Science.gov

Sample records for cycle alternative mechanisms

  1. Tectonic mechanisms associated with P- T paths of regional metamorphism: alternatives to single-cycle thrusting and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, John

    2004-11-01

    Metamorphic pressure ( P)-temperature ( T) paths are commonly used as tools to interpret the tectonic history of orogenic belts, those deformed belts of rocks that record past activity along active plate margins. Many studies and reviews relating P- T path development to tectonics have focused on thrusting-thermal relaxation cycles, with special emphasis on collisional processes. Other studies have assumed that P- T paths resulted from a single tectono-metamorphic event that accounted for the entire burial-exhumation history of the rocks. In many cases, such assumptions may prove invalid. This paper speculates on the relationship of tectonic processes other than thrusting-heating to P- T path development. The processes discussed herein include subduction initiation, triple-junction interactions, initiation and shut off of arc volcanism, subcontinental delamination, and hot spot migration. All of these processes may leave a signature in the metamorphic rock record. Examples are presented from a number of localities, most of which are from the Pacific Rim. Although thrusting-heating cycles have influenced metamorphic evolution in many orogenic belts, the potential impact of other types of tectonic mechanisms should not be overlooked.

  2. Separations Needs for the Alternate Chemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart

    2007-05-01

    The bulk of the efforts for the development of a hydrogen production plant supported by the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) have been directed towards the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle. However, it was judged prudent to re-investigate alternate chemical cycles in light of new developments and technical accomplishments derived from the current S-I work. This work analyzes the available data for the promising alternate chemical cycles to provide an understanding of their inherent chemical separations needs. None of the cycles analyzed have separations that are potential “show stoppers”; although some of the indicated separations will be challenging to perform. The majority of the separations involve processes that are either more achievable or more developed

  3. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF ELECTRICITY GENERATION ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes various electricity and electricity/steam cogeneration alternatives. Among these alternatives, are fossil fuel and biomass power generation plants. These plants have different designs due to the need in fossil fuel (coal) plants to include process u...

  4. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF ELECTRICITY GENERATION ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes various electricity and electricity/steam cogeneration alternatives. Among these alternatives, are fossil fuel and biomass power generation plants. These plants have different designs due to the need in fossil fuel (coal) plants to include process u...

  5. Body Temperature Cycles Control Rhythmic Alternative Splicing in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Preußner, Marco; Goldammer, Gesine; Neumann, Alexander; Haltenhof, Tom; Rautenstrauch, Pia; Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Heyd, Florian

    2017-08-03

    The core body temperature of all mammals oscillates with the time of the day. However, direct molecular consequences of small, physiological changes in body temperature remain largely elusive. Here we show that body temperature cycles drive rhythmic SR protein phosphorylation to control an alternative splicing (AS) program. A temperature change of 1°C is sufficient to induce a concerted splicing switch in a large group of functionally related genes, rendering this splicing-based thermometer much more sensitive than previously described temperature-sensing mechanisms. AS of two exons in the 5' UTR of the TATA-box binding protein (Tbp) highlights the general impact of this mechanism, as it results in rhythmic TBP protein levels with implications for global gene expression in vivo. Together our data establish body temperature-driven AS as a core clock-independent oscillator in mammalian peripheral clocks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Cycling to achieve healthy and sustainable alternatives].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Mauren Lopes; de Freitas, Carlos Machado

    2012-06-01

    The quest for healthier cities and citizens has contributed to the strengthening of public policies championing the bicycle as a means of transportation and offering benefits to individual wellbeing in various countries, however there is also an increased risk of accidents. The scope of this review is to analyze scientific output dealing with the relationship between cycling as a means of transportation and public health. PubMed, LILACS and SciELO were the chosen databases used in the research and 66 complete articles were selected. The results show that concern about this theme is recent, especially in developing countries. The most recurrent topics raised by the researchers were: traffic safety, public policies and the effects of cycling on health. We concluded that the decision to use the bicycle as a means of transportation occurs in a very heterogeneous manner, albeit with potentially greater impacts in developing countries where the inclusion of this theme in the research agendas related to the promotion of active transport, health and traffic safety is a matter of urgency.

  7. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternative ramped modal cycles. 1033.520 Section 1033.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test Procedures § 1033.520 Alternative ramped...

  8. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternative ramped modal cycles. 1033.520 Section 1033.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test Procedures § 1033.520 Alternative ramped...

  9. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternative ramped modal cycles. 1033.520 Section 1033.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test Procedures § 1033.520 Alternative ramped...

  10. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternative ramped modal cycles. 1033.520 Section 1033.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test Procedures § 1033.520 Alternative ramped...

  11. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternative ramped modal cycles. 1033.520 Section 1033.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test Procedures § 1033.520 Alternative ramped...

  12. Alternative to the seesaw mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Marcos, J. I.

    1999-05-01

    We give a new mechanism for generating very small, and almost degenerate, neutrino masses, without resorting to the seesaw mechanism or unnatural small Yukawa couplings. It requires the existence of at least 4 families with an almost democratic structure for the Yukawa couplings. It is also proven that this structure can account for large lepton mixings of the three light leptons.

  13. Chronically Alternating Light Cycles Increase Breast Cancer Risk in Mice.

    PubMed

    Van Dycke, Kirsten C G; Rodenburg, Wendy; van Oostrom, Conny T M; van Kerkhof, Linda W M; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Roenneberg, Till; van Steeg, Harry; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J

    2015-07-20

    Although epidemiological studies in shift workers and flight attendants have associated chronic circadian rhythm disturbance (CRD) with increased breast cancer risk, causal evidence for this association is lacking. Several scenarios have been proposed to contribute to the shift work-cancer connection: (1) internal desynchronization, (2) light at night (resulting in melatonin suppression), (3) sleep disruption, (4) lifestyle disturbances, and (5) decreased vitamin D levels due to lack of sunlight. The confounders inherent in human field studies are less problematic in animal studies, which are therefore a good approach to assess the causal relation between circadian disturbance and cancer. However, the experimental conditions of many of these animal studies were far from the reality of human shift workers. For example, some involved xenografts (addressing tumor growth rather than cancer initiation and/or progression), chemically induced tumor models, or continuous bright light exposure, which can lead to suppression of circadian rhythmicity. Here, we have exposed breast cancer-prone p53(R270H/+)WAPCre conditional mutant mice (in a FVB genetic background) to chronic CRD by subjecting them to a weekly alternating light-dark (LD) cycle throughout their life. Animals exposed to the weekly LD inversions showed a decrease in tumor suppression. In addition, these animals showed an increase in body weight. Importantly, this study provides the first experimental proof that CRD increases breast cancer development. Finally, our data suggest internal desynchronization and sleep disturbance as mechanisms linking shift work with cancer development and obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms and consequences of alternative polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Di Giammartino, Dafne Campigli; Nishida, Kensei; Manley, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is emerging as a widespread mechanism used to control gene expression. Like alternative splicing, usage of alternative poly(A) sites allows a single gene to encode multiple mRNA transcripts. In some cases, this changes the mRNA coding potential; in other cases, the code remains unchanged but the 3’UTR length is altered, influencing the fate of mRNAs in several ways, for example, by altering the availability of RNA binding protein sites and microRNA binding sites. The mechansims governing both global and gene-specific APA are only starting to be deciphered. Here we review what is known about these mechanisms and the functional consequences of alternative polyadenlyation. PMID:21925375

  15. Life cycle models of conventional and alternative-fueled automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Heather Louise

    This thesis reports life cycle inventories of internal combustion engine automobiles with feasible near term fuel/engine combinations. These combinations include unleaded gasoline, California Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, alcohol and gasoline blends (85 percent methanol or ethanol combined with 15 percent gasoline), and compressed natural gas in spark ignition direct and indirect injection engines. Additionally, I consider neat methanol and neat ethanol in spark ignition direct injection engines and diesel fuel in compression ignition direct and indirect injection engines. I investigate the potential of the above options to have a lower environmental impact than conventional gasoline-fueled automobiles, while still retaining comparable pricing and consumer benefits. More broadly, the objective is to assess whether the use of any of the alternative systems will help to lead to the goal of a more sustainable personal transportation system. The principal tool is the Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Analysis model which includes inventories of economic data, environmental discharges, and resource use. I develop a life cycle assessment framework to assemble the array of data generated by the model into three aggregate assessment parameters; economics, externalities, and vehicle attributes. The first step is to develop a set of 'comparable cars' with the alternative fuel/engine combinations, based on characteristics of a conventional 1998 gasoline-fueled Ford Taurus sedan, the baseline vehicle for the analyses. I calculate the assessment parameters assuming that these comparable cars can attain the potential thermal efficiencies estimated by experts for each fuel/engine combination. To a first approximation, there are no significant differences in the assessment parameters for the vehicle manufacture, service, fixed costs, and the end-of-life for any of the options. However, there are differences in the vehicle operation life cycle components and the state of technology

  16. An alternative approach to the prevention of doping in cycling.

    PubMed

    Aubel, Olivier; Ohl, Fabien

    2014-11-01

    Framed by an overly reductionist perspective on doping in professional cycling as an individual moral failing, anti-doping policies tend to envisage a combination of education and repression as the primary intervention strategies. We offer an alternative approach, which seeks to understand doping practices as embedded in social relations, especially in relation to team organisation and employment conditions. We undertake an in-depth analysis of the functioning of nine of the 40 world professional cycling teams, and the careers of the 2,351 riders who were or have been professionals since 2005. We find that anti-doping approaches rest upon questionable assumptions of doping as an individual moral fault, and have not produced the anti-doping effects expected or intended. Based on an analysis of team practices, and the ways in which riders produce their achievements, we offer an alternative perspective which emphasises doping as a product of social-economic condition. Our findings emphasise employment and business models, as well as day-to-day working conditions, as structural drivers of doping practices in which individuals and teams engage. Anti-doping requires structural as well as cultural change within the sport of professional cycling, especially in the ways teams function economically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Elucidating the mechanisms of double ionization using intense half-cycle, single-cycle, and double half-cycle pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamta, G. Lagmago; Starace, Anthony F.

    2003-10-01

    We investigate the interaction of a two-active electron system (Li{sup -}) with intense single-cycle and double half-cycle pulses. The 'intensity' and 'frequency' considered correspond to the 'multiphoton above-barrier regime'. For the single-cycle pulse (SCP), the electric field changes sign once, allowing electron wave packets created during the first half cycle to recollide with the parent ion when driven back by the field. For the double half-cycle pulse (DHP), however, the electric field does not change sign, and electron wave packets created during the first half cycle are not driven back to the parent ion. We find that both single and double ionization are significantly larger for the SCP than for the DHP, thereby elucidating the role of the rescattering mechanism. On the other hand, doubly ionized electrons produced by a half-cycle pulse and a DHP are found to have angular distributions in which one electron is ejected in the direction of the pulse field, and the other in the opposite direction. This clear signature of electron correlations suggests that 'shake-off', 'knockout', and, possibly, 'multiphoton-sharing' processes are alternative contributing mechanisms for double ionization in this regime.

  18. Segregation of cortical head direction cell assemblies on alternating theta cycles

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Mark P.; Bogaard, Andrew R.; Schultheiss, Nathan W.; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    High-level cortical systems for spatial navigation, including entorhinal grid cells, critically depend on input from the head direction system. We examined spiking rhythms and modes of synchrony between neurons participating in head direction networks for evidence of internal processing, independent of direct sensory drive, which may be important for grid cell function. We demonstrate that head direction networks of rats are segregated into at least two populations of neurons firing on alternate theta cycles (theta cycle skipping) with fixed synchronous or anti-synchronous relationships. Pairs of anti-synchronous theta cycle skipping neurons exhibited larger differences in head direction tuning with a minimum difference of 40 degrees of head direction. Septal inactivation preserved the head direction signal but eliminated theta cycle skipping of head direction cells and grid cell spatial periodicity. We propose that internal mechanisms underlying cycle skipping in head direction networks may be critical for downstream spatial computation by grid cells. PMID:23603709

  19. An Alternative Mechanism for Accelerated Carbon Sequestration in Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Haselbach, Liv M.; Thomle, Jonathan N.

    2014-07-01

    The increased rate of carbon dioxide sequestration (carbonation) is desired in many primary and secondary life applications of concrete in order to make the life cycle of concrete structures more carbon neutral. Most carbonation rate studies have focused on concrete exposed to air under various conditions. An alternative mechanism for accelerated carbon sequestration in concrete was investigated in this research based on the pH change of waters in contact with pervious concrete which have been submerged in carbonate laden waters. The results indicate that the concrete exposed to high levels of carbonate species in water may carbonate faster than when exposed to ambient air, and that the rate is higher with higher concentrations. Validation of increased carbon dioxide sequestration was also performed via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It is theorized that the proposed alternative mechanism reduces a limiting rate effect of carbon dioxide dissolution in water in the micro pores of the concrete.

  20. Advanced Electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production by Alternative Thermochemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lvov, Serguei; Chung, Mike; Fedkin, Mark; Lewis, Michele; Balashov, Victor; Chalkova, Elena; Akinfiev, Nikolay; Stork, Carol; Davis, Thomas; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Stanford, Thomas; Weidner, John; Law, Victor; Prindle, John

    2011-01-06

    Hydrogen fuel is a potentially major solution to the problem of climate change, as well as addressing urban air pollution issues. But a key future challenge for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier is a sustainable, low-cost method of producing it in large capacities. Most of the world's hydrogen is currently derived from fossil fuels through some type of reforming processes. Nuclear hydrogen production is an emerging and promising alternative to the reforming processes for carbon-free hydrogen production in the future. This report presents the main results of a research program carried out by a NERI Consortium, which consisted of Penn State University (PSU) (lead), University of South Carolina (USC), Tulane University (TU), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Thermochemical water decomposition is an emerging technology for large-scale production of hydrogen. Typically using two or more intermediate compounds, a sequence of chemical and physical processes split water into hydrogen and oxygen, without releasing any pollutants externally to the atmosphere. These intermediate compounds are recycled internally within a closed loop. While previous studies have identified over 200 possible thermochemical cycles, only a few have progressed beyond theoretical calculations to working experimental demonstrations that establish scientific and practical feasibility of the thermochemical processes. The Cu-Cl cycle has a significant advantage over other cycles due to lower temperature requirements – around 530 °C and below. As a result, it can be eventually linked with the Generation IV thermal power stations. Advantages of the Cu-Cl cycle over others include lower operating temperatures, ability to utilize low-grade waste heat to improve energy efficiency, and potentially lower cost materials. Another significant advantage is a relatively low voltage required for the electrochemical step (thus low electricity input). Other advantages include common chemical agents and

  1. A Life-Cycle Comparison of Alternative Automobile Fuels.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Heather L; Lave, Lester B; Lankey, Rebecca; Joshi, Satish

    2000-10-01

    We examine the life cycles of gasoline, diesel, compressed natural gas (CNG), and ethanol (C2H5OH)-fueled internal combustion engine (ICE) automobiles. Port and direct injection and spark and compression ignition engines are examined. We investigate diesel fuel from both petroleum and biosources as well as C2H5OH from corn, herbaceous bio-mass, and woody biomass. The baseline vehicle is a gasoline-fueled 1998 Ford Taurus. We optimize the other fuel/powertrain combinations for each specific fuel as a part of making the vehicles comparable to the baseline in terms of range, emissions level, and vehicle lifetime. Life-cycle calculations are done using the economic input-output life-cycle analysis (EIO-LCA) software; fuel cycles and vehicle end-of-life stages are based on published model results. We find that recent advances in gasoline vehicles, the low petroleum price, and the extensive gasoline infrastructure make it difficult for any alternative fuel to become commercially viable. The most attractive alternative fuel is compressed natural gas because it is less expensive than gasoline, has lower regulated pollutant and toxics emissions, produces less greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and is available in North America in large quantities. However, the bulk and weight of gas storage cylinders required for the vehicle to attain a range comparable to that of gasoline vehicles necessitates a redesign of the engine and chassis. Additional natural gas transportation and distribution infrastructure is required for large-scale use of natural gas for transportation. Diesel engines are extremely attractive in terms of energy efficiency, but expert judgment is divided on whether these engines will be able to meet strict emissions standards, even with reformulated fuel. The attractiveness of direct injection engines depends on their being able to meet strict emissions standards without losing their greater efficiency. Biofuels offer lower GHG emissions, are sustainable, and

  2. A life-cycle comparison of alternative automobile fuels.

    PubMed

    MacLean, H L; Lave, L B; Lankey, R; Joshi, S

    2000-10-01

    We examine the life cycles of gasoline, diesel, compressed natural gas (CNG), and ethanol (C2H5OH)-fueled internal combustion engine (ICE) automobiles. Port and direct injection and spark and compression ignition engines are examined. We investigate diesel fuel from both petroleum and biosources as well as C2H5OH from corn, herbaceous bio-mass, and woody biomass. The baseline vehicle is a gasoline-fueled 1998 Ford Taurus. We optimize the other fuel/powertrain combinations for each specific fuel as a part of making the vehicles comparable to the baseline in terms of range, emissions level, and vehicle lifetime. Life-cycle calculations are done using the economic input-output life-cycle analysis (EIO-LCA) software; fuel cycles and vehicle end-of-life stages are based on published model results. We find that recent advances in gasoline vehicles, the low petroleum price, and the extensive gasoline infrastructure make it difficult for any alternative fuel to become commercially viable. The most attractive alternative fuel is compressed natural gas because it is less expensive than gasoline, has lower regulated pollutant and toxics emissions, produces less greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and is available in North America in large quantities. However, the bulk and weight of gas storage cylinders required for the vehicle to attain a range comparable to that of gasoline vehicles necessitates a redesign of the engine and chassis. Additional natural gas transportation and distribution infrastructure is required for large-scale use of natural gas for transportation. Diesel engines are extremely attractive in terms of energy efficiency, but expert judgment is divided on whether these engines will be able to meet strict emissions standards, even with reformulated fuel. The attractiveness of direct injection engines depends on their being able to meet strict emissions standards without losing their greater efficiency. Biofuels offer lower GHG emissions, are sustainable, and

  3. ALTERNATIVE FLOWSHEETS FOR THE SULFUR-IODINE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,LC; LENTSCH,RD; BESENBRUCH,GE; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JE

    2003-02-01

    OAK-B135 A hydrogen economy will need significant new sources of hydrogen. Unless large-scale carbon sequestration can be economically implemented, use of hydrogen reduces greenhouse gases only if the hydrogen is produced with non-fossil energy sources. Nuclear energy is one of the limited options available. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantities of hydrogen from nuclear energy efficiently is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical water-splitting cycle, driven by high temperature heat from a helium Gas-Cooled Reactor. They have completed a study of nuclear-driven thermochemical water-splitting processes. The final task of this study was the development of a flowsheet for a prototype S-I production plant. An important element of this effort was the evaluation of alternative flowsheets and selection of the reference design.

  4. Alternative pathway therapy for urea cycle disorders: twenty years later.

    PubMed

    Batshaw, M L; MacArthur, R B; Tuchman, M

    2001-01-01

    Alternative pathway therapy is currently an accepted treatment approach for inborn errors of the urea cycle. This involves the long-term use of oral sodium phenylbutyrate, arginine supplements, or both, depending on the specific enzyme deficiency, and treatment of acute hyperammonemic crises with intravenous sodium benzoate/sodium phenylacetate plus arginine. A review of 20 years of experience with this approach illustrates the strengths and limitations of this treatment. It has clearly decreased the mortality and morbidity from these disorders, but they remain unacceptably high. The medications are generally well tolerated, but severe accidental overdosage has been reported because of the infrequent use of the medication. There is also a difference in their metabolism between newborns and older children that must be addressed in determining dosage. To avoid these complications it is recommended that drug levels in blood be monitored routinely and that very specific treatment protocols and oversight be followed to avoid overdoses. Finally, it must be acknowledged that alternative pathway therapy has limited effectiveness in preventing hyperammonemia and must be combined with effective dietary management. Therefore in children with neonatal-onset disease or in those with very poor metabolic control, liver transplantation should be considered. There should also be the continued search for innovative therapies that may offer a more permanent and complete correction, such as gene therapy.

  5. Farnesyltransferase inhibitors-induced autophagy: alternative mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Pan, Jingxuan; Song, Enlin; Cheng, Chao; Lee, Mong-Hong; Yeung, Sai-Ching Jim

    2009-01-01

    Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) were designed to block the action of Ras oncoproteins which depend on posttranslational modification by adding a farnesyl isoprenoid membrane anchor. However, off-target actions are believed to account for most of their antitumor activity. We recently reported the induction of autophagy in cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner by FTIs. We observed similar results of autophagy in a panel of tumor cell lines for the three FTIs tested. Therefore, the induction of autophagy is very likely a pharmacological class effect of inhibition of farnesyltransferase. In this addendum, we discuss the possible mechanisms underlying the induction of autophagy by FTIs, including reactive oxygen species-, DNA damage- and Ras-mediated pathways as alternatives to Rheb-mediated regulation of mTOR and autophagy.

  6. Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET

    SciTech Connect

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S.

    2012-07-23

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet

  7. Life-Cycle Analysis of Alternative Aviation Fuels in GREET

    SciTech Connect

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S.

    2012-06-01

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1_2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or(2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55–85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources — such as natural gas and coal — could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet

  8. Photosystem II cycle and alternative electron flow in leaves.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Agu; Eichelmann, Hillar; Oja, Vello; Rasulov, Bakhtier; Rämma, Heikko

    2006-07-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) were grown in the laboratory and leaves were taken from field-grown birch trees (Betula pendula Roth). Chlorophyll fluorescence, CO2 uptake and O2 evolution were measured and electron transport rates were calculated, J(C) from the CO2 uptake rate considering ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylation and oxygenation, J(O) from the O2 evolution rate, and J(F) from Chl fluorescence parameters. Mesophyll diffusion resistance, r(md), used for the calculation of J(C), was determined such that the in vivo Rubisco kinetic curve with respect to the carboxylation site CO2 concentration became a rectangular hyperbola with Km(CO2) of 10 microM at 22.5 degrees C. In sunflower, in the absence of external O2, J(O) = 1.07 J(C) when absorbed photon flux density (PAD) was varied, showing that the O2-independent components of the alternative electron flow to acceptors other than CO2 made up 7% of J(C). Under saturating light, J(F), however, was 20-30% faster than J(C), and J(F)-J(C) depended little on CO2 and O2 concentrations. The inter-relationship between J(F)-J(C) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was variable, dependent on the CO2 concentration. We conclude that the relatively fast electron flow J(F)-J(C) appearing at light saturation of photosynthesis contains a minor component coupled with proton translocation, serving for nitrite, oxaloacetate and oxygen reduction, and a major component that is mostly cyclic electron transport around PSII. The rate of the PSII cycle is sufficient to release the excess excitation pressure on PSII significantly. Although the O2-dependent Mehler-type alternative electron flow appeared to be under the detection threshold, its importance is discussed considering the documented enhancement of photosynthesis by oxygen.

  9. Mechanism for alternating access in neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lucy R; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Jacobs, Miriam T; Gesmonde, Joan; Xie, Li; Honig, Barry H; Rudnick, Gary

    2008-07-29

    Crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters, show a molecule of bound substrate that is essentially exposed to the extracellular space but occluded from the cytoplasm. Thus, there must exist an alternate conformation for LeuT in which the substrate is accessible to the cytoplasm and a corresponding mechanism that switches accessibility from one side of the membrane to the other. Here, we identify the cytoplasmic accessibility pathway of the alternate conformation in a mammalian serotonin transporter (SERT) (a member of the same transporter family as LeuT). We also propose a model for the cytoplasmic-facing state that exploits the internal pseudosymmetry observed in the crystal structure. LeuT contains two structurally similar repeats (TMs1-5 and TMs 6-10) that are inverted with respect to the plane of the membrane. The conformational differences between them result in the formation of the extracellular pathway. Our model for the cytoplasm-facing state exchanges the conformations of the two repeats and thus exposes the substrate and ion-binding sites to the cytoplasm. The conformational change that connects the two states primarily involves the tilting of a 4-helix bundle composed of transmembrane helices 1, 2, 6, and 7. Switching the tilt angle of this bundle is essentially equivalent to switching the conformation of the two repeats. Extensive mutagenesis of SERT and accessibility measurements, using cysteine reagents, are accommodated by our model. These observations may be of relevance to other transporter families, many of which contain internal inverted repeats.

  10. New mechanism proposed for glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Alan

    Were the ice ages triggered by an influx of extraterrestrial dust or meteoroids hitting Earth's upper atmosphere? A controversial and still unproven new theory recently described by Muller and MacDonald [1995] in Nature links the 100,000 year glacial cycle with changes in Earth's orbital inclination relative to the plane of the solar system. And, say the theory developers, the only logical mechanism they can find for the connection is increasing amounts of extraterrestrial material entering the atmosphere whenever Earth's orbit sweeps through the solar plane. Climate researchers are just beginning to test the model's predictions.

  11. Prospectives on the risks of alternative fuel cycles.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D H; Kastenberg, W E; Griesmeyer, J M

    1981-01-01

    A commentary is provided on the uncertainties in the data and in qualifying the phenomena relating to the risks imposed by the various steps involved in the use of coal, oil, natural gas, hydropower, and nuclear fuels for the generation of electricity. Uncertainties appear to be extremely large for hydropower which exhibits both large scale ecological impacts and the potential for high consequence, moderate frequency events at specific sites. Major risk-related uncertainties with the use of nuclear fuels include those surrounding nuclear weapons proliferation and reactor accident frequencies and consequences. Uncertainties for coal and oil include specification of the damage function of air transported sulfates and the effects of atmospheric CO2 buildup, acid rain, and groundwater contamination from mine water runoff. Compounding these problems is the potential impact of the growing global competition for a diminishing supply of oil. In the studies reviewed herein, the assessed risks of the nuclear fuel cycle are no greater than those of the primary alternatives. Prudence suggests that we do not totally reject any particular option at this time on the basis of health effects alone; similarly, no option is an undisputed choice. PMID:7270773

  12. Prospectives on the risks of alternative fuel cycles.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D H; Kastenberg, W E; Griesmeyer, J M

    1981-09-01

    A commentary is provided on the uncertainties in the data and in qualifying the phenomena relating to the risks imposed by the various steps involved in the use of coal, oil, natural gas, hydropower, and nuclear fuels for the generation of electricity. Uncertainties appear to be extremely large for hydropower which exhibits both large scale ecological impacts and the potential for high consequence, moderate frequency events at specific sites. Major risk-related uncertainties with the use of nuclear fuels include those surrounding nuclear weapons proliferation and reactor accident frequencies and consequences. Uncertainties for coal and oil include specification of the damage function of air transported sulfates and the effects of atmospheric CO2 buildup, acid rain, and groundwater contamination from mine water runoff. Compounding these problems is the potential impact of the growing global competition for a diminishing supply of oil. In the studies reviewed herein, the assessed risks of the nuclear fuel cycle are no greater than those of the primary alternatives. Prudence suggests that we do not totally reject any particular option at this time on the basis of health effects alone; similarly, no option is an undisputed choice.

  13. Mechanisms and Regulation of Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing is a critical step in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, providing significant expansion of the functional proteome of eukaryotic organisms with limited gene numbers. Split eukaryotic genes contain intervening sequences or introns disrupting protein-coding exons, and intron removal occurs by repeated assembly of a large and highly dynamic ribonucleoprotein complex termed the spliceosome, which is composed of five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles, U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5. Biochemical studies over the past 10 years have allowed the isolation as well as compositional, functional, and structural analysis of splicing complexes at distinct stages along the spliceosome cycle. The average human gene contains eight exons and seven introns, producing an average of three or more alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms. Recent high-throughput sequencing studies indicate that 100% of human genes produce at least two alternative mRNA isoforms. Mechanisms of alternative splicing include RNA–protein interactions of splicing factors with regulatory sites termed silencers or enhancers, RNA–RNA base-pairing interactions, or chromatin-based effects that can change or determine splicing patterns. Disease-causing mutations can often occur in splice sites near intron borders or in exonic or intronic RNA regulatory silencer or enhancer elements, as well as in genes that encode splicing factors. Together, these studies provide mechanistic insights into how spliceosome assembly, dynamics, and catalysis occur; how alternative splicing is regulated and evolves; and how splicing can be disrupted by cis- and trans-acting mutations leading to disease states. These findings make the spliceosome an attractive new target for small-molecule, antisense, and genome-editing therapeutic interventions. PMID:25784052

  14. Optimization Of The Alternate Cycle In A Membrane Aeration/Filtration Combined Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongjie; Dong, Wenyi; Yang, Yue; Gan, Guanghua; Li, Weiguang

    2010-11-01

    In this study, a membrane aeration/filtration combined bioreactor (CMBR) was constructed, and the effect of alternate cycle by CMBR on membrane fouling and oxygen utilization efficiency (OUE) was investigated. Results showed that under the condition, when the alternate cycle was 0.75˜3h, the ΔTMP (TMP value of the time when a filtration cycle was over) of CMBR maintained a basically constant value during the 6 days' continuous operation, which implied the CMBR achieved a favorable effect of the membrane fouling relieving. Too short or too long cycle would lead to a gradual increase of ΔTMP. OUE of CMBR increased with the extension of the alternate cycle. Thus, it suggested that the optimal alternate cycle of CMBR should be 3h.

  15. A Comparison Study of Various Nuclear Fuel Cycle Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Eun-ha; Ko, Won-il

    2007-07-01

    As a nation develops its nuclear strategies, it must consider various aspects of nuclear energy such as sustainability, environmental-friendliness, proliferation-resistance, economics, technologies, and so on. Like all the policy decision, however, a nuclear fuel cycle option can not be superior in all aspects; the nation must identify its top priority and accordingly evaluate all the possible nuclear fuel cycle options. For such a purpose, this paper takes four different fuel cycle options that are likely adopted by the Korean government, considering the current status of nuclear power generation and the 3. Comprehensive Nuclear Energy Promotion Plan (CNEPP) - Once-through Cycle, DUPIC Recycle, Thermal Recycle and GEN-IV Recycle. The paper then evaluates each option in terms of resource utilization and waste generation. The analysis shows that the GEN-IV Recycle appears to be most competitive from these aspects. (authors)

  16. Alternate energy dissipation? Phenolic metabolites and the xanthophyll cycle.

    PubMed

    Close, Dugald C; Beadle, Chris L

    2003-04-01

    The dynamics of phenolic galloylglucoses (di-, tri-, tetra- and penta-galloylglucose), flavonoids (quercitin and quercitin glycosides) and sideroxylonal were compared with that of xanthophyll cycle-dependent energy dissipation during rapid induction of chilling-dependent photo-inhibition. Pre-dawn xanthophyll cycle engagement of seedlings of Eucalyptus nitens transferred from mild nursery conditions to a low temperature controlled environment increased logarithmically during eight days of treatment. Photochemical efficiency and flavonoids decreased after four days of treatment and non-photochemical quenching after two days of treatment. Galloylglucoses and sideroxylonal decreased linearly during treatment. These results demonstrate that rapid changes in foliar phenolic levels are associated with abrupt changes in the plant environment. It is argued that under these growth-chamber conditions, the xanthophyll cycle facilitated dissipation of excess light energy, lessening the requirement for the dissipation of energy or antioxidant activity through phenolic metabolites.

  17. Representing and constructing liquefaction cycle alternatives for FLNG FEED using system entity structure concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sol; Lee, Kyu-Yeul

    2014-09-01

    To support the procedure for determining an optimal liquefaction cycle for FLNG FEED, an ontological modeling method which can automatically generate various alternative liquefaction cycles were carried out in this paper. General rules in combining equipment are extracted from existing onshore liquefaction cycles like C3MR and DMR cycle. A generic relational model which represents whole relations of the plant elements has all these rules, and it is expressed by using the system entity structure (SES), an ontological framework that hierarchically represents the elements of a system and their relationships. By using a process called pruning which reduces the SES to a candidate, various alternative relational models of the liquefaction cycles can be automatically generated. These alternatives were provided by XML-based formats, and they can be used for choosing an optimal liquefaction cycle on the basis of the assessments such as process simulation and reliability analysis

  18. Alternative refrigerants and refrigeration cycles for domestic refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, J.R.; Rice, C.L.; Vineyard, E.A.

    1992-12-01

    This project initially focused on using nonazeotropic refrigerant mixtures (NARMs) in a two-evaporator refrigerator-freezer design using two stages of liquid refrigerant subcooling. This concept was proposed and tested in 1975. The work suggested that the concept was 20% more efficient than the conventional one-evaporator refrigerator-freezer (RF) design. After considerable planning and system modeling based on using a NARM in a Lorenz-Meutzner (L-M) RF, the program scope was broadened to include investigation of a ``dual-loop`` concept where energy savings result from exploiting the less stringent operating conditions needed to satisfy cooling, of the fresh food section. A steady-state computer model (CYCLE-Z) capable of simulating conventional, dual loop, and L-M refrigeration cycles was developed. This model was used to rank the performance of 20 ozone-safe NARMs in the L-M refrigeration cycle while key system parameters were systematically varied. The results indicated that the steady-state efficiency of the L-M design was up to 25% greater than that of a conventional cycle. This model was also used to calculate the performance of other pure refrigerants relative to that of dichlorodifluoromethane, R-12, in conventional and dual-loop RF designs. Projected efficiency gains for these cycles were more modest, ranging from 0 to 10%. Individual compressor calorimeter tests of nine combinations of evaporator and condenser temperatures usually used to map RF compressor performance were carried out with R-12 and two candidate L-M NARMs in several compressors. Several models of a commercially produced two-evaporator RF were obtained as test units. Two dual-loop RF designs were built and tested as part of this project.

  19. Alternative refrigerants and refrigeration cycles for domestic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, J. R.; Rice, C. L.; Vineyard, E. A.

    1992-12-01

    This project initially focused on using nonazeotropic refrigerant mixtures (NARM's) in a two-evaporator refrigerator-freezer design using two stages of liquid refrigerant subcooling. This concept was proposed and tested in 1975. The work suggested that the concept was 20% more efficient than the conventional one-evaporator refrigerator-freezer (RF) design. After considerable planning and system modeling based on using a NARM in a Lorenz-Meutzner (L-M) RF, the program scope was broadened to include investigation of a 'dual-loop' concept where energy savings result from exploiting the less stringent operating conditions needed to satisfy cooling of the fresh food section. A steady-state computer model (CYCLE-Z) capable of simulating conventional, dual loop, and L-M refrigeration cycles was developed. This model was used to rank the performance of 20 ozone-safe NARM's in the L-M refrigeration cycle while key system parameters were systematically varied. The results indicated that the steady-state efficiency of the L-M design was up to 25% greater than that of a conventional cycle. This model was also used to calculate the performance of other pure refrigerants relative to that of dichlorodifluoromethane, R-12, in conventional and dual-loop RF designs. Projected efficiency gains for these cycles were more modest, ranging from 0 to 10%. Individual compressor calorimeter tests of nine combinations of evaporator and condenser temperatures usually used to map RF compressor performance were carried out with R-12 and two candidate L-M NARM's in several compressors. Several models of a commercially produced two-evaporator RF were obtained as test units. Two dual-loop RF designs were built and tested as part of this project.

  20. Tests of alternative reductants in the second uranium purification cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.

    1980-05-01

    Miniature mixer-settler tests of the second uranium purification cycle show that plutonium cannot be removed by hydroxylamine-hydrazine (NH/sub 2/OH-N/sub 2/H/sub 4/) because the acidity is too high, or by 2,5-di-t-pentylhydroquinone because HNO/sub 3/ oxidizes the hydroquinone. Plutonium can be removed satisfactorily when U(IV)-hydrazine is used as the reductant.

  1. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  2. Empirical Research of College Students' Alternative Frameworks of Particle Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hongmei

    2010-01-01

    Based on the constructive theory, about 300 college students of grade 05 of the electronic information specialty of Dezhou University are surveyed for their alternative frameworks of particle mechanics in college physics in this article. In the survey, the questionnaires are used to find out college students' alternative frameworks, and the…

  3. Alternative bacteriophage life cycles: the carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L.; Cummings, Nicola J.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease, often through consumption of contaminated poultry products. Bacteriophages are viruses that have the potential to control pathogenic bacteria, but understanding their complex life cycles is key to their successful exploitation. Treatment of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms with bacteriophages led to the discovery that phages had established a relationship with their hosts typical of the carrier state life cycle (CSLC), where bacteria and bacteriophages remain associated in equilibrium. Significant phenotypic changes include improved aerotolerance under nutrient-limited conditions that would confer an advantage to survive in extra-intestinal environments, but a lack in motility eliminated their ability to colonize chickens. Under these circumstances, phages can remain associated with a compatible host and continue to produce free virions to prospect for new hosts. Moreover, we demonstrate that CSLC host bacteria can act as expendable vehicles for the delivery of bacteriophages to new host bacteria within pre-colonized chickens. The CSLC represents an important phase in the ecology of Campylobacter bacteriophage. PMID:24671947

  4. Alternative bacteriophage life cycles: the carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L; Cummings, Nicola J; Connerton, Ian F

    2014-03-26

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease, often through consumption of contaminated poultry products. Bacteriophages are viruses that have the potential to control pathogenic bacteria, but understanding their complex life cycles is key to their successful exploitation. Treatment of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms with bacteriophages led to the discovery that phages had established a relationship with their hosts typical of the carrier state life cycle (CSLC), where bacteria and bacteriophages remain associated in equilibrium. Significant phenotypic changes include improved aerotolerance under nutrient-limited conditions that would confer an advantage to survive in extra-intestinal environments, but a lack in motility eliminated their ability to colonize chickens. Under these circumstances, phages can remain associated with a compatible host and continue to produce free virions to prospect for new hosts. Moreover, we demonstrate that CSLC host bacteria can act as expendable vehicles for the delivery of bacteriophages to new host bacteria within pre-colonized chickens. The CSLC represents an important phase in the ecology of Campylobacter bacteriophage.

  5. Comprehensive life cycle inventories of alternative wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jeffrey; de Haas, David; Hartley, Ken; Lant, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Over recent decades, the environmental regulations on wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) have trended towards increasingly stringent nutrient removal requirements for the protection of local waterways. However, such regulations typically ignore other environmental impacts that might accompany apparent improvements to the WWTP. This paper quantitatively defines the life cycle inventory of resources consumed and emissions produced in ten different wastewater treatment scenarios (covering six process configurations and nine treatment standards). The inventory results indicate that infrastructure resources, operational energy, direct greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and chemical consumption generally increase with increasing nitrogen removal, especially at discharge standards of total nitrogen <5 mgN L(-1). Similarly, infrastructure resources and chemical consumption increase sharply with increasing phosphorus removal, but operational energy and direct GHG emissions are largely unaffected. These trends represent a trade-off of negative environmental impacts against improved local receiving water quality. However, increased phosphorus removal in WWTPs also represents an opportunity for increased resource recovery and reuse via biosolids applied to agricultural land. This study highlights that where biosolids displace synthetic fertilisers, a negative environmental trade-off may also occur by increasing the heavy metals discharged to soil. Proper analysis of these positive and negative environmental trade-offs requires further life cycle impact assessment and an inherently subjective weighting of competing environmental costs and benefits.

  6. Development of alternate extractant systems for fast reactor fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Suresh, A.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Raj, Baldev

    2007-07-01

    Due to the limitations of TBP in processing of high burn-up, Pu-rich fast reactor fuels, there is a need to develop alternate extractants for fast reactor fuel processing. In this context, our Centre has been examining the suitability of alternate tri-alkyl phosphates. Third phase formation in the extraction of Th(IV) by TBP, tri-n-amyl phosphate (TAP) and tri-2-methyl-butyl phosphate (T2MBP) from nitric acid media has been investigated under various conditions to derive conclusions on their application for extraction of Pu at macro levels. The chemical and radiolytic degradation of tri-n-amyl-phosphate (TAP) diluted in normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) in the presence of nitric acid has been investigated by the measurement of plutonium retention in organic phase. The potential application of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been explored. Extraction of uranium (VI) and palladium (II) from nitric acid medium by commercially available RTIL and tri-n-butyl phosphate solution in RTIL have been studied and the feasibility of electrodeposition of uranium as uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) and palladium (II) as metallic palladium from the loaded organic phase have been demonstrated. This paper describes results of the above studies and discusses the suitability of the systems for fast reactor fuel reprocessing. (authors)

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF GASOLINE ALTERNATIVES: MTBE AND ETHANOL ADDITIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, the U.S. is considering options for additives to reformulated gasoline. To inform this debate the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development is conducting a screening life cycle assessment (LCA) of three gasoline alternatives. These alternatives include gasoline w...

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF GASOLINE ALTERNATIVES: MTBE AND ETHANOL ADDITIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, the U.S. is considering options for additives to reformulated gasoline. To inform this debate the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development is conducting a screening life cycle assessment (LCA) of three gasoline alternatives. These alternatives include gasoline w...

  9. Lidocaine transport through a cellophane membrane by alternating current iontophoresis with a duty cycle.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shizuka; Ogami, Saori; Shibaji, Takao; Umino, Masahiro

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether lidocaine can be efficiently transported across a cellophane membrane using a square-wave alternating current (AC) with an adjusted duty cycle. Three voltages at 1 kHz with 6 duty cycles were applied for 60 min to the diffusion cells on both sides of the cellophane membrane. The donor chamber was filled with 1% lidocaine hydrochloride solution. The transport of lidocaine was enhanced in a voltage-, and duty cycle-dependent manner. These findings indicate that voltage and the direct current (DC) component of the square-wave AC play important roles in generating the driving force necessary for lidocaine delivery. Additionally, the periodic polarity alteration could reduce the electrode polarization. The higher voltages and duty cycles induced a pH change. The practical electrical conditions which are preferable for clinical application were 10 V with a 70% duty cycle or 20 V with a 60% duty cycle.

  10. Mechanical Motion Induced by Spatially Distributed Limit-Cycle Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Mukae, Yuuki

    2017-03-01

    Spatially distributed limited-cycle oscillators are seen in various physical and biological systems. In internal organs, mechanical motions are induced by the stimuli of spatially distributed limit-cycle oscillators. We study several mechanical motions by limit-cycle oscillators using simple model equations. One problem is deformation waves of radius oscillation induced by desynchronized limit-cycle oscillators, which is motivated by peristaltic motion of the small intestine. A resonance-like phenomenon is found in the deformation waves, and particles can be transported by the deformation waves. Another is the beating motion of the heart. The expansion and contraction motion is realized by a spatially synchronized limit-cycle oscillation; however, the strong beating disappears by spiral chaos, which is closely related to serious arrhythmia in the heart.

  11. Differential expression and alternative splicing of cell cycle genes in imatinib-treated K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Lin, Jin; Huang, Lin-Feng; Huang, Bo; Xu, Yan-Mei; Li, Jing; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Wei-Ming; Min, Qing-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Cancer progression often involves the disorder of the cell cycle, and a number of effective chemotherapeutic drugs have been shown to induce cell cycle arrest. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively investigate the effects of imatinib on the expression profile of cell cycle genes in the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cell line. In addition, we also investigated alternative splicing of the cell cycle genes affected by imatinib, since an important relationship has been shown to exist between RNA splicing and cell cycle progression. Exon array analysis was performed using total RNA purified from normal and imatinib-treated K562 cells. We identified 185 differentially expressed genes and 277 alternative splicing events between the two cell groups. A detailed analysis by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of key genes confirmed the experimental results of the exon array. These results suggested that treatment of K562 cells with imatinib shifts the expression and alternative splicing profiles of several cell cycle-related genes. Importantly, these findings may help improve imatinib treatment strategies in patients with CML and may be useful for imatinib resistance research and CML drug development.

  12. Exactly Solvable Quantum Mechanical Potentials: An Alternative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pronchik, Jeremy N.; Williams, Brian W.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an alternative approach to finding exactly solvable, one-dimensional quantum mechanical potentials. Differs from the usual approach in that instead of starting with a particular potential and seeking solutions to the related Schrodinger equations, it begins with known solutions to second-order ordinary differential equations and seeks to…

  13. Exactly Solvable Quantum Mechanical Potentials: An Alternative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pronchik, Jeremy N.; Williams, Brian W.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an alternative approach to finding exactly solvable, one-dimensional quantum mechanical potentials. Differs from the usual approach in that instead of starting with a particular potential and seeking solutions to the related Schrodinger equations, it begins with known solutions to second-order ordinary differential equations and seeks to…

  14. The relation between the duty cycle and anesthetic effect in lidocaine iontophoresis using alternating current.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Ryo; Nakajima, Atsushi; Haida, Yu; Umino, Masahiro; Fukayama, Haruhisa

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the effect of the duty cycle on the anesthetic effect during lidocaine alternating current (AC) iontophoresis. A solution of 2% lidocaine was delivered to the medial antecubital skin for 20 minutes using AC iontophoresis with a duty cycle of 60%, 70%, or 80%. The von Frey test was then performed to evaluate the anesthetic effect. In the groups treated with a duty cycle of 80% or 70% the touch thresholds (TT) were significantly elevated from 0 minutes to 30 minutes and from 0 minutes to 20 minutes. TT were significantly elevated at 0 minutes in the group treated with a 60% duty cycle. The anesthetic effect was significantly enhanced in a duty cycle-dependent manner.

  15. Mechanics and regulation of cell shape during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew G; Paluch, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Many cell types undergo dramatic changes in shape throughout the cell cycle. For individual cells, a tight control of cell shape is crucial during cell division, but also in interphase, for example during cell migration. Moreover, cell cycle-related cell shape changes have been shown to be important for tissue morphogenesis in a number of developmental contexts. Cell shape is the physical result of cellular mechanical properties and of the forces exerted on the cell. An understanding of the causes and repercussions of cell shape changes thus requires knowledge of both the molecular regulation of cellular mechanics and how specific changes in cell mechanics in turn effect global shape changes. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on the control of cell morphology, both in terms of general cell mechanics and specifically during the cell cycle.

  16. Alternative Mechanisms in Hydrogen Production by Aluminum Anion Clusters.

    PubMed

    Day, Paul N; Nguyen, Kiet A; Pachter, Ruth

    2012-01-10

    Possible mechanisms for the reaction of aluminum anion clusters with water have been studied theoretically using density functional theory for four different size clusters. Our results confirm the previously found (Reber et al. J. Phys. Chem. A2010, 114, 6071) importance of Lewis-acid and Lewis-base sites on the cluster in the size specificity of the reactivity. However, alternative viable mechanisms have been found using both Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal kinetics. Grotthuss-like mechanisms appear to be the most energetically favorable. We show that while the superatom theory successfully predicts reactivity of smaller clusters, it is less useful for the larger clusters.

  17. Modification of Akt by SUMO conjugation regulates alternative splicing and cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Guillermo; Pelisch, Federico; Pozzi, Berta; Mammi, Pablo; Blaustein, Matías; Colman-Lerner, Alejandro; Srebrow, Anabella

    2013-01-01

    Akt/PKB is a key signaling molecule in higher eukaryotes and a crucial protein kinase in human health and disease. Phosphorylation, acetylation, and ubiquitylation have been reported as important regulatory post-translational modifications of this kinase. We describe here that Akt is modified by SUMO conjugation, and show that lysine residues 276 and 301 are the major SUMO attachment sites within this protein. We found that phosphorylation and SUMOylation of Akt appear as independent events. However, decreasing Akt SUMOylation levels severely affects the role of this kinase as a regulator of fibronectin and Bcl-x alternative splicing. Moreover, we observed that the Akt mutant (Akt E17K) found in several human tumors displays increased levels of SUMOylation and also an enhanced capacity to regulate fibronectin splicing patterns. This splicing regulatory activity is completely abolished by decreasing Akt E17K SUMO conjugation levels. Additionally, we found that SUMOylation controls Akt regulatory function at G₁/S transition during cell cycle progression. These findings reveal SUMO conjugation as a novel level of regulation for Akt activity, opening new areas of exploration related to the molecular mechanisms involved in the diverse cellular functions of this kinase. PMID:24013425

  18. An extensive program of periodic alternative splicing linked to cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Daniel; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Weatheritt, Robert; Wang, Yang; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-01-01

    Progression through the mitotic cell cycle requires periodic regulation of gene function at the levels of transcription, translation, protein-protein interactions, post-translational modification and degradation. However, the role of alternative splicing (AS) in the temporal control of cell cycle is not well understood. By sequencing the human transcriptome through two continuous cell cycles, we identify ~1300 genes with cell cycle-dependent AS changes. These genes are significantly enriched in functions linked to cell cycle control, yet they do not significantly overlap genes subject to periodic changes in steady-state transcript levels. Many of the periodically spliced genes are controlled by the SR protein kinase CLK1, whose level undergoes cell cycle-dependent fluctuations via an auto-inhibitory circuit. Disruption of CLK1 causes pleiotropic cell cycle defects and loss of proliferation, whereas CLK1 over-expression is associated with various cancers. These results thus reveal a large program of CLK1-regulated periodic AS intimately associated with cell cycle control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10288.001 PMID:27015110

  19. Effect of operational cycle time length on nitrogen removal in an alternating oxidation ditch system.

    PubMed

    Mantziaras, I D; Stamou, A; Katsiri, A

    2011-06-01

    This paper refers to nitrogen removal optimization of an alternating oxidation ditch system through the use of a mathematical model and pilot testing. The pilot system where measurements have been made has a total volume of 120 m(3) and consists of two ditches operating in four phases during one cycle and performs carbon oxidation, nitrification, denitrification and settling. The mathematical model consists of one-dimensional mass balance (convection-dispersion) equations based on the IAWPRC ASM 1 model. After the calibration and verification of the model, simulation system performance was made. Optimization is achieved by testing operational cycles and phases with different time lengths. The limits of EU directive 91/271 for nitrogen removal have been used for comparison. The findings show that operational cycles with smaller time lengths can achieve higher nitrogen removals and that an "equilibrium" between phase time percentages in the whole cycle, for a given inflow, must be achieved.

  20. An evaluation of alternative household solid waste treatment practices using life cycle inventory assessment mode.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Nguyen Phuc; Matsui, Yasuhiro

    2012-06-01

    Waste disposal is an important part of the life cycle of a product and is associated with environmental burdens like any other life-cycle stages. In this study, an integrated assessment for solid waste treatment practices, especially household solid waste, was undertaken to evaluate the impact contribution of household solid waste treatment alternatives towards the sustainable development by using Life Cycle Inventory Assessment method. A case study has been investigated under various possible scenarios, such as (1) landfill without landfill gas recovery, (2) landfill with landfill gas recovery and flaring, (3) landfill with landfill gas recovery and electric generation, (4) composting, and (5) incineration. The evaluation utilized the Life Cycle Inventory Assessment method for multiple assessments based on various aspects, such as greenhouse gas emission/reduction, energy generation/consumption, economic benefit, investment and operating cost, and land use burden. The results showed that incineration was the most efficient alternative for greenhouse gas emission reduction, economic benefit, energy recovery, and land use reduction, although it was identified as the most expensive for investment and operating cost, while composting scenario was also an efficient alternative with quite economic benefit, low investment and operating cost, and high reduction of land use, although it was identified as existing greenhouse gas emission and no energy generation. Furthermore, the aim of this study was also to establish localized assessment methods that waste management agencies, environmental engineers, and environmental policy decision makers can use to quantify and compare the contribution to the impacts from different waste treatment options.

  1. Spacetime alternatives in the quantum mechanics of a relativistic particle

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.T. Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH )

    1994-11-15

    Hartle's generalized quantum mechanics formalism is used to examine spacetime coarse grainings, i.e., sets of alternatives defined with respect to a region extended in time as well as space, in the quantum mechanics of a free relativistic particle. For a simple coarse graining and suitable initial conditions, tractable formulas are found for branch wave functions. Despite the nonlocality of the positive-definite version of the Klein-Gordon inner product, which means that nonoverlapping branches are not sufficient to imply decoherence, some initial conditions are found to give decoherence and allow the consistent assignment of probabilities.

  2. Cell cycle control, checkpoint mechanisms, and genotoxic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, R E; Kaufmann, W K; Paules, R S

    1999-01-01

    The ability of cells to maintain genomic integrity is vital for cell survival and proliferation. Lack of fidelity in DNA replication and maintenance can result in deleterious mutations leading to cell death or, in multicellular organisms, cancer. The purpose of this review is to discuss the known signal transduction pathways that regulate cell cycle progression and the mechanisms cells employ to insure DNA stability in the face of genotoxic stress. In particular, we focus on mammalian cell cycle checkpoint functions, their role in maintaining DNA stability during the cell cycle following exposure to genotoxic agents, and the gene products that act in checkpoint function signal transduction cascades. Key transitions in the cell cycle are regulated by the activities of various protein kinase complexes composed of cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) molecules. Surveillance control mechanisms that check to ensure proper completion of early events and cellular integrity before initiation of subsequent events in cell cycle progression are referred to as cell cycle checkpoints and can generate a transient delay that provides the cell more time to repair damage before progressing to the next phase of the cycle. A variety of cellular responses are elicited that function in checkpoint signaling to inhibit cyclin/Cdk activities. These responses include the p53-dependent and p53-independent induction of Cdk inhibitors and the p53-independent inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk molecules themselves. Eliciting proper G1, S, and G2 checkpoint responses to double-strand DNA breaks requires the function of the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene product. Several human heritable cancer-prone syndromes known to alter DNA stability have been found to have defects in checkpoint surveillance pathways. Exposures to several common sources of genotoxic stress, including oxidative stress, ionizing radiation, UV radiation, and the genotoxic compound benzo[a]pyrene, elicit cell cycle

  3. Alternative end-joining mechanisms: a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Decottignies, Anabelle

    2013-01-01

    In the presence of functional DNA repair pathways, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are mainly repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR), two conserved pathways that protect cells from aberrant chromosomal rearrangements. During the past two decades however, unusual and presumably distinct DNA end-joining repair activities have been unraveled in NHEJ-deficient cells and these are likely to operate in various chromosomal contexts and species. Most alternative DNA end-joining events reported so far appear to involve microhomologous sequences and are likely to rely on a subset of HR enzymes, namely those responsible for the single-strand annealing mechanism of HR, and on DNA Ligase III. Usually, microhomologies are not initially present at DSB ends and thus need to be unmasked through DNA end resection, a process that can lead to extensive nucleotide loss and is therefore highly mutagenic. In addition to microhomology-mediated end-joining events, recent studies in mammalian cells point toward the existence of a distinct and still ill defined alternative end-joining pathway that does not appear to rely on pre-existing microhomologies and may possibly involve DNA Ligase I. Whether dependent on microhomologies or not, alternative DNA end-joining mechanisms are likely to be highly mutagenic in vivo, being able to drive telomere fusion events and cancer-associated chromosomal translocations in mouse models. In the future, it will be important to better characterize the genetic requirements of these mutagenic alternative mechanisms of DNA end-joining. PMID:23565119

  4. Comparative evaluation of three alternative power cycles for waste heat recovery from the exhaust of adiabatic diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    Three alternative power cycles were compared in application as an exhaust-gas heat-recovery system for use with advanced adiabatic diesel engines. The power cycle alternatives considered were steam Rankine, organic Rankine with RC-1 as the working fluid, and variations of an air Brayton cycle. The comparison was made in terms of fuel economy and economic payback potential for heavy-duty trucks operating in line-haul service. The results indicate that, in terms of engine rated specific fuel consumption, a diesel/alternative-power-cycle engine offers a significant improvement over the turbocompound diesel used as the baseline for comparison. The maximum imporvement resulted from the use of a Rankine cycle heat-recovery system in series with turbocompounding. The air Brayton cycle alternatives studied, which included both simple-cycle and compression-intercooled configurations, were less effective and provided about half the fuel consumption improvement of the Rankine cycle alternatives under the same conditions. Capital and maintenance cost estimates were also developed for each of the heat-recovery power cycle systems. These costs were integrated with the fuel savings to identify the time required for net annual savings to pay back the initial capital investment. The sensitivity of capital payback time to arbitrary increases in fuel price, not accompanied by corresponding hardware cost inflation, was also examined. The results indicate that a fuel price increase is required for the alternative power cycles to pay back capital within an acceptable time period.

  5. Alternative polyadenylation: a mechanism maximizing transcriptome diversity in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Xing, Denghui; Li, Qingshun Quinn

    2009-05-01

    Based on comparative genome analyses, the increases in protein-coding gene number could not account for the increases of morphological and behavioral complexity of higher eukaryotes. Transcriptional regulations, alternative splicing and the involvement of non-coding RNA in gene expression regulations have been credited for the drastic increase of transcriptome complexity. However, an emerging theme of another mechanism that contributes to the formation of alternative mRNA 3'-ends is alternative polyadenylation (APA). First, recent studies indicated that APA is a wide spread phenomenon across the transcriptomes of higher eukaryotes and being regulated by developmental and environmental cues. Secondly, our characterization of the Arabidopsis polyadenylation factors suggested that plant polyadenylation has also evolved to regulate the expression of specific genes by means of APA and therefore the specific biological functions. Finally, Phylogenetic analyses of eukaryotic polyadenylation factors from several organisms revealed that the number of polyadenylation factors tends to increase in higher eukaryotes, which provides the potential for their functional differentiation in regulating gene expression through APA. Based on above evidence, we, thus, hypothesize that APA, serving as an additional mechanism, contributes to the complexity of higher eukaryotes.

  6. ELBOW, 2-1/2 INCH SIZE WITH HALF CYCLE ALTERNATOR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An elbow 2-1/2 in. size with half cycle alternator was designed and developed for use by very short above elbow , shoulder disarticulation and fore...quarter amputees. The elbow provides the amputee with a means of positively locking the forearm with respect to the arm in 13 separate positions of...system to the elbow unit and terminal device. Forearm rotation is permitted between the top portion of the elbow unit and the turntable to which the

  7. Effect of alternative pathway therapy on branched chain amino acid metabolism in urea cycle disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Fernando; Carter, Susan; O'Brien, William E; Lee, Brendan

    2004-04-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCDs) are a group of inborn errors of hepatic metabolism caused by the loss of enzymatic activities that mediate the transfer of nitrogen from ammonia to urea. These disorders often result in life-threatening hyperammonemia and hyperglutaminemia. A combination of sodium phenylbutyrate and sodium phenylacetate/benzoate is used in the clinical management of children with urea cycle defects as a glutamine trap, diverting nitrogen from urea synthesis to alternatives routes of excretion. We have observed that patients treated with these compounds have selective branched chain amino acid (BCAA) deficiency despite adequate dietary protein intake. However, the direct effect of alternative therapy on the steady state levels of plasma branched chain amino acids has not been well characterized. We have measured steady state plasma branched chain and other essential non-branched chain amino acids in control subjects, untreated ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency females and treated null activity urea cycle disorder patients in the fed steady state during the course of stable isotope studies. Steady-state leucine levels were noted to be significantly lower in treated urea cycle disorder patients when compared to either untreated ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency females or control subjects (P<0.0001). This effect was reproduced in control subjects who had depressed leucine levels when treated with sodium phenylacetate/benzoate (P<0.0001). Our studies suggest that this therapeutic modality has a substantial impact on the metabolism of branched chain amino acids in urea cycle disorder patients. These findings suggest that better titration of protein restriction could be achieved with branched chain amino acid supplementation in patients with UCDs who are on alternative route therapy.

  8. The life cycle assessment of alternative fuel chains for urban buses and trolleybuses.

    PubMed

    Kliucininkas, L; Matulevicius, J; Martuzevicius, D

    2012-05-30

    This paper describes a comparative analysis of public transport alternatives in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania. An LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) inventory analysis of fuel chains was undertaken using the midi urban bus and a similar type of trolleybus. The inventory analysis of fuel chains followed the guidelines provided by the ISO 14040 and ISO 14044 standards. The ReCiPe Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) methodology was used to quantify weighted damage originating from five alternative fuel chains. The compressed biogas fuel chain had the lowest weighted damage value, namely 45.7 mPt/km, whereas weighted damage values of the fuel chains based on electricity generation for trolleybuses were 60.6 mPt/km (for natural gas) and 78.9 mPt/km (for heavy fuel oil). The diesel and compressed natural gas fuel chains exhibited considerably higher damage values of 114.2 mPt/km and 132.6 mPt/km, respectively. The comparative life cycle assessment of fuel chains suggested that biogas-powered buses and electric trolleybuses can be considered as the best alternatives to use when modernizing the public transport fleet in Kaunas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Catalytic and mechanical cycles in F-ATP synthases: Fourth in the Cycles Review Series

    PubMed Central

    Dimroth, Peter; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Meier, T

    2006-01-01

    Cycles have a profound role in cellular life at all levels of organization. Well-known cycles in cell metabolism include the tricarboxylic acid and the urea cycle, in which a specific carrier substrate undergoes a sequence of chemical transformations and is regenerated at the end. Other examples include the interconversions of cofactors, such as NADH or ATP, which are present in the cell in limiting amounts and have to be recycled effectively for metabolism to continue. Every living cell performs a rapid turnover of ATP to ADP to fulfil various energetic demands and effectively regenerates the ATP from ADP in an energy-consuming process. The turnover of the ATP cycle is impressive; a human uses about its body weight in ATP per day. Enzymes perform catalytic reaction cycles in which they undergo several chemical and physical transformations before they are converted back to their original states. The ubiquitous F1Fo ATP synthase is of particular interest not only because of its biological importance, but also owing to its unique rotational mechanism. Here, we give an overview of the membrane-embedded Fo sector, particularly with respect to the recent crystal structure of the c ring from Ilyobacter tartaricus, and summarize current hypotheses for the mechanism by which rotation of the c ring is generated. PMID:16607397

  10. Management of radioactive waste gases from the nuclear fuel cycle. Volume I. Comparison of alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.G.; Prout, W.E.; Buckner, J.T.; Buckner, M.R.

    1980-12-01

    Alternatives were compared for collection and fixation of radioactive waste gases released during normal operation of the nuclear fuel cycle, and for transportation and storage/disposal of the resulting waste forms. The study used a numerical rating scheme to evaluate and compare the alternatives for krypton-85, iodine-129, and carbon-14; whereas a subjective evaluation, based on published reports and engineering judgement, was made for transportation and storage/disposal options. Based on these evaluations, certain alternatives are recommended for an integrated scheme for waste management of each of the subject waste gases. Phase II of this project, which is concerned with the development of performance criteria for the waste forms associated with the subject gases, will be completed by the end of 1980. This work will be documented as Volume II of this report.

  11. Quantitative Financial Analysis of Alternative Energy Efficiency Shareholder Incentive Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Chait, Michele; Edgar, George; Schlegel, Jeff; Shirley, Wayne

    2008-08-03

    Rising energy prices and climate change are central issues in the debate about our nation's energy policy. Many are demanding increased energy efficiency as a way to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lower the total cost of electricity and energy services for consumers and businesses. Yet, as the National Action Plan on Energy Efficiency (NAPEE) pointed out, many utilities continue to shy away from seriously expanding their energy efficiency program offerings because they claim there is insufficient profit-motivation, or even a financial disincentive, when compared to supply-side investments. With the recent introduction of Duke Energy's Save-a-Watt incentive mechanism and ongoing discussions about decoupling, regulators and policymakers are now faced with an expanded and diverse landscape of financial incentive mechanisms, Determining the 'right' way forward to promote deep and sustainable demand side resource programs is challenging. Due to the renaissance that energy efficiency is currently experiencing, many want to better understand the tradeoffs in stakeholder benefits between these alternative incentive structures before aggressively embarking on a path for which course corrections can be time-consuming and costly. Using a prototypical Southwest utility and a publicly available financial model, we show how various stakeholders (e.g. shareholders, ratepayers, etc.) are affected by these different types of shareholder incentive mechanisms under varying assumptions about program portfolios. This quantitative analysis compares the financial consequences associated with a wide range of alternative incentive structures. The results will help regulators and policymakers better understand the financial implications of DSR program incentive regulation.

  12. Mechanical chest compression: an alternative in helicopter emergency medical services?

    PubMed

    Gässler, Holger; Kümmerle, Simone; Ventzke, Marc-Michael; Lampl, Lorenz; Helm, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical chest compression devices are mentioned in the current guidelines of the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) as an alternative in long-lasting cardiopulmonary resuscitations (CPR) or during transport with ongoing CPR. We compared manual chest compression with mechanical devices in a rescue-helicopter-based scenario using a resuscitation manikin. Manual chest compression was compared with the mechanical devices LUCAS™ 2, AutoPulse™ and animax mono (10 series each) using the resuscitation manikin AmbuMan MegaCode Wireless, which was intubated endotracheally and controlled ventilated during the entire scenario. The scenario comprised the installation of each device, transport and loading phases, as well as a 10-min phase inside the helicopter (type BK 117). We investigated practicability as well as measured compression quality. All mechanical devices could be used readily in a BK 117 helicopter. The LUCAS 2 group was the only one that fulfilled all recommendations of the ERC (frequency 102 ± 0.1 min(-1), compression depth 54 ± 3 mm, hands-off time 2.5 ± 1.6 %). Performing adequate manual chest compression was barely possible (fraction of correct compressions 21 ± 15 %). In all four groups, the total hands-off time was <10 %. Performing manual chest compressions during rescue-helicopter transport is barely possible, and only of poor quality. If rescuers are experienced, mechanical chest compression devices could be good alternatives in this situation. We found that the LUCAS 2 system complied with all recommendations of ERC guidelines, and all three tested devices worked consistently during the entire scenario.

