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Sample records for cycle enzymes glutamine

  1. Glutamine metabolism and cycling in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Mora, J

    1990-01-01

    Evidence for the existence of a glutamine cycle in Neurospora crassa is reviewed. Through this cycle glutamine is converted into glutamate by glutamate synthase and catabolized by the glutamine transaminase-omega-amidase pathway, the products of which (2-oxoglutarate and ammonium) are the substrates for glutamate dehydrogenase-NADPH, which synthesizes glutamate. In the final step ammonium is assimilated into glutamine by the action of a glutamine synthetase (GS), which is formed by two distinct polypeptides, one catalytically very active (GS beta), and the other (GS alpha) less active but endowed with the capacity to modulate the activity of GS alpha. Glutamate synthase uses the amide nitrogen of glutamine to synthesize glutamate; glutamate dehydrogenase uses ammonium, and both are required to maintain the level of glutamate. The energy expended in the synthesis of glutamine drives the cycle. The glutamine cycle is not futile, because it is necessary to drive an effective carbon flow to support growth; in addition, it facilitates the allocation of nitrogen or carbon according to cellular demands. The glutamine cycle which dissipates energy links catabolism and anabolism and, in doing so, buffers variations in the nutrient supply and drives energy generation and carbon flow for optimal cell function. PMID:2145504

  2. Glutamine is required for snakehead fish vesiculovirus propagation via replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lindan; Yi, Lizhu; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xiaodan; Feng, Shuangshuang; Chen, Wenjie; Lan, Jiangfeng; Zhao, Lijuan; Tu, Jiagang; Lin, Li

    2016-11-01

    Snakehead fish vesiculovirus (SHVV), a member of the family Rhabdoviridae, has caused mass mortality in snakehead fish culture in China. Previous transcriptomic sequencing of SHVV-infected and non-infected striped snakehead fish cells (SSN-1) showed that glutaminase (GLS), the critical enzyme of glutamine metabolism, was upregulated upon SHVV infection. It therefore drew our attention to investigating the role of glutamine in SHVV propagation. Glutamine deprivation significantly reduced the expression of the mRNAs and proteins of SHVV, and the production of virus particles, indicating that glutamine was required for SHVV propagation. Glutamine can be converted to glutamate by GLS, and then be converted to α-ketoglutarate, to join in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Addition of the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate, oxaloacetic acid or pyruvate significantly restored SHVV propagation, indicating that the requirement of glutamine for SHVV propagation was due to its replenishment of the TCA cycle. Inhibiting the activity of GLS in SSN-1 cells by an inhibitor, bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide, decreased SHVV propagation, while overexpression of GLS increased SHVV propagation. Taken together, our data have revealed the relationship between glutamine metabolism and SHVV propagation.

  3. GLUTAMINE AND HYPERAMMONEMIC CRISES IN PATIENTS WITH UREA CYCLE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, B.; Diaz, G.A.; Rhead, W.; Lichter-Konecki, U.; Feigenbaum, A.; Berry, S.A.; Le Mons, C.; Bartley, J.; Longo, N.; Nagamani, S.C.; Berquist, W.; Gallagher, R.C.; Harding, C.O.; McCandless, S.E.; Smith, W.; Schulze, A.; Marino, M.; Rowell, R.; Coakley, D.F.; Mokhtarani, M.; Scharschmidt, B.F.

    2016-01-01

    Blood ammonia and glutamine levels are used as biomarkers of control in patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs). This study was undertaken to evaluate glutamine variability and utility as a predictor of hyperammonemic crises (HACs) in UCD patients. Methods The relationships between glutamine and ammonia levels and the incidence and timing of HACs were evaluated in over 100 adult and pediatric UCD patients who participated in clinical trials of glycerol phenylbutyrate. Results The median (range) intra-subject 24-hour coefficient of variation for glutamine was 15% (8–29%) as compared with 56% (28%–154%) for ammonia, and the correlation coefficient between glutamine and concurrent ammonia levels varied from 0.17 to 0.29. Patients with baseline (fasting) glutamine values >900 µmol/L had higher baseline ammonia levels (mean [SD]: 39.6 [26.2] µmol/L) than patients with baseline glutamine ≤900 µmol/L (26.6 [18.0] µmol/L). Glutamine values >900 µmol/L during the study were associated with an approximately 2-fold higher HAC risk (odds ratio [OR]=1.98; p=0.173). However, glutamine lost predictive significance (OR=1.47; p=0.439) when concomitant ammonia was taken into account, whereas the predictive value of baseline ammonia ≥ 1.0 upper limit of normal (ULN) was highly statistically significant (OR=4.96; p=0.013). There was no significant effect of glutamine >900 µmol/L on time to first HAC crisis (hazard ratio [HR]=1.14; p=0.813), but there was a significant effect of baseline ammonia ≥ 1.0 ULN (HR=4.62; p=0.0011). Conclusions The findings in this UCD population suggest that glutamine is a weaker predictor of HACs than ammonia and that the utility of the predictive value of glutamine will need to take into account concurrent ammonia levels. PMID:26586473

  4. The Glutamine Transporters and Their Role in the Glutamate/GABA-Glutamine Cycle.

    PubMed

    Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine is a key amino acid in the CNS, playing an important role in the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle (GGC). In the GGC, glutamine is transferred from astrocytes to neurons, where it will replenish the inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter pools. Different transporters participate in this neural communication, i.e., the transporters responsible for glutamine efflux from astrocytes and influx into the neurons, such as the members of the SNAT, LAT, y(+)LAT, and ASC families of transporters. The SNAT family consists of the transporter isoforms SNAT3 and SNAT5 that are related to efflux from the astrocytic compartment, and SNAT1 and SNAT2 that are associated with glutamine uptake into the neuronal compartment. The isoforms SNAT7 and SNAT8 do not have their role completely understood, but they likely also participate in the GGC. The isoforms LAT2 and y(+)LAT2 facilitate the exchange of neutral amino acids and cationic amino acids (y(+)LAT2 isoform) and have been associated with glutamine efflux from astrocytes. ASCT2 is a Na(+)-dependent antiporter, the participation of which in the GGC also remains to be better characterized. All these isoforms are tightly regulated by transcriptional and translational mechanisms, which are induced by several determinants such as amino acid deprivation, hormones, pH, and the activity of different signaling pathways. Dysfunctional glutamine transporter activity has been associated with the pathophysiological mechanisms of certain neurologic diseases, such as Hepatic Encephalopathy and Manganism. However, there might also be other neuropathological conditions associated with an altered GGC, in which glutamine transporters are dysfunctional. Hence, it appears to be of critical importance that the physiological and pathological aspects of glutamine transporters are thoroughly investigated.

