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Sample records for cycle arrest death

  1. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  2. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin(+)) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34(+)CD38(-)Lin(-/low)). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 (7μM) and G2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 induces cell cycle arrest and necrotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Arun P; Cheng, Gang; Sutter, Alton G; Evans, Zachary P; Polito, Carmen C; Jin, Lan; Liu, John; Schmidt, Michael G; Chavin, Kenneth D

    2014-03-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is a mitochondrial membrane protein that regulates energy metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We generated mouse carboxy- and amino-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged UCP2 constructs to investigate the effect of UCP2 expression on cell proliferation and viability. UCP2-transfected Hepa 1-6 cells did not show reduced cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) but showed increased levels of glutathione. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that transfected cells were less proliferative than nontransfected controls, with most cells blocked at the G1 phase. The effect of UCP2 on cell cycle arrest could not be reversed by providing exogenous ATP or oxidant supply, and was not affected by the chemical uncoupler carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP). However, this effect of UCP2 was augmented by treatment with genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which by itself did not affect cell proliferation on control hepatocytes. Western blotting analysis revealed decreased expression levels of CDK6 but not CDK2 and D-type cyclins. Examination of cell viability in UCP2-transfected cells with Trypan Blue and Annexin-V staining revealed that UCP2 transfection led to significantly increased cell death. However, characteristics of apoptosis were absent in UCP2-transfected Hepa 1-6 cells, including lack of oligonucleosomal fragmentation (laddering) of chromosomal DNA, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, and cleavage of caspase-3. In conclusion, our results indicate that UCP2 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and causes nonapoptotic cell death, suggesting that UCP2 may act as a powerful influence on hepatic regeneration and cell death in the steatotic liver.

  4. Involvement of p53 in cell death following cell cycle arrest and mitotic catastrophe induced by rotenone

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, António Pedro; Máximo, Valdemar; Lima, Jorge; Singh, Keshav K.; Soares, Paula; Videira, Arnaldo

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the cell death-inducing effects of rotenone, a plant extract commonly used as a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, we studied cancer cell lines with different genetic backgrounds. Rotenone inhibits cell growth through the induction of cell death and cell cycle arrest, associated with the development of mitotic catastrophe. The cell death inducer staurosporine potentiates the inhibition of cell growth by rotenone in a dose-dependent synergistic manner. The tumor suppressor p53 is involved in rotenone-induced cell death, since the drug treatment results in increased expression, phosphorylation and nuclear localization of the protein. The evaluation of the effects of rotenone on a p53-deficient cell line revealed that although not required for the promotion of mitotic catastrophe, functional p53 appears to be essential for the extensive cell death that occurs afterwards. Our results suggest that mitotic slippage also occurs subsequently to the rotenone-induced mitotic arrest and cells treated with the drug for a longer period become senescent. Treatment of mtDNA-depleted cells with rotenone induces cell death and cell cycle arrest as in cells containing wild type mtDNA, but not formation of reactive oxygen species. This suggests that the effects of rotenone are not dependent from the production of reactive oxygen species. This work highlights the multiple effects of rotenone in cancer cells related to its action as an anti-mitotic drug. PMID:21223980

  5. Involvement of p53 in cell death following cell cycle arrest and mitotic catastrophe induced by rotenone.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, António Pedro; Máximo, Valdemar; Lima, Jorge; Singh, Keshav K; Soares, Paula; Videira, Arnaldo

    2011-03-01

    In order to investigate the cell death-inducing effects of rotenone, a plant extract commonly used as a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, we studied cancer cell lines with different genetic backgrounds. Rotenone inhibits cell growth through the induction of cell death and cell cycle arrest, associated with the development of mitotic catastrophe. The cell death inducer staurosporine potentiates the inhibition of cell growth by rotenone in a dose-dependent synergistic manner. The tumor suppressor p53 is involved in rotenone-induced cell death, since the drug treatment results in increased expression, phosphorylation and nuclear localization of the protein. The evaluation of the effects of rotenone on a p53-deficient cell line revealed that although not required for the promotion of mitotic catastrophe, functional p53 appears to be essential for the extensive cell death that occurs afterwards. Our results suggest that mitotic slippage also occurs subsequently to the rotenone-induced mitotic arrest and cells treated with the drug for a longer period become senescent. Treatment of mtDNA-depleted cells with rotenone induces cell death and cell cycle arrest as in cells containing wild-type mtDNA, but not formation of reactive oxygen species. This suggests that the effects of rotenone are not dependent from the production of reactive oxygen species. This work highlights the multiple effects of rotenone in cancer cells related to its action as an anti-mitotic drug.

  6. Cell cycle arrest and biochemical changes accompanying cell death in harmful dinoflagellates following exposure to bacterial algicide IRI-160AA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrzywinski, Kaytee L.; Tilney, Charles L.; Warner, Mark E.; Coyne, Kathryn J.

    2017-03-01

    Bacteria may play a role in regulating harmful algal blooms, but little is known about the biochemical and physiological changes associated with cell death induced by algicidal bacteria. Previous work characterized an algicidal exudate (IRI-160AA) produced by Shewanella sp. IRI-160 that is effective against dinoflagellates, while having little to no effect on other phytoplankton species in laboratory culture experiments. The objective of this study was to evaluate biochemical changes associated with cell death and impacts on the cell cycle in three dinoflagellate species (Prorocentrum minimum, Karlodinium veneficum and Gyrodinium instriatum) after exposure to IRI-160AA. In this study, IRI-160AA induced cell cycle arrest in all dinoflagellates examined. Several indicators for programmed cell death (PCD) that are often observed in phytoplankton in response to a variety of stressors were also evaluated. Cell death was accompanied by significant increases in DNA degradation, intra- and extracellular ROS concentrations and DEVDase (caspase-3 like) protease activity, which have been associated with PCD in other phytoplankton species. Overall, results of this investigation provide strong evidence that treatment with the bacterial algicide, IRI-160AA results in cell cycle arrest and induces biochemical changes consistent with stress-related cell death responses observed in other phytoplankton.

  7. Cell cycle arrest and biochemical changes accompanying cell death in harmful dinoflagellates following exposure to bacterial algicide IRI-160AA

    PubMed Central

    Pokrzywinski, Kaytee L.; Tilney, Charles L.; Warner, Mark E.; Coyne, Kathryn J.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria may play a role in regulating harmful algal blooms, but little is known about the biochemical and physiological changes associated with cell death induced by algicidal bacteria. Previous work characterized an algicidal exudate (IRI-160AA) produced by Shewanella sp. IRI-160 that is effective against dinoflagellates, while having little to no effect on other phytoplankton species in laboratory culture experiments. The objective of this study was to evaluate biochemical changes associated with cell death and impacts on the cell cycle in three dinoflagellate species (Prorocentrum minimum, Karlodinium veneficum and Gyrodinium instriatum) after exposure to IRI-160AA. In this study, IRI-160AA induced cell cycle arrest in all dinoflagellates examined. Several indicators for programmed cell death (PCD) that are often observed in phytoplankton in response to a variety of stressors were also evaluated. Cell death was accompanied by significant increases in DNA degradation, intra- and extracellular ROS concentrations and DEVDase (caspase-3 like) protease activity, which have been associated with PCD in other phytoplankton species. Overall, results of this investigation provide strong evidence that treatment with the bacterial algicide, IRI-160AA results in cell cycle arrest and induces biochemical changes consistent with stress-related cell death responses observed in other phytoplankton. PMID:28332589

  8. Cypermethrin Induces Macrophages Death through Cell Cycle Arrest and Oxidative Stress-Mediated JNK/ERK Signaling Regulated Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fang; Liu, Qiaoyun; Xie, Shujun; Xu, Jian; Huang, Bo; Wu, Yihua; Xia, Dajing

    2016-06-17

    Cypermethrin is one of the most highly effective synthetic pyrethroid insecticides. The toxicity of cypermethrin to the reproductive and nervous systems has been well studied. However, little is known about the toxic effect of cypermethrin on immune cells such as macrophages. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of cypermethrin on macrophages and the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that cypermethrin reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells. Cypermethrin also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, cypermethrin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was associated with an enhanced expression of p21, wild-type p53, and down-regulation of cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK4. In addition, cypermethrin treatment activated MAPK signal pathways by inducing c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and increased the cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Further, pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) effectively abrogated cypermethrin-induced cell cytotoxicity, G1 cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, PARP activity, and JNK and ERK1/2 activation. The specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059) effectively reversed the phosphorylation level of JNK and ERK1/2, and attenuated the apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggested that cypermethrin caused immune cell death via inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis regulated by ROS-mediated JNK/ERK pathway.

  9. Cypermethrin Induces Macrophages Death through Cell Cycle Arrest and Oxidative Stress-Mediated JNK/ERK Signaling Regulated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Liu, Qiaoyun; Xie, Shujun; Xu, Jian; Huang, Bo; Wu, Yihua; Xia, Dajing

    2016-01-01

    Cypermethrin is one of the most highly effective synthetic pyrethroid insecticides. The toxicity of cypermethrin to the reproductive and nervous systems has been well studied. However, little is known about the toxic effect of cypermethrin on immune cells such as macrophages. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of cypermethrin on macrophages and the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that cypermethrin reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells. Cypermethrin also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, cypermethrin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was associated with an enhanced expression of p21, wild-type p53, and down-regulation of cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK4. In addition, cypermethrin treatment activated MAPK signal pathways by inducing c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and increased the cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Further, pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) effectively abrogated cypermethrin-induced cell cytotoxicity, G1 cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, PARP activity, and JNK and ERK1/2 activation. The specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059) effectively reversed the phosphorylation level of JNK and ERK1/2, and attenuated the apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggested that cypermethrin caused immune cell death via inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis regulated by ROS-mediated JNK/ERK pathway. PMID:27322250

  10. Bacillus thuringiensis parasporal proteins induce cell-cycle arrest and caspase-dependant apoptotic cell death in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kok-Keong; Wong, Rebecca Shin-Yee; Mohamed, Shar Mariam; Ibrahim, Tengku Azmi Tengku; Abdullah, Maha; Nadarajah, Vishna Devi

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) parasporal proteins with selective anticancer activity have recently garnered interest. This study determines the efficacy and mode of cell death of Bt 18 parasporal proteins against 3 leukemic cell lines (CEM-SS, CCRF-SB and CCRF-HSB-2).Cell-based biochemical analysis aimed to determine cell viability and the percentage of apoptotic cell death in treated cell lines; ultrastructural analysis to study apoptotic changes and Western blot to identify the parasporal proteins' binding site were performed. Bt 18 parasporal proteins moderately decreased viability of leukemic cells but not that of normal human T lymphocytes. Further purification of the proteins showed changes in inhibition selectivity. Phosphatidylserine externalization, active caspase-3, cell cycle, and ultrastructural analysis confirmed apoptotic activity and S-phase cell-cycle arrest. Western blot analysis demonstrated glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a binding protein. We suggest that Bt 18 parasporal proteins inhibit leukemic cell viability by cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and that glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase binding initiates apoptosis.

  11. SB225002 Induces Cell Death and Cell Cycle Arrest in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells through the Activation of GLIPR1

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Paulo C.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Zenatti, Priscila Pini; Nunes, Ricardo J.; Yunes, Rosendo A.; Nowill, Alexandre E.; Libermann, Towia A.; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Yunes, José Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent childhood malignancy. In the effort to find new anti-leukemic agents, we evaluated the small drug SB225002 (N-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-N’-(2-bromophenyl)urea). Although initially described as a selective antagonist of CXCR2, later studies have identified other cellular targets for SB225002, with potential medicinal use in cancer. We found that SB225002 has a significant pro-apoptotic effect against both B- and T-ALL cell lines. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that treatment with SB225002 induces G2-M cell cycle arrest. Transcriptional profiling revealed that SB225002-mediated apoptosis triggered a transcriptional program typical of tubulin binding agents. Network analysis revealed the activation of genes linked to the JUN and p53 pathways and inhibition of genes linked to the TNF pathway. Early cellular effects activated by SB225002 included the up-regulation of GLIPR1, a p53-target gene shown to have pro-apoptotic activities in prostate and bladder cancer. Silencing of GLIPR1 in B- and T-ALL cell lines resulted in increased resistance to SB225002. Although SB225002 promoted ROS increase in ALL cells, antioxidant N-Acetyl Cysteine pre-treatment only modestly attenuated cell death, implying that the pro-apoptotic effects of SB225002 are not exclusively mediated by ROS. Moreover, GLIPR1 silencing resulted in increased ROS levels both in untreated and SB225002-treated cells. In conclusion, SB225002 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in different B- and T-ALL cell lines. Inhibition of tubulin function with concurrent activation of the p53 pathway, in particular, its downstream target GLIPR1, seems to underlie the anti-leukemic effect of SB225002. PMID:26302043

  12. Copper-induced immunotoxicity involves cell cycle arrest and cell death in the spleen and thymus.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Soham; Keswani, Tarun; Dey, Manali; Bhattacharya, Shaswati; Sarkar, Samrat; Goswami, Suranjana; Ghosh, Nabanita; Dutta, Anuradha; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2012-03-11

    Copper is an essential trace element for human physiological processes. To evaluate the potential adverse health impact/immunotoxicological effects of this metal in situ due to over exposure, Swiss albino mice were treated (via intraperitoneal injections) with copper (II) chloride (copper chloride) at doses of 0, 5, or 7.5 mg copper chloride/kg body weight (b.w.) twice a week for 4 wk; these values were derived from LD₅₀ studies using copper chloride doses that ranged from 0 to 40 mg/kg BW (2×/wk, for 4 wk). Copper treated mice evidenced immunotoxicity as indicated by dose-related decreases and increases, respectively, in thymic and splenic weights. Histomorphological changes evidenced in these organs were thymic atrophy, white pulp shrinkage in the spleen, and apoptosis of splenocytes and thymocytes; these observations were confirmed by microscopic analyses. Cell count analyses indicated that the proliferative functions of the splenocytes and thymocytes were also altered because of the copper exposures. Among both cell types from the copper treated hosts, flow cytometric analyses revealed a dose related increase in the percentages of cells in the Sub-G₀/G₁ state, indicative of apoptosis which was further confirmed by Annexin V binding assay. In addition, the copper treatments altered the expression of selected cell death related genes such as EndoG and Bax in a dose related manner. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that there was also increased ubiquitin expression in both the cell types. In conclusion, these studies show that sublethal exposure to copper (as copper chloride) induces toxicity in the thymus and spleen, and increased Sub G₀/G₁ population among splenocytes and thymocytes that is mediated, in part, by the EndoG-Bax-ubiquitin pathway. This latter damage to these cells that reside in critical immune system organs are likely to be important contributing factors underlying the immunosuppression that has been documented by other

  13. C-Myc regulates radiation-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fengmei; Hou, Jun; Huang, Chengcheng; Sun, Xiujin; Zeng, Yanan; Cheng, Huiying; Wang, Hao; Li, Chao

    2017-04-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the role of c-Myc in the regulation of ionizing radiation-induced cell cycle arrest and cell death in human cervical cancer cells. Control and c-Myc-silenced Hela cells were collected at different time points after (60) Co γ-ray radiation. Flow cytometry was used to measure cell cycle distribution and apoptosis. Immunofluorescence was applied to determine the percentage of cells in M phase. Transmission electron microscopy and immunoblotting were used to detect the induction of autophagy after radiation. Immunoblotting was also used to measure the expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins. In c-Myc-silenced cells, radiation induced delayed but long-lasting G2/M arrest and an abnormal M phase compared with the control. In addition, c-Myc knockdown significantly inhibited apoptotic cell death induced by radiation. Meanwhile, radiation-induced autophagy appeared stronger in c-Myc-silenced cells. Mechanically, we found that Caspase 8 and survivin expression was decreased in c-Myc-silenced Hela-630 cells. These data showed that c-Myc serves as a co-regulator in radiation-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death in human cervical cancer cells. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. Gene copy number and cell cycle arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bose, Indrani

    2006-03-01

    The cell cycle is an orderly sequence of events which ultimately lead to the division of a single cell into two daughter cells. In the case of DNA damage by radiation or chemicals, the damage checkpoints in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle are activated. This results in an arrest of the cell cycle so that the DNA damage can be repaired. Once this is done, the cell continues with its usual cycle of activity. We study a mathematical model of the DNA damage checkpoint in the G2 phase which arrests the transition from the G2 to the M (mitotic) phase of the cell cycle. The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in activating the pathways leading to cell cycle arrest in mammalian systems. If the DNA damage is severe, the p53 proteins activate other pathways which bring about apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Loss of the p53 gene results in the proliferation of cells containing damaged DNA, i.e., in the growth of tumors which may ultimately become cancerous. There is some recent experimental evidence which suggests that the mutation of a single copy of the p53 gene (in the normal cell each gene has two identical copies) is sufficient to trigger the formation of tumors. We study the effect of reducing the gene copy number of the p53 and two other genes on cell cycle arrest and obtain results consistent with experimental observations.

  15. Sudden death during arrest and phencyclidine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Pestaner, Joseph P; Southall, Pamela E

    2003-06-01

    Deaths of individuals being arrested are important and complex medicolegal cases. Conclusions regarding the cause and manner of death for such cases must take into account multiple factors that may have played a role, as well as anticipate the forensic issues that will arise. In this article, we review the deaths of 2 individuals in which phencyclidine intoxication was a factor that contributed to death during arrest. Most cases of sudden death during arrest have involved cocaine intoxication; because phencyclidine's pharmacologic properties are quite different from those of cocaine, these cases allow for comparisons to those factors that may have greater importance.

  16. Green tea polyphenols induce cell death in breast cancer MCF-7 cells through induction of cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Min; Ou, Shi-Yi; Huang, Hui-Hua

    In order to study the molecular mechanisms of green tea polyphenols (GTPs) in treatment or prevention of breast cancer, the cytotoxic effects of GTPs on five human cell lines (MCF-7, A549, Hela, PC3, and HepG2 cells) were determined and the antitumor mechanisms of GTPs in MCF-7 cells were analyzed. The results showed that GTPs exhibited a broad spectrum of inhibition against the detected cancer cell lines, particularly the MCF-7 cells. Studies on the mechanisms revealed that the main modes of cell death induced by GTPs were cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis showed that GTPs mediated cell cycle arrest at both G1/M and G2/M transitions. GTP dose dependently led to apoptosis of MCF-7 cells via the mitochondrial pathways, as evidenced by induction of chromatin condensation, reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), improvement in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), induction of DNA fragmentation, and activations of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in the present paper.

  17. Green tea polyphenols induce cell death in breast cancer MCF-7 cells through induction of cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-min; Ou, Shi-yi; Huang, Hui-hua

    2017-01-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanisms of green tea polyphenols (GTPs) in treatment or prevention of breast cancer, the cytotoxic effects of GTPs on five human cell lines (MCF-7, A549, Hela, PC3, and HepG2 cells) were determined and the antitumor mechanisms of GTPs in MCF-7 cells were analyzed. The results showed that GTPs exhibited a broad spectrum of inhibition against the detected cancer cell lines, particularly the MCF-7 cells. Studies on the mechanisms revealed that the main modes of cell death induced by GTPs were cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis showed that GTPs mediated cell cycle arrest at both G1/M and G2/M transitions. GTP dose dependently led to apoptosis of MCF-7 cells via the mitochondrial pathways, as evidenced by induction of chromatin condensation, reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m), improvement in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), induction of DNA fragmentation, and activations of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in the present paper. PMID:28124838

  18. Targeting TRPM2 Channels Impairs Radiation-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Fosters Cell Death of T Cell Leukemia Cells in a Bcl-2-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Dominik; Misovic, Milan; Szteyn, Kalina; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Rudner, Justine; Huber, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    Messenger RNA data of lymphohematopoietic cancer lines suggest a correlation between expression of the cation channel TRPM2 and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. The latter is overexpressed in various tumor entities and mediates therapy resistance. Here, we analyzed the crosstalk between Bcl-2 and TRPM2 channels in T cell leukemia cells during oxidative stress as conferred by ionizing radiation (IR). To this end, the effects of TRPM2 inhibition or knock-down on plasma membrane currents, Ca2+ signaling, mitochondrial superoxide anion formation, and cell cycle progression were compared between irradiated (0–10 Gy) Bcl-2-overexpressing and empty vector-transfected Jurkat cells. As a result, IR stimulated a TRPM2-mediated Ca2+-entry, which was higher in Bcl-2-overexpressing than in control cells and which contributed to IR-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest. TRPM2 inhibition induced a release from G2/M arrest resulting in cell death. Collectively, this data suggests a pivotal function of TRPM2 in the DNA damage response of T cell leukemia cells. Apoptosis-resistant Bcl-2-overexpressing cells even can afford higher TRPM2 activity without risking a hazardous Ca2+-overload-induced mitochondrial superoxide anion formation. PMID:26839633

  19. Natriuretic peptide receptor A inhibition suppresses gastric cancer development through reactive oxygen species-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Ji-Wei; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Zhi, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Qun; Li, Bo-Wen; Wang, Lin-Jun; Xie, Kun-Ling; Tao, Jin-Qiu; Tang, Jie; Wei, Song; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Dian-Cai; Yang, Li; Xu, Ze-Kuan

    2016-10-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), the major receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), has been implicated in tumorigenesis; however, the role of ANP-NPRA signaling in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that NPRA expression was positively associated with gastric tumor size and cancer stage. NPRA inhibition by shRNA induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, cell death, and autophagy in gastric cancer cells, due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy led to caspase-dependent cell death. Therefore, autophagy induced by NPRA silencing may represent a cytoprotective mechanism. ROS accumulation activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). ROS-mediated activation of JNK inhibited cell proliferation by disturbing cell cycle and decreased cell viability. In addition, AMPK activation promoted autophagy in NPRA-downregulated cancer cells. Overall, our results indicate that the inhibition of NPRA suppresses gastric cancer development and targeting NPRA may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Induction of P3NS1 Myeloma Cell Death and Cell Cycle Arrest by Simvastatin and/or γ-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Ibrahim Y; Helwa, Reham; Elkashef, Hausein; Hassan, Nagwa H A

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of γ-radiation alone or combined with a cytotoxic drug, simvastatin, on viability and cell cycling of a myeloma cell line. P3NS1 myeloma cells were treated with the selected dose of simvastatin (0.1 μM/l) 24 hours prior to γ-irradiation (0.25, 0.5 and 1 Gy). The cell viability, induction of apoptosis, cell death, cell cycling, generation of ROS, and expression of P53, Bax, Bcl2, caspase3, PARP1 and Fas genes were estimated. The results indicated that simvastatin (0.1 μM/l) treatment for 24 hours prior to γ- irradiation increased cell death to 37.5% as compared to 4.81% by radiation (0.5 Gy) alone. It was found that simvastatin treatment before irradiation caused arrest of cells in G0/G1 and G2/M phases as assessed using flow cytometry. Interestingly, simvastatin treatment of P3NS1 cells increased the intracellular ROS production and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity with increased P53, Bax and Caspase3 gene expression while that of Bcl2 was decreased. Consequently, our results indicated that pre-treatment with simvastatin increased radio sensitivity of myeloma tumor cells in addition to apoptotic effects through an intrinsic mitochondrial pathway.

  1. Leptospermum flavescens Constituent-LF1 Causes Cell Death through the Induction of Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Lung Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Navanesan, Suerialoasan; Abdul Wahab, Norhanom; Manickam, Sugumaran; Sim, Kae Shin

    2015-01-01

    Leptospermum flavescens Sm. (Myrtaceae), locally known as ‘Senna makki’ is a smallish tree that is widespread and recorded to naturally occur in the montane regions above 900 m a.s.l from Burma to Australia. Although the species is recorded to be used traditionally to treat various ailments, there is limited data on biological and chemical investigations of L. flavescens. The aim of the present study was to investigate and understand the ability of L. flavescens in inducing cell death in lung cancer cells. The cytotoxic potentials of the extraction yields (methanol, hexane, ethyl acetate and water extracts as wells as a semi pure fraction, LF1) were evaluated against two human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines (A549 and NCI-H1299) using the MTT assay. LF1 showed the greatest cytotoxic effect against both cell lines with IC50 values of 7.12 ± 0.07 and 9.62 ± 0.50 μg/ml respectively. LF1 treated cells showed a sub-G1 region in the cell cycle analysis and also caused the presence of apoptotic morphologies in cells stained with acridine orange and ethidium bromide. Treatment with LF1 manifested an apoptotic population in cells that were evaluated using the Annexin V/ propidium iodide assay. Increasing dosage of LF1 caused a rise in the presence of activated caspase-3 enzymes in treated cells. Blockage of cell cycle progression was also observed in LF1-treated cells. These findings suggest that LF1 induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in treated lung cancer cells. Further studies are being conducted to isolate and identify the active compound as well to better understand the mechanism involved in inducing cell death. PMID:26287817

  2. Resveratrol mediates cell cycle arrest and cell death in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by directly targeting the EGFR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zixuan; Feng, Wei; Ji, Ying; Jin, Longyu

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol is a small polyphenol that has been intensively studied in a wide spectrum of therapeutic fields. More recently, resveratrol has been demonstrated to exert its antitumor activity in numerous tumor models. The present study reported that resveratrol exhibited a marked anti-proliferative effect on human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells by inducing cell cycle G0/G1 phase arrest and cell death, which was associated with a decrease in the expression levels of cyclin D1 and an increase in cleaved PARP/cleaved caspase-3 expression levels. The mechanisms underlying the antitumor potency of resveratrol were principally attributed to the downregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. The western blotting results showed that exposure of ESCC cells to resveratrol inhibited EGF-induced EGFR activation in addition to decreasing the total protein levels of EGFR and membrane/nuclear localization. In summary, the results suggested that resveratrol, or an associated analog, may have a role in the management of human ESCC. PMID:28123566

  3. Carboxylation of multiwalled carbon nanotube attenuated the cytotoxicity by limiting the oxidative stress initiated cell membrane integrity damage, cell cycle arrestment, and death receptor mediated apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenbao; Liu, Yanfei; Peng, Dongming

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the effects of carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-COOH) on human normal liver cell line L02 was compared with that of pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (p-MWCNTs). It was shown that compared with MWCNTs-COOH, p-MWCNTs induced apoptosis, reduced the level of intracellular antioxidant glutathione more significantly, and caused severer cell membrane damage as demonstrated by lactate dehydrogenase leakage. Cell cycles were arrested by both MWCNTs, while p-MWCNTs induced higher ratio of G0/G1 phase arrestment as compared with MWCNTs-COOH. Caspase-8 was also activated after both MWCNTs exposure, indicating extrinsic apoptotic pathway was involved in the apoptosis induced by MWCNTs exposure, more importantly, MWCNTs-COOH significantly reduced the activation of caspase-8 as compared with p-MWCNTs. All these results suggested that MWCNTs-COOH might be safer for in vivo application as compared with p-MWCNTs.

  4. Achyranthes aspera Root Extracts Induce Human Colon Cancer Cell (COLO-205) Death by Triggering the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway and S Phase Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shagun; Tandon, Simran

    2014-01-01

    Achyranthes aspera (AA) has been used traditionally for the cure of various disorders. However, the action of root extracts of AA as anticancer agent and its cellular mechanism remain unclear. The aim was to screen the antitumor effect of ethanolic (EAA) and aqueous (AAA) root extracts on the growth of colon cancer COLO-205 cells by testing their cytotoxicity, followed by their effect on clonogenicity, migration, and induction of apoptosis. Mechanisms leading to apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were also investigated by expression studies of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, p16, p21, and p27 genes, followed by flow cytometric analysis for cell cycle distribution. Cytotoxicity screening of AA extracts indicated greater cytotoxic activity of AAA extract against COLO-205 cells. A series of events marked by apoptosis revealed loss of cell viability, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation in AAA treated cells to a greater extent. The mRNA expression levels of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, p16, p21, and p27 were markedly increased in the AAA treated cells, along with decreased Bcl-2 expression. The cell cycle arrest at S phase was detected by flow cytometric analysis after treatment with AAA. Overall the study signifies the aqueous extracts as a promising therapeutic candidate against cancer. PMID:25401123

  5. Mechanisms of sulindac-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Barbara; Barbier, Valerie; Brickner, Howard; Welsh, John; Fotedar, Arun; McClelland, Michael

    2005-02-28

    The mechanism underlying the chemopreventive effects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac remains unclear. Its active metabolite, sulindac sulfide, induces cell cycle arrest as well as apoptosis in mammalian cell lines. We now show that in murine thymocytes, sulindac sulfide-induced cell death is p53, bax, Fas, and FasL independent. In contrast, bcl2 transgenic thymocytes are resistant to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that sulindac sulfide-induced cell cycle arrest in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) is partly mediated by the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) and the cyclin kinase inhibitor p21waf1/cip1. Furthermore, MEFs deficient in p21 or Rb are more susceptible to sulindac sulfide-induced cell death. These results suggest that sulindac may selectively target premalignant cells with cell cycle checkpoint deficits.

  6. Jellyfish extract induces apoptotic cell death through the p38 pathway and cell cycle arrest in chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Choong-Hwan; Abekura, Fukushi; Park, Jun-Young; Park, Nam Gyu; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Young-Choon; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae; Son, Jong-Keun

    2017-01-01

    Jellyfish species are widely distributed in the world’s oceans, and their population is rapidly increasing. Jellyfish extracts have several biological functions, such as cytotoxic, anti-microbial, and antioxidant activities in cells and organisms. However, the anti-cancer effect of Jellyfish extract has not yet been examined. We used chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to evaluate the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of hexane extracts from Nomura’s jellyfish in vitro. In this study, jellyfish are subjected to hexane extraction, and the extract is shown to have an anticancer effect on chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells. Interestingly, the present results show that jellyfish hexane extract (Jellyfish-HE) induces apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To identify the mechanism(s) underlying Jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis in K562 cells, we examined the effects of Jellyfish-HE on activation of caspase and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are responsible for cell cycle progression. Induction of apoptosis by Jellyfish-HE occurred through the activation of caspases-3,-8 and -9 and phosphorylation of p38. Jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis was blocked by a caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD. Moreover, during apoptosis in K562 cells, p38 MAPK was inhibited by pretreatment with SB203580, an inhibitor of p38. SB203580 blocked jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis. Additionally, Jellyfish-HE markedly arrests the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, taken together, the results imply that the anti-cancer activity of Jellyfish-HE may be mediated apoptosis by induction of caspases and activation of MAPK, especially phosphorylation of p38, and cell cycle arrest at the Go/G1 phase in K562 cells. PMID:28133573

  7. Theracurmin® efficiently inhibits the growth of human prostate and bladder cancer cells via induction of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minyong; Ho, Jin-Nyoung; Kook, Ha Rim; Lee, Sangchul; Oh, Jong Jin; Hong, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Byun, Seok-Soo

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anticancer properties of Theracurmin®, a novel form of the yellow curry pigment curcumin, as well as explore the molecular mechanisms of the potential anticancer effects of Theracurmin® on human prostate cancer and bladder cancer cells in vitro. The proliferation of cancer cells was examined by using the Cell Counting Kit-8. The clonogenic growth potential was determined by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle distribution was evaluated by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. Western blot analysis was applied to explore the expression patterns of molecules associated with apoptotic cell death and cell cycle checkpoint. We noted that Theracurmin® and curcumin exhibited similar anticancer effects in both androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These agents reduced cell viability and clonogenic growth potential by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle disturbance in human prostate cancer cells. Theracurmin® and curcumin also exerted marked anticancer effects on human bladder cancer cells, even in cisplatin-resistant T24R2 cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, Theracurmin® and curcumin treatment decreased cell viability and clonogenicity via induction of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle dysregulation in human bladder cancer cells. In conclusion, our study suggests that Theracurmin® has potential as an anticancer agent in complementary and alternative medicine for these urological cancers.

  8. Sp1 acetylation is associated with loss of DNA binding at promoters associated with cell cycle arrest and cell death in a colon cell line

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Butyrate, a known histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) and product of fibre fermentation, is postulated to mediate the protective effect of dietary fibre against colon cancer. The transcription factor Sp1 is a target of acetylation and is known to be associated with class I HDACs, including HDAC1. Sp1 is a ubiquitous transcription factor and Sp1-regulated genes include those involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and lipogenesis: all major pathways in cancer development. The only known acetylated residue of Sp1 is lysine703 which resides in the DNA binding domain. Here we show that acetylated Sp1 loses p21- and bak-promoter -binding function in vitro. Furthermore treatment with a panel of HDAC inhibitors showed clustering of activities for a subset of inhibitors, causing G2 cell cycle arrest, Sp1 acetylation, p21 and Bak over-expression, all with very similar EC50 concentrations. These HDACi activities were not distributed according to the molecular class of compound. In order to mimic loss of binding, an siRNA strategy was used to reduce Sp1 expression. This resulted in altered expression of multiple elements of the p53/p21 pathway. Taken together our data suggest a mechanistic model for the chemopreventive actions of butyrate in colon epithelial cells, and provide new insight into the differential activities some classes of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:20950428

  9. Honokiol, a potential therapeutic agent, induces cell cycle arrest and program cell death in vitro and in vivo in human thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chieh-Hsiang; Chen, Shu-Hsin; Chang, Yi-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Wen; Wu, Jin-Yi; Lim, Yun-Ping; Yu, Hui-I; Lee, Ying-Ray

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, the global incidence rate of which is rapidly rising. Surgery and radioiodine therapies are common and effective treatments only for nonmetastasized primary tumors. Therefore, effective treatment modalities are imperative for patients with radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancer. Honokiol, a biophenolic compound derived from Magnolia spp., has been shown have diverse biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antiangiogenic, and anticancer properties. In the present study, three human thyroid cancer cell lines, namely anaplastic, follicular, and poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells, were used to evaluate the chemotherapeutic activity of honokiol. Cell viability, cell cycle, apoptosis, and autophagy induction were determined through flow cytometry and western blot analysis. We found that honokiol treatment can suppress cell growth, induce cell cycle arrest, and enhance the induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells. Moreover, honokiol treatment modulated signaling pathways including Akt/mTOR, ERK, JNK, and p38 in the studied cells. In addition, the antitumorigenic activity of honokiol was also confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Our data provide evidence that honokiol has a unique application in chemotherapy for human thyroid cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sp1 acetylation is associated with loss of DNA binding at promoters associated with cell cycle arrest and cell death in a colon cell line.

    PubMed

    Waby, Jennifer S; Chirakkal, Haridasan; Yu, ChenWei; Griffiths, Gareth J; Benson, Roderick S P; Bingle, Colin D; Corfe, Bernard M

    2010-10-15

    Butyrate, a known histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) and product of fibre fermentation, is postulated to mediate the protective effect of dietary fibre against colon cancer. The transcription factor Sp1 is a target of acetylation and is known to be associated with class I HDACs, including HDAC1. Sp1 is a ubiquitous transcription factor and Sp1-regulated genes include those involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and lipogenesis: all major pathways in cancer development. The only known acetylated residue of Sp1 is lysine703 which resides in the DNA binding domain. Here we show that acetylated Sp1 loses p21- and bak-promoter -binding function in vitro. Furthermore treatment with a panel of HDAC inhibitors showed clustering of activities for a subset of inhibitors, causing G2 cell cycle arrest, Sp1 acetylation, p21 and Bak over-expression, all with very similar EC50 concentrations. These HDACi activities were not distributed according to the molecular class of compound. In order to mimic loss of binding, an siRNA strategy was used to reduce Sp1 expression. This resulted in altered expression of multiple elements of the p53/p21 pathway. Taken together our data suggest a mechanistic model for the chemopreventive actions of butyrate in colon epithelial cells, and provide new insight into the differential activities some classes of HDAC inhibitors.

  11. 17{alpha}-Estradiol arrests cell cycle progression at G{sub 2}/M and induces apoptotic cell death in human acute leukemia Jurkat T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Do Youn; Park, Hae Sun; Kim, Jun Seok; Kim, Jong Sik; Park, Wan; Song, Bang Ho; Kim, Hee-Sook; Taub, Dennis; Kim, Young Ho

    2008-09-15

    A pharmacological dose (2.5-10 {mu}M) of 17{alpha}-estradiol (17{alpha}-E{sub 2}) exerted a cytotoxic effect on human leukemias Jurkat T and U937 cells, which was not suppressed by the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780. Along with cytotoxicity in Jurkat T cells, several apoptotic events including mitochondrial cytochrome c release, activation of caspase-9, -3, and -8, PARP degradation, and DNA fragmentation were induced. The cytotoxicity of 17{alpha}-E{sub 2} was not blocked by the anti-Fas neutralizing antibody ZB-4. While undergoing apoptosis, there was a remarkable accumulation of G{sub 2}/M cells with the upregulatoin of cdc2 kinase activity, which was reflected in the Thr56 phosphorylation of Bcl-2. Dephosphorylation at Tyr15 and phosphorylation at Thr161 of cdc2, and significant increase in the cyclin B1 level were underlying factors for the cdc2 kinase activation. Whereas the 17{alpha}-E{sub 2}-induced apoptosis was completely abrogated by overexpression of Bcl-2 or by pretreatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk, the accumulation of G{sub 2}/M cells significantly increased. The caspase-8 inhibitor z-IETD-fmk failed to influence 17{alpha}-E{sub 2}-mediated caspase-9 activation, but it markedly reduced caspase-3 activation and PARP degradation with the suppression of apoptosis, indicating the contribution of caspase-8; not as an upstream event of the mitochondrial cytochrome c release, but to caspase-3 activation. In the presence of hydroxyurea, which blocked the cell cycle progression at the G{sub 1}/S boundary, 17{alpha}-E{sub 2} failed to induce the G{sub 2}/M arrest as well as apoptosis. These results demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of 17{alpha}-E{sub 2} toward Jurkat T cells is attributable to apoptosis mainly induced in G{sub 2}/M-arrested cells, in an ER-independent manner, via a mitochondria-dependent caspase pathway regulated by Bcl-2.

  12. Phenolic Compounds Isolated from Caesalpinia coriaria Induce S and G2/M Phase Cell Cycle Arrest Differentially and Trigger Cell Death by Interfering with Microtubule Dynamics in Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carranza, Jessica Nayelli; Alvarez, Laura; Marquina-Bahena, Silvia; Salas-Vidal, Enrique; Cuevas, Verónica; Jiménez, Elizabeth W; Veloz G, Rafael A; Carraz, Maelle; González-Maya, Leticia

    2017-04-22

    Caesalpinia coriaria (C. coriaria), also named cascalote, has been known traditionally in México for having cicatrizing and inflammatory properties. Phytochemical reports on Caesalpinia species have identified a high content of phenolic compounds and shown antineoplastic effects against cancer cells. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify the active compounds of a water:acetone:ethanol (WAE) extract of C. coriaria pods and characterize their cytotoxic effect and cell death induction in different cancer cell lines. The compounds isolated and identified by chromatography and spectroscopic analysis were stigmasterol, ethyl gallate and gallic acid. Cytotoxic assays on cancer cells showed different ranges of activities. A differential effect on cell cycle progression was observed by flow cytometry. In particular, ethyl gallate and tannic acid induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and showed interesting effect on microtubule stabilization in Hep3B cells observed by immunofluorescence. The induction of apoptosis was characterized by morphological characteristic changes, and was supported by increases in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 expression and activation of caspase 3/7. This work constitutes the first phytochemical and cytotoxic study of C. coriaria and showed the action of its phenolic constituents on cell cycle, cell death and microtubules organization.

  13. Death by Disimpaction: A Bradycardic Arrest Secondary to Rectal Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Cory M.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal examination and fecal disimpaction are common procedures performed in the Emergency Department on a daily basis. Here, we report a rare case of a patient suffering a cardiac arrest and ultimately death likely due to rectal manipulation. A 66-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with a complaint of abdominal distention and constipation. A rectal exam was performed. During the examination the patient became apneic. On the cardiac monitor the patient was found to be in pulseless electrical activity with a bradycardic rate. Our recommendation would be to provide adequate analgesia and close patient monitoring of those undergoing this procedure especially patients with significant stool burdens. PMID:28116179

  14. G2/M cell cycle arrest in the life cycle of viruses.

    PubMed

    Davy, Clare; Doorbar, John

    2007-11-25

    There is increasing evidence that viral infection, expression of viral protein or the presence of viral DNA causes the host cell cycle to arrest during G2/M. The mechanisms used by viruses to cause arrest vary widely; some involve the activation of the cellular pathways that induce arrest in response to DNA damage, while others use completely novel means. The analysis of virus-mediated arrest has not been proven easy, and in most cases the consequences of arrest for the virus life cycle are not well defined. However, a number of effects of arrest are being investigated and it will be interesting to see to what extent perturbation of the G2/M transition is involved in viral infections.

  15. Arresting cell cycles and the effect on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Vande Berg, Jerry S; Robson, Martin C

    2003-06-01

    Wounds that contain a significant number of fibroblasts that are arrested because of senescence, damaged DNA, or enduring quiescence do not heal. As the arrested population of cells decreases and more cells that divide and contribute to wound repair populate the wound, the wound is more likely to achieve closure. Having an understanding of the regulatory mechanisms within the cell cycle is important to wound repair, particularly chronic wounds. The theory of cellular senescence in chronic wounds is new and has never been tested. Studies seem to show that senescent cells in chronic wounds are a significant part of the wounding process. Senescence is irreversible, and senescent cells are refractory to growth factor therapy. Future growth factor therapies or genetic transfections that are capable of repairing the short circuit in cycling cells or overriding the senescent condition will be important partners in the successful treatment of chronic wound patients.

  16. Acanthamoeba induces cell-cycle arrest in host cells.

    PubMed

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Jayasekera, Samantha; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2004-08-01

    Acanthamoeba can cause fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) and eye keratitis. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of these emerging diseases remain unclear. In this study, the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) were determined. Two isolates of Acanthamoeba belonging to the T1 genotype (GAE isolate) and T4 genotype (keratitis isolate) were used, which showed severe cytotoxicity on HBMEC and HCEC, respectively. No tissue specificity was observed in their ability to exhibit binding to the host cells. To determine the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle, a cell-cycle-specific gene array was used. This screened for 96 genes specific for host cell-cycle regulation. It was observed that Acanthamoeba inhibited expression of genes encoding cyclins F and G1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6, which are proteins important for cell-cycle progression. Moreover, upregulation was observed of the expression of genes such as GADD45A and p130 Rb, associated with cell-cycle arrest, indicating cell-cycle inhibition. Next, the effect of Acanthamoeba on retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation was determined. pRb is a potent inhibitor of G1-to-S cell-cycle progression; however, its function is inhibited upon phosphorylation, allowing progression into S phase. Western blotting revealed that Acanthamoeba abolished pRb phosphorylation leading to cell-cycle arrest at the G1-to-S transition. Taken together, these studies demonstrated for the first time that Acanthamoeba inhibits the host cell cycle at the transcriptional level, as well as by modulating pRb phosphorylation using host cell-signalling mechanisms. A complete understanding of Acanthamoeba-host cell interactions may help in developing novel strategies to treat Acanthamoeba infections.

  17. Cell Arrest and Cell Death in Mammalian Preimplantation Development: Lessons from the Bovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Leidenfrost, Sandra; Boelhauve, Marc; Reichenbach, Myriam; Güngör, Tuna; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Sinowatz, Fred; Wolf, Eckhard; Habermann, Felix A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The causes, modes, biological role and prospective significance of cell death in preimplantation development in humans and other mammals are still poorly understood. Early bovine embryos represent a very attractive experimental model for the investigation of this fundamental and important issue. Methods and Findings To obtain reference data on the temporal and spatial occurrence of cell death in early bovine embryogenesis, three-dimensionally preserved embryos of different ages and stages of development up to hatched blastocysts were examined in toto by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In parallel, transcript abundance profiles for selected apoptosis-related genes were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Our study documents that in vitro as well as in vivo, the first four cleavage cycles are prone to a high failure rate including different types of permanent cell cycle arrest and subsequent non-apoptotic blastomere death. In vitro produced and in vivo derived blastocysts showed a significant incidence of cell death in the inner cell mass (ICM), but only in part with morphological features of apoptosis. Importantly, transcripts for CASP3, CASP9, CASP8 and FAS/FASLG were not detectable or found at very low abundances. Conclusions In vitro and in vivo, errors and failures of the first and the next three cleavage divisions frequently cause immediate embryo death or lead to aberrant subsequent development, and are the main source of developmental heterogeneity. A substantial occurrence of cell death in the ICM even in fast developing blastocysts strongly suggests a regular developmentally controlled elimination of cells, while the nature and mechanisms of ICM cell death are unclear. Morphological findings as well as transcript levels measured for important apoptosis-related genes are in conflict with the view that classical caspase-mediated apoptosis is the major cause of cell death in early bovine development. PMID

  18. Cell arrest and cell death in mammalian preimplantation development: lessons from the bovine model.

    PubMed

    Leidenfrost, Sandra; Boelhauve, Marc; Reichenbach, Myriam; Güngör, Tuna; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Sinowatz, Fred; Wolf, Eckhard; Habermann, Felix A

    2011-01-01

    The causes, modes, biological role and prospective significance of cell death in preimplantation development in humans and other mammals are still poorly understood. Early bovine embryos represent a very attractive experimental model for the investigation of this fundamental and important issue. To obtain reference data on the temporal and spatial occurrence of cell death in early bovine embryogenesis, three-dimensionally preserved embryos of different ages and stages of development up to hatched blastocysts were examined in toto by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In parallel, transcript abundance profiles for selected apoptosis-related genes were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Our study documents that in vitro as well as in vivo, the first four cleavage cycles are prone to a high failure rate including different types of permanent cell cycle arrest and subsequent non-apoptotic blastomere death. In vitro produced and in vivo derived blastocysts showed a significant incidence of cell death in the inner cell mass (ICM), but only in part with morphological features of apoptosis. Importantly, transcripts for CASP3, CASP9, CASP8 and FAS/FASLG were not detectable or found at very low abundances. In vitro and in vivo, errors and failures of the first and the next three cleavage divisions frequently cause immediate embryo death or lead to aberrant subsequent development, and are the main source of developmental heterogeneity. A substantial occurrence of cell death in the ICM even in fast developing blastocysts strongly suggests a regular developmentally controlled elimination of cells, while the nature and mechanisms of ICM cell death are unclear. Morphological findings as well as transcript levels measured for important apoptosis-related genes are in conflict with the view that classical caspase-mediated apoptosis is the major cause of cell death in early bovine development.

  19. Anticancer activity of taraxerol acetate in human glioblastoma cells and a mouse xenograft model via induction of autophagy and apoptotic cell death, cell cycle arrest and inhibition of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jing-Fang; Song, Ying-Fang; Liu, Zheng; Zheng, Zhao-Cong; Chen, Hong-Jie; Wang, Shou-Sen

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer and apoptotic effects of taraxerol acetate in U87 human glioblastoma cells. The effects on cell cycle phase distribution, cell cycle-associated proteins, autophagy, DNA fragmentation and cell migration were assessed. Cell viability was determined using the MTT assay, and phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy was utilized to determine the viability and apoptotic morphological features of the U87 cells. Flow cytometry using propidium iodide and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate demonstrated the effect of taraxerol acetate on the cell cycle phase distribution and apoptosis induction. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate the effect of the taraxerol acetate on cell cycle‑associated proteins and autophagy‑linked LC3B‑II proteins. The results demonstrated that taraxerol acetate induced dose‑ and time‑dependent cytotoxic effects in the U87 cells. Apoptotic induction following taraxerol acetate treatment was observed and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased from 7.3% in the control cells, to 16.1, 44.1 and 76.7% in the 10, 50 and 150 µM taraxerol acetate‑treated cells, respectively. Furthermore, taraxerol acetate treatment led to sub‑G1 cell cycle arrest with a corresponding decrease in the number of S‑phase cells. DNA fragments were observed as a result of the gel electrophoresis experiment following taraxerol acetate treatment. To investigate the inhibitory effects of taraxerol acetate on the migration of U87 cell, a wound healing assay was conducted. The number of cells that migrated to the scratched area decreased significantly following treatment with taraxerol acetate. In addition, taraxerol acetate inhibited tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Administration of 0.25 and 0.75 µg/g taraxerol acetate reduced the tumor weight from 1.2 g in the phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS)‑treated group (control) to 0.81 and 0.42

  20. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  1. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  2. Calcium signaling and cell cycle: Progression or death.

    PubMed

    Humeau, Juliette; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Vitale, Ilio; Nuñez, Lucia; Villalobos, Carlos; Kroemer, Guido; Senovilla, Laura

    2017-07-25

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration levels fluctuate in an ordered manner along the cell cycle, in line with the fact that Ca(2+) is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. Cell proliferation should be an error-free process, yet is endangered by mistakes. In fact, a complex network of proteins ensures that cell cycle does not progress until the previous phase has been successfully completed. Occasionally, errors occur during the cell cycle leading to cell cycle arrest. If the error is severe, and the cell cycle checkpoints work perfectly, this results into cellular demise by activation of apoptotic or non-apoptotic cell death programs. Cancer is characterized by deregulated proliferation and resistance against cell death. Ca(2+) is a central key to these phenomena as it modulates signaling pathways that control oncogenesis and cancer progression. Here, we discuss how Ca(2+) participates in the exogenous and endogenous signals controlling cell proliferation, as well as in the mechanisms by which cells die if irreparable cell cycle damage occurs. Moreover, we summarize how Ca(2+) homeostasis remodeling observed in cancer cells contributes to deregulated cell proliferation and resistance to cell death. Finally, we discuss the possibility to target specific components of Ca(2+) signal pathways to obtain cytostatic or cytotoxic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Purified Lesser weever fish venom (Trachinus vipera) induces eryptosis, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Fezai, Myriam; Slaymi, Chaker; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Lang, Florian; Jemaà, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Accidents caused by the sting of Trachinus vipera (known as Lesser weever fish) are relatively common in shallow waters of the Mediterranean. Symptoms after the sting vary from severe pain to edema or even tissue necrosis in some cases. Here we show that purified Lesser weever fish venom induces eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death, and apoptosis of human colon carcinoma cells. The venom leads to erythrocyte shrinkage, phosphatidylserine translocation and increased intracellular Ca2+, events typical for eryptosis. According to mitochondrial staining cancer cells dyed after the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Trachinus vipera venom further causes cell cycle arrest. PMID:27995979

  4. Piperlongumine Suppresses Proliferation of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma through Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Senescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, San-Yuan; Liu, Geng-Hung; Chao, Wen-Ying; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Lim, Yun-Ping; Lu, Chieh-Hsiang; Lai, Peng-Yeh; Chen, Hau-Ren; Lee, Ying-Ray

    2016-04-23

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), an aggressive cancer originating in the oral cavity, is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in males worldwide. This study investigated the antitumor activity and mechanisms of piperlongumine (PL), a natural compound isolated from Piper longum L., in human OSCC cells. The effects of PL on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in human OSCC cells were investigated. PL effectively inhibited cell growth, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis and senescence in OSCC cells. Moreover, PL-mediated anti-human OSCC behavior was inhibited by an ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment, suggesting that regulation of ROS was involved in the mechanism of the anticancer activity of PL. These findings suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth by regulating the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis and senescence and is a potential chemotherapy agent for human OSCC cells.

  5. [Cell cycle arrest at M phase induced by vinblastine in MOLT-4 cells].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yi-Sheng; Pan, Chang-Chuan; Jin, Chang-Nan; Li, Jian-Jun; Xiong, Gong-Peng; Zhang, Jian-Xi; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2009-04-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the biological effect of vinblastine (VLS), usually known as inductor of mitotic arrest, on MOLT-4 of ALL cells and to evaluate its significance. The cell arrest in M phase and/or cell apoptosis were induced by treatment of MOLT-4 cells with 0.05 microg/ml VLS for 0 - 12 hours; the DNA histogram was detected by flow cytometry; the morphological changes of cells were observed by confocal microscopy; the cell cycle distribution, cell apoptosis and morphological changes of cells before and after arrest were analyzed by using arrest increasing rate (AIR), arrest efficiency (AE), apoptosis rate (AR) and morphologic parameters respectively. The results indicated that the cell arrest did not accompanied by significant increase of apoptosis rate; the DNA histogram of cell arrest showed dynamic change of cell cycle in time-dependent manner; the arrest efficiency could be quantified. The cell arrest at M phase was accompanied by cell stack in S phase, the cell proliferation rate dropped after cell arrest occurred. The cells arrested at M phase possessed of characteristic morphologic features in cell mitosis. It is concluded that the vinblastine can solely induce arrest of MOLT-4 cells at M phase. This study provides experimental basis for further investigating the relation of cell cycle arrest to apoptosis, mechanism of checkpoint and development of new anticancer drugs.

  6. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi; Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer; Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M.; Knox, Susan J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  7. Tangeretin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through upregulation of PTEN expression in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Li; Wang, Da-Wei; Yu, Xu-Dong; Zhou, Yan-Ling

    2016-07-01

    Tangeretin (TANG), present in peel of citrus fruits, has been shown to various medicinal properties such as chemopreventive and neuroprotective. However, the chemopreventive effect of TANG on glioblastoma cells has not been examined. The present study was designed to explore the anticancer potential of TANG in glioblastoma cells and to investigate the related mechanism. Human glioblastoma U-87MG and LN-18 cells were treated with 45μM concentration of TANG and cell growth was measured by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution and cell death were measured by flow cytometry. The expression of cell cycle and apoptosis related genes were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot. The cells treated with TANG were significantly increased cell growth suppression and cell death effects than vehicle treated cells. Further, TANG treatment increases G2/M arrest and apoptosis by modulating PTEN and cell-cycle regulated genes such as cyclin-D and cdc-2 mRNA and protein expressions. Moreover, the ability of TANG to decrease cell growth and to induce cell death was compromised when PTEN was knockdown by siRNA. Taken together, the chemopreventive effect of TANG is associated with regulation of cell-cycle and apoptosis in glioblastoma, thereby attenuating glioblastoma cell growth. Hence, the present findings suggest that TANG may be a therapeutic agent for glioblastoma treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. α-Mangostin Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyun-Ho; Park, Bong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mangosteen has long been used as a traditional medicine and is known to have antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. Although the effects of α-mangostin, a natural compound extracted from the pericarp of mangosteen, have been investigated in many studies, there is limited data on the effects of the compound in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study, α-mangostin was assessed as a potential anticancer agent against human OSCC cells. α-Mangostin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with little to no effect on normal human PDLF cells. α-Mangostin treatment clearly showed apoptotic evidences such as nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of annexin V and PI-positive cells on OSCC cells. α-Mangostin treatment also caused the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and the translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol. The expressions of the mitochondria-related proteins were activated by α-mangostin. Treatment with α-mangostin also induced G1 phase arrest and downregulated cell cycle-related proteins (CDK/cyclin). Hence, α-mangostin specifically induces cell death and inhibits proliferation in OSCC cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, suggesting that α-mangostin may be an effective agent for the treatment of OSCC. PMID:27478478

  9. High-dose irradiation induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hee Jin; Lee, Eun-Mi; Nguyen, Long Duy; Shim, Jaekyung; Song, Young-Han

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) treatment induces a DNA damage response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis in metazoan somatic cells. Because little has been reported in germline cells, we performed a temporal analysis of the DNA damage response utilizing Drosophila oogenesis as a model system. Oogenesis in the adult Drosophila female begins with the generation of 16-cell cyst by four mitotic divisions of a cystoblast derived from the germline stem cells. We found that high-dose irradiation induced S and G2 arrests in these mitotically dividing germline cells in a grp/Chk1- and mnk/Chk2-dependent manner. However, the upstream kinase mei-41, Drosophila ATR ortholog, was required for the S-phase checkpoint but not for the G2 arrest. As in somatic cells, mnk/Chk2 and dp53 were required for the major cell death observed in early oogenesis when oocyte selection and meiotic recombination occurs. Similar to the unscheduled DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated from defective repair during meiotic recombination, IR-induced DSBs produced developmental defects affecting the spherical morphology of meiotic chromosomes and dorsal-ventral patterning. Moreover, various morphological abnormalities in the ovary were detected after irradiation. Most of the IR-induced defects observed in oogenesis were reversible and were restored between 24 and 96 h after irradiation. These defects in oogenesis severely reduced daily egg production and the hatch rate of the embryos of irradiated female. In summary, irradiated germline cells induced DSBs, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects resulting in reduction of egg production and defective embryogenesis.

  10. Parkin induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Ho; Cho, Yoonjung; Jung, Byung Chul; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kang, Yeo Wool; Pan, Cheol-Ho; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2015-08-14

    Parkin is a known tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism by which parkin acts as a tumor suppressor remains to be fully elucidated. Previously, we reported that parkin expression induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells. However, at that time, we did not consider the involvement of parkin in cell cycle control. In the current study, we investigated whether parkin is involved in cell cycle regulation and suppression of cancer cell growth. In our cell cycle analyses, parkin expression induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which parkin induces this G2/M arrest, we analyzed cell cycle regulatory molecules involved in the G2/M transition. Parkin expression induced CDC2 phosphorylation which is known to inhibit CDC2 activity and cause G2/M arrest. Cyclin B1, which is degraded during the mitotic transition, accumulated in response to parkin expression, thereby indicating parkin-induced G2/M arrest. Next, we established that Myt1, which is known to phosphorylate and inhibit CDC2, increased following parkin expression. In addition, we found that parkin also induces increased Myt1 expression, G2/M arrest, and reduced cell viability in TNF-α-treated HCT15 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of parkin expression by parkin-specific siRNA decreased Myt1 expression and phosphorylation of CDC2 and resulted in recovered cell viability. These results suggest that parkin acts as a crucial molecule causing cell cycle arrest in G2/M, thereby suppressing tumor cell growth.

  11. How Trypanosoma cruzi handles cell cycle arrest promoted by camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zuma, Aline Araujo; Mendes, Isabela Cecília; Reignault, Lissa Catherine; Elias, Maria Carolina; de Souza, Wanderley; Machado, Carlos Renato; Motta, Maria Cristina M

    2014-02-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, which affects approximately 8 million people in Latin America. This parasite contains a single nucleus and a kinetoplast, which harbors the mitochondrial DNA (kDNA). DNA topoisomerases act during replication, transcription and repair and modulate DNA topology by reverting supercoiling in the DNA double-strand. In this work, we evaluated the effects promoted by camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor that promotes protozoan proliferation impairment, cell cycle arrest, ultrastructure alterations and DNA lesions in epimastigotes of T. cruzi. The results showed that inhibition of cell proliferation was reversible only at the lowest drug concentration (1μM) used. The unpacking of nuclear heterochromatin and mitochondrion swelling were the main ultrastructural modifications observed. Inhibition of parasite proliferation also led to cell cycle arrest, which was most likely caused by nuclear DNA lesions. Following camptothecin treatment, some of the cells restored their DNA, whereas others entered early apoptosis but did not progress to late apoptosis, indicating that the protozoa stay alive in a "senescence-like" state. This programmed cell death may be associated with a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, these results indicate that the inhibition of T. cruzi proliferation is related to events capable of affecting cell cycle, DNA organization and mitochondrial activity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Honokiol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma MGC-803 cell line.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is a malignant tumor that responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In our study, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of honokiol, an active component isolated and purified from the Magnolia officinalis, in human gastric carcinoma MGC-803 cell line. The cell viability was detected by the CCK8 assay. The cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were assessed by flow cytometer. The protein expression of cell cycle regulators and tumor suppressors were analyzed by western blotting. Treatment of human gastric carcinoma cells with honokiol induced cell death in a dose-and time-dependent manner by using CCK8 assay. Consistent with the CCK8 assay, the flow cytometry results showed that the proportion of apoptosis cells had gained when the cells were exposed to honokiol. Moreover, Cyclin B1, CDC2 and cdc25C were downregulated, and the expression of p-CDC2 and p-cdc25c was significantly upregulated upon honokiol treatment. P53 and p21 were significantly upregulated by honokiol treatment. Treatment of MGC-803 cells with honokiol significantly increased the pro-apoptotic Bax level and decreased the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 level. These results confirmed that honokiol could induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, the underlying molecular mechanisms, at least partially, through activation p53 signaling and downregulation CDC2/cdc25C expression.

  13. Digital Holographic Microscopy for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Cell Cycle Arrest in L929 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Falck Miniotis, Maria; Mukwaya, Anthonny; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has emerged as a powerful non-invasive tool for cell analysis. It has the capacity to analyse multiple parameters simultaneously, such as cell- number, confluence and phase volume. This is done while cells are still adhered and growing in their culture flask. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DHM was able to monitor drug-induced cell cycle arrest in cultured cells and thus provide a non-disruptive alternative to flow cytometry. DHM parameters from G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrested L929 mouse fibroblast cells were collected. Cell cycle arrest was verified with flow cytometry. This study shows that DHM is able to monitor phase volume changes corresponding to either a G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest. G1-phase arrest with staurosporine correlated with a decrease in the average cell phase volume and G2/M-phase arrest with colcemid and etoposide correlated with an increase in the average cell phase volume. Importantly, DHM analysis of average cell phase volume was of comparable accuracy to flow cytometric measurement of cell cycle phase distribution as recorded following dose-dependent treatment with etoposide. Average cell phase volume changes in response to treatment with cell cycle arresting compounds could therefore be used as a DHM marker for monitoring cell cycle arrest in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:25208094

  14. Sonoporation-Induced Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest: Initial Findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wenjing; Sit, Wai Hung; Wan, Jennifer M. F.; Yu, Alfred C. H.

    2011-09-01

    Sonoporation is known to be able to temporarily permeabilize cells, but during this process it may have traumatic impact on cell viability. In this work, we found that sonoporation may induce apoptosis and G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest in some cells hours after ultrasonic exposure in vitro. Methods: Suspensions of HL-60 leukemia cells were prepared (106 cells/ml), and a 1% v/v microbubble solution was added to induce sonoporation during ultrasound exposure. They were then placed 7 cm away from a 2.54 cm-diameter, 1 MHz unfocused ultrasound probe, and these samples were insonated for 1 min with ultrasound pulses (10% duty cycle, 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency). In this study, two levels of peak negative ultrasound pressure were used: 0.3 MPa and 0.5 MPa. After exposure, the cell suspensions were further incubated. They were harvested after 4 h, 8 h, 12 h and 24 h to analyze the cell-cycle distribution (sub-G1, G0/G1, S, G2/M) at these time points using propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. Results: Some sonoporation-treated cells had undergone apoptosis by 4h, and the largest number of apoptotic cells (sub-G1 phase) was observed after 12h (0.3 MPa group: 25.0%; 0.5 MPa group: 27.2%). Also, after experiencing sonoporation, some viable cells were stopped in the G2/M phase without undergoing cytokinesis, and the maximum G2/M population rise was seen after 12h (0.3 MPa group: +12.2%; 0.5 MPa group: +14.7%). This was accompanied by decreases in the populations of G0/G1-phase and S-phase.

  15. Cell cycle arrest and clonogenic tumor cell kill by divergent chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Mastbergen, S C; Duivenvoorden, I; Versteegh, R T; Geldof, A A

    2000-01-01

    Regulators of cell cycle phase transitions could be important targets for cancer treatment using cytostatic chemotherapy. Therefore, the extent of cell cycle arrest induced by different cytostatic agents has to be correlated with ultimate clonogenic tumor cell death. Especially the value of early cell cycle perturbations as indicators for the clinical efficacy of drugs should be a matter of investigation. In vitro PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells were incubated for 24 hours with a panel of six different chemotherapeutic drugs in various concentrations (Aplidine, Cisplatin, Isohomohalichondrin B (IHB), Taxol, Vincristine and Vinorelbine). The short term effects on the cell cycle distribution were determined by DNA flowcytometry while the clonogenic capacity of these cells was quantitated to measure the cytotoxic treatment efficacy. Significant decreases of clonogenic survival proved to be strongly correlated with cell cycle perturbations. IHB, Taxol, Vincristine and Vinorelbine resulted in accumulation (up to 87-92%) in the G2M phase, while Cisplatin and Aplidine led to increases in the S-phase fraction and in both G2M- as well as S-phase fractions, respectively. Cell cycle phase perturbations appear to be suitable, early markers for cytotoxic drug efficacy.

  16. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yedjou, Clement G.; Tchounwou, Hervey M.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO3)2] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO3)2 for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI) assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05) increase of necrotic cell death in Pb(NO3)2-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by Pb(NO3)2 compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p < 0.05) in comet tail-length and percentages of DNA cleavage. Data generated from the flow cytometry assessment indicated that Pb(NO3)2 exposure significantly (p < 0.05) increased the proportion of caspase-3 positive cells (apoptotic cells) compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO3)2 exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO3)2 inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb(NO3)2 exposure and its associated adverse health

  17. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Yedjou, Clement G; Tchounwou, Hervey M; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO₃)₂] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO₃)₂ for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI) assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05) increase of necrotic cell death in Pb(NO₃)₂-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by Pb(NO₃)₂ compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p < 0.05) in comet tail-length and percentages of DNA cleavage. Data generated from the flow cytometry assessment indicated that Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure significantly (p < 0.05) increased the proportion of caspase-3 positive cells (apoptotic cells) compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO₃)₂ inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb

  18. Specific loss of apoptotic but not cell-cycle arrest function in a human tumor derived p53 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, S; Ludwig, R L; Haupt, Y; Bates, S; Lu, X; Oren, M; Vousden, K H

    1996-01-01

    The p53 tumor-suppressor gene product is frequently inactivated in malignancies by point mutation. Although most tumor-derived p53 mutants show loss of sequence specific transcriptional activation, some mutants have been identified which retain this activity. One such mutant, p53175P, is defective for the suppression of transformation in rodent cells, despite retaining the ability to suppress the growth of p53-null human cells. We now demonstrate that p53175P can induce a cell-cycle arrest in appropriate cell types but shows loss of apoptotic function. Our results therefore support a direct role of p53 transcriptional activation in mediating a cell-cycle arrest and demonstrate that such activity is not sufficient for the full apoptotic response. These data suggest that either p53 can induce apoptosis through a transcriptionally independent mechanism, a function lost by p53175P, or that this mutant has specifically lost the ability to activate genes which contribute to cell death, despite activation of genes responsible for the G1 arrest. This dissociation of the cell-cycle arrest and apoptotic activities of p53 indicates that inactivation of p53 apoptotic function without concomitant loss of growth inhibition can suffice to relieve p53-dependent tumor-suppression in vivo and thereby contribute to tumor development. Images PMID:8631304

  19. Direct inhibition of Retinoblastoma phosphorylation by Nimbolide causes cell cycle arrest and suppresses glioblastoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jane; Liu, Xiaona; Henry, Heather; Gasilina, Anjelika; Nassar, Nicholas; Ghosh, Jayeeta; Clark, Jason P; Kumar, Ashish; Pauletti, Giovanni M.; Ghosh, Pradip K; Dasgupta, Biplab

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Classical pharmacology allows the use and development of conventional phytomedicine faster and more economically than conventional drugs. This approach should be tested for their efficacy in terms of complementarity and disease control. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms by which nimbolide, a triterpenoid found in the well-known medicinal plant Azadirachta indica controls glioblastoma (GBM) growth. Experimental Design Using in vitro signaling, anchorage-independent growth, kinase assays, and xenograft models, we investigated the mechanisms of its growth inhibition in glioblastoma. Results We show that nimbolide or an ethanol soluble fraction of A. indica leaves (Azt) that contains nimbolide as the principal cytotoxic agent is highly cytotoxic against GBM in vitro and in vivo. Azt caused cell cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1-S stage in GBM cells expressing EGFRvIII, an oncogene present in about 20-25% of GBMs. Azt/nimbolide directly inhibited CDK4/CDK6 kinase activity leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein, cell cycle arrest at G1-S and cell death. Independent of RB hypophosphorylation, Azt also significantly reduced proliferative and survival advantage of GBM cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts by downregulating Bcl2 and blocking growth factor induced phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2 and STAT3. These effects were specific since Azt did not affect mTOR or other cell cycle regulators. In vivo, Azt completely prevented initiation and inhibited progression of GBM growth. Conclusions Our preclinical findings demonstrate Nimbolide as a potent anti-glioma agent that blocks cell cycle and inhibits glioma growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24170547

  20. Proteomic analysis of the response to cell cycle arrests in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ly, Tony; Endo, Aki; Lamond, Angus I

    2015-01-02

    Previously, we analyzed protein abundance changes across a 'minimally perturbed' cell cycle by using centrifugal elutriation to differentially enrich distinct cell cycle phases in human NB4 cells (Ly et al., 2014). In this study, we compare data from elutriated cells with NB4 cells arrested at comparable phases using serum starvation, hydroxyurea, or RO-3306. While elutriated and arrested cells have similar patterns of DNA content and cyclin expression, a large fraction of the proteome changes detected in arrested cells are found to reflect arrest-specific responses (i.e., starvation, DNA damage, CDK1 inhibition), rather than physiological cell cycle regulation. For example, we show most cells arrested in G2 by CDK1 inhibition express abnormally high levels of replication and origin licensing factors and are likely poised for genome re-replication. The protein data are available in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (

  1. [Cycle arrest of prostate carcinoma DU-145 cells induced by pseudolaric acid B].

    PubMed

    Mai, Xia; Xu, Zhong-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Cao, Bo; Xu, Rui-Cheng

    2012-11-01

    To study the effect of pseudolaric acid B (PLAB) on cell proliferation and cycle of human prostate carcinoma DU-145 cells. method: Its inhibitory effect on the cell growth was measured by MTT method. Characteristics of cell death were determined by Hoechest 33342 staining. The cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. The expressions of cyclin B1, cyclin D1 and CDK1 were detected by Real time-PCR and Western blot, respectively. PLAB notably inhibited DU-145 cell growth in a dose- and time dependent manner (P < 0.05). Its IC50 values of PLAB for DU-145 cells for 24, 48 and 72 h were 4.53, 2.39 and 2.08 micromol x L(-1), respectively. Having been treated with 5 micromol x L(-1) PLAB for 24 h, the cells showed such apoptosis characteristics as nuclei chromatin condensation and apoptotic body. With the increase in PLAB concentration, the proportion of G2/M phase cells strikingly increased in a dose- and time dependent manner (P < 0.05), meanwhile cyclin B1 and CDK1 showed over-expressions (P < 0.05), and the cyclin D1 showed under-expression (P < 0.05). PLAB can inhibit the growth of DU-145 cells and induce the cell cycle G2/M arrest, accompanied with the over-expression of cyclin B1 and CDK1, which may be related with its regulation cycle-associated protein degradation.

