glutamate receptor and mGluRs.

  11. Repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure increases basal glutamate in the nucleus accumbens of mice without affecting glutamate transport.

    PubMed

    Griffin, William C; Ramachandra, Vorani S; Knackstedt, Lori A; Becker, Howard C

    2015-01-01

    Repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure increase voluntary consumption of ethanol in mice. Previous work has shown that extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is significantly elevated in ethanol-dependent mice and that pharmacologically manipulating glutamate concentrations in the NAc will alter ethanol drinking, indicating that glutamate homeostasis plays a crucial role in ethanol drinking in this model. The present studies were designed to measure extracellular glutamate at a time point in which mice would ordinarily be allowed voluntary access to ethanol in the CIE model and, additionally, to measure glutamate transport capacity in the NAc at the same time point. Extracellular glutamate was measured using quantitative microdialysis procedures. Glutamate transport capacity was measured under Na(+)-dependent and Na(+)-independent conditions to determine whether the function of excitatory amino acid transporters (also known as system XAG) or of system Xc (-) (glial cysteine-glutamate exchanger) was influenced by CIE exposure. The results of the quantitative microdialysis experiment confirm increased extracellular glutamate (approximately twofold) in the NAc of CIE exposed mice (i.e., ethanol-dependent) compared to non-dependent mice in the NAc, consistent with earlier work. However, the increase in extracellular glutamate was not due to altered transporter function in the NAc of ethanol-dependent mice, because neither Na(+)-dependent nor Na(+)-independent glutamate transport was significantly altered by CIE exposure. These findings point to the possibility that hyperexcitability of cortical-striatal pathways underlies the increases in extracellular glutamate found in the ethanol-dependent mice.

  12. Extracellular glutamate diffusion determines the occupancy of glutamate receptors at CA1 synapses in the hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Kullmann, D M; Min, M Y; Asztely, F; Rusakov, D A

    1999-01-01

    Following exocytosis at excitatory synapses in the brain, glutamate binds to several subtypes of postsynaptic receptors. The degree of occupancy of AMPA and NMDA receptors at hippocampal synapses is, however, not known. One approach to estimate receptor occupancy is to examine quantal amplitude fluctuations of postsynaptic signals in hippocampal neurons studied in vitro. The results of such experiments suggest that NMDA receptors at CA1 synapses are activated not only by glutamate released from the immediately apposed presynaptic terminals, but also by glutamate spillover from neighbouring terminals. Numerical simulations point to the extracellular diffusion coefficient as a critical parameter that determines the extent of activation of receptors positioned at different distances from the release site. We have shown that raising the viscosity of the extracellular medium can modulate the diffusion coefficient, providing an experimental tool to investigate the role of diffusion in activation of synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. Whether intersynaptic cross-talk mediated by NMDA receptors occurs in vivo remains to be determined. The theoretical and experimental approaches described here also promise to shed light on the roles of metabotropic and kainate receptors, which often occur in an extrasynaptic distribution, and are therefore positioned to sense glutamate escaping from the synaptic cleft. PMID:10212489

  13. Spectra of glutamate dehydrogenase with diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Hillar, M

    1978-02-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase displays hyperchromicity at 256 nm and at 276 nm upon binding of diethylstilbestrol. Increase in absorbancy is linear at both regions up to 250 micrometer DES, and becomes parabolic at higher concentration of DES. ADP in the presence of DES causes decrease in absorbancy at 256 nm; absorbancy at 276 nm increased by DES is not affected by ADP. DES prevents spectral effects produced by GTP (decrease in absorbancy at 254 nm and at 276 nm). ADP still decreases absorbancy at 254 nm, leaving the 276 nm region unchanged. ADP enhances spectral effects produced by GTP. GTP, however, prevents changes produced by ADP.

  14. Glutamate-based therapeutic approaches: ampakines.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Gary

    2006-02-01

    Ampakines are a structurally diverse family of small molecules that positively modulate alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors, and thereby enhance fast, excitatory transmission throughout the brain. Surprisingly, ampakines have discrete effects on brain activity and behavior. Because their excitatory synaptic targets mediate communication between cortical regions, serve as sites of memory encoding, and regulate the production of growth factors, ampakines have a broad range of potential therapeutic applications. Several of these possibilities have been tested with positive results in preclinical models; preliminary clinical work has also been encouraging.

  15. Costimulation of AMPA and metabotropic glutamate receptors underlies phospholipase C activation by glutamate in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Hyun; Lee, Kyu-Hee; Lee, Doyun; Han, Young-Eun; Lee, Suk-Ho; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Ho, Won-Kyung

    2015-04-22

    Glutamate, a major neurotransmitter in the brain, activates ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs, respectively). The two types of glutamate receptors interact with each other, as exemplified by the modulation of iGluRs by mGluRs. However, the other way of interaction (i.e., modulation of mGluRs by iGluRs) has not received much attention. In this study, we found that group I mGluR-specific agonist (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) alone is not sufficient to activate phospholipase C (PLC) in rat hippocampus, while glutamate robustly activates PLC. These results suggested that additional mechanisms provided by iGluRs are involved in group I mGluR-mediated PLC activation. A series of experiments demonstrated that glutamate-induced PLC activation is mediated by mGluR5 and is facilitated by local Ca(2+) signals that are induced by AMPA-mediated depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation. Finally, we found that PLC and L-type Ca(2+) channels are involved in hippocampal mGluR-dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD) induced by paired-pulse low-frequency stimulation, but not in DHPG-induced chemical LTD. Together, we propose that AMPA receptors initiate Ca(2+) influx via the L-type Ca(2+) channels that facilitate mGluR5-PLC signaling cascades, which underlie mGluR-LTD in rat hippocampus.

  16. Localization of neuronal and glial glutamate transporters.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, J D; Martin, L; Levey, A I; Dykes-Hoberg, M; Jin, L; Wu, D; Nash, N; Kuncl, R W

    1994-09-01

    The cellular and subcellular distributions of the glutamate transporter subtypes EAAC1, GLT-1, and GLAST in the rat CNS were demonstrated using anti-peptide antibodies that recognize the C-terminal domains of each transporter. On immunoblots, the antibodies specifically recognize proteins of 65-73 kDa in total brain homogenates. Immunocytochemistry shows that glutamate transporter subtypes are distributed differentially within neurons and astroglia. EAAC1 is specific for certain neurons, such as large pyramidal cortical neurons and Purkinje cells, but does not appear to be selective for glutamatergic neurons. GLT-1 is localized only to astroglia. GLAST is found in both neurons and astroglia. The regional localizations are unique to each transporter subtype. EAAC1 is highly enriched in the cortex, hippocampus, and caudate-putamen and is confined to pre- and postsynaptic elements. GLT-1 is distributed in astrocytes throughout the brain and spinal cord. GLAST is most abundant in Bergmann glia in the cerebellar molecular layer brain, but is also present in the cortex, hippocampus, and deep cerebellar nuclei.

  17. Glutamate Receptors in Neuroinflammatory Demyelinating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Christopher; Paul, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system (CNS). The condition predominantly affects young adults and is characterised by immunological and inflammatory changes in the periphery and CNS that contribute to neurovascular disruption, haemopoietic cell invasion of target tissues, and demyelination of nerve fibres which culminate in neurological deficits that relapse and remit or are progressive. The main features of MS can be reproduced in the inducible animal counterpart, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The search for new MS treatments invariably employs EAE to determine drug activity and provide a rationale for exploring clinical efficacy. The preclinical development of compounds for MS has generally followed a conventional, immunotherapeutic route. However, over the past decade, a group of compounds that suppress EAE but have no apparent immunomodulatory activity have emerged. These drugs interact with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate family of glutamate receptors reported to control neurovascular permeability, inflammatory mediator synthesis, and resident glial cell functions including CNS myelination. The review considers the importance of the glutamate receptors in EAE and MS pathogenesis. The use of receptor antagonists to control EAE is also discussed together with the possibility of therapeutic application in demyelinating disease. PMID:16883070

  18. Therapeutic promise and principles: metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Shang, Yan Chen; Hou, Jinling

    2008-01-01

    For a number of disease entities, oxidative stress becomes a significant factor in the etiology and progression of cell dysfunction and injury. Therapeutic strategies that can identify novel signal transduction pathways to ameliorate the toxic effects of oxidative stress may lead to new avenues of treatment for a spectrum of disorders that include diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and immune system dysfunction. In this respect, metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) may offer exciting prospects for several disorders since these receptors can limit or prevent apoptotic cell injury as well as impact upon cellular development and function. Yet the role of mGluRs is complex in nature and may require specific mGluR modulation for a particular disease entity to maximize clinical efficacy and limit potential disability. Here we discuss the potential clinical translation of mGluRs and highlight the role of novel signal transduction pathways in the metabotropic glutamate system that may be vital for the clinical utility of mGluRs.

  19. ATP released from cardiac fibroblasts via connexin hemichannels activates profibrotic P2Y2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lu, David; Soleymani, Sahar; Madakshire, Rohit; Insel, Paul A

    2012-06-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) play an essential role in remodeling of the cardiac extracellular matrix. Extracellular nucleotide signaling may provoke a profibrotic response in CFs. We tested the hypothesis that physical perturbations release ATP from CFs and that ATP participates in profibrotic signaling. ATP release was abolished by the channel inhibitor carbenoxolone and inhibited by knockdown of either connexin (Cx)43 or Cx45 (47 and 35%, respectively), implying that hypotonic stimulation induces ATP release via Cx43 and Cx45 hemichannels, although pannexin 1 may also play a role. ATP released by hypotonic stimulation rapidly (<10 min) increased phosphorylated ERK by 5-8 fold, an effect largely eliminated by P2Y(2) receptor knockdown or ATP hydrolysis with apyrase. ATP stimulation of P2Y(2) receptors increased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) production, and in an ERK-dependent manner, ATP increased collagen accumulation by 60% and mRNA expression of profibrotic markers: plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 by 4.5- and 4.0-fold, respectively. Apyrase treatment substantially reduced the basal profibrotic phenotype, decreasing collagen and α-SMA content and increasing matrix metalloproteinase expression. Thus, ATP release activates P2Y(2) receptors to mediate profibrotic responses in CFs, implying that nucleotide release under both basal and activated states is likely an important mechanism for fibroblast homeostasis.

  20. Reciprocal regulation of epileptiform neuronal oscillations and electrical synapses in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Erika R; Higa, Guilherme S V; Morya, Edgard; Valle, Angela C; Kihara, Alexandre H; Britto, Luiz R G

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) channels have been recognized as an important mechanism for synchronizing neuronal networks. Herein, we investigated the participation of GJ channels in the pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) by analyzing electrophysiological activity following the blockade of connexins (Cx)-mediated communication. In addition, we examined the regulation of gene expression, protein levels, phosphorylation profile and distribution of neuronal Cx36, Cx45 and glial Cx43 in the rat hippocampus during the acute and latent periods. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that the GJ blockade anticipates the occurrence of low voltage oscillations and promotes a marked reduction of power in all analyzed frequencies.Cx36 gene expression and protein levels remained stable in acute and latent periods, whereas upregulation of Cx45 gene expression and protein redistribution were detected in the latent period. We also observed upregulation of Cx43 mRNA levels followed by changes in the phosphorylation profile and protein accumulation. Taken together, our results indisputably revealed that GJ communication participates in the epileptiform activity induced by pilocarpine. Moreover, considering that specific Cxs undergo alterations through acute and latent periods, this study indicates that the control of GJ communication may represent a focus in reliable anti-epileptogenic strategies.

  1. Effect of biotin on transcription levels of key enzymes and glutamate efflux in glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Duan, Zuoying; Shi, Zhongping

    2014-02-01

    Biotin is an important factor affecting the performance of glutamate fermentation by biotin auxotrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum and glutamate is over-produced only when initial biotin content is controlled at suitable levels or initial biotin is excessive but with Tween 40 addition during fermentation. The transcription levels of key enzymes at pyruvate, isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate metabolic nodes, as well as transport protein (TP) of glutamate were investigated under the conditions of varied biotin contents and Tween 40 supplementation. When biotin was insufficient, the genes encoding key enzymes and TP were down-regulated in the early production phase, in particular, the transcription level of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) which was only 2% of that of control. Although the cells' morphology transformation and TP level were not affected, low transcription level of ICDH led to lower final glutamate concentration (64 g/L). When biotin was excessive, the transcription levels of key enzymes were at comparable levels as those of control with ICDH as an exception, which was only 3-22% of control level throughout production phase. In this case, little intracellular glutamate accumulation (1.5 mg/g DCW) and impermeable membrane resulted in non glutamate secretion into broth, even though the quantity of TP was more than 10-folds of control level. Addition of Tween 40 when biotin was excessive stimulated the expression of all key enzymes and TP, intracellular glutamate content was much higher (10-12 mg/g DCW), and final glutamate concentration reached control level (75-80 g/L). Hence, the membrane alteration and TP were indispensable in glutamate secretion. Biotin and Tween 40 influenced the expression level of ICDH and glutamate efflux, thereby influencing glutamate production.

  2. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's Solution...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's Solution...

  4. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's Solution...

  5. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's Solution...

  6. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's Solution...

  7. Glutamate and Neurotrophic Factors in Neuronal Plasticity and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate’s role as a neurotransmitter at synapses has been known for 40 years, but glutamate has since been shown to regulate neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis and neuron survival in the developing and adult mammalian nervous system. Cell surface glutamate receptors are coupled to Ca2+ influx and release from endoplasmic reticulum stores which causes rapid (kinase- and protease-mediated) and delayed (transcription-dependent) responses that change the structure and function of neurons. Neurotrophic factors and glutamate interact to regulate developmental and adult neuroplasticity. For example, glutamate stimulates the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) which, in turn, modifies neuronal glutamate sensitivity, Ca2+ homeostasis and plasticity. Neurotrophic factors may modify glutamate signalling directly, by changing the expression of glutamate receptor subunits and Ca2+-regulating proteins, and also indirectly by inducing the production of antioxidant enzymes, energy-regulating proteins and anti-apoptotic Bcl2 family members. Excessive activation of glutamate receptors, under conditions of oxidative and metabolic stress, may contribute to neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in diseases ranging from stroke and Alzheimer’s disease to psychiatric disorders. By enhancing neurotrophic factor signalling, environmental factors such as exercise and dietary energy restriction, and chemicals such as antidepressants may optimize glutamatergic signalling and protect against neurological disorders. PMID:19076369

  8. Mammalian folylpoly-. gamma. -glutamate synthetase. 3. Specificity for folate analogues

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.; Cichowicz, D.J.; Shane, B.

    1987-01-27

    A variety of folate analogues were synthesized to explore the specificity of the folate binding site of hog liver folypolyglutamate synthetase and the requirements for catalysis. Modifications of the internal and terminal glutamate moieties of folate cause large drops in on rates and/or affinity for the protein. The only exceptions are glutamine, homocysteate, and ornithine analogues, indicating a less stringent specificity around the delta-carbon of glutamate. It is proposed that initial folate binding to the enzyme involves low-affinity interactions at a pterin and a glutamate site and that the first glutamate bound is the internal residue adjacent to the benzoyl group. Processive movement of the polyglutamate chain through the glutamate site and a possible conformational change in the protein when the terminal residue is bound would result in tight binding and would position the ..gamma..-carboxyl of the terminal glutamate in the correct position for catalysis. The 4-amino substitution of folate increases the on rate for monoglutamate derivatives but severely impairs catalysis with diglutamate derivatives. Pteroylornithine derivatives are the first potent and specific inhibitors of folylpolyglutamate synthetase to be identified and may act as analogues of reaction intermediates. Other folate derivatives with tetrahedral chemistry replacing the peptide bond, such as pteroyl-..gamma..-glutamyl-(psi,CH/sub 2/-NH)-glutamate, retain affinity for the protein but are considerably less effective inhibitors than the ornithine derivatives. Enzyme activity was assayed using (/sup 14/C)glutamate.

  9. 78 FR 76321 - Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... COMMISSION Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Indonesia of monosodium glutamate, provided for in subheading... United States at less than fair value (LTFV) and subsidized by the Governments of China and Indonesia....

  10. A review of glutamate's role in traumatic brain injury mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Cameron H.

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter used by the central nervous system (CNS) for synaptic communication, and its extracellular concentration is tightly regulated by glutamate transporters located on nearby astrocytes. Both animal models and human clinical studies have demonstrated elevated glutamate levels immediately following a traumatic brain event, with the duration and severity of the rise corresponding to prognosis. This rise in extracellular glutamate likely results from a combination of excessive neurotransmitter release from damaged neurons and down regulation of uptake mechanisms in local astrocytes. The immediate results of a traumatic event can lead to necrotic tissue in severely injured regions, while prolonged increases in excitatory transmission can cause secondary excitotoxic injury through activation of delayed apoptotic pathways. Initial TBI animal studies utilized a variety of broad glutamate receptor antagonists to successfully combat secondary injury mechanisms, but unfortunately this same strategy has proven inconclusive in subsequent human trials due to deleterious side effects and heterogeneity of injuries. More recent treatment strategies have utilized specific glutamate receptor subunit antagonists in an effort to minimize side effects and have shown promising results. Future challenges will be detecting the concentration and kinetics of the glutamate rise following injury, determining which patient populations could benefit from antagonist treatment based on their extracellular glutamate concentrations and when drugs should be administered to maximize efficacy.

  11. Right hemisphere involvement in imprinting memory revealed by glutamate treatment.

    PubMed

    Johnston, A N; Rogers, L J

    1998-08-01

    The lateralized use of the forebrain hemispheres during recall of imprinting memory was investigated using unilateral intrahemispheric injections of glutamate. Administration of glutamate to the right hemisphere 1.3, or 6 h after exposure to the imprinting stimulus disrupted recall 8 h after the end of training, whereas the same treatment of the left hemisphere had no effect. Imprinted chicks treated with glutamate injected into the right hemisphere did not approach the imprinting stimulus in preference to an alternative, unfamiliar stimulus during a simultaneous choice test, whereas imprinted chicks treated with glutamate injected into the left hemisphere showed a preference for the imprinting stimulus. Thus, the left and right hemispheres are involved differentially in the recall of imprinting memory. Fear behavior or activity levels were not altered by glutamate treatment of either the right or left hemisphere, indicating that the effects of glutamate were specific to recall of imprinting memory. However, the amnestic effect of treatment of the right hemisphere with glutamate was transient: it was no longer evident by 48 h after the end of training. Also, glutamate had no effect when the chicks were treated 9 h after the end of training. These results suggest that regions in right hemisphere of the chick brain are involved in early (0-8 h after training) recall of imprinting memory.

  12. Exchange transamination and the metabolism of glutamate in brain

    PubMed Central

    Balázs, R.; Haslam, R. J.

    1965-01-01

    1. Experiments were performed to throw light on why the incorporation of 14C from labelled carbohydrate precursors into glutamate has been found to be more marked in brain than in other tissues. 2. Rapid isotope exchange between labelled glutamate and unlabelled α-oxoglutarate was demonstrated in brain and liver mitochondrial preparations. In the presence but not in the absence of α-oxoglutarate the yield of 14CO2 from [1-14C]glutamate exceeded the net glutamate removal, and the final relative specific activities of the two substrates indicated that complete isotopic equilibration had occurred. Also, when in a brain preparation net glutamate removal was inhibited by malonate, isotope exchange between [1-14C]glutamate and α-oxoglutarate and the formation of 14CO2 were unaffected. 3. The time-course of isotope exchange between labelled glutamate and unlabelled α-oxoglutarate was followed in uncoupled brain and liver mitochondrial fractions, and the rate of exchange calculated by a computer was found to be 3–8 times more rapid than the maximal rate of utilization of the two substrates. 4. The physiological situation was imitated by the continuous infusion of small amounts of α-oxo[1-14C]glutarate into brain homogenate containing added glutamate. The fraction of 14C infused that was retained in the glutamate pool depended on the size of the latter, and the final relative specific activities of the two substrates indicated almost complete isotope exchange. Isotopic equilibration also occurred when α-oxoglutarate was generated from pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle in a brain mitochondrial preparation containing [1-14C]glutamate. 5. The differences in the incorporation of 14C from labelled glucose into the glutamate of brain and liver are discussed in terms of the rates of isotope exchange, the glutamate pool sizes and the rates of formation of labelled α-oxoglutarate in the two tissues. It is concluded that the differences between tissues in the

  13. EXCHANGE TRANSAMINATION AND THE METABOLISM OF GLUTAMATE IN BRAIN.

    PubMed

    BALAZS, R; HASLAM, J

    1965-01-01

    1. Experiments were performed to throw light on why the incorporation of (14)C from labelled carbohydrate precursors into glutamate has been found to be more marked in brain than in other tissues. 2. Rapid isotope exchange between labelled glutamate and unlabelled alpha-oxoglutarate was demonstrated in brain and liver mitochondrial preparations. In the presence but not in the absence of alpha-oxoglutarate the yield of (14)CO(2) from [1-(14)C]glutamate exceeded the net glutamate removal, and the final relative specific activities of the two substrates indicated that complete isotopic equilibration had occurred. Also, when in a brain preparation net glutamate removal was inhibited by malonate, isotope exchange between [1-(14)C]glutamate and alpha-oxoglutarate and the formation of (14)CO(2) were unaffected. 3. The time-course of isotope exchange between labelled glutamate and unlabelled alpha-oxoglutarate was followed in uncoupled brain and liver mitochondrial fractions, and the rate of exchange calculated by a computer was found to be 3-8 times more rapid than the maximal rate of utilization of the two substrates. 4. The physiological situation was imitated by the continuous infusion of small amounts of alpha-oxo[1-(14)C]glutarate into brain homogenate containing added glutamate. The fraction of (14)C infused that was retained in the glutamate pool depended on the size of the latter, and the final relative specific activities of the two substrates indicated almost complete isotope exchange. Isotopic equilibration also occurred when alpha-oxoglutarate was generated from pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle in a brain mitochondrial preparation containing [1-(14)C]glutamate. 5. The differences in the incorporation of (14)C from labelled glucose into the glutamate of brain and liver are discussed in terms of the rates of isotope exchange, the glutamate pool sizes and the rates of formation of labelled alpha-oxoglutarate in the two tissues. It is concluded that

  14. Functional reconstitution of Drosophila melanogaster NMJ glutamate receptors

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Tae Hee; Dharkar, Poorva; Mayer, Mark L.; ...

    2015-04-27

    The Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ), at which glutamate acts as the excitatory neurotransmitter, is a widely used model for genetic analysis of synapse function and development. Despite decades of study, the inability to reconstitute NMJ glutamate receptor function using heterologous expression systems has complicated the analysis of receptor function, such that it is difficult to resolve the molecular basis for compound phenotypes observed in mutant flies. In this paper, we find that Drosophila Neto functions as an essential component required for the function of NMJ glutamate receptors, permitting analysis of glutamate receptor responses in Xenopus oocytes. Finally, in combinationmore » with a crystallographic analysis of the GluRIIB ligand binding domain, we use this system to characterize the subunit dependence of assembly, channel block, and ligand selectivity for Drosophila NMJ glutamate receptors.« less

  15. Cortical neurons exposed to glutamate rapidly leak preloaded chromium 51

    SciTech Connect

    Maulucci-Gedde, M.; Choi, D.W.

    1987-05-01

    The acute toxic effects of excess glutamate exposure on cortical neurons in culture was followed using a novel adaptation of the /sup 51/Cr efflux assay. Although the acute, sodium-dependent phase of glutamate neurotoxicity may contribute to several acute disease settings, including sustained seizures and stroke, functional aspects of the phenomenon have not been previously studied. We report here that the earliest morphologic sign of glutamate neurotoxicity, neuronal swelling, is accompanied by a large efflux of complexed /sup 51/Cr from preloaded neurons in the first hour after exposure, and that this efflux is detectable as early as 15 min after the onset of glutamate exposure. We suggest that this pathological burst of /sup 51/Cr may result from glutamate-induced leakiness of neuronal cell membranes.

  16. The role of neural connexins in HeLa cell mobility and intercellular communication through tunneling tubes.

    PubMed

    Rimkutė, Lina; Jotautis, Vaidas; Marandykina, Alina; Sveikatienė, Renata; Antanavičiūtė, Ieva; Skeberdis, Vytenis Arvydas

    2016-01-13

    Membranous tunneling tubes (TTs) are a recently discovered new form of communication between remote cells allowing their electrical synchronization, migration, and transfer of cellular materials. TTs have been identified in the brain and share similarities with neuronal processes. TTs can be open-ended, close-ended or contain functional gap junctions at the membrane interface. Gap junctions are formed of two unapposed hemichannels composed of six connexin (Cx) subunits. There are evidences that Cxs also play channel-independent role in cell adhesion, migration, division, differentiation, formation of neuronal networks and tumorigenicity. These properties of Cxs and TTs may synergetically determine the cellular and intercellular processes. Therefore, we examined the impact of Cxs expressed in the nervous system (Cx36, Cx40, Cx43, Cx45, and Cx47) on: 1) cell mobility; 2) formation and properties of TTs; and 3) transfer of siRNA between remote cells through TTs. We have identified two types of TTs between HeLa cells: F-actin rich only and containing F-actin and α-tubulin. The morphology of TTs was not influenced by expression of examined connexins; however, Cx36-EGFP-expressing cells formed more TTs while cells expressing Cx43-EGFP, Cx45, and Cx47 formed fewer TTs between each other compared with wt and Cx40-CFP-expressing cells. Also, Cx36-EGFP and Cx40-CFP-expressing HeLa cells were more mobile compared with wt and other Cxs-expressing cells. TTs containing Cx40-CFP, Cx43-EGFP, or Cx47 gap junctions were capable of transmitting double-stranded small interfering RNA; however, Cx36-EGFP and Cx45 were not permeable to it. In addition, we show that Cx43-EGFP-expressing HeLa cells and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cells can couple to the mesenchymal stem cells through TTs. Different Cxs may modulate the mobility of cells and formation of TTs in an opposite manner; siRNA transfer through the GJ-containing TTs is Cx isoform-dependent.

  17. Expression of glutamate receptor subunits in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Stepulak, Andrzej; Luksch, Hella; Gebhardt, Christine; Uckermann, Ortrud; Marzahn, Jenny; Sifringer, Marco; Rzeski, Wojciech; Staufner, Christian; Brocke, Katja S; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2009-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a role for glutamate and its receptors in the biology of cancer. This study was designed to systematically analyze the expression of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subunits in various human cancer cell lines, compare expression levels to those in human brain tissue and, using electrophysiological techniques, explore whether cancer cells respond to glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists. Expression analysis of glutamate receptor subunits NR1-NR3B, GluR1-GluR7, KA1, KA2 and mGluR1-mGluR8 was performed by means of RT-PCR in human rhabdomyosarcoma/medulloblastoma (TE671), neuroblastoma (SK-NA-S), thyroid carcinoma (FTC 238), lung carcinoma (SK-LU-1), astrocytoma (MOGGCCM), multiple myeloma (RPMI 8226), glioma (U87-MG and U343), lung carcinoma (A549), colon adenocarcinoma (HT 29), T cell leukemia cells (Jurkat E6.1), breast carcinoma (T47D) and colon adenocarcinoma (LS180). Analysis revealed that all glutamate receptor subunits were differentially expressed in the tumor cell lines. For the majority of tumors, expression levels of NR2B, GluR4, GluR6 and KA2 were lower compared to human brain tissue. Confocal imaging revealed that selected glutamate receptor subunit proteins were expressed in tumor cells. By means of patch-clamp analysis, it was shown that A549 and TE671 cells depolarized in response to application of glutamate agonists and that this effect was reversed by glutamate receptor antagonists. This study reveals that glutamate receptor subunits are differentially expressed in human tumor cell lines at the mRNA and the protein level, and that their expression is associated with the formation of functional channels. The potential role of glutamate receptor antagonists in cancer therapy is a feasible goal to be explored in clinical trials.