  5. Glutamine and hyperammonemic crises in patients with urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, B; Diaz, G A; Rhead, W; Lichter-Konecki, U; Feigenbaum, A; Berry, S A; Le Mons, C; Bartley, J; Longo, N; Nagamani, S C; Berquist, W; Gallagher, R C; Harding, C O; McCandless, S E; Smith, W; Schulze, A; Marino, M; Rowell, R; Coakley, D F; Mokhtarani, M; Scharschmidt, B F

    2016-01-01

    Blood ammonia and glutamine levels are used as biomarkers of control in patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs). This study was undertaken to evaluate glutamine variability and utility as a predictor of hyperammonemic crises (HACs) in UCD patients. The relationships between glutamine and ammonia levels and the incidence and timing of HACs were evaluated in over 100 adult and pediatric UCD patients who participated in clinical trials of glycerol phenylbutyrate. The median (range) intra-subject 24-hour coefficient of variation for glutamine was 15% (8-29%) as compared with 56% (28%-154%) for ammonia, and the correlation coefficient between glutamine and concurrent ammonia levels varied from 0.17 to 0.29. Patients with baseline (fasting) glutamine values >900 μmol/L had higher baseline ammonia levels (mean [SD]: 39.6 [26.2]μmol/L) than patients with baseline glutamine ≤ 900 μmol/L (26.6 [18.0]μmol/L). Glutamine values >900 μmol/L during the study were associated with an approximately 2-fold higher HAC risk (odds ratio [OR]=1.98; p=0.173). However, glutamine lost predictive significance (OR=1.47; p=0.439) when concomitant ammonia was taken into account, whereas the predictive value of baseline ammonia ≥ 1.0 upper limit of normal (ULN) was highly statistically significant (OR=4.96; p=0.013). There was no significant effect of glutamine >900 μmol/L on time to first HAC crisis (hazard ratio [HR]=1.14; p=0.813), but there was a significant effect of baseline ammonia ≥ 1.0 ULN (HR=4.62; p=0.0011). The findings in this UCD population suggest that glutamine is a weaker predictor of HACs than ammonia and that the utility of the predictive value of glutamine will need to take into account concurrent ammonia levels. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cysteine digestive peptidases function as post-glutamine cleaving enzymes in tenebrionid stored product pests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cereals have storage proteins with high amounts of the amino acids glutamine and proline. Therefore, storage pests need to have digestive enzymes that are efficient in hydrolyzing these types of proteins. Post-glutamine cleaving peptidases (PGP) were isolated from the midgut of the stored product pe...

  7. A novel glutamine biosensor based on zinc oxide nanorod and glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Dilruba; Karakuş, Emine

    2016-01-01

    A novel biosensor for determination of L-glutamine in pharmaceutical glutamine powder was developed via immobilizing our produced glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina onto our prepared zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod and chitosan. ZnO nanorods were prepared as surface-dependent and surface-independent and both were used. The biosensor is specific for L-glutamine and the peculiar analytical properties (linearity range, reproducibility, and accuracy) of it were experimentally determined. The optimum operating conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, and medium temperature effect on the response of biosensor were studied. Km and Vmax values for the our-producing glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina immobilized on the biosensor were also determined as 0.29 mM and 208.33 mV/min., respectively, from Lineweaver-Burk plot. The biosensor was then used for the determination of glutamine contained in pharmaceutical formulations.

  8. Hypoosmotic swelling modifies glutamate-glutamine cycle in the cerebral cortex and in astrocyte cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hyzinski-García, María C.; Vincent, Melanie Y.; Haskew-Layton, Renée E.; Dohare, Preeti; Keller, Richard W.; Mongin, Alexander A.

    2011-01-01

    In our previous work, we found that perfusion of the rat cerebral cortex with hypoosmotic medium triggers massive release of the excitatory amino acid L-glutamate but decreases extracellular levels of L-glutamine (R.E. Haskew-Layton et al., PLoS ONE, 3: e3543). The release of glutamate was linked to activation of volume-regulated anion channels (VRAC), while mechanism(s) responsible for alterations in extracellular glutamine remained unclear. When mannitol was added to the hypoosmotic medium in order to reverse reductions in osmolarity, changes in microdialysate levels of glutamine were prevented, indicating an involvement of cellular swelling. Since the main source of brain glutamine is astrocytic synthesis and export, we explored the impact of hypoosmotic medium on glutamine synthesis and transport in rat primary astrocyte cultures. In astrocytes, a 40% reduction in medium osmolarity moderately stimulated the release of L-[3H]glutamine by ~2-fold and produced no changes in L-[3H]glutamine uptake. In comparison, hypoosmotic medium stimulated the release of glutamate (traced with D[3H]aspartate) by more than 20-fold. In whole-cell enzymatic assays, we discovered that hypoosmotic medium caused a 20% inhibition of astrocytic conversion of L[3H]glutamate into L-[3H]glutamine by glutamine synthetase. Using an HPLC assay we further found a 35% reduction in intracellular levels of endogenous glutamine. Overall, our findings suggest that cellular swelling (1) inhibits astrocytic glutamine synthetase activity, and (2) reduces substrate availability for this enzyme due to the activation of VRAC. These combined effects likely lead to reductions in astrocytic glutamine export in vivo and may partially explain occurrence of hyperexcitability and seizures in human hyponatremia. PMID:21517854

  9. Alanine and aspartate aminotransferase and glutamine-cycling pathway: their roles in pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sookoian, Silvia; Pirola, Carlos J

    2012-08-07

    Although new research technologies are constantly used to look either for genes or biomarkers in the prediction of metabolic syndrome (MS), the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this complex disease remains a major challenge. Interestingly, Cheng et al recently investigated possible pathways underlying MS by high-throughput metabolite profiling in two large and well characterized community-based cohorts. The authors explored by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry the plasma concentrations of 45 distinct metabolites and examined their relation to cardiometabolic risk, and observed that metabolic risk factors such as obesity, insulin resistance (IR), high blood pressure, and dyslipidemia were associated with several metabolites, including branched-chain amino acids, other hydrophobic amino acids, tryptophan breakdown products, and nucleotide metabolites. In addition, the authors found a significant association of IR traits with glutamine, glutamate and the glutamine-to-glutamate ratio. These data provide new insight into the pathogenesis of MS-associated phenotypes and introduce a crucial role of glutamine-cycling pathway as prominently involved in the development of metabolic risk. We consider that the hypothesis about the role of abnormal glutamate metabolism in the pathogenesis of the MS is certainly challenging and suggests the critical role of the liver in the global metabolic modulation as glutamate metabolism is linked with aminotransferase reactions. We discuss here the critical role of the "liver metabolism" in the pathogenesis of the MS and IR, and postulate that before fatty liver develops, abnormal levels of liver enzymes, such as alanine and aspartate aminotransferases might reflect high levels of hepatic transamination of amino acids in the liver.