  13. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: an alternative detection mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gopalsami, N; Chien, H T; Heifetz, A; Koehl, E R; Raptis, A C

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  14. Mechanisms of sulindac-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Barbara; Barbier, Valerie; Brickner, Howard; Welsh, John; Fotedar, Arun; McClelland, Michael

    2005-02-28

    The mechanism underlying the chemopreventive effects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac remains unclear. Its active metabolite, sulindac sulfide, induces cell cycle arrest as well as apoptosis in mammalian cell lines. We now show that in murine thymocytes, sulindac sulfide-induced cell death is p53, bax, Fas, and FasL independent. In contrast, bcl2 transgenic thymocytes are resistant to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that sulindac sulfide-induced cell cycle arrest in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) is partly mediated by the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) and the cyclin kinase inhibitor p21waf1/cip1. Furthermore, MEFs deficient in p21 or Rb are more susceptible to sulindac sulfide-induced cell death. These results suggest that sulindac may selectively target premalignant cells with cell cycle checkpoint deficits.

  15. Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. Q.

    1998-12-16

    At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

  16. A simple calibration method for mechanically braked cycle ergometers.

    PubMed

    Van Praagh, E; Bedu, M; Roddier, P; Coudert, J

    1992-01-01

    The calibration of cycle ergometers should be checked regularly. Some studies have shown calibration errors of more than 40%. A simple, inexpensive calibrating method for mechanically braked cycle ergometers was developed and tried out on a new type of ergocycle. The cycle ergometer was elevated and the crank replaced by a pulley fitted to the shaft. The crank speed (rpm) increased linearly as a function of time when different masses were applied on the pulley. For a given braking force on the cycle ergometer, different accelerations corresponding to the increased pulley forces could be measured. When extrapolating for zero acceleration, it was possible to determine a "limit-force" which allowed the system to be in equilibrium. Additional force creates motion. The same experiments were repeated with increasing braking forces. Using the differently sized gear sprockets of the transmission system, it was possible to calculate the actual force, including all the resistances. The actual force found by the calibrating method was then compared with the indicated force proposed by the manufacturer. With increasing forces, the relative errors decreased from 9.6 to 2.9%. The cycle ergometer calibrated by this technique meets the standards recommended in exercise physiology.

  17. Epigenetic mechanisms in diurnal cycles of metabolism and neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Weston T.; LaSalle, Janine M.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian cycle is a genetically encoded clock that drives cellular rhythms of transcription, translation and metabolism. The circadian clock interacts with the diurnal environment that also drives transcription and metabolism during light/dark, sleep/wake, hot/cold and feast/fast daily and seasonal cycles. Epigenetic regulation provides a mechanism for cells to integrate genetic programs with environmental signals in order produce an adaptive and consistent output. Recent studies have revealed that DNA methylation is one epigenetic mechanism that entrains the circadian clock to a diurnal environment. We also review recent circadian findings in the epigenetic neurodevelopmental disorders Prader–Willi, Angelman and Rett syndromes and hypothesize a link between optimal brain development and intact synchrony between circadian and diurnal rhythms. PMID:26105183

  18. Transcranial Alternating Current and Random Noise Stimulation: Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Antal, Andrea; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is a relatively recent method suited to noninvasively modulate brain oscillations. Technically the method is similar but not identical to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). While decades of research in animals and humans has revealed the main physiological mechanisms of tDCS, less is known about the physiological mechanisms of tACS. Method. Here, we review recent interdisciplinary research that has furthered our understanding of how tACS affects brain oscillations and by what means transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) that is a special form of tACS can modulate cortical functions. Results. Animal experiments have demonstrated in what way neurons react to invasively and transcranially applied alternating currents. Such findings are further supported by neural network simulations and knowledge from physics on entraining physical oscillators in the human brain. As a result, fine-grained models of the human skull and brain allow the prediction of the exact pattern of current flow during tDCS and tACS. Finally, recent studies on human physiology and behavior complete the picture of noninvasive modulation of brain oscillations. Conclusion. In future, the methods may be applicable in therapy of neurological and psychiatric disorders that are due to malfunctioning brain oscillations. PMID:27242932

  19. Alternative development in Polystoma gallieni (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) and life cycle evolution.

    PubMed

    Badets, Mathieu; Du Preez, Louis; Verneau, Olivier

    2013-10-01

    Considering the addition of intermediate transmission steps during life cycle evolution, developmental plasticity, canalization forces and inherited parental effect must be invoked to explain new host colonization. Unfortunately, there is a lack of experimental procedures and relevant models to explore the adaptive value of alternative developmental phenotypes during life cycle evolution. However, within the monogeneans that are characterized by a direct life cycle, an extension of the transmission strategy of amphibian parasites has been reported within species of Polystoma and Metapolystoma (Polyopisthocotylea; Polystomatidae). In this study, we tested whether the infection success of Polystoma gallieni within tadpoles of its specific host, the Stripeless Tree Frog Hyla meridionalis, differs depending on the parental origin of the oncomiracidium. An increase in the infection success of the parasitic larvae when exposed to the same experimental conditions as their parents was expected as an adaptive pattern of non-genetic inherited information. Twice as many parasites were actually recorded from tadpoles infected with oncomiracidia hatching from eggs of the bladder parental phenotype (1.63 ± 0.82 parasites per host) than from tadpoles infected with oncomiracidia hatching from eggs of the branchial parental phenotype (0.83 ± 0.64 parasites per host). Because in natural environments the alternation of the two phenotypes is likely to occur due to the ecology of its host, the differential infection success within young tadpoles could have an adaptive value that favors the parasite transmission over time.

  20. Alternating access mechanisms of LeuT-fold transporters: trailblazing towards the promised energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Kazmier, Kelli; Claxton, Derek P; Mchaourab, Hassane S

    2016-12-29

    Secondary active transporters couple the uphill translocation of substrates to electrochemical ion gradients. Transporter conformational motion, generically referred to as alternating access, enables a central ligand binding site to change its orientation relative to the membrane. Here we review themes of alternating access and the transduction of ion gradient energy to power this process in the LeuT-fold class of transporters where crystallographic, computational and spectroscopic approaches have converged to yield detailed models of transport cycles. Specifically, we compare findings for the Na(+)-coupled amino acid transporter LeuT and the Na(+)-coupled hydantoin transporter Mhp1. Although these studies have illuminated multiple aspects of transporter structures and dynamics, a number of questions remain unresolved that so far hinder understanding transport mechanisms in an energy landscape perspective.

  1. Life-cycle cost analysis for radioactive waste remediation alternatives. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.P.; Toland, R.J.; Buitrago, D.Y.

    1995-03-01

    This research has two primary objectives. The first is to develop a generic, interactive, spreadsheet-based life-cycle cost model that uses net present value and risk analysis techniques for cost comparison. The second is to apply the model specifically to the vitrification and cementation methods of waste remediation. By using spreadsheet analysis and graphics capabilities, the model will provide direct and objective comparisons of remediation alternatives. Since vitrification is a new technology, the plant design and operations are conceptual. Therefore, computer simulation and engineering judgement are integral to the vitrification LCC estimate. (AN) (Abstract from report page 2, scope and objectives).

  2. Investigation of Thermal High Cycle and Low Cycle Fatigue Mechanisms of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings have attracted increased attention for diesel engine applications. The advantages of using the ceramic coatings include a potential increase in efficiency and power density and a decrease in maintenance cost. Zirconia-based ceramics are the most important coating materials for such applications because of their low thermal conductivity, relatively high thermal expansivity and excellent mechanical properties. However, durability of thick thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) under severe temperature cycling encountered in engine conditions, remains a major question. The thermal transients associated with the start/stop and no-load/full-load engine cycle, and with the in-cylinder combustion process, generate thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and thermal high cycle fatigue (HCF) in the coating system. Therefore, the failure mechanisms of thick TBCs are expected to be quite different from those of thin TBCs under these temperature transients. The coating failure is related not only to thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation of the bond coats and substrates, but also to the steep thermal stress gradients induced in the coating systems. Although it has been reported that stresses generated by thermal transients can initiate surface and interface cracks in a coating system, the mechanisms of the crack propagation and of coating failure under the complex LCF and HCF conditions are still not understood. In this paper, the thermal fatigue behavior of an yttria partially stabilized zirconia coating system under simulated LCF and HCF engine conditions is investigated. The effects of LCF and HCF on surface crack initiation and propagation are also discussed.

  3. Life cycle assessment of the use of alternative fuels in cement kilns: A case study.

    PubMed

    Georgiopoulou, Martha; Lyberatos, Gerasimos

    2017-07-14

    The benefits of using alternative fuels (AFs) in the cement industry include reduction of the use of non-renewable fossil fuels and lower emissions of greenhouse gases, since fossil fuels are replaced with materials that would otherwise be degraded or incinerated with corresponding emissions and final residues. Furthermore, the use of alternative fuels maximizes the recovery of energy. Seven different scenaria were developed for the production of 1 ton of clinker in a rotary cement kiln. Each of these scenaria includes the use of alternative fuels such as RDF (Refuse derived fuel), TDF (Tire derived fuel) and BS (Biological sludge) or a mixture of them, in partial replacement of conventional fuels such as coal and pet coke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the environmental impacts of the use of alternative fuels in relation to conventional fuels in the kiln operation. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology is used to quantify the potential environmental impacts in each scenario. The interpretation of the results provides the conclusion that the most environmentally friendly prospect is the scenario based on RDF while the less preferable scenario is the scenario based on BS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vicious cycles within the neuropathophysiologic mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Standridge, John B

    2006-04-01

    Rigorous scientific research has identified multiple interactive mechanisms that parallel and are likely causative of the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Causative mechanisms include genomics, the creation of amyloid beta (Abeta), factors inhibiting the Abeta removal process, the transformation of Abeta to its toxic forms (various forms of Abeta aggregation), and lastly the oxidative, inflammatory, and other effects of toxic Abeta. Fibrillar beta-amyloid peptide, a major component of senile plaques in AD brain, is known to induce microglial-mediated neurotoxicity under certain conditions, but some recent studies support the notion that Abeta oligomers are the primary neurotoxins. Abeta-42 oligomers that are soluble and highly neurotoxic, referred to as Abeta-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs), assemble under conditions that block fibril formation. These oligomers bind to dendrite surfaces in small clusters with ligand-like specificity and are capable of destroying hippocampal neurons at nanomolar concentrations. Evidence is presented that AD is triggered by these soluble, neurotoxic assemblies of Abeta rather than the late stage pathology landmarks of amyloid plaques and tangles. The premise is that AD symptoms stem from aberrant nerve cell signaling and synaptic failure rather than nerve cell death, which nevertheless follows and exacerbates the initial pathologies of AD. The defective clearance of amyloid leads to amyloid angiopathy that in turn perpetuates hypoperfusion that affects formation as well as absorption of CSF thereby altering clearance of amyloid and promoting vascular and parenchymal deposition[1]. Hypoperfusion, the defective clearance of amyloid, and resultant increase in amyloid deposition thus represent a vicious cycle. Chronic vascular hypoperfusion-induced mitochondrial failure results in oxidative damage, which drives caspase 3-mediated Abeta peptide secretion and enhances amyloidogenic APP processing. Intracellular Abeta

  5. Assessment of Alternative Funding Mechanisms for the IAEA

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, Christopher; Wyse, Evan T.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Ford, Benjamin E.

    2012-06-15

    While the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has enjoyed substantial success and prestige in the international community, there is growing concern that global demographic trends, advances in technology and the trend towards austerity in Member State budgets will stretch the Agency’s resources to a point where it may no longer be possible to execute its multifaceted mission in its entirety. As part of an ongoing effort by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to evaluate the IAEA’s long-term budgetary concerns , this paper proposes a series of alternate funding mechanisms that have the potential to sustain the IAEA in the long-term, including endowment, charity, and fee-for-service funding models.

  6. Alternative Mechanical Structure for LARP Nb3Sn Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Anerella, M.; Cozzolino, J.; Ambrosio, G.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Kovach, P.; Lamm, M.; Sabbi, G.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.

    2010-08-01

    An alternative structure for the 120 mm Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnet presently under development for use in the upgrade for LHC at CERN is presented. The goals of this structure are to build on the existing technology developed in LARP with the LQ and HQ series magnets and to further optimize the features required for operation in the accelerator. These features include mechanical alignment needed for field quality and provisions for cold mass cooling with 1.9 K helium in a helium pressure vessel. The structure will also optimize coil azimuthal and axial pre-load for high gradient operation, and will incorporate features intended to improve manufacturability, thereby improving reliability and reducing cost.

  7. Inward H(+) pump xenorhodopsin: Mechanism and alternative optogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Vitaly; Mager, Thomas; Kovalev, Kirill; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Alekseev, Alexey; Juettner, Josephine; Chizhov, Igor; Bamann, Christian; Vavourakis, Charlotte; Ghai, Rohit; Gushchin, Ivan; Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Rogachev, Andrey; Melnikov, Igor; Popov, Alexander; Balandin, Taras; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Manstein, Dietmar J; Bueldt, Georg; Bamberg, Ernst; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2017-09-01

    Generation of an electrochemical proton gradient is the first step of cell bioenergetics. In prokaryotes, the gradient is created by outward membrane protein proton pumps. Inward plasma membrane native proton pumps are yet unknown. We describe comprehensive functional studies of the representatives of the yet noncharacterized xenorhodopsins from Nanohaloarchaea family of microbial rhodopsins. They are inward proton pumps as we demonstrate in model membrane systems, Escherichia coli cells, human embryonic kidney cells, neuroblastoma cells, and rat hippocampal neuronal cells. We also solved the structure of a xenorhodopsin from the nanohalosarchaeon Nanosalina (NsXeR) and suggest a mechanism of inward proton pumping. We demonstrate that the NsXeR is a powerful pump, which is able to elicit action potentials in rat hippocampal neuronal cells up to their maximal intrinsic firing frequency. Hence, inwardly directed proton pumps are suitable for light-induced remote control of neurons, and they are an alternative to the well-known cation-selective channelrhodopsins.

  8. Alternative Derivations of the Statistical Mechanical Distribution Laws

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Frederick T.

    1971-01-01

    A new approach is presented for the derivation of statistical mechanical distribution laws. The derivations are accomplished by minimizing the Helmholtz free energy under constant temperature and volume, instead of maximizing the entropy under constant energy and volume. An alternative method involves stipulating equality of chemical potential, or equality of activity, for particles in different energy levels. This approach leads to a general statement of distribution laws applicable to all systems for which thermodynamic probabilities can be written. The methods also avoid use of the calculus of variations, Lagrangian multipliers, and Stirling's approximation for the factorial. The results are applied specifically to Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein statistics. The special significance of chemical potential and activity is discussed for microscopic systems. PMID:16578712

  9. Statistical mechanics of self-driven Carnot cycles.

    PubMed

    Smith, E

    1999-10-01

    The spontaneous generation and finite-amplitude saturation of sound, in a traveling-wave thermoacoustic engine, are derived as properties of a second-order phase transition. It has previously been argued that this dynamical phase transition, called "onset," has an equivalent equilibrium representation, but the saturation mechanism and scaling were not computed. In this work, the sound modes implementing the engine cycle are coarse-grained and statistically averaged, in a partition function derived from microscopic dynamics on criteria of scale invariance. Self-amplification performed by the engine cycle is introduced through higher-order modal interactions. Stationary points and fluctuations of the resulting phenomenological Lagrangian are analyzed and related to background dynamical currents. The scaling of the stable sound amplitude near the critical point is derived and shown to arise universally from the interaction of finite-temperature disorder, with the order induced by self-amplification.

  10. Investigation of Thermal High Cycle and Low Cycle Fatigue Mechanisms of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thick thermal barrier coating systems in a diesel engine experience severe thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) during engine operation. In this paper, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in a ZrO2-8wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coating, under simulated engine thermal LCF and HCF conditions, are investigated using a high power CO2 laser. Experiments showed that the combined LCF/HCF tests induced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation and accelerated crack growth, as compared to the pure LCF test. Lateral crack branching and the ceramic/bond coat interface delaminations were also facilitated by HCF thermal loads, even in the absence of severe interfacial oxidation. Fatigue damages at crack wake surfaces, due to such phenomena as asperity/debris contact induced cracking and splat pull-out bending during cycling, were observed especially for the combined LCF/HCF tests. It is found that the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures, which induce tensile stresses in the coating after cooling. The failure associated with HCF process, however, is mainly associated with a surface wedging mechanism. The interaction between the LCF, HCF and ceramic coating creep, and the relative importance of LCF and HCF in crack propagation are also discussed based on the experimental evidence.

  11. Investigation of Thermal High Cycle and Low Cycle Fatigue Mechanisms of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thick thermal barrier coating systems in a diesel engine experience severe thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) during engine operation. In this paper, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in a ZrO2-8wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coating, under simulated engine thermal LCF and HCF conditions, are investigated using a high power CO2 laser. Experiments showed that the combined LCF-HCF tests induced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation and accelerated crack growth, as compared to the pure LCF test. Lateral crack branching and the ceramic/bond coat interface delaminations were also facilitated by HCF thermal loads, even in the absence of severe interfacial oxidation. Fatigue damage at crack wake surfaces, due to such phenomena as asperity/debris contact induced cracking and splat pull-out bending during cycling, was observed especially for the combined LCF-HCF tests. It is found that the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures, which induce tensile stresses in the coating after cooling. The failure associated with HCF process, however, is mainly associated with a surface wedging mechanism. The interaction between the LCF, HCF and ceramic coating creep, and the relative importance of LCF and HCF in crack propagation are also discussed based on the experimental evidence.

  12. Calcium cycling proteins and heart failure: mechanisms and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Marks, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent signaling is highly regulated in cardiomyocytes and determines the force of cardiac muscle contraction. Ca2+ cycling refers to the release and reuptake of intracellular Ca2+ that drives muscle contraction and relaxation. In failing hearts, Ca2+ cycling is profoundly altered, resulting in impaired contractility and fatal cardiac arrhythmias. The key defects in Ca2+ cycling occur at the level of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), a Ca2+ storage organelle in muscle. Defects in the regulation of Ca2+ cycling proteins including the ryanodine receptor 2, cardiac (RyR2)/Ca2+ release channel macromolecular complexes and the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2a (SERCA2a)/phospholamban complex contribute to heart failure. RyR2s are oxidized, nitrosylated, and PKA hyperphosphorylated, resulting in "leaky" channels in failing hearts. These leaky RyR2s contribute to depletion of Ca2+ from the SR, and the leaking Ca2+ depolarizes cardiomyocytes and triggers fatal arrhythmias. SERCA2a is downregulated and phospholamban is hypophosphorylated in failing hearts, resulting in impaired SR Ca2+ reuptake that conspires with leaky RyR2 to deplete SR Ca2+. Two new therapeutic strategies for heart failure (HF) are now being tested in clinical trials: (a) fixing the leak in RyR2 channels with a novel class of Ca2+-release channel stabilizers called Rycals and (b) increasing expression of SERCA2a to improve SR Ca2+ reuptake with viral-mediated gene therapy. There are many potential opportunities for additional mechanism-based therapeutics involving the machinery that regulates Ca2+ cycling in the heart.

  13. Moving toward multilateral mechanisms for the fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Panasyuk,A.; Rosenthal,M.; Efremov, G. V.

    2009-04-17

    Multilateral mechanisms for the fuel cycle are seen as a potentially important way to create an industrial infrastructure that will support a renaissance and at the same time not contribute to the risk of nuclear proliferation. In this way, international nuclear fuel cycle centers for enrichment can help to provide an assurance of supply of nuclear fuel that will reduce the likelihood that individual states will pursue this sensitive technology, which can be used to produce nuclear material directly usable nuclear weapons. Multinational participation in such mechanisms can also potentially promote transparency, build confidence, and make the implementation of IAEA safeguards more effective or more efficient. At the same time, it is important to ensure that there is no dissemination of sensitive technology. The Russian Federation has taken a lead role in this area by establishing an International Uranium Enrichment Center (IUEC) for the provision of enrichment services at its uranium enrichment plant located at the Angarsk Electrolysis Chemical Complex (AECC). This paper describes how the IUEe is organized, who its members are, and the steps that it has taken both to provide an assured supply of nuclear fuel and to ensure protection of sensitive technology. It also describes the relationship between the IUEC and the IAEA and steps that remain to be taken to enhance its assurance of supply. Using the IUEC as a starting point for discussion, the paper also explores more generally the ways in which features of such fuel cycle centers with multinational participation can have an impact on safeguards arrangements, transparency, and confidence-building. Issues include possible lAEA safeguards arrangements or other links to the IAEA that might be established at such fuel cycle centers, impact of location in a nuclear weapon state, and the transition by the IAEA to State Level safeguards approaches.

  14. Modeling the Q-cycle mechanism of transmembrane energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    The Q-cycle mechanism plays an important role in the conversion of the redox energy into the energy of the proton electrochemical gradient across the biomembrane. The bifurcated electron transfer reaction, which is built into this mechanism, recycles one electron, thus allowing us to translocate two protons per one electron moving to the high-potential redox chain. We study a kinetic model of the Q-cycle mechanism in an artificial system which mimics the bf complex of plants and cyanobacteria in the regime of ferredoxin-dependent cyclic electron flow. Using methods of condensed matter physics, we derive a set of master equations and describe a time sequence of electron and proton transfer reactions in the complex. We find energetic conditions when the bifurcation of the electron pathways at the positive side of the membrane occurs naturally, without any additional gates. For reasonable parameter values, we show that this system is able to translocate more than 1.8 protons, on average, per one electron, with a thermodynamic efficiency of the order of 32% or higher.

  15. Comparative life-cycle cost analysis for low-level mixed waste remediation alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.A.; White, T.P.; Kloeber, J.M.; Toland, R.J.; Cain, J.P.; Buitrago, D.Y.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold: (1) to develop a generic, life-cycle cost model for evaluating low-level, mixed waste remediation alternatives, and (2) to apply the model specifically, to estimate remediation costs for a site similar to the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, OH. Life-cycle costs for vitrification, cementation, and dry removal process technologies are estimated. Since vitrification is in a conceptual phase, computer simulation is used to help characterize the support infrastructure of a large scale vitrification plant. Cost estimating relationships obtained from the simulation data, previous cost estimates, available process data, engineering judgment, and expert opinion all provide input to an Excel based spreadsheet for generating cash flow streams. Crystal Ball, an Excel add-on, was used for discounting cash flows for net present value analysis. The resulting LCC data was then analyzed using multi-attribute decision analysis techniques with cost and remediation time as criteria. The analytical framework presented allows alternatives to be evaluated in the context of budgetary, social, and political considerations. In general, the longer the remediation takes, the lower the net present value of the process. This is true because of the time value of money and large percentage of the costs attributed to storage or disposal.

  16. Treatment of sewage sludge in a thermophilic membrane reactor (TMR) with alternate aeration cycles.

    PubMed

    Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Castagnola, Federico; Sordi, Marco; Bertanza, Giorgio

    2015-10-01

    The management of sewage sludge is becoming a more and more important issue, both at national and international level, in particular due to the uncertain recovery/disposal future options. Therefore, it is clear that the development of new technologies that can mitigate the problem at the source by reducing sludge production is necessary, such as the European Directive 2008/98/EC prescribes. This work shows the results obtained with a thermophilic membrane reactor, for processing a biological sludge derived from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) that treats urban and industrial wastewater. Sewage sludge was treated in a thermophilic membrane reactor (TMR), at pilot-scale (1 m(3) volume), with alternate aeration cycles. The experimentation was divided into two phases: a "startup phase" during which, starting with a psychrophilic/mesophilic biomass, thermophilic conditions were progressively reached, while feeding a highly biodegradable substrate; the obtained thermophilic biomass was then used, in the "regime phase", to digest biological sludge which was fed to the plant. Good removal yields were observed: 64% and 57% for volatile solids (VS) and total COD (CODtot), respectively, with an average hydraulic retention time (HRT) equal to 20 d, an organic loading rate (OLR) of about 1.4-1.8 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) and aeration/non aeration cycles alternated every 4 h. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An Alternative Mechanism for the Dimerization of Formic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Nicole R.; Tschumper, Gregory; Yan, Ge; Schaefer, Henry F.

    2003-11-01

    Gas-phase formic acid exists primarily as a cyclic dimer. The mechanism of dimerization has been traditionally considered to be a synchronous process; however, recent experimental findings suggest a possible alternative mechanism by which two formic acid monomers proceed through an acyclic dimer to the cyclic dimer in a stepwise process. To investigate this newly proposed process of dimerization in formic acid, density functional theory and second-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) have been used to optimize cis and trans monomers of formic acid, the acyclic and cyclic dimers, and the acyclic and cyclic transition states between minima. Single-point energies of the trans monomer, dimer minima, and transition states at the MP2/TZ2P+diff optimized geometries were computed at the coupled-cluster level of theory including singles and doubles with perturbatively applied triple excitations [CCSD(T)] with an aug-cc-pVTZ basis set to obtain an accurate determination of energy barriers and dissociation energies. A counterpoise correction was performed to determine an estimate of the basis set superposition error in computing relative energies. The explicitly correlated MP2 method of Kutzelnigg and Klopper (MP2-R12) was used to provide an independent means for obtaining the MP2 one-particle limit. The cyclic minimum is predicted to be 6.3 kcal/mol more stable than the acyclic minimum, and the barrier to double proton transfer is 7.1 kcal/mol.

  18. Multiplex Eukaryotic Transcription (In)activation: Timing, Bursting and Cycling of a Ratchet Clock Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rybakova, Katja N.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Tomaszewska, Aleksandra; Moné, Martijn J.; Carlberg, Carsten; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of eukaryotic transcription is an intricate process that relies on a multitude of regulatory proteins forming complexes on chromatin. Chromatin modifications appear to play a guiding role in protein-complex assembly on chromatin. Together, these processes give rise to stochastic, often bursting, transcriptional activity. Here we present a model of eukaryotic transcription that aims to integrate those mechanisms. We use stochastic and ordinary-differential-equation modeling frameworks to examine various possible mechanisms of gene regulation by multiple transcription factors. We find that the assembly of large transcription factor complexes on chromatin via equilibrium-binding mechanisms is highly inefficient and insensitive to concentration changes of single regulatory proteins. An alternative model that lacks these limitations is a cyclic ratchet mechanism. In this mechanism, small protein complexes assemble sequentially on the promoter. Chromatin modifications mark the completion of a protein complex assembly, and sensitize the local chromatin for the assembly of the next protein complex. In this manner, a strict order of protein complex assemblies is attained. Even though the individual assembly steps are highly stochastic in duration, a sequence of them gives rise to a remarkable precision of the transcription cycle duration. This mechanism explains how transcription activation cycles, lasting for tens of minutes, derive from regulatory proteins residing on chromatin for only tens of seconds. Transcriptional bursts are an inherent feature of such transcription activation cycles. Bursting transcription can cause individual cells to remain in synchrony transiently, offering an explanation of transcriptional cycling as observed in cell populations, both on promoter chromatin status and mRNA levels. PMID:25909187

  19. Multiplex Eukaryotic Transcription (In)activation: Timing, Bursting and Cycling of a Ratchet Clock Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rybakova, Katja N; Bruggeman, Frank J; Tomaszewska, Aleksandra; Moné, Martijn J; Carlberg, Carsten; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2015-04-01

    Activation of eukaryotic transcription is an intricate process that relies on a multitude of regulatory proteins forming complexes on chromatin. Chromatin modifications appear to play a guiding role in protein-complex assembly on chromatin. Together, these processes give rise to stochastic, often bursting, transcriptional activity. Here we present a model of eukaryotic transcription that aims to integrate those mechanisms. We use stochastic and ordinary-differential-equation modeling frameworks to examine various possible mechanisms of gene regulation by multiple transcription factors. We find that the assembly of large transcription factor complexes on chromatin via equilibrium-binding mechanisms is highly inefficient and insensitive to concentration changes of single regulatory proteins. An alternative model that lacks these limitations is a cyclic ratchet mechanism. In this mechanism, small protein complexes assemble sequentially on the promoter. Chromatin modifications mark the completion of a protein complex assembly, and sensitize the local chromatin for the assembly of the next protein complex. In this manner, a strict order of protein complex assemblies is attained. Even though the individual assembly steps are highly stochastic in duration, a sequence of them gives rise to a remarkable precision of the transcription cycle duration. This mechanism explains how transcription activation cycles, lasting for tens of minutes, derive from regulatory proteins residing on chromatin for only tens of seconds. Transcriptional bursts are an inherent feature of such transcription activation cycles. Bursting transcription can cause individual cells to remain in synchrony transiently, offering an explanation of transcriptional cycling as observed in cell populations, both on promoter chromatin status and mRNA levels.

  20. The Dynamical Mechanisms of the Cell Cycle Size Checkpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shi-Fu; Yan, Jie; Liu, Zeng-Rong; Yang, Ling

    2012-10-01

    Cell division must be tightly coupled to cell growth in order to maintain cell size, whereas the mechanisms of how initialization of mitosis is regulated by cell size remain to be elucidated. We develop a mathematical model of the cell cycle, which incorporates cell growth to investigate the dynamical properties of the size checkpoint in embryos of Xenopus laevis. We show that the size checkpoint is naturally raised from a saddle-node bifurcation, and in a mutant case, the cell loses its size control ability due to the loss of this saddle-node point.

  1. Life-cycle cost and impacts: alternatives for managing KE basin sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, C.J.

    1997-06-27

    This document presents the results of a life-cycle cost and impacts evaluation of alternatives for managing sludge that will be removed from the K Basins. The two basins are located in the 100-K Area of the Hanford Site. This evaluation was conducted by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) and its subcontractors to support decisions regarding the ultimate disposition of the sludge. The long-range plan for the Hanford Site calls for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), sludge, debris, and water to be removed from the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins. This activity will be conducted as a removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The scope of the CERCLA action will be limited to removing the SNF, sludge, debris, and water from the basins and transferring them to authorized facilities for interim storage and/or treatment and disposal. The scope includes treating the sludge and water in the 100-K Area prior to the transfer. Alternatives for the removal action are evaluated in a CERCLA engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) and include different methods for managing sludge from the KE Basins. The scope of the removal action does not include storing, treating, or disposing of the sludge once it is transferred to the receiving facility and the EE/CA does not evaluate those downstream activities. This life-cycle evaluation goes beyond the EE/CA and considers the full life-cycle costs and impacts of dispositioning sludge.

  2. Statistical mechanics of self-driven Carnot cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.

    1999-10-01

    The spontaneous generation and finite-amplitude saturation of sound, in a traveling-wave thermoacoustic engine, are derived as properties of a second-order phase transition. It has previously been argued that this dynamical phase transition, called {open_quotes}onset,{close_quotes} has an equivalent equilibrium representation, but the saturation mechanism and scaling were not computed. In this work, the sound modes implementing the engine cycle are coarse-grained and statistically averaged, in a partition function derived from microscopic dynamics on criteria of scale invariance. Self-amplification performed by the engine cycle is introduced through higher-order modal interactions. Stationary points and fluctuations of the resulting phenomenological Lagrangian are analyzed and related to background dynamical currents. The scaling of the stable sound amplitude near the critical point is derived and shown to arise universally from the interaction of finite-temperature disorder, with the order induced by self-amplification. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Conductive plastics: comparing alternative nanotechnologies by performance and life cycle release probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Nicole; Wohlleben, Wendel; Tomović, Željko

    2017-03-01

    Nanocomposites can be considered safe during their life cycle as long as the nanofillers remain embedded in the matrix. Therefore, a possible release of nanofillers has to be assessed before commercialization. This report addresses possible life cycle release scenarios for carbon nanotubes (CNT), graphene, and carbon black (CB) from a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) matrix. The content of each nanofiller was adjusted to achieve the same conductivity level. The nanofillers reduced the rate of nanoscale releases during mechanical processing with decreasing release in the order neat TPU, TPU-CNT, TPU-graphene, and TPU-CB. Released fragments were dominated by the polymer matrix with embedded or surface-protruding nanofillers. During electron microscopy analysis, free CB was observed, however, there was no free CNT or graphene. Quantitatively, the presence of free nanofillers remained below the detection limit of <0.01% of generated dust. Further, both the production process and type of mechanical processing showed a significant impact with higher release rates for injection-molded compared to extruded and sanded compared to drilled materials. Due to its optimal performance for further development, extruded TPU-CNT was investigated in a combined, stepwise worst case scenario (mechanical processing after weathering). After weathering by simulated sunlight and rain, CNT were visible at the surface of the nanocomposite; after additional sanding, fragments showed protruding CNT, but free CNT were not detected. In summary, this preliminary exposure assessment showed no indication that recommended occupational exposure limits for carbonaceous nanomaterials can be exceeded during the life cycle of the specific TPU nanocomposites and conditions investigated in this study.

  4. Alternative Oxidase Activity in Tobacco Leaf Mitochondria (Dependence on Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle-Mediated Redox Regulation and Pyruvate Activation).

    PubMed

    Vanlerberghe, G. C.; Day, D. A.; Wiskich, J. T.; Vanlerberghe, A. E.; McIntosh, L.

    1995-10-01

    Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (cv Petit Havana SR1) containing high levels of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) protein due to the introduction of a sense transgene(s) of Aox1, the nuclear gene encoding AOX, were used to investigate mechanisms regulating AOX activity. After purification of leaf mitochondria, a large proportion of the AOX protein was present as the oxidized (covalently associated and less active) dimer. High AOX activity in these mitochondria was dependent on both reduction of the protein by DTT (to the noncovalently associated and more active dimer) and its subsequent activation by certain [alpha]-keto acids, particularly pyruvate. Reduction of AOX to its more active form could also be mediated by intramitochondrial reducing power generated by the oxidation of certain tricarboxylic acid cycle substrates, most notably isocitrate and malate. Our evidence suggests that NADPH may be specifically required for AOX reduction. All of the above regulatory mechanisms applied to AOX in wild-type mitochondria as well. Transgenic leaves lacking AOX due to the introduction of an Aox1 antisense transgene or multiple sense transgenes were used to investigate the potential physiological significance of the AOX-regulatory mechanisms. Under conditions in which respiratory carbon metabolism is restricted by the capacity of mitochondrial electron transport, feed-forward activation of AOX by mitochondrial reducing power and pyruvate may act to prevent redirection of carbon metabolism, such as to fermentative pathways.

  5. Life cycle comparison of waste-to-energy alternatives for municipal waste treatment in Chilean Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Bezama, Alberto; Douglas, Carla; Méndez, Jacqueline; Szarka, Nóra; Muñoz, Edmundo; Navia, Rodrigo; Schock, Steffen; Konrad, Odorico; Ulloa, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The energy system in the Region of Aysén, Chile, is characterized by a strong dependence on fossil fuels, which account for up to 51% of the installed capacity. Although the implementation of waste-to-energy concepts in municipal waste management systems could support the establishment of a more fossil-independent energy system for the region, previous studies have concluded that energy recovery systems are not suitable from an economic perspective in Chile. Therefore, this work intends to evaluate these technical options from an environmental perspective, using life cycle assessment as a tool for a comparative analysis, considering Coyhaique city as a case study. Three technical alternatives were evaluated: (i) landfill gas recovery and flaring without energy recovery; (ii) landfill gas recovery and energy use; and (iii) the implementation of an anaerobic digestion system for the organic waste fraction coupled with energy recovery from the biogas produced. Mass and energy balances of the three analyzed alternatives have been modeled. The comparative LCA considered global warming potential, abiotic depletion and ozone layer depletion as impact categories, as well as required raw energy and produced energy as comparative regional-specific indicators. According to the results, the use of the recovered landfill gas as an energy source can be identified as the most environmentally appropriate solution for Coyhaique, especially when taking into consideration the global impact categories.

  6. Phototoxicity: Its Mechanism and Animal Alternative Test Methods

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeonji; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2015-01-01

    The skin exposure to solar irradiation and photoreactive xenobiotics may produce abnormal skin reaction, phototoxicity. Phototoxicity is an acute light-induced response, which occurs when photoreacive chemicals are activated by solar lights and transformed into products cytotoxic against the skin cells. Multifarious symptoms of phototoxicity are identified, skin irritation, erythema, pruritis, and edema that are similar to those of the exaggerated sunburn. Diverse organic chemicals, especially drugs, are known to induce phototoxicity, which is probably from the common possession of UV-absorbing benzene or heterocyclic rings in their molecular structures. Both UVB (290~320 nm) and UVA (320~400 nm) are responsible for the manifestation of phototoxicity. Absorption of photons and absorbed energy (hv) by photoactive chemicals results in molecular changes or generates reactive oxygen species and depending on the way how endogenous molecules are affected by phototoxicants, mechanisms of phototoxcity is categorized into two modes of action: Direct when unstable species from excited state directly react with the endogenous molecules, and indirect when endogeneous molecules react with secondary photoproducts. In order to identify phototoxic potential of a chemical, various test methods have been introduced. Focus is given to animal alternative test methods, i.e., in vitro, and in chemico assays as well as in vivo. 3T3 neutral red uptake assay, erythrocyte photohemolysis test, and phototoxicity test using human 3-dimensional (3D) epidermis model are examples of in vitro assays. In chemico methods evaluate the generation of reactive oxygen species or DNA strand break activity employing plasmid for chemicals, or drugs with phototoxic potential. PMID:26191378

  7. Mathematical model of alternative mechanism of telomere length maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, Richard; Bod'ová, Katarína; Nosek, Jozef; Tomáška, L'ubomír

    2014-03-01

    Biopolymer length regulation is a complex process that involves a large number of biological, chemical, and physical subprocesses acting simultaneously across multiple spatial and temporal scales. An illustrative example important for genomic stability is the length regulation of telomeres—nucleoprotein structures at the ends of linear chromosomes consisting of tandemly repeated DNA sequences and a specialized set of proteins. Maintenance of telomeres is often facilitated by the enzyme telomerase but, particularly in telomerase-free systems, the maintenance of chromosomal termini depends on alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanisms mediated by recombination. Various linear and circular DNA structures were identified to participate in ALT, however, dynamics of the whole process is still poorly understood. We propose a chemical kinetics model of ALT with kinetic rates systematically derived from the biophysics of DNA diffusion and looping. The reaction system is reduced to a coagulation-fragmentation system by quasi-steady-state approximation. The detailed treatment of kinetic rates yields explicit formulas for expected size distributions of telomeres that demonstrate the key role played by the J factor, a quantitative measure of bending of polymers. The results are in agreement with experimental data and point out interesting phenomena: an appearance of very long telomeric circles if the total telomere density exceeds a critical value (excess mass) and a nonlinear response of the telomere size distributions to the amount of telomeric DNA in the system. The results can be of general importance for understanding dynamics of telomeres in telomerase-independent systems as this mode of telomere maintenance is similar to the situation in tumor cells lacking telomerase activity. Furthermore, due to its universality, the model may also serve as a prototype of an interaction between linear and circular DNA structures in various settings.

  8. Mechanisms of brain evolution: regulation of neural progenitor cell diversity and cell cycle length.

    PubMed

    Borrell, Victor; Calegari, Federico

    2014-09-01

    In the last few years, several studies have revisited long-held assumptions in the field of brain development and evolution providing us with a fundamentally new vision on the mechanisms controlling its size and shape, hence function. Among these studies, some described hitherto unforeseeable subtypes of neural progenitors while others reinterpreted long-known observations about their cell cycle in alternative new ways. Most remarkably, this knowledge combined has allowed the generation of mammalian model organisms in which brain size and folding has been selectively increased giving us the means to understand the mechanisms underlying the evolution of the most complex and sophisticated organ. Here we review the key findings made in this area and make a few conjectures about their evolutionary meaning including the likelihood of Martians conquering our planet. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of calcium cycling versus restitution in the mechanism of repolarization alternans.

    PubMed

    Pruvot, Etienne J; Katra, Rodolphe P; Rosenbaum, David S; Laurita, Kenneth R

    2004-04-30

    T-wave alternans, a powerful marker of arrhythmic events, results from alternation in action potential duration (APD). The underlying cellular mechanism of APD alternans is unknown but has been attributed to either intracellular calcium (Ca2+) cycling or membrane ionic currents, manifested by a steep slope of cellular APD restitution. To address these mechanisms, high-resolution optical mapping techniques were used to measure action potentials and Ca2+ transients simultaneously from hundreds of epicardial sites in the guinea pig model of pacing-induced T-wave alternans (n=7). The pacing rates (ie, alternans threshold) at which T-wave (369+/-11 bpm), APD (369+/-21 bpm), and Ca2+ (371+/-29 bpm) alternans first appeared were comparable. Importantly, the site of origin of APD alternans and Ca2+ alternans consistently occurred together near the base of the left ventricle, not where APD restitution was steepest. In addition, APD and Ca2+ alternans were remarkably similar both spatially and temporally during discordant alternans. In conclusion, the mechanism underlying T-wave alternans in the intact heart is more closely associated with intracellular Ca2+ cycling rather than APD restitution.

  10. Underlying brain mechanisms that regulate sleep-wakefulness cycles.

    PubMed

    Gvilia, Irma

    2010-01-01

    Daily cycles of wakefulness and sleep are regulated by coordinated interactions between wakefulness- and sleep-regulating neural circuitry. Wakefulness is associated with neuronal activity in cholinergic neurons in the brainstem and basal forebrain, monoaminergic neurons in the brainstem and posterior hypothalamus, and hypocretin (orexin) neurons in the lateral hypothalamus that act in a coordinated manner to stimulate cortical activation on the one hand and behavioral arousal on the other hand. Each of these neuronal groups subserves distinct aspects of wakefulness-related functions of the brain. Normal transitions from wakefulness to sleep involve sleep-related inhibition and/or disfacilitation of the multiple arousal systems. The cell groups that shut off the network of arousal systems, at sleep onset, occur with high density in the ventral lateral preoptic area (VLPO) and the median preoptic nucleus (MnPN) of the hypothalamus. Preoptic neurons are activated during sleep and exhibit sleep-wake state-dependent discharge patterns that are reciprocal of that observed in several arousal systems. Neurons in the VLPO contain the inhibitory neuromodulator, galanin, and the inhibitory neurotransmitter, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The majority of MnPN sleep-active neurons synthesize GABA. VLPO and MnPN neurons are sources of projections to arousal-regulatory systems in the posterior and lateral hypothalamus and the rostral brainstem. Mechanisms of sleep induction by these nuclei are hypothesized to involve GABA-mediated inhibition of multiple arousal systems. Normal cycling between discrete behavioral states is mediated by the combined influence of a sleep need that increases with continued wakefulness and an intrinsic circadian oscillation. This chapter will review anatomical and functional properties of populations of sleep-/wake-regulating neurons, focusing on recent findings supporting functional significance of the VLPO and MnPN in the regulation of sleep

  11. [Effects and mechanism of freeze-thawing cycles on key processes of nitrogen cycle in terrestrial ecosystem].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-qin; Qi, Yu-chun; Dong, Yun-she; Peng, Qin; Guo, Shu-fang; He, Yun-long; Yan, Zhong-qing

    2015-11-01

    As a widespread natural phenomenon in the soil of middle and high latitude as well as high altitude, freeze-thawing cycles have a great influence on the nitrogen cycle of terrestrial ecosystem in non-growing season. Freeze-thawing cycles can alter the physicochemical and biological properties of the soil, which thereby affect the migration and transformation of soil nitrogen. The impacts of freeze-thawing cycles on key processes of nitrogen cycle in terrestrial ecosystem found in available studies remain inconsistent, the mechanism is still not clear, and the research methods also need to be further explored and innovated. So it is necessary to sum up and analyze the existing achievements in order to better understand the processes of soil nitrogen cycle subjected to freeze-thawing cycles. This paper reviewed the research progress in China and abroad about the effects and mechanisms of freeze-thawing cycles on key processes of nitrogen cycle in terrestrial ecosystem, including mineralization, immobilization, nitrification and denitrification, N leakage and gaseous loss, and analyzed the deficiencies of extant research. The possible key research topics that should be urgently paid more attention to in the future were also discussed.

  12. Role of duty cycle on Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth inhibition mechanisms by positive electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Ali, Fadel M; Elgebaly, Reem H; Elneklawi, Mona S; Othman, Amal S

    2016-08-12

    P. aeruginosa considered as a notoriously difficult organism to be controlled by antibiotics or disinfectants. The potential use of alternative means as an aid to avoid the wide use of antibiotics against bacteria pathogen has been recently arisen remarkably. Effect of extremely low frequency positive electric pulse with different duty cycles on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC: 27853) growth by constructed and implemented exposure device was investigated in this study. The exposure device was applied to give extremely low frequency in the range of 0.1 up to 20 Hz with the capability to control the duty cycle of each pulse with variation from 10% up to 100%. Growth curves of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated before and after exposure to different frequencies (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 Hz) through measuring the optical density and cell count. Exposures to selected frequencies in the whole ranges of duty cycles were done. These studies were followed by DNA fragmentation, transmission electron microscope (TEM), antibiotic susceptibility tests, and dielectric measurements. Findings revealed inhibition effect by 48.56% and 47.4% together with change in the DNA structural properties for samples exposed to 0.5 Hz and 0.7 Hz respectively. Moreover the data indicated important role of duty cycle on the inhibition mechanism. It is concluded that there are two different mechanisms of interaction between positive electric pulse and microorganism occurred; 0.5 Hz caused rupture in cell wall while 0.7 Hz caused denaturation of the inner consistent of the cell.

  13. Mechanisms of biotic resistance across complex life cycles.

    PubMed

    Rius, Marc; Potter, Elaine E; Aguirre, J David; Stachowicz, John J

    2014-01-01

    Biotic resistance is the ability of communities to inhibit the establishment, spread or impact of novel species. However, the interactions that underlie biotic resistance depend heavily on the contexts in which species interact. Consequently, studies of biotic resistance that consider single processes, patches, species or life-history stages may provide an incomplete picture of the capacity for communities to resist invasion. Many organisms have multiphasic life cycles, where individuals can occupy distinct niches at different stages of the life history. Generally, studies of biotic resistance focus on interactions within a single life-history stage, and interactions at other life-history stages are overlooked. Here, we demonstrate that different mechanisms of biotic resistance occur across the life history and together limit the invasion success of an introduced marine invertebrate (Ciona intestinalis) in Northern California. We tested the role of interactions (competition and predation) with the resident community in limiting the abundance of Ciona through experiments conducted on fertilization, larval survival, settlement, early postsettlement survival, and the survival of juveniles and adults. Under some circumstances, Ciona became abundant in mid-successional stages and showed more rapid growth rates than a morphologically similar native species, Ascidia ceratodes. However, predators reduced Ciona abundance much more than that of Ascidia at several life stages. Furthermore, Ciona appeared to be a weaker competitor at the adult stage. Early life-history interactions with other sessile species at the fertilization, larval and recruit stages had modest to no effects on Ciona abundance. The presence of biotic resistance mechanisms acting at multiple life stages, and potentially under different conditions, suggests that different components of biotic resistance interact to enhance the resident community's resistance to invasion. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of

  14. Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions from alternative fuels in Australian heavy vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Tom; Grant, Tim; Williams, David; Watson, Harry

    This paper quantifies the expected pre-combustion and combustion emissions of greenhouse gases from Australian heavy vehicles using alternative fuels. We use the term exbodied emissions for these full fuel-cycle emissions. The fuels examined are low sulfur diesel (LSD), ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULS), compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), ethanol (from lignocellulose), biodiesel and waste oil. Biodiesel and ethanol have the lowest exbodied greenhouse gas emissions (in grams greenhouse gases per kilometre travelled). Biodiesel reduces exbodied greenhouse gas emissions from 41% to 51% whereas ethanol reduces emissions by 49-55%. In fact, both emit larger quantities of CO 2 than conventional fuels, but as most of the CO 2 is from renewable carbon stocks that fraction is not counted towards the greenhouse gas emissions from the fuel. The gaseous fuels (LPG, CNG) come next with emissions that range from 88% to 92% of diesel. The emissions of greenhouse gases from diesel are reduced if waste oil is used as a diesel extender, but the processing energy required to generate LSD and ULS in Australia increase their greenhouse gas emissions compared to diesel fuel. The extra energy required liquefy and cool LNG means that it has the highest exbodied greenhouse gas emissions of the fuels that were considered.

  15. Studies with Ferrous Sulfamate and Alternate Reductants for 2nd Uranium Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, M.L.

    2003-01-15

    A wide range of miniature mixer-settler tests were conducted to determine the source of iron and sulfur contamination in the uranium product stream (''1EU'') of H Canyon's 2nd Uranium Cycle. The problem was reproduced on the laboratory scale mixer-settlers by changing the feed location of ferrous sulfamate from stage D4 to stage D1. Other process variables effected no change. It was later determined that ferrous sulfamate (FS) solids had plugged the FS line to stage D4, causing FS to backup a ventline and enter the Canyon process at stage D1. Pluggage was almost certainly due to precipitation of FS solids during extended process downtime. During the search for the root cause, tests showed that FS solids were quite small (1-10 mm), and a portion of them could bypass the current Canyon prefilter (3-mm). Also, additional tests were done to find an alternate means of reducing and thereby removing plutonium and neptunium from the uranium product. These tests showed that FS was a more effective reductant than either ascorbic acid or a hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) / dilute FS combination.

  16. Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

    2011-09-01

    Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

  17. Paying for College: Student Loans and Alternative Financing Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eureka Project, Sacramento, CA.

    As a part of a study on financing higher education in California, information is presented on student loans and alternative methods of financing. Part 1 reviews problems caused by a heavy reliance on the federal Guaranteed Student Loan program (GSL). It discusses troubles of the GSL program; the lack of policy purpose; program costs; defaults;…

  18. Mechanisms for synchrony and alternation in song interactions of the bushcricket Mecopoda elongata (Tettigoniidae: Orthoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Kratzer, Silvia; Steiner, Klaus; Römer, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Males of the bushcricket Mecopoda elongata synchronise or alternate their chirps with their neighbours in an aggregation. Since synchrony is imperfect, leader and follower chirps are established in song interactions; females prefer leader chirps in phonotactic trials. Using playback experiments and simulations of song oscillator interactions, we investigate the mechanisms that result in synchrony and alternation, and the probability for the leader role in synchrony. A major predictor for the leader role of a male is its intrinsic chirp period, which varies in a population from 1.6 to 2.3 s. Faster singing males establish the leader role more often than males with longer chirp periods. The phase-response curve (PRC) of the song oscillators differs to other rhythmically calling or flashing insects, in that only the disturbed cycle is influenced in duration by a stimulus. This results in sustained leader or follower chirps of one male, when the intrinsic chirp periods of two males differ by 150 ms or more. By contrast, the individual shape of the male’s PRC has only little influence on the outcome of chirp interactions. The consequences of these findings for the evolution of synchrony in this species are discussed. PMID:15614532

  19. Chemisorption On Nanoparticles: An Alternative Mechanism For Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, A; Reboredo, F; Galli, G

    2004-04-09

    We present first principles, computational predictions of a porous, nano-structured semiconductor material that will reversibly store hydrogen for fuel cell applications. The material is competitive with current metal hydride storage materials, but contains only carbon and silicon, reducing both its cost and environmental impact. Additionally, unlike metal hydrides, the core skeleton structure of this material is unaltered when cycling from full hydrogen storage to full hydrogen depletion, removing engineering complications associated with expansion/contraction of the material.

  20. Fundamental study of failure mechanisms of pressure vessels under thermo-mechanical cycling in multiphase environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penso Mula, Jorge Antonio

    Cracking and bulging in welded and internally lined pressure vessels that work in thermal-mechanical cycling services have been well known problems in the petrochemical, power and nuclear industries. Published literature and industry surveys show that similar problems have been occurring during the last 50 years. Understanding the causes of cracking and bulging would lead to improvements in the reliability of these pressure vessels. This study attempts to add information required for improving the knowledge and fundamental understanding of these problems. Cracking and bulging, most often in the weld areas, commonly experienced in delayed coking units (e.g. coke drums) in oil refineries are typical examples. The coke drum was selected for this study because of the existing field experience and past industrial investigation results that were available to serve as the baseline references for the analytical studies performed for this dissertation. Another reason for selecting the delayed coking units for this study was due to their high economical yields. Shutting down these units would cause a high negative economic impact on the refinery operations. Several failure mechanisms were hypothesized. The finite element method was used to analyze these significant variables and to verify the hypotheses. In conclusion, a fundamental explanation of the occurrence of bulging and cracking in pressure vessels in multiphase environments has been developed. Several important factors have been identified, including the high convection coefficient of the boiling layer during filling and quenching, the mismatch in physical, thermal and mechanical properties in the dissimilar weld of the clad plates and process conditions such as heating and quenching rate and warming time. Material selection for coke drums should consider not only fatigue strength but also corrosion resistance at high temperatures and low temperatures. Cracking occurs due to low cycle fatigue and corrosion. The FEA

  1. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  2. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  3. A Freshwater Starvation Mechanism for Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, E. W.; Hewitt, I.; Fowler, A.; Clark, C.; Evatt, G. W.; Munday, D. R.; Stokes, C.

    2014-12-01

    Many northern hemisphere climate records, particularly those from around the North Atlantic, show a series of rapid climate changes that recurred on centennial to millennial timescales throughout most of the last glacial period. These Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) sequences are observed most prominently in Greenland ice cores, although they have a global signature, including an out of phase Antarctic signal. They consist of warming jumps of order 10°C, occurring in typically 40 years, followed generally by a slow cooling (Greenland Interstadial, GI) lasting between a few centuries and a few millennia, and then a final rapid temperature drop into a cold Greenland Stadial (GS) that lasts for a similar period. The most distinctive feature of D-O cycles is the rapid warming event, often attributed to a sudden change in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Recent work has suggested that AMOC is most easily disrupted by freshwater delivered through the Arctic. We suggest that the proposed AMOC changes may have occurred as part of a natural oscillation, in which runoff from the Laurentide ice sheet into the Arctic is controlled by temperature around the North Atlantic. The Arctic buffers the salinity changes, but under warm conditions, high runoff eventually leads to water entering the North Atlantic with low enough salinity to switch AMOC into its weaker state. Under the colder conditions now prevailing, the Arctic is starved of runoff, and the salinity rises until a further switch occurs. Contrary to many previous studies, this mechanism does not require large freshwater pulses to the North Atlantic. Instead, steady changes in ice-sheet runoff, driven by the AMOC, lead to a naturally arising oscillator, in which the rapid warmings come about because the Arctic Ocean is starved of freshwater. The changing size of the ice sheets would have affected the magnitude and extent of runoff, and we suggest that this may provide a simple explanation

  4. Comparative life cycle assessment of alternative strategies for energy recovery from used cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Lidia; Mendecka, Barbara; Carnevale, Ennio

    2017-05-15

    The separate collection of Used Cooking Oil (UCO) is gaining popularity through several countries in Europe. An appropriate management of UCO waste stream leads to substantial benefits. In this study, we analyse two different possibilities of UCO energy reuse: the direct feed to a reciprocating internal combustion engine (ICE) for cogeneration purpose, and the processing to generate biodiesel. Concerning biodiesel production, we analyse four among conventional and innovative technologies, characterised by different type and amount of used chemicals, heat and electricity consumptions and yields. We perform a systematic evaluation of environmental benefits and drawbacks by applying life cycle assessment (LCA) analysis to compare the alternatives. For the impact assessment, two methods are selected: the Global Warming Potential (GWP) and Cumulative Exergy Consumption (CExC). Results related only to the processing phases (i.e. not including yet the avoided effects) show that the recovery of UCO in cogeneration plant has in general lower values in terms of environmental impacts than its employment in biodiesel production. When products and co-products substitution are included, the savings obtained by the substitution of conventional diesel production, in the biodiesel cases, are significantly higher than the avoided effects for electricity and heat in the cogeneration case. In particular, by using the UCO in the biodiesel production processes, the savings vary from 41.6 to 54.6 GJex per tUCO, and from 2270 to 2860 kg CO2eq per tUCO for CExC and GWP, respectively. A particular focus is put on sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Overall, high uncertainty of final results for process impacts is observed, especially for the supercritical methanol process. Low uncertainty values are evaluated for the avoided effects. Including the uncertain character of the impacts, cogeneration scenario and NaOH catalysed process of biodiesel production result to be the most suitable

  5. Flagellar Synchronization Is a Simple Alternative to Cell Cycle Synchronization for Ciliary and Flagellar Studies.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Soumita; Avasthi, Prachee

    2017-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an ideal model organism for studies of ciliary function and assembly. In assays for biological and biochemical effects of various factors on flagellar structure and function, synchronous culture is advantageous for minimizing variability. Here, we have characterized a method in which 100% synchronization is achieved with respect to flagellar length but not with respect to the cell cycle. The method requires inducing flagellar regeneration by amputation of the entire cell population and limiting regeneration time. This results in a maximally homogeneous distribution of flagellar lengths at 3 h postamputation. We found that time-limiting new protein synthesis during flagellar synchronization limits variability in the unassembled pool of limiting flagellar protein and variability in flagellar length without affecting the range of cell volumes. We also found that long- and short-flagella mutants that regenerate normally require longer and shorter synchronization times, respectively. By minimizing flagellar length variability using a simple method requiring only hours and no changes in media, flagellar synchronization facilitates the detection of small changes in flagellar length resulting from both chemical and genetic perturbations in Chlamydomonas. This method increases our ability to probe the basic biology of ciliary size regulation and related disease etiologies. IMPORTANCE Cilia and flagella are highly conserved antenna-like organelles that found in nearly all mammalian cell types. They perform sensory and motile functions contributing to numerous physiological and developmental processes. Defects in their assembly and function are implicated in a wide range of human diseases ranging from retinal degeneration to cancer. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an algal model system for studying mammalian cilium formation and function. Here, we report a simple synchronization method that allows detection of small

  6. Genomic Scars Generated by Polymerase Theta Reveal the Versatile Mechanism of Alternative End-Joining

    PubMed Central

    van Schendel, Robin; van Heteren, Jane; Welten, Richard; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    For more than half a century, genotoxic agents have been used to induce mutations in the genome of model organisms to establish genotype-phenotype relationships. While inaccurate replication across damaged bases can explain the formation of single nucleotide variants, it remained unknown how DNA damage induces more severe genomic alterations. Here, we demonstrate for two of the most widely used mutagens, i.e. ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and photo-activated trimethylpsoralen (UV/TMP), that deletion mutagenesis is the result of polymerase Theta (POLQ)-mediated end joining (TMEJ) of double strand breaks (DSBs). This discovery allowed us to survey many thousands of available C. elegans deletion alleles to address the biology of this alternative end-joining repair mechanism. Analysis of ~7,000 deletion breakpoints and their cognate junctions reveals a distinct order of events. We found that nascent strands blocked at sites of DNA damage can engage in one or more cycles of primer extension using a more downstream located break end as a template. Resolution is accomplished when 3’ overhangs have matching ends. Our study provides a step-wise and versatile model for the in vivo mechanism of POLQ action, which explains the molecular nature of mutagen-induced deletion alleles. PMID:27755535

  7. Fiber post cementation strategies: effect of mechanical cycling on push-out bond strength and cement polymerization stress.

    PubMed

    Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Amaral, Marina; Boaro, Leticia Cristina; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of mechanical cycling and cementation strategies on the push-out bond strength between fiber posts and root dentin and the polymerization stresses produced using three resin cements. Eighty bovine mandibular teeth were sectioned to a length of 16 mm, prepared to 12 mm, and embedded in self-curing acrylic resin. The specimens were then distributed into 8 groups (n = 10): Gr1 - Scotchbond Multi Purpose + RelyX ARC; Gr2 - Scotchbond Multi Purpose + RelyX ARC + mechanical cycling; Gr3 - AdheSE + Multilink Automix; Gr4 - AdheSE + Multilink Automix + mechanical cycling; Gr5 - phosphoric acid + RelyX U100 (self-adhesive cement); Gr6 - phosphoric acid+ RelyX U100 + mechanical cycling; Gr7 - RelyX U100; Gr8 - RelyX U100 + mechanical cycling. The values obtained from the push-out bond strength test were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05), while the values obtained from the polymerization stress test were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Mechanical cycling did not affect the bond strength values (p = 0.236), while cementation strategies affected the push-out bond strength (p < 0.001). Luting with RelyX U100 and Scotch Bond Multi Purpose + RelyX ARC yielded higher push-out bond strength values. The polymerization stress results were affected by the factor "cement" (p = 0.0104): the self-adhesive cement RelyX U100 exhibited the lowest values, RelyX ARC resulted in the highest values, while Multilink Automix presented values statistically similar to the other two cements. The self-adhesive cement appears to be a good alternative for luting fiber posts due to the high push-out bond strengths and lower polymerization stress values.

  8. The effect of duty cycle and frequency on muscle torque production using kilohertz frequency range alternating current.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alex R; Robertson, Valma J; Ioannou, Harry

    2004-09-01

    We investigated the frequency and duty cycle dependence of maximal electrically induced torque (MEIT) of the wrist extensors. Fifty hertz burst modulated sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the frequency range 0.5-20 kHz was used, with duty cycles ranging from a minimum (one cycle) to maximum (continuous AC). MEITs were similar at low frequencies but decreased markedly above 2.5 kHz. MEITs also decreased markedly above a 20% duty cycle. Subjective reports of discomfort were fewest at 4 kHz and at duty cycles in the range 20-25%. Our conclusion is that for maximum torque production, a frequency of 1 kHz and a duty cycle of 20% are indicated. When comfort is a major consideration, a frequency of 2.5 kHz provides an acceptable trade-off between MEIT and comfort. The findings also suggest that low duty cycle, burst modulated AC stimulation may be more effective than stimulation using conventional low-frequency pulsed current.

  9. Regulation of the Calvin cycle for CO2 fixation as an example for general control mechanisms in metabolic cycles.

    PubMed

    Fridlyand, L E; Scheibe, R

    1999-08-01

    The theory of a metabolic cycle with the main portion of its intermediates remaining inside the cycle during one turnover has been developed. On this basis, the regulation of the Calvin cycle is analyzed. It is demonstrated that not only the reactions of non-equilibrium enzymes, as the carboxylation of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate, but reactions that operate close to a thermodynamic equilibrium, especially the reduction of 3-phosphoglycerate and the transketolase reaction can significantly influence the total turnover period in the Calvin cycle. The role of compensating mechanisms in the maintenance of the photosynthesis rate upon changes of environmental conditions and of enzyme contents is analyzed for the Calvin cycle. It is shown that the change of the total quantity of the metabolites is one of the main self-regulated mechanisms in the Calvin cycle. A change of the ATP/ADP ratio can be used by the cell to maintain the CO2 assimilation rate, when the total quantity of the metabolites is changed. The developed analysis permits to explain some experimental data obtained with transgenic plants with restricted efflux of carbon from the chloroplasts.

  10. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation.

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-Awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-04-15

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation

    PubMed Central

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  12. Alternating access mechanism in the POT family of oligopeptide transporters.

    PubMed

    Solcan, Nicolae; Kwok, Jane; Fowler, Philip W; Cameron, Alexander D; Drew, David; Iwata, So; Newstead, Simon

    2012-08-15

    Short chain peptides are actively transported across membranes as an efficient route for dietary protein absorption and for maintaining cellular homeostasis. In mammals, peptide transport occurs via PepT1 and PepT2, which belong to the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter, or POT family. The recent crystal structure of a bacterial POT transporter confirmed that they belong to the major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters. Despite the functional characterization of POT family members in bacteria, fungi and mammals, a detailed model for peptide recognition and transport remains unavailable. In this study, we report the 3.3-Å resolution crystal structure and functional characterization of a POT family transporter from the bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus. Crystallized in an inward open conformation the structure identifies a hinge-like movement within the C-terminal half of the transporter that facilitates opening of an intracellular gate controlling access to a central peptide-binding site. Our associated functional data support a model for peptide transport that highlights the importance of salt bridge interactions in orchestrating alternating access within the POT family.