  18. Prefrontal glutamate correlates of methamphetamine sensitization and preference

    PubMed Central

    Lominac, Kevin D.; Quadir, Sema G.; Barrett, Hannah M.; McKenna, Courtney L.; Schwartz, Lisa M.; Ruiz, Paige N.; Wroten, Melissa G.; Campbell, Rianne R.; Miller, Bailey W.; Holloway, John J.; Travis, Katherine O.; Rajasekar, Ganesh; Maliniak, Dan; Thompson, Andrew B.; Urman, Lawrence E.; Kippin, Tod E.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Szumlinski, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a widely abused, highly addictive, psychostimulant that elicits pronounced deficits in neurocognitive function related to hypo-functioning of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Our understanding of how repeated methamphetamine impacts excitatory glutamatergic transmission within the PFC is limited, as is information about the relation between PFC glutamate and addiction vulnerability/resiliency. In vivo microdialysis and immunoblotting studies characterized the effects of methamphetamine (10 injections of 2 mg/kg, IP) upon extracellular glutamate in C57BL/6J mice and upon glutamate receptor and transporter expression, within the medial PFC. Glutamatergic correlates of both genetic and idiopathic variance in MA preference/intake were determined through studies of high versus low MA-drinking selectively bred mouse lines (MAHDR versus MALDR, respectively) and inbred C57BL/6J mice exhibiting spontaneously divergent place-conditioning phenotypes. Repeated methamphetamine sensitized drug-induced glutamate release and lowered indices of NMDA receptor expression in C57BL/6J mice, but did not alter basal extracellular glutamate content or total protein expression of Homer proteins, or metabotropic or AMPA glutamate receptors. Elevated basal glutamate, blunted methamphetamine-induced glutamate release and ERK activation, as well as reduced protein expression of mGlu2/3 and Homer2a/b were all correlated biochemical traits of selection for high versus low methamphetamine drinking, and Homer2a/b levels were inversely correlated with the motivational valence of methamphetamine in C57BL/6J mice. These data provide novel evidence that repeated, low-dose, methamphetamine is sufficient to perturb pre- and post-synaptic aspects of glutamate transmission within the medial PFC and that glutamate anomalies within this region may contribute to both genetic and idiopathic variance in methamphetamine addiction vulnerability/resiliency. PMID:26742098

  19. Morphine Induces Ubiquitin-Proteasome Activity and Glutamate Transporter Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liling; Wang, Shuxing; Sung, Backil; Lim, Grewo; Mao, Jianren

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate transporters play a crucial role in physiological glutamate homeostasis, neurotoxicity, and glutamatergic regulation of opioid tolerance. However, how the glutamate transporter turnover is regulated remains poorly understood. Here we show that chronic morphine exposure induced posttranscriptional down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAC1 in C6 glioma cells with a concurrent decrease in glutamate uptake and increase in proteasome activity, which were blocked by the selective proteasome inhibitor MG-132 or lactacystin but not the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquin. At the cellular level, chronic morphine induced the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome Ten)-mediated up-regulation of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Nedd4 via cAMP/protein kinase A signaling, leading to EAAC1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Either Nedd4 or PTEN knockdown with small interfering RNA prevented the morphine-induced EAAC1 degradation and decreased glutamate uptake. These data indicate that cAMP/protein kinase A signaling serves as an intracellular regulator upstream to the activation of the PTEN/Nedd4-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome system activity that is critical for glutamate transporter turnover. Under an in vivo condition, chronic morphine exposure also induced posttranscriptional down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAC1, which was prevented by MG-132, and transcriptional up-regulation of PTEN and Nedd4 within the spinal cord dorsal horn. Thus, inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated glutamate transporter degradation may be an important mechanism for preventing glutamate overexcitation and may offer a new strategy for treating certain neurological disorders and improving opioid therapy in chronic pain management. PMID:18539596

  20. Prefrontal glutamate correlates of methamphetamine sensitization and preference.

    PubMed

    Lominac, Kevin D; Quadir, Sema G; Barrett, Hannah M; McKenna, Courtney L; Schwartz, Lisa M; Ruiz, Paige N; Wroten, Melissa G; Campbell, Rianne R; Miller, Bailey W; Holloway, John J; Travis, Katherine O; Rajasekar, Ganesh; Maliniak, Dan; Thompson, Andrew B; Urman, Lawrence E; Kippin, Tod E; Phillips, Tamara J; Szumlinski, Karen K

    2016-03-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a widely misused, highly addictive psychostimulant that elicits pronounced deficits in neurocognitive function related to hypo-functioning of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Our understanding of how repeated MA impacts excitatory glutamatergic transmission within the PFC is limited, as is information about the relationship between PFC glutamate and addiction vulnerability/resiliency. In vivo microdialysis and immunoblotting studies characterized the effects of MA (ten injections of 2 mg/kg, i.p.) upon extracellular glutamate in C57BL/6J mice and upon glutamate receptor and transporter expression, within the medial PFC. Glutamatergic correlates of both genetic and idiopathic variance in MA preference/intake were determined through studies of high vs. low MA-drinking selectively bred mouse lines (MAHDR vs. MALDR, respectively) and inbred C57BL/6J mice exhibiting spontaneously divergent place-conditioning phenotypes. Repeated MA sensitized drug-induced glutamate release and lowered indices of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor expression in C57BL/6J mice, but did not alter basal extracellular glutamate content or total protein expression of Homer proteins, or metabotropic or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid glutamate receptors. Elevated basal glutamate, blunted MA-induced glutamate release and ERK activation, as well as reduced protein expression of mGlu2/3 and Homer2a/b were all correlated biochemical traits of selection for high vs. low MA drinking, and Homer2a/b levels were inversely correlated with the motivational valence of MA in C57BL/6J mice. These data provide novel evidence that repeated, low-dose MA is sufficient to perturb pre- and post-synaptic aspects of glutamate transmission within the medial PFC and that glutamate anomalies within this region may contribute to both genetic and idiopathic variance in MA addiction vulnerability/resiliency.

  1. Serum Glutamic-Oxaloacetic Transaminase (GOT) and Glutamic-Pyruvic Transaminase (GPT) Levels in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Chen, Li-Mei; Fang, Wen-Hui; Lin, Lan-Ping; Loh, Ching-Hui

    2010-01-01

    The elevated serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) rate among people with intellectual disabilities (ID) is unknown and have not been sufficiently studies. The present paper aims to provide the profile of GOT and GPT, and their associated relationship with other biochemical levels of children or…

  2. Serum Glutamic-Oxaloacetic Transaminase (GOT) and Glutamic-Pyruvic Transaminase (GPT) Levels in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Chen, Li-Mei; Fang, Wen-Hui; Lin, Lan-Ping; Loh, Ching-Hui

    2010-01-01

    The elevated serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) rate among people with intellectual disabilities (ID) is unknown and have not been sufficiently studies. The present paper aims to provide the profile of GOT and GPT, and their associated relationship with other biochemical levels of children or…

  3. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Verwer, R W H; van Wamelen, D J; Qi, X-R; Gao, S-F; Lucassen, P J; Swaab, D F

    2016-11-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the neuronal/glial glutamate transporters was determined by qPCR in postmortem prefrontal cortex. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) were selected from young MDD patients who had committed suicide (MDD-S; n = 17), from MDD patients who died of non-suicide related causes (MDD-NS; n = 7) and from matched control subjects (n = 12). We also compared elderly depressed patients who had not committed suicide (n = 14) with matched control subjects (n = 22). We found that neuronal located components (EAAT3, EAAT4, ASCT1, SNAT1, SNAT2) of the glutamate-glutamine cycle were increased in the ACC while the astroglia located components (EAAT1, EAAT2, GLUL) were decreased in the DLPFC of MDD-S patients. In contrast, most of the components in the cycle were increased in the DLPFC of MDD-NS patients. In conclusion, the glutamate-glutamine cycle - and thus glutamine transmission - is differentially affected in depressed suicide patients and depressed non-suicide patients in an area specific way. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of glutamate and its receptors in autism and the use of glutamate receptor antagonists in treatment.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Donald C

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and may be a key neurotransmitter involved in autism. Literature pertaining to glutamate and autism or related disorders (e.g., Fragile X syndrome) is reviewed in this article. Interest in glutamatergic dysfunction in autism is high due to increasing convergent evidence implicating the system in the disorder from peripheral biomarkers, neuroimaging, protein expression, genetics and animal models. Currently, there are no pharmaceutical interventions approved for autism that address glutamate deficits in the disorder. New treatments related to glutamatergic neurotransmission, however, are emerging. In addition, older glutamate-modulating medications with approved indications for use in other disorders are being investigated for re-tasking as treatments for autism. This review presents evidence in support of glutamate abnormalities in autism and the potential for translation into new treatments for the disorder.

  5. The role of glutamate and its receptors in autism and the use of glutamate receptor antagonists in treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Donald C.

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and may be a key neurotransmitter involved in autism. Literature pertaining to glutamate and autism or related disorders (e.g., Fragile X syndrome) is reviewed in this article. Interest in glutamatergic dysfunction in autism is high due to increasing convergent evidence implicating the system in the disorder from peripheral biomarkers, neuroimaging, protein expression, genetics and animal models. Currently, there are no pharmaceutical interventions approved for autism that address glutamate deficits in the disorder. New treatments related to glutamatergic neurotransmission, however, are emerging. In addition, older glutamate-modulating medications with approved indications for use in other disorders are being investigated for re-tasking as treatments for autism. This review presents evidence in support of glutamate abnormalities in autism and the potential for translation into new treatments for the disorder. PMID:24752754

  6. Glutamate-induced glutamate release: A proposed mechanism for calcium bursting in astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larter, Raima; Craig, Melissa Glendening

    2005-12-01

    Here we present a new model for the generation of complex calcium-bursting patterns in astrocytes, a type of brain cell recently implicated in a variety of neural functions including memory formation. The model involves two positive feedback processes, in which the key feedback species are calcium ion and glutamate. The latter is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and has been shown to be involved in bidirectional communication between astrocytes and nearby neurons. The glutamate feedback process considered here is shown to be critical for the generation of complex bursting oscillations in the astrocytes and to, perhaps, code for information which may be passed from neuron to neuron via the astrocyte. These processes may be involved in memory storage and formation as well as in mechanisms which lead to dynamical diseases such as epilepsy.

  7. Poly(γ-glutamic acid), coagulation? Anticoagulation?

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Peng, Fang; Zhang, Tao; Chi, Bo; Xu, Hong; Mao, Chun; Feng, Shuaihui

    2016-11-01

    Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) powder was usually used as hemostatic agent because of its excellent physical properties of water-absorption and water-locking. However, if γ-PGA absorbs enough water, how about its blood compatibility? Here, the other side of the coin was investigated. The anticoagulant properties of γ-PGA were characterized by in vitro coagulation tests, hemolytic assay, platelet adhesion, and platelet activation. Moreover, cytotoxicity experiments of γ-PGA were also carried out by MTT assay. Results indicated that the sufficient water-absorbed γ-PGA has good anticoagulant property and non-cytotoxicity. It means γ-PGA has good anticoagulant property, non-cytotoxicity. If γ-PGA has absorbed enough water, it can be used as an anticoagulation biomaterial. With double effects (coagulation and anticoagulation), the γ-PGA with desirable bioproperties can be readily tailored to cater to various biomedical applications.

  8. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Moreno, José L; Sealfon, Stuart C; González-Maeso, Javier

    2009-12-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most common mental illnesses, with hereditary and environmental factors important for its etiology. All antipsychotics have in common a high affinity for monoaminergic receptors. Whereas hallucinations and delusions usually respond to typical (haloperidol-like) and atypical (clozapine-like) monoaminergic antipsychotics, their efficacy in improving negative symptoms and cognitive deficits remains inadequate. In addition, devastating side effects are a common characteristic of monoaminergic antipsychotics. Recent biochemical, preclinical and clinical findings support group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2 and mGluR3) as a new approach to treat schizophrenia. This paper reviews the status of general knowledge of mGluR2 and mGluR3 in the psychopharmacology, genetics and neuropathology of schizophrenia.

  9. The cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc− drives breast tumor cell glutamate release and cancer-induced bone pain

    PubMed Central

    Slosky, Lauren M.; BassiriRad, Neemah M.; Symons, Ashley M.; Thompson, Michelle; Doyle, Timothy; Forte, Brittany L.; Staatz, William D.; Bui, Lynn; Neumann, William L.; Mantyh, Patrick W.; Salvemini, Daniela; Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Vanderah, Todd W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bone is one of the leading sites of metastasis for frequently diagnosed malignancies, including those arising in the breast, prostate and lung. Although these cancers develop unnoticed and are painless in their primary sites, bone metastases result in debilitating pain. Deeper investigation of this pain may reveal etiology and lead to early cancer detection. Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) is inadequately managed with current standard-of-care analgesics and dramatically diminishes patient quality of life. While CIBP etiology is multifaceted, elevated levels of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, in the bone-tumor microenvironment may drive maladaptive nociceptive signaling. Here, we establish a relationship between the reactive nitrogen species peroxynitrite, tumor-derived glutamate, and CIBP. In vitro and in a syngeneic in vivo model of breast CIBP, murine mammary adenocarcinoma cells significantly elevated glutamate via the cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc−. The well-known system xc− inhibitor sulfasalazine significantly reduced levels of glutamate and attenuated CIBP-associated flinching and guarding behaviors. Peroxynitrite, a highly reactive species produced in tumors, significantly increased system xc− functional expression and tumor cell glutamate release. Scavenging peroxynitrite with the iron and mangano-based porphyrins, FeTMPyP and SRI10, significantly diminished tumor cell system xc− functional expression, reduced femur glutamate levels and mitigated CIBP. In sum, we demonstrate how breast cancer bone metastases upregulate a cystine/glutamate co-transporter to elevate extracellular glutamate. Pharmacological manipulation of peroxynitrite or system xc− attenuates CIBP, supporting a role for tumor-derived glutamate in CIBP and validating the targeting of system xc− as a novel therapeutic strategy for the management of metastatic bone pain. PMID:27482630

  10. Glutamate and GABA in Appetite Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Teresa C.

    2013-01-01

    Appetite is regulated by a coordinated interplay between gut, adipose tissue, and brain. A primary site for the regulation of appetite is the hypothalamus where interaction between orexigenic neurons, expressing Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related protein, and anorexigenic neurons, expressing Pro-opiomelanocortin cocaine/Amphetamine-related transcript, controls energy homeostasis. Within the hypothalamus, several peripheral signals have been shown to modulate the activity of these neurons, including the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and the anorexigenic hormones insulin and leptin. In addition to the accumulated knowledge on neuropeptide signaling, presence and function of amino acid neurotransmitters in key hypothalamic neurons brought a new light into appetite regulation. Therefore, the principal aim of this review will be to describe the current knowledge of the role of amino acid neurotransmitters in the mechanism of neuronal activation during appetite regulation and the associated neuronal-astrocytic metabolic coupling mechanisms. Glutamate and GABA dominate synaptic transmission in the hypothalamus and administration of their receptors agonists into hypothalamic nuclei stimulates feeding. By using 13C High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy based analysis, the Cerdán group has shown that increased neuronal firing in mice hypothalamus, as triggered by appetite during the feeding-fasting paradigm, may stimulate the use of lactate as neuronal fuel leading to increased astrocytic glucose consumption and glycolysis. Moreover, fasted mice showed increased hypothalamic [2-13C]GABA content, which may be explained by the existence of GABAergic neurons in key appetite regulation hypothalamic nuclei. Interestingly, increased [2-13C]GABA concentration in the hypothalamus of fasted animals appears to result mainly from reduction in GABA metabolizing pathways, rather than increased GABA synthesis by augmented activity of the glutamate

  11. Allosteric Modulation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sheffler, Douglas J.; Gregory, Karen J.; Rook, Jerri M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The development of receptor subtype-selective ligands by targeting allosteric sites of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has proven highly successful in recent years. One GPCR family that has greatly benefited from this approach is the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus). These family C GPCRs participate in the neuromodulatory actions of glutamate throughout the CNS, where they play a number of key roles in regulating synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. A large number of mGlu subtype-selective allosteric modulators have been identified, the majority of which are thought to bind within the transmembrane regions of the receptor. These modulators can either enhance or inhibit mGlu functional responses and, together with mGlu knockout mice, have furthered the establishment of the physiologic roles of many mGlu subtypes. Numerous pharmacological and receptor mutagenesis studies have been aimed at providing a greater mechanistic understanding of the interaction of mGlu allosteric modulators with the receptor, which have revealed evidence for common allosteric binding sites across multiple mGlu subtypes and the presence for multiple allosteric sites within a single mGlu subtype. Recent data have also revealed that mGlu allosteric modulators can display functional selectivity toward particular signal transduction cascades downstream of an individual mGlu subtype. Studies continue to validate the therapeutic utility of mGlu allosteric modulators as a potential therapeutic approach for a number of disorders including anxiety, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, and Fragile X syndrome. PMID:21907906

  12. Glutamate and GABA in Appetite Regulation.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Teresa C

    2013-01-01

    Appetite is regulated by a coordinated interplay between gut, adipose tissue, and brain. A primary site for the regulation of appetite is the hypothalamus where interaction between orexigenic neurons, expressing Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related protein, and anorexigenic neurons, expressing Pro-opiomelanocortin cocaine/Amphetamine-related transcript, controls energy homeostasis. Within the hypothalamus, several peripheral signals have been shown to modulate the activity of these neurons, including the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and the anorexigenic hormones insulin and leptin. In addition to the accumulated knowledge on neuropeptide signaling, presence and function of amino acid neurotransmitters in key hypothalamic neurons brought a new light into appetite regulation. Therefore, the principal aim of this review will be to describe the current knowledge of the role of amino acid neurotransmitters in the mechanism of neuronal activation during appetite regulation and the associated neuronal-astrocytic metabolic coupling mechanisms. Glutamate and GABA dominate synaptic transmission in the hypothalamus and administration of their receptors agonists into hypothalamic nuclei stimulates feeding. By using (13)C High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy based analysis, the Cerdán group has shown that increased neuronal firing in mice hypothalamus, as triggered by appetite during the feeding-fasting paradigm, may stimulate the use of lactate as neuronal fuel leading to increased astrocytic glucose consumption and glycolysis. Moreover, fasted mice showed increased hypothalamic [2-(13)C]GABA content, which may be explained by the existence of GABAergic neurons in key appetite regulation hypothalamic nuclei. Interestingly, increased [2-(13)C]GABA concentration in the hypothalamus of fasted animals appears to result mainly from reduction in GABA metabolizing pathways, rather than increased GABA synthesis by augmented activity of the glutamate

  13. Calcium regulates glutamate dehydrogenase and poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis in Bacillus natto.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yonghong; Dong, Guiru; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yuling; Chen, Weifeng

    2016-04-01

    To study the effect of Ca(2+) on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and its role in poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) synthesis in Bacillus natto HSF 1410. When the concentration of Ca(2+) varied from 0 to 0.1 g/l in the growth medium of B. natto HSF 1410, γ-PGA production increased from 6.8 to 9.7 g/l, while GDH specific activity and NH4Cl consumption improved from 183 to 295 U/mg and from 0.65 to 0.77 g/l, respectively. GDH with α-ketoglutarate as substrate primarily used NADPH as coenzyme with a K m of 0.08 mM. GDH was responsible for the synthesis of endogenous glutamate. The specific activity of GDH remained essentially unchanged in the presence of CaCl2 (0.05-0.2 g/l) in vitro. However, the specific activity of GDH and its expression was significantly increased by CaCl2 in vivo. Therefore, the regulation of GDH and PGA synthesis by Ca(2+) is an intracellular process. Calcium regulation may be an effective approach for producing γ-PGA on an industrial scale.

  14. Glutamine-Glutamate Cycle Flux Is Similar in Cultured Astrocytes and Brain and Both Glutamate Production and Oxidation Are Mainly Catalyzed by Aspartate Aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Leif; Rothman, Douglas L

    2017-02-24

    The glutamine-glutamate cycle provides neurons with astrocyte-generated glutamate/γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and oxidizes glutamate in astrocytes, and it returns released transmitter glutamate/GABA to neurons after astrocytic uptake. This review deals primarily with the glutamate/GABA generation/oxidation, although it also shows similarity between metabolic rates in cultured astrocytes and intact brain. A key point is identification of the enzyme(s) converting astrocytic α-ketoglutarate to glutamate and vice versa. Most experiments in cultured astrocytes, including those by one of us, suggest that glutamate formation is catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) and its degradation by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). Strongly supported by results shown in Table 1 we now propose that both reactions are primarily catalyzed by AAT. This is possible because the formation occurs in the cytosol and the degradation in mitochondria and they are temporally separate. High glutamate/glutamine concentrations abolish the need for glutamate production from α-ketoglutarate and due to metabolic coupling between glutamate synthesis and oxidation these high concentrations render AAT-mediated glutamate oxidation impossible. This necessitates the use of GDH under these conditions, shown by insensitivity of the oxidation to the transamination inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA). Experiments using lower glutamate/glutamine concentration show inhibition of glutamate oxidation by AOAA, consistent with the coupled transamination reactions described here.

  15. Cultures of rat astrocytes challenged with a steady supply of glutamate: new model to study flux distribution in the glutamate-glutamine cycle.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Luís L; Monteiro, Miguel A R; Alves, Paula M; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Santos, Helena

    2005-09-01

    Glutamate metabolism in astrocytes was studied using an experimental setup that simulates the role of neurons (glutamate producers and glutamine consumers) by the addition of glutaminase to the culture medium. Thereby, a steady supply of glutamate was imposed at the expense of glutamine, and the stress intensity was manipulated by changing the glutaminase concentration. Glutamate supply rates in the range 8-23 nmol/min/mg protein were examined for periods of up to 48 h. When the glutamate supply rate exceeded the uptake rate of this amino acid, a transient increase in the extracellular concentration of glutamate was observed. In response to this stress, the fluxes through the glutamate transporter and glutamine synthetase were increased considerably, and the extracellular concentration of glutamate was eventually restored to a low level. The increased levels of glutamine synthetase were demonstrated by immunoblotting analysis. The effect on glutamate metabolism of the transaminase inhibitor, aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), and of NH4Cl was also investigated. The supply of glutamate caused a concomitant reduction in the levels of phosphocreatine, phosphoethanolamine, and phosphocholine without affecting the ATP pool. Glutamine synthetase was shown to be is a key element in the control of glutamate metabolism in astrocytic cultures. The metabolic fate of glutamate depends greatly on the time of endurance to the challenge: in naive cells, glutamate was primarily metabolized through the transaminase pathway, while in well-adapted cells glutamate was converted almost exclusively through glutamine synthetase.

  16. Glutamine-Glutamate Cycle Flux Is Similar in Cultured Astrocytes and Brain and Both Glutamate Production and Oxidation Are Mainly Catalyzed by Aspartate Aminotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Leif; Rothman, Douglas L

    2017-01-01

    The glutamine-glutamate cycle provides neurons with astrocyte-generated glutamate/γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and oxidizes glutamate in astrocytes, and it returns released transmitter glutamate/GABA to neurons after astrocytic uptake. This review deals primarily with the glutamate/GABA generation/oxidation, although it also shows similarity between metabolic rates in cultured astrocytes and intact brain. A key point is identification of the enzyme(s) converting astrocytic α-ketoglutarate to glutamate and vice versa. Most experiments in cultured astrocytes, including those by one of us, suggest that glutamate formation is catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) and its degradation by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). Strongly supported by results shown in Table 1 we now propose that both reactions are primarily catalyzed by AAT. This is possible because the formation occurs in the cytosol and the degradation in mitochondria and they are temporally separate. High glutamate/glutamine concentrations abolish the need for glutamate production from α-ketoglutarate and due to metabolic coupling between glutamate synthesis and oxidation these high concentrations render AAT-mediated glutamate oxidation impossible. This necessitates the use of GDH under these conditions, shown by insensitivity of the oxidation to the transamination inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA). Experiments using lower glutamate/glutamine concentration show inhibition of glutamate oxidation by AOAA, consistent with the coupled transamination reactions described here. PMID:28245547

  17. Food Application of Newly Developed Handy-type Glutamate Sensor.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Yuuka; Oikawa, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

     Tests on physiological functions of umami have been actively conducted and a need recognized for a high-performance quantification device that is simple and cost-effective, and whose use is not limited to a particular location or user. To address this need, Ajinomoto Co. and Tanita Corp. have jointly been researching and developing a simple device for glutamate measurement. The device uses L-glutamate oxidase immobilized on a hydrogen peroxide electrode. L-glutamate in the sample is converted to α-ketoglutaric acid, which produces hydrogen peroxide. Subsequently, the electrical current from the electrochemical reaction of hydrogen peroxide is measured to determine the L-glutamate concentration. In order to evaluate its basic performance, we used this device to measure the concentration of L-glutamate standard solutions. In a concentration range of 0-1.0%, the difference from the theoretical value was minimal. The coefficient of variation (CV) value of 3 measurements was 4% or less. This shows that the device has a reasonable level of precision and accuracy. The device was also used in trial measurements of L-glutamate concentrations in food. There was a good correlation between the results obtained using the developed device and those obtained with an amino acid analyzer; the correlation coefficient was R=0.997 (n=24). In this review, we demonstrate the use of our device to measure the glutamate concentration in miso soup served daily at a home for elderly people, and other foods and ingredients.

  18. A mechanism of sulfite neurotoxicity: direct inhibition of glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Vincent, Annette Shoba; Halliwell, Barry; Wong, Kim Ping

    2004-10-08

    Exposure of Neuro-2a and PC12 cells to micromolar concentrations of sulfite caused an increase in reactive oxygen species and a decrease in ATP. Likewise, the biosynthesis of ATP in intact rat brain mitochondria from the oxidation of glutamate was inhibited by micromolar sulfite. Glutamate-driven respiration increased the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and this was abolished by sulfite but the MMP generated by oxidation of malate and succinate was not affected. The increased rate of production of NADH from exogenous NAD+ and glutamate added to rat brain mitochondrial extracts was inhibited by sulfite, and mitochondria preincubated with sulfite failed to reduce NAD+. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in rat brain mitochondrial extract was inhibited dose-dependently by sulfite as was the activity of a purified enzyme. An increase in the Km (glutamate) and a decrease in Vmax resulting in an attenuation in Vmax/Km (glutamate) at 100 microm sulfite suggest a mixed type of inhibition. However, uncompetitive inhibition was noted with decreases in both Km (NAD+) and Vmax, whereas Vmax/Km (NAD+) remained relatively constant. We propose that GDH is one target of action of sulfite, leading to a decrease in alpha-ketoglutarate and a diminished flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle accompanied by a decrease in NADH through the mitochondrial electron transport chain, a decreased MMP, and a decrease in ATP synthesis. Because glutamate is a major metabolite in the brain, inhibition of GDH by sulfite could contribute to the severe phenotype of sulfite oxidase deficiency in human infants.