  10. Assessment of plasma ammonia and glutamine concentrations in urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Serrano, M; Ormazábal, A; Vilaseca, M A; Lambruschini, N; Garcia-Romero, R; Meavilla, S; Perez-Dueñas, B; Pineda, M; Garcia-Cazorla, A; Campistol, J; Artuch, R

    2011-06-01

    To analyze the association between ammonia and glutamine used for metabolic control in inherited urea cycle disorders (UCD) in a large series of patients. Paired plasma amino acid-ammonia data from 26 UCD patients were analyzed (n=921). Increased plasma glutamine values were consistently observed in UCD patients, despite normal plasma ammonia concentrations, especially for mitochondrial UCD. Further therapeutic efforts are probably needed to control increased glutamine values, considering their potentially neurotoxic effect. Copyright © 2011 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Glutamine synthetase. IX. Purification and characterization of the enzyme from sheep spleen.

    PubMed

    Wu, C

    1977-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase (L-glutamate: ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2) has been purified about 550-fold from sheep spleen. The subunit weight of the enzyme is estimated to be 48 000. Sedimentation coefficient determination by density gradient centrifugation gives a value of 15.0 S. The approximate molecular weight calculated from the S value is 378500. In addition, electron micrographs of the enzyme show an "H" shape. Hence, the protein appears to have eight subunits. In sheep spleen, the enzyme resides chiefly in the soluble fraction of the cell. The amino acid composition of the enzyme from spleen shows similarity to that from other sources. The enzyme activity is nearly five times as high in Mg2+ as in Mn2+. ATP inhibits the enzyme; the inhibition is competitive with respect to Mg2+ATP. A number of compounds, such as D-alanine, AMP, creatine phosphate, arsenite in combination with 2,3-dimercaptopropanol, and 2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate, also inhibit the enzyme. The inhibition by the last compound is competitive with respect to glutamate. D-Glutamate and alpha-methyl-DL-glutamate can serve as substrates in the synthesis reaction, but N-methyl-DL-glutamate cannot. On the other hand, neither D-glutamine nor N-acetyl-L-glutamine can replace L-glutamine as a substrate in the gamma-glutamyl transfer reaction of the enzyme. Inhibition of Mn2+ and ATP and its reversal by Mg2+ have been discussed as a means of regulating the enzyme activity in mammalian tissues.

  12. Glutamine fuels a vicious cycle of autophagy in the tumor stroma and oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in epithelial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ying-Hui; Lin, Zhao; Flomenberg, Neal; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica

    2011-01-01

    Glutamine metabolism is crucial for cancer cell growth via the generation of intermediate molecules in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, antioxidants and ammonia. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of glutamine on metabolism in the breast cancer tumor microenvironment, with a focus on autophagy and cell death in both epithelial and stromal compartments. For this purpose, MCF7 breast cancer cells were cultured alone or co-cultured with nontransformed fibroblasts in media containing high glutamine and low glucose (glutamine +) or under control conditions, with no glutamine and high glucose (glutamine −). Here, we show that MCF7 cells maintained in co-culture with glutamine display increased mitochondrial mass, as compared with control conditions. Importantly, treatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine abolishes the glutamine-induced augmentation of mitochondrial mass. It is known that loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression in fibroblasts is associated with increased autophagy and an aggressive tumor microenvironment. Here, we show that Cav-1 downregulation which occurs in fibroblasts maintained in co-culture specifically requires glutamine. Interestingly, glutamine increases the expression of autophagy markers in fibroblasts, but decreases expression of autophagy markers in MCF7 cells, indicating that glutamine regulates the autophagy program in a compartment-specific manner. Functionally, glutamine protects MCF7 cells against apoptosis, via the upregulation of the anti-apoptotic and anti-autophagic protein TIGAR. Also, we show that glutamine cooperates with stromal fibroblasts to confer tamoxifen-resistance in MCF7 cancer cells. Finally, we provide evidence that co-culture with fibroblasts (1) promotes glutamine catabolism, and (2) decreases glutamine synthesis in MCF7 cancer cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that autophagic fibroblasts may serve as a key source of energy-rich glutamine to fuel cancer cell mitochondrial

  13. Tolerance of hyperammonemia in brain of Heteropneustes fossilis is supported by glutamate-glutamine cycle.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Suman; Mishra, Rajnikant

    2017-03-01

    This report presents analysis of molecular switches associated with tolerance to hyperammonemia in Heteropneustes fossilis because it tolerates about 100-fold more ammonia than mammals. Brains of Heteropneustes fossilis exposed to 100mM ammonium chloride were dissected after Zero hour as control, 16h and 20h exposure. The status of neuron and glia were analysed by Golgi staining, Luxol Fast Blue, and Nissl's staining. The expression patterns of genes associated to homeostasis of neuron and glia, management of oxidative stress and inflammation, ammonia metabolism and brain derived neurotrophic factor were analysed through reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. After 20h of hyperammonemia glia were more degenerated than neurons. The expression of mRNA of lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh), super oxide dismutase (Sod), catalase (Catalase), arginase-I (Arg I), inducible nitric oxide (iNos), glutaminase (GA), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) was up-regulated than the control. The levels of mRNA of Arg II, glutamate dehydrogenase (Gdh), glutamine synthetase (GS), glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) and S100β were down-regulated than control due to hyperammonemia. It appears first observation on impact of hyperammonemia on the status of neurons, myelination and glial cells in brain of Heteropneustes fossilis by Golgi staining, Nissl's and Luxol Fast Blue staining. The distribution of ammonia and glutamate metabolising enzymes in brain supports multi-centric mechanism (s) of regulation. The expression of Arg I and Arg II gets inversely regulated and glutamate-glutamine cycle also operates in Heteropneustes fossilis against hyperammonemia in brain.