  13. Alternating access mechanism in the POT family of oligopeptide transporters

    PubMed Central

    Solcan, Nicolae; Kwok, Jane; Fowler, Philip W; Cameron, Alexander D; Drew, David; Iwata, So; Newstead, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Short chain peptides are actively transported across membranes as an efficient route for dietary protein absorption and for maintaining cellular homeostasis. In mammals, peptide transport occurs via PepT1 and PepT2, which belong to the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter, or POT family. The recent crystal structure of a bacterial POT transporter confirmed that they belong to the major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters. Despite the functional characterization of POT family members in bacteria, fungi and mammals, a detailed model for peptide recognition and transport remains unavailable. In this study, we report the 3.3-Å resolution crystal structure and functional characterization of a POT family transporter from the bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus. Crystallized in an inward open conformation the structure identifies a hinge-like movement within the C-terminal half of the transporter that facilitates opening of an intracellular gate controlling access to a central peptide-binding site. Our associated functional data support a model for peptide transport that highlights the importance of salt bridge interactions in orchestrating alternating access within the POT family. PMID:22659829

  14. Flagellar Synchronization Is a Simple Alternative to Cell Cycle Synchronization for Ciliary and Flagellar Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Soumita

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an ideal model organism for studies of ciliary function and assembly. In assays for biological and biochemical effects of various factors on flagellar structure and function, synchronous culture is advantageous for minimizing variability. Here, we have characterized a method in which 100% synchronization is achieved with respect to flagellar length but not with respect to the cell cycle. The method requires inducing flagellar regeneration by amputation of the entire cell population and limiting regeneration time. This results in a maximally homogeneous distribution of flagellar lengths at 3 h postamputation. We found that time-limiting new protein synthesis during flagellar synchronization limits variability in the unassembled pool of limiting flagellar protein and variability in flagellar length without affecting the range of cell volumes. We also found that long- and short-flagella mutants that regenerate normally require longer and shorter synchronization times, respectively. By minimizing flagellar length variability using a simple method requiring only hours and no changes in media, flagellar synchronization facilitates the detection of small changes in flagellar length resulting from both chemical and genetic perturbations in Chlamydomonas. This method increases our ability to probe the basic biology of ciliary size regulation and related disease etiologies. IMPORTANCE Cilia and flagella are highly conserved antenna-like organelles that found in nearly all mammalian cell types. They perform sensory and motile functions contributing to numerous physiological and developmental processes. Defects in their assembly and function are implicated in a wide range of human diseases ranging from retinal degeneration to cancer. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an algal model system for studying mammalian cilium formation and function. Here, we report a simple synchronization method that allows detection of

  15. Hybrid Vapor Compression Ejector Cycle: Presentation to IAPG Mechanical Working Group

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Compression Ejector Cycle: Presentation to IAPG Mechanical Working Group Parmesh Verma and Tom Radcliff, United Technologies Research Center UNCLASSIFIED... Ejector Cycle Presentation to IAPG Mechanical Working Group 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W909MY-10-C-0005 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...hybrid vapor compression ejector heat pump cycle developed under an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funded contract is provided. 15. SUBJECT

  16. Cell cycle molecules and mechanisms of the budding and fission yeasts.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Tim; Pearce, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    The cell cycles of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe are currently the best understood of all eukaryotes. Studies in these two evolutionarily divergent organisms have identified common control mechanisms, which have provided paradigms for our understanding of the eukaryotic cell cycle. This chapter provides an overview of our current knowledge of the molecules and mechanisms that regulate the mitotic cell cycle in these two yeasts.

  17. Conformational cycle and ion-coupling mechanism of the Na+/hydantoin transporter Mhp1

    PubMed Central

    Kazmier, Kelli; Sharma, Shruti; Islam, Shahidul M.; Roux, Benoît; Mchaourab, Hassane S.

    2014-01-01

    Ion-dependent transporters of the LeuT-fold couple the uptake of physiologically essential molecules to transmembrane ion gradients. Defined by a conserved 5-helix inverted repeat that encodes common principles of ion and substrate binding, the LeuT-fold has been captured in outward-facing, occluded, and inward-facing conformations. However, fundamental questions relating to the structural basis of alternating access and coupling to ion gradients remain unanswered. Here, we used distance measurements between pairs of spin labels to define the conformational cycle of the Na+-coupled hydantoin symporter Mhp1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens. Our results reveal that the inward-facing and outward-facing Mhp1 crystal structures represent sampled intermediate states in solution. Here, we provide a mechanistic context for these structures, mapping them into a model of transport based on ion- and substrate-dependent conformational equilibria. In contrast to the Na+/leucine transporter LeuT, our results suggest that Na+ binding at the conserved second Na+ binding site does not change the energetics of the inward- and outward-facing conformations of Mhp1. Comparative analysis of ligand-dependent alternating access in LeuT and Mhp1 lead us to propose that different coupling schemes to ion gradients may define distinct conformational mechanisms within the LeuT-fold class. PMID:25267652

  18. Conformational cycle and ion-coupling mechanism of the Na+/hydantoin transporter Mhp1.

    PubMed

    Kazmier, Kelli; Sharma, Shruti; Islam, Shahidul M; Roux, Benoît; Mchaourab, Hassane S

    2014-10-14

    Ion-dependent transporters of the LeuT-fold couple the uptake of physiologically essential molecules to transmembrane ion gradients. Defined by a conserved 5-helix inverted repeat that encodes common principles of ion and substrate binding, the LeuT-fold has been captured in outward-facing, occluded, and inward-facing conformations. However, fundamental questions relating to the structural basis of alternating access and coupling to ion gradients remain unanswered. Here, we used distance measurements between pairs of spin labels to define the conformational cycle of the Na(+)-coupled hydantoin symporter Mhp1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens. Our results reveal that the inward-facing and outward-facing Mhp1 crystal structures represent sampled intermediate states in solution. Here, we provide a mechanistic context for these structures, mapping them into a model of transport based on ion- and substrate-dependent conformational equilibria. In contrast to the Na(+)/leucine transporter LeuT, our results suggest that Na(+) binding at the conserved second Na(+) binding site does not change the energetics of the inward- and outward-facing conformations of Mhp1. Comparative analysis of ligand-dependent alternating access in LeuT and Mhp1 lead us to propose that different coupling schemes to ion gradients may define distinct conformational mechanisms within the LeuT-fold class.

  19. Automated respiratory cycles selection is highly specific and improves respiratory mechanics analysis.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Vincent; Graas, Estelle; Rigo, Jacques

    2012-07-01

    Selected optimal respiratory cycles should allow calculation of respiratory mechanic parameters focusing on patient-ventilator interaction. New computer software automatically selecting optimal breaths and respiratory mechanics derived from those cycles are evaluated. Retrospective study. University level III neonatal intensive care unit. Ten mins synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and assist/control ventilation recordings from ten newborns. The ventilator provided respiratory mechanic data (ventilator respiratory cycles) every 10 secs. Pressure, flow, and volume waves and pressure-volume, pressure-flow, and volume-flow loops were reconstructed from continuous pressure-volume recordings. Visual assessment determined assisted leak-free optimal respiratory cycles (selected respiratory cycles). New software graded the quality of cycles (automated respiratory cycles). Respiratory mechanic values were derived from both sets of optimal cycles. We evaluated quality selection and compared mean values and their variability according to ventilatory mode and respiratory mechanic provenance. To assess discriminating power, all 45 "t" values obtained from interpatient comparisons were compared for each respiratory mechanic parameter. A total of 11,724 breaths are evaluated. Automated respiratory cycle/selected respiratory cycle selections agreement is high: 88% of maximal κ with linear weighting. Specificity and positive predictive values are 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. Averaged values are similar between automated respiratory cycle and ventilator respiratory cycle. C20/C alone is markedly decreased in automated respiratory cycle (1.27 ± 0.37 vs. 1.81 ± 0.67). Tidal volume apparent similarity disappears in assist/control: automated respiratory cycle tidal volume (4.8 ± 1.0 mL/kg) is significantly lower than for ventilator respiratory cycle (5.6 ± 1.8 mL/kg). Coefficients of variation decrease for all automated respiratory cycle parameters in all infants. "t

  20. Alternative Salary Auction Mechanisms for the Navy: An Experimental Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    auctions transfer the most surplus value to the Navy. Equity is fairness among sailors, and may mean equal pay or equal benefit (surplus)3. No...values range from $40,000 to $80,000 – Each value in range equally likely – Rounded to nearest $1000 8 Willingness to Pay (WTP) • Maximum a company is...test the impact of bidding behavior on two matching mechanisms proposed by prior research for use in the U.S. Navy’s Assignment Incentive Pay (AIP

  1. Alternative carbohydrate reserves used in the daily cycle of crassulacean acid metabolism

    Treesearch

    C.C. Black; J.-Q. Chen; R.L. Doong; M.N. Angelov; Shi-Jean S. Sung

    1996-01-01

    Each day a massive interlocked biochemical cycle occurs in the green tissues of crassulacean acid metabolism plants.The function of this interlocked cycle, in its simplest context, is to furnish most of the CO2 for CAM plant photosynthesis.In this unified presentation our aims are (1) to divide CAM plants into two metabolic groups, (2) to...

  2. Alternative Physical Therapy Protocol Using a Cycle Ergometer During Hospital Rehabilitation of Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Margarete Diprat; Lopes, Diene Gomes Colvara; de Mello, Renato Gorga Bandeira; Macagnan, Fabrício Edler; Kessler, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the efficacy of a cycle ergometer-based exercise program to a standard protocol on the increment of the maximum distance walked during the six-minute walk test in the postoperative rehabilitation of patients submitted to coronary artery bypass grafting. METHODS A controlled clinical trial pilot, blinded to the outcome, enrolled subjects who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting in a hospital from Southern Brazil. Subjects were designated for the standard physical rehabilitation protocol or to an alternative cycle ergometer-based protocol through simple random sampling. The primary outcome was the difference in the maximum distance walked in the six-minute walk test before and after the allocated intervention. RESULTS Twenty-four patients were included in the analysis, 10 in the standard protocol and 14 in the alternative protocol group. There was an increment in the maximum distance walked in both groups, and borderline superiority in the intervention group comparing to the control group (312.2 vs. 249.7; P=0.06). CONCLUSION There was an increase in the maximum distance walked in the alternative protocol compared to the standard protocol. Thus, it is postulated that the use of a cycle ergometer can be included in physical rehabilitation in the hospital phase of postoperative coronary artery bypass grafting. However, randomized studies with larger sample size should be conducted to assess the significance of these findings. PMID:26934400

  3. Some Implications of Political Systems Theory for Alternative Demand Processing Mechanisms for Public School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaynor, Alan K.

    1971-01-01

    Utilizes Easton's political systems framework to analyze existing structural inadequacies and to support a number of alternative mechanisms for coping more effectively with politically energetic and ideologically divergent educational demands. (Author)

  4. Mammalian cell-cycle regulation: several Cdks, numerous cyclins and diverse compensatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, A; Kaldis, P

    2009-08-20

    After a decade of extensive work on gene knockout mouse models of cell-cycle regulators, the classical model of cell-cycle regulation was seriously challenged. Several unexpected compensatory mechanisms were uncovered among cyclins and Cdks in these studies. The most astonishing observation is that Cdk2 is dispensable for the regulation of the mitotic cell cycle with both Cdk4 and Cdk1 covering for Cdk2's functions. Similar to yeast, it was recently discovered that Cdk1 alone can drive the mammalian cell cycle, indicating that the regulation of the mammalian cell cycle is highly conserved. Nevertheless, cell-cycle-independent functions of Cdks and cyclins such as in DNA damage repair are still under investigation. Here we review the compensatory mechanisms among major cyclins and Cdks in mammalian cell-cycle regulation.

  5. Alternative mechanisms of action of cationic antimicrobial peptides on bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hale, John D F; Hancock, Robert E W

    2007-12-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are a novel type of antibiotic offering much potential in the treatment of microbial-related diseases. They offer many advantages for commercial development, including a broad spectrum of action and modest size. However, despite the identification or synthetic production of thousands of such peptides, the mode of action remains elusive, except for a few examples. While the dogma for the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides against bacteria is believed to be through pore formation or membrane barrier disruption, some peptides clearly act differently and other intracellular target sites have been identified. This article presents an updated review of how cationic antimicrobial peptides are able to affect bacterial killing, with a focus on internal targets.

  6. Alternative Mechanism for White Adipose Tissue Lipolysis after Thermal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Li; Patsouris, David; Sadri, Ali-Reza; Dai, Xiaojing; Amini-Nik, Saeid; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Extensively burned patients often suffer from sepsis, a complication that enhances postburn hypermetabolism and contributes to increased incidence of multiple organ failure, morbidity and mortality. Despite the clinical importance of burn sepsis, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of such infection-related metabolic derangements and organ dysfunction are still largely unknown. We recently found that upon endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, the white adipose tissue (WAT) interacts with the liver via inflammatory and metabolic signals leading to profound hepatic alterations, including hepatocyte apoptosis and hepatic fatty infiltration. We therefore hypothesized that burn plus infection causes an increase in lipolysis of WAT after major burn, partially through induction of ER stress, contributing to hyperlipidemia and profound hepatic lipid infiltration. We used a two-hit rat model of 60% total body surface area scald burn, followed by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 3 d postburn. One day later, animals were euthanized and liver and epididymal WAT (EWAT) samples were collected for gene expression, protein analysis and histological study of inflammasome activation, ER stress, apoptosis and lipid metabolism. Our results showed that burn plus LPS profoundly increased lipolysis in WAT associated with significantly increased hepatic lipid infiltration. Burn plus LPS augmented ER stress by upregulating CHOP and activating ATF6, inducing NLRP3 inflammasome activation and leading to increased apoptosis and lipolysis in WAT with a distinct enzymatic mechanism related to inhibition of AMPK signaling. In conclusion, burn sepsis causes profound alterations in WAT and liver that are associated with changes in organ function and structure. PMID:26736177

  7. Alternative functions of core cell cycle regulators in neuronal migration, neuronal maturation, and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher L.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that boundaries separating a cycling cell from a post-mitotic neuron are not as concrete as expected. Novel and unique physiological functions in neurons have been ascribed for proteins fundamentally required for cell cycle progression and control. These “core” cell cycle regulators serve diverse post-mitotic functions that span various developmental stages of a neuron, including neuronal migration, axonal elongation, axon pruning, dendrite morphogenesis, and synaptic maturation and plasticity. In this review, we detail the non-proliferative post-mitotic roles that these cell cycle proteins have recently been reported to play, the significance of their expression in neurons, mechanistic insight when available, and future prospects. PMID:19447088

  8. Tissue-specific mechanisms of alternative polyadenylation: testis, brain, and beyond.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Clinton C; McMahon, K Wyatt

    2010-01-01

    Changing the position of the poly(A) tail in an mRNA--alternative polyadenylation--is an important mechanism to increase the diversity of gene expression, especially in metazoans. Alternative polyadenylation often occurs in a tissue- or developmental stage-specific manner and can significantly affect gene activity by changing the protein product generated, the stability of the transcript, its localization, or its translatability. Despite the important regulatory effects that alternative polyadenylation have on gene expression, only a sparse few examples have been mechanistically characterized. Here, we review the known mechanisms for the control of alternative polyadenylation, catalog the tissues that demonstrate a propensity for alternative polyadenylation, and focus on the proteins that are known to regulate alternative polyadenylation in specific tissues. We conclude that the field of alternative polyadenylation remains in its infancy, with possibilities for future investigation on the horizon. Given the profound effect alternative polyadenylation can have on gene expression and human health, improved understanding of alternative polyadenylation could lead to numerous advances in control of gene activity. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Alternate transcripts of the Drosophila "activator" E2F are necessary for maintenance of cell cycle exit during development.

    PubMed

    Bradley-Gill, Mary-Rose; Kim, Minhee; Feingold, Daniel; Yergeau, Christine; Houde, Josée; Moon, Nam-Sung

    2016-03-15

    The E2F family of transcription factors are evolutionarily conserved regulators of the cell cycle that can be divided into two groups based on their ability to either activate or repress transcription. In Drosophila, there is only one "activator" E2F, dE2F1, which provides all of the pro-proliferative activity of E2F during development. Interestingly, the de2f1 gene can be transcribed from multiple promoters resulting in six alternate transcripts. In this study, we sought to investigate the biological significance of the alternate transcriptional start sites. We focused on the de2f1 promoter region where tissue and cell-type specific enhancer activities were observed at the larval stage. While a genomic deletion of this region, de2f1(ΔRA), decreased the overall expression level of dE2F1, flies developed normally with no obvious proliferation defects. However, a detailed analysis of the de2f1(ΔRA) mutant eye imaginal discs revealed that dE2F1 is needed for proper cell cycle exit. We discovered that dE2F1 expression during G1 arrest prior to the differentiation process of the developing eye is important for maintaining cell cycle arrest at a later stage of the eye development. Overall, our study suggests that specific alternate transcripts of "activator" E2F, dE2F1, may have a dual function on cell cycle progression and cannot simply be viewed as a pro-proliferative transcription factor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell wall mannoprotein of Candida albicans induces cell cycle alternation and inhibits apoptosis of HaCaT cells via NF-κB signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Yang; Jiang, Hang-Hang; Zhang, Yu-Jing; Hao, Xing-Jia; Sun, Yu-Zhe; Qi, Rui-Qun; Chen, Hong-Duo; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2017-10-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is a commensal organism in human and a well-known dimorphic opportunistic pathogenic fungus. Though plenty of researches on the pathogenesis of C. albicans have been performed, the mechanism is not fully understood. The cell wall components of C. albicans have been documented to play important roles in its pathogenic processes. To further study the infectious mechanism of C. albicans, we investigated the potential functional role of its cell wall mannoprotein in cell cycle and apoptosis of HaCaT cells. We found that mannoprotein could promote the transition of cell cycle from G1/G0 to S phase, in which Cyclin D1, CDK4 and p-Rb, the major regulators of the cell cycle progression, showed significant upregulation, and CDKN1A (cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21)) showed significant downregulation. Mannoprotein also could inhibit apoptosis of HaCaT cells, which was well associated with increased expression of BCL2 (Bcl-2). Moreover, mannoprotein could increase the phosphorylation levels of RELA (p65) and NFKBIA (IκBα), as the key factors of NF-κB signal pathway in HaCaT cells, suggesting the activation of NF-κB signal pathway. Additionally, a NF-κB specific inhibitor, PDTC, could rescue the effect of mannoprotein on cell cycle and apoptosis of HaCaT cells, which suggested that mannoprotein could activate NF-κB signal pathway to mediate cell cycle alternation and inhibit apoptosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Interference of peritoneal dialysis fluids with cell cycle mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Büchel, Janine; Bartosova, Maria; Eich, Gwendolyn; Wittenberger, Timo; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Steppan, Sonja; Hackert, Thilo; Schaefer, Franz; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Schmitt, Claus P

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDF) differ with respect to osmotic and buffer compound, and pH and glucose degradation products (GDP) content. The impact on peritoneal membrane integrity is still insufficiently described. We assessed global genomic effects of PDF in primary human peritoneal mesothelial cells (PMC) by whole genome analyses, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and functional measurements. PMC isolated from omentum of non-uremic patients were incubated with conventional single chamber PDF (CPDF), lactate- (LPDF), bicarbonate- (BPDF) and bicarbonate/lactate-buffered double-chamber PDF (BLPDF), icodextrin (IPDF) and amino acid PDF (APDF), diluted 1:1 with medium. Affymetrix GeneChip U133Plus2.0 (Affymetrix, CA, USA) and quantitative RT-PCR were applied; cell viability was assessed by proliferation assays. The number of differentially expressed genes compared to medium was 464 with APDF, 208 with CPDF, 169 with IPDF, 71 with LPDF, 45 with BPDF and 42 with BLPDF. Out of these genes 74%, 73%, 79%, 72%, 47% and 57% were downregulated. Gene Ontology (GO) term annotations mainly revealed associations with cell cycle (p = 10(-35)), cell division, mitosis, and DNA replication. One hundred and eighteen out of 249 probe sets detecting genes involved in cell cycle/division were suppressed, with APDF-treated PMC being affected the most regarding absolute number and degree, followed by CPDF and IPDF. Bicarbonate-containing PDF and BLPDF-treated PMC were affected the least. Quantitative RT-PCR measurements confirmed microarray findings for key cell cycle genes (CDK1/CCNB1/CCNE2/AURKA/KIF11/KIF14). Suppression was lowest for BPDF and BLPDF, they upregulated CCNE2 and SMC4. All PDF upregulated 3 out of 4 assessed cell cycle repressors (p53/BAX/p21). Cell viability scores confirmed gene expression results, being 79% of medium for LPDF, 101% for BLPDF, 51% for CPDF and 23% for IPDF. Amino acid-containing PDF (84%) incubated cells were as viable as BPDF

  12. Interference of Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids with Cell Cycle Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Büchel, Janine; Bartosova, Maria; Eich, Gwendolyn; Wittenberger, Timo; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Steppan, Sonja; Hackert, Thilo; Schaefer, Franz; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Schmitt, Claus P.

    2015-01-01

    ♦ Introduction: Peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDF) differ with respect to osmotic and buffer compound, and pH and glucose degradation products (GDP) content. The impact on peritoneal membrane integrity is still insufficiently described. We assessed global genomic effects of PDF in primary human peritoneal mesothelial cells (PMC) by whole genome analyses, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and functional measurements. ♦ Methods: PMC isolated from omentum of non-uremic patients were incubated with conventional single chamber PDF (CPDF), lactate- (LPDF), bicarbonate- (BPDF) and bicarbonate/lactate-buffered double-chamber PDF (BLPDF), icodextrin (IPDF) and amino acid PDF (APDF), diluted 1:1 with medium. Affymetrix GeneChip U133Plus2.0 (Affymetrix, CA, USA) and quantitative RT-PCR were applied; cell viability was assessed by proliferation assays. ♦ Results: The number of differentially expressed genes compared to medium was 464 with APDF, 208 with CPDF, 169 with IPDF, 71 with LPDF, 45 with BPDF and 42 with BLPDF. Out of these genes 74%, 73%, 79%, 72%, 47% and 57% were downregulated. Gene Ontology (GO) term annotations mainly revealed associations with cell cycle (p = 10-35), cell division, mitosis, and DNA replication. One hundred and eighteen out of 249 probe sets detecting genes involved in cell cycle/division were suppressed, with APDF-treated PMC being affected the most regarding absolute number and degree, followed by CPDF and IPDF. Bicarbonate-containing PDF and BLPDF-treated PMC were affected the least. Quantitative RT-PCR measurements confirmed microarray findings for key cell cycle genes (CDK1/CCNB1/CCNE2/AURKA/KIF11/KIF14). Suppression was lowest for BPDF and BLPDF, they upregulated CCNE2 and SMC4. All PDF upregulated 3 out of 4 assessed cell cycle repressors (p53/BAX/p21). Cell viability scores confirmed gene expression results, being 79% of medium for LPDF, 101% for BLPDF, 51% for CPDF and 23% for IPDF. Amino acid-containing PDF

  13. The water-water cycle as alternative photon and electron sinks.

    PubMed Central

    Asada, K

    2000-01-01

    The water-water cycle in chloroplasts is the photoreduction of dioxygen to water in photosystem I (PS I) by the electrons generated in photosystem II (PS II) from water. In the water-water cycle, the rate of photoreduction of dioxygen in PS I is several orders of magnitude lower than those of the disproportionation of superoxide catalysed by superoxide dismutase, the reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water catalysed by ascorbate peroxidase, and the reduction of the resulting oxidized forms of ascorbate by reduced ferredoxin or catalysed by either dehydroascorbate reductase or monodehydroascorbate reductase. The water-water cycle therefore effectively shortens the lifetimes of photoproduced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide to suppress the production of hydroxyl radicals, their interactions with the target molecules in chloroplasts, and resulting photoinhibition. When leaves are exposed to photon intensities of sunlight in excess of that required to support the fixation of CO2, the intersystem electron carriers are over-reduced, resulting in photoinhibition. Under such conditions, the water-water cycle not only scavenges active oxygens, but also safely dissipates excess photon energy and electrons, in addition to downregulation of PS II and photorespiration. The dual functions of the water-water cycle for protection from photoinhibition under photon excess stress are discussed, along with its functional evolution. PMID:11127996

  14. The Parasexual Cycle in Candida albicans Provides an Alternative Pathway to Meiosis for the Formation of Recombinant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Forche, Anja; Alby, Kevin; Schaefer, Dana; Johnson, Alexander D; Berman, Judith; Bennett, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Candida albicans has an elaborate, yet efficient, mating system that promotes conjugation between diploid a and α strains. The product of mating is a tetraploid a/α cell that must undergo a reductional division to return to the diploid state. Despite the presence of several “meiosis-specific” genes in the C. albicans genome, a meiotic program has not been observed. Instead, tetraploid products of mating can be induced to undergo efficient, random chromosome loss, often producing strains that are diploid, or close to diploid, in ploidy. Using SNP and comparative genome hybridization arrays we have now analyzed the genotypes of products from the C. albicans parasexual cycle. We show that the parasexual cycle generates progeny strains with shuffled combinations of the eight C. albicans chromosomes. In addition, several isolates had undergone extensive genetic recombination between homologous chromosomes, including multiple gene conversion events. Progeny strains exhibited altered colony morphologies on laboratory media, demonstrating that the parasexual cycle generates phenotypic variants of C. albicans. In several fungi, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the conserved Spo11 protein is integral to meiotic recombination, where it is required for the formation of DNA double-strand breaks. We show that deletion of SPO11 prevented genetic recombination between homologous chromosomes during the C. albicans parasexual cycle. These findings suggest that at least one meiosis-specific gene has been re-programmed to mediate genetic recombination during the alternative parasexual life cycle of C. albicans. We discuss, in light of the long association of C. albicans with warm-blooded animals, the potential advantages of a parasexual cycle over a conventional sexual cycle. PMID:18462019

  15. Simulations of heart mechanics over the cardiac cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavoularis, Stavros; Doyle, Matthew; Bourgault, Yves

    2009-11-01

    This study is concerned with the numerical simulation of blood flow and myocardium motion with fluid-structure interaction of the left ventricle (LV) of a canine heart over the entire cardiac cycle. The LV geometry is modeled as a series of nested prolate ellipsoids and is capped with cylindrical tubes representing the inflow and outflow tracts. The myocardium is modeled as a multi-layered, slightly compressible, transversely isotropic, hyperelastic material, with each layer having different principal directions to approximate the fibrous structure. Blood is modeled as a slightly compressible Newtonian fluid. Blood flow into and out of the LV is driven by left atrial and aortic pressures applied at the distal ends of the inflow and outflow tracts, respectively, along with changes in the stresses in the myocardium caused by time-dependent changes in its material properties, which simulate the cyclic contraction and relaxation of the muscle fibers. Numerical solutions are obtained with the use of a finite element code. The computed temporal and spatial variations of pressure and velocity in the blood and stresses and strains in the myocardium will be discussed and compared to physiological data. The variation of the LV cavity volume over the cardiac cycle will also be discussed.

  16. Accelerated Thermal Cycling and Failure Mechanisms for BGA and CSP Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the accelerated thermal cycling test methods that are currently used by industry to characterize the interconnect reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) ball grid array (BGA) and chip scale package (CSP) assemblies. Acceleration induced failure mechanisms varied from conventional surface mount (SM) failures for CSPs. Examples of unrealistic life projections for other CSPs are also presented. The cumulative cycles to failure for ceramic BGA assemblies performed under different conditions, including plots of their two Weibull parameters, are presented. The results are for cycles in the range of -30 C to 100 C, -55 C to 100 C, and -55 C to 125 C. Failure mechanisms as well as cycles to failure for thermal shock and thermal cycling conditions in the range of -55 C to 125 C were compared. Projection to other temperature cycling ranges using a modified Coffin-Manson relationship is also presented.

  17. [Immunohistochemical assay of cellular cycle markers: an alternative to chip-diagnosis of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Petrov, S V; Orlova, R V; Raskin, G A; Khacanov, R Sh

    2007-01-01

    A new method of evaluation of immunohistochemical markers of cellular cycle (K-67, topoisomerase-II-alpha, P21/wafl), adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, CD33v6), oncoprotein HER-2, and estrogen and progesterone receptors of tumor is presented. High-precision count of tumor cells, which express each marker, was carried out using serial paraffin sections and Leica CTR5000 morphometric station and Leica Quin Plus program, to identify tumor sensitivity to anthracyclines and taxanes. Proliferative potential, tumor sensitivity to key chemical drugs and prognosis were evaluated on the basis of the evidence obtained and, in particular, the role of the proteins under study played in cellular cycle.

  18. An Alternative Form of the Defense Mechanisms Inventory: Assessing Chinese University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Li-Fang

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the major weakness in the response format of the Defense Mechanisms Inventory and to use the information most relevant to the population concerned in the present study, an alternative form of the Defense Mechanisms Inventory (DMI-AF) was designed. The 80 Likert-scaled items in the inventory were tested among 385 university students in…

  19. Alternatives to Mechanical Drills for the Early Stages of Language Practice in Foreign Language Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aski, Janice M.

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing body of research indicating that mechanical drills do not facilitate the development of explicit or implicit knowledge. This study identifies the inadequate aspects of mechanical drills and offers alternative activities for the early stages of language practice, whose formats and features comply with recent research in the…

  20. An Alternative Form of the Defense Mechanisms Inventory: Assessing Chinese University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Li-Fang

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the major weakness in the response format of the Defense Mechanisms Inventory and to use the information most relevant to the population concerned in the present study, an alternative form of the Defense Mechanisms Inventory (DMI-AF) was designed. The 80 Likert-scaled items in the inventory were tested among 385 university students in…

  1. Alternatives to Mechanical Drills for the Early Stages of Language Practice in Foreign Language Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aski, Janice M.

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing body of research indicating that mechanical drills do not facilitate the development of explicit or implicit knowledge. This study identifies the inadequate aspects of mechanical drills and offers alternative activities for the early stages of language practice, whose formats and features comply with recent research in the…

  2. Alternative reactions at the interface of glycolysis and citric acid cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Harmen M; Kozak, Barbara U; Niemeijer, Matthijs S; Duine, Hendrik J; Luttik, Marijke A H; Boer, Viktor M; Kötter, Peter; Daran, Jean-Marc G; van Maris, Antonius J A; Pronk, Jack T

    2016-05-01

    Pyruvate and acetyl-coenzyme A, located at the interface between glycolysis and TCA cycle, are important intermediates in yeast metabolism and key precursors for industrially relevant products. Rational engineering of their supply requires knowledge of compensatory reactions that replace predominant pathways when these are inactivated. This study investigates effects of individual and combined mutations that inactivate the mitochondrial pyruvate-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex, extramitochondrial citrate synthase (Cit2) and mitochondrial CoA-transferase (Ach1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Additionally, strains with a constitutively expressed carnitine shuttle were constructed and analyzed. A predominant role of the PDH complex in linking glycolysis and TCA cycle in glucose-grown batch cultures could be functionally replaced by the combined activity of the cytosolic PDH bypass and Cit2. Strongly impaired growth and a high incidence of respiratory deficiency in pda1Δ ach1Δ strains showed that synthesis of intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA as a metabolic precursor requires activity of either the PDH complex or Ach1. Constitutive overexpression of AGP2, HNM1, YAT2, YAT1, CRC1 and CAT2 enabled the carnitine shuttle to efficiently link glycolysis and TCA cycle in l-carnitine-supplemented, glucose-grown batch cultures. Strains in which all known reactions at the glycolysis-TCA cycle interface were inactivated still grew slowly on glucose, indicating additional flexibility at this key metabolic junction. © FEMS 2016.

  3. Progress of Stirling cycle analysis and loss mechanism characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, R. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment of Stirling engine thermodynamic modeling and design codes shows a general deficiency; this deficiency is due to poor understanding of the fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena that occur in the oscillating flow and pressure level environment within the engines. Stirling engine thermodynamic loss mechanisms are listed. Several experimental and computational research efforts now underway to characterize various loss mechanisms are reviewed. The need for additional experimental rigs and rig upgrades is discussed. Recent developments and current efforts in Stirling engine thermodynamic modeling are also reviewed.

  4. Progress of Stirling cycle analysis and loss mechanism characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, R.C. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment of Stirling engine thermodynamic modeling and design codes shows a general deficiency; this deficiency is due to poor understanding of the fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena that occur in the oscillating flow and pressure level environment within the engines. Requirements for improving modeling and design are discussed. Stirling engine thermodynamic loss mechanisms are listed. Several experimental and computational research efforts now underway to characterize various loss mechanisms are reviewed. The need for additional experimental rigs and rig upgrades is discussed. Recent developments and current efforts in Stirling engine thermodynamic modeling are also reviewed.

  5. Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid waste management alternatives with consideration of uncertainty: SIWMS development and application

    SciTech Connect

    El Hanandeh, Ali; El-Zein, Abbas

    2010-05-15

    This paper describes the development and application of the Stochastic Integrated Waste Management Simulator (SIWMS) model. SIWMS provides a detailed view of the environmental impacts and associated costs of municipal solid waste (MSW) management alternatives under conditions of uncertainty. The model follows a life-cycle inventory approach extended with compensatory systems to provide more equitable bases for comparing different alternatives. Economic performance is measured by the net present value. The model is verified against four publicly available models under deterministic conditions and then used to study the impact of uncertainty on Sydney's MSW management 'best practices'. Uncertainty has a significant effect on all impact categories. The greatest effect is observed in the global warming category where a reversal of impact direction is predicted. The reliability of the system is most sensitive to uncertainties in the waste processing and disposal. The results highlight the importance of incorporating uncertainty at all stages to better understand the behaviour of the MSW system.

  6. The mechanisms underlying the production of discontinuous gas exchange cycles in insects.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philip G D

    2017-08-17

    This review examines the control of gas exchange in insects, specifically examining what mechanisms could explain the emergence of discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs). DGCs are gas exchange patterns consisting of alternating breath-hold periods and bouts of gas exchange. While all insects are capable of displaying a continuous pattern of gas exchange, this episodic pattern is known to occur within only some groups of insects and then only sporadically or during certain phases of their life cycle. Investigations into DGCs have tended to emphasise the role of chemosensory thresholds in triggering spiracle opening as critical for producing these gas exchange patterns. However, a chemosensory basis for episodic breathing also requires an as-of-yet unidentified hysteresis between internal respiratory stimuli, chemoreceptors, and the spiracles. What has been less appreciated is the role that the insect's central nervous system (CNS) might play in generating episodic patterns of ventilation. The active ventilation displayed by many insects during DGCs suggests that this pattern could be the product of directed control by the CNS rather than arising passively as a result of self-sustaining oscillations in internal oxygen and carbon dioxide levels. This paper attempts to summarise what is currently known about insect gas exchange regulation, examining the location and control of ventilatory pattern generators in the CNS, the influence of chemoreceptor feedback in the form of O2 and CO2/pH fluctuations in the haemolymph, and the role of state-dependent changes in CNS activity on ventilatory control. This information is placed in the context of what is currently known regarding the production of discontinuous gas exchange patterns.

  7. Mitochondrial Mechanisms of Redox Cycling Agents Implicated in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lopert, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Environmental agents have been implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) based on epidemiological studies and the ability of toxicants to replicate features of PD. However, the precise mechanisms by which toxicants induce dopaminergic toxicity observed in the idiopathic form of PD remain to be fully understood. The roles of ROS and mitochondria are strongly suggested in the mechanisms by which these toxicants exert dopaminergic toxicity. There are marked differences and similarities shared by the toxicants in increasing steady-state levels of mitochondrial ROS. Furthermore, toxicants increase steady-state mitochondrial ROS levels by stimulating the production, inhibiting the antioxidant pathways of both. This review will focus on the role of mitochondria and ROS in PD associated with environmental exposures to redox-based toxicants. PMID:25749885

  8. Benefits and risks of emerging technologies: integrating life cycle assessment and decision analysis to assess lumber treatment alternatives.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Michael P; Bates, Matthew E; Madison, Marcus; Linkov, Igor

    2014-10-07

    Assessing the best options among emerging technologies (e.g., new chemicals, nanotechnologies) is complicated because of trade-offs across benefits and risks that are difficult to quantify given limited and fragmented availability of information. This study demonstrates the integration of multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) to address technology alternative selection decisions. As a case study, prioritization of six lumber treatment alternatives [micronized copper quaternary (MCQ); alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ); water-borne copper naphthenate (CN); oil-borne copper naphthenate (CNo); water-borne copper quinolate (CQ); and water-borne zinc naphthenate (ZN)] for military use are considered. Multiattribute value theory (MAVT) is used to derive risk and benefit scores. Risk scores are calculated using a cradle-to-gate LCA. Benefit scores are calculated by scoring of cost, durability, and corrosiveness criteria. Three weighting schemes are used, representing Environmental, Military and Balanced stakeholder perspectives. Aggregated scores from all three perspectives show CQ to be the least favorable alterative. MCQ is identified as the most favorable alternative from the Environmental stakeholder perspective. From the Military stakeholder perspective, ZN is determined to be the most favorable alternative, followed closely by MCQ. This type of scoring and ranking of multiple heterogeneous criteria in a systematic and transparent way facilitates better justification of technology selection and regulation.

  9. Jet Propellant 8 versus Alternative Jet Fuels: A Life-Cycle Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    United States imports.26 The CBTL process uses three existing technologies to convert coal and biomass into liquid fuel: gasification , FT synthesis...and carbon capture and storage. Gasification converts coal and biomass into CO and H2, a mixture commonly referred to as “syngas.” FT synthesis...com- pare petroleum-derived jet fuel (i.e., JP-8) to an alternative jet fuel derived from a coal- biomass -to-liquid (CBTL) process. The EIO- LCA

  10. Three high duty cycle, space-qualified mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, David; Horber, Ralph; Wolfson, Jake

    1993-01-01

    The Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) is a scientific instrument aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. In 1995, the spacecraft will be put into a halo orbit about the L1 Lagrangian point (equal Sun and Earth gravity). The MDI looks at the sun continuously and takes a picture with a large format CCD camera every 3 seconds. The design goal of the mission is 6 years, so over 60 million pictures will be taken. The sun, being a high intensity source, provides a signal with a single pixel noise level of 0.2 percent. Many images are combined to measure the oscillatory motion of the sun so very high performance is required of the mechanisms in order that they not add noise to the data. The MDI instrument is made up of two parts, the electronics package and the optics package. This paper describes the design and testing of three mechanisms on the MDI which are required to operate large numbers of times.

  11. Effect of mechanical cycling on the flexural strength of densely sintered ceramics.

    PubMed

    Itinoche, Koiti Marco; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Oyafuso, Denise

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mechanical cycling on the biaxial flexural strength of two densely sintered ceramic materials. Disc shaped zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) and high alumina (Procera AllCeram) ceramic specimens (diameter: 15 mm and thickness: 1.2 mm) were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions. The specimens from each ceramic material (N=40, n=10/per group) were tested for flexural strength either with or without being subjected to mechanical cycling (20,000 cycles under 50 N load, immersion in distilled water at 37 degrees C) in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). High alumina ceramic specimens revealed significantly higher flexural strength values without and with mechanical cycling (647+/-48 and 630+/-43 MPa, respectively) than those of zirconia ceramic (497+/-35 and 458+/-53 MPa, respectively) (p<0.05). Mechanical cycling for 20,000 times under 50 N decreased the flexural strength values for both high alumina and zirconia ceramic but it was not statistically significant (p>0.05). High alumina ceramic revealed significantly higher mean flexural strength values than that of zirconia ceramic tested in this study either with or without mechanical cycling conditions.

  12. Microstructural fracture mechanics in high-cycle fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, E.R. de los; Navarro, A.

    1997-12-31

    Microstructural Fracture Mechanics principles are used to develop a model of crack growth in long life fatigue. In its simplest form microstructural modelling considers the material as a polycrystal of uniform grain size D, with a crack system divided into three zones: the crack, the plastic zone and the microstructural barrier zone. The solution of the equilibrium equation allows for the calculation of the stresses sustained by the crack wake, plastic zone, barrier zone and elastic enclave, and the crack tip plastic displacement {phi}. Crack growth rate is calculated through a Paris type relationship in terms of {phi}, i.e., da/dN = C{phi}{sup n}. Conditions for crack arrest and instability are established.

  13. Life cycle assessment of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power plant and the impacts of key design alternatives.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, John J; Heath, Garvin A; Turchi, Craig S

    2011-03-15

    Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, CA, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle (LC) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrates salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its LC, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g of CO(2eq) per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJ(eq)/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce LC water consumption by 77% but increase LC GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase LC GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces LC GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

  14. Toxic emissions from mobile sources: a total fuel-cycle analysis for conventional and alternative fuel vehicles.

    PubMed

    Winebrake, J J; Wang, M Q; He, D

    2001-07-01

    Mobile sources are among the largest contributors of four hazardous air pollutants--benzene, 1,3-butadiene, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde--in urban areas. At the same time, federal and state governments are promoting the use of alternative fuel vehicles as a means to curb local air pollution. As yet, the impact of this movement toward alternative fuels with respect to toxic emissions has not been well studied. The purpose of this paper is to compare toxic emissions from vehicles operating on a variety of fuels, including reformulated gasoline (RFG), natural gas, ethanol, methanol, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and electricity. This study uses a version of Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model, appropriately modified to estimate toxic emissions. The GREET model conducts a total fuel-cycle analysis that calculates emissions from both downstream (e.g., operation of the vehicle) and upstream (e.g., fuel production and distribution) stages of the fuel cycle. We find that almost all of the fuels studied reduce 1,3-butadiene emissions compared with conventional gasoline (CG). However, the use of ethanol in E85 (fuel made with 85% ethanol) or RFG leads to increased acetaldehyde emissions, and the use of methanol, ethanol, and compressed natural gas (CNG) may result in increased formaldehyde emissions. When the modeling results for the four air toxics are considered together with their cancer risk factors, all the fuels and vehicle technologies show air toxic emission reduction benefits.

  15. Responses of methanogen mcrA genes and their transcripts to an alternate dry/wet cycle of paddy field soil.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke; Conrad, Ralf; Lu, Yahai

    2012-01-01

    Intermittent drainage can substantially reduce methane emission from rice fields, but the microbial mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, we determined the rates of methane production and emission, the dynamics of ferric iron and sulfate, and the abundance of methanogen mcrA genes (encoding the alpha subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase) and their transcripts in response to alternate dry/wet cycles in paddy field soil. We found that intermittent drainage did not affect the growth of rice plants but significantly reduced the rates of both methane production and emission. The dry/wet cycles also resulted in shifts of soil redox conditions, increasing the concentrations of ferric iron and sulfate in the soil. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that both mcrA gene copies and mcrA transcripts significantly decreased after dry/wet alternation compared to continuous flooding. Correlation and regression analyses showed that the abundance of mcrA genes and transcripts positively correlated with methane production potential and soil water content and negatively correlated with the concentrations of ferric iron and sulfate in the soil. However, the transcription of mcrA genes was reduced to a greater extent than the abundance of mcrA genes, resulting in very low mcrA transcript/gene ratios after intermittent drainage. Furthermore, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that the composition of methanogenic community remained stable under dry/wet cycles, whereas that of metabolically active methanogens strongly changed. Collectively, our study demonstrated a stronger effect of intermittent drainage on the abundance of mcrA transcripts than of mcrA genes in rice field soil.

  16. Responses of Methanogen mcrA Genes and Their Transcripts to an Alternate Dry/Wet Cycle of Paddy Field Soil

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Conrad, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Intermittent drainage can substantially reduce methane emission from rice fields, but the microbial mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, we determined the rates of methane production and emission, the dynamics of ferric iron and sulfate, and the abundance of methanogen mcrA genes (encoding the alpha subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase) and their transcripts in response to alternate dry/wet cycles in paddy field soil. We found that intermittent drainage did not affect the growth of rice plants but significantly reduced the rates of both methane production and emission. The dry/wet cycles also resulted in shifts of soil redox conditions, increasing the concentrations of ferric iron and sulfate in the soil. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that both mcrA gene copies and mcrA transcripts significantly decreased after dry/wet alternation compared to continuous flooding. Correlation and regression analyses showed that the abundance of mcrA genes and transcripts positively correlated with methane production potential and soil water content and negatively correlated with the concentrations of ferric iron and sulfate in the soil. However, the transcription of mcrA genes was reduced to a greater extent than the abundance of mcrA genes, resulting in very low mcrA transcript/gene ratios after intermittent drainage. Furthermore, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that the composition of methanogenic community remained stable under dry/wet cycles, whereas that of metabolically active methanogens strongly changed. Collectively, our study demonstrated a stronger effect of intermittent drainage on the abundance of mcrA transcripts than of mcrA genes in rice field soil. PMID:22101043

  17. Quantifying variability in life cycle greenhouse gas inventories of alternative middle distillate transportation fuels.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Russell W; Wong, Hsin Min; Hileman, James I

    2011-05-15

    The presence of variability in life cycle analysis (LCA) is inherent due to both inexact LCA procedures and variation of numerical inputs. Variability in LCA needs to be clearly distinguished from uncertainty. This paper uses specific examples from the production of diesel and jet fuels from 14 different feedstocks to demonstrate general trends in the types and magnitudes of variability present in life cycle greenhouse gas (LC-GHG) inventories of middle distillate fuels. Sources of variability have been categorized as pathway specific, coproduct usage and allocation, and land use change. The results of this research demonstrate that subjective choices such as coproduct usage and allocation methodology can be more important sources of variability in the LC-GHG inventory of a fuel option than the process and energy use of fuel production. Through the application of a consistent analysis methodology across all fuel options, the influence of these subjective biases is minimized, and the LC-GHG inventories for each feedstock-to-fuel option can be effectively compared and discussed. By considering the types and magnitudes of variability across multiple fuel pathways, it is evident that LCA results should be presented as a range instead of a point value. The policy implications of this are discussed.

  18. Environmental impacts of remediation of a trichloroethene-contaminated site: life cycle assessment of remediation alternatives.

    PubMed

    Lemming, Gitte; Hauschild, Michael Z; Chambon, Julie; Binning, Philip J; Bulle, Cécile; Margni, Manuele; Bjerg, Poul L

    2010-12-01

    The environmental impacts of remediation of a chloroethene-contaminated site were evaluated using life cycle assessment (LCA). The compared remediation options are (i) in situ bioremediation by enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD), (ii) in situ thermal desorption (ISTD), and (iii) excavation of the contaminated soil followed by off-site treatment and disposal. The results showed that choosing the ERD option will reduce the life-cycle impacts of remediation remarkably compared to choosing either ISTD or excavation, which are more energy-demanding. In addition to the secondary impacts of remediation, this study includes assessment of local toxic impacts (the primary impact) related to the on-site contaminant leaching to groundwater and subsequent human exposure via drinking water. The primary human toxic impacts were high for ERD due to the formation and leaching of chlorinated degradation products, especially vinyl chloride during remediation. However, the secondary human toxic impacts of ISTD and excavation are likely to be even higher, particularly due to upstream impacts from steel production. The newly launched model, USEtox, was applied for characterization of primary and secondary toxic impacts and combined with a site-dependent fate model of the leaching of chlorinated ethenes from the fractured clay till site.

  19. Alternative Applications of Homogeneous Thoria-Urania Fuel in Light Water Reactors to Enhance the Economics of the Thorium Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyung-Kook; Noh, Jae-Man; Yoo, Jae-Woon; Cho, Jin-Young; Park, Sang-Yoon; Chang, Moon-Hee

    2004-07-15

    Since the thorium-based fuel has many incentives including the reduction of plutonium generation and long-lived radiotoxic isotope production, the research on the use of thorium as a nuclear fuel for nuclear power reactors has been performed and will last for a long time. Focus is on the fuel economics of the thorium-based cycle for light water reactors (LWRs). Analyses show that the neutronic behavior of a mixed thorium and uranium dioxide (Th + U)O{sub 2} core in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) will not be significantly different from that of a UO{sub 2} core. This implies that homogeneous (Th + U)O{sub 2} fuel can be used in PWRs instead of the current UO{sub 2} fuel without any significant mechanical modification of the fuel design and without any change in the nuclear design limits. However, homogeneous (Th + U)O{sub 2} has not shown any economic advantage over UO{sub 2} fuel when current fuel management strategies are used. Thus, alternative applications of homogeneous (Th + U)O{sub 2} fuel in LWRs have been investigated to enhance the economics of the thorium fuel cycle. Specifically, thorium-uranium fuel with a {sup 235}U enrichment significantly <19.5 wt%, mixed cores of both duplex (Th + U)O{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies, and use of homogeneous thorium-uranium fuel in small-to-medium PWRs with a 5-yr cycle length have been investigated. The proposed alternatives result in far better fuel economics than the homogeneous thorium-uranium fuel cycle. However, the proposed alternatives do not show the economic merit of thorium-based fuel options for existing LWRs as compared to the UO{sub 2} fuel option. However, the inclusion of spent-fuel disposal costs in the fuel cost estimate makes (Th + U)O{sub 2} fuel competitive with UO{sub 2} fuel. In the case of a spent-fuel disposal cost higher than 700 US$/kg HM, the long-lived core with better economic potential than the UO{sub 2}-fueled core may be realized with the homogeneous (Th + U)O{sub 2} fuel.

  20. The effect of a thermal renal denervation cycle on the mechanical properties of the arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Alan A; Sheridan, William S; Sharif, Faisal; Murphy, Bruce P

    2014-11-28

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect that a thermal renal denervation cycle has on the mechanical properties of the arterial wall. Porcine arterial tissue specimens were tested in three groups: native tissue, decellularized tissue, decellularized with collagen digestion (e.g. elastin only). One arterial specimen was used as an unheated control specimen while another paired specimen was subjected to a thermal cycle of 70°C for 120s (n=10). The specimens were subjected to tensile loading and a shrinkage analysis. We observed two key results: The mechanical properties associated with the elastin extracellular matrix (ECM) were not affected by the thermal cycle. The effect of the thermal cycle on the collagen (ECM) was significant, in both the native and decellularized groups the thermal cycle caused a statistically significant decrease in stiffness, and failure strength, moreover the native tissue demonstrated a 27% reduction in lumen area post exposure to the thermal cycle. We have demonstrated that a renal denervation thermal cycle can significantly affect the mechanical properties of an arterial wall, and these changes in stiffness and failure strength were associated with alterations to the collagen rather than the elastin extracellular matrix component.

  1. Regulation of alternative splicing by local histone modifications: potential roles for RNA-guided mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua-Lin; Luo, Guangbin; Wise, Jo Ann; Lou, Hua

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms through which alternative splicing and histone modifications regulate gene expression are now understood in considerable detail. Here, we discuss recent studies that connect these two previously separate avenues of investigation, beginning with the unexpected discoveries that nucleosomes are preferentially positioned over exons and DNA methylation and certain histone modifications also show exonic enrichment. These findings have profound implications linking chromatin structure, histone modification and splicing regulation. Complementary single gene studies provided insight into the mechanisms through which DNA methylation and histones modifications modulate alternative splicing patterns. Here, we review an emerging theme resulting from these studies: RNA-guided mechanisms integrating chromatin modification and splicing. Several groundbreaking papers reported that small noncoding RNAs affect alternative exon usage by targeting histone methyltransferase complexes to form localized facultative heterochromatin. More recent studies provided evidence that pre-messenger RNA itself can serve as a guide to enable precise alternative splicing regulation via local recruitment of histone-modifying enzymes, and emerging evidence points to a similar role for long noncoding RNAs. An exciting challenge for the future is to understand the impact of local modulation of transcription elongation rates on the dynamic interplay between histone modifications, alternative splicing and other processes occurring on chromatin. PMID:24081581

  2. Life cycle assessment of a power tower concentrating solar plant and the impacts of key design alternatives.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Michael B; Heath, Garvin A; Burkhardt, John J; Turchi, Craig S

    2013-06-04

    A hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) is used to evaluate four sustainability metrics over the life cycle of a power tower concentrating solar power (CSP) facility: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). The reference design is for a dry-cooled, 106 MW(net) power tower facility located near Tucson, AZ that uses a mixture of mined nitrate salts as the heat transfer fluid and storage medium, a two-tank thermal energy storage system designed for six hours of full load-equivalent storage, and receives auxiliary power from the local electric grid. A thermocline-based storage system, synthetically derived salts, and natural gas auxiliary power are evaluated as design alternatives. Over its life cycle, the reference plant is estimated to have GHG emissions of 37 g CO2eq/kWh, consume 1.4 L/kWh of water and 0.49 MJ/kWh of energy, and have an EPBT of 15 months. Using synthetic salts is estimated to increase GHG emissions by 12%, CED by 7%, and water consumption by 4% compared to mined salts. Natural gas auxiliary power results in greater than 10% decreases in GHG emissions, water consumption, and CED. The thermocline design is most advantageous when coupled with the use of synthetic salts.

  3. Experimental evolution of an alternating uni- and multicellular life cycle in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, William C.; Herron, Matthew D.; Howell, Kathryn; Pentz, Jennifer T.; Rosenzweig, Frank; Travisano, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The transition to multicellularity enabled the evolution of large, complex organisms, but early steps in this transition remain poorly understood. Here we show that multicellular complexity, including development from a single cell, can evolve rapidly in a unicellular organism that has never had a multicellular ancestor. We subject the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to conditions that favour multicellularity, resulting in the evolution of a multicellular life cycle in which clusters reproduce via motile unicellular propagules. While a single-cell genetic bottleneck during ontogeny is widely regarded as an adaptation to limit among-cell conflict, its appearance very early in this transition suggests that it did not evolve for this purpose. Instead, we find that unicellular propagules are adaptive even in the absence of intercellular conflict, maximizing cluster-level fecundity. These results demonstrate that the unicellular bottleneck, a trait essential for evolving multicellular complexity, can arise rapidly via co-option of the ancestral unicellular form. PMID:24193369

  4. 45 CFR 148.128 - State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms. 148.128 Section 148.128 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE...

  5. 45 CFR 148.128 - State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms. 148.128 Section 148.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE...

  6. 45 CFR 148.128 - State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms. 148.128 Section 148.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE...

  7. 45 CFR 148.128 - State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms. 148.128 Section 148.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE...

  8. Effect of root canal preparation, type of endodontic post and mechanical cycling on root fracture strength

    PubMed Central

    RIPPE, Marília Pivetta; SANTINI, Manuela Favarin; BIER, Carlos Alexandre Souza; BALDISSARA, Paolo; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of the type of root canal preparation, intraradicular post and mechanical cycling on the fracture strength of roots. Material and Methods eighty human single rooted teeth were divided into 8 groups according to the instruments used for root canal preparation (manual or rotary instruments), the type of intraradicular post (fiber posts- FRC and cast post and core- CPC) and the use of mechanical cycling (MC) as follows: Manual and FRC; Manual, FRC and MC; Manual and CPC; Manual, CPC and MC; Rotary and FRC; Rotary, FRC and MC; Rotary and CPC; Rotary, CPC and MC. The filling was performed by lateral compactation. All root canals were prepared for a post with a 10 mm length, using the custom #2 bur of the glass fiber post system. For mechanical cycling, the protocol was applied as follows: an angle of incidence of 45°, 37°C, 88 N, 4 Hz, 2 million pulses. All groups were submitted to fracture strength test in a 45° device with 1 mm/ min cross-head speed until failure occurred. Results The 3-way ANOVA showed that the root canal preparation strategy (p<0.03) and post type (p<0.0001) affected the fracture strength results, while mechanical cycling (p=0.29) did not. Conclusion The root canal preparation strategy only influenced the root fracture strength when restoring with a fiber post and mechanical cycling, so it does not seem to be an important factor in this scenario. PMID:25025556

  9. Impact of Wetting/Oven-Drying Cycles on the Mechanical and Physical Properties of Birch Plywood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooru, M.; Kasepuu, K.; Kask, R.; Lille, H.

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to explore some physical and mechanical properties and the dimensional stability of birch (Betula sp.) nine-ply veneers glued with phenol-formaldehyde (PF) after 10 cycles of soaking/oven-drying. The properties to be determined were bending strength (BS), modulus of elasticity in bending (MOE), Janka hardness (JH) and thickness swelling (TS), which were tested according to the European Standards (EN). An analytical equation was used for approximation of the change in the physical and mechanical properties of the samples depending on the number of cycles. It was shown that the values of the studied properties were affected most by the first soaking and drying cycles after which BS and MOE decreased continuously while the values of JH and TS stabilized. After 10 cycles the final values of BS, MOE, JH and TS accounted for 75-81%, 95%, 82% and 98.5% of the initial values, respectively.

  10. Evaluation of different end-of-life management alternatives for used natural cork stoppers through life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Demertzi, Martha; Dias, Ana Cláudia; Matos, Arlindo; Arroja, Luís Manuel

    2015-12-01

    An important aspect of sustainable development is the implementation of effective and sustainable waste management strategies. The present study focuses on a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach to different waste management strategies for natural cork stoppers, namely incineration at a municipal solid waste incinerator, landfilling in a sanitary landfill, and recycling. In the literature, there are no LCA studies analyzing in detail the end-of-life stage of natural cork stoppers as well as other cork products. In addition, cork is usually treated as wood at the end-of-life stage. Thus, the outcome of this study can provide an important insight into this matter. The results showed that different management alternatives, namely incineration and recycling, could be chosen depending on the impact category considered. The former alternative presented the best environmental results in the impact categories of climate change, ozone depletion and acidification, while the latter for photochemical ozone formation and mineral and fossil resource depletion. The landfilling alternative did not present the best environmental performance in any of the impact categories. However, when the biogenic carbon dioxide emission was assessed for the climate change category, the landfilling alternative was found to be the most effective since most of the biogenic carbon would be permanently stored in the cork products and not emitted into the atmosphere. A sensitivity analysis was performed and the results showed that there are various parameters that can significantly influence the results (e.g., carbon content in cork and decay rate of cork in the landfill). Thus, LCA studies should include a detailed description concerning their assumptions when the end-of-life stage is included in the boundaries since they can influence the results, and furthermore, to facilitate the comparison of different end-of-life scenarios. The present study and the obtained results could be useful for the

  11. International Space Station Passive and Active Common Berthing Mechanism Thermal Cycle Test.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    The International Space Station Alpha Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) thermal cycle test was conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center...AEDC) 12V Thermal Vacuum Chamber. The CBM is the primary mechanical interface for joining the International Space Station Alpha modules on-orbit. The...Berthing Mechanism developed under the NASA-MSFC/Boeing International Space Station Alpha program. Performance parameters validated by tests include: thermal

  12. Alternative "global warming" metrics in life cycle assessment: a case study with existing transportation data.

    PubMed

    Peters, Glen P; Aamaas, Borgar; T Lund, Marianne; Solli, Christian; Fuglestvedt, Jan S

    2011-10-15

    The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) impact category "global warming" compares emissions of long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs) using Global Warming Potential (GWP) with a 100-year time-horizon as specified in the Kyoto Protocol. Two weaknesses of this approach are (1) the exclusion of short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs) and biophysical factors despite their established importance, and (2) the use of a particular emission metric (GWP) with a choice of specific time-horizons (20, 100, and 500 years). The GWP and the three time-horizons were based on an illustrative example with value judgments and vague interpretations. Here we illustrate, using LCA data of the transportation sector, the importance of SLCFs relative to LLGHGs, different emission metrics, and different treatments of time. We find that both the inclusion of SLCFs and the choice of emission metric can alter results and thereby change mitigation priorities. The explicit inclusion of time, both for emissions and impacts, can remove value-laden assumptions and provide additional information for impact assessments. We believe that our results show that a debate is needed in the LCA community on the impact category "global warming" covering which emissions to include, the emission metric(s) to use, and the treatment of time.

  13. The Primary and Secondary Production of Germanium: A Life-Cycle Assessment of Different Process Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertz, Benedicte; Verhelle, Jensen; Schurmans, Maarten

    2015-02-01

    Germanium is a semiconducting metalloid element used in optical fibers, catalysis, infrared optics, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes. The need for Ge in these markets is considered to increase by a steady ~1% on a yearly basis. Its economic importance, coupled with the identified supply risks, has led to the classification of germanium as a critical raw material within Europe. Since the early 1950s, Umicore Electro-Optic Materials has supplied germanium-based materials solutions to its markets around the world. Umicore extracts germanium from a wide range of refining and recycling feeds. The main objectives of this study were to quantify the potential environmental impacts of the production of germanium from production scraps from the photovoltaic industry and to compare them with the potential impacts of the primary production of germanium from coal. The data related to the secondary production are Umicore-specific data. Environmental impact scores have been calculated for the impact categories recommended by the International reference life cycle data system. The comparison of the primary and secondary production highlights the benefit linked to the recycling of metals.

  14. CYCLE pilot: a protocol for a pilot randomised study of early cycle ergometry versus routine physiotherapy in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Alexander J; Clarke, France; Herridge, Margaret S; Koo, Karen K Y; Rudkowski, Jill; Seely, Andrew J E; Pellizzari, Joseph R; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Mourtzakis, Marina; Karachi, Timothy; Cook, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early exercise with in-bed cycling as part of an intensive care unit (ICU) rehabilitation programme has the potential to improve physical and functional outcomes following critical illness. The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of enrolling adults in a multicentre pilot randomised clinical trial (RCT) of early in-bed cycling versus routine physiotherapy to inform a larger RCT. Methods and analysis 60-patient parallel group pilot RCT in 7 Canadian medical-surgical ICUs. We will include all previously ambulatory adult patients within the first 0–4 days of mechanical ventilation, without exclusion criteria. After informed consent, patients will be randomised using a web-based, centralised electronic system, to 30 min of in-bed leg cycling in addition to routine physiotherapy, 5 days per week, for the duration of their ICU stay (28 days maximum) or routine physiotherapy alone. We will measure patients' muscle strength (Medical Research Council Sum Score, quadriceps force) and function (Physical Function in ICU Test (scored), 30 s sit-to-stand, 2 min walk test) at ICU awakening, ICU discharge and hospital discharge. Our 4 feasibility outcomes are: (1) patient accrual of 1–2 patients per month per centre, (2) protocol violation rate <20%, (3) outcome measure ascertainment >80% at the 3 time points and (4) blinded outcomes ascertainment >80% at hospital discharge. Hospital outcome assessors are blinded to group assignment, whereas participants, ICU physiotherapists, ICU caregivers, research coordinators and ICU outcome assessors are not blinded to group assignment. We will analyse feasibility outcomes with descriptive statistics. Ethics and dissemination Each participating centre will obtain local ethics approval, and results of the study will be published to inform the design and conduct of a future multicentre RCT of in-bed cycling to improve physical outcomes in ICU survivors. Trial registration number NCT02377830; Pre

  15. Signal of Acceleration and Physical Mechanism of Water Cycle in Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guo-Lin; Wu, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Global warming accelerates water cycle with features of regional difference. However, little is known about the physical mechanism behind the phenomenon. To reveal the links between water cycle and climatic environment, we analyzed the changes of water cycle elements and their relationships with climatic and environmental factors. We found that when global warming was significant during the period of 1986-2003, the precipitation in Tarim mountains as well as Xinjiang increased rapidly except for Tarim plains, which indicated that there existed a signal of acceleration for water cycle in Xinjiang. The speed of water cycle is mainly affected by altitude, latitude, longitude, slope direction, and the most fundamental element is temperature. Moreover, according to Clausius-Kela Bai Lung relation, we found that the climate change induced the increase of temperature and accelerated the local water cycle only for the wet places. Our results provide a possible physical mechanisms of water cycle and thus well link the climate change to water circulation. PMID:27907078

  16. On the potential alternate binding change mechanism in a dimeric structure of Pyruvate Phosphate Dikinase.

    PubMed

    Ciupka, Daniel; Gohlke, Holger

    2017-08-14

    The pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) reaction mechanism is characterized by a distinct spatial separation of reaction centers and large conformational changes involving an opening-closing motion of the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and a swiveling motion of the central domain (CD). However, why PPDK is active only in a dimeric form and to what extent an alternate binding change mechanism could underlie this fact has remained elusive. We performed unbiased molecular dynamics simulations, configurational free energy computations, and rigidity analysis to address this question. Our results support the hypothesis that PPDK dimerization influences the opening-closing motion of the NBDs, and that this influence is mediated via the CDs of both chains. Such an influence would be a prerequisite for an alternate binding change mechanism to occur. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a possible explanation has been suggested as to why only dimeric PPDK is active.