  2. TGEV nucleocapsid protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of p53 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Li; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Xingang; Tong, Dewen

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • TGEV N protein reduces cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. • TGEV N protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by regulating p53 signaling. • TGEV N protein plays important roles in TGEV-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. - Abstract: Our previous studies showed that TGEV infection could induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via activation of p53 signaling in cultured host cells. However, it is unclear which viral gene causes these effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGEV nucleocapsid (N) protein on PK-15 cells. We found that TGEV N protein suppressed cell proliferation by causing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis. Characterization of various cellular proteins that are involved in regulating cell cycle progression demonstrated that the expression of N gene resulted in an accumulation of p53 and p21, which suppressed cyclin B1, cdc2 and cdk2 expression. Moreover, the expression of TGEV N gene promoted translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which in turn caused the release of cytochrome c, followed by activation of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis in the transfected PK-15 cells following cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that p53 inhibitor attenuated TGEV N protein induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and apoptosis through reversing the expression changes of cdc2, cdk2 and cyclin B1 and the translocation changes of Bax and cytochrome c induced by TGEV N protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TGEV N protein might play an important role in TGEV infection-induced p53 activation and cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis occurrence.

  3. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) induces ferroptosis and causes cell cycle arrest in head and neck carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Renyu; Zhang, Ziheng; Chen, Lingfeng; Zhou, Yunfang; Zou, Peng; Feng, Chen; Wang, Li; Liang, Guang

    2016-10-10

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, exhibits a wide range of biological roles including a highly efficient and specific anti-tumor activity. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of DHA on head and neck carcinoma cells and elucidate the potential mechanisms. We used five head and neck carcinoma cell lines and two non-tumorigenic normal epithelial cell lines to achieve our goals. Cells were exposed to DHA and subjected to cellular activity assays including viability, cell cycle analysis, cell death, and angiogenic phenotype. Our results show that DHA causes cell cycle arrest which is mediated through Forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1). We also demonstrate that DHA induces ferroptosis and apoptosis in head and neck carcinoma cells. Lastly, our results show that DHA alters the angiogenic phenotype of cancer cells by reducing the expression of angiogenic factors and the ability of cancer cells to support endothelial cell tubule formation. Our study suggests that DHA specifically causes head and neck cancer cell death through contribution from both ferroptosis and apoptosis. DHA may represent an effective strategy in head and neck cancer treatment.

  4. CIL-102-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells via Upregulation of p21 and GADD45

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Shih; Kuo, Yi-Hung; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Hsieh, Meng-Chiao; Huang, Cheng-Yi; Lee, Ko-Chao; Lee, Kam-Fai; Shen, Chien-Heng; Tung, Shui-Yi; Teng, Chih-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    CIL-102 (1-[4-(furo[2,3-b]quinolin-4-ylamino)phenyl]ethanone) is a well-known, major active agent of the alkaloid derivative of Camptotheca acuminata with valuable biological properties, including anti-tumorigenic activity. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which CIL-102 mediated the induction of cell death, and we performed cell cycle G2/M arrest to clarify molecular changes in colorectal cancer cells (CRC). Treatment of DLD-1 cells with CIL-102 resulted in triggering the extrinsic apoptosis pathway through the activation of Fas-L, caspase-8 and the induction of Bid cleavage and cytochrome c release in a time-dependent manner. In addition, CIL-102 mediated apoptosis and G2/M arrest by phosphorylation of the Jun N-terminus kinase (JNK1/2) signaling pathway. This resulted in the expression of NFκB p50, p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP) levels, and in the induction of p21 and GADD45 as well as the decreased association of cdc2/cyclin B. Furthermore, treatment with the JNK1/2 (SP600125), NFκB (PDTI) or the p300/CBP (C646) inhibitors abolished CIL-102-induced cell cycle G2/M arrest and reversed the association of cdc2 with cyclin B. Therefore, we demonstrated that there was an increase in the cellular levels of p21 and GADD45 by CIL-102 reduction in cell viability and cell cycle arrest via the activation of the JNK1/2, NFκB p50, p300 and CBP signaling modules. Collectively, our results demonstrated that CIL-102 induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of colon cancer cells by upregulating p21 and GADD45 expression and by activating JNK1/2, NFκB p50 and p300 to provide a new mechanism for CIL-102 treatment. PMID:28068431

  5. Taxol induces concentration-dependent phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and cell cycle arrest in ASTC-a-1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wen-jing; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2010-02-01

    Taxol (Paclitaxel) is an important natural product for the treatment of solid tumors. Different concentrations of taxol can trigger distinct effects on both the cellular microtubule network and biochemical pathways. Apoptosis induced by low concentrations (5-30 nM) of taxol was associated with mitotic arrest, alteration of microtubule dynamics and/or G2/M cell cycle arrest, whereas high concentrations of this drug (0.2-30 μM) caused significant microtubule damage, and was found recently to induce cytoplasm vacuolization in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. In present study, cell counting kit (CCK-8) assay, confocal microscope, and flow cytometry analysis were used to analyze the cell death form induced by 35 nM and 70 μM of taxol respectively in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. After treatment of 35 nM taxol for 48 h, the OD450 value was 0.80, and 35 nM taxol was found to induce dominantly cell death in apoptotic pathway such as phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, G2/M phase arrest after treatment for 24 h, and nuclear fragmentation after treatment for 48 h. After 70 μM taxol treated the cell for 24 h, the OD450 value was 1.01, and 70 μM taxol induced cytoplasm vacuolization programmed cell death (PCD) and G2/M phase as well as the polyploidy phase arrest in paraptotic-like cell death. These findings imply that the regulated signaling pathway of cell death induced by taxol is dependent on taxol concentration in ASTC-a-1 cells.

  6. Deoxyelephantopin from Elephantopus scaber L. induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Miaoxian; Chung, Hau Yin; Li, Yaolan

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Deoxyelephantopin (ESD) inhibited cell proliferation in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. {yields} ESD induced cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases via modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. {yields} ESD triggered apoptosis by dysfunction of mitochondria and induction of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways. {yields} ESD also triggered Akt, ERK, and JNK signaling pathways. -- Abstract: Deoxyelephantopin (ESD), a naturally occurring sesquiterpene lactone present in the Chinese medicinal herb, Elephantopus scaber L. exerted anticancer effects on various cultured cancer cells. However, the cellular mechanisms by which it controls the development of the cancer cells are unavailable, particularly the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. In this study, we found that ESD inhibited the CNE cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases was also found. Western blotting analysis showed that modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins was responsible for the ESD-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, ESD also triggered apoptosis in CNE cells. Dysfunction in mitochondria was found to be associated with the ESD-induced apoptosis as evidenced by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential ({Delta}{Psi}m), the translocation of cytochrome c, and the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins. Despite the Western blotting analysis showed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (cleavage of caspases-3, -7, -8, -9, and -10) were triggered in the ESD-induced apoptosis, additional analysis also showed that the induction of apoptosis could be achieved by the caspase-independent manner. Besides, Akt, ERK and JNK pathways were found to involve in ESD-induced cell death. Overall, our findings provided the first evidence that ESD induced cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in CNE cells. ESD could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC).

  7. Hispolon induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep3B cells by modulating ERK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guan-Jhong; Deng, Jeng-Shyan; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2011-07-13

    Hispolon is an active phenolic compound of Phellinus igniarius , a mushroom that has recently been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. This study investigated the antiproliferative effect of hispolon on human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep3B cells by using the MTT assay, DNA fragmentation, DAPI (4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride) staining, and flow cytometric analyses. Hispolon inhibited cellular growth of Hep3B cells in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner, through the induction of cell cycle arrest at S phase measured using flow cytometric analysis and apoptotic cell death, as demonstrated by DNA laddering. Hispolon-induced S-phase arrest was associated with a marked decrease in the protein expression of cyclins A and E and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, with concomitant induction of p21waf1/Cip1 and p27Kip1. Exposure of Hep3B cells to hispolon resulted in apoptosis as evidenced by caspase activation, PARP cleavage, and DNA fragmentation. Hispolon treatment also activated JNK, p38 MAPK, and ERK expression. Inhibitors of ERK (PB98095), but not those of JNK (SP600125) and p38 MAPK (SB203580), suppressed hispolon-induced S-phase arrest and apoptosis in Hep3B cells. These findings establish a mechanistic link between the MAPK pathway and hispolon-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Hep3B cells.

  8. Cell cycle-arrested tumor cells exhibit increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, H; Wachter, F; Grunert, M; Jeremias, I

    2013-01-01

    Resting tumor cells represent a huge challenge during anticancer therapy due to their increased treatment resistance. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a putative future anticancer drug, currently in phases I and II clinical studies. We recently showed that TRAIL is able to target leukemia stem cell surrogates. Here, we tested the ability of TRAIL to target cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Cell cycle arrest was induced in tumor cell lines and xenografted tumor cells in G0, G1 or G2 using cytotoxic drugs, phase-specific inhibitors or RNA interference against cyclinB and E. Biochemical or molecular arrest at any point of the cell cycle increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, when cell cycle arrest was disabled by addition of caffeine, the antitumor activity of TRAIL was reduced. Most important for clinical translation, tumor cells from three children with B precursor or T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia showed increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis upon knockdown of either cyclinB or cyclinE, arresting the cell cycle in G2 or G1, respectively. Taken together and in contrast to most conventional cytotoxic drugs, TRAIL exerts enhanced antitumor activity against cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Therefore, TRAIL might represent an interesting drug to treat static-tumor disease, for example, during minimal residual disease. PMID:23744361

  9. Bcl-xL controls a switch between cell death modes during mitotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bah, N; Maillet, L; Ryan, J; Dubreil, S; Gautier, F; Letai, A; Juin, P; Barillé-Nion, S

    2014-01-01

    Antimitotic agents such as microtubule inhibitors (paclitaxel) are widely used in cancer therapy while new agents blocking mitosis onset are currently in development. All these agents impose a prolonged mitotic arrest in cancer cells that relies on sustained activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint and may lead to subsequent cell death by incompletely understood molecular events. We have investigated the role played by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members in the fate of mitotically arrested mammary tumor cells treated with paclitaxel, or depleted in Cdc20, the activator of the anaphase promoting complex. Under these conditions, a weak and delayed mitotic cell death occurs that is caspase- and Bax/Bak-independent. Moreover, BH3 profiling assays indicate that viable cells during mitotic arrest are primed to die by apoptosis and that Bcl-xL is required to maintain mitochondrial integrity. Consistently, Bcl-xL depletion, or treatment with its inhibitor ABT-737 (but not with the specific Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-199), during mitotic arrest converts cell response to antimitotics to efficient caspase and Bax-dependent apoptosis. Apoptotic priming under conditions of mitotic arrest relies, at least in part, on the phosphorylation on serine 62 of Bcl-xL, which modulates its interaction with Bax and its sensitivity to ABT-737. The phospho-mimetic S62D-Bcl-xL mutant is indeed less efficient than the corresponding phospho-deficient S62A-Bcl-xL mutant in sequestrating Bax and in protecting cancer cells from mitotic cell death or yeast cells from Bax-induced growth inhibition. Our results provide a rationale for combining Bcl-xL targeting to antimitotic agents to improve clinical efficacy of antimitotic strategy in cancer therapy. PMID:24922075

  10. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chun-Xiu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yin-Xue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Dong; Yang, Tianxing; Pan, Si-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with a poor response to current chemotherapy. Danusertib is a pan-inhibitor of the Aurora kinases and a third-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent anticancer effects, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human gastric cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of danusertib on cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the molecular mechanisms involved in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells. The results showed that danusertib had potent growth-inhibitory, apoptosis-inducing, and autophagy-inducing effects on AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Danusertib arrested AGS and NCI-N78 cells in G2/M phase, with downregulation of expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and upregulation of expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danusertib induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, with an increase in expression of proapoptotic protein and a decrease in antiapoptotic proteins in both cell lines. Danusertib induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and triggered activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Further, danusertib induced autophagy, with an increase in expression of beclin 1 and conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-I) to LC3-II in both cell lines. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as well as activation of 5' AMP-activated protein kinase contributed to the proautophagic effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. SB202191 and wortmannin enhanced the autophagy-inducing effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. In addition, danusertib inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition with an increase in expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in expression of

  11. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chun-Xiu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yin-Xue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Dong; Yang, Tianxing; Pan, Si-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with a poor response to current chemotherapy. Danusertib is a pan-inhibitor of the Aurora kinases and a third-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent anticancer effects, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human gastric cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of danusertib on cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the molecular mechanisms involved in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells. The results showed that danusertib had potent growth-inhibitory, apoptosis-inducing, and autophagy-inducing effects on AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Danusertib arrested AGS and NCI-N78 cells in G2/M phase, with downregulation of expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and upregulation of expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danusertib induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, with an increase in expression of proapoptotic protein and a decrease in antiapoptotic proteins in both cell lines. Danusertib induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and triggered activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Further, danusertib induced autophagy, with an increase in expression of beclin 1 and conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-I) to LC3-II in both cell lines. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as well as activation of 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase contributed to the proautophagic effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. SB202191 and wortmannin enhanced the autophagy-inducing effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. In addition, danusertib inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition with an increase in expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in expression

  12. Cell death and growth arrest in response to photodynamic therapy with membrane-bound photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Piette, Jacques; Volanti, Cédric; Vantieghem, Annelies; Matroule, Jean-Yves; Habraken, Yvette; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2003-10-15

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment for cancer and for certain benign conditions that is based on the use of a photosensitizer and light to produce reactive oxygen species in cells. Many of the photosensitizers currently used in PDT localize in different cell compartments such as mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and generate cell death by triggering necrosis and/or apoptosis. Efficient cell death is observed when light, oxygen and the photosensitizer are not limiting ("high dose PDT"). When one of these components is limiting ("low dose PDT"), most of the cells do not immediately undergo apoptosis or necrosis but are growth arrested with several transduction pathways activated. This commentary will review the mechanism of apoptosis and growth arrest mediated by two important PDT agents, i.e. pyropheophorbide and hypericin.

  13. Pseudolaric acid B induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma l929 cell.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing hua; Liu, Chun yu; Zheng, Gui bin; Zhang, Li Ying; Yan, Ming hui; Zhang, Wen yan; Meng, Xian ying; Yu, Xiao fang

    2013-01-01

    PAB induced various cancer cell apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence. But in cell line murine fibrosarcoma L929, PAB did not induce apoptosis, but autophagy, therefore it was thought by us as a good model to research the relationship of cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence bypass apoptosis. Inhibitory ratio was assessed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis. Phase contrast microscopy visualized cell morphology. Hoechst 33258 staining for nuclear change, propidium iodode (PI) staining for cell cycle, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining for autophagy, and rodanmine 123 staining for mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured by fluorescence microscopy or flowcytometry. Apoptosis was determined by DNA ladder test. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity was detected by PKC assay kit. SA-β-galactosidase assay was used to detect senescence. Protein expression was examined by western blot. PAB inhibited L929 cell growth in time-and dose-dependent manner. At 12 h, 80 μmol/L PAB induced obvious mitotic arrest; at 24 h, PAB began to induce autophagy; at 36 h, cell-treated with PAB slip into G1 cell cycle; and 3 d PAB induced senescence. In time sequence PAB induced firstly cell cycle arrest, then autophagy, then slippage into G1 phase, lastly senescence. Senescent cells had high level of autophagy, inhibiting autophagy led to apoptosis, and no senescence. PAB activated PKC activity to induce cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence, inhibiting PKC activity suppressed cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence. PAB induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma L929 cell through PKC.

  14. Centchroman induces redox-dependent apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shyam, Hari; Singh, Neetu; Kaushik, Shweta; Sharma, Ramesh; Balapure, Anil K

    2017-04-01

    Centchroman (CC) or Ormeloxifene has been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in various types of cancer cells. This has, however, not been addressed for endometrial cancer cells where its (CC) mechanism of action remains unclear. This study focuses on the basis of antineoplasticity of CC by blocking the targets involved in the cell cycle, survival and apoptosis in endometrial cancer cells. Ishikawa Human Endometrial Cancer Cells were cultured under estrogen deprived medium, exposed to CC and analyzed for proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we also analyzed oxidative stress induced by CC. Cell viability studies confirmed the IC50 of CC in Ishikawa cells to be 20 µM after 48 h treatment. CC arrests the cells in G0/G1 phase through cyclin D1 and cyclin E mediated pathways. Phosphatidylserine externalization, nuclear morphology changes, DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage, and alteration of Bcl-2 family protein expression clearly suggest ongoing apoptosis in the CC treated cells. Activation of caspase 3 & 9, up-regulation of AIF and inhibition of apoptosis by z-VAD-fmk clearly explains the participation of the intrinsic pathway of programmed cell death. Further, the increase of ROS, loss of MMP, inhibition of antioxidant (MnSOD, Cu/Zn-SOD and GST) and inhibition of apoptosis with L-NAC suggests CC induced oxidative stress leading to apoptosis via mitochondria mediated pathway. Therefore, CC could be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of Endometrial Cancer adjunct to its utility as a contraceptive and an anti-breast cancer agent.

  15. Cell cycle arrest and activation of development in marine invertebrate deuterostomes.

    PubMed

    Costache, Vlad; McDougall, Alex; Dumollard, Rémi

    2014-08-01

    Like most metazoans, eggs of echinoderms and tunicates (marine deuterostomes, there is no data for the cephalochordates) arrest awaiting fertilization due to the activity of the Mos/MEK/MAPK cascade and are released from this cell cycle arrest by sperm-triggered Ca2+ signals. Invertebrate deuterostome eggs display mainly three distinct types of cell cycle arrest before fertilization mediated by potentially different cytostatic factors (CSF): one CSF causes arrest during meiotic metaphase I (MI-CSF in tunicates and some starfishes), another CSF likely causes arrest during meiotic metaphase II (amphioxus), and yet another form of CSF causes arrest to occur after meiotic exit during G1 of the first mitotic cycle (G1-CSF). In tunicates and echinoderms these different CSF activities have been shown to rely on the Mos//MAPK pathway for establishment and on Ca2+ signals for their inactivation. Despite these molecular similarities, release of MI-CSF arrest is caused by APC/C activation (to destroy cyclin B) whereas release from G1-CSF is caused by stimulating S phase and the synthesis of cyclins. Further research is needed to understand how both the Mos//MAPK cascade and Ca2+ achieve these tasks in different marine invertebrate deuterostomes. Another conserved feature of eggs is that protein synthesis of specific mRNAs is necessary to proceed through oocyte maturation and to maintain CSF-induced cell cycle arrest. Then activation of development at fertilization is accompanied by an increase in the rate of protein synthesis but the mechanisms involved are still largely unknown in most of the marine deuterostomes. How the sperm-triggered Ca2+ signals cause an increase in protein synthesis has been studied mainly in sea urchin eggs. Here we review these conserved features of eggs (arrest, activation and protein synthesis) focusing on the non-vertebrate deuterostomes.

  16. Loss of p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis promotes genomic instability and premature aging.

    PubMed

    Li, Tongyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Jiang, Le; Manfredi, James; Zha, Shan; Gu, Wei

    2016-03-15

    Although p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis are well accepted as major tumor suppression mechanisms, the loss of these functions does not directly lead to tumorigenesis, suggesting that the precise roles of these canonical activities of p53 need to be redefined. Here, we report that the cells derived from the mutant mice expressing p533KR, an acetylation-defective mutant that fails to induce cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, exhibit high levels of aneuploidy upon DNA damage. Moreover, the embryonic lethality caused by the deficiency of XRCC4, a key DNA double strand break repair factor, can be fully rescued in the p533KR/3KR background. Notably, despite high levels of genomic instability, p533KR/3KRXRCC4-/- mice, unlike p53-/- XRCC4-/- mice, are not succumbed to pro-B-cell lymphomas. Nevertheless, p533KR/3KR XRCC4-/- mice display aging-like phenotypes including testicular atrophy, kyphosis, and premature death. Further analyses demonstrate that SLC7A11 is downregulated and that p53-mediated ferroptosis is significantly induced in spleens and testis of p533KR/3KRXRCC4-/- mice. These results demonstrate that the direct role of p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis is to control genomic stability in vivo. Our study not only validates the importance of ferroptosis in p53-mediated tumor suppression in vivo but also reveals that the combination of genomic instability and activation of ferroptosis may promote aging-associated phenotypes.

  17. Zerumbone, a Sesquiterpene, Controls Proliferation and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Laryngeal Carcinoma Cell Line Hep-2.

    PubMed

    Jegannathan, Srimathi Devi; Arul, Santhosh; Dayalan, Haripriya

    2016-07-01

    Zerumbone (ZER), a sesquiterpene found in Zingiber zerumbet Smith, has been shown to possess antiproliferative, anticancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity against various types of human carcinoma. The molecular mechanism by which ZER mediates its activity against many cancer types is revealed by many studies. Upregulation of proapoptotic molecules and suppression of antiapoptotic gene expression are few of the mechanisms by which ZER mediates its effect. The present study is focused on investigating the effect of ZER on proliferation of laryngeal carcinoma cells (Hep-2). MTT assay results showed that ZER (0.01-100 μM) induced death of Hep-2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner; significant suppression of proliferation of Hep-2 cells was seen with a IC50 value of 15 µM. ZER at a concentration of 15 and 30 μM for 48 h showed early signs of apoptosis as evidenced by confocal microscopy imaging. Flow cytometry studies showed that ZER induced cell cycle arrest. ZER arrested Hep-2 proliferation at S and G2/M phases of cell cycle. In conclusion, these results indicate that ZER has antiproliferative effect and arrests cell cycle in Hep-2 cells in vitro. This could be a potential anticancer drug against laryngeal carcinoma.

  18. Normoxic resuscitation after cardiac arrest protects against hippocampal oxidative stress, metabolic dysfunction, and neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Vereczki, Viktoria; Martin, Erica; Rosenthal, Robert E; Hof, Patrick R; Hoffman, Gloria E; Fiskum, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Resuscitation and prolonged ventilation using 100% oxygen after cardiac arrest is standard clinical practice despite evidence from animal models indicating that neurologic outcome is improved using normoxic compared with hyperoxic resuscitation. This study tested the hypothesis that normoxic ventilation during the first hour after cardiac arrest in dogs protects against prelethal oxidative stress to proteins, loss of the critical metabolic enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC), and minimizes subsequent neuronal death in the hippocampus. Anesthetized beagles underwent 10 mins ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest, followed by defibrillation and ventilation with either 21% or 100% O2. At 1 h after resuscitation, the ventilator was adjusted to maintain normal blood gas levels in both groups. Brains were perfusion-fixed at 2 h reperfusion and used for immunohistochemical measurements of hippocampal nitrotyrosine, a product of protein oxidation, and the E1α subunit of PDHC. In hyperoxic dogs, PDHC immunostaining diminished by approximately 90% compared with sham-operated dogs, while staining in normoxic animals was not significantly different from nonischemic dogs. Protein nitration in the hippocampal neurons of hyperoxic animals was 2–3 times greater than either sham-operated or normoxic resuscitated animals at 2 h reperfusion. Stereologic quantification of neuronal death at 24 h reperfusion showed a 40% reduction using normoxic compared with hyperoxic resuscitation. These results indicate that postischemic hyperoxic ventilation promotes oxidative stress that exacerbates prelethal loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase and delayed hippocampal neuronal cell death. Moreover, these findings indicate the need for clinical trials comparing the effects of different ventilatory oxygen levels on neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest. PMID:16251887

  19. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER INDUCES ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL CYCLE ARREST: ROLE OF G1 CYCLINS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingmei; Ghio, Andrew J.; Gao, Mingxing; Wei, Ke; Rosen, Glenn D.; Upadhyay, Daya

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that the ambient air pollution particles (PM) induce cell cycle arrest in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Exposure of PM (25μg/cm2) to AEC induced cells cycle arrest in G1 phase, inhibited DNA synthesis, blocked cell proliferation and caused decrease in cyclin E, A, D1 and Cyclin E- cyclin-dependent kinase(CDK)-2 kinase activity after 4h. PM induced upregulation of CDK inhibitor, p21 protein and p21 activity in AEC. SiRNAp21 blocked PM–induced downregulation of cyclins and AEC G1 arrest. Accordingly, we provide the evidence that PM induces AEC G1 arrest by altered regulation of G1 cyclins and CDKs. PMID:17977533

  20. Ambient particulate matter induces alveolar epithelial cell cycle arrest: role of G1 cyclins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingmei; Ghio, Andrew J; Gao, Mingxing; Wei, Ke; Rosen, Glenn D; Upadhyay, Daya

    2007-11-13

    We hypothesized that the ambient air pollution particles (particulate matter; PM) induce cell cycle arrest in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Exposure of PM (25microg/cm(2)) to AEC induced cells cycle arrest in G1 phase, inhibited DNA synthesis, blocked cell proliferation and caused decrease in cyclin E, A, D1 and Cyclin E- cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-2 kinase activity after 4h. PM induced upregulation of CDK inhibitor, p21 protein and p21 activity in AEC. SiRNAp21 blocked PM-induced downregulation of cyclins and AEC G1 arrest. Accordingly, we provide the evidence that PM induces AEC G1 arrest by altered regulation of G1 cyclins and CDKs.

  1. The Oxygen Rich Postnatal Environment Induces Cardiomyocyte Cell Cycle Arrest Through DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Bao N.; Kimura, Wataru; Muralidhar, Shalini A.; Moon, Jesung; Amatruda, James F.; Phelps, Kate L.; Grinsfelder, David; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Chen, Rui; Garcia, Joseph A.; Santos, Celio X.; Thet, SuWannee; Mori, Eiichiro; Kinter, Michael T.; Rindler, Paul M.; Zacchigna, Serena; Mukherjee, Shibani; Chen, David J.; Mahmoud, Ahmed I.; Giacca, Mauro; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Aroumougame, Asaithamby; Shah, Ajay M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Sadek, Hesham A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The mammalian heart has a remarkable regenerative capacity for a short period of time after birth, after which the majority of cardiomyocytes permanently exit cell cycle. We sought to determine the primary post-natal event that results in cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We hypothesized that transition to the oxygen rich postnatal environment is the upstream signal that results in cell cycle arrest of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative DNA damage, and DNA damage response (DDR) markers significantly increase in the heart during the first postnatal week. Intriguingly, postnatal hypoxemia, ROS scavenging, or inhibition of DDR all prolong the postnatal proliferative window of cardiomyocytes, while hyperoxemia and ROS generators shorten it. These findings uncover a previously unrecognized protective mechanism that mediates cardiomyocyte cell cycle arrest in exchange for utilization of oxygen dependent aerobic metabolism. Reduction of mitochondrial-dependent oxidative stress should be important component of cardiomyocyte proliferation-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:24766806

  2. The oxygen-rich postnatal environment induces cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest through DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Puente, Bao N; Kimura, Wataru; Muralidhar, Shalini A; Moon, Jesung; Amatruda, James F; Phelps, Kate L; Grinsfelder, David; Rothermel, Beverly A; Chen, Rui; Garcia, Joseph A; Santos, Celio X; Thet, SuWannee; Mori, Eiichiro; Kinter, Michael T; Rindler, Paul M; Zacchigna, Serena; Mukherjee, Shibani; Chen, David J; Mahmoud, Ahmed I; Giacca, Mauro; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Aroumougame, Asaithamby; Shah, Ajay M; Szweda, Luke I; Sadek, Hesham A

    2014-04-24

    The mammalian heart has a remarkable regenerative capacity for a short period of time after birth, after which the majority of cardiomyocytes permanently exit cell cycle. We sought to determine the primary postnatal event that results in cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We hypothesized that transition to the oxygen-rich postnatal environment is the upstream signal that results in cell-cycle arrest of cardiomyocytes. Here, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative DNA damage, and DNA damage response (DDR) markers significantly increase in the heart during the first postnatal week. Intriguingly, postnatal hypoxemia, ROS scavenging, or inhibition of DDR all prolong the postnatal proliferative window of cardiomyocytes, whereas hyperoxemia and ROS generators shorten it. These findings uncover a protective mechanism that mediates cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest in exchange for utilization of oxygen-dependent aerobic metabolism. Reduction of mitochondrial-dependent oxidative stress should be an important component of cardiomyocyte proliferation-based therapeutic approaches.

  3. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in rabbit retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Chang; Tai, Ming-Hong; Hu, Dan-Ning; Lai, Chien-Hsiung; Chen, Yi-Hao; Wu, Yi-Chen; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Kuo, Hsi-Kung

    2008-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play essential roles in the intracellular control of the cell cycle. It has been postulated that roscovitine, a potent CDK2, CDK5, and CDC2 inhibitor, might inhibit cellular proliferation by arresting the cell cycle. This in vitro study investigated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of roscovitine in cultured rabbit retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Experiments using rabbit RPE from young pigmented rabbits were carried out using roscovitine dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 micromol. Cell proliferation was measured by an MTT assay. The cell cycle response of RPE cells to roscovitine was analyzed by flow cytometry of propidium iodide-stained nuclei. Proteins related to DNA damage in the RPE cells were then assayed by Western blot. Roscovitine inhibited proliferation of RPE cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis after treatment demonstrated an accumulation of cells arrested in the S- and G2/M phases. Flow cytometry showed that 40 microM of roscovitine increased the cell population in the sub-G1 peak, which is considered a marker of cell death by apoptosis. Western blot analysis revealed Bcl-2 decreased and Bax increased after treatment of RPE cells with roscovitine. This study of the response of RPE cells to roscovitine demonstrated a bidirectional relationship between cell cycle control and apoptosis.

  4. Induction of Apoptosis and Antiproliferative Activity of Naringenin in Human Epidermoid Carcinoma Cell through ROS Generation and Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jafri, Asif; Ahmad, Sheeba; Afzal, Mohammad; Arshad, Md

    2014-01-01

    A natural predominant flavanone naringenin, especially abundant in citrus fruits, has a wide range of pharmacological activities. The search for antiproliferative agents that reduce skin carcinoma is a task of great importance. The objective of this study was to analyze the anti-proliferative and apoptotic mechanism of naringenin using MTT assay, DNA fragmentation, nuclear condensation, change in mitochondrial membrane potential, cell cycle kinetics and caspase-3 as biomarkers and to investigate the ability to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiating apoptotic cascade in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Results showed that naringenin exposure significantly reduced the cell viability of A431 cells (p<0.01) with a concomitant increase in nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation in a dose dependent manner. The intracellular ROS generation assay showed statistically significant (p<0.001) dose-related increment in ROS production for naringenin. It also caused naringenin-mediated epidermoid carcinoma apoptosis by inducing mitochondrial depolarization. Cell cycle study showed that naringenin induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase of cell cycle and caspase-3 analysis revealed a dose dependent increment in caspase-3 activity which led to cell apoptosis. This study confirms the efficacy of naringenin that lead to cell death in epidermoid carcinoma cells via inducing ROS generation, mitochondrial depolarization, nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and caspase-3 activation. PMID:25330158

  5. Ibogaine-associated cardiac arrest and death: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Jessica A; Wilcox, Susan R; Richards, Jeremy B

    2016-04-01

    A naturally occurring hallucinogenic plant alkaloid, ibogaine has been used as an adjuvant for opiate withdrawal for the past 50 years. In the setting of an escalating nationwide opiate epidemic, use of substances such as ibogaine may also increase. Therefore, familiarity with the mechanisms and potential adverse effects of ibogaine is important for clinicians. We present the case report of a man whose use of ibogaine resulted in cardiac arrest and death, complemented by a review of the literature regarding ibogaine's clinical effects. A 40-year-old man who used ibogaine for symptoms of heroin withdrawal suffered acute cardiac arrest leading to cerebral edema and brain death. His presentation was consistent with ibogaine-induced cardiotoxicity and ibogaine-induced cardiac arrest, and a review of the literature regarding the history, mechanisms, risks and clinical outcomes associated with ibogaine is presented. The case presented underscores the significant potential clinical risks of ibogaine. It is important the healthcare community be aware of the possible effects of ibogaine such that clinicians can provide informed counseling to their patients regarding the risks of attempting detoxification with ibogaine.

  6. The arrest of drivers under the influence as a predictor of subsequent social disadvantage and death.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, Karoliina; Haukka, Jari; Lillsunde, Pirjo; Lintonen, Tomi; Mäkelä, Pia

    2014-04-01

    The association between DUI (driving under the influence) and disadvantaged social background has been shown in cross-sectional studies, but less is known about the processes behind this phenomenon. We aimed to examine the effect of DUI arrest on subsequent social disadvantage in Finland during 1993-2006 to provide more understanding about the dynamics of DUI and marginalization and to study DUI arrest as a potential point of intervention. In this longitudinal, register-based study the Register of DUI suspects (n=68894) was linked with the Employment Register. An age- and gender-matched reference population (n=67740) was drawn from the general Finnish population. A multi-state model was used to estimate the transition intensities between three different states (advantaged social status/disadvantaged social status/death) among three different DUI groups (alcohol only, prescription drugs, illicit drugs). Compared to references, the movement of DUI suspects between different social states was more dynamic in that they were more likely to either move to a disadvantaged social state or to an improved status (except DUI suspects using prescription drugs). A DUI's relative risk of death compared to references was high, especially if currently in advantaged social status. The effect of DUI did not diminish over time. Driving under the influence is associated with an increased long-term risk for social disadvantage. DUI arrest could serve as an opportunity for intervention in the marginalization process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ibogaine-associated cardiac arrest and death: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Meisner, Jessica A.; Wilcox, Susan R.; Richards, Jeremy B.

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring hallucinogenic plant alkaloid, ibogaine has been used as an adjuvant for opiate withdrawal for the past 50 years. In the setting of an escalating nationwide opiate epidemic, use of substances such as ibogaine may also increase. Therefore, familiarity with the mechanisms and potential adverse effects of ibogaine is important for clinicians. We present the case report of a man whose use of ibogaine resulted in cardiac arrest and death, complemented by a review of the literature regarding ibogaine’s clinical effects. A 40-year-old man who used ibogaine for symptoms of heroin withdrawal suffered acute cardiac arrest leading to cerebral edema and brain death. His presentation was consistent with ibogaine-induced cardiotoxicity and ibogaine-induced cardiac arrest, and a review of the literature regarding the history, mechanisms, risks and clinical outcomes associated with ibogaine is presented. The case presented underscores the significant potential clinical risks of ibogaine. It is important the healthcare community be aware of the possible effects of ibogaine such that clinicians can provide informed counseling to their patients regarding the risks of attempting detoxification with ibogaine. PMID:27141291

  8. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Mice H22 Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiye; Ni, Yanbo; Yang, Jing; Lin, Xutao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    Background It is widely recognized that astaxanthin (ASX), a member of the carotenoid family, has strong biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and immune-modulation activities. Previous studies have confirmed that ASX can effectively inhibit hepatoma cells in vitro. Material/Methods MTT was used to assay proliferation of mice H22 cells, and flow cytometry was used to determine apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of H22 cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, anti-tumor activity of ASX was observed in mice. Results ASX inhibited the proliferation of H22 cells, promoted cell necrosis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G2 phase in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions This study indicated that ASX can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mice H22 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27333866

  9. Altered Cell Cycle Arrest by Multifunctional Drug-Loaded Enzymatically-Triggered Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Can; Sun, Ying; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiangyu; Gao, Pei; Duan, Yourong

    2016-01-20

    cRGD-targeting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-sensitive nanoparticles [PLGA-PEG1K-cRGD/PLGA-peptide-PEG5K (NPs-cRGD)] were successfully developed. Au-Pt(IV) nanoparticles, PTX, and ADR were encapsulated into NPs-RGD separately. The effects of the drug-loaded nanoparticles on the cell cycle were investigated. Here, we showed that higher cytotoxicity of drug-loaded nanoparticles was related to the cell cycle arrest, compared to that of free drugs. The NPs-cRGD studied here did not disrupt cell cycle progression. The cell cycle of Au-Pt(IV)@NPs-cRGD showed a main S phase arrest in all phases of the cell cycle phase, especially in G0/G1 phase. PTX@NPs-cRGD and ADR@NPs-cRGD showed a higher ratio of G2/M and S phase arrest than the free drugs, respectively. Cells in G0/G1 and S phases of the cell cycle had a higher uptake ratio of NPs-cRGD. A nutrient deprivation or an increase in the requirement of nutrients in tumor cells could promote the uptake of nanoparticles from the microenvironments. In vivo, NPs-cRGD could efficiently accumulate at tumor sites. The inhibition of tumor growth coupled with cell cycle arrest is in line with that in vitro. On the basis of our results, we propose that future studies on nanoparticle action mechanism should consider the cell cycle, which could be different from free drugs. Understanding the actions of cell cycle arrest could affect the application of nanomedicine in the clinic.

  10. Lithium increases proliferation of hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells and rescues irradiation-induced cell cycle arrest in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zanni, Giulia; Di Martino, Elena; Omelyanenko, Anna; Andäng, Michael; Delle, Ulla; Elmroth, Kecke; Blomgren, Klas

    2015-11-10

    Radiotherapy in children causes debilitating cognitive decline, partly linked to impaired neurogenesis. Irradiation targets primarily cancer cells but also endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) leading to cell death or cell cycle arrest. Here we evaluated the effects of lithium on proliferation, cell cycle and DNA damage after irradiation of young NSPCs in vitro.NSPCs were treated with 1 or 3 mM LiCl and we investigated proliferation capacity (neurosphere volume and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation). Using flow cytometry, we analysed apoptosis (annexin V), cell cycle (propidium iodide) and DNA damage (γH2AX) after irradiation (3.5 Gy) of lithium-treated NSPCs.Lithium increased BrdU incorporation and, dose-dependently, the number of cells in replicative phase as well as neurosphere growth. Irradiation induced cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2/M phases. Treatment with 3 mM LiCl was sufficient to increase NSPCs in S phase, boost neurosphere growth and reduce DNA damage. Lithium did not affect the levels of apoptosis, suggesting that it does not rescue NSPCs committed to apoptosis due to accumulated DNA damage.Lithium is a very promising candidate for protection of the juvenile brain from radiotherapy and for its potential to thereby improve the quality of life for those children who survive their cancer.

  11. Lithium increases proliferation of hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells and rescues irradiation-induced cell cycle arrest in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Omelyanenko, Anna; Andäng, Michael; Delle, Ulla; Elmroth, Kecke; Blomgren, Klas

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy in children causes debilitating cognitive decline, partly linked to impaired neurogenesis. Irradiation targets primarily cancer cells but also endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) leading to cell death or cell cycle arrest. Here we evaluated the effects of lithium on proliferation, cell cycle and DNA damage after irradiation of young NSPCs in vitro. NSPCs were treated with 1 or 3 mM LiCl and we investigated proliferation capacity (neurosphere volume and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation). Using flow cytometry, we analysed apoptosis (annexin V), cell cycle (propidium iodide) and DNA damage (γH2AX) after irradiation (3.5 Gy) of lithium-treated NSPCs. Lithium increased BrdU incorporation and, dose-dependently, the number of cells in replicative phase as well as neurosphere growth. Irradiation induced cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2/M phases. Treatment with 3 mM LiCl was sufficient to increase NSPCs in S phase, boost neurosphere growth and reduce DNA damage. Lithium did not affect the levels of apoptosis, suggesting that it does not rescue NSPCs committed to apoptosis due to accumulated DNA damage. Lithium is a very promising candidate for protection of the juvenile brain from radiotherapy and for its potential to thereby improve the quality of life for those children who survive their cancer. PMID:26397227

  12. The nonstructural protein NP1 of human bocavirus 1 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Hela cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Bin; Cai, Yingyue; Li, Yongshu; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Kaiyu; Li, Yi; Yang, Yongbo

    2013-05-25

    Human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV1) is a newly identified pathogen associated with human respiratory tract illnesses. Previous studies demonstrated that proteins of HBoV1 failed to cause cell death, which is considered as a possible common feature of bocaviruses. However, our work showed that the NP1 of HBoV1 induced apoptotic cell death in Hela cells in the absence of viral genome replication and expression of other viral proteins. Mitochondria apoptotic pathway was involved in the NP1-induced apoptosis that was confirmed by apoptotic characteristics including morphological changes, DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. We also demonstrated that the cell cycle of NP1-transfected Hela cells was transiently arrested at G2/M phase followed by rapid appearance of apoptosis and that the N terminal domain of NP1 was critical to its nuclear localization and function in apoptosis induction in Hela cells. These findings might provide alternative information for further study of mechanism of HBoV1 pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► NP1 protein of HBoV1 induced apoptosis in Hela cells was first reported. ► NP1 induced-apoptosis followed the cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. ► The NP1 induced-apoptosis was mediated by mitochondrion apoptotic pathway. ► N terminal of NP1 was critical for apoptosis induction and nuclear localization.

  13. Alisertib Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, Autophagy and Suppresses EMT in HT29 and Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Bao-Jun; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Zhu, Da-Jian; Ju, Yong-Le; Wu, Jin-Hao; Ouyang, Man-Zhao; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with substantial mortality and morbidity. Alisertib (ALS) is a selective Aurora kinase A (AURKA) inhibitor with unclear effect and molecular interactome on CRC. This study aimed to evaluate the molecular interactome and anticancer effect of ALS and explore the underlying mechanisms in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. ALS markedly arrested cells in G2/M phase in both cell lines, accompanied by remarkable alterations in the expression level of key cell cycle regulators. ALS induced apoptosis in HT29 and Caco-2 cells through mitochondrial and death receptor pathways. ALS also induced autophagy in HT29 and Caco-2 cells, with the suppression of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), but activation of 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathways. There was a differential modulating effect of ALS on p38 MAPK signaling pathway in both cell lines. Moreover, induction or inhibition of autophagy modulated basal and ALS-induced apoptosis in both cell lines. ALS potently suppressed epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. Collectively, it suggests that induction of cell cycle arrest, promotion of apoptosis and autophagy, and suppression of EMT involving mitochondrial, death receptor, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, p38 MAPK, and AMPK signaling pathways contribute to the cancer cell killing effect of ALS on CRC cells. PMID:26729093

  14. Proteomic analysis of the response to cell cycle arrests in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Tony; Endo, Aki; Lamond, Angus I

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previously, we analyzed protein abundance changes across a ‘minimally perturbed’ cell cycle by using centrifugal elutriation to differentially enrich distinct cell cycle phases in human NB4 cells (Ly et al., 2014). In this study, we compare data from elutriated cells with NB4 cells arrested at comparable phases using serum starvation, hydroxyurea, or RO-3306. While elutriated and arrested cells have similar patterns of DNA content and cyclin expression, a large fraction of the proteome changes detected in arrested cells are found to reflect arrest-specific responses (i.e., starvation, DNA damage, CDK1 inhibition), rather than physiological cell cycle regulation. For example, we show most cells arrested in G2 by CDK1 inhibition express abnormally high levels of replication and origin licensing factors and are likely poised for genome re-replication. The protein data are available in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/), an online, searchable resource. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04534.001 PMID:25555159

  15. Adenosine induces G2/M cell-cycle arrest by inhibiting cell mitosis progression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun-Zhi; Tang, Bo; Yu, Lu; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Jian-Fa; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2009-12-16

    Cellular adenosine accumulates under stress conditions. Few papers on adenosine are concerned with its function in the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the essential mechanism by which all living things reproduce and the target machinery when cells encounter stresses, so it is necessary to examine the relationship between adenosine and the cell cycle. In the present study, adenosine was found to induce G-2/M cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, adenosine was found to modulate the expression of some important proteins in the cell cycle, such as cyclin B and p21, and to inhibit the transition of metaphase to anaphase in mitosis.

  16. Knockdown of REGγ inhibits proliferation by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaojun; Wang, Longsheng; Xu, Chen; Chen, Hui; Peng, Bo; Xu, Yunfei; Yao, Xudong; Li, Lei; Zheng, Junhua

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignant tumor and the second leading cause of cancer related death among men in western countries. REGγ, a proteasome activator, is reported to play important roles in various human cancers. However, the expression patterns and potential roles of REGγ in prostate cancer have never been reported. In this study, we found for the first time that REGγ is overexpressed in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines at both protein and mRNA levels. In addition, we demonstrated that knockdown of REGγ significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in PCa cell lines PC-3 and DU145. Moreover, we observed that the expressions of P21 were increased while the levels of cycinD1 and bcl-2 were decreased after knockdown of REGγ in PCa cells. And the stabilization of P21 was enhanced after REGγ knockdown in PC-3 cells. In summary, our findings suggest that REGγ may play important roles in prostate cancer and may serve as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of PCa patients. PMID:28861169

  17. Artemisinin triggers induction of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in Leishmania donovani promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Sen, Rupashree; Bandyopadhyay, Samiran; Dutta, Avijit; Mandal, Goutam; Ganguly, Sudipto; Saha, Piu; Chatterjee, Mitali

    2007-09-01

    A major impediment to effective anti-leishmanial chemotherapy is the emergence of drug resistance, especially to sodium antimony gluconate, the first-line treatment for leishmaniasis. Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Artemisia annua, is an established anti-malarial compound that showed anti-leishmanial activity in both promastigotes and amastigotes, with IC(50) values of 160 and 22 microM, respectively, and, importantly, was accompanied by a high safety index (>22-fold). The leishmanicidal activity of artemisinin was mediated via apoptosis as evidenced by externalization of phosphatidylserine, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, in situ labelling of DNA fragments by terminal deoxyribonucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) and cell-cycle arrest at the sub-G(0)/G(1) phase. Taken together, these data indicate that artemisinin has promising anti-leishmanial activity that is mediated by programmed cell death and, accordingly, merits consideration and further investigation as a therapeutic option for the treatment of leishmaniasis.

  18. Schlafen-1 causes a cell cycle arrest by inhibiting induction of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gareth; Boggan, Louise; Bowie, Andrew; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2005-09-02

    Schlafen-1 (Slfn-1), the prototypic member of the Schlafen family of proteins, was described as an inducer of growth arrest in T-lymphocytes and causes a cell cycle arrest in NIH3T3 fibroblasts prior to the G1/S transition. How Slfn-1 exerts its effects on the cell cycle is not currently known. We report that synchronized murine fibroblasts expressing Slfn-1 do not exit G1 when stimulated with fetal calf serum, platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) or epidermal growth factor (EGF). The induction of cyclin D1 by these stimuli was blocked in the presence of Slfn-1 as were all downstream cell cycle processes. Overexpression of cyclin D1 in growth-arrested, Slfn-1-expressing cells induced an increase in cell growth consistent with this protein being the biological target of Slfn-1. Activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by EGF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was unaffected by Slfn-1 expression. PDGF signaling was, however, almost completely blocked. This was due to a lack of PDGF receptor expression in Slfn-1-expressing cells consistent with Slfn-1 blocking the cell cycle in G1 where PDGF receptor expression is normally down-regulated. Finally, overexpression of Slfn-1 inhibited the activation of the cyclin D1 promoter. Slfn-1 therefore causes a cell cycle arrest during G1 by inhibiting induction of cyclin D1 by mitogens.

  19. Glucose restriction induces transient G2 cell cycle arrest extending cellular chronological lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Fumie; Ishii, Mahiro; Mori, Ayaka; Uehara, Lisa; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Kojiro; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2016-01-01

    While glucose is the fundamental source of energy in most eukaryotes, it is not always abundantly available in natural environments, including within the human body. Eukaryotic cells are therefore thought to possess adaptive mechanisms to survive glucose-limited conditions, which remain unclear. Here, we report a novel mechanism regulating cell cycle progression in response to abrupt changes in extracellular glucose concentration. Upon reduction of glucose in the medium, wild-type fission yeast cells undergo transient arrest specifically at G2 phase. This cell cycle arrest is dependent on the Wee1 tyrosine kinase inhibiting the key cell cycle regulator, CDK1/Cdc2. Mutant cells lacking Wee1 are not arrested at G2 upon glucose limitation and lose viability faster than the wild-type cells under glucose-depleted quiescent conditions, suggesting that this cell cycle arrest is required for extension of chronological lifespan. Our findings indicate the presence of a novel cell cycle checkpoint monitoring glucose availability, which may be a good molecular target for cancer therapy. PMID:26804466

  20. HDAC8 Prevents Anthrax Lethal Toxin-induced Cell Cycle Arrest through Silencing PTEN in Human Monocytic THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Soon-Duck; Cho, Woohyun; Kim, Sung Ouk

    2017-01-01

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) is a cytotoxic virulence factor that causes cell cycle arrest and cell death in various cell types. However, susceptibility to the cytotoxic effects varies depending on cell types. In proliferating monocytes, LeTx has only transient cytotoxic effects due to activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT-mediated adaptive responses. To date, the mechanism of LeTx in activating PI3K-AKT signaling axis is unknown. This study shows that the histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) is involved in activating PI3K-AKT signaling axis through down-regulating the phosphatase and tensin homolog 1 (PTEN) in human monocytic THP-1 cells. The HDAC8-specific activator TM-2-51 and inhibitor PCI-34051 enhanced and prevented, respectively, AKT activation and cell cycle progression in LeTx-treated cells. Furthermore, HDAC8 induced tri-methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3), which is known to suppress PTEN expression, through at least in part down-regulating the H3K27me3 eraser Jumonji Domain Containing (JMJD) 3. Importantly, the JMJD3-specific inhibitor GSK-J4 induced AKT activation and protected cell cycle arrest in LeTx-treated cells, regardless the presence of HDAC8 activity. Collectively, this study for the first time demonstrated that HDAC8 activity determines susceptibility to cell cycle arrest induced by LeTx, through regulating the PI3K-PTEN-AKT signaling axis. PMID:28509866

  1. Scorpion (Androctonus bicolor) venom exhibits cytotoxicity and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in breast and colorectal cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K.; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Abbasmanthiri, Rajamohamed; Arshaduddin, Mohammed; Al-Harthi, Fahad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The defective apoptosis is believed to play a major role in the survival and proliferation of neoplastic cells. Hence, the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells is one of the targets for cancer treatment. Researchers are considering scorpion venom as a potent natural source for cancer treatment because it contains many bioactive compounds. The main objective of the current study is to evaluate the anticancer property of Androctonus bicolor scorpion venom on cancer cells. Materials and Methods: Scorpions were milked by electrical stimulation of telsons and lyophilized. The breast (MDA-MB-231) and colorectal (HCT-8) cancer cells were maintained in appropriate condition. The venom cytotoxicity was assessed by 3-(4,5-di-methylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay, and the cellular and nuclear changes were studied with propidium iodide and 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole stain, respectively. The cell cycle arrest was examined using muse cell analyzer. Results: The A. bicolor venom exerted cytotoxic effects on MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cells in a dose- and duration-dependent manner and induced apoptotic cell death. The treatment with this venom arrests the cancer cells in G0/G1 phase of cell cycle. Conclusions: The venom selectively induces the rate of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cells as reflected by morphological and cell cycle studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first scientific evidence demonstrating the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by A. bicolor scorpion venom. PMID:27721540

  2. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction inhibits telomerase activity independent of its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, M; Ogawa, T; Mizumoto, K; Ueno, H; Niiyama, H; Sato, N; Nakamura, M; Tanaka, M

    1999-08-01

    Evidence for a relationship between overexpression of wild-type p53 and telomerase activity remains controversial. We investigated whether p53 gene transduction could cause telomerase inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines, focusing on the relation of transduction to growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic cell death. The cells were infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing wild-type p53 or p21WAF1 at a multiplicity of infection of 100 or were continuously exposed to 10 microM VP-16, which is well known to induce apoptosis. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction caused G1 cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and resultant growth inhibition in MIA PaCa-2 cells; the cell number 2 days after infection was 50% of preinfection value, and 13% of the cells were dead. Moreover, the transduction resulted in complete depression of telomerase activity through down-regulation of hTERT mRNA expression. In contrast, p21WAF1 gene transduction only arrested cell growth and cell cycle at G1 phase, and VP-16 treatment inhibited cell growth with G2-M arrest and apoptosis; after treatment, the cell number was 73% of pretreatment, and 12% of the cells were dead. Neither p21WAF1 gene transduction nor VP-16 treatment caused telomerase inhibition. Similar results were obtained in two other pancreatic cancer cell lines, SUIT-2 and AsPC-1. Thus, our results demonstrate that the p53 gene transduction directly inhibits telomerase activity, independent of its effects on cell growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis.

  3. Cell-cycle arrest and acute kidney injury: the light and the dark sides

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, John A.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common consequence of systemic illness or injury and it complicates several forms of major surgery. Two major difficulties have hampered progress in AKI research and clinical management. AKI is difficult to detect early and its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. We recently reported results from multi-center studies where two urinary markers of cell-cycle arrest, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) were validated for development of AKI well ahead of clinical manifestations—azotemia and oliguria. Cell-cycle arrest is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of AKI and this ‘dark side’ may also involve progression to chronic kidney disease. However, cell-cycle arrest has a ‘light side’ as well, since this mechanism can protect cells from the disastrous consequences of entering cell division with damaged DNA or insufficient bioenergetic resources during injury or stress. Whether we can use the light side to help prevent AKI remains to be seen, but there is already evidence that cell-cycle arrest biomarkers are indicators of both sides of this complex physiology. PMID:26044835

  4. Valproic acid induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Maria G; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Pugliese, Mariateresa; Costantino, Lucia; Poli, Roberta; Bosco, Ornella; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe

    2005-03-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma is an aggressive human cancer that is resistant to conventional therapy. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are a promising class of drugs, acting as antiproliferative agents by promoting differentiation, as well as inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Valproic acid (VPA), a class I selective histone deacetylase inhibitor widely used as an anticonvulsant, promotes differentiation in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells by inducing Na(+)/I(-) symporter and increasing iodine uptake. Here, we show that it is also highly effective at suppressing growth in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cell lines (N-PA and BHT-101). Apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest are the underlying mechanisms of VPA's effect on cell growth. It induces apoptosis by activating the intrinsic pathway; caspases 3 and 9 are activated but not caspase 8. Cell cycle is selectively arrested in G(1) and is associated with the increased expression of p21 and the reduced expression of cyclin A. Both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are induced by treatment with 1 mm VPA, a dose that promotes cell redifferentiation and that is slightly above the serum concentration reached in patients treated for epilepsy. These multifaceted properties make VPA of clinical interest as a new approach to treating poorly differentiated thyroid cancer.

  5. Kaempferol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma through EGFR/p38 signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenbin; Dang, Qiang; Xu, Defeng; Chen, Yule; Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Kaijie; Zeng, Jin; Long, Qingzhi; Wang, Xinyang; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2014-03-01

    Kaempferol has been shown to inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in several tumors, but not in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In the present study, we investigated the effects of kaempferol and the underlying mechanism(s) on the cell growth of RCC cells. MTT assay and colony formation assay were used to study cell growth, and flow cytometry was used to study apoptosis and cell cycles in different RCC cells treated with various doses of kaempferol. A significant inhibition on cell growth, induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were observed in 786-O and 769-P cells after kaempferol treatment compared with the control group. Moreover, the results clearly showed that kaempferol causes a strong inhibition of the activation of the EGFR/p38 signaling pathways, upregulation of p21 expression and downregulation of cyclin B1 expression in human RCC cells, together with activation of PARP cleavages, induction of apoptotic death and inhibition of cell growth. Collectively, our results suggest that kaempferol may serve as a candidate for chemo-preventive or chemotherapeutic agents for RCC.

  6. Fisetin and hesperetin induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in chronic myeloid leukemia cells accompanied by modulation of cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Adan, Aysun; Baran, Yusuf

    2016-05-01

    Fisetin and hesperetin, naturally occurring flavonoids, have been reported as novel antioxidants with chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic potential against various types of cancer. However, their mechanism of action in CML is still unknown. This particular study aims to evaluate the therapeutic potentials of fisetin and hesperetin and their effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression in human K562 CML cells. The results indicated that fisetin and hesperetin inhibited cell proliferation and triggered programmed cell death in these cells. The latter was confırmed by mitochondrial membrane depolarization and an increase in caspase-3 activation. In addition to that, we have detected S and G2/M cell cycle arrests and G0/G1 arrest upon fisetin and hesperetin treatment, respectively. To identify the altered genes and genetic networks in response to fisetin and hesperetin, whole-genome microarray analysis was performed. The microarray gene profiling analysis revealed some important signaling pathways including JAK/STAT pathway, KIT receptor signaling, and growth hormone receptor signaling that were altered upon fisetin and hesperetin treatment. Moreover, microarray data suggested potential candidate genes for targeted CML therapy. Fisetin and hesperetin significantly modulated the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and division, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, and other significant cellular processes such as replication, transcription, and translation. In conclusion, our results suggest that fisetin and hesperetin as potential natural agents for CML therapy.

  7. Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng. seed extract suppresses breast cancer growth by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Yanmin; Liu, Yanping; Yang, Xiaoyan Ou; Zhan, Yingzhuan

    2015-10-01

    The herb Momordica cochinchinensis has been used for a variety of purposes, and been shown to have anti‑cancer properties. The present study assessed the potency and the underlying mechanisms of action of the ethyl acetate extract of seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis (ESMC2) on breast cancer cells. Therefore, the effects of ESMC2 on the cell viability, cell cycle and apoptosis of MDA‑MB‑231 cells were investigated. The results showed that ESMC2 exerted a marked growth inhibitory effect on the cells. Cell cycle arrest in G2 phase following treatment with ESMC2 was associated with a marked increase in the protein levels of cyclin B1, cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and a decrease in cyclin D1 expression. In addition, ESMC2 dose‑dependently induced cell apoptosis, which was mediated via upregulation of the apoptosis-associated proteins p53, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2)‑associated X protein, Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer and Bcl-2-associated death promoter expression, as well as downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B, Bcl‑2 and myeloid cell leukemia‑1. Furthermore, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Akt phosphorylation were decreased by ESMC2 in a dose‑dependent manner, indicating that ESMC2 exerted its effects via the mitogen-activated protein kinase/JNK pathway. Furthermore, nude mouse xenotransplant models were used to evaluate the tumor growth inhibitory effects of ESMC2. The possible chemical components of ESMC2 were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and 12 compounds were detected from the major peaks based on the similarity index with entries of a compound database. The results of the present study may aid in the development of novel therapies for breast cancer.

  8. Effects of curine in HL-60 leukemic cells: cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Bruna Braga; Faheina-Martins, Gláucia Veríssimo; Coulidiati, Tangbadioa Hervé; Bomfim, Caio César Barbosa; da Silva Dias, Celidarque; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Araújo, Demetrius Antônio Machado

    2015-04-01

    Curine is a natural alkaloid isolated from Chondrodendron platyphyllum and it has been reported that this alkaloid has vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study is to analyze the cytotoxic effects of curine in cancer cell lines HL-60, K562, and HT-29, and in primary cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Cells were treated with curine (from 3 to 15 µM) for 24 and 48 h. Cell viability was analyzed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and flow cytometry with propidium iodide (PI) assay. To assess the type of cell death induced in HL-60, the cell cycle, morphological, and biochemical alterations were analyzed, which were determined by differential staining with acridine orange/ethidium bromide, and annexin V/PI double-labeling and change in mitochondrial membrane potential assays. Curine demonstrated a potent cytotoxic effect on leukemic cell lines (HL-60 and K562). Its cytotoxic effects in HL-60 cells was related to plasma membrane damage and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase from 43.4 ± 1.0 to 56.7 ± 1.4 % (p < 0.05). Curine (15 μM) also increased the apoptotic cells number by around 60 % in HL-60 cells and caused phosphatidylserine externalization, inducing about 57 % of apoptosis. Moreover, this alkaloid provoked 20 % of mitochondrial membrane depolarization. We conclude that curine presented a cytotoxic effect and induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. Thus, it can be considered a promising pharmacological drug.

  9. Abnormal mitosis triggers p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in human tetraploid cells.

    PubMed

    Kuffer, Christian; Kuznetsova, Anastasia Yurievna; Storchová, Zuzana

    2013-08-01

    Erroneously arising tetraploid mammalian cells are chromosomally instable and may facilitate cell transformation. An increasing body of evidence shows that the propagation of mammalian tetraploid cells is limited by a p53-dependent arrest. The trigger of this arrest has not been identified so far. Here we show by live cell imaging of tetraploid cells generated by an induced cytokinesis failure that most tetraploids arrest and die in a p53-dependent manner after the first tetraploid mitosis. Furthermore, we found that the main trigger is a mitotic defect, in particular, chromosome missegregation during bipolar mitosis or spindle multipolarity. Both a transient multipolar spindle followed by efficient clustering in anaphase as well as a multipolar spindle followed by multipolar mitosis inhibited subsequent proliferation to a similar degree. We found that the tetraploid cells did not accumulate double-strand breaks that could cause the cell cycle arrest after tetraploid mitosis. In contrast, tetraploid cells showed increased levels of oxidative DNA damage coinciding with the p53 activation. To further elucidate the pathways involved in the proliferation control of tetraploid cells, we knocked down specific kinases that had been previously linked to the cell cycle arrest and p53 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the checkpoint kinase ATM phosphorylates p53 in tetraploid cells after abnormal mitosis and thus contributes to proliferation control of human aberrantly arising tetraploids.

  10. Aristolochic acid-induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest depends on ROS generation and MAP kinases activation.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Whyard, Terry C; Waltzer, Wayne C; Grollman, Arthur P; Rosenquist, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ingestion of aristolochic acids (AAs) contained in herbal remedies results in a renal disease and, frequently, urothelial malignancy. The genotoxicity of AA in renal cells, including mutagenic DNA adducts formation, is well documented. However, the mechanisms of AA-induced tubular atrophy and renal fibrosis are largely unknown. To better elucidate some aspects of this process, we studied cell cycle distribution and cell survival of renal epithelial cells treated with AAI at low and high doses. A low dose of AA induces cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase via activation of DNA damage checkpoint pathway ATM-Chk2-p53-p21. DNA damage signaling pathway is activated more likely via increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by AA treatment then via DNA damage induced directly by AA. Higher AA concentration induced cell death partly via apoptosis. Since mitogen-activated protein kinases play an important role in cell survival, death and cell cycle progression, we assayed their function in AA-treated renal tubular epithelial cells. ERK1/2 and p38 but not JNK were activated in cells treated with AA. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 as well as suppression of ROS generation with N-acetyl-L-cysteine resulted in the partial relief of cells from G2/M checkpoint and a decline of apoptosis level. Cell cycle arrest may be a mechanism for DNA repair, cell survival and reprogramming of epithelial cells to the fibroblast type. An apoptosis of renal epithelial cells at higher AA dose might be necessary to provide space for newly reprogrammed fibrotic cells.

  11. DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest: a hallmark of apoptosis induced by Ruta graveolens in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Arora, Shagun; Tandon, Simran

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of various potencies of Ruta graveolens (Ruta) on COLO-205 cell line, as evidenced by cytotoxicity, migration, clonogenecity, morphological and biochemical changes and modification in the levels of genes associated with apoptosis and cell cycle. On treatment of COLO-205 cells maximal effects were seen with mother tincture (MT) and 30C potencies, wherein decrease in cell viability along with reduced clonogenecity and migration capabilities were noted. In addition morphological and biochemical alterations such as nuclear changes (fragmented nuclei with condensed chromatin) and DNA ladder-like pattern (increased amount of fragmented DNA) in COLO-205 cells indicating apoptotic related cell death were seen. The expression of apoptosis and cell-cycle related regulatory genes assessed by reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed an up-regulation of caspase 9, caspase-3, Bax, p21 and p27 expression and down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression in treated cells. The mode of cell death was suggestive of intrinsic apoptotic pathway along with cell cycle arrest at the G2/M of the cell cycle. Our findings indicate that phytochemicals present in Ruta showed potential for natural therapeutic product development for colon carcinoma.

  12. Dux4 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through upregulation of p21 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jin, Suqin; Hao, Hongjun; Zheng, Lemin; Zhou, Boda; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Dux4 induced TE671 cell proliferation defect and G1 phase arrest. • Dux4 upregulated p21 expression without activating p53. • Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. • Sp1 binding site was required for Dux4-induced p21 promoter activation. - Abstract: It has been implicated that Dux4 plays crucial roles in development of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. But the underlying myopathic mechanisms and related down-stream events of this retrogene were far from clear. Here, we reported that overexpression of Dux4 in a cell model TE671 reduced cell proliferation rate, and increased G1 phase accumulation. We also determined the impact of Dux4 on p53/p21 signal pathway, which controls the checkpoint in cell cycle progression. Overexpression of Dux4 increased p21 mRNA and protein level, while expression of p53, phospho-p53 remained unchanged. Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrated that enhanced Dux4 expression increased p21 promoter activity and elevated expression of Sp1 transcription factor. Mutation of Sp1 binding site decreased dux4 induced p21 promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the Dux4-induced binding of Sp1 to p21 promoter in vivo. These results suggest that Dux4 might induce proliferation inhibition and G1 phase arrest through upregulation of p21.

  13. Brain stem death as the vital determinant for resumption of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Julie Y H; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Chan, Samuel H H

    2009-11-04

    Spontaneous circulation returns to less than half of adult cardiac arrest victims who received in-hospital resuscitation. One clue for this disheartening outcome arises from the prognosis that asystole invariably takes place, after a time lag, on diagnosis of brain stem death. The designation of brain stem death as the point of no return further suggests that permanent impairment of the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery precedes death. It follows that a crucial determinant for successful revival of an arrested heart is that spontaneous circulation must resume before brain stem death commences. Here, we evaluated the hypothesis that maintained functional integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), a neural substrate that is intimately related to brain stem death and central circulatory regulation, holds the key to the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation. An animal model of brain stem death employing the pesticide mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rats was used. Intravenous administration of lethal doses of mevinphos elicited an abrupt cardiac arrest, accompanied by elevated systemic arterial pressure and anoxia, augmented neuronal excitability and enhanced microvascular perfusion in RVLM. This period represents the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation in our experimental model. Animals with restored spontaneous circulation exhibited maintained neuronal functionality in RVLM beyond this critical time-window, alongside resumption of baseline tissue oxygen and enhancement of local blood flow. Intriguingly, animals that subsequently died manifested sustained anoxia, diminished local blood flow, depressed mitochondrial electron transport activities and reduced ATP production, leading to necrotic cell death in RVLM. That amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction and bioenergetic failure in RVLM by coenzyme Q10, the mobile electron

  14. Nucleolar asymmetry and the importance of septin integrity upon cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Urvashi; Najm, Fadi

    2017-01-01

    Cell cycle arrest can be imposed by inactivating the anaphase promoting complex (APC). In S. cerevisiae this arrest has been reported to stabilize a metaphase-like intermediate in which the nuclear envelope spans the bud neck, while chromatin repeatedly translocates between the mother and bud domains. The present investigation was undertaken to learn how other features of nuclear organization are affected upon depletion of the APC activator, Cdc20. We observe that the spindle pole bodies and the spindle repeatedly translocate across the narrow orifice at the level of the neck. Nevertheless, we find that the nucleolus (organized around rDNA repeats on the long right arm of chromosome XII) remains in the mother domain, marking the polarity of the nucleus. Accordingly, chromosome XII is polarized: TelXIIR remains in the mother domain and its centromere is predominantly located in the bud domain. In order to learn why the nucleolus remains in the mother domain, we studied the impact of inhibiting rRNA synthesis in arrested cells. We observed that this fragments the nucleolus and that these fragments entered the bud domain. Taken together with earlier observations, the restriction of the nucleolus to the mother domain therefore can be attributed to its massive structure. We also observed that inactivation of septins allowed arrested cells to complete the cell cycle, that the alternative APC activator, Cdh1, was required for completion of the cell cycle and that induction of Cdh1 itself caused arrested cells to progress to the end of the cell cycle. PMID:28339487

  15. Prp19 Arrests Cell Cycle via Cdc5L in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renzheng; Xue, Ruyi; Qu, Di; Yin, Jie; Shen, Xi-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Pre-mRNA processing factor 19 (Prp19) is involved in many cellular events including pre-mRNA processing and DNA damage response. Recently, it has been identified as a candidate oncogene in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the role of Prp19 in tumor biology is still elusive. Here, we reported that Prp19 arrested cell cycle in HCC cells via regulating G2/M transition. Mechanistic insights revealed that silencing Prp19 inhibited the expression of cell division cycle 5-like (Cdc5L) via repressing the translation of Cdc5L mRNA and facilitating lysosome-mediated degradation of Cdc5L in HCC cells. Furthermore, we found that silencing Prp19 induced cell cycle arrest could be partially resumed by overexpressing Cdc5L. This work implied that Prp19 participated in mitotic progression and thus could be a promising therapeutic target of HCC. PMID:28387715

  16. Postnatal telomere dysfunction induces cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest through p21 activation

    PubMed Central

    Aix, Esther; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Óscar; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlota; Aguado, Tania

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that drive mammalian cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle soon after birth remain largely unknown. Here, we identify telomere dysfunction as a critical physiological signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We show that telomerase activity and cardiomyocyte telomere length decrease sharply in wild-type mouse hearts after birth, resulting in cardiomyocytes with dysfunctional telomeres and anaphase bridges and positive for the cell-cycle arrest protein p21. We further show that premature telomere dysfunction pushes cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle. Cardiomyocytes from telomerase-deficient mice with dysfunctional telomeres (G3 Terc−/−) show precocious development of anaphase-bridge formation, p21 up-regulation, and binucleation. In line with these findings, the cardiomyocyte proliferative response after cardiac injury was lost in G3 Terc−/− newborns but rescued in G3 Terc−/−/p21−/− mice. These results reveal telomere dysfunction as a crucial signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest after birth and suggest interventions to augment the regeneration capacity of mammalian hearts. PMID:27241915

  17. The long non-coding RNA GAS5 differentially regulates cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of BRCA1 and p53 in human neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mazar, Joseph; Rosado, Amy; Shelley, John; Marchica, John; Westmoreland, Tamarah J

    2017-01-01

    The long non-coding RNA GAS5 has been shown to modulate cancer proliferation in numerous human cancer systems and has been correlated with successful patient outcome. Our examination of GAS5 in neuroblastoma has revealed robust expression in both MYCN-amplified and non-amplified cell lines. Knockdown of GAS5 In vitro resulted in defects in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and induced cell cycle arrest. Further analysis of GAS5 clones revealed multiple novel splice variants, two of which inversely modulated with MYCN status. Complementation studies of the variants post-knockdown of GAS5 indicated alternate phenotypes, with one variant (FL) considerably enhancing cell proliferation by rescuing cell cycle arrest and the other (C2) driving apoptosis, suggesting a unique role for each in neuroblastoma cancer physiology. Global sequencing and ELISA arrays revealed that the loss of GAS5 induced p53, BRCA1, and GADD45A, which appeared to modulate cell cycle arrest in concert. Complementation with only the FL GAS5 clone could rescue cell cycle arrest, stabilizing HDM2, and leading to the loss of p53. Together, these data offer novel therapeutic targets in the form of lncRNA splice variants for separate challenges against cancer growth and cell death. PMID:28035057

  18. Cell cycle age dependence for radiation-induced G/sub 2/ arrest: evidence for time-dependent repair

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.