  14. Glutamine synthetase and nitrogen cycling in colonies of the marine diazotrophic cyanobacteria Trichodesmium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, E J; Bergman, B; Dawson, R; Siddiqui, P J; Söderbäck, E; Capone, D G

    1992-01-01

    We examined freshly collected samples of the colonial planktonic cyanobacterium Trichodesmium thiebautii to determine the pathways of recently fixed N within and among trichomes. High concentrations of glutamate and glutamine were found in colonies. Glutamate and glutamine uptake rates and concentrations in cells were low in the early morning and increased in the late morning to reach maxima near midday; then uptake and concentration again fell to low values. This pattern followed that previously observed for T. thiebautii nitrogenase activity. Our results suggest that recently fixed nitrogen is incorporated into glutamine in the N2-fixing trichomes and may be passed as glutamate to non-N2-fixing trichomes. The high transport rates and concentrations of glutamate may explain the previously observed absence of appreciable uptake of NH4+, NO3-, or urea by Trichodesmium spp. Immunolocalization, Western blots (immunoblots), and enzymatic assays indicated that glutamine synthetase (GS) was present in all cells during both day and night. GS appeared to be primarily contained in cells of T. thiebautii rather than in associated bacteria or cyanobacteria. Double immunolabeling showed that cells with nitrogenase (Fe protein) contained levels of the GS protein that were twofold higher than those in cells with little or no nitrogenase. GS activity and the uptake of glutamine and glutamate dramatically decreased in the presence of the GS inhibitor methionine sulfoximine. Since no glutamate dehydrogenase activity was detected in this species, GS appears to be the primary enzyme responsible for NH3 incorporation. Images PMID:1359837

  15. Cysteine digestive peptidases function as post-glutamine cleaving enzymes in tenebrionid stored-product pests.

    PubMed

    Goptar, I A; Semashko, T A; Danilenko, S A; Lysogorskaya, E N; Oksenoit, E S; Zhuzhikov, D P; Belozersky, M A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Oppert, B; Filippova, I Yu; Elpidina, E N

    2012-02-01

    The major storage proteins in cereals, prolamins, have an abundance of the amino acids glutamine and proline. Storage pests need specific digestive enzymes to efficiently hydrolyze these storage proteins. Therefore, post-glutamine cleaving peptidases (PGP) were isolated from the midgut of the stored-product pest, Tenebrio molitor (yellow mealworm). Three distinct PGP activities were found in the anterior and posterior midgut using the highly-specific chromogenic peptide substrate N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-Ala-L-Ala-L-Gln p-nitroanilide. PGP peptidases were characterized according to gel elution times, activity profiles in buffers of different pH, electrophoretic mobility under native conditions, and inhibitor sensitivity. The results indicate that PGP activity is due to cysteine and not serine chymotrypsin-like peptidases from the T. molitor larvae midgut. We propose that the evolutionary conservation of cysteine peptidases in the complement of digestive peptidases of tenebrionid stored-product beetles is due not only to the adaptation of insects to plants rich in serine peptidase inhibitors, but also to accommodate the need to efficiently cleave major dietary proteins rich in glutamine. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Glutamine Synthetase Induction in Embryonic Neural Retina: Immunochemical Identification of Polysomes Involved in Enzyme Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, P. K.; Moscona, A. A.

    1973-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) in embryonic neural retina in culture is rapidly induced by hydrocortisone. Retina polysomes involved in translation of this enzyme were precipitated with a high degree of specificity by the gammaglobulin isolated from antiserum against the enzyme (anti-enzyme gammaglobulin). Using immunoprecipitation procedures, we determined that the amount of polysome-bound nascent enzyme was maximal in polysomes comprising 9-14 ribosomes and was about 3-fold higher in the induced than in the noninduced retina. Within this size group of polysomes, those comprising 11-13 ribosomes showed consistently greater binding of anti-enzyme [125I]gammaglobulin than of normal [125I]-gammaglobulin. This size of polysomes corresponds to that calculated for a monocistronic messenger RNA for the subunit of this enzyme, which has a molecular weight of 42,000. The application of immunochemical techniques to identification of templates for synthesis of an enzyme in embryonic cells that constitutes less than 1% of the total cellular proteins indicates the usefulness of this method for detailed studies on regulation of other quantitatively minor products significant in cell differentiation. PMID:4146379

  17. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Verwer, R W H; van Wamelen, D J; Qi, X-R; Gao, S-F; Lucassen, P J; Swaab, D F

    2016-11-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the neuronal/glial glutamate transporters was determined by qPCR in postmortem prefrontal cortex. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) were selected from young MDD patients who had committed suicide (MDD-S; n = 17), from MDD patients who died of non-suicide related causes (MDD-NS; n = 7) and from matched control subjects (n = 12). We also compared elderly depressed patients who had not committed suicide (n = 14) with matched control subjects (n = 22). We found that neuronal located components (EAAT3, EAAT4, ASCT1, SNAT1, SNAT2) of the glutamate-glutamine cycle were increased in the ACC while the astroglia located components (EAAT1, EAAT2, GLUL) were decreased in the DLPFC of MDD-S patients. In contrast, most of the components in the cycle were increased in the DLPFC of MDD-NS patients. In conclusion, the glutamate-glutamine cycle - and thus glutamine transmission - is differentially affected in depressed suicide patients and depressed non-suicide patients in an area specific way. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Glutamine Synthetase in Legumes: Recent Advances in Enzyme Structure and Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Betti, Marco; García-Calderón, Margarita; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M.; Credali, Alfredo; Estivill, Guillermo; Galván, Francisco; Vega, José M.; Márquez, Antonio J.