  17. Cycle training induces muscle hypertrophy and strength gain: strategies and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hayao; Loenneke, J P; Thiebaud, R S; Abe, T

    2015-03-01

    Cycle training is widely performed as a major part of any exercise program seeking to improve aerobic capacity and cardiovascular health. However, the effect of cycle training on muscle size and strength gain still requires further insight, even though it is known that professional cyclists display larger muscle size compared to controls. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss the effects of cycle training on muscle size and strength of the lower extremity and the possible mechanisms for increasing muscle size with cycle training. It is plausible that cycle training requires a longer period to significantly increase muscle size compared to typical resistance training due to a much slower hypertrophy rate. Cycle training induces muscle hypertrophy similarly between young and older age groups, while strength gain seems to favor older adults, which suggests that the probability for improving in muscle quality appears to be higher in older adults compared to young adults. For young adults, higher-intensity intermittent cycling may be required to achieve strength gains. It also appears that muscle hypertrophy induced by cycle training results from the positive changes in muscle protein net balance.

  18. Dehydration rate and time of desiccation affect recovery of the lichen alga [corrected] Trebouxia erici: alternative and classical protective mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gasulla, Francisco; de Nova, Pedro Gómez; Esteban-Carrasco, Alberto; Zapata, José M; Barreno, Eva; Guéra, Alfredo

    2009-12-01

    The mechanisms involved in desiccation tolerance of lichens and their photobionts are still poorly understood. To better understand these mechanisms we have studied dehydration rate and desiccation time in Trebouxia, the most abundant chlorophytic photobiont in lichen. Our findings indicate that the drying rate has a profound effect on the recovery of photosynthetic activity of algae after rehydration, greater than the effects of desiccation duration. The basal fluorescence (F'(o)) values in desiccated algae were significantly higher after rapid dehydration, than after slow dehydration, suggesting higher levels of light energy dissipation in slow-dried algae. Higher values of PSII electron transport were recovered after rehydration of slow-dried Trebouxia erici compared to rapid-dried algae. The main component of non-photochemical quenching after slow dehydration was energy dependent (q (E)), whereas after fast dehydration it was photoinhibition (q (I)). Although q (E) seems to play a role during desiccation recovery, no significant variations were detected in the xanthophyll cycle components. Desiccation did not affect PSI functionality. Classical antioxidant activities like superoxide dismutase or peroxidase decreased during desiccation and early recovery. Dehydrins were detected in the lichen-forming algae T. erici and were constitutively expressed. There is probably a minimal period required to develop strategies which will facilitate transition to the desiccated state in this algae. In this process, the xanthophyll cycle and classical antioxidant mechanisms play a very limited role, if any. However, our results indicate that there is an alternative mechanism of light energy dissipation during desiccation, where activation is dependent on a sufficiently slow dehydration rate.

  19. Emissions tradeoffs among alternative marine fuels: total fuel cycle analysis of residual oil, marine gas oil, and marine diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Corbett, James J; Winebrake, James J

    2008-04-01

    Worldwide concerns about sulfur oxide (SOx) emissions from ships are motivating the replacement of marine residual oil (RO) with cleaner, lower-sulfur fuels, such as marine gas oil (MGO) and marine diesel oil (MDO). Vessel operators can use MGO and MDO directly or blended with RO to achieve environmental and economic objectives. Although expected to be much cleaner in terms of criteria pollutants, these fuels require additional energy in the upstream stages of the fuel cycle (i.e., fuel processing and refining), and thus raise questions about the net impacts on greenhouse gas emissions (primarily carbon dioxide [CO2]) because of production and use. This paper applies the Total Energy and Environmental Analysis for Marine Systems (TEAMS) model to conduct a total fuel cycle analysis of RO, MGO, MDO, and associated blends for a typical container ship. MGO and MDO blends achieve significant (70-85%) SOx emissions reductions compared with RO across a range of fuel quality and refining efficiency assumptions. We estimate CO2 increases of less than 1% using best estimates of fuel quality and refinery efficiency parameters and demonstrate how these results vary based on parameter assumptions. Our analysis suggests that product refining efficiency influences the CO2 tradeoff more than differences in the physical and energy parameters of the alternative fuels, suggesting that modest increases in CO2 could be offset by efficiency improvements at some refineries. Our results help resolve conflicting estimates of greenhouse gas tradeoffs associated with fuel switching and other emissions control policies.

  20. Comparative alternative materials assessment to screen toxicity hazards in the life cycle of CIGS thin film photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Daniel A; Yu, Mengjing; Lam, Carl W; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Schoenung, Julie M

    2013-09-15

    Copper-indium-gallium-selenium-sulfide (CIGS) thin film photovoltaics are increasingly penetrating the market supply for consumer solar panels. Although CIGS is attractive for producing less greenhouse gas emissions than fossil-fuel based energy sources, CIGS manufacturing processes and solar cell devices use hazardous materials that should be carefully considered in evaluating and comparing net environmental benefits of energy products. Through this research, we present a case study on the toxicity hazards associated with alternative materials selection for CIGS manufacturing. We applied two numeric models, The Green Screen for Safer Chemicals and the Toxic Potential Indicator. To improve the sensitivity of the model outputs, we developed a novel, life cycle thinking based hazard assessment method that facilitates the projection of hazards throughout material life cycles. Our results show that the least hazardous CIGS solar cell device and manufacturing protocol consist of a titanium substrate, molybdenum metal back electrode, CuInS₂ p-type absorber deposited by spray pyrolysis, ZnS buffer deposited by spray ion layer gas reduction, ZnO:Ga transparent conducting oxide (TCO) deposited by sputtering, and the encapsulant polydimethylsiloxane.

  1. Strategic Grassland Bird Conservation throughout the Annual Cycle: Linking Policy Alternatives, Landowner Decisions, and Biological Population Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Drum, Ryan G.; Ribic, Christine A.; Koch, Katie; Lonsdorf, Eric; Grant, Evan; Ahlering, Marissa; Barnhill, Laurel; Dailey, Thomas; Lor, Socheata; Mueller, Connie; Pavlacky, David C.; Rideout, Catherine; Sample, David

    2015-01-01

    Grassland bird habitat has declined substantially in the United States. Remaining grasslands are increasingly fragmented, mostly privately owned, and vary greatly in terms of habitat quality and protection status. A coordinated strategic response for grassland bird conservation is difficult, largely due to the scope and complexity of the problem, further compounded by biological, sociological, and economic uncertainties. We describe the results from a collaborative Structured Decision Making (SDM) workshop focused on linking social and economic drivers of landscape change to grassland bird population outcomes. We identified and evaluated alternative strategies for grassland bird conservation using a series of rapid prototype models. We modeled change in grassland and agriculture cover in hypothetical landscapes resulting from different landowner decisions in response to alternative socio-economic conservation policy decisions. Resulting changes in land cover at all three stages of the annual cycle (breeding, wintering, and migration) were used to estimate changes in grassland bird populations. Our results suggest that successful grassland bird conservation may depend upon linkages with ecosystem services on working agricultural lands and grassland-based marketing campaigns to engage the public. With further development, spatial models that link landowner decisions with biological outcomes can be essential tools for making conservation policy decisions. A coordinated non-traditional partnership will likely be necessary to clearly understand and systematically respond to the many conservation challenges facing grassland birds. PMID:26569108

  2. Solid-state fermentation and composting as alternatives to treat hair waste: A life-cycle assessment comparative approach.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Eva; Komilis, Dimitrios; Sánchez, Antoni

    2017-07-01

    One of the wastes associated with leather production in tannery industries is the hair residue generated during the dehairing process. Hair wastes are mainly dumped or managed through composting but recent studies propose the treatment of hair wastes through solid-state fermentation (SSF) to obtain proteases and compost. These enzymes are suitable for its use in an enzymatic dehairing process, as an alternative to the current chemical dehairing process. In the present work, two different scenarios for the valorization of the hair waste are proposed and assessed by means of life-cycle assessment: composting and SSF for protease production. Detailed data on hair waste composting and on SSF protease production are gathered from previous studies performed by our research group and from a literature survey. Background inventory data are mainly based on Ecoinvent version 3 from software SimaPro® 8. The main aim of this study was to identify which process results in the highest environmental impact. The SSF process was found to have lower environmental impacts than composting, due to the fact that the enzyme use in the dehairing process prevents the use of chemicals traditionally used in the dehairing process. This permits to reformulate an industrial process from the classical approach of waste management to a novel alternative based on circular economy.

  3. Hybrid life-cycle assessment (LCA) of CO2 emission with management alternatives for household food wastes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Rokuta; Nansai, Keisuke; Fujii, Minoru; Hashimoto, Seiji

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we conducted a hybrid life-cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate reductions in CO(2) emissions by food waste biogasification of household food wastes in Japan. Two alternative scenarios were examined. In one alternative (Ref), all combustible municipal solid wastes (MSWs), including food waste, are incinerated. In the other (Bio), food waste is biogasified, while the other combustible wastes are incinerated. An inventory analysis of energy and material flow in the MSW management system was conducted. Subsequently, the inventory data were summarized into an input-output format, and a make-use input-output framework was applied. Furthermore, a production equilibrium model was established using a matrix representing the input- output relationship of energy and materials among the processes and sectors. Several levels of power generation efficiency from incineration were applied as a sensitivity analysis. The hybrid LCA indicated that the difference between the Bio and Ref scenarios, from the perspective of CO( 2) emissions, is relatively small. However, a 13-14% reduction of CO(2) emissions of the total waste management sector in Japan may be achieved by improving the efficiency of power generation from incineration from 10% to 25%.

  4. Strategic Grassland Bird Conservation throughout the annual cycle: Linking policy alternatives, landowner decisions, and biological population outcomes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drum, Ryan G.; Ribic, Christine; Koch, Katie; Lonsdorf, Eric V.; Grant, Edward C.; Ahlering, Marissa; Barnhill, Laurel; Dailey, Thomas; Lor, Socheata; Mueller, Connie; Pavlacky, D.C.; Rideout, Catherine; Sample, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Grassland bird habitat has declined substantially in the United States. Remaining grasslands are increasingly fragmented, mostly privately owned, and vary greatly in terms of habitat quality and protection status. A coordinated strategic response for grassland bird conservation is difficult, largely due to the scope and complexity of the problem, further compounded by biological, sociological, and economic uncertainties. We describe the results from a collaborative Structured Decision Making (SDM) workshop focused on linking social and economic drivers of landscape change to grassland bird population outcomes. We identified and evaluated alternative strategies for grassland bird conservation using a series of rapid prototype models. We modeled change in grassland and agriculture cover in hypothetical landscapes resulting from different landowner decisions in response to alternative socio-economic conservation policy decisions. Resulting changes in land cover at all three stages of the annual cycle (breeding, wintering, and migration) were used to estimate changes in grassland bird populations. Our results suggest that successful grassland bird conservation may depend upon linkages with ecosystem services on working agricultural lands and grassland-based marketing campaigns to engage the public. With further development, spatial models that link landowner decisions with biological outcomes can be essential tools for making conservation policy decisions. A coordinated non-traditional partnership will likely be necessary to clearly understand and systematically respond to the many conservation challenges facing grassland birds.

  5. Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid waste management alternatives with consideration of uncertainty: SIWMS development and application.

    PubMed

    Hanandeh, Ali El; El-Zein, Abbas

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the development and application of the Stochastic Integrated Waste Management Simulator (SIWMS) model. SIWMS provides a detailed view of the environmental impacts and associated costs of municipal solid waste (MSW) management alternatives under conditions of uncertainty. The model follows a life-cycle inventory approach extended with compensatory systems to provide more equitable bases for comparing different alternatives. Economic performance is measured by the net present value. The model is verified against four publicly available models under deterministic conditions and then used to study the impact of uncertainty on Sydney's MSW management 'best practices'. Uncertainty has a significant effect on all impact categories. The greatest effect is observed in the global warming category where a reversal of impact direction is predicted. The reliability of the system is most sensitive to uncertainties in the waste processing and disposal. The results highlight the importance of incorporating uncertainty at all stages to better understand the behaviour of the MSW system. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Strategic Grassland Bird Conservation throughout the Annual Cycle: Linking Policy Alternatives, Landowner Decisions, and Biological Population Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Drum, Ryan G; Ribic, Christine A; Koch, Katie; Lonsdorf, Eric; Grant, Evan; Ahlering, Marissa; Barnhill, Laurel; Dailey, Thomas; Lor, Socheata; Mueller, Connie; Pavlacky, David C; Rideout, Catherine; Sample, David

    2015-01-01

    Grassland bird habitat has declined substantially in the United States. Remaining grasslands are increasingly fragmented, mostly privately owned, and vary greatly in terms of habitat quality and protection status. A coordinated strategic response for grassland bird conservation is difficult, largely due to the scope and complexity of the problem, further compounded by biological, sociological, and economic uncertainties. We describe the results from a collaborative Structured Decision Making (SDM) workshop focused on linking social and economic drivers of landscape change to grassland bird population outcomes. We identified and evaluated alternative strategies for grassland bird conservation using a series of rapid prototype models. We modeled change in grassland and agriculture cover in hypothetical landscapes resulting from different landowner decisions in response to alternative socio-economic conservation policy decisions. Resulting changes in land cover at all three stages of the annual cycle (breeding, wintering, and migration) were used to estimate changes in grassland bird populations. Our results suggest that successful grassland bird conservation may depend upon linkages with ecosystem services on working agricultural lands and grassland-based marketing campaigns to engage the public. With further development, spatial models that link landowner decisions with biological outcomes can be essential tools for making conservation policy decisions. A coordinated non-traditional partnership will likely be necessary to clearly understand and systematically respond to the many conservation challenges facing grassland birds.

  7. Alternative programs to presynchronize estrous cycles in dairy cattle before a timed artificial insemination program.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J S

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to test potential presynchronization programs applied to cows before a timed artificial insemination (TAI) program to increase the percentage of cows ovulating in response to both GnRH injections of a TAI program and having a functional corpus luteum before the first GnRH injection of the TAI program. At calving, cows were blocked by lactation (1 vs. 2+) and assigned randomly to receive 1 of 5 presynchronization treatments. Two variants of the standard Presynch program were tested in which 2 injections of PGF2α were administered 14 d apart with either 14 d (Pre14; n=122), 12 d (Pre12; n=123), or 10 d (Pre10; n=151) intervening before a TAI program was initiated. Two other presynchronization programs consisted of administering a progesterone-releasing controlled internal drug release (CIDR) insert for 7 d plus PGF2α administration at insert removal. Insert removal occurred either 10 d (CIDR10; n=157) or 3 d (CIDR3; n=117) before a TAI program was initiated. The TAI program was a standard Cosynch program [injection of GnRH 7 d before (GnRH-1) and 72 h after (GnRH-2) PGF2α with TAI administered 72 h after PGF2α]. Cosynch served as the control (n=157), and cows were assumed to be starting this program at random stages of the estrous cycle. From a subset of cows per treatment (ranging from 49 to 51 cows each), blood samples were collected from coccygeal vessels by using evacuated tubes at d -28, -14, 0 (onset of TAI program), 7, 9, 14, and 21. Ovarian scans were conducted on d 0, 7, 9, 14, and 21 by transrectal ultrasonography. Diameters of follicles and corpus luteum were measured at each exam, and ovulation was determined on d 7 (response to GnRH-1 on d 0) and d 14 (response to GnRH-2 on d 10). Ovulatory incidence after GnRH-1 (47.1 to 67.3%) and GnRH-2 (78 to 90.2%) varied but did not differ among treatments. Before GnRH-1, progesterone concentrations were less in the CIDR3 treatment than in all other treatments. Before GnRH-2, progesterone was

  8. Cell cycle regulation as a mechanism for functional separation of the apparently redundant uracil DNA glycosylases TDG and UNG2

    PubMed Central

    Hardeland, Ulrike; Kunz, Christophe; Focke, Frauke; Szadkowski, Marta; Schär, Primo

    2007-01-01

    Human Thymine-DNA Glycosylase (TDG) is a member of the uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) superfamily. It excises uracil, thymine and a number of chemical base lesions when mispaired with guanine in double-stranded DNA. These activities are not unique to TDG; at least three additional proteins with similar enzymatic properties are present in mammalian cells. The successful co-evolution of these enzymes implies the existence of non-redundant biological functions that must be coordinated. Here, we report cell cycle regulation as a mechanism for the functional separation of apparently redundant DNA glycosylases. We show that cells entering S-phase eliminate TDG through the ubiquitin–proteasome system and then maintain a TDG-free condition until G2. Incomplete degradation of ectopically expressed TDG impedes S-phase progression and cell proliferation. The mode of cell cycle regulation of TDG is strictly inverse to that of UNG2, which peaks in and throughout S-phase and then declines to undetectable levels until it appears again just before the next S-phase. Thus, TDG- and UNG2-dependent base excision repair alternates throughout the cell cycle, and the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway constitutes the underlying regulatory system. PMID:17526518

  9. Cycling stability and degradation mechanism of LiMnPO4 based electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskon, J.; Pivko, M.; Jerman, I.; Tchernychova, E.; Logar, N. Zabukovec; Zorko, M.; Selih, V. S.; Dominko, R.; Gaberscek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Long term stability of LiMnPO4 particles with a crystallite size between ∼20 and 50 nm covered with a dense native carbon coating (14 wt.%) is demonstrated. More than 500 cycles at a rate of C/20, in the potential window of 2.7-4.5 V and a temperature of 55 °C were achieved. During most of the cycling the average capacity decay was less than 0.06% per cycle. After about 500 cycles a sudden capacity drop was observed. Degradation processes in various stages of cycling were thoroughly examined using a range of techniques. Severe surface film formation, manganese dissolution and degradation of LixMnPO4 accompanied by formation of Li4P2O7 were clearly identified. The good long term stability seems to be due to dense, protective carbon coating. Decomposition is most likely initiated at local defects in the microstructure of pyrolytic carbon coating around LiMnPO4 particles. In addition to known degradation mechanisms of LiMnPO4 we observed pronounced gradual amorphization of the olivine crystallites during long-term cycling at 55 °C. Finally, changes in morphology of the carbon black additive after prolonged cycling are reported and commented.

  10. [Effects of biochar on soil nitrogen cycle and related mechanisms: a review].

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi-Fan; Yang, Min; Dong, Da; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2013-09-01

    Biochar has its unique physical and chemical properties, playing a significant role in soil amelioration, nutrient retention, fertility improvement, and carbon storage, and being a hotspot in the research areas of soil ecosystem, biogeochemical cycling, and agricultural carbon sequestration. As a kind of anthropogenic materials, biochar has the potential in controlling soil nitrogen (N) cycle directly or indirectly, and thus, has profound effects on soil ecological functions. This paper reviewed the latest literatures regarding the effects of biochar applications on soil N cycle, with the focuses on the nitrogen species adsorption and the biochemical processes (nitrification, denitrification, and nitrogen fixation) , and analyzed the related action mechanisms of biochar. The future research areas for better understanding the interactions between biochar and soil N cycle were proposed.

  11. Role of mechanical loads in inducing in-cycle tensile stress in thermally grown oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, R.; Jansz, M.; Mossaddad, M.; Raghavan, S.; Okasinski, J.S.; Almer, J.D.; Perez, H.P.; Imbrie, P.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction results tracking the strain behavior of the various layers during a cycle, under thermo-mechanical conditions are presented in this work. The quantitative strain measurements here show that the thermally grown oxide briefly experiences in-plane tensile stress ({sigma}{sub 22} = +36.4 MPa) with increased mechanical loading during ramp-up in the thermal cycle. These findings are the first in situ experimental observations of these strains under thermo-mechanical conditions, envisaged to serve as a catalyst for crack initiation. The depth resolved measurements of strain taken during applied thermal and mechanical load in this work are a significant step towards achieving realistic testing conditions.

  12. Parametric Studies Of Failure Mechanisms In Thermal Barrier Coatings During Thermal Cycling Using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivathsa, B.; Das, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are widely used on different hot components of gas turbine engines such as blades and vanes. Although, several mechanisms for the failure of the TBCs have been suggested, it is largely accepted that the durability of these coatings is primarily determined by the residual stresses that are developed during the thermal cycling. In the present study, the residual stress build-up in an electron beam physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD) based TBCs on a coupon during thermal cycling has been studied by varying three parameters such as the cooling rate, TBC thickness and substrate thickness. A two-dimensional thermomechanical generalized plane strain finite element simulations have been performed for thousand cycles. It was observed that these variations change the stress profile significantly and the stress severity factor increases non-linearly. Overall, the predictions of the model agree with reported experimental results and help in predicting the failure mechanisms.

  13. A power-cycling-induced failure mechanism in IGBT multichip modules

    SciTech Connect

    Malberti, P.; Ciappa, M.; Cattomio, R.

    1995-12-31

    Catastrophic burn-out occurring during power-cycling of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT) multichip modules have been observed to arise as a secondary failure mechanism caused by the lifting of the emitter aluminum bonding wires. In effect, the successive lift-off of the aluminum wires results in a current crowding through few IGBT cells with consequent triggering of the internal parasitic thyristor-structure. Basing on failure analysis data, this paper presents a simple qualitative model for the time dependent lift-off of aluminum bondwires in IGBT modules occurring during either field operation, or accelerated tests. This power-cycling induced failure mechanism is described in terms of the reconstruction of the aluminum interconnection as consequence of plastic deformation. Some practical conclusions are finally drawn for power cycle testing and for optimal thermal design.

  14. Alternative splicing mechanisms orchestrating post-transcriptional gene expression: intron retention and the intron-rich genome of apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, Matteo; Spano, Furio; Magini, Alessandro; Emiliani, Carla; Carruthers, Vern B; Di Cristina, Manlio

    2016-02-01

    Apicomplexan parasites including Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium species have complex life cycles that include multiple hosts and differentiation through several morphologically distinct stages requiring marked changes in gene expression. This review highlights emerging evidence implicating regulation of mRNA splicing as a mechanism to prime these parasites for rapid gene expression upon differentiation. We summarize the most important insights in alternative splicing including its role in regulating gene expression by decreasing mRNA abundance via 'Regulated Unproductive Splicing and Translation'. As a related but less well-understood mechanism, we discuss also our recent work suggesting a role for intron retention for precluding translation of stage specific isoforms of T. gondii glycolytic enzymes. We additionally provide new evidence that intron retention might be a widespread mechanism during parasite differentiation. Supporting this notion, recent genome-wide analysis of Toxoplasma and Plasmodium suggests intron retention is more pervasive than heretofore thought. These findings parallel recent emergence of intron retention being more prevalent in mammals than previously believed, thereby adding to the established roles in plants, fungi and unicellular eukaryotes. Deeper mechanistic studies of intron retention will provide important insight into its role in regulating gene expression in apicomplexan parasites and more general in eukaryotic organisms.

  15. Muscular tissues of the squid Doryteuthis pealeii express identical myosin heavy chain isoforms: an alternative mechanism for tuning contractile speed.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Justin F; Kier, William M

    2012-01-15

    The speed of muscle contraction is largely controlled at the sarcomere level by the ATPase activity of the motor protein myosin. Differences in amino acid sequence in catalytically important regions of myosin yield different myosin isoforms with varying ATPase activities and resulting differences in cross-bridge cycling rates and interfilamentary sliding velocities. Modulation of whole-muscle performance by changes in myosin isoform ATPase activity is regarded as a universal mechanism to tune contractile properties, especially in vertebrate muscles. Invertebrates such as squid, however, may exhibit an alternative mechanism to tune contractile properties that is based on differences in muscle ultrastructure, including variable myofilament and sarcomere lengths. To determine definitively whether contractile properties of squid muscles are regulated via different myosin isoforms (i.e. different ATPase activities), the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the myosin heavy chain from the squid Doryteuthis pealeii were determined from the mantle, arm, tentacle, fin and funnel retractor musculature. We identified three myosin heavy chain isoforms in squid muscular tissues, with differences arising at surface loop 1 and the carboxy terminus. All three isoforms were detected in all five tissues studied. These results suggest that the muscular tissues of D. pealeii express identical myosin isoforms, and it is likely that differences in muscle ultrastructure, not myosin ATPase activity, represent the most important mechanism for tuning contractile speeds.

  16. Fourier transform large amplitude alternating current voltammetry investigations of the split wave phenomenon in electrocatalytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Song, Peng; Ma, Hongkai; Meng, Luwen; Wang, Yian; Nguyen, Hoang Viet; Lawrence, Nathan S; Fisher, Adrian C

    2017-08-29

    Fourier transform large amplitude alternating current voltammetry (FTACV) studies are reported on an electrocatalytic (EC') mechanistic system which exhibits split wave behavior on both macro- and micro-size working electrodes. The electrochemical characteristics of the EC' mechanism were analysed using the fundamental to fourth harmonic components deduced by the Fourier transform algorithm. The effects of the sinusoidal frequencies of the applied potential, electrode geometry and substrate concentrations are investigated. The split wave phenomenon was observed and explored particularly.

  17. Deciphering the Mechanism of Alternative Cleavage and Polyadenylation in Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Cleavage and Polyadenylation in Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Chioniso Masamha, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0218 Deciphering the Mechanism of Alternative Cleavage and Polyadenylation in Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) 5b...shorten the 3’UTR of their mRNAs has important implications in cancer. Truncation of the cyclin D1 mRNA in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is one of the

  18. Mechanical properties of a nitrogen-bearing austenitic steel during static and cycle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, E. V.; Terent'ev, V. F.; Prosvirnin, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    The mechanical properties of a nitrogen-bearing corrosion-resistant austenitic steel containing 0.311% nitrogen have been studied during static and cyclic deformation. It is found that the steel having an ultimate strength of 930 MPa exhibits a plasticity of 33%. The endurance limit under repeated tension at 106 loading cycles is 400 MPa. The propagation of a fatigue crack at low and high amplitudes of cyclic deformation follows a ductile fracture mechanism with the presence of fatigue grooves.

  19. Reduction of the excess sludge production by biological alternating process: real application results and metabolic uncoupling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Eusebi, Anna Laura; Battistoni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The biological solution proposed to reduce the wasted sludge production is based on a process of alternating phases realized in a specific reactor (alternate cycles in sludge line (ACSL)) where a quote of the recycle sludge is treated and sent back to the main activated sludge process. The ACSL process was applied in two urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The reduction was tested by changing the hydraulic retention time and the conditions of oxidation reduction potential. The main mechanism of the process is recognized in the metabolic uncoupling. In fact, an increase in the specific oxygen uptake rate in the biological reactors was recorded (up to 20 mg/g VSS/h), which was stimulated by the fasting condition in the ACSL. The process is able to reduce the observed sludge yield on average of 25-30% with final average values reaching 0.179 kg VSS/kg chemical oxygen demand (COD) for WWTP1 and 0.117 kg VSS/kg COD for WWTP2.

  20. Effect of surface treatment of brackets and mechanical cycling on adhesion to enamel.

    PubMed

    Arrais, Fabiola Rossato; Degrazia, Felipe; Peres, Bernardo Urbanetto; Ferrazzo, Vilmar Antonio; Grehs, Renesio Armindo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study sought to evaluate how surface conditioning from bracket and mechanical cycling aging affected the bond strength between metallic brackets and bovine enamel, and to determine the adhesive remnant index. Eighty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin using polyvinyl chloride rings and divided into 4 groups based on surface treatment (n = 20). Group 1 (control) received no surface treatment, Group 2 specimens were sandblasted with aluminum oxide particles, Group 3 specimens were sandblasted with silicon oxide and treated with a tribochemichemical silica coupling agent, and Group 4 specimens were primed with a multidomain protein-based agent. Half of the specimens were submitted to shear bond testing, while the others were subjected to mechanical cycling. ANOVA showed that mechanical cycling did not have a significant influence on bond strength (P = 0.9244), while surface conditioning of the brackets did (P = 0.0001). Tukey's test results were similar for mechanical cycling, and indicated that only Group 3 significantly improved the resin bond to the brackets; however, this group also demonstrated the highest percentage of enamel failure.

  1. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  2. Learning the Cardiac Cycle: Simultaneous Observations of Electrical and Mechanical Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Richard Alec; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method for integrating electrical and mechanical events of the cardiac cycle by measuring systolic time intervals, which involves simultaneous recording of the ECG, a phonocardiogram, and the contour of the carotid pulse. Both resting and stress change data are provided as bases for class discussion. (CS)

  3. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  4. Learning the Cardiac Cycle: Simultaneous Observations of Electrical and Mechanical Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Richard Alec; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method for integrating electrical and mechanical events of the cardiac cycle by measuring systolic time intervals, which involves simultaneous recording of the ECG, a phonocardiogram, and the contour of the carotid pulse. Both resting and stress change data are provided as bases for class discussion. (CS)

  5. Mechanical properties of cast commercially pure titanium simulating ceramic firing cycles.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Johnson Campideli; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro; Naves, Lucas Zago; Costa, Ana Rosa; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenco; Henriques, Guilhereme Elias Pessanha

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the mechanical properties (ultimate tensile strength, elongation and hardness) of the commercially pure titanium (cp Ti) as casting and after ceramic firing cycles. Dumbbell-shaped specimens were prepared for the tensile strength testing. Disk-shaped cast specimens were used for microhardness testing. The ceramic firing cycles were made simulating a low fusion ceramic application. Tensile testing was conducted in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until failure. Ultimate tensile strength and elongation were recorded. The fracture mode was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Vickers hardness was measured in a hardness tester. The data from the tensile and hardness tests were subjected to a one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The mean values of tensile strength were not changed by the ceramic firing cycles. Lower hardness was observed for cp Ti as casting compared with Ti cast after the firing cycles. The ceramic firing cycles did not show any considerable prejudicial effects on the mechanical properties of the cp Ti.

  6. Physical and biogeochemical mechanisms of internal carbon cycling in Lake Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilcher, Darren J.; McKinley, Galen A.; Bootsma, Harvey A.; Bennington, Val

    2015-03-01

    The lakewide seasonal carbon cycle of Lake Michigan is poorly quantified and lacks the mechanistic links necessary to determine impacts upon it from eutrophication, invasive species, and climate change. A first step toward a full appreciation of Lake Michigan's carbon cycle is to quantify the dominant mechanisms of its internal carbon cycle. To achieve this, we use the MIT general circulation model configured to the bathymetry of Lake Michigan and coupled to an ecosystem model to simulate the seasonal cycle of productivity, temperature, circulation, and the partial pressure of CO2 in water (pCO2). This biogeochemistry is designed to be appropriate for the prequagga mussel state of the lake. The primary mechanism behind the seasonal cycle of primary productivity is lake physics. The offshore spring phytoplankton bloom begins following a reduction in deep vertical mixing and ends with the depletion of nutrients via thermal stratification. The exception is the western shoreline, where summer winds drive coastal upwelling, providing hypolimnetic nutrients and generating significant productivity. Surface pCO2 is controlled by the net effect from temperature on solubility, and is modulated by biological uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and isothermal mixing of DIC-rich water in winter. Temperature tends to have the greatest seasonal impact in nearshore regions, while local DIC has the greatest impact in offshore regions. Lakewide, the model suggests that carbon is absorbed from the atmosphere during the spring bloom and released to the atmosphere during winter mixing and when summer surface temperatures are at their maximum.

  7. A Mechanism for the Loading-Unloading Substorm Cycle Missing in MHD Global Magnetospheric Simulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Uritsky, V.; Vassiliadis, D.; Baker, D. N.

    2005-01-01

    Loading and consequent unloading of magnetic flux is an essential element of the substorm cycle in Earth's magnetotail. We are unaware of an available global MHD magnetospheric simulation model that includes a loading- unloading cycle in its behavior. Given the central role that MHD models presently play in the development of our understanding of magnetospheric dynamics, and given the present plans for the central role that these models will play in ongoing space weather prediction programs, it is clear that this failure must be corrected. A 2-dimensional numerical driven current-sheet model has been developed that incorporates an idealized current- driven instability with a resistive MHD system. Under steady loading, the model exhibits a global loading- unloading cycle. The specific mechanism for producing the loading-unloading cycle will be discussed. It will be shown that scale-free avalanching of electromagnetic energy through the model, from loading to unloading, is carried by repetitive bursts of localized reconnection. Each burst leads, somewhat later, to a field configuration that is capable of exciting a reconnection burst again. This process repeats itself in an intermittent manner while the total field energy in the system falls. At the end of an unloading interval, the total field energy is reduced to well below that necessary to initiate the next unloading event and, thus, a loading-unloading cycle results. It will be shown that, in this model, it is the topology of bursty localized reconnection that is responsible for the appearance of the loading-unloading cycle.

  8. Effects of mechanical and thermal cycling on composite and hybrid laminates with residual stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of tensile load cycling and thermal cycling on residual stiffness and strength properties of the following composite and hybrid angle-ply laminates were studied: boron/epoxy, boron/polyimide, graphite/low-modulus epoxy, graphite/high-modulus epoxy, graphite/polyimide, S-glass/epoxy, graphite/Kevlar 49/epoxy, and graphite/S-glass/epoxy. Specimens of the first six types were mechanically cycled up to 90% of static strength. Those that survived 10 million cycles were tested statically to failure, and no significant changes in residual strength and modulus were noted. Specimens of all types were subjected to thermal cycling between room temperature and 411 K for the epoxy-matrix composites and 533 K for the polyimide-matrix composites. The residual strength and stiffness remained largely unchanged, except for the graphite/low-modulus epoxy, which showed reductions in both of approximately 35%. When low-temperature thermal cycling under tensile load was applied, there was a noticeable reduction in modulus and strength in the graphite/low-modulus epoxy and some strength reduction in the S-glass/epoxy.

  9. MECHANICAL STRAIN AND PIEZOELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF PZT STACKS RELATED TO SEMI-BIPOLAR ELECTRIC CYCLING FATIGUE

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Cooper, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    PZT stacks that had an inter-digital internal electrode configuration and consisted of a specific number of multilayer actuators were tested to more than 108 cycles by using a 100-Hz semi-bipolar sine wave with a field range of +4.5/-0.9 kV/mm and a 20-MPa mechanical preload. Significant reductions in mechanical strain and piezoelectric coefficients were observed during the fatigue cycling, depending on the measuring condition. Extensive surface discharges and arcs were also observed. These surface events as well as related dielectric breakdown resulted in the erosion of external electrode and outcrop of internal electrode, and that partially accounts for the reduction observed above. The data obtained in this study demonstrated the feasibility of using a semi-bipolar mode to drive a PZT stack with a designed mechanical preload applied and illustrated the potential fatigue of stack~{!/~}s performance during its service.

  10. Global transcription analysis of Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants reveals an alternating pattern of gene expression and effects on hypoxic and oxidative genes.

    PubMed

    McCammon, Mark T; Epstein, Charles B; Przybyla-Zawislak, Beata; McAlister-Henn, Lee; Butow, Ronald A

    2003-03-01

    To understand the many roles of the Krebs tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in cell function, we used DNA microarrays to examine gene expression in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. mRNA was analyzed from yeast strains harboring defects in each of 15 genes that encode subunits of the eight TCA cycle enzymes. The expression of >400 genes changed at least threefold in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. Many genes displayed a common response to TCA cycle dysfunction indicative of a shift away from oxidative metabolism. Another set of genes displayed a pairwise, alternating pattern of expression in response to contiguous TCA cycle enzyme defects: expression was elevated in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutants, diminished in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA ligase mutants, elevated again in succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants, and diminished again in malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase mutants. This pattern correlated with previously defined TCA cycle growth-enhancing mutations and suggested a novel metabolic signaling pathway monitoring TCA cycle function. Expression of hypoxic/anaerobic genes was elevated in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutants, whereas expression of oxidative genes was diminished, consistent with a heme signaling defect caused by inadequate levels of the heme precursor, succinyl-CoA. These studies have revealed extensive responses to changes in TCA cycle function and have uncovered new and unexpected metabolic networks that are wired into the TCA cycle.

  11. Mechanism of Silicon Electrode Aging upon Cycling in Full Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Delpuech, Nathalie; Dupre, Nicolas; Moreau, Philippe; Bridel, Jean-Sebastian; Gaubicher, Joel; Lestriez, Bernard; Guyomard, Dominique

    2016-04-21

    Understanding the aging mechanism of silicon-based negative electrodes for lithium-ion batteries upon cycling is essential to solve the problem of low coulombic efficiency and capacity fading and further to implement this new high-capacity material in commercial cells. Nevertheless, such studies have so far focused on half cells in which silicon is cycled versus an infinite reservoir of lithium. In the present work, the aging mechanism of silicon-based electrodes is studied upon cycling in a full Li-ion cell configuration with LiCoO2 as the positive electrode. Postmortem analyses of both electrodes clearly indicate that neither one of them contains lithium and that no discernible degradation results from the cycling. The aging mechanism can be explained by the reduction of solvent molecules. Electrons extracted from the positive electrode are responsible for an internal imbalance in the cell, which results in progressive slippage of the electrodes and reduces the compositional range of cyclable lithium ions for both electrodes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Failure mechanisms of nano-silicon anodes upon cycling: an electrode porosity evolution model.

    PubMed

    Radvanyi, Etienne; Porcher, Willy; De Vito, Eric; Montani, Alexandre; Franger, Sylvain; Jouanneau Si Larbi, Séverine

    2014-08-28

    With a specific capacity of 3600 mA h g(-1), silicon is a promising anode active material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, because of the huge volume changes undergone by Si particles upon (de)alloying with lithium, Si electrodes suffer from rapid capacity fading. A deep understanding of the associated failure mechanisms is necessary to improve these electrochemical performances. To reach this goal, we investigate here nano-Si based electrodes by several characterization techniques. Thanks to all these techniques, many aspects, such as the behaviour of the active material or the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and the lithiation mechanisms, are studied upon cycling. A clear picture of the failure mechanisms of nano-Si based electrodes is provided. In particular, by combining Hg analyses, SEM observations of electrode cross-sections, and EIS measurements, we follow the evolution of the porosity within the electrode. For the first time, our results clearly show a real dynamic of the pore size distribution: the first cycles lead to the formation of a micrometric porosity which is not present initially. During the following cycles, these large pores are progressively filled up with SEI products which form continuously at the Si particle surface. Thus, from the 50th cycle, Li(+) ion diffusion is dramatically hindered leading to a strongly heterogeneous lithiation of the electrode and a rapid capacity fading.

  13. Case Study of Cycle Time Reduction by Mechanization in Manufacturing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanavel, C.; Saravanan, R.; Chandrasekaran, M.; Pugazhenthi, R.

    2017-03-01

    Research and Innovation offer facilitation, fulfil the day to day requirements, and bring sophisticated things to the society. In industries such facilitation reduces the fatigue, employee morale and improves productivity. The research is focused on such requirement for gear box manufacturing industries. The Six sigma approach of Eliminate, Combine, Rearrange, Simplify (ECRS) method and cycle time analysis were carried out to understanding the problem and solution requirements. The newly mechanized equipment was installed and tested. The result shows that cycle time reduced significantly and reduced employee fatigue and raised morale to a great extent. The designed equipment is a general purpose to improve the productivity of similar industries.

  14. The floodplain large-wood cycle hypothesis: A mechanism for the physical and biotic structuring of temperate forested alluvial valleys in the North Pacific coastal ecoregion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Brian D.; Montgomery, David R.; Fetherston, Kevin L.; Abbe, Tim B.

    2012-02-01

    A 'floodplain large-wood cycle' is hypothesized as a mechanism for generating landforms and influencing river dynamics in ways that structure and maintain riparian and aquatic ecosystems of forested alluvial river valleys of the Pacific coastal temperate rainforest of North America. In the cycle, pieces of wood large enough to resist fluvial transport and remain in river channels initiate and stabilize wood jams, which in turn create alluvial patches and protect them from erosion. These stable patches provide sites for trees to mature over hundreds of years in river valleys where the average cycle of floodplain turnover is much briefer, thus providing a future source of large wood and reinforcing the cycle. Different tree species can function in the floodplain large-wood cycle in different ecological regions, in different river valleys within regions, and within individual river valleys in which forest composition changes through time. The cycle promotes a physically complex, biodiverse, and self-reinforcing state. Conversely, loss of large trees from the system drives landforms and ecosystems toward an alternate stable state of diminished biogeomorphic complexity. Reestablishing large trees is thus necessary to restore such rivers. Although interactions and mechanisms may differ between biomes and in larger or smaller rivers, available evidence suggests that large riparian trees may have similarly fundamental roles in the physical and biotic structuring of river valleys elsewhere in the temperate zone.

  15. The Neoarchaean surficial sulphur cycle: An alternative hypothesis based on analogies with 20th-century atmospheric lead.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, M; Whitehouse, M J; Kamber, B S

    2017-05-01

    We revisit the S-isotope systematics of sedimentary pyrite in a shaly limestone from the ca. 2.52 Ga Gamohaan Formation, Upper Campbellrand Subgroup, Transvaal, South Africa. The analysed rock is interpreted to have been deposited in a water depth of ca. 50-100 m, in a restricted sub-basin on a drowning platform. A previous study discovered that the pyrites define a nonzero intercept δ(34) SV-CDT -Δ(33) S data array. The present study carried out further quadruple S-isotope analyses of pyrite, confirming and expanding the linear δ(34) SV-CDT -Δ(33) S array with an δ(34) S zero intercept at ∆(33) S ca. +5. This was previously interpreted to indicate mixing of unrelated S-sources in the sediment environment, involving a combination of recycled sulphur from sulphides that had originally formed by sulphate-reducing bacteria, along with elemental sulphur. Here, we advance an alternative explanation based on the recognition that the Archaean seawater sulphate concentration was likely very low, implying that the Archaean ocean could have been poorly mixed with respect to sulphur. Thus, modern oceanic sulphur systematics provide limited insight into the Archaean sulphur cycle. Instead, we propose that the 20th-century atmospheric lead event may be a useful analogue. Similar to industrial lead, the main oceanic input of Archaean sulphur was through atmospheric raindown, with individual giant point sources capable of temporally dominating atmospheric input. Local atmospheric S-isotope signals, of no global significance, could thus have been transmitted into the localised sediment record. Thus, the nonzero intercept δ(34) SV-CDT -Δ(33) S data array may alternatively represent a very localised S-isotope signature in the Neoarchaean surface environment. Fallout from local volcanic eruptions could imprint recycled MIF-S signals into pyrite of restricted depositional environments, thereby avoiding attenuation of the signal in the subdued, averaged global open ocean

  16. Cracking mechanisms in thermally cycled Ti-6Al-4V reinforced with SiC fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Thomin, S.H.; Dunand, D.C.; Noel, P.A.

    1995-04-01

    A titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) reinforced with continuous SiC fibers (SCS-6) was thermally cycled between 200 C and 700 C in air and argon. The composite mechanical properties deteriorate with an increasing number of cycles in air because of matrix cracks emanating from the specimen surface. These cracks also give oxygen access to fibers, further resulting in fiber degradation. The following matrix cracking mechanisms are examined: (1) thermal fatigue by internal stresses resulting from the mismatch of thermal expansion between fibers and matrix, (2) matrix oxygen embrittlement, and (3) ratcheting from oxide accumulating within cracks. Matrix stresses are determined using an analytical model, considering stress relaxation by matrix creep and the temperature dependence of materials properties. Matrix fatigue from these cyclically varying stresses (mechanism (1)) cannot solely account for the observed crack depth; oxygen embrittlement of the crack tip (mechanism (2)) is concluded to be another necessary damage mechanism. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the stress intensity resulting from crack wedging by oxide formation (mechanism (3)) is given, which may be an operating mechanism as well for long cracks.

  17. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2014-01-01

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration–response, and economic health impact modeling for ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or “grid average” electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles. PMID:25512510

  18. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States

    DOE PAGES

    Tessum, Christopher W.; Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2014-12-30

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration–response, and economic health impact modeling for ozonemore » (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or “grid average” electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles.« less

  19. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tessum, Christopher W; Hill, Jason D; Marshall, Julian D

    2014-12-30

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration-response, and economic health impact modeling for ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or "grid average" electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles.

  20. Total fuel-cycle analysis of heavy-duty vehicles using biofuels and natural gas-based alternative fuels.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Patrick E; Green, Erin H; Corbett, James J; Mas, Carl; Winebrake, James J

    2011-03-01

    Heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) present a growing energy and environmental concern worldwide. These vehicles rely almost entirely on diesel fuel for propulsion and create problems associated with local pollution, climate change, and energy security. Given these problems and the expected global expansion of HDVs in transportation sectors, industry and governments are pursuing biofuels and natural gas as potential alternative fuels for HDVs. Using recent lifecycle datasets, this paper evaluates the energy and emissions impacts of these fuels in the HDV sector by conducting a total fuel-cycle (TFC) analysis for Class 8 HDVs for six fuel pathways: (1) petroleum to ultra low sulfur diesel; (2) petroleum and soyoil to biodiesel (methyl soy ester); (3) petroleum, ethanol, and oxygenate to e-diesel; (4) petroleum and natural gas to Fischer-Tropsch diesel; (5) natural gas to compressed natural gas; and (6) natural gas to liquefied natural gas. TFC emissions are evaluated for three greenhouse gases (GHGs) (carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane) and five other pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, and sulfur oxides), along with estimates of total energy and petroleum consumption associated with each of the six fuel pathways. Results show definite advantages with biodiesel and compressed natural gas for most pollutants, negligible benefits for e-diesel, and increased GHG emissions for liquefied natural gas and Fischer-Tropsch diesel (from natural gas).

  1. Evaluating environmental impacts of alternative construction waste management approaches using supply-chain-linked life-cycle analysis.

    PubMed

    Kucukvar, Murat; Egilmez, Gokhan; Tatari, Omer

    2014-06-01

    Waste management in construction is critical for the sustainable treatment of building-related construction and demolition (C&D) waste materials, and recycling of these wastes has been considered as one of the best strategies in minimization of C&D debris. However, recycling of C&D materials may not always be a feasible strategy for every waste type and therefore recycling and other waste treatment strategies should be supported by robust decision-making models. With the aim of assessing the net carbon, energy, and water footprints of C&D recycling and other waste management alternatives, a comprehensive economic input-output-based hybrid life-cycle assessment model is developed by tracing all of the economy-wide supply-chain impacts of three waste management strategies: recycling, landfilling, and incineration. Analysis results showed that only the recycling of construction materials provided positive environmental footprint savings in terms of carbon, energy, and water footprints. Incineration is a better option as a secondary strategy after recycling for water and energy footprint categories, whereas landfilling is found to be as slightly better strategy when carbon footprint is considered as the main focus of comparison. In terms of construction materials' environmental footprint, nonferrous metals are found to have a significant environmental footprint reduction potential if recycled.

  2. Mammalian Glutaminase Gls2 Gene Encodes Two Functional Alternative Transcripts by a Surrogate Promoter Usage Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sandoval, José A.; Manzanares, Elisa; Lobo, Carolina; Segura, J. A.; Alonso, Francisco J.; Matés, José M.; Márquez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Background Glutaminase is expressed in most mammalian tissues and cancer cells, but the regulation of its expression is poorly understood. An essential step to accomplish this goal is the characterization of its species- and cell-specific isoenzyme pattern of expression. Our aim was to identify and characterize transcript variants of the mammalian glutaminase Gls2 gene. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate for the first time simultaneous expression of two transcript variants from the Gls2 gene in human, rat and mouse. A combination of RT-PCR, primer-extension analysis, bioinformatics, real-time PCR, in vitro transcription and translation and immunoblot analysis was applied to investigate GLS2 transcripts in mammalian tissues. Short (LGA) and long (GAB) transcript forms were isolated in brain and liver tissue of human, rat and mouse. The short LGA transcript arises by a combination of two mechanisms of transcriptional modulation: alternative transcription initiation and alternative promoter. The LGA variant contains both the transcription start site (TSS) and the alternative promoter in the first intron of the Gls2 gene. The full human LGA transcript has two in-frame ATGs in the first exon, which are missing in orthologous rat and mouse transcripts. In vitro transcription and translation of human LGA yielded two polypeptides of the predicted size, but only the canonical full-length protein displayed catalytic activity. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts showed marked variations depending on species and tissues analyzed. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report demonstrating expression of alternative transcripts of the mammalian Gls2 gene. Transcriptional mechanisms giving rise to GLS2 variants and isolation of novel GLS2 transcripts in human, rat and mouse are presented. Results were also confirmed at the protein level, where catalytic activity was demonstrated for the human LGA protein. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts was

  3. Photosystem II cycle activity and alternative electron transport in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum under dynamic light conditions and nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heiko; Jakob, Torsten; Lavaud, Johann; Wilhelm, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Alternative electron sinks are an important regulatory mechanism to dissipate excessively absorbed light energy particularly under fast changing dynamic light conditions. In diatoms, the cyclic electron transport (CET) around Photosystem II (PS II) is an alternative electron transport pathway (AET) that contributes to avoidance of overexcitation under high light illumination. The combination of nitrogen limitation and high-intensity irradiance regularly occurs under natural conditions and is expected to force the imbalance between light absorption and the metabolic use of light energy. The present study demonstrates that under N limitation, the amount of AET and the activity of CETPSII in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum were increased. Thereby, the activity of CETPSII was linearly correlated with the amount of AET rates. It is concluded that CETPSII significantly contributes to AET in P. tricornutum. Surprisingly, CETPSII was found to be activated already at the end of the dark period under N-limited conditions. This coincided with a significantly increased degree of reduction of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. The analysis of the macromolecular composition of cells of P. tricornutum under N-limited conditions revealed a carbon allocation in favor of carbohydrates during the light period and their degradation during the dark phase. A possible linkage between the activity of CETPSII and degree of reduction of the PQ pool on the one side and the macromolecular changes on the other is discussed.

  4. Marginal adaptation of class V composite restorations submitted to thermal and mechanical cycling

    PubMed Central

    CASSELLI, Denise Sá Maia; FARIA-E-SILVA, André Luis; CASSELLI, Henrique; MARTINS, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of the margin location and an adhesive system on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations. Material and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in bovine teeth with the gingival margin on the dentin and the incisal margin on the enamel. The cavities were restored with a micro-hybrid composite resin using an etch-and-rinse [Single Bond 2 (SB)] or a self-etching adhesive [Clearfil SE Bond (CL)]. After finishing and polishing the restorations, epoxy replicas were prepared. The marginal adaptation was analyzed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, 500 x magnification). The higher gap width in each margin was recorded (T0). After the first evaluation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycling (2,000 cycles of 5ºC±2ºC followed by 55ºC±2ºC - T1) and mechanical cycling (100,000 cycles of 50 kN and 2 Hz - T2). Replicas of samples were rebuilt after each cycling and analyzed under SEM. The data were submitted to Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon and Friedman testing (a=0.05). Results: The SB presented higher gaps in the dentin than the enamel, while there was no difference between the substrate for the CL. In the dentin, the CL showed better marginal sealing than the SB. The opposite occurred in the enamel. There were no significant differences between the baseline, thermal and mechanical cycling for any experimental condition. Conclusions: The outcomes of the present study showed that the adhesive system and margin location have an important effect on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations. PMID:23559115

  5. Forest Carbon Cycling Across Gradients of Disturbance Severity: Patterns and Underlying Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, C. M.; Bohrer, G.; Nave, L. E.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.; Vogel, C. S.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Goodrich-Stuart, E. J.; Curtis, P.

    2014-12-01

    Ecological disturbances alter biogeochemical processes central to forest carbon (C) storage. Disturbances to forests occur along a continuum of severity, from low intensity disturbance causing the mortality of only a subset of trees to severe stand-replacing disturbance that kills all trees; yet, considerable uncertainty exists in how and why the forest C cycle changes across gradients of disturbance intensity, and whether ecosystem models robustly simulate these responses. At the University of Michigan Biological Station, we are using multiple ecosystem-scale experiments to examine how disturbance intensity affects C cycling and to identify the underlying mechanisms that support recovery of the C cycle. The Forest Accelerated Succession Experiment (FASET), in which a third of all canopy trees were stem girdled within a 39 ha area, employs C cycling measurements within paired treatment and control meteorological flux tower footprints. A separate study examines forest C cycling following stand-replacing clear-cut harvest and fire. We found that net ecosystem production (NEP) was highly resilient following moderate disturbance, but experienced long-term reductions following stand-replacing disturbance. Using a gradient of disturbance severity within the FASET treatment, we found that forest production declined non-linearly with rising disturbance intensity, remaining stable until a threshold of ~60 % tree mortality was exceeded. NEP was sustained following moderate disturbance because of improved canopy light-use efficiency, which compensated for a temporary reduction in leaf area index. Contrastingly, NEP was reduced for several decades at the highest levels of disturbance severity. A model assessment revealed that neither big-leaf nor gap models captured the observed high resilience in NEP following low intensity disturbance, suggesting inadequate representation of the mechanisms supporting C cycling resilience.

  6. Calmodulin-mediated cell cycle regulation: new mechanisms for old observations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaehyun; Husain, Mansoor

    2006-10-01

    The significance of divalent calcium ions (Ca(2+)) to cell cycle progression has been a subject of study for several decades, with a regulatory role for Ca(2+) suggested in distinct cell types and multiple organisms. Our interest in proliferative vascular diseases led us to focus on mammalian vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in particular, in which we and others had shown that a coordinate elevation in the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration is required for G(1) to S phase cell cycle progression. However, the molecular basis for this Ca(2+)-sensitive cell cycle transition was not known. Our recent discovery of a functional protein-protein interaction between the late G1-active cyclin E1 and the major calcium signal-transducing factor calmodulin (CaM) sheds new light on the mechanism(s) through which Ca2+ concentrations regulate cell cycle. Having identified a CaM-binding site on cyclin E1, our studies support a direct role for CaM in mediating Ca2+-sensitive cyclin E/CDK2 activity and G1 to S phase transitions in VSMC. The CaM binding site identified on cyclin E1 has a Kd for CaM consistent with that of known CaM-binding proteins, and is composed of a 22 amino acids N-terminal sequence that is highly conserved across several mammalian species. Deletion of this binding site abolished CaM binding and Ca2+-sensitive cyclin E/Cdk2 activity. Here we provide our perspectives on the literature supporting a role for Ca2+ in cell cycle regulation, focusing on the evidence implicating CaM in this functionality, and discuss the potential for therapeutic modulation of CaM-dependent cell cycle machinery.

  7. Alternative mechanisms alter the emergent properties of self-organization in mussel beds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan-Xing; Weerman, Ellen J; Herman, Peter M J; Olff, Han; van de Koppel, Johan

    2012-07-22

    Theoretical models predict that spatial self-organization can have important, unexpected implications by affecting the functioning of ecosystems in terms of resilience and productivity. Whether and how these emergent effects depend on specific formulations of the underlying mechanisms are questions that are often ignored. Here, we compare two alternative models of regular spatial pattern formation in mussel beds that have different mechanistic descriptions of the facilitative interactions between mussels. The first mechanism involves a reduced mussel loss rate at high density owing to mutual protection between the mussels, which is the basis of prior studies on the pattern formation in mussels. The second mechanism assumes, based on novel experimental evidence, that mussels feed more efficiently on top of mussel-generated hummocks. Model simulations point out that the second mechanism produces very similar types of spatial patterns in mussel beds. Yet the mechanisms predict a strikingly contrasting effect of these spatial patterns on ecosystem functioning, in terms of productivity and resilience. In the first model, where high mussel densities reduce mussel loss rates, patterns are predicted to strongly increase productivity and decrease the recovery time of the bed following a disturbance. When pattern formation is generated by increased feeding efficiency on hummocks, only minor emergent effects of pattern formation on ecosystem functioning are predicted. Our results provide a warning against predictions of the implications and emergent properties of spatial self-organization, when the mechanisms that underlie self-organization are incompletely understood and not based on the experimental study.

  8. Alternative mechanisms alter the emergent properties of self-organization in mussel beds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quan-Xing; Weerman, Ellen J.; Herman, Peter M. J.; Olff, Han; van de Koppel, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical models predict that spatial self-organization can have important, unexpected implications by affecting the functioning of ecosystems in terms of resilience and productivity. Whether and how these emergent effects depend on specific formulations of the underlying mechanisms are questions that are often ignored. Here, we compare two alternative models of regular spatial pattern formation in mussel beds that have different mechanistic descriptions of the facilitative interactions between mussels. The first mechanism involves a reduced mussel loss rate at high density owing to mutual protection between the mussels, which is the basis of prior studies on the pattern formation in mussels. The second mechanism assumes, based on novel experimental evidence, that mussels feed more efficiently on top of mussel-generated hummocks. Model simulations point out that the second mechanism produces very similar types of spatial patterns in mussel beds. Yet the mechanisms predict a strikingly contrasting effect of these spatial patterns on ecosystem functioning, in terms of productivity and resilience. In the first model, where high mussel densities reduce mussel loss rates, patterns are predicted to strongly increase productivity and decrease the recovery time of the bed following a disturbance. When pattern formation is generated by increased feeding efficiency on hummocks, only minor emergent effects of pattern formation on ecosystem functioning are predicted. Our results provide a warning against predictions of the implications and emergent properties of spatial self-organization, when the mechanisms that underlie self-organization are incompletely understood and not based on the experimental study. PMID:22418256

  9. Mechanical modeling of innovative metamaterials alternating pentamode lattices and confinement plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternali, F.; Amendola, A.

    2017-02-01

    This study examines the mechanical behavior of a novel class of mechanical metamaterials alternating pentamode lattices and stiffening plates. The unit cell of such lattices consists of a sub-lattice of the face cubic-centered unit cell typically analyzed in the current literature on pentamode materials. The studied systems exhibit only three soft deformation modes in the infinitesimal stretch-dominated regime, as opposed to the five zero-energy modes of unconfined pentamode lattices. We develop analytical formulae for the vertical and bending stiffness properties and study the dependence of such quantities on the main design parameters: the lattice constant, the solid volume fraction, the cross-section area of the rods, and the layer thickness. A noteworthy result is that the effective compression modulus of the analyzed structures is equal to two thirds of the Young modulus of the stiffest isotropic elastic networks currently available in the literature, being accompanied by zero-rigidity against infinitesimal shear and twisting mechanisms. The use of the proposed metamaterials as novel seismic-isolation devices and impact-protection equipment is discussed by drawing comparisons with the response of alternative devices already available or under development.

  10. RecO Protein Initiates DNA Recombination and Strand Annealing through Two Alternative DNA Binding Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Ryzhikov, Mikhail; Gupta, Richa; Glickman, Michael; Korolev, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Recombination mediator proteins (RMPs) are important for genome stability in all organisms. Several RMPs support two alternative reactions: initiation of homologous recombination and DNA annealing. We examined mechanisms of RMPs in both reactions with Mycobacterium smegmatis RecO (MsRecO) and demonstrated that MsRecO interacts with ssDNA by two distinct mechanisms. Zinc stimulates MsRecO binding to ssDNA during annealing, whereas the recombination function is zinc-independent and is regulated by interaction with MsRecR. Thus, different structural motifs or conformations of MsRecO are responsible for interaction with ssDNA during annealing and recombination. Neither annealing nor recombinase loading depends on MsRecO interaction with the conserved C-terminal tail of single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding protein (SSB), which is known to bind Escherichia coli RecO. However, similarly to E. coli proteins, MsRecO and MsRecOR do not dismiss SSB from ssDNA, suggesting that RMPs form a complex with SSB-ssDNA even in the absence of binding to the major protein interaction motif. We propose that alternative conformations of such complexes define the mechanism by which RMPs initiate the repair of stalled replication and support two different functions during recombinational repair of DNA breaks. PMID:25170075

  11. Alternative Mechanisms of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Clearance in Perforin Knockout Mice Lead to Enhanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Sandra; Rutigliano, John A.; Graham, Barney S.

    2001-01-01

    Virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes are key effectors for the clearance of virus-infected cells and are required for the normal clearance of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in mice. Although perforin/granzyme-mediated lysis of infected cells is thought to be the major molecular mechanism used by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes for elimination of virus, its role in RSV has not been reported. Here, we show that viral clearance in perforin knockout (PKO) mice is slightly delayed but that both PKO and wild-type mice clear virus by day 10, suggesting an alternative mechanism of RSV clearance. Effector T cells from the lungs of both groups of mice were shown to lyse Fas (CD95)-overexpressing target cells in greater numbers than target cells expressing low levels of Fas, suggesting that Fas ligand (CD95L)-mediated target cell lysis was occurring in vivo. This cell lysis was associated with a delay in RSV-induced disease in PKO mice compared to the time of disease onset for wild-type controls, which correlated with increased and prolonged production of gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha levels in PKO mice. We conclude that while perforin is not necessary for the clearance of primary RSV infection, the use of alternative CTL target cell killing mechanisms is less efficient and can lead to enhanced disease. PMID:11559824

  12. Strain Interactions as a Mechanism for Dominant Strain Alternation and Incidence Oscillation in Infectious Diseases: Seasonal Influenza as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Many human infectious diseases are caused by pathogens that have multiple strains and show oscillation in infection incidence and alternation of dominant strains which together are referred to as epidemic cycling. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of epidemic cycling is essential for forecasting outbreaks of epidemics and therefore important for public health planning. Current theoretical effort is mainly focused on the factors that are extrinsic to the pathogens themselves ("extrinsic factors") such as environmental variation and seasonal change in human behaviours and susceptibility. Nevertheless, co-circulation of different strains of a pathogen was usually observed and thus strains interact with one another within concurrent infection and during sequential infection. The existence of these intrinsic factors is common and may be involved in the generation of epidemic cycling of multi-strain pathogens. To explore the mechanisms that are intrinsic to the pathogens themselves ("intrinsic factors") for epidemic cycling, we consider a multi-strain SIRS model including cross-immunity and infectivity enhancement and use seasonal influenza as an example to parameterize the model. The Kullback-Leibler information distance was calculated to measure the match between the model outputs and the typical features of seasonal flu (an outbreak duration of 11 weeks and an annual attack rate of 15%). Results show that interactions among strains can generate seasonal influenza with these characteristic features, provided that: the infectivity of a single strain within concurrent infection is enhanced 2-7 times that within a single infection; cross-immunity as a result of past infection is 0.5-0.8 and lasts 2-9 years; while other parameters are within their widely accepted ranges (such as a 2-3 day infectious period and the basic reproductive number of 1.8-3.0). Moreover, the observed alternation of the dominant strain among epidemics emerges naturally from the best fit model

  13. Strain Interactions as a Mechanism for Dominant Strain Alternation and Incidence Oscillation in Infectious Diseases: Seasonal Influenza as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Many human infectious diseases are caused by pathogens that have multiple strains and show oscillation in infection incidence and alternation of dominant strains which together are referred to as epidemic cycling. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of epidemic cycling is essential for forecasting outbreaks of epidemics and therefore important for public health planning. Current theoretical effort is mainly focused on the factors that are extrinsic to the pathogens themselves (“extrinsic factors”) such as environmental variation and seasonal change in human behaviours and susceptibility. Nevertheless, co-circulation of different strains of a pathogen was usually observed and thus strains interact with one another within concurrent infection and during sequential infection. The existence of these intrinsic factors is common and may be involved in the generation of epidemic cycling of multi-strain pathogens. Methods and Findings To explore the mechanisms that are intrinsic to the pathogens themselves (“intrinsic factors”) for epidemic cycling, we consider a multi-strain SIRS model including cross-immunity and infectivity enhancement and use seasonal influenza as an example to parameterize the model. The Kullback-Leibler information distance was calculated to measure the match between the model outputs and the typical features of seasonal flu (an outbreak duration of 11 weeks and an annual attack rate of 15%). Results show that interactions among strains can generate seasonal influenza with these characteristic features, provided that: the infectivity of a single strain within concurrent infection is enhanced 2−7 times that within a single infection; cross-immunity as a result of past infection is 0.5–0.8 and lasts 2–9 years; while other parameters are within their widely accepted ranges (such as a 2–3 day infectious period and the basic reproductive number of 1.8–3.0). Moreover, the observed alternation of the dominant strain among

  14. Effect of Thermo-mechanical Load Cycling on Microleakage in Class II Ormocer Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Erdilek, Dina; Dörter, Can; Koray, Fatma; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz; Efes, Begum Guray; Gomec, Yavuz

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal sealing ability of an ormocer in comparison with a hybrid composite when using thermocycling and load cycling procedures together in the study design. Methods Modified proximal Class II cavities were prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of twenty-two human premolars. Each tooth was restored with Admira and contralaterally with TPH Spectrum. Half of all of the teeth were subjected to thermo-mechanical load cycling. After dye penetration, longitudinal sections in mesio-distal direction were prepared and examined under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed with Mann Whitney U test. Results The results showed that the thermo-mechanical load cycling caused a statistically significant increase in gingival microleakage when compared with the non-thermocycled and non-loaded restorations for both the materials Admira (P=0.006) and TPH Spectrum (P=0.023). Conclusions Simultaneous load cycling and thermocycling are decisive factors in the in vitro assessment of gingival microleakage, which still remains to be a clinical problem even with the ormocer system Admira. PMID:19756194

  15. Influence of creep damage on the low cycle thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of two tantalum base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.; Doble, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue tests have been performed on the tantalum base alloys T-111 and ASTAR 811C with synchronized, independently programmed temperature and strain cycling. The thermal-mechanical cycles applied fell into three basic categories: these were isothermal cycling, in-phase thermal cycling, and out-of-phase thermal cycling. In-phase cycling was defined as tensile deformation associated with high temperature and compressive deformation with low temperature, while out-of-phase thermal cycling was defined as the reverse case. The in-phase thermal cycling had a pronounced detrimental influence on the fatigue life of both alloys, with the life reduction being greater in the solid solution strengthened T-111 alloy than in the carbide strengthened ASTAR 811C alloy. The out-of-phase tests also showed pronounced effects on the fatigue life of both alloys, although not as dramatic.