    1985-09-01

    Exponentially growing eucaryotic cells, irradiated in interphase, are delayed in progression to mitosis chiefly by arrest in G/sub 2/. The sensitivity of Chinese hamster ovary cells to G/sub 2/ arrest induction by X rays increases through the cell cycle, up to the X-ray transition point (TP) in G/sub 2/. This age response can be explained by cell cycle age-dependent changes in susceptibility of the target(s) for G/sub 2/ arrest and/or by changes in capability for postirradiation recovery from G/sub 2/ arrest damage. Discrimination between sensitivity changes and repair phenomena is possible only if the level of G/sub 2/ arrest-causing damage sustained by a cell at the time of irradiation and the level ultimately expressed as arrest can be determined. The ability of caffeine to ameliorate radiation-induced G/sub 2/ arrest, while inhibiting repair of G/sub 2/ arrest-causing damage makes such an analysis possible. In the presence of caffeine, progression of irradiated cells was relatively unperturbed, but on caffeine removal, G/sub 2/ arrest was expressed. The duration of G/sub 2/ arrest was independent of the length of the prior caffeine exposure. This finding indicates that the target for G/sub 2/ arrest induction is present throughout the cell cycle and that the level of G/sub 2/ arrest damage incurred is initially constant for all cell cycle phases. The data are consistent with the existence of a time-dependent recovery mechanism to explain the age dependence for radiation induction of G/sub 2/ arrest.

  19. Cell cycle arrest in a model of colistin nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hack, Bradley K.; Alexander, Jessy J.; Xu, Chang; Dolan, M. Eileen; Cunningham, Patrick N.

    2013-01-01

    Colistin (polymixin E) is an antibiotic prescribed with resurging frequency for multidrug resistant gram negative bacterial infections. It is associated with nephrotoxicity in humans in up to 55% of cases. Little is known regarding genes involved in colistin nephrotoxicity. A murine model of colistin-mediated kidney injury was developed. C57/BL6 mice were administered saline or colistin at a dose of 16 mg/kg/day in 2 divided intraperitoneal doses and killed after either 3 or 15 days of colistin. After 15 days, mice exposed to colistin had elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and pathologic evidence of acute tubular necrosis and apoptosis. After 3 days, mice had neither BUN elevation nor substantial pathologic injury; however, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin was elevated (P = 0.017). An Illumina gene expression array was performed on kidney RNA harvested 72 h after first colistin dose to identify differentially expressed genes early in drug treatment. Array data revealed 21 differentially expressed genes (false discovery rate < 0.1) between control and colistin-exposed mice, including LGALS3 and CCNB1. The gene signature was significantly enriched for genes involved in cell cycle proliferation. RT-PCR, immunoblot, and immunostaining validated the relevance of key genes and proteins. This murine model offers insights into the potential mechanism of colistin-mediated nephrotoxicity. Further studies will determine whether the identified genes play a causative or protective role in colistin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:23922129

  20. Cell Cycle Regulators and Cell Death in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zebell, Sophia G.; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Various cell death mechanisms are integral to host defense in both plants and mammals. Plant defense against biotrophic pathogens is associated with programmed cell death (PCD) of the infected cell. This effector-triggered PCD is partly analogous to pyroptosis, an inflammatory host cell death process that plays a crucial role in defense against microbial infections in mammals. Plant effector-triggered PCD also shares with mammalian apoptosis the involvement of cell cycle regulators as signaling components. Here we explore the similarities between these different cell death programs as they relate to host defense and their relationship to the cell-cycle. PMID:26468745

  1. Cell-Cycle Regulators and Cell Death in Immunity.

    PubMed

    Zebell, Sophia G; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-10-14

    Various cell death mechanisms are integral to host defense in both plants and mammals. Plant defense against biotrophic pathogens is associated with programmed cell death (PCD) of the infected cell. This effector-triggered PCD is partly analogous to pyroptosis, an inflammatory host cell death process that plays a crucial role in defense against microbial infections in mammals. Plant effector-triggered PCD also shares with mammalian apoptosis the involvement of cell-cycle regulators as signaling components. Here we explore the similarities between these different cell death programs as they relate to host defense and their relationship to the cell cycle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. AMPK Causes Cell Cycle Arrest in LKB1-deficient Cells via Activation of CAMKK2

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, Sarah; Ross, Fiona A.; Ciruelos, Diana Vara; Gray, Alexander; Gowans, Graeme J.; Hardie, D. Grahame

    2017-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated by phosphorylation at Thr172, either by the tumor suppressor kinase LKB1 or by an alternate pathway involving the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase, CAMKK2. Increases in AMP:ATP and ADP:ATP ratios, signifying energy deficit, promote allosteric activation and net Thr172 phosphorylation mediated by LKB1, so that the LKB1-AMPK pathway acts as an energy sensor. Many tumor cells carry loss-of-function mutations in the STK11 gene encoding LKB1, but LKB1 re-expression in these cells causes cell cycle arrest. Therefore, it was investigated as to whether arrest by LKB1 is caused by activation of AMPK or of one of the AMPK-related kinases, which are also dependent on LKB1 but are not activated by CAMKK2. In three LKB1-null tumor cell lines, treatment with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 caused a G1-arrest that correlated with AMPK activation and Thr172 phosphorylation. In G361 cells, expression of a truncated, CAMKK2 mutant also caused G1-arrest similar to that caused by expression of LKB1, while expression of a dominant negative AMPK mutant, or a double knockout of both AMPK-α subunits, also prevented the cell cycle arrest caused by A23187. These mechanistic findings confirm that AMPK activation triggers cell cycle arrest, and also suggest that the rapid proliferation of LKB1-null tumor cells is due to lack of the restraining influence of AMPK. However, cell cycle arrest can be restored by re-expressing LKB1 or a constitutively active CAMKK2, or by pharmacological agents that increase intracellular Ca2+ and thus activate endogenous CAMKK2. Implications Evidence here reveals that the rapid growth and proliferation of cancer cells lacking the tumor suppressor LKB1 is due to reduced activity of AMPK, and suggests a therapeutic approach by which this block might be circumvented. PMID:27141100

  3. Lipid biomarkers of glioma cell growth arrest and cell death detected by 1 H magic angle spinning MRS.

    PubMed

    Mirbahai, Ladan; Wilson, Martin; Shaw, Christopher S; McConville, Carmel; Malcomson, Roger D G; Kauppinen, Risto A; Peet, Andrew C

    2012-11-01

    Biomarkers of early response to treatment have the potential to improve cancer therapy by allowing treatment to be tailored to the individual. Alterations in lipids detected by in vivo MRS have been suggested as noninvasive biomarkers of cell stress and early indicators of cell death. An improved understanding of the relationship between MRS lipids and cell stress in vitro would aid in the translation of this technique into clinical use. Rat BT4C glioma cells were treated with 50 µ m cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum II (cisplatin), a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, and harvested at several time points up to 72 h. High-resolution magic angle spinning (1) H MRS of cells was then performed on a 600-MHz NMR spectrometer. The metabolites were quantified using a time domain fitting method, TARQUIN. Increases were detected in saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid resonances early during the exposure to cisplatin. The fatty acid CH(2) /CH(3) ratio was unaltered by treatment after allowing for contributions of macromolecules. Polyunsaturated fatty acids increased on treatment, with the group -CH=CH-CH(2) -CH=CH- accounting for all the unsaturated fatty acid signals. Transmission electron microscopy, in addition to Nile red and 4',6-diamino-2-phenylindole co-staining, revealed that the lipid increase was associated with cytoplasmic neutral lipid droplets. Small numbers of apoptotic and necrotic cells were detected by trypan blue, annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled flow cytometry and DNA laddering after up to 48 h of cisplatin exposure. Propidium iodide flow cytometry revealed that cells accumulated in the G1 stage of the cell growth cycle. In conclusion, an increase in the size of the lipid droplets is detected in morphologically viable cells during cisplatin exposure. (1) H MRS can detect lipid alterations during cell cycle arrest and progression of cell death, and has the potential to provide a noninvasive biomarker of treatment efficacy in vivo.

  4. Synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity, a poptosis and cell cycle arrest of dibenzoxanthenes derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiu-Zhen; Yao, Jun-Hua; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Wang, Ji; Huang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Two new dibenzoxanthenes compounds 1 and 2 have been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral methods. The crystal structure of compound 2 informs that the five rings of compound are almost planar. The DNA binding properties of two compounds were studied by absorption titration, viscosity measurement and luminescence. These results indicate that two compounds interact with calf thymus DNA through intercalative mode. Agarose gel electrophoresis experiment shows that PBR 322 DNA can be induced to cleave by two compounds under photoactivated condition. Compound 1 exhibits higher cytotoxicity than compound 2 toward MG-63, BEL-7402 and A549 cells. The apoptosis and cellular uptake of MG-63 cells were studied by fluorescence microscopy. Two compounds can also enhance the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. Compound 1 induces cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and compound 2 induces cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase in MG-63.

  5. Arctigenin induces cell cycle arrest by blocking the phosphorylation of Rb via the modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Hong, Se Chul; Jeong, Hyung Jin; Koo, Jin Suk

    2011-10-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, worldwide being second only to lung cancer as a cause of death. Arctigenin, a representative dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, occurs in a variety of plants. However, the molecular mechanisms of arctigenin for anti-tumor effect on gastric cancer have not been examined. This study examined the biological effects of arctigenin on the human gastric cancer cell line SNU-1 and AGS. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. In MTT assay, the proliferation of SNU-1 and AGS cells was significantly inhibited by arctigenin in a time and dose dependent manner, as compared with SNU-1 and AGS cells cultured in the absence of arctigenin. Inhibition of cell proliferation by arctigenin was in part associated with apoptotic cell death, as shown by changes in the expression ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax by arctigenin. Also, arctigenin blocked cell cycle arrest from G(1) to S phase by regulating the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Rb, cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK4, CDK2, p21Waf1/Cip1 and p15 INK4b. The antiproliferative effect of arctigenin on SNU-1 and AGS gastric cancer cells revealed in this study suggests that arctigenin has intriguing potential as a chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Induction of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by berberine in bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Keqiang; Zhang, Cheng; Feng, Jinbo; Hou, Lifang; Yan, Lei; Zhou, Zunlin; Liu, Zhaoxu; Liu, Cheng; Fan, Yidon; Zheng, Baozhong; Xu, Zhonghua

    2011-07-01

    Bladder cancer is the ninth most common type of cancer, and its surgery is always followed by chemotherapy to prevent recurrence. Berberine is non-toxic to normal cells but has anti-cancer effects in many cancer cell lines. This study was aimed to determine whether berberine inhibits the cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in BIU-87 and T24 bladder cancer cell line. The superficial bladder cancer cell line BIU-87 and invasive T24 bladder cancer cells were treated with different concentrations of berberine. MTT assay was used to determine the effects of berberine on the viability of these cells. The cell cycle arrest was detected through propidium iodide (PI) staining. The induction of apoptosis was determined through Annexin V-conjugated Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa488) staining. Berberine inhibited the viability of BIU-87 and T24 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also promoted cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in a dose-dependent manner and induced apoptosis. We observed that H-Ras and c-fos mRNA and protein expressionswere dose-dependently and time-dependently decreased by berberine treatment. Also, we investigated the cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 protein expressions increased in a dose-dependent manner. Berberine inhibits the cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in BIU-87, bladder cancer cell line and T24, invasive bladder cancer cell line. Berberine can inhibit the oncogentic H-Ras and c-fos in T24 cells, and can induce the activation of the caspase-3 and caspase-9 apoptosis. Therefore, berberine has the potential to be a novel chemotherapy drug to treat the bladder cancer by suppressing tumor growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Simvastatin induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits proliferation of bladder cancer cells via PPARγ signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Cao, Rui; Wang, Yongzhi; Qian, Guofeng; Dan, Han C.; Jiang, Wei; Ju, Lingao; Wu, Min; Xiao, Yu; Wang, Xinghuan

    2016-01-01

    Simvastatin is currently one of the most common drugs for old patients with hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerotic diseases by reducing cholesterol level and anti-lipid properties. Importantly, simvastatin has also been reported to have anti-tumor effect, but the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. We collected several human bladder samples and performed microarray. Data analysis suggested bladder cancer (BCa) was significantly associated with fatty acid/lipid metabolism via PPAR signalling pathway. We observed simvastatin did not trigger BCa cell apoptosis, but reduced cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied by PPARγ-activation. Moreover, flow cytometry analysis indicated that simvastatin induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, suggested by downregulation of CDK4/6 and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, simvastatin suppressed BCa cell metastasis by inhibiting EMT and affecting AKT/GSK3β. More importantly, we found that the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and the alterations of CDK4/6 and Cyclin D1 triggered by simvastatin could be recovered by PPARγ-antagonist (GW9662), whereas the treatment of PPARα-antagonist (GW6471) shown no significant effects on the BCa cells. Taken together, our study for the first time revealed that simvastatin inhibited bladder cancer cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest at G1/G0 phase via PPARγ signalling pathway. PMID:27779188

  8. Unexpected arrest-related deaths in america: 12 months of open source surveillance.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jeffrey D; Heegaard, William G; Dawes, Donald M; Natarajan, Sridhar; Reardon, Robert F; Miner, James R

    2009-05-01

    Sudden, unexpected arrest-related death (ARD) has been associated with drug abuse, extreme delirium or certain police practices. There is insufficient surveillance and causation data available. We report 12 months of surveillance data using a novel data collection methodology. We used an open-source, prospective method to collect 12 consecutive months of data, including demographics, behavior, illicit substance use, control methods used, and time of collapse after law enforcement contact. Descriptive analysis and chi-square testing were applied. There were 162 ARD events reported that met inclusion criteria. The majority were male with mean age 36 years, and involved bizarre, agitated behavior and reports of drug abuse just prior to death. Law enforcement control techniques included none (14%); empty-hand techniques (69%); intermediate weapons such as TASER((R)) device, impact weapon or chemical irritant spray (52%); and deadly force (12%). Time from contact to subject collapse included instantaneous (13%), within the first hour (53%) and 1-48 hours (35%). Significant collapse time associations occurred with the use of certain intermediate weapons. This surveillance report can be a foundation for discussing ARD. These data support the premise that ARDs primarily occur in persons with a certain demographic and behavior profile that includes middle-aged males exhibiting agitated, bizarre behavior generally following illicit drug abuse. Collapse time associations were demonstrated with the use of TASER devices and impact weapons. We recommend further study in this area to validate our data collection method and findings.

  9. Unexpected Arrest-Related Deaths in America: 12 Months of Open Source Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jeffrey D.; Heegaard, William G.; Dawes, Donald M.; Natarajan, Sridhar; Reardon, Robert F.; Miner, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Sudden, unexpected arrest-related death (ARD) has been associated with drug abuse, extreme delirium or certain police practices. There is insufficient surveillance and causation data available. We report 12 months of surveillance data using a novel data collection methodology. Methods: We used an open-source, prospective method to collect 12 consecutive months of data, including demographics, behavior, illicit substance use, control methods used, and time of collapse after law enforcement contact. Descriptive analysis and chi-square testing were applied. Results: There were 162 ARD events reported that met inclusion criteria. The majority were male with mean age 36 years, and involved bizarre, agitated behavior and reports of drug abuse just prior to death. Law enforcement control techniques included none (14%); empty-hand techniques (69%); intermediate weapons such as TASER® device, impact weapon or chemical irritant spray (52%); and deadly force (12%). Time from contact to subject collapse included instantaneous (13%), within the first hour (53%) and 1–48 hours (35%). Significant collapse time associations occurred with the use of certain intermediate weapons. Conclusion: This surveillance report can be a foundation for discussing ARD. These data support the premise that ARDs primarily occur in persons with a certain demographic and behavior profile that includes middle-aged males exhibiting agitated, bizarre behavior generally following illicit drug abuse. Collapse time associations were demonstrated with the use of TASER devices and impact weapons. We recommend further study in this area to validate our data collection method and findings. PMID:19561821

  10. Cardiac arrest triggers hippocampal neuronal death through autophagic and apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Derong; Shang, Hanbing; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Wei; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of neuronal death induced by ischemic injury remains unknown. We investigated whether autophagy and p53 signaling played a role in the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons following global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, in a rat model of 8-min asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Increased autophagosome numbers, expression of lysosomal cathepsin B, cathepsin D, Beclin-1, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) suggested autophagy in hippocampal cells. The expression of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and its target genes: Bax, p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), and damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM) were upregulated following CA. The p53-specific inhibitor pifithrin-α (PFT-α) significantly reduced the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and PUMA) and autophagic proteins (LC3-II and DRAM) that generally increase following CA. PFT-α also reduced hippocampal neuronal damage following CA. Similarly, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which inhibits autophagy and bafilomycin A1 (BFA), which inhibits lysosomes, significantly inhibited hippocampal neuronal damage after CA. These results indicate that CA affects both autophagy and apoptosis, partially mediated by p53. Autophagy plays a significant role in hippocampal neuronal death induced by cerebral I/R following asphyxial-CA. PMID:27273382

  11. Crambescidin-816 acts as a fungicidal with more potency than crambescidin-800 and -830, inducing cell cycle arrest, increased cell size and apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rubiolo, Juan A; Ternon, Eva; López-Alonso, Henar; Thomas, Olivier P; Vega, Félix V; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2013-11-08

    In this paper, we show the effect of crambescidin-816, -800, and -830 on Saccharomyces cerevisiae viability. We determined that, of the three molecules tested, crambescidin-816 was the most potent. Based on this result, we continued by determining the effect of crambescidin-816 on the cell cycle of this yeast. The compound induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M followed by an increase in cell DNA content and size. When the type of cell death was analyzed, we observed that crambescidin-816 induced apoptosis. The antifungal effect indicates that crambescidins, and mostly crambescidin-816, could serve as a lead compound to fight fungal infections.

  12. Determination of death after circulatory arrest by intensive care physicians: A survey of current practice in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Wind, Jentina; van Mook, Walther N K A; Dhanani, Sonny; van Heurn, Ernest W L

    2016-02-01

    Determination of death is an essential part of donation after circulatory death (DCD). We studied the current practices of determination of death after circulatory arrest by intensive care physicians in the Netherlands, the availability of guidelines, and the occurrence of the phenomenon of autoresuscitation. The Determination of Cardiac Death Practices in Intensive Care Survey was sent to all intensive care physicians. Fifty-five percent of 568 Dutch intensive care physicians responded. Most respondents learned death determination from clinical practice. The most commonly used tests for death determination were flat arterial line tracing, flat electrocardiogram (standard 3-lead electrocardiogram), and fixed and dilated pupils. Rarely used tests were absence pulse by echo Doppler, absent blood pressure by noninvasive monitoring, and unresponsiveness to painful stimulus. No diagnostic test or procedure was uniformly performed, but 80% of respondents perceived a need for standardization of death determination. Autoresuscitation was witnessed by 37%, after withdrawal of treatment or after unsuccessful resuscitation. Extensive variability in the practice of determining death after circulatory arrest exists, and a need for guidelines and standardization, especially if organ donation follows death, is reported. Autoresuscitation is reported; this observation requires attention in further prospective observational studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, Chandramu; Dontula, Ranadheer; Gujrati, Meena; Lakka, Sajani S.

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  14. Mefloquine inhibits chondrocytic proliferation by arresting cell cycle in G2/M phase.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Chen, Zeng-Gan; Xia, Qing; Lin, Jian-Ping; Yan, Zuo-Qin; Yao, Zheng-Jun; Dong, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Mefloquine (MQ), an analog of chloroquine, exhibits a promising cytotoxic activity against carcinoma cell lines and for the treatment of glioblastoma patients. The present study demonstrates the effect of mefloquine on proliferation and cell cycle in chondrocytes. MTT assay and propidium iodide staining were used for the analysis of proliferation and cell cycle distribution, respectively. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression levels of cyclin B1/cdc2, cdc25c, p21WAF1/CIP1 and p53. The results revealed that mefloquine inhibited the proliferation of chondrocytes and caused cell cycle arrests in the G2/M phase. The proliferation of chondrocytes was reduced to 27% at 40 μM concentration of mefloquine after 48 h. The population of chondrocytes in G2/M phase was found to be 15.7 and 48.4%, respectively at 10 and 40 μM concentration of mefloquine at 48 h following treatment. The expression of the cell cycle regulatory proteins including, cyclin B1/cdc2 and cdc25c was inhibited. On the other hand, mefloquine treatment promoted the expression of p21WAF1/CIP1 and p53 at 40 μM concentration after 48 h. Therefore, mefloquine inhibits proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest in chondrocytes.

  15. Involvement of Mcl1 in diallyl disulfide-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lan; Ji, Xiao-Xia; Tan, Hui; Feng, Mei-Yan; Tang, Yi; Wen, Ling; Su, Qi

    2012-06-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) has shown potential as a therapeutic agent in various cancers. Previously, we found that myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl1) was downregulated in DADS-induced cell cycle arrest in HL-60 human leukemia cells. Here, we investigated the role of this protein in DADS-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in HL-60 cells. We demonstrated that DADS treatment significantly increased the proportion of G2/M phase HL-60 cells (P<0.05) and caused a time-dependent significant downregulation of Mcl1 and the cell cycle-related proteins PCNA and CDK1 (P<0.05). Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Mcl1 expression in HL-60 cells arrested the cell cycle in G2/M phase. By co-immunoprecipitation, we demonstrated that Mcl1 associated with PCNA and CDK1 in G2/M cell cycle arrest in DADS-treated HL-60 cells. DADS decreased the interaction of Mcl1 with PCNA and CDK1, leading to G2/M cell cycle arrest in HL-60 cells. Mcl1 plays an important role in DADS-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in HL-60 human leukemia cells.

  16. Jatamanvaltrate P induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and autophagy in human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Zhu, Rui; Tian, Shasha; Wang, Yiqi; Lou, Siyue; Zhao, Huajun

    2017-03-10

    Jatamanvaltrate P is a novel iridoid ester isolated from Valeriana jatamansi Jones, a traditional medicine used to treat nervous disorders. In this study, we found that Jatamanvaltrate P possessed notable antitumor properties and therefore evaluated its anticancer effects against human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Jatamanvaltrate P inhibited the growth and proliferation of MCF-7 and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-453 and MDA-MB-468) in a concentration-dependent manner, while displayed relatively low cytotoxicity to human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). Treatment with Jatamanvaltrate P induced G2/M-phase arrest in TNBC and G0/G1-phase arrest in MCF-7 cells. Further study of the molecular mechanisms of this cytotoxic compound demonstrated that Jatamanvaltrate P enhanced cleavage of PARP and caspases, while decreased the expression levels of cell cycle-related Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1 and Cdc-2. It also activated autophagy, as indicated by the triggered autophagosome formation and increased LC3-II levels. Autophagy inhibition by 3-MA co-treatment undermined Jatamanvaltrate P-induced cell death. Finally, Jatamanvaltrate P exhibited a potential antitumor effect in MDA-MB-231 xenografts without apparent toxicity. These results suggest that Jatamanvaltrate P is a potential therapeutic agent for breast cancer, providing a basis for development of the compound as a novel chemotherapeutic agent.

  17. Hispolon from Phellinus linteus induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in NB4 human leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chuan; Chang, Heng-Yuan; Deng, Jeng-Shyan; Chen, Jian-Jung; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Lin, I-Hsin; Kuo, Wan-Lin; Chao, Wei; Huang, Guan-Jhong

    2013-01-01

    Hispolon (a phenolic compound isolated from Phellinus linteus) has been shown to possess strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and antidiabetic properties. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effect of hispolon on human hepatocellular carcinoma NB4 cells using the MTT assay, DNA fragmentation, DAPI (4, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride) staining, and flow cytometric analysis. Hispolon inhibited the cellular growth of NB4 cells in a dose-dependent manner through the induction of cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase measured using flow cytometric analysis and apoptotic cell death, as demonstrated by DNA laddering. Exposure of NB4 cells to hispolon-induced apoptosis-related protein expressions, such as the cleavage form of caspase 3, caspase 8, caspase 9, poly (ADP ribose) polymerase, and the proapoptotic Bax protein. Western blot analysis showed that the protein levels of extrinsic apoptotic proteins (Fas and FasL), intrinsic related proteins (cytochrome c), and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 were increased in NB4 cells after hispolon treatment. Hispolon-induced G0/G1-phase arrest was associated with a marked decrease in the protein expression of p53, cyclins D1, and cyclins E, and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 2, and 4, with concomitant induction of p21waf1/Cip1 and p27Kip1. We conclude that hispolon induces both of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in NB4 human leukemia cells in vitro.

  18. CDK4/6 inhibition induces epithelial cell cycle arrest and ameliorates acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    DiRocco, Derek P.; Bisi, John; Roberts, Patrick; Strum, Jay; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sharpless, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and urgently requires new preventative therapies. Expression of a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor transgene protects against AKI, suggesting that manipulating the tubular epithelial cell cycle may be a viable therapeutic strategy. Broad spectrum small molecule CDK inhibitors are protective in some kidney injury models, but these have toxicities and epithelial proliferation is eventually required for renal repair. Here, we tested a well-tolerated, novel and specific small molecule inhibitor of CDK4 and CDK6, PD 0332991, to investigate the effects of transient cell cycle inhibition on epithelial survival in vitro and kidney injury in vivo. We report that CDK4/6 inhibition induced G0/G1 cycle arrest in cultured human renal proximal tubule cells (hRPTC) at baseline and after injury. Induction of transient G0/G1 cycle arrest through CDK4/6 inhibition protected hRPTC from DNA damage and caspase 3/7 activation following exposure to the nephrotoxins cisplatin, etoposide, and antimycin A. In vivo, mice treated with PD 0332991 before ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) exhibited dramatically reduced epithelial progression through S phase 24 h after IRI. Despite reduced epithelial proliferation, PD 0332991 ameliorated kidney injury as reflected by improved serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels 24 h after injury. Inflammatory markers and macrophage infiltration were significantly decreased in injured kidneys 3 days following IRI. These results indicate that induction of proximal tubule cell cycle arrest with specific CDK4/6 inhibitors, or “pharmacological quiescence,” represents a novel strategy to prevent AKI. PMID:24338822

  19. Resveratrol modulates roscovitine-mediated cell cycle arrest of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wesierska-Gadek, Józefa; Kramer, Matthias P; Maurer, Margarita

    2008-04-01

    Human MCF-7 breast cancer cells are relatively resistant to anti-cancer drugs. Recently, we reported that roscovitine (ROSC), a selective cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, arrested human MCF-7 breast cancer cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle and concomitantly induced apoptosis. Moreover, we observed that the effect of the CDK inhibitor was dependent on the content of the culture medium. The cell cycle inhibiting action of ROSC was markedly diminished in human MCF-7 cells cultivated in medium supplemented with phenol red. These observations indicated that the therapeutic effects of ROSC can be affected by the components of the tissue medium. Recently, a number of epidemiological and experimental studies indicated that polyphenols (e.g. resveratrol, epicatechins etc.), abundant micronutrients in food, are anti-oxidant agents and could have strong anti-mitotic as well as pro-apoptotic activities. In the present contribution we raised the question whether the ROSC-mediated cell cycle arrest could be additionally modulated by compounds of natural origin, especially by polyphenols. Considering the potential benefits of the dietary components during the post-chemotherapy period, we focused our attention on the effects of resveratrol administration after treatment with ROSC. We analyzed whether the combined treatment with resveratrol would exert any additional effect on the cell cycle status of ROSC-treated human cancer cells. Resveratrol exhibited low direct cytotoxicity. The combined treatment with ROSC enhanced the ROSC-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest. These results indicate that targeted combination of anti-cancer drugs with distinct naturally occurring compounds could increase the efficacy of the therapy and concomitantly reduce the undesired side effects exerted by cytostatic drugs.

  20. A non-death role of the yeast metacaspase: Yca1p alters cell cycle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robin E C; Puente, Lawrence G; Kaern, Mads; Megeney, Lynn A

    2008-08-13

    Caspase proteases are a conserved protein family predominantly known for engaging and executing apoptotic cell death. Nevertheless, in higher eukaryotes, caspases also influence a variety of cell behaviors including differentiation, proliferation and growth control. S. cerevisiae expresses a primordial caspase, yca1, and exhibits apoptosis-like death under certain stresses; however, the benefit of a dedicated death program to single cell organisms is controversial. In the absence of a clear rationale to justify the evolutionary retention of a death only pathway, we hypothesize that yca1 also influences non-apoptotic events. We report that genetic ablation and/or catalytic inactivation of Yca1p leads to a longer G1/S transition accompanied by slower growth in fermentation conditions. Downregulation of Yca1p proteolytic activity also results in failure to arrest during nocodazole treatment, indicating that Yca1p participates in the G2/M mitotic checkpoint. 20s proteasome activity and ROS staining of the Delta yca1 strain is indistinguishable from its isogenic control suggesting that putative regulation of the oxidative stress response by Yca1p does not instigate the cell cycle phenotype. Our results demonstrate multiple non-death roles for yca1 in the cell cycle.

  1. Honokiol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via p53 activation in H4 human neuroglioma cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yun-Bao; Bao, Xin-Jie; Xu, Song-Bai; Zhang, Xing-Dong; Liu, Hai-Yan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the signal pathway of honokiol-induced apoptosis in H4 human neuroglioma cells and to evaluate whether p53 signaling and cell cycle arrest were involved in honokiol-treated H4 human neuroglioma cells. The cell viability was detected by the CCK8 assay. The cell apoptosis was assessed by annexin V-PI double-labeling staining and hoechst 33342 staining. The protein expression of cell cycle regulators and tumor suppressors were analyzed by western blotting. Treatment of H4 human neuroglioma cells with honokiol induced cell death in a dose-and time-dependent manner by using CCK8 assay. Consistent with the CCK8 assay, the flow cytometry results showed that the proportion of the apoptosis cells increased after honokiol when compared with untreated group. Moreover, H4 human neuroglioma cells exposed to honokiol, resulted in an accumulation of cells in S and G2/M phase. Apoptotic bodies were clearly observed in human neuroglioma cells when treated with honokiol and then stained with Hoechst 33342. The expression of Cyclin B1, CDC2 and cdc25C were downregulated, however, the expression of p-CDC2 and p-cdc25c was significantly upregulated when the neuroglioma cells were exposed to honokiol. Moreover, p53, p21 and Bax/Bcl-2 were significantly upregulated by honokiol treatment. These results confirmed that honokiol could induce apoptosis in human neuroglioma cells, the underlying molecular mechanisms, at least partially, through activation p53 signaling and induction of cell cycle arrest.

  2. Cordyceps cicadae induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in MHCC97H human hepatocellular carcinoma cells: a proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hualin; Zhang, Jing; Sit, Wai-Hung; Lee, Chung-Yung Jetty; Wan, Jennifer Man-Fan

    2014-01-01

    Cordyceps cicadae is a medicinal fungus that is often used for treating cancer. However, the anticancer mechanisms of C. cicadae are largely unknown. This study aims to investigate the anticancer mechanisms of C. cicadae against hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro using a proteomic approach. Human hepatocellular carcinoma MHCC97H cells were treated with a water extract of C. cicadae (0, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 μg/mL) for 48 h and harvested for cell viability assays. The significant differences in protein expression between control and C. cicadae-treated cells were analyzed by two-dimensional gel-based proteomics coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Flow cytometry analysis was employed to investigate the cell cycle and cell death. The anticancer molecular mechanism was analyzed by whole proteome mapping. The water extract of C. cicadae (0, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 μg/mL) inhibited the growth of MHCC97H cells in a dose-dependent manner via G2/M phase cell cycle arrest with no evidence of apoptosis. Among the identified proteins with upregulated expression were dynactin subunit 2, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1, heat shock protein beta-1, alpha-enolase isoform 1, phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, and WD repeat-containing protein 1. Meanwhile, the proteins with downregulated expression were 14-3-3 gamma, BUB3, microtubule-associated protein RP/EB family member 1, thioredoxin-like protein, chloride intracellular channel protein 1, ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5, xaa-Pro dipeptidase, enoyl-CoA delta isomerase 1, protein-disulfide isomerase-related chaperone Erp29, hnRNP 2H9B, peroxiredoxin 1, WD-40 repeat protein, and serine/threonine kinase receptor-associated protein. The water extract of C. cicadae reduced the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma MHCC97H cells via G2/M cell cycle arrest.

  3. Cell cycle arrest induced by MPPa-PDT in MDA-MB-231 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liming; Bi, Wenxiang; Tian, Yuanyuan

    2016-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a medical treatment using a photosensitizing agent and light source to treat cancers. Pyropheophorbidea methyl ester (MPPa), a derivative of chlorophyll, is a novel potent photosensitizer. To learn more about this photosensitizer, we examined the cell cycle arrest in MDA-MB-231. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometer. Checkpoints of the cell cycle were measured by western blot. In this study, we found that the expression of Cyclin D1 was obviously decreased, while the expression of Chk2 and P21 was increased after PDT treatment. This study showed that MPPa-PDT affected the checkpoints of the cell cycle and led the cells to apoptosis.

  4. Polydatin inhibits growth of lung cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and causing cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yusong; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Meng, Qinghui; Jiao, Yang; Xu, Jiaying; Fan, Saijun

    2014-01-01

    Polydatin (PD), a small natural compound from Polygonum cuspidatum, has a number of biological functions. However, the anticancer activity of PD has been poorly investigated. In the present study, thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of PD on cell growth. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were investigated by flow cytometry. In addition, the expression of several proteins associated with apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that PD significantly inhibits the proliferation of A549 and NCI-H1975 lung cancer cell lines and causes dose-dependent apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that PD induces S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of Bcl-2 decreased as that of Bax increased, and the expression of cyclin D1 was also suppressed. The results suggest that PD has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of lung cancer.

  5. Polydatin inhibits growth of lung cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and causing cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YUSONG; ZHUANG, ZHIXIANG; MENG, QINGHUI; JIAO, YANG; XU, JIAYING; FAN, SAIJUN

    2014-01-01

    Polydatin (PD), a small natural compound from Polygonum cuspidatum, has a number of biological functions. However, the anticancer activity of PD has been poorly investigated. In the present study, thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of PD on cell growth. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were investigated by flow cytometry. In addition, the expression of several proteins associated with apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that PD significantly inhibits the proliferation of A549 and NCI-H1975 lung cancer cell lines and causes dose-dependent apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that PD induces S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of Bcl-2 decreased as that of Bax increased, and the expression of cyclin D1 was also suppressed. The results suggest that PD has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:24348867

  6. Natural Compounds as Modulators of Cell Cycle Arrest: Application for Anticancer Chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia; Cevallos-Solorzano, Gabriela; Romero-Benavides, Juan Carlos; Orellana, Maria Isabel Ramirez

    2017-04-01

    Natural compounds from various plants, microorganisms and marine species play an important role in the discovery novel components that can be successfully used in numerous biomedical applications, including anticancer therapeutics. Since uncontrolled and rapid cell division is a hallmark of cancer, unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying mitosis is key to understanding how various natural compounds might function as inhibitors of cell cycle progression. A number of natural compounds that inhibit the cell cycle arrest have proven effective for killing cancer cells in vitro, in vivo and in clinical settings. Significant advances that have been recently made in the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the cell cycle regulation using the chemotherapeutic agents is of great importance for improving the efficacy of targeted therapeutics and overcoming resistance to anticancer drugs, especially of natural origin, which inhibit the activities of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, as well as other proteins and enzymes involved in proper regulation of cell cycle leading to controlled cell proliferation.

  7. Middle infrared radiation induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Shih, Meng-Her; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Tsai, Shang-Ru; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Lee, Si-Chen

    2013-01-01

    There were studies investigating the effects of broadband infrared radiation (IR) on cancer cell, while the influences of middle-infrared radiation (MIR) are still unknown. In this study, a MIR emitter with emission wavelength band in the 3-5 µm region was developed to irradiate A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. It was found that MIR exposure inhibited cell proliferation and induced morphological changes by altering the cellular distribution of cytoskeletal components. Using quantitative PCR, we found that MIR promoted the expression levels of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related and Rad3-related), TP53 (tumor protein p53), p21 (CDKN1A, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A) and GADD45 (growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible), but decreased the expression levels of cyclin B coding genes, CCNB1 and CCNB2, as well as CDK1 (Cyclin-dependent kinase 1). The reduction of protein expression levels of CDC25C, cyclin B1 and the phosphorylation of CDK1 at Thr-161 altogether suggest G(2)/M arrest occurred in A549 cells by MIR. DNA repair foci formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) marker γ-H2AX and sensor 53BP1 was induced by MIR treatment, it implies the MIR induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest resulted from DSB. This study illustrates a potential role for the use of MIR in lung cancer therapy by initiating DSB and blocking cell cycle progression.

  8. Middle Infrared Radiation Induces G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest in A549 Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Tsai, Shang-Ru; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Lee, Si-Chen

    2013-01-01

    There were studies investigating the effects of broadband infrared radiation (IR) on cancer cell, while the influences of middle-infrared radiation (MIR) are still unknown. In this study, a MIR emitter with emission wavelength band in the 3–5 µm region was developed to irradiate A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. It was found that MIR exposure inhibited cell proliferation and induced morphological changes by altering the cellular distribution of cytoskeletal components. Using quantitative PCR, we found that MIR promoted the expression levels of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related and Rad3-related), TP53 (tumor protein p53), p21 (CDKN1A, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A) and GADD45 (growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible), but decreased the expression levels of cyclin B coding genes, CCNB1 and CCNB2, as well as CDK1 (Cyclin-dependent kinase 1). The reduction of protein expression levels of CDC25C, cyclin B1 and the phosphorylation of CDK1 at Thr-161 altogether suggest G2/M arrest occurred in A549 cells by MIR. DNA repair foci formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) marker γ-H2AX and sensor 53BP1 was induced by MIR treatment, it implies the MIR induced G2/M cell cycle arrest resulted from DSB. This study illustrates a potential role for the use of MIR in lung cancer therapy by initiating DSB and blocking cell cycle progression. PMID:23335992

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus infection of cells arrested in the cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, P; Hensel, M; Emerman, M

    1992-01-01

    Cell proliferation is necessary for proviral integration and productive infection of most retroviruses. Nevertheless, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can infect non-dividing macrophages. This ability to grow in non-dividing cells is not specific to macrophages because, as we show here, CD4+ HeLa cells arrested at stage G2 of the cell cycle can be infected by HIV-1. Proliferation is necessary for these same cells to be infected by a murine retrovirus, MuLV. HIV-1 integrates into the arrested cell DNA and produces viral RNA and protein in a pattern similar to that in normal cells. In addition, our data suggest that the ability to infect non-dividing cells is due to one of the HIV-1 core virion proteins. HIV infection of non-dividing cells distinguishes lentiviruses from other retroviruses and is likely to be important in the natural history of HIV infection. Images PMID:1322294

  10. Novel mechanism of harmaline on inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by up-regulating Fas/FasL in SGC-7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihai; Wang, Chunhua; Jiang, Chenguang; Zeng, Hong; He, Xiangjiu

    2015-12-18

    Harmaline (HAR), a natural occurrence β-carboline alkaloid, was isolated from the seeds of Peganum harmala and exhibited potent antitumor effect. In this study, the anti-gastric tumor effects of HAR were firstly investigated in vitro and in vivo. The results strongly showed that HAR could inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce G2/M cell cycle arrest accompanied by an increase in apoptotic cell death in SGC-7901 cancer cells. HAR could up-regulate the expressions of cell cycle-related proteins of p-Cdc2, p21, p-p53, Cyclin B and down-regulate the expression of p-Cdc25C. In addition, HAR could up-regulate the expressions of Fas/FasL, activated Caspase-8 and Caspase-3. Moreover, blocking Fas/FasL signaling could markedly inhibit the apoptosis caused by HAR, suggesting that Fas/FasL mediated pathways were involved in HAR-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, HAR could also exert on antitumor activity with a dose of 15 mg/kg/day in vivo, which was also related with cell cycle arrest. These new findings provided a framework for further exploration of HAR which possess the potential antitumor activity by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  11. Novel mechanism of harmaline on inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by up-regulating Fas/FasL in SGC-7901 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihai; Wang, Chunhua; Jiang, Chenguang; Zeng, Hong; He, Xiangjiu

    2015-01-01

    Harmaline (HAR), a natural occurrence β-carboline alkaloid, was isolated from the seeds of Peganum harmala and exhibited potent antitumor effect. In this study, the anti-gastric tumor effects of HAR were firstly investigated in vitro and in vivo. The results strongly showed that HAR could inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce G2/M cell cycle arrest accompanied by an increase in apoptotic cell death in SGC-7901 cancer cells. HAR could up-regulate the expressions of cell cycle-related proteins of p-Cdc2, p21, p-p53, Cyclin B and down-regulate the expression of p-Cdc25C. In addition, HAR could up-regulate the expressions of Fas/FasL, activated Caspase-8 and Caspase-3. Moreover, blocking Fas/FasL signaling could markedly inhibit the apoptosis caused by HAR, suggesting that Fas/FasL mediated pathways were involved in HAR-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, HAR could also exert on antitumor activity with a dose of 15 mg/kg/day in vivo, which was also related with cell cycle arrest. These new findings provided a framework for further exploration of HAR which possess the potential antitumor activity by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. PMID:26678950

  12. Dihydromyricetin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in melanoma SK-MEL-28 cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guofang; Liu, Jie; Chen, Hege; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Qingyu; Li, Mingyi; Zhu, Runzhi

    2014-06-01

    Dihydromyricetin (DHM) exhibits multiple pharmacological activities; however, the role of DHM in anti-melanoma activities and the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of DHM on cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis in the human melanoma SK-MEL-28 cell line, and to explore the related mechanisms. The effect of DHM on cell proliferation was investigated by MTT assay, and cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry. TUNEL assay was used to evaluate DHM-mediated apoptosis, and western blotting was applied to examine expression levels of p53, p21, Cdc25A, Cdc2, P-Cdc2, Bax, IKK-α, NF-κB p65, p38 and P-p38 proteins. The results revealed that DHM suppressed cell proliferation of SK-MEL-28 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and caused cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase. DHM increased the production of p53 and p21 proteins and downregulated the production of Cdc25A, Cdc2 and P-Cdc2 proteins, which induced cell cycle arrest. Additionally, DHM significantly induced the apoptosis of SK-MEL-28 cells, and enhanced the expression levels of Bax proteins and decreased the protein levels of IKK-α, NF-κB (p65) and P-p38. The results suggest that DHM may be a novel and effective candidate agent to inhibit the growth of melanoma.

  13. Ibuprofen and apigenin induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Elsisi, Nahed S; Darling-Reed, Selina; Lee, Eunsook Y; Oriaku, Ebenezer T; Soliman, Karam F

    2005-02-28

    In case of injury or disease, microglia are recruited to the site of the pathology and become activated as evidenced by morphological changes and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Evidence suggests that microglia proliferate by cell division to create gliosis at the site of pathological conditions such as the amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease and the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients. The hyperactivation of microglia contributes to neurotoxicity. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that anti-inflammatory compounds modulate the progression of cell cycle and induce apoptosis of the activated cells. We investigated the effects of ibuprofen (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) and apigenin (a flavonoid with anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties) on the cell cycle of the murine microglial cell line BV-2. The findings indicate that apigenin-induced cell cycle arrest preferentially in the G2/M phase and ibuprofen caused S phase arrest. The binding of annexin V-FITC to the membranes of cells which indicates the apoptotic process were examined, whereas the DNA was stained with propidium iodide. Both apigenin and ibuprofen induced apoptosis significantly in early and late stages. The induction of apoptosis by ibuprofen and apigenin was confirmed using TUNEL assay, revealing that 25 microM apigenin and 250 microM ibuprofen significantly increased apoptosis in BV-2 cells. The results from the present study suggest that anti-inflammatory compounds might inhibit microglial proliferation by modulating the cell cycle progression and apoptosis.

  14. Nonylphenol decreases viability and arrests cell cycle via reactive oxygen species in Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongmei; Zhang, Yingmei; Liu, Yingxia; Zhang, Wenya

    2013-01-01

    4-Nonylphenol (NP), an environmental contaminant commonly found in water systems, has been documented to have adverse effects on human health. In the current study, the effects of NP on the survival, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell cycle distribution of human Raji cells, a human lymphoblastoid cell line with B cell characteristics, were investigated. Furthermore, N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC) was used to explore the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that NP dramatically reduced cell viability along with the induction of ROS in a dose dependent manner, and cell survival was recovered by NAC pretreatment. Most strikingly, NP exposure altered the cell cycle profile, mainly leading to the accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. Pretreatment of Raji cells with NAC attenuated the NP-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest. Taken together, the results suggest NP exhibits cytotoxic effects on Raji cells by decreasing cell viability and inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest, in a ROS dependent manner. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Variant surface glycoprotein RNA interference triggers a precytokinesis cell cycle arrest in African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Sheader, Karen; Vaughan, Sue; Minchin, James; Hughes, Katie; Gull, Keith; Rudenko, Gloria

    2005-06-14

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that causes African sleeping sickness. T. brucei multiplies extracellularly in the bloodstream, relying on antigenic variation of a dense variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat to escape antibody-mediated lysis. We investigated the role of VSG in proliferation and pathogenicity by using inducible RNA interference to ablate VSG transcript down to 1-2% normal levels. Inhibiting VSG synthesis in vitro triggers a rapid and specific cell cycle checkpoint blocking cell division. Parasites arrest at a discrete precytokinesis stage with two full-length flagella and opposing flagellar pockets, without undergoing additional rounds of S phase and mitosis. A subset (<10%) of the stalled cells have internal flagella, indicating that the progenitors of these cells were already committed to cytokinesis when VSG restriction was sensed. Although there was no obvious VSG depletion in vitro after 24-h induction of VSG RNA interference, there was rapid clearance of these cells in vivo. We propose that a stringent block in VSG synthesis produces stalled trypanosomes with a minimally compromised VSG coat, which can be targeted by the immune system. Our data indicate that VSG protein or transcript is monitored during cell cycle progression in bloodstream-form T. brucei and describes precise precytokinesis cell cycle arrest. This checkpoint before cell division provides a link between the protective VSG coat and cell cycle progression and could function as a novel parasite safety mechanism, preventing extensive dilution of the protective VSG coat in the absence of VSG synthesis.

  16. Does cell cycle arrest occur in plant under solar UV-B radiation?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Wang, Yan; Björn, Lars Olof; Li, Shaoshan

    2011-06-01

    UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) is an integral part of solar radiation and has many harmful effects on plant growth and development. However, the molecular mechanism for the inhibition of plant growth by UV-B remains largely unknown. UV-B radiation induces various responses such as growth inhibition, DNA damage and changes of gene expression. Recently, by using synchronous root tip culture, we found that UV-B modulates the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes through DNA damage. Western blotting analysis revealed that UV-B induced G1-to-S arrest did not correlate with the protein abundance of CDKB1;1 and CYCD3;1 gene regulating proteins, but may with the posttranslational control. We extended the expression analysis of cell cycle related genes based on the published microarray data and the results strengthen our assumption that cell cycle arrest could occur in plant under solar UV-B radiation. Further study is needed to elucidate the relationship between cell cycle regulation and protective pathway induced by low dose of UV-B radiation fundamental molecular mechanism for how plants respond to solar UV-B radiation.

  17. Tumor cell cycle arrest induced by shear stress: Roles of integrins and Smad

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shun-Fu; Chang, Cheng Allen; Lee, Ding-Yu; Lee, Pei-Ling; Yeh, Yu-Ming; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Chien, Shu; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann

    2008-01-01

    Interstitial flow in and around tumor tissue affects the mechanical microenvironment to modulate tumor cell growth and metastasis. We investigated the roles of flow-induced shear stress in modulating cell cycle distribution in four tumor cell lines and the underlying mechanisms. In all four cell lines, incubation under static conditions for 24 or 48 h led to G0/G1 arrest; in contrast, shear stress (12 dynes/cm2) induced G2/M arrest. The molecular basis of the shear effect was analyzed, and the presentation on molecular mechanism is focused on human MG63 osteosarcoma cells. Shear stress induced increased expressions of cyclin B1 and p21CIP1 and decreased expressions of cyclins A, D1, and E, cyclin-dependent protein kinases (Cdk)-1, -2, -4, and -6, and p27KIP1 as well as a decrease in Cdk1 activity. Using specific antibodies and small interfering RNA, we found that the shear-induced G2/M arrest and corresponding changes in G2/M regulatory protein expression and activity were mediated by αvβ3 and β1 integrins through bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IA-specific Smad1 and Smad5. Shear stress also down-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) binding activity and osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase expressions in MG63 cells; these responses were mediated by αvβ3 and β1 integrins through Smad5. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism by which shear stress induces G2/M arrest in tumor cells and inhibits cell differentiation and demonstrate the importance of mechanical microenvironment in modulating molecular signaling, gene expression, cell cycle, and functions in tumor cells. PMID:18310319

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis arrests host cycle at the G1/S transition to establish long term infection.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Bridgette M; Rahman, Md Aejazur; Lamprecht, Dirk A; Rohde, Kyle H; Saini, Vikram; Adamson, John H; Russell, David G; Steyn, Adrie J C

    2017-05-01

    Signals modulating the production of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) virulence factors essential for establishing long-term persistent infection are unknown. The WhiB3 redox regulator is known to regulate the production of Mtb virulence factors, however the mechanisms of this modulation are unknown. To advance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in WhiB3 regulation, we performed Mtb in vitro, intraphagosomal and infected host expression analyses. Our Mtb expression analyses in conjunction with extracellular flux analyses demonstrated that WhiB3 maintains bioenergetic homeostasis in response to available carbon sources found in vivo to establish Mtb infection. Our infected host expression analysis indicated that WhiB3 is involved in regulation of the host cell cycle. Detailed cell-cycle analysis revealed that Mtb infection inhibited the macrophage G1/S transition, and polyketides under WhiB3 control arrested the macrophages in the G0-G1 phase. Notably, infection with the Mtb whiB3 mutant or polyketide mutants had little effect on the macrophage cell cycle and emulated the uninfected cells. This suggests that polyketides regulated by Mtb WhiB3 are responsible for the cell cycle arrest observed in macrophages infected with the wild type Mtb. Thus, our findings demonstrate that Mtb WhiB3 maintains bioenergetic homeostasis to produce polyketide and lipid cyclomodulins that target the host cell cycle. This is a new mechanism whereby Mtb modulates the immune system by altering the host cell cycle to promote long-term persistence. This new knowledge could serve as the foundation for new host-directed therapeutic discovery efforts that target the host cell cycle.

  19. Cytotoxicity of atropine to human corneal epithelial cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cheng-Lei; Wen, Qian; Fan, Ting-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Atropine is an anticholinergic drug for mydriasis in eye clinic, and its abuse might be cytotoxic to the cornea and result in blurred vision. However, the cytotoxicity of atropine to the cornea and its cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of atropine to corneal epithelium and its underlying mechanisms using an in vitro model of non-transfected human corneal epithelial (HCEP) cells. Our results showed that atropine, above the concentration of 0.3125 g/l (1/32 of its therapeutic dosage in eye clinic), had a dose- and time-dependent toxicity to HCEP cells by inducing morphological abnormality, cytopathic effect, viability decline, and proliferation retardation. Moreover, the proliferation-retarding effect of atropine on the cells was achieved by inducing G1/S phase arrest and downregulation of E-cadherin and β-catenin. Besides, atropine also had an apoptosis-inducing effect on the cells by inducing phosphatidylserine externalization, plasma membrane permeability elevation, DNA fragmentation and apoptotic body formation. Furthermore, atropine could also induce activations of caspase-2, -3 and -9, disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, downregulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, upregulation of Bax and Bad, and upregulation of cytoplasmic cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor, implying a death receptor-mediated mitochondrion-dependent pathway is most probably involved in the apoptosis of HCEP cells induced by atropine. Taken together, our results suggest that atropine has remarkable cytotoxicity to HCEP cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and death receptor-mediated mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis.

  20. An Early Warning Score Predicts Risk of Death after In-hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest in Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alexander P; Maciel, Robert C; Sheppard, William; Sacks, Greg; Hines, O Joe

    2015-10-01

    In-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest can contribute significantly to publicly reported mortality rates. Systems to improve mortality are being implemented across all specialties. A review was conducted for all surgical patients >18 years of age who experienced a "Code Blue" event between January 1, 2013 and March 9, 2014 at a university hospital. A previously validated Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) using routine vital signs and neurologic status was calculated at regular intervals preceding the event. In 62 patients, the most common causes of arrest included respiratory failure, arrhythmia, sepsis, hemorrhage, and airway obstruction, but remained unknown in 27 per cent of cases. A total of 56.5 per cent of patients died before hospital discharge. In-hospital death was associated with American Society of Anesthesiologists status (P = 0.039) and acute versus elective admission (P = 0.003). Increasing MEWS on admission, 24 hours before the event, the event-day, and a maximum MEWS score on the day of the event increased the odds of death. Max MEWS remained associated with death after multivariate analysis (odds ratio 1.39, P = 0.025). Simple and easy to implement warning scores such as MEWS can identify surgical patients at risk of death after arrest. Such recognition may provide an opportunity for clinical intervention resulting in improved patient outcomes and hospital mortality rates.

  1. Drug-induced cell cycle modulation leading to cell-cycle arrest, nuclear mis-segregation, or endoreplication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer cell responses to chemotherapeutic agents vary, and this may reflect different defects in DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis control. Cytometry analysis only quantifies dye-incorporation to examine DNA content and does not reflect the biological complexity of the cell cycle in drug discovery screens. Results Using population and time-lapse imaging analyses of cultured immortalized cells expressing a new version of the fluorescent cell-cycle indicator, Fucci (Fluorescent Ubiquitination-based Cell Cycle Indicator), we found great diversity in the cell-cycle alterations induced by two anticancer drugs. When treated with etoposide, an inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II, HeLa and NMuMG cells halted at the G2/M checkpoint. HeLa cells remained there, but NMuMG cells then overrode the checkpoint and underwent nuclear mis-segregation or avoided the checkpoint and entered the endoreplication cycle in a drug concentration dependent manner. In contrast, an inhibitor of Cdk4 led to G1 arrest or endoreplication in NMuMG cells depending upon the initial cell-cycle phase of drug exposure. Conclusions Drug-induced cell cycle modulation varied not only between different cell types or following treatment with different drugs, but also between cells treated with different concentrations of the same drug or following drug addition during different phases of the cell cycle. By combining cytometry analysis with the Fucci probe, we have developed a novel assay that fully integrates the complexity of cell cycle regulation into drug discovery screens. This assay system will represent a powerful drug-discovery tool for the development of the next generation of anti-cancer therapies. PMID:21226962

  2. Role of DNA methylation in cell cycle arrest induced by Cr (VI) in two cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jianlin; Wang, Yu; Yao, Chunji; Jin, Lingzhi; Wang, Xiuzhi; Xiao, Yun; Wu, Nanxiang; Song, Peng; Song, Yang; Tan, Yufeng; Gao, Ming; Liu, Kecheng; Zhang, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(IV)], a well-known industrial waste product and an environmental pollutant, is recognized as a human carcinogen. But its mechanisms of carcinogenicity remain unclear, and recent studies suggest that DNA methylation may play an important role in the carcinogenesis of Cr(IV). The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of Cr(IV) on cell cycle progress, global DNA methylation, and DNA methylation of p16 gene. A human B lymphoblastoid cell line and a human lung cell line A549 were exposed to 5-15 µM potassium dichromate or 1.25-5 µg/cm² lead chromate for 2-24 hours. Cell cycle was arrested at G₁ phase by both compounds in 24 hours exposure group, but global hypomethylation occurred earlier than cell cycle arrest, and the hypomethylation status maintained for more than 20 hours. The mRNA expression of p16 was significantly up-regulated by Cr(IV), especially by potassium dichromate, and the mRNA expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6) was significantly down-regulated. But protein expression analysis showed very little change of p16 gene. Both qualitative and quantitative results showed that DNA methylation status of p16 remained unchanged. Collectively, our data suggested that global hypomethylation was possibly responsible for Cr(IV)-induced G₁ phase arrest, but DNA methylation might not be related to up-regulation of p16 gene by Cr(IV).

  3. Role of DNA Methylation in Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Cr (VI) in Two Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jianlin; Wang, Yu; Yao, Chunji; Jin, Lingzhi; Wang, Xiuzhi; Xiao, Yun; Wu, Nanxiang; Song, Peng; Song, Yang; Tan, Yufeng; Gao, Ming; Liu, Kecheng; Zhang, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(IV)], a well-known industrial waste product and an environmental pollutant, is recognized as a human carcinogen. But its mechanisms of carcinogenicity remain unclear, and recent studies suggest that DNA methylation may play an important role in the carcinogenesis of Cr(IV). The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of Cr(IV) on cell cycle progress, global DNA methylation, and DNA methylation of p16 gene. A human B lymphoblastoid cell line and a human lung cell line A549 were exposed to 5–15 µM potassium dichromate or 1.25–5 µg/cm2 lead chromate for 2–24 hours. Cell cycle was arrested at G1 phase by both compounds in 24 hours exposure group, but global hypomethylation occurred earlier than cell cycle arrest, and the hypomethylation status maintained for more than 20 hours. The mRNA expression of p16 was significantly up-regulated by Cr(IV), especially by potassium dichromate, and the mRNA expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6) was significantly down-regulated. But protein expression analysis showed very little change of p16 gene. Both qualitative and quantitative results showed that DNA methylation status of p16 remained unchanged. Collectively, our data suggested that global hypomethylation was possibly responsible for Cr(IV) - induced G1 phase arrest,but DNA methylation might not be related to up-regulation of p16 gene by Cr(IV). PMID:23940686

  4. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xianqi; Qiu, Shuifeng; Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  5. Induction of cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer cells by the dietary compound isoliquiritigenin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeo Myeong; Lim, Do Young; Choi, Hyun Ju; Jung, Jae In; Chung, Won-Yoon; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2009-02-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a flavonoid chalcone that is present in licorice, shallot, and bean sprouts, is known to have antitumorigenic activities. The present study examined whether ISL alters prostate cancer cell cycle progression. DU145 human and MatLyLu (MLL) rat prostate cancer cells were cultured with various concentrations of ISL. In both DU145 and MLL cells treated with ISL, the percentage of cells in the G1 phase increased, and the incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine decreased. ISL decreased the protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, whereas cyclin A and CDK2 expressions were unaltered in cells treated with ISL. The expression of the CDK inhibitor p27(KIP1) was increased in cells treated with 20 micromol/L ISL. In addition, treatment of cells with 20 micromol/L ISL for 24 hours led to G2/M cell cycle arrest. Cell division control (CDC) 2 protein levels remained unchanged. The protein levels of phospho-CDC2 (Tyr15) and cyclin B1 were increased, and the CDC25C level was decreased by ISL dose-dependently. We demonstrate that ISL promotes cell cycle arrest in DU145 and MLL cells, thereby providing insights into the mechanisms underlying its antitumorigenic activities.

  6. Vitisin A inhibits adipocyte differentiation through cell cycle arrest in 3T3-L1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soon-hee; Park, Hee-Sook; Lee, Myoung-su; Cho, Yong-Jin; Kim, Young-Sup; Hwang, Jin-Taek; Sung, Mi Jeong; Kim, Myung Sunny; Kwon, Dae Young

    2008-07-18

    Inhibition of adipocyte differentiation is one approach among the anti-obesity strategies. This study demonstrates that vitisin A, a resveratrol tetramer, inhibits adipocyte differentiation most effectively of 18 stilbenes tested. Fat accumulation and PPAR{gamma} expression were decreased by vitisin A in a dose-dependent manner. Vitisin A significantly inhibited preadipocyte proliferation and consequent differentiation within the first 2 days of treatment, indicating that the anti-adipogenic effect of vitisin A was derived from anti-proliferation. Based on cell cycle analysis, vitisin A blocked the cell cycle at the G1-S phase transition, causing cells to remain in the preadipocyte state. Vitisin A increased p21 expression, while the Rb phosphorylation level was reduced. Therefore, vitisin A seems to induce G1 arrest through p21- and consequent Rb-dependent suppression of transcription. On the other hand, ERK and Akt signaling pathways were not involved in the anti-mitotic regulation by vitisin A. Taken together, these results suggest that vitisin A inhibits adipocyte differentiation through preadipocyte cell cycle arrest.

  7. Role of NF-κB-p53 crosstalk in ultraviolet A-induced cell death and G1 arrest in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Kyung; Cha, Hwa Jun; Hong, Misun; Yoon, Yeongmin; Lee, Hyunjin; An, Sungkwan

    2012-01-01

    Photoaging is the premature aging of the skin caused by repeated exposure to sunlight and is characterized by a depletion of the dermal extracellular matrix. This depletion is due to the loss of fibroblast cells and their multiple functions. UVA was revealed as a major inducer of photoaging in various clinical studies. As UVA photons have long wavelength spectra, UVA penetrates deeper into the dermis than UVB and UVC, leading to the induction of cell death, the destruction of the dermal extracellular matrix through the induction of matrix metalloproteinase expression, and the repression of collagen expression. However, the exact effects of UVA on the skin remain a matter of debate. Here, we assess cell cycle stage to demonstrate that NF-κB-p53 crosstalk induces apoptosis and growth arrest in UVA-irradiated human dermal fibroblasts. In addition, UVA irradiation led to an increase of NF-κB-HDAC1 complexes, which in turn repressed cyclin D1 expression in UVA-irradiated human dermal fibroblasts. We provide direct evidence that UVA irradiation induces changes in the p53-dependent NF-κB complex that lead to growth arrest and apoptosis through the repression of cyclin D1. These studies uncovered that NF-κB-p53 crosstalk is a key regulator of UVA-dependent growth arrest and apoptosis.

  8. Lipid-soluble ginseng extract induces apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Moo Rim; Kim, Hwan Mook; Kang, Jong Soon; Lee, Kiho; Lee, Sung Dong; Hyun, Dong-Hoon; In, Man-Jin; Park, Song-Kyu; Kim, Dong Chung

    2011-06-01

    This study was performed to elucidate the anticancer mechanism of a lipid-soluble ginseng extract (LSGE) by analyzing induction of apoptosis and arrest of cell cycle progression using the NCI-H460 human lung cancer cell line. Proliferation of NCI-H460 cells was potently inhibited by LSGE in a dose-dependent manner. The cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in NCI-H460 cells was induced by LSGE. The percentage of G0/G1 phase cells significantly increased, while that of S phase cells decreased after treatment with LSGE. The expression levels of cyclin-dependent kinase2 (CDK2), CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D3 and cyclin E related to G0/G1 cells progression were also altered by LSGE. In addition, LSGE-induced cell death occurred through apoptosis, which was accompanied by increasing the activity of caspases including caspase-8, caspase-9 and caspase-3. Consistent with enhancement of caspase activity, LSGE increased protein levels of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). These apoptotic effects of LSGE were inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk. These findings indicate that LSGE inhibits NCI-H460 human lung cancer cell growth by cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and induction of caspase-mediated apoptosis.

  9. Phytometabolite Dehydroleucodine Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and DNA Damage in Human Astrocytoma Cells through p73/p53 Regulation.

    PubMed

    Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia; González-Arévalo, Gabriela; Velásquez-Rojas, Gabriela; Malagon, Omar; Vidari, Giovanni; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Ratovitski, Edward A; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the idea that secondary metabolites obtained from medicinal plants (phytometabolites) may be important contributors in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents to reduce the occurrence or recurrence of cancer. Our study focused on Dehydroleucodine (DhL), a sesquiterpene found in the provinces of Loja and Zamora-Chinchipe. In this study, we showed that DhL displayed cytostatic and cytotoxic activities on the human cerebral astrocytoma D384 cell line. With lactone isolated from Gynoxys verrucosa Wedd, a medicinal plant from Ecuador, we found that DhL induced cell death in D384 cells by triggering cell cycle arrest and inducing apoptosis and DNA damage. We further found that the cell death resulted in the increased expression of CDKN1A and BAX proteins. A marked induction of the levels of total TP73 and phosphorylated TP53, TP73, and γ-H2AX proteins was observed in D384 cells exposed to DhL, but no increase in total TP53 levels was detected. Overall these studies demonstrated the marked effect of DhL on the diminished survival of human astrocytoma cells through the induced expression of TP73 and phosphorylation of TP73 and TP53, suggesting their key roles in the tumor cell response to DhL treatment.

  10. Vapor of Volatile Oils from Litsea cubeba Seed Induces Apoptosis and Causes Cell Cycle Arrest in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seal, Soma; Chatterjee, Priyajit; Bhattacharya, Sushmita; Pal, Durba; Dasgupta, Suman; Kundu, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Sandip; Bhattacharya, Shelley; Bhuyan, Mantu; Bhattacharyya, Pranab R.; Baishya, Gakul; Barua, Nabin C.; Baruah, Pranab K.; Rao, Paruchuri G.; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a major killer in cancer related human death. Its therapeutic intervention requires superior efficient molecule(s) as it often becomes resistant to present chemotherapy options. Here we report that vapor of volatile oil compounds obtained from Litsea cubeba seeds killed human NSCLC cells, A549, through the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Vapor generated from the combined oils (VCO) deactivated Akt, a key player in cancer cell survival and proliferation. Interestingly VCO dephosphorylated Akt at both Ser473 and Thr308; through the suppression of mTOR and pPDK1 respectively. As a consequence of this, diminished phosphorylation of Bad occurred along with the decreased Bcl-xL expression. This subsequently enhanced Bax levels permitting the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol which concomitantly activated caspase 9 and caspase 3 resulting apoptotic cell death. Impairment of Akt activation by VCO also deactivated Mdm2 that effected overexpression of p53 which in turn upregulated p21 expression. This causes enhanced p21 binding to cyclin D1 that halted G1 to S phase progression. Taken together, VCO produces two prong effects on lung cancer cells, it induces apoptosis and blocked cancer cell proliferation, both occurred due to the deactivation of Akt. In addition, it has another crucial advantage: VCO could be directly delivered to lung cancer tissue through inhalation. PMID:23091605

  11. Vapor of volatile oils from Litsea cubeba seed induces apoptosis and causes cell cycle arrest in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seal, Soma; Chatterjee, Priyajit; Bhattacharya, Sushmita; Pal, Durba; Dasgupta, Suman; Kundu, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Sandip; Bhattacharya, Shelley; Bhuyan, Mantu; Bhattacharyya, Pranab R; Baishya, Gakul; Barua, Nabin C; Baruah, Pranab K; Rao, Paruchuri G; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a major killer in cancer related human death. Its therapeutic intervention requires superior efficient molecule(s) as it often becomes resistant to present chemotherapy options. Here we report that vapor of volatile oil compounds obtained from Litsea cubeba seeds killed human NSCLC cells, A549, through the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Vapor generated from the combined oils (VCO) deactivated Akt, a key player in cancer cell survival and proliferation. Interestingly VCO dephosphorylated Akt at both Ser(473) and Thr(308); through the suppression of mTOR and pPDK1 respectively. As a consequence of this, diminished phosphorylation of Bad occurred along with the decreased Bcl-xL expression. This subsequently enhanced Bax levels permitting the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol which concomitantly activated caspase 9 and caspase 3 resulting apoptotic cell death. Impairment of Akt activation by VCO also deactivated Mdm2 that effected overexpression of p53 which in turn upregulated p21 expression. This causes enhanced p21 binding to cyclin D1 that halted G1 to S phase progression. Taken together, VCO produces two prong effects on lung cancer cells, it induces apoptosis and blocked cancer cell proliferation, both occurred due to the deactivation of Akt. In addition, it has another crucial advantage: VCO could be directly delivered to lung cancer tissue through inhalation.

  12. Phytometabolite Dehydroleucodine Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and DNA Damage in Human Astrocytoma Cells through p73/p53 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia; González-Arévalo, Gabriela; Velásquez-Rojas, Gabriela; Malagon, Omar; Vidari, Giovanni; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Ratovitski, Edward A.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the idea that secondary metabolites obtained from medicinal plants (phytometabolites) may be important contributors in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents to reduce the occurrence or recurrence of cancer. Our study focused on Dehydroleucodine (DhL), a sesquiterpene found in the provinces of Loja and Zamora-Chinchipe. In this study, we showed that DhL displayed cytostatic and cytotoxic activities on the human cerebral astrocytoma D384 cell line. With lactone isolated from Gynoxys verrucosa Wedd, a medicinal plant from Ecuador, we found that DhL induced cell death in D384 cells by triggering cell cycle arrest and inducing apoptosis and DNA damage. We further found that the cell death resulted in the increased expression of CDKN1A and BAX proteins. A marked induction of the levels of total TP73 and phosphorylated TP53, TP73, and γ-H2AX proteins was observed in D384 cells exposed to DhL, but no increase in total TP53 levels was detected. Overall these studies demonstrated the marked effect of DhL on the diminished survival of human astrocytoma cells through the induced expression of TP73 and phosphorylation of TP73 and TP53, suggesting their key roles in the tumor cell response to DhL treatment. PMID:26309132

  13. Berberine induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma SNU-5 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing-Pin; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lee, Jau-Hong; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the inhibited growth (cytotoxic activity) of berberine and apoptotic pathway with its molecular mechanism of action. METHODS: The in vitro cytotoxic techniques were complemented by cell cycle analysis and determination of sub-G1 for apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma SNU-5 cells. Percentage of viable cells, cell cycle, and sub-G1 group (apoptosis) were examined and determined by the flow cytometric methods. The associated proteins for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were examined by Western blotting. RESULTS: For SNU-5 cell line, the IC (50) was found to be 48 μmol/L of berberine. In SNU-5 cells treated with 25-200 μmol/L berberine, G2/M cell cycle arrest was observed which was associated with a marked increment of the expression of p53, Wee1 and CDk1 proteins and decreased cyclin B. A concentration-dependent decrease of cells in G0/G1 phase and an increase in G2/M phase were detected. In addition, apoptosis detected as sub-G0 cell population in cell cycle measurement was proved in 25-200 μmol/L berberine-treated cells by monitoring the apoptotic pathway. Apoptosis was identified by sub-G0 cell population, and upregulation of Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2, release of Ca2+, decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and then led to the release of mitochondrial cytochrome C into the cytoplasm and caused the activation of caspase-3, and finally led to the occurrence of apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Berberine induces p53 expression and leads to the decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential, Cytochrome C release and activation of caspase-3 for the induction of apoptosis. PMID:16440412

  14. Inhibitory effect of oleanolic acid on hepatocellular carcinoma via ERK-p53-mediated cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Bai, Hua; Zhang, Xiaodi; Liu, Jiangzheng; Cao, Peipei; Liao, Nai; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhao; Hai, Chunxu

    2013-06-01

    Incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is dramatically increasing and is the third cause of cancer death worldwide. One key approach to control HCC is chemoprevention by naturally occurring agents. This study aims at investigating the antitumor effect of oleanolic acid (OA) and the molecular mechanisms. BALB/c mice were injected subcutaneously with HepG2 cells to establish transplanted tumors. Apoptosis and cell cycle arrest-related markers and signaling cascades were determined by western blot, immunofluorescence, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometric analysis. OA exhibited inhibitory effect on HCC through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest both in transplanted tumors and in HepG2 cells. OA induced apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway, evidenced by inhibition of Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, mitochondrial dysfunction, transient increase of adenosine triphosphate, increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, increased release of cytochrome c and activation of caspase/poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway may be due to reactive oxygen species generated by mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, resulted from enhancement of lipolysis regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate response element-binding protein-hormone-sensitive lipase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ signaling. OA induced G2/M cell cycle arrest through p21-mediated downregulation of cyclin B1/cdc2. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and p53 were involved in OA-exerted effect, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-p53 signaling played a central role in OA-activated cascades responsible for apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. OA demonstrated significant antitumor activities in HCC in vivo and in vitro models. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the antitumor effect of OA.