  19. Neurodegeneration in the Brain Tumor Microenvironment: Glutamate in the Limelight

    PubMed Central

    Savaskan, Nicolai E.; Fan, Zheng; Broggini, Thomas; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are characterized by destructive growth and neuronal cell death making them one of the most devastating diseases. Neurodegenerative actions of malignant gliomas resemble mechanisms also found in many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Recent data demonstrate that gliomas seize neuronal glutamate signaling for their own growth advantage. Excessive glutamate release via the glutamate/cystine antiporter xCT (system xc-, SLC7a11) renders cancer cells resistant to chemotherapeutics and create the tumor microenvironment toxic for neurons. In particular the glutamate/cystine antiporter xCT takes center stage in neurodegenerative processes and sets this transporter a potential prime target for cancer therapy. Noteworthy is the finding, that reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and thereby TRP channels can potentiate glutamate release. Yet another important biological feature of the xCT/glutamate system is its modulatory effect on the tumor microenvironment with impact on host cells and the cancer stem cell niche. The EMA and FDA-approved drug sulfasalazine (SAS) presents a lead compound for xCT inhibition, although so far clinical trials on glioblastomas with SAS were ambiguous. Here, we critically analyze the mechanisms of action of xCT antiporter on malignant gliomas and in the tumor microenvironment. Deciphering the impact of xCT and glutamate and its relation to TRP channels in brain tumors pave the way for developing important cancer microenvironmental modulators and drugable lead targets. PMID:26411769

  20. Evidence for Glutamate as a Neuroglial Transmitter within Sensory Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Ling-Hsuan; Gong, Kerui; Adedoyin, Mary; Ng, Johnson; Bhargava, Aditi; Ohara, Peter T.; Jasmin, Luc

    2013-01-01

    This study examines key elements of glutamatergic transmission within sensory ganglia of the rat. We show that the soma of primary sensory neurons release glutamate when depolarized. Using acute dissociated mixed neuronal/glia cultures of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or trigeminal ganglia and a colorimetric assay, we show that when glutamate uptake by satellite glial cells (SGCs) is inhibited, KCl stimulation leads to simultaneous increase of glutamate in the culture medium. With calcium imaging we see that the soma of primary sensory neurons and SGCs respond to AMPA, NMDA, kainate and mGluR agonists, and selective antagonists block this response. Using whole cell patch-clamp technique, inward currents were recorded from small diameter (<30 µm) DRG neurons from intact DRGs (ex-vivo whole ganglion preparation) in response to local application of the above glutamate receptor agonists. Following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of either the inferior orbital nerve or the sciatic nerve, glutamate expression increases in the trigeminal ganglia and DRG respectively. This increase occurs in neurons of all diameters and is present in the somata of neurons with injured axons as well as in somata of neighboring uninjured neurons. These data provides additional evidence that glutamate can be released within the sensory ganglion, and that the somata of primary sensory neurons as well as SGCs express functional glutamate receptors at their surface. These findings, together with our previous gene knockdown data, suggest that glutamatergic transmission within the ganglion could impact nociceptive threshold. PMID:23844184

  1. Dietary Glutamate: Interactions With the Enteric Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Xia, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Digestion of dietary protein elevates intraluminal concentrations of glutamate in the small intestine, some of which gain access to the enteric nervous system (ENS). Glutamate, in the central nervous system (CNS), is an excitatory neurotransmitter. A dogma that glutamatergic neurophysiology in the ENS recapitulates CNS glutamatergic function persists. We reassessed the premise that glutamatergic signaling in the ENS recapitulates its neurotransmitter role in the CNS. Methods Pharmacological analysis of actions of receptor agonists and antagonists in concert with immunohistochemical localization of glutamate transporters and receptors was used. Analysis focused on intracellularly-recorded electrical and synaptic behavior of ENS neurons, on stimulation of mucosal secretion by secretomotor neurons in the submucosal plexus and on muscle contractile behavior mediated by musculomotor neurons in the myenteric plexus. Results Immunoreactivity for glutamate was expressed in ENS neurons. ENS neurons expressed immunoreactivity for the EAAC-1 glutamate transporter. Neither L-glutamate nor glutamatergic receptor agonists had excitatory actions on ENS neurons. Metabotropic glutamatergic receptor agonists did not directly stimulate neurogenic mucosal chloride secretion. Neither L-glutamate nor the metabotropic glutamatergic receptor agonist, aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (ACPD), changed the mean amplitude of spontaneously occurring contractions in circular or longitudinal strips of intestinal wall from either guinea pig or human small intestinal preparations. Conclusions Early discoveries, for excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission in the CNS, inspired enthusiasm that investigation in the ENS would yield discoveries recapitulating the CNS glutamatergic story. We found this not to be the case. PMID:24466444

  2. Small molecule glutaminase inhibitors block glutamate release from stimulated microglia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; O'Driscoll, Cliona M; Bressler, Joseph; Kaufmann, Walter; Rojas, Camilo J; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-03

    Glutaminase plays a critical role in the generation of glutamate, a key excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Excess glutamate release from activated macrophages and microglia correlates with upregulated glutaminase suggesting a pathogenic role for glutaminase. Both glutaminase siRNA and small molecule inhibitors have been shown to decrease excess glutamate and provide neuroprotection in multiple models of disease, including HIV-associated dementia (HAD), multiple sclerosis and ischemia. Consequently, inhibition of glutaminase could be of interest for treatment of these diseases. Bis-2-(5-phenylacetimido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide (BPTES) and 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), two most commonly used glutaminase inhibitors, are either poorly soluble or non-specific. Recently, several new BPTES analogs with improved physicochemical properties were reported. To evaluate these new inhibitors, we established a cell-based microglial activation assay measuring glutamate release. Microglia-mediated glutamate levels were significantly augmented by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands coincident with increased glutaminase activity. While several potent glutaminase inhibitors abrogated the increase in glutamate, a structurally related analog devoid of glutaminase activity was unable to block the increase. In the absence of glutamine, glutamate levels were significantly attenuated. These data suggest that the in vitro microglia assay may be a useful tool in developing glutaminase inhibitors of therapeutic interest.

  3. Evidence for glutamate as a neuroglial transmitter within sensory ganglia.

    PubMed

    Kung, Ling-Hsuan; Gong, Kerui; Adedoyin, Mary; Ng, Johnson; Bhargava, Aditi; Ohara, Peter T; Jasmin, Luc

    2013-01-01

    This study examines key elements of glutamatergic transmission within sensory ganglia of the rat. We show that the soma of primary sensory neurons release glutamate when depolarized. Using acute dissociated mixed neuronal/glia cultures of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or trigeminal ganglia and a colorimetric assay, we show that when glutamate uptake by satellite glial cells (SGCs) is inhibited, KCl stimulation leads to simultaneous increase of glutamate in the culture medium. With calcium imaging we see that the soma of primary sensory neurons and SGCs respond to AMPA, NMDA, kainate and mGluR agonists, and selective antagonists block this response. Using whole cell patch-clamp technique, inward currents were recorded from small diameter (<30 µm) DRG neurons from intact DRGs (ex-vivo whole ganglion preparation) in response to local application of the above glutamate receptor agonists. Following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of either the inferior orbital nerve or the sciatic nerve, glutamate expression increases in the trigeminal ganglia and DRG respectively. This increase occurs in neurons of all diameters and is present in the somata of neurons with injured axons as well as in somata of neighboring uninjured neurons. These data provides additional evidence that glutamate can be released within the sensory ganglion, and that the somata of primary sensory neurons as well as SGCs express functional glutamate receptors at their surface. These findings, together with our previous gene knockdown data, suggest that glutamatergic transmission within the ganglion could impact nociceptive threshold.

  4. Role of gap junctions in the contractile response to agonists in the mesenteric artery of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke-Tao; Li, Xin-Zhi; Li, Li; Jiang, Xue-Wei; Chen, Xin-Yan; Liu, Wei-Dong; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Zhong-Shuang; Si, Jun-Qiang

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effects of hypertension on the changes in gap junctions between vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the mesenteric artery (MA) of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Whole-cell patch clamp, pressure myography, real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), western blot analysis and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the differences in expression and function of the gap junction between MA VSMCs of SHR and control normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. (1) Whole-cell patch clamp measurements showed that the membrane capacitance and conductance of in-situ MA VSMCs of SHR were significantly greater than those of WKY rats (P<0.05), suggesting enhanced gap junction coupling between MA VSMCs of SHR. (2) The administration of phenylephrine (PE) and KCl (an endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor) initiated more pronounced vasoconstriction in SHR versus WKY rats (P<0.05). Furthermore, 2-APB (a gap junction inhibitor) attenuated PE- and KCl-induced vasoconstriction, and the inhibitory effects of 2-APB were significantly greater in SHR (P<0.05). (3) The expression of connexin 45 (Cx45) mRNA and protein in the MA was greater in SHR versus WKY rats (P<0.05). The level of phosphorylated Cx43 was significantly higher in SHR versus WKY rats (P<0.05), although the expression of total Cx43 mRNA and protein in the MA was equivalent between SHR and WKY rats. Electron microscopy revealed that the gap junctions were significantly larger in SHR versus WKY rats. Increases in the expression of Cx45 and phosphorylation of Cx43 may contribute to the enhancement of communication across gap junctions between MA VSMCs of SHR, which may increase the contractile response to agonists.

  5. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids.

  6. Connexin Hemichannel Composition Determines the FGF-1–induced Membrane Permeability and Free [Ca2+]i Responses

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Prado, Nicolás; Retamal, Mauricio A.; Shoji, Kenji F.; Martínez, Agustín D.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Cell surface hemichannels (HCs) composed of different connexin (Cx) types are present in diverse cells and their possible role on FGF-1–induced cellular responses remains unknown. Here, we show that FGF-1 transiently (4–14 h, maximal at 7 h) increases the membrane permeability through HCs in HeLa cells expressing Cx43 or Cx45 under physiological extracellular Ca2+/Mg2+ concentrations. The effect does not occur in HeLa cells expressing HCs constituted of Cx26 or Cx43 with its C-terminus truncated at aa 257, or in parental nontransfected HeLa cells. The increase in membrane permeability is associated with a rise in HC levels at the cell surface and a proportional increase in HC unitary events. The response requires an early intracellular free Ca2+ concentration increase, activation of a p38 MAP kinase-dependent pathway, and a regulatory site of Cx subunit C-terminus. The FGF-1–induced rise in membrane permeability is also associated with a late increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, suggesting that responsive HCs allow Ca2+ influx. The cell density of Cx26 and Cx43 HeLa transfectants cultured in serum-free medium was differentially affected by FGF-1. Thus, the FGF-1–induced cell permeabilization and derived consequences depend on the Cx composition of HCs. PMID:18495870

  7. Synteny between the pro+ marker and human glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase.

    PubMed

    Jones, C

    1975-10-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells with a specific auxotrophy for proline were fused with human cells from a variety of sources and the resulting hybrids analyzed for human genetic markers. Of 63 hybrid clones examined, 27 possessed both proline and cytoplasmic glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase markers; 36 had neither; and no clones were found possessing one and not the other. These results constitute evidence that the proline and glutamate oxalocetate transaminase markers are syntenic. Evidence for absence of synteny between these and a variety of other human genes is presented. Biochemical tracer experiments established that the proline biosynthetic pathway through glutamate has been restored in the Pro+ hybrids.

  8. GDH3 encodes a glutamate dehydrogenase isozyme, a previously unrecognized route for glutamate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, A; Deluna, A; Olivera, H; Valenzuela, L; Gonzalez, A

    1997-09-01

    It has been considered that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, like many other microorganisms, synthesizes glutamate through the action of NADP+-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+-GDH), encoded by GDH1, or through the combined action of glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase (GOGAT), encoded by GLN1 and GLT1, respectively. A double mutant of S. cerevisiae lacking NADP+-GDH and GOGAT activities was constructed. This strain was able to grow on ammonium as the sole nitrogen source and thus to synthesize glutamate through an alternative pathway. A computer search for similarities between the GDH1 nucleotide sequence and the complete yeast genome was carried out. In addition to identifying its cognate sequence at chromosome XIV, the search found that GDH1 showed high identity with a previously recognized open reading frame (GDH3) of chromosome I. Triple mutants impaired in GDH1, GLT1, and GDH3 were obtained. These were strict glutamate auxotrophs. Our results indicate that GDH3 plays a significant physiological role, providing glutamate when GDH1 and GLT1 are impaired. This is the first example of a microorganism possessing three pathways for glutamate biosynthesis.

  9. Relationship between increase in astrocytic GLT-1 glutamate transport and late-LTP

    PubMed Central

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na+-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) and late long-term potentiation (L-LTP). Four issues were addressed in this research: Which glutamate transporter is responsible for the increase in glutamate uptake during L-LTP? In what cell type in the hippocampus does the increase in glutamate uptake occur? Does a single type of cell contain all the mechanisms to respond to an induction stimulus with a change in glutamate uptake? What role does the increase in glutamate uptake play during L-LTP? We have confirmed that GLT-1 is responsible for the increase in glutamate uptake during L-LTP. Also, we found that astrocytes were responsible for much, if not all, of the increase in glutamate uptake in hippocampal slices during L-LTP. Additionally, we found that cultured astrocytes alone were able to respond to an induction stimulus with an increase in glutamate uptake. Inhibition of basal glutamate uptake did not affect the induction of L-LTP, but inhibition of the increase in glutamate uptake did inhibit both the expression of L-LTP and induction of additional LTP. It seems likely that heightened glutamate transport plays an ongoing role in the ability of hippocampal circuitry to code and store information. PMID:23166293

  10. The Influence of Glutamate on Axonal Compound Action Potential In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Abouelela, Ahmed; Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background Our previous experiments demonstrated modulation of the amplitude of the axonal compound action potential (CAP) by electrical stimulation. To verify assumption that glutamate released from axons could be involved in this phenomenon, the modification of the axonal CAP induced by glutamate was investigated. Objectives The major objective of this research is to verify the hypothesis that axonal activity would trigger the release of glutamate, which in turn would interact with specific axonal receptors modifying the amplitude of the action potential. Methods Segments of the sciatic nerve were exposed to exogenous glutamate in vitro, and CAP was recorded before and after glutamate application. In some experiments, the release of radioactive glutamate analog from the sciatic nerve exposed to exogenous glutamate was also evaluated. Results The glutamate-induced increase in CAP was blocked by different glutamate receptor antagonists. The effect of glutamate was not observed in Ca-free medium, and was blocked by antagonists of calcium channels. Exogenous glutamate, applied to the segments of sciatic nerve, induced the release of radioactive glutamate analog, demonstrating glutamate-induced glutamate release. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that axolemma contains components necessary for glutamatergic neurotransmission. Conclusion The proteins of the axonal membrane can under the influence of electrical stimulation or exogenous glutamate change membrane permeability and ionic conductance, leading to a change in the amplitude of CAP. We suggest that increased axonal activity leads to the release of glutamate that results in changes in the amplitude of CAPs.

  11. The Influence of Glutamate on Axonal Compound Action Potential In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Abouelela, Ahmed; Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background Our previous experiments demonstrated modulation of the amplitude of the axonal compound action potential (CAP) by electrical stimulation. To verify assumption that glutamate released from axons could be involved in this phenomenon, the modification of the axonal CAP induced by glutamate was investigated. Objectives The major objective of this research is to verify the hypothesis that axonal activity would trigger the release of glutamate, which in turn would interact with specific axonal receptors modifying the amplitude of the action potential. Methods Segments of the sciatic nerve were exposed to exogenous glutamate in vitro, and CAP was recorded before and after glutamate application. In some experiments, the release of radioactive glutamate analog from the sciatic nerve exposed to exogenous glutamate was also evaluated. Results The glutamate-induced increase in CAP was blocked by different glutamate receptor antagonists. The effect of glutamate was not observed in Ca-free medium, and was blocked by antagonists of calcium channels. Exogenous glutamate, applied to the segments of sciatic nerve, induced the release of radioactive glutamate analog, demonstrating glutamate-induced glutamate release. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that axolemma contains components necessary for glutamatergic neurotransmission. Conclusion The proteins of the axonal membrane can under the influence of electrical stimulation or exogenous glutamate change membrane permeability and ionic conductance, leading to a change in the amplitude of CAP. We suggest that increased axonal activity leads to the release of glutamate that results in changes in the amplitude of CAPs. PMID:28077958

  12. Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Glutamate Carrier SLC25A22 in Astrocytes Leads to Intracellular Glutamate Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Goubert, Emmanuelle; Mircheva, Yanina; Lasorsa, Francesco M; Melon, Christophe; Profilo, Emanuela; Sutera, Julie; Becq, Hélène; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Palmieri, Luigi; Aniksztejn, Laurent; Molinari, Florence

    2017-01-01

    The solute carrier family 25 (SLC25) drives the import of a large diversity of metabolites into mitochondria, a key cellular structure involved in many metabolic functions. Mutations of the mitochondrial glutamate carrier SLC25A22 (also named GC1) have been identified in early epileptic encephalopathy (EEE) and migrating partial seizures in infancy (MPSI) but the pathophysiological mechanism of GC1 deficiency is still unknown, hampered by the absence of an in vivo model. This carrier is mainly expressed in astrocytes and is the principal gate for glutamate entry into mitochondria. A sufficient supply of energy is essential for the proper function of the brain and mitochondria have a pivotal role in maintaining energy homeostasis. In this work, we wanted to study the consequences of GC1 absence in an in vitro model in order to understand if glutamate catabolism and/or mitochondrial function could be affected. First, short hairpin RNA (shRNA) designed to specifically silence GC1 were validated in rat C6 glioma cells. Silencing GC1 in C6 resulted in a reduction of the GC1 mRNA combined with a decrease of the mitochondrial glutamate carrier activity. Then, primary astrocyte cultures were prepared and transfected with shRNA-GC1 or mismatch-RNA (mmRNA) constructs using the Neon® Transfection System in order to target a high number of primary astrocytes, more than 64%. Silencing GC1 in primary astrocytes resulted in a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (Phosphate) (NAD(P)H) formation upon glutamate stimulation. We also observed that the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) was functional after glucose stimulation but not activated by glutamate, resulting in a lower level of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in silenced astrocytes compared to control cells. Moreover, GC1 inactivation resulted in an intracellular glutamate accumulation. Our results show that mitochondrial glutamate transport via GC1 is important in sustaining glutamate homeostasis in astrocytes

  13. Integration between Glycolysis and Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle Flux May Explain Preferential Glycolytic Increase during Brain Activation, Requiring Glutamate.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Leif; Chen, Ye

    2017-01-01

    The 1988 observation by Fox et al. (1988) that brief intense brain activation increases glycolysis (pyruvate formation from glucose) much more than oxidative metabolism has been abundantly confirmed. Specifically glycolytic increase was unexpected because the amount of ATP it generates is much smaller than that formed by subsequent oxidative metabolism of pyruvate. The present article shows that preferential glycolysis can be explained by metabolic processes associated with activation of the glutamate-glutamine cycle. The flux in this cycle, which is essential for production of transmitter glutamate and GABA, equals 75% of brain glucose utilization and each turn is associated with utilization of ~1 glucose molecule. About one half of the association between cycle flux and glucose metabolism occurs during neuronal conversion of glutamine to glutamate in a process similar to the malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS) except that glutamate is supplied from glutamine, not formed from α-ketoglutarate (αKG) as during operation of conventional MAS. Regular MAS function is triggered by one oxidative process in the cytosol during glycolysis causing NAD(+) reduction to NADH. Since NADH cannot cross the mitochondrial membrane (MEM) for oxidation NAD(+) is re-generated by conversion of cytosolic oxaloacetate (OAA) to malate, which enters the mitochondria for oxidation and in a cyclic process regenerates cytosolic OAA. Therefore MAS as well as the "pseudo-MAS" necessary for neuronal glutamate formation can only operate together with cytosolic reduction of NAD(+) to NADH. The major process causing NAD(+) reduction is glycolysis which therefore also must occur during neuronal conversion of glutamine to glutamate and may energize vesicular glutamate uptake which preferentially uses glycolytically derived energy. Another major contributor to the association between glutamate-glutamine cycle and glucose utilization is the need for astrocytic pyruvate to generate glutamate. Although some

  14. Bidirectional Control of Synaptic GABAAR Clustering by Glutamate and Calcium.

    PubMed

    Bannai, Hiroko; Niwa, Fumihiro; Sherwood, Mark W; Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Arizono, Misa; Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Sugiura, Kotomi; Lévi, Sabine; Triller, Antoine; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-29

    GABAergic synaptic transmission regulates brain function by establishing the appropriate excitation-inhibition (E/I) balance in neural circuits. The structure and function of GABAergic synapses are sensitive to destabilization by impinging neurotransmitters. However, signaling mechanisms that promote the restorative homeostatic stabilization of GABAergic synapses remain unknown. Here, by quantum dot single-particle tracking, we characterize a signaling pathway that promotes the stability of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) postsynaptic organization. Slow metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling activates IP3 receptor-dependent calcium release and protein kinase C to promote GABAAR clustering and GABAergic transmission. This GABAAR stabilization pathway counteracts the rapid cluster dispersion caused by glutamate-driven NMDA receptor-dependent calcium influx and calcineurin dephosphorylation, including in conditions of pathological glutamate toxicity. These findings show that glutamate activates distinct receptors and spatiotemporal patterns of calcium signaling for opposing control of GABAergic synapses.

  15. Improved Purification and Spectroscopic Properties of Squash Glutamate Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Yamaura, I; Funatsu, M

    1996-01-01

    Squash glutamate decarboxylase was purified by DEAE-Cellulose batchwise followed by Blue-Sepharose, Cellulofine GCL-2000, and Toyopearl HW-55F column chromatography. The purified glutamate decarboxylase had a high specific activity (95.0 u/mg). The absorption spectrum of glutamate decarboxylase had an absorption maximum at 420 nm in the range 300-500 nm. A pH change from 5.3 to 7.8 was accompanied by a decrease in absorbancy at 420 nm. One mole of glutamate decarboxylase contained 3.8 and 1.3 mol of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate at pH 5.8 and pH 7.8, respectively.

  16. Neuroprotective Effects of Glutamate Antagonists and Extracellular Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, David A.; Giffard, Rona G.; Choi, Dennis W.

    1993-06-01

    Glutamate antagonists protect neurons from hypoxic injury both in vivo and in vitro, but in vitro studies have not been done under the acidic conditions typical of hypoxia-ischemia in vivo. Consistent with glutamate receptor antagonism, extracellular acidity reduced neuronal death in murine cortical cultures that were deprived of oxygen and glucose. Under these acid conditions, N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isox-azolepropionate-kainate antagonists further reduced neuronal death, such that some neurons tolerated prolonged oxygen and glucose deprivation almost as well as did astrocytes. Neuroprotection induced by this combination exceeded that induced by glutamate antagonists alone, suggesting that extracellular acidity has beneficial effects beyond the attenuation of ionotropic glutamate receptor activation.

  17. Bidirectional Control of Synaptic GABAAR Clustering by Glutamate and Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Bannai, Hiroko; Niwa, Fumihiro; Sherwood, Mark W.; Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Arizono, Misa; Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Sugiura, Kotomi; Lévi, Sabine; Triller, Antoine; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Summary GABAergic synaptic transmission regulates brain function by establishing the appropriate excitation-inhibition (E/I) balance in neural circuits. The structure and function of GABAergic synapses are sensitive to destabilization by impinging neurotransmitters. However, signaling mechanisms that promote the restorative homeostatic stabilization of GABAergic synapses remain unknown. Here, by quantum dot single-particle tracking, we characterize a signaling pathway that promotes the stability of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) postsynaptic organization. Slow metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling activates IP3 receptor-dependent calcium release and protein kinase C to promote GABAAR clustering and GABAergic transmission. This GABAAR stabilization pathway counteracts the rapid cluster dispersion caused by glutamate-driven NMDA receptor-dependent calcium influx and calcineurin dephosphorylation, including in conditions of pathological glutamate toxicity. These findings show that glutamate activates distinct receptors and spatiotemporal patterns of calcium signaling for opposing control of GABAergic synapses. PMID:26711343

  18. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-04

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  19. Immunochemical characterization of the brain glutamate binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.

    1986-01-01

    A glutamate binding protein (GBP) was purified from bovine and rat brain to near homogeneity. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against this protein. An enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay was used to quantify and determine the specificity of the antibody response. The antibodies were shown to strongly react with bovine brain GBP and the analogous protein from rat brain. The antibodies did not show any crossreactivity with the glutamate metabolizing enzymes, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase and glutamyl transpeptidase, however it crossreacted moderately with glutamate decarboxylase. The antibodies were also used to define the possible physiologic activity of GBP in synaptic membranes. The antibodies were shown: (i) to inhibit the excitatory amino-acid stimulation of thiocyanate (SCN)flux, (ii) had no effect on transport of L-Glutamic acid across the synaptic membrane, and (iii) had no effect on the depolarization-induced release of L-glutamate. When the anti-GBP antibodies were used to localize and quantify the GBP distribution in various subcellular fractions and in brain tissue samples, it was found that the hippocampus had the highest immunoreactivity followed by the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex and caudate-putamen. The distribution of immunoreactivity in the subcellular fraction were as follows: synaptic membranes > crude mitochondrial fraction > homogenate > myelin. In conclusion these studies suggest that: (a) the rat brain GBP and the bovine brain GBP are immunologically homologous protein, (b) there are no structural similarities between the GBP and the glutamate metabolizing enzymes with the exception of glutamate decarboxylase and (c) the subcellular and regional distribution of the GBP immunoreactivity followed a similar pattern as observed for L-(/sup 3/H)-binding.

  20. Update on food safety of monosodium l-glutamate (MSG).

    PubMed

    Henry-Unaeze, Helen Nonye

    2017-09-18

    This evidence-based safety review of the flavor enhancer monosodium l-glutamate (MSG) was triggered by its global use and recent studies expressing some safety concerns. This article obtained information through search of evidence-based scientific databases, especially the US National Library of Medicine NIH. (A) MSG is a water-soluble salt of glutamate, a non-essential amino acid, normally synthesized in the body and prevalent in protein foods. (B) MSG is utilized world-wide for its "umami" taste and flavor enhancement qualities, (C) the human body does not discriminate between glutamate present in food and that added as seasoning, (D) glutamate metabolism is compartmentalized in the human body without reported ethnic differences, (E) glutamate does not passively cross biological membranes, (F) food glutamate is completely metabolized by gut cells as energy source and serves as key substrate for other important metabolites in the liver, (G) normal food use of MSG is dose-dependent and self-limiting without elevation in plasma glutamate, (H) the recent EFSA acceptable daily intake (30mg/kg body weight/day) is not attainable when MSG is consumed at normal dietary level, (I) scientists have not been able to consistently elicit reactions in double-blind studies with 'sensitive' individuals using MSG or placebo in food. Based on the above observations (A-I), high quality MSG is safe for all life-cycle stages without respect to ethnic origin or culinary background. MSG researchers are advised to employ appropriate scientific methodologies, consider glutamate metabolism and its normal food use before extrapolating pharmacological rodent studies to humans. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Ammonia Mediates Methamphetamine-Induced Increases in Glutamate and Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Halpin, Laura E; Northrop, Nicole A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia has been identified to have a significant role in the long-term damage to dopamine and serotonin terminals produced by methamphetamine (METH), but how ammonia contributes to this damage is unknown. Experiments were conducted to identify whether increases in brain ammonia affect METH-induced increases in glutamate and subsequent excitotoxicity. Increases in striatal glutamate were measured using in vivo microdialysis. To examine the role of ammonia in mediating changes in extracellular glutamate after METH exposure, lactulose was used to decrease plasma and brain ammonia. Lactulose is a non-absorbable disaccharide, which alters the intestinal lumen through multiple mechanisms that lead to the increased peripheral excretion of ammonia. METH caused a significant increase in extracellular glutamate that was prevented by lactulose. Lactulose had no effect on METH-induced hyperthermia. To determine if ammonia contributed to excitotoxicity, the effect of METH and lactulose treatment on calpain-mediated spectrin proteolysis was measured. METH significantly increased calpain-specific spectrin breakdown products, and this increase was prevented with lactulose treatment. To examine if ammonia-induced increases in extracellular glutamate were mediated by excitatory amino-acid transporters, the reverse dialysis of ammonia, the glutamate transporter inhibitor, DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA), or the combination of the two directly into the striatum of awake, freely moving rats was conducted. TBOA blocked the increases in extracellular glutamate produced by the reverse dialysis of ammonia. These findings demonstrate that ammonia mediates METH-induced increases in extracellular glutamate through an excitatory amino-acid transporter to cause excitotoxicity. PMID:24165886

  2. Glutamate: the new frontier in pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Uys, Joachim D; LaLumiere, Ryan T

    2008-11-01

    Considerable research into the neurobiology of cocaine addiction has shed light on the role of glutamate. Findings from models of relapse to cocaine-seeking indicate that the glutamatergic system is critically involved, as glutamate levels in the nucleus accumbens increase during reinstatement and glutamate receptor activation is necessary for reinstatement to drug-seeking. Thus, it would seem beneficial to block the increased glutamate release, but full antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors produce undesirable side effects. Therefore, modulation of glutamatergic transmission would be advantageous and provide novel pharmacotherapeutic avenues. Pharmacotherapies have been developed that have the potential to modulate excessive glutamatergic transmission through ionotropic and metabotropic (mGluR) glutamate receptors. Compounds that modulate glutamatergic transmission through ionotropic glutamate receptors include the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonists, amantadine and memantine, and the partial N-methyl-D-aspartic acid agonist d-cycloserine. They have shown promise in preclinical models of cocaine addiction. The mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 is effective in inhibiting cocaine seeking in preclinical animal models and could decrease stress-induced relapse due to its anxiolytic effects. Similarly, the mGluR1/5 antagonists, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine and 3-[2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl]pyridine, have shown to be effective in preclinical models of cocaine addiction. The cysteine pro-drug, N-acetylcysteine, restores the inhibitory tone on presynaptic glutamate receptors and has been effective in reducing cue-induced craving and cocaine use in humans. Furthermore, anticonvulsants, such as topiramate or lamotrigine, have shown efficacy in treating cocaine dependence or reducing relapse in humans. Future pharmacotherapy may focus on manipulating signal transduction proteins and pathways, which include Homer/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid complexes, to

  3. Ammonia mediates methamphetamine-induced increases in glutamate and excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Laura E; Northrop, Nicole A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has been identified to have a significant role in the long-term damage to dopamine and serotonin terminals produced by methamphetamine (METH), but how ammonia contributes to this damage is unknown. Experiments were conducted to identify whether increases in brain ammonia affect METH-induced increases in glutamate and subsequent excitotoxicity. Increases in striatal glutamate were measured using in vivo microdialysis. To examine the role of ammonia in mediating changes in extracellular glutamate after METH exposure, lactulose was used to decrease plasma and brain ammonia. Lactulose is a non-absorbable disaccharide, which alters the intestinal lumen through multiple mechanisms that lead to the increased peripheral excretion of ammonia. METH caused a significant increase in extracellular glutamate that was prevented by lactulose. Lactulose had no effect on METH-induced hyperthermia. To determine if ammonia contributed to excitotoxicity, the effect of METH and lactulose treatment on calpain-mediated spectrin proteolysis was measured. METH significantly increased calpain-specific spectrin breakdown products, and this increase was prevented with lactulose treatment. To examine if ammonia-induced increases in extracellular glutamate were mediated by excitatory amino-acid transporters, the reverse dialysis of ammonia, the glutamate transporter inhibitor, DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA), or the combination of the two directly into the striatum of awake, freely moving rats was conducted. TBOA blocked the increases in extracellular glutamate produced by the reverse dialysis of ammonia. These findings demonstrate that ammonia mediates METH-induced increases in extracellular glutamate through an excitatory amino-acid transporter to cause excitotoxicity.