  16. An alternative bactericidal mechanism of action for lantibiotic peptides that target lipid II.

    PubMed

    Hasper, Hester E; Kramer, Naomi E; Smith, James L; Hillman, J D; Zachariah, Cherian; Kuipers, Oscar P; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2006-09-15

    Lantibiotics are polycyclic peptides containing unusual amino acids, which have binding specificity for bacterial cells, targeting the bacterial cell wall component lipid II to form pores and thereby lyse the cells. Yet several members of these lipid II-targeted lantibiotics are too short to be able to span the lipid bilayer and cannot form pores, but somehow they maintain their antibacterial efficacy. We describe an alternative mechanism by which members of the lantibiotic family kill Gram-positive bacteria by removing lipid II from the cell division site (or septum) and thus block cell wall synthesis.

  17. Effect of thermal cycling on the mechanical properties of 350-grade maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, U.K.; Kishore, R.; Asundi, M.K.

    1996-03-01

    The effects of retained austenite produced by thermal cycling on the mechanical properties of a precipitation-hardened 350-grade commercial maraging steel were examined. The presence of retained austenite caused decreases in the yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and effected a significant increase in the tensile ductility. Increased impact toughness was also produced by this treatment. The mechanical stability of retained austenite was evaluated by tension and impact tests at subambient temperatures. A deformation-induced transformation of the austenite was manifested as load drops on the load-elongation plots at subzero temperatures. This transformation imparts excellent low-temperature ductility to the material. A wide range of strength, ductility, and toughness can be obtained by subjecting the steel to thermal cycling before the precipitation-hardening treatment.

  18. Mechanisms of dissolved organic carbon cycling in an ocean margin. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, R.

    1997-11-24

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the largest reservoir of organic carbon in the ocean, and the objectives of this project were to investigate the mechanisms and pathways of DOC formation and consumption in seawater. Carbohydrates are the most abundant form of DOC, and this project included measurements of dissolved carbohydrates as well as DOC to help delineate the cycling of DOC. Many of the methods and approaches for investigating DOC production were developed as part of this project.

  19. Child and spouse replacement mechanisms: a life cycle perspective on family composition in Peru.

    PubMed

    Tienda, M

    1980-01-01

    The author assesses the patterns of family extension in Peru by examining variations in family composition over the family life cycle. The amount and type of extension among Peruvian families at successive stages of family development are examined. The relative importance of general overlap and of child and spouse replacement mechanisms as processes that help to ensure the viability of residential family units is studied. The empirical analysis is based on a 1970-1971 survey of a national sample of Peruvian households

  20. Cycling of a Lithium-Ion Battery with a Silicon Anode Drives Large Mechanical Actuation.

    PubMed

    Lang, Jialiang; Ding, Bin; Zhu, Ting; Su, Hanxiao; Luo, Hao; Qi, Longhao; Liu, Kai; Wang, Ke; Hussain, Naveed; Zhao, Chunsong; Li, Xiaoyan; Gao, Huajian; Wu, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Lithium-ion batteries with a Si anode can drive large mechanical actuation by utilizing the dramatic volume changes of the electrode during the charge/discharge cycles. A large loading of more than 10 MPa can be actuated by a LiFePO4 ||Si full battery with a rapid response while the driving voltage is lower than 4 V. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Beyond debuttressing: Mechanics of paraglacial rock slope damage during repeat glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grämiger, Lorenz M.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Gischig, Valentin S.; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Loew, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Cycles of glaciation impose mechanical stresses on underlying bedrock as glaciers advance, erode, and retreat. Fracture initiation and propagation constitute rock mass damage and act as preparatory factors for slope failures; however, the mechanics of paraglacial rock slope damage remain poorly characterized. Using conceptual numerical models closely based on the Aletsch Glacier region of Switzerland, we explore how in situ stress changes associated with fluctuating ice thickness can drive progressive rock mass failure preparing future slope instabilities. Our simulations reveal that glacial cycles as purely mechanical loading and unloading phenomena produce relatively limited new damage. However, ice fluctuations can increase the criticality of fractures in adjacent slopes, which may in turn increase the efficacy of fatigue processes. Bedrock erosion during glaciation promotes significant new damage during first deglaciation. An already weakened rock slope is more susceptible to damage from glacier loading and unloading and may fail completely. We find that damage kinematics are controlled by discontinuity geometry and the relative position of the glacier; ice advance and retreat both generate damage. We correlate model results with mapped landslides around the Great Aletsch Glacier. Our result that most damage occurs during first deglaciation agrees with the relative age of the majority of identified landslides. The kinematics and dimensions of a slope failure produced in our models are also in good agreement with characteristics of instabilities observed in the field. Our results extend simplified assumptions of glacial debuttressing, demonstrating in detail how cycles of ice loading, erosion, and unloading drive paraglacial rock slope damage.

  2. Modeling mechanical degradation in lithium ion batteries during cycling: Solid electrolyte interphase fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laresgoiti, Izaro; Käbitz, Stefan; Ecker, Madeleine; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2015-12-01

    During cycling, mechanical stresses can occur in the composite electrode, inside the active material, but also in the solid electrolyte interphase layer. A mechanical model is proposed based on a system made of a spherical graphite particle surrounded by the solid electrolyte interphase layer. During lithium intercalation or de-intercalation, stresses in the graphite are produced, governed by the diffusion induced stress phenomena and in the solid electrolyte interphase, driven by the graphite expansion. The stresses in both materials were simulated and a sensitivity analysis was performed to clarify the influence of principal parameters on both processes. Finally, assuming that the solid electrolyte interphase is the weakest material and therefore more prone to fracture than graphite, the experimental capacity fade during cycling was modeled based on its break and repair effect rather than on the fracture of the active material. The mechanical model of the solid electrolyte interphase was implemented in a single particle lithium ion battery model in order to reproduce capacity fade during battery lifetime. The model results were compared against cycle life aging experimental data, reproducing accurately the influence of the depth of discharge as well as the average state of charge on the capacity fade.

  3. An Alternative Mechanism for the Methylation of Phosphoethanolamine Catalyzed by Plasmodium falciparum Phosphoethanolamine Methyltransferase*♦

    PubMed Central

    Saen-oon, Suwipa; Lee, Soon Goo; Jez, Joseph M.; Guallar, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The phosphobase methylation pathway catalyzed by the phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase in Plasmodium falciparum (PfPMT), the malaria parasite, offers an attractive target for anti-parasitic drug development. PfPMT methylates phosphoethanolamine (pEA) to phosphocholine for use in membrane biogenesis. Quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations tested the proposed reaction mechanism for methylation of pEA involving the previously identified Tyr-19–His-132 dyad, which indicated an energetically unfavorable mechanism. Instead, the QM/MM calculations suggested an alternative mechanism involving Asp-128. The reaction coordinate involves the stepwise transfer of a proton to Asp-128 via a bridging water molecule followed by a typical Sn2-type methyl transfer from S-adenosylmethionine to pEA. Functional analysis of the D128A, D128E, D128Q, and D128N PfPMT mutants shows a loss of activity with pEA but not with the final substrate of the methylation pathway. X-ray crystal structures of the PfPMT-D128A mutant in complex with S-adenosylhomocysteine and either pEA or phosphocholine reveal how mutation of Asp-128 disrupts a hydrogen bond network in the active site. The combined QM/MM, biochemical, and structural studies identify a key role for Asp-128 in the initial step of the phosphobase methylation pathway in Plasmodium and provide molecular insight on the evolution of multiple activities in the active site of the PMT. PMID:25288796

  4. Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle.

    PubMed

    Abe, Sumiyoshi; Okuyama, Shinji

    2011-02-01

    The similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics is discussed. It is found that if the Clausius equality is imposed on the Shannon entropy and the analog of the quantity of heat, then the value of the Shannon entropy comes to formally coincide with that of the von Neumann entropy of the canonical density matrix, and pure-state quantum mechanics apparently transmutes into quantum thermodynamics. The corresponding quantum Carnot cycle of a simple two-state model of a particle confined in a one-dimensional infinite potential well is studied, and its efficiency is shown to be identical to the classical one.

  5. Top-color jungle gym: An alternative to the seesaw mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgi, Howard; Grant, Aaron K.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss an alternative to the top-color seesaw mechanism. In our scheme, all the light quarks carry top-color, and there are many composite SU(2) doublets. This makes it possible to get the observed t quark mass and observed SU(2)×U(1) breaking in a way that is quite different from the classic seesaw mechanism. We discuss a model of this kind that arises naturally in the context of dynamically broken top-color. There are many composite scalars in a theory of this kind. This has important effects on the Pagels-Stokar relation and the Higgs boson mass. We find mHiggs<~330 GeV, lighter than in typical top-color models. We also show that the electroweak singlet quarks in such a model can be lighter than the corresponding quarks in a seesaw model.

  6. Mycobacterial escape from macrophage phagosomes to the cytoplasm represents an alternate adaptation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jamwal, Shilpa V.; Mehrotra, Parul; Singh, Archana; Siddiqui, Zaved; Basu, Atanu; Rao, Kanury V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) within the host macrophage is mediated through pathogen-dependent inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, which enables bacteria to persist within the immature phagosomal compartment. By employing ultrastructural examination of different field isolates supported by biochemical analysis, we found that some of the Mtb strains were in fact poorly adapted for subsistence within endocytic vesicles of infected macrophages. Instead, through a mechanism involving activation of host cytosolic phospholipase A2, these bacteria rapidly escaped from phagosomes, and established residence in the cytoplasm of the host cell. Interestingly, by facilitating an enhanced suppression of host cellular autophagy, this translocation served as an alternate virulence acquisition mechanism. Thus, our studies reveal plasticity in the adaptation strategies employed by Mtb, for survival in the host macrophage. PMID:26980157

  7. Towards nanomedicines of the future: Remote magneto-mechanical actuation of nanomedicines by alternating magnetic fields☆

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, Yuri I.; Gribanovsky, Sergey L.; Golovin, Dmitry Y.; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Majouga, Alexander G.; Master, Alyssa M.; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the concept of magneto-mechanical actuation of single-domain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in super-low and low frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) and its possible use for remote control of nanomedicines and drug delivery systems. The applications of this approach for remote actuation of drug release as well as effects on biomacromolecules, biomembranes, subcellular structures and cells are discussed in comparison to conventional strategies employing magnetic hyperthermia in a radio frequency (RF) AMF. Several quantitative models describing interaction of functionalized MNPs with single macromolecules, lipid membranes, and proteins (e.g. cell membrane receptors, ion channels) are presented. The optimal characteristics of the MNPs and an AMF for effective magneto-mechanical actuation of single molecule responses in biological and bio-inspired systems are discussed. Altogether, the described studies and phenomena offer opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics both alone and in combination with magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:26407671

  8. Mycobacterial escape from macrophage phagosomes to the cytoplasm represents an alternate adaptation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Shilpa V; Mehrotra, Parul; Singh, Archana; Siddiqui, Zaved; Basu, Atanu; Rao, Kanury V S

    2016-03-16

    Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) within the host macrophage is mediated through pathogen-dependent inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, which enables bacteria to persist within the immature phagosomal compartment. By employing ultrastructural examination of different field isolates supported by biochemical analysis, we found that some of the Mtb strains were in fact poorly adapted for subsistence within endocytic vesicles of infected macrophages. Instead, through a mechanism involving activation of host cytosolic phospholipase A2, these bacteria rapidly escaped from phagosomes, and established residence in the cytoplasm of the host cell. Interestingly, by facilitating an enhanced suppression of host cellular autophagy, this translocation served as an alternate virulence acquisition mechanism. Thus, our studies reveal plasticity in the adaptation strategies employed by Mtb, for survival in the host macrophage.

  9. Towards nanomedicines of the future: Remote magneto-mechanical actuation of nanomedicines by alternating magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Yuri I; Gribanovsky, Sergey L; Golovin, Dmitry Y; Klyachko, Natalia L; Majouga, Alexander G; Master, Аlyssa M; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2015-12-10

    The paper describes the concept of magneto-mechanical actuation of single-domain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in super-low and low frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) and its possible use for remote control of nanomedicines and drug delivery systems. The applications of this approach for remote actuation of drug release as well as effects on biomacromolecules, biomembranes, subcellular structures and cells are discussed in comparison to conventional strategies employing magnetic hyperthermia in a radio frequency (RF) AMF. Several quantitative models describing interaction of functionalized MNPs with single macromolecules, lipid membranes, and proteins (e.g. cell membrane receptors, ion channels) are presented. The optimal characteristics of the MNPs and an AMF for effective magneto-mechanical actuation of single molecule responses in biological and bio-inspired systems are discussed. Altogether, the described studies and phenomena offer opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics both alone and in combination with magnetic hyperthermia.

  10. Attentional Biases toward Attractive Alternatives and Rivals: Mechanisms Involved in Relationship Maintenance among Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yidan; Zhao, Guang; Tu, Shen; Zheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A long-term romantic relationship can offer many benefits to committed individuals. Thus, humans possess relationship maintenance mechanisms to protect against threats from those who serve as attractive alternatives or intrasexual rivals. Many studies have indicated that romantic love can act as a commitment device to activate these mechanisms. To examine the attentional bias associated with relationship maintenance among 108 college students (49 single and 59 committed females) in China, we used a semantic priming procedure to activate mental representations associated with romantic love and then asked participants to complete a dot-probe task for the purpose of making a distinction between the engage and disengage components of attention. No significant engaging effects toward attractive faces were observed among committed females, but the following significant disengaging effects were found: when primed with romantic love, single females showed increased attention toward and difficulty in disengaging from attractive male faces, whereas females already in a committed relationship did not alter their attention, remaining as inattentive to attractive alternatives as they were in the baseline condition. In addition, committed females responded to love priming by exhibiting difficulty in disengaging from attractive rivals. The present findings provide evidence in the Chinese cultural context for the existence of early-stage attentional processes in the domain of relationship maintenance that committed Chinese females protected an ongoing relationship by not only being inattentive to attractive males who could serve as attractive alternatives, but also being more attentive to attractive females who could be potential rivals when mental representations associated with romantic love were primed. PMID:26309232

  11. Attentional Biases toward Attractive Alternatives and Rivals: Mechanisms Involved in Relationship Maintenance among Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yidan; Zhao, Guang; Tu, Shen; Zheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A long-term romantic relationship can offer many benefits to committed individuals. Thus, humans possess relationship maintenance mechanisms to protect against threats from those who serve as attractive alternatives or intrasexual rivals. Many studies have indicated that romantic love can act as a commitment device to activate these mechanisms. To examine the attentional bias associated with relationship maintenance among 108 college students (49 single and 59 committed females) in China, we used a semantic priming procedure to activate mental representations associated with romantic love and then asked participants to complete a dot-probe task for the purpose of making a distinction between the engage and disengage components of attention. No significant engaging effects toward attractive faces were observed among committed females, but the following significant disengaging effects were found: when primed with romantic love, single females showed increased attention toward and difficulty in disengaging from attractive male faces, whereas females already in a committed relationship did not alter their attention, remaining as inattentive to attractive alternatives as they were in the baseline condition. In addition, committed females responded to love priming by exhibiting difficulty in disengaging from attractive rivals. The present findings provide evidence in the Chinese cultural context for the existence of early-stage attentional processes in the domain of relationship maintenance that committed Chinese females protected an ongoing relationship by not only being inattentive to attractive males who could serve as attractive alternatives, but also being more attentive to attractive females who could be potential rivals when mental representations associated with romantic love were primed.

  12. Application of food waste disposers and alternate cycles process in small-decentralized towns: a case study.

    PubMed

    Battistoni, Paolo; Fatone, Francesco; Passacantando, Daniele; Bolzonella, David

    2007-02-01

    The use of food waste disposers (FWDs) can be an interesting option to integrate the management of municipal wastewaters and household organic waste in small towns and decentralized areas. This strategy can be even more environmentally friendly if a suitable treatment process of the resulting sewage is performed in order to control nutrients emission. However, still nowadays, part of the scientific and technical community considers the application of this technology a possible source of problems. In this study, the FWDs were applied, with a market penetration factor of 67%, in a mountain village of 250 inhabitants. Further, the existing wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was upgraded by applying an automatically controlled alternate cycles process for the management of nutrients removal. With specific reference to the observed results, the impact of the ground food waste on the sewerage system did not show particular solids sedimentation or significant hydraulic overflows. Further, the WWTP was able to face the overloads of 11, 55 and 2g per capita per day of TSS, COD and TN, respectively. Then, the increase of the readily biodegradable COD (rbCOD/COD from 0.20 to 0.25) and the favourable COD/TN ratio (from 9.9 to 12) led to a specific denitrification rate of some 0.06kgNO(3)-N/(kg MLVSS day). Therefore, not only COD removal, but also the total nitrogen removal increased: the denitrification efficiency reached 85%. That led to a better exploitation of the nitrogen-bound oxygen and a consequent reduction of energy requirements of 39%. The final economic evaluation showed the benefits of the application of this technology with a pay back time of 4-5 years.

  13. Mechanisms for alternative treatments in Parkinson's disease: acupuncture, tai chi, and other treatments.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Bijan D; Kluger, Benzi

    2014-06-01

    At least 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) use one or more forms of alternative therapy (AT) to complement standard treatments. This article reviews the commonest forms of AT for PD, including acupuncture, tai chi, yoga, mindfulness, massage, herbal medicine, and cannabis. We discuss the current evidence for the clinical efficacy of each AT and discuss potential mechanisms, including those suggested by animal and human studies. With a few notable exceptions, none of the treatments examined were investigated rigorously enough to draw definitive conclusions about efficacy or mechanism. Tai chi, acupuncture, Mucuna pruriens, cannabinoids, and music therapy have all been proposed to work through specific mechanisms, although current evidence is insufficient to support or refute these claims, with the possible exception of Mucuna pruriens (which contains levodopa). It is likely that most ATs predominantly treat PD patients through general mechanisms, including placebo effects, stress reduction, and improved mood and sleep, and AT may provide patients with a greater locus of control regarding their illness.

  14. Measuring the distribution of equity in terms of energy, environmental, and economic costs in the fuel cycles of alternative fuel vehicles with hydrogen pathway scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Patrick E.

    Numerous analyses exist which examine the energy, environmental, and economic tradeoffs between conventional gasoline vehicles and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles powered by hydrogen produced from a variety of sources. These analyses are commonly referred to as "E3" analyses because of their inclusion of Energy, Environmental, and Economic indicators. Recent research as sought a means to incorporate social Equity into E3 analyses, thus producing an "E4" analysis. However, E4 analyses in the realm of energy policy are uncommon, and in the realm of alternative transportation fuels, E4 analyses are extremely rare. This dissertation discusses the creation of a novel E4 simulation tool usable to weigh energy, environmental, economic, and equity trade-offs between conventional gasoline vehicles and alternative fuel vehicles, with specific application to hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The model, dubbed the F uel Life-cycle Analysis of Solar Hydrogen -- Energy, Environment, Economic & Equity model, or FLASH-E4, is a total fuel-cycle model that combines energy, environmental, and economic analysis methodologies with the addition of an equity analysis component. The model is capable of providing results regarding total fuel-cycle energy consumption, emissions production, energy and environmental cost, and level of social equity within a population in which low-income drivers use CGV technology and high-income drivers use a number of advanced hydrogen FCV technologies. Using theories of equity and social indicators conceptually embodied in the Lorenz Curve and Gini Index, the equity of the distribution of societal energy and environmental costs are measured for a population in which some drivers use CGVs and other drivers use FCVs. It is found, based on baseline input data representative of the United States (US), that the distribution of energy and environmental costs in a population in which some drivers use CGVs and other drivers use natural gas-based hydrogen FCVs can be

  15. A Mobility-Aware Adaptive Duty Cycling Mechanism for Tracking Objects during Tunnel Excavation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taesik; Min, Hong; Jung, Jinman

    2017-01-01

    Tunnel construction workers face many dangers while working under dark conditions, with difficult access and egress, and many potential hazards. To enhance safety at tunnel construction sites, low latency tracking of mobile objects (e.g., heavy-duty equipment) and construction workers is critical for managing the dangerous construction environment. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are the basis for a widely used technology for monitoring the environment because of their energy-efficiency and scalability. However, their use involves an inherent point-to-point delay caused by duty cycling mechanisms that can result in a significant rise in the delivery latency for tracking mobile objects. To overcome this issue, we proposed a mobility-aware adaptive duty cycling mechanism for the WSNs based on object mobility. For the evaluation, we tested this mechanism for mobile object tracking at a tunnel excavation site. The evaluation results showed that the proposed mechanism could track mobile objects with low latency while they were moving, and could reduce energy consumption by increasing sleep time while the objects were immobile. PMID:28241473

  16. Fatigue Response of a PZT Multilayer Actuator under High-Field Electric Cycling with Mechanical Preload

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2009-01-01

    An electric fatigue test system has been developed for piezoelectric actuator with a mechanical loading capability. Fatigue responses of a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) multilayer actuator (MLA) with a plate-through electrode configuration have been studied under an electric field (1.7 times that of a coercive field of PZT material) and a concurrent mechanical preload (30.0 MPa). A total of 1.0x10^9 cycles were carried out. Variations in charge density and mechanical strain under a high electric field and constant mechanical loads were observed during the fatigue test. The dc and the first harmonic (at 10 Hz) dielectric and piezoelectric coefficients were subsequently characterized by using FFT (Fast Fourier Transformation). It has been observed that both the dielectric and the piezoelectric coefficients underwent a monotonic decrease prior to 2.86x10^8 cycles under the relevant preload, and then fluctuated to a certain extent. Both the dielectric loss tangent and the piezoelectric loss tangent also exhibited the fluctuations after a certain amount of drop but at different levels relative to the pre-fatigue. And finally, the results were discussed with respect to domain wall mobility, microcracking, and other pre-existing anomalies.

  17. A Mobility-Aware Adaptive Duty Cycling Mechanism for Tracking Objects during Tunnel Excavation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taesik; Min, Hong; Jung, Jinman

    2017-02-23

    Tunnel construction workers face many dangers while working under dark conditions, with difficult access and egress, and many potential hazards. To enhance safety at tunnel construction sites, low latency tracking of mobile objects (e.g., heavy-duty equipment) and construction workers is critical for managing the dangerous construction environment. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are the basis for a widely used technology for monitoring the environment because of their energy-efficiency and scalability. However, their use involves an inherent point-to-point delay caused by duty cycling mechanisms that can result in a significant rise in the delivery latency for tracking mobile objects. To overcome this issue, we proposed a mobility-aware adaptive duty cycling mechanism for the WSNs based on object mobility. For the evaluation, we tested this mechanism for mobile object tracking at a tunnel excavation site. The evaluation results showed that the proposed mechanism could track mobile objects with low latency while they were moving, and could reduce energy consumption by increasing sleep time while the objects were immobile.

  18. Dynamic protein S-palmitoylation mediates parasite life cycle progression and diverse mechanisms of virulence.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert W B; Sharma, Aabha I; Engman, David M

    2017-04-01

    Eukaryotic parasites possess complex life cycles and utilize an assortment of molecular mechanisms to overcome physical barriers, suppress and/or bypass the host immune response, including invading host cells where they can replicate in a protected intracellular niche. Protein S-palmitoylation is a dynamic post-translational modification in which the fatty acid palmitate is covalently linked to cysteine residues on proteins by the enzyme palmitoyl acyltransferase (PAT) and can be removed by lysosomal palmitoyl-protein thioesterase (PPT) or cytosolic acyl-protein thioesterase (APT). In addition to anchoring proteins to intracellular membranes, functions of dynamic palmitoylation include - targeting proteins to specific intracellular compartments via trafficking pathways, regulating the cycling of proteins between membranes, modulating protein function and regulating protein stability. Recent studies in the eukaryotic parasites - Plasmodium falciparum, Toxoplasma gondii, Trypanosoma brucei, Cryptococcus neoformans and Giardia lamblia - have identified large families of PATs and palmitoylated proteins. Many palmitoylated proteins are important for diverse aspects of pathogenesis, including differentiation into infective life cycle stages, biogenesis and tethering of secretory organelles, assembling the machinery powering motility and targeting virulence factors to the plasma membrane. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge of palmitoylation in eukaryotic parasites, highlighting five exemplary mechanisms of parasite virulence dependent on palmitoylation.

  19. Effect of fast freeze-thaw cycles on mechanical properties of ordinary-air-entrained concrete.

    PubMed

    Shang, Huai-shuai; Cao, Wei-qun; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Freezing-thawing resistance is a very significant characteristic for concrete in severe environment (such as cold region with the lowest temperature below 0°C). In this study, ordinary-air-entrained (O-A-E) concrete was produced in a laboratory environment; the compressive strength, cubic compressive strength of C50, C40, C30, C25, and C20 ordinary-air-entrained concrete, tensile strength, and cleavage strength of C30 ordinary-air-entrained concrete were measured after fast freeze-thaw cycles. The effects of fast freeze-thaw cycles on the mechanical properties (compressive strength and cleavage strength) of ordinary-air-entrained concrete materials are investigated on the basis of the experimental results. And the concise mathematical formula between mechanical behavior and number of fast freeze-thaw cycles was established. The experiment results can be used as a reference in design, maintenance, and life prediction of ordinary-air-entrained concrete structure (such as dam, offshore platform, etc.) in cold regions.

  20. Fatigue responses of PZT stacks under semi-bipolar electric cycling with mechanical preload

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Cooper, Thomas A; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    PZT stacks that had an inter-digital internal electrode configuration were tested to more than 10^8 cycles. A 100-Hz semi-bipolar sine wave with a field range of +4.5/-0.9 kV/mm was used in cycling with a concurrently-applied 20 MPa preload. Significant reductions in piezoelectric and dielectric responses were observed during the cycling depending on the measuring condition. Extensive surface discharges were also observed. These surface events resulted in the erosion of external electrode and the outcrop of internal electrode. Sections prepared by sequential polishing technique revealed a variety of damage mechanisms including delaminations, pores, and etch grooves. The scale of damage was correlated to the degree of fatigue-induced reduction in piezoelectric and dielectric responses. The results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of using a semi-bipolar mode to drive a PZT stack under a mechanical preload and illustrate the potential fatigue and damages of the stack in service.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Anisotropic Conductive Adhesive Film Under Hygrothermal Aging and Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Lan; Chen, Xu; Gao, Hong

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical properties of anisotropic conductive adhesive film (ACF) were investigated experimentally under various environmental conditions. The temperature sweep test was conducted to investigate the effects of temperature on dynamical mechanical properties of the ACF. The ACF exhibited transitions to the glass state, viscoelastic state, and rubber state with increasing temperature, and its glass-transition temperature ( T g) was determined to be 149°C. The creep-recovery behaviors of the ACF were investigated, and it was found that the initial strains, instantaneous strains, and creep or recovery rates increased with increasing temperature. No obvious creep phenomenon was observed at low temperatures (≤0°C). The creep strain and creep rates at any time decreased with increasing hygrothermal aging time. The uniaxial tensile behaviors of the ACF were also investigated under hygrothermal aging and thermal cycling. The results show that the Young's modulus and tensile strength of the ACF decrease with increasing hygrothermal aging time; however, they increase at first and then decrease with increasing thermal cycling time. T g decreases slightly for the ACF after hygrothermal aging; however, it increases after thermal cycling.

  2. Effect of Fast Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Mechanical Properties of Ordinary-Air-Entrained Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Huai-shuai; Cao, Wei-qun; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Freezing-thawing resistance is a very significant characteristic for concrete in severe environment (such as cold region with the lowest temperature below 0°C). In this study, ordinary-air-entrained (O-A-E) concrete was produced in a laboratory environment; the compressive strength, cubic compressive strength of C50, C40, C30, C25, and C20 ordinary-air-entrained concrete, tensile strength, and cleavage strength of C30 ordinary-air-entrained concrete were measured after fast freeze-thaw cycles. The effects of fast freeze-thaw cycles on the mechanical properties (compressive strength and cleavage strength) of ordinary-air-entrained concrete materials are investigated on the basis of the experimental results. And the concise mathematical formula between mechanical behavior and number of fast freeze-thaw cycles was established. The experiment results can be used as a reference in design, maintenance, and life prediction of ordinary-air-entrained concrete structure (such as dam, offshore platform, etc.) in cold regions. PMID:24895671

  3. Alternating Sulfone Copolymers Depolymerize in Response to Both Chemical and Mechanical Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kaushlendra; Goodwin, Andrew P

    2015-09-15

    This work describes the depolymerization of poly(vinyl acetate-alt-sulfur dioxide) (PVAS) as initiated by chemical and mechanical stimuli. In recent years, macromolecules that are able to depolymerize in response to specific stimuli have been highly sought because of their ability to amplify signal for sensing and drug delivery. Examples include self-immolative polymers from alkoxyphenol derivatives and polyaldehydes. We show here that alternating copolymers of sulfur dioxide and vinyl acetate are able to undergo similar depolymerization into their monomer components in response to various chemical and mechanical stimuli. Certain vinyl monomers such as vinyl acetate are able to polymerize with sulfur dioxide in a perfectly alternating manner, and the resulting copolymer possesses a low ceiling temperature. We show that this polymer is able to break down into its monomer components when subjected to UV/acetone, various Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), and ultrasonication. In the case of UV, the acetone reacted via a Norrish reaction to produce free radicals that caused clean monomer production. For ROS, the polymer showed reactivity to both oxidizing and radical-containing ROS. Through kinetic studies, these polymers were shown to proceed via a two-part, first-order kinetic model with a fast initiation phase and a slow depolymerization phase. Finally, the polymers were subjected to probe ultrasonication, and depolymerization occurred as well. Most tellingly, the polymer again showed a fast initiation step and continued to depolymerize even after ultrasonication stopped. This class of polymers shows potential for drug delivery in response to both endogenous chemical and externally-applied mechanical cues.

  4. TryCYCLE: A Prospective Study of the Safety and Feasibility of Early In-Bed Cycling in Mechanically Ventilated Patients.

    PubMed

    Kho, Michelle E; Molloy, Alexander J; Clarke, France J; Ajami, Daana; McCaughan, Magda; Obrovac, Kristy; Murphy, Christina; Camposilvan, Laura; Herridge, Margaret S; Koo, Karen K Y; Rudkowski, Jill; Seely, Andrew J E; Zanni, Jennifer M; Mourtzakis, Marina; Piraino, Thomas; Cook, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the safety and feasibility of in-bed cycling started within the first 4 days of mechanical ventilation (MV) to inform a future randomized clinical trial. We conducted a 33-patient prospective cohort study in a 21-bed adult academic medical-surgical intensive care unit (ICU) in Hamilton, ON, Canada. We included adult patients (≥ 18 years) receiving MV who walked independently pre-ICU. Our intervention was 30 minutes of in-bed supine cycling 6 days/week in the ICU. Our primary outcome was Safety (termination), measured as events prompting cycling termination; secondary Safety (disconnection or dislodgement) outcomes included catheter/tube dislodgements. Feasibility was measured as consent rate and fidelity to intervention. For our primary outcome, we calculated the binary proportion and 95% confidence interval (CI). From 10/2013-8/2014, we obtained consent from 34 of 37 patients approached (91.9%), 33 of whom received in-bed cycling. Of those who cycled, 16(48.4%) were female, the mean (SD) age was 65.8(12.2) years, and APACHE II score was 24.3(6.7); 29(87.9%) had medical admitting diagnoses. Cycling termination was infrequent (2.0%, 95% CI: 0.8%-4.9%) and no device dislodgements occurred. Cycling began a median [IQR] of 3 [2, 4] days after ICU admission; patients received 5 [3, 8] cycling sessions with a median duration of 30.7 [21.6, 30.8] minutes per session. During 205 total cycling sessions, patients were receiving invasive MV (150 [73.1%]), vasopressors (6 [2.9%]), sedative or analgesic infusions (77 [37.6%]) and dialysis (4 [2.0%]). Early cycling within the first 4 days of MV among hemodynamically stable patients is safe and feasible. Research to evaluate the effect of early cycling on patient function is warranted. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01885442.

  5. Probabilistic Material Strength Degradation Model for Inconel 718 Components Subjected to High Temperature, High-Cycle and Low-Cycle Mechanical Fatigue, Creep and Thermal Fatigue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie C.; Boyce, Lola

    1995-01-01

    The development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation is described. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes five effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, high-cycle mechanical fatigue, low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing predictions of high-cycle mechanical fatigue and high temperature effects with experiments are presented. Results from this limited verification study strongly supported that material degradation can be represented by randomized multifactor interaction models.

  6. Validity and reliability of an alternative method for measuring power output during six-second all-out cycling.

    PubMed

    Watson, Martin; Bibbo, Daniele; Duffy, Charles R; Riches, Philip E; Conforto, Silvia; Macaluso, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    In a laboratory setting where both a mechanically-braked cycling ergometer and a motion analysis (MA) system are available, flywheel angular displacement can be estimated by using MA. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the validity and reliability of a MA method for measuring maximal power output (Pmax) in comparison with a force transducer (FT) method. Eight males and eight females undertook three identical sessions, separated by 4 to 6 days; the first being a familiarization session. Individuals performed three 6-second sprints against 50% of the maximal resistance to complete two pedal revolutions with a 3-minute rest between trials. Power was determined independently using both MA and FT analyses. Validity: MA recorded significantly higher Pmax than FT (P < .05). Bland-Altman plots showed that there was a systematic bias in the difference between the measures of the two systems. This difference increased as power increased. Repeatability: Intraclass correlation coefficients were on average 0.90 ± 0.05 in males and 0.85 ± 0.08 in females. Measuring Pmax by MA, therefore, is as appropriate for use in exercise physiology research as Pmax measured by FT, provided that a bias between these measurements methods is allowed for.

  7. Static mechanical strain induces capillary endothelial cell cycle re-entry and sprouting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiger, A. S.; Liu, F. D.; Durham, J. T.; Jagielska, A.; Mahmoodian, R.; Van Vliet, K. J.; Herman, I. M.

    2016-08-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are known to respond to a range of biochemical and time-varying mechanical cues that can promote blood vessel sprouting termed angiogenesis. It is less understood how these cells respond to sustained (i.e., static) mechanical cues such as the deformation generated by other contractile vascular cells, cues which can change with age and disease state. Here we demonstrate that static tensile strain of 10%, consistent with that exerted by contractile microvascular pericytes, can directly and rapidly induce cell cycle re-entry in growth-arrested microvascular endothelial cell monolayers. S-phase entry in response to this strain correlates with absence of nuclear p27, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, this modest strain promotes sprouting of endothelial cells, suggesting a novel mechanical ‘angiogenic switch’. These findings suggest that static tensile strain can directly stimulate pathological angiogenesis, implying that pericyte absence or death is not necessarily required of endothelial cell re-activation.

  8. Low Cycle and Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue of Friction Welded Dissimilar Superalloys Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Motoki; Sano, Atsushi; Tran, Tra Hung; Okazaki, Masakazu; Sekihara, Masaru

    The high temperature strengths of the dissimilar friction welded superalloys joint between the cast polycrystalline Mar-M247 and the forged IN718 alloys have been investigated under low cycle and thermo-mechanical fatigue loadings, in comparison with those of the base metals. The experiments showed that the lives of the dissimilar joints were significantly influenced by the test conditions and loading modes. Not only the lives themselves but also the failure positions and mechanisms were sensitive to the loading mode. The fracture behaviors depending on the loading modes and test conditions were discussed, based on the macroscopic elastic follow-up mechanism and the microstructural inhomogeneity in the friction weld joint.

  9. From Hopf Bifurcation to Limit Cycles Control in Underactuated Mechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khraief Haddad, Nahla; Belghith, Safya; Gritli, Hassène; Chemori, Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of obtaining stable and robust oscillations of underactuated mechanical systems. It is concerned with the Hopf bifurcation analysis of a Controlled Inertia Wheel Inverted Pendulum (C-IWIP). Firstly, the stabilization was achieved with a control law based on the Interconnection, Damping, Assignment Passive Based Control method (IDA-PBC). Interestingly, the considered closed-loop system exhibits both supercritical and subcritical Hopf bifurcation for certain gains of the control law. Secondly, we used the center manifold theorem and the normal form technique to study the stability and instability of limit cycles emerging from the Hopf bifurcation. Finally, numerical simulations were conducted to validate the analytical results in order to prove that with IDA-PBC we can control not only the unstable equilibrium but also some trajectories such as limit cycles.

  10. Caulobacter crescentus Cell Cycle-Regulated DNA Methyltransferase Uses a Novel Mechanism for Substrate Recognition.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Clayton B; Yakubov, Aziz B; Reich, Norbert O

    2017-08-01

    Caulobacter crescentus relies on DNA methylation by the cell cycle-regulated methyltransferase (CcrM) in addition to key transcription factors to control the cell cycle and direct cellular differentiation. CcrM is shown here to efficiently methylate its cognate recognition site 5'-GANTC-3' in single-stranded and hemimethylated double-stranded DNA. We report the Km, kcat, kmethylation, and Kd for single-stranded and hemimethylated substrates, revealing discrimination of 10(7)-fold for noncognate sequences. The enzyme also shows a similar discrimination against single-stranded RNA. Two independent assays clearly show that CcrM is highly processive with single-stranded and hemimethylated DNA. Collectively, the data provide evidence that CcrM and other DNA-modifying enzymes may use a new mechanism to recognize DNA in a key epigenetic process.

  11. Rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jihua; Wang, Yanhong; Liu, Xinyan; Zhou, Xiaoshuang; Li, Rongshan

    2015-07-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most frequent type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. The role of cell cycle regulation in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy has been studied. The present study was designed to explore whether rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms. After establishing an IgA nephropathy model, rats were randomly divided into four groups. Coomassie Brilliant Blue was used to measure the 24-h urinary protein levels. Renal function was determined using an autoanalyzer. Proliferation was assayed via Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry. Rat mesangial cells were cultured and divided into the six groups. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry were used to detect cell proliferation and the cell cycle phase. Western blotting was performed to determine cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, p27(Kip1), p70S6K/p-p70S6K, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2/p- extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein expression. A low dose of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin prevented an additional increase in proteinuria, protected kidney function, and reduced IgA deposition in a model of IgA nephropathy. Rapamycin inhibited mesangial cell proliferation and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase. Rapamycin did not affect the expression of cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2. However, rapamycin upregulated p27(Kip1) at least in part via AKT (also known as protein kinase B)/mTOR. In conclusion, rapamycin can affect cell cycle regulation to inhibit mesangial cell proliferation, thereby reduce IgA deposition, and slow the progression of IgAN.

  12. DOES MECHANISM MATTER? UNRELATED NEUROTOXICANTS CONVERGE ON CELL CYCLE AND APOPTOSIS DURING NEURODIFFERENTIATION

    PubMed Central

    Slotkin, Theodore A.; Seidler, Frederic J.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanistically unrelated developmental neurotoxicants often produce neural cell loss culminating in similar functional and behavioral outcomes. We compared an organophosphate pesticide (diazinon), an organochlorine pesticide (dieldrin) and a metal (Ni2+) for effects on the genes regulating cell cycle and apoptosis in differentiating PC12 cells, an in vitro model of neuronal development. Each agent was introduced at 30 μM for 24 or 72 hr, treatments devoid of cytotoxicity. Using microarrays, we examined the mRNAs encoding nearly 400 genes involved in each of the biological processes. All three agents targeted both the cell cycle and apoptosis pathways, evidenced by significant transcriptional changes in 40–45% of the cell cycle-related genes and 30–40% of the apoptosis-related genes. There was also a high degree of overlap as to which specific genes were affected by the diverse agents, with 80 cell cycle genes and 56 apoptosis genes common to all three. Concordance analysis, which assesses stringent matching of the direction, magnitude and timing of the transcriptional changes, showed highly significant correlations for pairwise comparisons of all the agents, for both cell cycle and apoptosis. Our results show that otherwise disparate developmental neurotoxicants converge on common cellular pathways governing the acquisition and programmed death of neural cells, providing a specific link to cell deficits. Our studies suggest that identifying the initial mechanism of action of a developmental neurotoxicant may be strategically less important than focusing on the pathways that converge on common final outcomes such as cell loss. PMID:22546817

  13. Helminth 2-Cys peroxiredoxin drives Th2 responses through a mechanism involving alternatively activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Sheila; Stack, Colin M.; O'Neill, Sandra M.; Sayed, Ahmed A.; Williams, David L.; Dalton, John P.

    2008-01-01

    During helminth infections, alternatively activated macrophages (AAMacs) are key to promoting Th2 responses and suppressing Th1-driven inflammatory pathology. Th2 cytokines IL-4 and/or IL-13 are believed to be important in the induction and activation of AAMacs. Using murine models for the helminth infections caused by Fasciola hepatica (Fh) and Schistosoma mansoni (Sm), we show that a secreted antioxidant, peroxiredoxin (Prx), induces alternative activation of macrophages. These activated, Ym1-expressing macrophages enhanced the secretion of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 from naive CD4+ T cells. Administration of recombinant FhPrx and SmPrx to wild-type and IL-4−/− and IL-13−/− mice induced the production of AAMacs. In addition, Prx stimulated the expression of markers of AAMacs (particularly, Ym1) in vitro, and therefore can act independently of IL-4/IL-13 signaling. The immunomodulatory property of Prx is not due to its antioxidant activity, as an inactive recombinant variant with active site Cys residues replaced by Gly could also induce AAMacs and Th2 responses. Immunization of mice with recombinant Prx or passive transfer of anti-Prx antibodies prior to infection with Fh not only blocked the induction of AAMacs but also the development of parasite-specific Th2 responses. We propose that Prx activates macrophages as an initial step in the induction of Th2 responses by helminth parasites and is thereby a novel pathogen-associated molecular pattern.—Donnelly, S., Stack, C. M., O'Neill, S. M., Sayed, A. A., Williams, D. L., Dalton, J. P. Helminth 2-Cys peroxiredoxin drives Th2 responses through a mechanism involving alternatively activated macrophages. PMID:18708590

  14. An alternative mechanism for the methylation of phosphoethanolamine catalyzed by Plasmodium falciparum phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase

    DOE PAGES

    Saen-oon, Suwipa; Lee, Soon Goo; Jez, Joseph M.; ...

    2014-10-06

    Here, the phosphobase methylation pathway catalyzed by the phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase in Plasmodium falciparum (PfPMT), the malaria parasite, offers an attractive target for anti-parasitic drug development. PfPMT methylates phosphoethanolamine (pEA) to phosphocholine for use in membrane biogenesis. Quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations tested the proposed reaction mechanism for methylation of pEA involving the previously identified Tyr-19–His-132 dyad, which indicated an energetically unfavorable mechanism. Instead, the QM/MM calculations suggested an alternative mechanism involving Asp-128. The reaction coordinate involves the stepwise transfer of a proton to Asp-128 via a bridging water molecule followed by a typical Sn2-type methyl transfer from S-adenosylmethioninemore » to pEA. Functional analysis of the D128A, D128E, D128Q, and D128N PfPMT mutants shows a loss of activity with pEA but not with the final substrate of the methylation pathway. X-ray crystal structures of the PfPMT-D128A mutant in complex with S-adenosylhomocysteine and either pEA or phosphocholine reveal how mutation of Asp-128 disrupts a hydrogen bond network in the active site. The combined QM/MM, biochemical, and structural studies identify a key role for Asp-128 in the initial step of the phosphobase methylation pathway in Plasmodium and provide molecular insight on the evolution of multiple activities in the active site of the PMT.« less

  15. An alternative mechanism for the methylation of phosphoethanolamine catalyzed by Plasmodium falciparum phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Saen-Oon, Suwipa; Lee, Soon Goo; Jez, Joseph M; Guallar, Victor

    2014-12-05

    The phosphobase methylation pathway catalyzed by the phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase in Plasmodium falciparum (PfPMT), the malaria parasite, offers an attractive target for anti-parasitic drug development. PfPMT methylates phosphoethanolamine (pEA) to phosphocholine for use in membrane biogenesis. Quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations tested the proposed reaction mechanism for methylation of pEA involving the previously identified Tyr-19-His-132 dyad, which indicated an energetically unfavorable mechanism. Instead, the QM/MM calculations suggested an alternative mechanism involving Asp-128. The reaction coordinate involves the stepwise transfer of a proton to Asp-128 via a bridging water molecule followed by a typical Sn2-type methyl transfer from S-adenosylmethionine to pEA. Functional analysis of the D128A, D128E, D128Q, and D128N PfPMT mutants shows a loss of activity with pEA but not with the final substrate of the methylation pathway. X-ray crystal structures of the PfPMT-D128A mutant in complex with S-adenosylhomocysteine and either pEA or phosphocholine reveal how mutation of Asp-128 disrupts a hydrogen bond network in the active site. The combined QM/MM, biochemical, and structural studies identify a key role for Asp-128 in the initial step of the phosphobase methylation pathway in Plasmodium and provide molecular insight on the evolution of multiple activities in the active site of the PMT. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. An alternate formulation of blood vessel mechanics and the meaning of the in vivo property.

    PubMed

    Brossollet, L J; Vito, R P

    1995-06-01

    In an effort to bridge the gap between theoretically based vascular mechanics and simpler, clinically relevant compliance models, an alternative complementary energy formulation as well as an improved experimental method are proposed. This formulation generalizes the uniaxial compliance models to multiaxial stretch and twist and clarifies the role of the total in vivo force (measured in biaxial vascular testing) in vessel stability. The measurement of wall thickness when incompressibility is assumed, and the assumption of the existence of an unloaded state are unnecessary. Scattered results from both clinical and mechanical literature are reinterpreted in view of this new understanding of vascular mechanics. Canine saphenous veins (4-5 mm in diameter) conform to the behavior expected from the analysis. Their in vivo property is shown to be a passive property, independent of smooth muscle tone. Redundant particle tracking, control of force and pressure values and the use of papaverine, result, respectively, in strain measurements accurate to within 0.002, experimental control accurate to 0.5% of full range, and repeatable experiments over a few days. The validated system and the new formulation show great potential for exploiting the benefits of innovative experimental design and statistically reliable data analysis.

  17. Alternative splicing modulates Kv channel clustering through a molecular ball and chain mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandany, Nitzan; Marciano, Shir; Magidovich, Elhanan; Frimerman, Teddy; Yehezkel, Rinat; Shem-Ad, Tzilhav; Lewin, Limor; Abdu, Uri; Orr, Irit; Yifrach, Ofer

    2015-03-01

    Ion channel clustering at the post-synaptic density serves a fundamental role in action potential generation and transmission. Here, we show that interaction between the Shaker Kv channel and the PSD-95 scaffold protein underlying channel clustering is modulated by the length of the intrinsically disordered C terminal channel tail. We further show that this tail functions as an entropic clock that times PSD-95 binding. We thus propose a ‘ball and chain’ mechanism to explain Kv channel binding to scaffold proteins, analogous to the mechanism describing channel fast inactivation. The physiological relevance of this mechanism is demonstrated in that alternative splicing of the Shaker channel gene to produce variants of distinct tail lengths resulted in differential channel cell surface expression levels and clustering metrics that correlate with differences in affinity of the variants for PSD-95. We suggest that modulating channel clustering by specific spatial-temporal spliced variant targeting serves a fundamental role in nervous system development and tuning.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of cell cycle control in the mouse Y1 adrenal cell line.

    PubMed

    Costa, Erico T; Forti, Fábio L; Rocha, Kátia M; Moraes, Miriam S; Armelin, Hugo A

    2004-11-01

    Y1 adrenocortical tumor cells possess amplified and overexpressed c-Ki-ras proto-oncogene, displaying chronic high levels of the c-Ki-Ras-GTP protein. Despite this oncogenic lesion, we previously reported that Y1 cells retain tight regulatory mechanisms of cell cycle control typified by the mitogenic response triggered by FGF2 in G0/G1-arrested cells. ACTH, on the other hand, elicits cAMP/PKA-mediated antimitogenic mechanisms involving Akt/PKB dephosphorylation/deactivation and c-Myc protein degradation, blocking G1 phase progression stimulated by FGF2. In this paper we report that ACTH does not directly antagonize any of the early or late sequential steps comprising the mitogenic response triggered by FGF2. In effect, ACTH targets deactivation of constitutively phosphorylated-Akt, restraining the potential of c-Ki-Ras-GTP to subvert Y1 cell cycle control. Thus, we can consider ACTH a tumor suppressor rather than an antimitogenic hormone. In addition, we present initial results showing that high constitutive levels of c-Ki-Ras-GTP render Y1 cells susceptible to dye upon FGF2 treatment. This surprising FGF2 death-effect, that is independent of the well known FGF2-mitogenic activity, might involve a natural unsuspected mechanism for restraining oncogene-induced proliferation.

  19. The Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Endometriosis: A Review of Utilization and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Sai; Zhang, Yue-Hui; Liu, Chen-Fang; Tsui, Ilene; Guo, Ying; Ai, Bei-Bei; Han, Feng-Juan

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis (EM) is one of the common gynecological conditions causing menstrual and pelvic pain and affects 10%–15% of women of reproductive age. In recent years, the complementary and alternative medical (CAM) treatment for EM has become popular due to the few adverse reactions reported. The CAM therapy for EM includes several different treatments such as herbs (herbal prescription, extract, and patent), acupuncture, microwave physiotherapy, and Chinese herb medicine enema (CHM enema). These CAM therapies are effective at relieving dysmenorrhoea, shrinking adnexal masses, and promoting pregnancy, with less unpleasant side effects when compared to hormonal and surgical treatments. In this review, we focus on the status quo of CAM on EM and try to identify therapeutic efficacy and mechanisms based on some clinical and experimental studies. We hope to provide some instructive suggestions for clinical treatment and experimental research in the future. PMID:24701237

  20. Reply to "Comment on 'Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: Entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle' ''.

    PubMed

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2015-05-01

    In their Comment on the paper [Abe and Okuyama, Phys. Rev. E 83, 021121 (2011)], González-Díaz and Díaz-Solórzano discuss that the initial state of the quantum-mechanical analog of the Carnot cycle should be not in a pure state but in a mixed state due to a projective measurement of the system energy. Here, first the Comment is shown to miss the point. Then, second, multiple projective measurements are discussed as a generalization of the Comment, although they are not relevant to the work commented.

  1. Reply to ``Comment on `Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: Entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2015-05-01

    In their Comment on the paper [Abe and Okuyama, Phys. Rev. E 83, 021121 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.83.021121], González-Díaz and Díaz-Solórzano discuss that the initial state of the quantum-mechanical analog of the Carnot cycle should be not in a pure state but in a mixed state due to a projective measurement of the system energy. Here, first the Comment is shown to miss the point. Then, second, multiple projective measurements are discussed as a generalization of the Comment, although they are not relevant to the work commented.

  2. From Cycling Between Coupled Reactions to the Cross-Bridge Cycle: Mechanical Power Output as an Integral Part of Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Diederichs, Frank

    2012-01-01

    ATP delivery and its usage are achieved by cycling of respective intermediates through interconnected coupled reactions. At steady state, cycling between coupled reactions always occurs at zero resistance of the whole cycle without dissipation of free energy. The cross-bridge cycle can also be described by a system of coupled reactions: one energising reaction, which energises myosin heads by coupled ATP splitting, and one de-energising reaction, which transduces free energy from myosin heads to coupled actin movement. The whole cycle of myosin heads via cross-bridge formation and dissociation proceeds at zero resistance. Dissipation of free energy from coupled reactions occurs whenever the input potential overcomes the counteracting output potential. In addition, dissipation is produced by uncoupling. This is brought about by a load dependent shortening of the cross-bridge stroke to zero, which allows isometric force generation without mechanical power output. The occurrence of maximal efficiency is caused by uncoupling. Under coupled conditions, Hill’s equation (velocity as a function of load) is fulfilled. In addition, force and shortening velocity both depend on [Ca2+]. Muscular fatigue is triggered when ATP consumption overcomes ATP delivery. As a result, the substrate of the cycle, [MgATP2−], is reduced. This leads to a switch off of cycling and ATP consumption, so that a recovery of [ATP] is possible. In this way a potentially harmful, persistent low energy state of the cell can be avoided. PMID:24957757

  3. Effects of seawater acidification on cell cycle control mechanisms in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos.

    PubMed

    Place, Sean P; Smith, Bryan W

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown fertilization and development of marine species can be significantly inhibited when the pH of sea water is artificially lowered. Little mechanistic understanding of these effects exists to date, but previous work has linked developmental inhibition to reduced cleavage rates in embryos. To explore this further, we tested whether common cell cycle checkpoints were involved using three cellular biomarkers of cell cycle progression: (1) the onset of DNA synthesis, (2) production of a mitotic regulator, cyclin B, and (3) formation of the mitotic spindle. We grew embryos of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, in seawater artifically buffered to a pH of ∼7.0, 7.5, and 8.0 by CO(2) infusion. Our results suggest the reduced rates of mitotic cleavage are likely unrelated to common cell cycle checkpoints. We found no significant differences in the three biomarkers assessed between pH treatments, indicating the embryos progress through the G(1)/S, G(2)/M and metaphase/anaphase transitions at relatively similar rates. These data suggest low pH environments may not impact developmental programs directly, but may act through secondary mechanisms such as cellular energetics.

  4. Global patterns and substrate-based mechanisms of the terrestrial nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Niu, Shuli; Classen, Aimée T; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Kardol, Paul; Liu, Lingli; Luo, Yiqi; Rustad, Lindsey; Sun, Jian; Tang, Jianwu; Templer, Pamela H; Thomas, R Quinn; Tian, Dashuan; Vicca, Sara; Wang, Ying-Ping; Xia, Jianyang; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition is impacting the services that ecosystems provide to humanity. However, the mechanisms determining impacts on the N cycle are not fully understood. To explore the mechanistic underpinnings of N impacts on N cycle processes, we reviewed and synthesised recent progress in ecosystem N research through empirical studies, conceptual analysis and model simulations. Experimental and observational studies have revealed that the stimulation of plant N uptake and soil retention generally diminishes as N loading increases, while dissolved and gaseous losses of N occur at low N availability but increase exponentially and become the dominant fate of N at high loading rates. The original N saturation hypothesis emphasises sequential N saturation from plant uptake to soil retention before N losses occur. However, biogeochemical models that simulate simultaneous competition for soil N substrates by multiple processes match the observed patterns of N losses better than models based on sequential competition. To enable better prediction of terrestrial N cycle responses to N loading, we recommend that future research identifies the response functions of different N processes to substrate availability using manipulative experiments, and incorporates the measured N saturation response functions into conceptual, theoretical and quantitative analyses.

  5. Failure Mechanisms of SAC/Fe-Ni Solder Joints During Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Yin; Liu, Zhi-Quan; Li, Cai-Fu

    2017-08-01

    Thermal cycling tests have been conducted on Sn-Ag-Cu/Fe- xNi ( x = 73 wt.% or 45 wt.%) and Sn-Ag-Cu/Cu solder joints according to the Joint Electron Device Engineering Council industrial standard to study their interfacial reliability under thermal stress. The interfacial intermetallic compounds formed for solder joints on Cu, Fe-73Ni, and Fe-45Ni were 4.5 μm, 1.7 μm, and 1.4 μm thick, respectively, after 3000 cycles, demonstrating excellent diffusion barrier effect of Fe-Ni under bump metallization (UBM). Also, two deformation modes, viz. solder extrusion and fatigue crack formation, were observed by scanning electron microscopy and three-dimensional x-ray microscopy. Solder extrusion dominated for solder joints on Cu, while fatigue cracks dominated for solder joints on Fe-45Ni and both modes were detected for those on Fe-73Ni. Solder joints on Fe-Ni presented inferior reliability during thermal cycling compared with those on Cu, with characteristic lifetime of 3441 h, 3190 h, and 1247 h for Cu, Fe-73Ni, and Fe-45Ni UBM, respectively. This degradation of the interfacial reliability for solder joints on Fe-Ni is attributed to the mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at interconnection level. The CTE mismatch at microstructure level was also analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction for clearer identification of recrystallization-related deformation mechanisms.

  6. A dual inhibitory mechanism sufficient to maintain cell cycle restricted CENP-A assembly

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Ana; Guo, Lucie Y.; Mata, João F.; Bodor, Dani L.; Cao, Xing-Jun; Bailey, Aaron O.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Black, Ben E.; Jansen, Lars E.T

    2017-01-01

    Summary Chromatin featuring the H3 variant CENP-A at the centromere is critical for its mitotic function and epigenetic maintenance. Assembly of centromeric chromatin is restricted to G1 phase through inhibitory action of Cdk1/2 kinases in other phases of the cell cycle. Here, we identify the two key targets sufficient to maintain cell cycle control of CENP-A assembly. We uncovered a single phosphorylation site in the licensing factor M18BP1 and a cyclin A binding site in the CENP-A chaperone, HJURP, mediating specific inhibitory phosphorylation. Simultaneous expression of mutant proteins lacking these residues, results in complete uncoupling from the cell cycle. Consequently, CENP-A assembly is fully recapitulated under high Cdk activities, indistinguishable from G1 assembly. We find that Cdk-mediated inhibition is exerted by sequestering active factors away from the centromere. Finally, we show that displacement of M18BP1 from the centromere is critical for the assembly mechanism of CENP-A. PMID:28017591

  7. New insights into the mechanism of amine/nitroxide cycling during the hindered amine light stabilizer inhibited oxidative degradation of polymers.

    PubMed

    Gryn'ova, Ganna; Ingold, K U; Coote, Michelle L

    2012-08-08

    High-level ab initio molecular orbital theory calculations are used to identify the origin of the remarkably high inhibition stoichiometric factors exhibited by dialkylamine-based radical-trapping antioxidants. We have calculated the free energy barriers and reaction energies at 25, 80, and 260 °C in the gas phase and in aqueous solution for a broad range of reactions that might, potentially, be involved in amine/nitroxide cycling, as well as several novel pathways proposed as part of the present work, including that of N-alkyl hindered amine light stabilizer activation. We find that most of the literature nitroxide regeneration cycles should be discarded on either kinetic or thermodynamic grounds; some are even inconsistent with existing experimental observations. We therefore propose a new mechanistic cycle that relies on abstraction of a β-hydrogen atom from an alkoxyamine (R(1)R(2)NOCHR(3)R(4)). Our results suggest that this cycle is energetically feasible for a range of substrates and provides an explanation for previously misinterpreted or unexplained experimental results. We also explore alternative mechanisms for amine/nitroxide cycling for cases where the alkoxyamines do not possess an abstractable β-hydrogen.

  8. Probing the mechanics of the complete DNA transcription cycle in real-time using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Christoph G; Cross, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a DNA-dependent motor protein that links ribonucleotide polymerization to force generation and DNA translocation through its active site, i.e., mechanical work. Single-molecule studies using optical tweezers have allowed researchers to probe the load-dependent ribonucleotide incorporation rate and processivity of both single-subunit viral and multisubunit prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNAPs engaged in transcription elongation. A single-molecule method is described here, which allows the complete transcription cycle (i.e., promoter binding, initiation, elongation and termination) to be followed in real-time using dual-trap optical tweezers and a unique "three-bead" geometry. This single-molecule transcription assay can be used to probe the mechanics of both stationary and moving RNAP-DNA complexes engaged in different stages of transcription.

  9. Effects of Hygrothermal Cycling on the Chemical, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties of 862/W Epoxy Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Roberts, Gary D.; Copa, Christine C.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2011-01-01

    The hygrothermal aging characteristics of an epoxy resin were characterized over 1 year, which included 908 temperature and humidity cycles. The epoxy resin quickly showed evidence of aging through color change and increased brittleness. The influence of aging on the material s glass transition temperature (Tg) was evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). The Tg remained relatively constant throughout the year long cyclic aging profile. The chemical composition was monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) where evidence of chemical aging and advancement of cure was noted. The tensile strength of the resin was tested as it aged. This property was severely affected by the aging process in the form of reduced ductility and embrittlement. Detailed chemical evaluation suggests many aging mechanisms are taking place during exposure to hygrothermal conditions. This paper details the influence of processes such as: advancement of cure, chemical degradation, and physical aging on the chemical and physical properties of the epoxy resin.

  10. Mechanics of a rope-braked cycle ergometer flywheel and its use for physiological measurement.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Kathryn L; Gordon, Rae S; Baker, Julien S; Davies, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    The cycle ergometer is one of the main tools used by physiologists in studies involving the measurement of work or power against physiological criteria. The current mechanical analysis of a Monark 824E rope-braked ergometer is based on a simplified approach. In this study a detailed analysis of the system is adopted to increase understanding. The mechanics of the ergometer flywheel are explained using data generated experimentally and the detailed components of the values of work that comprise the total work done by a subject are discussed. The total work done by a subject in 2.5 minutes at a speed of 60 rpm against a brake mass of 3 kg was 23,034 J compared with the value of 27,000 J that normally would be attributed using the traditional calculations. This 15% difference is mainly due to the incorrect assumption that the brake load is the force due to the basket mass.

  11. Modelling feedback mechanisms in the carbon cycle: balancing the carbon budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotmans, J.; den Elzen, M. G. J.

    1993-09-01

    Within the carbon cycle feedback, mechanisms that amplify or dampen the exchange of carbon dioxide between the different reservoirs to enhance concentrations of carbon dioxide and increase temperature from anthropogenic perturbations, play a crucial rôle. Quite a lot of these feedbacks are known, but most of them only potentially. This article evaluates the role of a number of these feedback processes within the carbon cycle. In order to assess their impact, some terrestrial feedbacks have been built into a coupled carbon cycle and climate model, as part of the integrated climate assessment model IMAGE. A number of simulation experiments have been performed with this coupled carbon cycle/climate model to compare historical atmospheric concentration values of carbon dioxide with simulated values. Also global biospheric and oceanic carbon fluxes were validated against other modelling estimates. Based on the assumptions of the IPCC's 1990 Business-as-Usual (BaU-1990) scenario, future projections of the carbon dioxide concentration have been made. A key principle in this is that we have used the modelled feedbacks in order to balance the past and present carbon budget. For atmospheric carbon dioxide, this results in substantially lower projections than the IPCC-estimates: the difference in 2100 is approximately 16% from the 1990 level. Furthermore, the IPCC's 'best guess' or 'central estimate' value of the CO2 concentration in 2100 falls outside the uncertainty range estimated with our balanced modelling approach. Sensitivity experiments with the model have been performed to quantify to what extent the terrestrial feedback processes and oceanic fluxes influence the global carbon balance in the model. It is shown that a historical and present carbon balance can be obtained in many different ways, resulting in different biospheric fluxes and thus in considerably different atmospheric CO2 projections.

  12. Hemp Thermal Insulation Concrete with Alternative Binders, Analysis of their Thermal and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinka, M.; Sahmenko, G.; Korjakins, A.; Radina, L.; Bajare, D.

    2015-11-01

    One of the main challenges that construction industry faces today is how to address the demands for more sustainable, environmentally friendly and carbon neutral construction materials and building upkeep processes. One of the answers to these demands is lime-hemp concrete (LHC) building materials - carbon negative materials that have sufficient thermal insulation capabilities to be used as thermal insulation materials for new as well as for existing buildings. But one problem needs to be overcome before these materials can be used on a large scale - current manufacturing technology allows these materials to be used only as self-bearing thermal insulation material with large labour intensity in the manufacturing process. In order to lower the labour intensity and allow the material to be used in wider applications, a LHC block and board production is necessary, which in turn calls for the binders different from the classically used ones, as they show insufficient mechanical strength for this new use. The particular study focuses on alternative binders produced using gypsum-cement compositions ensuring they are usable in outdoor applications together with hemp shives. Physical, mechanical, thermal and water absorption properties of hemp concrete with various binders are addressed in the current study.