  15. Linalool Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Cervical Cancer Cells through CDKIs.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Yin; Shieh, Den-En; Chen, Chung-Chi; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Dong, Huei-Ping

    2015-11-26

    Plantaginaceae, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases from common cold to cancer. Linalool is one of the biologically active compounds that can be isolated from Plantaginaceae. Most of the commonly used cytotoxic anticancer drugs have been shown to induce apoptosis in susceptible tumor cells. However, the signaling pathway for apoptosis remains undefined. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of linalool on human cancer cell lines was investigated. Water-soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1) based colorimetric cellular cytotoxicity assay, was used to test the cytotoxic ability of linalool against U937 and HeLa cells, and flow cytometry (FCM) and genechip analysis were used to investigate the possible mechanism of apoptosis. These results demonstrated that linalool exhibited a good cytotoxic effect on U937 and HeLa cells, with the IC50 value of 2.59 and 11.02 μM, respectively, compared with 5-FU with values of 4.86 and 12.31 μM, respectively. After treating U937 cells with linalool for 6 h, we found an increased sub-G1 peak and a dose-dependent phenomenon, whereby these cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, by using genechip analysis, we observed that linalool can promote p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18 gene expression. Therefore, this study verified that linalool can arrest the cell cycle of U937 cells at the G0/G1 phase and can arrest the cell cycle of HeLa cells at the G2/M phase. Its mechanism facilitates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CDKIs) p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18, as well as the non-expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) activity.

  16. Linalool Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Cervical Cancer Cells through CDKIs

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mei-Yin; Shieh, Den-En; Chen, Chung-Chi; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Dong, Huei-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Plantaginaceae, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases from common cold to cancer. Linalool is one of the biologically active compounds that can be isolated from Plantaginaceae. Most of the commonly used cytotoxic anticancer drugs have been shown to induce apoptosis in susceptible tumor cells. However, the signaling pathway for apoptosis remains undefined. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of linalool on human cancer cell lines was investigated. Water-soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1) based colorimetric cellular cytotoxicity assay, was used to test the cytotoxic ability of linalool against U937 and HeLa cells, and flow cytometry (FCM) and genechip analysis were used to investigate the possible mechanism of apoptosis. These results demonstrated that linalool exhibited a good cytotoxic effect on U937 and HeLa cells, with the IC50 value of 2.59 and 11.02 μM, respectively, compared with 5-FU with values of 4.86 and 12.31 μM, respectively. After treating U937 cells with linalool for 6 h, we found an increased sub-G1 peak and a dose-dependent phenomenon, whereby these cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, by using genechip analysis, we observed that linalool can promote p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18 gene expression. Therefore, this study verified that linalool can arrest the cell cycle of U937 cells at the G0/G1 phase and can arrest the cell cycle of HeLa cells at the G2/M phase. Its mechanism facilitates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CDKIs) p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18, as well as the non-expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) activity. PMID:26703569

  17. Schisandrin B inhibits the proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by inducing cycle arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xue-Jiao; Zhao, Li-Jing; Hao, Yu-Qiu; Su, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Jun-Yao; Du, Yan-Wei; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the world. Schizandrin B (Sch B) is one of the main dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans present in the fruit of Schisandra chinensis (Schisandraceae). Sch B has multiple functions against cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Sch B on the proliferation, cell cycling, apoptosis and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by MTT, flow cytometry, wound healing and transwell invasion assays. Treatment with Sch B inhibited the proliferation of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Sch B induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase by down-regulating the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4, and CDK6, but up-regulating p53 and p21 expression in A549 cells. Furthermore, Sch B triggered A549 cell apoptosis by increasing Bax, cleaved caspase-3, 9, Cyto C, but decreasing Bcl-2 and PCNA expression. In addition, Sch B inhibited the invasion and migration of A549 cells by down-regulating the expressions of HIF-1, VEGF, MMP-9 and MMP-2. Therefore, Sch B has potent anti-tumor activity and may be a promising traditional Chinese medicine for human lung carcinoma. PMID:26221229

  18. Sesquiterpene lactones from Ambrosia spp. are active against a murine lymphoma cell line by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Martino, Renzo; Beer, María Florencia; Elso, Orlando; Donadel, Osvaldo; Sülsen, Valeria; Anesini, Claudia

    2015-10-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (STLs) are natural terpenoid compounds. They have been recognized as antitumor agents. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the antiproliferative effects of psilostachyin, psilostachyin C, peruvin and cumanin on the murine lymphoma cell line BW5147. Cells were treated with the STLs at different concentrations. Tritiated thymidine uptake was employed to determine cell proliferation. MTT assay was used to analyze cell viability. Flow cytometry assay with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide was employed to evaluate cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential and cell cycle analysis were also evaluated by flow cytometry. Antioxidant enzymes activities were determined spectrophotometrically by kinetic assays. Results showed that these STLs inhibited cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner by exerting cytotoxicity through apoptosis. Psilostachyin C was the most active and the less toxic compound. This STL induced apoptosis with an impairment in mitochondrial membrane potential. Psilostachyin C was able to induce ROS generation, related to a modulation of the antioxidant enzymes activity. In addition, it induced cell cycle arrest in S phase. In conclusion, psilostachyin C was found to be active against lymphoma cells exerting both cytostatic and cytotoxic effects. These findings may provide a novel approach for lymphoma treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chelidonium majus crude extract inhibits migration and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Deljanin, Milena; Nikolic, Mladen; Baskic, Dejan; Todorovic, Danijela; Djurdjevic, Predrag; Zaric, Milan; Stankovic, Milan; Todorovic, Milos; Avramovic, Dusko; Popovic, Suzana

    2016-08-22

    Chelidonium majus L (Papaveraceae) is widely used in alternative medicine for treatment of various disorders. Antitumor activities of alkaloids isolated from this plant have been reviewed, while there are only a few studies that examine properties of the whole extract. The aim of the present study was to investigate direct cytotoxic effects, as well as indirect antitumor effects of Chelidonium majus ethanolic extract against different tumor cell lines,. MTT and SRB assays were performed to estimate cytotoxic effects of Chelidonium majus extract against human tumor cell lines A549, H460, HCT 116, SW480, MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry. Type of cell death induced by extract was determined by flow cytometry and cell morphology assessment. Inhibitory effect on migration of cancer cells was assessed by wound healing assay. Chelidonium majus extract showed selective time- and dose-dependent increase of cytotoxicity in all six cell lines, with individual cell line sensitivities. Extract promoted cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis. Cotreatment with doxorubicin enhanced cytotoxicity of the drug. Also, inhibitory effect on migration was shown with non-toxic extract concentration. These results indicate possible usefulness of Chelidonium majus crude extract in antitumor therapy, whether through its direct cytotoxic effect, by prevention of metastasis, or as adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Knockdown of human deubiquitinase PSMD14 induces cell cycle arrest and senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Ann; McLaren, Rajashree P.; Mason, Paul; Chai, Lilly; Dufault, Michael R.; Huang, Yinyin; Liang, Beirong; Gans, Joseph D.; Zhang, Mindy; Carter, Kara; Gladysheva, Tatiana B.; Teicher, Beverly A.; Biemann, Hans-Peter N.; Booker, Michael; Goldberg, Mark A.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Lillie, James; Madden, Stephen L.; Jiang, Yide

    2010-01-15

    The PSMD14 (POH1, also known as Rpn11/MPR1/S13/CepP1) protein within the 19S complex (19S cap; PA700) is responsible for substrate deubiquitination during proteasomal degradation. The role of PSMD14 in cell proliferation and senescence was explored using siRNA knockdown in carcinoma cell lines. Our results reveal that down-regulation of PSMD14 by siRNA transfection had a considerable impact on cell viability causing cell arrest in the G0-G1 phase, ultimately leading to senescence. The molecular events associated with decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and senescence include down-regulation of cyclin B1-CDK1-CDC25C, down-regulation of cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21{sup /Cip} and p27{sup /Kip1}. Most notably, phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein was markedly reduced in PSMD14 knockdown cells. A comparative study with PSMB5, a subunit of the 20S proteasome, revealed that PSMB5 and PSMD14 have different effects on cell cycle, senescence and associated molecular events. These data support the view that the 19S and 20S subunits of the proteasome have distinct biological functions and imply that targeting 19S and 20S would have distinct molecular consequences on tumor cells.

  1. Cimicifuga foetida extract inhibits proliferation of hepatocellular cells via induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ze; Pan, Ruile; Chang, Qi; Si, Jianyong; Xiao, Peigen; Wu, Erxi

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) from the aerial part of Cimicifuga foetida Linnaeus possesses the anti-tumor action on hepatoma, and therefore, provide evidence for the traditional use of the plant as a detoxification agent. EAF was extracted and its cytotoxicity was evaluated on a panel of Hepatocytes by MTT assay. The IC(50) values of EAF on HepG2, R-HepG2 and primary cultured normal mouse hepatocytes were 21, 43 and 80 microg/mL, respectively. Morphology observation, Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, cell cycle analysis and western blot were used to further elucidate the cytotoxic mechanism of EAF. EAF induced G(0)/G(1)cell cycle arrest at lower concentration (25 microg/mL), and triggered G(2)/M arrest and apoptosis at higher concentrations (50 and 100 microg/mL, respectively). An increase in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, activation of downstream effector Caspase 3, and cleavage of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were implicated in EAF-induced apoptosis. In addition, EAF inhibited the growth of the implanted mouse H(22) tumor in a dose-dependent manner with the growth inhibitory rate of 63.32% at 200 mg/kg. In conclusion, EAF may potentially find use as a new therapy for the treatment of hepatoma.

  2. Isoalantolactone inhibits UM-SCC-10A cell growth via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minjun; Zhang, Hua; Hu, Jiehua; Weng, Zhiyong; Li, Chenyuan; Li, Hong; Zhao, Yan; Mei, Xifan; Ren, Fu; Li, Lihua

    2013-01-01

    Isoalantolactone is a sesquiterpene lactone compound isolated from the roots of Inula helenium L. Previous studies have demonstrated that isoalantolactone possesses antifungal, anti-bacterial, anti-helminthic and anti-proliferative properties in a variety of cells, but there are no studies concerning its effects on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In the present study, an MTT assay demonstrated that isoalantolactone has anti-proliferative activity against the HNSCC cell line (UM-SCC-10A). Immunostaining identified that this compound induced UM-SCC-10A cell apoptosis but not necrosis. To explain the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects, flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that the apoptosis was associated with cell cycle arrest during the G1 phase, up-regulation of p53 and p21, and down-regulation of cyclin D. Furthermore, our results revealed that induction of apoptosis through a mitochondrial pathway led to up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein expression (Bax), down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein expression (Bcl-2), mitochondrial release of cytochrome c (Cyto c), reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and activation of caspase-3 (Casp-3). Involvement of the caspase apoptosis pathway was confirmed using caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK pretreatment. Together, our findings suggest that isoalantolactone induced caspase-dependent apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway and was associated with cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in UM-SCC-10A cells. Therefore, isoalantolactone may become a potential drug for treating HNSCC.

  3. Caudatin Inhibits Human Glioma Cells Growth Through Triggering DNA Damage-Mediated Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Kun; Yang, Ming-feng; Fan, Cun-dong; Sun, Bao-liang

    2015-10-01

    Caudatin, one of the species of C-21 steroidal glycosides mainly isolated from the root of Cynanchum bungei Decne, exhibits potent anticancer activities. However, the mechanism remains poorly defined. In the present study, the growth inhibitory effect and mechanism of caudatin on human glioma cells were evaluated in vitro. The results revealed that caudatin time- and dose-dependently inhibited U251 and U87 cells growth. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that caudatin-induced growth inhibition against U251 and U87 cells was mainly achieved by the induction of G0/G1 and S-phase cell cycle arrest through triggering DNA damage, as convinced by the up-regulation of p53, p21, and histone phosphorylation, as well as the down-regulation of cyclin D1. Moreover, caudatin treatment also triggered the activation of ERK and inactivation of AKT pathway. LY294002 (an AKT inhibitor) addition enhanced caudation-induced AKT inhibition, indicating that caudatin inhibited U251 cells growth in an AKT-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that caudatin may act as a novel cytostatic reagent against human glioma cells through the induction of DNA damage-mediated cell cycle arrest with the involvement of modulating MAPK and AKT pathways.

  4. The histone deacetylase inhibitor LBH589 inhibits expression of mitotic genes causing G2/M arrest and cell death in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Prystowsky, Michael B; Adomako, Alfred; Smith, Richard V; Kawachi, Nicole; McKimpson, Wendy; Atadja, Peter; Chen, Quan; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Parish, Joanna L; Childs, Geoffrey; Belbin, Thomas J

    2009-08-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma represents a complex set of neoplasms arising in diverse anatomical locations. The site and stage of the cancer determine whether patients will be treated with single or multi-modality therapy. The HDAC inhibitor LBH589 is effective in treating some haematological neoplasms and shows promise for certain epithelial neoplasms. As with other human cancer cell lines, LBH589 causes up-regulation of p21, G2/M cell cycle arrest, and cell death of human HNSCC cell lines, as measured using flow cytometry and cDNA microarrays. Global RNA expression studies following treatment of the HNSCC cell line FaDu with LBH589 reveal down-regulation of genes required for chromosome congression and segregation (SMC2L1), sister chromatid cohesion (DDX11), and kinetochore structure (CENP-A, CENP-F, and CENP-M); these LBH589-induced changes in gene expression coupled with the down-regulation of MYC and BIRC5 (survivin) provide a plausible explanation for the early mitotic arrest and cell death observed. When LBH589-induced changes in gene expression were compared with gene expression profiles of 41 primary HNSCC samples, many of the genes that were down-regulated by LBH589 showed increased expression in primary HNSCC, suggesting that some patients with HNSCC may respond to treatment with LBH589. (c) 2009 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Alantolactone Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest on Lung Squamous Cancer SK-MES-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Pan, Zhenxiang; Luo, Yungang; Zhang, Leilei; Li, Xin; Zhang, Guangxin; Zhang, Yifan; Cui, Ranji; Sun, Mei; Zhang, Xingyi

    2015-05-01

    Alantolactone, a sesquiterpene lactone compound, has variety of pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic effects. In our study, alantolactone inhibited cancer cell proliferation. To explore the mechanisms underlying its antitumor action, we further examined apoptotic cells and cell cycle distribution using flow cytometry analysis. Alantolactone triggered apoptosis and induced cell cycle G1/G0 phase arrest. Furthermore, the expressions of caspases-8, -9, -3, PARP, and Bax were significantly upregulated, while antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2 expression was inhibited. In addition, the expressions of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), CDK6, cyclin D3, and cyclin D1 were downregulated by alantolactone. Therefore, our findings indicated that alantolactone has an antiproliferative role on lung squamous cancer cells, and it may be a promising chemotherapeutic agent for squamous lung cancer SK-MES-1 cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cell Division and Targeted Cell Cycle Arrest Opens and Stabilizes Basement Membrane Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Matus, David Q.; Chang, Emily; Makohon-Moore, Sasha C.; Hagedorn, Mary A.; Chi, Qiuyi; Sherwood, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Large gaps in basement membrane (BM) occur during organ remodeling and cancer cell invasion. Whether dividing cells, which temporarily reduce their attachment to BM, influence these breaches is unknown. Here we analyse uterine-vulval attachment during development across 21 species of rhabditid nematodes and find that the BM gap that forms between these organs is always bounded by a non-dividing vulval cell. Through cell cycle manipulation and live cell imaging in Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that actively dividing vulval cells facilitate enlargement of this breach by promoting BM movement. In contrast, targeted cell-cycle arrest halts BM movement and limits gap opening. Further, we demonstrate that the BM component laminin accumulates at the BM gap edge and promotes increased integrin levels in non-dividing vulval cells, stabilizing gap position. Together, these studies reveal that cell division can be used as a mechanism to regulate BM breaches, thus controlling the exchange of cells between tissues. PMID:24924309

  7. Enhanced radiation-induced cytotoxic effect by 2-ME in glioma cells is mediated by induction of cell cycle arrest and DNA damage via activation of ATM pathways.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huichao; Zhao, Shiguang; Zhang, Jianhua; Lv, Gongwei; Zhang, Xu; Yu, Hongwei; Wang, Huibo; Wang, Ligang

    2007-12-14

    Glioblastoma multiform is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults, but there remains no effective therapeutic approach. 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME), which is a naturally occurring metabolite of 17beta-estradiol, was shown to enhance radiotherapeutic effect in certain tumors; however, whether 2-ME can also enhance the sensitivity of glioma cells to radiotherapy remains unknown. The present study, therefore, was to address this issue using two human glioma cell lines (T98G and U251MG). These cells were irradiated with and without 2-ME and then clonogenic assay, apoptosis assay, DNA damage, and cell cycle change were examined. Results showed that 2-ME significantly enhances radiation-induced cell death in both glioma cells, shown by decreasing cell viability and increasing apoptotic cell death. No such radiosensitizing effect was observed if cells pre-treated with Estrodiol, suggesting the specifically radiosensitizing effect of 2-ME rather than a general effect of estrodials. The enhanced radio-cytotoxic effect in glioma cells by 2-ME was found to be associated with its enhancement of G(2)/M arrest and DNA damage, and phosphorylated ATM protein kinases as well as cell cycle checkpoint protein Chk2. Furthermore, inhibition of ATM by ATM inhibitor abolished 2-ME-activated Chk2 and enhanced radio-cytotoxic effects. These results suggest that 2-ME enhancement of the sensitivity of glioma cell lines to radiotherapy is mediated by induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased DNA damage via activation of ATM kinases.

  8. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERα-positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ansems, Marleen; Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Looman, Maaike W G; Smid, Marcel; de Graaf, Annemarie M A; de Weerd, Vanja; Zuidscherwoude, Malou; Foekens, John A; Martens, John W M; Adema, Gosse J

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERα) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERα and as a strong and independent prognostic marker in ESR1 (ERα gene)-positive breast cancer patients. In this study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism on how DC-SCRIPT inhibits breast cancer cell growth. DC-SCRIPT mRNA levels from 190 primary ESR1-positive breast tumors were related to global gene expression, followed by gene ontology and pathway analysis. The effect of DC-SCRIPT on breast cancer cell growth and cell cycle arrest was investigated using novel DC-SCRIPT-inducible MCF7 breast cancer cell lines. Genome-wide expression profiling of DC-SCRIPT-expressing MCF7 cells was performed to investigate the effect of DC-SCRIPT on cell cycle-related gene expression. Findings were validated by real-time PCR in a cohort of 1,132 ESR1-positive breast cancer patients. In the primary ESR1-positive breast tumors, DC-SCRIPT expression negatively correlated with several cell cycle gene ontologies and pathways. DC-SCRIPT expression strongly reduced breast cancer cell growth in vitro, breast tumor growth in vivo, and induced cell cycle arrest. In addition, in the presence of DC-SCRIPT, multiple cell cycles related genes were differentially expressed including the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B. Moreover, in 1,132 primary ESR1-positive breast tumors, DC-SCRIPT expression also correlated with CDKN2B expression. Collectively, these data show that DC-SCRIPT acts as a novel regulator of CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ESR1-positive breast cancer cells.

  9. Transient rRNA synthesis inhibition with CX-5461 is sufficient to elicit growth arrest and cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Negi, Sandeep S; Brown, Patrick

    2015-10-27

    Enhanced rRNA synthesis is a downstream effect of many of the signaling pathways that are aberrantly activated in cancer, such as the PI3K/mTOR and MAP kinase pathways. Recently, two new rRNA synthesis inhibitors have demonstrated therapeutic effects on cancer cells while sparing normal cells. One of them, CX-5461, is currently in phase 1 clinical trials for hematological malignancies. Here, we investigate the effectiveness of transient treatment with this drug on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Our results show that short exposure to CX-5461 followed by drug washout is sufficient to induce persistent G2 cell-cycle arrest and irreversible commitment to cell death, in spite of rRNA synthesis returning to normal within 24 hours of drug washout. The magnitude of cell death after transient exposure is similar to continuous exposure, but the time to cell death is relatively delayed with transient exposure. In this report, we also investigate rational drug combinations that can potentiate the effect of continuous CX-5461 treatment. We show that the checkpoint abrogator UCN-01 can relieve CX-5461-induced G2 arrest and potentiate the cytotoxic effects of CX-5461. Finally, we show that ERK1/2 is activated upon CX-5461 treatment, and that pharmacological inhibition of MEK1/2 leads to enhanced cell death in combination with CX-5461. In summary, our results provide evidence for the effectiveness of CX-5461 pulse treatment, which may minimize drug related toxicity, and evidence for enhanced effectiveness of CX-5461 in combination with other targeted agents.

  10. Transient rRNA synthesis inhibition with CX-5461 is sufficient to elicit growth arrest and cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Sandeep S.; Brown, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced rRNA synthesis is a downstream effect of many of the signaling pathways that are aberrantly activated in cancer, such as the PI3K/mTOR and MAP kinase pathways. Recently, two new rRNA synthesis inhibitors have demonstrated therapeutic effects on cancer cells while sparing normal cells. One of them, CX-5461, is currently in phase 1 clinical trials for hematological malignancies. Here, we investigate the effectiveness of transient treatment with this drug on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Our results show that short exposure to CX-5461 followed by drug washout is sufficient to induce persistent G2 cell-cycle arrest and irreversible commitment to cell death, in spite of rRNA synthesis returning to normal within 24 hours of drug washout. The magnitude of cell death after transient exposure is similar to continuous exposure, but the time to cell death is relatively delayed with transient exposure. In this report, we also investigate rational drug combinations that can potentiate the effect of continuous CX-5461 treatment. We show that the checkpoint abrogator UCN-01 can relieve CX-5461-induced G2 arrest and potentiate the cytotoxic effects of CX-5461. Finally, we show that ERK1/2 is activated upon CX-5461 treatment, and that pharmacological inhibition of MEK1/2 leads to enhanced cell death in combination with CX-5461. In summary, our results provide evidence for the effectiveness of CX-5461 pulse treatment, which may minimize drug related toxicity, and evidence for enhanced effectiveness of CX-5461 in combination with other targeted agents. PMID:26472108

  11. Life changes in patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest : the effect of near-death experiences.

    PubMed

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika

    2013-03-01

    Cardiac arrest is a traumatic event that often affects patients' lives in many ways. Patients after near-death experiences (NDEs) often express strong and permanent change of their values, beliefs and principles. The aim of this study was to determine the association between NDEs and life changes in patients 6 months after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. This was a prospective observational study, which included 37 patients (average age 54.0 years, range 22-81 years, 29 males) 6 months after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The presence of NDEs was assessed with a self-administered Greyson's NDE scale. The intensity of life changes was assessed with a self-administered Ring's life change inventory. Univariate analysis was performed. NDEs were reported by seven (18.9%) patients. In comparison to the non-NDEs group, patients in the NDEs group expressed significantly stronger changes in the following items: tolerance for others, understanding of myself, appreciation of nature, sense that there is some inner meaning to my life and concern with questions of social justice. Cardiac arrest survivors do not express extensive life changes. But, the presence of NDEs is significantly associated with the change of interest in some aspects of patients' lives. Such patients should be prepared for significant life changes that might occur after NDEs by health workers and receive professional help to accommodate to them.

  12. Lipopolysaccharide treatment arrests the cell cycle of BV-2 microglial cells in G₁ phase and protects them from UV light-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yoko S; Ota, Akira; Nakashima, Akira; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Kodani, Yu; Mori, Keiji; Nagatsu, Toshiharu

    2015-02-01

    We previously reported that an optimal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) markedly extends the lifespan of murine primary-cultured microglia by suppressing cell death pathways. In this study, we investigated the effects of LPS pretreatment on UV light-induced apoptosis of cells from the microglial cell line BV-2. More than half of BV-2 cells were apoptotic, and procaspase-3 was cleaved into its active form at 3 h of UV irradiation. In contrast, in BV-2 cells treated with LPS for 24 h, UV irradiation caused neither apoptosis nor procaspase-3 cleavage. LPS treatment arrested the cell cycle in G1 phase and upregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Waf1/Cip1) and growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible (GADD) 45α in BV-2 cells. When p21(Waf1/Cip1) and GADD45α were knocked down by small interfering RNA, procaspase-3 was cleaved into its active form to induce apoptosis. Our findings suggest that LPS inhibits UV-induced apoptosis in BV-2 cells through arrest of the cell cycle in G1 phase by upregulation of p21(Waf1/Cip1) and GADD45α. Excessive activation of microglia may play a critical role in the exacerbation of neurodegeneration, therefore, normalizing the precise regulation of apoptosis may be a new strategy to prevent the deterioration caused by neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. Natural Compounds as Modulators of Cell Cycle Arrest: Application for Anticancer Chemotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia; Cevallos-Solorzano, Gabriela; Romero-Benavides, Juan Carlos; Orellana, Maria Isabel Ramirez

    2017-01-01

    Natural compounds from various plants, microorganisms and marine species play an important role in the discovery novel components that can be successfully used in numerous biomedical applications, including anticancer therapeutics. Since uncontrolled and rapid cell division is a hallmark of cancer, unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying mitosis is key to understanding how various natural compounds might function as inhibitors of cell cycle progression. A number of natural compounds that inhibit the cell cycle arrest have proven effective for killing cancer cells in vitro, in vivo and in clinical settings. Significant advances that have been recently made in the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the cell cycle regulation using the chemotherapeutic agents is of great importance for improving the efficacy of targeted therapeutics and overcoming resistance to anticancer drugs, especially of natural origin, which inhibit the activities of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, as well as other proteins and enzymes involved in proper regulation of cell cycle leading to controlled cell proliferation. PMID:28367072

  14. Low molecular weight apple polysaccharides induced cell cycle arrest in colorectal tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhua; Mei, Lin; Niu, Yinbo; Sun, Yang; Huang, Haitao; Li, Qian; Kong, Xianghe; Liu, Li; Li, Zhiquan; Mei, Qibing

    2012-04-01

    Dietary components play an important role in cancer prevention. Many ingredients from apples have been proven to have antitumor potency. We thus made low molecular weight apple polysaccharides (LMWAP) and evaluated the effects of it on colorectal cancer (CRC). The effects of LMWAP on human colon carcinoma cells (HT-29) were evaluated using a microarray. Then, cell-cycle distribution was measured by flow cytometric analysis. A colitis-associated colorectal cancer mouse model was used to assess the effect of LMWAP on in vivo CRC prevention. Treatment of HT-29 cells with LMWAP resulted in 333 genes expression over cutoff values (≥2-fold). Further analysis demonstrated that pathways of cell cycle were mainly influenced. At the concentrations from 0.001 to 0.1 mg/mL, LMWAP induced a G(0)/G(1) phase block in HT-29 cells in a dose-dependent way. In vivo studies revealed that administration of LMWAP could protect ICR mice against CRC effectively. The results of Western blot suggested LMWAP induced cell-cycle arrest in a p53 independent manner. These data indicate that LMWAP could inhibit the development of CRC through affecting cell cycle, and it has potential for clinical prevention for colon cancer.

  15. Cinobufacini induced MDA-MB-231 cell apoptosis-associated cell cycle arrest and cytoskeleton function.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lina; Song, Bing; Jin, Hua; Pi, Jiang; Liu, Li; Jiang, Jinhuan; Cai, Jiye

    2012-02-01

    Cinobufacini is a traditional Chinese anti-tumor drug and widely used in clinic experiences. But little is known about its effect on the cells. In this study, the effects of cinobufacini on breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell were evaluated by CCK-8 assay, and the data showed cinobufacini could inhibit the MDA-MB-231 cells growth effectively in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry analysis. After the cells being treated with 50 μg/mL cinobufacini for 48 h, the early apoptosis percentage (20.45 ± 1.46%) is much higher than the normal group (7.73 ± 1.21%). The cell cycle data indicated that cinobufacini caused a cell cycle arrest at S phase. What's more, cinobufacini can affect the disruption of cytoskeleton, and these alterations changed the cell-surface ultrastructure and the cell morphology which were detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at nanoscale level. It indicated that the cell membrane structure and cytoskeleton networks were destroyed and the cell tails were narrowed after the cell being treated with cinobufacini. The present study is to provide valuable new insights to understand the mechanism of the drug in anti-tumor process. Furthermore, the knowledge concerning the signaling of cell cycle is potentially important to clinical utility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Induction of necrosis and cell cycle arrest in murine cancer cell lines by Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil and terpinen-4-ol.

    PubMed

    Greay, S J; Ireland, D J; Kissick, H T; Levy, A; Beilharz, M W; Riley, T V; Carson, C F

    2010-04-01

    To examine the in vitro anticancer activity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil (TTO), and its major active terpene component, terpinen-4-ol, against two aggressive murine tumour cell lines, AE17 mesothelioma and B16 melanoma. Effects of TTO and terpinen-4-ol on the cellular viability of two tumour cell lines and fibroblast cells were assessed by MTT assay. Induction of apoptotic and necrotic cell death was visualised by fluorescent microscopy and quantified by flow cytometry. Tumour cell ultrastructural changes were examined by transmission electron microscopy and changes in cell cycle distribution were assessed by flow cytometry, with changes in cellular morphology monitored by video time lapse microscopy. TTO and terpinen-4-ol significantly inhibited the growth of two murine tumour cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Interestingly, cytotoxic doses of TTO and terpinen-4-ol were significantly less efficacious against non-tumour fibroblast cells. TTO and terpinen-4-ol induced necrotic cell death coupled with low level apoptotic cell death in both tumour cell lines. This primary necrosis was clarified by video time lapse microscopy and also by transmission electron microscopy which revealed ultrastructural features including cell and organelle swelling following treatment with TTO. In addition, both TTO and terpinen-4-ol induced their inhibitory effect by eliciting G1 cell cycle arrest. TTO and terpinen-4-ol had significant anti-proliferative activity against two tumour cell lines. Moreover, the identification of primary necrotic cell death and cell cycle arrest of the aggressive tumour cells highlights the potential anticancer activity of TTO and terpinen-4-ol.

  17. Citric acid induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of human immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) via caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Chen, Chia-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Hung, Sung-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2013-10-01

    Citric acid is an alpha-hydroxyacid (AHA) widely used in cosmetic dermatology and skincare products. However, there is concern regarding its safety for the skin. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of citric acid on the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. HaCaT cells were treated with citric acid at 2.5-12.5 mM for different time periods. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated by 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining, flow cytometry, western blot and confocal microscopy. Citric acid not only inhibited proliferation of HaCaT cells in a dose-dependent manner, but also induced apoptosis and cell cycle-arrest at the G2/M phase (before 24 h) and S phase (after 24 h). Citric acid increased the level of Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) and reduced the levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2), B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-XL) and activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, which subsequently induced apoptosis via caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. Citric acid also activated death receptors and increased the levels of caspase-8, activated BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) protein, Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and Endonuclease G (EndoG). Therefore, citric acid induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. The study results suggest that citric acid is cytotoxic to HaCaT cells via induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in vitro.

  18. Cordyceps cicadae induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in MHCC97H human hepatocellular carcinoma cells: a proteomic study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cordyceps cicadae is a medicinal fungus that is often used for treating cancer. However, the anticancer mechanisms of C. cicadae are largely unknown. This study aims to investigate the anticancer mechanisms of C. cicadae against hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Human hepatocellular carcinoma MHCC97H cells were treated with a water extract of C. cicadae (0, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 μg/mL) for 48 h and harvested for cell viability assays. The significant differences in protein expression between control and C. cicadae-treated cells were analyzed by two-dimensional gel-based proteomics coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Flow cytometry analysis was employed to investigate the cell cycle and cell death. The anticancer molecular mechanism was analyzed by whole proteome mapping. Results The water extract of C. cicadae (0, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 μg/mL) inhibited the growth of MHCC97H cells in a dose-dependent manner via G2/M phase cell cycle arrest with no evidence of apoptosis. Among the identified proteins with upregulated expression were dynactin subunit 2, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1, heat shock protein beta-1, alpha-enolase isoform 1, phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, and WD repeat-containing protein 1. Meanwhile, the proteins with downregulated expression were 14-3-3 gamma, BUB3, microtubule-associated protein RP/EB family member 1, thioredoxin-like protein, chloride intracellular channel protein 1, ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5, xaa-Pro dipeptidase, enoyl-CoA delta isomerase 1, protein-disulfide isomerase-related chaperone Erp29, hnRNP 2H9B, peroxiredoxin 1, WD-40 repeat protein, and serine/threonine kinase receptor-associated protein. Conclusion The water extract of C. cicadae reduced the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma MHCC97H cells via G2/M cell cycle arrest. PMID:24872842

  19. PVM/MA-shelled selol nanocapsules promote cell cycle arrest in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selol is an oily mixture of selenitetriacylglycerides that was obtained as a semi-synthetic compound containing selenite. Selol is effective against cancerous cells and less toxic to normal cells compared with inorganic forms of selenite. However, Selol’s hydrophobicity hinders its administration in vivo. Therefore, the present study aimed to produce a formulation of Selol nanocapsules (SPN) and to test its effectiveness against pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells (A549). Results Nanocapsules were produced through an interfacial nanoprecipitation method. The polymer shell was composed of poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride) (PVM/MA) copolymer. The obtained nanocapsules were monodisperse and stable. Both free Selol (S) and SPN reduced the viability of A549 cells, whereas S induced a greater reduction in non-tumor cell viability than SPN. The suppressor effect of SPN was primarily associated to the G2/M arrest of the cell cycle, as was corroborated by the down-regulations of the CCNB1 and CDC25C genes. Apoptosis and necrosis were induced by Selol in a discrete percentage of A549 cells. SPN also increased the production of reactive oxygen species, leading to oxidative cellular damage and to the overexpression of the GPX1, CYP1A1, BAX and BCL2 genes. Conclusions This study presents a stable formulation of PVM/MA-shelled Selol nanocapsules and provides the first demonstration that Selol promotes G2/M arrest in cancerous cells. PMID:25149827

  20. Raman spectrum reveals the cell cycle arrest of Triptolide-induced leukemic T-lymphocytes apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daosen; Feng, Yanyan; Zhang, Qinnan; Su, Xin; Lu, Xiaoxu; Liu, Shengde; Zhong, Liyun

    2015-04-01

    Triptolide (TPL), a traditional Chinese medicine extract, possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties. Though some research results have implicated that Triptolide (TPL) can be utilized in the treatment of leukemia, it remains controversial about the mechanism of TPL-induced leukemic T-lymphocytes apoptosis. In this study, combining Raman spectroscopic data, principal component analysis (PCA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, both the biochemical changes and morphological changes during TPL-induced cell apoptosis were presented. In contrast, the corresponding data during Daunorubicin (DNR)-induced cell apoptosis was also exhibited. The obtained results showed that Raman spectral changes during TPL-induced cell apoptosis were greatly different from DNR-induced cell apoptosis in the early stage of apoptosis but revealed the high similarity in the late stage of apoptosis. Moreover, above Raman spectral changes were respectively consistent with the morphological changes of different stages during TPL-induced apoptosis or DNR-induced apoptosis, including membrane shrinkage and blebbing, chromatin condensation and the formation of apoptotic bodies. Importantly, it was found that Raman spectral changes with TPL-induced apoptosis or DNR-induced apoptosis were respectively related with the cell cycle G1 phase arrest or G1 and S phase arrest.

  1. Isoprenoid geranylgeranylacetone inhibits human colon cancer cells through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoyuki; Tsuno, Nelson H; Okaji, Yurai; Kawai, Kazushige; Shuno, Yasutaka; Nagawa, Hirokazu; Oshima, Noriko; Takahashi, Koki

    2010-10-01

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an isoprenoid compound, is a widely used antiulcer drug developed in Japan. GGA is structurally similar to plaunotol and geranylgeraniol, another isoprenoid reported to exert strong anticancer effects. In an earlier study, GGA was shown to inhibit ovarian cancer invasion by attenuating not only Rho activation, but also Ras-MAPK activation. In this study, we aimed to test whether GGA could have a therapeutic effect on colon cancer cells. As a result, we found that GGA induced a dose-dependent decrease in the proliferative activity through induction of cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. The induction of apoptosis was mediated by the activation of both caspase-8 and caspase-9 pathways. The induction of G1 arrest was mediated by the increase of p21 and p27, and also the decrease of phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein levels. This study showed the potential anticancer activity of GGA. As this drug is already available in Japan for clinical use as an antiulcer/antigastritis agent, clinical trials will be designed to confirm its potential usefulness for cancer patients.

  2. Grape Seed Extract Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manjinder; Mandair, Reinuka; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2008-01-01

    One approach to control colorectal cancer (CRC) is its preventive intervention by dietary agents or those consumed as supplements. However, since most of these products are often consumed by patients as an alternative and complementary medicine (CAM) practice, a scientific base such as efficacy, mechanism and standardized preparation, needs to be developed. Grape seed extract (GSE) is one such supplement widely consumed by humans for its several health benefits. We reported recently that GSE inhibits CRC cell HT29 growth in culture and nude mice xenograft. Since GSE is available commercially through different vendors, here we assessed whether GSE from two different manufacturers produces comparable biological effects in a panel of human CRC cell lines. Our results show that irrespective of source, GSE strongly inhibits LoVo, HT29 and SW480 cell growth, with a G1 arrest in LoVo and HT29 cells, but an S and/or G2/M arrest in SW480 cell cycle progression. GSE also induced Cip/p21 levels in all three cell lines. Furthermore, an induction of apoptosis was observed in all three cell lines by GSE. Taken together, our findings suggest that GSE could be an effective CAM agent against CRC possibly due to its strong growth inhibitory and apoptosis inducing effects. PMID:19003575

  3. Grape seed extract induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manjinder; Mandair, Reinuka; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2008-01-01

    One approach to control colorectal cancer (CRC) is its preventive intervention by dietary agents or those consumed as supplements. However, because most of these products are often consumed by patients as an complementary and alternative medicine practice, a scientific base such as efficacy, mechanism, and standardized preparation needs to be developed. Grape seed extract (GSE) is one such supplement widely consumed by humans for its several health benefits. We reported recently that GSE inhibits CRC cell HT29 growth in culture and nude mice xenograft. Because GSE is available commercially through different vendors, here we assessed whether GSE from 2 different manufacturers produces comparable biological effects in a panel of human CRC cell lines. Our results show that irrespective of source, GSE strongly inhibits LoVo, HT29, and SW480 cell growth, with a G1 arrest in LoVo and HT29 cells but an S and/or G2/M arrest in SW480 cell cycle progression. GSE also induced Cip/p21 levels in all 3 cell lines. Furthermore, an induction of apoptosis was observed in all 3 cell lines by GSE. Taken together, our findings suggest that GSE could be an effective CAM agent against CRC possibly due to its strong growth inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects.

  4. G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest Correlates with Primate Lentiviral Vpr Interaction with the SLX4 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Gregory; Lawrence, Madeleine; Hué, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accessory gene vpr, common to all primate lentiviruses, induces potent G2/M arrest in cycling cells. A recent study showed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) mediates this through activation of the SLX4/MUS81/EME1 exonuclease complex that forms part of the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway. To confirm these observations, we have examined the G2/M arrest phenotypes of a panel of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Vpr proteins. We show that SIV Vpr proteins differ in their ability to promote cell cycle arrest in human cells. While this is dependent on the DCAF1/DDB1/CUL4 ubiquitin ligase complex, interaction with human DCAF1 does not predict G2/M arrest activity of SIV Vpr in human cells. In all cases, SIV Vpr-mediated cell cycle arrest in human cells correlated with interaction with human SLX4 (huSLX4) and could be abolished by small interfering RNA (siRNA) depletion of any member of the SLX4 complex. In contrast, all but one of the HIV/SIV Vpr proteins tested, including those that lacked activity in human cells, were competent for G2/M arrest in grivet cells. Correspondingly, here cell cycle arrest correlated with interaction with the grivet orthologues of the SLX4 complex, suggesting a level of host adaptation in these interactions. Phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that G2/M arrest/SLX4 interactions are ancestral activities of primate lentiviral Vpr proteins and that the ability to dysregulate the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway is an essential function of Vpr in vivo. IMPORTANCE The Vpr protein of HIV-1 and related viruses is essential for the virus in vivo. The ability of Vpr to block the cell cycle at mitotic entry is well known, but the importance of this function for viral replication is unclear. Recent data have shown that HIV-1 Vpr targets the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway by interacting with and activating an endonuclease complex, SLX4/MUS81/EME1, that processes interstrand DNA cross-links. Here

  5. Quercetin-3-O-glucoside induces human DNA topoisomerase II inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Sudhanshu; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2014-04-01

    Dietary flavonoids have been associated with reduced risk of cancer including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Quercetin-3-O-glucoside (Q3G) has been shown to possess anti-proliferative and antioxidant activities. The objectives of this study were to assess the anti-proliferative properties of Q3G in human liver cancer cells (HepG2); assess the cytotoxicity on normal primary cells; and elucidate its possible mechanism of action(s). Using a dose- and time-dependent study, we evaluated the antiproliferative properties of Q3G in HepG2 cells using MTS cell viability assay and lactate dehydrogenase release assay. To elucidate the mechanism of action, we performed cell-cycle analysis using flow cytometry. Cell death via apoptosis was analyzed by DNA fragmentation assay, caspase-3 induction assay and fluorescence microscopy. DNA topoisomerase II drug screening assay was performed to assess the effect of Q3G on DNA topoisomerase II. Q3G treatment inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HepG2 cells with the blockade of the cell cycle in the S-phase. Additionally, Q3G exhibited a strong ability to inhibit DNA topoisomerase II. Furthermore, DNA fragmentation and fluorescence microscopy analysis suggested that Q3G induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells with the activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, Q3G exhibited significantly lower toxicity to normal cells (primary human and rat hepatocytes and primary lung cells) than sorafenib (p<0.05), a chemotherapy drug for hepatocellular carcinoma. The results suggest that Q3G is a potential antitumor agent against liver cancer with a possible mechanism of action via cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Further research should be performed to confirm these results in vivo.

  6. Protein-binding, cytotoxicity in vitro and cell cycle arrest of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Si-Hong; Zhu, Jian-Wei; Xu, Hui-Hua; Wang, Yan; Liu, Ya-Min; Liang, Jun-Bo; Zhang, Gui-Qiang; Cao, Di-Hua; Lin, Yang-Yang; Wu, Yong; Guo, Qi-Feng

    2016-05-01

    The cytotoxic activity of two Ru(II) complexes against A549, BEL-7402, HeLa, PC-12, SGC-7901 and SiHa cell lines was investigated by MTT method. Complexes 1 and 2 show moderate cytotoxicity toward BEL-7402 cells with an IC50 value of 53.9 ± 3.4 and 39.3 ± 2.1 μM. The effects of the complexes inducing apoptosis, cellular uptake, reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential in BEL-7402 cells have been studied by fluorescence microscopy. The percentages of apoptotic and necrotic cells and cell cycle arrest were studied by flow cytometry. The BSA-binding behaviors were investigated by UV/visible and fluorescent spectra.

  7. Isolation and characterization of phthalates from Brevibacterium mcbrellneri that cause cytotoxicity and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rajamanikyam, Maheshwari; Vadlapudi, Varahalarao; Parvathaneni, Sai Prathima; Koude, Dhevendar; Sripadi, Prabhakar; Misra, Sunil; Amanchy, Ramars; Upadhyayula, Suryanarayana Murty

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Brevibacterieae are ubiquitous Gram positive organisms that are responsible for the feet odour and cheese aroma. Brevibacterium mcbrellneri is a relatively new member belonging to Brevibacterieae. In the current manuscript we discuss isolation of biologically active metabolites from Brevibacterium mcbrellneri. Two aromatic esters were isolated from Brevibacterium mcbrellneri by “Bioassay guided fractionation strategy” and identified as di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and dibutyl phthalate by chemical characterization using biophysical techniques. The phthalate compounds show broad spectrum antibacterial activity and mosquito larvicidal activity. Mosquito larvicidal activity has been attributed to inhibition of acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity. These compounds were found to be cytotoxic in multiple cell lines causing cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. PMID:28507481

  8. Cancer Preventive Efficacy of Marine Carotenoid Fucoxanthin: Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Nandakumar, Natarajan; Periyasamy Balasubramanian, Maruthaiveeran; Nishigaki, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations have shown that overcoming the risk of cancer is related to the consumption of green vegetables and fruits. Many compounds from different origins, such as terrestrial plants and marine and microbial sources, have been reported to have therapeutic effects of which marine sources are the most important because the diversity of marine life is more varied than other sources. Fucoxanthin is one important compound with a marine origin and belongs to the group of carotenoids; it can be found in marine brown seaweeds, macroalgae, and diatoms, all of which have remarkable biological properties. Numerous studies have shown that fucoxanthin has considerable medicinal potential and promising applications in human health. In this review, we summarize the anticancer effects of fucoxanthin through several different mechanisms including anti-proliferation, induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and anti-angiogenesis, and its possible role in the treatment of cancer. PMID:24322524

  9. Parthenolide induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of human 5637 bladder cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guang; Xie, Liping

    2011-08-09

    Parthenolide, the principal component of sesquiterpene lactones present in medical plants such as feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), has been reported to have anti-tumor activity. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of parthenolide against bladder cancer and its mechanism of action. Treatment of bladder cancer cells with parthenolide resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability. Parthenolide induced apoptosis through the modulation of Bcl-2 family proteins and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase degradation. Treatment with parthenolide led to G1 phase cell cycle arrest in 5637 cells by modulation of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated cyclin-dependent kinase 2. Parthenolide also inhibited the invasive ability of bladder cancer cells. These findings suggest that parthenolide could be a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of bladder cancer.

  10. Boldine induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in T24 human bladder cancer cell line via regulation of ERK, AKT, and GSK-3β.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Daniéli; Bertola, Gabriela; Dietrich, Fabrícia; Figueiró, Fabrício; Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Moreira Fonseca, José Cláudio; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; Barrios, Carlos Henrique; Battastini, Ana Maria O; Salbego, Christianne G

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most prevalent genitourinary malignancies. Despite active chemotherapy regimens, patients with bladder cancer suffer from a high rate of tumor recurrence. Thus, new approaches and agents to improve quality of life and survival still need to be developed. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect and underlying mechanisms of boldine, an aporphine alkaloid of Peumus boldus, on bladder cancer proliferation and cell death. Sulforhodamine B assay, Tetrazolium reduction assay, Flow Cytometry Analysis, Ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity and Western blot assay were performed. The results showed that boldine was able to reduce cell viability and cell proliferation in T24 cells. In addition, boldine arrests the cell cycle at G2/M-phase and cause cell death by apoptosis. Boldine-induced inhibition of cell growth and cell cycle arrest appears to be linked to inactivation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase protein (ERK). Additionally, the efficacy of boldine in apoptosis-induced in T24 cells is correlated with modulation of AKT (inactivation) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) (activation) proteins. The present findings may, in part, explain the therapeutic effects of boldine for treatment of urinary bladder cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of cell cycle arrest in estrogen responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells: pitfalls of the MTS assay.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Eileen M; Alling, Nikki; Jackson, Elise A; Yagoub, Daniel; Haass, Nikolas K; Allen, John D; Martinello-Wilks, Rosetta

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine resistance is a major problem with anti-estrogen treatments and how to overcome resistance is a major concern in the clinic. Reliable measurement of cell viability, proliferation, growth inhibition and death is important in screening for drug treatment efficacy in vitro. This report describes and compares commonly used proliferation assays for induced estrogen-responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cell cycle arrest including: determination of cell number by direct counting of viable cells; or fluorescence SYBR®Green (SYBR) DNA labeling; determination of mitochondrial metabolic activity by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay; assessment of newly synthesized DNA using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) nucleoside analog binding and Alexa Fluor® azide visualization by fluorescence microscopy; cell-cycle phase measurement by flow cytometry. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with ICI 182780 (Faslodex), FTY720, serum deprivation or induction of the tumor suppressor p14ARF showed inhibition of cell proliferation determined by the Trypan Blue exclusion assay and SYBR DNA labeling assay. In contrast, the effects of treatment with ICI 182780 or p14ARF-induction were not confirmed using the MTS assay. Cell cycle inhibition by ICI 182780 and p14ARF-induction was further confirmed by flow cytometric analysis and EdU-DNA incorporation. To explore this discrepancy further, we showed that ICI 182780 and p14ARF-induction increased MCF-7 cell mitochondrial activity by MTS assay in individual cells compared to control cells thereby providing a misleading proliferation readout. Interrogation of p14ARF-induction on MCF-7 metabolic activity using TMRE assays and high content image analysis showed that increased mitochondrial activity was concomitant with increased mitochondrial biomass with no loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, or cell death. We conclude that, whilst p14ARF and ICI 182780 stop cell cycle progression, the

  12. Sulforaphane inhibits mitotic clonal expansion during adipogenesis through cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Lee, Youn-Sun; Sin, Dong-Mi; Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2012-07-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for numerous metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. Adipocyte differentiation is triggered by adipocyte hyperplasia, which leads to obesity. In this study, the inhibitory effect of sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate, on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells was investigated. Sulforaphane decreased the accumulation of lipid droplets stained with Oil Red O and inhibited the elevation of triglycerides in the adipocytes (half-maximal inhibitory concentration = 7.3 µmol/l). The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), major transcription factors for adipocyte differentiation, was significantly reduced by sulforaphane. The major effects of sulforaphane on the inhibition of adipocyte differentiation occurred during the early stage of adipogenesis. Thus, the expression of C/EBPβ, an early-stage biomarker of adipogenesis, decreased in a concentration-dependent manner when the adipocytes were exposed to sulforaphane (0, 5, 10, and 20 µmol/l). The proliferation of adipocytes treated with 20 µmol/l sulforaphane for 24 and 48 h was also suppressed. These results indicate that sulforaphane may specifically affect mitotic clonal expansion to inhibit adipocyte differentiation. Sulforaphane arrested the cell cycle at the G(0)/G(1) phase, increased p27 expression, and decreased retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation. Additionally, sulforaphane modestly decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. Our results indicate that the inhibition of early-stage adipocyte differentiation by sulforaphane may be associated with cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) phase through upregulation of p27 expression.

  13. Ayurvedic medicine constituent withaferin a causes G2 and M phase cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Stan, Silvia D; Zeng, Yan; Singh, Shivendra V

    2008-01-01

    Withaferin A (WA) is derived from the medicinal plant Withania somnifera that has been safely used for centuries in the Indian Ayurvedic medicine for treatment of various ailments. We now demonstrate that WA treatment causes G2 and mitotic arrest in human breast cancer cells. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 (estrogen-independent) and MCF-7 (estrogen-responsive) cell lines with WA resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent increase in G2-M fraction, which correlated with a decrease in levels of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25C) and/or Cdc25B proteins, leading to accumulation of Tyrosine15 phosphorylated (inactive) Cdk1. Ectopic expression of Cdc25C conferred partial yet significant protection against WA-mediated G2-M phase cell cycle arrest in MDA-MB-231 cells. The WA-treated MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells were also arrested in mitosis as judged by fluorescence microscopy and analysis of Ser10 phosphorylated histone H3. Mitotic arrest resulting from exposure to WA was accompanied by an increase in the protein level of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome substrate securin. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that G2-M phase cell cycle arrest may be an important mechanism in antiproliferative effect of WA against human breast cancer cells.

  14. Brahma is required for cell cycle arrest and late muscle gene expression during skeletal myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Albini, Sonia; Coutinho Toto, Paula; Dall’Agnese, Alessandra; Malecova, Barbora; Cenciarelli, Carlo; Felsani, Armando; Caruso, Maurizia; Bultman, Scott J; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Although the two catalytic subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex—Brahma (Brm) and Brg1—are almost invariably co-expressed, their mutually exclusive incorporation into distinct SWI/SNF complexes predicts that Brg1- and Brm-based SWI/SNF complexes execute specific functions. Here, we show that Brg1 and Brm have distinct functions at discrete stages of muscle differentiation. While Brg1 is required for the activation of muscle gene transcription at early stages of differentiation, Brm is required for Ccnd1 repression and cell cycle arrest prior to the activation of muscle genes. Ccnd1 knockdown rescues the ability to exit the cell cycle in Brm-deficient myoblasts, but does not recover terminal differentiation, revealing a previously unrecognized role of Brm in the activation of late muscle gene expression independent from the control of cell cycle. Consistently, Brm null mice displayed impaired muscle regeneration after injury, with aberrant proliferation of satellite cells and delayed formation of new myofibers. These data reveal stage-specific roles of Brm during skeletal myogenesis, via formation of repressive and activatory SWI/SNF complexes. PMID:26136374

  15. p53 controls CDC7 levels to reinforce G1 cell cycle arrest upon genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tudzarova, Slavica; Dey, Ayona; Stoeber, Kai; Okorokov, Andrei L.; Williams, Gareth H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA replication initiation is a key event in the cell cycle, which is dependent on 2 kinases - CDK2 and CDC7. Here we report a novel mechanism in which p53 induces G1 checkpoint and cell cycle arrest by downregulating CDC7 kinase in response to genotoxic stress. We demonstrate that p53 controls CDC7 stability post-transcriptionally via miR-192/215 and post-translationally via Fbxw7β E3 ubiquitin ligase. The p53-dependent pathway of CDC7 downregulation is interlinked with the p53-p21-CDK2 pathway, as p21-mediated inhibition of CDK2-dependent phosphorylation of CDC7 on Thr376 is required for GSK3ß-phosphorylation and Fbxw7ß-dependent degradation of CDC7. Notably, sustained oncogenic high levels of active CDC7 exert a negative feedback onto p53, leading to unrestrained S-phase progression and accumulation of DNA damage. Thus, p53-dependent control of CDC7 levels is essential for blocking G1/S cell-cycle transition upon genotoxic stress, thereby safeguarding the genome from instability and thus representing a novel general stress response. PMID:27611229

  16. Effect of sesamin on apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer mcf-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Siao, An-Ci; Hou, Chien-Wei; Kao, Yung-Hsi; Jeng, Kee-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Dietary prevention has been known to reduce breast cancer risk. Sesamin is one of the major components in sesame seeds and has been widely studied and proven to have anti-proliferation and anti-angiogenic effects on cancer cells. In this study, the influence of sesamin was tested in the human breast cancer MCF-7 cell line for cell viability (MTT assay) and cell cycling (flow cytometry). Results showed that sesamin dose-dependently (1, 10 and 50 μM) reduced the cell viability and increased LDH release and apoptosis (TUNEL assay). In addition, there was a significant increase of sub-G1 phase arrest in the cell cycle after sesamin treatment. Furthermore, sesamin increased the expression of apoptotic markers of Bax, caspase-3, and cell cycle control proteins, p53 and checkpoint kinase 2. Taken together, these results suggested that sesamin might be used as a dietary supplement for prevention of breast cancer by modulating apoptotic signal pathways and inhibiting tumor cell growth.

  17. The phytohormone auxin induces G1 cell-cycle arrest of human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Ester, Katja; Curković-Perica, Mirna; Kralj, Marijeta

    2009-10-01

    The plant hormone auxin is the key regulator of plant growth and development. Auxin regulates transcription of plant genes by targeting degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins Aux/IAA. While there are many reports describing its potential to modulate human cell functions, the majority are based on auxin action following enzymatic activation. A study focused on auxin alone and its antiproliferative potential, with emphasis on modulation of the cell cycle, has not been performed. Therefore, we analyzed tumor growth inhibitory effects and the cell-cycle perturbations of natural (IAA, IBA) and synthetic (NAA, 2,4-D) auxins. All derivatives showed cytostatic effects on selected human tumor cell lines. The cell-cycle analysis revealed that IAA and 2,4-D induce strong G1 arrest, along with a drastic decrease in the percentage of S-phase cells in MCF-7 cell line. This phenomenon demonstrates that auxins may have novel, unexploited antitumor potential and should be further investigated. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  18. Znhit1 causes cell cycle arrest and down-regulates CDK6 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhengmin; Cao, Yonghao; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Ying; Ding, Yuqiang; Liu, Xiaolong

    2009-08-14

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) is the key element of the D-type cyclin holoenzymes which has been found to function in the regulation of G1-phase of the cell cycle and is presumed to play important roles in T cell function. In this study, Znhit1, a member of a new zinc finger protein family defined by a conserved Zf-HIT domain, induced arrest in the G1-phase of the cell cycle in NIH/3T3 cells. Of the G1 cell cycle factors examined, the expression of CDK6 was found to be strongly down-regulated by Znhit1 via transcriptional repression. This effect may have correlations with the decreased acetylation level of histone H4 in the CDK6 promoter region. In addition, considering that CDK6 expression predominates in T cells, the negative regulatory role of Znhit1 in TCR-induced T cell proliferation was validated using transgenic mice. These findings identified Znhit1 as a CDK6 regulator that plays an important role in cell proliferation.

  19. Ailanthone Inhibits Huh7 Cancer Cell Growth via Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Zhenjian; Hu, Jianyang; Yang, Xiaolin; Chen, Minfen; Lei, Xueping; Deng, Lijuan; Yao, Nan; Peng, Qunlong; Chen, Zhesheng; Ye, Wencai; Zhang, Dongmei

    2015-11-03

    While searching for natural anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) components in Ailanthus altissima, we discovered that ailanthone had potent antineoplastic activity against HCC. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor effect of ailanthone on HCC have not been examined. In this study, the antitumor activity and the underlying mechanisms of ailanthone were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies showed that ailanthone induced G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest, as indicated by decreased expression of cyclins and CDKs and increased expression of p21 and p27. Our results demonstrated that ailanthone triggered DNA damage characterized by activation of the ATM/ATR pathway. Moreover, ailanthone-induced cell death was associated with apoptosis, as evidenced by an increased ratio of cells in the subG1 phase and by PARP cleavage and caspase activation. Ailanthone-induced apoptosis was mitochondrion-mediated and involved the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in Huh7 cells. In vivo studies demonstrated that ailanthone inhibited the growth and angiogenesis of tumor xenografts without significant secondary adverse effects, indicating its safety for treating HCC. In conclusion, our study is the first to report the efficacy of ailanthone against Huh7 cells and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. These findings suggest that ailanthone is a potential agent for the treatment of liver cancer.

  20. Ailanthone Inhibits Huh7 Cancer Cell Growth via Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Zhenjian; Hu, Jianyang; Yang, Xiaolin; Chen, Minfen; Lei, Xueping; Deng, Lijuan; Yao, Nan; Peng, Qunlong; Chen, Zhesheng; Ye, Wencai; Zhang, Dongmei

    2015-01-01

    While searching for natural anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) components in Ailanthus altissima, we discovered that ailanthone had potent antineoplastic activity against HCC. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor effect of ailanthone on HCC have not been examined. In this study, the antitumor activity and the underlying mechanisms of ailanthone were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies showed that ailanthone induced G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest, as indicated by decreased expression of cyclins and CDKs and increased expression of p21 and p27. Our results demonstrated that ailanthone triggered DNA damage characterized by activation of the ATM/ATR pathway. Moreover, ailanthone-induced cell death was associated with apoptosis, as evidenced by an increased ratio of cells in the subG1 phase and by PARP cleavage and caspase activation. Ailanthone-induced apoptosis was mitochondrion-mediated and involved the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in Huh7 cells. In vivo studies demonstrated that ailanthone inhibited the growth and angiogenesis of tumor xenografts without significant secondary adverse effects, indicating its safety for treating HCC. In conclusion, our study is the first to report the efficacy of ailanthone against Huh7 cells and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. These findings suggest that ailanthone is a potential agent for the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:26525771

  1. Molecular mechanisms underlying mangiferin-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in A549 human lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, WEI; DENG, JIAGANG; TONG, RONGSHENG; YANG, YONG; HE, XIA; LV, JIANZHEN; WANG, HAILIAN; DENG, SHAOPING; QI, PING; ZHANG, DINGDING; WANG, YI

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin, which is a C-glucosylxanthone (1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone-C2-β-D-glucoside) purified from plant sources, has recently gained attention due to its various biological activities. The present study aimed to determine the apoptotic effects of mangiferin on A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In vitro studies demonstrated that mangiferin exerted growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects against A549 cells. In addition, mangiferin exhibited anti-tumor properties in A549 xenograft mice in vivo. Mangiferin triggered G2/M phase cell cycle arrest via down-regulating the cyclin-dependent kinase 1-cyclin B1 signaling pathway, and induced apoptotic cell death by inhibiting the protein kinase C-nuclear factor-κB pathway. In addition, mangiferin was able to enhance the antiproliferative effects of cisplatin on A549 cells, thus indicating the potential for a combined therapy. Notably, mangiferin exerted anticancer effects in vivo, where it was able to markedly decrease the volume and weight of subcutaneous tumor mass, and expand the lifespan of xenograft mice. The present study clarified the molecular mechanisms underlying mangiferin-induced antitumor activities, and suggested that mangiferin may be considered a potential antineoplastic drug for the future treatment of cancer. PMID:26935347

  2. Benfluron Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Activation of p53 Pathway in MOLT-4 Leukemic Cells.

    PubMed

    Seifrtová, M; Cochlarová, T; Havelek, R; Řezáčová, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the effect of potential anti-tumour agent benfluron on human leukemic cells MOLT-4 and elucidate the molecular mechanisms of response of tumour cells to this chemotherapeutic agent. It has been shown that the mechanisms of action of benfluron are complex, but the molecular pathways of the cytostatic effect have remained unknown and the present study contributes to their elucidation. In this work, benfluron reduced viability of the treated cells and induced caspase-mediated apoptosis. The programmed cell death was associated with activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3/7. Moreover, exposure of cells to benfluron resulted in accumulation of the cells primarily in late S and G2/M phases. The changes in the levels of key proteins show that benfluron provoked activation of p53 and induced phosphorylation of p53 on serine 15 and serine 392. The application of benfluron led to phosphorylation of Chk1 on serine 345 and phosphorylation of Chk2 on threonine 68 in the treated cells. Higher doses of benfluron caused phosphorylation of ERK1/2 on threonine 202 and tyrosine 204, whereas JNK and p38 kinases were not activated. In conclusion, benfluron induces apoptosis, cell cycle arrest in late S and G2/M phases, and activates various signalling pathways of the DNA damage response.

  3. Galiellalactone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the ATM/ATR pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    García, Víctor; Lara-Chica, Maribel; Cantarero, Irene; Sterner, Olov; Calzado, Marco A; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2016-01-26

    Galiellalactone (GL) is a fungal metabolite that presents antitumor activities on prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. In this study we show that GL induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, caspase-dependent apoptosis and also affected the microtubule organization and migration ability in DU145 cells. GL did not induce double strand DNA break but activated the ATR and ATM-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) inducing CHK1, H2AX phosphorylation (fH2AX) and CDC25C downregulation. Inhibition of the ATM/ATR activation with caffeine reverted GL-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA damage measured by fH2AX. In contrast, UCN-01, a CHK1 inhibitor, prevented GL-induced cell cycle arrest but enhanced apoptosis in DU145 cells. Furthermore, we found that GL did not increase the levels of intracellular ROS, but the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely prevented the effects of GL on fH2AX, G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In contrast to NAC, other antioxidants such as ambroxol and EGCG did not interfere with the activity of GL on cell cycle. GL significantly suppressed DU145 xenograft growth in vivo and induced the expression of fH2AX in the tumors. These findings identify for the first time that GL activates DDR in prostate cancer.

  4. A cellular threshold for active ERK1/2 levels determines Raf/MEK/ERK-mediated growth arrest versus death responses.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Keun; Wu, Pui-Kei; Park, Jong-In

    2017-10-03

    In addition to its conventional role for cell proliferation and survival, the Raf/MEK/Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway can also induce growth arrest and death responses, if aberrantly activated. Here, we determined a molecular basis of ERK1/2 signaling that underlies these growth inhibitory physiological outputs. We found that overexpression of ERK1 or ERK2 switches ΔRaf-1:ER-induced growth arrest responses to caspase-dependent apoptotic death responses in different cell types. These death responses, however, were reverted to growth arrest responses upon titration of cellular phospho-ERK1/2 levels by the MEK1/2 inhibitor AZD6244. These data suggest that a cellular threshold for active ERK1/2 levels exists and affects the cell fate between death and growth arrest. We also found that death-mediating ability of ERK2 is abolished by the catalytic site-disabling Lys52Arg replacement or significantly attenuated by the F-site recruitment site-disabling Tyr261Asn replacement, although unaffected by the mutations that disable the common docking groove or the dimerization interface. Therefore, ERK1/2 mediates death signaling dependently of kinase activity and specific physical interactions. Intriguingly, Tyr261Asn-replaced ERK2 could still mediate growth arrest signaling, further contrasting the molecular basis of ERK1/2-mediated growth arrest and death signaling. These data reveal a mechanism underlying the role of ERK1/2 as a focal point of Raf/MEK/ERK-mediated growth arrest and death signaling. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Icarisid II inhibits the proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Xie, Mao; Jiang, Neng; Huang, Feifei; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Ruishan; Lu, Jingjing; Liao, Shijie; Liu, Yun

    2017-06-01

    Icarisid II, one of the main active components of Herba Epimedii extracts, shows potent antitumor activity in various cancer cell lines, including osteosarcoma cells. However, the anticancer mechanism of icarisid II against osteosarcoma U2OS needs further exploration. This study aims to investigate further antitumor effects of icarisid II on human osteosarcoma cells and elucidate the underlying mechanism. We cultivated human osteosarcoma USO2 cells in vitro using different concentrations of icarisid II (0-30 µM). Cell viability was detected at 24, 48, and 72 h using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide analysis. Cell cycle was tested by flow cytometry after treatment with icarisid II for 48 h. Annexin V-allophycocyanin and 7-aminoactinomycin D staining were conducted to detect cell apoptosis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay were performed to measure the levels of genes and proteins related to cell cycle and apoptosis. Results showed that icarisid II significantly inhibited the proliferation and induced apoptosis of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells. The half maximal inhibitory concentration values were 14.44, 11.02, and 7.37 µM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. Cell cycle was arrested in the G2/M phase in vitro. In addition, icarisid II upregulated the expression levels of P21 and CyclinB1 whereas downregulated the expression levels of CyclinD1, CDC2, and P-Cdc25C, which were related to cell cycle arrest in U2OS cells. The cell apoptotic rate increased in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with icarisid II for 48 h. Icarisid II induced apoptosis by upregulating Bax, downregulating Bcl-2, and activating apoptosis-related proteins, including cleaved caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. These data indicate that icarisid II exhibits an antiproliferation effect on human osteosarcoma cells and induces apoptosis by activating the caspase family in a time- and dose

  6. Molecular interplay between cdk4 and p21 dictates G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gulappa, Thippeswamy; Reddy, Ramadevi Subramani; Suman, Suman; Nyakeriga, Alice M.; Damodaran, Chendil

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 3, 9-dihydroxy-2-prenylcoumestan (pso), a furanocoumarin, on PC-3 and C4-2B castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines. Pso caused significant G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibition of cell growth. Molecular analysis of cyclin (D1, D2, D3, and E), cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) (cdks 2, 4, and 6), and cdk inhibitor (p21 and p27) expression suggested transcriptional regulation of the cdk inhibitors and more significant downregulation of cdk4 than of cyclins or other cdks. Overexpression of cdk4, or silencing of p21 or p27, overcame pso-induced G0/G1 arrest, suggesting that G0/G1 cell cycle arrest is a potential mechanism of growth inhibition in CRPC cells. PMID:23684928

  7. 5-(2-Carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative induces G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human leukemia K562 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yao; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Han, Kai-Lin; Yang, Yao; Song, Bin-Bin; Guo, Qian-Nan; Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Zhang, Yong-Min; Teng, Yu-Ou; Yu, Peng

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • 5-(2-Carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative (HKL 2H) inhibited K562’s proliferation. • HKL 2H caused the morphology change of G{sub 2}/M phase arrest and typical apoptosis. • HKL 2H induced G2/M cell cycle phase arrest in K562 cells. • HKL 2H induced apoptosis in K562 cells through the mitochondrial pathway. - Abstract: Our previous study successfully identified that the novel isatin derivative (E)-methyl 3-(1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl) acrylate (HKL 2H) acts as an anticancer agent at an inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) level of 3 nM. In this study, the molecular mechanism how HKL 2H induces cytotoxic activity in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells was investigated. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the cells were arrested in the G{sub 2}/M phase and accumulated subsequently in the sub-G{sub 1} phase in the presence of HKL 2H. HKL 2H treatment down-regulated the expressions of CDK1 and cyclin B but up-regulated the level of phosphorylated CDK1. Annexin-V staining and the classic DNA ladder studies showed that HKL 2H induced the apoptosis of K562 cells. Our study further showed that HKL 2H treatment caused the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, activated caspase-3 and lowered the Bcl-2/Bax ratio in K562 cells, suggesting that the HKL 2H-causing programmed cell death of K562 cells was caused via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Taken together, our data demonstrated that HKL 2H, a 5-(2-carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative, notably induces G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in K562 cells, indicating that this compound could be a promising anticancer candidate for further investigation.

  8. Novel tetrahydroacridine and cyclopentaquinoline derivatives with fluorobenzoic acid moiety induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in lung cancer cells by activation of DNA damage signaling.