    2012-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the key enzyme involved in the assimilation of ammonia derived either from nitrate reduction, N2 fixation, photorespiration or asparagine breakdown. A small gene family is encoding for different cytosolic (GS1) or plastidic (GS2) isoforms in legumes. We summarize here the recent advances carried out concerning the quaternary structure of GS, as well as the functional relationship existing between GS2 and processes such as nodulation, photorespiration and water stress, in this latter case by means of proline production. Functional genomic analysis using GS2-minus mutant reveals the key role of GS2 in the metabolic control of the plants and, more particularly, in carbon metabolism. PMID:22942686

  19. Glutamine fuels a vicious cycle of autophagy in the tumor stroma and oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in epithelial cancer cells: implications for preventing chemotherapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ying-Hui; Lin, Zhao; Flomenberg, Neal; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E

    2011-12-15

    Glutamine metabolism is crucial for cancer cell growth via the generation of intermediate molecules in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, antioxidants and ammonia. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of glutamine on metabolism in the breast cancer tumor microenvironment, with a focus on autophagy and cell death in both epithelial and stromal compartments. For this purpose, MCF7 breast cancer cells were cultured alone or co-cultured with non-transformed fibroblasts in media containing high glutamine and low glucose (glutamine +) or under control conditions, with no glutamine and high glucose (glutamine -). Here, we show that MCF7 cells maintained in co-culture with glutamine display increased mitochondrial mass, as compared with control conditions. Importantly, treatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine abolishes the glutamine-induced augmentation of mitochondrial mass. It is known that loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression in fibroblasts is associated with increased autophagy and an aggressive tumor microenvironment. Here, we show that Cav-1 downregulation which occurs in fibroblasts maintained in co-culture specifically requires glutamine. Interestingly, glutamine increases the expression of autophagy markers in fibroblasts, but decreases expression of autophagy markers in MCF7 cells, indicating that glutamine regulates the autophagy program in a compartment-specific manner. Functionally, glutamine protects MCF7 cells against apoptosis, via the upregulation of the anti-apoptotic and anti-autophagic protein TIGAR. Also, we show that glutamine cooperates with stromal fibroblasts to confer tamoxifen-resistance in MCF7 cancer cells. Finally, we provide evidence that co-culture with fibroblasts (1) promotes glutamine catabolism, and (2) decreases glutamine synthesis in MCF7 cancer cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that autophagic fibroblasts may serve as a key source of energy-rich glutamine to fuel cancer cell mitochondrial

  20. Glutamine-Glutamate Cycle Flux Is Similar in Cultured Astrocytes and Brain and Both Glutamate Production and Oxidation Are Mainly Catalyzed by Aspartate Aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Leif; Rothman, Douglas L

    2017-02-24

    The glutamine-glutamate cycle provides neurons with astrocyte-generated glutamate/γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and oxidizes glutamate in astrocytes, and it returns released transmitter glutamate/GABA to neurons after astrocytic uptake. This review deals primarily with the glutamate/GABA generation/oxidation, although it also shows similarity between metabolic rates in cultured astrocytes and intact brain. A key point is identification of the enzyme(s) converting astrocytic α-ketoglutarate to glutamate and vice versa. Most experiments in cultured astrocytes, including those by one of us, suggest that glutamate formation is catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) and its degradation by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). Strongly supported by results shown in Table 1 we now propose that both reactions are primarily catalyzed by AAT. This is possible because the formation occurs in the cytosol and the degradation in mitochondria and they are temporally separate. High glutamate/glutamine concentrations abolish the need for glutamate production from α-ketoglutarate and due to metabolic coupling between glutamate synthesis and oxidation these high concentrations render AAT-mediated glutamate oxidation impossible. This necessitates the use of GDH under these conditions, shown by insensitivity of the oxidation to the transamination inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA). Experiments using lower glutamate/glutamine concentration show inhibition of glutamate oxidation by AOAA, consistent with the coupled transamination reactions described here.

  1. Glutamine-Glutamate Cycle Flux Is Similar in Cultured Astrocytes and Brain and Both Glutamate Production and Oxidation Are Mainly Catalyzed by Aspartate Aminotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Leif; Rothman, Douglas L

    2017-01-01

    The glutamine-glutamate cycle provides neurons with astrocyte-generated glutamate/γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and oxidizes glutamate in astrocytes, and it returns released transmitter glutamate/GABA to neurons after astrocytic uptake. This review deals primarily with the glutamate/GABA generation/oxidation, although it also shows similarity between metabolic rates in cultured astrocytes and intact brain. A key point is identification of the enzyme(s) converting astrocytic α-ketoglutarate to glutamate and vice versa. Most experiments in cultured astrocytes, including those by one of us, suggest that glutamate formation is catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) and its degradation by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). Strongly supported by results shown in Table 1 we now propose that both reactions are primarily catalyzed by AAT. This is possible because the formation occurs in the cytosol and the degradation in mitochondria and they are temporally separate. High glutamate/glutamine concentrations abolish the need for glutamate production from α-ketoglutarate and due to metabolic coupling between glutamate synthesis and oxidation these high concentrations render AAT-mediated glutamate oxidation impossible. This necessitates the use of GDH under these conditions, shown by insensitivity of the oxidation to the transamination inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA). Experiments using lower glutamate/glutamine concentration show inhibition of glutamate oxidation by AOAA, consistent with the coupled transamination reactions described here. PMID:28245547

  2. The Glutamate–Glutamine (GABA) Cycle: Importance of Late Postnatal Development and Potential Reciprocal Interactions between Biosynthesis and Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Leif

    2013-01-01

    The gold standard for studies of glutamate–glutamine (GABA) cycling and its connections to brain biosynthesis from glucose of glutamate and GABA and their subsequent metabolism are the elegant in vivo studies by 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), showing the large fluxes in the cycle. However, simpler experiments in intact brain tissue (e.g., immunohistochemistry), brain slices, cultured brain cells, and mitochondria have also made important contributions to the understanding of details, mechanisms, and functional consequences of glutamate/GABA biosynthesis and degradation. The purpose of this review is to attempt to integrate evidence from different sources regarding (i) the enzyme(s) responsible for the initial conversion of α-ketoglutarate to glutamate; (ii) the possibility that especially glutamate oxidation is essentially confined to astrocytes; and (iii) the ontogenetically very late onset and maturation of glutamine–glutamate (GABA) cycle function. Pathway models based on the functional importance of aspartate for glutamate synthesis suggest the possibility of interacting pathways for biosynthesis and degradation of glutamate and GABA and the use of transamination as the default mechanism for initiation of glutamate oxidation. The late development and maturation are related to the late cortical gliogenesis and convert brain cortical function from being purely neuronal to becoming neuronal-astrocytic. This conversion is associated with huge increases in energy demand and production, and the character of potentially incurred gains of function are discussed. These may include alterations in learning mechanisms, in mice indicated by lack of pairing of odor learning with aversive stimuli in newborn animals but the development of such an association 10–12 days later. The possibility is suggested that analogous maturational changes may contribute to differences in the way learning is accomplished in the newborn human brain and during later