  13. Mechanisms underpinning use of new walking and cycling infrastructure in different contexts: mixed-method analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahlqvist, Shannon; Goodman, Anna; Jones, Tim; Powell, Jane; Song, Yena; Ogilvie, David

    2015-02-21

    Few studies have evaluated the effects of infrastructural improvements to promote walking and cycling. Even fewer have explored how the context and mechanisms of such interventions may interact to produce their outcomes. This mixed-method analysis forms part of the UK iConnect study, which aims to evaluate new walking and cycling routes at three sites - Cardiff, Kenilworth and Southampton. Applying a complementary follow-up approach, we first identified differences in awareness and patterns of use of the infrastructure in survey data from a cohort of adult residents at baseline in spring 2010 (n = 3516) and again one (n = 1849) and two (n = 1510) years later following completion of the infrastructural projects (Analysis 1). We subsequently analysed data from 17 semi-structured interviews with key informants to understand how the new schemes might influence walking and cycling (Analysis 2a). In parallel, we analysed cohort survey data on environmental perceptions (Analysis 2b). We integrated these two datasets to interpret differences across the sites consistent with a theoretical framework that hypothesised that the schemes would improve connectivity and the social environment. After two years, 52% of Cardiff respondents reported using the infrastructure compared with 37% in Kenilworth and 22% in Southampton. Patterns of use did not vary substantially between sites. 17% reported using the new infrastructure for transport, compared with 39% for recreation. Environmental perceptions at baseline were generally unfavourable, with the greatest improvements in Cardiff. Qualitative data revealed that all schemes had a recreational focus to varying extents, that the visibility of schemes to local people might be an important mechanism driving use and that the scale and design of the schemes and the contrast they presented with existing infrastructure may have influenced their use. The dominance of recreational uses may have reflected the specific local goals of

  14. Microbial mechanisms coupling carbon and phosphorus cycles in phosphorus-limited northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Malfatti, F; Turk, V; Tinta, T; Mozetič, P; Manganelli, M; Samo, T J; Ugalde, J A; Kovač, N; Stefanelli, M; Antonioli, M; Fonda-Umani, S; Del Negro, P; Cataletto, B; Hozić, A; Ivošević Denardis, N; Zutić, V; Svetličić, V; Mišić Radić, T; Radić, T; Fuks, D; Azam, F

    2014-02-01

    The coastal northern Adriatic Sea receives pulsed inputs of riverine nutrients, causing phytoplankton blooms and seasonally sustained dissolved organic carbon (DOC) accumulation-hypothesized to cause episodes of massive mucilage. The underlying mechanisms regulating P and C cycles and their coupling are unclear. Extensive biogeochemical parameters, processes and community composition were measured in a 64-day mesocosms deployed off Piran, Slovenia. We followed the temporal trends of C and P fluxes in P-enriched (P+) and unenriched (P-) mesocosms. An intense diatom bloom developed then crashed; however, substantial primary production was maintained throughout, supported by tightly coupled P regeneration by bacteria and phytoplankton. Results provide novel insights on post-bloom C and P dynamics and mechanisms. 1) Post-bloom DOC accumulation to 186 μM remained elevated despite high bacterial carbon demand. Presumably, a large part of DOC accumulated due to the bacterial ectohydrolytic processing of primary productivity that adventitiously generated slow-to-degrade DOC; 2) bacteria heavily colonized post-bloom diatom aggregates, rendering them microscale hotspots of P regeneration due to locally intense bacterial ectohydrolase activities; 3) Pi turnover was rapid thus suggesting high P flux through the DOP pool (dissolved organic phosphorus) turnover; 4) Alpha- and Gamma-proteobacteria dominated the bacterial communities despite great differences of C and P pools and fluxes in both mesocosms. However, minor taxa showed dramatic changes in community compositions. Major OTUs were presumably generalists adapted to diverse productivity regimes.We suggest that variation in bacterial ectohydrolase activities on aggregates, regulating the rates of POM→DOM transition as well as dissolved polymer hydrolysis, could become a bottleneck in P regeneration. This could be another regulatory step, in addition to APase, in the microbial regulation of P cycle and the coupling

  15. c-Jun regulates cell cycle progression and apoptosis by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wisdom, R; Johnson, R S; Moore, C

    1999-01-01

    c-Jun is a component of the transcription factor AP-1, which is activated by a wide variety of extracellular stimuli. The regulation of c-Jun is complex and involves both increases in the levels of c-Jun protein as well as phosphorylation of specific serines (63 and 73) by Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). We have used fibroblasts derived from c-Jun null embryos to define the role of c-Jun in two separate processes: cell growth and apoptosis. We show that in fibroblasts, c-Jun is required for progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle; c-Jun-mediated G1 progression occurs by a mechanism that involves direct transcriptional control of the cyclin D1 gene, establishing a molecular link between growth factor signaling and cell cycle regulators. In addition, c-Jun protects cells from UV-induced cell death and cooperates with NF-kappaB to prevent apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha). c-Jun mediated G1 progression is independent of phosphorylation of serines 63/73; however, protection from apoptosis in response to UV, a potent inducer of JNK/SAP kinase activity, requires serines 63/73. The results reveal critical roles for c-Jun in two different cellular processes and show that different extracellular stimuli can target c-Jun by distinct biochemical mechanisms. PMID:9878062

  16. Understanding Low-cycle Fatigue Life Improvement Mechanisms in a Pre-twinned Magnesium Alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke

    2015-10-03

    The mechanisms of fatigue life improvement by pre-twinning process in a commercial rolled magnesium (Mg) alloy have been investigated using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. It is found that by introducing the excess twinned grains through pre-compression along the rolling direction the fatigue life was enhanced approximately 50%, mainly resulting from the prolonged detwinning process and inhibited dislocation slip during reverse tension. Moreover, after pre-twinning process, the removal of the rapid strain hardening during reverse tension leads to a compressive mean stress value and more symmetric shape of stress-strain hysteresis loop. The pre-twinning has significant impactsmore » on the twinning-detwinning characteristics and deformation modes during cyclic loading and greatly facilitates the twinning-detwinning activities in plastic deformation. The cyclic straining leads to the increase of contribution of tensile twinning deformation in overall plastic deformation in both the as-received and pre-deformed sample. The mechanisms of load partitioning in different groups of grains are closely related to the deformation modes in each deformation stage, while the fatigue cycling has little influence on the load sharing. The pre-twinning process provides an easy and cost-effective route to improve the low-cycle fatigue life through manufacturing and processing, which would advance the wide application of light-weight wrought Mg alloys as structural materials.« less

  17. Understanding Low-cycle Fatigue Life Improvement Mechanisms in a Pre-twinned Magnesium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke

    2015-10-03

    The mechanisms of fatigue life improvement by pre-twinning process in a commercial rolled magnesium (Mg) alloy have been investigated using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. It is found that by introducing the excess twinned grains through pre-compression along the rolling direction the fatigue life was enhanced approximately 50%, mainly resulting from the prolonged detwinning process and inhibited dislocation slip during reverse tension. Moreover, after pre-twinning process, the removal of the rapid strain hardening during reverse tension leads to a compressive mean stress value and more symmetric shape of stress-strain hysteresis loop. The pre-twinning has significant impacts on the twinning-detwinning characteristics and deformation modes during cyclic loading and greatly facilitates the twinning-detwinning activities in plastic deformation. The cyclic straining leads to the increase of contribution of tensile twinning deformation in overall plastic deformation in both the as-received and pre-deformed sample. The mechanisms of load partitioning in different groups of grains are closely related to the deformation modes in each deformation stage, while the fatigue cycling has little influence on the load sharing. The pre-twinning process provides an easy and cost-effective route to improve the low-cycle fatigue life through manufacturing and processing, which would advance the wide application of light-weight wrought Mg alloys as structural materials.

  18. The mechanism of methane and dioxygen activation in the catalytic cycle of methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Shteinman, A A

    1995-03-27

    The binuclear structure of the active center of methane monooxygenase plays a determining role in dioxygen activation and in selectivity and specificity of alkane oxidation with this enzyme. A new mechanism is suggested for binding and activation of O2, which involves side-on binding of O2-(2) to iron atoms followed by its conversion to the bis-mu-oxo complex considered as an alternative of ferryl in CH4 activation. This mechanism results in the sequence of the cleavage of the O-O bond of peroxide O/O2-instead of the opposite sequence O2-/O, which takes place in the case of heme monooxygenase cytochrome P-450. Therefore, in this case there is no necessity of the charge relay system [N.B. Gerber and S.G. Sligar, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 114 (1992) 8742] for the transformation of O2 to an active intermediate. The experiment for checking this hypothesis is suggested.

  19. Simulation, Model Verification and Controls Development of Brayton Cycle PM Alternator: Testing and Simulation of 2 KW PM Generator with Diode Bridge Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankovic, Ana V.

    2003-01-01

    Professor Stankovic will be developing and refining Simulink based models of the PM alternator and comparing the simulation results with experimental measurements taken from the unit. Her first task is to validate the models using the experimental data. Her next task is to develop alternative control techniques for the application of the Brayton Cycle PM Alternator in a nuclear electric propulsion vehicle. The control techniques will be first simulated using the validated models then tried experimentally with hardware available at NASA. Testing and simulation of a 2KW PM synchronous generator with diode bridge output is described. The parameters of a synchronous PM generator have been measured and used in simulation. Test procedures have been developed to verify the PM generator model with diode bridge output. Experimental and simulation results are in excellent agreement.

  20. Simulation, Model Verification and Controls Development of Brayton Cycle PM Alternator: Testing and Simulation of 2 KW PM Generator with Diode Bridge Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankovic, Ana V.

    2003-01-01

    Professor Stankovic will be developing and refining Simulink based models of the PM alternator and comparing the simulation results with experimental measurements taken from the unit. Her first task is to validate the models using the experimental data. Her next task is to develop alternative control techniques for the application of the Brayton Cycle PM Alternator in a nuclear electric propulsion vehicle. The control techniques will be first simulated using the validated models then tried experimentally with hardware available at NASA. Testing and simulation of a 2KW PM synchronous generator with diode bridge output is described. The parameters of a synchronous PM generator have been measured and used in simulation. Test procedures have been developed to verify the PM generator model with diode bridge output. Experimental and simulation results are in excellent agreement.

  1. Investigation into the effects of varying frequency of mechanical stimulation in a cycle-by-cycle manner on engineered cardiac construct function.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kathy Ye; Black, Lauren Deems

    2017-02-01

    Mechanical stimulation has been used extensively to improve the function of cardiac engineered tissue, as it mimics the physical environment in which the tissue is situated during normal development. However, previous mechanical stimulation has been carried out under a constant frequency that more closely resembles a diseased heart. The goal of this study was to create a bioreactor system that would allow us to control the mechanical stimulation of engineered cardiac tissue on a cycle-by-cycle basis. This unique system allows us to determine the effects on cardiac construct function of introducing variability to the mechanical stretch. To test our bioreactor system, constructs created from neonatal rat cardiomyocytes entrapped in fibrin hydrogels were stimulated under various regimes for 2 weeks and then assessed for functional outcomes. No differences were observed in the final cell number in each condition, indicating that variability in frequency did not have a negative effect on viability. The forces were higher for all mechanical stimulation groups compared to static controls, although no differences were observed between the mechanically stimulated conditions, indicating that variable frequency on a cycle-by-cycle basis has limited effects on the resulting force. Although differences in the observed twitch force were not observed, differences in the protein expression indicate that variable-frequency mechanical stimulation had an effect on cell-cell coupling and growth pathway activation in the constructs. Thus, this bioreactor system provides a valuable tool for further development and optimization of engineered myocardial tissue as a repair or replacement strategy for patients undergoing heart failure. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Alternative splicing of U2AF1 reveals a shared repression mechanism for duplicated exons

    PubMed Central

    Kralovicova, Jana; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The auxiliary factor of U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U2AF) facilitates branch point (BP) recognition and formation of lariat introns. The gene for the 35-kD subunit of U2AF gives rise to two protein isoforms (termed U2AF35a and U2AF35b) that are encoded by alternatively spliced exons 3 and Ab, respectively. The splicing recognition sequences of exon 3 are less favorable than exon Ab, yet U2AF35a expression is higher than U2AF35b across tissues. We show that U2AF35b repression is facilitated by weak, closely spaced BPs next to a long polypyrimidine tract of exon Ab. Each BP lacked canonical uridines at position -2 relative to the BP adenines, with efficient U2 base-pairing interactions predicted only for shifted registers reminiscent of programmed ribosomal frameshifting. The BP cluster was compensated by interactions involving unpaired cytosines in an upstream, EvoFold-predicted stem loop (termed ESL) that binds FUBP1/2. Exon Ab inclusion correlated with predicted free energies of mutant ESLs, suggesting that the ESL operates as a conserved rheostat between long inverted repeats upstream of each exon. The isoform-specific U2AF35 expression was U2AF65-dependent, required interactions between the U2AF-homology motif (UHM) and the α6 helix of U2AF35, and was fine-tuned by exon Ab/3 variants. Finally, we identify tandem homologous exons regulated by U2AF and show that their preferential responses to U2AF65-related proteins and SRSF3 are associated with unpaired pre-mRNA segments upstream of U2AF-repressed 3′ss. These results provide new insights into tissue-specific subfunctionalization of duplicated exons in vertebrate evolution and expand the repertoire of exon repression mechanisms that control alternative splicing. PMID:27566151

  3. A mechanism that maintains alternative life histories in a loggerhead sea turtle population.

    PubMed

    Hatase, Hideo; Omuta, Kazuyoshi; Tsukamoto, Katsumi

    2013-11-01

    Intrapopulation variation in habitat use is commonly seen among mobile animals, yet the mechanisms maintaining it have rarely been researched among untrackable species. To investigate how alternative life histories are maintained in a population of the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta), cumulative reproductive output was evaluated and compared between small planktivores inhabiting oceanic areas (with water depths > 200 m) and large benthivores inhabiting neritic areas (depths < 200 m) that sympatrically nested at Yakushima Island, Japan, from 1986 to 2011. In total, 362 nesting females sampled in three different years were classified into the two foraging groups based on stable isotope ratios in egg yolks. There were significant differences between the two foraging groups in most recorded life history parameters (clutch size, clutch frequency, breeding frequency, and remigration intervals), with the exception of emergence success. We did not find evidence of life history trade-offs, nor age-related changes in fecundity. Over the 26-year study period, we calculated a 2.4-fold greater reproductive output for neritic foragers than for oceanic ones, accounting for breeding and clutch frequency. Temporal consistencies in stable isotope ratios and remigration intervals within females suggested that female Japanese loggerheads show fidelity to respective foraging habitats throughout the adult stage. The large difference in productivity between the two groups was unlikely to be offset by the difference in survival during the period from aboveground emergence to first reproduction, suggesting that oceanic foragers have a lower level of fitness than neritic ones. Together with an absence of genetic structure between foraging groups, we infer that alternative life histories in a loggerhead turtle population are maintained by a conditional strategy.

  4. Probabilistic material strength degradation model for Inconel 718 components subjected to high temperature, high-cycle and low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie C.; Boyce, Lola

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of both the fifth and sixth year effort of a research program conducted for NASA-LeRC by The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). The research included on-going development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation model. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes five effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, high-cycle mechanical fatigue, low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Statistical analysis was conducted on experimental Inconel 718 data obtained from the open literature. This analysis provided regression parameters for use as the model's empirical material constants, thus calibrating the model specifically for Inconel 718. Model calibration was carried out for five variables, namely, high temperature, high-cycle and low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Methodology to estimate standard deviations of these material constants for input into the probabilistic material strength model was developed. Using an updated version of PROMISS, entitled PROMISS93, a sensitivity study for the combined effects of high-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue was performed. Then using the current version of PROMISS, entitled PROMISS94, a second sensitivity study including the effect of low-cycle mechanical fatigue, as well as, the three previous effects was performed. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing a combination of high-cycle mechanical

  5. Mechanism-Based Modeling for Low Cycle Fatigue of Cast Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; Sloss, Clayton

    2017-06-01

    A mechanism-based approach—the integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT)—is used to model low cycle fatigue behavior of 1.4848 cast austenitic steel over the temperature range from room temperature (RT) to 1173 K (900 °C) and the strain rate range from of 2 × 10-4 to 2 × 10-2 s-1. The ICFT formulates the material's constitutive equation based on the physical strain decomposition into mechanism strains, and the associated damage accumulation consisting of crack nucleation and propagation in coalescence with internally distributed damage. At room temperature, the material behavior is controlled by plasticity, resulting in a rate-independent and cyclically stable behavior. The material exhibits significant cyclic hardening at intermediate temperatures, 673 K to 873 K (400 °C to 600 °C), with negative strain rate sensitivity, due to dynamic strain aging. At high temperatures >1073 K (800 °C), time-dependent deformation is manifested with positive rate sensitivity as commonly seen in metallic materials at high temperature. The ICFT quantitatively delineates the contribution of each mechanism in damage accumulation, and predicts the fatigue life as a result of synergistic interaction of the above identified mechanisms. The model descriptions agree well with the experimental and fractographic observations.

  6. A comparative study of commercial lithium ion battery cycle life in electrical vehicle: Aging mechanism identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuebing; Ouyang, Minggao; Lu, Languang; Li, Jianqiu; Zheng, Yuejiu; Li, Zhe

    2014-04-01

    When lithium-ion batteries age with cycling, the battery capacity decreases and the resistance increases. The aging mechanism of different types of lithium-ion batteries differs. The loss of lithium inventory, loss of active material, and the increase in resistance may result in battery aging. Generally, analysis of the battery aging mechanism requires dismantling of batteries and using methods such as X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. These methods may permanently damage the battery. Therefore, the methods are inappropriate for the battery management system (BMS) in an electric vehicle. The constant current charging curves while charging the battery could be used to get the incremental capacity and differential voltage curves for identifying the aging mechanism; the battery state-of-health can then be estimated. This method can be potentially used in the BMS for online diagnostic and prognostic services. The genetic algorithm could be used to quantitatively analyze the battery aging offline. And the membership function could be used for onboard aging mechanism identification.

  7. Mechanisms for Annual Cycle Changes in Monsoons in a Warming Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Anji

    2014-05-01

    Analyses of phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) experiments show that the global monsoon is expected to increase in area, precipitation, and intensity as the climate system responds to anthropogenic forcing. Concurrently, detailed analyses for several individual monsoons indicate a re-distribution of rainfall from early to late in the rainy season. This presentation will further examine CMIP5 projected changes in the annual cycle of precipitation in monsoon regions, and use a moist static energy framework to evaluate competing mechanisms identified to be important in precipitation changes over land. In the presence of sufficient surface moisture, the local response to the increase in downwelling energy is characterized by increased evaporation, increased low-level moist static energy, and decreased stability with consequent increases in precipitation. A remote mechanism begins with warmer oceans and operates on land regions via a warmer tropical troposphere, increased stability, and decreased precipitation. The remote mechanism controls the projected changes during winter, and the local mechanism appears to control the switch to increased precipitation during summer in several monsoon regions. During the early summer transition, regions where boundary layer moisture availability is reduced due to decreases in evaporation and moisture convergence experience an enhanced convective barrier. This enhanced convective barrier leads to a redistribution of rainfall from early to late summer, and is robust in the American and African monsoons but not seen in Asia.

  8. Mechanism-Based Modeling for Low Cycle Fatigue of Cast Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; Sloss, Clayton

    2017-09-01

    A mechanism-based approach—the integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT)—is used to model low cycle fatigue behavior of 1.4848 cast austenitic steel over the temperature range from room temperature (RT) to 1173 K (900 °C) and the strain rate range from of 2 × 10-4 to 2 × 10-2 s-1. The ICFT formulates the material's constitutive equation based on the physical strain decomposition into mechanism strains, and the associated damage accumulation consisting of crack nucleation and propagation in coalescence with internally distributed damage. At room temperature, the material behavior is controlled by plasticity, resulting in a rate-independent and cyclically stable behavior. The material exhibits significant cyclic hardening at intermediate temperatures, 673 K to 873 K (400 °C to 600 °C), with negative strain rate sensitivity, due to dynamic strain aging. At high temperatures >1073 K (800 °C), time-dependent deformation is manifested with positive rate sensitivity as commonly seen in metallic materials at high temperature. The ICFT quantitatively delineates the contribution of each mechanism in damage accumulation, and predicts the fatigue life as a result of synergistic interaction of the above identified mechanisms. The model descriptions agree well with the experimental and fractographic observations.

  9. Where will the money come from? Alternative mechanisms to HIV donor funding.

    PubMed

    Katz, Itamar; Routh, Subrata; Bitran, Ricardo; Hulme, Alexandra; Avila, Carlos

    2014-09-16

    Donor funding for HIV programs has flattened out in recent years, which limits the ability of HIV programs worldwide to achieve universal access and sustain current progress. This study examines alternative mechanisms for resource mobilization. Potential non-donor funding sources for national HIV responses in low- and middle-income countries were explored through literature review and Global Fund documentation, including data from 17 countries. We identified the source, financing agent, magnitude of resources, frequency of availability, as well as enabling and risk factors. Four non-donor funding sources for HIV programs were identified: earmarked levy for HIV from country budgets; risk-pooling schemes such as health insurance; debt conversion, in which the creditor country reduces the debt of the debtor country and allocates at least a part of that reduction to health; and concessionary loans from international development banks, which unlike grants, must be repaid. The first two are recurring sources of funding, while the latter two are usually one-time sources, and, if very large, might negatively affect the debtor country's economy. Insurance schemes in five African countries covered less than 6.1% of the HIV expenditure, while social health insurance in four Latin American countries covered 8-11% of the HIV expenditure; in Colombia and Chile, it covered 69% and 60%, respectively. Most low-income countries will find concessionary loans hard to repay, as their HIV programs cost 0.5-4% of GDP. Even in a middle-income country like India, a US$255 million concessionary loan to be repaid over 25 years provided only 7.8% of a 5-year HIV budget. Earmarked levies provided only 15% of the annual HIV funding needs in Zimbabwe and Kenya. Debt conversion provided the same share in Indonesia, but in Pakistan it was much higher - the equivalent of 45% of the annual cost of the national HIV program. Domestic sources of funding are important alternatives to consider and might

  10. Compensatory mechanisms in Great Lakes sea lamprey populations: implications for alternative control strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Michael L.; Bergstedt, R.A.; Twohey, Michael B.; Fodale, Michael F.; Cuddy, Douglas W.; Slade, Jeffrey W.

    2003-01-01

    Compensatory mechanisms are demographic processes that tend to increase population growth rates at lower population density. These processes will tend to reduce the effectiveness of actions that use controls on reproductive success to suppress sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), an economically important pest in the Great Lakes. Historical evidence for compensatory mechanisms in sea lamprey populations was reviewed, and revealed: (1) strong evidence for shifts in sex ratios as sea lamprey abundance was reduced in the early years of the control program; (2) weak and equivocal evidence for increased growth rates of sea lamprey cohorts re-colonizing streams following a lampricide treatment; and (3) suggestions of other compensatory processes, such as earlier ages at metamorphosis, but with little empirical evidence. Larval size distribution data for cohorts in the first and second years following a lampricide treatment (26 pairs of cohorts in 20 streams) was analyzed and did not indicate a consistent pattern of more rapid growth of the first colonizing cohort (only 11 of 33 cases). To test for compensation between spawning and age-1 in sea lamprey populations, data were analyzed for 49 stream-years for which spawning female abundance was known and age-1 abundance was estimated in the following year. A fit of these data to a Ricker stock-recruitment function showed evidence for compensation, measured as reduced survival to age 1 at higher abundance of spawning females. More obvious, however, was a large amount of density-independent variation in survival, which tends to mask evidence for compensatory survival. The results were applied to a simple model that simulates sea lamprey populations and their control in a hypothetical lake. Control strategies that targeted reproductive success performed far less well than comparable strategies that targeted larval populations, because density-independent recruitment variation leads to occasional strong year classes even when

  11. Temporal evolution of mechanisms controlling ocean carbon uptake during the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohfeld, Karen E.; Chase, Zanna

    2017-08-01

    Many mechanisms have been proposed to explain the ∼85-90 ppm decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) during the last glacial cycle, between 127,000 and 18,000 yrs ago. When taken together, these mechanisms can, in some models, account for the full glacial-interglacial CO2 drawdown. Most proxy-based evaluations focus on the peak of the Last Glacial Maximum, 24,000-18,000 yrs ago, and little has been done to determine the sequential timing of processes affecting CO2 during the last glacial cycle. Here we use a new compilation of sea-surface temperature records together with time-sequenced records of carbon and Nd isotopes, and other proxies to determine when the most commonly proposed mechanisms could have been important for CO2 drawdown. We find that the initial major drawdown of 35 ppm 115,000 yrs ago was most likely a result of Antarctic sea ice expansion. Importantly, changes in deep ocean circulation and mixing did not play a major role until at least 30,000 yrs after the first CO2 drawdown. The second phase of CO2 drawdown occurred ∼70,000 yrs ago and was also coincident with the first significant influences of enhanced ocean productivity due to dust. Finally, minimum concentrations of atmospheric CO2 during the Last Glacial Maximum resulted from the combination of physical and biological factors, including the barrier effect of expanded Southern Ocean sea ice, slower ventilation of the deep sea, and ocean biological feedbacks.

  12. Heliox breathing equally influences respiratory mechanics and cycling performance in trained males and females

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Sabrina S.; Dominelli, Paolo B.; Sporer, Benjamin C.; Koehle, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that inspiring a low-density gas mixture (helium-oxygen; HeO2) would minimize mechanical ventilatory constraints and preferentially increase exercise performance in females relative to males. Trained male (n = 11, 31 yr) and female (n = 10, 26 yr) cyclists performed an incremental cycle test to exhaustion to determine maximal aerobic capacity (V̇o2max; male = 61, female = 56 ml·kg−1·min−1). A randomized, single-blinded crossover design was used for two experimental days where subjects completed a 5-km cycling time trial breathing humidified compressed room air or HeO2 (21% O2:balance He). Subjects were instrumented with an esophageal balloon for the assessment of respiratory mechanics. During the time trial, we assessed the ability of HeO2 to alleviate mechanical ventilatory constraints in three ways: 1) expiratory flow limitation, 2) utilization of ventilatory capacity, and 3) the work of breathing. We found that HeO2 significantly reduced the work of breathing, increased the size of the maximal flow-volume envelope, and reduced the fractional utilization of the maximal ventilatory capacity equally between men and women. The primary finding of this study was that inspiring HeO2 was associated with a statistically significant performance improvement of 0.7% (3.2 s) for males and 1.5% (8.1 s) for females (P < 0.05); however, there were no sex differences with respect to improvement in time trial performance (P > 0.05). Our results suggest that the extent of sex-based differences in airway anatomy, work of breathing, and expiratory flow limitation is not great enough to differentially affect whole body exercise performance. PMID:25429095

  13. Cell-autonomous regulation of fast troponin T pre-mRNA alternative splicing in response to mechanical stretch.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Rudolf J; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S

    2012-08-01

    How mechanochemical signals induced by the amount of weight borne by the skeletal musculature are translated into modifications to muscle sarcomeres is poorly understood. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that, in response to experimentally induced increases in the weight load borne by a rat, alternative splicing of the fast skeletal muscle troponin T (Tnnt3) pre-mRNA in gastrocnemius was adjusted in a correlated fashion with the amount of added weight. (Schilder RJ, Kimball SR, Marden JH, Jefferson LS. J Exp Biol 214: 1523-1532, 2011). Thus muscle load is perceived quantitatively by the body, and mechanisms that sense it appear to control processes that generate muscle sarcomere composition plasticity, such as alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Here we demonstrate how mechanical stretch (see earlier comment) of C2C12 muscle cells in culture results in changes to Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing that are qualitatively similar to those observed in response to added weight in rats. Moreover, inhibition of Akt signaling, but not that of ERK1/2, prevents the stretch-induced effect on Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing. These findings suggest that effects of muscle load on Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing are controlled by a cell-autonomous mechanism, rather than systemically. They also indicate that, in addition to its regulatory role in protein synthesis and muscle mass plasticity, Akt signaling may regulate muscle sarcomere composition by modulating alternative splicing events in response to load. Manipulation of Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing by mechanical stretch of cells in culture provides a model to investigate the biology of weight sensing by skeletal muscles and facilitates identification of mechanisms through which skeletal muscles match their performance and experienced load.

  14. The water-water cycle in leaves is not a major alternative electron sink for dissipation of excess excitation energy when CO(2) assimilation is restricted.

    PubMed

    Driever, Steven M; Baker, Neil R

    2011-05-01

    Electron flux from water via photosystem II (PSII) and PSI to oxygen (water-water cycle) may provide a mechanism for dissipation of excess excitation energy in leaves when CO(2) assimilation is restricted. Mass spectrometry was used to measure O(2) uptake and evolution together with CO(2) uptake in leaves of French bean and maize at CO(2) concentrations saturating for photosynthesis and the CO(2) compensation point. In French bean at high CO(2) and low O(2) concentrations no significant water-water cycle activity was observed. At the CO(2) compensation point and 3% O(2) a low rate of water-water cycle activity was observed, which accounted for 30% of the linear electron flux from water. In maize leaves negligible water-water cycle activity was detected at the compensation point. During induction of photosynthesis in maize linear electron flux was considerably greater than CO(2) assimilation, but no significant water-water cycle activity was detected. Miscanthus × giganteus grown at chilling temperature also exhibited rates of linear electron transport considerably in excess of CO(2) assimilation; however, no significant water-water cycle activity was detected. Clearly the water-water cycle can operate in leaves under some conditions, but it does not act as a major sink for excess excitation energy when CO(2) assimilation is restricted. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Dunaliella tertiolecta (Chlorophyta) Avoids Cell Death Under Ultraviolet Radiation By Triggering Alternative Photoprotective Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Segovia, María; Mata, Teresa; Palma, Armando; García-Gómez, Candela; Lorenzo, Rosario; Rivera, Alicia; Figueroa, Félix L

    2015-11-01

    The effect of different ultraviolet radiation (UVR) treatments combining PAR (P), UVA (A) and UVB (B) on the molecular physiology of Dunaliella tertiolecta was studied during 6 days to assess the response to chronic UVR exposure. UVR reduced cell growth but did not cause cell death, as shown by the absence of SYTOX Green labeling and cellular morphology. However, caspase-like enzymatic activities (CLs), (regarded as cell death proteases), were active even though the cells were not dying. Maximal quantum yield of fluorescence (Fv /Fm ) and photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) dropped. Decreased nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) paralleled a drop in xanthophyll cycle de-epoxidation under UVB. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and D1 protein accumulation were inversely correlated. PAB exhibited elevated ROS production at earlier times. Once ROS decayed, D1 protein recovered two-fold compared with P and PA at later stages. Therefore, PsbA gene was still transcribed, suggesting ROS involvement in D1 recovery by its direct effect on mRNA-translation. We add evidence of an UVB-induced positive effect on the cells when P is present, providing photoprotection and resilience, by means of D1 repair. This allowed cells to survive. The photoprotective mechanisms described here (which are counterintuitive in principle) conform to an important ecophysiological response regarding light stress acclimation.

  16. TryCYCLE: A Prospective Study of the Safety and Feasibility of Early In-Bed Cycling in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Alexander J.; Clarke, France J.; Ajami, Daana; McCaughan, Magda; Obrovac, Kristy; Murphy, Christina; Camposilvan, Laura; Herridge, Margaret S.; Koo, Karen K. Y.; Rudkowski, Jill; Seely, Andrew J. E.; Zanni, Jennifer M.; Mourtzakis, Marina; Piraino, Thomas; Cook, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to assess the safety and feasibility of in-bed cycling started within the first 4 days of mechanical ventilation (MV) to inform a future randomized clinical trial. Methods We conducted a 33-patient prospective cohort study in a 21-bed adult academic medical-surgical intensive care unit (ICU) in Hamilton, ON, Canada. We included adult patients (≥ 18 years) receiving MV who walked independently pre-ICU. Our intervention was 30 minutes of in-bed supine cycling 6 days/week in the ICU. Our primary outcome was Safety (termination), measured as events prompting cycling termination; secondary Safety (disconnection or dislodgement) outcomes included catheter/tube dislodgements. Feasibility was measured as consent rate and fidelity to intervention. For our primary outcome, we calculated the binary proportion and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results From 10/2013-8/2014, we obtained consent from 34 of 37 patients approached (91.9%), 33 of whom received in-bed cycling. Of those who cycled, 16(48.4%) were female, the mean (SD) age was 65.8(12.2) years, and APACHE II score was 24.3(6.7); 29(87.9%) had medical admitting diagnoses. Cycling termination was infrequent (2.0%, 95% CI: 0.8%-4.9%) and no device dislodgements occurred. Cycling began a median [IQR] of 3 [2, 4] days after ICU admission; patients received 5 [3, 8] cycling sessions with a median duration of 30.7 [21.6, 30.8] minutes per session. During 205 total cycling sessions, patients were receiving invasive MV (150 [73.1%]), vasopressors (6 [2.9%]), sedative or analgesic infusions (77 [37.6%]) and dialysis (4 [2.0%]). Conclusions Early cycling within the first 4 days of MV among hemodynamically stable patients is safe and feasible. Research to evaluate the effect of early cycling on patient function is warranted. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01885442 PMID:28030555

  17. Genomic Profiling Reveals an Alternate Mechanism for Hepatic Tumor Promotion by Perfluorooctanoic Acid in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Tilton, Susan C.; Orner, Gayle A.; Benninghoff, Abby D.; Carpenter, Hillary M.; Hendricks, Jerry D.; Pereira, Cliff B.; Williams, David E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a potent hepatocarcinogen and peroxisome proliferator (PP) in rodents. Humans are not susceptible to peroxisome proliferation and are considered refractory to carcinogenesis by PPs. Previous studies with rainbow trout indicate they are also insensitive to peroxisome proliferation by the PP dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), but are still susceptible to enhanced hepatocarcinogenesis after chronic exposure. Objectives In this study, we used trout as a unique in vivo tumor model to study the potential for PFOA carcinogenesis in the absence of peroxisome proliferation compared with the structurally diverse PPs clofibrate (CLOF) and DHEA. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis were identified from hepatic gene expression profiles phenotypically anchored to tumor outcome. Methods We fed aflatoxin B1 or sham-initiated animals 200–1,800 ppm PFOA in the diet for 30 weeks for tumor analysis. We subsequently examined gene expression by cDNA array in animals fed PFOA, DHEA, CLOF, or 5 ppm 17β-estradiol (E2, a known tumor promoter) in the diet for 14 days. Results PFOA (1,800 ppm or 50 mg/kg/day) and DHEA treatments resulted in enhanced liver tumor incidence and multiplicity (p < 0.0001), whereas CLOF showed no effect. Carcinogenesis was independent of peroxisome proliferation, measured by lack of peroxisomal β-oxidation and catalase activity. Alternately, both tumor promoters, PFOA and DHEA, resulted in estrogenic gene signatures with strong correlation to E2 by Pearson correlation (R = 0.81 and 0.78, respectively), whereas CLOF regulated no genes in common with E2. Conclusions These data suggest that the tumor-promoting activities of PFOA in trout are due to novel mechanisms involving estrogenic signaling and are independent of peroxisome proliferation. PMID:18709148

  18. Thermo-mechanical effects of thermal cycled copper through-silicon vias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marro, James

    The semiconductor industry is currently facing transistor scaling issues due to fabrication thresholds and quantum effects. In this "More-Than-Moore" era, the industry is developing new ways to increase device performance, such as stacking chips for three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D-IC). The 3D-IC's superior performance over their 2D counterparts can be attributed to the use of vertical interconnects, or through silicon vias (TSV). These interconnects are much shorter, reducing signal delay. However TSVs are susceptible to various thermo-mechanical reliability concerns. Heating during fabrication and use, in conjunction with coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the copper TSVs and silicon substrate, create harmful stresses in the system. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the signal integrity of Cu-TSVs and determine the major contributing factors of the signal degradation upon in-use conditions. Two series of samples containing blind Cu-TSVs embedded in a Si substrate were studied, each having different types and amounts of voids from manufacturing. The samples were thermally cycled up to 2000 times using three maximum temperatures to simulate three unique in-use conditions. S11 parameter measurements were then conducted to determine the signal integrity of the TSVs. To investigate the internal response from cycling, a protocol was developed for cross-sectioning the copper TSVs. Voids were measured using scanning electron microscope and focused ion beam imaging of the cross-sections, while the microstructural evolution of the copper was monitored with electron backscattering diffraction. An increase in void area was found to occur after cycling. This is thought to be the major contributing factor in the signal degradation of the TSVs, since no microstructural changes were observed in the copper.

  19. The long-term seismic cycle in collisional margins: insights from Seismo-Thermo-Mechanical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Zilio, L.; van Dinther, Y.; Gerya, T.

    2015-12-01

    The April 25, 2015, Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake is the largest one in the Nepal Himalaya since 1934. Since the foreland part of it is densely populated, these events represent a considerable seismic hazard. The restricted direct observations in time and space in combination with tectonic and rheological complexities, however, pose a difficult problem for both seismic hazard assessment and modeling efforts. In this study we for the first time simulate cycles of spontaneous earthquake-like ruptures on non a-priori defined faults within a generic continental collision zone. We use the Seismo-Thermo-Mechanical (STM) numerical modeling approach, which is based on a continuum, viscoelastoplastic code I2ELVIS and is validated for seismic cycle applications against a laboratory model and natural observations (van Dinther et al., 2013a, b). The 2-D model setup consists of two continental plates separated by an oceanic plate, in which the incipient subduction phase is followed by continent-continent collision. In different collisional stages, we evaluate a non-associative Drucker-Prager plasticity yield criterion with pressure dependent yield strength and a strongly rate-dependent friction formulation. Our results show physically consistent emergence of complex rupture paths, both on- and off-main frontal thrust. Assuming different physical properties of tectonic nappes, we find that ruptures propagate following rheological or tectonic discontinuities. Our findings suggest that the interseismic coupling of the main-thrust affects the seismic cycle of the entire orogenic belt. While thrust-faulting events mainly occur on the main frontal thrust, normal-faulting events spread throughout the orogenic belt as a consequence of gravitational extension. Results from an event detection algorithm shows events in the deeper portions of the orogenic belt, both within the oceanic slab and near the bottom of the wedge where material is squeezed between stiff lithospheric mantle portions.

  20. Polyimide aerogels with amide cross-links: a low cost alternative for mechanically strong polymer aerogels.

    PubMed

    Meador, Mary Ann B; Alemán, Christian R; Hanson, Katrina; Ramirez, Nakaira; Vivod, Stephanie L; Wilmoth, Nathan; McCorkle, Linda

    2015-01-21

    Polyimide aerogels combine high porosity, low thermal conductivity, flexibility, and low density with excellent mechanical properties. However, previously used cross-linkers, such as 1,3,5-triaminophenoxybenzene (TAB), 2,4,6-tris(4-aminophenyl)pyridine (TAPP), or octa(aminophenoxy)silsesquioxane (OAPS), either are not commercially available or are prohibitively expensive. Finding more cost efficient cross-linkers that are commercially available to synthesize these aerogels is crucial for making large scale manufacturing attractive. Herein, we describe an approach to making polyimide aerogels starting with amine capped oligomers that are cross-linked with 1,3,5-benzenetricarbonyl trichloride (BTC). BTC is a lower cost, commercially available alternative to TAB, TAPP, or OAPS. Aerogels made in this way have the same or higher modulus and higher surface area compared to those previously reported with either TAB or OAPS cross-links at the same density. While the cross-link structure is an amide, the thermal stability is not compromised most likely because the cross-link is only a small part of the composition of the aerogel. Onset of decomposition depends primarily on the backbone chemistry with 4,4'-oxidianiline (ODA) being more thermally stable than 2,2'-dimethylbenzidine (DMBZ), similar to those previously reported with other cross-links.

  1. Climate change and shrinking salamanders: alternative mechanisms for changes in plethodontid salamander body size.

    PubMed

    Connette, Grant M; Crawford, John A; Peterman, William E

    2015-08-01

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated relationships between climate trends and body size change of organisms. In many cases, climate might be expected to influence body size by altering thermoregulation, energetics or food availability. However, observed body size change can result from a variety of ecological processes (e.g. growth, selection, population dynamics) or imperfect observation of biological systems. We used two extensive datasets to evaluate alternative mechanisms for recently reported changes in the observed body size of plethodontid salamanders. We found that mean adult body size of salamanders can be highly sensitive to survey conditions, particularly rainfall. This systematic bias in the detection of larger or smaller individuals could result in a signature of body size change in relation to reported climate trends when it is simply observation error. We also identify considerable variability in body size distributions among years and find that individual growth rates can be strongly influenced by weather. Finally, our study demonstrates that measures of mean adult body size can be highly variable among surveys and that large sample sizes may be required to make reliable inferences. Identifying the effects of climate change is a critical area of research in ecology and conservation. Researchers should be aware that observed changes in certain organisms can result from multiple ecological processes or systematic bias due to nonrandom sampling of populations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The PHLAME (Promoting Healthy Lifestyles: Alternative Models' Effects) firefighter study: testing mediating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ranby, Krista W; MacKinnon, David P; Fairchild, Amanda J; Elliot, Diane L; Kuehl, Kerry S; Goldberg, Linn

    2011-10-01

    This paper examines the mechanisms by which PHLAME (Promoting Healthy Lifestyles: Alternative Models' Effects), a health promotion intervention, improved healthy eating and exercise behavior among firefighters, a population at high risk for health problems due to occupational hazards. In a randomized trial, 397 firefighters participated in either the PHLAME team intervention with their work shift or a control condition. Intervention sessions taught benefits of a healthy diet and regular exercise, and sought to improve social norms and social support from coworkers for healthy behavior. At posttest, team intervention participants had increased their fruit and vegetable consumption as compared to control participants. An increase in knowledge of fruit and vegetable benefits and improved dietary coworker norms partially mediated these effects. Exercise habits and VO2 max were related to targeted mediators but were not significantly changed by the team intervention. Partial support was found for both the action and conceptual theories underlying the intervention. Our findings illustrate how an effective program's process can be deconstructed to understand the underpinnings of behavior change and refine interventions. Further, fire stations may improve the health of firefighters by emphasizing the benefits of healthy diet and exercise behaviors while also encouraging behavior change by coworkers as a whole. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Analysis of heat loss mechanisms for mobile tent-type refuge alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Bissert, P.T.; Yantek, D.S.; Klein, M.D.; Yan, L.

    2017-01-01

    Federal regulations require that refuge alternatives (RAs) be located within 305 m (1,000 ft) of the working face and spaced at one-hour travel distances in the outby area in underground coal mines, in the event that miners cannot escape during a disaster. The Mine Safety and Health Administration mandates that RAs provide safe shelter and livable conditions for a minimum of 96 hours while maintaining the apparent temperature below 35 °C (95 °F). The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health used a validated thermal simulation model to examine the mechanisms of heat loss from an RA to the ambient mine and the effect of mine strata composition on the final internal dry bulb temperature (DBT) for a mobile tent-type RA. The results of these studies show that 51 percent of the heat loss from the RA to the ambient mine is due to radiation and 31 percent to conduction. Three mine width and height configurations and four mine strata compositions were examined. The final DBT inside the RA after 96 hours varied by less than 1 °C (1.8 °F) for the three mine width/height configurations and by less than 2 °C (3.6 °F) for the four mine strata compositions. PMID:28736496

  4. Alternative mechanism for coffee-ring deposition based on active role of free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari Kang, Saeed; Vandadi, Vahid; Felske, James D.; Masoud, Hassan

    2016-12-01

    When a colloidal sessile droplet dries on a substrate, the particles suspended in it usually deposit in a ringlike pattern. This phenomenon is commonly referred to as the "coffee-ring" effect. One paradigm for why this occurs is as a consequence of the solutes being transported towards the pinned contact line by the flow inside the drop, which is induced by surface evaporation. From this perspective, the role of the liquid-gas interface in shaping the deposition pattern is somewhat minimized. Here, we propose an alternative mechanism for the coffee-ring deposition. It is based on the bulk flow within the drop transporting particles to the interface where they are captured by the receding free surface and subsequently transported along the interface until they are deposited near the contact line. That the interface captures the solutes as the evaporation proceeds is supported by a Lagrangian tracing of particles advected by the flow field within the droplet. We model the interfacial adsorption and transport of particles as a one-dimensional advection-generation process in toroidal coordinates and show that the theory reproduces ring-shaped depositions. Using this model, deposition patterns on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces are examined in which the evaporation is modeled as being either diffusive or uniform over the surface.

  5. Alternative mechanisms of inhibiting activity of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Chandra Shaker; Jangra, Ashok; Bezbaruah, Babul Kumar; V, Athira K; Sykam, Shivaji

    2016-01-01

    Poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-1), a DNA nick-sensor enzyme, is an abundant nuclear protein. Upon sensing DNA breaks, PARP-1 gets activated and cleaves NAD into nicotinamide and ADP-ribose and polymerizes the latter onto nuclear acceptor proteins including histones, transcription factors, and PARP-1 itself. Poly(ADP-ribosylation) mainly contributes to DNA repairing mechanism. However, oxidative stress-induced over-activation of PARP-1 consumes excess of NAD and consequently ATP, culminating into cell necrosis. This cellular suicide pathway has been implicated in several conditions such as stroke, myocardial ischemia, diabetes. Thus, it can be a rationale approach to inhibit the activity of PARP-1 for reducing detrimental effects associated with oxidative stress-induced over-activation of PARP-1. Several preclinical as well as clinical studies of PARP-1 inhibitors have been used in conditions such as cancer, stroke and traumatic brain injury. Conventionally, there are many studies which employed the concept of direct inhibition of PARP-1 by competing with NAD. Here, in the present review, we highlight several prospective alternative approaches for the inhibition of PARP-1 activity.

  6. Bioluminescence is produced from a trapped firefly luciferase conformation predicted by the domain alternation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Rosenberg, Justin C; Fontaine, Danielle M; Southworth, Tara L; Behney, Curran E; Uzasci, Lerna

    2011-07-27

    According to the domain alternation mechanism and crystal structure evidence, the acyl-CoA synthetases, one of three subgroups of a superfamily of adenylating enzymes, catalyze adenylate- and thioester-forming half-reactions in two different conformations. The enzymes accomplish this by presenting two active sites through an ~140° rotation of the C-domain. The second half-reaction catalyzed by another subgroup, the beetle luciferases, is a mechanistically dissimilar oxidative process that produces bioluminescence. We have demonstrated that a firefly luciferase variant containing cysteine residues at positions 108 and 447 can be intramolecularly cross-linked by 1,2-bis(maleimido)ethane, trapping the enzyme in a C-domain-rotated conformation previously undocumented in the available luciferase crystal structures. The cross-linked luciferase cannot adenylate luciferin but is nearly fully capable of bioluminescence with synthetic luciferyl adenylate because it retains the ability to carry out the oxidative half-reaction. The cross-linked luciferase is apparently trapped in a conformation similar to those adopted by acyl-CoA synthetases as they convert acyl adenylates into the corresponding CoA thioesters.

  7. An alternative mechanism for international health aid: evaluating a Global Social Protection Fund.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Several public health groups have called for the creation of a global fund for 'social protection'-a fund that produces the international equivalent of domestic tax collection and safety net systems to finance care for the ill and disabled and related health costs. All participating countries would pay into a global fund based on a metric of their ability to pay and withdraw from the common pool based on a metric of their need for funds. We assessed how alternative strategies and metrics by which to operate such a fund would affect its size and impact on health system financing. Using a mathematical model, we found that common targets for health funding in low-income countries require higher levels of aid expenditures than presently distributed. Some mechanisms exist that may incentivize reduction of domestic health inequalities, and direct most funds towards the poorest populations. Payments from high-income countries are also likely to decrease over time as middle-income countries' economies grow.

  8. Classical and quantum-mechanical treatments of nonsequential double ionization with few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira de Morisson Faria, C.; Liu, X.; Sanpera, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2004-10-01

    We address nonsequential double ionization induced by strong, linearly polarized laser fields of only a few cycles, considering a physical mechanism in which the second electron is dislodged by the inelastic collision of the first electron with its parent ion. The problem is treated classically, using an ensemble model, and quantum mechanically, within the strong-field and uniform saddle-point approximations. In the latter case, the results are interpreted in terms of “quantum orbits,” which can be related to the trajectories of a classical electron in an electric field. We obtain highly asymmetric electron momentum distributions, which strongly depend on the absolute phase, i.e., on the phase difference between the pulse envelope and its carrier frequency. Around a particular value of this parameter, the distributions shift from the region of positive to that of negative momenta, or vice versa, in a radical fashion. This behavior is investigated in detail for several driving-field parameters, and provides a very efficient method for measuring the absolute phase. Both models yield very similar distributions, which share the same physical explanation. There exist, however, minor discrepancies due to the fact that, beyond the region for which electron-impact ionization is classically allowed, the yields from the quantum-mechanical computation decay exponentially, whereas their classical counterparts vanish.

  9. Cell cycle disruption and apoptosis as mechanisms of toxicity of organochlorines in Zea mays roots.

    PubMed

    Blondel, Claire; Melesan, Marc; San Miguel, Angélique; Veyrenc, Sylvie; Meresse, Patrick; Pezet, Mylène; Reynaud, Stephane; Raveton, Muriel

    2014-07-15

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) are widespread environmental pollutants; two of them are highly persistent: lindane (γHCH) and chlordecone (CLD). Maize plants cope with high levels of OCP-environmental pollution, however little is known about cellular mechanisms involved in plant response to such OCP-exposures. This research was aimed at understanding the physiological pathways involved in the plant response to OCPs in function of a gradient of exposure. Here we provide the evidences that OCPs might disrupt root cell cycle leading to a rise in the level of polyploidy possibly through mechanisms of endoreduplication. In addition, low-to-high doses of γHCH were able to induce an accumulation of H2O2 without modifying NO contents, while CLD modulated neither H2O2 nor NO production. [Ca(2+)]cytosolic, the caspase-3-like activity as well as TUNEL-positive nuclei and IP-positive cells increased after exposure to low-to-high doses of OCPs. These data strongly suggest a cascade mechanism of the OCP-induced toxic effect, notably with an increase in [Ca(2+)]cytosolic and caspase-3-like activity, suggesting the activation of programmed cell death pathway.

  10. [Inhibitory effect of valproic acid on cell cycle of Kasumi-1 cell line and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Zhu, Cui-Min

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the influence of valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, on cell cycle of Kasumi-1 cells, and explore its molecular mechanism. Kasumi-1 cells were treated with VPA at different concentration and different time cell cycle changes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cyclin D1 and p21(WAF1/CIP) gene, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, were determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. (1) VPA blocked the Kasumi-1 cells in G(0)/G(1) phase. (2) Compared with control group, 3 mmol/L VPA treated Kasumi-1 cells for different times caused their mRNA expression of cyclin D1 decreased. Treated with VPA at different concentration for 3 days, the mRNA expression decreased in a dose-dependent manner. (3) VPA induced p21(WAF1/CIP) mRNA expression increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The p21(WAF1/CIP) protein increased with increasing concentration of VPA at day 3. The p21(WAF1/CIP) protein significantly increased with 3 mmol/L VPA treatment for 2 d (2.498 +/- 0.240). VPA can arrest Kasumi-1 cell in G(0)/G(1) phase through the regulation of cyclin D1 and p21(WAF1/CIP).

  11. Effect of mechanical cycling on screw torque in external hexagon implants with and without platform switching.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Bruno Andrade Cantharino; Vedovatto, Eduardo; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; Mazaro, José Vitor Quinelli; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of mechanical cycling on the torque of retaining screw in external hexagon implants with platform switching (PS), regular platform (RP) and wide platform (WP). A total of 30 specimens were equally divided into 3 groups: PS, PR and WP. Each specimen was prepared with implants: 3.75 x 10 mm for RP group and 5.0x10 mm for PS and WP groups and its respective abutment with 32 Ncm torque. All groups were subjected to 106 cycles with 100 N (corresponding to about 40 months of chewing). The results were obtained with the reverse torque of each specimen and data were evaluated using ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). The PS group showed statistically significant difference in screw removal torque (30.06±5.42) compared with RP (23.75±2.76) and WP (21.32±3.53) (p<0.05) groups; the RP and WP groups showed no statistically significant difference between them. It was concluded that the PS group showed higher reverse torque value, suggesting lower susceptibility of the abutment screw loosening.

  12. The Mechanisms of Calcium Cycling and Action Potential Dynamics in Cardiac Alternans

    PubMed Central

    Kanaporis, Giedrius; Blatter, Lothar A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Alternans is a risk factor for cardiac arrhythmia, including atrial fibrillation. At the cellular level alternans manifests as beat-to-beat alternations in contraction, action potential duration (APD) and magnitude of the Ca2+ transient (CaT). Electromechanical and CaT alternans are highly correlated, however it has remained controversial whether the primary cause of alternans is a disturbance of cellular Ca2+ signaling or electrical membrane properties. Objective Determine whether a primary failure of intracellular Ca2+ regulation or disturbances in Vm and AP regulation are responsible for the occurrence of alternans in atrial myocytes. Methods and Results Pacing-induced APD and CaT alternans were studied in single rabbit atrial and ventricular myocytes using combined [Ca2+]i and electrophysiological measurements. In current-clamp experiments APD and CaT alternans strongly correlated in time and magnitude. CaT alternans was observed without alternation in L-type Ca2+ current, however, elimination of intracellular Ca2+ release abolished APD alternans, indicating that [Ca2+]i dynamics have a profound effect on the occurrence of CaT alternans. Trains of two distinctive voltage commands in form of APs recorded during large and small alternans CaTs, were applied to voltage-clamped cells. CaT alternans were observed with and without alternation in the voltage command shape. During ‘alternans AP-clamp’ large CaTs coincided with both long and short AP waveforms, indicating that CaT alternans develop irrespective of AP dynamics. Conclusion The primary mechanism underlying alternans in atrial cells, similarly to ventricular cells, resides in a disturbance of Ca2+ signaling while APD alternans are a secondary consequence, mediated by Ca2+-dependent AP modulation. PMID:25532796

  13. The mechanical properties of glass fabric composites following heat treatment and thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.; Robertson, S.J.; Smart, D.

    1997-06-01

    The use of glass fibre composites as insulating materials in superconducting magnets is common practice but the trend to larger and more complex structures may require different processing techniques. In order to quantify possible process related effects, three types of glass (E-glass, S2-glass and quartz) were used in the manufacture of composite panels. These panels were exposed to environments which may be experienced by insulating materials during the manufacture and service life of Niobium-Tin magnets. Process variations included heat treatment of fabrics prior to resin impregnation and thermal cycling of the finished composites to the cure temperature and to 77 K. Changes in the mechanical properties at room temperature and at 77 K are reported.

  14. Feedback of mechanical effectiveness induces adaptations in motor modules during cycling

    PubMed Central

    De Marchis, Cristiano; Schmid, Maurizio; Bibbo, Daniele; Castronovo, Anna Margherita; D'Alessio, Tommaso; Conforto, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have reported evidence that the motor system may rely on a modular organization, even if this behavior has yet to be confirmed during motor adaptation. The aim of the present study is to investigate the modular motor control mechanisms underlying the execution of pedaling by untrained subjects in different biomechanical conditions. We use the muscle synergies framework to characterize the muscle coordination of 11 subjects pedaling under two different conditions. The first one consists of a pedaling exercise with a strategy freely chosen by the subjects (Preferred Pedaling Technique, PPT), while the second condition constrains the gesture by means of a real time visual feedback of mechanical effectiveness (Effective Pedaling Technique, EPT). Pedal forces, recorded using a pair of instrumented pedals, were used to calculate the Index of Effectiveness (IE). EMG signals were recorded from eight muscles of the dominant leg and Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) was applied for the extraction of muscle synergies. All the synergy vectors, extracted cycle by cycle for each subject, were pooled across subjects and conditions and underwent a 2-dimensional Sammon's non-linear mapping. Seven representative clusters were identified on the Sammon's projection, and the corresponding eight-dimensional synergy vectors were used to reconstruct the repertoire of muscle activation for all subjects and all pedaling conditions (VAF > 0.8 for each individual muscle pattern). Only 5 out of the 7 identified modules were used by the subjects during the PPT pedaling condition, while 2 additional modules were found specific for the pedaling condition EPT. The temporal recruitment of three identified modules was highly correlated with IE. The structure of the identified modules was found similar to that extracted in other studies of human walking, partly confirming the existence of shared and task specific muscle synergies, and providing further evidence on the modularity

  15. Evidence for polyphosphate accumulating organism (PAO)-mediated phosphorus cycling in stream biofilms under alternating aerobic/anaerobic conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient in freshwater ecosystems and excessive inputs can lead to eutrophication. In-stream cycling of P involves complex biological, chemical, and physical processes that are not fully understood. Microbial metabolisms are suspected to control oxygen-dependent up...

  16. Alternative ways of using field-based estimates to calibrate ecosystem models and their implications for ecosystem carbon cycle studies

    Treesearch

    Y. He; Q. Zhuang; A.D. McGuire; Y. Liu; M. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Model-data fusion is a process in which field observations are used to constrain model parameters. How observations are used to constrain parameters has a direct impact on the carbon cycle dynamics simulated by ecosystem models. In this study, we present an evaluation of several options for the use of observations inmodeling regional carbon dynamics and explore the...

  17. 78 FR 60275 - Alternative Method for Calculating Off-Cycle Credits for Mercedes-Benz Vehicles Under the Light...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... efficiency exterior lighting, infrared glazing, and active seat ventilation. The application is only for off... stop-start, high efficiency exterior lighting, infrared glazing, and active seat ventilation. The... ). High Efficiency Exterior Lighting Mercedes-Benz is applying for off-cycle credits for high...

  18. Effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of Cu/SS joints after single and multiple HIP cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tähtinen, S.; Singh, B. N.; Toft, P.

    2000-12-01

    The present design of the ITER plasma facing components consists of a copper alloy heat sink layer between plasma facing materials and stainless steel structure. The main option for manufacturing these components is hot isostatic pressing (HIP) method and several HIP thermal cycles are foreseen for manufacturing of the complete blanket module. Mechanical characterisation of HIP joints between dissimilar metals is a complicated issue, where information on mechanical properties of base alloys, metallurgy of the HIP joints and mechanical testing methods will be required. The tensile and three point bend tests produced different fracture modes, depending on test temperature, applied HIP thermal cycles and neutron irradiation. The fracture mode was either ductile fracture of copper alloy or joint interface fracture. The mechanical properties of the HIP joint specimens were dominated by strength mismatch of the base alloys which was affected by HIP thermal cycles and neutron irradiation.

  19. Soil carbon model alternatives for ECHAM5/JSBACH climate model: Evaluation and impacts on global carbon cycle estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thum, T.; RäIsäNen, P.; Sevanto, S.; Tuomi, M.; Reick, C.; Vesala, T.; Raddatz, T.; Aalto, T.; JäRvinen, H.; Altimir, N.; Pilegaard, K.; Nagy, Z.; Rambal, S.; Liski, J.

    2011-06-01

    The response of soil organic carbon to climate change might lead to significant feedbacks affecting global warming. This response can be studied by coupled climate-carbon cycle models but so far the description of soil organic carbon cycle in these models has been quite simple. In this work we used the coupled climate-carbon cycle model ECHAM5/JSBACH (European Center/Hamburg Model 5/Jena Scheme for Biosphere-Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg) with two different soil carbon modules, namely (1) the original soil carbon model of JSBACH called CBALANCE and (2) a new soil carbon model Yasso07, to study the interaction between climate variability and soil organic carbon. Equivalent ECHAM5/JSBACH simulations were conducted using both soil carbon models, with freely varying atmospheric CO2 for the last 30 years (1977-2006). In this study, anthropogenic CO2 emissions and ocean carbon cycle were excluded. The new model formulation produced soil carbon stock estimates that were much closer to measured values. It also captured better the seasonal cycle of the direct CO2 exchange measurements at the three grassland sites considered (RMS error reduced by 12%), while for the five forest sites also analyzed, the results were ambiguous and the RMS error was 12% larger for Yasso07 than for CBALANCE. As a response to climatic changes, Yasso07 showed greater release of soil carbon to the atmosphere than the original model formulation during the years 1977-2006. This emphasizes the need for better understanding the processes affecting soil carbon stocks and their turnover rates to predict the climatic feedbacks.

  20. CuCrZr alloy microstructure and mechanical properties after hot isostatic pressing bonding cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frayssines, P.-E.; Gentzbittel, J.-M.; Guilloud, A.; Bucci, P.; Soreau, T.; Francois, N.; Primaux, F.; Heikkinen, S.; Zacchia, F.; Eaton, R.; Barabash, V.; Mitteau, R.

    2014-04-01

    ITER first wall (FW) panels are a layered structure made of the three following materials: 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel, CuCrZr alloy and beryllium. Two hot isostatic pressing (HIP) cycles are included in the reference fabrication route to bond these materials together for the normal heat flux design supplied by the European Union (EU). This reference fabrication route ensures sufficiently good mechanical properties for the materials and joints, which fulfil the ITER mechanical specifications, but often results in a coarse grain size for the CuCrZr alloy, which is not favourable, especially, for the thermal creep properties of the FW panels. To limit the abnormal grain growth of CuCrZr and make the ITER FW fabrication route more reliable, a study began in 2010 in the EU in the frame of an ITER task agreement. Two material fabrication approaches have been investigated. The first one was dedicated to the fabrication of solid CuCrZr alloy in close collaboration with an industrial copper alloys manufacturer. The second approach investigated was the manufacturing of CuCrZr alloy using the powder metallurgy (PM) route and HIP consolidation. This paper presents the main mechanical and microstructural results associated with the two CuCrZr approaches mentioned above. The mechanical properties of solid CuCrZr, PM CuCrZr and joints (solid CuCrZr/solid CuCrZr and solid CuCrZr/316L(N) and PM CuCrZr/316L(N)) are also presented.

  1. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 2: Advanced energy conversion systems. Part 1: Open-cycle gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. H.; Corman, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Ten energy conversion systems are defined and analyzed in terms of efficiency. These include: open-cycle gas turbine recuperative; open-cycle gas turbine; closed-cycle gas turbine; supercritical CO2 cycle; advanced steam cycle; liquid metal topping cycle; open-cycle MHD; closed-cycle inert gas MHD; closed-cycle liquid metal MHD; and fuel cells. Results are presented.

  2. Supercharged two-cycle engines employing novel single element reciprocating shuttle inlet valve mechanisms and with a variable compression ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesen, Bernard (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates to novel reciprocating shuttle inlet valves, effective with every type of two-cycle engine, from small high-speed single cylinder model engines, to large low-speed multiple cylinder engines, employing spark or compression ignition. Also permitting the elimination of out-of-phase piston arrangements to control scavenging and supercharging of opposed-piston engines. The reciprocating shuttle inlet valve (32) and its operating mechanism (34) is constructed as a single and simple uncomplicated member, in combination with the lost-motion abutments, (46) and (48), formed in a piston skirt, obviating the need for any complex mechanisms or auxiliary drives, unaffected by heat, friction, wear or inertial forces. The reciprocating shuttle inlet valve retains the simplicity and advantages of two-cycle engines, while permitting an increase in volumetric efficiency and performance, thereby increasing the range of usefulness of two-cycle engines into many areas that are now dominated by the four-cycle engine.

  3. Application of fracture mechanics and half-cycle theory to the prediction of fatigue life of aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1989-01-01

    The service life of aircraft structural components undergoing random stress cycling was analyzed by the application of fracture mechanics. The initial crack sizes at the critical stress points for the fatigue crack growth analysis were established through proof load tests. The fatigue crack growth rates for random stress cycles were calculated using the half-cycle method. A new equation was developed for calculating the number of remaining flights for the structural components. The number of remaining flights predicted by the new equation is much lower than that predicted by the conventional equation. This report describes the application of fracture mechanics and the half-cycle method to calculate the number of remaining flights for aircraft structural components.

  4. [Diaphragmatic pacemaker as an alternative to mechanical ventilation in patients with cervical spinal injury].

    PubMed

    Romero-Ganuza, F J; Gambarrutta-Malfatti, C; Diez de la Lastra-Buigues, E; Marín-Ruiz, M Á; Merlo-González, V E; Sánchez-Aranzueque Pantoja, A M; García-Moreno, F J; Mazaira-Álvarez, J

    2011-01-01

    To verify that the diaphragmatic pacemaker is a form of respiratory support that can be used to replace a volumetric respirator in cervical spinal injury patients with cervical spinal lesion and diaphragmatic paralysis by means of its comparison with the traditional volumetric respirator. Retrospective study of a prospective database and age-matched case-control study. Intensive Care Unit and Intermediate Care Respiratory Unit, Paraplegics National Hospital, Toledo (Spain). We collected data on all patients discharged from the Hospital with permanent respiratory support by volumetric respirator or diaphragmatic pacemaker during a follow-up period of 25 years. Personal interviews were conducted to evaluate health-related quality of life. Comparison and survival tests were used for statistical comparisons. Quality of life questionnaire. The main variables collected were demographic data, hospital stay, mortality, family reintegration and health-related quality of life. We evaluated the clinical records of 101 patients, 37 in the pacemaker-group and 64 in the volumetric respirator-group. Our results show that ICU admission duration and hospitalization as well as family reintegration, without significant differences, with a tendency to greater survival in pacemaker patients (18.18 versus 9.67 years by the Kaplan-Meier method, p<0.001). However, this difference becomes non-significant (p=0.06) after adjustment of the groups by age. Furthermore, better quality of life was found in these same patients with pacemakers in terms of security, communication, sociability, comfort and mobility in the patients. Diaphragmatic pacemaker ventilation is an effective alternative to mechanical ventilation with similar efficacy that improve quality of life in patients with severe respiratory failure due to cervical spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  6. Investigation of Cumulative Fatigue Damage Through Sequential Low Cycle Fatigue and High Cycle Fatigue Cycling at High Temperature for a Type 316LN Stainless Steel: Life-Prediction Techniques and Associated Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Aritra; Nagesha, A.; Parameswaran, P.; Sandhya, R.; Laha, K.; Okazaki, M.