    PubMed

    Szymański, Paweł; Olszewska, Paulina; Mikiciuk-Olasik, Elżbieta; Różalski, Antoni; Maszewska, Agnieszka; Markiewicz, Łukasz; Cuchra, Magda; Majsterek, Ireneusz

    2017-03-01

    Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, indicating a necessity to develop more effective therapy. Acridine derivatives are potential anticancer agents due to their ability to intercalate DNA as well as inhibit enzymes involved in replication and transcription. Recently, we have evaluated anticancer activity of 32 novel acridine-based compounds. We found that the most effective were tetrahydroacridine and cyclopentaquinoline derivatives with fluorobenzoic acid containing eight and nine carbon atoms in the aliphatic chain. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms of compounds-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. All compounds activated Ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase and phosphorylated histone H2A.X at Ser139 indicating DNA damage. Treatment of cells with the compounds increased phosphorylation and accumulation of p53 that regulate cell cycle as well as apoptosis. All compounds induced G0/1 cell cycle arrest by phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 at Tyr15 resulting in attenuation of the kinase activity. In addition, cyclopentaquinoline derivatives induced expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 inhibitor, p21; however, tetrahydroacridine derivatives had no significant effect on p21. Moreover, all compounds decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential accompanied by increased expression of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2, suggesting activation of the mitochondrial pathway. All compounds also significantly attenuated the migration rates of lung cancer cells. Collectively, our findings suggest a central role of activation of DNA damage signaling in response to new acridine derivatives treatment to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells and provide support for their further development as potential drug candidates.

  9. ECPR for Refractory Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-22

    Cardiac Arrest; Heart Arrest; Sudden Cardiac Arrest; Cardiopulmonary Arrest; Death, Sudden, Cardiac; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; CPR; Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

  10. Transcriptional profiling of breast cancer cells in response to mevinolin: Evidence of cell cycle arrest, DNA degradation and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    MAHMOUD, ALI M.; ABOUL-SOUD, MOURAD A.M.; HAN, JUNKYU; AL-SHEIKH, YAZEED A.; AL-ABD, AHMED M.; EL-SHEMY, HANY A.

    2016-01-01

    The merging of high-throughput gene expression techniques, such as microarray, in the screening of natural products as anticancer agents, is considered the optimal solution for gaining a better understanding of the intervention mechanism. Red yeast rice (RYR), a Chinese dietary product, contains a mixture of hypocholesterolemia agents such as statins. Typically, statins have this effect via the inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol. Recently, statins have been shown to exhibit various beneficial antineoplastic properties through the disruption of tumor angiogenesis and metastatic processes. Mevinolin (MVN) is a member of statins and is abundantly present in RYR. Early experimental trials suggested that the mixed apoptotic/necrotic cell death pathway is activated in response to MVN exposure. In the current study, the cytotoxic profile of MVN was evaluated against MCF-7, a breast cancer-derived cell line. The obtained results indicated that MVN-induced cytotoxicity is multi-factorial involving several regulatory pathways in the cytotoxic effects of MVN on breast cancer cell lines. In addition, MVN-induced transcript abundance profiles inferred from microarrays showed significant changes in some key cell processes. The changes were predicted to induce cell cycle arrest and reactive oxygen species generation but inhibit DNA repair and cell proliferation. This MVN-mediated multi-factorial stress triggered specific programmed cell death (apoptosis) and DNA degradation responses in breast cancer cells. Taken together, the observed MVN-induced effects underscore the potential of this ubiquitous natural compound as a selective anticancer activity, with broad safety margins and low cost compared to benchmarked traditional synthetic chemotherapeutic agents. Additionally, the data support further pre-clinical and clinical evaluations of MVN as a novel strategy to combat breast cancer and overcome drug resistance. PMID:26983896

  11. Transcriptional profiling of breast cancer cells in response to mevinolin: Evidence of cell cycle arrest, DNA degradation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ali M; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A M; Han, Junkyu; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A; Al-Abd, Ahmed M; El-Shemy, Hany A

    2016-05-01

    The merging of high-throughput gene expression techniques, such as microarray, in the screening of natural products as anticancer agents, is considered the optimal solution for gaining a better understanding of the intervention mechanism. Red yeast rice (RYR), a Chinese dietary product, contains a mixture of hypocholesterolemia agents such as statins. Typically, statins have this effect via the inhibition of HMG‑CoA reductase, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol. Recently, statins have been shown to exhibit various beneficial antineoplastic properties through the disruption of tumor angiogenesis and metastatic processes. Mevinolin (MVN) is a member of statins and is abundantly present in RYR. Early experimental trials suggested that the mixed apoptotic/necrotic cell death pathway is activated in response to MVN exposure. In the current study, the cytotoxic profile of MVN was evaluated against MCF‑7, a breast cancer‑derived cell line. The obtained results indicated that MVN‑induced cytotoxicity is multi‑factorial involving several regulatory pathways in the cytotoxic effects of MVN on breast cancer cell lines. In addition, MVN‑induced transcript abundance profiles inferred from microarrays showed significant changes in some key cell processes. The changes were predicted to induce cell cycle arrest and reactive oxygen species generation but inhibit DNA repair and cell proliferation. This MVN‑mediated multi‑factorial stress triggered specific programmed cell death (apoptosis) and DNA degradation responses in breast cancer cells. Taken together, the observed MVN‑induced effects underscore the potential of this ubiquitous natural compound as a selective anticancer activity, with broad safety margins and low cost compared to benchmarked traditional synthetic chemotherapeutic agents. Additionally, the data support further pre‑clinical and clinical evaluations of MVN as a novel strategy to combat breast cancer and overcome drug resistance.

  12. p21WAF1 modulates drug-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Carwyn; Hogarth, Linda A; Mackenzie, Karen L; Hall, Andrew G; Lock, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    p21WAF1 is a well-characterized mediator of cell cycle arrest and may also modulate chemotherapy-induced cell death. The role of p21WAF1 in drug-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells was investigated using p53-functional patient-derived xenografts (PDXs), in which p21WAF1 was epigenetically silenced in T-cell ALL (T-ALL), but not in B-cell precursor (BCP)-ALL PDXs. Upon exposure to diverse cytotoxic drugs, T-ALL PDX cells exhibited markedly increased caspase-3/7 activity and phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization on the plasma membrane compared with BCP-ALL cells. Despite dramatic differences in apoptotic characteristics between T-ALL and BCP-ALL PDXs, both ALL subtypes exhibited similar cell death kinetics and were equally sensitive to p53-inducing drugs in vitro, although T-ALL PDXs were significantly more sensitive to the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat. Transient siRNA suppression of p21WAF1 in the BCP-ALL 697 cell line resulted in a moderate depletion of the cell fraction in G1 phase and marked increase in PS externalization following exposure to etoposide. Furthermore, stable lentiviral p21WAF1 silencing in the BCP-ALL Nalm-6 cell line accelerated PS externalization and cell death following exposure to etoposide and vorinostat, supporting previous findings. Finally, the Sp1 inhibitor, terameprocol, inhibited p21WAF1 expression in Nalm-6 cells exposed to vorinostat and also partially augmented vorinostat-induced cell death. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that p21WAF1 regulates the early stages of drug-induced apoptosis in ALL cells and significantly modulates their sensitivity to vorinostat. PMID:26506264

  13. Mechanism of T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest in Mia-PaCa pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Andrew M; Sarkar, Sibaji; Faller, Douglas V

    2012-06-01

    DNA oligonucleotides with sequence homology to human telomeric DNA (T-oligo) induce cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis, senescence, or autophagy in a human cancer cell type-specific manner. T-oligo has potential as a new therapeutic strategy in oncology because of its ability to target certain types of tumor cells while sparing normal ones. In the present study, we demonstrate the T-oligo-induced S-phase cell cycle arrest in four pancreatic cancer cell lines. To further contribute to the mechanistic understanding of T-oligo, we also identify cyclin dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) as a functional mediator in the T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest of pancreatic cancer cells. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active cdk2 mutant abrogates T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest in these tumor cells while knockdown of cdk2 expression alone recapitulates the T-oligo effect. Finally, we demonstrate the dispensability of T-oligo-induced ATM/ATR-mediated DNA damage response-signaling pathways, which have long been considered functional in the T-oligo signaling mechanism.

  14. Roles of p53 and caspases in the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by HIV-1 vpr.

    PubMed

    Shostak, L D; Ludlow, J; Fisk, J; Pursell, S; Rimel, B J; Nguyen, D; Rosenblatt, J D; Planelles, V

    1999-08-25

    The vpr gene from the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) encodes a 14-kDa protein that prevents cell proliferation by causing a block in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle. This cellular function of vpr is conserved in evolution because other primate lentiviruses, including HIV-2, SIV(mac), and SIV(agm) encode related genes that also induce G(2) arrest. After G(2) arrest, cells expressing vpr undergo apoptosis. The signaling pathways that result in vpr-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis have yet to be determined. The p53 tumor suppressor protein is involved in signaling pathways leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a variety of cell types. In this work, we examine the potential role of p53 in mediating cell cycle block and/or apoptosis by HIV-1 vpr and demonstrate that both phenomena occur independently of the presence and function of p53. Caspases are common mediators of apoptosis. We examined the potential role of caspases in mediating vpr-induced apoptosis by treating vpr-expressing cells with Boc-D-FMK, a broad spectrum, irreversible inhibitor of the caspase family. Boc-D-FMK significantly reduced the numbers of apoptotic cells induced by vpr. Therefore, we conclude that vpr-induced apoptosis is effected via the activation of caspases. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  15. Suppression of the allogeneic response by the anti-allergy drug N-(3,4-dimethoxycinnamonyl) anthranilic acid results from T-cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zaher, Sarah S; Coe, David; Chai, Jian-Guo; Larkin, Daniel F P; George, Andrew J T

    2013-02-01

    Previously we have shown that indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and the tryptophan metabolite, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) can prolong corneal allograft survival. IDO modulates the immune response by depletion of the essential amino acid tryptophan by breakdown to kynurenines, which themselves act directly on T lymphocytes. The tryptophan metabolite analogue N-(3,4-dimethoxycinnamonyl) anthranilic acid (DAA, 'Tranilast') shares the anthranilic acid core with 3HK. Systemic administration of DAA to mice receiving a fully MHC-mismatched allograft of cornea or skin resulted in significant delay in rejection (median survival of controls 12 days, 13 days for cornea and skin grafts, respectively, and of treated mice 24 days (P < 0.0001) and 17 days (P < 0.03), respectively). We provide evidence that DAA-induced suppression of the allogeneic response, in contrast to that induced by tryptophan metabolites, was a result of cell cycle arrest rather than T-cell death. Cell cycle arrest was mediated by up-regulation of the cell cycle-specific inhibitors p21 and p15, and associated with a significant reduction in interleukin-2 production, allowing us to characterize a novel mechanism for DAA-induced T-cell anergy. Currently licensed as an anti-allergy drug, the oral bioavailability and safe therapeutic profile of DAA make it a candidate for the prevention of rejection of transplanted cornea and other tissues.

  16. Cephalochromin induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549 human non-small-cell lung cancer cells by inflicting mitochondrial disruption.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Che-Jen; Hsiao, George; Chen, Wei-Lin; Wang, Shih-Wei; Chiang, Chun-Ping; Liu, Li-Ya; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Chung, Chi-Li

    2014-04-25

    The fungus-derived compound cephalochromin, isolated from the fermented broth of Cosmospora vilior YMJ89051501, shows growth-inhibitory and apoptotic activity against human lung cancer A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 2.8 μM at 48 h. Cephalochromin induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase through down-regulation of cyclin D1, cyclin E, Cdk 2, and Cdk 4 expressions. Cephalochromin markedly increased the hypodiploid sub-G1 phase (apoptosis) of the cell cycle at 48 h as measured by flow cytometric analysis. Reactive oxygen species generation and loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were also markedly induced by cephalochromin. Moreover, the immunoblotting assays showed that cephalochromin reduced survivin and Bcl-xL expression and induced the activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3 and the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, indicating the involvement of a caspase signaling cascade. The caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk significantly suppressed cephalochromin-induced apoptosis. Cephalochromin also triggered LC3 II, autophagic marker, expression. Taken together, this is the first report that cephalochromin induced an antiproliferative effect on human lung cancer cells through mitochondrial disruption and down-regulation of survivin, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, loss of MMP, and subsequently apoptotic cell death.

  17. The neem limonoids azadirachtin and nimbolide induce cell cycle arrest and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells.

    PubMed

    Priyadarsini, R Vidya; Murugan, R Senthil; Sripriya, P; Karunagaran, D; Nagini, S

    2010-06-01

    Limonoids from the neem tree (Azadirachta indica) have attracted considerable research attention in recent years owing to their potent antioxidant and anti-proliferative effects. The present study was designed to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which azadirachtin and nimbolide exert cytotoxic effects in the human cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line. Both azadirachtin and nimbolide significantly suppressed the viability of HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner by inducing cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase accompanied by p53-dependent p21 accumulation and down-regulation of the cell cycle regulatory proteins cyclin B, cyclin D1 and PCNA. Characteristic changes in nuclear morphology, presence of a subdiploid peak and annexin-V staining pointed to apoptosis as the mode of cell death. Increased generation of reactive oxygen species with decline in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and release of cytochrome c confirmed that the neem limonoids transduced the apoptotic signal via the mitochondrial pathway. Altered expression of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and over-expression of caspases and survivin provide compelling evidence that azadirachtin and nimbolide induce a shift of balance toward a pro-apoptotic phenotype. Antioxidants such as azadirachtin and nimbolide that can simultaneously arrest the cell cycle and target multiple molecules involved in mitochondrial apoptosis offer immense potential as anti-cancer therapeutic drugs.

  18. Airborne urban particles (Milan winter-PM2.5) cause mitotic arrest and cell death: Effects on DNA, mitochondria, AhR binding and spindle organization.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Maurizio; Ovrevik, Johan; Mollerup, Steen; Asare, Nana; Longhin, Eleonora; Dahlman, Hans-Jørgen; Camatini, Marina; Holme, Jørn A

    2011-08-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) is considered to be an important contributor to lung diseases. In the present study we report that Milan winter-PM2.5 inhibited proliferation in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) by inducing mitotic arrest. The cell cycle arrest was followed by an increase in mitotic-apoptotic cells, mitotic slippage and finally an increase in "classical" apoptotic cells. Exposure to winter-PM10 induced only a slight effect which may be due to the presence of PM2.5 in this fraction while pure combustion particles failed to disturb mitosis. Fewer cells expressing the mitosis marker phospho-histone H3 compared to cells with condensed chromosomes, suggest that PM2.5 induced premature mitosis. PM2.5 was internalized into the cells and often localized in laminar organelles, although particles without apparent plasma membrane covering were also seen. In PM-containing cells mitochondria and lysosomes were often damaged, and in mitotic cells fragmented chromosomes often appeared. PM2.5 induced DNA strands breaks and triggered a DNA-damage response characterized by increased phosphorylation of ATM, Chk2 and H2AX; as well as induced a marked increase in expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-regulated genes, CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and AhRR. Furthermore, some disturbance of the organization of microtubules was indicated. It is hypothesized that the induced mitotic arrest and following cell death was due to a premature chromosome condensation caused by a combination of DNA, mitochondrial and spindle damage.

  19. The molecular mechanism of G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by AFB1 in the jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Heng; Jiang, Min; Peng, Xi; Cui, Hengmin; Zhou, Yi; He, Min; Zuo, Zhicai; Ouyang, Ping; Fan, Junde; Fang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) has potent hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and other adverse effects in human and animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by AFB1 in the jejunum of broilers. Broilers, as experimental animals, were fed 0.6 mg/kg AFB1 diet for 3 weeks. Our results showed that AFB1 reduced the jejunal villus height, villus height/crypt ratio and caused G2/M cell cycle arrest. The G2/M cell cycle was accompanied by the increase of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), p53, Chk2, p21 protein and mRNA expression, and the decrease of Mdm2, cdc25C, cdc2, cyclin B and proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein and mRNA expression. In conclusion, AFB1 blocked G2/M cell cycle by ATM pathway in the jejunum of broilers. PMID:27232757

  20. Glucose capped silver nanoparticles induce cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Panzarini, Elisa; Mariano, Stefania; Vergallo, Cristian; Carata, Elisabetta; Fimia, Gian Maria; Mura, Francesco; Rossi, Marco; Vergaro, Viviana; Ciccarella, Giuseppe; Corazzari, Marco; Dini, Luciana

    2017-02-20

    This study aims to determine the interaction (uptake and biological effects on cell viability and cell cycle progression) of glucose capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs-G) on human epithelioid cervix carcinoma (HeLa) cells, in relation to amount, 2×10(3) or 2×10(4) NPs/cell, and exposure time, up to 48h. The spherical and well dispersed AgNPs (30±5nm) were obtained by using glucose as reducing agent in a green synthesis method that ensures to stabilize AgNPs avoiding cytotoxic soluble silver ions Ag(+) release. HeLa cells take up abundantly and rapidly AgNPs-G resulting toxic to cells in amount and incubation time dependent manner. HeLa cells were arrested at S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle and subG1 population increased when incubated with 2×10(4) AgNPs-G/cell. Mitotic index decreased accordingly. The dissolution experiments demonstrated that the observed effects were due only to AgNPs-G since glucose capping prevents Ag(+) release. The AgNPs-G influence on HeLa cells viability and cell cycle progression suggest that AgNPs-G, alone or in combination with chemotherapeutics, may be exploited for the development of novel antiproliferative treatment in cancer therapy. However, the possible influence of the cell cycle on cellular uptake of AgNPs-G and the mechanism of AgNPs entry in cells need further investigation.

  1. Tocotrienol-rich fraction of palm oil induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis selectively in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Janmejai K.; Gupta, Sanjay . E-mail: sanjay.gupta@case.edu

    2006-07-28

    One of the requisite of cancer chemopreventive agent is elimination of damaged or malignant cells through cell cycle inhibition or induction of apoptosis without affecting normal cells. In this study, employing normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), virally transformed normal human prostate epithelial cells (PZ-HPV-7), and human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3), we evaluated the growth-inhibitory and apoptotic effects of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from palm oil. TRF treatment to PrEC and PZ-HPV-7 resulted in almost identical growth-inhibitory responses of low magnitude. In sharp contrast, TRF treatment resulted in significant decreases in cell viability and colony formation in all three prostate cancer cell lines. The IC{sub 5} values after 24 h TRF treatment in LNCaP, PC-3, and DU145 cells were in the order 16.5, 17.5, and 22.0 {mu}g/ml. TRF treatment resulted in significant apoptosis in all the cell lines as evident from (i) DNA fragmentation (ii) fluorescence microscopy, and (iii) cell death detection ELISA, whereas the PrEC and PZ-HPV-7 cells did not undergo apoptosis, but showed modestly decreased cell viability only at a high dose of 80 {mu}g/ml. In cell cycle analysis, TRF (10-40 {mu}g/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent G0/G1 phase arrest and sub G1 accumulation in all three cancer cell lines but not in PZ-HPV-7 cells. These results suggest that the palm oil derivative TRF is capable of selectively inhibiting cellular proliferation and accelerating apoptotic events in prostate cancer cells. TRF offers significant promise as a chemopreventive and/or therapeutic agent against prostate cancer.

  2. Invasive Cell Fate Requires G1 Cell-Cycle Arrest and Histone Deacetylase-Mediated Changes in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Matus, David Q; Lohmer, Lauren L; Kelley, Laura C; Schindler, Adam J; Kohrman, Abraham Q; Barkoulas, Michalis; Zhang, Wan; Chi, Qiuyi; Sherwood, David R

    2015-10-26

    Despite critical roles in development and cancer, the mechanisms that specify invasive cellular behavior are poorly understood. Through a screen of transcription factors in Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified G1 cell-cycle arrest as a precisely regulated requirement of the anchor cell (AC) invasion program. We show that the nuclear receptor nhr-67/tlx directs the AC into G1 arrest in part through regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor cki-1. Loss of nhr-67 resulted in non-invasive, mitotic ACs that failed to express matrix metalloproteinases or actin regulators and lack invadopodia, F-actin-rich membrane protrusions that facilitate invasion. We further show that G1 arrest is necessary for the histone deacetylase HDA-1, a key regulator of differentiation, to promote pro-invasive gene expression and invadopodia formation. Together, these results suggest that invasive cell fate requires G1 arrest and that strategies targeting both G1-arrested and actively cycling cells may be needed to halt metastatic cancer.

  3. Paris Saponin I Sensitizes Gastric Cancer Cell Lines to Cisplatin via Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shuichuan; Du, Leiwen; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Xinhai; Li, Jinhui; Xu, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Background Dose-related toxicity is the major restriction of cisplatin and cisplatin-combination chemotherapy, and is a challenge for advanced gastric cancer treatment. We explored the possibility of using Paris saponin I as an agent to sensitize gastric cancer cells to cisplatin, and examined the underlying mechanism. Material/Methods Growth inhibition was detected by MTT assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis were detected using flow cytometry and Annexin V/PI staining. The P21waf1/cip1, Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 protein expression were detected using Western blot analysis. Results The results revealed that PSI sensitized gastric cancer cells to cisplatin, with low toxicity. The IC50 value of cisplatin in SGC-7901 cell lines was decreased when combined with PSI. PSI promoted cisplatin-induced G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis in a cisplatin concentration-dependent manner. Bcl-2 protein expression decreased, but Bax, caspase-3, and P21waf1/cip1 protein expression increased with PSI treatment. Conclusions The underlying mechanism of Paris saponin I may be related to targeting the apoptosis pathway and cell cycle blocking, which suggests that PSI is a potential therapeutic sensitizer for cisplatin in treating gastric cancer. PMID:27755523

  4. Ellagic acid suppresses lipid accumulation by suppressing early adipogenic events and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Woo, Mi-Seon; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Seo, Min-Jung; Jeon, Hui-Jeon; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2015-03-01

    Ellagic acid (EA) is a natural polyphenol found in various fruits and vegetables. In this study, we examined the inhibitory effect of EA on fat accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells during adipogenesis. Our data showed that EA reduced fat accumulation by down-regulating adipogenic markers such as peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) at the mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. We found that the decrease in adipogenic markers resulted from reduced expression of some early adipogenic transcription factors such as KLF4, KLF5, Krox20, and C/EBPβ within 24 h. Also, these inhibitions were correlated with down-regulation of TG synthetic enzymes, causing inhibition of triglyceride (TG) levels in 3T3-L1 cells investigated by ORO staining and in zebrafish investigated by TG assay. Additionally, the cell cycle analysis showed that EA inhibited cell cycle progression by arresting cells at the G0/G1 phase.

  5. Cycle arrest and aneuploidy induced by zidovudine in murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Campos, P B; Sartore, R C; Ramalho, B L; Costa, E S; Rehen, S K

    2012-07-01

    Zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine; AZT) is a nucleoside analogue widely used for the treatment of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Medical guidelines recommend the use of AZT by pregnant women in order to reduce risk of HIV vertical transmission. Although it is efficacious, little is known about the side effects of AZT on embryonic development. In this sense, we used murine embryonic stem (mES) cells as a model to investigate the consequences of AZT exposure for embryogenesis. Firstly, mES colonies were incubated with AZT (50 or 100 μM) and cell cycle profile was evaluated. While 27.7 ± 5.43% of untreated mES cells were in G2/M phase, this percentage raised to 45.96 ± 4.18% after AZT exposure (100 μM). To identify whether accumulation of cells in G2/M phase could be related to chromosome missegregation with consequent cell cycle arrest, aneuploidy rate was evaluated after AZT treatment. Untreated colonies presented 39.6 ± 8.4% of cells aneuploid, while after AZT 100 μM treatment, the proportion of aneuploid cells raised to 67.8 ± 3.4% with prevalence of chromosome loss. This event was accompanied by micronuclei formation as AZT 100 μM treated mES cells presented a 2-fold increase compared to untreated ones. These data suggest that AZT exerts genotoxic effects and increases chromosome instability at early stages of embryonic development.

  6. Combination of PTEN and {gamma}-Ionizing Radiation Enhances Cell Death and G{sub 2}/M Arrest Through Regulation of AKT Activity and p21 Induction in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong Kuk; Jung, Hae-Yun; Park, Seon Ho; Kang, Seung Yi; Yi, Mi-Rang; Um, Hong Duck; Hong, Sung Hee

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To identify the role of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) during {gamma}-ionizing radiation ({gamma}-IR) treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Wild-type PTEN or mutant forms of PTEN plasmids were transfected to construct stable transfectants of the NCI-H1299 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. Combined effects of PTEN expression and IR treatment were tested using immunoblot, clonogenic, and cell-counting assays. Related signaling pathways were studied with immunoblot and kinase assays. Results: At steady state, stable transfectants showed almost the same proliferation rate but had different AKT phosphorylation patterns. When treated with {gamma}-IR, wild-type PTEN transfectants showed higher levels of cell death compared with mock vector or mutant transfectants, and showed increased G{sub 2}/M cell-cycle arrest accompanied by p21 induction and CDK1 inactivation. NCI-H1299 cells were treated with phosphosinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway inhibitor (LY29002), resulting in reduced AKT phosphorylation levels. Treatment of NCI-H1299 cells with LY29002 and {gamma}-IR resulted in increased cell-cycle arrest and p21 induction. Endogenous wild-type PTEN-containing NCI-H460 cells were treated with PTEN-specific siRNA and then irradiated with {gamma}-IR: however reduced PTEN levels did not induce cell-cycle arrest or p21 expression. Conclusions: Taken together, these findings indicate that PTEN may modulate cell death or the cell cycle via AKT inactivation by PTEN and {gamma}-IR treatment. We also propose that a PTEN-PI3K/AKT-p21-CDK1 pathway could regulate cell death and the cell cycle by {gamma}-IR treatment.

  7. Human rabies deaths in Africa: breaking the cycle of indifference.

    PubMed

    Dodet, Betty; Tejiokem, Mathurin C; Aguemon, Abdou-Rahman; Bourhy, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    The current outbreak of Ebola virus disease has mobilized the international community against this deadly disease. However, rabies, another deadly disease, is greatly affecting the African continent, with an estimated 25 000 deaths every year. And yet, the disease can be prevented by a vaccine, if necessary with immunoglobulin, even when administered after exposure to the rabies virus. Rabies victims die because of neglect and ignorance, because they are not aware of these life-saving biologicals, or because they cannot access them or do not have the money to pay for them. Breaking the cycle of indifference of rabies deaths in humans in Africa should be a priority of governments, international organizations and all stakeholders involved.

  8. Nucleolin down-regulation is involved in ADP-induced cell cycle arrest in S phase and cell apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenmeng; Luo, Junqing; Xiang, Fang; Liu, Xueting; Jiang, Manli; Liao, Lingjuan; Hu, Jinyue

    2014-01-01

    High concentration of extracellular ADP has been reported to induce cell apoptosis, but the molecular mechanisms remain not fully elucidated. In this study, we found by serendipity that ADP treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) down-regulated the protein level of nucleolin in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ADP treatment did not decrease the transcript level of nucloelin, suggesting that ADP might induce nucleolin protein degradation. HUVEC and HAEC expressed ADP receptor P2Y13 receptor, but did not express P2Y1 or P2Y12 receptors. However, P2Y1, 12, 13 receptor antagonists MRS2179, PSB0739, MRS2211 did not inhibit ADP-induced down-regulation of nucleolin. Moreover, MRS2211 itself down-regulated nucleolin protein level. In addition, 2-MeSADP, an agonist for P2Y1, 12 and 13 receptors, did not down-regulate nucleolin protein. These results suggested that ADP-induced nucleolin down-regulation was not due to the activation of P2Y1, 12, or 13 receptors. We also found that ADP treatment induced cell cycle arrest in S phase, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition via nucleolin down-regulation. The over-expression of nucleolin by gene transfer partly reversed ADP-induced cell cycle arrest, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition. Furthermore, ADP sensitized HUVEC to cisplatin-induced cell death by the down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression. Taken together, we found, for the first time to our knowledge, a novel mechanism by which ADP regulates cell proliferation by induction of cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis via targeting nucelolin.

  9. Nucleolin Down-Regulation Is Involved in ADP-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in S Phase and Cell Apoptosis in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenmeng; Luo, Junqing; Xiang, Fang; Liu, Xueting; Jiang, Manli; Liao, Lingjuan; Hu, Jinyue

    2014-01-01

    High concentration of extracellular ADP has been reported to induce cell apoptosis, but the molecular mechanisms remain not fully elucidated. In this study, we found by serendipity that ADP treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) down-regulated the protein level of nucleolin in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ADP treatment did not decrease the transcript level of nucloelin, suggesting that ADP might induce nucleolin protein degradation. HUVEC and HAEC expressed ADP receptor P2Y13 receptor, but did not express P2Y1 or P2Y12 receptors. However, P2Y1, 12, 13 receptor antagonists MRS2179, PSB0739, MRS2211 did not inhibit ADP-induced down-regulation of nucleolin. Moreover, MRS2211 itself down-regulated nucleolin protein level. In addition, 2-MeSADP, an agonist for P2Y1, 12 and 13 receptors, did not down-regulate nucleolin protein. These results suggested that ADP-induced nucleolin down-regulation was not due to the activation of P2Y1, 12, or 13 receptors. We also found that ADP treatment induced cell cycle arrest in S phase, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition via nucleolin down-regulation. The over-expression of nucleolin by gene transfer partly reversed ADP-induced cell cycle arrest, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition. Furthermore, ADP sensitized HUVEC to cisplatin-induced cell death by the down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression. Taken together, we found, for the first time to our knowledge, a novel mechanism by which ADP regulates cell proliferation by induction of cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis via targeting nucelolin. PMID:25290311

  10. Sorbus rufopilosa Extract Exhibits Antioxidant and Anticancer Activities by Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Colon Adenocarcinoma HT29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, You Na; Jin, Soojung; Park, Hyun-Jin; Kwon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Byung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sorbus rufopilosa, a tsema rowan, is a species of the small ornamental trees in the genus Sorbus and the family Rosaceae found in East Asia. The bioactivities of S. rufopilosa have not yet been fully determined. The objective of this study is to evaluate the antioxidant and anticancer effects of ethanol extract of S. rufopilosa (EESR) and to determine the molecular mechanism of its anticancer activity in human colon carcinoma HT29 cells. Methods To examine the antioxidant activity of EESR, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity assay was performed. Inhibitory effect of EESR on cancer cell growth and proliferation was determined by water-soluble tetrazolium salt assay. To investigate the mechanism of EESR-mediated cytotoxicity, HT29 cells were treated with various concentrations of EESR and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry, 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, and Western blot analysis. Results EESR showed significant antioxidant activity and inhibitory effect on HT29 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. EESR induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase in a dose-dependent manner by modulating cyclin B, cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), and CDK inhibitor p21 expression. EESR-induced apoptosis was associated with the upregulation of p53, a death receptor Fas, and a pro-apoptotic protein Bax and the activation of caspase 3, 8, and 9, resulting in the degradation of PARP. Conclusions EESR possessing antioxidant activity efficiently inhibits proliferation of HT29 cells by inducing both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. EESR may be a possible candidate for the anticancer drug development. PMID:28053959

  11. Clove Extract Inhibits Tumor Growth and Promotes Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haizhou; Schmitz, John C.; Wei, Jianteng; Cao, Shousong; Beumer, Jan H.; Strychor, Sandra; Cheng, Linyou; Liu, Ming; Wang, Cuicui; Wu, Ning; Zhao, Xiangzhong; Zhang, Yuyan; Liao, Joshua; Chu, Edward; Lin, Xiukun

    2014-01-01

    Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) have been used as a traditional Chinese medicinal herb for thousands of years. Cloves possess antiseptic, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties, but their potential anticancer activity remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects and biological mechanisms of ethyl acetate extract of cloves (EAEC) and the potential bioactive components responsible for its antitumor activity. The effects of EAEC on cell growth, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis were investigated using human cancer cell lines. The molecular changes associated with the effects of EAEC were analyzed by Western blot and (qRT)-PCR analysis. The in vivo effect of EAEC and its bioactive component was investigated using the HT-29 tumor xenograft model. We identified oleanolic acid (OA) as one of the components of EAEC responsible for its antitumor activity. Both EAEC and OA display cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, EAEC was superior to OA and the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil at suppressing growth of colon tumor xenografts. EAEC promoted G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with EAEC and OA selectively increased protein expression of p21WAF1/Cip1 and γ-H2AX and downregulated expression of cell cycle-regulated proteins. Moreover, many of these changes were at the mRNA level, suggesting transcriptional regulation by EAEC treatment. Our results demonstrate that clove extract may represent a novel therapeutic herb for the treatment of colorectal cancer, and OA appears to be one of the bioactive components. PMID:24854101

  12. Clove extract inhibits tumor growth and promotes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haizhou; Schmitz, John C; Wei, Jianteng; Cao, Shousong; Beumer, Jan H; Strychor, Sandra; Cheng, Linyou; Liu, Ming; Wang, Cuicui; Wu, Ning; Zhao, Xiangzhong; Zhang, Yuyan; Liao, Joshua; Chu, Edward; Lin, Xiukun

    2014-01-01

    Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) have been used as a traditional Chinese medicinal herb for thousands of years. Cloves possess antiseptic, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties, but their potential anticancer activity remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects and biological mechanisms of ethyl acetate extract of cloves (EAEC) and the potential bioactive components responsible for its antitumor activity. The effects of EAEC on cell growth, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis were investigated using human cancer cell lines. The molecular changes associated with the effects of EAEC were analyzed by Western blot and (qRT)-PCR analysis. The in vivo effect of EAEC and its bioactive component was investigated using the HT-29 tumor xenograft model. We identified oleanolic acid (OA) as one of the components of EAEC responsible for its antitumor activity. Both EAEC and OA display cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, EAEC was superior to OA and the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil at suppressing growth of colon tumor xenografts. EAEC promoted G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with EAEC and OA selectively increased protein expression of p21(WAF1/Cip1) and γ-H2AX and downregulated expression of cell cycle-regulated proteins. Moreover, many of these changes were at the mRNA level, suggesting transcriptional regulation by EAEC treatment. Our results demonstrate that clove extract may represent a novel therapeutic herb for the treatment of colorectal cancer, and OA appears to be one of the bioactive components.

  13. Role of the retinoblastoma protein in cell cycle arrest mediated by a novel cell surface proliferation inhibitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enebo, D. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Moos, P. J.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A novel cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS-18), purified from the cell surface of bovine cerebral cortex cells has been shown to be a potent and reversible inhibitor of proliferation of a wide array of fibroblasts as well as epithelial-like cells and nontransformed and transformed cells. To investigate the possible mechanisms by which CeReS-18 exerts its inhibitory action, the effect of the inhibitor on the posttranslational regulation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (RB), a tumor suppressor gene, has been examined. It is shown that CeReS-18 mediated cell cycle arrest of both human diploid fibroblasts (HSBP) and mouse fibroblasts (Swiss 3T3) results in the maintenance of the RB protein in the hypophosphorylated state, consistent with a late G1 arrest site. Although their normal nontransformed counterparts are sensitive to cell cycle arrest mediated by CeReS-18, cell lines lacking a functional RB protein, through either genetic mutation or DNA tumor virus oncoprotein interaction, are less sensitive. The refractory nature of these cells is shown to be independent of specific surface receptors for the inhibitor, and another tumor suppressor gene (p53) does not appear to be involved in the CeReS-18 inhibition of cell proliferation. The requirement for a functional RB protein product, in order for CeReS-18 to mediate cell cycle arrest, is discussed in light of regulatory events associated with density-dependent growth inhibition.

  14. Role of the retinoblastoma protein in cell cycle arrest mediated by a novel cell surface proliferation inhibitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enebo, D. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Moos, P. J.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A novel cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS-18), purified from the cell surface of bovine cerebral cortex cells has been shown to be a potent and reversible inhibitor of proliferation of a wide array of fibroblasts as well as epithelial-like cells and nontransformed and transformed cells. To investigate the possible mechanisms by which CeReS-18 exerts its inhibitory action, the effect of the inhibitor on the posttranslational regulation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (RB), a tumor suppressor gene, has been examined. It is shown that CeReS-18 mediated cell cycle arrest of both human diploid fibroblasts (HSBP) and mouse fibroblasts (Swiss 3T3) results in the maintenance of the RB protein in the hypophosphorylated state, consistent with a late G1 arrest site. Although their normal nontransformed counterparts are sensitive to cell cycle arrest mediated by CeReS-18, cell lines lacking a functional RB protein, through either genetic mutation or DNA tumor virus oncoprotein interaction, are less sensitive. The refractory nature of these cells is shown to be independent of specific surface receptors for the inhibitor, and another tumor suppressor gene (p53) does not appear to be involved in the CeReS-18 inhibition of cell proliferation. The requirement for a functional RB protein product, in order for CeReS-18 to mediate cell cycle arrest, is discussed in light of regulatory events associated with density-dependent growth inhibition.

  15. Critical Role of AMPK/FoxO3A Axis in Globular Adiponectin-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Anup; Nepal, Saroj; Kim, Mi Jin; Chang, Jae Hoon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Jeong, Gil-Saeng; Jeong, Chul-Ho; Park, Gyu Hwan; Jung, Sunghee; Lim, Jaecheong; Cho, Eunha; Lee, Soyoung; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Adiponectin predominantly secreted from adipose tissue has exhibited potent anti-proliferative properties in cancer cells via modulating cell cycle and apoptosis. FoxO3A, a Forkhead box O member of the transcription factor, plays a critical role in modulating expression of genes involved in cell death and/or survival. In this study, we investigated the role of FoxO3A signaling in anti-cancer activities of adiponectin. Herein, we have shown that treatment with globular adiponectin (gAcrp) increases p27 but decreases cyclinD1 expression in human hepatoma (HepG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. Gene ablation of FoxO3A prevented gAcrp-induced increase in p27 and decreased in cyclin D1 expression, and further ameliorated cell cycle arrest by gAcrp, indicating a critical role of FoxO3A in gAcrp-induced cell cycle arrest of cancer cells. Moreover, treatment with gAcrp also induced caspase-3/7 activation and increased Fas ligand (FasL) expression in both HepG2 and MCF-7 cells. Transfection with FoxO3A siRNA inhibited gAcrp-induced caspase-3/7 activation and FasL expression, suggesting that FoxO3A signaling also plays an important role in gAcrp-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. We also found that gene silencing of AMPK prevented gAcrp-induced nuclear translocation of FoxO3A in HepG2 and MCF-7 cells. In addition, suppression of AMPK also blocked gAcrp-induced cell cycle arrest and further attenuated gAcrp-induced caspase-3/7 activation, indicating that AMPK signaling plays a pivotal role in both gAcrp-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via acting as an upstream signaling of FoxO3A. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that AMPK/FoxO3A axis plays a cardinal role in anti-proliferative effect of adiponectin in cancer cells.

  16. Resveratrol causes cell cycle arrest, decreased collagen synthesis, and apoptosis in rat intestinal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Patricia; Schmiedlin-Ren, Phyllissa; Mathias, Jason S.; Tang, Huaijing; Christman, Gregory M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most difficult and treatment-resistant complications of Crohn's disease is the development of fibrotic intestinal strictures due to mesenchymal cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in berries, peanuts, grapes, and red wine, has been shown to inhibit fibrosis in vasculature, heart, lung, kidney, liver, and esophagus in animal models. Resveratrol has also been shown to inhibit oxidation, inflammation, and cell proliferation and to decrease collagen synthesis in several cell types or animal models. The aim of this study was to determine whether resveratrol has antifibrotic effects on intestinal smooth muscle cells. Responses to resveratrol by cultured smooth muscle cells isolated from colons of untreated Lewis rats were examined; this rat strain is used in a model of Crohn's disease with prominent intestinal fibrosis. A relative decrease in cell numbers following treatment with 50 and 100 μM resveratrol was evident at 24 h (P ≤ 0.005). This effect was largely due to cell cycle arrest, with an increase in the percent of cells in S phase from 8 to 25–35% (P < 0.05). Cell viability was unchanged until 2–3 days of treatment when there was a 1.2- to 5.0-fold increase in the percent of apoptotic cells, depending on the assay (P < 0.05). Expression of collagen type I protein was decreased following treatment with resveratrol for 24 h (to 44 and 25% of control levels with 50 and 100 μM resveratrol, respectively; P < 0.05). Expression of procollagen types I and III mRNA was also decreased with resveratrol treatment. Resveratrol (50 μM) diminished the proliferative response to TGF-β1 (P = 0.02) as well as IGF-I-stimulated collagen production (P = 0.02). Thus resveratrol decreases intestinal smooth muscle cell numbers through its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and also decreases collagen synthesis by the cells. These effects could be useful in preventing the smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and collagen

  17. Naphthoquinones from Onosma paniculata induce cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Nadine; Rinner, Beate; Deutsch, Alexander J A; Lohberger, Birgit; Knausz, Heike; Kunert, Olaf; Blunder, Martina; Boechzelt, Herbert; Schaider, Helmut; Bauer, Rudolf

    2012-05-25

    Activity-guided fractionation of a petroleum ether-soluble extract of the roots of Onosma paniculata, which has been shown to affect the cell cycle and to induce apoptosis in melanoma cells, led to the isolation of several shikonin derivatives, namely, β-hydroxyisovalerylshikonin (1), acetylshikonin (2), dimethylacrylshikonin (3), and a mixture of α-methylbutyrylshikonin and isovalerylshikonin (4+5). All compounds exhibited strong cytotoxicity against eight cancer cell lines and MRC-5 lung fibroblasts, with 3 found to possess the most potent cytotoxicity toward four melanoma cell lines (SBcl2, WM35, WM9, and WM164). Furthermore, 3 and the mixture of 4+5 were found to interfere with cell-cycle progression in these cell lines and led to an increasing number of cells in the subG1 region as well as to caspase-3/7 activation, indicating apoptotic cell death.

  18. Quercetin arrests G2/M phase and induces caspase-dependent cell death in U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Jin; Kim, On Hee; Kim, Yeoun Hee; Lim, Jun Hee; Kim, Shin; Park, Jong-Wook; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2006-08-28

    Quercetin, a natural product derived from grapes, has been shown to prevent carcinogenesis in murine models. We report here that quercetin induces anti-proliferation and arrests G2/M phase in U937 cells. The G2/M phase accumulation was accompanied by an increase in the level of the cyclin B. In contrast, the level of the cyclin D, cyclin E, E2F1, and E2F2 was marked decreased in quercetin-treated U937 cells. Removal of quercetin from the culture medium stimulates U937 cells to synchronously re-enter the cell cycle, decrease expression level of cyclin B, and increased the expression level of cyclin D and cyclin E. These data demonstrate that quercetin causes reversible G2/M phase arrest, which was related with dramatic changes in the level of cyclin B, cyclin D, and cyclin E. Quercetin-induced down-regulation of cyclin D and cyclin E was associated with suppression of transcriptional levels but not protein stability. In addition, quercetin-treated U937 cells showed DNA fragmentation, increased sub-G1 population, and generated a 60kDa cleavage product of PLC-gamma1 in a dose-dependent manner, which were significantly inhibited by z-VAD-fmk. These data clearly indicate that quercetin-induced apoptosis is associated with caspase activation. In summary, the growth inhibition of the quercetin is highly related to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis in human promonocytic U937 cells.

  19. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome protein Cdc27 is a target for curcumin-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), the yellow pigment in the Asian spice turmeric, is a hydrophobic polyphenol from the rhizome of Curcuma longa. Because of its chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential with no discernable side effects, it has become one of the major natural agents being developed for cancer therapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that curcumin induces cell death through activation of apoptotic pathways and inhibition of cell growth and proliferation. The mitotic checkpoint, or spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), is the major cell cycle control mechanism to delay the onset of anaphase during mitosis. One of the key regulators of the SAC is the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) which ubiquitinates cyclin B and securin and targets them for proteolysis. Because APC/C not only ensures cell cycle arrest upon spindle disruption but also promotes cell death in response to prolonged mitotic arrest, it has become an attractive drug target in cancer therapy. Methods Cell cycle profiles were determined in control and curcumin-treated medulloblastoma and various other cancer cell lines. Pull-down assays were used to confirm curcumin binding. APC/C activity was determined using an in vitro APC activity assay. Results We identified Cdc27/APC3, a component of the APC/C, as a novel molecular target of curcumin and showed that curcumin binds to and crosslinks Cdc27 to affect APC/C function. We further provide evidence that curcumin preferably induces apoptosis in cells expressing phosphorylated Cdc27 usually found in highly proliferating cells. Conclusions We report that curcumin directly targets the SAC to induce apoptosis preferably in cells with high levels of phosphorylated Cdc27. Our studies provide a possible molecular mechanism why curcumin induces apoptosis preferentially in cancer cells and suggest that phosphorylation of Cdc27 could be used as a biomarker to predict the therapeutic response of cancer cells to curcumin. PMID:22280307

  20. 53BP1 and USP28 mediate p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in response to centrosome loss and prolonged mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chii Shyang; Mazo, Gregory; Das, Tuhin; Goodman, Joshua; Kim, Minhee; O'Rourke, Brian P; Izquierdo, Denisse; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis occurs efficiently, but when it is disturbed or delayed, p53-dependent cell death or senescence is often triggered after mitotic exit. To characterize this process, we conducted CRISPR-mediated loss-of-function screens using a cell-based assay in which mitosis is consistently disturbed by centrosome loss. We identified 53BP1 and USP28 as essential components acting upstream of p53, evoking p21-dependent cell cycle arrest in response not only to centrosome loss, but also to other distinct defects causing prolonged mitosis. Intriguingly, 53BP1 mediates p53 activation independently of its DNA repair activity, but requiring its interacting protein USP28 that can directly deubiquitinate p53 in vitro and ectopically stabilize p53 in vivo. Moreover, 53BP1 can transduce prolonged mitosis to cell cycle arrest independently of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), suggesting that while SAC protects mitotic accuracy by slowing down mitosis, 53BP1 and USP28 function in parallel to select against disturbed or delayed mitosis, promoting mitotic efficiency. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16270.001 PMID:27371829

  1. Physalin A induces G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in human non-small cell lung cancer cells: involvement of the p38 MAPK/ROS pathway.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ning; Jian, Jun-Feng; Cao, Shi-Jie; Zhang, Qiang; Mao, Yi-Wei; Huang, Yi-Yuan; Peng, Yan-Fei; Qiu, Feng; Gao, Xiu-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Physalin A (PA) is an active withanolide isolated from Physalis alkekengi var. franchetii, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine named Jindenglong, which has long been used for the treatment of sore throat, hepatitis, and tumors in China. In the present study, we firstly investigated the effects of PA on proliferation and cell cycle distribution of the human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cell line, and the potential mechanisms involved. Here, PA inhibited cell growth in dose- and time-dependent manners. Treatment of A549 cells with 28.4 μM PA for 24 h resulted in approximately 50 % cell death. PA increased the amount of intracellular ROS and the proportion of cells in G2/M. G2/M arrest was attenuated by the addition of ROS scavenger NAC. ERK and P38 were triggered by PA through phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The phosphorylation of ERK and P38 were not attenuated by the addition of NAC, but the use of the p38 inhibitor could reduce, at least in part, PA-induced ROS and the proportion of cells in G2/M. PA induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in A549 cells involving in the p38 MAPK/ROS pathway. This study suggests that PA might be a promising therapeutic agent against NSCLC.

  2. 53BP1 and USP28 mediate p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in response to centrosome loss and prolonged mitosis.

    PubMed

    Fong, Chii Shyang; Mazo, Gregory; Das, Tuhin; Goodman, Joshua; Kim, Minhee; O'Rourke, Brian P; Izquierdo, Denisse; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2016-07-02

    Mitosis occurs efficiently, but when it is disturbed or delayed, p53-dependent cell death or senescence is often triggered after mitotic exit. To characterize this process, we conducted CRISPR-mediated loss-of-function screens using a cell-based assay in which mitosis is consistently disturbed by centrosome loss. We identified 53BP1 and USP28 as essential components acting upstream of p53, evoking p21-dependent cell cycle arrest in response not only to centrosome loss, but also to other distinct defects causing prolonged mitosis. Intriguingly, 53BP1 mediates p53 activation independently of its DNA repair activity, but requiring its interacting protein USP28 that can directly deubiquitinate p53 in vitro and ectopically stabilize p53 in vivo. Moreover, 53BP1 can transduce prolonged mitosis to cell cycle arrest independently of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), suggesting that while SAC protects mitotic accuracy by slowing down mitosis, 53BP1 and USP28 function in parallel to select against disturbed or delayed mitosis, promoting mitotic efficiency.

  3. Novel coumarin- and quinolinone-based polycycles as cell division cycle 25-A and -C phosphatases inhibitors induce proliferation arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, Clemens; Czepukojc, Brigitte; Evain-Bana, Emilie; Xu, Zhanjie; Stazi, Giulia; Mori, Mattia; Patsilinakos, Alexandros; Mai, Antonello; Botta, Bruno; Ragno, Rino; Bagrel, Denise; Kirsch, Gilbert; Meiser, Peter; Jacob, Claus; Montenarh, Mathias; Valente, Sergio

    2017-07-07

    Cell division cycle phosphatases CDC25 A, B and C are involved in modulating cell cycle processes and are found overexpressed in a large panel of cancer typology. Here, we describe the development of two novel quinone-polycycle series of CDC25A and C inhibitors on the one hand 1a-k, coumarin-based, and on the other 2a-g, quinolinone-based, which inhibit either enzymes up to a sub-micro molar level and at single-digit micro molar concentrations, respectively. When tested in six different cancer cell lines, compound 2c displayed the highest efficacy to arrest cell viability, showing in almost all cell lines sub-micro molar IC50 values, a profile even better than the reference compound NCS95397. To investigate the putative binding mode of the inhibitors and to develop quantitative structure-activity relationships, molecular docking and 3-D QSAR studies were also carried out. Four selected inhibitors, 1a, 1d, 2a and 2c have been also tested in A431 cancer cells; among them, compound 2c was the most potent one leading to cell proliferation arrest and decreased CDC25C protein levels together with its splicing variant. Compound 2c displayed increased phosphorylation levels of histone H3, induction of PARP and caspase 3 cleavage, highlighting its contribution to cell death through pro-apoptotic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Enterolactone induces G1-phase cell cycle arrest in non-small cell lung cancer cells by down-regulating cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    Chikara, Shireen; Lindsey, Kaitlin; Dhillon, Harsharan; Mamidi, Sujan; Kittilson, Jeffrey; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Reindl, Katie M.

    2017-01-01

    Flaxseed is a rich source of the plant lignan secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) which is metabolized into mammalian lignans enterodiol (ED) and enterolactone (EL) in the digestive tract. The anti-cancer properties of these lignans have been demonstrated for various cancer types, but have not been studied for lung cancer. In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effects of EL for several non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines of various genetic backgrounds. EL inhibited the growth of A549, H441, and H520 lung cancer cells in concentration- and time-dependent manners. The anti-proliferative effects of EL for lung cancer cells were not due to enhanced cell death, but rather due to G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Molecular studies revealed that EL- decreased mRNA or protein expression levels of the G1-phase promoters cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)-2, -4, and -6, and p-cdc25A; decreased phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p-pRb) protein levels; and simultaneously increased levels of p21WAF1/CIP1, a negative regulator of the G1-phase. The results suggest that EL inhibits the growth of NSCLC cell lines by down-regulating G1-phase cyclins and CDKs, and up-regulating p21WAF1/CIP1, which leads to G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Therefore, EL may hold promise as an adjuvant treatment for lung cancer therapy. PMID:28323486

  5. Enterolactone Induces G1-phase Cell Cycle Arrest in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cells by Downregulating Cyclins and Cyclin-dependent Kinases.

    PubMed

    Chikara, Shireen; Lindsey, Kaitlin; Dhillon, Harsharan; Mamidi, Sujan; Kittilson, Jeffrey; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Reindl, Katie M

    2017-01-01

    Flaxseed is a rich source of the plant lignan secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), which is metabolized into mammalian lignans enterodiol (ED) and enterolactone (EL) in the digestive tract. The anticancer properties of these lignans have been demonstrated for various cancer types, but have not been studied for lung cancer. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of EL for several nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines of various genetic backgrounds. EL inhibited the growth of A549, H441, and H520 lung cancer cells in concentration- and time-dependent manners. The antiproliferative effects of EL for lung cancer cells were not due to enhanced cell death, but rather due to G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Molecular studies revealed that EL decreased mRNA or protein expression levels of the G1-phase promoters cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)-2, -4, and -6, and p-cdc25A; decreased phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p-pRb) protein levels; and simultaneously increased levels of p21(WAF1/CIP1), a negative regulator of the G1 phase. The results suggest that EL inhibits the growth of NSCLC cell lines by downregulating G1-phase cyclins and CDKs, and upregulating p21(WAF1/CIP1), which leads to G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Therefore, EL may hold promise as an adjuvant treatment for lung cancer therapy.

  6. Enhanced induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via the mitochondrial membrane potential disruption in human U87 malignant glioma cells by aloe emodin.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Samhani; Haris, Khalilah; Abdul Ghani, Abdul Rahman Izaini; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Johan, Muhammad Farid; Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul Aziz

    2013-09-01

    Aloe emodin, one of the active compounds found in Aloe vera leaves, plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and death. It has been reported to promote the anti-cancer effects in various cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the mechanism of inducing apoptosis by this agent is poorly understood in glioma cells. This research is to investigate the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest inducing by aloe emodin on U87 human malignant glioma cells. Aloe emodin showed a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of U87 cells proliferation and decreased the percentage of viable U87 cells via the induction of apoptosis. Characteristic morphological changes, such as the formation of apoptotic bodies, were observed with confocal microscope by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, supporting our viability study and flow cytometry analysis results. Our data also demonstrated that aloe emodin arrested the cell cycle in the S phase and promoted the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in U87 cells that indicated the early event of the mitochondria-induced apoptotic pathway.

  7. Unprecedented inhibition of tubulin polymerization directed by gold nanoparticles inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Diptiman; Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; John, Robin; Dasgupta, Anjan Kumar; Pradeep, Thalappil; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2013-05-01

    The effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the polymerization of tubulin has not been examined till now. We report that interaction of weakly protected AuNPs with microtubules (MTs) could cause inhibition of polymerization and aggregation in the cell free system. We estimate that single citrate capped AuNPs could cause aggregation of ~105 tubulin heterodimers. Investigation of the nature of inhibition of polymerization and aggregation by Raman and Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies indicated partial conformational changes of tubulin and microtubules, thus revealing that AuNP-induced conformational change is the driving force behind the observed phenomenon. Cell culture experiments were carried out to check whether this can happen inside a cell. Dark field microscopy (DFM) combined with hyperspectral imaging (HSI) along with flow cytometric (FC) and confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analyses suggested that AuNPs entered the cell, caused aggregation of the MTs of A549 cells, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and concomitant apoptosis. Further, Western blot analysis indicated the upregulation of mitochondrial apoptosis proteins such as Bax and p53, down regulation of Bcl-2 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) confirming mitochondrial apoptosis. Western blot run after cold-depolymerization revealed an increase in the aggregated insoluble intracellular tubulin while the control and actin did not aggregate, suggesting microtubule damage induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The observed polymerization inhibition and cytotoxic effects were dependent on the size and concentration of the AuNPs used and also on the incubation time. As microtubules are important cellular structures and target for anti-cancer drugs, this first observation of nanoparticles-induced protein's conformational change-based aggregation of the tubulin-MT system is of high importance, and would be useful in the understanding of cancer therapeutics

  8. Imaging bone morphogenetic protein 7 induced cell cycle arrest in experimental gliomas.

    PubMed

    Klose, Anke; Waerzeggers, Yannic; Monfared, Parisa; Vukicevic, Slobodan; Kaijzel, Eric L; Winkeler, Alexandra; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2011-03-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) belongs to the superfamily of transforming growth factor β-like cytokines, which can act either as tumor suppressors or as tumor promoters depending on cell type and differentiation. Our investigations focused on analyzing the effects of BMP-7 during glioma cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. BMP-7 treatment decreased the proliferation of Gli36ΔEGFR-LITG glioma cells up to 50%through a cell cycle arrest in the G(1) phase but not by induction of apoptosis. This effect was mediated by the modulation of the expression and phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, and downstream retinoblastoma protein. Furthermore, in vivo optical imaging of luciferase activity of Gli36ΔEGFR-LITG cells implanted intracranially into nude mice in the presence or absence of BMP-7 treatment corroborated the antiproliferative effects of this cytokine. This report clearly underlines the tumor-suppressive role of BMP-7 in glioma-derived cells. Taken together, our results indicate that manipulating the BMP/transforming growth factor β signaling cascade may serve as a new strategy for imaging-guided molecular-targeted therapy of malignant gliomas.

  9. Bracken-fern extracts induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Motahhareh Tourchi; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Dehghani, Hesam

    2012-01-01

    Bracken fern [Pteridium aquilinem (L.) kuhn (Dennstaedtiaceae)] is one of the most common species on the planet. It has been consumed by humans and animals for centuries. Use by some human groups is because they believe bracken fern is good for health as plant medicine. However, it is also one of the few known plants that can cause tumors in farm animals. Many interested groups have focused their attention on bracken fern because of these interesting features. In order to evaluate the biological effects of exposure to this plant in cellular level, human cancer cell lines were treated with the fern dichloromethane extracts and the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were studied. Anti-proliferative/cytotoxic effects were evaluated by cell count, MTT assay and flow cytometry methods with three different cancer cell lines, TCC, NTERA2, and MCF-7, and two normal cells, HDF1 and HFF3. Pro-apoptotic effects of the extracts were determined by DAPI staining and comet assay, on TCC cancer cells compared to the normal control cell lines. Cellular morphology was examined by light microscopy. Our present study showed that the extract caused DNA damage and apoptosis at high concentrations (200 μg/mL) and also it may induce cell cycle arrest (G2/M phase) at mild concentrations (50 and 30 μg/mL) depending on the cell type and tumor origin. These results indicate that bracken fern extract is a potent source of anticancer compounds that could be utilized pharmaceutically.

  10. Cataloging and organizing p73 interactions in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Tozluoğlu, Melda; Karaca, Ezgi; Haliloglu, Turkan

    2008-01-01

    We have compiled the p73-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis pathways. p73 is a member of the p53 family, consisting of p53, p63 and p73. p73 exists in several isoforms, presenting different domain structures. p73 functions not only as a tumor suppressor in apoptosis but also as differentiator in embryo development. p53 mutations are responsible for half of the human cancers; p73 can partially substitute mutant p53 as tumor suppressor. The pathways we assembled create a p73-centered network consisting of 53 proteins and 176 interactions. We clustered our network into five functional categories: Upregulation, Activation, Suppression, Transcriptional Activity and Degradation. Our literature searches led to discovering proteins (c-Jun and pRb) with apparent opposing functional effects; these indicate either currently missing proteins and interactions or experimental misidentification or functional annotation. For convenience, here we present the p73 network using the molecular interaction map (MIM) notation. The p73 MIM is unique amongst MIMs, since it further implements detailed domain features. We highlight shared pathways between p53 and p73. We expect that the compiled and organized network would be useful to p53 family-based studies. PMID:18660513

  11. Apigenin inhibits proliferation and invasion, and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangming; Han, Xiaodong; Cheng, Wei; Ni, Jing; Zhang, Yunfei; Lin, Jingrong; Song, Zhiqi

    2017-04-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most invasive and fatal form of cutaneous cancer. Moreover it is extremely resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Apigenin, a non-mutagenic flavonoid, has been found to exhibit chemopreventive and/or anticancerogenic properties in many different types of human cancer cells. Therefore, apigenin may have particular relevance for development as a chemotherapeutic agent for cancer treatment. In the present study, we investigated the effects of apigenin on the viability, migration and invasion potential, dendrite morphology, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in human melanoma A375 and C8161 cell lines in vitro. Apigenin effectively suppressed the proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. Moreover, it inhibited cell migration and invasion, lengthened the dendrites, and induced G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Furthermore, apigenin promoted the activation of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP proteins and decreased the expression of phosphorylated (p)‑ERK1/2 proteins, p-AKT and p-mTOR. Consequently, apigenin is a novel therapeutic candidate for melanoma.

  12. Knockdown of USP39 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Bo; Lei, Yu; Sun, Jingying; Zhang, Yaohua; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-10-01

    The spliceosome machinery composed of multimeric protein complexes guides precursor messenger RNAs (mRNAs) (pre-mRNAs) splicing in eukaryotic cells. Spliceosome components have been shown to be downregulated in cancer and could be a promising molecular target for anticancer therapy. The ubiquitin-specific protease 39 (USP39) is essential for pre-mRNA splicing, and upregulated USP39 expression is noted in a variety of cancers. However, the role of USP39 in the development and progression of melanoma remains unclear. In the present study, USP39 expression was found to be increased in melanoma tissues compared with that in nevus tissues. USP39 silencing via lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) significantly suppressed melanoma cell proliferation, induced G0/G1 cell cycle phase arrest, and increased apoptosis in vitro. Moreover, USP39 knockdown suppressed melanoma tumor growth in a xenograft model. In addition, USP39 silencing was associated with the increased expressions of p21, p27, and Bax. Furthermore, the inhibition of USP39 expression decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, indicating that ERK signaling pathways might be involved in the regulation of melanoma cell proliferation by USP39. Our findings suggest that USP39 may play crucial roles in the development and pathogenesis of melanoma, and it may serve as a potential therapeutic target for melanoma.

  13. Imaging Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Experimental Gliomas12

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Anke; Waerzeggers, Yannic; Monfared, Parisa; Vukicevic, Slobodan; Kaijzel, Eric L; Winkeler, Alexandra; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) belongs to the superfamily of transforming growth factor β-like cytokines, which can act either as tumor suppressors or as tumor promoters depending on cell type and differentiation. Our investigations focused on analyzing the effects of BMP-7 during glioma cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. BMP-7 treatment decreased the proliferation of Gli36ΔEGFR-LITG glioma cells up to 50%through a cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase but not by induction of apoptosis. This effect was mediated by the modulation of the expression and phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, and downstream retinoblastoma protein. Furthermore, in vivo optical imaging of luciferase activity of Gli36ΔEGFR-LITG cells implanted intracranially into nude mice in the presence or absence of BMP-7 treatment corroborated the antiproliferative effects of this cytokine. This report clearly underlines the tumor-suppressive role of BMP-7 in glioma-derived cells. Taken together, our results indicate that manipulating the BMP/transforming growth factor β signaling cascade may serve as a new strategy for imaging-guided molecular-targeted therapy of malignant gliomas. PMID:21390190

  14. Telomere loss in somatic cells of Drosophila causes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, K; Golic, K G

    1999-01-01

    Checkpoint mechanisms that respond to DNA damage in the mitotic cell cycle are necessary to maintain the fidelity of chromosome transmission. These mechanisms must be able to distinguish the normal telomeres of linear chromosomes from double-strand break damage. However, on several occasions, Drosophila chromosomes that lack their normal telomeric DNA have been recovered, raising the issue of whether Drosophila is able to distinguish telomeric termini from nontelomeric breaks. We used site-specific recombination on a dispensable chromosome to induce the formation of a dicentric chromosome and an acentric, telomere-bearing, chromosome fragment in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster. The acentric fragment is lost when cells divide and the dicentric breaks, transmitting a chromosome that has lost a telomere to each daughter cell. In the eye imaginal disc, cells with a newly broken chromosome initially experience mitotic arrest and then undergo apoptosis when cells are induced to divide as the eye differentiates. Therefore, Drosophila cells can detect and respond to a single broken chromosome. It follows that transmissible chromosomes lacking normal telomeric DNA nonetheless must possess functional telomeres. We conclude that Drosophila telomeres can be established and maintained by a mechanism that does not rely on the terminal DNA sequence. PMID:10049921

  15. Pterostilbene induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Gege; Xu, Zhijian; Yang, Guang; Li, Bo; Wu, Xiaosong; Xiao, Wenqin; Xie, Bingqian; Hu, Liangning; Sun, Xi; Chang, Gaomei; Gao, Minjie; Gao, Lu; Dai, Bojie; Tao, Yi; Zhu, Weiliang; Shi, Jumei

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Pterostilbene, a natural dimethylated analog of resveratrol, has been shown to possess diverse pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer properties. However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been no study of the effects of pterostilbene upon hematological malignancies. Herein, we report the antitumor activity and mechanism of pterostilbene against DLBCL cells both in vitro and in vivo. We found that pterostilbene treatment resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability. In addition, pterostilbene exhibited a strong cytotoxic effect, as evidenced not only by reductions of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) but also by increases in cellular apoptotic index and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, leading to arrest in the S-phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, pterostilbene treatment directly up-regulated p-p38MAPK and down-regulated p-ERK1/2. In vivo, intravenous administration of pterostilbene inhibited tumor development in xenograft mouse models. Overall, the results suggested that pterostilbene is a potential anti-cancer pharmaceutical against human DLBCL by a mechanism involving the suppression of ERK1/2 and activation of p38MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:27869173

  16. Boletus edulis biologically active biopolymers induce cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Cardoso, Claudia; Ferreira Milheiro Nunes, Fernando Hermínio; Ramos Novo Amorim de Barros, Ana Isabel; Marques, Guilhermina; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-04-25

    The use of biologically active compounds isolated from edible mushrooms against cancer raises global interest. Anticancer properties are mainly attributed to biopolymers including mainly polysaccharides, polysaccharopeptides, polysaccharide proteins, glycoproteins and proteins. In spite of the fact that Boletus edulis is one of the widely occurring and most consumed edible mushrooms, antitumor biopolymers isolated from it have not been exactly defined and studied so far. The present study is an attempt to extend this knowledge on molecular mechanisms of their anticancer action. The mushroom biopolymers (polysaccharides and glycoproteins) were extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The antiproliferative activity in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (LS180) was screened by means of MTT and BrdU assays. At the same time fractions' cytotoxicity was examined on the human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) by means of the LDH assay. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis and protein expression involved in anticancer activity of the selected biopolymer fraction. In vitro studies have shown that fractions isolated from Boletus edulis were not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells and in the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells. The best results were obtained in the case of the fraction designated as BE3. The tested compound inhibited cancer cell proliferation which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase. Growth inhibition was associated with modulation of the p16/cyclin D1/CDK4-6/pRb pathway, an aberration of which is a critical step in the development of many human cancers including colon cancer. Our results indicate that a biopolymer BE3 from Boletus edulis possesses anticancer potential and may provide a new therapeutic/preventive option in colon cancer chemoprevention.

  17. Arecoline induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity to human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shuei-Kuen; Chang, Mei-Chi; Su, Cheng-Yao; Chi, Lin-Yang; Chang, Jenny Zwei-Ching; Tseng, Wan-Yu; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Hsu, Ming-Lun; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2012-08-01

    Betel quid (BQ) chewing is a common oral habit in South Asia and Taiwan. BQ consumption may increase the risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), and periodontitis as well as systemic diseases (atherosclerosis, hypertension, etc.). However, little is known about the toxic effect of BQ components on endothelial cells that play important roles for angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, tissue fibrosis, and cardiovascular diseases. EAhy 926 (EAHY) endothelial cells were exposed to arecoline, a major BQ alkaloid, for various time periods. Cytotoxicity was estimated by 3-(4, 5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. The cell cycle distribution of EAHY cells residing in sub-G0/G1, G0/G1, S-, and G2/M phases was analyzed by propidium iodide staining of cellular DNA content and flow cytometry. Some EAHY cells retracted, became round-shaped in appearance, and even detached from the culture plate after exposure to higher concentrations of arecoline (> 0.4 mM). At concentrations of 0.4 and 0.8 mM, arecoline induced significant cytotoxicity to EAHY cells. At similar concentrations, arecoline induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased sub-G0/G1 population, a hallmark of apoptosis. Interestingly, prolonged exposure to arecoline (0.1 mM) for 12 and 21 days significantly suppressed the proliferation of EAHY cells, whereas EAHY cells showed adaptation and survived when exposed to 0.05 mM arecoline. These results suggest that BQ components may contribute to the pathogenesis of OSF and BQ chewing-related cardiovascular diseases via toxicity to oral or systemic endothelial cells, leading to impairment of vascular function. During BQ chewing, endothelial damage may be induced by areca nut components and associate with the pathogenesis of OSF, periodontitis, and cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Silymarin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Ma, Yalin; Liu, Ying; Zheng, Dongping; Huang, Guangrong

    2014-11-15

    The polyphenolic flavonoid silymarin that is the milk thistle extract has been found to possess an anti-cancer effect against various human epithelial cancers. In this study, to explore the regulative effect of silymarin on human ovarian cancer line A2780s and PA-1 cells, 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and flow cytometry were respectively used to determine the inhibitory effect of silymarin on the both cell lines, and to measure their cell cycle progression. Apoptosis induction and mitochondrial membrane potential damage were separately detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling assay and 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide staining. Additionally, western blotting was applied to determine cytochrome C release and expression levels of p53, p21, p27, p16, CDK2, Bax, Bcl-2, procaspase-9, procaspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and caspase-3 proteins. The activity of caspase-9 and caspase-3 was measured using Caspase-Glo-9 and Caspase-Glo-3 assay. The results indicated that silymarin effectively suppressed cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and arrested cell cycle progression at G1/S phase in A2780s and PA-1 cells via up-regulation of p53, p21, and p27 protein expression, and down-regulation of CDK2 protein expression. Additionally, silymarin treatment for 24h at 50 and 100µg/ml resulted in a reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome C release, and significantly induced apoptosis in A2780s and PA-1 cells by increasing Bax and decreasing Bcl-2 protein expression, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Therefore, silymarin is a possible potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. miR-22 promotes apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells via inducing cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Gai, Pengzhou; Sun, Hongliang; Wang, Guangda; Xu, Qiang; Qi, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zuofu; Jiang, Lei

    2017-04-01

    To study the effects of miR-22 on the proliferation and the apoptosis of osteosarcoma MG-63 cell line and to explore the potential molecular mechanism that miR-22 regulates this biological process. Quantitive real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was performed to explore the miRNA level of miR-22. The MG-63 cell line was infected with miR-22 mimics for establishment of miR-22 overexpression. Non-infected cells were in blank group and cells infected with empty vector were served as negative control (NC group). MTT assay was conducted to measure cell viability. The cell cycle and apoptosis were explored using flow cytometry and the apoptosis-related markers were detected by western blotting. RT-qPCR results revealed that the miR-22 miRNA level in the MG-63 cells was significantly lower than that in osteoblasts (P<0.05). MTT assay showed that the MG-63 cells infected with miR-22 mimics exhibited markedly decreased proliferation ability compared with blank and empty vector (NC) groups. Next, we found that overexpression of miR-22 remarkably increased the apoptosis of the MG-63 cells, evidenced from the flow cytometry results and elevated Bax and reduced Bcl-2. Furthermore, results revealed that percentage of the cells at G0/G1 phase in miR-22 mimic group (66.75±3.67%) was significantly higher than blank (52.9±2.58%) and NC (50.5±2.45%) groups. miR-22 attenuated the proliferation and induced the apoptosis of the MG-63 cells via promoting G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Thus, miR-22 may have the potential to be a novel therapeutic in treatment of osteosarcoma.