  4. Reactivation of substrate-inactivated brain glutamate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Meeley, M P; Martin, D L

    1983-03-01

    The effects of ATP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) on the reactivation of glutamate apodecarboxylase by its cofactor pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (pyridoxal-P) was studied. Apoenzyme was prepared by preincubation with glutamate. Apoenzyme prepared with glutamate alone was reactivated slowly and incompletely by adding a saturating concentration of pyridoxal-P (20 microM). Reactivation was slightly enhanced by 1-10 mM Pi. Reactivation by pyridoxal-P plus Pi was greatly enhanced by the presence of low concentrations (less than 100 microM) of ATP during the preparation of apoenzyme with glutamate. Reactivation was much lower if Pi was omitted. Enhancement of reactivation by ATP was due to its effect during apoenzyme formation, since ATP did not enhance reactivation if added only during reactivation and since the enhancing effect persisted after the removal of free ATP by chromatography on Sephadex G-25 after apoenzyme preparation and before reactivation. Reactivation was inhibited by high concentrations of ATP (greater than 100 microM), possibly by competition of ATP for the cofactor binding site. Four factors (glutamate, pyridoxal-P, ATP, and Pi) control a cycle of inactivation and reactivation that appears to be important in the regulation of brain glutamate decarboxylase.

  5. Bidirectional regulation of thermotaxis by glutamate transmissions in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Noriyuki; Kuhara, Atsushi; Nakamura, Fumiya; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Mori, Ikue

    2011-01-01

    In complex neural circuits of the brain, massive information is processed with neuronal communication through synaptic transmissions. It is thus fundamental to delineate information flows encoded by various kinds of transmissions. Here, we show that glutamate signals from two distinct sensory neurons bidirectionally affect the same postsynaptic interneuron, thereby producing the opposite behaviours. EAT-4/VGLUT (vesicular glutamate transporter)-dependent glutamate signals from AFD thermosensory neurons inhibit the postsynaptic AIY interneurons through activation of GLC-3/GluCl inhibitory glutamate receptor and behaviourally drive migration towards colder temperature. By contrast, EAT-4-dependent glutamate signals from AWC thermosensory neurons stimulate the AIY neurons to induce migration towards warmer temperature. Alteration of the strength of AFD and AWC signals led to significant changes of AIY activity, resulting in drastic modulation of behaviour. We thus provide an important insight on information processing, in which two glutamate transmissions encoding opposite information flows regulate neural activities to produce a large spectrum of behavioural outputs. PMID:21304490

  6. Desynchronization of glutamate release prolongs synchronous CA3 network activity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jethro; Stubblefield, Elizabeth A; Benke, Timothy A; Staley, Kevin J

    2007-05-01

    Periodic bursts of activity in the disinhibited in vitro hippocampal CA3 network spread through the neural population by the glutamatergic recurrent collateral axons that link CA3 pyramidal cells. It was previously proposed that these bursts of activity are terminated by exhaustion of releasable glutamate at the recurrent collateral synapses so that the next periodic burst of network activity cannot occur until the supply of glutamate has been replenished. As a test of this hypothesis, the rate of glutamate release at CA3 axon terminals was reduced by substitution of extracellular Ca(2+) with Sr(2+). Reduction of the rate of glutamate release reduces the rate of depletion and should thereby prolong bursts. Here we demonstrate that Sr(2+) substitution prolongs spontaneous bursts in the disinhibited adult CA3 hippocampal slices to 37.2 +/- 7.6 (SE) times the duration in control conditions. Sr(2+) also decreased the probability of burst initiation and the rate of burst onset, consistent with reduced synchrony of glutamate release and a consequent reduced rate of spread of excitation through the slice. These findings support the supply of releasable glutamate as an important determinant of the probability and duration of synchronous CA3 network activity.

  7. Nitrogen isotope effects on glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, L.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-05-03

    The nitrogen isotope effect on the decarboxylation of glutamic acid by glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli has been measured by comparison of the isotopic composition of the amino nitrogen of the product ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid isolated after 10-20% reaction with that of the starting glutamic acid. At pH 4.7, 37 /sup 0/C, the isotope effect is k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9855 +/- 0.0006 when compared to unprotonated glutamic acid. Interpretation of this result requires knowledge of the equilibrium nitrogen isotope effect for Schiff base formation. This equilibrium isotope effect is K/sup 14//K/sup 15/ - 0.9824 for the formation of the unprotonated Schiff base between unprotonated valine and salicylaldehyde. Analysis of the nitrogen isotope effect on decarboxylation of glutamic acid and of the previously measured carbon isotope effect on this same reaction shows that decarboxylation and Schiff base formation are jointly rate limiting. The enzyme-bound Schiff base between glutamate and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate partitions approximately 2:1 between decarboxylation and return to the starting state. The nitrogen isotope effect also reveals that the Schiff base nitrogen is protonated in this intermediate.

  8. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  9. Glutamate affects dendritic morphology of neurons grown on compliant substrates.

    PubMed

    Previtera, Michelle L; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2015-01-01

    Brain stiffness changes in response to injury or disease. As a secondary consequence, glutamate is released from neurons and astroglia. Two types of glutamate receptors, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, sense mechanotransduction, leading to downstream signaling in neurons. Recently, our group reported that these two receptors affect dendrite morphology in hippocampal neurons grown on compliant substrates. Blocking receptor activity has distinct effects on dendrites, depending on whether neurons are grown on soft or stiff gels. In the current study, we examine whether exposure to glutamate itself alters stiffness-mediated changes to dendrites in hippocampal neurons. We find that glutamate augments changes seen when neurons are grown on soft gels of 300 or 600 Pa, but in contrast, glutamate attenuates changes seen when neurons are grown on stiff gels of 3,000 Pa. These results suggest that there is interplay between mechanosensing and glutamate receptor activation in determining dendrite morphology in neurons.

  10. Mapping of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Edelhoff, S.; Adler, D.A.; Disteche, C.M.; Grubin, C.E.; Karlsen, A.E.; Lernmark, A.; Foster, D. )

    1993-07-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the synthesis of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is known as a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS), but is also present outside the CNS. Recent studies showed that GAD is the major target of autoantibodies associated with the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and of the rare stiff man syndrome. Studies of GAD expression have demonstrated multiple transcripts, suggesting several isoforms of GAD. In this study, three different genes were mapped by in situ hybridization to both human and mouse chromosomes. The GAD1 gene was mapped to human chromosome 2q31 and to mouse chromosome 2D in a known region of conservation between human and mouse. GAD2, previously mapped to human chromosome 10p11.2-p12, was mapped to mouse chromosome 2A2-B, which identifies a new region of conservation between human and mouse chromosomes. A potential GAD3 transcript was mapped to human chromosome 22q13 and to mouse chromosome 15E in a known region of conservation between human and mouse. It is concluded that the GAD genes may form a family with as many as three related members. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  11. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  12. Type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu1) trigger the gating of GluD2 delta glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ady, Visou; Perroy, Julie; Tricoire, Ludovic; Piochon, Claire; Dadak, Selma; Chen, Xiaoru; Dusart, Isabelle; Fagni, Laurent; Lambolez, Bertrand; Levenes, Carole

    2014-01-01

    The orphan GluD2 receptor belongs to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family but does not bind glutamate. Ligand-gated GluD2 currents have never been evidenced, and whether GluD2 operates as an ion channel has been a long-standing question. Here, we show that GluD2 gating is triggered by type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors, both in a heterologous expression system and in Purkinje cells. Thus, GluD2 is not only an adhesion molecule at synapses but also works as a channel. This gating mechanism reveals new properties of glutamate receptors that emerge from their interaction and opens unexpected perspectives regarding synaptic transmission and plasticity. PMID:24357660

  13. Comparative evaluation of glutamate-sensitive radiopharmaceuticals: Technetium-99m-glutamic acid and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-bis(glutamate) conjugate for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Dipti; Tiwari, Anjani K; Chuttani, Krishna; Kaul, Ankur; Singh, Harpal; Mishra, Anil K

    2010-12-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography has become a significant imaging modality with huge potential to visualize and provide information of anatomic dysfunctions that are predictive of future diseases. This imaging tool is complimented by radiopharmaceuticals/radiosubstrates that help in imaging specific physiological aspects of the human body. The present study was undertaken to explore the utility of technetium-99m (⁹⁹(m)Tc)-labeled glutamate conjugates for tumor scintigraphy. As part of our efforts to further utilize the application of chelating agents, glutamic acid was conjugated with a multidentate ligand, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The DTPA-glutamate conjugate [DTPA-bis(Glu)] was well characterized by IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy. The biological activity of glutamic acid was compared with its DTPA conjugate by radiocomplexation with ⁹⁹(m)Tc (labeling efficiency ≥98%). In vivo studies of both the radiolabeled complexes ⁹⁹(m)Tc-Glu and ⁹⁹(m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Glu) were then carried out, followed by gamma scintigraphy in New Zealand albino rabbits. Improved serum stability of ⁹⁹(m)Tc-labeled DTPA conjugate indicated that ⁹⁹(m)Tc remained bound to the conjugate up to 24 hours. Blood clearance showed a relatively slow washout of the DTPA conjugate when compared with the labeled glutamate. Biodistribution characteristics of the conjugate in Balb/c mice revealed that DTPA conjugation of glutamic acid favors less accumulation in the liver and bone and rapid renal clearance. Tumor scintigraphy in mice showed increasing tumor accumulation, stable up to 4 hours. These preliminary studies show that ⁹⁹(m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Glu) can be a useful radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic applications in single-photon emission computed tomography imaging.

  14. Effects of ammonia on high affinity glutamate uptake and glutamate transporter EAAT3 expression in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Helen; Zwingmann, Claudia; Pannunzio, Marc; Butterworth, Roger F

    2003-07-01

    Increased levels of extracellular glutamate are a consistent feature of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) associated with liver failure and other hyperammonemic pathologies. Reduction of glutamate uptake has been described in ammonia-exposed cultured astrocytes, synaptosomes, and in animal models of hyperammonemia. In the present study, we examine the effects of pathophysiological concentrations of ammonia on D-aspartate (a non-metabolizable analog of glutamate) uptake by cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Exposure of these cells to ammonia resulted in time-dependent (24% reduction at 24h and 60% reduction at 5 days, P<0.001) and dose-dependent (21, 37, and 57% reduction at 1, 2.5, and 5mM for 5 days, P<0.01) suppression of D-aspartate uptake. Kinetic analyses revealed significant decreases in the velocity of uptake (V(max)) (37% decrease at 2.5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.05 and 52% decrease at 5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.001) as well as significant reductions in K(m) values (25% reduction at 2.5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.05 and 45% reduction at 5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.001). Western blotting, on the other hand, showed no significant changes in the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1/EAAT3 protein, the only glutamate transporter currently known to be expressed by these cells. In addition, 1H combined with 13C-NMR spectroscopy studies using the stable isotope [1-13C]-glucose demonstrated a significant increase in intracellular glutamate levels derived from the oxidative metabolism of glucose, rather than from the deamidation of exogenous glutamine in cultured granule neurons exposed to ammonia. The present study provides evidence that the effects of ammonia on glutamate uptake are not solely an astrocytic phenomenon and that unlike the astrocytic glutamate transporter counterpart, EAAT3 protein expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells is not down-regulated when exposed to ammonia. Decrease of glutamate uptake in these cellular preparations may afford an additional regulatory mechanism aimed at

  15. Integration between Glycolysis and Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle Flux May Explain Preferential Glycolytic Increase during Brain Activation, Requiring Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Leif; Chen, Ye

    2017-01-01

    The 1988 observation by Fox et al. (1988) that brief intense brain activation increases glycolysis (pyruvate formation from glucose) much more than oxidative metabolism has been abundantly confirmed. Specifically glycolytic increase was unexpected because the amount of ATP it generates is much smaller than that formed by subsequent oxidative metabolism of pyruvate. The present article shows that preferential glycolysis can be explained by metabolic processes associated with activation of the glutamate-glutamine cycle. The flux in this cycle, which is essential for production of transmitter glutamate and GABA, equals 75% of brain glucose utilization and each turn is associated with utilization of ~1 glucose molecule. About one half of the association between cycle flux and glucose metabolism occurs during neuronal conversion of glutamine to glutamate in a process similar to the malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS) except that glutamate is supplied from glutamine, not formed from α-ketoglutarate (αKG) as during operation of conventional MAS. Regular MAS function is triggered by one oxidative process in the cytosol during glycolysis causing NAD+ reduction to NADH. Since NADH cannot cross the mitochondrial membrane (MEM) for oxidation NAD+ is re-generated by conversion of cytosolic oxaloacetate (OAA) to malate, which enters the mitochondria for oxidation and in a cyclic process regenerates cytosolic OAA. Therefore MAS as well as the “pseudo-MAS” necessary for neuronal glutamate formation can only operate together with cytosolic reduction of NAD+ to NADH. The major process causing NAD+ reduction is glycolysis which therefore also must occur during neuronal conversion of glutamine to glutamate and may energize vesicular glutamate uptake which preferentially uses glycolytically derived energy. Another major contributor to the association between glutamate-glutamine cycle and glucose utilization is the need for astrocytic pyruvate to generate glutamate. Although some

  16. Enhancing poly-γ-glutamic acid production in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens by introducing the glutamate synthesis features from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Quan, Yufen; Gu, Yanyan; Liu, Fenghong; Huang, Xiaozhong; Shen, Haosheng; Dang, Yulei; Cao, Mingfeng; Gao, Weixia; Lu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yi; Song, Cunjiang; Wang, Shufang

    2017-05-22

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a valuable polymer with glutamate as its sole precursor. Enhancement of the intracellular glutamate synthesis is a very important strategy for the improvement of γ-PGA production, especially for those glutamate-independent γ-PGA producing strains. Corynebacterium glutamicum has long been used for industrial glutamate production and it exhibits some unique features for glutamate synthesis; therefore introduction of these metabolic characters into the γ-PGA producing strain might lead to increased intracellular glutamate availability, and thus ultimate γ-PGA production. In this study, the unique glutamate synthesis features from C. glutamicum was introduced into the glutamate-independent γ-PGA producing Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NK-1 strain. After introducing the energy-saving NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADPH-GDH) pathway, the NK-1 (pHT315-gdh) strain showed slightly increase (by 9.1%) in γ-PGA production. Moreover, an optimized metabolic toggle switch for controlling the expression of ɑ-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC) was introduced into the NK-1 strain, because it was previously shown that the ODHC in C. glutamicum was completely inhibited when glutamate was actively produced. The obtained NK-PO1 (pHT01-xylR) strain showed 66.2% higher γ-PGA production than the NK-1 strain. However, the further combination of these two strategies (introducing both NADPH-GDH pathway and the metabolic toggle switch) did not lead to further increase of γ-PGA production but rather the resultant γ-PGA production was even lower than that in the NK-1 strain. We proposed new metabolic engineering strategies to improve the γ-PGA production in B. amyloliquefaciens. The NK-1 (pHT315-gdh) strain with the introduction of NADPH-GDH pathway showed 9.1% improvement in γ-PGA production. The NK-PO1 (pHT01-xylR) strain with the introduction of a metabolic toggle switch for controlling the expression of ODHC showed 66.2% higher

  17. Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Chiriboga, A. Sebastian; Komorowski, Lars; Kümpfel, Tania; Probst, Christian; Hinson, Shannon R.; Pittock, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe retrospectively the clinical associations of immunoglobulin G (IgG) targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1-IgG). Methods: Specimens of 9 patients evaluated on a service basis in the Mayo Clinic Neuroimmunology Laboratory by tissue-based immunofluorescence assay (IFA) yielded a robust, synaptic immunostaining pattern consistent with mGluR1-IgG (serum, 9; CSF, 2 available). Transfected HEK293 cell-based assay (CBA) confirmed mGluR1 specificity in all 11 specimens. A further 2 patients were detected in Germany primarily by CBA. Results: The median symptom onset age for the 11 patients was 58 years (range 33–81 years); 6 were male. All 9 Mayo Clinic patients had subacute onset of cerebellar ataxia, 4 had dysgeusia, 1 had psychiatric symptoms, and 1 had cognitive impairment. All were evaluated for malignancy, but only 1 was affected (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma). One developed ataxia post–herpes zoster infection. Head MRIs were generally atrophic or normal-appearing, and CSF was inflammatory in just 1 of 5 tested, though mGluR1-IgG was detected in both specimens submitted. Five patients improved (attributable to immunotherapy in 4, spontaneously in 1), 3 stabilized (attributable to immunotherapy in 2, cancer therapy in 1), and 1 progressively declined (untreated). The 2 German patients had ataxia, but fulfilled multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria (1 relapsing-remitting, 1 progressive). However, both had histories of hematologic malignancy (acute lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma), and had mGluR1-IgG detected in serum by CBA (weakly positive on tissue-based IFA). Conclusions: mGluR1 autoimmunity represents a treatable form of cerebellar ataxia. Dysgeusia may be a diagnostic clue. Paraneoplastic, parainfectious, or idiopathic causes may occur. PMID:26888994

  18. Intracerebral synthesis of glutamine from hyperpolarized glutamate.

    PubMed

    Mazuel, Leslie; Schulte, Rolf F; Cladière, Aurélie; Spéziale, Claudine; Lagrée, Marie; Leremboure, Martin; Jean, Betty; Durif, Franck; Chassain, Carine

    2017-10-01

    Changes in glutamate (Glu) levels occur in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. We proposed the use of (13) C spectroscopy and the highly amplified signal generated by hyperpolarization to achieve spatial and temporal resolutions adequate for in vivo studies of Glu metabolism in the healthy rat brain. Thus, we investigated uptake of hyperpolarized [1(-13C) ]Glu after a temporary blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption protocol and its conversion to glutamine (Gln) in the brain. [1-(13) C]Glu was hyperpolarized using the dynamic nuclear polarization process. A temporary BBB disruption using mannitol allowed hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]Glu to reach the brain. Then, hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]Glu brain metabolism was observed in vivo by MR spectroscopy experiments at 3T. Products synthesized from [1-(13) C]Glu were assigned via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]Glu reached 20% ± 2.3% polarization after 90 min. After validation of the BBB disruption protocol, hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]Glu (175.4 ppm) was detected inside the rat brain, and the formation of [1-(13) C]Gln at 174.9 ppm was also observed. The Gln synthesis from hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]Glu can be monitored in vivo in the healthy rat brain after opening the BBB. Magn Reson Med 78:1296-1305, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  20. Therapeutic effects of glutamic acid in piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xiao, Hao; Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Li, Lili; Nyachoti, Charles Martin; Xiong, Xia; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common food contaminants, primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract to affect animal and human health. This study was conducted to examine the protective function of glutamic acid on intestinal injury and oxidative stress caused by DON in piglets. Twenty-eight piglets were assigned randomly into 4 dietary treatments (7 pigs/treatment): 1) uncontaminated control diet (NC), 2) NC+DON at 4 mg/kg (DON), 3) NC+2% glutamic acid (GLU), and 4) NC+2% glutamic acid + DON at 4 mg/kg (DG). At day 15, 30 and 37, blood samples were collected to determine serum concentrations of CAT (catalase), T-AOC (total antioxidant capacity), H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide), NO (nitric oxide), MDA (maleic dialdehyde), DAO (diamine oxidase) and D-lactate. Intestinal morphology, and the activation of Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway, as well as the concentrations of H2O2, MDA, and DAO in kidney, liver and small intestine, were analyzed at day 37. Results showed that DON significantly (P<0.05) induced oxidative stress in piglets, while this stress was remarkably reduced with glutamic acid supplementation according to the change of oxidative parameters in blood and tissues. Meanwhile, DON caused obvious intestinal injury from microscopic observations and permeability indicators, which was alleviated by glutamic acid supplementation. Moreover, the inhibition of DON on Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway was reduced by glutamic acid supplementation. Collectively, these data suggest that glutamic acid may be a useful nutritional regulator for DON-induced damage manifested as oxidative stress, intestinal injury and signaling inhibition.

  1. Therapeutic Effects of Glutamic Acid in Piglets Challenged with Deoxynivalenol

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Li, Lili; Nyachoti, Charles Martin; Xiong, Xia; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common food contaminants, primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract to affect animal and human health. This study was conducted to examine the protective function of glutamic acid on intestinal injury and oxidative stress caused by DON in piglets. Twenty-eight piglets were assigned randomly into 4 dietary treatments (7 pigs/treatment): 1) uncontaminated control diet (NC), 2) NC+DON at 4 mg/kg (DON), 3) NC+2% glutamic acid (GLU), and 4) NC+2% glutamic acid + DON at 4 mg/kg (DG). At day 15, 30 and 37, blood samples were collected to determine serum concentrations of CAT (catalase), T-AOC (total antioxidant capacity), H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide), NO (nitric oxide), MDA (maleic dialdehyde), DAO (diamine oxidase) and D-lactate. Intestinal morphology, and the activation of Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway, as well as the concentrations of H2O2, MDA, and DAO in kidney, liver and small intestine, were analyzed at day 37. Results showed that DON significantly (P<0.05) induced oxidative stress in piglets, while this stress was remarkably reduced with glutamic acid supplementation according to the change of oxidative parameters in blood and tissues. Meanwhile, DON caused obvious intestinal injury from microscopic observations and permeability indicators, which was alleviated by glutamic acid supplementation. Moreover, the inhibition of DON on Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway was reduced by glutamic acid supplementation. Collectively, these data suggest that glutamic acid may be a useful nutritional regulator for DON-induced damage manifested as oxidative stress, intestinal injury and signaling inhibition. PMID:24984001

  2. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction.

    PubMed

    Olive, M Foster

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials.

  3. A NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase mutant of the petit-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis uses the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway for glutamate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, L; Guzmán-León, S; Coria, R; Ramírez, J; Aranda, C; González, A

    1995-10-01

    The activities of the enzymes involved in ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis were determined in wild-type and NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) null mutant strains of Kluyveromyces lactis. The specific NADP-GDH activity from K. lactis was fivefold lower than that found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activities were similar to those reported in S. cerevisiae. The NADP-GDH null mutant was obtained by transforming the uraA strain MD2/1 with a linearized integrative yeast vector harbouring a 390 bp fragment of the NADP-GDH structural gene. This mutant grew as well as the parent strain on ammonium, but showed GS and GOGAT activities higher that those found in the wild-type strain, implying that the GS-GOGAT pathway could play a leading role in glutamate biosynthesis in K. lactis. Southern blotting analysis of K. lactis chromosomes separated by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, indicated that the NADP-GDH structural gene is localized on chromosome VI.

  4. Increasing influence of the glutamate transporter inhibitor on glutamate release in low [Na +] media under extremal conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    The effect of the competitive nontransportable inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate DL-TBOA on the release of glutamate in Ca 2 -free Na - and NMDG-supplemented media was evaluated after exposure of rats to extremal conditions 6 min incubation of synaptosomes with 10 mu M DL-TBOA in low Na media resulted in the increase in extracellular L- 14 C glutamate level for control animals by 2 0 pm 0 5 of total accumulated label and 100 mu M DL-TBOA - 3 5 pm 0 5 respectively The experimental data for animals subjected to centrifuge-induced hypergravity showed 4 0 pm 1 0 and 9 0 pm 2 0 increase in L- 14 C glutamate level for 10 mu M and 100 mu M DL-TBOA respectively D le 0 05 The enhancement of the extracellular level of L- 14 C glutamate after application of DL-TBOA would be expected to connect with the inhibition of L- 14 C glutamate uptake process It appears that DL-TBOA inhibited uptake more potently after hypergravity The effect of DL-TBOA on depolarization-induced carrier-mediated L- 14 C glutamate release increased after hypergravity loading in Na - and low Na NMDG- supplemented media 10 mu M DL-TBOA-induced decrease in L- 14 C glutamate release in Na - supplemented medium was 15 2 pm 2 2 in the control experiments and 26 2 pm 3 9 after loading D le 0 05 and in low Na medium was 37 0 pm 2 5 and 45 0 pm 3 4 respectively DL-TBOA was demonstrated to better inhibit the transporter-mediated

  5. Regulatory Aspects of l-Glutamate Transport in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Pateman, J. A.; Kinghorn, J. R.; Dunn, Etta

    1974-01-01

    Wild-type cells of Aspergillus nidulans synthesize a transport system which appears to be specific for l-glutamate and l-aspartate. The system is energy dependent and concentrates l-glutamate at least 60-fold. In cells grown in the presence of 1% sucrose, l-glutamate uptake activity is regulated by ammonium control, although it is not certain whether this is at the level of transcription or translation. Mutants that are insensitive to ammonium control of certain other unrelated systems, e.g., nitrate reductase, are also insensitive, except in the case of one class of ammonium-insensitive mutants, to ammonium control of l-glutamate transport. The activity of this transport system is specifically impaired in a mutant at the aauA locus. This mutation results in poor growth with l-glutamate or l-aspartate as the sole carbon or nitrogen source and is recessive in the heterozygous diploid aauA1/+ for transport and growth characteristics. The likelihood that the mutation results in a defect of the transport mechanism rather than abnormal ammonium control is discussed. PMID:4605030

  6. Dopamine neuron dependent behaviors mediated by glutamate cotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Mingote, Susana; Chuhma, Nao; Kalmbach, Abigail; Thomsen, Gretchen M; Wang, Yvonne; Mihali, Andra; Sferrazza, Caroline; Zucker-Scharff, Ilana; Siena, Anna-Claire; Welch, Martha G; Lizardi-Ortiz, José; Sulzer, David; Moore, Holly; Gaisler-Salomon, Inna; Rayport, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area use glutamate as a cotransmitter. To elucidate the behavioral role of the cotransmission, we targeted the glutamate-recycling enzyme glutaminase (gene Gls1). In mice with a dopamine transporter (Slc6a3)-driven conditional heterozygous (cHET) reduction of Gls1 in their dopamine neurons, dopamine neuron survival and transmission were unaffected, while glutamate cotransmission at phasic firing frequencies was reduced, enabling a selective focus on the cotransmission. The mice showed normal emotional and motor behaviors, and an unaffected response to acute amphetamine. Strikingly, amphetamine sensitization was reduced and latent inhibition potentiated. These behavioral effects, also seen in global GLS1 HETs with a schizophrenia resilience phenotype, were not seen in mice with an Emx1-driven forebrain reduction affecting most brain glutamatergic neurons. Thus, a reduction in dopamine neuron glutamate cotransmission appears to mediate significant components of the GLS1 HET schizophrenia resilience phenotype, and glutamate cotransmission appears to be important in attribution of motivational salience. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.27566.001 PMID:28703706

  7. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-03-30

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons.

  8. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  9. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II does not process amyloid-β peptide.