    2017-01-01

    Cumulative fatigue damage under sequential low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) cycling was investigated at 923 K (650 °C) by conducting HCF tests on specimens subjected to prior LCF cycling at various strain amplitudes. Remnant HCF lives were found to decrease drastically with increase in prior fatigue exposure as a result of strong LCF-HCF interactions. The rate of decrease in remnant lives varied as a function of the applied strain amplitude. A threshold damage in terms of prior LCF life-fraction was found, below which no significant LCF-HCF interaction takes place. Similarly, a critical damage during the LCF pre-cycling marking the highest degree of LCF-HCF interaction was identified which was found to depend on the applied strain amplitude. In view of the non-linear damage accumulation behavior, Miner's linear damage rule proved to be highly non-conservative. Manson's damage curve approach, suitably modified, was found to be a better alternative for predicting the remnant HCF life. The single constant (β) employed in the model, which reflects the damage accumulation of the material under two/multi-level loading conditions is derived from the regression analysis of the experimental results and validated further.

  7. Investigation of Cumulative Fatigue Damage Through Sequential Low Cycle Fatigue and High Cycle Fatigue Cycling at High Temperature for a Type 316LN Stainless Steel: Life-Prediction Techniques and Associated Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Aritra; Nagesha, A.; Parameswaran, P.; Sandhya, R.; Laha, K.; Okazaki, M.

    2017-03-01

    Cumulative fatigue damage under sequential low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) cycling was investigated at 923 K (650 °C) by conducting HCF tests on specimens subjected to prior LCF cycling at various strain amplitudes. Remnant HCF lives were found to decrease drastically with increase in prior fatigue exposure as a result of strong LCF-HCF interactions. The rate of decrease in remnant lives varied as a function of the applied strain amplitude. A threshold damage in terms of prior LCF life-fraction was found, below which no significant LCF-HCF interaction takes place. Similarly, a critical damage during the LCF pre-cycling marking the highest degree of LCF-HCF interaction was identified which was found to depend on the applied strain amplitude. In view of the non-linear damage accumulation behavior, Miner's linear damage rule proved to be highly non-conservative. Manson's damage curve approach, suitably modified, was found to be a better alternative for predicting the remnant HCF life. The single constant ( β) employed in the model, which reflects the damage accumulation of the material under two/multi-level loading conditions is derived from the regression analysis of the experimental results and validated further.

  8. Confidence versus Performance as an Indicator of the Presence of Alternative Conceptions and Inadequate Problem-Solving Skills in Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potgieter, Marietjie; Malatje, Esther; Gaigher, Estelle; Venter, Elsie

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the use of performance-confidence relationships to signal the presence of alternative conceptions and inadequate problem-solving skills in mechanics. A group of 33 students entering physics at a South African university participated in the project. The test instrument consisted of 20 items derived from existing standardised…

  9. Cycling excitation process: An ultra efficient and quiet signal amplification mechanism in semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu-Hsin; Yan, Lujiang; Zhang, Alex Ce; Hall, David; Niaz, Iftikhar Ahmad; Zhou, Yuchun; Sham, L. J.; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2015-08-03

    Signal amplification, performed by transistor amplifiers with its merit rated by the efficiency and noise characteristics, is ubiquitous in all electronic systems. Because of transistor thermal noise, an intrinsic signal amplification mechanism, impact ionization was sought after to complement the limits of transistor amplifiers. However, due to the high operation voltage (30-200 V typically), low power efficiency, limited scalability, and, above all, rapidly increasing excess noise with amplification factor, impact ionization has been out of favor for most electronic systems except for a few applications such as avalanche photodetectors and single-photon Geiger detectors. Here, we report an internal signal amplification mechanism based on the principle of the phonon-assisted cycling excitation process (CEP). Si devices using this concept show ultrahigh gain, low operation voltage, CMOS compatibility, and, above all, quantum limit noise performance that is 30 times lower than devices using impact ionization. Established on a unique physical effect of attractive properties, CEP-based devices can potentially revolutionize the fields of semiconductor electronics.

  10. Low-cycle fatigue-cracking mechanisms in fcc crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Qu, S.; Duan, Q. Q.; Wu, S. D.; Li, S. X.; Wang, Z. G.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2011-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue (LCF) cracking behavior in various face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline materials, including Cu single crystals, bicrystals and polycrystals, Cu-Al and Cu-Zn alloys, ultrafine-grained (UFG) Al-Cu and Cu-Zn alloys, was systematically investigated and reviewed. In Cu single crystals, fatigue cracking always nucleates along slip bands and deformation bands. The large-angle grain boundary (GB) becomes the preferential site in bicrystals and polycrystals. In addition, fatigue cracking can also nucleate along slip bands and twin boundaries (TBs) in polycrystalline materials. However, shear bands and coarse deformation bands are observed to the preferential sites for fatigue cracking in UFG materials with a large number of GBs. Based on numerous observations on fatigue-cracking behavior, the fatigue-cracking mechanisms along slip bands, GBs, TBs, shear bands and deformation bands were systematically compared and classified into two types, i.e. shear crack and impingement crack. Finally, these fatigue-cracking behaviors are discussed in depth for a better understanding of their physical nature and the transition from intergranular to transgranular cracking in various fcc crystalline materials. These comprehensive results for fatigue damage mechanisms should significantly aid in obtaining the optimum design to further strengthen and toughen metallic materials in practice.

  11. Elucidation of Softening Mechanism in Rinse Cycle Fabric Softeners. Part 1: Effect of Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Takako; Morita, Naoki; Okamoto, Yoshimasa; Nakamura, Koichi

    Most softening agents, such as rinse cycle fabric softeners, used by consumers at home contain cationic surfactants that have two long alkyl chains as their main component. The softening mechanism on fibers, especially cotton, has not yet been scientifically established, despite the market prevalence of fabric softeners for decades. One explanation for the softening effect is that the friction between fibers is reduced. According to this explanation, the fiber surfaces are coated by layers of alkyl chains. Because of the low coefficient of friction between alkyl chain layers of low surface energy, the fibers easily slide against one another yielding softer cotton clothing. However, no direct scientific evidence exists to prove the validity of this explanation. The softening mechanism of cotton yarn is discussed in this paper. Bending force values of cotton yarn treated with several concentrations of softener are measured by bend testing, and cotton and polyester yarns are compared. Results indicate that increases in cotton yarn hardness after natural drying are caused by cross-linking among inner fibers aided by bound water. This type of bound water has been known to exist even after 2 days of drying at 25 °C and 60 % relative humidity. Yarn dried in vacuo is soft, similar to that treated with softener. Thus, some of the softening effect caused by fabric softeners on cotton can be attributed to the prevention of cross-linking by bound water between cotton fibers.

  12. Regulation of cell division cycle progression by bcl-2 expression: a potential mechanism for inhibition of programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the bcl-2 gene has been shown to effectively confer resistance to programmed cell death under a variety of circumstances. However, despite a wealth of literature describing this phenomenon, very little is known about the mechanism of resistance. In the experiments described here, we show that bcl-2 gene expression can result in an inhibition of cell division cycle progression. These findings are based upon the analysis of cell cycle distribution, cell cycle kinetics, and relative phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein, using primary tissues in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro, as well as continuous cell lines. The effects of bcl-2 expression on cell cycle progression appear to be focused at the G1 to S phase transition, which is a critical control point in the decision between continued cell cycle progression or the induction programmed cell death. In all systems tested, bcl-2 expression resulted in a substantial 30-60% increase in the length of G1 phase; such an increase is very substantial in the context of other regulators of cell cycle progression. Based upon our findings, and the related findings of others, we propose a mechanism by which bcl-2 expression might exert its well known inhibition of programmed cell death by regulating the kinetics of cell cycle progression at a critical control point. PMID:8642331

  13. Left ventricular twist mechanics during incremental cycling and knee extension exercise in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Alexander; Hough, John; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Richards, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate left ventricular (LV) twist mechanics in response to incremental cycling and isometric knee extension exercises. Twenty-six healthy male participants (age = 30.42 ± 6.17 years) were used to study peak twist mechanics at rest and during incremental semi-supine cycling at 30 and 60% work rate maximum (W max) and during short duration (15 s contractions) isometric knee extension at 40 and 75% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography. Data presented as mean ± standard deviation or median (interquartile range). LV twist increased from rest to 30% W max (13.21° ± 4.63° to 20.04° ± 4.76°, p < 0.001) then remained unchanged. LV systolic and diastolic twisting velocities progressively increased with exercise intensity during cycling from rest to 60% W max (twisting, 88.21° ± 20.51° to 209.05° ± 34.56° s(-1), p < 0.0001; untwisting, -93.90 (29.62)° to -267.31 (104.30)° s(-1), p < 0.0001). During the knee extension exercise, LV twist remained unchanged with progressive intensity (rest 13.40° ± 4.80° to 75% MVC 16.77° ± 5.54°, p > 0.05), whilst twisting velocity increased (rest 89.15° ± 21.77° s(-1) to 75% MVC 124.32° ± 34.89° s(-1), p < 0.01). Untwisting velocity remained unchanged from rest [-90.60 (27.19)° s(-1)] to 40% MVC (p > 0.05) then increased from 40 to 75% MVC [-98.44 (43.54)° s(-1) to -138.42 (73.29)° s(-1), p < 0.01]. Apical rotations and rotational velocities were greater than basal during all conditions and intensities (all p < 0.01). Cycling increased LV twist to 30% W max which then remained unchanged thereafter, whereas twisting velocities showed further increases to greater intensities. A novel finding is that LV twist was unaffected by incremental knee extension, yet systolic and diastolic twisting velocities augmented with isometric exercise.

  14. Pericyte contractility controls endothelial cell cycle progression and sprouting: insights into angiogenic switch mechanics.

    PubMed

    Durham, Jennifer T; Surks, Howard K; Dulmovits, Brian M; Herman, Ira M

    2014-11-01

    Microvascular stability and regulation of capillary tonus are regulated by pericytes and their interactions with endothelial cells (EC). While the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway has been implicated in modulation of pericyte contractility, in part via regulation of the myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), the mechanisms linking Rho GTPase activity with actomyosin-based contraction and the cytoskeleton are equivocal. Recently, the myosin phosphatase-RhoA-interacting protein (MRIP) was shown to mediate the RhoA/ROCK-directed MLCP inactivation in vascular smooth muscle. Here we report that MRIP directly interacts with the β-actin-specific capping protein βcap73. Furthermore, manipulation of MRIP expression influences pericyte contractility, with MRIP silencing inducing cytoskeletal remodeling and cellular hypertrophy. MRIP knockdown induces a repositioning of βcap73 from the leading edge to stress fibers; thus MRIP-silenced pericytes increase F-actin-driven cell spreading twofold. These hypertrophied and cytoskeleton-enriched pericytes demonstrate a 2.2-fold increase in contractility upon MRIP knockdown when cells are plated on a deformable substrate. In turn, silencing pericyte MRIP significantly affects EC cycle progression and angiogenic activation. When MRIP-silenced pericytes are cocultured with capillary EC, there is a 2.0-fold increase in EC cycle entry. Furthermore, in three-dimensional models of injury and repair, silencing pericyte MRIP results in a 1.6-fold elevation of total tube area due to EC network formation and increased angiogenic sprouting. The pivotal role of MRIP expression in governing pericyte contractile phenotype and endothelial growth should lend important new insights into how chemomechanical signaling pathways control the "angiogenic switch" and pathological angiogenic induction. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Instrumentation to study myofibril mechanics from static to artificial simulations of cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Vikhorev, Petr G; Ferenczi, Michael A; Marston, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    Many causes of heart muscle diseases and skeletal muscle diseases are inherited and caused by mutations in genes of sarcomere proteins which play either a structural or contractile role in the muscle cell. Tissue samples from human hearts with mutations can be obtained but often samples are only a few milligrams and it is necessary to freeze them for storage and transportation. Myofibrils are the fundamental contractile components of the muscle cell and retain all structural elements and contractile proteins performing in contractile event; moreover viable myofibrils can be obtained from frozen tissue.•We are describing a versatile technique for measuring the contractility and its Ca(2+) regulation in single myofibrils. The control of myofibril length, incubation medium and data acquisition is carried out using a digital acquisition board via computer software. Using computer control it is possible not only to measure contractile and mechanical parameters but also simulate complex protocols such as a cardiac cycle to vary length and medium independently.•This single myofibril force assay is well suited for physiological measurements. The system can be adapted to measure tension amplitude, rates of contraction and relaxation, Ca(2+) dependence of these parameters in dose-response measurements, length-dependent activation, stretch response, myofibril elasticity and response to simulated cardiac cycle length changes. Our approach provides an all-round quantitative way to measure myofibrils performance and to observe the effect of mutations or posttranslational modifications. The technique has been demonstrated by the study of contraction in heart with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy mutations in sarcomere proteins.

  16. The signature of the earthquake cycle at subduction zones: insights from simple mechanical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govers, R. M. A.; Furlong, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    Some of the convergent margins are now densely instrumented. As a result, recent megathrusts events in Tohoku, Maule and Sumatra were well recorded. Longer term observations document persistent uplift and permanent strain of the overriding plate. Regional models of the earthquake cycle have become increasingly sophisticated tools to understand the seismological and geodetic signals. They capture critical physical processes like (partial) locking of the plate interface, the detailed co-seismic slip, poro-elastic and mantle relaxation and afterslip. Emerging from both the observations and the models is that similar physical processes are active at different margins, and that part of the observed complexity is controlled by them being in different stages of the earthquake cycle. Our relatively simple geodynamic models aim to isolate the geodetic and geological signature of these physical processes. Co-seismic and subsequent slip on the subduction interface are dynamically (and consistently) driven. This setup allows us to incorporate earthquake history, to access the sensitivity of the (short-term) seismological and geodetic signals to mechanical properties of the overriding plate/slab system, and to predict (longer-term) geological imprints. We find that the mega-thrusts induce significant tensile stresses in the overriding plate near the down-dip end of the co-seismic fault. Down-dip afterslip reduces these stresses, and aftershocks agree with fast slip during a short period here. The ratio of the loading and relaxation time scales exerts a critical control on post-seismic relaxation. For Tohoku and Sumatra, this ratio is relatively large and these margins therefore undergo a protracted post-seismic relaxation period, including a slow migration away from the trench of the (convergence) point where horizontal velocities change from trench- to continent ward. The time ratio is much smaller in Chile, resulting in a short post-seismic relaxation period, i.e., even

  17. A Modified Wilson Cycle Scenario Based on Thermo-Mechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    The major problem of classical Wilson Cycle concept is the suggested conversion of the passive continental margin to the active subduction zone. Previous modeling studies assumed either unusually thick felsic continental crust at the margin (over 40 km) or unusually low lithospheric thickness (less than 70 km) to simulate this process. Here we propose a new triggering factor in subduction initiation process that is mantle suction force. Based on this proposal we suggest a modification of Wilson Cycle concept. Sometime after opening and extension of oceanic basin, continental passive margin moves over the slab remnants of the former active subduction zones in deep mantle. Such slab remnants or deep slabs of neighboring active subduction zones produce a suction mantle flow introducing additional compression at the passive margin. It results in the initiation of a new subduction zone, hence starting the closing phase of Wilson Cycle. In this scenario the weakness of continental crust near the passive margin which is inherited from the rifting phase and horizontal push force induced from far-field topographic gradient within the continent facilitate and speed up subduction initiation process. Our thermo-mechanical modeling shows that after a few tens of million years a shear zone may indeed develop along the passive margin that has typical two-layered 35 km thick continental crust and thermal lithosphere thicker than 100 km if there is a broad mantle down-welling flow below the margin. Soon after formation of this shear zone oceanic plate descends into mantle and subduction initiates. Subduction initiation occurs following over-thrusting of continental crust and retreating of future trench. In models without far-field topographic gradient within the continent subduction initiation requires weaker passive margin. Our results also indicate that subduction initiation depends on several parameters such as magnitude, domain size and location of suction mantle flow

  18. Stage-specific alternative splicing of the heat-shock transcription factor during the life-cycle of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Ram, D; Ziv, E; Lantner, F; Lardans, V; Schechter, I

    2004-11-01

    Stage-specific alternative splicing of the heat-shock transcription factor of Schistosoma mansoni (SmHSF) generates isoforms with structural diversity that may modulate the activity of SmHSF at different life-stages, and thus may regulate the expression of different genes at different developmental stages. RT-PCR, cloning and DNA-sequence analyses showed stage-specific alternative splicing inside the DNA-binding domain (DBD) involving introns I1 and I2, and beyond the DBD involving introns I4a and I7. Retention of introns I2 and I4 would inactivate SmHSF since they contain termination codons. Retention of intron I1 would add 11 amino acids inside the DBD and may change the DNA-binding specificity of SmHSF; intron I7 would add 13 amino acids to the effector region of HSF. Retention of introns was more pronounced in cercariae (larval stage living in water) than in adult worms (parasitic form in mammals). The isoforms were expressed in bacteria, but functional evaluation was not feasible, because only the isoform lacking introns was soluble while isoforms with introns were insoluble. However, stage-specific alternative splicing that changed HSF function in vivo was evidenced in intact cercariae. The cercarial SmHSF mRNA was enriched with introns I2 and I4a that contain termination codons. Therefore, translation of the SmHSF mRNA was impaired, and the SmHSF protein was undetectable. Consequently, the HSP70 gene could not be transcribed, and the HSP70 mRNA was missing. Alternative splicing was observed for short DNA segments (33-45 bp) bound by splice signals, located in the coding region. These are not bona fida exons since they are not flanked by introns. Yet, they are not regular introns since they are often found in mature mRNA. Alternative splicing of these DNA segments caused structural diversity that could modulate the function of the gene product.

  19. Mechanical ventilatory constraints during incremental cycle exercise in human pregnancy: implications for respiratory sensation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Dennis; Webb, Katherine A; Davies, Gregory A L; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the physiological mechanisms of exertional respiratory discomfort (breathlessness) in pregnancy by comparing ventilatory (breathing pattern, airway function, operating lung volumes, oesophageal pressure (Poes)-derived indices of respiratory mechanics) and perceptual (breathlessness intensity) responses to incremental cycle exercise in 15 young, healthy women in the third trimester (TM3; between 34 and 38 weeks gestation) and again 4–5 months postpartum (PP). During pregnancy, resting inspiratory capacity (IC) increased (P < 0.01) and end-expiratory lung volume decreased (P < 0.001), with no associated change in total lung capacity (TLC) or static respiratory muscle strength. This permitted greater tidal volume (VT) expansion throughout exercise in TM3, while preserving the relationship between contractile respiratory muscle effort (tidal Poes swing expressed as a percentage of maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax)) and thoracic volume displacement (VT expressed as a percentage of vital capacity) and between breathlessness and ventilation (V̇E). At the highest equivalent work rate (HEWR = 128 ± 5 W) in TM3 compared with PP: V̇E, tidal Poes/PImax and breathlessness intensity ratings increased by 10.2 l min−1 (P < 0.001), 8.8%PImax (P < 0.05) and 0.9 Borg units (P < 0.05), respectively. Pulmonary resistance was not increased at rest or during exercise at the HEWR in TM3, despite marked increases in mean tidal inspiratory and expiratory flow rates, suggesting increased bronchodilatation. Dynamic mechanical constraints on VT expansion (P < 0.05) with associated increased breathlessness intensity ratings (P < 0.05) were observed near peak exercise in TM3 compared with PP. In conclusion: (1) pregnancy-induced increases in exertional breathlessness reflected the normal awareness of increased V̇E and contractile respiratory muscle effort; (2) mechanical adaptations of the respiratory system, including recruitment of resting IC

  20. Influence of Rapid Freeze-Thaw Cycling on the Mechanical Properties of Sustainable Strain-Hardening Cement Composite (2SHCC)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seok-Joon; Rokugo, Keitetsu; Park, Wan-Shin; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides experimental results to investigate the mechanical properties of sustainable strain-hardening cement composite (2SHCC) for infrastructures after freeze-thaw actions. To improve the sustainability of SHCC materials in this study, high energy-consumptive components—silica sand, cement, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers—in the conventional SHCC materials are partially replaced with recycled materials such as recycled sand, fly ash, and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers, respectively. To investigate the mechanical properties of green SHCC that contains recycled materials, the cement, PVA fiber and silica sand were replaced with 10% fly ash, 25% PET fiber, and 10% recycled aggregate based on preliminary experimental results for the development of 2SHCC material, respectively. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight for 2SHCC material were measured at every 30 cycles of freeze-thaw. The effects of freeze-thaw cycles on the mechanical properties of sustainable SHCC are evaluated by conducting compressive tests, four-point flexural tests, direct tensile tests and prism splitting tests after 90, 180, and 300 cycles of rapid freeze-thaw. Freeze-thaw testing was conducted according to ASTM C 666 Procedure A. Test results show that after 300 cycles of freezing and thawing actions, the dynamic modulus of elasticity and mass loss of damaged 2SHCC were similar to those of virgin 2SHCC, while the freeze-thaw cycles influence mechanical properties of the 2SHCC material except for compressive behavior. PMID:28788522

  1. Effect of Alternate Supply of Shielding Gases of Tungsten Inert Gas Welding on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Neelam Vilas; Telsang, Martand Tamanacharya

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to study the effect of alternate supply of the shielding gas in comparison with the conventional method of TIG welding with pure argon gas. The two sets of combination are used as 10-10 and 40-20 s for alternate supply of the Argon and Helium shielding gas respectively. The effect of alternate supply of shielding gas is studied on the mechanical properties like bend test, tensile test and impact test. The full factorial experimental design is applied for three set of combinations. The ANOVA is used to find significant parameters for the process and regression analysis used to develop the mathematical model. The result shows that the alternate supply of the shielding gas for 10-10 s provides better result for the bend, tensile and impact test as compared with the conventional argon gas and the alternate supply of 40-20 s argon and helium gas respectively. Welding speed can be increased for alternate supply of the shielding gas that can reduce the total welding cost.

  2. Use of Guided Acoustic Waves to Assess the Effects of Thermal-Mechanical Cycling on Composite Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires it thorough understanding of the long-term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading. As part of a study to evaluate the effects of thermal-mechanical cycling, it guided acoustic (Lamb) wave measurement system was used to measure the bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system uses a pulse/receive technique that excites an antisymmetric Lamb mode and measures the time-of-flight over a wide frequency range. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the velocity dispersion curve. A series of 16 and 32-ply composite laminates were subjected to it thermal-mechanical loading profile in load frames equipped with special environmental chambers. The composite systems studied were it graphite fiber reinforced amorphous thermoplastic polyimide and it graphite fiber reinforced bismaleimide thermoset. The samples were exposed to both high and low temperature extremes its well as high and low strain profiles. The bending and out-of-plane stiffnesses for composite sample that have undergone over 6,000 cycles of thermal-mechanical loading are reported. The Lamb wave generated elastic stiffness results have shown decreases of up to 20% at 4,936 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoplastic samples and up to 64% at 4,706 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoset samples.

  3. Methyl Jasmonate: Putative Mechanisms of Action on Cancer Cells Cycle, Metabolism, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Cesari, Italo Mario; Figueiredo Rodrigues, Mariana; Mendonça, Bruna dos Santos; Amôedo, Nivea Dias; Rumjanek, Franklin David

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MJ), an oxylipid that induces defense-related mechanisms in plants, has been shown to be active against cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, without affecting normal cells. Here we review most of the described MJ activities in an attempt to get an integrated view and better understanding of its multifaceted modes of action. MJ (1) arrests cell cycle, inhibiting cell growth and proliferation, (2) causes cell death through the intrinsic/extrinsic proapoptotic, p53-independent apoptotic, and nonapoptotic (necrosis) pathways, (3) detaches hexokinase from the voltage-dependent anion channel, dissociating glycolytic and mitochondrial functions, decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, favoring cytochrome c release and ATP depletion, activating pro-apoptotic, and inactivating antiapoptotic proteins, (4) induces reactive oxygen species mediated responses, (5) stimulates MAPK-stress signaling and redifferentiation in leukemia cells, (6) inhibits overexpressed proinflammatory enzymes in cancer cells such as aldo-keto reductase 1 and 5-lipoxygenase, and (7) inhibits cell migration and shows antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activities. Finally, MJ may act as a chemosensitizer to some chemotherapics helping to overcome drug resistant. The complete lack of toxicity to normal cells and the rapidity by which MJ causes damage to cancer cells turn MJ into a promising anticancer agent that can be used alone or in combination with other agents. PMID:24648844

  4. Failure Mechanisms and Damage Model of Ductile Cast Iron Under Low-Cycle Fatigue Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; MacNeil, Ryan; Zhang, Zhong; Sloss, Clayton

    2014-10-01

    Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests were conducted on ductile cast iron (DCI) at strain rates of 0.02, 0.002, and 0.0002/s in the temperature range from room temperature to 1073 K (800 °C). A constitutive-damage model was developed within the integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT) framework on the premise of strain decomposition into rate-independent plasticity and time-dependent creep. Four major damage mechanisms: (i) plasticity-induced fatigue, (ii) intergranular embrittlement (IE), (iii) creep, and (iv) oxidation were considered in a nonlinear creep-fatigue interaction model which represents the overall damage accumulation process consisting of oxidation-assisted fatigue crack nucleation and propagation in coalescence with internally distributed damage ( e.g., IE and creep), leading to final fracture. The model was found to agree with the experimental observations of the complex DCI-LCF phenomena, for which the linear damage summation rule would fail.

  5. Computational study on the behaviors of granular materials under mechanical cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Ye, Minyou; Chen, Hongli

    2015-11-07

    Considering that fusion pebble beds are probably subjected to the cyclic compression excitation in their future applications, we presented a computational study to report the effect of mechanical cycling on the behaviors of granular matter. The correctness of our numerical experiments was confirmed by a comparison with the effective medium theory. Under the cyclic loads, the fast granular compaction was observed to evolve in a stretched exponential law. Besides, the increasing stiffening in packing structure, especially the decreasing moduli pressure dependence due to granular consolidation, was also observed. For the force chains inside the pebble beds, both the internal force distribution and the spatial distribution of force chains would become increasingly uniform as the external force perturbation proceeded and therefore produced the stress relief on grains. In this case, the originally proposed 3-parameter Mueth function was found to fail to describe the internal force distribution. Thereby, its improved functional form with 4 parameters was proposed here and proved to better fit the data. These findings will provide more detailed information on the pebble beds for the relevant fusion design and analysis.

  6. Fiber-reinforced composite analysis using optical coherence tomography after mechanical and thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyotoku, B. B. C.; Braz, A. K. S.; Braz, R.; Gomes, A. S. L.

    2007-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are new materials which have been used for a variety of dental applications, including tooth splinting, replacement of missing teeth, treatment of dental emergencies, reinforcement of resin provisional fixed prosthodontic restorations, orthodontic retention, and other clinical applications. Different fiber types are available, but little clinical information has been disseminated. The traditional microscopy investigation, most commonly used to study this material, is a destructive technique, which requires specimen sectioning and are essentially surface measurements. On the basis of these considerations, the aim of this research is to analyze the interior of a dental sample reinforced with fiber after a mechanical and thermal cycling to emulate oral conditions using optical coherence tomography (OCT). The device we are using is a home built Fourier domain OCT working at 800 nm with 6 μm resolution. The results are compared with microscopy images to validate OCT as a working method. In long term, fractures allow bacterial invasion provoking plaque and calculus formation that can cause caries and periodontal disease. Therefore, non invasive imaging of the bridge fiber enables the possibility of periodic clinical evaluation to ensure the patient health. Furthermore, OCT images can provide a powerful method for quantitative analysis of crack propagation, and can potentially be used for in vivo assessment.

  7. Runaway social games, genetic cycles driven by alternative male and female strategies, and the origin of morphs.

    PubMed

    Sinervo, B

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of evolutionarily stable strategies (ESS) and decade-long field studies indicate that two color morphs of female side-blotched lizards exhibit density- and frequency-dependent strategies. Orange females are r-strategists: they lay large clutches of small progeny that are favored at low density. Conversely, yellow females are K-strategists: they lay small clutches of large progeny that are favored when carrying capacity is exceeded and the population crashes to low density. Interactions among three male morphs resembles a rock-paper-scissors (RPS) game. Fertilization success of males depends on frequency of neighboring morphs. Orange males usurp territory from blue neighbors and thereby mate with many females. However, orange males are vulnerable to cuckoldry by sneaky yellow males that mimic females. The yellow strategy is thwarted in turn by the mate-guarding strategy of blue. Sinervo and Lively (1996) developed a simple asexual model of the RPS game. Here, we model the dynamics of male and female morphs with one- and two-locus genetic models. Male and female games were considered in isolation and modeled as games that were genetically coupled by the same locus. Parameters for payoff matrices, which describe the force of frequency-dependent selection in ESS games, were estimated from free-ranging animals. Period of cycles in nature was 5 years for males and 2 years for females. Only the one locus model with three alleles (o, b, y) was capable of driving rapid cycles in male and female games. Furthermore, the o allele must be dominant to the y allele in females. Finally, the amplitude of male cycles was only reproduced in genetic models which allowed for irreversible plasticity of by genotypes, which is consistent with hormonally-induced changes that transform some males with yellow to dark blue. We also critique experimental designs that are necessary to detect density- and frequency-dependent selection in nature. Finally, runaway ESS games are discussed

  8. Rapid peroxisomal responses to ROS suggest an alternative mechanistic model for post-biogenesis peroxisomal life cycle in plants

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Plants adapt to and survive in some of the harshest environments. Their success can be ascribed to an ability to maintain an optimal subcellular redox environment. Peroxisomes, ubiquitous ROS producing and scavenging organelles in eukaryotes play an important role in cellular homeostasis. Recently the formation of thin membrane extensions called peroxules has provided further evidence for peroxisomal role in rapidly sensing and responding to alterations in subcellular ROS. Within a cell the transient extension and retraction of peroxules is asynchronous but takes place within seconds. Peroxules follow tracks defined by tubules of the endoplasmic reticulum and their formation does not appear to involve an elaborate transcriptional-translational machinery. Rather the rapidity of peroxisomal responses suggests ROS instigated membrane modifications aimed at local ROS scavenging or leading to peroxisome elongation prior to their fission for increasing peroxisome numbers within a cell. A model on post-biogenesis peroxisomal life-cycle taking cognizance of rapid peroxisomal responses is presented. PMID:19820326

  9. Energy and emission benefits of alternative transportation liquid fuels derived from switchgrass: a fuel life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Wu, May; Wu, Ye; Wang, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a mobility chains, or well-to-wheels (WTW), analysis to assess the energy and emission benefits of cellulosic biomass for the U.S. transportation sector in the years 2015-2030. We estimated the life-cycle energy consumption and emissions associated with biofuel production and use in light-duty vehicle (LDV) technologies by using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model. Analysis of biofuel production was based on ASPEN Plus model simulation of an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity. Our study revealed that cellulosic biofuels as E85 (mixture of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume), FTD, and DME offer substantial savings in petroleum (66-93%) and fossil energy (65-88%) consumption on a per-mile basis. Decreased fossil fuel use translates to 82-87% reductions in greenhouse gas emissions across all unblended cellulosic biofuels. In urban areas, our study shows net reductions for almost all criteria pollutants, with the exception of carbon monoxide (unchanged), for each of the biofuel production option examined. Conventional and hybrid electric vehicles, when fueled with E85, could reduce total sulfur oxide (SO(x)) emissions to 39-43% of those generated by vehicles fueled with gasoline. By using bio-FTD and bio-DME in place of diesel, SO(x) emissions are reduced to 46-58% of those generated by diesel-fueled vehicles. Six different fuel production options were compared. This study strongly suggests that integrated heat and power co-generation by means of gas turbine combined cycle is a crucial factor in the energy savings and emission reductions.

  10. The molecular mechanism of G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by AFB1 in the jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Heng; Jiang, Min; Peng, Xi; Cui, Hengmin; Zhou, Yi; He, Min; Zuo, Zhicai; Ouyang, Ping; Fan, Junde; Fang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) has potent hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and other adverse effects in human and animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by AFB1 in the jejunum of broilers. Broilers, as experimental animals, were fed 0.6 mg/kg AFB1 diet for 3 weeks. Our results showed that AFB1 reduced the jejunal villus height, villus height/crypt ratio and caused G2/M cell cycle arrest. The G2/M cell cycle was accompanied by the increase of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), p53, Chk2, p21 protein and mRNA expression, and the decrease of Mdm2, cdc25C, cdc2, cyclin B and proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein and mRNA expression. In conclusion, AFB1 blocked G2/M cell cycle by ATM pathway in the jejunum of broilers. PMID:27232757

  11. Mechanical Unloading of Mouse Bone in Microgravity Significantly Alters Cell Cycle Gene Set Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Kaplan, Warren; Burns, Brnedan

    2012-07-01

    Spaceflight factors, including microgravity and space radiation, have many detrimental short-term effects on human physiology, including muscle and bone degradation, and immune system dysfunction. The long-term progression of these physiological effects is still poorly understood, and a serious concern for long duration spaceflight missions. We hypothesized that some of the degenerative effects of spaceflight may be caused in part by an inability of stem cells to proliferate and differentiate normally resulting in an impairment of tissue regenerative processes. Furthermore, we hypothesized that long-term bone tissue degeneration in space may be mediated by activation of the p53 signaling network resulting in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis in osteoprogenitors. In our analyses we found that spaceflight caused significant bone loss in the weight-bearing bones of mice with a 6.3% reduction in bone volume and 11.9% decrease in bone thickness associated with increased osteoclastic activity. Along with this rapid bone loss we also observed alterations in the cell cycle characterized by an increase in the Cdkn1a/p21 cell cycle arrest molecule independent of Trp53. Overexpression of Cdkn1a/p21 was localized to osteoblasts lining the periosteal surface of the femur and chondrocytes in the head of the femur, suggesting an inhibition of proliferation in two key regenerative cell types of the femur in response to spaceflight. Additionally we found overexpression of several matrix degradation molecules including MMP-1a, 3 and 10, of which MMP-10 was localized to osteocytes within the shaft of the femur. This, in conjunction with 40 nm resolution synchrotron nano-Computed Tomography (nano-CT) observations of an increase in osteocyte lacunae cross-sectional area, perimeter and a decrease in circularity indicates a potential role for osteocytic osteolysis in the observed bone degeneration in spaceflight. To further investigate the genetic response of bone to mechanical

  12. A physical mechanism for the prediction of the sunspot number during solar cycle 21. [graphs (charts)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Scherrer, P. H.; Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    On physical grounds it is suggested that the sun's polar field strength near a solar minimum is closely related to the following cycle's solar activity. Four methods of estimating the sun's polar magnetic field strength near solar minimum are employed to provide an estimate of cycle 21's yearly mean sunspot number at solar maximum of 140 plus or minus 20. This estimate is considered to be a first order attempt to predict the cycle's activity using one parameter of physical importance.

  13. High temperature low cycle fatigue mechanisms for nickel base and a copper base alloy. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C. I.

    1982-01-01

    Damage mechanisms were studied in Rene' 95 and NARloy Z, using optical, scanning and transmission in microscopy. In necklace Rene' 95, crack initiation was mainly associated with cracking of surface MC carbides, except for hold time tests at higher strain ranges where initiation was associated more with a grain boundary mechanism. A mixed mode of propagation with a faceted fracture morphology was typical for all cycle characters. The dependence of life on maximum tensile stress can be demonstrated by the data falling onto three lines corresponding to the three tensile hold times, in the life against maximum tensile stress plot. In NARloy Z, crack initiation was always at the grain boundaries. The mode of crack propagation depended on the cycle character. The life decreased with decreasing strain rate and with tensile holds. In terms of damage mode, different life prediction laws may be applicable to different cycle characters.

  14. A post-transcriptional mechanism contributes to circadian cycling of a per-beta-galactosidase fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Zwiebel, L J; Hardin, P E; Liu, X; Hall, J C; Rosbash, M

    1991-01-01

    The period gene (per) of Drosophila melanogaster affects circadian rhythms. Circadian fluctuations in per mRNA levels are thought to contribute to circadian fluctuations in per protein levels in the heads of adult flies. To address the mechanisms underlying these oscillatory phenomena, we have analyzed RNA and protein cycling from two per-beta-galactosidase fusion genes. These studies demonstrate that 5' noncoding sequences from per are sufficient to cause the fusion mRNA levels to cycle in a wild-type (rhythmic) background. Protein cycling requires additional sequences derived from the per coding region. The data suggest that there is a per-dependent posttranscriptional mechanism that is under circadian clock control required for per protein levels to fluctuate in a rhythmic fashion. Images PMID:1902573

  15. Comparison of nine theoretical models for estimating the mechanical power output in cycling

    PubMed Central

    González‐Haro, Carlos; Ballarini, P A Galilea; Soria, M; Drobnic, F; Escanero, J F

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess which of the equations used to estimate mechanical power output for a wide aerobic range of exercise intensities gives the closest value to that measured with the SRM training system. Methods Thirty four triathletes and endurance cyclists of both sexes (mean (SD) age 24 (5) years, height 176.3 (6.6) cm, weight 69.4 (7.6) kg and Vo2max 61.5 (5.9) ml/kg/min) performed three incremental tests, one in the laboratory and two in the velodrome. The mean mechanical power output measured with the SRM training system in the velodrome tests corresponding to each stage of the tests was compared with the values theoretically estimated using the nine most referenced equations in literature (Whitt (Ergonomics 1971;14:419–24); Di Prampero et al (J Appl Physiol 1979;47:201–6); Whitt and Wilson (Bicycling science. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1982); Kyle (Racing with the sun. Philadelphia: Society of Automotive Engineers, 1991:43–50); Menard (First International Congress on Science and Cycling Skills, Malaga, 1992); Olds et al (J Appl Physiol 1995;78:1596–611; J Appl Physiol 1993;75:730–7); Broker (USOC Sport Science and Technology Report 1–24, 1994); Candau et al (Med Sci Sports Exerc 1999;31:1441–7)). This comparison was made using the mean squared error of prediction, the systematic error and the random error. Results The equations of Candau et al, Di Prampero et al, Olds et al (J Appl Physiol 1993;75:730–7) and Whitt gave a moderate mean squared error of prediction (12.7%, 21.6%, 13.2% and 16.5%, respectively) and a low random error (0.5%, 0.6%, 0.7% and 0.8%, respectively). Conclusions The equations of Candau et al and Di Prampero et al give the best estimate of mechanical power output when compared with measurements obtained with the SRM training system. PMID:17341588

  16. Alternating frequencies of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation: does it produce greater analgesic effects on mechanical and thermal pain thresholds?

    PubMed

    Tong, K C; Lo, Sing Kai; Cheing, Gladys L

    2007-10-01

    To determine whether alternating frequency transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) at 2 and 100Hz (2/100Hz) has a more potent hypoalgesic effect than a fixed frequency at 2 or 100Hz in healthy participants. A single-blind randomized controlled trial with a convenience sample. University physiotherapy department. Sixty-four healthy volunteers (32 men [mean age, 28.1+/-5.9y], 32 women [mean age, 27.7+/-5.6y]) were recruited and randomly divided into 4 groups. The 4 groups received TENS delivered at (1) 2Hz; (2) 100Hz; (3) 2/100Hz alternating frequency; and (4) no treatment (control group), respectively. Electric stimulation was applied over the anterior aspect of the dominant forearm for 30 minutes. Mechanical pain thresholds (MPTs) and heat pain thresholds (HPTs) were recorded before, during, and after TENS stimulation. The data were analyzed using linear mixed models, with group treated as a between-subject factor and time a within-subject factor. During and shortly after electric stimulation, HPT increased significantly in the alternating frequency stimulation group (P=.024). MPT increased significantly in both the 100Hz (P=.008) and the alternating frequency groups (P=.012), but the increase was substantially larger in the 100Hz group. Alternating frequency stimulation produced a greater elevation in the HPT, but a greater increase in the MPT was achieved using 100Hz stimulation.

  17. Differential transcriptional regulation by alternatively designed mechanisms: A mathematical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Necmettin; Aktas, Mehmet Emin; Ozcan, Seyma Nur; Akbas, Esra; Ay, Ahmet

    2016-08-02

    Cells maintain cellular homeostasis employing different regulatory mechanisms to respond external stimuli. We study two groups of signal-dependent transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. In the first group, we assume that repressor and activator proteins compete for binding to the same regulatory site on DNA (competitive mechanisms). In the second group, they can bind to different regulatory regions in a noncompetitive fashion (noncompetitive mechanisms). For both competitive and noncompetitive mechanisms, we studied the gene expression dynamics by increasing the repressor or decreasing the activator abundance (inhibition mechanisms), or by decreasing the repressor or increasing the activator abundance (activation mechanisms). We employed delay differential equation models. Our simulation results show that the competitive and noncompetitive inhibition mechanisms exhibit comparable repression effectiveness. However, response time is fastest in the noncompetitive inhibition mechanism due to increased repressor abundance, and slowest in the competitive inhibition mechanism by increased repressor level. The competitive and noncompetitive inhibition mechanisms through decreased activator abundance show comparable and moderate response times, while the competitive and noncompetitive activation mechanisms by increased activator protein level display more effective and faster response. Our study exemplifies the importance of mathematical modeling and computer simulation in the analysis of gene expression dynamics.

  18. Effect of Moisture Cycling on Mechanical Response of Metal-Plate Connector Joints With and Without an Adhesive Interface

    Treesearch

    Leslie H. Groom

    1995-01-01

    Wood trusses are frequently located in light-frame structures where they are subjected to significant shifts in moisture conditions. However, little is known about the effects of moisture cycling of the wood members on the mechanical behavior of metal-plate connector (MPC) joints. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to quantify the effect of wood moisture...

  19. Life cycle assessment of integrated waste management systems for alternative legacy scenarios of the London Olympic Park.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Olga; Lettieri, Paola; Bogle, I David L

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the results of the life cycle assessment (LCA) of 10 integrated waste management systems (IWMSs) for 3 potential post-event site design scenarios of the London Olympic Park. The aim of the LCA study is to evaluate direct and indirect emissions resulting from various treatment options of municipal solid waste (MSW) annually generated on site together with avoided emissions resulting from energy, materials and nutrients recovery. IWMSs are modelled using GaBi v6.0 Product Sustainability software and results are presented based on the CML (v.Nov-10) characterisation method. The results show that IWMSs with advanced thermal treatment (ATT) and incineration with energy recovery have the lowest Global Warming Potential (GWP) than IWMSs where landfill is the primary waste treatment process. This is due to higher direct emissions and lower avoided emissions from the landfill process compared to the emissions from the thermal treatment processes. LCA results demonstrate that significant environmental savings are achieved through substitution of virgin materials with recycled ones. The results of the sensitivity analysis carried out for IWMS 1 shows that increasing recycling rate by 5%, 10% and 15% compared to the baseline scenario can reduce GWP by 8%, 17% and 25% respectively. Sensitivity analysis also shows how changes in waste composition affect the overall result of the system. The outcomes of such assessments provide decision-makers with fundamental information regarding the environmental impacts of different waste treatment options necessary for sustainable waste management planning.

  20. Co-management of domestic wastewater and food waste: A life cycle comparison of alternative food waste diversion strategies.

    PubMed

    Becker, Adilson M; Yu, Kevin; Stadler, Lauren B; Smith, Adam L

    2017-01-01

    Food waste is increasingly viewed as a resource that should be diverted from landfills. This study used life cycle assessment to compare co-management of food waste and domestic wastewater using anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) against conventional activated sludge (CAS) and high rate activated sludge (HRAS) with three disposal options for food waste: landfilling (LF), anaerobic digestion (AD), and composting (CP). Based on the net energy balance (NEB), AnMBR and HRAS/AD were the most attractive scenarios due to cogeneration of produced biogas. However, cogeneration negatively impacted carcinogenics, non-carcinogenics, and ozone depletion, illustrating unavoidable tradeoffs between energy recovery from biogas and environmental impacts. Fugitive emissions of methane severely increased global warming impacts of all scenarios except HRAS/AD with AnMBR particularly affected by effluent dissolved methane emissions. AnMBR was also most sensitive to food waste diversion participation, with 40% diversion necessary to achieve a positive NEB at the current state of development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Regime shifts in exploited marine food webs: detecting mechanisms underlying alternative stable states using size-structured community dynamics theory

    PubMed Central

    Gårdmark, Anna; Casini, Michele; Huss, Magnus; van Leeuwen, Anieke; Hjelm, Joakim; Persson, Lennart; de Roos, André M.

    2015-01-01

    Many marine ecosystems have undergone ‘regime shifts’, i.e. abrupt reorganizations across trophic levels. Establishing whether these constitute shifts between alternative stable states is of key importance for the prospects of ecosystem recovery and for management. We show how mechanisms underlying alternative stable states caused by predator–prey interactions can be revealed in field data, using analyses guided by theory on size-structured community dynamics. This is done by combining data on individual performance (such as growth and fecundity) with information on population size and prey availability. We use Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and their prey in the Baltic Sea as an example to discuss and distinguish two types of mechanisms, ‘cultivation-depensation’ and ‘overcompensation’, that can cause alternative stable states preventing the recovery of overexploited piscivorous fish populations. Importantly, the type of mechanism can be inferred already from changes in the predators' body growth in different life stages. Our approach can thus be readily applied to monitored stocks of piscivorous fish species, for which this information often can be assembled. Using this tool can help resolve the causes of catastrophic collapses in marine predatory–prey systems and guide fisheries managers on how to successfully restore collapsed piscivorous fish stocks.

  2. Life cycle assessment of integrated waste management systems for alternative legacy scenarios of the London Olympic Park

    SciTech Connect

    Parkes, Olga Lettieri, Paola Bogle, I. David L.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Application of LCA in planning integrated waste management systems. • Environmental valuation of 3 legacy scenarios for the Olympic Park. • Hot-spot analysis highlights the importance of energy and materials recovery. • Most environmental savings are achieved through materials recycling. • Sensitivity analysis shows importance of waste composition and recycling rates. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of the life cycle assessment (LCA) of 10 integrated waste management systems (IWMSs) for 3 potential post-event site design scenarios of the London Olympic Park. The aim of the LCA study is to evaluate direct and indirect emissions resulting from various treatment options of municipal solid waste (MSW) annually generated on site together with avoided emissions resulting from energy, materials and nutrients recovery. IWMSs are modelled using GaBi v6.0 Product Sustainability software and results are presented based on the CML (v.Nov-10) characterisation method. The results show that IWMSs with advanced thermal treatment (ATT) and incineration with energy recovery have the lowest Global Warming Potential (GWP) than IWMSs where landfill is the primary waste treatment process. This is due to higher direct emissions and lower avoided emissions from the landfill process compared to the emissions from the thermal treatment processes. LCA results demonstrate that significant environmental savings are achieved through substitution of virgin materials with recycled ones. The results of the sensitivity analysis carried out for IWMS 1 shows that increasing recycling rate by 5%, 10% and 15% compared to the baseline scenario can reduce GWP by 8%, 17% and 25% respectively. Sensitivity analysis also shows how changes in waste composition affect the overall result of the system. The outcomes of such assessments provide decision-makers with fundamental information regarding the environmental impacts of different waste treatment options necessary for

  3. Alternative ways of using field-based estimates to calibrate ecosystem models and their implications for carbon cycle studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    He, Yujie; Zhuang, Qianlai; McGuire, David; Liu, Yaling; Chen, Min

    2013-01-01

    Model-data fusion is a process in which field observations are used to constrain model parameters. How observations are used to constrain parameters has a direct impact on the carbon cycle dynamics simulated by ecosystem models. In this study, we present an evaluation of several options for the use of observations in modeling regional carbon dynamics and explore the implications of those options. We calibrated the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model on a hierarchy of three vegetation classification levels for the Alaskan boreal forest: species level, plant-functional-type level (PFT level), and biome level, and we examined the differences in simulated carbon dynamics. Species-specific field-based estimates were directly used to parameterize the model for species-level simulations, while weighted averages based on species percent cover were used to generate estimates for PFT- and biome-level model parameterization. We found that calibrated key ecosystem process parameters differed substantially among species and overlapped for species that are categorized into different PFTs. Our analysis of parameter sets suggests that the PFT-level parameterizations primarily reflected the dominant species and that functional information of some species were lost from the PFT-level parameterizations. The biome-level parameterization was primarily representative of the needleleaf PFT and lost information on broadleaf species or PFT function. Our results indicate that PFT-level simulations may be potentially representative of the performance of species-level simulations while biome-level simulations may result in biased estimates. Improved theoretical and empirical justifications for grouping species into PFTs or biomes are needed to adequately represent the dynamics of ecosystem functioning and structure.

  4. [Means and methods of alternative therapy for cancer: acupuncture--the effects and mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Korman, D B

    2014-01-01

    Among means of alternative and complementary therapy for cancer, acupuncture holds a special place. This is because, unlike the most other methods of alternative and complementary therapy for cancer, efficacy and safety of acupuncture in the symptomatic treatment for cancer patients is considered as proven. Not accidentally such leading cancer centers in the USA as the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, the M.D.Anderson Cancer Center in Houston integrated acupuncture in accepted in these centers treatment standards and are staffed by licensed professionals on acupuncture. Particular attention is drawn to the use of acupuncture in hospices. It is stressed that it is the most effective and safe in the performance by qualified licensed professionals

  5. SR proteins and the nonsense-mediated decay mechanism are involved in human GLB1 gene alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, Raül; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background The human GLB1 gene is known to give rise to two alternatively spliced mRNAs, which encode two different proteins: lysosomal β-galactosidase (β-gal) and elastin-binding protein (EBP). The β-gal transcript includes the 16 exons of the GLB1 gene. In the EBP transcript, exons 3, 4 and 6 are skipped, while exon 5 has a different reading frame. However, little is known on how this alternative splicing is regulated. Findings Cycloheximide treatment of HeLa cells and human fibroblasts revealed the presence of new transcripts that are otherwise degraded by nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). A minigene carrying the exons involved in the alternative splicing of GLB1 was constructed. Improving the acceptor-site scores of exons 3 or 4 increased the relative inclusion of these exons, but did not stop them being skipped in some transcripts. Overexpression of different SR proteins altered the relative proportion of the different transcripts produced by the minigene, indicating a possible mechanism for the regulation of the alternative splicing of GLB1. Finally, a comparison of this gene among different species was performed. Conclusion In the processing of the GLB1 RNA several transcripts are generated, but only those with a correct reading frame are not degraded. The differential inclusion/exclusion of exons could be partially explained by the relatively weak splice sites in the exons involved. Different SR proteins have an effect on the process of skipping of these exons, at least in the minigene conditions, indicating a possible mechanism for the regulation of the alternative splicing of the GLB1 gene. PMID:19114006

  6. Molecular identification of larvae of a tetraphyllidean tapeworm (Platyhelminthes: Eucestoda) in a razor clam as an alternative intermediate host in the life cycle of Acanthobothrium brevissime.

    PubMed

    Holland, Nicholas D; Wilson, Nerida G

    2009-10-01

    Dwarf razor clams (Ensis minor) in the Gulf of Mexico are known to be infected with plerocercoid larvae of a tetraphyllidean tapeworm. Here, we show that these larvae live unencysted in the intestinal lumen of the clam. Morphologically, the larvae are similar to (although significantly larger than) tapeworm larvae previously described living in the gut of amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae) from the same habitat. Sequence data from the D2 region of the 28S rDNA from clam-infecting larvae were identical to the sequence of Acanthobothrium brevissime isolated as larvae from amphioxus and as adults from a stingray (Dasyatis say). The sequence data leave little doubt that the dwarf razor clam and the amphioxus are alternative intermediate hosts in the life cycle of A. brevissime.

  7. Low cycle fatigue and strengthening mechanism of cold extruded large diameter internal thread of Q460 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hong; Mei, Qing; Yuan, Jingyun; Zheng, Zaixiang; Jin, Yifu; Zuo, Dunwen

    2016-05-01

    large diameter internal thread of high-strength steel(LDITHSS) manufactured by traditional methods always has the problems of low accuracy and short life. Compared with traditional methods, the cold extrusion process is an effective means to realize higher accuracy and longer life. The low-cycle fatigue properties of LDITHSS are obtained by experiments, and the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks are observed by scanning electron microscope(SEM). Based on the mechanical properties, surface microstructure and residual stress, the strengthening mechanism of cold extruded large diameter internal thread(LDIT) is discussed. The results show that new grains or sub-grains can be formed on the surface of LDIT due to grain segmentation and grain refinement during cold extrusion. The fibrous structures appear as elongated and streamlined along the normal direction of the tooth surface which leads to residual compressive stress on the extruded surface. The maximum tension stress of LDIT after cold extrusion is found to be 192.55 kN. Under low stress cycling, the yield stress on thread increases, the propagation rate of crack reduces, the fatigue life is thus improved significantly with decreasing surface grain diameter and the average fatigue life increases to 45.539×103 cycle when the maximum applied load decreases to 120 kN. The low cycle fatigue and strengthening mechanism of cold extruded LDIT revealed by this research has significant importance to promote application of internal thread by cold extrusion processing.

  8. Comment on "Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: Entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Díaz, L. A.; Díaz-Solórzano, S.

    2015-05-01

    In the paper by Abe and Okuyama [Phys. Rev. E 83, 021121 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.83.021121], the quantum Carnot cycle of a simple two-state model of a particle confined in a one-dimensional infinite potential well is discussed. It is claimed that the state at the beginning of the quantum Carnot cycle is pure. After that, it is apparently transmuted to a mixed state if Clausius equality is imposed. We prove that this statement is incorrect. In particular, we prove that the state at the beginning of the cycle is mixed due to the process of measuring energy.

  9. Comment on "Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: Entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle".

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, L A; Díaz-Solórzano, S

    2015-05-01

    In the paper by Abe and Okuyama [Phys. Rev. E 83, 021121 (2011)], the quantum Carnot cycle of a simple two-state model of a particle confined in a one-dimensional infinite potential well is discussed. It is claimed that the state at the beginning of the quantum Carnot cycle is pure. After that, it is apparently transmuted to a mixed state if Clausius equality is imposed. We prove that this statement is incorrect. In particular, we prove that the state at the beginning of the cycle is mixed due to the process of measuring energy.

  10. Life cycle assessment of water supply alternatives in water-receiving areas of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang

    2016-02-01

    To alleviate the water shortage in northern China, the Chinese government launched the world's largest water diversion project, the South-to-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP), which delivers water from water-sufficient southern China to water-deficient northern China. However, an up-to-date study has not been conducted to determine whether the project is a favorable option to augment the water supply from an environmental perspective. The life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology integrated with a freshwater withdrawal category (FWI) was adopted to compare water supply alternatives in the water-receiving areas of the SNWDP, i.e., water diversion, wastewater reclamation and seawater desalination. Beijing, Tianjin, Jinan and Qingdao were studied as representative cities because they are the primary water-receiving areas of the SNWDP. The results revealed that the operation phase played the dominant role in all but one of the life cycle impact categories considered and contributed to more than 70% of their scores. For Beijing and Tianjin, receiving water through the SNWDP is the most sustainable option to augment the water supply. The result can be drawn in all of the water-receiving areas of the middle route of the SNWDP. For Jinan and Qingdao, the most sustainable option is the wastewater reclamation system. The seawater desalination system obtains the highest score of the standard impact indicators in all of the study areas, whereas it is the most favorable water supply option when considering the freshwater withdrawal impact. Although the most sustainable water supply alternative was recommended through an LCA analysis, multi-water resources should be integrated into the region's water supply from the perspective of water sustainability. The results of this study provide a useful recommendation on the management of water resources for China.

  11. The effect of high temperature braze thermal cycles on mechanical properties of a dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.; Schmale, D.T.

    1987-08-01

    Room temperature (RT) and elevated temperature (200 to 400/sup 0/C) mechanical properties were determined on thin tubes of low oxygen grade Glidcop Al-15 (CDA alloy 15715) (99.7% Cu) in both the as-cold worked condition and subsequent to high temperature braze thermal cycles. For the RT tests, three different braze thermal cycles were employed: (1) 5 min at 870/sup 0/C cycle, (2) 30 min at 870/sup 0/C cycle, (3) 5 min at 980/sup 0/C cycle. Results of RT tests showed that ultimate tensile strength declined from 486 MPa to approx.425 MPa in the thermally cycled condition. Typical tensile ductilities at RT increased from 8% to approx.18%. The effect of the braze thermal cycle is to apparently induce a modest amount of recovery (without recrystallization) in the dispersion strengthened matrix. These results are consistent with long term annealing studies conducted on solid rectangular bar pieces of Glidcop Al-15. In the elevated temperature (200 to 400/sup 0/C) tensile property tests, the effect of the braze cycle on ultimate tensile strength is most pronounced at 200/sup 0/C, but becomes negligible by 400/sup 0/C. The dependence of ultimate tensile strength on imposed strain rate and temperature can be adequately characterized by a phenomenological creep equation appropriate for the power-law breakdown regime. Analysis of the low temperature creep data for Thoria dispersed nickel of Wilcox and Clauer is included to demonstrate that the phenomenological equation used has general applicability for the case of oxide dispersion strengthened metals at homologous temperatures <0.5T/sub M/.

  12. Evaluation of new alternatives in wastewater treatment plants based on dynamic modelling and life cycle assessment (DM-LCA).

    PubMed

    Bisinella de Faria, A B; Spérandio, M; Ahmadi, A; Tiruta-Barna, L

    2015-11-01

    With a view to quantifying the energy and environmental advantages of Urine Source-Separation (USS) combined with different treatment processes, five wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) scenarios were compared to a reference scenario using Dynamic Modelling (DM) and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), and an integrated DM-LCA framework was thus developed. Dynamic simulations were carried out in BioWin(®) in order to obtain a realistic evaluation of the dynamic behaviour and performance of plants under perturbation. LCA calculations were performed within Umberto(®) using the Ecoinvent database. A Python™ interface was used to integrate and convert simulation data and to introduce them into Umberto(®) to achieve a complete LCA evaluation comprising foreground and background processes. Comparisons between steady-state and dynamic simulations revealed the importance of considering dynamic aspects such as nutrient and flow peaks. The results of the evaluation highlighted the potential of the USS scenario for nutrient recovery whereas the Enhanced Primary Clarification (EPC) scenario gave increased biogas production and also notably decreased aeration consumption, leading to a positive energy balance. Both USS and EPC scenarios also showed increased stability of plant operation, with smaller daily averages of total nitrogen and phosphorus. In this context, USS and EPC results demonstrated that the coupled USS + EPC scenario and its combinations with agricultural spreading of N-rich effluent and nitritation/anaerobic deammonification could present an energy-positive balance with respectively 27% and 33% lower energy requirements and an increase in biogas production of 23%, compared to the reference scenario. The coupled scenarios also presented lesser environmental impacts (reduction of 31% and 39% in total endpoint impacts) along with effluent quality well within the specified limits. The marked environmental performance (reduction of global warming) when nitrogen is used

  13. Kinetic model of mitochondrial Krebs cycle: unraveling the mechanism of salicylate hepatotoxic effects.

    PubMed

    Mogilevskaya, Ekaterina; Demin, Oleg; Goryanin, Igor

    2006-10-01

    This paper studies the effect of salicylate on the energy metabolism of mitochondria using in silico simulations. A kinetic model of the mitochondrial Krebs cycle is constructed using information on the individual enzymes. Model parameters for the rate equations are estimated using in vitro experimental data from the literature. Enzyme concentrations are determined from data on respiration in mitochondrial suspensions containing glutamate and malate. It is shown that inhibition in succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase by salicylate contributes substantially to the cumulative inhibition of the Krebs cycle by salicylates. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation has little effect and coenzyme A consumption in salicylates transformation processes has an insignificant effect on the rate of substrate oxidation in the Krebs cycle. It is found that the salicylate-inhibited Krebs cycle flux can be increased by flux redirection through addition of external glutamate and malate, and depletion in external alpha-ketoglutarate and glycine concentrations.

  14. Advances in understanding of soil biogeochemical cycles: the mechanism of HS entry into the root interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2017-04-01

    Humic substances represent the major reservoir of carbon (C) in ecosystems, and their turnover is crucial for understanding the global C cycle. As shown by some investigators [1-2], the phenomenon of the uptake of the whole humic particles by plant roots is a significant step of biogeochemical cycle of carbon in soils. The mechanism of HS entry the root interior remained unknown for a long time. However recently, the last one was discovered [3]. An advanced model [3] includes two hypotheses. These hypotheses are as follows: (1) each nano-size particle possesses a quantum image that can be revealed as a packet of electromagnetic waves; (2) the interaction of nano-size particle with the membrane (plasma membrane) of living cells, on which it is adsorbed, occurs via the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability on the membrane surface. An advanced model allows us to look insight some into some phenomena that were observed by experiments but remained not understood [2]. The authors [2] applied tritium autoradiography to wheat seedlings cultivated with tritium-labeled HS to consider the uptake of humic particles by plant roots. They found a significant increase in the content of some polar (monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol (SQDG) and phosphatidylcholine (PC)) and neutral (free fatty acids, FFA) lipids which were detected in the wheat seedlings treated with humic particles. Authors [2] pointed that lipids MGDG, DGDG, SQDG are crucial for functional and structural integrity of the photosystem complex. Therefore, a stimulating action of adsorbed humic particles evoked phenomena like photosynthesis in root cells that can be interpreted using an advanced model: humic particles being nano-size particles become adsorbed on the plant roots in soils, and influence their micro environment, where they are located, with the specific electromagnetic exposure. Another finding of authors consisted in the

  15. Influence of duty cycle on the power-duration relationship: observations and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Broxterman, R M; Ade, C J; Wilcox, S L; Schlup, S J; Craig, J C; Barstow, T J

    2014-02-01

    The highest sustainable rate of aerobic metabolism [critical power (CP)] and the finite amount of work that can be performed above CP (W' [curvature constant]) were determined under two muscle contraction duty cycles. Eight men completed at least three constant-power handgrip tests to exhaustion to determine CP and W' for 50% and 20% duty cycles, while brachial artery blood flow (Q̇BA) and deoxygenated-[hemoglobin + myoglobin] (deoxy-[Hb+Mb]) were measured. CP was lower for the 50% duty cycle (3.9 ± 0.9 W) than the 20% duty cycle (5.1 ± 0.8 W; p < 0.001), while W' was not significantly different (50% duty cycle: 452 ± 141 J vs. 20% duty cycle: 432 ± 130 J; p > 0.05). At the same power output, Q̇BA and deoxy-[Hb + Mb] achieved higher end-exercise values for the 20% duty cycle (9.87 ± 1.73 ml·s(-1); 51.7 ± 4.7 μM) than the 50% duty cycle (7.37 ± 1.76 ml·s(-1), p < 0.001; 44.3 ± 2.4 μM, p < 0.03). These findings indicate that blood flow influences CP, but not W'.

  16. Aberrant alternative splicing of thyroid hormone receptor in a TSH-secreting pituitary tumor is a mechanism for hormone resistance.

    PubMed

    Ando, S; Sarlis, N J; Krishnan, J; Feng, X; Refetoff, S; Zhang, M Q; Oldfield, E H; Yen, P M

    2001-09-01

    Patients with TSH-secreting pituitary tumors (TSHomas) have high serum TSH levels despite elevated thyroid hormone levels. The mechanism for this defect in the negative regulation of TSH secretion is not known. We performed RT-PCR to detect mutations in TRbeta from a surgically resected TSHoma. Analyses of the RT-PCR products revealed a 135-bp deletion within the sixth exon that encodes the ligand-binding domain of TRbeta2. This deletion was caused by alternative splicing of TRbeta2 mRNA, as near-consensus splice sequences were found at the junction site and no deletion or mutations were detected in the tumoral genomic DNA. This TRbeta variant (TRbeta2spl) lacked thyroid hormone binding and had impaired T3-dependent negative regulation of both TSHbeta and glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit genes in cotransfection studies. Furthermore, TRbeta2spl showed dominant negative activity against the wild-type TRbeta2. These findings strongly suggest that aberrant alternative splicing of TRbeta2 mRNA generated an abnormal TR protein that accounted for the defective negative regulation of TSH in the TSHoma. This is the first example of aberrant alternative splicing of a nuclear hormone receptor causing hormonal dysregulation. This novel posttranscriptional mechanism for generating abnormal receptors may occur in other hormone-resistant states or tumors in which no receptor mutation is detected in genomic DNA.