  20. 2'-Nitroflavone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Mariano G; Blank, Viviana C; Marder, Mariel; Roguin, Leonor P

    2008-09-08

    The mechanism of antitumor action of a synthetic nitroflavone derivative, 2'-nitroflavone, was evaluated in vitro in HeLa human cervix adenocarcinoma cells. We showed that the nitroflavone derivative slowed down the cell cycle at the S phase and increase the population of cells at the G2/M phase after 24h of incubation. The treatment with 2'-nitroflavone also induced an apoptotic response, characterized by an increase of the sub-G1 fraction of cells, by cells with chromatin condensation and membrane blebbing, by a typical ladder of DNA fragmentation and by detection of apoptotic cells stained with Annexin V. The observed apoptosis was regulated by caspase-8 and -9, both contributing to the activation of the effector caspase-3. In addition, inhibitors of caspase-8 or -9 partially protected HeLa cells from 2'-nitroflavone-induced cell death. We also found that 2'-nitroflavone did not affect the total amount of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins, although a translocation of Bax from cytosol to mitochondria was evident after 6h of exposure. Furthermore, 2'-nitroflavone decreased the expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein, induced the release of cytochrome C to cytosol and increased the levels of Fas and Fas-L. Our results indicated that both death receptor and mitochondria-dependent pathways are involved in the apoptotic cell death triggered by 2'-nitroflavone and suggest that this derivative could be a potentially useful agent for the treatment of certain malignancies.

  1. Phytochemical induction of cell cycle arrest by glutathione oxidation and reversal by N-acetylcysteine in human colon carcinomacarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Odom, R. Y.; Dansby, M. Y.; Rollins-Hairston, A. M.; Jackson, K. M.; Kirlin, W. G.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer prevention by dietary phytochemicals has been shown to involve decreased cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest. However, there is limited understanding of the mechanisms involved. Previously, we have shown that a common effect of phytochemicals investigated is to oxidize the intracellular glutathione (GSH) pool. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate whether changes in the glutathione redox potential in response to dietary phytochemicals was related to their induction of cell cycle arrest. Human colon carcinoma (HT29) cells were treated with benzyl isothiocyanate (BIT), diallyl disulfide (DADS), dimethyl fumarate (DMF), lycopene (LYC), sodium butyrate (NaB) or buthione sulfoxamine (BSO, a GSH synthesis inhibitor) at concentrations shown to cause oxidation of the GSH: glutathione disulfide pool. A decrease in cell proliferation, as measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation, was observed that could be reversed by pretreatment with the GSH precursor and antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Cell cycle analysis on cells isolated 16 h after treatment indicated an increase in the percentage (ranging from 75% to 30% for benzyl isothiocyanate and lycopene, respectively) of cells at G2/M arrest compared to control treatments (dimethylsulfoxide) in response to phytochemical concentrations that oxidized the GSH pool. Pretreatment for 6 h with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) resulted in a partial reversal of the G2/M arrest. As expected the GSH oxidation from these phytochemical treatments was reversible by NAC. That both cell proliferation and G2/M arrest, were also reversed by NAC leads to the conclusion that these phytochemical effects are also mediated, in part, by intracellular oxidation. Thus, one potential mechanism for cancer prevention by dietary phytochemicals is inhibition of the growth of cancer cells through modulation of their intracellular redox environment. PMID:19373606

  2. LncRNA LINC00341 mediates PM2.5-induced cell cycle arrest in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiqin; Wu, Jianjun; Peng, Xiaowu; Yang, Ti; Liu, Meiling; Chen, Lijian; Dai, Xin; Wang, Zhishan; Yang, Chengfeng; Yan, Bing; Jiang, Yiguo

    2017-07-05

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) could adhere to many toxic substances and cause respiratory diseases.However, the associated pathogenic mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of PM2.5 on cell cycle progression in human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE) and the underlying mechanism mediated by lncRNAs. PM2.5 treatment inhibited cell proliferation in 16HBE cells in a dose-dependent manner. The results of flow cytometry assay (FCM) showed that PM2.5 induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. The lncRNA microarray analysis indicated that treatment with PM2.5 led to the alteration of lncRNA expression profiles. qRT-PCR were performed to confirm the differential expression of several candidate lncRNAs. lncRNA LINC00341 was significantly up-regulated in 16HBE cell after PM2.5 treatment. Further functional studies showed that knockdown of lncRNA LINC00341 reversed PM2.5-induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and p21 expression. These results suggest that up-regulation of the lncRNA LINC00341 mediates PM2.5-induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, and probably through regulating the expression of p21. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Solanum tuberosum lectin inhibits Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells growth by inducing apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed Rashel; Rahman, Md Musfikur; Amin, Ruhul; Karim, Md Rezaul; Mahmud, Zahid Hayat; Hossain, M Tofazzal

    2016-06-01

    Recently, a lectin was purified from the potato cultivated in Bangladesh locally known as Sheel. In the present study cytotoxicity of the lectin against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells was studied by MTT assay in vitro in RPMI-1640 medium and 8.0-36.0 % cell growth inhibition was observed at the range of 2.5-160 μg/ml protein concentration when incubated for 24 h. The lectin-induced apoptosis in EAC cells was confirmed by fluorescence and optical microscope. The apoptotic cell death was also confirmed by using caspase inhibitors. Cells growth inhibition caused by the lectin (36 %) was remarkably decreased to 7.6 and 22.3 % respectively in the presence of caspase-3 and -8 inhibitors. RT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression of apoptosis-related genes Bcl-X, p53, and Bax. An intensive expression of Bcl-X gene was observed in untreated control EAC cells with the disappeared of the gene in Sheel-treated EAC cells. At the same time, Bax gene expression appeared only in Sheel-treated EAC cells and the expression level of the p53 gene was increased remarkable after the treatment of EAC cells with the lectin. The lectin showed strong agglutination activity against EAC cells. Flow cytometry was used to study the cell cycle phases of EAC cells and it was observed that the lectin arrested the G2/M phase. In conclusion, Sheel lectin inhibited EAC cells growth by inducing apoptosis.

  4. Securinine from Phyllanthus glaucus Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krauze-Baranowska, Mirosława; Ochocka, J. Renata

    2016-01-01

    Background The Securinega-type alkaloids occur in plants belonging to Euphorbiaceae family. One of the most widely distributed alkaloid of this group is securinine, which was identified next to allosecurinine in Phyllanthus glaucus (leafflower). Recently, some Securinega-type alkaloids have paid attention to its antiproliferative potency towards different cancer cells. However, the cytotoxic properties of allosecurinine have not yet been evaluated. Methods The cytotoxicity of the extract, alkaloid fraction obtained from P. glaucus, isolated securinine and allosecurinine against HeLa cells was evaluated by real-time xCELLigence system and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was detected by annexin V and 7-amino-actinomycin (7-AAD) staining and confirmed with fluorescent Hoechst 33342 dye. The assessment of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the level of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), caspase-3/7 activity and cell cycle analysis were measured by flow cytometry. The enzymatic activity of caspase-9 was assessed by a luminometric assay. The expression of apoptosis associated genes was analyzed by real-time PCR. Results The experimental data revealed that securinine and the alkaloid fraction were significantly potent on HeLa cells growth inhibition with IC50 values of 7.02 ± 0.52 μg/ml (32.3 μM) and 25.46 ± 1.79 μg/ml, respectively. The activity of allosecurinine and Phyllanthus extract were much lower. Furthermore, our study showed that the most active securinine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in the tested cells, increased the percentage of ROS positive cells and depolarized cells as well as stimulated the activity of ERK1/2, caspase-9 and -3/7. Securinine also induced cell cycle arrest in S phase. Real-time PCR analysis showed high expression of TNFRSF genes in the cells stimulated with securinine. Conclusions Securinine

  5. Human cytochrome c enters murine J774 cells and causes G{sub 1} and G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraoka, Yoshinori; Granja, Ana Teresa; Fialho, Arsenio M.; Schlarb-Ridley, Beatrix G.; Das Gupta, Tapas K.; Chakrabarty, Ananda M.; Yamada, Tohru . E-mail: tohru@uic.edu

    2005-12-16

    Cytochrome c is well known as a carrier of electrons during respiration. Current evidence indicates that cytochrome c also functions as a major component of apoptosomes to induce apoptosis in eukaryotic cells as well as an antioxidant. More recently, a prokaryotic cytochrome c, cytochrome c {sub 551} from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has been shown to enter in mammalian cells such as the murine macrophage-like J774 cells and causes inhibition of cell cycle progression. Much less is known about such functions by mammalian cytochromes c, particularly the human cytochrome c. We now report that similar to P. aeruginosa cytochrome c {sub 551}, the purified human cytochrome c protein can enter J774 cells and induce cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 1} to S phase, as well as at the G{sub 2}/M phase at higher concentrations. Unlike P. aeruginosa cytochrome c {sub 551} which had no effect on the induction of apoptosis, human cytochrome c induces significant apoptosis and cell death in J774 cells, presumably through inhibition of the cell cycle at the G{sub 2}/M phase. When incubated with human breast cancer MCF-7 and normal mammary epithelial cell line MCF-10A1 cells, human cytochrome c entered in both types of cells but induced cell death only in the normal MCF-10A1 cells. The ability of human cytochrome c to enter J774 cells was greatly reduced at 4 deg. C, suggesting energy requirement in the entry process.

  6. Impact of Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in U251 Cell Cycle Arrest in G1 Stage and Caspase Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Liang, Peng; Zhang, Rui

    2015-11-23

    BACKGROUND Most mitochondria-mediated apoptosis has some relevance to the cell cycle, but there is still a lack of investigations about U251 cell cycle in human brain glioma cells. In this study, we aimed to clarify the correlation of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis with the U251 cell cycle and its influence on apoptosis, through observing the impact of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in U251cell specificity cycle arrest and Caspase activation. MATERIAL AND METHODS AnnexinV/PI and API were used to label the brain glioma cells for flow cytometry analysis of U251 cell apoptosis and cell cycle. RT-PCR and Western blot were performed to detect Caspase-3 and Caspase-9 activation. RESULTS Peripheral blood in stationary phase is not sensitive to apoptosis induction, but U251 cells have obvious apoptosis. Mitochondria-mediated apoptosis mainly occurs in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Caspase-3 and Caspase-9 mRNAs and proteins expression increased significantly after the cells were treated by mitochondrial apoptosis-related gene Bax induction. CONCLUSIONS Mitochondria-mediated apoptosis is related to the U251 cell cycle with specific G1 stage arrest. Caspase activation occurs in the process of cell apoptosis.

  7. Novel synthetic analogs of diallyl disulfide triggers cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via ROS generation in MIA PaCa-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Vikas; Manral, Apra; Arora, Rashi; Meena, Poonam; Gusain, Siddharth; Saluja, Daman; Tiwari, Manisha

    2017-08-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), a principal organosulfur component of garlic, is known for its medicinal properties including anti-cancer activity. Prior studies have demonstrated that the compounds containing Diallyl disulfide moieties exhibited diverse therapeutic potential with promising biological activities. In the present study, we have investigated the in vitro anticancer activity of Diallyl disulfide derivatives (5a-5l and 7e-7m) against human cancer cell lines. The effect of DADS analogs on different cancer cell lines was measured through MTT assay. Cell cycle progression, apoptosis, DNA fragmentation and levels of ROS were analyzed through FACS and confocal imaging. Bis[3-(3-fluorophenyl)prop-2-ene]disulfide (compound 5b) was the most potent compound among the tested DADS derivatives. FACS analysis revealed that increase in ROS generation by compound 5b was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and apoptosis in MIA PaCa-2 cells. Further, the apoptosis was confirmed by TUNEL assay. Western blot analysis showed that compound 5b induces G2/M phase arrest via ROS mediated DNA-damage, which in turn, induces phosphorylation of Chk1/Cdc25c/Cdc2 pathway. Furthermore, altered levels of ROS triggers intrinsic apoptotic cascade, as evidenced by dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential (ψ), decrease in Bcl-2/Bax ratio, cytochrome c release and cleavage of procaspase-3. Scavenging of ROS by antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) reversed the compound 5b induced augmented intracellular ROS levels and cell death. Taken together, the anti-proliferative effects of compound 5b were attributed to intracellular ROS accumulation, which in turn, triggers apoptosis by mediating DNA damage-induced G2/M phase arrest and evoking mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in MIA PaCa-2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Induction of G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis pathway in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells by sulfated polysaccharide extracted from Laurencia papillosa.

    PubMed

    Murad, Hossam; Hawat, Mohammad; Ekhtiar, Adnan; AlJapawe, Abdulmunim; Abbas, Assef; Darwish, Hussein; Sbenati, Oula; Ghannam, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae consumption is linked to law cancer incidences in countries that traditionally consume marine products. Hence, Phytochemicals are considered as potential chemo-preventive and chemotherapeutic agents against cancer. We investigated the effects of the algal sulfated polysaccharide extract (ASPE) from the red marine alga L. papillosa on MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to study the cell viability, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Changes in the expression of certain genes associated with cell cycle regulation was conducted by PCR real time analyses. Further investigations on apoptotic molecules was performed by ROS measurement and protein profiling. ASPE at low doses (10 µg/ml), inhibited cell proliferation, and arrested proliferating MDA-MB-231 cells at G1-phase. However, higher doses (50 µg/ml), triggered apoptosis in those cells. The low dose of ASPE also caused up-regulation of Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27 and down-regulation of cyclins D1, D2, and E1 transcripts and their related cyclin dependent kinases: Cdk2, Cdk4, and Cdk6. The higher doses of ASPE initiated a dose-dependent apoptotic death in MDA-MB-231 by induction of Bax transcripts, inhibition of Bcl-2 and cleavage of Caspase-3 protein. Over-generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also observed in MDA-MB-231 treated cells. These findings indicated that ASPE induces G1-phase arrest and apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. ASPE may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for breast cancer.

  9. Oxidative stress, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest are induced in primary fetal alveolar type II epithelial cells exposed to fine particulate matter from cooking oil fumes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Yan-Yan; Cao, Ji-Yu; Tao, Fang-Biao; Zhu, Xiao-Xia; Yao, Ci-Jiang; Chen, Dao-Jun; Che, Zhen; Zhao, Qi-Hong; Wen, Long-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a linkage between morbidity and mortality and particulate matter (PM), particularly fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that can readily penetrate into the lungs and are therefore more likely to increase the incidence of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the compositions of cooking oil fume (COF)-derived PM2.5, which is the major source of indoor pollution in China. Furthermore, oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest induced by COF-derived PM2.5 in primary fetal alveolar type II epithelial cells (AEC II cells) were also detected. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a radical scavenger, was used to identify the role of oxidative stress in the abovementioned processes. Our results suggested that compositions of COF-derived PM2.5 are obviously different to PM2.5 derived from other sources, and COF-derived PM2.5 led to cell death, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and G0/G1 cell arrest in primary fetal AEC II cells. Furthermore, the results also showed that COF-derived PM2.5 induced apoptosis through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway, which is indicated by the increased expression of ER stress-related apoptotic markers, namely GRP78 and caspase-12. Besides, the induction of oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest was reversed by pretreatment with NAC. These findings strongly suggested that COF-derived PM2.5-induced toxicity in primary fetal AEC II cells is mediated by increased oxidative stress, accompanied by ER stress which results in apoptosis.

  10. PD98059 Protects Brain against Cells Death Resulting from ROS/ERK Activation in a Cardiac Arrest Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Thi, Phuong Anh; Chen, Meng-Hua; Li, Nuo; Zhuo, Xiao-Jun; Xie, Lu

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and experimental postcardiac arrest treatment has not reached therapeutic success. The present study investigated the effect of PD98059 (PD) in rats subjected to cardiac arrest (CA)/cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Experimental rats were divided randomly into 3 groups: sham, CA, and PD. The rats except for sham group were subjected to CA for 5 min followed by CPR operation. Once spontaneous circulation was restored, saline and PD were injected in CA and PD groups, respectively. The survival rates and neurologic deficit scores (NDS) were observed, and the following indices of brain tissue were evaluated: ROS, MDA, SOD, p-ERK1/2/ERK1/2, caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, TUNEL positive cells, and double fluorescent staining of p-ERK/TUNEL. Our results indicated that PD treatment significantly reduced apoptotic neurons and improved the survival rates and NDS. Moreover, PD markedly downregulated the ROS, MDA, p-ERK, and caspase-3, Bax and upregulated SOD and Bcl-2 levels. Double staining p-ERK/TUNEL in choroid plexus and cortex showed that cell death is dependent on ERK activation. The findings in present study demonstrated that PD provides neuroprotection via antioxidant activity and antiapoptosis in rats subjected to CA/CPR.

  11. A novel peptide sansalvamide analogue inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth through G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Ujiki, Michael B. |; Milam, Ben; Ding Xianzhong |; Roginsky, Alexandra B.; Salabat, M. Reza; Talamonti, Mark S.; Bell, Richard H. |; Gu Wenxin; Silverman, Richard B. ||; Adrian, Thomas E. |. E-mail: tadrian@northwestern.edu

    2006-02-24

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have little hope for cure because no effective therapies are available. Sansalvamide A is a cyclic depsipeptide produced by a marine fungus. We investigated the effect of a novel sansalvamide A analogue on growth, cell-cycle phases, and induction of apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The sansalvamide analogue caused marked time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis and cell proliferation of two human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1 and S2-013). The analogue induced G0/G1 phase cell-cycle arrest and morphological changes suggesting induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was confirmed by annexin V binding. This novel sansalvamide analogue inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells through G0/G1 arrest and induces apoptosis. Sansalvamide analogues may be valuable for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  12. Inhibition of protein kinase B activity induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis during early G₁ phase in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    van Opstal, Angélique; Bijvelt, José; van Donselaar, Elly; Humbel, Bruno M; Boonstra, Johannes

    2012-04-01

    Inhibition of PKB (protein kinase B) activity using a highly selective PKB inhibitor resulted in inhibition of cell cycle progression only if cells were in early G1 phase at the time of addition of the inhibitor, as demonstrated by time-lapse cinematography. Addition of the inhibitor during mitosis up to 2 h after mitosis resulted in arrest of the cells in early G1 phase, as deduced from the expression of cyclins D and A and incorporation of thymidine. After 24 h of cell cycle arrest, cells expressed the cleaved caspase-3, a central mediator of apoptosis. These results demonstrate that PKB activity in early G1 phase is required to prevent the induction of apoptosis. Using antibodies, it was demonstrated that active PKB translocates to the nucleus during early G1 phase, while an even distribution of PKB was observed through cytoplasm and nucleus during the end of G1 phase.

  13. Early detection of brain death using the Bispectral Index (BIS) in patients treated by extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) for refractory cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Jouffroy, Romain; Lamhaut, Lionel; Guyard, Alexandra; Philippe, Pascal; An, Kim; Spaulding, Christian; Baud, Frédéric; Carli, Pierre; Vivien, Benoît

    2017-08-24

    Despite increasing use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) for treatment of refractory cardiac arrest patients, prognosis remains dismal, often resulting in brain-death. However, clinical assessment of brain-death occurence is difficult in post-cardiac arrest patients, sedated, paralyzed, under mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH). Our objective was to assess the usefulness of Bispectral-Index (BIS) monitoring at bedside for an early detection of brain-death occurrence in refractory cardiac arrest patients treated by E-CPR. This prospective study was performed in an intensive care unit of an university hospital. Forty-six patients suffering from refractory cardiac arrest treated by E-CPR were included. BIS was continuously recorded during ICU hospitalization. Clinical brain-death was confirmed when appropriate by EEG and/or cerebral CT angiography. Twenty-nine patients evolved into brain-death and had average BIS values under MTH and after rewarming (temperature ≥35°C) of 4 (0-47) and 0 (0-82), respectively. Among these, 11 (38%) entered into a procedure of organs donation. Among the 17 non-brain-dead patients, the average BIS values at admission and after rewarming were 39 (0-65) and 59 (22-82), respectively. Two patients had on admission a BIS value equal to zero and evolved to a poor prognostic (CPC 4) and died after care limitations. BIS values were significantly different between patients who developed brain death and those who did not. In both groups, no differences were observed between the AUCs of ROC curves for BIS values under MTH and after rewarming (respectively 0.86 vs 0.83, NS). Initial values of BIS could be used as an assessment tool for early detection of brain-death in refractory cardiac arrest patients treated by mild therapeutic hypothermia and E-CPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibition of Aurora A Kinase by Alisertib Induces Autophagy and Cell Cycle Arrest and Increases Chemosensitivity in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiaohua; Yu, Xinfa; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Chengyu; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Aurora A kinase represent a feasible target in cancer therapy. To evaluate the proteomic response of human liver carcinoma cells to alisertib (ALS) and identify the molecular targets of ALS, we examined the effects of ALS on the proliferation, cell cycle, autophagy, apoptosis, and chemosensitivity in HepG2 cells. The stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) based quantitative proteomic study was performed to evaluate the proteomic response to ALS. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed using flow cytometry and autophagy was determined using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Our SILAC proteomic study showed that ALS regulated the expression of 914 proteins, with 407 molecules being up-regulated and 507 molecules being down-regulated in HepG2 cells. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) and KEGG pathway analysis identified 146 and 32 signaling pathways were regulated by ALS, respectively, which were associated with cell survival, programmed cell death, and nutrition-energy metabolism. Subsequently, the verification experiments showed that ALS remarkably arrested HepG2 cells in G2/M phase and led to an accumulation of aneuploidy via regulating the expression of key cell cycle regulators. ALS induced a marked autophagy in a concentration- and time-dependent manner via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Autophagy inhibition promoted the pro-apoptotic effect of ALS, indicating a cyto-protective role of ALS-induced autophagy. ALS increased the chemosensitivity of HepG2 cells to cisplatin and doxorubicin. Taken together, ALS induces autophagy and cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells via PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated pathway. Autophagy inhibition may promote the anticancer effect of ALS and sensitize the chemotherapy in HepG2 cells. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. SKLB70326, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of cell-cycle progression, induces G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest and apoptosis in human hepatic carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yuanyuan; He, Haiyun; Peng, Feng; Liu, Jiyan; Dai, Xiaoyun; Lin, Hongjun; Xu, Youzhi; Zhou, Tian; Mao, Yongqiu; Xie, Gang; Yang, Shengyong; Yu, Luoting; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yinglan

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 is a novel compound and has activity of anti-HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest via inhibiting the activity of CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway. -- Abstract: We previously reported the potential of a novel small molecule 3-amino-6-(3-methoxyphenyl)thieno[2.3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide (SKLB70326) as an anticancer agent. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer effects and possible mechanisms of SKLB70326 in vitro. We found that SKLB70326 treatment significantly inhibited human hepatic carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro, and the HepG2 cell line was the most sensitive to its treatment. The inhibition of cell proliferation correlated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest, which was followed by apoptotic cell death. The SKLB70326-mediated cell-cycle arrest was associated with the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, CDK4 and CDK6 but not cyclin D1 or cyclin E. The phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) was also observed. SKLB70326 treatment induced apoptotic cell death via the activation of PARP, caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bax as well as the downregulation of Bcl-2. The expression levels of p53 and p21 were also induced by SKLB70326 treatment. Moreover, SKLB70326 treatment was well tolerated. In conclusion, SKLB70326, a novel cell-cycle inhibitor, notably inhibits HepG2 cell proliferation through the induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest and subsequent apoptosis. Its potential as a candidate anticancer agent warrants further investigation.

  16. Polychlorinated Biphenyl Quinone Metabolite Promotes p53-Dependent DNA Damage Checkpoint Activation, S-Phase Cycle Arrest and Extrinsic Apoptosis in Human Liver Hepatocellular Carcinoma HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiufang; Li, Lingrui; Shi, Qiong; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Fu, Juanli; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang

    2015-11-16

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of persistent organic pollutants. The toxic behavior and mechanism of PCBs individuals and congeners have been extensively investigated. However, there is only limited information on their metabolites. Our previous studies have shown that a synthetic PCB metabolite, PCB29-pQ, causes oxidative damage with the evidence of cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and mitochondrial-derived intrinsic apoptosis. Here, we investigate the effects of PCB29-pQ on DNA damage checkpoint activation, cell cycle arrest, and death receptor-related extrinsic apoptosis in human liver hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Our results illustrate that PCB29-pQ increases the S-phase cell population by down-regulating cyclins A/D1/E, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK 2/4/6), and cell division cycle 25A (CDC25A) and up-regulating p21/p27 protein expressions. PCB29-pQ also induces apoptosis via the up-regulation of Fas/FasL and the activation of caspase 8/3. Moreover, p53 plays a pivotal role in PCB29-pQ-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via the activation of ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 checkpoints. Cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death were attenuated by the pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). Taken together, these results demonstrate that PCB29-pQ induces oxidative stress and promotes p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint activation, S-phase cycle arrest, and extrinsic apoptosis in HepG2 cells.

  17. Platelet-activating factor induces cell cycle arrest and disrupts the DNA damage response in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Puebla-Osorio, N; Damiani, E; Bover, L; Ullrich, S E

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid modulator of inflammation that has diverse physiological and pathological functions. Previously, we demonstrated that PAF has an essential role in ultraviolet (UV)-induced immunosuppression and reduces the repair of damaged DNA, suggesting that UV-induced PAF is contributing to skin cancer initiation by inducing immune suppression and also affecting a proper DNA damage response. The exact role of PAF in modulating cell proliferation, differentiation or transformation is unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) by which PAF affects the cell cycle and impairs early DNA damage response. PAF arrests proliferation in transformed and nontransformed human mast cells by reducing the expression of cyclin-B1 and promoting the expression of p21. PAF-treated cells show a dose-dependent cell cycle arrest mainly at G2–M, and a decrease in the DNA damage response elements MCPH1/BRIT-1 and ataxia telangiectasia and rad related (ATR). In addition, PAF disrupts the localization of p-ataxia telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), and phosphorylated-ataxia telangiectasia and rad related (p-ATR) at the site of DNA damage. Whereas the potent effect on cell cycle arrest may imply a tumor suppressor activity for PAF, the impairment of proper DNA damage response might implicate PAF as a tumor promoter. The outcome of these diverse effects may be dependent on specific cues in the microenvironment. PMID:25950475

  18. Terpenoids inhibit Candida albicans growth by affecting membrane integrity and arrest of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Jadhav, Sitaram; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-10-15

    Anti-Candida potential of six terpenoids were evaluated in this study against various isolates of Candida albicans (n=39) and non-C. albicans (n=9) that are differentially susceptible to fluconazole. All the six terpenoids tested, showed excellent activity and were equally effective against isolates of Candida sps., tested in this study. Linalool and citral were the most effective ones, inhibiting all the isolates at ≤0.064% (v/v). Five among the six terpenoids tested were fungicidal. Time dependent kill curve assay showed that MFCs of linalool and eugenol were highly toxic to C. albicans, killing 99.9% inoculum within seven min of exposure, while that of citronellal, linalyl acetate and citral required 15min, 1h and 2h, respectively. FIC index values (Linalool - 0.140, benzyl benzoate - 0.156, eugenol - 0.265, citral - 0.281 and 0.312 for linalyl acetate and citronellal) and isobologram obtained by checker board assay showed that all the six terpenoids tested exhibit excellent synergistic activity with fluconazole against a fluconazole resistant strain of C. albicans. Terpenoids tested arrested C. albicans cells at different phases of the cell cycle i.e. linalool and LA at G1, citral and citronellal at S phase and benzyl benzoate at G2-M phase and induced apoptosis. Linalool, citral, citronellal and benzyl benzoate caused more than 50% inhibition of germ tube induction at 0.008%, while eugenol and LA required 0.032 and 0.016% (v/v) concentrations, respectively. MICs of all the terpenoids for the C. albicans growth were non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested exhibited excellent activity against C. albicans yeast and hyphal form growth at the concentrations that are non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested in this study may find use in antifungal chemotherapy, not only as antifungal agents but also as synergistic agents along with conventional drugs like fluconazole.

  19. Benzylidenetetralones, cyclic chalcone analogues, induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Drutovic, David; Chripkova, Martina; Pilatova, Martina; Kruzliak, Peter; Perjesi, Pal; Sarissky, Marek; Lupi, Monica; Damia, Giovanna; Broggini, Massimo; Mojzis, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the world, with 1.2 million new cancer cases annually. Chalcones are secondary metabolite precursors of flavonoids that exhibit diverse biological activities, including antioxidant and antitumor activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the antiproliferative effect of new synthetic chalcone derivatives on HCT116 cells. (E)-2-(2',4'-dimethoxybenzylidene)-1-tetralone (Q705) was found to be the most active (IC50 = 3.44 ± 0.25 μM). Based on these results, this compound was chosen for further analysis of its biochemical and molecular mechanisms. Our results showed that Q705 inhibited the growth and clonogenicity of HCT116 cells. The results of a flow cytometric analyses suggested that this compound caused a significant cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and increased the proportion of cells in the subG0/G1 phase, marker of apoptosis. Q705-induced apoptosis was confirmed by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay. Treatment of HCT116 cells with this chalcone significantly increased the caspase-3,-7 activity and resulted in cleavage of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Changes in the nuclear morphology such as chromatin condensation were also observed. These effects were associated with a decreased expression of bcl-xL and increased overall ratio of bax/bcl-xL mRNA levels. Immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR analysis revealed that Q705 induced H2AX histone modifications characteristic of DNA damage, disruption of microtubule organization and downregulation of tubulins. In summary, these results suggest that the cyclic chalcone analogue Q705 has potential as a new compound for colorectal cancer therapy.

  20. A novel nucleolar protein, PAPA-1, induces growth arrest as a result of cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Taruho S; Maita, Hiroshi; Tabata, Takanori; Taira, Takahiro; Kitaura, Hirotake; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2004-09-29

    We have identified a novel nucleolar protein, PAP-1-associated protein-1 (PAPA-1), after screening the interacting proteins with Pim-1-associated protein-1 (PAP-1), a protein that is a phosphorylation target of Pim-1 kinase. PAPA-1 comprises 345 amino acids with a basic amino-acid cluster. PAPA-1 was found to be localized in the nucleolus in transfected HeLa cells, and the lysine/histidine cluster was essential for nucleolar localization of PAPA-1. PAPA-1 protein and mRNA expression decreased upon serum restimulation of starvation-synchronized cells, which displayed maximum level of PAPA-1 expression at G0 and early G1 phase of the cell cycle. Ectopic expression of PAPA-1 induced growth suppression of cells, and the effect was dependent on its nucleolar localization in established HeLa cell lines that inducibly express PAPA-1 or its deletion mutant under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter. Furthermore, when PAPA-1-inducible HeLa cells were synchronized by thymidine, colcemid or mimosine, and then PAPA-1 was expressed, the proportion of cells at the G1 phase was obviously increased. These results suggest that PAPA-1 induces growth and cell cycle arrests at the G1 phase of the cell cycle.

  1. Indole-3-carbinol induces G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through aryl hydrocarbon receptor in THP-1 monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Saeed; Seyedhosseini, Fakhri Sadat; Behnampour, Nasser; Yazdani, Yaghoub

    2017-10-01

    The role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in carcinogenesis has been studied recently. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) is an AhR agonist and a potential anticancer agent. Here, we investigated the effects of I3C on cell cycle progression and apoptosis through activation of AhR on THP-1 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell line. MTT viability assay was used to measure the cytotoxic effects of I3C on THP-1 cells. Apoptosis and cell cycle assays were investigated using flow cytometry. Real time RT-PCR was conducted to measure the alterations in the expression of AhR gene, key genes associated with AhR activation (IL1β and CYP1A1) and major genes involved in cell cycle regulation and apoptosis including P27, P21, CDK2, P53, BCL2 and FasR. Our findings revealed that I3C inhibits the proliferation of THP-1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with minimal toxicity over normal monocytes. The AhR target genes (CYP1A1, IL1β) were overexpressed upon I3C treatment (p < .05 to p < .001). The antiproliferative effects of I3C were in association with programed cell death. I3C downregulated BCL2 and upregulated FasR in THP-1 cells (p < .05 to p < .001). G1 cell cycle arrest was also observed using flow cytometry. G1-acting cell cycle genes (P21, P27 and P53) were overexpressed (p < .05 to p < .001), while CDK2 was downregulated upon I3C treatment (p < .01 to p < .001). I3C could exert its antileukemic effects through AhR activation which is associated with programed cell death and G1 cell cycle arrest in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Therefore, AhR could be targeted as a novel treatment possibility in AML.

  2. Ethanol extract of Innotus obliquus (Chaga mushroom) induces G1 cell cycle arrest in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Inonotus obliquus (I. obliquus, Chaga mushroom) has long been used as a folk medicine to treat cancer. In the present study, we examined whether or not ethanol extract of I. obliquus (EEIO) inhibits cell cycle progression in HT-29 human colon cancer cells, in addition to its mechanism of action. MATERIALS/METHODS To examine the effects of Inonotus obliquus on the cell cycle progression and the molecular mechanism in colon cancer cells, HT-29 human colon cancer cells were cultured in the presence of 2.5 - 10 µg/mL of EEIO, and analyzed the cell cycle arrest by flow cytometry and the cell cycle controlling protein expression by Western blotting. RESULTS Treatment cells with 2.5 - 10 µg/mL of EEIO reduced viable HT-29 cell numbers and DNA synthesis, increased the percentage of cells in G1 phase, decreased protein expression of CDK2, CDK4, and cyclin D1, increased expression of p21, p27, and p53, and inhibited phosphorylation of Rb and E2F1 expression. Among I. obliquus fractions, fraction 2 (fractionated by dichloromethane from EEIO) showed the same effect as EEIO treatment on cell proliferation and cell cycle-related protein levels. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that fraction 2 is the major fraction that induces G1 arrest and inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting I. obliquus could be used as a natural anti-cancer ingredient in the food and/or pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25861415

  3. Preclinical Activity of Simvastatin Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in G1 via Blockade of Cyclin D-Cdk4 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu-Wei; Chang, Chi-Chang; Hung, Chao-Ming; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Huang, Tzuu-Yuan; Hsu, Yi-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death. Nonetheless, a decrease in overall incidence and mortality has been observed in the last 30 years due to prevention strategies and improvements in the use of chemotherapeutic agents. In recent studies, Simvastatin (SIM) has demonstrated anti-tumor activity, as well as potent chemopreventive action. As an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA), SIM has been shown to stimulate apoptotic cell death. In this study, an MTT assay revealed the cytotoxic activity of SIM against human large cell lung cancer (Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC) cells (NCI-H460); however, induced apoptosis was not observed in NCI-H460 cells. Protein expression levels of cell cycle regulating proteins Cdk4, Cyclin D1, p16 and p27 were markedly altered by SIM. Collectively, our results indicate that SIM inhibits cell proliferation and arrests NCI-H460 cell cycle progression via inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases and cyclins and the enhancement of CDK inhibitors p16 and p27. Our findings suggest that, in addition to the known effects on hypercholesterolemia therapy, SIM may also provide antitumor activity in established NSCLC. PMID:23481641

  4. 7-Epiclusianone, a Benzophenone Extracted from Garcinia brasiliensis (Clusiaceae), Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in G1/S Transition in A549 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ionta, Marisa; Ferreira-Silva, Guilherme A; Niero, Evandro L; Costa, Éderson D'Martin; Martens, Adam A; Rosa, Welton; Soares, Marisi G; Machado-Santelli, Gláucia M; Lago, João Henrique G; Santos, Marcelo H

    2015-07-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. Disease stage is the most relevant factor influencing mortality. Unfortunately, most patients are still diagnosed at an advanced stage and their five-year survival rate is only 4%. Thus, it is relevant to identify novel drugs that can improve the treatment options for lung cancer. Natural products have been an important source for the discovery of new compounds with pharmacological potential including antineoplastic agents. We have previously isolated a prenylated benzophenone (7-epiclusianone) from Garcinia brasiliensis (Clusiaceae) that has several biological properties including antiproliferative activity against cancer cell lines. In continuation with our studies, the present work aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved with antiproliferative activity of 7-epiclusianone in A549 cells. Our data showed that 7-epiclusianone reduced the viability of A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 16.13 ± 1.12 μM). Cells were arrested in G1/S transition and apoptosis was induced. In addition, we observed morphological changes with cytoskeleton disorganization in consequence of the treatment. Taken together, the results showed that cell cycle arrest in G1/S transition is the main mechanism involved with antiproliferative activity of 7-epiclusianone. Our results are promising and open up the prospect of using this compound in further anticancer in vivo studies.

  5. Anti-proliferative of physcion 8-O-β-glucopyranoside isolated from Rumex japonicus Houtt. on A549 cell lines via inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi-Chao; Yang, Yu-Peng

    2014-10-06

    Lung cancers are leading causes of cancer death, and Rumex japonicus has been traditionally used in folk medicine as anti-microorganic, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agents. This study was designed to investigate the anti-proliferative activity of physcion 8-O-β-glucopyranoside (PG) isolated from Rumex japonicus Houtt. on A549 cell lines. In our present study, PG was isolated and identified from the ethanol extracts of R. japonicus. MTT method was used to evaluate the anti-proliferative activity of PG on A549 cell lines, and cell cycle distribution assay, apoptosis assay, and western blot analysis in vitro were used to explore the possible mechanisms. From the results of our present study, cell viability was obviously inhibited by PG, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Our results also suggested that the anti-proliferative effect of PG was related to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase through repression of cdc2 and Cyclin B1 protein expression. In addition, the results of apoptosis assay and western blot analysis indicated that the anti-proliferative activity could be related to apoptosis via up-regulating the expressions of Bax, caspase-3 and caspase-7, and down-regulating the expressions of Bcl-2. In conclusion, the PG has significant anti-proliferative activity on A549 cell lines, and the possible mechanism was related to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, and apoptosis via the regulations of Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3 and caspase-7.

  6. 25-O-acetyl-23,24-dihydro-cucurbitacin F induces cell cycle G2/M arrest and apoptosis in human soft tissue sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lohberger, Birgit; Kretschmer, Nadine; Bernhart, Eva; Rinner, Beate; Stuendl, Nicole; Kaltenegger, Heike; Kahl, Stefan; Bauer, Rudolf; Leithner, Andreas

    2015-04-22

    Quisqualis indica is used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat cancer and related syndromes and also known for its anthelminthic effects. Soft tissue sarcomas represent a rare group of malignant tumors that frequently exhibit chemotherapeutic resistance and increased metastatic potential. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic, apoptosis inducing and cell cycle arresting effects of 25-O-acetyl-23,24-dihydro-cucurbitacin F which has been isolated from leaves and twigs of Q. indica. The present study investigates the effects of 25-O-acetyl-23,24-dihydro-cucurbitacin F (1) on cell viability, cell cycle distribution, and apoptotic induction of three human sarcoma cell lines of various origins by using the CellTiter 96(®) AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay, flow cytometrical experiments, real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting, and the Caspase-Glo(®) 3/7 Assay We could show that 1 reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner and arrested the cells at the G2/M interface. The accumulation of cells at the G2/M phase resulted in a significant decrease of the cell cycle checkpoint regulators cyclin B1, cyclin A, CDK1, and CDK2. Interestingly, 1 inhibited survivin expression significantly, which functions as a key regulator of mitosis and programmed cell death, and is overexpressed in many tumor types including sarcomas. Moreover, 1 induced apoptosis in liposarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma cells caspase-3 dependently. Our data strongly support 1 as a very interesting target for further investigation and development of novel therapeutics in sarcoma research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Aloe-emodin induced in vitro G2/M arrest of cell cycle in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, H C; Hsieh, W T; Chang, W C; Chung, J G

    2004-08-01

    In this study, we have evaluated the chemopreventive role of aloe-emodin in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells in vitro by studying the regulation of proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis. Aloe-emodin inhibited cell proliferation and induced G2/M arrest and apoptosis in HL-60 cells. Investigation of the levels of cyclins B1, E and A by immunoblot analysis showed that cyclin E level was unaffected, whereas cyclin B1 and A levels increased with aloe-emodin in HL-60 cells. Investigation of the levels of cyclin-dependent kinases, Cdk1 and 2, showed increased levels of Cdk1 but the levels of Cdk2 were not effected with aloe-emodin in HL-60 cells. The levels of p27 were increased after HL-60 cells were cotreated with various concentrations of aloe-emodin. The increase of the levels of p27 may be the major factor for aloe-emodin to cause G2/M arrest in these examined cells. Flow cytometric assays and DNA fragmentation gel electrophoresis also confirmed aloe-emodin induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. The levels of caspase-3 were increased after HL-60 cells were cotreated with 10 microM aloe-emodin for 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Taken together, aloe-emodin therefore appears to exert its anticarcinogenesis properties by inhibiting proliferation and inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis underwent activation of caspase-3 in human leukemia HL-60 cells.

  8. Tryptone-stabilized gold nanoparticles target tubulin and inhibit cell viability by inducing an unusual form of cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Mahaddalkar, Tejashree; Mehta, Sourabh; Cheriyamundath, Sanith; Muthurajan, Harries; Lopus, Manu

    2017-09-05

    Gold nanoparticles have been investigated extensively for their molecular mechanisms of action and anticancer potential. We report a novel, tubulin-targeted antiproliferative mechanism of action of tryptone-stabilized gold nanoparticles (TsAuNPs). TsAuNPs, synthesized using HAuCl4·3H2O and tryptone and characterized by a variety of spectroscopic methods and transmission electron microscopy, were found to be inhibitory to viability of human pancreatic (PANC-1), cervical (HeLa), and breast (MDA-MB-231) cancer cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner, with highest efficacy against PANC-1 cells. The particles strongly inhibited the clonogenic propagation of PANC-1 cells. TsAuNPs-mediated inhibition of cell viability involved an unusual mode of cell cycle arrest (arrest at both G0/G1 phase and S-phase) followed by apoptosis. In vitro, TsAuNPs bound purified tubulin, competitively inhibited anilinonaphthalene sulfonate binding to tubulin, and suppressed tubulin assembly. In cells, tubulin-TsAuNPs interactions were manifested as a disrupted microtubule network, defective reassembly of cold-disassembled microtubules, and induction of tubulin acetylation. Our data indicate that TsAuNPs inhibit cell viability by inducing differential cell cycle arrest possibly through disrupted dynamicity of cellular microtubules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Resveratrol inhibits oral squamous cell carcinoma through induction of apoptosis and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Jing-Lei; Zhang, Wan-Lin; Liu, Dong-Xu

    2016-03-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effect of resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) present as a natural phytoalexin in grapes, peanuts, and red wine on oral squamous cancer cell lines, SCC-VII, SCC-25, and YD-38. MTS assay and flow cytometry, respectively, were used for the analysis of inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Western blot analysis was performed to examine the effect of resveratrol on the expression of proteins associated with cell cycle regulation. The results revealed a concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of proliferation in all the three tested cell lines on treatment with resveratrol. The IC50 of resveratrol for SCC-VII, SCC-25, and YD-38 cell lines was found to be 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0 μg/ml, respectively, after 48-h treatment. Examination of the cell cycle analysis showed that resveratrol treatment induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and enhanced the expression of phospho-cdc2 (Tyr 15), cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 in the oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. It also caused a marked increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells as revealed by the fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Thus, resveratrol exhibits inhibitory effect on the proliferation of OSCC oral cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest.

  10. Rhizoma Paridis Saponins Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma A549 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jue; Yang, Yixi; Lei, Lei; Tian, Mengliang

    2015-01-01

    Background As a traditional Chinese medicine herb, Chonglou (Paris polyphylla var. chinensis) has been used as anticancer medicine in China in recent decades, as it can induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in numerous cancer cells. The saponins extract from the rhizoma of Chonglou [Rhizoma Paridis saponins (RPS)] is known as the main active component for anticancer treatment. However, the molecular mechanism of the anticancer effect of RPS is unknown. Material/Methods The present study evaluated the effect of RPS in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cells using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) -2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry. Subsequently, the expression of several genes associated with cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Results RPS was revealed to inhibit cell growth, causing a number of cells to accumulate in the G 1 phase of the cell cycle, leading to apoptosis. In addition, the effect was dose-dependent. Moreover, the results of qRT-PCR and Western blotting showed that p53 and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) were significantly downregulated, and that BCL2, BAX, and p21 were upregulated, by RPS treatment. Conclusions We speculated that the RPS could act on a pathway, including p53, p21, BCL2, BAX, and CDK2, and results in G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in NSCLC cells. PMID:26311066

  11. Thoc1 inhibits cell growth via induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jianmei; Zou, Shitao; Hu, Mengshang; Zhu, Ran; Xu, Jiaying; Jiao, Yang; Fan, Saijun

    2014-06-01

    THO complex 1 (Thoc1) is a human nuclear matrix protein that binds to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein (pRb). While some studies suggest that Thoc1 has characteristics of a tumor suppressor protein, whether Thoc1 can inhibit lung cancer cell growth is not clear. In the present study, we observed that Thoc1 is lowly expressed in the lung cancer cell lines SPC-A1 and NCI-H1975. Then, we investigated the potential effects of Thoc1 on lung cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis after stable transfection of these lines with a Thoc1 expression vector. We found that overexpression of Thoc1 can inhibit cell proliferation, induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and promote apoptosis. Further investigation indicated that overexpression of Thoc1 is involved in the inhibition of cell cycle-related proteins cyclin A1 and B1 and of pro-apoptotic factors Bax and caspase-3. In vivo experiments showed that tumors overexpressing Thoc1 display a slower growth rate than the control xenografts and show reduced expression of the protein Ki-67, which localized on the nuclear membrane. Taken together, our data show that in lung cancer cells, Thoc1 inhibits cell growth through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These results indicate that Thoc1 may be used as a novel therapeutic target for human lung cancer treatment.

  12. In Vitro Anti-Neuroblastoma Activity of Thymoquinone Against Neuro-2a Cells via Cell-cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, Arumugam; Raghunandhakumar, Subramanian; Priyadharsini, Jayaseelan Vijayashree; Jayaraman, Gopalswamy

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that thymoquinone (TQ) has a potent cytotoxic effect and induces apoptosis via caspase-3 activation with down-regulation of XIAP in mouse neuroblastoma (Neuro-2a) cells. Interestingly, our results showed that TQ was significantly more cytotoxic towards Neuro-2a cells when compared with primary normal neuronal cells. In this study, the effects of TQ on cell-cycle regulation and the mechanisms that contribute to this effect were investigated using Neuro-2a cells. Cell-cycle analysis performed by flow cytometry revealed cell-cycle arrest at G2/M phase and a significant increase in the accumulation of TQ-treated cells at sub-G1 phase, indicating induction of apoptosis by the compound. Moreover, TQ increased the expression of p53, p21 mRNA and protein levels, whereas it decreased the protein expression of PCNA, cyclin B1 and Cdc2 in a dose- dependent manner. Our finding suggests that TQ could suppress cell growth and cell survival via arresting the cell-cycle in the G2/M phase and inducing apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells.

  13. Kefir induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in HTLV-1-negative malignant T-lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Katia; Baydoun, Elias; Rizk, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adult lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignancy that occurs in white blood cells. The overall cure rate in children is 85%, whereas it is only 40% in adults. Kefir is an important probiotic that contains many bioactive ingredients, which give it unique health benefits. It has been shown to control several cellular types of cancer. Purpose: The present study investigates the effect of a cell-free fraction of kefir on CEM and Jurkat cells, which are human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1)-negative malignant T-lymphocytes. Methods: Cells were incubated with different kefir concentrations. The cytotoxicity of the compound was evaluated by determining the percentage viability of cells. The effect of all the noncytotoxic concentrations of kefir on the proliferation of CEM and Jurkat cells was then assessed. The levels of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α), transforming growth factor- beta1 (TGF-β1), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and MMP-9 mRNA upon kefir treatment were then analyzed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Finally, the growth inhibitory effects of kefir on cell-cycle progression/apoptosis were assessed by Cell Death Detection (ELISA) and flow cytometry. Results: The maximum cytotoxicity recorded after 48-hours treatment with 80 μg/μL kefir was only 42% and 39% in CEM and Jurkat cells, respectively. The percent reduction in proliferation was very significant, and was dose-, and time-dependent. In both cell lines, kefir exhibited its antiproliferative effect by downregulating TGF-α and upregulating TGF-β1 mRNA expression. Upon kefir treatment, a marked increase in cell-cycle distribution was noted in the preG1 phase of CEM and Jurkat cells, indicating the proapoptotic effect of kefir, which was further confirmed by Cell Death Detection ELISA. However, kefir did not affect the mRNA expression of metalloproteinases needed for the invasion of leukemic cell lines. Conclusion: In conclusion, kefir is

  14. Kefir induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in HTLV-1-negative malignant T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Maalouf, Katia; Baydoun, Elias; Rizk, Sandra

    2011-02-14

    Adult lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignancy that occurs in white blood cells. The overall cure rate in children is 85%, whereas it is only 40% in adults. Kefir is an important probiotic that contains many bioactive ingredients, which give it unique health benefits. It has been shown to control several cellular types of cancer. The present study investigates the effect of a cell-free fraction of kefir on CEM and Jurkat cells, which are human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1)-negative malignant T-lymphocytes. Cells were incubated with different kefir concentrations. The cytotoxicity of the compound was evaluated by determining the percentage viability of cells. The effect of all the noncytotoxic concentrations of kefir on the proliferation of CEM and Jurkat cells was then assessed. The levels of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α), transforming growth factor- beta1 (TGF-β1), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and MMP-9 mRNA upon kefir treatment were then analyzed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Finally, the growth inhibitory effects of kefir on cell-cycle progression/apoptosis were assessed by Cell Death Detection (ELISA) and flow cytometry. The maximum cytotoxicity recorded after 48-hours treatment with 80 μg/μL kefir was only 42% and 39% in CEM and Jurkat cells, respectively. The percent reduction in proliferation was very significant, and was dose-, and time-dependent. In both cell lines, kefir exhibited its antiproliferative effect by downregulating TGF-α and upregulating TGF-β1 mRNA expression. Upon kefir treatment, a marked increase in cell-cycle distribution was noted in the preG(1) phase of CEM and Jurkat cells, indicating the proapoptotic effect of kefir, which was further confirmed by Cell Death Detection ELISA. However, kefir did not affect the mRNA expression of metalloproteinases needed for the invasion of leukemic cell lines. In conclusion, kefir is effective in inhibiting proliferation and inducing

  15. Telomerase Cajal body protein 1 depletion inhibits telomerase trafficking to telomeres and induces G1 cell cycle arrest in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ping; Wang, Zhitian; Lv, Wang; Pan, Hui; Yang, Yunhai; Yuan, Xiaoshuai; Hu, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Telomerase Cajal body protein 1 (TCAB1) is a telomerase holoenzyme, which is markedly enriched in Cajal bodies (CBs) and facilitates the recruitment of telomerase to CBs in the S phase of the cell cycle. This recruitment is dependent on TCAB1 binding to a telomerase RNA component. The majority of cancer cells are able to grow indefinitely due to telomerase and its mechanism of trafficking to telomeres. In the present study, a certain level of TCAB1 expression in A549 human lung cells was identified and TCAB1 knockdown exhibited a potent antiproliferative effect on these cells, which was coupled with a decrease in the cell density and activity of the cellular enzymes. In addition, TCAB1-depletion was demonstrated to inhibit telomerase trafficking to telomeres in the A549 cells, leading to subsequent G1 cell cycle arrest without inducing apoptotic cell death. Overall, these observations indicated that TCAB1 may be essential for A549 cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation, and may be a potential candidate for the development of a therapeutic target for lung adenocarcinomas.

  16. Kelussia odoratissima Mozaff. activates intrinsic pathway of apoptosis in breast cancer cells associated with S phase cell cycle arrest via involvement of p21/p27 in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Karimian, Hamed; Arya, Aditya; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Razavi, Mahboubeh; Hajrezaei, Maryam; Karim Khan, Ataul; Mohd Ali, Hapipah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Noordin, Mohamad Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticancer potential of Kelussia odoratissima. Several in vitro and in vivo biological assays were applied to explore the direct effect of an extract and bioactive compound of this plant against breast cancer cells and its possible mechanism of action. Materials and methods K. odoratissima methanol extract (KME) was prepared, and MTT assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity. To identify the cytotoxic compound, a bioassay-guided investigation was performed on methanol extract. 8-Hydroxy-ar-turmerone was isolated as a bioactive compound. In vivo study was performed in the breast cancer rat model. LA7 cell line was used to induce the breast tumor. Histopathological and expression changes of PCNA, Bcl-2, Bax, p27 and p21 and caspase-3 were examined. The induction of apoptosis was tested using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) assay. To confirm the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, caspase-7 and caspase-9 assays were utilized. In addition, cell cycle arrest was evaluated. Results Our results demonstrated that K. odoratissima has an obvious effect on the arrest of proliferation of cancer cells. It induced apoptosis, transduced the cell death signals, decreased the threshold of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), upregulated Bax and downregulated Bcl-2. Conclusion This study demonstrated that K. odoratissima exhibits antitumor activity against breast cancer cells via cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:28203057

  17. Tumor cell "dead or alive": caspase and survivin regulate cell death, cell cycle and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Shiraki, K

    2001-04-01

    Cell death and cell cycle progression are two sides of the same coin, and these two different phenomenons are regulated moderately to maintain the cellular homeostasis. Tumor is one of the disease states produced as a result of the disintegrated regulation and is characterized as cells showing an irreversible progression of cell cycle and a resistance to cell death signaling. Several investigations have been performed for the understanding of cell death or cell cycle, and cell death research has remarkably progressed in these 10 years. Caspase is a nomenclature referring to ICE/CED-3 cysteine proteinase family and plays a central role during cell death. Recently, several investigations raised some possible hypotheses that caspase is also involved in cell cycle regulation. In this issue, therefore, we review the molecular basis of cell death and cell cycle regulated by caspase in tumor, especially hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  18. Suppression of urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma cell by the ethanol extract of pomegranate fruit through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pomegranate possesses many medicinal properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammation and antitumor. It has been extensively used as a folk medicine by many cultures. Pomegranate fruit has been shown to have the inhibitory efficacy against prostate cancer and lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. It can be exploited in chemoprevention and chemotherapy of prostate cancer. In this study we examined the anti-cancer efficacy of pomegranate fruit grown in Taiwan against urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UBUC) and its mechanism of action. Methods Edible portion of Taiwanese pomegranate was extracted using ethanol and the anti-cancer effectiveness of ethanol extract was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry and western immunoblotting were exploited to uncover the molecular pathways underlying anti-UBUC activity of Taiwanese pomegranate ethanol extract. Results This study demonstrated that Taiwanese pomegranate fruit ethanol extract (PEE) could effectively restrict the proliferation of UBUC T24 and J82 cells. Cell cycle analyses indicated that the S phase arrest induced by PEE treatment might be caused by an increase in cyclin A protein level and a decrease in the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 1. The results of western immunoblotting demonstrated that PEE treatment could not only evoke the activation of pro-caspase-3, -8,-9 but also increase Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in T24 cells. The above observations implicated that PEE administration might trigger the apoptosis in T24 cells through death receptor signaling and mitochondrial damage pathway. Besides we found that PEE exposure to T24 cells could provoke intensive activation of procaspase-12 and enhance the expressions of CHOP and Bip, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker, suggesting that ER stress might be the cardinal apoptotic mechanism of PEE-induced inhibition of bladder cancer cell. Conclusions The analytical results of this study help to provide

  19. Ammodytoxin, a secretory phospholipase A2, inhibits G2 cell-cycle arrest in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Uros; Sribar, Jernej; Matis, Maja; Anderluh, Gregor; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Krizaj, Igor; Gubensek, Franc

    2005-10-15

    Ammodytoxin (Atx), an sPLA2 (secretory phospholipase A2), binds to g and e isoforms of porcine 14-3-3 proteins in vitro. 14-3-3 proteins are evolutionarily conserved eukaryotic regulatory proteins involved in a variety of biological processes, including cell-cycle regulation. We have now shown that Atx binds to yeast 14-3-3 proteins with an affinity similar to that for the mammalian isoforms. Thus yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used as a model eukaryotic cell, which lacks endogenous phospholipases A2, to assess the in vivo relevance of this interaction. Atx was expressed in yeast cells and shown to be biologically active inside the cells. It inhibited G2 cell-cycle arrest in yeast, which is regulated by 14-3-3 proteins. Interference with the cell cycle indicates a possible mechanism by which sPLA2s are able to cause the opposing effects, proliferation and apoptosis, in mammalian cells.

  20. Xanthones from the Leaves of Garcinia cowa Induce Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and Autophagy in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhengxiang; Zhang, Hong; Xu, Danqing; Lao, Yuanzhi; Fu, Wenwei; Tan, Hongsheng; Cao, Peng; Yang, Ling; Xu, Hongxi

    2015-06-19

    Two new xanthones, cowaxanthones G (1) and H (2), and 23 known analogues were isolated from an acetone extract of the leaves of Garcinia cowa. The isolated compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity against three cancer cell lines and immortalized HL7702 normal liver cells, whereby compounds 1, 5, 8, and 15-17 exhibited significant cytotoxicity. Cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry showed that 5 induced cell cycle arrest at the S phase in a dose-dependent manner, 1 and 16 at the G2/M phase, and 17 at the G1 phase, while 16 and 17 induced apoptosis. Moreover, autophagy analysis by GFP-LC3 puncta formation and western blotting suggested that 17 induced autophagy. Taken together, our results suggest that these xanthones possess anticancer activities targeting cell cycle, apoptosis, and autophagy signaling pathways.

  1. Cloning and sequence analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD9 gene and further evidence that its product is required for cell cycle arrest induced by DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Schiestl, R H; Reynolds, P; Prakash, S; Prakash, L

    1989-01-01

    Procaryotic and eucaryotic cells possess mechanisms for arresting cell division in response to DNA damage. Eucaryotic cells arrest division in the G2 stage of the cell cycle, and various observations suggest that this arrest is necessary to ensure the completion of repair of damaged DNA before the entry of cells into mitosis. Here, we provide evidence that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD9 gene, mutations of which confer sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, is necessary for the cell cycle arrest phenomenon. Our studies with the rad9 delta mutation show that RAD9 plays a role in the cell cycle arrest of methyl methanesulfonate-treated cells and is absolutely required for the cell cycle arrest in the temperature-sensitive cdc9 mutant, which is defective in DNA ligase. At the restrictive temperature, cell cycle progression of cdc9 cells is blocked sometime after the DNA chain elongation step, whereas cdc9 rad9 delta cells do not arrest at this point and undergo one or two additional divisions. Upon transfer from the restrictive to the permissive temperature, a larger proportion of the cdc9 cells than of the cdc9 rad9 delta cells forms viable colonies, indicating that RAD9-mediated cell cycle arrest allows for proper ligation of DNA breaks before the entry of cells into mitosis. The rad9 delta mutation does not affect the frequency of spontaneous or UV-induced mutation and recombination, suggesting that RAD9 is not directly involved in mutagenic or recombinational repair processes. The RAD9 gene encodes a transcript of approximately 4.2 kilobases and a protein of 1,309 amino acids of Mr 148,412. We suggest that RAD9 may be involved in regulating the expression of genes required for the transition from G2 to mitosis. Images PMID:2664461

  2. High fat diet triggers cell cycle arrest and excessive apoptosis of granulosa cells during the follicular development

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yanqing; Zhang, Zhenghong; Liao, Xinghui; Wang, Zhengchao

    2015-10-23

    The regulatory mechanism of granulosa cells (GCs) proliferation during the follicular development is complicated and multifactorial, which is essential for the oocyte growth and normal ovarian functions. To investigate the role of high fat diet (HFD) on the proliferation of GCs, 4-week old female mice were fed with HFD or normal control diet (NC) for 15 weeks or 20 weeks and then detected the expression level of some regulatory molecules of cell cycle and apoptosis. The abnormal ovarian morphology was observed at 20 weeks. Further mechanistic studies indicated that HFD induced-obesity caused elevated apoptotic levels in GCs of the ovaries in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, cell cycle progress was also impacted after HFD fed. The cell cycle inhibitors, p27{sup Kip1} and p21{sup Cip1}, were significantly induced in the ovaries from the mice in HFD group when compared with that in the ovaries from the mice in NC group. Subsequently, the expression levels of Cyclin D1, D3 and CDK4 were also significantly influenced in the ovaries from the mice fed with HFD in a time-dependent manner. The present results suggested that HFD induced-obesity may trigger cell cycle arrest and excessive apoptosis of GCs, causing the abnormal follicular development and ovarian function failure. - Highlights: • HFD induced-obesity leads to abnormal ovarian morphology. • HFD induced-obesity triggers excessive apoptosis in the ovary. • HFD induced-obesity up-regulates cell cycle inhibitors p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} in the ovary. • HFD induced-obesity causes cell cycle arrest in the ovary.

  3. Disease and Carrier Isolates of Neisseria meningitidis Cause G1 Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    von Papen, Michael; Oosthuysen, Wilhelm F.; Becam, Jérôme; Claus, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Microbial pathogens have developed several mechanisms to modulate and interfere with host cell cycle progression. In this study, we analyzed the effect of the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis on the cell cycle of epithelial cells. Two pathogenic isolates, as well as two carrier isolates, were tested for their ability to adhere to and invade into the epithelial cell lines Detroit 562 and NP69 and to modulate the cell cycle. We found that all isolates adhered equally well to both Detroit 562 and NP69 cells, whereas the carrier isolates were significantly less invasive. Using propidium iodide staining and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine pulse-labeling, we provide evidence that meningococcal infection arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle at 24 h postinfection. In parallel, a significant decrease of cells in the S phase was observed. Interestingly, G1-phase arrest was only induced after infection with live bacteria but not with heat-killed bacteria. By Western blotting we demonstrate that bacterial infection resulted in a decreased protein level of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, whereas cyclin E expression levels were increased. Furthermore, N. meningitidis infection induced an accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) p21WAF1/CIP1 that was accompanied by a redistribution of this CKI to the cell nucleus, as shown by immunofluorescence analysis. Moreover, the p27CIP1 CKI was redistributed and showed punctate foci in infected cells. In summary, we present data that N. meningitidis can interfere with the processes of host cell cycle regulation. PMID:27430269

  4. Mechanisms of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells induced by hybrid-compound histone deacetylase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Seiko; Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Takahashi, Osamu; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Nishino, Norikazu; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Ky-2, remarkably inhibits myeloma cell growth. •Ky-2 demonstrates no cytotoxicity against normal lymphocytic cells. •Ky-2 induces cell cycle arrest through the cell cycle-associated proteins. •Ky-2 induces Bcl-2-inhibitable apoptosis through a caspase-dependent cascade. -- Abstract: Objectives: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are new therapeutic agents, used to treat various types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ky-2, a hybrid-compound HDAC inhibitor, on the growth of mouse myeloma cells. Materials and methods: Myeloma cells, HS-72, P3U1, and mouse normal cells were used in this study. Effect of HDAC inhibitors on cell viability was determined by WST-assay and trypan blue assay. Cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometer. The expression of cell cycle regulatory and the apoptosis associated proteins were examined by Western blot analysis. Hoechst’s staining was used to detect apoptotic cells. Results: Our findings showed that Ky-2 decreased the levels of HDACs, while it enhanced acetylation of histone H3. Myeloma cell proliferation was inhibited by Ky-2 treatment. Interestingly, Ky-2 had no cytotoxic effects on mouse normal cells. Ky-2 treatment induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest and accumulation of a sub-G1 phase population, while Western blotting analysis revealed that expressions of the cell cycle-associated proteins were up-regulated. Also, Ky-2 enhanced the cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 in myeloma cells, followed by DNA fragmentation. In addition, Ky-2 was not found to induce apoptosis in bcl-2 overexpressing myeloma cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Ky-2 induces apoptosis via a caspase-dependent cascade and Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism in myeloma cells.

  5. Hexavalent chromium induces energy metabolism disturbance and p53-dependent cell cycle arrest via reactive oxygen species in L-02 hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang; Feng, Xiaotao; Zeng, Ming; Guan, Lan; Hu, Qingqing; Zhong, Caigao

    2012-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] has become a non-negligible pollutant in the world. Cr(VI) exposure leads to severe damage to the liver, but the mechanisms involved in Cr(VI)-mediated toxicity in the liver are unclear. The present study aimed to explore whether Cr(VI) induces energy metabolism disturbance and cell cycle arrest in human L-02 hepatocytes. We showed that Cr(VI) inhibited state 3 respiration, respiratory control rate (RCR), and subsequently induced energy metabolism disturbance with decreased ATP production. Interestingly, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry and protein expression analysis by western blotting revealed that low dose of Cr(VI) (4 uM) exposure induced S phase cell cycle arrest with decreased mediator of replication checkpoint 1 (Mrc1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), while higher doses of Cr(VI) (16, 32 uM) exposure resulted in G2/M phase arrest with decreased budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles-related 1 (BubR1) and cell division cycle 25 (CDC25). Mechanism study revealed that Cr(VI) decreased the activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (MRCC) I and II, thus leading to ROS accumulation. Moreover, inhibiting ROS production by antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) rescued Cr(VI)-induced ATP depletion and cell cycle arrest. ROS-mediated p53 activation was found to involve in Cr(VI)-induced cell cycle arrest, and p53 inhibitor Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) rescued Cr(VI)-induced reduction of check point proteins Mrc1 and BubR1, thus inhibiting cell cycle arrest. In summary, the present study provides experimental evidence that Cr(VI) leads to energy metabolism disturbance and p53-dependent cell cycle arrest via ROS in L-02 hepatocytes.

  6. Ligand modulation of a dinuclear platinum compound leads to mechanistic differences in cell cycle progression and arrest.

    PubMed

    Menon, Vijay R; Peterson, Erica J; Valerie, Kristoffer; Farrell, Nicholas P; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2013-12-15

    Despite similar structures and DNA binding profiles, two recently synthesized dinuclear platinum compounds are shown to elicit highly divergent effects on cell cycle progression. In colorectal HCT116 cells, BBR3610 shows a classical G2/M arrest with initial accumulation in S phase, but the derivative compound BBR3610-DACH, formed by introduction of the 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (DACH) as carrier ligand, results in severe G1/S as well as G2/M phase arrest, with nearly complete S phase depletion. The origin of this unique effect was studied. Cellular interstrand crosslinking as assayed by comet analysis was similar for both compounds, confirming previous in vitro results obtained on plasmid DNA. Immunoblotting revealed a stabilization of p53 and concomitant transient increases in p21 and p27 proteins after treatment with BBR3610-DACH. Cell viability assays and cytometric analysis of p53 and p21 null cells indicated that BBR3610-DACH-induced cell cycle arrest was p21-dependent and partially p53-dependent. However, an increase in the levels of cyclin E was observed with steady state levels of CDK2 and Cdc25A, suggesting that the G1 block occurs downstream of CDK/cyclin complex formation. The G2/M block was corroborated with decreased levels of cyclin A and cyclin B1. Surprisingly, BBR3610-DACH-induced G1 block was independent of ATM and ATR. Finally, both compounds induced apoptosis, with BBR3610-DACH showing a robust PARP-1 cleavage that was not associated with caspase-3/7 cleavage. In summary, BBR3610-DACH is a DNA binding platinum agent with unique inhibitory effects on cell cycle progression that could be further developed as a chemotherapeutic agent complementary to cisplatin and oxaliplatin.

  7. Nickel chloride (NiCl2) in hepatic toxicity: apoptosis, G2/M cell cycle arrest and inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongrui; Cui, Hengmin; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Zhao, Ling; Chen, Kejie; Deng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Up to now, the precise mechanism of Ni toxicology is still indistinct. Our aim was to test the apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and inflammatory response mechanism induced by NiCl2 in the liver of broiler chickens. NiCl2 significantly increased hepatic apoptosis. NiCl2 activated mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway by decreasing Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, and increasing Bax, Bak, caspase-3, caspase-9 and PARP mRNA expression. In the Fas-mediated apoptotic pathway, mRNA expression levels of Fas, FasL, caspase-8 were increased. Also, NiCl2 induced ER stress apoptotic pathway by increasing GRP78 and GRP94 mRNA expressions. The ER stress was activated through PERK, IRE1 and ATF6 pathways, which were characterized by increasing eIF2α, ATF4, IRE1, XBP1 and ATF6 mRNA expressions. And, NiCl2 arrested G2/M phase cell cycle by increasing p53, p21 and decreasing cdc2, cyclin B mRNA expressions. Simultaneously, NiCl2 increased TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 mRNA expressions through NF-κB activation. In conclusion, NiCl2 induces apoptosis through mitochondria, Fas and ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathways and causes cell cycle G2/M phase arrest via p53-dependent pathway and generates inflammatory response by activating NF-κB pathway. PMID:27824316

  8. Verbesina encelioides: cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest, and oxidative DNA damage in human liver cancer (HepG2) cell line.

    PubMed

    Al-Oqail, Mai M; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Al-Sheddi, Ebtesam S; Saquib, Quaiser; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Farshori, Nida N

    2016-05-10

    Cancer is a major health problem and exploiting natural products have been one of the most successful methods to combat this disease. Verbesina encelioides is a notorious weed with various pharmacological properties. The aim of the present investigation was to screen the anticancer potential of V. encelioides extract against human lung cancer (A-549), breast cancer (MCF-7), and liver cancer (HepG2) cell lines. A-549, MCF-7, and HepG2 cells were exposed to various concentrations of (10-1000 μg/ml) of V. encelioides for 24 h. Further, cytotoxic concentrations (250, 500, and 1000 μg/ml) of V. encelioides induced oxidative stress (GSH and LPO), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cell cycle arrest, and DNA damage in HepG2 cells were studied. The exposure of cells to 10-1000 μg/ml of extract for 24 h, revealed the concentrations 250-1000 μg/ml was cytotoxic against MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, but not against A-549 cells. Moreover, the extract showed higher decrease in the cell viability against HepG2 cells than MCF-7 cells. Therefore, HepG2 cells were selected for further studies viz. oxidative stress (GSH and LPO), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cell cycle arrest, and DNA damage. The results revealed differential anticancer activity of V. encelioides against A-549, MCF-7 and HepG2 cells. A significant induction of oxidative stress, ROS generation, and MMP levels was observed in HepG2 cells. The cell cycle analysis and comet assay showed that V. encelioides significantly induced G2/M arrests and DNA damage. These results indicate that V. encelioides possess substantial cytotoxic potential and may warrant further investigation to develop potential anticancer agent.