  3. Manganese toxicity in the CNS: the glutamine/glutamate-γ-aminobutyric acid cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is required for maintaining proper function and regulation of numerous biochemical and cellular reactions. Despite its essentiality, at excessive levels Mn is toxic to the CNS. Increased accumulation of Mn in specific brain regions, such as the substantia nigra, globus pallidus and striatum, triggers neurotoxicity resulting in a neurological brain disorder, termed manganism. Mn has been also implicated in the pathophysiology of several other neurodegenerative diseases. Its toxicity is associated with disruption of the glutamine (Gln)/glutamate (Glu)-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) cycle (GGC) between astrocytes and neurons, thus leading to changes in Glu-ergic and/or GABAergic transmission and Gln metabolism. Here we discuss the common mechanisms underlying Mn-induced neurotoxicity and their relationship to CNS pathology and GGC impairment. PMID:23360507

  4. Manganese toxicity in the central nervous system: the glutamine/glutamate-γ-aminobutyric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, M; Aschner, M

    2013-05-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is required for maintaining proper function and regulation of numerous biochemical and cellular reactions. Despite its essentiality, at excessive levels Mn is toxic to the central nervous system (CNS). Increased accumulation of Mn in specific brain regions, such as the substantia nigra, globus pallidus and striatum, triggers neurotoxicity resulting in a neurological brain disorder, termed manganism. Mn has been also implicated in the pathophysiology of several other neurodegenerative diseases. Its toxicity is associated with disruption of the glutamine (Gln)/glutamate (Glu)-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) cycle (GGC) between astrocytes and neurons, thus leading to changes in Glu-ergic and/or GABAergic transmission and Gln metabolism. Here we discuss the common mechanisms underlying Mn-induced neurotoxicity and their relationship to CNS pathology and GGC impairment.

  5. Critical Evaluation of the Changes in Glutamine Synthetase Activity in Models of Cerebral Stroke.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Battaile, Kevin; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2015-12-01

    The following article addresses some seemingly paradoxical observations concerning cerebral glutamine synthetase in ischemia-reperfusion injury. In the brain, this enzyme is predominantly found in astrocytes and catalyzes part of the glutamine-glutamate cycle. Glutamine synthetase is also thought to be especially sensitive to inactivation by the oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals generated during strokes. Despite this apparent sensitivity, glutamine synthetase specific activity is elevated in the affected tissues during reperfusion. Given the central role of the glutamine-glutamate cycle in the brain, we sought to resolve these conflicting observations with the view of providing an alternative perspective for therapeutic intervention in stroke.

  6. Glutamine-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase and other enzyme activities related to the pyrimidine pathway in spleen of Squalus acanthias (spiny dogfish).

    PubMed

    Anderson, P M

    1989-07-15

    The first two steps of urea synthesis in liver of marine elasmobranchs involve formation of glutamine from ammonia and of carbamoyl phosphate from glutamine, catalysed by glutamine synthetase and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, respectively [Anderson & Casey (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 456-462]; both of these enzymes are localized exclusively in the mitochondrial matrix. The objective of this study was to establish the enzymology of carbamoyl phosphate formation and utilization for pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis in Squalus acanthias (spiny dogfish), a representative elasmobranch. Aspartate carbamoyltransferase could not be detected in liver of dogfish. Spleen extracts, however, had glutamine-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, aspartate carbamoyltransferase, dihydro-orotase, and glutamine synthetase activities, all localized in the cytosol; dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, and orotidine-5'-decarboxylase activities were also present. Except for glutamine synthetase, the levels of all activities were very low. The carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity is inhibited by UTP and is activated by 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate. The first three enzyme activities of the pyrimidine pathway were eluted in distinctly different positions during gel filtration chromatography under a number of different conditions; although complete proteolysis of inter-domain regions of a multifunctional complex during extraction cannot be excluded, the evidence suggests that in dogfish, in contrast to mammalian species, these three enzymes of the pyrimidine pathway exist as individual polypeptide chains. These results: (1) establish that dogfish express two different glutamine-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activities, (2) confirm the report [Smith, Ritter & Campbell (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 198-202] that dogfish express two different glutamine synthetases, and (3) provide indirect evidence that glutamine may not be available in liver for

  7. Glutamine-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase and other enzyme activities related to the pyrimidine pathway in spleen of Squalus acanthias (spiny dogfish).

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P M

    1989-01-01

    The first two steps of urea synthesis in liver of marine elasmobranchs involve formation of glutamine from ammonia and of carbamoyl phosphate from glutamine, catalysed by glutamine synthetase and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, respectively [Anderson & Casey (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 456-462]; both of these enzymes are localized exclusively in the mitochondrial matrix. The objective of this study was to establish the enzymology of carbamoyl phosphate formation and utilization for pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis in Squalus acanthias (spiny dogfish), a representative elasmobranch. Aspartate carbamoyltransferase could not be detected in liver of dogfish. Spleen extracts, however, had glutamine-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, aspartate carbamoyltransferase, dihydro-orotase, and glutamine synthetase activities, all localized in the cytosol; dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, and orotidine-5'-decarboxylase activities were also present. Except for glutamine synthetase, the levels of all activities were very low. The carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity is inhibited by UTP and is activated by 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate. The first three enzyme activities of the pyrimidine pathway were eluted in distinctly different positions during gel filtration chromatography under a number of different conditions; although complete proteolysis of inter-domain regions of a multifunctional complex during extraction cannot be excluded, the evidence suggests that in dogfish, in contrast to mammalian species, these three enzymes of the pyrimidine pathway exist as individual polypeptide chains. These results: (1) establish that dogfish express two different glutamine-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activities, (2) confirm the report [Smith, Ritter & Campbell (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 198-202] that dogfish express two different glutamine synthetases, and (3) provide indirect evidence that glutamine may not be available in liver for

  8. The pathways of glutamate and glutamine oxidation by tumor cell mitochondria. Role of mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Lehninger, A L

    1984-05-25

    Little evidence has been available on the oxidative pathways of glutamine and glutamate, the major respiratory substrates of cancer cells. Glutamate formed from glutamine by phosphate-dependent glutaminase undergoes quantitative transamination by aerobic tumor mitochondria to yield aspartate. However, when malate is also added there is a pronounced decrease in aspartate production and a large formation of citrate and alanine, in both state 3 and 4 conditions. In contrast, addition of malate to normal rat heart, liver, or kidney mitochondria oxidizing glutamate causes a marked increase in aspartate production. Further analysis showed that extramitochondrial malate is oxidized almost quantitatively to pyruvate + CO2 by NAD(P)+-linked malic enzyme, present in the mitochondria of all tumors tested, but absent in heart, liver, and kidney mitochondria. On the other hand intramitochondrial malate generated from glutamate is oxidized quantitatively to oxalacetate by mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase of tumors. Acetyl-CoA derived from extramitochondrial malate via pyruvate and oxalacetate derived from glutamate via intramitochondrial malate are quantitatively converted into citrate, which is extruded. No evidence was found that malic enzyme of tumor mitochondria converts glutamate-derived malate into pyruvate as postulated in other reports. Possible mechanisms for the integration of mitochondrial malic enzyme and malate dehydrogenase activities in tumors are discussed.