  17. Diminished Alternative Reinforcement as a Mechanism Underlying Socioeconomic Disparities in Adolescent Substance Use.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Bello, Mariel S; Unger, Jennifer B; Strong, David R; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Audrain-McGovern, Janet

    2015-11-01

    This study examined socioeconomic disparities in adolescent substance use utilizing a behavioral economic theoretical framework. We tested the hypothesis that teens of lower (vs. higher) socioeconomic status (SES) are vulnerable to substance use because they engage in fewer pleasurable substance-free activities that provide reinforcement and may deter substance use. In a cross-sectional correlational design, 9th grade students (N=2839; mean age=14.1years) in Los Angeles, California, USA completed surveys in Fall 2013 measuring SES (i.e., parental education), alternative reinforcement (engagement in pleasurable substance-free activities, e.g., hobbies), substance use susceptibility, initiation, and frequency, and other factors. For multi-substance composite outcomes, lower parental education was associated with greater likelihood of substance use initiation in the overall sample, frequency of use among lifetime substance users, and susceptibility to substance use in never users. Substance-specific analyses revealed that lower parental education was associated with higher likelihood of initiating cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana use as well as greater susceptibility to use cigarettes in never smokers. Each inverse association between parental education and substance-related outcomes was statistically mediated by diminished alternative reinforcement; lower parental education was associated with lower engagement in alternative reinforcers, which, in turn, was associated with greater substance use susceptibility, initiation, and frequency. These results point to a behavioral economic interpretation for socioeconomic disparities in adolescent substance use. Replication and extension of these findings would suggest that prevention programs that increase access to and engagement in healthy and fun activities may reduce youth socioeconomic health disparities related to substance use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alternative mechanisms for O2 release and O-O bond formation in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Li, Xichen; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2015-05-14

    In a previous detailed study of all the steps of water oxidation in photosystem II, it was surprisingly found that O2 release is as critical for the rate as O-O bond formation. A new mechanism for O2 release has now been found, which can be described as an opening followed by a closing of the interior of the oxygen evolving complex. A transition state for peroxide rotation forming a superoxide radical, missed in the previous study, and a structural change around the outside manganese are two key steps in the new mechanism. However, O2 release may still remain rate-limiting. Additionally, for the step forming the O-O bond, an alternative, experimentally suggested, mechanism was investigated. The new model calculations can rule out the precise use of that mechanism. However, a variant with a rotation of the ligands around the outer manganese by about 30° will give a low barrier, competitive with the old DFT mechanism. Both these mechanisms use an oxyl-oxo mechanism for O-O bond formation involving the same two manganese atoms and the central oxo group (O5).

  19. Bioenergy and bioproducts from municipal organic waste as alternative to landfilling: a comparative life cycle assessment with prospective application to Mexico.

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Alvarado, Carlos; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M; Ponce-Noyola, M Teresa

    2016-06-03

    A life cycle assessment (LCA) of a four-stage biorefinery concept, coined H-M-Z-S, that converts 1 t of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) into bioenergy and bioproducts was performed in order to determine whether it could be an alternative to common disposal of OFMSW in landfills in the Mexican reality. The OFMSW is first fermented for hydrogen production, then the fermentates are distributed 40 % to the methane production, 40 % to enzyme production, and 20 % to the saccharification stage. From hydrogen and methane, up to 267 MJ and 204 kWh of gross heat and electricity were produced. The biorefinery proved to be self-sustainable in terms of power (95 kWh net power), but it presented a deficit of energy for heating services (-155 MJ), which was partially alleviated by digesting the wastes from the bioproducts stages (-84 MJ). Compared to landfill, biorefinery showed lower environmental impacts in global warming (down to -128 kg CO2-eq), ozone layer depletion (2.96 × 10(-6) kg CFC11-eq), and photochemical oxidation potentials (0.011 kg C2H4-eq). The landfarming of the digestates increased significantly the eutrophication impacts, up to 20 % below the eutrophication from landfilling (1.425 kg PO4-eq). These results suggest that H-M-Z-S biorefinery could be an attractive alternative compared to conventional landfilling for the management of municipal solid wastes, although new alternatives and uses of co-products and wastes should be explored and tested. Moreover, the biorefinery system would benefit from the integration into the market chain of the bioproducts, i.e., enzymes and hydrolysates among others.

  20. Effect of a high temperature cycle on the mechanical properties of silicon carbide/titanium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Johnson, W. S.; Pollock, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the effects of the SPF/DB cycle on continuous SiC fiber-reinforced Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn composite's matrix, fiber, and matrix-fiber interface. The fibers in question, designated SCS-6, have a carbon core and thin, carbon-rich surface. The fatigue endurance limit at 50,000 cycles for the SPF/DB specimens was 50 percent lower than for the as-fabricated material. The substantial changes in tensile strength, fatigue life, and fracture-surface appearance due to the SPF-DB cycle are explained by a difference in the failure mechanisms due to SPF/DB-induced changes in the fiber/matrix interface strength.

  1. System modeling reveals the molecular mechanisms of HSC cell cycle alteration mediated by Maff and Egr3 under leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Rudong; Wang, Yin; Cheng, Hui; Liu, Gang; Cheng, Tao; Liu, Yunlong; Liu, Lei

    2017-10-03

    Molecular mechanisms of the functional alteration of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in leukemic environment attract intensive research interests. As known in previous researches, Maff and Egr3 are two important genes having opposite functions on cell cycle; however, they are both highly expressed in HSCs under leukemia. Hence, exploring the molecular mechanisms of how the genes act on cell cycle will help revealing the functional alteration of HSCs. We herein utilize the bioinformatic resources to computationally model the acting mechanisms of Maff and Egr3 on cell cycle. Using the data of functional experiments as reference, molecular acting mechanisms are optimally enumerated through model selection. The results are consolidated by evidences from gene sequence analysis, thus having enhanced the confidence of our pilot findings, which suggest that HSCs possibly undergo a "adaptation - suppression" process in response to the malignant environment of leukemia. As a pilot research, our results may provide valuable insights for further experimental studies. Meanwhile, our research method combining computational modeling and data from functional experiments can be worthwhile for knowledge discovery; and it can be generalized and extended to other biological/biomedical studies.

  2. Neural Mechanisms Influencing Interlimb Coordination during Locomotion in Humans: Presynaptic Modulation of Forearm H-Reflexes during Leg Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A.; Klarner, Taryn; Barss, Trevor S.; Hundza, Sandra R.; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition of transmission between Ia afferent terminals and alpha motoneurons (Ia PSI) is a major control mechanism associated with soleus H-reflex modulation during human locomotion. Rhythmic arm cycling suppresses soleus H-reflex amplitude by increasing segmental Ia PSI. There is a reciprocal organization in the human nervous system such that arm cycling modulates H-reflexes in leg muscles and leg cycling modulates H-reflexes in forearm muscles. However, comparatively little is known about mechanisms subserving the effects from leg to arm. Using a conditioning-test (C-T) stimulation paradigm, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that changes in Ia PSI underlie the modulation of H-reflexes in forearm flexor muscles during leg cycling. Subjects performed leg cycling and static activation while H-reflexes were evoked in forearm flexor muscles. H-reflexes were conditioned with either electrical stimuli to the radial nerve (to increase Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 20 ms) or to the superficial radial (SR) nerve (to reduce Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 37–47 ms). While stationary, H-reflex amplitudes were significantly suppressed by radial nerve conditioning and facilitated by SR nerve conditioning. Leg cycling suppressed H-reflex amplitudes and the amount of this suppression was increased with radial nerve conditioning. SR conditioning stimulation removed the suppression of H-reflex amplitude resulting from leg cycling. Interestingly, these effects and interactions on H-reflex amplitudes were observed with subthreshold conditioning stimulus intensities (radial n., ∼0.6×MT; SR n., ∼ perceptual threshold) that did not have clear post synaptic effects. That is, did not evoke reflexes in the surface EMG of forearm flexor muscles. We conclude that the interaction between leg cycling and somatosensory conditioning of forearm H-reflex amplitudes is mediated by modulation of Ia PSI pathways. Overall our results support a conservation of neural

  3. Neural mechanisms influencing interlimb coordination during locomotion in humans: presynaptic modulation of forearm H-reflexes during leg cycling.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Klarner, Taryn; Barss, Trevor S; Hundza, Sandra R; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E Paul

    2013-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition of transmission between Ia afferent terminals and alpha motoneurons (Ia PSI) is a major control mechanism associated with soleus H-reflex modulation during human locomotion. Rhythmic arm cycling suppresses soleus H-reflex amplitude by increasing segmental Ia PSI. There is a reciprocal organization in the human nervous system such that arm cycling modulates H-reflexes in leg muscles and leg cycling modulates H-reflexes in forearm muscles. However, comparatively little is known about mechanisms subserving the effects from leg to arm. Using a conditioning-test (C-T) stimulation paradigm, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that changes in Ia PSI underlie the modulation of H-reflexes in forearm flexor muscles during leg cycling. Subjects performed leg cycling and static activation while H-reflexes were evoked in forearm flexor muscles. H-reflexes were conditioned with either electrical stimuli to the radial nerve (to increase Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 20 ms) or to the superficial radial (SR) nerve (to reduce Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 37-47 ms). While stationary, H-reflex amplitudes were significantly suppressed by radial nerve conditioning and facilitated by SR nerve conditioning. Leg cycling suppressed H-reflex amplitudes and the amount of this suppression was increased with radial nerve conditioning. SR conditioning stimulation removed the suppression of H-reflex amplitude resulting from leg cycling. Interestingly, these effects and interactions on H-reflex amplitudes were observed with subthreshold conditioning stimulus intensities (radial n., ∼0.6×MT; SR n., ∼ perceptual threshold) that did not have clear post synaptic effects. That is, did not evoke reflexes in the surface EMG of forearm flexor muscles. We conclude that the interaction between leg cycling and somatosensory conditioning of forearm H-reflex amplitudes is mediated by modulation of Ia PSI pathways. Overall our results support a conservation of neural

  4. Development and validation of an alternative disturbed skin model by mechanical abrasion to study drug penetration

    PubMed Central

    Schlupp, P.; Weber, M.; Schmidts, T.; Geiger, K.; Runkel, F.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and cosmetics for dermal application are usually tested on healthy skin, although the primary permeation barrier, the stratum corneum, is often impaired by skin diseases or small skin lesions, especially on the hands. These skin conditions can considerably influence the permeation of chemicals and drugs. Furthermore, risk assessment for example of nanoparticles should be performed under various skin conditions to reflect the true circumstances. Therefore, an alternative and reproducible method for a high throughput of skin samples with impaired skin barrier was developed and verified by skin permeation studies (25 h) of caffeine, sorbic acid and testosterone compared to healthy (untreated) and tape-stripped skin. Skin barrier disruption was controlled by TEWL measurement. Skin permeation of the three substances was increased in tape-stripped and abraded skin compared to untreated skin due to the reduced barrier integrity. Enhancement of drug uptake was highest for the most hydrophilic substance, caffeine, followed by sorbic acid and lipophilic testosterone. No significant difference in drug uptake studies was observed between the new abrasion method with an aluminum-coated sponge and the tape-stripping method. The obtained results demonstrate that this abrasion method is an alternative way to achieve a disturbed skin barrier for drug and chemical uptake studies. PMID:25756004

  5. The alternating access mechanism of transport as observed in the sodium-hydantoin transporter Mhp1

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Simone; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Beckstein, Oliver; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Iwata, So; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Cameron, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary active transporters move molecules across cell membranes by coupling this process to the energetically favourable downhill movement of ions or protons along an electrochemical gradient. They function by the alternating access model of transport in which, through conformational changes, the substrate binding site alternately faces either side of the membrane. Owing to the difficulties in obtaining the crystal structure of a single transporter in different conformational states, relatively little structural information is known to explain how this process occurs. Here, the structure of the sodium-benzylhydantoin transporter, Mhp1, from Microbacterium liquefaciens, has been determined in three conformational states; from this a mechanism is proposed for switching from the outward-facing open conformation through an occluded structure to the inward-facing open state. PMID:21169684

  6. Inducing myoblast re-entry into the cell cycle: a potential mechanism for laser-enhanced skeletal muscle regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Fang, Y.; Zhang, C. P.; Chen, P.; Wang, C. Z.; Kang, H. X.; Shen, B. J.; Liang, J.; Fu, X. B.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the cell cycle and proliferative activity of cultured myoblasts, and sought to elucidate the possible cellular mechanism by which LLLI promotes the regeneration of skeletal muscle in vivo. Primary myoblasts isolated from rat hindlegs were irradiated with helium-neon laser light at different energy densities. Distributions of cell-cycle subpopulations and the expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins in myoblasts were assessed using flow cytometric analysis and western blot assay. It was found that laser irradiation stimulated cell-cycle entry; induced the expression of cyclin A and cyclin D; and increased cell proliferation index and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation as compared to the unirradiated control cells, indicating LLLI augmented the number of proliferative myoblasts in the S phase and G2/M phase of the cell cycle. These results suggest that LLLI at certain fluxes and wavelengths could activate quiescent myoblasts, leading to cell division and facilitating new myofiber formation. This could contribute to the improvement of skeletal muscle regeneration following trauma and myopathic diseases.

  7. The impact of altered task mechanics on timing and duration of eccentric bi-articular muscle contractions during cycling.

    PubMed

    Connick, Mark J; Li, François-Xavier

    2013-02-01

    In order to understand muscle adaptations to altered task mechanics during cycling, this study investigated the impact of altered seat height and cadence on timing and duration of gastrocnemius (GAST), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL) eccentric contractions and muscle activation patterns, and cycling economy. Ten male cyclists completed 9 × 5 min of cycling at 3 seat heights and 3 cadences. Three-dimensional leg kinematics and muscle activation patterns were recorded to estimate timing of eccentric muscle contractions. Onset, offset and duration of eccentric contractions and, onset, offset and duration of muscle activation were calculated, along with cycling economy. Duration of GAST and VL eccentric contractions decreased with increasing seat height due to earlier offset of eccentric muscle contractions. Duration of BF eccentric contractions significantly increased with seat height due to a later eccentric contraction offset. Offset of GAST and BF muscle activation occurred earlier with increasing cadence. Cycling economy was significantly affected by cadence but not seat height. The results suggest that as a consequence of altered seat height, proprioceptive feedback is used to fine-tune the timing of bi-articular eccentric muscle contractions. These results may have implications for seat height self-selection.

  8. High-cycle fatigue of 10M Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory alloy in reversed mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltio, I.; Soroka, A.; Ge, Y.; Söderberg, O.; Hannula, S.-P.

    2010-07-01

    Application of Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory alloys in magnetic-field-induced actuation relies on their performance in long-term high-cycle fatigue. In this paper the performance and changes in the microstructure of a Ni-Mn-Ga 10M martensite single crystal material are reported in a long-term mechanically induced shape change cycling. The longest test was run for 2 × 109 cycles at a frequency of 250 Hz and a strain amplitude of ± 1%. After the test a clear increase of the dynamic stiffness of the material was detected. Three specimens out of ten were cycled until fracture occurred and their fracture mechanism was studied. It was observed that the macroscopic crack growth took place roughly at a 45° angle with respect to the loading direction that was along the lang100rang crystallographic direction of the sample. The macroscopic fracture plane seemed to correspond roughly to the {111} crystal planes. On a microscopic scale the fracture propagated in a step-like manner at least partly along crystallographic planes. The steps at the fracture plane correspond to the {101} twin planes, with the height of steps along the lang101rang direction. The final fracture of the samples occurred in a brittle manner after the critical stress was exceeded.

  9. Degradation mechanism of over-charged LiCoO2/mesocarbon microbeads battery during shallow depth of discharge cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Lingling; Ma, Yulin; Cheng, Xinqun; ...

    2016-08-26

    LiCoO2/mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) batteries are over-charged to different voltage (4.4 V, 4.5 V, 4.6 V, and 4.7 V, respectively) for ten times, and then are cycled 1000 times for shallow depth of discharge. The morphology, structure, and electrochemical performance of the electrode materials were studied in detail in order to identify the capacity fading mechanism of over-charged battery after long-term cycling. The cycling performances of LiCoO2/MCMB batteries are gradually aggravated with the increase of over-charging voltage and the degradation mechanism is diverse upon the degree of over-charging. Furthermore, the capacity fading after long-term cycling of battery over-charged to 4.6 Vmore » or 4.7 V is mainly attributed to the cathodes. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) demonstrates that the lower valence state of cobalt exists on the surface of the LiCoO2 after serious over-charging (4.6 V or 4.7 V), and cobalt is dissolved then deposited on the anode according to the result of energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). But, after shallow over-charging (4.4 V or 4.5 V), the capacity deterioration is proposed as the loss of active lithium, presented by the generation of the SEI film on the anode, which is verified by water washed tests.« less

  10. Degradation mechanism of over-charged LiCoO2/mesocarbon microbeads battery during shallow depth of discharge cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingling; Ma, Yulin; Cheng, Xinqun; Cui, Yingzhi; Guan, Ting; Gao, Yunzhi; Du, Chunyu; Yin, Geping; Lin, Feng; Nordlund, Dennis

    2016-10-01

    LiCoO2/mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) batteries are over-charged to different voltage (4.4 V, 4.5 V, 4.6 V, and 4.7 V, respectively) for ten times, and then are cycled 1000 times for shallow depth of discharge. The morphology, structure, and electrochemical performance of the electrode materials were studied in detail in order to identify the capacity fading mechanism of over-charged battery after long-term cycling. The cycling performances of LiCoO2/MCMB batteries are gradually aggravated with the increase of over-charging voltage and the degradation mechanism is diverse upon the degree of over-charging. The capacity fading after long-term cycling of battery over-charged to 4.6 V or 4.7 V is mainly attributed to the cathodes. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) demonstrates that the lower valence state of cobalt exists on the surface of the LiCoO2 after serious over-charging (4.6 V or 4.7 V), and cobalt is dissolved then deposited on the anode according to the result of energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). However, after shallow over-charging (4.4 V or 4.5 V), the capacity deterioration is proposed as the loss of active lithium, presented by the generation of the SEI film on the anode, which is verified by water washed tests.

  11. Using the Anatomical Axis as an Alternative to the Mechanical Axis to Assess Knee Alignment.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Shane C; Sutherland, John; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-12-01

    The treatment of knee osteoarthritis and the preparation for total knee arthroplasty require repetitive imaging to guide preoperative planning and operative technique. Full-length standing anteroposterior images are the gold standard in assessing the alignment of the limb via the measurement of the mechanical axis of the knee. The anatomical axis can be obtained from a more limited image of the knee, and as such is less expensive and exposes the patient to less ionizing radiation. The objective of this cross-sectional prospective study was to examine the extent to which the anatomical axis measured on a fixed-flexed posteroanterior (Rosenberg view) radiograph correlates with the mechanical axis. The data of 209 total knee arthroplasty radiographs were analyzed to compare the preoperative correlation between the mechanical and anatomical axis. The anatomical axis correlated with the mechanical axis when it was measured from both the standing full-length anteroposterior radiograph and from a fixed-flexed posteroanterior radiograph. Using an angle of offset found from linear regression, these correlations become closer. Body mass index and Kellgren-Lawrence grade were not found to have a significant effect. It is the conclusion of this study that the anatomical axis, as measured from a limited knee radiography, may serve as a plausible estimate of the mechanical axis when done with a neutral angle of offset, and that offset angle depends on gender and the imaging technique used to determine the anatomical axis.

  12. Nonlinear optics at low powers: Alternative mechanism of on-chip optical frequency comb generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogov, Andrei S.; Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2016-12-01

    Nonlinear optical effects provide a natural way of light manipulation and interaction and form the foundation of applied photonics, from high-speed signal processing and telecommunication to ultrahigh-bandwidth interconnects and information processing. However, relatively weak nonlinear response at optical frequencies calls for operation at high optical powers or boosting efficiency of nonlinear parametric processes by enhancing local-field intensity with high-quality-factor resonators near cavity resonance, resulting in reduced operational bandwidth and increased loss due to multiphoton absorption. We present an alternative to this conventional approach, with strong nonlinear optical effects at low local intensities, based on period-doubling bifurcations near nonlinear cavity antiresonance and apply it to low-power optical frequency comb generation in a silicon chip.

  13. Thyme essential oil as an alternative mechanism: biofungicide-causing sensitivity of Mycosphaerella graminicola.

    PubMed

    Ben Jabeur, M; Somai-Jemmali, L; Hamada, W

    2017-04-01

    To understand the mode of action of thyme essential oil as an alternative biofungicide. The chemical composition of thyme essential oil isolated by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Thymus vulgaris was analyzed. The main constituents of thyme essential oil were thymol (76·96%), ρ-cymene (9·89%), γ-terpinene (1·92%) and caryophyllene oxide (1·69%). The antifungal activity of the oil and its pure major component (thymol) was assessed by the in vitro assay against Mycosphaerella graminicola. Thyme oil exhibited higher antifungal activity than thymol. The expression pattern of genes involved in fungal development and detoxification acting in M. graminicola under thyme oil and thymol treatment was analyzed. Thyme oil overexpressed, more than thymol, the genes encoding for the efflux pump (MgMfs1, MgAtr4), the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) (MgBcy1) and the MAPK MgHog1. Thyme oil repressed the expression of the genes encoding for the efflux pump MgAtr4, the MAPK (MgSlt2) and the regulatory subunit of PKA (MgBcy1). However, thymol repressed only MgAtr4 and MgSlt2 expression. These data highlight the ability of thyme oil to target genes involved in fungal development and virulence of the yeast-like fungi M. graminicola, which explain its higher antifungal activity. These findings will probably be useful to design an alternative biofungicide which will not lead to pathogen multidrug resistance. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Thermo and mechanical cycling and veneering method do not influence Y-TZP core/veneer interface bond strength.

    PubMed

    Vidotti, Hugo Alberto; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Insaurralde, Elizeu; de Almeida, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga; do Valle, Accácio Lins

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of thermal and mechanical cycling and veneering technique on the shear bond strength of Y-TZP (yttrium oxide partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal) core-veneer interfaces. Cylindrical Y-TZP specimens were veneered either by layering (n=20) or by pressing technique (n=20). A metal ceramic group (CoCr) was used as control (n=20). Ten specimens for each group were thermal and mechanical cycled and then all samples were subjected to shear bond strength in a universal testing machine with a 0.5mm/min crosshead speed. Mean shear bond strength (MPa) was analysed with a 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p<0.05). Failure mode was determined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal and mechanical cycling had no influence on the shear bond strength for all groups. The CoCr group presented the highest bond strength value (p<0.05) (34.72 ± 7.05 MPa). There was no significant difference between Y-TZP veneered by layering (22.46 ± 2.08 MPa) or pressing (23.58 ± 2.1 MPa) technique. Failure modes were predominantly adhesive for CoCr group, and cohesive within veneer for Y-TZP groups. Thermal and mechanical cycling, as well as the veneering technique does not affect Y-TZP core-veneer bond strength. Different methods of veneering Y-TZP restorations would not influence the clinical performance of the core/veneer interfaces. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. From waste plastics to industrial raw materials: A life cycle assessment of mechanical plastic recycling practice based on a real-world case study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fu; Guo, Jianfeng; Zhang, Wujie; Summers, Peter A; Hall, Philip

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical recycling of waste plastics is an environmental solution to the problem of waste plastic disposal, and has already become a common practice in industry. However, limited information can be found on either the industralised plastic recycling or the recycled materials, despite the use of recycled plastics has already extended to automobile production. This study investigates the life cycle environmental impacts of mechanical plastic recycling practice of a plastic recycling company in China. Waste plastics from various sources, such as agricultural wastes, plastic product manufacturers, collected solid plastic wastes and parts dismantled from waste electric and electronic equipments, are processed in three routes with products end up in different markets. The results of life cycle assessments show that the extrusion process has the largest environmental impacts, followed by the use of fillers and additives. Compared to production of virgin plastics and composites, the mechanical recycling is proved to be a superior alternative in most environmental aspects. Substituting virgin plastic composites with recycled plastic composites has achieved the highest environmental benefits, as virgin composite production has an impact almost 4 times higher that of the recycled composite production in each ReCiPe endpoint damage factor. Sensitivity analysis shows that the coverage of collecting network contribute affect little to overall environmental impact, and centralisation plays an important role in reducing overall environmental impacts. Among the fillers and additives, impact modifiers account for the most significant contributions to the environmental impacts of recycled composites. This study provides necessary information about the existing industrialised plastic recycling practice, and recommendations are given. Research implications are presented with the purpose to achieve higher substitution rate and lower environmental impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  16. Linguistic Alternatives to Quantitative Research Strategies. Part One: How Linguistic Mechanisms Advance Research Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeager, Joseph; Sommer, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Combining psycholinguistic technologies and systems analysis created advances in motivational profiling and numerous new behavioral engineering applications. These advances leapfrog many mainstream statistical research methods, producing superior research results via cause-effect language mechanisms. Entire industries explore motives ranging from…

  17. Introducing Mechanics: II. Towards a Justified Choice between Alternative Theories of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmett, Katrina; Klaassen, Kees; Eijkelhof, Harrie

    2009-01-01

    In an earlier article we presented an innovative approach for introducing mechanics at upper secondary level based on the idea of tapping core causal knowledge, and we described the working of the first part of the module. In this article we describe the second part of the module, in which we make use of the students' intuitive plausibility…

  18. Neutrophil activation: an alternative to prostaglandin inhibition as the mechanism of action for NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Altman, R D

    1990-02-01

    Experimental findings suggest that inhibition of neutrophil activation rather than suppression of prostaglandin formation may represent the principal mechanism of action of antiinflammatory drugs. This theory would account for the effectiveness of prostaglandin preserving agents, such as the nonacetylated salicylate salsalate, in the treatment of rheumatic disease. Results of the controlled clinical trials described in other papers contained in this supplement indicate that salsalate is equally effective as aspirin and the newer NSAID naproxen in relieving the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The damage to the gastric mucosa associated with NSAID use is believed to be attributable to impairment of mucosal defense mechanisms resulting from the inhibition of gastroprotective prostaglandins. Confirmation of neutrophil activation as the mechanism of action of NSAIDs would explain the efficacy of salsalate in light of its lower incidence of gastrointestinal side effects in controlled clinical trials with aspirin and naproxen. Establishment of such a mechanism would also suggest that the other adverse effects related to prostaglandin inhibition, such as hypersensitivity reactions, platelet dysfunction, and a reduction in renal function, are not necessary correlates of effective antiinflammatory therapy.

  19. Alternative Mechanisms to Encourage Individual Contributions to Vocational Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haukka, Sandra; Keating, Jack; Lamb, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Financing vocational education and training, as part of Australia's commitment to lifelong learning, will become a greater challenge as increased spending on other public services, such as health and welfare caused by an aging population, constrains government education expenditure. This report examines a range of mechanisms to encourage…

  20. 45 CFR 148.128 - State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Insurance Portability Model Act. (ii) A qualified high risk pool, which, for purposes of this section, is a... REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE MARKET... mechanism meets the following conditions: (i) Offers health insurance coverage to all eligible individuals...

  1. CCDs in the Mechanics Lab--A Competitive Alternative? (Part I).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    1995-01-01

    Reports on the implementation of a relatively low-cost, versatile, and intuitive system to teach basic mechanics based on the use of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera and inexpensive image-processing and analysis software. Discusses strengths and limitations of CCD imaging technologies. (JRH)

  2. CCDs in the Mechanics Lab--A Competitive Alternative? (Part I).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    1995-01-01

    Reports on the implementation of a relatively low-cost, versatile, and intuitive system to teach basic mechanics based on the use of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera and inexpensive image-processing and analysis software. Discusses strengths and limitations of CCD imaging technologies. (JRH)

  3. Influence of Different Thermo-mechanical Cycling Routes on Recovery Stresses of Annealed NiTi Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. J.; Ge, Y. L.; Van Humbeeck, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the influence of different thermo-mechanical cycling routes on recovery stresses of annealed NiTi wires has been investigated by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer. The as-received wire was annealed in Argon atmosphere in the temperature range of 350 to 900 °C. Differential scanning calorimeter was used to study the martensite transformation. In route I, the sample is deformed to 2% pre-strain and recovery stress is measured after unloading. In route II, the sample undergoes 3% deformation followed by a free shape recovery and then is reloaded to 2% pre-strain and recovery stress is measured after unloading. In route III, the sample undergoes a constrained thermal cycling at 3% pre-strain followed by a free shape recovery and then recovery stress is measured at 2% pre-strain. The results show that both route II and III can improve the recovery stresses. Route III has higher recovery stresses than route II for samples annealed at 550-700 °C. The improvements of recovery stresses under route II and III are partly attributed to the decrease of A s temperatures after thermo-mechanical cycling. Such information is essential for the proper use of NiTi alloys in smart structures, intelligent controllers, and memory devices.

  4. Coating dental implant abutment screws with diamondlike carbon doped with diamond nanoparticles: the effect on maintaining torque after mechanical cycling.

    PubMed

    Lepesqueur, Laura Soares; de Figueiredo, Viviane Maria Gonçalves; Ferreira, Leandro Lameirão; Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva; Massi, Marcos; Bottino, Marco Antônio; Nogueira Junior, Lafayette

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effect of maintaining torque after mechanical cycling of abutment screws that are coated with diamondlike carbon and coated with diamondlike carbon doped with diamond nanoparticles, with external and internal hex connections. Sixty implants were divided into six groups according to the type of connection (external or internal hex) and the type of abutment screw (uncoated, coated with diamondlike carbon, and coated with diamondlike carbon doped with diamond nanoparticles). The implants were inserted into polyurethane resin and crowns of nickel chrome were cemented on the implants. The crowns had a hole for access to the screw. The initial torque and the torque after mechanical cycling were measured. The torque values maintained (in percentages) were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test, with a significance level of 5%. The largest torque value was maintained in uncoated screws with external hex connections, a finding that was statistically significant (P = .0001). No statistically significant differences were seen between the groups with and without coating in maintaining torque for screws with internal hex connections (P = .5476). After mechanical cycling, the diamondlike carbon with and without diamond doping on the abutment screws showed no improvement in maintaining torque in external and internal hex connections.

  5. Soil organic carbon enrichment of dust emissions: Magnitude, mechanisms and its implications for the carbon cycle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil erosion is an important component of the global carbon cycle. However, little attention has been given to the role of aeolian processes in influencing soil organic carbon (SOC) flux and the release of greenhouse gasses, such as carbon-dioxide (CO2), to the atmosphere. Understanding the magnitu...

  6. Possible mechanism of the first ground level enhancement of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abul Firoz, Kazi; Li, Chuan; Gan, Weiqun

    2013-04-01

    Solar flare and CME-driven shock are the particle acceleration processes which are believed to cause ground level enhancement (GLE). In this respect, we carried out a study to understand the particle acceleration processes during 17 May 2012 with an aim to comprehend the possible mechanism of the concurrent GLE (GLE71, the first GLE of the solar cycle 24). For this, the cosmic ray intensities registered by neutron monitors at several sites have been analyzed with concurrent solar flare components and CME-driven shock wave. The intensive phases of the solar flare components have been investigated with the solar radio type III burst while the shock wave has been recognized in terms of type II burst. Both type III and II bursts have also been investigated with concurrent electron fluxes and solar radio flux density. On the basis of soft X-ray (1-8 Å) time profile, it is found that the solar flare started at ~ 01:25 UT and reached maximum at 01:47 UT with medium strength (M5.1). The flare originated from the active region 11476 at the western hemisphere (N13W83) of the Sun. To justify the strength of the flare, we also looked into the chromospheric evaporation and recognized that this flare was indeed less powerful than an X-class flare. Since the GLE is the high energy particle event, the responsible flare components are supposed to be the high energy flare components. So, we investigated the high energy flare components (~0.5-0.002 Å) and found that they have maximum phases at ~01:39 - 01:41 UT which are consistent with the pronounced phases of type III burst. The temporal difference between maximum phases of the high energy flare components and GLE71 is ~>28 minutes indicating that solar flare might not have caused this GLE. We then investigated CME (~1582 km/s) that onset at ~01:31 UT and started driving the shock wave at ~01:38 UT while showed up first appearance at 01:48:05 UT. For better understanding of the acceleration processes, we studied the spatial

  7. Molecular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent AMPA receptor cycling in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Casimiro, Tanya M.; Nawy, Scott; Carroll, Reed C.

    2013-01-01

    On retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) transmit light encoded information to the brain and receive excitatory input from On cone bipolar cells (CBPs). The synaptic CBP input onto On RGCs is mediated by AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) that include both those lacking a GluA2 subunit, and are therefore permeable to Ca2+, and those that possess at least one GluA2 subunit and are Ca2+-impermeable. We have previously demonstrated in electrophysiological studies that periods of low synaptic activity, brought about by housing animals in darkness, enhances the proportion of GluA2-lacking AMPARs at the On CBP-On RGC synapse by mobilizing surface GluA2 containing receptors into a receptor pool that rapidly cycles in and out of the membrane. AMPAR cycling induction by reduced synaptic activity takes several hours. This delay suggests that changes in expression of proteins which regulate AMPAR trafficking may mediate the altered mobility of GluA2 AMPARs in RGCs. In this study, we test the hypothesis that AMPAR trafficking proteins couple synaptic activity to AMPAR cycling in RGCs. Immunocytochemical and biochemical analysis confirmed that darkness decreases surface GluA2 in RGCs and changed the expression levels of three proteins associated with GluA2 trafficking. GRIP was decreased, while PICK1 and Arc were increased. Knockdown of GRIP with siRNA elevated constitutive AMPAR cycling, mimicking effects of reduced synaptic activity, while knockdown of PICK1 and ARC blocked increases in constitutive GluA2 trafficking. Our results support a role for correlated, activity-driven changes in multiple AMPAR trafficking proteins that modulate GluA2 cycling which can in turn affect synaptic AMPAR composition in RGCs. PMID:23911793

  8. RNA-sequencing analysis reveals the hepatotoxic mechanism of perfluoroalkyl alternatives, HFPO2 and HFPO4, following exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianshe; Wang, Xiaoyang; Sheng, Nan; Zhou, Xiujuan; Cui, Ruina; Zhang, Hongxia; Dai, Jiayin

    2017-04-01

    The toxicological impact of traditional perfluoroalkyl chemicals has led to the elimination and restriction of these substances. However, many novel perfluoroalkyl alternatives remain unregulated and little is known about their potential effects on environmental and human health. Daily administration of two alternative perfluoroalkyl substances, HFPO2 and HFPO4 (1 mg kg(-1) body weight), for 28 days resulted in hepatomegaly and hepatic histopathological injury in mice, particularly in the HFPO4 group. We generated and compared high-throughput RNA-sequencing data from hepatic tissues in control and treatment group mice to clarify the mechanism of HFPO2 and HFPO4 hepatotoxicity. We identified 146 (101 upregulated, 45 downregulated) and 1295 (716 upregulated, 579 downregulated) hepatic transcripts that exhibited statistically significant changes (fold change ≥2 or ≤0.5, false discovery rate < 0.05) after HFPO2 and HFPO4 treatment, respectively. Among them, 111 (82 upregulated, 29 downregulated) transcripts were changed in both groups, and lipid metabolism associated genes were dominant. Thus, similar to their popular predecessors, HFPO2 and HFPO4 exposure exerted hepatic effects, including hepatomegaly and injury, and altered lipid metabolism gene levels in the liver, though HFPO4 exerted greater hepatotoxicity than HFPO2. The unregulated use of these emerging perfluoroalkyl alternatives may affect environmental and human health, and their biological effects need further exploration. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Molecular mechanisms governing Pcdh-γ gene expression: Evidence for a multiple promoter and cis-alternative splicing model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaozhong; Su, Hong; Bradley, Allan

    2002-01-01

    The genomic architecture of protocadherin (Pcdh) gene clusters is remarkably similar to that of the immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene clusters, and can potentially provide significant molecular diversity. Pcdh genes are abundantly expressed in the central nervous system. These molecules are primary candidates for establishing specific neuronal connectivity. Despite the extensive analyses of the genomic structure of both human and mouse Pcdh gene clusters, the definitive molecular mechanisms that control Pcdh gene expression are still unknown. Four theories have been proposed, including (1) DNA recombination followed by cis-splicing, (2) single promoter and cis-alternative splicing, (3) multiple promoters and cis-alternative splicing, and (4) multiple promoters and trans-splicing. Using a combination of molecular and genetic analyses, we evaluated the four models at the Pcdh-γ locus. Our analysis provides evidence that the transcription of individual Pcdh-γ genes is under the control of a distinct but related promoter upstream of each Pcdh-γ variable exon, and posttranscriptional processing of each Pcdh-γ transcript is predominantly mediated through cis-alternative splicing. PMID:12154121

  10. Experimental Test of an Event-Based Corpuscular Model Modification as an Alternative to Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo Pietro; Genovese, Marco; Migdall, Alan; Piacentini, Fabrizio; Polyakov, Sergey V.; Traina, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    We present the first experimental test that distinguishes between an event-based corpuscular model (EBCM) [H. De Raedt et al.: J. Comput. Theor. Nanosci. 8 (2011) 1052] of the interaction of photons with matter and quantum mechanics. The test looks at the interference that results as a single photon passes through a Mach--Zehnder interferometer [H. De Raedt et al.: J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 74 (2005) 16]. The experimental results, obtained with a low-noise single-photon source [G. Brida et al.: Opt. Express 19 (2011) 1484], agree with the predictions of standard quantum mechanics with a reduced χ2 of 0.98 and falsify the EBCM with a reduced χ2 of greater than 20.

  11. Alternative mechanism for bacteriophage adsorption to the motile bacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C.; Viollier, Patrick H.; Ely, Bert; Poindexter, Jeanne S.; Georgieva, Maria; Jensen, Grant J.; Wright, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    2D and 3D cryo-electron microscopy, together with adsorption kinetics assays of ϕCb13 and ϕCbK phage-infected Caulobacter crescentus, provides insight into the mechanisms of infection. ϕCb13 and ϕCbK actively interact with the flagellum and subsequently attach to receptors on the cell pole. We present evidence that the first interaction of the phage with the bacterial flagellum takes place through a filament on the phage head. This contact with the flagellum facilitates concentration of phage particles around the receptor (i.e., the pilus portals) on the bacterial cell surface, thereby increasing the likelihood of infection. Phage head filaments have not been well characterized and their function is described here. Phage head filaments may systematically underlie the initial interactions of phages with their hosts in other systems and possibly represent a widespread mechanism of efficient phage propagation. PMID:21613567

  12. Reaction Mechanism and Improved Performance of Solution-Based Electrochemiluminescence Cell Driven by Alternating Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobeshima, Taiki; Nakamura, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Norihisa

    2013-05-01

    An AC-driven light-emitting cell based on the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) [Ru(bpy)32+] was fabricated by simply placing the electrolyte solution between transparent electrodes, and this AC-driven ECL cell was demonstrated for comparison to a DC-ECL cell. The properties of the ECL cell were dramatically improved by using the AC method. The AC-ECL cell showed the luminance of 56.4 cd/m2, the current efficiency of 0.78 cd/A and the turn-on response time of ca. 15 ms under application of 4 V, 50 Hz AC. We also elucidated the detailed mechanisms of the AC-ECL reaction to monitor the faradaic current. These improved properties and the frequency dependence of the AC-ECL cell were discussed in the relation to the revealed mechanisms.

  13. Crystal structure of A. aeolicus LpxC with bound product suggests alternate deacetylation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew D; Gao, Ning; Ross, Philip L; Olivier, Nelson B

    2015-09-01

    UDP-3-O-acyl-N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase (LpxC) is the first committed step to form lipid A, an essential component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. As it is essential for the survival of many pathogens, LpxC is an attractive target for antibacterial therapeutics. Herein, we report the product-bound co-crystal structure of LpxC from the acheal Aquifex aeolicus solved to 1.6 Å resolution. We identified interactions by hydroxyl and hydroxymethyl substituents of the product glucosamine ring that may enable new insights to exploit waters in the active site for structure-based design of LpxC inhibitors with novel scaffolds. By using this product structure, we have performed quantum mechanical modeling on the substrate in the active site. Based on our results and published experimental data, we propose a new mechanism that may lead to a better understanding of LpxC catalysis and inhibition.

  14. Weaning from mechanical ventilation: why are we still looking for alternative methods?

    PubMed

    Frutos-Vivar, F; Esteban, A

    2013-12-01

    Most patients who require mechanical ventilation for longer than 24 hours, and who improve the condition leading to the indication of ventilatory support, can be weaned after passing a first spontaneous breathing test. The challenge is to improve the weaning of patients who fail that first test. We have methods that can be referred to as traditional, such as the T-tube, pressure support or synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV). In recent years, however, new applications of usual techniques as noninvasive ventilation, new ventilation methods such as automatic tube compensation (ATC), mandatory minute ventilation (MMV), adaptive support ventilation or automatic weaning systems based on pressure support have been described. Their possible role in weaning from mechanical ventilation among patients with difficult or prolonged weaning remains to be established. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. An alternative mechanism for production of emission features in some infrared objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apruzese, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Two dust-envelope models of the M supergiant VX Sgr, which exhibits a prominent emission feature at 10 microns, are presented. The models indicate that, for certain envelope sizes, the presence of the observed emission feature does not necessarily indicate that the emitting grains possess a similar feature in their emissivity profile. The mechanism which may in some cases be producing the observed emission feature is discussed.

  16. Does molecular docking reveal alternative chemopreventive mechanism of activation of oxidoreductase by sulforaphane isothiocyanates?

    PubMed

    Mazur, Pawel; Magdziarz, Tomasz; Bak, Andrzej; Chilmonczyk, Zdzislaw; Kasprzycka-Guttman, Teresa; Misiewicz-Krzemińska, Irena; Skupińska, Katarzyna; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2010-07-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITC) are well-known chemopreventive agents extracted from vegetables. This activity results from the activation of human oxidoreductase. In this letter, the uncompetitive activatory mechanism of ITC was investigated using docking and molecular dynamics simulations. This indicates that NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase can efficiently improve enzyme-substrate recognition within the catalytic site if the ITC activator supports the interaction in the uncompetitive binding site.

  17. Homozygous deletions of CDKN2A caused by alternative mechanisms in various human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Raschke, Sascha; Balz, Vera; Efferth, Thomas; Schulz, Wolfgang A; Florl, Andrea R

    2005-01-01

    The CDKN2A tumor-suppressor locus on chromosome band 9p21, which encodes p16(INK4A), a negative regulator of cyclin-dependent kinases, and p14(ARF1), an activator of TP53, is inactivated in many human cancers by point mutation, promoter hypermethylation, and, often, deletion. Homozygous deletions are unusually prevalent at this locus in very different human cancers. In the present study, we compared deletions in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) cell lines to those in T-cell acute lymphatic leukemia (T-ALL), glioma, and bladder carcinoma (TCC) cell lines. Of 14 SCCHN lines, 10 showed homozygous deletions of CDKN2A, one displayed promoter hypermethylation with gene silencing, and one had a frameshift deletion in exon 2. Many deletion ends were in or proximal to the repetitive sequence clusters flanking the locus. Breakpoint junctions displayed variable microhomologies or insertions characteristic of DNA repair by nonhomologous end-joining. In general, deletions were much smaller in SCCHN than in TCC and glioma. In T-ALL, breakpoints were near consensus sites for recombination mediated by RAG (recombination activating genes) enzymes, and the structure of the junctions was consistent with this mechanism. We suggest that different mechanisms of CDKN2A deletion prevail in different human cancers. Aberrant RAG-mediated recombination may be responsible in T-ALL, and exuberant DNA repair by nonhomologous end-joining is the likely prevailing mechanism in SCCHN, but a distinct mechanism in TCC and glioma remains to be elucidated.

  18. Alternative mechanisms of increased eggshell hardness of avian brood parasites relative to host species

    PubMed Central

    Igic, Branislav; Braganza, Kim; Hyland, Margaret M.; Silyn-Roberts, Heather; Cassey, Phillip; Grim, Tomas; Rutila, Jarkko; Moskát, Csaba; Hauber, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Obligate brood parasitic birds lay their eggs in nests of other species and parasite eggs typically have evolved greater structural strength relative to host eggs. Increased mechanical strength of the parasite eggshell is an adaptation that can interfere with puncture ejection behaviours of discriminating hosts. We investigated whether hardness of eggshells is related to differences between physical and chemical traits from three different races of the parasitic common cuckoo Cuculus canorus, and their respective hosts. Using tools developed for materials science, we discovered a novel correlate of increased strength of parasite eggs: the common cuckoo's egg exhibits a greater microhardness, especially in the inner region of the shell matrix, relative to its host and sympatric non-host species. We then tested predictions of four potential mechanisms of shell strength: (i) increased relative thickness overall, (ii) greater proportion of the structurally harder shell layers, (iii) higher concentration of inorganic components in the shell matrix, and (iv) elevated deposition of a high density compound, MgCO3, in the shell matrix. We confirmed support only for hypothesis (i). Eggshell characteristics did not differ between parasite eggs sampled from different host nests in distant geographical sites, suggesting an evolutionarily shared microstructural mechanism of stronger parasite eggshells across diverse host-races of brood parasitic cuckoos. PMID:21561966

  19. Enzyme-enzyme interactions and metabolite channelling: alternative mechanisms and their evolutionary significance.

    PubMed Central

    Cascante, M; Sorribas, A; Canela, E I

    1994-01-01

    Metabolite channelling may result from different kinetic mechanisms in which enzyme-enzyme interactions occur, so that intermediates are not released into the bulk solution and cannot be used by enzymes outside the channel. From an evolutionary point of view, the emergence of such mechanisms may provide new functional possibilities for the system, which would result in a selective advantage. Hence, it would be useful to evaluate the objective advantages provided by the various options by considering different criteria for functional effectiveness. Following this strategy, the goal of this paper is to compare a model for a free-diffusion two-enzyme system with two different models with inclusion of enzyme-enzyme interactions. In addition, models with simultaneous free and interacting branches are also analysed, and their advantages or disadvantages are presented. Basic guidelines are suggested that help in predicting the occurrence of specific mechanisms in different circumstances, and provide theoretical evidence in support of the hypothesis that no single solution simultaneously optimizes all the possible desired properties of the system. PMID:8135736

  20. Mechanisms of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells induced by hybrid-compound histone deacetylase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Seiko; Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Takahashi, Osamu; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Nishino, Norikazu; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Ky-2, remarkably inhibits myeloma cell growth. •Ky-2 demonstrates no cytotoxicity against normal lymphocytic cells. •Ky-2 induces cell cycle arrest through the cell cycle-associated proteins. •Ky-2 induces Bcl-2-inhibitable apoptosis through a caspase-dependent cascade. -- Abstract: Objectives: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are new therapeutic agents, used to treat various types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ky-2, a hybrid-compound HDAC inhibitor, on the growth of mouse myeloma cells. Materials and methods: Myeloma cells, HS-72, P3U1, and mouse normal cells were used in this study. Effect of HDAC inhibitors on cell viability was determined by WST-assay and trypan blue assay. Cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometer. The expression of cell cycle regulatory and the apoptosis associated proteins were examined by Western blot analysis. Hoechst’s staining was used to detect apoptotic cells. Results: Our findings showed that Ky-2 decreased the levels of HDACs, while it enhanced acetylation of histone H3. Myeloma cell proliferation was inhibited by Ky-2 treatment. Interestingly, Ky-2 had no cytotoxic effects on mouse normal cells. Ky-2 treatment induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest and accumulation of a sub-G1 phase population, while Western blotting analysis revealed that expressions of the cell cycle-associated proteins were up-regulated. Also, Ky-2 enhanced the cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 in myeloma cells, followed by DNA fragmentation. In addition, Ky-2 was not found to induce apoptosis in bcl-2 overexpressing myeloma cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Ky-2 induces apoptosis via a caspase-dependent cascade and Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism in myeloma cells.

  1. The Alternative complex III: properties and possible mechanisms for electron transfer and energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Refojo, Patrícia N; Teixeira, Miguel; Pereira, Manuela M

    2012-10-01

    Alternative complexes III (ACIII) are recently identified membrane-bound enzymes that replace functionally the cytochrome bc(1/)b(6)f complexes. In general, ACIII are composed of four transmembrane proteins and three peripheral subunits that contain iron-sulfur centers and C-type hemes. ACIII are built by a combination of modules present in different enzyme families, namely the complex iron-sulfur molybdenum containing enzymes. In this article a historical perspective on the investigation of ACIII is presented, followed by an overview of the present knowledge on these enzymes. Electron transfer pathways within the protein are discussed taking into account possible different locations (cytoplasmatic or periplasmatic) of the iron-sulfur containing protein and their contribution to energy conservation. In this way several hypotheses for energy conservation modes are raised including linear and bifurcating electron transfer pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Using Unconstrained Tongue Motion as an Alternative Control Mechanism for Wheeled Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Xueliang; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, noncontact, and wireless assistive technology that infers users’ intentions by detecting and classifying their voluntary tongue motions, and translating them to user-defined commands. We have developed customized interface circuitry between an external TDS (eTDS) prototype and a commercial powered wheelchair (PWC) as well as three control strategies to evaluate the tongue motion as an alternative control input for wheeled mobility. We tested the eTDS performance in driving PWCs on 12 able-bodied human subjects, of which 11 were novice. The results showed that all subjects could complete navigation tasks by operating the PWC using their tongue motions. Despite little prior experience, the average time using the eTDS and the tongue was only approximately three times longer than using a joystick and the fingers. Navigation time was strongly dependant on the number of issued commands, which reduced by gaining experience. Particularly, the unintended issued commands (the Midas touch problem) were rare, demonstrating the effectiveness of the tongue tracking and external magnetic field cancellation algorithms as well as the safety of the TDS for wheeled mobility. PMID:19362901

  3. Using unconstrained tongue motion as an alternative control mechanism for wheeled mobility.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xueliang; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2009-06-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, noncontact, and wireless assistive technology that infers users' intentions by detecting and classifying their voluntary tongue motions, and translating them to user-defined commands. We have developed customized interface circuitry between an external TDS (eTDS) prototype and a commercial powered wheelchair (PWC) as well as three control strategies to evaluate the tongue motion as an alternative control input for wheeled mobility. We tested the eTDS performance in driving PWCs on 12 able-bodied human subjects, of which 11 were novice. The results showed that all subjects could complete navigation tasks by operating the PWC using their tongue motions. Despite little prior experience, the average time using the eTDS and the tongue was only approximately three times longer than using a joystick and the fingers. Navigation time was strongly dependant on the number of issued commands, which reduced by gaining experience. Particularly, the unintended issued commands (the Midas touch problem) were rare, demonstrating the effectiveness of the tongue tracking and external magnetic field cancellation algorithms as well as the safety of the TDS for wheeled mobility.

  4. Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H.; Scheutz, C.

    2012-01-15

    An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

  5. Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling.

    PubMed

    Andersen, J K; Boldrin, A; Christensen, T H; Scheutz, C

    2012-01-01

    An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg(-1) wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28mPEMg(-1) ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Cell Cycle Regulation of Smooth Muscle Cells--Searching for Inhibitors of Neointima Formation: Is Combretastatin A4 an Alternative to Sirolimus and Paclitaxel?

    PubMed

    Spira, Daniel; Grözinger, Gerd; Domschke, Nicole; Bantleon, Rüdiger; Schmehl, Jörg; Wiskirchen, Jakub; Wiesinger, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    To compare the effects of sirolimus, paclitaxel, and combretastatin A4 (CA4) on regulatory proteins of the cell cycle in proliferating smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Human aortic SMCs were treated with sirolimus, paclitaxel, and CA4 at 5 × 10(-9) mol/L. After 1 day, half of the cells were harvested (DAY1 group). The treatment medium of the other half was replaced with culture medium on day 4, and those cells were harvested on day 5 (DAY5 group). Cyclins D1, D2, E, and A and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p16, p21, and p27 were detected by Western blot technique. Quantification was performed by scanning densitometry of the specific bands. In the DAY1 group, treatment with sirolimus resulted in decreased intracellular levels of cyclins D2 and A (P < .05). Increased D cyclins and reduced levels of cyclins E and A (P < .05) in the DAY5 group indicated a permanent G1/S block by sirolimus. Paclitaxel led to only slight alterations of cyclin and CDK inhibitor expression (P > .05). In the DAY1 group, CA4 decreased intracellular levels of cyclins D2, E, and A (P < .05). Despite recovery effects in the DAY5 group (increase of cyclins D1, D2, and A compared with DAY1 group; P < .05), the upregulation of the CDK inhibitor p21, increased D cyclins, and decreased cyclins E and A (P < .05) are compatible with a G1 arrest. CA4 is a stronger inhibitor of the SMC cycle than sirolimus or paclitaxel and may represent an alternative for drug-eluting stents in atherosclerotic luminal stenosis. The effect of CA4 on neointima formation should be evaluated further. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

    1999-12-17

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal

  8. Indigenous social insurance as an alternative financing mechanism for health care in Ethiopia (the case of eders).

    PubMed

    Mariam, Damen Haile

    2003-04-01

    With increasing demand for services further propagated by population growth and by people's response to newly emerging pathologies, nations in sub-Saharan Africa are faced with insurmountable problems in sustaining their health systems. Realizing the inadequacy of solely relying on the public sector, these countries are seeking alternative mechanisms for health financing. Among the alternatives suggested are risk-sharing mechanisms that include community-based schemes that tap the potential of indigenous social arrangements. In Ethiopia, eders are major forms of indigenous arrangements utilized mainly for assisting victims in bereavement and executing funeral-related activities. These associations are also called upon in various self-help activities and sometimes provide health insurance, even though mostly in an informal manner. Therefore, they have the potential to serve as social financing mechanisms. Since these are already functioning groups, the administrative cost for the extra health-related activity will not be as high as in the case of forming a new insurance entity. In addition, the fact that eders are based on mutual understanding among members minimizes the possibility of adverse selection. Based on the above background, an exploratory study was conducted in 40 villages distributed in various parts of Ethiopia to assess the possible roles eders might play in providing insurance for health financing. Both qualitative and quantitative (household and health facility exit interview surveys) methods of data collection were utilized. The study concludes that eder-based schemes are, indeed, options for experimentation as mechanisms for financing health care in rural Ethiopia. It was also found that 21.5% of respondents in the household and 16% of those in the exit surveys were already utilizing eders to finance part of their health expenditure. In addition, 86% of the respondents in the household and 90% of those in the exit survey were willing to participate

  9. Alternative mating tactics in the yellow dung fly: resolving mechanisms of small-male advantage off pasture

    PubMed Central

    Gress, Brian E.; Waltzer, Ryan J.; Lüpold, Stefan; Droge-Young, Elizabeth M.; Manier, Mollie K.; Pitnick, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the yellow dung fly mating system may include alternative patroller–competitor mating tactics in which large males compete for gravid females on dung, whereas small, non-competitive males search for females at foraging sites. Small males obtain most matings off pasture, yet the behavioural mechanism(s) giving rise to this pattern are unknown. We investigated the male and female behaviours that determine mating success in this environment by conducting field mating experiments and found small males to benefit from several attributes specific to the off-pasture mating environment. First, small males from foraging sites exhibited higher mating propensity, indicating that large males away from dung may be depleted of energy and/or sperm. Second, small males were more discriminating, being significantly less likely to attempt with non-gravid females, which are absent on dung but common off pasture. Third, non-gravid females were generally more likely to actively struggle and reject mating attempts; however, such behaviours occurred disproportionately more often with large males. Female Scathophaga stercoraria thus appear to preferentially mate with small males when off pasture. These findings challenge assumptions about male–female interactions in systems with alternative mating tactics and reveal hidden processes that may influence selection patterns in the field. PMID:24225455

  10. Alternative mating tactics in the yellow dung fly: resolving mechanisms of small-male advantage off pasture.

    PubMed

    Gress, Brian E; Waltzer, Ryan J; Lüpold, Stefan; Droge-Young, Elizabeth M; Manier, Mollie K; Pitnick, Scott

    2014-01-07

    Recent work suggests that the yellow dung fly mating system may include alternative patroller-competitor mating tactics in which large males compete for gravid females on dung, whereas small, non-competitive males search for females at foraging sites. Small males obtain most matings off pasture, yet the behavioural mechanism(s) giving rise to this pattern are unknown. We investigated the male and female behaviours that determine mating success in this environment by conducting field mating experiments and found small males to benefit from several attributes specific to the off-pasture mating environment. First, small males from foraging sites exhibited higher mating propensity, indicating that large males away from dung may be depleted of energy and/or sperm. Second, small males were more discriminating, being significantly less likely to attempt with non-gravid females, which are absent on dung but common off pasture. Third, non-gravid females were generally more likely to actively struggle and reject mating attempts; however, such behaviours occurred disproportionately more often with large males. Female Scathophaga stercoraria thus appear to preferentially mate with small males when off pasture. These findings challenge assumptions about male-female interactions in systems with alternative mating tactics and reveal hidden processes that may influence selection patterns in the field.

  11. Exploration of Alternate Catalytic Mechanisms and Optimization Strategies for Retroaldolase Design

    PubMed Central

    Bjelic, Sinisa; Kipnis, Yakov; Wang, Ling; Pianowski, Zbigniew; Vorobiev, Sergey; Su, Min; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Kornhaber, Gregory; Hunt, John F.; Tong, Liang; Hilvert, Donald; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    Designed retroaldolases have utilized a nucleophilic lysine to promote carbon–carbon bond cleavage of β-hydroxy-ketones via a covalent Schiff base intermediate. Previous computational designs have incorporated a water molecule to facilitate formation and breakdown of the carbinolamine intermediate to give the Schiff base and to function as a general acid/base. Here we investigate an alternative active-site design in which the catalytic water molecule was replaced by the side chain of a glutamic acid. Five out of seven designs expressed solubly and exhibited catalytic efficiencies similar to previously designed retroaldolases for the conversion of 4-hydro-xy-4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone to 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde and acetone. After one round of site-directed saturation mutagenesis, improved variants of the two best designs, RA114 and RA117, exhibited among the highest kcat (>10−3 s−1) and kcat/KM (11–25 M−1 s−1) values observed for retroaldolase designs prior to comprehensive directed evolution. In both cases, the >105-fold rate accelerations that were achieved are within 1–3 orders of magnitude of the rate enhancements reported for the best catalysts for related reactions, including catalytic antibodies (kcat/kuncat = 106 to 108) and an extensively evolved computational design (kcat/kuncat > 107). The catalytic sites, revealed by X-ray structures of optimized versions of the two active designs, are in close agreement with the design models except for the catalytic lysine in RA114. We further improved the variants by computational remodeling of the loops and yeast display selection for reactivity of the catalytic lysine with a diketone probe, obtaining an additional order of magnitude enhancement in activity with both approaches. PMID:24161950

  12. Al-Li alloy AA2198's very high cycle fatigue crack initiation mechanism and its fatigue thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luopeng; Cao, Xiaojian; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-10-01

    AA2198 alloy is one of the third generation Al-Li alloys which have low density, high elastic modulus, high specific strength and specific stiffness. Compared With the previous two generation Al-Li alloys, the third generation alloys have much improved in alloys strength, corrosion resistance and weldable characteristic. For these advantages, the third generation Al-Li alloys are used as aircraft structures, such as C919 aviation airplane manufactured by China and Russia next generation aviation airplane--MS-21. As we know, the aircraft structures are usually subjected to more than 108 cycles fatigue life during 20-30 years of service, however, there is few reported paper about the third generation Al-Li alloys' very high cycle fatigue(VHCF) which is more than 108 cycles fatigue. The VHCF experiment of AA2198 have been carried out. The two different initiation mechanisms of fatigue fracture have been found in VHCF. The cracks can initiate from the interior of the testing material with lower stress amplitude and more than 108 cycles fatigue life, or from the surface or subsurface of material which is the dominant reason of fatigue failures. During the experiment, the infrared technology is used to monitor the VHCF thermal effect. With the increase of the stress, the temperature of sample is also rising up, increasing about 15 °C for every 10Mpa. The theoretical thermal analysis is also carried out.

  13. Mechanism of T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest in Mia-PaCa pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Andrew M; Sarkar, Sibaji; Faller, Douglas V

    2012-06-01

    DNA oligonucleotides with sequence homology to human telomeric DNA (T-oligo) induce cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis, senescence, or autophagy in a human cancer cell type-specific manner. T-oligo has potential as a new therapeutic strategy in oncology because of its ability to target certain types of tumor cells while sparing normal ones. In the present study, we demonstrate the T-oligo-induced S-phase cell cycle arrest in four pancreatic cancer cell lines. To further contribute to the mechanistic understanding of T-oligo, we also identify cyclin dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) as a functional mediator in the T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest of pancreatic cancer cells. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active cdk2 mutant abrogates T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest in these tumor cells while knockdown of cdk2 expression alone recapitulates the T-oligo effect. Finally, we demonstrate the dispensability of T-oligo-induced ATM/ATR-mediated DNA damage response-signaling pathways, which have long been considered functional in the T-oligo signaling mechanism.

  14. Energetics, mechanics and molecular engineering of calcium cycling in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Rall, Jack A

    2005-01-01

    During muscle contraction and relaxation, Ca2+ moves through a cycle. About 20 to 40% of the ATP utilized in a twitch or a tetanus is utilized by the SR Ca2+ pump to sequester Ca2+. Parvalbumin is a soluble Ca2+ binding protein that functions in parallel with the SR Ca2+ pump to promote relaxation in rapidly contracting and relaxing skeletal muscles, especially at low temperatures. The rate of Ca2+ dissociation from troponin C, once thought to be much more rapid than the rate of relaxation, is likely to be similar to the rate of cross-bridge detachment and to the rate of muscle relaxation under some conditions. During the past fifty years, great progress has been made in understanding the Ca2+ cycle during skeletal muscle contraction and relaxation. Nonetheless, there are still mysteries waiting to be unraveled.

  15. Effects of high temperature brazing and thermal cycling on mechanical properties of Hastelloy X.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L.; Buckley, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Data are presented on the effects of brazing alloy, brazing operation, thermal cycling, and combinations of these on the yield strength, elongation, ultimate tensile strength, and fatigue life of thin gage Hastelloy X. These data show that brazing with a Ni-Pd-Au alloy at 1461 K resulted in reductions of 35 percent in yield strength and elongation, 6 percent in ultimate tensile strength, and 18 percent in fatigue limit of Hastelloy X, as compared with as-received material. Subsequent exposure to 200 thermal cycles between 533 K and 1144 K after brazing caused further losses of 4 percent in yield strength, 8 percent in ultimate tensile strength, and 6 percent in fatigue limit.

  16. Alternative mechanisms for regulating racial responses according to internal vs external cues

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, David M.; Kubota, Jennifer T.; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Devine, Patricia G.

    2006-01-01

    Personal (internal) and normative (external) impetuses for regulating racially biased behaviour are well-documented, yet the extent to which internally and externally driven regulatory processes arise from the same mechanism is unknown. Whereas the regulation of race bias according to internal cues has been associated with conflict-monitoring processes and activation of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), we proposed that responses regulated according to external cues to respond without prejudice involves mechanisms of error-perception, a process associated with rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) activity. We recruited low-prejudice participants who reported high or low sensitivity to non-prejudiced norms, and participants completed a stereotype inhibition task in private or public while electroencephalography was recorded. Analysis of event-related potentials revealed that the error-related negativity component, linked to dACC activity, predicted behavioural control of bias across conditions, whereas the error-perception component, linked to rACC activity, predicted control only in public among participants sensitive to external pressures to respond without prejudice. PMID:18985098

  17. Neurotoxin localization to ectodermal gland cells uncovers an alternative mechanism of venom delivery in sea anemones.

    PubMed

    Moran, Yehu; Genikhovich, Grigory; Gordon, Dalia; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Zenkert, Claudia; Ozbek, Suat; Technau, Ulrich; Gurevitz, Michael

    2012-04-07

    Jellyfish, hydras, corals and sea anemones (phylum Cnidaria) are known for their venomous stinging cells, nematocytes, used for prey and defence. Here we show, however, that the potent Type I neurotoxin of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, Nv1, is confined to ectodermal gland cells rather than nematocytes. We d