    PubMed

    Sedlák, František; Šácha, Pavel; Blechová, Miroslava; Březinová, Anna; Šafařík, Martin; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Konvalinka, Jan

    2013-07-01

    The accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is thought to be a major causative mechanism of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ accumulation could be caused by dysregulated processing of amyloid precursor protein, yielding excessive amounts of Aβ, and/or by inefficient proteolytic degradation of the peptide itself. Several proteases have been described as Aβ degradation enzymes, most notably metalloendopeptidases, aspartic endopeptidases, and some exopeptidases. Recently a report suggested that another metallopeptidase, glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII), can also cleave Aβ. GCPII is a zinc exopeptidase that cleaves glutamate from N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate in the central nervous system and from pteroylpoly-γ-glutamate in the jejunum. GCPII has been proposed as a promising therapeutic target for disorders caused by glutamate neurotoxicity. However, an Aβ-degrading activity of GCPII would compromise potential pharmaceutical use of GCPII inhibitors, because the enzyme inhibition might lead to increased Aβ levels and consequently to Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we analyzed the reported Aβ-degrading activity of GCPII using highly purified recombinant enzyme and synthetic Aβ. We did not detect any Aβ degradation activity of GCPII or its homologue even under prolonged incubation at a high enzyme to substrate ratio. These results are in good agreement with the current detailed structural understanding of the substrate specificity and enzyme-ligand interactions of GCPII.

  10. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Vigneault, Érika; Poirel, Odile; Riad, Mustapha; Prud'homme, Josée; Dumas, Sylvie; Turecki, Gustavo; Fasano, Caroline; Mechawar, Naguib; El Mestikawy, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe) while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains. PMID:25798091

  11. Stress, glucocorticoids and glutamate release: effects of antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2011-08-01

    Stressful life events impact on memory, cognition and emotional responses, and are known to precipitate mood/anxiety disorders. It is increasingly recognized that stress and its neurochemical and endocrine mediators induce changes in glutamate synapses and circuitry, and this in turn modify mental states. Half a century after the monoamine hypothesis, it is widely accepted that maladaptive changes in excitatory/inhibitory circuitry have a primary role in the pathophysiology of mood/anxiety disorders. The neuroplasticity hypothesis posits that volumetric changes consistently found in limbic and cortical areas of depressed subjects are in good part due to remodeling of neuronal dendritic arbors and loss of synaptic spines. A considerable body of work, carried out with in vivo microdialysis as well as alternative methodologies, has shown that both stress and corticosterone treatment induce enhancement of activity-dependent glutamate release. Accordingly, results from preclinical studies suggest that stress- and glucocorticoid-induced enhancement of glutamate release and transmission plays a main role in the induction of maladaptive cellular effects, in turn responsible for dendritic remodeling. Additional recent work has showed that drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (antidepressants) prevent the enhancement of glutamate release induced by stress. Understanding the action of traditional drugs on glutamate transmission could be of great help in developing drugs that may work directly at this level.

  12. GLUTAMATE ABNORMALITIES IN OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER: NEUROBIOLOGY, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Pittenger, Christopher; Bloch, Michael H.; Williams, Kyle

    2011-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder is prevalent, disabling, incompletely understood, and often resistant to current therapies. Established treatments consist of specialized cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy with medications targeting serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. However, remission is rare, and more than a quarter of OCD sufferers receive little or no benefit from these approaches, even when they are optimally delivered. New insights into the disorder, and new treatment strategies, are urgently needed. Recent evidence suggests that the ubiquitous excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate is dysregulated in OCD, and that this dysregulation may contribute to the pathophysiology of the disorder. Here we review the current state of this evidence, including neuroimaging studies, genetics, neurochemical investigations, and insights from animal models. Finally, we review recent findings from small clinical trials of glutamate-modulating medications in treatment-refractory OCD. The precise role of glutamate dysregulation in OCD remains unclear, and we lack blinded, well-controlled studies demonstrating therapeutic benefit from glutamate-modulating agents. Nevertheless, the evidence supporting some important perturbation of glutamate in the disorder is increasingly strong. This new perspective on the pathophysiology of OCD, which complements the older focus on monoaminergic neurotransmission, constitutes an important focus of current research and a promising area for the ongoing development of new therapeutics. PMID:21963369

  13. Influence of glutamic acid enantiomers on C-mineralization.

    PubMed

    Formánek, Pavel; Vranová, Valerie; Lojková, Lea

    2015-02-01

    Seasonal dynamics in the mineralization of glutamic acid enantiomers in soils from selected ecosystems was determined and subjected to a range of treatments: ambient x elevated CO2 level and meadow x dense x thinned forest environment. Mineralization of glutamic acid was determined by incubation of the soil with 2 mg L- or D-glutamic acid g(-1) of dry soil to induce the maximum respiration rate. Mineralization of glutamic acid enantiomers in soils fluctuates over the course of a vegetation season, following a similar trend across a range of ecosystems. Mineralization is affected by environmental changes and management practices, including elevated CO2 level and thinning intensity. L-glutamic acid metabolism is more dependent on soil type as compared to metabolism of its D-enantiomer. The results support the hypothesis that the slower rate of D- compared to L- amino acid mineralization is due to different roles in anabolism and catabolism of the soil microbial community. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Glutamate and asparagine cataplerosis underlie glutamine addiction in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ratnikov, Boris; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Ronai, Ze'ev A.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Scott, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine dependence is a prominent feature of cancer metabolism, and here we show that melanoma cells, irrespective of their oncogenic background, depend on glutamine for growth. A quantitative audit of how carbon from glutamine is used showed that TCA-cycle-derived glutamate is, in most melanoma cells, the major glutamine-derived cataplerotic output and product of glutaminolysis. In the absence of glutamine, TCA cycle metabolites were liable to depletion through aminotransferase-mediated α-ketoglutarate-to-glutamate conversion and glutamate secretion. Aspartate was an essential cataplerotic output, as melanoma cells demonstrated a limited capacity to salvage external aspartate. Also, the absence of asparagine increased the glutamine requirement, pointing to vulnerability in the aspartate-asparagine biosynthetic pathway within melanoma metabolism. In contrast to melanoma cells, melanocytes could grow in the absence of glutamine. Melanocytes use more glutamine for protein synthesis rather than secreting it as glutamate and are less prone to loss of glutamate and TCA cycle metabolites when starved of glutamine. PMID:25749035

  15. Role of tunneling in the enzyme glutamate mutase.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Judith B; Liu, Yu; Werner, Hans-Joachim; Kästner, Johannes

    2012-11-26

    The role of quantum mechanical atom tunneling during the conversion of glutamate to methylaspartate catalyzed by glutamate mutase is investigated by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations based on coupled cluster and density functional calculations. The use of instanton theory allows us to calculate the tunneling contributions of up to 78 atoms in the active site. We calculate kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and compare them to experimental data. The simulations lead to deuterium KIEs of 10 for the hydrogen abstraction from glutamate substrate and 16 for the hydrogen abstraction from methylaspartate substrate, which are consistent with the experimental results. The hydrogen abstraction from methylaspartate has higher primary deuterium and tritium (46.1) KIEs than the abstraction from glutamate. The tunneling effect increases the reaction rate by a factor of 12.3 for the hydrogen abstraction from methylaspartate at 0. Tunneling is supported by the environment by preparing the enzyme through classical motions. Consideraton of the tunneling contributions of more and more atoms around the active center shows that the motions at the ribose ring play a central role during the tunneling enhancement of the hydrogen transfers. Our simulations give new insight into the catalytic process in glutamate mutase and the way enzymes use tunneling effects for a successful catalysis.

  16. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Vigneault, Érika; Poirel, Odile; Riad, Mustapha; Prud'homme, Josée; Dumas, Sylvie; Turecki, Gustavo; Fasano, Caroline; Mechawar, Naguib; El Mestikawy, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe) while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains.

  17. Zinc signaling through glucocorticoid and glutamate signaling in stressful circumstances.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna

    2010-11-01

    Humans and animals are constantly exposed to environmental stress. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responds to stress, followed by glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal glands. This response serves to maintain homeostasis in the living body through energy mobilization or to restore it. The brain is an important target for glucocorticoids. The hippocampus participates in the regulation of the HPA axis. Stress activates glutamatergic neurons in the hippocampus, and serious stress induces dyshomeostasis of extracellular glutamate. This dyshomeostasis, which is potentiated by glucocorticoids, modifies cognitive and emotional behavior. On the other hand, zinc is necessary for glucocorticoid signaling and is released from glutamatergic (zincergic) neurons to modulate synaptic glutamate signaling. Stress also induces dyshomeostasis of extracellular zinc, which may be linked to dyshomeostasis of extracellular glutamate. Thus, glucocorticoid signaling might also contribute to dyshomeostasis of extracellular zinc. It is likely that zinc signaling participates in cognitive and emotional behavior through glucocorticoid and glutamate signaling under stressful circumstances. This Mini-Review analyzes the relationship among signals of glucocorticoid, glutamate, and zinc under stressful circumstances to elucidate the significance of the zinc signaling in response to stress.

  18. A novel mechanism of neuroprotection: Blood glutamate grabber

    PubMed Central

    Loza, María Isabel; Mirelman, David; Brea, José; Blanco, Miguel; Sobrino, Tomás; Campos, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity is a primary contributor of ischemic neuronal death and other cellular components of the neurovascular unit. Several strategies have been developed against glutamate excitotoxicity, however none of them have not shown positive results in the clinical practice so far. Nowadays, the concept of blood/brain glutamate grabbing or scavenging is well recognized as a novel and attractive protective strategy to reduce the excitotoxic effect of excess extracellular glutamate that accumulates in the brain following an ischemic stroke. The main advantage of this novel therapeutic strategy is that it occurs in the blood circulation and therefore does not affect the normal brain neurophysiology, as it has been described for other drug treatments used against glutamate excitotoxicity. In this work we report all experimental data from the beginning of our studies, focused on stroke pathology, and we describe new findings about the potential application of this therapy. Future clinical trials will allow to know the real efficacy of this novel therapeutic strategy in stroke patients. PMID:26661174

  19. Methylphenidate Increases Glutamate Uptake in Bergmann Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Guillem, Alain M; Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; López-Bayghen, Bruno; Calleros, Oscar A; Campuzano, Marco R; Ortega, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, exerts its actions through the activation of specific membrane receptors present in neurons and glial cells. Over-stimulation of glutamate receptors results in neuronal death, phenomena known as excitotoxicity. A family of glutamate uptake systems, mainly expressed in glial cells, removes the amino acid from the synaptic cleft preventing an excessive glutamatergic stimulation and thus neuronal damage. Autism spectrum disorders comprise a group of syndromes characterized by impaired social interactions and anxiety. One or the most common drugs prescribed to treat these disorders is Methylphenidate, known to increase dopamine extracellular levels, although it is not clear if its sedative effects are related to a plausible regulation of the glutamatergic tone via the regulation of the glial glutamate uptake systems. To gain insight into this possibility, we used the well-established model system of cultured chick cerebellum Bergmann glia cells. A time and dose-dependent increase in the activity and protein levels of glutamate transporters was detected upon Methylphenidate exposure. Interestingly, this increase is the result of an augmentation of both the synthesis as well as the insertion of these protein complexes in the plasma membrane. These results favour the notion that glial cells are Methylphenidate targets, and that by these means could regulate dopamine turnover.

  20. A novel mechanism of neuroprotection: Blood glutamate grabber.

    PubMed

    Castillo, José; Loza, María Isabel; Mirelman, David; Brea, José; Blanco, Miguel; Sobrino, Tomás; Campos, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity is a primary contributor of ischemic neuronal death and other cellular components of the neurovascular unit. Several strategies have been developed against glutamate excitotoxicity, however none of them have not shown positive results in the clinical practice so far. Nowadays, the concept of blood/brain glutamate grabbing or scavenging is well recognized as a novel and attractive protective strategy to reduce the excitotoxic effect of excess extracellular glutamate that accumulates in the brain following an ischemic stroke. The main advantage of this novel therapeutic strategy is that it occurs in the blood circulation and therefore does not affect the normal brain neurophysiology, as it has been described for other drug treatments used against glutamate excitotoxicity. In this work we report all experimental data from the beginning of our studies, focused on stroke pathology, and we describe new findings about the potential application of this therapy. Future clinical trials will allow to know the real efficacy of this novel therapeutic strategy in stroke patients.

  1. The efficiency of glutamate uptake differs between neonatal and adult cortical microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lecointre, Maryline; Hauchecorne, Michelle; Chaussivert, Armelle; Marret, Stéphane; Leroux, Philippe; Jegou, Sylvie; Leroux-Nicollet, Isabelle; Gonzalez, Bruno J; Henry, Vincent J

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate transporters (excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAATs)) are essential for brain homeostasis. While previous studies indicate that the vascular endothelium contributes to glutamate efflux in the adult brain, little information is available regarding glutamate uptake in the immature brain. The present study shows a differential expression pattern of EAATs between cortical microvessels in adults and newborns. In addition, adult cortical endothelial cells take up glutamate more efficiently than neonatal cells. Our findings indicate age-specific changes in extracellular glutamate regulation by brain endothelial cells, suggesting differences in the efficiency of glutamate efflux during an excitotoxic process that, in turn, may contribute to age-specific brain vulnerability. PMID:24517976

  2. Central Role of Glutamate Metabolism in the Maintenance of Nitrogen Homeostasis in Normal and Hyperammonemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Jeitner, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is present in the brain at an average concentration—typically 10–12 mM—far in excess of those of other amino acids. In glutamate-containing vesicles in the brain, the concentration of glutamate may even exceed 100 mM. Yet because glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter, the concentration of this amino acid in the cerebral extracellular fluid must be kept low—typically µM. The remarkable gradient of glutamate in the different cerebral compartments: vesicles > cytosol/mitochondria > extracellular fluid attests to the extraordinary effectiveness of glutamate transporters and the strict control of enzymes of glutamate catabolism and synthesis in well-defined cellular and subcellular compartments in the brain. A major route for glutamate and ammonia removal is via the glutamine synthetase (glutamate ammonia ligase) reaction. Glutamate is also removed by conversion to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) via the action of glutamate decarboxylase. On the other hand, cerebral glutamate levels are maintained by the action of glutaminase and by various α-ketoglutarate-linked aminotransferases (especially aspartate aminotransferase and the mitochondrial and cytosolic forms of the branched-chain aminotransferases). Although the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction is freely reversible, owing to rapid removal of ammonia as glutamine amide, the direction of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction in the brain in vivo is mainly toward glutamate catabolism rather than toward the net synthesis of glutamate, even under hyperammonemia conditions. During hyperammonemia, there is a large increase in cerebral glutamine content, but only small changes in the levels of glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. Thus, the channeling of glutamate toward glutamine during hyperammonemia results in the net synthesis of 5-carbon units. This increase in 5-carbon units is accomplished in part by the ammonia-induced stimulation of the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate

  3. Chemical activation of a high-affinity glutamate transporter in human erythrocytes and its implications for malaria-parasite-induced glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Winterberg, Markus; Rajendran, Esther; Baumeister, Stefan; Bietz, Sven; Kirk, Kiaran; Lingelbach, Klaus

    2012-04-12

    Human erythrocytes have a low basal permeability to L-glutamate and are not known to have a functional glutamate transporter. Here, treatment of human erythrocytes with arsenite was shown to induce the uptake of L-glutamate and D-aspartate, but not that of D-glutamate or L-alanine. The majority of the arsenite-induced L-glutamate influx was via a high-affinity, Na(+)-dependent system showing characteristics of members of the "excitatory amino acid transporter" (EAAT) family. Western blots and immunofluorescence assays revealed the presence of a member of this family, EAAT3, on the erythrocyte membrane. Erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum take up glutamate from the extracellular environment. Although the majority of uptake is via a low-affinity Na(+)-independent pathway there is, in addition, a high-affinity uptake component, raising the possibility that the parasite activates the host cell glutamate transporter.

  4. Ubiquitin-dependent trafficking and turnover of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Goo, Marisa S; Scudder, Samantha L; Patrick, Gentry N

    2015-01-01

    Changes in synaptic strength underlie the basis of learning and memory and are controlled, in part, by the insertion or removal of AMPA-type glutamate receptors at the postsynaptic membrane of excitatory synapses. Once internalized, these receptors may be recycled back to the plasma membrane by subunit-specific interactions with other proteins or by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation. Alternatively, these receptors may be targeted for destruction by multiple degradation pathways in the cell. Ubiquitination, another post-translational modification, has recently emerged as a key signal that regulates the recycling and trafficking of glutamate receptors. In this review, we will discuss recent findings on the role of ubiquitination in the trafficking and turnover of ionotropic glutamate receptors and plasticity of excitatory synapses.

  5. A noncanonical release of GABA and glutamate modulates neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Manent, Jean-Bernard; Demarque, Michaël; Jorquera, Isabel; Pellegrino, Christophe; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Aniksztejn, Laurent; Represa, Alfonso

    2005-05-11

    Immature neurons express GABA and glutamate receptors before synapse formation, and both transmitters are released at an early developmental stage. We have now tested the hypothesis that the ongoing release of GABA and glutamate modulates neuronal migration. Using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling and cocultures of hippocampal slices obtained from naive and green fluorescent protein-transgenic mice, we report that migration is severely affected by GABA(A) or NMDA receptor antagonist treatments. These effects were also present in munc18-1 knock-out slices in which soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-dependent vesicular secretion of transmitters has been deleted. GABA(A) antagonists were more efficient than NMDA antagonists to reduce cell migration, in keeping with the earlier maturation of GABAergic mechanisms. We conclude that GABA and, to a lesser degree, glutamate released in a SNARE-independent mechanism exert a paracrine action on neuronal migration.

  6. Glutamate transporters in brain ischemia: to modulate or not?

    PubMed Central

    Krzyżanowska, Weronika; Pomierny, Bartosz; Filip, Małgorzata; Pera, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we briefly describe glutamate (Glu) metabolism and its specific transports and receptors in the central nervous system (CNS). Thereafter, we focus on excitatory amino acid transporters, cystine/glutamate antiporters (system xc-) and vesicular glutamate transporters, specifically addressing their location and roles in CNS and the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of Glu transporters. We provide evidence from in vitro or in vivo studies concerning alterations in Glu transporter expression in response to hypoxia or ischemia, including limited human data that supports the role of Glu transporters in stroke patients. Moreover, the potential to induce brain tolerance to ischemia through modulation of the expression and/or activities of Glu transporters is also discussed. Finally we present strategies involving the application of ischemic preconditioning and pharmacological agents, eg β-lactam antibiotics, amitriptyline, riluzole and N-acetylcysteine, which result in the significant protection of nervous tissues against ischemia. PMID:24681894

  7. [PECULIARITIES OF THE CEREBROVASCULAR EFFECTS OF GLUTAMIC ACID].

    PubMed

    Gan'shina, T S; Kurza, E V; Kurdyumov, I N; Maslennikov, D V; Mirzoyan, R S

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on nonlinear rats subjected to global transient cerebral ischemia revealed the ability of glutamic acid to improve cerebral circulation. Consequently, the excitatory amino acid can produce adverse (neurotoxic) and positive (anti-ischemic) effects in cerebral ischemia. The cerebrovascular effect of glutamic acid in cerebral ischemia is attenuated on the background action of the MNDA receptor blocker MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg intravenously) and eliminated by bicuculline. When glutamic acid is combined with the non-competitive MNDA receptor antagonist MK-801, neither one nor another drug shows its vasodilator effect. The results are indicative of the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory systems on the level of cerebral vessels and once again confirm our previous conclusion about the decisive role of GABA(A) receptors in brain vessels in the implementation of anti-ischemic activity of endogenous compounds (melatonin) and well-known pharmacological substances (mexidol, afobazole), and new chemical compounds based on GABA-containing lipid derivatives.

  8. Enzymatic production of α-ketoglutaric acid from l-glutamic acid via l-glutamate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Niu, Panqing; Dong, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Yuancai; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-10

    In this study, a novel strategy for α-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) production from l-glutamic acid using recombinant l-glutamate oxidase (LGOX) was developed. First, by analyzing the molecular structure characteristics of l-glutamic acid and α-KG, LGOX was found to be the best catalyst for oxidizing the amino group of l-glutamic acid to a ketonic group without the need for exogenous cofactor. Then the LGOX gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) in a soluble and active form, and the recombinant LGOX activity reached to a maximum value of 0.59U/mL at pH 6.5, 30°C. Finally, the maximum α-KG concentration reached 104.7g/L from 110g/L l-glutamic acid in 24h, under the following optimum conditions: 1.5U/mL LGOX, 250U/mL catalase, 3mM MnCl2, 30°C, and pH 6.5. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Chronic Glutamate Toxicity in Neurodegenerative Diseases—What is the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Lewerenz, Jan; Maher, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Together with aspartate, glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Glutamate binds and activates both ligand-gated ion channels (ionotropic glutamate receptors) and a class of G-protein coupled receptors (metabotropic glutamate receptors). Although the intracellular glutamate concentration in the brain is in the millimolar range, the extracellular glutamate concentration is kept in the low micromolar range by the action of excitatory amino acid transporters that import glutamate and aspartate into astrocytes and neurons. Excess extracellular glutamate may lead to excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo in acute insults like ischemic stroke via the overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. In addition, chronic excitotoxicity has been hypothesized to play a role in numerous neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Based on this hypothesis, a good deal of effort has been devoted to develop and test drugs that either inhibit glutamate receptors or decrease extracellular glutamate. In this review, we provide an overview of the different pathways that are thought to lead to an over-activation of the glutamatergic system and glutamate toxicity in neurodegeneration. In addition, we summarize the available experimental evidence for glutamate toxicity in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26733784

  10. Two Pathways of Glutamate Fermentation by Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Buckel, Wolfgang; Barker, H. A.

    1974-01-01

    Two pathways are involved in the fermentation of glutamate to acetate, butyrate, carbon dioxide, and ammonia—the methylaspartate and the hydroxyglutarate pathways which are used by Clostridium tetanomorphum and Peptococcus aerogenes, respectively. Although these pathways give rise to the same products, they are easily distinguished by different labeling patterns of the butyrate when [4-14C]glutamate is used as substrate. Schmidt degradation of the radioactive butyrate from C. tetanomorphum yielded equally labeled propionate and carbon dioxide, whereas nearly all the radioactivity of the butyrate from P. aerogenes was recovered in the corresponding propionate. This procedure was used as a test for the pathway of glutamate fermentation by 15 strains (9 species) of anaerobic bacteria. The labeling patterns of the butyrate indicate that glutamate is fermented via the methylaspartate pathway by C. tetani, C. cochlearium, and C. saccarobutyricum, and via the hydroxyglutarate pathway by Acidaminococcus fermentans, C. microsporum, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and F. fusiformis. Enzymes specific for each pathway were assayed in crude extracts of the above organisms. 3-Methylaspartase was found only in clostridia which use the methylaspartate pathway, including Clostridium SB4 and C. sticklandii, which probably degrade glutamate to acetate and carbon dioxide by using a second amino acid as hydrogen acceptor. High levels of 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase were found exclusively in organisms that use the hydroxyglutarate pathway. The data indicate that only two pathways are involved in the fermentation of glutamate by the bacteria analyzed. The methylaspartate pathway appears to be used only by species of Clostridium, whereas the hydroxyglutarate pathway is used by representatives of several genera. PMID:4813895

  11. Glutamate and ATP signalling in white matter pathology

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Excessive signalling by excitatory neurotransmitters like glutamate and ATP can be deleterious to neurons and oligodendroglia, and cause disease. In particular, sustained activation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), kainate and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors damages oligodendrocytes, a feature that depends entirely on Ca2+ overload of the cytoplasm and that can be initiated by disruption of glutamate homeostasis. Thus, inhibition of glutamate uptake by activated microglia can compromise glutamate homeostasis and induce oligodendrocyte excitotoxicity. Moreover, non-lethal, brief activation of kainate receptors in oligodendrocytes rapidly sensitizes these cells to complement attack as a consequence of oxidative stress. In addition to glutamate, ATP signalling can directly trigger oligodendrocyte excitotoxicity via activation of Ca2+-permeable P2X7 purinergic receptors, which mediates ischaemic damage to white matter (WM) and causes lesions that are reminiscent of multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques. Conversely, blockade of P2X7 receptors attenuates post-ischaemic injury to WM and ameliorates chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of MS. Importantly, P2X7 expression is elevated in normal-appearing WM in patients with MS, suggesting that signalling through this receptor in oligodendrocytes may be enhanced in this disease. Altogether, these observations reveal novel mechanisms by which altered glutamate and ATP homeostasis can trigger oligodendrocyte death. This review aims at summarizing current knowledge about the mechanisms leading to WM damage as a consequence of altered neurotransmitter signalling, and their relevance to disease. This knowledge will generate new therapeutic avenues to treat more efficiently acute and chronic WM pathology. PMID:21250988

  12. Role of Glutamate Transporters in Redox Homeostasis of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Stephanie M.; Ogunrinu-Babarinde, Toyin; Holt, Kenneth T.; Sontheimer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Redox homeostasis is especially important in the brain where high oxygen consumption produces an abundance of harmful oxidative by-products. Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide non-protein thiol. It is the central nervous system’s most abundant antioxidant, and the master controller of brain redox homeostasis. The glutamate transporters, System xc− (SXC) and the Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAAT), play important, synergistic roles in the synthesis of GSH. In glial cells, SXC mediates the uptake of cystine, which after intracellular reduction to cysteine, reacts with glutamate during the rate-limiting step of GSH synthesis. EAAT3 mediates direct cysteine uptake for neuronal GSH synthesis. SXC and EAAT work in concert in glial cells to provide two intracellular substrates for GSH synthesis, cystine and glutamate. Their cyclical basal function also prevents a buildup of extracellular glutamate, which SXC releases extracellularly in exchange for cystine uptake. Maintaining extracellular glutamate homeostasis is critical to prevent neuronal toxicity, as well as glutamate-mediated SXC inhibition, of which each could lead to a depletion of intracellular GSH and loss of cellular redox control. Many neurological diseases show evidence of GSH dysfunction, and increased GSH has been widely associated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance of gliomas. We present evidence suggesting that gliomas expressing elevated levels of SXC are more reliant on GSH for growth and survival. They have an increased inherent radiation resistance, yet inhibition of SXC can increase tumor sensitivity at low radiation doses. GSH depletion through SXC inhibition may be a viable mechanism to enhance current glioma treatment strategies and make tumors more sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy protocols. PMID:24418113

  13. Brain glutamate metabolism during metabolic alkalosis and acidosis.

    PubMed

    Ang, R C; Hoop, B; Kazemi, H

    1992-12-01

    Glutamate modifies ventilation by altering neural excitability centrally. Metabolic acid-base perturbations may also alter cerebral glutamate metabolism locally and thus affect ventilation. Therefore, the effect of metabolic acid-base perturbations on central nervous system glutamate metabolism was studied in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs under normal acid-base conditions and during isocapnic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid transfer rates of radiotracer [13N]ammonia and of [13N]glutamine synthesized de novo via the reaction glutamate+NH3-->glutamine in brain glia were measured during normal acid-base conditions and after 90 min of acute isocapnic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid [13N]ammonia and [13N]glutamine transfer rates decreased in metabolic acidosis. Maximal glial glutamine efflux rate jm equals 85.6 +/- 9.5 (SE) mumol.l-1 x min-1 in all animals. No difference in jm was observed in metabolic alkalosis or acidosis. Mean cerebral cortical glutamate concentration was significantly lower in acidosis [7.01 +/- 0.45 (SE) mumol/g brain tissue] and tended to be larger in alkalosis, compared with 7.97 +/- 0.89 mumol/g in normal acid-base conditions. There was a similar change in cerebral cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration. Within the limits of the present method and measurements, the results suggest that acute metabolic acidosis but not alkalosis reduces glial glutamine efflux, corresponding to changes in cerebral cortical glutamate metabolism. These results suggest that glutamatergic mechanisms may contribute to central respiratory control in metabolic acidosis.

  14. Metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptors as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Marek, Gerard J

    2004-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors are a family of class III G-protein-coupled receptors comprising eight members (mGluR1-8), which are an attractive target in the central nervous system because of the widespread use of glutamate as the principal excitatory amino acid transmitter. The unique pharmacology of class III G-protein coupled receptors, their forebrain localization in key limbic-related cortical/thalamic/striatal/amygdaloid circuits, and the promise of subtle modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission make these receptors intriguing targets for a wide variety of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  15. Monosodium glutamate and sweet taste: generalization of conditioned taste aversion between glutamate and sweet stimuli in rats.