  9. Photodynamic therapy results in induction of WAF1/CIP1/P21 leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, N; Feyes, D K; Agarwal, R; Mukhtar, H

    1998-06-09

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising new modality that utilizes a combination of a photosensitizing chemical and visible light for the management of a variety of solid malignancies. The mechanism of PDT-mediated cell killing is not well defined. We investigated the involvement of cell cycle regulatory events during silicon phthalocyanine (Pc4)-PDT-mediated apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma cells A431. PDT resulted in apoptosis, inhibition of cell growth, and G0-G1 phase arrest of the cell cycle, in a time-dependent fashion. Western blot analysis revealed that PDT results in an induction of the cyclin kinase inhibitor WAF1/CIP1/p21, and a down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and their catalytic subunits cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 2 and cdk6. The treatment also resulted in a decrease in kinase activities associated with all the cdks and cyclins examined. PDT also resulted in (i) an increase in the binding of cyclin D1 and cdk6 toward WAF1/CIP1/p21, and (ii) a decrease in the binding of cyclin D1 toward cdk2 and cdk6. The binding of cyclin E and cdk2 toward WAF1/CIP1/p21, and of cyclin E toward cdk2 did not change by the treatment. These data suggest that PDT-mediated induction of WAF1/CIP1/p21 results in an imposition of artificial checkpoint at G1 --> S transition thereby resulting in an arrest of cells in G0-G1 phase of the cell cycle through inhibition in the cdk2, cdk6, cyclin D1, and cyclin E. We suggest that this arrest is an irreversible process and the cells, unable to repair the damages, ultimately undergo apoptosis.

  10. Induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HT-29 human colon cancer cells by the dietary compound luteolin.

    PubMed

    Lim, Do Y; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Tyner, Angela L; Park, Jung H Y

    2007-01-01

    Luteolin is 3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone found in celery, green pepper, and perilla leaf that inhibits tumorigenesis in animal models. We examined luteolin-mediated regulation of cell cycle progression and apoptosis in the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line. Luteolin decreased DNA synthesis and viable HT-29 cell numbers in a concentration-dependent manner. It inhibited cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4 and CDK2 activity, resulting in G1 arrest with a concomitant decrease of phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. Activities of CDK4 and CDK2 decreased within 2 h after luteolin treatment, with a 38% decrease in CDK2 activity (P < 0.05) observed in cells treated with 40 micromol/l luteolin. Luteolin inhibited CDK2 activity in a cell-free system, suggesting that it directly inhibits CDK2. Cyclin D1 levels decreased after luteolin treatment, although no changes in expression of cyclin A, cyclin E, CDK4, or CDK2 were detected. Luteolin also promoted G2/M arrest at 24 h posttreatment by downregulating cyclin B1 expression and inhibiting cell division cycle (CDC)2 activity. Luteolin promoted apoptosis with increased activation of caspases 3, 7, and 9 and enhanced poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and decreased expression of p21(CIP1/WAF1), survivin, Mcl-1, Bcl-x(L), and Mdm-2. Decreased expression of these key antiapoptotic proteins could contribute to the increase in p53-independent apoptosis that was observed in HT-29 cells. We demonstrate that luteolin promotes both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the HT-29 colon cancer cell line, providing insight about the mechanisms underlying its antitumorigenic activities.

  11. Extracts of centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A375 human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weina; Liu, Rui; Qi, Junpeng; Zhang, Yanmin

    2014-07-01

    Extracts from the centipede Scolopendra genus, have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various diseases and have been found to exhibit anticancer activity in tumor cells. To investigate the potential and associated antitumor mechanism of alcohol extracts of the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans (AECS), cell viability, cell cycle and cell apoptosis were studied and the results revealed that AECS inhibits A375 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, AECS was found to arrest the cell cycle of A375 cells at the S phase, which was accompanied by a marked increase in the protein levels of cyclin E and a decrease in the protein levels of cyclin D1. In a cell culture system, AECS markedly induced the apoptosis of A375 cells, which was closely associated with the effects on the Bcl-2 family, whereby decreased Bcl-2 and increased Bak, Bax and Bad expression levels were observed. The underlying mechanism of AECS inhibiting A375 cell proliferation was associated with the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, indicating that AECS may present as a potential therapeutic agent for administration in human melanoma cancer intervention.

  12. Troglitazone but not rosiglitazone induces G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human and rat hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bae, Myung-Ae; Rhee, Herman; Song, Byoung J

    2003-03-20

    Rosiglitazone (RSG), an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), induces minor toxicity in humans relative to another PPARgamma agonist, troglitazone (TRO). In contrast, recent reports suggest that RSG causes growth arrest and apoptosis of normal and cancerous cells. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the relative toxicities of TRO and RSG on three different hepatoma cell lines, and observed that TRO, but not RSG, was cytotoxic. Additionally, we studied the mechanism by which TRO induced damage to HepG2 hepatoma cells. Our results indicated that TRO increased the levels of p53, p27, and p21, while it reduced the levels of cyclin D1 and phospho-Rb in a time-dependent manner. Increased p27 and p21 levels coincided with reduced activities of cell cycle dependent kinases (cdk) such as cdk2- and cyclin A-protein kinases 24 h after TRO treatment. These results demonstrate that TRO, but not RSG, causes G1 arrest of hepatoma cells, most likely through changing the levels of cell cycle regulators. Furthermore, because RSG did not affect the levels of cell cycle regulators, TRO-mediated growth inhibition appears independent of PPARgamma activation.

  13. Honokiol, a chemopreventive agent against skin cancer, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human epidermoid A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Chilampalli, Chandeshwari; Guillermo, Ruth; Kaushik, Radhey S; Young, Alan; Chandrasekher, Gudiseva; Fahmy, Hesham; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2011-11-01

    Honokiol is a plant lignan isolated from bark and seed cones of Magnolia officinalis. Recent studies from our laboratory indicated that honokiol pretreatment decreased ultraviolet B-induced skin cancer development in SKH-1 mice. The aim of the present investigation was to study the effects of honokiol on human epidermoid squamous carcinoma A431 cells and to elucidate possible mechanisms involved in preventing skin cancer. A431 cells were pretreated with different concentrations of honokiol for a specific time period and investigated for effects on apoptosis and cell cycle analysis. Treatment with honokiol significantly decreased cell viability and cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Honokiol pretreatment at 50 μmol/L concentration induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest significantly (P < 0.05) and decreased the percentage of cells in the S and G2/M phase. Honokiol down-regulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D2, Cdk2, Cdk4 and Cdk6 proteins and up-regulated the expression of Cdk's inhibitor proteins p21 and p27. Pretreatment of A431 cells with honokiol leads to induction of apoptosis and DNA fragmentation. These findings indicate that honokiol provides its effects in squamous carcinoma cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis.

  14. Toona Sinensis and Moschus Decoction Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Cervical Carcinoma HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Hong; Zhang, Yifei; Fang, Zhijia; Huang, Zhiwei; Shi, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Toona sinensis and Moschus are two herb materials used in traditional Chinese medicine, most commonly for their various biological activities. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of three decoctions from Toona sinensis, Moschus, and Toona sinensis and Moschus in combination on cell growth in several normal and cancer cell lines by cell viability assay. The results showed that the combined decoction exhibited the strongest anticancer effects, compared to two single decoctions. The observations indicated that the combined decoction did not induce cell apoptosis and autophagy in HeLa cells by fluorescence microscopy. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the combined decoction arrested HeLa cell cycle progression in S-phase. After the decoction incubation, among 41 cell cycle related genes, eight were reduced, while five were increased in mRNA levels by real-time PCR assay. Western blotting showed that there were no apparent changes of protein levels of Cyclin E1, while P27 expression significantly declined and the levels of CDC7 and CDK7 obviously increased. The data suggest that the RB pathway is partially responsible for the decoction-induced S-phase cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. Therefore, the combined decoction may have therapeutic potential as an anticancer formula for certain cancers. PMID:24511319

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy induces cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis of glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioma stem cells in the quiescent state are resistant to clinical radiation therapy. An almost inevitable glioma recurrence is due to the persistence of these cells. The high linear energy transfer associated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) could kill quiescent and proliferative cells. Methods The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of BNCT on glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro. The damage induced by BNCT was assessed using cell cycle progression, apoptotic cell ratio and apoptosis-associated proteins expression. Results The surviving fraction and cell viability of glioma stem/progenitor cells were decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells using the same boronophenylalanine pretreatment and the same dose of neutron flux. BNCT induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, with changes in the expression of associated proteins. Conclusions Glioma stem/progenitor cells, which are resistant to current clinical radiotherapy, could be effectively killed by BNCT in vitro via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis using a prolonged neutron irradiation, although radiosensitivity of glioma stem/progenitor cells was decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells when using the same dose of thermal neutron exposure and boronophenylalanine pretreatment. Thus, BNCT could offer an appreciable therapeutic advantage to prevent tumor recurrence, and may become a promising treatment in recurrent glioma. PMID:23915425

  16. Classical swine fever virus Shimen infection increases p53 signaling to promote cell cycle arrest in porcine alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Pengbo; Hu, Congxia; Li, Xuepeng; Zhou, Yulu; Hu, Aoxue; Zhang, Ya; Gao, Lifang; Gong, Cunmei; Guo, Kangkang; Zhang, Xianghan; Zhang, Yanming

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) replicates in macrophages and causes persistent infection. Despite its role in disastrous economic losses in swine industries, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are poorly understood. The virus evades the neutralizing immune response, subverting the immune system to ensure its own survival and persistence. Our genome-wide analysis of porcine alveolar macrophage transcriptional responses to CSFV Shimen infection using the Solexa/Illumina digital gene expression system revealed that p53 pathway components and cell cycle molecules were differentially regulated during infection compared to controls. Further, we investigated the molecular changes in macrophages infected with CSFV Shimen, focusing on the genes involved in the p53 pathway. CSFV Shimen infection led to phosphorylation and accumulation of p53 in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, CSFV Shimen infection upregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21) mRNA and protein. In addition, CSFV Shimen infection induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, as well as downregulation of cyclin E1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). The expression of genes in the p53 pathway did not change significantly after p53 knockdown by pifithrin-α during CSFV Shimen infection. Our data suggest that CSFV Shimen infection increases expression of host p53 and p21, and inhibits expression of cyclin E1 and CDK2, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. CSFV may utilize this strategy to subvert the innate immune response and proliferate in host cells.

  17. Pfaffosidic Fraction from Hebanthe paniculata Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Caspase-3-Induced Apoptosis in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Cogliati, Bruno; Latorre, Andréia Oliveira; Akisue, Gokithi; Nagamine, Márcia Kazumi; Haraguchi, Mitsue; Hansen, Daiane; Sanches, Daniel Soares; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan

    2015-01-01

    Hebanthe paniculata roots (formerly Pfaffia paniculata and popularly known as Brazilian ginseng) show antineoplastic, chemopreventive, and antiproliferative properties. Functional properties of these roots and their extracts are usually attributed to the pfaffosidic fraction, which is composed mainly by pfaffosides A–F. However, the therapeutic potential of this fraction in cancer cells is not yet entirely understood. This study aimed to analyze the antitumoral effects of the purified pfaffosidic fraction or saponinic fraction on the human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line. Cellular viability, proliferation, and apoptosis were evaluated, respectively, by MTT assay, BrdU incorporation, activated caspase-3 immunocytochemistry, and DNA fragmentation assay. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry and the cell cycle-related proteins were analyzed by quantitative PCR and Western blot. The cells exposed to pfaffosidic fraction had reduced viability and cellular growth, induced G2/M at 48 h or S at 72 h arrest, and increased sub-G1 cell population via cyclin E downregulation, p27KIP1 overexpression, and caspase-3-induced apoptosis, without affecting the DNA integrity. Antitumoral effects of pfaffosidic fraction from H. paniculata in HepG2 cells originated by multimechanisms of action might be associated with cell cycle arrest in the S phase, by CDK2 and cyclin E downregulation and p27KIP1 overexpression, besides induction of apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. PMID:26075002

  18. Ellagic acid induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through TGF-β/Smad3 signaling pathway in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Sheng; Bai, Ming-Han; Zhang, Tao; Li, Guo-Dong; Liu, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women worldwide and preventive therapy could reverse or delay the devastating impact of this disease. Ellagic acid (EA), a dietary flavonoid polyphenol which is present in abundance in pomegranate, muscadine grapes, walnuts and strawberries, has been shown to inhibit cancer cells proliferation and induce apoptosis. Here, we investigated the growth inhibitory effects of EA on MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In the present study, we first found that EA inhibits the proliferation of MCF-7 breast cancer cells mainly mediated by arresting cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Moreover, gene expression profiling of MCF-7 breast cancer cell line treated with EA for 6, 12 and 24 h was performed using cDNA microarray. A total of 4,738 genes were found with a >2.0-fold change after 24 h of EA treatment. Among these genes, 2,547 were downregulated and 2,191 were upregulated. Furthermore, the changes of 16 genes, which belong to TGF-β/Smads signaling pathway, were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and/or western blot analysis. TGF-β/Smads signaling pathway was found as the potential molecular mechanism of EA to regulate breast cancer cell cycle arrest in vitro. Therefore, the regulation of TGF-β/Smads pathway in breast cancer cells could be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of patients with breast cancer. Further studies with in vitro models, as well as an analysis of additional human samples, are still needed to confirm the molecular mechanisms of EA in inhibition or prevention of breast cancer growth.

  19. Demographics and post-mortem toxicology findings in deaths among people arrested multiple times for use of illicit drugs and/or impaired driving.

    PubMed

    Ahlner, Johan; Holmgren, Anita; Jones, Alan Wayne

    2016-08-01

    Multiple arrests for use of illicit drugs and/or impaired driving strongly suggests the existence of a personality disorder and/or a substance abuse problem. This retrospective study (1993-2010) used a national forensic toxicology database (TOXBASE), and we identified 3943 individuals with two or more arrests for use of illicit drugs and/or impaired driving. These individuals had subsequently died from a fatal drug poisoning or some other cause of death, such as trauma. Of the 3943 repeat offenders 1807 (46%) died from a fatal drug overdose and 2136 (54%) died from other causes (p<0.001). The repeat offenders were predominantly male (90% vs 10%) and mean age of drug poisoning deaths was 5 y younger (mean 35 y) than other causes of death (mean 40 y). Significantly more repeat offenders (46%) died from drug overdose compared with all other forensic autopsies (14%) (p<0.001). Four or more drugs were identified in femoral blood in 44% of deaths from poisoning (drug overdose) compared with 18% of deaths by other causes (p<0.001). The manner of death was considered accidental in 54% of deaths among repeat offenders compared with 28% for other suspicious deaths (p<0.001). The psychoactive substances most commonly identified in autopsy blood from repeat offenders were ethanol, morphine (from heroin), diazepam, amphetamines, cannabis, and various opioids. This study shows that people arrested multiple times for use of illicit drugs and/or impaired driving are more likely to die by accidentally overdosing with drugs. Lives might be saved if repeat offenders were sentenced to treatment and rehabilitation for their drug abuse problem instead of conventional penalties for drug-related crimes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Abnormal serotonin receptor expression in DBA/2 mice associated with susceptibility to sudden death due to respiratory arrest.

    PubMed

    Uteshev, Victor V; Tupal, Srinivasan; Mhaskar, Yashanad; Faingold, Carl L

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies indicate that DBA/2 mice may be a useful model of human sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), since these mice exhibit generalized convulsive seizures followed by respiratory arrest (RA). Respiratory deficits, following generalized convulsive seizures, are observed prior to SUDEP in patients. RA that occurs in DBA/2 mice following sound-induced seizures can be prevented by treatments that activate serotonin (5-HT) receptors. 5-HT receptor subtypes in brainstem respiratory centers are important in regulating normal respiration. The present study compared the expression of 5-HT subtype receptor proteins in excised brainstem tissue, containing the rostral ventral medulla respiratory region in DBA/2 mice vs. seizure-resistant C57BL/6J mice, using Western blot analysis. The results indicate that expression of specific 5-HT(2C), 5-HT(3), and 5-HT(4) receptor proteins in the brainstem tissue of DBA/2 mice is significantly diminished, while expression of the 5-HT(2B) receptors is significantly enhanced as compared to C57BL/6J mice. No difference in expression of 5-HT transporter protein is seen. These findings suggest that the DBA/2 mice are susceptible to RA, in part, because of the altered expression of 5-HT receptors. Preliminary studies indicate that 5-HT(2C) receptors may be particularly important, since a 5-HT(2C) agonist is very effective in blocking RA in DBA/2 mice.

  1. Serotonin and sudden death: differential effects of serotonergic drugs on seizure-induced respiratory arrest in DBA/1 mice.

    PubMed

    Faingold, Carl L; Kommajosyula, Srinivasa P; Long, X; Plath, Kristin; Randall, Marcus

    2014-08-01

    In the DBA/1 mouse model of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), administration of a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluvoxamine, completely suppressed seizure-induced respiratory arrest (S-IRA) at 30 min after administration (i.p.) in a dose-related manner without blocking audiogenic seizures (AGSz), but another SSRI, paroxetine, reduced S-IRA but with a delayed (24 h) onset and significant toxicity. A serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine, reduced S-IRA incidence, but higher doses were ineffective. A selective 5-HT7 agonist, AS-19, was totally ineffective in reducing S-IRA. In developing DBA/1 mice that had not previously experienced AGSz, administration of a nonselective 5-HT antagonist, cyproheptadine, induced a significantly greater incidence of S-IRA than that of saline. This study confirms that certain drugs that enhance the activation of 5-HT receptors are able to prevent S-IRA, but not all serotonergic drugs are equally effective, which may be relevant to the potential use of these drugs for SUDEP prevention. Serotonergic antagonists may be problematic in patients with epilepsy.

  2. Is brain computed tomography combined with somatosensory evoked potentials useful in the prediction of brain death after cardiac arrest?

    PubMed

    Scarpino, Maenia; Lanzo, Giovanni; Lolli, Francesco; Moretti, Marco; Carrai, Riccardo; Migliaccio, Maria Luisa; Spalletti, Maddalena; Bonizzoli, Manuela; Peris, Adriano; Amantini, Aldo; Grippo, Antonello

    2017-09-01

    Brain death (BD) in coma after cardiac arrest (CA) is difficult to predict. Basal ganglia gray matter/white matter (GM/WM) ratio density and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) may differentiate patients evolving toward BD. We used SEPs and brain computed tomography (CT) after coma onset, within the first 24hours. Of the 160 patients included in the study, 22 (14%) evolved toward BD. SEP patterns predicted BD (ROC area=0.82, P<0.0001). The combination of SEP patterns, bilaterally absent (AA) and absent on one hemisphere and pathological on the other (AP), predicted BD with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 62.3%, with a positive likelihood ratio of 2.65. The GM/WM ratio predicted BD (ROC area=0.68, P=0.01). A GM/WM ratio <1.07 had a sensitivity of 30.4%, a specificity of 94.9%, and a positive likelihood ratio of 6.27. The combination of SEP and CT findings did not increase the prediction of BD. SEPs and brain CT within 24hours predicted BD after CA. Severe SEP findings (SEP patterns: AA, AP) identified a subset of patients in whom BD could occur. Brain CT (GM/WM ratio in basal ganglia) predicted an early evolution toward BD with high specificity but lower sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Induction of caspase-mediated apoptosis and cell-cycle G1 arrest by selenium metabolite methylselenol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zaisen; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2002-07-01

    Previous work based on mono-methyl selenium compounds that are putative precursors of methylselenol has strongly implicated this metabolite in the induction of caspase-mediated apoptosis of human prostate carcinoma and leukemia cells and G1 arrest in human vascular endothelial and cancer epithelial cells. To test the hypothesis that methylselenol itself is responsible for exerting these cellular effects, we examined the apoptotic action on DU145 human prostate cancer cells and the G1 arrest effect on the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) of methylselenol generated with seleno-L-methionine as a substrate for L-methionine-alpha-deamino-gamma-mercaptomethane lyase (EC4.4.1.11, also known as methioninase). Exposure of DU145 cells to methylselenol so generated in the sub-micromolar range led to caspase-mediated cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, nucleosomal DNA fragmentation, and morphologic apoptosis and resulted in a profile of biochemical effects similar to that of methylseleninic acid (MSeA) exposure as exemplified by the inhibition of phosphorylation of protein kinase AKT and extracellularly regulated kinases 1/2. In HUVEC, methylselenol exposure recapitulated the G1 arrest action of MSeA in mitogen-stimulated G1 progression during mid-G1 to late G1. This stage specificity was mimicked by inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. The results support methylselenol as an active selenium metabolite for inducing caspase-mediated apoptosis and cell-cycle G1 arrest. This cell-free methylselenol-generation system is expected to have significant usefulness for studying the biochemical and molecular targeting mechanisms of this critical metabolite and may constitute the basis of a novel therapeutic approach for cancer, using seleno-L-methionine as a prodrug. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Combined paclitaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil therapy enhances ionizing radiation effects, inhibits migration and induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Elias, Silvia Taveira; Borges, Gabriel Alvares; Rêgo, Daniela Fortunato; E Silva, Luis Felipe Oliveira; Avelino, Samuel; DE Matos Neto, João Nunes; Simeoni, Luiz Alberto; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2015-09-01

    Although taxels (in particular paclitaxel), cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy has been approved for use in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), little is known with regard to the cellular mechanisms of this novel drug association. In order to investigate the reaction of cells to this novel treatment, the present study aimed to examine the cytotoxic effect of TPF in HNSCC cell lines in combination with irradiation, to analyze its effect on cell cycle progression and cell death, and to evaluate its ability to alter cell migration. An MTT assay was used to determine cell viability following TPF and cisplatin treatments in two human HNSCC cell lines (FaDu and SCC-9) and one keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). The concurrent use of TPF or cisplatin and irradiation was also analyzed. Flow cytometric analysis was utilized to determine the cell cycle distribution and to verify the induction of apoptosis. The capacity of the drugs to alter oral cancer cell migration was also evaluated using a Transwell migration assay. The results indicated that TPF and cisplatin were cytotoxic to all cell lines, and enhanced the effects of ionizing radiation. FaDu cells were significantly more sensitive to the two treatments, and TPF was more cytotoxic than cisplatin for all cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TPF increased the number of cells in G0/G1 phase in the SCC-9 cell line, and indicated apoptotic cell death. The results of the Transwell assay demonstrated that TPF inhibited migration in oral carcinoma cell lines. The results of the present study indicated that TPF functions in oral carcinoma cell lines through the enhancement of ionizing radiation effects, inducing cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 and apoptosis, in addition to inhibiting migration.

  5. Extract of Saccharina japonica induces apoptosis companied by cell cycle arrest and endoplasmic reticulum stress in SK-Hep1 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Il Jung, Hyun; Jo, Mi Jeong; Kim, Hyung-Rak; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gun-Do

    2014-01-01

    Saccharina japonica is a family member of Phaeophyceae (brown macro-alga) and extensively cultivated in China, Japan and Korea. Here, the potential anti-cancer effect of n-hexane fraction of S. japonica was evaluated in SK-Hep1 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The N-hexane fraction reduced cell viability and increased the numbers of apoptotic cells in a both dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptosis was activated by both caspase-dependent and independent pathways. The caspase-dependent cell death pathway is mediated by cell surface death receptors and activated caspase-8 amplified the apoptotic signal either through direct activation of downstream caspase-3 or pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad, Bax and Bak) subsequently leading to the release of cytochrome c. On the other hand, caspase-independent apoptosis appeared mediated by disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and translocation of AIF to the nucleus where they induced chromatin condensation and/or large-scale DNA fragmentation. In addition, the n-hexane fraction induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress and cell cycle arrest. The results suggested that potential anti-cancer effects of n-hexane extract from S. japonica on SK-Hep1 cells.

  6. Pirarubicin inhibits multidrug-resistant osteosarcoma cell proliferation through induction of G2/M phase cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shui-er; Xiong, Sang; Lin, Feng; Qiao, Guang-lei; Feng, Tao; Shen, Zan; Min, Da-liu; Zhang, Chun-ling; Yao, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Pirarubicin (THP) is recently found to be effective in treating patients with advanced, relapsed or recurrent high-grade osteosarcoma. In this study, the effects of THP on the multidrug-resistant (MDR) osteosarcoma cells were assessed, and the underlying mechanisms for the disruption of cell cycle kinetics by THP were explored. Methods: Human osteosarcoma cell line MG63 and human MDR osteosarcoma cell line MG63/DOX were tested. The cytotoxicity of drugs was examined using a cell proliferation assay with the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). The distribution of cells across the cell cycle was determined with flow cytometry. The expression of cell cycle-regulated genes cyclin B1 and Cdc2 (CDK1), and the phosphorylated Cdc2 and Cdc25C was examined using Western blot analyses. Results: MG63/DOX cells were highly resistant to doxorubicin (ADM) and gemcitabine (GEM), but were sensitive or lowly resistant to THP, methotrexate (MTX) and cisplatin (DDP). Treatment of MG63/DOX cells with THP (200–1000 ng/mL) inhibited the cell proliferation in time- and concentration-dependent manners. THP (50–500 ng/mL) induced MG63/DOX cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Furthermore, the treatment of MG63/DOX cells with THP (200–1000 ng/mL) downregulated cyclin B1 expression, and decreased the phosphorylated Cdc2 at Thr161. Conversely, the treatment increased the phosphorylated Cdc2 at Thr14/Tyr15 and Cdc25C at Ser216, which led to a decrease in Cdc2-cyclin B1 activity. Conclusion: The cytotoxicity of THP to MG63/DOX cells may be in part due to its ability to arrest cell cycle progression at the G2/M phase, which supports the use of THP for managing patients with MDR osteosarcoma. PMID:22580740

  7. Cell cycle arrest during S or M phase generates polarized growth via distinct signals in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Bachewich, Catherine; Nantel, Andre; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2005-08-01

    Treatments that perturb DNA synthesis or mitosis will activate checkpoints that prevent cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. In yeast-form cells of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, exposure to hydroxyurea (HU) or shutting off expression of the polo-like kinase CaCDC5 blocked nuclear division and spindle elongation, but activated a highly polarized growth mode. We have used transcription profiling both to characterize the initiation and progression of this polar growth pattern and to determine how cell elongation may be linked to the cell cycle in C. albicans. Different gene expression patterns during early stages of cell elongation support the concept that CaCdc5p-depleted and HU-exposed cells were blocked at different stages of the cell cycle, and suggest that different signals may generate the common polarized growth phenotype. Consistent with this, BUB2 expression was modulated in CaCdc5p-depleted cells, and absence of BUB2 prevented the maintenance of cell polarization, resulting in multibudded, pseudohyphal cells with constrictions. In contrast, HU-induced filaments did not modulate or require BUB2, but were dependent on the GTPase Ras1p. However, at later stages of cell elongation, transcription profiles were more similar, and comparisons with serum-induced hyphae revealed that the cell cycle-arrested filaments expressed several targets of the hyphal signalling pathways. Thus, arresting the yeast cell cycle in S or M phase generates a polarized growth pattern through different mechanisms in C. albicans, and maintenance of the polar growth mode can ultimately lead to the expression of hyphal-associated cell wall and virulence-related factors, in the absence of any external stimuli.

  8. Induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human HCC MHCC97H cells with Chrysanthemum indicum extract

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zong-Fang; Wang, Zhi-Dong; Ji, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Shu; Huang, Chen; Li, Jun; Xia, Xian-Ming

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Chrysanthemum indicum extract (CIE) on inhibition of proliferation and on apoptosis, and the underlying mechanisms, in a human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) MHCC97H cell line. METHODS: Viable rat hepatocytes and human endothelial ECV304 cells were examined by trypan blue exclusion and MTT assay, respectively, as normal controls. The proliferation of MHCC97H cells was determined by MTT assay. The cellular morphology of MHCC97H cells was observed by phase contrast microscopy. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze cell apoptosis with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI), mitochondrial membrane potential with rhodamine 123 and cell cycle with PI in MHCC97H cells. Apoptotic proteins such as cytochrome C, caspase-9, caspase-3 and cell cycle proteins, including P21 and CDK4, were measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: CIE inhibited proliferation of MHCC97H cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity in rat hepatocytes and human endothelial cells. CIE induced apoptosis of MHCC97H cells in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by flow cytometry. The apoptosis was accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome C and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. CIE arrested the cell cycle in the S phase by increasing P21 and decreasing CDK4 protein expression. CONCLUSION: CIE exerted a significant apoptotic effect through a mitochondrial pathway and arrested the cell cycle by regulation of cell cycle-related proteins in MHCC97H cells without an effect on normal cells. The cancer-specific selectivity shown in this study suggests that the plant extract could be a promising novel treatment for human cancer. PMID:19777612

  9. Bufalin inhibits pancreatic cancer by inducing cell cycle arrest via the c-Myc/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Xiao, Xiang-Yang; Shou, Qi-Yang; Yan, Jun-Feng; Chen, Long; Fu, Hui-Ying; Wang, Jian-Chao

    2016-12-04

    Bufalin, a cardiotonic steroid isolated from toad venom (bufo gargarizans Cantor or B. melanotictus Schneider), has widely demonstrated antitumor effects and exhibits potential antitumor activity in various human cancer cells lines. The main characteristic of cancers including pancreatic cancer is the ability of uncontrolled proliferation. The aim of this study is to clarify the underlying mechanism by which bufalin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. The effect of bufalin on the suppression of tumor growth in vivo was studied in a bioluminescent mouse model generated using the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3-luc2 and the cytotoxicity was evaluated in BcPc3 and Sw1990 cells with MTT. Flow cytometry and western blotting analyses were utilized to detect the effect of bufalin on the cell cycle and to detect the cell cycle-related proteins, respectively. Then, a luciferase reporter assay was applied to screen the activity of potent transcription factors following bufalin exposure and their expression was detected by western blotting. Bufalin suppressed tumor growth in a bioluminescence mouse model generated using BxPC3-luc2 cells and inhibited cell proliferation in vitro through inducing cell cycle arrest at S phase. Bufalin treatment inhibited cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 expression and therefore increased expression of p27, a regulatory molecular that controls cell cycle transition from S to G2 phase. Furthermore, luciferase reporter screening studies revealed that bufalin inhibited the expression and activity of the transcription factors c-Myc and NF-κB, which might cause cell cycle arrest at S phase and the inhibition of cell proliferation. Taken together, our results indicate that bufalin can inhibit pancreatic cancer by targeting c-Myc, thus suggesting that the mechanism of c-Myc regulation by bufalin might be worthy of further study regarding its potential as a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  10. Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis Induced by Kinamycin F in Human Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Bavelloni, Alberto; Focaccia, Enrico; Piazzi, Manuela; Errani, Costantino; Blalock, William; Faenza, Irene

    2017-08-01

    Kinamycin F is a bacterial metabolite which contains an unusual and potentially reactive diazo group that is known for its ability to inhibit cell growth. In this study, the potential anti-tumor activity of kinamycin F was investigated in three human osteosarcoma cell lines, MG-63, U-2 OS and HOS as an antitumor agent with a potentially novel target. Proliferation and cell viability were measured in three human osteosarcoma cell lines by commercially available kits. We also evaluated the effects of the drug on cell cycle progression using the Muse™ Cell Analyzer. Caspase-3 activity was determined by a fluorometric EnzChek assay kit. Finally, following treatment with kinamycin F the protein levels of cyclin D3, cyclin A and cdK-2 were examined. Kinamycin F induced a concentration-dependent cell death in all the three cell lines. Flow cytometry revealed that kinamycin F treatment at 1 μM concentration significantly increased the cell population in the G2/M-phase (60-65%). Kinamycin F activated caspase 3 in all the three cell lines, clearly demonstrating that the growth inhibitory effect of kinamycin F can be attributed to apoptosis induction. Finally, kinamycin F suppressed osteosarcoma cell proliferation affecting cyclin A and D3 expression. Understanding the mechanism by which kinamycin F exerts its ability to inhibit cell growth may be a step forward in the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of OS. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, promotes cell cycle arrest and re-sensitizes rituximab- and chemo-resistant lymphoma cells to chemotherapy agents.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kai; Gu, Juan J; Zhang, Qunling; Mavis, Cory; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J; Czuczman, Myron S; Guo, Ye

    2016-02-01

    evaluated by Western blotting. Finally, cell lines were pre-exposed to vorinostat for 48 h and subsequently exposed to several chemotherapy agents (cisplatin, etoposide, or gemcitabine); changes in cell viability were determined by CellTiter-Glo(®) luminescence assay (Promega, Fitchburg, WI), and synergistic activity was evaluated using the CalcuSyn software. Vorinostat induced dose-dependent cell death in RRCL and in primary tumor cells. In addition, in vitro exposure of RRCL to vorinostat resulted in an increase in p21 and acetylation of histone H3 leading to G1 cell cycle arrest. Vorinostat exposure resulted in apoptosis in RSCL cell lines but not in RRCL. This finding suggests that in RRCL, vorinostat induces cell death by alternative pathways (i.e., irreversible cell cycle arrest). Of interest, vorinostat was found to reverse acquired chemotherapy resistance in RRCL. Our data suggest that vorinostat is active in RRCL with a known defective apoptotic machinery, it can active alternative cell death pathways. Given the multiple pathways affected by HDAC inhibition, vorinostat can potentially be used to overcome acquired resistant to chemotherapy in aggressive B cell lymphoma.

  12. Novel ent-Kaurane Diterpenoid from Rubus corchorifolius L. f. Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth via Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexiang; Wu, Xian; Ouyang, Wen; Gu, Min; Gao, Zili; Song, Mingyue; Chen, Yunjiao; Lin, Yanyin; Cao, Yong; Xiao, Hang

    2017-03-01

    The tender leaves of Rubus corchorifolius L. f. have been consumed as tea for drinking in China since ancient times. In this study, a novel ent-kaurane diterpenoid was isolated and identified from R. corchorifolius L. f. leaves as ent-kaur-2-one-16β,17-dihydroxy-acetone-ketal (DEK). DEK suppressed the growth of HCT116 human colon cancer cells with an IC50 value of 40 ± 0.21 μM, while it did not cause significant growth inhibition on CCD-18Co human colonic myofibroblasts at up to100 μM. Moreover, DEK induced extensive apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest in the colon cancer cells. Accordingly, DEK caused profound effects on multiple signaling proteins associated with cell proliferation, cell death, and inflammation. DEK significantly upregulated the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins such as cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved PARP, p53, Bax, and tumor suppressor p21(Cip1/Waf1), downregulated the levels of cell cycle regulating proteins such as cyclinD1, CDK2, and CDK4 and carcinogenic proteins such as EGFR and COX-2, and suppressed the activation of Akt. Overall, our results provide a basis for using DEK as a potential chemopreventive agent against colon carcinogenesis.

  13. TEAD4-YAP interaction regulates tumoral growth by controlling cell-cycle arrest at the G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shin; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Nakashima, Dai; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Koide, Nao; Takahara, Toshikazu; Shimizu, Toshihiro; Iyoda, Manabu; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2017-04-29

    TEA domain transcription factor 4 (TEAD4), which has critical functions in the process of embryonic development, is expressed in various cancers. However, the important role of TEAD4 in human oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) remain unclear. Here we investigated the TEAD4 expression level and the functional mechanism in OSCC using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, TEAD4 knockdown model was used to evaluate cellular proliferation, cell-cycle analysis, and the interaction between TEAD4 and Yes-associated protein (YAP) which was reported to be a transcription coactivator of cellular proliferation. In the current study, we found that TEAD4 expression increased significantly in vitro and in vivo and correlated with tumoral size in OSCC patients. TEAD4 knockdown OSCC cells showed decreased cellular proliferation resulting from cell-cycle arrest in the G1 phase by down-regulation of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and up-regulation of CDK inhibitors. We also found that the TEAD4-YAP complex in the nuclei may be related closely to transcriptions of G1 arrest-related genes. Taken together, we concluded that TEAD4 might play an important role in tumoral growth and have potential to be a therapeutic target in OSCCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Endosulfan inhibiting the meiosis process via depressing expressions of regulatory factors and causing cell cycle arrest in spermatogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang-Zi; Zhang, Lian-Shuang; Wei, Jia-Liu; Ren, Li-Hua; Zhang, Jin; Jing, Li; Yang, Man; Wang, Ji; Sun, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Xian-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Endosulfan is a persistent organic pollutant and widely used in agriculture as a pesticide. It is present in air, water, and soil worldwide; therefore, it is a health risk affecting especially the reproductive system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of endosulfan in the reproductive system. To investigate the effect of endosulfan on meiosis process, 32 rats were divided into four groups, treated with 0, 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg/day endosulfan, respectively, and sacrificed after the 21 days of treatments. Results show that endosulfan caused the reductions in sperm concentration and motility rate, which resulted into an increased in sperm abnormality rate; further, endosulfan induced downregulation of spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (Sohlh1) which controls the switch on meiosis in mammals, as well cyclin A1, cyclin-dependent kinases 1 (CDK1), and cyclin-dependent kinases 2 (CDK2). In vitro, endosulfan induced G2/M phase arrest in the spermatogenic cell cycle and caused proliferation inhibition. Moreover, endosulfan induced oxidative stress and DNA damage in vivo and vitro. The results suggested that endosulfan could inhibit the start of meiosis by downregulating the expression of Sohlh1 and induce G2/M phase arrest of cell cycle by decreasing the expression of cyclin A1, CDK1, and CDK2 via oxidative damage, which inhibits the meiosis process, and therefore decrease the amount of sperm.

  15. A Flavone Constituent from Myoporum bontioides Induces M-Phase Cell Cycle Arrest of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jing-Ru; Bai, Li-Yuan; Lin, Wei-Yu; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chen, Yu-Chang; Chao, Shi-Wei; Feng, Chia-Hsien

    2017-03-15

    Myoporum bontioides is a traditional medicinal plant in Asia with various biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial characteristics. To identify the bioactive constituents from M. bontioides, a newly-identified flavone, 3,4'-dimethoxy-3',5,7-trihydroxyflavone (compound 1), along with eight known compounds, were investigated in human MCF-7 breast cancer, SCC4 oral cancer, and THP-1 monocytic leukemia cells. Among these compounds, compound 1 exhibited the strongest antiproliferative activity with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values ranging from 3.3 μM (MCF-7) to 8.6 μM (SCC4). Flow cytometric analysis indicated that compound 1 induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in MCF-7 cells. Mechanistic evidence suggests that the G2/M arrest could be attributable to compound 1's modulatory effects on the phosphorylation and expression of numerous key signaling effectors, including cell division cycle 2 (CDC2), CDC25C, and p53. Notably, compound 1 downregulated the expression of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) and HDAC4, leading to increased histone H3 acetylation and p21 upregulation. Together, these findings suggest the translational potential of compound 1 as a breast cancer treatment.

  16. Phloretin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells through the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Fan, Chenghe; Pu, Lv; Wei, Cui; Jin, Haiqiang; Teng, Yuming; Zhao, Mingming; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi; Jiang, Feng; Shu, Junlong; Li, Fan; Peng, Qing; Kong, Jian; Pan, Bing; Zheng, Lemin; Huang, Yining

    2016-06-01

    Phloretin, a flavonoid present in various plants, has been reported to exert anticarcinogenic effects. However, the mechanism of its chemo-preventive effect on human glioblastoma cells is not fully understood. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of phloretin and its associated chemo-preventive effect in human glioblastoma cells. The results indicate that phloretin inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G0-G1 phase and induced apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells. Phloretin-induced cell cycle arrest was associated with increased expression of p27 and decreased expression of cdk2, cdk4, cdk6, cyclinD and cyclinE. Moreover, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling cascades were suppressed by phloretin in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, phloretin triggered the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). This was accompanied by the up-regulation of Bax, Bak and c-PARP and the down-regulation of Bcl-2. The antioxidant agents N-acetyl-L-cysteine and glutathione weakened the effect of phloretin on glioblastoma cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that phloretin exerts potent chemo-preventive activity in human glioblastoma cells through the generation of ROS.

  17. p27Kip1 Is Required to Mediate a G1 Cell Cycle Arrest Downstream of ATM following Genotoxic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cassimere, Erica K.; Mauvais, Claire; Denicourt, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a coordinated signaling network that ensures the maintenance of genome stability under DNA damaging stress. In response to DNA lesions, activation of the DDR leads to the establishment of cell cycle checkpoints that delay cell-cycle progression and allow repair of the defects. The tumor suppressor p27Kip1 is a cyclin-CDK inhibitor that plays an important role in regulating quiescence in a variety of tissues. Several studies have suggested that p27Kip1 also plays a role in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we demonstrate that p27Kip1 is essential for the establishment of a G1 checkpoint arrest after DNA damage. We also uncovered that ATM phosphorylates p27Kip1 on a previously uncharacterized residue (Ser-140), which leads to its stabilization after induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of this stabilization by replacing endogenous p27Kip1 with a Ser-140 phospho-mutant (S140A) significantly sensitized cells to IR treatments. Our findings reveal a novel role for p27Kip1 in the DNA damage response pathway and suggest that part of its tumor suppressing functions relies in its ability to mediate a G1 arrest after the induction of DNA double strand breaks. PMID:27611996

  18. Apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in oral lichen planus Hypothesis on their possible influence on its malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Bascones, C; Gonzalez-Moles, M A; Esparza, G; Bravo, M; Acevedo, A; Gil-Montoya, J A; Bascones, A

    2005-10-01

    The quantitative importance of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis mechanisms in oral lichen planus (OLP) was analysed in order to assess the cell response to T lymphocyte aggression and establish a hypothesis on the influence of these phenomena in the malignant transformation process. The TUNEL assay and immunohistochemical methods were used to detect caspase-3, bax, and p21 in 32 tissue samples of oral mucosa with OLP and in 20 samples of normal oral mucosa. Positivity for TUNEL, caspase-3 and p21 was significantly more frequent in cases than in controls (p<0.001). Both TUNEL and caspase-3 positivity was significantly greater in the basal versus suprabasal layer (p=0.004 and 0.052, respectively). The basal and suprabasal expression of p21 was significantly higher in cases with a more intense liquefaction degeneration (p<0.01). There was no significant difference in basal expression of bax between cases and controls. The quantitative importance of apoptosis was small in OLP. Epithelial cells attacked in OLP have a very low response to apoptosis and cell cycle arrest mechanisms, which may produce an epithelial substrate that favours malignant transformation.

  19. Calotropin from Asclepias curasavica induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mo, En-Pan; Zhang, Rong-Rong; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Tan, Qiu-Tong; Liu, Fang-Lan; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-09-16

    Calotropin (M11), an active compound isolated from Asclepias curasavica L., was found to exert strong inhibitory and pro-apoptotic activity specifically against cisplatin-induced resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells (A549/CDDP). Molecular mechanism study revealed that M11 induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase through down-regulating cyclins, CDK1, CDK2 and up-regulating p53 and p21. Furthermore, M11 accelerated apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway which was accompanied by increase Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increase in reactive oxygen species production, activations of caspases 3 and 9 as well as cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). The activation and phosphorylation of JNK was also found to be involved in M11-induced apoptosis, and SP610025 (specific JNK inhibitor) partially prevented apoptosis induced by M11. In contrast, all of the effects that M11 induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549/CDDP cells were not significant in A549 cells. Drugs with higher sensitivity against resistant tumor cells than the parent cells are rather rare. Results of this study supported the potential application of M11 on the non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) with cisplatin resistance.

  20. Flavonoids from Gynostemma pentaphyllum exhibit differential induction of cell cycle arrest in H460 and A549 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ko-Chung; Chiang, Tzu-Hsuan; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Lin, Li-Ju; Chao, Wei-Chih; Chen, Bing-Huei; Lu, Jyh-Feng

    2014-10-31

    Flavonoids, containing mainly kaempferol rhamnohexoside derivatives, were extracted from Gynostemma pentaphyllum (G. pentaphyllum) and their potential growth inhibition effects against H460 non-small cell lung cancer cells was explored and compared to that on A549 cells. The extracted flavonoids were found to exhibit antiproliferation effects against H460 cells (IC50 = 50.2 μg/mL), although the IC50 of H460 is 2.5-fold that of A549 cells (IC50 = 19.8 μg/mL). Further investigation revealed that H460 cells are more susceptible to kaempferol than A549, whereas A549 cell growth is better inhibited by kaempferol rhamnohexoside derivatives as compared with H460. In addition, flavonoids from G. pentaphyllum induced cell cycle arrest at both S and G2/M phases with concurrent modulated expression of the cellular proteins cyclin A, B, p53 and p21 in A549 cells, but not H460. On the contrary, apoptosis and concomitant alteration in balance of BCL-2 and BAX expression as well as activation of caspase-3 were equally affected between both cells by flavonoid treatment. These observations strongly suggest the growth inhibition discrepancy between H460 and A549 following flavonoid treatment can be attributed to the lack of cell cycle arrest in H460 cells and the differences between H460 and A549 cells may serve as contrasting models for further mechanistic investigations.

  1. Induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by polyvinylpyrrolidone K-30 and protective effect of alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Bao; Lou, Yang; Luo, Zhao-Feng; Zhang, Dong-Fang; Wang, Yu-Zhen

    2003-09-05

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone is a macromolecular polymer with widespread use in industry as well as in medicine for various purposes. Its effect on cells cultured in vitro, however, has not been fully investigated. To elucidate this issue, we studied the influence of PVP K-30 on cultured HeLa cells. PVP K-30 treatment produced a dose- and time-dependent toxicity to HeLa cells. Cells exposed to PVP K-30 exhibited several morphological features of apoptosis. Gel electrophoresis of DNA from PVP K-30-treated cells showed typical apoptotic ladder. And flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that PVP K-30 induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and the subsequent appearance of sub-G1 population. In addition, it was shown that procaspase-3 was activated in response to PVP K-30 treatment. We also found that alpha-tocopherol efficiently protected HeLa cells from PVP K-30 cytotoxicity. This is the first demonstration that PVP K-30 could induce apoptosis in HeLa cells and cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase, and that PVP K-30 toxicity could be attenuated by alpha-tocopherol.

  2. AP-2γ Induces p21 Expression, Arrests Cell Cycle, and Inhibits the Tumor Growth of Human Carcinoma Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hualei; Goswami, Prabhat C; Domann, Frederick E

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Activating enhancer-binding protein 2γ (AP-2γ) is a member of the developmentally regulated AP-2 transcription factor family that regulates the expression of many downstream genes. Whereas the effects of AP-2α overexpression on cell growth are fairly well established, the cellular effects of AP-2γ overexpression are less well studied. Our new findings show that AP-2γ significantly upregulates p21 mRNA and proteins, inhibits cell growth, and decreases clonogenic survival. Cell cycle analysis revealed that forced AP-2γ expression induced G1-phase arrest, decreased DNA synthesis, and decreased the fraction of cells in S phase. AP-2γ expression also led to cyclin D1 repression, decreased Rb phosphorylation, and decreased E2F activity in breast carcinoma cells. AP-2γ binding to the p21 promoter was observed in vivo, and the absence of growth inhibition in response to AP-2γ expression in p21 (-/-) cells demonstrated that p21 caused, at least in part, AP-2-induced cell cycle arrest. Finally, the tumor growth of human breast carcinoma cells in vivo was inhibited by the expression of AP-2γ relative to empty vector-infected cells, suggesting that AP-2γ acts as a tumor suppressor. In summary, expression of either AP-2γ or AP-2α inhibited breast carcinoma cell growth; thus, these genes may be therapeutic targets for breast cancer. PMID:16867219

  3. Induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by grape seed procyanidin extract in human bladder cancer BIU87 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Zhang, W-Y; Kong, Z-H; Ding, D-G

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human bladder cancer BIU87 cells and to investigate its molecular mechanism in vitro. BIU87 cells were treated with different concentrations of GSPE for 24h in vitro while an untreated group was taken as control. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, Hoechst 33258 staining, flow cytometry, RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect the anti-proliferation and apoptotic induction effects of GSPE on BIU87 cells. It was found that GSPE inhibited the cell growth through cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and induced cell apoptosis in BIU87 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Semi-quantitated RT-PCR and Western blot analyses indicated that GSPE increased caspase-3 (p<0.01), but decreased the expression of cyclinD1, CDK4 and survivin (p<0.01). GSPE inhibits cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in BIU87 cells, and the effect may be related with its down-regulation of cyclinD1, CDK4 and survivin.

  4. Cell cycle arrest and apoptogenic properties of opium alkaloids noscapine and papaverine on breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sajadian, Saharolsadat; Vatankhah, Melody; Majdzadeh, Maryam; Kouhsari, Shide Montaser; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Previous report of the vast effectiveness of opium derivatives in cancer therapy is leading us to see possible effects of these derivatives on cancer stem cells in order to find new agent for cancer therapy. In this study, cells were stained for CSC markers and sorted by magnetic beads. CSCs exhibit the characteristic CD44(+)/CD24(-/low)/ESA(+) phenotype. Noscapine and papaverine (alkaloids) showed anti-proliferative activity on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. It was observed that noscapine has more cytotoxic effect on CSC derived from both cell lines compared with their parental cells. Papaverine has more cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 CSCs in comparison with parental cells, while CSCs population of MDA-MB-231 is more resistant to papaverine compared with MDA-MB-231 cells. Noscapine enhances apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 CSCs more than parent cells, while in MCF-7 CSCs the apoptosis is less than parent cells. Our results show that papverine is less active in terms of apoptotic effect on CSCs in both cell lines. Moreover, noscapine arrests MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 CSCs cell cycle at G2/M phase, while papverine arrests cell cycle at G0/G1 phase. It was suggested different mechanism for apoptotic cytotoxicity. The results of this study show possible specific effects of noscapine on these breast cell lines CSCs.

  5. Downregulation of HDAC9 inhibits cell proliferation and tumor formation by inducing cell cycle arrest in retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yiting; Wu, Dan; Xia, Fengjie; Xian, Hongyu; Zhu, Xinyue; Cui, Hongjuan; Huang, Zhenping

    2016-04-29

    Histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) is a member of class II HDACs, which regulates a wide variety of normal and abnormal physiological functions. Recently, HDAC9 has been found to be overexpressed in some types of human cancers. However, the role of HDAC9 in retinoblastoma remains unclear. In this study, we found that HDAC9 was commonly expressed in retinoblastoma tissues and HDAC9 was overexpressed in prognostically poor retinoblastoma patients. Through knocking down HDAC9 in Y79 and WERI-Rb-1 cells, the expression level of HDAC9 was found to be positively related to cell proliferation in vitro. Further investigation indicated that knockdown HDAC9 could significantly induce cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in retinoblastoma cells. Western blot assay showed downregulation of HDAC9 could significantly decrease cyclin E2 and CDK2 expression. Lastly, xenograft study in nude mice showed that downregulation of HDAC9 inhibited tumor growth and development in vivo. Therefore, our results suggest that HDAC9 could serve as a novel potential therapeutic target in the treatment of retinoblastoma. - Highlights: • High expression of HDAC9 correlates with poor patient prognosis. • Downregulation of HDAC9 inhibits cell proliferation in retinoblastoma cells. • Downregulation of HDAC9 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in retinoblastoma cells. • Downregulation of HDAC9 suppresses tumor growth in nude mice.

  6. A sex-inducing pheromone triggers cell cycle arrest and mate attraction in the diatom Seminavis robusta

    PubMed Central

    Moeys, Sara; Frenkel, Johannes; Lembke, Christine; Gillard, Jeroen T. F.; Devos, Valerie; Van den Berge, Koen; Bouillon, Barbara; Huysman, Marie J. J.; De Decker, Sam; Scharf, Julia; Bones, Atle; Brembu, Tore; Winge, Per; Sabbe, Koen; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Clement, Lieven; De Veylder, Lieven; Pohnert, Georg; Vyverman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Although sexual reproduction is believed to play a major role in the high diversification rates and species richness of diatoms, a mechanistic understanding of diatom life cycle control is virtually lacking. Diatom sexual signalling is controlled by a complex, yet largely unknown, pheromone system. Here, a sex-inducing pheromone (SIP+) of the benthic pennate diatom Seminavis robusta was identified by comparative metabolomics, subsequently purified, and physicochemically characterized. Transcriptome analysis revealed that SIP+ triggers the switch from mitosis-to-meiosis in the opposing mating type, coupled with the transcriptional induction of proline biosynthesis genes, and the release of the proline-derived attraction pheromone. The induction of cell cycle arrest by a pheromone, chemically distinct from the one used to attract the opposite mating type, highlights the existence of a sophisticated mechanism to increase chances of mate finding, while keeping the metabolic losses associated with the release of an attraction pheromone to a minimum. PMID:26786712

  7. Deguelin, a novel anti-tumorigenic agent targeting apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and anti-angiogenesis for cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YING; MA, WENLI; ZHENG, WENLING

    2013-01-01

    Deguelin is a natural compound of the flavonoid family products isolated from Derris trifoliata Lour. or Mundulea sericea (Leguminosae). It exhibited significant anti-tumorigenesis and anti-proliferative activity in various types of cancer both in vitro and in vivo. Deguelin induced cell apoptosis by blocking anti-apoptotic pathways, such as PI3K-Akt, IKK-IκBα-NF-κB and AMPK-mTOR-survivin, while inhibiting tumor cell propagation and malignant transformation through p27-cyclinE-pRb-E2F1 cell cycle control and HIF-1α-VEGF anti-angiogenic pathways. In pre-clinical trials, deguelin markedly decreased the tumor incidence. These biological findings identified deguelin as a novel anti-tumorigenic agent targeting apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and anti-angiogenesis for cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy. PMID:24649149

  8. Low Doses of Cisplatin Induce Gene Alterations, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis in Human Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velma, Venkatramreddy; Dasari, Shaloam R.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a known antitumor drug, but its mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we studied the anticancer potential of cisplatin at doses of 1, 2, or 3 µM using HL-60 cells as a test model. We investigated cisplatin effects at the molecular level using RNA sequencing, cell cycle analysis, and apoptotic assay after 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours of treatment. The results show that many genes responsible for molecular and cellular functions were significantly altered. Cisplatin treatment also caused the cells to be arrested at the DNA synthesis phase, and as the time increases, the cells gradually accumulated at the sub-G1 phase. Also, as the dose increases, a significant number of cells entered into the apoptotic and necrotic stages. Altogether, the data show that low doses of cisplatin significantly impact the viability of HL-60 cells, through modulation of gene expression, cell cycle, and apoptosis. PMID:27594783

  9. NS1- and Minute Virus of Mice-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest: Involvement of p53 and p21cip1

    PubMed Central

    Op De Beeck, Anne; Sobczak-Thepot, Joelle; Sirma, Huseyin; Bourgain, Florence; Brechot, Christian; Caillet-Fauquet, Perrine

    2001-01-01

    The nonstructural protein NS1 of the autonomous parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVMp) is cytolytic when expressed in transformed cells. Before causing extensive cell lysis, NS1 induces a multistep cell cycle arrest in G1, S, and G2, well reproducing the arrest in S and G2 observed upon MVMp infection. In this work we investigated the molecular mechanisms of growth inhibition mediated by NS1 and MVMp. We show that NS1-mediated cell cycle arrest correlates with the accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p21cip1 associated with both the cyclin A/Cdk and cyclin E/Cdk2 complexes but in the absence of accumulation of p53, a potent transcriptional activator of p21cip1. By comparison, MVMp infection induced the accumulation of both p53 and p21cip1. We demonstrate that p53 plays an essential role in the MVMp-induced cell cycle arrest in both S and G2 by using p53 wild-type (+/+) and null (−/−) cells. Furthermore, only the G2 arrest was abrogated in p21cip1 null (−/−) cells. Together these results show that the MVMp-induced cell cycle arrest in S is p53 dependent but p21cip1 independent, whereas the arrest in G2 depends on both p53 and its downstream effector p21cip1. They also suggest that induction of p21cip1 by the viral protein NS1 arrests cells in G2 through inhibition of cyclin A-dependent kinase activity. PMID:11602746

  10. Cytoskeleton disorder and cell cycle arrest may be associated with the alteration of protein CEP135 by microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Xiaoming; Sun, Yeqing; Wu, Di; Li, Yixiao; Liu, Zhiyuan

    In the past decades, alterations in the morphology, cytoskeleton and cell cycle have been observed in cells in vitro under microgravity conditions. But the underlying mechanisms are not absolutely identified yet. Our previous study on proteomic and microRNA expression profiles of zebrafish embryos exposed to simulated-microgravity has demonstrated a serial of microgravity-sensitive molecules. Centrosomal protein of 135 kDa (CEP135) was found down-regulated, but the mRNA expression level of it was up-regulated in zebrafish embryos after simulated-microgravity. However, the functional study on CEP135 is very limited and it has not been cloned in zebrafish till now. In this study, we try to determine whether the cytoskeleton disorder and cell cycle arrest is associated with the alteration of CEP135 by microgravity. Full-length cDNA of cep135 gene was firstly cloned from mitosis phase of ZF4. The sequence was analyzed and the phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the similarity to other species. Zebrafish embryonic cell line ZF4 were exposed to simulated microgravity for 24 and 48 hours, using a rotary cell culture system (RCCS) designed by NASA. Quantitative analysis by western blot showed that CEP135 expression level was significantly decreased two times after 24 hour simulated microgravity. Cell cycle detection by flow cytometer indicated ZF4 cells were blocked in G1 phase after 24 and 48 hour simulated microgravity. Moreover, double immunostained ZF4 cells with anti-tubulin and anti-CEP135antibodies demonstrated simulated microgravity could lead to cytoskeleton disorder and CEP135 abnormality. Further investigations are currently being carried out to determine whether knockdown and over-expression of CEP135 will modulate cytoskeleton and cell cycle. In vitro data in combination within vivo results might, at least in part, explain the dramatic effects of microgravity. Key Words: microgravity; CEP135; Cytoskeleton disorder; G1 arrest; ZF4 cell line

  11. γ-Tocotrienol prevents cell cycle arrest in aged human fibroblast cells through p16(INK4a) pathway.

    PubMed

    Zainuddin, Azalina; Chua, Kien-Hui; Tan, Jen-Kit; Jaafar, Faizul; Makpol, Suzana

    2017-02-01

    Human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) proliferation in culture has been used as a model of aging at the cellular level. Growth arrest is one of the most important mechanisms responsible for replicative senescence. Recent researches have been focusing on the function of vitamin E in modulating cellular signaling and gene expression. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of palm γ-tocotrienol (vitamin E) in modulating cellular aging through p16(INK4a) pathway in HDF cells. Primary culture of senescent HDFs was incubated with 70 μM of palm γ-tocotrienol for 24 hours. Silencing of p16(INK4a) was carried out by siRNA transfection. RNA was extracted from the different treatment groups and gene expression analysis was carried out by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Proteins that were regulated by p16(INK4a) were determined by western blot technique. The finding of this study showed that p16(INK4a) mRNA was overexpressed in senescent HDFs, and hypophosphorylated-pRb and cyclin D1 protein expressions were increased (p < 0.05). However, downregulation of p16(INK4a) and hypophosphorylated-pRb and cyclin D1 protein expressions (p < 0.05) by γ-tocotrienol led to modulation of the cell cycle regulation during cellular aging. In conclusion, senescent HDFs showed change in biological process specifically in cell cycle regulation with elevated expression of genes and proteins which may contribute to cell cycle arrest. Palm γ-tocotrienol may delay cellular senescence of HDFs by regulating cell cycle through downregulation of p16(INK4a) and hypophosphorylated-pRb and cyclin D1 protein expressions.

  12. The Hog1 MAP Kinase Promotes the Recovery from Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Correia, Inês; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca; Pla, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions is controlled via specific checkpoints. Signal transduction pathways mediated by MAPKs play a crucial role in sensing stress. For example, the canonical MAPKs Mkc1 (of the cell wall integrity pathway), and Hog1 (of the HOG pathway), are activated upon oxidative stress. In this work, we have analyzed the effect of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide on cell cycle progression in Candida albicans. Hydrogen peroxide was shown to induce a transient arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, a G1 arrest was observed, although phosphorylation of Mkc1 and Hog1 MAPKs can take place at all stages of the cell cycle. Interestingly, hog1 (but not mkc1) mutants required a longer time compared to wild type cells to resume growth after hydrogen peroxide challenge. Using GFP-labeled cells and mixed cultures of wild type and hog1 cells we were able to show that hog1 mutants progress faster through the cell cycle under standard growth conditions in the absence of stress (YPD at 37°C). Consequently, hog1 mutants exhibited a smaller cell size. The altered cell cycle progression correlates with altered expression of the G1 cyclins Cln3 and Pcl2 in hog1 cells compared to the wild type strain. In addition, Hgc1 (a hypha-specific G1 cyclin) as well as Cln3 displayed a different kinetics of expression in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in hog1 mutants. Collectively, these results indicate that Hog1 regulates the expression of G1 cyclins not only in response to oxidative stress, but also under standard growth conditions. Hydrogen peroxide treated cells did not show fluctuations in the mRNA levels for SOL1, which are observed in untreated cells during cell cycle progression. In addition, treatment with hydrogen peroxide prevented degradation of Sol1, an effect which was enhanced in hog1 mutants. Therefore, in C. albicans, the MAPK Hog1 mediates cell cycle progression in response to oxidative

  13. The Hog1 MAP Kinase Promotes the Recovery from Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Inês; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca; Pla, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions is controlled via specific checkpoints. Signal transduction pathways mediated by MAPKs play a crucial role in sensing stress. For example, the canonical MAPKs Mkc1 (of the cell wall integrity pathway), and Hog1 (of the HOG pathway), are activated upon oxidative stress. In this work, we have analyzed the effect of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide on cell cycle progression in Candida albicans. Hydrogen peroxide was shown to induce a transient arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, a G1 arrest was observed, although phosphorylation of Mkc1 and Hog1 MAPKs can take place at all stages of the cell cycle. Interestingly, hog1 (but not mkc1) mutants required a longer time compared to wild type cells to resume growth after hydrogen peroxide challenge. Using GFP-labeled cells and mixed cultures of wild type and hog1 cells we were able to show that hog1 mutants progress faster through the cell cycle under standard growth conditions in the absence of stress (YPD at 37°C). Consequently, hog1 mutants exhibited a smaller cell size. The altered cell cycle progression correlates with altered expression of the G1 cyclins Cln3 and Pcl2 in hog1 cells compared to the wild type strain. In addition, Hgc1 (a hypha-specific G1 cyclin) as well as Cln3 displayed a different kinetics of expression in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in hog1 mutants. Collectively, these results indicate that Hog1 regulates the expression of G1 cyclins not only in response to oxidative stress, but also under standard growth conditions. Hydrogen peroxide treated cells did not show fluctuations in the mRNA levels for SOL1, which are observed in untreated cells during cell cycle progression. In addition, treatment with hydrogen peroxide prevented degradation of Sol1, an effect which was enhanced in hog1 mutants. Therefore, in C. albicans, the MAPK Hog1 mediates cell cycle progression in response to oxidative

  14. G2 cell cycle arrest, down-regulation of cyclin B, and induction of mitotic catastrophe by the flavoprotein inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium.

    PubMed

    Scaife, Robin M

    2004-10-01

    Because proliferation of eukaryotic cells requires cell cycle-regulated chromatid separation by the mitotic spindle, it is subject to regulation by mitotic checkpoints. To determine the mechanism of the antiproliferative activity of the flavoprotein-specific inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), I have examined its effect on the cell cycle and mitosis. Similar to paclitaxel, exposure to DPI causes an accumulation of cells with a 4N DNA content. However, unlike the paclitaxel-mediated mitotic block, DPI-treated cells are arrested in the cell cycle prior to mitosis. Although DPI-treated cells can arrest with fully separated centrosomes at opposite sides of the nucleus, these centrosomes fail to assemble mitotic spindle microtubules and they do not accumulate the Thr(288) phosphorylated Aurora-A kinase marker of centrosome maturation. In contrast with paclitaxel-arrested cells, DPI impairs cyclin B1 accumulation. Release from DPI permits an accumulation of cyclin B1 and progression of the cells into mitosis. Conversely, exposure of paclitaxel-arrested mitotic cells to DPI causes a precipitous drop in cyclin B and Thr(288) phosphorylated Aurora-A levels and leads to mitotic catastrophe in a range of cancerous and noncancerous cells. Hence, the antiproliferative activity of DPI reflects a novel inhibitory mechanism of cell cycle progression that can reverse spindle checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest.

  15. Anthocyanins from roselle extract arrest cell cycle G2/M phase transition via ATM/Chk pathway in p53-deficient leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Chang; Huang, Hui-Pei; Chang, Kai-Ting; Wang, Chau-Jong; Chang, Yun-Ching

    2017-04-01

    Cell cycle regulation is an important issue in cancer therapy. Delphinidin and cyanidin are two major anthocyanins of the roselle plant (Hibiscus sabdariffa). In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hibiscus anthocyanins (HAs) on cell cycle arrest in human leukemia cell line HL-60 and the analyzed the underlying molecular mechanisms. HAs extracted from roselle calyces (purity 90%) markedly induced G2/M arrest evaluated with flow cytometry analysis. Western blot analyses revealed that HAs (0.1-0.7 mg mL(-1) ) induced G2/M arrest via increasing Tyr15 phosphorylation of Cdc2, and inducing Cdk inhibitors p27 and p21. HAs also induced phosphorylation of upstream signals related to G2/M arrest such as phosphorylation of Cdc25C tyrosine phosphatase at Ser216, increasing the binding of pCdc25C with 14-3-3 protein. HAs-induced phosphorylation of Cdc25C could be activated by ATM checkpoint kinases, Chk1, and Chk2. We first time confirmed that ATM-Chk1/2-Cdc25C pathway as a critical mechanism for G2/M arrest in HAs-induced leukemia cell cycle arrest, indicating that this compound could be a promising anticancer candidate or chemopreventive agents for further investigation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1290-1304, 2017.

  16. R-Phycoerythrin Induces SGC-7901 Apoptosis by Arresting Cell Cycle at S Phase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huixin; Gao, Shiyong; Zhuang, Yan; Dong, Yanhong; Guan, Wenhui; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Jian; Cui, Jingru

    2016-09-12

    R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE), one of the chemical constituents of red algae, could produce singlet oxygen upon excitation with the appropriate radiation and possibly be used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer. Documents reported that R-PE could inhibit cell proliferation in HepG2 and A549 cells, which was significative for cancer therapy. This is due to the fact that R-PE could kill cancer cells directly as well as by PDT. However, little is known about the cytotoxicity of R-PE to the SGC-7901 cell. In this study, it has been found that R-PE could inhibit SGC-7901 proliferation and induce cell apoptosis, which was achieved by arresting the SGC-7901 cell at S phase. CyclinA, CDK2 and CDC25A are proteins associated with the S phase, and it was found that R-PE could increase the expression of cyclin A protein and decrease the expression of CDK2 and CDC25A proteins. Thus, it was concluded that R-PE reduced the CDK2 protein activated through decreasing the CDC25A factor, which reduced the formation of Cyclin-CDK complex. The reduction of Cyclin-CDK complex made the SGC-7901 cells arrest at the S phase. Therefore, R-PE induced apoptosis by arresting the SGC-7901 cell at S phase was successful, which was achieved by the expression of the CDC25A protein, which reduced the CDK2 protein actived and the formation of Cyclin-CDK complex.

  17. R-Phycoerythrin Induces SGC-7901 Apoptosis by Arresting Cell Cycle at S Phase

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huixin; Gao, Shiyong; Zhuang, Yan; Dong, Yanhong; Guan, Wenhui; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Jian; Cui, Jingru

    2016-01-01

    R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE), one of the chemical constituents of red algae, could produce singlet oxygen upon excitation with the appropriate radiation and possibly be used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer. Documents reported that R-PE could inhibit cell proliferation in HepG2 and A549 cells, which was significative for cancer therapy. This is due to the fact that R-PE could kill cancer cells directly as well as by PDT. However, little is known about the cytotoxicity of R-PE to the SGC-7901 cell. In this study, it has been found that R-PE could inhibit SGC-7901 proliferation and induce cell apoptosis, which was achieved by arresting the SGC-7901 cell at S phase. CyclinA, CDK2 and CDC25A are proteins associated with the S phase, and it was found that R-PE could increase the expression of cyclin A protein and decrease the expression of CDK2 and CDC25A proteins. Thus, it was concluded that R-PE reduced the CDK2 protein activated through decreasing the CDC25A factor, which reduced the formation of Cyclin-CDK complex. The reduction of Cyclin-CDK complex made the SGC-7901 cells arrest at the S phase. Therefore, R-PE induced apoptosis by arresting the SGC-7901 cell at S phase was successful, which was achieved by the expression of the CDC25A protein, which reduced the CDK2 protein actived and the formation of Cyclin-CDK complex. PMID:27626431

  18. Effect of position and weight force on inferior vena cava diameter--implications for arrest-related death.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jeffrey D; Dawes, Donald M; Moore, Johanna C; Caroon, Liberty V; Miner, James R

    2011-10-10

    The physiology of many sudden, unexpected arrest-related deaths (ARDs) proximate to restraint has not been elucidated. A sudden decrease in central venous return during restraint procedures could be physiologically detrimental. The impact of body position and applied weight force on central venous return has not been previously studied. In this study, we use ultrasound to measure the size of the inferior vena cava (IVC) as a surrogate of central venous return in the standing position, prone position, and with weight force applied to the thorax in the prone position. This was a prospective, observational study of volunteer human subjects. The IVC was visualized from the abdomen in both the longitudinal and transverse section in the standing and prone positions without weight force applied, and with 100 lbs (45 kg) and 147 lbs (67 kg) of weight force on the upper back in the prone position. Maximum and minimum measurements were determined in each section to account for possible respiratory variation of the IVC. The IVC significantly decreased in size with each successive change: from standing to prone, from prone to prone with 100 lbs (45 kg) weight compression, from prone with 100 lbs (45 kg) weight compression to prone with 147 lbs (67 kg) weight compression (p < 0.0001). The vital sign measurements had no statistical change. The physiology involved in many sudden, unexpected ARDs has not been elucidated. However, in our study, we found a significant decrease in IVC diameter with weight force compression to the upper thorax when the subject was in the prone position. This may have implications for the tactics of restraint to aid in the prevention of sudden, unexpected ARD cases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Understanding cell cycle and cell death regulation provides novel weapons against human diseases.