  9. Disruption of the Glutamate–Glutamine Cycle Involving Astrocytes in an Animal Model of Depression for Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    Rappeneau, Virginie; Blaker, Amanda; Petro, Jeff R.; Yamamoto, Bryan K.; Shimamoto, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women are twice as likely as men to develop major depression. The brain mechanisms underlying this sex disparity are not clear. Disruption of the glutamate–glutamine cycle has been implicated in psychiatric disturbances. This study identifies sex-based impairments in the glutamate–glutamine cycle involving astrocytes using an animal model of depression. Methods: Male and female adult Long-Evans rats were exposed to chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) for 21 days, using a modified resident-intruder paradigm. Territorial aggression was used for males and maternal aggression was used for females to induce depressive-like deficits for intruders. The depressive-like phenotype was assessed with intake for saccharin solution, weight gain, estrous cycle, and corticosterone (CORT). Behaviors displayed by the intruders during daily encounters with residents were characterized. Rats with daily handling were used as controls for each sex. Ten days after the last encounter, both the intruders and controls were subjected to a no-net-flux in vivo microdialysis to assess glutamate accumulation and extracellular glutamine in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). The contralateral hemispheres were used for determining changes in astrocytic markers, including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1). Results: Both male and female intruders reduced saccharin intake over the course of CSDS, compared to their pre-stress period and to their respective controls. Male intruders exhibited submissive/defensive behaviors to territorial aggression by receiving sideways threats and bites. These males showed reductions in striatal GLT-1 and spontaneous glutamine in the NAc, compared to controls. Female intruders exhibited isolated behaviors to maternal aggression, including immobility, rearing, and selfgrooming. Their non-reproductive days were extended. Also, they showed reductions in prefrontal and accumbal GFAP+ cells and prefrontal GLT-1, compared to

  10. Metabolic Cooperation of Glucose and Glutamine Is Essential for the Lytic Cycle of Obligate Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Nitzsche, Richard; Zagoriy, Vyacheslav; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread protozoan parasite infecting nearly all warm-blooded organisms. Asexual reproduction of the parasite within its host cells is achieved by consecutive lytic cycles, which necessitates biogenesis of significant energy and biomass. Here we show that glucose and glutamine are the two major physiologically important nutrients used for the synthesis of macromolecules (ATP, nucleic acid, proteins, and lipids) in T. gondii, and either of them is sufficient to ensure the parasite survival. The parasite can counteract genetic ablation of its glucose transporter by increasing the flux of glutamine-derived carbon through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and by concurrently activating gluconeogenesis, which guarantee a continued biogenesis of ATP and biomass for host-cell invasion and parasite replication, respectively. In accord, a pharmacological inhibition of glutaminolysis or oxidative phosphorylation arrests the lytic cycle of the glycolysis-deficient mutant, which is primarily a consequence of impaired invasion due to depletion of ATP. Unexpectedly, however, intracellular parasites continue to proliferate, albeit slower, notwithstanding a simultaneous deprivation of glucose and glutamine. A growth defect in the glycolysis-impaired mutant is caused by a compromised synthesis of lipids, which cannot be counterbalanced by glutamine but can be restored by acetate. Consistently, supplementation of parasite cultures with exogenous acetate can amend the lytic cycle of the glucose transport mutant. Such plasticity in the parasite's carbon flux enables a growth-and-survival trade-off in assorted nutrient milieus, which may underlie the promiscuous survival of T. gondii tachyzoites in diverse host cells. Our results also indicate a convergence of parasite metabolism with cancer cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Metabolic Cooperation of Glucose and Glutamine Is Essential for the Lytic Cycle of Obligate Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii*

    PubMed Central

    Nitzsche, Richard; Zagoriy, Vyacheslav; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread protozoan parasite infecting nearly all warm-blooded organisms. Asexual reproduction of the parasite within its host cells is achieved by consecutive lytic cycles, which necessitates biogenesis of significant energy and biomass. Here we show that glucose and glutamine are the two major physiologically important nutrients used for the synthesis of macromolecules (ATP, nucleic acid, proteins, and lipids) in T. gondii, and either of them is sufficient to ensure the parasite survival. The parasite can counteract genetic ablation of its glucose transporter by increasing the flux of glutamine-derived carbon through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and by concurrently activating gluconeogenesis, which guarantee a continued biogenesis of ATP and biomass for host-cell invasion and parasite replication, respectively. In accord, a pharmacological inhibition of glutaminolysis or oxidative phosphorylation arrests the lytic cycle of the glycolysis-deficient mutant, which is primarily a consequence of impaired invasion due to depletion of ATP. Unexpectedly, however, intracellular parasites continue to proliferate, albeit slower, notwithstanding a simultaneous deprivation of glucose and glutamine. A growth defect in the glycolysis-impaired mutant is caused by a compromised synthesis of lipids, which cannot be counterbalanced by glutamine but can be restored by acetate. Consistently, supplementation of parasite cultures with exogenous acetate can amend the lytic cycle of the glucose transport mutant. Such plasticity in the parasite's carbon flux enables a growth-and-survival trade-off in assorted nutrient milieus, which may underlie the promiscuous survival of T. gondii tachyzoites in diverse host cells. Our results also indicate a convergence of parasite metabolism with cancer cells. PMID:26518878

  12. ω-Amidase: an underappreciated, but important enzyme in L-glutamine and L-asparagine metabolism; relevance to sulfur and nitrogen metabolism, tumor biology and hyperammonemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Arthur J L; Shurubor, Yevgeniya I; Dorai, Thambi; Pinto, John T; Isakova, Elena P; Deryabina, Yulia I; Denton, Travis T; Krasnikov, Boris F