    PubMed

    Heyer, B R; Taylor-Burds, C C; Tran, L H; Delay, E R

    2003-09-01

    Even though monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a prototypical umami substance, previous studies reported that a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) to MSG, mixed with amiloride to block the taste of sodium, generalizes to sucrose. These findings suggest that the taste of glutamate mimics the taste of sucrose and raise the question of whether glutamate has a broadly tuned sweet taste component. To test this hypothesis, CTA experiments were conducted to test for generalization between MSG and several sweet stimuli: sucrose, glucose, maltose, saccharin and SC-45647. Strong bidirectional generalization was seen between MSG mixed with amiloride and sucrose, glucose, saccharin and SC-45647. Weak generalization was seen between MSG and maltose, and sucrose and maltose. None of the CTAs generalized to NMDA. These findings support the hypothesis that the taste of MSG has broadly tuned, sweet-like characteristics, possibly due to the convergence of afferent signals for MSG, natural sugars and artificial sweeteners.

  16. [Enzymatic production of α-ketoglutaric acid by L-glutamate oxidase from L-glutamic acid].

    PubMed

    Niu, Panqing; Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Liming

    2014-08-01

    We produced α-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) from L-glutamic acid, using enzymatic transformation approach with L-glutamate oxidase (LGOX). First, wild strain Streptomyces sp. FMME066 was mutated with NTG, a genetically stable mutant Streptomyces sp. FMME067 was obtained. Under the optimal nutrition conditions with fructose 10 g/L, peptone 7.5 g/L, KH2PO4 1 g/L and CaCl2 0.05 g/L, the maximum LGOX activity reached 0.14 U/mL. The LGOX was stable to pH and temperature, and Mn2+ had a stimulating effect. Finally, after 24 h enzymatic conversion under the optimal conditions, the maximum titer of α-KG reached 38.1 g/L from 47 g/L L-glutamic acid. Enzymatic transformation by LGOX is a potential approach for α-KG production.

  17. [Glutamate and malignant gliomas, from epilepsia to biological aggressiveness: therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Blecic, Serge; Rynkowski, Michal; De Witte, Olivier; Lefranc, Florence

    2013-09-01

    In this review article, we describe the unrecognized roles of glutamate and glutamate receptors in malignant glioma biology. The neurotransmitter glutamate released from malignant glioma cells in the extracellular matrix is responsible for seizure induction and at higher concentration neuronal cell death. This neuronal cell death will create vacated place for tumor growth. Glutamate also stimulates the growth and the migration of glial tumor cells by means of the activation of glutamate receptors on glioma cells in a paracrine and autocrine manner. The multitude of effects of glutamate in glioma biology supports the rationale for pharmacological targeting of glutamate receptors and transporters in the adjuvant treatment of malignant gliomas in neurology and neuro-oncology. Using the website www.clinicaltrials.gov/ as a reference - a service developed by the National Library of Medicine for the National Health Institute in USA - we have evoked the few clinical trials completed and currently ongoing with therapies targeting the glutamate receptors.

  18. Dopamine denervation of the prefrontal cortex increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1

    PubMed Central

    Vollbrecht, Peter J.; Simmler, Linda D.; Blakely, Randy D.; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2014-01-01

    Both dopamine and glutamate are critically involved in cognitive processes such as working memory. Astrocytes, which express dopamine receptors, are essential elements in the termination of glutamatergic signaling: the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for >90% of cortical glutamate uptake. The effect of dopamine depletion on glutamate transporters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is unknown. In an effort to determine if astrocytes are a locus of cortical dopamine-glutamate interactions, we examined the effects of chronic dopamine denervation on PFC protein and mRNA levels of glutamate transporters. PFC dopamine denervation elicited a marked increase in GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on levels of other glutamate transporters; high affinity glutamate transport was positively correlated with the extent of dopamine depletion. GLT-1 gene expression was not altered. Our data suggests that dopamine depletion may lead to post-translational modifications that result in increased expression and activity of GLT-1 in PFC astrocytes. PMID:24611756

  19. Receptor-mediated glutamate release from volume sensitive channels in astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Takahiro; Kang, Jian; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.; Simon, Sanford M.; Lin, Jane H.-C.; Yu, Yufei; Li, Yuxing; Yang, Jay; Dienel, Gerald; Zielke, H. Ronald; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2005-11-01

    Several lines of work have shown that astrocytes release glutamate in response to receptor activation, which results in a modulation of local synaptic activity. Astrocytic glutamate release is Ca2+-dependent and occurs in conjunction with exocytosis of glutamate containing vesicles. However, astrocytes contain a millimolar concentration of cytosolic glutamate and express channels permeable to small anions, such as glutamate. Here, we tested the idea that astrocytes respond to receptor stimulation by dynamic changes in cell volume, resulting in volume-sensitive channel activation, and efflux of cytosolic glutamate. Confocal imaging and whole-cell recordings demonstrated that astrocytes exhibited a transient Ca2+-dependent cell volume increase, which activated glutamate permeable channels. HPLC analysis revealed that glutamate was released in conjunction with other amino acid osmolytes. Our observations indicate that volume-sensitive channel may constitute a previously uncharacterized target for modulation of astrocyte-neuronal interactions. electrophysiology | exocytosis | neurotransmitters | osmolarity | synapses

  20. Glutamate Clearance Is Locally Modulated by Presynaptic Neuronal Activity in the Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Moritz; Hanson, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are abundantly expressed by astrocytes, rapidly remove glutamate from the extracellular environment, and restrict the temporal and spatial extent of glutamate signaling. Studies probing EAAT function suggest that their capacity to remove glutamate is large and does not saturate, even with substantial glutamate challenges. In contrast, we report that neuronal activity rapidly and reversibly modulates EAAT-dependent glutamate transport. To date, no physiological manipulation has shown changes in functional glutamate uptake in a nonpathological state. Using iGluSnFr-based glutamate imaging and electrophysiology in the adult mouse cortex, we show that glutamate uptake is slowed up to threefold following bursts of neuronal activity. The slowing of glutamate uptake depends on the frequency and duration of presynaptic neuronal activity but is independent of the amount of glutamate released. The modulation of glutamate uptake is brief, returning to normal within 50 ms after stimulation ceases. Interestingly, the slowing of glutamate uptake is specific to activated synapses, even within the domain of an individual astrocyte. Activity-induced slowing of glutamate uptake, and the increased persistence of glutamate in the extracellular space, is reflected by increased decay times of neuronal NR2A-mediated NMDA currents. These results show that astrocytic clearance of extracellular glutamate is slowed in a temporally and spatially specific manner following bursts of neuronal activity ≥30 Hz and that these changes affect the neuronal response to released glutamate. This suggests a previously unreported form of neuron–astrocyte interaction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We report the first fast, physiological modulation of astrocyte glutamate clearance kinetics. We show that presynaptic activity in the cerebral cortex increases the persistence of glutamate in the extracellular space by slowing its clearance by astrocytes. Because of

  1. The GLT-1 (EAAT2; slc1a2) glutamate transporter is essential for glutamate homeostasis in the neocortex of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bjørnsen, Lars Petter; Hadera, Mussie G; Zhou, Yun; Danbolt, Niels C; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and is inactivated by cellular uptake catalyzed mostly by the glutamate transporter subtypes GLT-1 (EAAT2) and GLAST (EAAT1). Astrocytes express both GLT-1 and GLAST, while axon terminals in the neocortex only express GLT-1. To evaluate the role of GLT-1 in glutamate homeostasis, we injected GLT-1 knockout (KO) mice and wild-type littermates with [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate 15 min before euthanization. Metabolite levels were analyzed in extracts from neocortex and cerebellum and (13)C labeling in neocortex. Whereas the cerebellum in GLT-1-deficient mice had normal levels of glutamate, glutamine, and (13)C labeling of metabolites, glutamate level was decreased but labeling from [1-(13)C] glucose was unchanged in the neocortex. The contribution from pyruvate carboxylation toward labeling of these metabolites was unchanged. Labeling from [1,2-(13)C] acetate, originating in astrocytes, was decreased in glutamate and glutamine in the neocortex indicating reduced mitochondrial metabolism in astrocytes. The decreased amount of glutamate in the cortex indicates that glutamine transport into neurons is not sufficient to replenish glutamate lost because of neurotransmission and that GLT-1 plays a role in glutamate homeostasis in the cortex. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and is inactivated by uptake via GLT-1 (EAAT2) and GLAST (EAAT1) transporters, while axon terminals in the neocortex only express GLT-1. To evaluate the role of GLT-1 in glutamate homeostasis, we used [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate injection and NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that glutamine transport into neurons is not sufficient to replenish glutamate lost because of neurotransmission and that GLT-1 plays a role in glutamate homeostasis in the neocortex.

  2. Rapid Microelectrode Measurements and the Origin and Regulation of Extracellular Glutamate in Rat Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hascup, E.R.; Hascup, K.N.; Stephens, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Huettl, P.; Gratton, A.; Gerhardt, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a significant role in several mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, addiction and anxiety. Previous studies on PFC glutamate-mediated function have used techniques that raise questions on the neuronal vs. astrocytic origin of glutamate. The present studies used enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEAs) to monitor second-by-second resting glutamate levels in the PFC of awake rats. Locally-applied drugs were employed in an attempt to discriminate between the neuronal or glial components of the resting glutamate signal. Local application of tetrodotoxin (TTX; sodium channel blocker), produced a significant (~40%) decline in resting glutamate levels. In addition significant reductions in extracellular glutamate were seen with locally-applied ω-conotoxin (MVIIC; ~50%; calcium channel blocker), and the mGluR⅔ agonist, LY379268 (~20%), and a significant increase with the mGluR⅔ antagonist LY341495 (~40%), effects all consistent with a large neuronal contribution to the resting glutamate levels. Local administration of D,L-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA; glutamate transporter inhibitor) produced an ~120% increase in extracellular glutamate levels, supporting that excitatory amino acid transporters, which are largely located on glia, modulate clearance of extracellular glutamate. Interestingly, local application of (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (CPG; cystine/glutamate antiporter inhibitor), produced small, non-significant bi-phasic changes in extracellular glutamate versus vehicle control. Finally, pre-administration of TTX completely blocked the glutamate response to tail pinch stress. Taken together, these results support that PFC resting glutamate levels in rats as measured by the MEA technology are at least 40-50% derived from neurons. Furthermore, these data support that the impulse flow-dependent glutamate release from a physiologically-evoked event is entirely neuronally derived. PMID:20969570

  3. Effect of Charge Substitutions at Residue His-142 on Voltage Gating of Connexin43 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Junko; Gutiérrez, Cristina; González, Daniel; Kieken, Fabien; Seki, Akiko; Requena Carrión, Jesus; Sorgen, Paul L.; Taffet, Steven M.; Barrio, Luis C.; Delmar, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the carboxyl terminal of connexin43 (Cx43CT) is involved in fast transjunctional voltage gating. Separate studies support the notion of an intramolecular association between Cx43CT and a region of the cytoplasmic loop (amino acids 119–144; referred to as “L2”). Structural analysis of L2 shows two α-helical domains, each with a histidine residue in its sequence (H126 and H142). Here, we determined the effect of H142 replacement by lysine, alanine, and glutamate on the voltage gating of Cx43 channels. Mutation H142E led to a significant reduction in the frequency of occurrence of the residual state and a prolongation of dwell open time. Macroscopically, there was a large reduction in the fast component of voltage gating. These results resembled those observed for a mutant lacking the carboxyl terminal (CT) domain. NMR experiments showed that mutation H142E significantly decreased the Cx43CT-L2 interaction and disrupted the secondary structure of L2. Overall, our data support the hypothesis that fast voltage gating involves an intramolecular particle-receptor interaction between CT and L2. Some of the structural constrains of fast voltage gating may be shared with those involved in the chemical gating of Cx43. PMID:16963503

  4. Role of gap junctions in the contractile response to agonists in the mesenteric resistance artery of rats with acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Li, Xin-Zhi; Peng, Min; Ji, Wei; Zhao, Lei; Li, Li; Zhang, Liang; Si, Jun-Qiang; Ma, Ke-Tao

    2017-04-01

    Hypoxic exposure results in the vascular dysfunction and reduction of vasomotor responses and thus disrupts or reduces blood flow in the resistance arteries. Connexin (Cx)-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) serves a critical role in the regulation of vasomotor tone and the synchronized contraction of arteries, however whether the adverse effect of hypoxia on vasomotor responses in vascular smooth muscle layer of resistance arteries is involved in changes in the GJIC and the expression of Cx43 and Cx45 remains to be elucidated. Pressure myography, whole-cell patch clamp and western blot analysis were used to investigate the differences in expression and function of gap junction (GJ) in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of the mesenteric resistance artery (MRA) from Sprague‑Dawley (SD) rats in normoxia and acute hypoxia groups. In the present study, whole‑cell patch clamp measurements demonstrated a significant reduction in the membrane capacitance and conductance in the VSMCs of the MRAs in the acute hypoxia (5 min) group (n=13) compared with the normoxia group (n=13), which suggested that exposure to acute hypoxia of 5 min decreased the coupling of the GJ between the VSMCs of MRAs in SD rats. Pressure myographic analysis demonstrated that 0.1‑100 µM phenylephrine (PE)‑induced MRA vasoconstriction was less sensitive under the acute hypoxic condition (n=7) compared with the normoxia condition (n=9) following treatment with 100 µM 2‑aminoethoxydiphenyl borate for 20 min. Compared with SD rats under normoxia, the PE‑initiated vasoconstrictive frequency and amplitude under acute hypoxia for 20, 40 and 60 min in the MRAs of SD rats was markedly attenuated (n=7). The results of western blot analysis indicated that the expression levels of Cx43 and Cx45 in MRA under acute hypoxia (1 h) were lower compared with normoxia. Cx43‑and Cx45‑mediated GJs serve a significant role in the regulation of the vasomotor function

  5. Investigation of second harmonic generation in glutamic acid-metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, T.M.; Cline, S.M.; Zelmon, D.E.; Vuppuladhadium, R.; Gupta, S.D.; Ramabadran, U.B.

    1996-12-31

    To design new second order nonlinear crystals, the authors have characterized a series of dipeptide complexes and copper glutamate. They tested 16 materials using powder second harmonic generation. The best of these materials was copper glutamate. Results of initial nonlinear optical characterization of the copper glutamate powder determined by the Kurtz powder test are presented.

  6. [The comparative investigation of antihypoxia activity of glutamic and N-acetylglutamic acids].

    PubMed

    Makarova, L M; Pogorelyĭ, V E

    2013-01-01

    Comparative study of antihypoxic activity of glutamic and N-acetylglutamic acid in doses of 1, 10, 50 and 100 mg/kg was realized. It was experimentally ascertained that the most apparent antihypoxic action of study objects occurs in conditions of hypobaric hypoxia of acetylated derivative of glutamic acid considerably exceeds glutamic acid.

  7. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN P...

  8. 40 CFR 721.3820 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-, disodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3820 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-, disodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN P...

  10. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN P...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN P...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN P...

  13. Chronic rhinitis with nasal polyposis associated with sodium glutamate intolerance.

    PubMed

    Asero, Riccardo; Bottazzi, Gianna

    2007-01-01

    The study reports a case of perennial rhinitis with bilateral polyposis. A careful diagnostic workup revealed that the disorder was caused by sodium glutamate intolerance. This is the first study showing an association between intolerance to food additives and nasal polyposis. 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Palmitoylethanolamide inhibits glutamate release in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wu, Chia-Chan; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2015-03-11

    The effect of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), an endogenous fatty acid amide displaying neuroprotective actions, on glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals (synaptosomes) was investigated. PEA inhibited the Ca²⁺-dependent release of glutamate, which was triggered by exposing synaptosomes to the potassium channel blocker 4-aminopyridine. This release inhibition was concentration dependent, associated with a reduction in cytosolic Ca²⁺ concentration, and not due to a change in synaptosomal membrane potential. The glutamate release-inhibiting effect of PEA was prevented by the Ca(v)2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-agatoxin IVA or the protein kinase A inhibitor H89, not affected by the intracellular Ca²⁺ release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157, and partially antagonized by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM281. Based on these results, we suggest that PEA exerts its presynaptic inhibition, likely through a reduction in the Ca²⁺ influx mediated by Ca(v)2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, thereby inhibiting the release of glutamate from rat cortical nerve terminals. This release inhibition might be linked to the activation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the suppression of the protein kinase A pathway.

  15. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Heiko J.; Fukuda, A.; Kilb, W.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca2+ transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  16. Blood and Brain Glutamate Levels in Children with Autistic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Tamer H.; Abdelrahman, Hadeel M.; Fattah, Nelly R. Abdel; El-Masry, Nagda M.; Hashim, Haitham M.; El-Gerby, Khaled M.; Fattah, Nermin R. Abdel

    2013-01-01

    Despite of the great efforts that move forward to clarify the pathophysiologic mechanisms in autism, the cause of this disorder, however, remains largely unknown. There is an increasing body of literature concerning neurochemical contributions to the pathophysiology of autism. We aimed to determine blood and brain levels of glutamate in children…

  17. Peripheral Glutamate Receptors Are Required for Hyperalgesia Induced by Capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Jin, You-Hong; Takemura, Motohide; Furuyama, Akira; Yonehara, Norifumi

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid1 (TRPV1) and glutamate receptors (GluRs) are located in small diameter primary afferent neurons (nociceptors), and it was speculated that glutamate released in the peripheral tissue in response to activation of TRPV1 might activate nociceptors retrogradely. But, it was not clear which types of GluRs are functioning in the nociceptive sensory transmission. In the present study, we examined the c-Fos expression in spinal cord dorsal horn following injection of drugs associated with glutamate receptors with/without capsaicin into the hindpaw. The subcutaneous injection of capsaicin or glutamate remarkably evoked c-Fos expression in ipsilateral sides of spinal cord dorsal horn. This capsaicin evoked increase of c-Fos expression was significantly prevented by concomitant administration of MK801, CNQX, and CPCCOEt. On the other hand, there were not any significant changes in coinjection of capsaicin and MCCG or MSOP. These results reveal that the activation of iGluRs and group I mGluR in peripheral afferent nerves play an important role in mechanisms whereby capsaicin evokes/maintains nociceptive responses. PMID:22110945

  18. Paraventricular Stimulation with Glutamate Elicits Bradycardia and Pituitary Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Miyamoto, Michael; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    The excitatory neurotransmitter, L-glutamate (0.5 M, pH 7.4), or the organic acid, acetate (0.5 M, pH 7.4), was microinjected (50 nl over 2 min) directly into the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) of pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats while arterial blood pressure and heart rate and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), vasopressin, and oxytocin were measured. Activation of PVN neurons with L-glutamate led to increases in plasma ACTH, vasopressin, and oxytocin and a profound bradycardia (-80 beats/min) with little change in arterial blood pressure. Microinjection of acetate had no effect on the above variables. The decrease in heart rate was shown to be dependent on the concentration of glutamate injected and the volume of injectate. The bradycardia was mediated through the autonomic nervous system because ganglionic blockade (pentolinium tartrate) eliminated the response; atropine and propranolol severely attenuated the bradycardia. The bradycardia was greatest when L-glutamate was microinjected into the caudal PVN. Injections into the rostral PVN or into nuclei surrounding the PVN led to small or nonsignificant decreases in heart rate. Focal electric stimulation (2-50 pA) of the PVN also led to decreases in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. These data suggest that activation of PVN neurons leads to the release of ACTH, vasopressin, and oxytocin from the pituitary and a bradycardia that is mediated by the autonomic nervous system.

  19. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in mammalian ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the reversible inter-conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia. High levels of GDH activity is found in mammalian liver, kidney, brain, and pancreas. In the liver, GDH reaction appears to be close-to-equilibrium, providing the appropriate ratio of ammonia and amino acids for urea synthesis in periportal hepatocytes. In addition, GDH produces glutamate for glutamine synthesis in a small rim of pericentral hepatocytes. Hence, hepatic GDH can be either a source for ammonia or an ammonia scavenger. In the kidney, GDH function produces ammonia from glutamate to control acidosis. In the human, the presence of two differentially regulated isoforms (hGDH1 and hGDH2) suggests a complex role for GDH in ammonia homeostasis. Whereas hGDH1 is sensitive to GTP inhibition, hGDH2 has dissociated its function from GTP control. Furthermore, hGDH2 shows a lower optimal pH than hGDH1. The hGDH2 enzyme is selectively expressed in human astrocytes and Sertoli cells, probably facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential for their supportive role. Here, we report that hGDH2 is also expressed in the epithelial cells lining the convoluted tubules of the renal cortex. As hGDH2 functions more efficiently under acidotic conditions without the operation of the GTP energy switch, its presence in the kidney may increase the efficacy of the organ to maintain acid base equilibrium.

  20. Dynamic DNA methylation controls glutamate receptor trafficking and synaptic scaling.

    PubMed

    Sweatt, J David

    2016-05-01

    Hebbian plasticity, including long-term potentiation and long-term depression, has long been regarded as important for local circuit refinement in the context of memory formation and stabilization. However, circuit development and stabilization additionally relies on non-Hebbian, homeostatic, forms of plasticity such as synaptic scaling. Synaptic scaling is induced by chronic increases or decreases in neuronal activity. Synaptic scaling is associated with cell-wide adjustments in postsynaptic receptor density, and can occur in a multiplicative manner resulting in preservation of relative synaptic strengths across the entire neuron's population of synapses. Both active DNA methylation and demethylation have been validated as crucial regulators of gene transcription during learning, and synaptic scaling is known to be transcriptionally dependent. However, it has been unclear whether homeostatic forms of plasticity such as synaptic scaling are regulated via epigenetic mechanisms. This review describes exciting recent work that has demonstrated a role for active changes in neuronal DNA methylation and demethylation as a controller of synaptic scaling and glutamate receptor trafficking. These findings bring together three major categories of memory-associated mechanisms that were previously largely considered separately: DNA methylation, homeostatic plasticity, and glutamate receptor trafficking. This review describes exciting recent work that has demonstrated a role for active changes in neuronal DNA methylation and demethylation as a controller of synaptic scaling and glutamate receptor trafficking. These findings bring together three major categories of memory-associated mechanisms that were previously considered separately: glutamate receptor trafficking, DNA methylation, and homeostatic plasticity.

  1. Caffeine promotes glutamate and histamine release in the posterior hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Tohru; Siegel, Jerome M.

    2014-01-01

    Histamine neurons are active during waking and largely inactive during sleep, with minimal activity during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Caffeine, the most widely used stimulant, causes a significant increase of sleep onset latency in rats and humans. We hypothesized that caffeine increases glutamate release in the posterior hypothalamus (PH) and produces increased activity of wake-active histamine neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis, we collected samples from the PH after caffeine administration in freely behaving rats. HPLC analysis and biosensor measurements showed a significant increase in glutamate levels beginning 30 min after caffeine administration. Glutamate levels remained elevated for at least 140 min. GABA levels did not significantly change over the same time period. Histamine level significantly increased beginning 30 min after caffeine administration and remained elevated for at least 140 min. Immunostaining showed a significantly elevated number of c-Fos-labeled histamine neurons in caffeine-treated rats compared with saline-treated animals. We conclude that increased glutamate levels in the PH activate histamine neurons and contribute to caffeine-induced waking and alertness. PMID:25031227

  2. Two components of glutamate exocytosis differentially affected by presynaptic modulation.

    PubMed

    Herrero, I; Castro, E; Miras-Portugal, M T; Sánchez-Prieto, J

    1996-12-01

    The total Ca(2+)-dependent release of glutamate induced by depolarization of cerebrocortical nerve terminals with KCl was analyzed into a fast and a slow component. The fast component exhibited a decay time of < 1 s and accounted for 0.95 +/- 0.10 nmol of glutamate, whereas the slow component, which exhibited a decay time of 52 +/- 7 s, accounted for the release of 2.48 +/- 0.19 nmol of glutamate. These two components were differentially affected by the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA, the divalent cation Sr2+, or the botulinum neurotoxin A. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclohexyladenosine strongly reduced the fast component without altering the slow component. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of arachidonic acid and the facilitatory action of the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (1S, 3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1, 3-dicarboxylic acid were observed as a decrease and an increase, respectively, in the two components. It is concluded, first, that the fast and slow components correspond to the release of docked and mobilized vesicles, respectively, and second, that presynaptic modulation more significantly alters the fast component of release.

  3. Functional kainate-selective glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Lerma, J; Paternain, A V; Naranjo, J R; Mellström, B

    1993-01-01

    Glutamate mediates fast synaptic transmission at the majority of excitatory synapses throughout the central nervous system by interacting with different types of receptor channels. Cloning of glutamate receptors has provided evidence for the existence of several structurally related subunit families, each composed of several members. It has been proposed that KA1 and KA2 and GluR-5, GluR-6, and GluR-7 families represent subunit classes of high-affinity kainate receptors and that in vivo different kainate receptor subtypes might be constructed from these subunits in heteromeric assembly. However, despite some indications from autoradiographic studies and binding data in brain membranes, no functional pure kainate receptors have so far been detected in brain cells. We have found that early after culturing, a high percentage of rat hippocampal neurons express functional, kainate-selective glutamate receptors. These kainate receptors show pronounced desensitization with fast onset and very slow recovery and are also activated by quisqualate and domoate, but not by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional glutamate receptors of the kainate type in nerve cells, which are likely to be native homomeric GluR-6 receptors. PMID:7505445

  4. Microbial production and chemical transformation of poly-γ-glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Ashiuchi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamate (PGA), a novel polyamide material with industrial applications, possesses a nylon-like backbone, is structurally similar to polyacrylic acid, is biodegradable and is safe for human consumption. PGA is frequently found in the mucilage of natto, a Japanese traditional fermented food. To date, three different types of PGA, namely a homo polymer of d-glutamate (D-PGA), a homo polymer of l-glutamate (L-PGA), and a random copolymer consisting of d- and l-glutamate (DL-PGA), are known. This review will detail the occurrence and physiology of PGA. The proposed reaction mechanism of PGA synthesis including its localization and the structure of the involved enzyme, PGA synthetase, are described. The occurrence of multiple carboxyl residues in PGA likely plays a role in its relative unsuitability for the development of bio-nylon plastics and thus, establishment of an efficient PGA-reforming strategy is of great importance. Aside from the potential applications of PGA proposed to date, a new technique for chemical transformation of PGA is also discussed. Finally, some techniques for PGA and its derivatives in advanced material technology are presented. PMID:23855427

  5. Does formate reduce alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia to glutamate?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughan, Q.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The reported reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia by formate is much slower than described (Morowitz et al., 1995). The formate reduction if any is small under these conditions. Glutamate is produced from a reduction by a second molecule of alpha-ketoglutarate involving an oxidative decarboxylation.

  6. Molecular Characteristics of Membrane Glutamate Receptor-Ionophore Interaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-29

    Neurochemical - Research , 1984, 9, 29-44. Chang, H.H., Michaelis, E.K. & Roy, S. Functional characteristics of . -Z L-glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate...receptors in isolated brain synaptic membranes. Neurochemical Research , 1984, 9, 901-913. Michaelis, E. K., Galton, N. and Early, S. L. Spider venous

  7. Metabotropic glutamate receptors: From the workbench to the bedside

    PubMed Central

    Nicoletti, F.; Bockaert, J.; Collingridge, G.L.; Conn, P.J.; Ferraguti, F.; Schoepp, D.D.; Wroblewski, J.T.; Pin, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors were discovered in the mid 1980s and originally described as glutamate receptors coupled to polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis. Almost 6500 articles have been published since then, and subtype-selective mGlu receptor ligands are now under clinical development for the treatment of a variety of disorders such as Fragile-X syndrome, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias, generalized anxiety disorder, chronic pain, and gastroesophageal reflux disorder. Prof. Erminio Costa was linked to the early times of the mGlu receptor history, when a few research groups challenged the general belief that glutamate could only activate ionotropic receptors and all metabolic responses to glutamate were secondary to calcium entry. This review moves from those nostalgic times to the most recent advances in the physiology and pharmacology of mGlu receptors, and highlights the role of individual mGlu receptor subtypes in the pathophysiology of human disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Trends in Neuropharmacology: In Memory of Erminio Costa’. PMID:21036182

  8. PRRT2 Mutant Leads to Dysfunction of Glutamate Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Niu, Fenghe; Zhu, Xilin; Wu, Xiaopan; Shen, Ning; Peng, Xiaozhong; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic choreoathetosis (PKC) is an inherited disease of the nervous system. We previously identified PRRT2 as the causative gene of PKC. However, as little is known about the function of PRRT2, elucidating its function will benefit not only PKC studies, but also many other related disorders. Here, we reveal higher levels of glutamate in the plasma of PKC patients and the culture medium of neurons following knock-out Prrt2 expression. Using double immunostaining assays we confirm Prrt2 is located at the glutamatergic neurons in accordance with its function. Our co-immunoprecipitation assays reveal mutant PRRT2 interferes with SNAP25 and GRIA1 interactions, respectively. Furthermore, using live-labeling techniques, we confirmed co-transfection with mutant PRRT2 caused an increase in GRIA1 distribution on the cell surface. Therefore, our results suggest that mutant PRRT2, probably through its weakened interaction with SNAP25, affects glutamate signaling and glutamate receptor activity, resulting in the increase of glutamate release and subsequent neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:25915028

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of the mammalian glutamate transporter EAAT3.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Germano; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are membrane proteins that enable sodium-coupled uptake of glutamate and other amino acids into neurons. Crystal structures of the archaeal homolog GltPh have been recently determined both in the inward- and outward-facing conformations. Here we construct homology models for the mammalian glutamate transporter EAAT3 in both conformations and perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate its similarities and differences from GltPh. In particular, we study the coordination of the different ligands, the gating mechanism and the location of the proton and potassium binding sites in EAAT3. We show that the protonation of the E374 residue is essential for binding of glutamate to EAAT3, otherwise glutamate becomes unstable in the binding site. The gating mechanism in the inward-facing state of EAAT3 is found to be different from that of GltPh, which is traced to the relocation of an arginine residue from the HP1 segment in GltPh to the TM8 segment in EAAT3. Finally, we perform free energy calculations to locate the potassium binding site in EAAT3, and find a high-affinity site that overlaps with the Na1 and Na3 sites in GltPh.