    PubMed

    Wiman, K G; Zhivotovsky, B

    2017-05-01

    Cell division, cell differentiation and cell death are the three principal physiological processes that regulate tissue homoeostasis in multicellular organisms. The growth and survival of cells as well as the integrity of the genome are regulated by a complex network of pathways, in which cell cycle checkpoints, DNA repair and programmed cell death have critical roles. Disruption of genomic integrity and impaired regulation of cell death may both lead to uncontrolled cell growth. Compromised cell death can also favour genomic instability. It is becoming increasingly clear that dysregulation of cell cycle and cell death processes plays an important role in the development of major disorders such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, infection, inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. Research achievements in these fields have led to the development of novel approaches for treatment of various conditions associated with abnormalities in the regulation of cell cycle progression or cell death. A better understanding of how cellular life-and-death processes are regulated is essential for this development. To highlight these important advances, the Third Nobel Conference entitled 'The Cell Cycle and Cell Death in Disease' was organized at Karolinska Institutet in 2016. In this review we will summarize current understanding of cell cycle progression and cell death and discuss some of the recent advances in therapeutic applications in pathological conditions such as cancer, neurological disorders and inflammation. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  20. An La-related protein controls cell cycle arrest by nuclear retrograde transport of tRNAs during diapause formation in Artemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dian-Fu; Lin, Cheng; Wang, Hong-Liang; Zhang, Li; Dai, Li; Jia, Sheng-Nan; Zhou, Rong; Li, Ran; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Fan; Clegg, James S; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2016-03-03

    In eukaryotes, tRNA trafficking between the nucleus and cytoplasm is a complex process connected with cell cycle regulation. Such trafficking is therefore of fundamental importance in cell biology, and disruption of this process has grave consequences for cell viability and survival. To cope with harsh habitats, Artemia has evolved a special reproductive mode to release encysted embryos in which cell division can be maintained in a dormancy state for a long period. Using Artemia as a peculiar model of the cell cycle, an La-related protein from Artemia, named Ar-Larp, was found to bind to tRNA and accumulate in the nucleus, leading to cell cycle arrest and controlling the onset of diapause formation in Artemia. Furthermore, exogenous gene expression of Ar-Larp could induce cell cycle arrest in cancer cells and suppress tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model, similar to the results obtained in diapause embryos of Artemia. Our study of tRNA trafficking indicated that Ar-Larp controls cell cycle arrest by binding to tRNAs and influencing their retrograde movement from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, which is connected to pathways involved in cell cycle checkpoints. These findings in Artemia offer new insights into the mechanism underlying cell cycle arrest regulation, as well as providing a potentially novel approach to study tRNA retrograde movement from the cytoplasm to the nucleus.

  1. Notch3 overexpression causes arrest of cell cycle progression by inducing Cdh1 expression in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Fa; Dou, Xiao-Wei; Liang, Yuan-Ke; Lin, Hao-Yu; Bai, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Xi-Xun; Wei, Xiao-Long; Li, Yao-Chen; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Uncontrolled cell proliferation, genomic instability and cancer are closely related to the abnormal activation of the cell cycle. Therefore, blocking the cell cycle of cancer cells has become one of the key goals for treating malignancies. Unfortunately, the factors affecting cell cycle progression remain largely unknown. In this study, we have explored the effects of Notch3 on the cell cycle in breast cancer cell lines by 3 methods: overexpressing the intra-cellular domain of Notch3 (N3ICD), knocking-down Notch3 by RNA interference, and using X-ray radiation exposure. The results revealed that overexpression of Notch3 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, and inhibited the proliferation and colony-formation rate in the breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, overexpressing N3ICD upregulated Cdh1 expression and resulted in p27Kip accumulation by accelerating Skp2 degradation. Conversely, silencing of Notch3 in the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, caused a decrease in expression levels of Cdh1 and p27Kip at both the protein and mRNA levels, while the expression of Skp2 only increased at the protein level. Correspondingly, there was an increase in the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase and an elevated proliferative ability and colony-formation rate, which may be caused by alterations of the Cdh1/Skp2/p27 axis. These results were also supported by exposing MDA-MB-231 cells or MCF-7 treated with siN3 to X-irradiation at various doses. Overall, our data showed that overexpression of N3ICD upregulated the expression of Cdh1 and caused p27Kip accumulation by accelerating Skp2 degradation, which in turn led to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, in the context of proliferating breast cancer cell lines. These findings help to illuminate the precision therapy targeted to cell cycle progression, required for cancer treatment. PMID:26694515

  2. Notch3 overexpression causes arrest of cell cycle progression by inducing Cdh1 expression in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Fa; Dou, Xiao-Wei; Liang, Yuan-Ke; Lin, Hao-Yu; Bai, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Xi-Xun; Wei, Xiao-Long; Li, Yao-Chen; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation, genomic instability and cancer are closely related to the abnormal activation of the cell cycle. Therefore, blocking the cell cycle of cancer cells has become one of the key goals for treating malignancies. Unfortunately, the factors affecting cell cycle progression remain largely unknown. In this study, we have explored the effects of Notch3 on the cell cycle in breast cancer cell lines by 3 methods: overexpressing the intra-cellular domain of Notch3 (N3ICD), knocking-down Notch3 by RNA interference, and using X-ray radiation exposure. The results revealed that overexpression of Notch3 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, and inhibited the proliferation and colony-formation rate in the breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, overexpressing N3ICD upregulated Cdh1 expression and resulted in p27(Kip) accumulation by accelerating Skp2 degradation. Conversely, silencing of Notch3 in the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, caused a decrease in expression levels of Cdh1 and p27(Kip) at both the protein and mRNA levels, while the expression of Skp2 only increased at the protein level. Correspondingly, there was an increase in the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase and an elevated proliferative ability and colony-formation rate, which may be caused by alterations of the Cdh1/Skp2/p27 axis. These results were also supported by exposing MDA-MB-231 cells or MCF-7 treated with siN3 to X-irradiation at various doses. Overall, our data showed that overexpression of N3ICD upregulated the expression of Cdh1 and caused p27(Kip) accumulation by accelerating Skp2 degradation, which in turn led to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, in the context of proliferating breast cancer cell lines. These findings help to illuminate the precision therapy targeted to cell cycle progression, required for cancer treatment.

  3. Ferulago angulata activates intrinsic pathway of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells associated with G1 cell cycle arrest via involvement of p21/p27.

    PubMed

    Karimian, Hamed; Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Golbabapour, Shahram; Razavi, Mahboubeh; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Arya, Aditya; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Mohan, Syam; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Noordin, Mohamad Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Ferulago angulata is a medicinal plant that is traditionally known for its anti-inflammatory and antiulcer properties. The present study was aimed to evaluate its anticancer activity and the possible mechanism of action using MCF-7 as an in vitro model. F. angulata leaf extracts were prepared using solvents in the order of increasing polarity. As determined by MTT assay, F. angulata leaves hexane extract (FALHE) revealed the strongest cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 5.3 ± 0.82 μg/mL. The acute toxicity study of FALHE provided evidence of the safety of the plant extract. Microscopic and flow cytometric analysis using annexin-V probe showed an induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 by FALHE. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with FALHE encouraged the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, with cell death transducing signals that reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential with cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol. The released cytochrome c triggered the activation of caspase-9. Meanwhile, the overexpression of caspase-8 suggested the involvement of an extrinsic pathway in the induced apoptosis at the late stage of treatment. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis showed that FALHE treatment significantly arrested MCF-7 cells in the G1 phase, which was associated with upregulation of p21 and p27 assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Immunofluorescence and the quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of MCF-7 cells after treatment with FALHE revealed an upregulation of Bax and a downregulation of Bcl-2 proteins. These findings proposed that FALHE suppressed the proliferation of MCF-7 cells via cell cycle arrest and the induction of apoptosis through intrinsic pathway.

  4. Early Activation of the Kynurenine Pathway Predicts Early Death and Long‐term Outcome in Patients Resuscitated From Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Latini, Roberto; Vaahersalo, Jukka; Masson, Serge; Kurola, Jouni; Varpula, Tero; Lucchetti, Jacopo; Fracasso, Claudia; Guiso, Giovanna; Montanelli, Alessandro; Barlera, Simona; Gobbi, Marco; Tiainen, Marjaana; Pettilä, Ville; Skrifvars, Markus B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The kynurenine pathway (KP) is the major route of tryptophan (TRP) catabolism and is activated by inflammation and after cardiac arrest in animals. We hypothesized that the KP activation level correlates with severity of post–cardiac arrest shock, early death, and long‐term outcome. Methods and Results Plasma was obtained from 245 patients enrolled in a prospective multicenter observational study in 21 intensive care units in Finland. Time to return of spontaneous circulation, lowest systolic arterial pressure, and bicarbonate during the first 24 hours were collected. A cerebral performance category of 3 to 5 defined 12‐month poor outcome. Plasma TRP and KP metabolites, kynurenine (KYN), kynurenic acid, 3‐hydroxyanthranilic acid, and the ratio of KYN to TRP were measured by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. All KP metabolites at intensive care unit admission were significantly higher in cardiac arrest patients with a nonshockable rhythm compared to those with a shockable rhythm, and kynurenic acid and 3‐hydroxyanthranilic acid correlated with time to return of spontaneous circulation. Patients with higher levels of KYN, KYN to TRP, kynurenic acid, and 3‐hydroxyanthranilic acid had lower 24‐hour systolic arterial pressure and bicarbonate. All KP metabolites and the ratio of KYN to TRP, but not TRP, were significantly higher in patients who died in the intensive care unit in comparison to those who survived. Multivariable logistic regression showed that high kynurenic acid (odds ratio: 1.004; 95% confidence interval: 1.001 to 1.008; P=0.014), and 3‐hydroxyanthranilic acid (odds ratio: 1.011; 95% confidence interval: 1.001 to 1.022; P=0.03) were independently associated with 12‐month poor outcome and significantly improved risk reclassification. Conclusions KP is activated early after cardiac arrest and is associated with severity of post–cardiac arrest shock, early death, and poor long‐term outcome. PMID:25092787

  5. Anti-cancer effect of Cordyceps militaris in human colorectal carcinoma RKO cells via cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Hee; Lee, Seulki; Lee, Kanghyo; Shin, Yu Su; Kang, Hyojeung; Cho, Hyosun

    2015-07-04

    Cordyceps militaris has been used as a traditional medicine in Asian countries for a long time. Different types of Cordyceps extract were reported to have various pharmacological activities including an anti-cancer effect. We investigated the inhibitory effect of Cordyceps militaris ethanol extract on a human colorectal cancer-derived cell line, RKO. RKO cells were treated with various concentrations of nucleosides-enriched ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris for 48 h and cytotoxicity was measured using a CCK-8 assay. Then, xenograft Balb/c nude mice were injected with RKO cells and subsequently orally administered with ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris every day for 3 weeks to examine the inhibitory effect on tumor growth. Lastly, the effect of Cordyceps militaris on cell cycle as well as apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry. Also, the expression of p53, caspase 9, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, Bim, Bax, Bak, and Bad were detected using western blot assay. RKO cells were highly susceptible to the ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris (CME) and the growth of RKO cells-derived tumor was significantly delayed by the treatment of Cordyceps militaris. Cordyceps militaris induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase (untreated; 20.5 %, CME 100 μg/ml; 61.67 %, CME 300 μg/ml; 66.33 %) and increased early apoptosis (untreated; 1.01 %, CME 100 μg/ml; 8.48 %, CME 300 μg/ml; 18.07 %). The expression of p53, cleaved caspase 9, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, Bim, Bak, and Bad were upregulated by the treatment of Cordyceps militaris. Ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris was highly cytotoxic to human colorectal carcinoma RKO cells and inhibited the growth of tumor in xenograft model. The anti-tumor effect of Cordyceps militaris was associated with an induction of cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis.

  6. SCYL1-BP1 affects cell cycle arrest in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells via Cyclin F and RRM2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhi, Qiaoming; Ye, Qin; Zhou, Chengyuan; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Wei; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Di; Li, Pu; Huo, Keke

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle is regulated via important biological mechanisms. Controlled expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins is crucial to maintain cell cycle progression. However, unbalanced protein expression leads to many diseases, such as cancer. Previous research suggests that SCYL1-BP1 function might be related to cell cycle progression and SCYL1-BP1 dysfunction to diseases through undefined mechanisms. In this research, an unbiased yeast two-hybrid screen was used to find protein(s) with potential biological relevance to SCYL1-BP1 function, and a novel interaction was recognized between SCYL1-BP1 and Cyclin F. This interaction was chosen as a paradigm to study SCYL1-BP1 function in cell cycle progression and its possible role in tumorigenesis. We found that SCYL1-BP1 binds to Cyclin F both in vivo and in vitro. SCYL1-BP1 overexpression promoted expression of the CCNF gene and simultaneously delayed Cyclin F protein degradation. SCYL1-BP1 knockdown reduced the expression of endogenous Cyclin F. It was also demonstrated in functional assays that SCYL1-BP1 overexpression induces G2/M arrest in cultured liver cells. Furthermore, SCYL1-BP1 sustained RRM2 protein expression by reducing its ubiquitination. Thus, we propose that SCYL1- BP1 affects the cell cycle through increasing steady state levels of Cyclin F and RRM2 proteins, thus constituting a dual regulatory circuit. This study provides a possible mechanism for SCYL1-BP1-mediated cell cycle regulation and related diseases.

  7. High fat diet triggers cell cycle arrest and excessive apoptosis of granulosa cells during the follicular development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanqing; Zhang, Zhenghong; Liao, Xinghui; Wang, Zhengchao

    2015-10-23

    The regulatory mechanism of granulosa cells (GCs) proliferation during the follicular development is complicated and multifactorial, which is essential for the oocyte growth and normal ovarian functions. To investigate the role of high fat diet (HFD) on the proliferation of GCs, 4-week old female mice were fed with HFD or normal control diet (NC) for 15 weeks or 20 weeks and then detected the expression level of some regulatory molecules of cell cycle and apoptosis. The abnormal ovarian morphology was observed at 20 weeks. Further mechanistic studies indicated that HFD induced-obesity caused elevated apoptotic levels in GCs of the ovaries in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, cell cycle progress was also impacted after HFD fed. The cell cycle inhibitors, p27(Kip1) and p21(Cip1), were significantly induced in the ovaries from the mice in HFD group when compared with that in the ovaries from the mice in NC group. Subsequently, the expression levels of Cyclin D1, D3 and CDK4 were also significantly influenced in the ovaries from the mice fed with HFD in a time-dependent manner. The present results suggested that HFD induced-obesity may trigger cell cycle arrest and excessive apoptosis of GCs, causing the abnormal follicular development and ovarian function failure.

  8. Evodiamine Prevents Glioma Growth, Induces Glioblastoma Cell Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest through JNK Activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Shin; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Liu, Kao-Hui; Chen, Yen-Chou; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2017-01-01

    Evodiamine (EVO) is an active medicinal compound derived from the traditional herbal medicine Evodia rutaecarpa. It has been reported that evodiamine has several beneficial biological properties, including anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities of EVO against the growth of glioblastoma cells remain undefined. EVO induced significant decreases in the viability of U87 and C6 glioma cells, but not of primary astrocytes, according with the occurrence of apoptotic characteristics including DNA ladders, caspase-3 and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein cleavage, and hypodiploid cells. The disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was detected, and it was found that the peptidyl caspase-9 inhibitor, Z-LEHD-FMK, significantly prevented glioma cells from EVO-induced apoptosis. Increased c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) protein phosphorylation by EVO was observed, and the addition of JNK inhibitors, SP600125 and JNKI inhibited the EVO-induced apoptosis was inhibited. Additionally, EVO treatment induced G2/M arrest with increased polymerized tubulin protein expression in U87 and C6 cells. Elevated expressions of the cyclin B1, p53, and phosphorylated (p)-p53 proteins were detected in EVO-treated glioma cells, and these were inhibited by JNK inhibitors. An in vivo study showed that EVO significantly reduced the growth of gliomas elicited by the subcutaneous injection of U87 cells with increases in cyclin B1, p53, and p-p53 protein expressions in tumors. An analysis of eight EVO-related chemicals showed that alkyl groups at position 14 in EVO are important for its anti-glioma effects which involve both apoptosis and G2/M arrest. Evidence is provided that supports EVO induction of apoptosis and G2/M arrest via the activation of JNK-mediated gene expression and disruption of MMP in glioblastoma cells. EVO was shown to penetrate the blood-brain barrier; EVO is therefore predicted to be a promising

  9. Rice hull extracts inhibit proliferation of MCF-7 cells with G₁ cell cycle arrest in parallel with their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Chung, Nam-Jin; Choi, Ki-Choon; Lee, Seung-Ah; Baek, Jin-A; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2015-03-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been a major dietary staple worldwide for centuries. Growing interest in the beneficial effects of antioxidants has inspired investigation of rice hulls as an attractive source of chemopreventive compounds for breast cancer intervention. We prepared methanol extracts from rice hulls of three Korean bred cultivars (japonica), Ilpum, Heugjinju, and Jeogjinju, and one japonica weedy rice, WD-3. We examined the antiproliferative potential of the hull extracts on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and the related mechanisms thereof. Hull extracts inhibited proliferation of the cells and mediated G0/G1 phase arrest by suppressing cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, where WD-3 extract showed the most potent. Blockage of p21 expression by small interfering RNA transfection attenuated G1 phase arrest induced by WD-3 extract. The WD-3 extract exhibited greater antioxidant potential and total phenolic compounds, compared with other rice hulls. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis for the F4 fractioned from WD-3 extract revealed that cinnamic acid derivatives were the major active constituents. The F4 fraction most potently inhibited proliferation of MCF-7 cells than WD-3 extract through the suppression of cell cycle regulatory factors. Collectively, our results suggest that the pigmented rice hulls possess greater antioxidant and chemopreventive activity against breast cancer than the other rice cultivars tested, demonstrating that WD-3 rice hulls are an attractive source of chemopreventive bioactive compounds.

  10. Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation Induces G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest in Brain Pericytes Associated with ERK Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenjie; Yu, Zhiyuan; Xie, Minjie; Wang, Wei; Luo, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence has revealed that brain pericytes are multifunctional and contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of neurological disorders. However, the role of pericytes in cerebral ischemia, and especially the pathophysiological alterations in pericytes, remains unclear. In the present study, our aim was to determine whether the proliferation of pericytes is affected by cerebral ischemia and, if so, to identify the underlying mechanism(s). Cultured brain pericytes subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) were used as our model of cerebral ischemia; the protein expression levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cdk4, and cyclin B1 were determined by Western blot analysis, and cell cycle analysis was assessed by flow cytometry. The OGD treatment reduced the brain pericyte proliferation by causing G2/M phase arrest and downregulating the protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cdk4, and cyclin B1. Further studies demonstrated a simultaneous decrease in the activity of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK), suggesting a critical role of the ERK signaling cascade in the inhibition of OGD-induced pericyte proliferation. We suggest that OGD inhibition of the proliferation of brain pericytes is associated with the inactivation of the ERK signaling pathway, which arrests them in the G2/M phase.

  11. Effects of hormone agonists on Sf9 cells, proliferation and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, Maeva; Califano, Jérôme; Hilliou, Frédérique; Tran, Trang; Taquet, Nathalie; Feyereisen, René; Le Goff, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    Methoxyfenozide and methoprene are two insecticides that mimic the action of the main hormones involved in the control of insect growth and development, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. We investigated their effect on the Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cell line. Methoxyfenozide was more toxic than methoprene in cell viability tests and more potent in the inhibition of cellular proliferation. Cell growth arrest occurred in the G2/M phase after a methoprene treatment and more modestly in G1 after methoxyfenozide treatment. Microarray experiments and real-time quantitative PCR to follow the expression of nuclear receptors ultraspiracle and ecdysone receptor were performed to understand the molecular action of these hormone agonists. Twenty-six genes were differentially expressed after methoxyfenozide treatment and 55 genes after methoprene treatment with no gene in common between the two treatments. Our results suggest two different signalling pathways in Sf9 cells.

  12. Review of Chromium (VI) Apoptosis, Cell-Cycle-Arrest, and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, A; Shi, J; Lee, WKP; Hill, R; Wakeman, TP; Katz, A; Xu, B; Dalal, NS; Robertson, JD; Chen, C; Chiu, N; Donehower, L

    2014-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium combines with glutathione in chloride intracellular channel carrier to form tetravalent and pentavelent chromium in plasma and organelle membranes. It also combines with NADH/NADPH to form pentavalent chromium in mitochondria. Tetravalent- and pentavalent- chromium (directly and indirectly) mediated DNA double strand breaks activate DNA damage signaling sensors: DNA-dependent-protein-kinase signals p53-dependent intrinsic mitochorndrial apoptosis, and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated and ataxia-telangiectasia-Rad3-related signal cell-arrest for DNA repair. Tetravalent chromium may be the most potent species since it causes DNA breaks and somatic recombination, but not apoptosis. Upon further failure of apoptosis and senescence/DNA-repair, damaged cells may become immortal with loss-of-heterozygosity and genetic plasticity. PMID:20859824

  13. Effects of Hormone Agonists on Sf9 Cells, Proliferation and Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Giraudo, Maeva; Califano, Jérôme; Hilliou, Frédérique; Tran, Trang; Taquet, Nathalie; Feyereisen, René; Le Goff, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    Methoxyfenozide and methoprene are two insecticides that mimic the action of the main hormones involved in the control of insect growth and development, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. We investigated their effect on the Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cell line. Methoxyfenozide was more toxic than methoprene in cell viability tests and more potent in the inhibition of cellular proliferation. Cell growth arrest occurred in the G2/M phase after a methoprene treatment and more modestly in G1 after methoxyfenozide treatment. Microarray experiments and real-time quantitative PCR to follow the expression of nuclear receptors ultraspiracle and ecdysone receptor were performed to understand the molecular action of these hormone agonists. Twenty-six genes were differentially expressed after methoxyfenozide treatment and 55 genes after methoprene treatment with no gene in common between the two treatments. Our results suggest two different signalling pathways in Sf9 cells. PMID:21991338

  14. Gene expression profiling analysis reveals arsenic-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in p53-proficient and p53-deficient cells through differential gene pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xiaozhong Robinson, Joshua F.; Gribble, Elizabeth; Hong, Sung Woo; Sidhu, Jaspreet S.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2008-12-15

    Arsenic (As) is a well-known environmental toxicant and carcinogen as well as an effective chemotherapeutic agent. The underlying mechanism of this dual capability, however, is not fully understood. Tumor suppressor gene p53, a pivotal cell cycle checkpoint signaling protein, has been hypothesized to play a possible role in mediating As-induced toxicity and therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we found that arsenite (As{sup 3+}) induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner in both p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). There was, however, a distinction between genotypes in the apoptotic response, with a more prominent induction of caspase-3 in the p53{sup -/-} cells than in the p53{sup +/+} cells. To examine this difference further, a systems-based genomic analysis was conducted comparing the critical molecular mechanisms between the p53 genotypes in response to As{sup 3+}. A significant alteration in the Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway was found in both genotypes. In p53{sup +/+} MEFs, As{sup 3+} induced p53-dependent gene expression alterations in DNA damage and cell cycle regulation genes. However, in the p53{sup -/-} MEFs, As{sup 3+} induced a significant up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes (Noxa) and down-regulation of genes in immune modulation. Our findings demonstrate that As-induced cell death occurs through a p53-independent pathway in p53 deficient cells while apoptosis induction occurs through p53-dependent pathway in normal tissue. This difference in the mechanism of apoptotic responses between the genotypes provides important information regarding the apparent dichotomy of arsenic's dual mechanisms, and potentially leads to further advancement of its utility as a chemotherapeutic agent.

  15. Low concentrations of the toxin ophiobolin A lead to an arrest of the cell cycle and alter the intracellular partitioning of glutathione between the nuclei and cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Locato, Vittoria; Uzal, Esther Novo; Cimini, Sara; Zonno, Maria Chiara; Evidente, Antonio; Micera, Alessandra; Foyer, Christine H; De Gara, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Ophiobolin A, a tetracyclic sesterpenoid produced by phytopathogenic fungi, is responsible for catastrophic losses in crop yield but its mechanism of action is not understood. The effects of ophiobolin A were therefore investigated on the growth and redox metabolism of Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (TBY-2) cell cultures by applying concentrations of the toxin that did not promote cell death. At concentrations between 2 and 5 μM, ophiobolin A inhibited growth and proliferation of the TBY-2 cells, which remained viable. Microscopic and cytofluorimetric analyses showed that ophiobolin A treatment caused a rapid decrease in mitotic index, with a lower percentage of the cells at G1 and increased numbers of cells at the S/G2 phases. Cell size was not changed following treatment suggesting that the arrest of cell cycle progression was not the result of a block on cell growth. The characteristic glutathione redox state and the localization of glutathione in the nucleus during cell proliferation were not changed by ophiobolin A. However, subsequent decreases in glutathione and the re-distribution of glutathione between the cytoplasm and nuclei after mitosis occurring in control cells, as well as the profile of glutathionylated proteins, were changed in the presence of the toxin. The profile of poly ADP-ribosylated proteins were also modified by ophiobolin A. Taken together, these data provide evidence of the mechanism of ophiobolin A action as a cell cycle inhibitor and further demonstrate the link between nuclear glutathione and the cell cycle regulation, suggesting that glutathione-dependent redox controls in the nuclei prior to cell division are of pivotal importance.

  16. Chromosome Mis-segregation Generates Cell-Cycle-Arrested Cells with Complex Karyotypes that Are Eliminated by the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Santaguida, Stefano; Richardson, Amelia; Iyer, Divya Ramalingam; M'Saad, Ons; Zasadil, Lauren; Knouse, Kristin A; Wong, Yao Liang; Rhind, Nicholas; Desai, Arshad; Amon, Angelika

    2017-06-19

    Aneuploidy, a state of karyotype imbalance, is a hallmark of cancer. Changes in chromosome copy number have been proposed to drive disease by modulating the dosage of cancer driver genes and by promoting cancer genome evolution. Given the potential of cells with abnormal karyotypes to become cancerous, do pathways that limit the prevalence of such cells exist? By investigating the immediate consequences of aneuploidy on cell physiology, we identified mechanisms that eliminate aneuploid cells. We find that chromosome mis-segregation leads to further genomic instability that ultimately causes cell-cycle arrest. We further show that cells with complex karyotypes exhibit features of senescence and produce pro-inflammatory signals that promote their clearance by the immune system. We propose that cells with abnormal karyotypes generate a signal for their own elimination that may serve as a means for cancer cell immunosurveillance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Targeting HGF/c-MET induces cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, and apoptosis for primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Cao, Yueyu; Bonstaff, Karlie; Doyle, Lisa; Del Valle, Luis; Whitby, Denise; Parsons, Chris; Reiss, Krzysztof; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2015-12-24

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a principal causative agent of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) with a poor prognosis in immunocompromised patients. However, it still lacks effective treatment which urgently requires the identification of novel therapeutic targets for PEL. Here, we report that the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-MET pathway is highly activated by KSHV in vitro and in vivo. The selective c-MET inhibitor, PF-2341066, can induce PEL apoptosis through cell cycle arrest and DNA damage, and suppress tumor progression in a xenograft murine model. By using microarray analysis, we identify many novel genes that are potentially controlled by HGF/c-MET within PEL cells. One of the downstream candidates, ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase subunit M2 (RRM2), also displays the promising therapeutic value for PEL treatment. Our findings provide the framework for development of HGF/c-MET-focused therapy and implementation of clinical trials for PEL patients.

  18. Targeting HGF/c-MET induces cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, and apoptosis for primary effusion lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lu; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Cao, Yueyu; Bonstaff, Karlie; Doyle, Lisa; Del Valle, Luis; Whitby, Denise; Parsons, Chris; Reiss, Krzysztof; Zabaleta, Jovanny

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a principal causative agent of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) with a poor prognosis in immunocompromised patients. However, it still lacks effective treatment which urgently requires the identification of novel therapeutic targets for PEL. Here, we report that the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-MET pathway is highly activated by KSHV in vitro and in vivo. The selective c-MET inhibitor, PF-2341066, can induce PEL apoptosis through cell cycle arrest and DNA damage, and suppress tumor progression in a xenograft murine model. By using microarray analysis, we identify many novel genes that are potentially controlled by HGF/c-MET within PEL cells. One of the downstream candidates, ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase subunit M2 (RRM2), also displays the promising therapeutic value for PEL treatment. Our findings provide the framework for development of HGF/c-MET–focused therapy and implementation of clinical trials for PEL patients. PMID:26531163

  19. Lipoxygenase inhibitors induce arrest of tumor cells in S-phase of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Hofmanová, J; Soucek, K; Pacherník, J; Kovaríková, M; Hoferová, Z; Minksová, K; Netíková, J; Kozubík, A

    2002-01-01

    Inhibitors of the lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism represent a potential anti-tumor drugs. These compounds have been found to inhibit the growth and induce the apoptosis of various tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, the effects of the lipoxygenase inhibitors esculetin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) on the progression of the cell cycle were investigated in eight mammalian cell lines of different origin. Flow cytometric analyses of cell cycle distribution after staining of DNA with propidium iodide or 7-aminoactinomycin D and DNA synthesis using incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine showed that both esculetin and NDGA suppress cell growth by interrupting the progression of cells through S-phase that results in their accumulation in this phase of the cell cycle. The possible mechanisms of these effects and the significance of the findings for the improvement of anticancer therapy targeted on cell cycle is discussed.

  20. Eriocalyxin B induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through caspase- and p53-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lin; Yue, Grace G.L.; Lau, Clara B.S.; Sun, Handong; Fung, Kwok Pui; Leung, Ping Chung; Han, Quanbin; Leung, Po Sing

    2012-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect early and responds poorly to chemotherapy. A breakthrough in the development of new therapeutic agents is urgently needed. Eriocalyxin B (EriB), isolated from the Isodon eriocalyx plant, is an ent-kaurane diterpenoid with promise as a broad-spectrum anti-cancer agent. The anti-leukemic activity of EriB, including the underlying mechanisms involved, has been particularly well documented. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time EriB's potent cytotoxicity against four pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, namely PANC-1, SW1990, CAPAN-1, and CAPAN-2. The effects were comparable to that of the chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CAM), but with much lower toxicity against normal human liver WRL68 cells. EriB's cytoxicity against CAPAN-2 cells was found to involve caspase-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. Moreover, the p53 pathway was found to be activated by EriB in these cells. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that EriB inhibited the growth of human pancreatic tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice without significant secondary adverse effects. These results suggest that EriB should be considered a candidate for pancreatic cancer treatment. -- Highlights: ► We study Eriocalyxin B (EriB)'s cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cell lines. ► EriB inhibits cell proliferation via mediation of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. ► The effects are involved in caspase-dependent apoptosis and p53 pathway. ► In vivo study also shows EriB inhibits the growth of human pancreatic tumor. ► EriB can be a good candidate for chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

  1. Supercritical carbon dioxide extract of Physalis peruviana induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human lung cancer H661 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Jing; Chang, Shun-Pang; Lin, Doung-Liang; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Hou, Fwu-Feuu; Ng, Lean-Teik

    2009-06-01

    Physalis peruviana L. (PP) is a popular folk medicine used for treating cancer, leukemia, hepatitis, rheumatism and other diseases. In this study, our objectives were to examine the total flavonoid and phenol content of different PP extracts (aqueous: HWEPP; ethanolic: EEPP; supercritical carbon dioxide: SCEPP-0, SCEPP-4 and SCEPP-5) and their antiproliferative effects in human lung cancer H661 cells. Among all the extracts tested, results showed that SCEPP-5 possessed the highest total flavonoid (226.19 +/- 4.15 mg/g) and phenol (100.82 +/- 6.25 mg/g) contents. SCEPP-5 also demonstrated the most potent inhibitory effect on H661 cell proliferation. Using DNA ladder and flow cytometry analysis, SCEPP-5 effectively induced H661 cell apoptosis as demonstrated by the accumulation of Sub-G1 peak and fragmentation of DNA. SCEPP-5 not only induced cell cycle arrest at S phase, it also up-regulated the expression of pro-apoptotic protein (Bax) and down-regulated the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP). Furthermore, the apoptotic induction in H661 cells was found to associate with an elevated p53 protein expression, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Taken together, these results conclude that SCEPP-5 induced cell cycle arrest at S phase, and its apoptotic induction could be mediated through the p53-dependent pathway and modification of Bax and XIAP proteins expression. The results have also provided important pharmacological backgrounds for the potential use of PP supercritical fluid extract as products for cancer prevention.

  2. AM251 induces apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in A375 human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Sara; Fogli, Stefano; Romanini, Antonella; Pellegrino, Mario; Adinolfi, Barbara; Podestà, Adriano; Costa, Barbara; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Martini, Claudia; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Nieri, Paola

    2015-08-01

    Human cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive and chemotherapy-resistant type of cancer. AM251 is a cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor antagonist/inverse agonist with off-target antitumor activity against pancreatic and colon cancer cells. The current study aimed to characterize the in-vitro antimelanoma activity of AM251. The BRAF V600E mutant melanoma cell line, A375, was used as an in-vitro model system. Characterization tools included a cell viability assay, nuclear morphology assessment, gene expression, western blot, flow cytometry with Annexin V-FITC/7-AAD double staining, cell cycle analyses, and measurements of changes in intracellular cAMP and calcium concentrations. AM251 exerted a marked cytotoxic effect against A375 human melanoma cells with potency comparable with that observed for cisplatin without significant changes in the human dermal fibroblasts viability. AM251, at a concentration that approximates the IC50, downregulated genes encoding antiapoptotic proteins (BCL2 and survivin) and increased transcription levels of proapoptotic BAX, induced alteration of Annexin V reactivity, DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation in the cell nuclei, and G2/M phase arrest.AM251 also induced a 40% increase in the basal cAMP levels, but it did not affect intracellular calcium concentrations. The involvement of GPR55, TRPA1, and COX-2 in the AM251 mechanism of action was excluded. The combination of AM251 with celecoxib produced a synergistic antitumor activity, although the mechanism underlying this effect remains to be elucidated. This study provides the first evidence of a proapoptotic effect and G2/M cell cycle arrest of AM251 on A375 cells. This compound may be a potential prototype for the development of promising diarylpyrazole derivatives to be evaluated in human cutaneous melanoma.

  3. Phenylhydroquinone induces loss of thymocytes through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis elevation in p53-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Yuichiro; Nishi, Kosuke; Nishimoto, Sogo; Sugahara, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    ortho-Phenylphenol has been employed in post-harvest treatment of citrus fruits. Although o-phenylphenol has been reported to cause carcinomas in the urinary tract in rats, toxicity to the immune organs is still unknown. Herein, we report that administration of o-phenylphenol induces thymic atrophy and loss of thymocytes in female BALB/c mice. The influence seems to result from inhibition of the thymocyte development, because increased and decreased populations of the CD4⁻ CD8⁻ double-negative and CD4⁺ CD8⁺ double-positive thymocytes were observed in the o-phenylphenol-administered mice, respectively. ortho-Phenylphenol is metabolized to phenylhydroquinone by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. Phenylhydroquinone made cell cycle of thymocytes to be arrested through reduced expression of the genes associated with G₂/M phase and through phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15. Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 was upregulated by activation of not only ATR but also Erk1/2 and p38, leading to increase of apoptosis. Gene expression of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) was promoted in thymocytes from the o-phenylphenol-administered mice. Overall, our results suggest that o-phenylphenol induces CYP1A1 expression and is metabolized into phenylhydroquinone by the expressed CYP1A1 in thymocytes. The produced phenylhydroquinone in turn induces inhibition of thymocyte development through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the p53-dependent pathway.

  4. Lobaplatin arrests cell cycle progression, induces apoptosis and alters the proteome in human cervical cancer cell Line CaSki.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqin; Ran, Li; Fang, Wen; Wang, Donghong

    2014-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynecologic tumors. There is an upward trend in the incidence. The objective of this research was to explore the effect of lobaplatin on cervical cancer CaSki cells proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis and analysis of the differential expressed proteins of CaSki cells after exposed to lobaplatin. Our findings have shown that lobaplatin inhibits cell proliferations in human cervical cancer CaSki cells in dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry assay confirmed that lobaplatin affected cervical cancer cell survival by blocking cell cycle progression in S phase and G0/G1 phase and inducing apoptosis in dose- and time-dependent manner. Lobaplatin treatment reduced polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 2, ribose-phosphate pyrophosphokinase, hypothetical protein, terminal uridylyltransferase 7, ubiquitin specific protease 16 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 expression and increase zinc finger protein 91, zinc finger protein, C-X-C motif chemokine 10 precursor, stromal cell protein and laminin subunit alpha-4 expression. Some of the differentially expressed proteins may be associated with antitumor effect of lobaplatin. Lobaplatin showed a good antitumour activity in in vitro models of human cervical cancer cells. These results indicate that lobaplatin could be an effective chemotherapeutic agent in human cervical cancer treatment by inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and changing many kinds of protein molecule expression level.

  5. Low-selenium diet induces cell cycle arrest of thymocytes and alters serum IL-2 content in chickens.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xi; Cui, Hengmin; Yuan, Jingxin; Cui, Wei; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Pan, Kangcheng; Zhou, Yi; Lai, Weimin

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this 42-day study was to investigate the effects of low selenium (Se) on cellular immune function by determining cell cycle of thymus, serum IL-2 content, and mitogenesis of peripheral blood T-lymphocytes. One hundred twenty 1-day-old Avian broilers were randomly assigned to two groups of 60 each and were fed on a low-Se diet (0.0342 mg/kg Se) or a control diet (0.2 mg/kg Se), respectively. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry showed that low-Se diet caused an increase in G(0)G(1) phase cells that corresponded to a decrease in S-phase cells in thymus. Ultrastructurally, mitochondria injury and increased apoptotic cells with condensed nuclei were observed. Low-Se diet decreased the serum IL-2 contents and mitogenesis of peripheral blood lymphocytes to concanavalin A in comparison with those of control group. These data indicate that low-Se diet inhibits the development of thymus by arresting the cell cycle and decreasing the IL-2 content.

  6. Decursin inhibits growth of human bladder and colon cancer cells via apoptosis, G1-phase cell cycle arrest and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wun-Jae; Lee, Se-Jung; Choi, Young Deuk; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2010-04-01

    Decursin, a pyranocoumarin isolated from the Korean Angelica gigas root, has demonstrated anti-cancer properties. In the present study, we found that decursin inhibited cell viability in cultured human urinary bladder cancer 235J cells and colon cancer HCT116 cells. The inhibited proliferation was due to apoptotic induction, because both cells treated with decursin dose-dependently showed a sub-G1 phase accumulation and an increased cytoplasmic DNA-histone complex. Cell death caused by decursin was also associated with the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 and the up-regulation of pro-apoptotic molecules cytochrome c, caspase 3 and Bax. Treatment of both types of cancer cells with decursin resulted in G1-phase cell cycle arrest, as revealed by FACS analyses. In addition, decursin increased protein levels of p21WAF1 with a decrease in cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). Furthermore, decursin induced the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) in both cancer cell lines, with the notable exceptions of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. Finally, pretreatment with ERK-specific inhibitor PD98059 reversed decursin-induced p21WAF1 expression and decursin-inhibited cell growth. Thus, these findings suggest that decursin has potential therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of bladder and colon cancer.

  7. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Transactivator Rta Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in G0/G1 Phase by Stabilizing and Promoting Nuclear Localization of p27kip

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) immediate-early gene, replication, and transcription activator (K-Rta) is a key viral protein that serves as the master regulator for viral lytic replication. In this study, we investigated the role of K-Rta in cell cycle regulation and found that the expression of K-Rta in doxycycline (Dox)-inducible BJAB cells induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Western blot analysis of key cell cycle regulators revealed that K-Rta-mediated cell cycle arrest was associated with a decrease in cyclin A and phosphorylated Rb (pS807/pS811) protein levels, both markers of S phase progression, and an increase in protein levels for p27, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Further, we found that K-Rta does not affect the transcription of p27 but regulates p27 at the posttranslational level by inhibiting its proteosomal degradation. Immunofluorescence staining and cell fractionation experiments revealed largely nuclear compartmentalization of p27 in K-Rta-expressing cells, demonstrating that K-Rta not only stabilizes p27 but also modulates its cellular localization. Finally, short hairpin RNA knockdown of p27 significantly abrogates cell cycle arrest in K-Rta-expressing cells, supporting its key role in K-Rta-mediated cell cycle arrest. Our findings are consistent with previous studies which showed that expression of immediate-early genes of several herpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus, results in cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, possibly to avoid competition for resources needed for host cell replication during the S phase. PMID:24067984

  8. Silencing HCCR2 expression inhibits the proliferation of leukemia cells by inducing apoptosis and promoting cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shu-Kai; Ren, Han-Yun; Shi, Yong-Jin; Liu, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The human cervical cancer oncogene (HCCR2) has been found to be overexpressed in a variety of human malignant tumors cells, and its function is related to cell cycle progression and survival. However, the molecular mechanisms of action of HCCR2 in leukemia remain unclear. In this study, we used the RNA interference strategy to investigate the effects of HCCR2 knockdown in the K562 leukemia cell line, and to explore the potential mechanisms involved. Following transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting HCCR2 (HCCR2-siRNA), we examined the effects of HCCR2 knockdown on cell morphology, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in K562 cells. Morphological changes were evaluated by Wright-Giemsa staining. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry. The expression levels of genes related to the cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot analysis. HCCR2 expression at the mRNA and protein level was significantly decreased following transfection with plasmids expressing HCCR2-siRNA. Silencing HCCR2 expression significantly suppressed cell proliferation, induced G1 cell cycle arrest and promoted the apoptosis of K562 cells. Additionally, we found that the expression of Bax, p53 and p21 was significantly increased, while Bcl-2 expression was significantly decreased in the HCCR2-siRNA-transfected cells. However, the expression of p27 was not affected. These results suggest that the HCCR2 gene plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of leukemia, thus making it an attractive therapeutic target for acute leukemia.

  9. Protein PSMD8 may mediate microgravity-induced cell cycle arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Xiaoming; Sun, Yeqing; Xu, Dan; Wu, Di; Chen, Xiaoning

    Microgravity environment of space can induce a serial of changes in cells, such as morphology alterations, cytoskeleton disorder and cell cycle disturbance. Our previous study of simulated-microgravity on zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos demonstrated 26s proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 8 (PSMD8) might be a microgravity sensitive gene. However, functional study on PSMD8 is very limited and it has not been cloned in zebrafish till now. In this study, we tried to clone PSMD8 gene in zebrafish, quantify its protein expression level in zebrafish embryos after simulated microgravity and identify its possible function in cell cycle regulation. A rotary cell culture system (RCCS) designed by national aeronautics and apace administration (NASA) of America was used to simulate microgravity. The full-length of psmd8 gene in zebrafish was cloned. Preliminary analysis on its sequence and phylogenetic tree construction were carried out subsequently. Quantitative analysis by western blot showed that PSMD8 protein expression levels were significantly increased 1.18 and 1.22 times after 24-48hpf and 24-72hpf simulated microgravity, respectively. Moreover, a significant delay on zebrafish embryo development was found in simulated-microgravity exposed group. Inhibition of PSMD8 protein in zebrafish embryonic cell lines ZF4 could block cell cycle in G1 phase, which indicated that PSMD8 may play a role in cell cycle regulation. Interestingly, simulated-microgravity could also block ZF4 cell in G1 phase. Whether it is PSMD8 mediated cell cycle regulation result in the zebrafish embryo development delay after simulated microgravity exposure still needs further study. Key Words: PSMD8; Simulated-microgravity; Cell cycle; ZF4 cell line

  10. Caveolin-1 expression negatively regulates cell cycle progression by inducing G(0)/G(1) arrest via a p53/p21(WAF1/Cip1)-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, F; Volonté, D; Liu, J; Capozza, F; Frank, P G; Zhu, L; Pestell, R G; Lisanti, M P

    2001-08-01

    Caveolin-1 is a principal component of caveolae membranes in vivo. Caveolin-1 mRNA and protein expression are lost or reduced during cell transformation by activated oncogenes. Interestingly, the human caveolin-1 gene is localized to a suspected tumor suppressor locus (7q31.1). However, it remains unknown whether caveolin-1 plays any role in regulating cell cycle progression. Here, we directly demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression arrests cells in the G(0)/G(1) phase of the cell cycle. We show that serum starvation induces up-regulation of endogenous caveolin-1 and arrests cells in the G(0)/G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, targeted down-regulation of caveolin-1 induces cells to exit the G(0)/G(1) phase. Next, we constructed a green fluorescent protein-tagged caveolin-1 (Cav-1-GFP) to examine the effect of caveolin-1 expression on cell cycle regulation. We directly demonstrate that recombinant expression of Cav-1-GFP induces arrest in the G(0)/G(1) phase of the cell cycle. To examine whether caveolin-1 expression is important for modulating cell cycle progression in vivo, we expressed wild-type caveolin-1 as a transgene in mice. Analysis of primary cultures of mouse embryonic fibroblasts from caveolin-1 transgenic mice reveals that caveolin-1 induces 1) cells to exit the S phase of the cell cycle with a concomitant increase in the G(0)/G(1) population, 2) a reduction in cellular proliferation, and 3) a reduction in the DNA replication rate. Finally, we demonstrate that caveolin-1-mediated cell cycle arrest occurs through a p53/p21-dependent pathway. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that caveolin-1 expression plays a critical role in the modulation of cell cycle progression in vivo.

  11. Caveolin-1 Expression Negatively Regulates Cell Cycle Progression by Inducing G0/G1 Arrest via a p53/p21WAF1/Cip1-dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Galbiati, Ferruccio; Volonte', Daniela; Liu, Jun; Capozza, Franco; Frank, Philippe G.; Zhu, Liang; Pestell, Richard G.; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is a principal component of caveolae membranes in vivo. Caveolin-1 mRNA and protein expression are lost or reduced during cell transformation by activated oncogenes. Interestingly, the human caveolin-1 gene is localized to a suspected tumor suppressor locus (7q31.1). However, it remains unknown whether caveolin-1 plays any role in regulating cell cycle progression. Here, we directly demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression arrests cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. We show that serum starvation induces up-regulation of endogenous caveolin-1 and arrests cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, targeted down-regulation of caveolin-1 induces cells to exit the G0/G1 phase. Next, we constructed a green fluorescent protein-tagged caveolin-1 (Cav-1-GFP) to examine the effect of caveolin-1 expression on cell cycle regulation. We directly demonstrate that recombinant expression of Cav-1-GFP induces arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. To examine whether caveolin-1 expression is important for modulating cell cycle progression in vivo, we expressed wild-type caveolin-1 as a transgene in mice. Analysis of primary cultures of mouse embryonic fibroblasts from caveolin-1 transgenic mice reveals that caveolin-1 induces 1) cells to exit the S phase of the cell cycle with a concomitant increase in the G0/G1 population, 2) a reduction in cellular proliferation, and 3) a reduction in the DNA replication rate. Finally, we demonstrate that caveolin-1-mediated cell cycle arrest occurs through a p53/p21-dependent pathway. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that caveolin-1 expression plays a critical role in the modulation of cell cycle progression in vivo. PMID:11514613

  12. Dissociation of centrosome replication events from cycles of DNA synthesis and mitotic division in hydroxyurea-arrested Chinese hamster ovary cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the mechanisms used by somatic cells to regulate the replication of the centrosome complex. Centrosome doubling was studied in CHO cells by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy using human autoimmune anticentrosome antiserum, and by Northern blotting using the cDNA encoding portion of the centrosome autoantigen pericentriolar material (PCM)-1. Centrosome doubling could be dissociated from cycles of DNA synthesis and mitotic division by arresting cells at the G1/S boundary of the cell cycle using either hydroxyurea or aphidicolin. Immunofluorescence micros-copy using SPJ human autoimmune anticentrosome antiserum demonstrated that arrested cells were able to undergo numerous rounds of centrosome replication in the absence of cycles of DNA synthesis and mitosis. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the synthesis and degradation of the mRNA encoding PCM-1 occurred in a cell cycle-dependent fashion in CHO cells with peak levels of PCM-1 mRNA being present in G1 and S phase cells before mRNA amounts dropped to undetectable levels in G2 and M phases. Conversely, cells arrested at the G1/S boundary of the cell cycle maintained PCM-1 mRNA at artificially elevated levels, providing a possible molecular mechanism for explaining the multiple rounds of centrosome replication that occurred in CHO cells during prolonged hydroxyurea-induced arrest. The capacity to replicate centrosomes could be abolished in hydroxyurea-arrested CHO cells by culturing the cells in dialyzed serum. However, the ability to replicate centrosomes and to synthesize PCM-1 mRNA could be re- initiated by adding EGF to the dialyzed serum. This experimental system should be useful for investigating the positive and negative molecular mechanisms used by somatic cells to regulate the replication of centrosomes and for studying and the methods used by somatic cells for coordinating centrosome duplication with other cell cycle progression events. PMID:7790366

  13. Characterization of RAD9 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and evidence that its function acts posttranslationally in cell cycle arrest after DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, T A; Hartwell, L H

    1990-01-01

    In eucaryotic cells, incompletely replicated or damaged chromosomes induce cell cycle arrest in G2 before mitosis, and in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the RAD9 gene is essential for the cell cycle arrest (T.A. Weinert and L. H. Hartwell, Science 241:317-322, 1988). In this report, we extend the analysis of RAD9-dependent cell cycle control. We found that both induction of RAD9-dependent arrest in G2 and recovery from arrest could occur in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, showing that the mechanism of RAD9-dependent control involves a posttranslational mechanism(s). We have isolated and determined the DNA sequence of the RAD9 gene, confirming the DNA sequence reported previously (R. H. Schiestl, P. Reynolds, S. Prakash, and L. Prakash, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:1882-1886, 1989). The predicted protein sequence for the Rad9 protein bears no similarity to sequences of known proteins. We also found that synthesis of the RAD9 transcript in the cell cycle was constitutive and not induced by X-irradiation. We constructed yeast cells containing a complete deletion of the RAD9 gene; the rad9 null mutants were viable, sensitive to X- and UV irradiation, and defective for cell cycle arrest after DNA damage. Although Rad+ and rad9 delta cells had similar growth rates and cell cycle kinetics in unirradiated cells, the spontaneous rate of chromosome loss (in unirradiated cells) was elevated 7- to 21-fold in rad9 delta cells. These studies show that in the presence of induced or endogenous DNA damage, RAD9 is a negative regulator that inhibits progression from G2 in order to preserve cell viability and to maintain the fidelity of chromosome transmission. Images PMID:2247073

  14. Resveratrol Improves Cell Cycle Arrest in Chronic Prostatitis Rats, by C-kit/SCF Suppression.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Zeng, Huizhi; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Jiashu; Zeng, Xiaona; Gong, Fengtao; Liu, Qi; Yang, Bo

    2017-08-01

    Chronic prostatitis (CP) with complex pathogenesis is difficult for treatment. c-kit has been associated with the control of cell proliferation of prostate cells. This study aims to evaluate the role of resveratrol, an activator of Sirt1, in regulating the expression of c-kit in CP and investigate the consequent effects on cell cycle. Rat model of CP was established through subcutaneous injections of diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus vaccine and subsequently treated with resveratrol. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed to identify the histopathological changes in prostates. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining examined the expression level of c-kit, stem cell factor (SCF), Sirt1, and cell cycle-associated proteins. The model group exhibited severe diffuse chronic inflammation, characterized by leukocyte infiltration and papillary frond protrusion into the gland cavities, and a notable increase in prostatic epithelial height. Gland lumen diameter was also significantly smaller; the activity of c-kit/SCF in the CP rats was increased significantly compared to the control group. Meanwhile, the cell cycle proteins are dysregulated significantly in CP rats. Resveratrol treatment significantly improved these factors by Sirt1 activation. Dysregulation of cell cycle was involved in the pathological processes of CP, which was improved after resveratrol treatment by the downregulation of c-kit/SCF by activating Sirt1.

  15. Involvement of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle perturbation in retinoic acid-induced cleft palate in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Junko . E-mail: okajun@anat1.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Shiota, Kohei

    2007-05-15

    Retinoic acid (RA), a metabolite of vitamin A, plays a key role in a variety of biological processes and is essential for normal embryonic development. On the other hand, exogenous RA could cause cleft palate in offspring when it is given to pregnant animals at either the early or late phases of palatogenesis, but the pathogenetic mechanism of cleft palate caused by excess RA remains not fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of excess of RA on early palatogenesis in mouse fetuses and analyze the teratogenic mechanism, especially at the stage prior to palatal shelf elevation. We gave all-trans RA (100 mg/kg) orally to E11.5 ICR pregnant mice and observed the changes occurring in the palatal shelves of their fetuses. It was found that apoptotic cell death increased not only in the epithelium of the palatal shelves but also in the tongue primordium, which might affect tongue withdrawal movement during palatogenesis and impair the horizontal elevation of palatal shelves. In addition, RA was found to prevent the G{sub 1}/S progression of palatal mesenchymal cells through upregulation of p21 {sup Cip1}, leading to Rb hypophospholylation. Thus, RA appears to cause G{sub 1} arrest in palatal mesenchymal cells in a similar manner as in various cancer and embryonic cells. It is likely that apoptotic cell death and cell cycle disruption are involved in cleft palate formation induced by RA.

  16. Honokiol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via inhibition of survival signals in adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Chie; Arbiser, Jack L; Mori, Naoki

    2012-07-01

    Honokiol, a naturally occurring biphenyl, possesses anti-neoplastic properties. We investigated activities of honokiol against adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) associated with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Cell viability was assessed using colorimetric assay. Propidium iodide staining was performed to determine cell cycle phase. Apoptotic effects were evaluated by 7A6 detection and caspases activity. Expressions of cell cycle- and apoptosis-associated proteins were analyzed by Western blot. We investigated the efficacy of honokiol in mice harboring tumors of HTLV-1-infected T-cell origin. Honokiol exhibited cytotoxic activity against HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines and ATL cells. We identified two different effects of honokiol on HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines: cell cycle inhibition and induction of apoptosis. Honokiol induced G1 cell cycle arrest by reducing the expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6 and c-Myc, while apoptosis was induced via reduced expression of cIAP-2, XIAP and survivin. The induced apoptosis was also associated with activation of caspases-3 and -9. In addition, honokiol suppressed the phosphorylation of IκBα, IKKα, IKKβ, STAT3, STAT5 and Akt, down-regulated JunB and JunD, and inhibited DNA binding of NF-κB, AP-1, STAT3 and STAT5. These effects resulted in the inactivation of survival signals including NF-κB, AP-1, STATs and Akt. Honokiol was highly effective against ATL in mice Our data suggested that honokiol is a systemically available, non-toxic inhibitor of ATL cell growth that should be examined for potential clinical application. Our findings provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of honokiol for the management of ATL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cycles Tipping the Scale between Death and Survival (=``Life")

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halberg, F.; Cornélissen, G.; Sothern, R. B.; Katinas, G. S.; Schwartzkopff, O.; Otsuka, K.

    Systematic chronobiologically interpreted ambulatory bloodpressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) monitoring (C-ABPM 7D/24H is now automatically possible; if continued around the clock over a week, this approach detects vascular variability disorders (VVDs) that include, among others, high BP itself and CHAT, short for circadian hyper-amplitude-tension. BP is never a constant ``true" (resting) value and can be more reliably diagnosed by CABPM 7d/24h as MESOR-hypertension, MH. CHAT carries a risk of hard events greater than MH and can be treated, among other VVDs, which if they coexist constitute vascular variability syndromes (VVSs). A project on The BIOsphere and the COSmos, BIOCOS (corne001@umn.edu), provides, in exchange for the data, cost-free analyses and the opportunity of obtaining monitors at a cost reduction of 80% complements the records from purely physical tools for surveilling the variable sun, by validating in the biosphere the reality of intermittent, aeolian envi ronmental spectral components that can be more consistent than their physical counterparts once they are coded in genes. C-ABPM 7D/24H indicates relevant associations of space weather with human health and ecology. Monitoring reveals, around and in living matter, a system of transdisciplinary cycles with common average periods, quantified with point-and-interval estimates of parameters. The cycles in space climate are critical in discussing global warming. The cycles' periods are described as congruent when their CIs (95\\ intervals) overlie or overlap and the amplitudes' CIs' lower limits are positive. Some congruent cycles in organisms, counterparts of the environmental day and the seasons, relate to electromagnetic radiation in the visible domain; these are the usually environmentally synchronized socio-photo-thermoperiodisms (photics). The biosphere also resonates with or is pulled or driven by nonstationary, environmental nonphotic cycles (nonphotics) -- particle emissi ons from the sun and

  18. Lebein, a snake venom disintegrin, suppresses human colon cancer cells proliferation and tumor-induced angiogenesis through cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction and inhibition of VEGF expression.

    PubMed

    Zakraoui, Ons; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Aloui, Zohra; Othman, Houcemeddine; Grépin, Renaud; Haoues, Meriam; Essafi, Makram; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Gasmi, Ammar; Karoui, Habib; Pagès, Gilles; Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija

    2017-01-01

    Lebein, is an heterodimeric disintegrin isolated from Macrovipera lebetina snake venom that was previously characterized as an inhibitor of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. In this study, we investigated the effect of Lebein on the p53-dependent growth of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. We found that Lebein significantly inhibited LS174 (p53wt), HCT116 (p53wt), and HT29 (p53mut) colon cancer cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest through the modulation of expression levels of the tumor suppression factor p53, cell cycle regulating proteins cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4, retinoblastoma (Rb), CDK1, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27. Interestingly, Lebein-induced apoptosis of colon cancer cells was dependent on their p53 status. Thus, in LS174 cells, cell death was associated with PARP cleavage and the activation of caspases 3 and 8 while in HCT116 cells, Lebein induced caspase-independent apoptosis through increased expression of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). In LS174 cells, Lebein triggers the activation of the MAPK ERK1/2 pathway through induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It also decreased cell adhesion and migration to fibronectin through down regulation of α5β1 integrin. Moreover, Lebein significantly reduced the expression of two angiogenesis stimulators, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Neuropilin 1 (NRP1). It inhibited the VEGF-induced neovascularization process in the quail embryonic CAM system and blocked the development of human colon adenocarcinoma in nude mice. Overall, our work indicates that Lebein may be useful to design a new therapy against colon cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Arecoline decreases interleukin-6 production and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human basal cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-Wen; Hsieh, Bau-Shan; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Hu, Yu-Chen; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Chang, Kee-Lung

    2012-01-15

    Arecoline, the most abundant areca alkaloid, has been reported to decrease interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in epithelial cancer cells. Since IL-6 overexpression contributes to the tumorigenic potency of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), this study was designed to investigate whether arecoline altered IL-6 expression and its downstream regulation of apoptosis and the cell cycle in cultured BCC-1/KMC cells. BCC-1/KMC cells and a human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, were treated with arecoline at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 μg/ml, then IL-6 production and expression of apoptosis- and cell cycle progress-related factors were examined. After 24 h exposure, arecoline inhibited BCC-1/KMC cell growth and decreased IL-6 production in terms of mRNA expression and protein secretion, but had no effect on HaCaT cells. Analysis of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation showed that arecoline induced apoptosis of BCC-1/KMC cells in a dose-dependent manner, activated caspase-3, and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, arecoline induced progressive and sustained accumulation of BCC-1/KMC cells in G2/M phase as a result of reducing checkpoint Cdc2 activity by decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase levels and increasing p53 levels. Furthermore, subcutaneous injection of arecoline led to decreased BCC-1/KMC tumor growth in BALB/c mice by inducing apoptosis. This study demonstrates that arecoline has potential for preventing BCC tumorigenesis by reducing levels of the tumor cell survival factor IL-6, increasing levels of the tumor suppressor factor p53, and eliciting cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis. Highlights: ► Arecoline has potential to prevent against basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis. ► It has more effectiveness on BCC as compared with a human keratinocyte cell line. ► Mechanisms involved including reducing tumor cells’ survival factor IL-6, ► Decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase, enhancing tumor suppressor factor p53, ► Eliciting G2/M

  20. Combined treatment of gamma-tocotrienol with statins induce mammary tumor cell cycle arrest in G1.

    PubMed

    Wali, Vikram B; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Sylvester, Paul W

    2009-06-01

    Statins and gamma-tocotrienol (a rare isoform of vitamin E) both inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMGCoA) reductase activity and display anticancer activity. However, clinical application of statins has been limited by high dose toxicity. Previous studies showed that combined statin and gamma-tocotrienol treatment synergistically inhibits growth of highly malignant +SA mammary epithelial cells in culture. To investigate the mechanism mediating this growth inhibition, studies were conducted to determine the effect of combination low dose gamma-tocotrienol and statin treatment on +SA mammary tumor cell cycle progression. Treatment with 0.25 microM simvastatin, lovastatin, mevastatin, 10 microM pravastatin or 2.0 microM gamma-tocotrienol alone had no effect, while combined treatment of individual statins with gamma-tocotrienol significantly inhibited +SA cell proliferation during the 4-day culture period. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that combined treatment induced cell cycle arrest in G1. Additional studies showed that treatment with 0.25 microM simvastatin or 2 microM gamma-tocotrienol alone had no effect on the relative intracellular levels of cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6, but combined treatment caused a large reduction in cyclin D1 and CDK2 levels. Combined treatments also caused a relatively large increase in p27, but had no effect on p21 and p15 levels, and resulted in a large reduction in retinoblastoma (Rb) protein phosphorylation at ser780 and ser807/811. Similar effects were observed following combined treatment of gamma-tocotrienol with low doses of lovastatin, mevastatin and pravastatin. These findings demonstrate that combination low dose statin and gamma-tocotrienol treatment induced mammary tumor cell cycle arrest at G1, resulting from an increase in p27 expression, and a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1, CDK2, and hypophosphorylation of Rb protein. These findings suggest that combined treatment of statins with gamma

  1. Pectenotoxin-2 induces G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer cells via ATM and Chk1/2-mediated phosphorylation of cdc25C.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong-Oh; Kim, Mun-Ock; Nam, Taek-Jeong; Kim, Se-Kwon; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gi-Young

    2010-07-01

    Although pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) is known to regulate the actin depolymerization and to induce apoptosis through downregulation of telomerase activity, little is known on its effect on the cell cycle regulation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of PTX-2 on G2/M arrest in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7). Treatment with PTX-2 significantly suppressed cell proliferation and induced G2/M phase arrest through down-regulation of cyclin B1 and cdc2 expression, but also through phosphorylation of cdc25C. We found increased phosphorylation of ATM and Chk1/2 in a PTX-2 dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment with PTX-2 increased H2O2 generation with correlated G2/M arrest. Our results showed that ATM- and Chk1/2-mediated phosphorylation of cdc25C plays a major role in G2/M arrest, but not in H2O2 generation induced by PTX-2 treatment. We also observed that PTX-2-induced cell cycle arrest was not restricted to p53 status in human breast cancer cells.

  2. Small PARP inhibitor PJ-34 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue Tao; Moles, Ramona; Chaib-Mezrag, Hassiba; Nicot, Christophe

    2015-10-23

    HTLV-I is associated with the development of an aggressive form of lymphocytic leukemia known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). A major obstacle for effective treatment of ATLL resides in the genetic diversity of tumor cells and their ability to acquire resistance to chemotherapy regimens. As a result, most patients relapse and current therapeutic approaches still have limited long-term survival benefits. Hence, the development of novel approaches is greatly needed. In this study, we found that a small molecule inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), PJ-34, is very effective in activating S/G2M cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in permanent cell cycle arrest and reactivation of p53 transcription functions and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis of HTLV-I-transformed and patient-derived ATLL tumor cells. We also found that HTLV-I-transformed MT-2 cells are resistant to PJ-34 therapy associated with reduced cleaved caspase-3 activation and increased expression of RelA/p65. Since PJ-34 has been tested in clinical trials for the treatment of solid tumors, our results suggest that some ATLL patients may be good candidates to benefit from PJ-34 therapy.

  3. Inhibition of PPARα induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and synergizes with glycolysis inhibition in kidney cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abu Aboud, Omran; Wettersten, Hiromi I; Weiss, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the sixth most common cancer in the US. While RCC is highly metastatic, there are few therapeutics options available for patients with metastatic RCC, and progression-free survival of patients even with the newest targeted therapeutics is only up to two years. Thus, novel therapeutic targets for this disease are desperately needed. Based on our previous metabolomics studies showing alteration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) related events in both RCC patient and xenograft mice materials, this pathway was further examined in the current study in the setting of RCC. PPARα is a nuclear receptor protein that functions as a transcription factor for genes including those encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism; while PPARα has been reported to regulate tumor growth in several cancers, it has not been evaluated in RCC. A specific PPARα antagonist, GW6471, induced both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in VHL(+) and VHL(-) RCC cell lines (786-O and Caki-1) associated with attenuation of the cell cycle regulatory proteins c-Myc, Cyclin D1, and CDK4; this data was confirmed as specific to PPARα antagonism by siRNA methods. Interestingly, when glycolysis was blocked by several methods, the cytotoxicity of GW6471 was synergistically increased, suggesting a switch to fatty acid oxidation from glycolysis and providing an entirely novel therapeutic approach for RCC.

  4. Apigenin promotes apoptosis, inhibits invasion and induces cell cycle arrest of T24 human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Mao, Yeqing; Chen, Hong; Lin, Yiwei; Hu, Zhenghui; Wu, Jian; Xu, Xin; Xu, Xianglai; Qin, Jie; Xie, Liping

    2013-06-01

    Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) was recently shown effective in inhibiting several cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of apigenin in the human bladder cancer cell line T24 for the first time. T24 cells were treated with varying concentrations and time of apigenin. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Cell motility and invasiveness were assayed by Matrigel migration and invasion assay. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis were used to detect cell apoptosis, cell cycle and signaling pathway. The results demonstrated that apigenin suppressed proliferation and inhibited the migration and invasion potential of T24 bladder cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was associated with induced G2/M Phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The mechanism of action is like to involve PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins. Apigenin increased caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage, indicating that apigenin induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent way. These findings suggest that apigenin may be an effective way for treating human bladder cancer.

  5. Chaetocin-A histone methyltransferase inhibitor-Impairs proliferation, arrests cell cycle and induces nucleolar disassembly in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Zuma, Aline Araujo; Santos, Jean de Oliveira; Mendes, Isabela; de Souza, Wanderley; Machado, Carlos Renato; Motta, Maria Cristina M

    2017-02-06

    The Trypanosomatidae family includes pathogenic species of medical and veterinary interest. Chagas disease is endemic in Latin America, and about 8 million people are infected worldwide. There is a need for more effective drugs for the acute, undetermined and chronic phases of the disease that, in addition, do not cause side effects, stimulating the search for identification of new drug targets, as well as new chemotherapeutic targets. Trypanosomatids contain characteristic structures, such as the nucleus that undergoes a closed mitosis without chromosome formation and variations of chromatin packing in the different protozoa developmental stages. The nuclear DNA is condensed by histones that suffer post-translational modifications, such as addition of methyl groups by histone methyltransferases (MHT) and addition of acetyl groups by acetyltransferases. These processes modulate gene expression and chromatin organization, which are crucial to transcription, replication, repair and recombination. In the present study, the effects of chaetocin, a HMT inhibitor, on T. cruzi epimastigote proliferation, viability, ultrastructure and cell cycle were investigated. Results indicate that chaetocin promoted irreversible inhibition of protozoa growth, evident unpacking of nuclear heterochromatin and intense nucleolus fragmentation, which is associated with parasite cell cycle arrest and RNA transcription blockage. Taken together, data obtained with chaetocin treatment stimulate the use of histone methyltransferase inhibitors against pathogenic trypanosomatids.

  6. Rosiglitazone inhibits cell proliferation by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ADPKD cyst-lining epithelia cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yawei; Dai, Bing; Fu, Lili; Jia, Jieshuang; Mei, Changlin

    2010-06-01

    Abnormal proliferation is an important pathological feature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Many drugs inhibiting cell proliferation have been proved to be effective in slowing the disease progression in ADPKD. Recent evidence has suggested that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligands have anti-neoplasm effects through inhibiting cell growth and inducing cell apoptosis in various cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the expression of PPARgamma in human ADPKD kidney tissues and cyst-lining epithelial cell line, and found that the expression of PPARgamma was greater in ADPKD kidney tissues and cyst-lining epithelial cell line than in normal kidney tissues and human kidney cortex (HKC) cell line. Rosiglitazone inhibited significantly proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. These effects were diminished by GW9662, a specific PPARgamma antagonist. Cell cycle analysis showed a G0/G1 arrest in human ADPKD cyst-lining epithelial cells with rosiglitazone treatment. Analysis of cell cycle regulatory proteins revealed that rosiglitazone decreased the protein levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, pRb, cyclin D1, cyclin D2 and Cdk4 but increased the levels of p21 and p27 in a dose-dependent manner. Rosiglitazone also induced apoptosis in cyst-lining epithelial cells, which was correlated with increased bax expression and decreased bcl-2 expression. These results suggest PPARgamma agonist might serve as a promising drug for the treatment of ADPKD.

  7. Patrinia scabiosaefolia inhibits the proliferation of colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo via G1/S cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingyue; Sun, Guodong; Shen, Aling; Liu, Liya; Ding, Jingzhen; Peng, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Patrinia scabiosaefolia (PS) has long been used as an important component in traditional Chinese medicine formulas to treat gastrointestinal malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC). We recently reported that PS can inhibit CRC growth through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. To further elucidate the mode of action of PS, in the present study, we used a CRC mouse xenograft model and a human CRC cell line HT-29 to evaluate the effect of the ethanol extract of PS (EEPS) on cancer cell proliferation and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that EEPS inhibited CRC growth both in vivo and in vitro, which was associated with the inhibitory effects of EEPS on cancer cell proliferation. In addition, EEPS treatment significantly blocked G1 to S phase cell cycle progression in HT-29 cells. Moreover, EEPS treatment decreased the expression of pro-proliferative CyclinD1 and CDK4, at both the mRNA and protein levels. Thus, inhibition of cell proliferation via G1/S cell cycle arrest might be a potential mechanism whereby PS effectively treats cancers.

  8. Histological Lesions, Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and T Cell Subsets Changes of Spleen in Chicken Fed Aflatoxin-contaminated Corn

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xi; Zhang, Keying; Bai, Shiping; Ding, Xuemei; Zeng, Qiufeng; Yang, Jun; Fang, Jing; Chen, Kejie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of corn naturally contaminated with aflatoxin B1 and aflatoxin B2 on pathological lesions, apoptosis, cell cycle phases and T lymphocyte subsets of spleen, and to provide an experimental basis for understanding the mechanism of aflatoxin-induced immunosuppression. A total of 900 COBB500 male broilers were randomly allocated into five groups with six replicates per group and 30 birds per replicate. The experiment lasted for 6 weeks and the five dietary treatments consisted of control, 25% contaminated corn, 50% contaminated corn, 75% contaminated corn and 100% contaminated corn groups. The histopathological spleen lesions from the contaminated corn groups was characterized as congestion of red pulp, increased necrotic cells and vacuoles in the splenic corpuscle and periarterial lymphatic sheath. The contaminated corn intake significantly increased re