  10. Blood and Brain Glutamate Levels in Children with Autistic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Tamer H.; Abdelrahman, Hadeel M.; Fattah, Nelly R. Abdel; El-Masry, Nagda M.; Hashim, Haitham M.; El-Gerby, Khaled M.; Fattah, Nermin R. Abdel

    2013-01-01

    Despite of the great efforts that move forward to clarify the pathophysiologic mechanisms in autism, the cause of this disorder, however, remains largely unknown. There is an increasing body of literature concerning neurochemical contributions to the pathophysiology of autism. We aimed to determine blood and brain levels of glutamate in children…

  11. Does formate reduce alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia to glutamate?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughan, Q.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The reported reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia by formate is much slower than described (Morowitz et al., 1995). The formate reduction if any is small under these conditions. Glutamate is produced from a reduction by a second molecule of alpha-ketoglutarate involving an oxidative decarboxylation.

  12. Functional kainate-selective glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lerma, J; Paternain, A V; Naranjo, J R; Mellström, B

    1993-12-15

    Glutamate mediates fast synaptic transmission at the majority of excitatory synapses throughout the central nervous system by interacting with different types of receptor channels. Cloning of glutamate receptors has provided evidence for the existence of several structurally related subunit families, each composed of several members. It has been proposed that KA1 and KA2 and GluR-5, GluR-6, and GluR-7 families represent subunit classes of high-affinity kainate receptors and that in vivo different kainate receptor subtypes might be constructed from these subunits in heteromeric assembly. However, despite some indications from autoradiographic studies and binding data in brain membranes, no functional pure kainate receptors have so far been detected in brain cells. We have found that early after culturing, a high percentage of rat hippocampal neurons express functional, kainate-selective glutamate receptors. These kainate receptors show pronounced desensitization with fast onset and very slow recovery and are also activated by quisqualate and domoate, but not by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional glutamate receptors of the kainate type in nerve cells, which are likely to be native homomeric GluR-6 receptors.

  13. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Fukuda, A; Kilb, W

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca(2+) transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis.

  14. Paraventricular Stimulation with Glutamate Elicits Bradycardia and Pituitary Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Miyamoto, Michael; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    The excitatory neurotransmitter, L-glutamate (0.5 M, pH 7.4), or the organic acid, acetate (0.5 M, pH 7.4), was microinjected (50 nl over 2 min) directly into the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) of pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats while arterial blood pressure and heart rate and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), vasopressin, and oxytocin were measured. Activation of PVN neurons with L-glutamate led to increases in plasma ACTH, vasopressin, and oxytocin and a profound bradycardia (-80 beats/min) with little change in arterial blood pressure. Microinjection of acetate had no effect on the above variables. The decrease in heart rate was shown to be dependent on the concentration of glutamate injected and the volume of injectate. The bradycardia was mediated through the autonomic nervous system because ganglionic blockade (pentolinium tartrate) eliminated the response; atropine and propranolol severely attenuated the bradycardia. The bradycardia was greatest when L-glutamate was microinjected into the caudal PVN. Injections into the rostral PVN or into nuclei surrounding the PVN led to small or nonsignificant decreases in heart rate. Focal electric stimulation (2-50 pA) of the PVN also led to decreases in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. These data suggest that activation of PVN neurons leads to the release of ACTH, vasopressin, and oxytocin from the pituitary and a bradycardia that is mediated by the autonomic nervous system.

  15. Caffeine promotes glutamate and histamine release in the posterior hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    John, Joshi; Kodama, Tohru; Siegel, Jerome M

    2014-09-15

    Histamine neurons are active during waking and largely inactive during sleep, with minimal activity during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Caffeine, the most widely used stimulant, causes a significant increase of sleep onset latency in rats and humans. We hypothesized that caffeine increases glutamate release in the posterior hypothalamus (PH) and produces increased activity of wake-active histamine neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis, we collected samples from the PH after caffeine administration in freely behaving rats. HPLC analysis and biosensor measurements showed a significant increase in glutamate levels beginning 30 min after caffeine administration. Glutamate levels remained elevated for at least 140 min. GABA levels did not significantly change over the same time period. Histamine level significantly increased beginning 30 min after caffeine administration and remained elevated for at least 140 min. Immunostaining showed a significantly elevated number of c-Fos-labeled histamine neurons in caffeine-treated rats compared with saline-treated animals. We conclude that increased glutamate levels in the PH activate histamine neurons and contribute to caffeine-induced waking and alertness.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Mammalian Glutamate Transporter EAAT3

    PubMed Central

    Heinzelmann, Germano; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are membrane proteins that enable sodium-coupled uptake of glutamate and other amino acids into neurons. Crystal structures of the archaeal homolog GltPh have been recently determined both in the inward- and outward-facing conformations. Here we construct homology models for the mammalian glutamate transporter EAAT3 in both conformations and perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate its similarities and differences from GltPh. In particular, we study the coordination of the different ligands, the gating mechanism and the location of the proton and potassium binding sites in EAAT3. We show that the protonation of the E374 residue is essential for binding of glutamate to EAAT3, otherwise glutamate becomes unstable in the binding site. The gating mechanism in the inward-facing state of EAAT3 is found to be different from that of GltPh, which is traced to the relocation of an arginine residue from the HP1 segment in GltPh to the TM8 segment in EAAT3. Finally, we perform free energy calculations to locate the potassium binding site in EAAT3, and find a high-affinity site that overlaps with the Na1 and Na3 sites in GltPh. PMID:24643009

  17. Protection from glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by memantine

    PubMed Central

    Kutzing, Melinda K.; Luo, Vincent; Firestein, Bonnie L.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates whether the uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine, is able to protect dissociated cortical neurons from glutamate-induced excitotoxicity (GIE). Treatment with glutamate resulted in a significant loss of synchronization of neuronal activity as well as a significant increase in the duration of synchronized bursting events (SBEs). By administering memantine at the same time as glutamate, we were able to completely prevent these changes to the neuronal activity. Pretreatment with memantine was somewhat effective in preventing changes to the culture synchronization but was unable to fully protect the synchronization of electrical activity between neurons that showed high levels of synchronization prior to injury. Additionally, memantine pretreatment was unable to prevent the increase in the duration of SBEs caused by GIE. Thus, the timing of memantine treatment is important for conferring neuroprotection against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Finally, we found that GIE leads to a significant increase in the burst duration. Our data suggest that this may be due to an alteration in the inhibitory function of the neurons. PMID:22203191

  18. [Metabotropic glutamate receptors as targets for new drug development].

    PubMed

    Arkhipov, V I; Kapralova, M V

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to experimental investigations of metabotropic glutamate receptors and the properties of drugs (ligands) belonging to agonists, antagonists, and modulators of the activity of these receptors. Possibilities of the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia patients, and narcotic dependency by using drugs of this class are considered.

  19. Microstructure of poly(gamma-glutamic acid) produced by Bacillus subtilis consisting of clusters of D- and L-glutamic acid repeating units.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Ishiguro, Masaji; Mutsukado, Mai; Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Tanaka, Toshio

    2008-06-11

    Poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (PGA) produced by a strain of Bacillus subtilis was partially hydrolyzed into various oligopeptides so that the dipeptide fraction was isolated by the preparative thin-layer chromatography. HPLC analysis was applied to the detection of each of the four stereoisomers in this fraction using chemically synthesized authentic samples. The fraction consisted of N-gamma- d-glutamyl- d-glutamic acid, N-gamma- l-glutamyl- l-glutamic acid, N-gamma- d-glutamyl- l-glutamic acid, and N-gamma- l-glutamyl- d-glutamic acid at a ratio of 5.9:6.0:1.0:1.0. On the basis of this result, a model was proposed for the microstructure of the bacterial PGA, in which d- and l-glutamic acid repeating units are alternately linked in a single chain of the molecule.

  20. Study on connexin gene and protein expression and cellular distribution in relation to real-time proliferation of porcine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, B; Ziółkowska, A; Ciesiółka, S; Piotrowska, H; Antosik, P; Bukowska, D; Nowicki, M; Brüssow, K P; Zabel, M

    2014-01-01

    Granulosa cells (GCs) play an important role during follicle growth and development in preovulatory stage. Moreover, the proteins such as connexins are responsible for formation of protein channel between follicular-cumulus cells and oocyte. This study was aimed to investigate the role of connexin expression in porcine GCs in relation to their cellular distribution and real-time cell proliferation. In the present study, porcine GCs were isolated from the follicles of puberal gilts and then cultured in a real-time cellular analyzer (RTCA) system for 168 h. The expression levels of connexins (Cxs) Cx36, Cx37, Cx40 and Cx43 mRNA were measured by RQ-PCR analysis, and differences in the expression and distribution of Cx30, Cx31, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45 proteins were analyzed by confocal microscopic visualization. We found higher level of Cx36, Cx37, and Cx43 mRNA expression in GCs at recovery (at 0 h of in vitro culture, IVC) compared to all analyzed time periods of IVC (24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 h; P<0.001). On the other hand, the expression level of Cx40 transcripts was higher after 24 h of IVC compared to 0 h and the other times of IVC (P<0.001). Similarly to mRNAs, the expression levels of Cx31, Cx37 and Cx45 proteins were higher before (0 h) compared to after 168 h of IVC. The expression of Cx30 and Cx43, however, did not vary between the groups. In all, the proteins were distributed throughout the cell membrane rather than in the cytoplasm both before and after IVC. After 24 h of IVC, we observed a significant increase in the proliferation of GCs (log phase). We found differences in the proliferation index between 72-96 and 96- 140 h within the same population of GCs. In conclusion, the decrease in the expression of Cx mRNAs and proteins following IVC could be associated with a breakdown in gap-junction connections (GJCs), and leads to the decreased of their activity, which may be a reason of non-functional existence of connexon in follicular granulosa cells

  1. Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in schizophrenia: A review

    PubMed Central

    Plitman, Eric; Nakajima, Shinichiro; de la Fuente-Sandoval, Camilo; Gerretsen, Philip; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Kobylianskii, Jane; Chung, Jun Ku; Caravaggio, Fernando; Iwata, Yusuke; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Findings from neuroimaging studies in patients with schizophrenia suggest widespread structural changes although the mechanisms through which these changes occur are currently unknown. Glutamatergic activity appears to be increased in the early phases of schizophrenia and may contribute to these structural alterations through an excitotoxic effect. The primary aim of this review was to describe the possible role of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in explaining the presence of neuroanatomical changes within schizophrenia. A Medline® literature search was conducted, identifying English language studies on the topic of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in schizophrenia, using the terms “schizophreni*” and “glutam*” and ((“MRS” or “MRI” or “magnetic resonance”) or (“computed tomography” or “CT”)). Studies concomitantly investigating glutamatergic activity and brain structure in patients with schizophrenia were included. Results are discussed in the context of findings from preclinical studies. Seven studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. These studies provide inconclusive support for the role of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in the occurrence of structural changes within schizophrenia, with the caveat that there is a paucity of human studies investigating this topic. Preclinical data suggest that an excitotoxic effect may occur as a result of a paradoxical increase in glutamatergic activity following N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction. Based on animal literature, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity may account for certain structural changes present in schizophrenia, but additional human studies are required to substantiate these findings. Future studies should adopt a longitudinal design and employ magnetic resonance imaging techniques to investigate whether an association between glutamatergic activity and structural changes exists in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25159198

  2. Therapeutic Modulation of Glutamate Receptors in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jaso, Brittany A.; Niciu, Mark J.; Iadarola, Nicolas D.; Lally, Níall; Richards, Erica M.; Park, Minkyung; Ballard, Elizabeth D.; Nugent, Allison C.; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Zarate, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for major depressive disorder (MDD) have a distinct lag of onset that can prolong distress and impairment for patients, and real-world effectiveness trials further suggest that antidepressant efficacy is limited in many patients. All currently approved antidepressant medications for MDD act primarily through monoaminergic mechanisms, e.g., receptor/reuptake agonists or antagonists with varying affinities for serotonin, norepinephrine, or dopamine. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and glutamate and its cognate receptors are implicated in the pathophysiology of MDD, as well as in the development of novel therapeutics for this disorder. Since the rapid and robust antidepressant effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist ketamine were first observed in 2000, other NMDA receptor antagonists have been studied in MDD. These have been associated with relatively modest antidepressant effects compared to ketamine, but some have shown more favorable characteristics with increased potential in clinical practice (for instance, oral administration, decreased dissociative and/or psychotomimetic effects, and reduced abuse/diversion liability). This article reviews the clinical evidence supporting the use of glutamate receptor modulators with direct affinity for cognate receptors: 1) non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists (ketamine, memantine, dextromethorphan, AZD6765); 2) subunit (NR2B)-specific NMDA receptor antagonists (CP-101,606/traxoprodil, MK-0657); 3) NMDA receptor glycine-site partial agonists (D-cycloserine, GLYX-13); and 4) metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) modulators (AZD2066, RO4917523/basimglurant). Several other theoretical glutamate receptor targets with preclinical antidepressant-like efficacy, but that have yet to be studied clinically, are also briefly discussed; these include α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleproprionic acid (AMPA) agonists, mGluR2/3 negative

  3. Glutamate-AMPAR interaction in a model of synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Ventriglia, Francesco; Di Maio, Vito

    2013-11-06

    Over the last several years we have investigated the excitatory synaptic response by means of a mathematical model based on a detailed description of the synapse geometry, the Brownian motion of Glutamate molecules and their binding to postsynaptic receptors. Recently, the basic model has been modified for the numbers, the size and the 3D structure of receptors according to new data from the literature. Some results of simulations performed with the updated model are shown here. They were aimed to study the synaptic response in relation to the binding probability, to the probable height of the receptors in the synaptic cleft, and to the space-time distribution of Glutamate/Receptor collisions. A first series of simulations permitted to determine a possible range of values for the binding probability of Glutamate to receptors. Other simulations, investigating the changes induced on the synaptic response by the variations of the height of AMPA receptors in synaptic cleft, allowed to identify the height producing the higher amplitude peak of the mEPSCs. Finally, two new statistical descriptors for analyzing the synaptic response were presented. The first is based on the study of the space distribution of the number of Glutamate/Receptor collisions. Simulations investigating the effects of an increasing eccentricity of the releasing vesicle allowed assessing this method. The second one considers the inter-collision times between Glutamate molecules and binding sites. The results of some of the last simulations demonstrated its capacity to highlight the subtleties and the randomness underlying the activation of the receptors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neural Coding 2012.

  4. Therapeutic Modulation of Glutamate Receptors in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Jaso, Brittany A; Niciu, Mark J; Iadarola, Nicolas D; Lally, Niall; Richards, Erica M; Park, Minkyung; Ballard, Elizabeth D; Nugent, Allison C; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Zarate, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for major depressive disorder (MDD) have a distinct lag of onset that can prolong distress and impairment for patients, and realworld effectiveness trials further suggest that antidepressant efficacy is limited in many patients. All currently approved antidepressant medications for MDD act primarily through monoaminergic mechanisms, e.g., receptor/reuptake agonists or antagonists with varying affinities for serotonin, norepinephrine, or dopamine. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and glutamate and its cognate receptors are implicated in the pathophysiology of MDD, as well as in the development of novel therapeutics for this disorder. Since the rapid and robust antidepressant effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist ketamine were first observed in 2000, other NMDA receptor antagonists have been studied in MDD. These have been associated with relatively modest antidepressant effects compared to ketamine, but some have shown more favorable characteristics with increased potential in clinical practice (for instance, oral administration, decreased dissociative and/or psychotomimetic effects, and reduced abuse/diversion liability). This article reviews the clinical evidence supporting the use of glutamate receptor modulators with direct affinity for cognate receptors: 1) non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists (ketamine, memantine, dextromethorphan, AZD6765); 2) subunit (NR2B)-specific NMDA receptor antagonists (CP- 101,606/traxoprodil, MK-0657); 3) NMDA receptor glycine-site partial agonists (D-cycloserine, GLYX- 13); and 4) metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) modulators (AZD2066, RO4917523/basimglurant). Several other theoretical glutamate receptor targets with preclinical antidepressant-like efficacy, but that have yet to be studied clinically, are also briefly discussed; these include α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4- isoxazoleproprionic acid (AMPA) agonists, mGluR2/3 negative

  5. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Gay R.; Friedrich, Victor L. Jr.; Martinelli, Giorgio P.

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  6. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons.

    PubMed

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  7. Glutamate, GABA, and glutamine are synchronously upregulated in the mouse lateral septum during the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changjiu; Gammie, Stephen C

    2014-12-03

    Dramatic structural and functional remodeling occurs in the postpartum brain for the establishment of maternal care, which is essential for the growth and development of young offspring. Glutamate and GABA signaling are critically important in modulating multiple behavioral performances. Large scale signaling changes occur in the postpartum brain, but it is still not clear to what extent the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA change and whether the ratio of glutamate/GABA remains balanced. In this study, we examined the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle in the lateral septum (LS) of postpartum female mice. In postpartum females (relative to virgins), tissue levels of glutamate and GABA were elevated in LS and increased mRNA was found for the respective enzymes producing glutamate and GABA, glutaminase (Gls) and glutamate decarboxylase 1 and 2 (Gad1 and Gad2). The common precursor, glutamine, was elevated as was the enzyme that produces it, glutamate-ammonia ligase (Glul). Additionally, glutamate, GABA, and glutamine were positively correlated and the glutamate/GABA ratio was almost identical in the postpartum and virgin females. Collectively, these findings indicate that glutamate and GABA signaling are increased and that the ratio of glutamate/GABA is well balanced in the maternal LS. The postpartum brain may provide a useful model system for understanding how glutamate and GABA are linked despite large signaling changes. Given that some mental health disorders, including depression and schizophrenia display dysregulated glutamate/GABA ratio, and there is increased vulnerability to mental disorders in mothers, it is possible that these postpartum disorders emerge when glutamate and GABA changes are not properly coordinated.

  8. The role of hypothermia in the regulation of blood glutamate levels in naive rats.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Matthew; Kuts, Ruslan; Gruenbaum, Benjamin F; Melamed, Israel; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Klein, Moti; Shapira, Yoram; Zlotnik, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The exact mechanism of hypothermia-induced neuroprotection has not been determined yet; however, we hypothesized that it may be mediated by a blood glutamate-scavenging effect. Here, we examine the effect of hypothermic conditions (mild, moderate, and deep) on blood glutamate levels in naive rats. To identify the mechanism of hypothermia-induced glutamate reduction, we also measured concentrations of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), the primary regulators of glutamate concentration in blood. Rats were anesthetized with isoflurane, and their rectal temperature was maintained for 6 hours at 36 to 37°C, 33 to 36°C, 30 to 32°C, 18 to 22°C, or was not maintained artificially. At 6 hours, active cooling was discontinued and rats were allowed to rewarm. There were 12 rats in each group for a total of 60 rats. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours for the determination of blood glutamate, GOT, and GPT levels. A strong correlation between body temperature and blood glutamate levels was observed (P<0.001). Mild (33 to 36°C) and moderate (30 to 32°C) hypothermia led to reduced blood glutamate levels (P<0.001). Deep hypothermia (18 to 22°C) was associated with significant elevations in blood glutamate levels (P<0.001). Hypothermia, irrespective of the degree, led to elevations in GOT in plasma (P<0.001). Mild and moderate hypothermia led to a reduction in blood glutamate levels in rats, whereas deep hypothermia was associated with a significant elevation in blood glutamate levels. We further demonstrated an elevation of GOT and GPT levels, supporting their involvement in reducing blood glutamate by the conversion of glutamate to 2-ketoglutarate. We suggest that the neuroprotective properties of hypothermia may be partially because of a blood glutamate-scavenging mechanism.

  9. The conversion of glutamate by glutamine synthase in neocortical astrocytes from juvenile rat is important to limit glutamate spillover and peri/extrasynaptic activation of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Yosra; Amri, Mohamed; Becq, Hélène; Molinari, Florence; Aniksztejn, Laurent

    2017-02-01

    Glutamate transporters (EAATs) are important to maintain spatial and temporal specificity of synaptic transmission. Their efficiency to uptake and transport glutamate into the intracellular space depends on several parameters including the intracellular concentrations of Na(+) and glutamate, the elevations of which may slow down the cycling rate of EAATs. In astrocytes, glutamate is maintained at low concentration due to the presence of specific enzymes such as glutamine synthase (GS). GS inhibition results in cytosolic accumulation of glutamate suggesting that the conversion of glutamate by GS is important for EAATs operation. Here we recorded astrocytes from juvenile rat neocortical slices and analyzed the consequences of elevated intracellular glutamate concentrations and of GS inhibition on the time course of synaptically evoked transporter current (STC). In slices from rats treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSO), a GS inhibitor, STC evoked by short burst of high frequency stimulation (HFS; 100 Hz for 100 ms) but not by low frequency stimulation (LFS; 0.1 Hz) was twice slower than STC evoked from saline injected rats. Same results were obtained for astrocytes recorded with pipette containing 3-10 mM glutamate and compared with cells recorded with 0 or1 mM glutamate in the patch pipette. We also showed that HFS elicited significantly larger NMDAR-excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with a stronger peri/extrasynaptic component in pyramidal cells from MSO-treated compared with saline treated rats. Taken together our data demonstrate that the conversion of glutamate by GS is fundamental to ensure an efficient clearance of glutamate by EAATs and to prevent glutamate spillover. GLIA 2017;65:401-415.

  10. Construction of glutamate biosensor based on covalent immobilization of glutamate oxidase on polypyrrole nanoparticles/polyaniline modified gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Batra, Bhawna; Kumari, Seema; Pundir, Chandra Shekhar

    2014-04-10

    A method is described for construction of a highly sensitive electrochemical biosensor for detection of glutamate. The biosensor is based on covalent immobilization of glutamate oxidase (GluOx) onto polypyrrole nanoparticles and polyaniline composite film (PPyNPs/PANI) electrodeposited onto Au electrode. The enzyme electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The biosensor showed optimum response within 3s at pH 7.5 (0.1 M sodium phosphate) and 35 °C, when operated at 50 mV s⁻¹. It exhibited excellent sensitivity (detection limit as 0.1 nM), fast response time and wider linear range (from 0.02 to 400 μM). Analytical recovery of added glutamate (5 mM and 10 mM) was 95.56 and 97%, while within batch and between batch coefficients of variation were 3.2% and 3.35% respectively. The enzyme electrode was used 100 times over a period of 60 days, when stored at 4 °C. The biosensor measured glutamate level in food stuff, which correlated well with a standard colorimetric method (r=0.99). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential contribution of the proline and glutamine pathways to glutamate biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation in yeast lacking glutamate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sieg, Alex G.; Trotter, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymes play a pivotal role in glutamate biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation. It has been proposed that, in GDH-deficient yeast, either the proline utilization (PUT) or the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) pathway serves as the alternative pathway for glutamate production and nitrogen assimilation to the exclusion of the other. Using a gdh-null mutant (gdh1Δ2Δ3Δ), this ambiguity was addressed using a combination of growth studies and pathway-specific enzyme assays on a variety of nitrogen sources (ammonia, glutamine, proline and urea). The GDH-null mutant was viable on all nitrogen sources tested, confirming that alternate pathways for nitrogen assimilation exist in the gdh-null strain. Enzyme assays point to GS/GOGAT as the primary alternative pathway on the preferred nitrogen sources ammonia and glutamine, whereas growth on proline required both the PUT and GS/GOGAT pathways. In contrast, growth on glucose-urea media elicited a decrease in GOGAT activity along with an increase in activity of the PUT pathway specific enzyme Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH). Together, these results suggest the alternative pathway for nitrogen assimilation in strains lacking the preferred GDH-dependent route is nitrogen source dependent and that neither GS/GOGAT nor PUT serves as the sole compensatory pathway. PMID:24629525

  12. Deletion of genes involved in glutamate metabolism to improve poly-gamma-glutamic acid production in B. amyloliquefaciens LL3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; He, Yulian; Gao, Weixia; Feng, Jun; Cao, Mingfeng; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang; Wang, Shufang

    2015-02-01

    Here, we attempted to elevate poly-gamma-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) production by modifying genes involved in glutamate metabolism in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LL3. Products of rocR, rocG and gudB facilitate the conversion from glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in Bacillus subtillis. The gene odhA is responsible for the synthesis of a component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to succinyl coenzyme A. In-frame deletions of these four genes were performed. In shake flask experiments the gudB/rocG double mutant presented enhanced production of γ-PGA, a 38 % increase compared with wild type. When fermented in a 5-L fermenter with pH control, the γ-PGA yield of the rocR mutant was increased to 5.83 g/L from 4.55 g/L for shake flask experiments. The gudB/rocG double mutant produced 5.68 g/L γ-PGA compared with that of 4.03 g/L for the wild type, a 40 % increase. Those results indicated the possibility of improving γ-PGA production by modifying glutamate metabolism, and identified potential genetic targets to improve γ-PGA production.

  13. Differential contribution of the proline and glutamine pathways to glutamate biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation in yeast lacking glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Alex G; Trotter, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymes play a pivotal role in glutamate biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation. It has been proposed that, in GDH-deficient yeast, either the proline utilization (PUT) or the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) pathway serves as the alternative pathway for glutamate production and nitrogen assimilation to the exclusion of the other. Using a gdh-null mutant (gdh1Δ2Δ3Δ), this ambiguity was addressed using a combination of growth studies and pathway-specific enzyme assays on a variety of nitrogen sources (ammonia, glutamine, proline and urea). The GDH-null mutant was viable on all nitrogen sources tested, confirming that alternate pathways for nitrogen assimilation exist in the gdh-null strain. Enzyme assays point to GS/GOGAT as the primary alternative pathway on the preferred nitrogen sources ammonia and glutamine, whereas growth on proline required both the PUT and GS/GOGAT pathways. In contrast, growth on glucose-urea media elicited a decrease in GOGAT activity along with an increase in activity of the PUT pathway specific enzyme Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH). Together, these results suggest the alternative pathway for nitrogen assimilation in strains lacking the preferred GDH-dependent route is nitrogen source dependent and that neither GS/GOGAT nor PUT serves as the sole compensatory pathway.

  14. Methotrexate induces seizure and decreases glutamate uptake in brain slices: prevention by ionotropic glutamate receptors antagonists and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Leke, R; Oliveira, D L; Schmidt, A P; Avila, T T; Jorge, R S; Fischer, A; Wofchuk, S; Souza, D O; Portela, L V

    2006-12-03

    Methotrexate (MTX)-induced neurotoxicity may occur after intrathecal or systemic administration at low, intermediate and high doses for the treatment of malignant or inflammatory diseases. The mechanisms of MTX neurotoxicity are not totally understood, and appear to be multifactorial. In this study we characterized a model of MTX-induced seizures in mice to evaluate the convulsive and toxic MTX properties. Additionally, the effect of MTX-induced seizures on the activity of glutamate transporters, as well as the anticonvulsant role of MK-801, DNQX and adenosine on glutamate uptake in brain slices was investigated . MTX induced tonic-clonic seizures in approximately 95% of animals and pre-treatment with MK-801, DNQX and adenosine prevented seizure in 80%, 62% and 50% of animals, respectively. Moreover, MTX leads 59% of mice to death, which was prevented in 100% and 94% when animals received MK-801 and DNQX, respectively. Glutamate uptake decreased by 20% to 30% in cortical slices after MTX-induced seizures. Interestingly, when seizures were prevented by MK-801, DNQX or adenosine, glutamate uptake activity remained at the same level as the control group. Thus, our results demonstrate the involvement of the glutamatergic system in MTX-induced seizures.

  15. The stressed synapse: the impact of stress and glucocorticoids on glutamate transmission.

    PubMed

    Popoli, Maurizio; Yan, Zhen; McEwen, Bruce S; Sanacora, Gerard

    2011-11-30

    Mounting evidence suggests that acute and chronic stress, especially the stress-induced release of glucocorticoids, induces changes in glutamate neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, thereby influencing some aspects of cognitive processing. In addition, dysfunction of glutamatergic neurotransmission is increasingly considered to be a core feature of stress-related mental illnesses. Recent studies have shed light on the mechanisms by which stress and glucocorticoids affect glutamate transmission, including effects on glutamate release, glutamate receptors and glutamate clearance and metabolism. This new understanding provides insights into normal brain functioning, as well as the pathophysiology and potential new treatments of stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders.

  16. The stressed synapse: the impact of stress and glucocorticoids on glutamate transmission

    PubMed Central

    Popoli, Maurizio; Yan, Zhen; McEwen, Bruce; Sanacora, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Preface Mounting evidence suggests that acute and chronic stress, especially the stress-induced release of glucocorticoids, induces changes in glutamate neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, thereby influencing some aspects of cognitive processing. In addition, dysfunction of glutamatergic neurotransmission is increasingly considered to be a core feature of stress-related mental illnesses. Recent studies have shed light on the mechanisms by which stress and glucocorticoids affect glutamate transmission, including effects on glutamate release, glutamate receptors and glutamate clearance and metabolism. This new understanding provides insights into normal brain functioning as well as the pathophysiology and potential new treatments of stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:22127301

  17. A modern ionotropic glutamate receptor with a K(+) selectivity signature sequence.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, H; Sandoz, G; Isacoff, E Y

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system and gates non-selective cation channels. The origins of glutamate receptors are not well understood as they differ structurally and functionally from simple bacterial ligand-gated ion channels. Here we report the discovery of an ionotropic glutamate receptor that combines the typical eukaryotic domain architecture with the 'TXVGYG' signature sequence of the selectivity filter found in K(+) channels. This receptor exhibits functional properties intermediate between bacterial and eukaryotic glutamate-gated ion channels, suggesting a link in the evolution of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  18. Simultaneous and selective production of levan and poly(gamma-glutamic acid) by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ing-Lung; Yu, Yun-Ti

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis(natto) Takahashi, used to prepare the fermented soybean product natto, was grown in a basal medium containing 5% (w/w) sucrose and 1.5% (w/w) L-glutamate and produced 58% (w/w) poly(gamma-glutamic acid) and 42% (w/w) levan simultaneously. After 21 h, 40-50 mg levan ml-1 had been produced in medium containing 20% (w/w) sucrose but without L-glutamate. In medium containing L-glutamic acid but without sucrose, mainly poly(gamma-glutamic acid) was produced.

  19. MDMA decreases glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus and increases seizure susceptibility: Role for glutamate.

    PubMed

    Huff, Courtney L; Morano, Rachel L; Herman, James P; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2016-12-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) is a unique psychostimulant that continues to be a popular drug of abuse. It has been well documented that MDMA reduces markers of 5-HT axon terminals in rodents, as well as humans. A loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons in the hippocampus following MDMA treatment has only been documented recently. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that MDMA reduces glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-IR, another biochemical marker of GABA neurons, in the hippocampus and that this reduction in GAD67-IR neurons and an accompanying increase in seizure susceptibility involve glutamate receptor activation. Repeated exposure to MDMA (3×10mg/kg, ip) resulted in a reduction of 37-58% of GAD67-IR cells in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA1, and CA3 regions, as well as an increased susceptibility to kainic acid-induced seizures, both of which persisted for at least 30days following MDMA treatment. Administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 or the glutamate transporter type 1 (GLT-1) inducer ceftriaxone prevented both the MDMA-induced loss of GAD67-IR neurons and the increased vulnerability to kainic acid-induced seizures. The MDMA-induced increase in the extracellular concentration of glutamate in the hippocampus was significantly diminished in rats treated with ceftriaxone, thereby implicating a glutamatergic mechanism in the neuroprotective effects of ceftriaxone. In summary, the present findings support a role for increased extracellular glutamate and NMDA receptor activation in the MDMA-induced loss of hippocampal GAD67-IR neurons and the subsequent increased susceptibility to evoked seizures.

  20. Salidroside protects cortical neurons against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei-Yong; Ye, Qiang; Huang, Huan-Jie; Xia, Nian-Ge; Chen, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Yi; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that glutamate-induced cytotoxicity contributes to autophagic neuron death and is partially mediated by increased oxidative stress. Salidroside has been demonstrated to have neuroprotective effects in glutamate-induced neuronal damage. The precise mechanism of its regulatory role in neuronal autophagy is, however, poorly understood. This study aimed to probe the effects and mechanisms of salidroside in glutamate-induced autophagy activation in cultured rat cortical neurons. Cell viability assay, Western blotting, coimmunoprecipitation, and small interfering RNA were performed to analyze autophagy activities during glutamate-evoked oxidative injury. We found that salidroside protected neonatal neurons from glutamate-induced apoptotic cell death. Salidroside significantly attenuated the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio and expression of Beclin-1, but increased (SQSTM1)/p62 expression under glutamate exposure. Pretreatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA), an autophagy inhibitor, decreased LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, attenuated glutamate-induced cell injury, and mimicked some of the protective effects of salidroside against glutamate-induced cell injury. Molecular analysis demonstrated that salidroside inhibited cortical neuron autophagy in response to glutamate exposure through p53 signaling by increasing the accumulation of cytoplasmic p53. Salidroside inhibited the glutamate-induced dissociation of the Bcl-2-Beclin-1 complex with minor affects on the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. These data demonstrate that the inhibition of autophagy could be responsible for the neuroprotective effects of salidroside on glutamate-induced neuronal injury.

  1. Electrogenic glutamate uptake is a major current carrier in the membrane of axolotl retinal glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brew, Helen; Attwell, David

    1987-06-01

    Glutamate is taken up avidly by glial cells in the central nervous system1. Glutamate uptake may terminate the transmitter action of glutamate released from neurons1, and keep extracellular glutamate at concentrations below those which are neurotoxic. We report here that glutamate evokes a large inward current in retinal glial cells which have their membrane potential and intracellular ion concentrations controlled by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique2. This current seems to be due to an electrogenic glutamate uptake carrier, which transports at least two sodium ions with every glutamate anion carried into the cell. Glutamate uptake is strongly voltage-dependent, decreasing at depolarized potentials: when fully activated, it contributes almost half of the conductance in the part of the glial cell membrane facing the retinal neurons. The spatial localization, glutamate affinity and magnitude of the uptake are appropriate for terminating the synaptic action of glutamate released from photoreceptors and bipolar cells. These data challenge present explanations of how the b-wave of the electroretinogram is generated, and suggest a mechanism for non-vesicular voltage-dependent release of glutamate from neurons.

  2. Dopamine denervation of the prefrontal cortex increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1.

    PubMed

    Vollbrecht, Peter J; Simmler, Linda D; Blakely, Randy D; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2014-07-01

    Both dopamine and glutamate are critically involved in cognitive processes such as working memory. Astrocytes, which express dopamine receptors, are essential elements in the termination of glutamatergic signaling: the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for > 90% of cortical glutamate uptake. The effect of dopamine depletion on glutamate transporters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) remains unknown. In an effort to determine if astrocytes are a locus of cortical dopamine-glutamate interactions, we examined the effects of chronic dopamine denervation on PFC protein and mRNA levels of glutamate transporters. PFC dopamine denervation elicited a marked increase in GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on levels of other glutamate transporters; high-affinity glutamate transport was positively correlated with the extent of dopamine depletion. GLT-1 gene expression was not altered. Our data suggest that dopamine depletion may lead to post-translational modifications that result in increased expression and activity of GLT-1 in PFC astrocytes. The glutamate transporter GLT-1 is expressed by astrocytes, which also express dopamine receptors. Regulation of prefrontal cortical (PFC) GLT-1 potentially offers a novel treatment approach to the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Partial PFC dopamine deafferentation increased membrane expression of GLT-1 protein and glutamate uptake, but did not alter levels of the other two neocortical glutamate transporters, GLAST and EAAC1.

  3. P301L Tau Expression Affects Glutamate Release and Clearance in the Hippocampal Trisynaptic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Holly C.; Rudy, Carolyn C.; Batten, Seth R.; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Reed, Miranda N.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) often exhibit hippocampal hyperexcitability. A growing body of evidence suggests perturbations in the glutamatergic tripartite synapse may underlie this hyperexcitability. Here, we used a tau mouse model of AD (rTg(TauP301L)4510) to examine the effects of tau pathology on hippocampal glutamate regulation. We found a 40% increase in hippocampal vGLUT, which packages glutamate into vesicles, and has previously been shown to influence glutamate release, and a 40% decrease in hippocampal GLT-1, the major glutamate transporter responsible for removing glutamate from the extracellular space. To determine whether these alterations affected glutamate regulation in vivo, we measured tonic glutamate levels, potassium-evoked glutamate release, and glutamate uptake/clearance in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, and CA1 regions of the hippocampus. P301L tau expression resulted in a 4- and 7-fold increase in potassium-evoked glutamate release in the DG and CA3, respectively, and significantly decreased glutamate clearance in all 3 regions. Both release and clearance correlated with memory performance in the hippocampal-dependent Barnes maze task. Alterations in mice expressing P301L were observed at a time when tau pathology was subtle and before readily detectable neuron loss. These data suggest novel mechanisms by which tau may mediate hyperexcitability. PMID:25319522

  4. Neuroprotective effects of yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, on glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Z; Kanno, H; Ueki, T; Terawaki, K; Tabuchi, M; Ikarashi, Y; Kase, Y

    2009-04-10

    To clarify the mechanism of yokukansan (TJ-54), a traditional Japanese medicine, against glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, the effects of TJ-54 on glutamate uptake function were first examined using cultured rat cortical astrocytes. Under thiamine-deficient conditions, the uptake of glutamate into astrocytes, and the levels of proteins and mRNA expressions of glutamate aspartate transporter of astrocytes significantly decreased. These decreases were ameliorated in a dose-dependent manner by treatment with TJ-54 (100-700 microg/ml). The improvement of glutamate uptake with TJ-54 was completely blocked by the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-hydroxyaspartic acid. Effects of TJ-54 on glutamate-induced neuronal death were next examined by using cultured PC12 cells as a model for neurons. Addition of 17.5 mM glutamate to the culture medium induced an approximately 50% cell death, as evaluated by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. TJ-54 (1-1000 microg/ml) inhibited the cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, competitive binding assays to glutamate receptors showed that TJ-54 bound potently to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, in particular, to its glutamate and glycine recognition sites. These results suggest that TJ-54 may exert a neuroprotective effect against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity not only by amelioration of dysfunction of astrocytes but also by direct protection of neuronal cells.

  5. Effect of insulin on the compartmentation of glutamate for protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.B.; Mohan, C.; Bessman, S.P.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of insulin on the formation of CO/sub 2/ and incorporation of 1-/sup 14/C glutamine and U-/sup 14/C acetate into protein was studied in isolated rat hepatocytes. Insulin caused an 18% increase in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from U-/sup 14/C acetate in comparison to a 10% increase from 1-/sup 14/C glutamate. Insulin caused a greater increase in the incorporation of tracer acetate carbons into hepatocyte protein. Hydrolysis of labeled protein and subsequent determination of glutamate specific activity revealed that incorporation of acetate carbons into protein as glutamate was about 52% greater in the presence of insulin. These results demonstrate the existence of two compartments of glutamate for protein synthesis: (i) glutamate generated in the Krebs cycle through transamination of a-ketoglutarate; (ii) cytosolic glutamate. Insulin had a greater stimulatory effect on the incorporation of glutamate generated in the Krebs cycle.

  6. Rat meningeal and brain microvasculature pericytes co-express the vesicular glutamate transporters 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Brian N; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2008-04-18

    Pericytes are small cells that are apposed to brain and meningeal microvasculature and control capillary contraction, thereby regulating local cerebral perfusion. Pericytes respond to exogenously applied glutamate in vitro and express metabotropic glutamate receptors. However, it is unclear if pericytes have the capacity to release glutamate. We therefore determined whether pericytes express vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), which are considered to be unambiguous markers of cells that use glutamate as an intercellular signaling molecule. Leptomeningeal and brain microvasculature-associated pericytes of the adult rat, as defined by the presence of NG2 proteoglycan, expressed both VGLUT2- and VGLUT3-immunoreactivity, but did not express VGLUT1. Consistent with the hypothesis that pericytes release glutamate, VGLUT2- and VGLUT3-immunoreactivities appeared to be localized to secretory vesicles. These results suggest that glutamate is released from pericytes of the leptomeninges and brain microvasculature, and demonstrate for the first time the co-localization of VGLUT2 and VGLUT3.

  7. Modulation of Astrocyte Glutamate Transporters Decreases Seizures in a Mouse Model of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ling-Hui; Bero, Adam W.; Zhang, Bo; Holtzman, David M.; Wong, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Astrocyte dysfunction may contribute to epileptogenesis and other neurological deficits in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC). In particular, decreased expression and function of astrocyte glutamate transporters have been implicated in causing elevated extracellular glutamate levels, neuronal death, and epilepsy in a mouse model of TSC (Tsc1GFAPCKO mice), involving inactivation of the Tsc1 gene primarily in astrocytes. Here, we tested whether pharmacological induction of astrocyte glutamate transporter expression can prevent the neurological phenotype of Tsc1GFAPCKO mice. Early treatment with ceftriaxone prior to the onset of epilepsy increased expression of astrocyte glutamate transporters, decreased extracellular glutamate levels, neuronal death, and seizure frequency, and improved survival in Tsc1GFAPCKO mice. In contrast, late treatment with ceftriaxone after onset of epilepsy increased glutamate transporter expression, but had no effect on seizures. These results indicate that astrocyte glutamate transporters contribute to epileptogenesis in Tsc1GFAPCKO mice and suggest novel therapeutic strategies for epilepsy in TSC directed at astrocytes. PMID:20045054

  8. Excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and axonal damage induced by glutamate transporter inhibition.

    PubMed

    Domercq, María; Etxebarria, Estibaliz; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2005-10-01

    Glutamate uptake is crucial to terminate glutamate signaling and to prevent excitotoxicity. The present study describes the expression of functional glutamate transporters GLAST and GLT-1 in oligodendrocytes by means of electrophysiology, uptake assays, and immunocytochemistry. Inhibition of glutamate uptake, both in oligodendrocyte cultures and in isolated optic nerves, increases glutamate levels and causes oligodendrocyte excitotoxicity, which is prevented by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) and kainate receptor antagonists. Furthermore, glutamate transporter inhibitors or antisense oligonucleotides applied onto the optic nerve in vivo lead to oligodendroglial loss, massive demyelination, and severe axonal damage. Overall, these results demonstrate that the integrity of oligodendrocytes and white matter depends on proper glutamate transporter function. Deregulated transporter activity may contribute to acute and chronic white matter damage.

  9. Glutamic acid and its derivatives: candidates for rational design of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Wani, Waseem A; Haque, Ashanul; Saleem, Kishwar

    2013-05-01

    Throughout the history of human civilizations, cancer has been a major health problem. Its treatment has been interesting but challenging to scientists. Glutamic acid and its derivative glutamine are known to play interesting roles in cancer genesis, hence, it was realized that structurally variant glutamic acid derivatives may be designed and developed and, might be having antagonistic effects on cancer. The present article describes the state-of-art of glutamic acid and its derivatives as anticancer agents. Attempts have been made to explore the effectivity of drug-delivery systems based on glutamic acid for the delivery of anticancer drugs. Moreover, efforts have also been made to discuss the mechanism of action of glutamic acid derivatives as anticancer agents, clinical applications of glutamic acid derivatives, as well as recent developments and future perspectives of glutamic acid drug development have also been discussed.

  10. Glutamate release from satellite glial cells of the murine trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Lysann; Warwick, Rebekah A; Pannicke, Thomas; Reichenbach, Andreas; Grosche, Antje; Hanani, Menachem

    2014-08-22

    It has been proposed that glutamate serves as a mediator between neurons and satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia and that SGCs release glutamate. Using a novel method, we studied glutamate release from SGCs from murine trigeminal ganglia. Sensory neurons with adhering SGCs were enzymatically isolated from wild type and transgenic mice in which vesicular exocytosis was suppressed in glial cells. Extracellular glutamate was detected by microfluorimetry. After loading the cells with a photolabile Ca(2+) chelator, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was raised in SGCs by a UV pulse, which resulted in glutamate release. The amount of released glutamate was decreased in cells with suppressed exocytosis and after pharmacological block of hemichannels. The data demonstrate that SGCs of the trigeminal ganglion release glutamate in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner.

  11. Role of NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S M; Magasanik, B

    1990-01-01

    We cloned GDH2, the gene that encodes the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by purifying the enzyme, making polyclonal antibodies to it, and using the antibodies to screen a lambda gt11 yeast genomic library. A yeast strain with a deletion-disruption allele of GDH2 which replaced the wild-type gene grew very poorly with glutamate as a nitrogen source, but growth improved significantly when the strain was also provided with adenine or other nitrogenous compounds whose biosynthesis requires glutamine. Our results indicate that the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase catalyzes the major, but not sole, pathway for generation of ammonia from glutamate. We also isolated yeast mutants that lacked glutamate synthase activity and present evidence which shows that normally NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase is not involved in glutamate biosynthesis, but that if the enzyme is overexpressed, it may function reversibly in intact cells. PMID:1975578

  12. Repeated exposure to moderate doses of ethanol augments hippocampal glutamate neurotransmission by increasing release

    PubMed Central

    Chefer, Vladimir; Meis, Jennifer; Wang, Grace; Kuzmin, Alexander; Bakalkin, Georgy; Shippenberg, Toni

    2013-01-01

    The present study used conventional and quantitative microdialysis to assess glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the hippocampal CA3 area of the rat following a moderate-dose ethanol treatment regimen. Male Wistar rats received 3.4 g/kg of ethanol or water for 6 days via gastric gavage. Microdialysis experiments commenced 2 days later. Basal and depolarization-induced glutamate overflow were significantly elevated in ethanol-treated animals. Basal and depolarization-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) overflow were unaltered. Quantitative no-net-flux microdialysis was used to determine if changes in dialysate glutamate levels following ethanol administration are due to an increase in release or a decrease in uptake.To confirm the validity of this method for quantifying basal glutamate dynamics, extracellular concentrations of glutamate and the extraction fraction, which reflects changes in analyte clearance, were quantified in response to retro-dialysis of the glutamate uptake blocker trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (tPDC). tPDC significantly decreased the extraction fraction for glutamate, resulting in augmented extracellular glutamate concentrations. Repeated ethanol administration did not alter the glutamate extraction fraction. However, extracellular glutamate concentrations were significantly elevated, indicating that glutamate release is increased as a consequence of repeated ethanol administration. These data demonstrate that repeated bouts of moderate ethanol consumption alter basal glutamate dynamics in the CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus. Basal glutamate release is augmented, whereas glutamate uptake is unchanged. Furthermore, they suggest that dysregulation of glutamate transmission in this region may contribute to the previously documented deficits in cognitive function associated with moderate dose ethanol use. PMID:21182572

  13. Neurosteroid binding to the amino terminal and glutamate binding domains of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara; Bartle, Emily; Roark, Ryan; Fanelli, David; Pham, Melissa; Pollard, Beth; Borkowski, Brian; Rhoads, Sarah; Kim, Joon; Rocha, Monica; Kahlson, Martha; Kangala, Melinda; Gentile, Lisa

    2012-06-01

    The endogenous neurosteroids, pregnenolone sulfate (PS) and 3α-hydroxy-5β-pregnan-20-one sulfate (PREGAS), have been shown to differentially regulate the ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) family of ligand-gated ion channels. Upon binding to these receptors, PREGAS decreases current flow through the channels. Upon binding to non-NMDA or NMDA receptors containing an GluN2C or GluN2D subunit, PS also decreases current flow through the channels, however, upon binding to NMDA receptors containing an GluN2A or GluN2B subunit, flow through the channels increases. To begin to understand this differential regulation, we have cloned the S1S2 and amino terminal domains (ATD) of the NMDA GluN2B and GluN2D and AMPA GluA2 subunits. Here we present results that show that PS and PREGAS bind to different sites in the ATD of the GluA2 subunit, which when combined with previous results from our lab, now identifies two binding domains for each neurosteroid. We also show both neurosteroids bind only to the ATD of the GluN2D subunit, suggesting that this binding is distinct from that of the AMPA GluA2 subunit, with both leading to iGluR inhibition. Finally, we provide evidence that both PS and PREGAS bind to the S1S2 domain of the NMDA GluN2B subunit. Neurosteroid binding to the S1S2 domain of NMDA subunits responsible for potentiation of iGluRs and to the ATD of NMDA subunits responsible for inhibition of iGluRs, provides an interesting option for therapeutic design.

  14. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D induces the glutamate transporter SLC1A1 and alters glutamate handling in non-transformed mammary cells

    PubMed Central

    Beaudin, Sarah; Welsh, JoEllen

    2016-01-01

    Genomic profiling of immortalized human mammary epithelial (hTERT-HME1) cells identified several metabolic genes, including the membrane glutamate transporter, SLC1A1, as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) regulated. In these studies we have surveyed the effects of 1,25D on known glutamate transporters and evaluated its impact on cellular glutamate handling. We confirm that expression of SLC1A1 and all of its known transcript variants are significantly upregulated in hTERT-HME1 cells following 1,25D treatment. Expression of the full-length cognate protein, EAAT3 is correspondingly increased in 1,25D treated hTERT-HME1 cells. Under the same conditions, the expression of two other glutamate transporters - SLC1A6 (EAAT4) and SLC1A2 (EAAT2 or GLT-1) - is enhanced by 1,25D while that of SLC1A3 (EAAT1 or GLAST) and SLC7A11 (xCT) is decreased. Glutamate is not essential for growth of hTERT-HME1 cells, and supplemental glutamate (up to 0.5 mM) does not abrogate the growth inhibitory effects of 1,25D. These data suggest that extracellular glutamate is not a major contributor to cellular energy metabolism in hTERT-HME1 cells under basal conditions and that the growth inhibitory effects of 1,25D are not secondary to its effects on glutamate handling. Instead, the effects of 1,25D on glutamate transporters translated to a decrease in cellular glutamate concentration and an increase in media glutamate concentration, suggesting that one or more of these transporters functions to export glutamate in response to 1,25D exposure. The reduced cellular glutamate concentration may also reflect its incorporation into the cellular glutathione (GSH) pool, which is increased upon 1,25D treatment. In support of this concept, the expression of GCLC (which codes for the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis) and genes which generate reducing equivalents in the form of NADPH (ie, G6PD, PGD, IDH2) are elevated in 1,25D treated cells. Taken together, these data identify 1,25D as a physiological

  15. Alcohol consumption increases basal extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens core of Sprague-Dawley rats without increasing spontaneous glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Pati, Dipanwita; Kelly, Kyle; Stennett, Bethany; Frazier, Charles J; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2016-07-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc) mediates ethanol consumption. Previous studies using non-contingent and voluntary alcohol administration in inbred rodents have reported increased basal extracellular glutamate levels in the NAc. Here, we assessed basal glutamate levels in the NAc following intermittent alcohol consumption in male Sprague-Dawley rats that had access to ethanol for 7 weeks on alternating days. We found increased basal NAc glutamate at 24 h withdrawal from ethanol and thus sought to identify the source of this glutamate. To do so, we employed a combination of microdialysis, slice electrophysiology and western blotting. Reverse dialysis of the voltage-gated sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin did not affect glutamate levels in either group. Electrophysiological recordings in slices made after 24 h withdrawal revealed a decrease in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) frequency relative to controls, with no change in sEPSC amplitude. No change in metabotropic glutamate receptor 2/3 (mGlu2/3) function was detected as bath application of the mGlu2/3 agonist LY379268 decreased spontaneous and miniature EPSC frequency in slices from both control and ethanol-consuming rats. The increase in basal glutamate was not associated with changes in the surface expression of GLT-1, however, a decrease in slope of the no-net-flux dialysis function was observed following ethanol consumption, indicating a potential decrease in glutamate reuptake. Taken together, these findings indicate that the increase in basal extracellular glutamate occurring after chronic ethanol consumption is not mediated by an increase in action potential-dependent glutamate release or a failure of mGlu2/3 autoreceptors to regulate such release. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Genes in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Maj, Carlo; Minelli, Alessandra; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Sacchetti, Emilio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies revealed two main components in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia, one constituted by common variants determining a distributed polygenic effect and one represented by a large number of heterogeneous rare and highly disruptive mutations. These gene modifications often affect neural transmission and different studies proved an involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia phenotype. Through the combination of literature information with genomic data from public repositories, we analyzed the current knowledge on the involvement of genetic variations of the human metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia and related endophenotypes. Despite the analysis did not reveal a definitive connection, different suggestive associations have been identified and in particular a relevant role has emerged for GRM3 in affecting specific schizophrenia endophenotypes. This supports the hypothesis that these receptors are directly involved in schizophrenia disorder. PMID:27296644

  17. Sexual attraction enhances glutamate transmission in mammalian anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long-Jun; Kim, Susan S; Li, Xiangyao; Zhang, Fuxing; Zhuo, Min

    2009-05-06

    Functional human brain imaging studies have indicated the essential role of cortical regions, such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), in romantic love and sex. However, the neurobiological basis of how the ACC neurons are activated and engaged in sexual attraction remains unknown. Using transgenic mice in which the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is controlled by the promoter of the activity-dependent gene c-fos, we found that ACC pyramidal neurons are activated by sexual attraction. The presynaptic glutamate release to the activated neurons is increased and pharmacological inhibition of neuronal activities in the ACC reduced the interest of male mice to female mice. Our results present direct evidence of the critical role of the ACC in sexual attraction, and long-term increases in glutamate mediated excitatory transmission may contribute to sexual attraction between male and female mice.

  18. Deep brain light stimulation effects on glutamate and dopamine concentration.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Lin, Shih-Shian; Liu, Janelle; Chen, Shih-How; Chio, Chung-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Compared to deep brain electrical stimulation, which has been applied to treating pathological brain diseases, little work has been done on the effect of deep brain light stimulation. A fiber-coupled laser stimulator at 840 nm wavelength and 130 Hz pulse repetition rate is developed in this work for deep brain light stimulation in a rat model. Concentration changes in glutamate and dopamine in the striatum are observed using a microdialysis probe when the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is stimulated at various optical power levels. Experimental results show that light stimulation causes the concentration of glutamate to decrease while that of dopamine is increased. This suggests that deep brain light stimulation of the STN is a promising therapeutic strategy for dopamine-related diseases such as Parkinson's disease. The stimulator developed for this work is useful for deep brain light stimulation in biomedical research.

  19. Effect of glutamate analogues on brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Campbell, G L; Bartel, R; Freidman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1985-10-01

    Glutamate analogues have been used in many different experimental approaches in neurobiology. A small number of these analogues have been classified as gliotoxic. We have examined the effect of seven glutamate analogues (five gliotoxic and two neurotoxic) on the growth and viability of four human glioma cell lines, one human medulloblastoma cell line, and one human sarcoma cell line. Aminoadipic acid and homocysteic acid predominantly affected the growth of two glioma cell lines in the presence of 4 mM glutamine. Phosphonobutyric acid predominantly affected the other two glioma cell lines and the medulloblastoma cell line in the presence of 4 mM glutamine. In medium containing no glutamine, all three analogues had marked effects on all the cell lines except the sarc