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, two major routes exist for the metabolic conversion of L-glutamine to α-ketoglutarate. The most widely studied pathway involves the hydrolysis of L-glutamine to L-glutamate catalyzed by glutaminases, followed by the conversion of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate by the action of an L-glutamate-linked aminotransferase or via the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. However, another major pathway exists in mammals for the conversion of L-glutamine to α-ketoglutarate (the glutaminase II pathway) in which L-glutamine is first transaminated to α-ketoglutaramate (KGM) followed by hydrolysis of KGM to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia catalyzed by an amidase known as ω-amidase. In mammals, the glutaminase II pathway is present in both cytosolic and mitochondrial compartments and is most prominent in liver and kidney. Similarly, two routes exist for the conversion of L-asparagine to oxaloacetate. In the most extensively studied pathway, L-asparagine is hydrolyzed to L-aspartate by the action of asparaginase, followed by transamination of L-aspartate to oxaloacetate. However, another pathway also exists for the conversion of L-asparagine to oxaloacetate (the asparaginase II pathway). In this pathway, L-asparagine is first transaminated to α-ketosuccinamate (KSM), followed by hydrolysis of KSM to oxaloacetate by the action of ω-amidase. One advantage of both the glutaminase II and the asparaginase II pathways is that they are irreversible, and thus are important in anaplerosis by shuttling 5-C (α-ketoglutarate) and 4-C (oxaloacetate) units into the TCA cycle. In this review, we briefly mention the importance of the glutaminase II and asparaginase II pathways in microorganisms and plants. However, the major emphasis of the review is related to the importance of these pathways (especially the common enzyme component of both pathways--ω-amidase) in nitrogen and sulfur metabolism in mammals and as a source of anaplerotic carbon moieties in rapidly dividing cells. The

  13. Ability of nonenzymic nitration or acetylation of E. coli glutamine synthetase to produce effects analogous to enzymic adenylylation.

    PubMed

    Cimino, F; Anderson, W B; Stadtman, E R

    1970-06-01

    Treatment of unadenylylated glutamine synthetase from Escherichia coli with tetranitromethane or with N-acetylimidazole produces alterations in catalytic parameters that are similar to alterations caused by the physiologically important process of adenylylation. All three modification reactions lead to a change in divalent ion requirement for biosynthetic activity; the unmodified enzyme requires Mg(2+) for activity, whereas the modified enzymes exhibit increased activity with Mn(2+). The gamma-glutamyl transferase activity of the modified enzyme is more sensitive to feedback inhibition by tryptophan, histidine, CTP, and AMP, and to inhibition by Mg(2+) or to inactivation by 5 M urea. Finally, the pH optimum for the unmodified enzyme is 7.9, while the modified enzymes are more active at pH 6.8. Since treatment of the enzyme with N-acetylimidazole results in a decrease in absorbancy at 278 mmu and treatment with tetranitromethane causes an increase in absorbancy at 428 mmu, the effects of these reagents are probably due to modification of certain tyrosyl groups on the enzyme. However, other evidence indicates that the tyrosyl residues which are susceptible to adenylylation in the adenylyltransferase-catalyzed reaction are not involved in the acetylation or nitration reactions.

  14. Ability of Nonenzymic Nitration or Acetylation of E. coli Glutamine Synthetase to Produce Effects Analogous to Enzymic Adenylylation

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, Filiberto; Anderson, Wayne B.; Stadtman, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    Treatment of unadenylylated glutamine synthetase from Escherichia coli with tetranitromethane or with N-acetylimidazole produces alterations in catalytic parameters that are similar to alterations caused by the physiologically important process of adenylylation. All three modification reactions lead to a change in divalent ion requirement for biosynthetic activity; the unmodified enzyme requires Mg2+ for activity, whereas the modified enzymes exhibit increased activity with Mn2+. The γ-glutamyl transferase activity of the modified enzyme is more sensitive to feedback inhibition by tryptophan, histidine, CTP, and AMP, and to inhibition by Mg2+ or to inactivation by 5 M urea. Finally, the pH optimum for the unmodified enzyme is 7.9, while the modified enzymes are more active at pH 6.8. Since treatment of the enzyme with N-acetylimidazole results in a decrease in absorbancy at 278 mμ and treatment with tetranitromethane causes an increase in absorbancy at 428 mμ, the effects of these reagents are probably due to modification of certain tyrosyl groups on the enzyme. However, other evidence indicates that the tyrosyl residues which are susceptible to adenylylation in the adenylyltransferase-catalyzed reaction are not involved in the acetylation or nitration reactions. PMID:4317919

  15. Activity of the lactate-alanine shuttle is independent of glutamate-glutamine cycle activity in cerebellar neuronal-astrocytic cultures.

    PubMed

    Bak, Lasse K; Sickmann, Helle M; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    The glutamate-glutamine cycle describes the neuronal release of glutamate into the synaptic cleft, astrocytic uptake, and conversion into glutamine, followed by release for use as a neuronal glutamate precursor. This only explains the fate of the carbon atoms, however, and not that of the ammonia. Recently, a role for alanine has been proposed in transfer of ammonia between glutamatergic neurons and astrocytes, denoted the lactate-alanine shuttle (Waagepetersen et al. [ 2000] J. Neurochem. 75:471-479). The role of alanine in this context has been studied further using cerebellar neuronal cultures and corresponding neuronal-astrocytic cocultures. A superfusion paradigm was used to induce repetitively vesicular glutamate release by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in the neurons, allowing the relative activity dependency of the lactate-alanine shuttle to be assessed. [(15)N]Alanine (0.2 mM), [2-(15)N]/[5-(15)N]glutamine (0.25 mM), and [(15)N]ammonia (0.3 mM) were used as precursors and cell extracts were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Labeling from [(15)N]alanine in glutamine, aspartate, and glutamate in cerebellar cocultures was independent of depolarization of the neurons. Employing glutamine with the amino group labeled ([2-(15)N]glutamine) as the precursor, an activity-dependent increase in the labeling of both glutamate and aspartate (but not alanine) was observed in the cerebellar neurons. When the amide group of glutamine was labeled ([5-(15)N]glutamine), no labeling could be detected in the analyzed metabolites. Altogether, the results of this study support the existence of the lactate-alanine shuttle and the associated glutamate-glutamine cycle. No direct coupling of the two shuttles was observed, however, and only the glutamate-glutamine cycle seemed activity dependent.

  16. Integration between Glycolysis and Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle Flux May Explain Preferential Glycolytic Increase during Brain Activation, Requiring Glutamate.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Leif; Chen, Ye

    2017-01-01

    The 1988 observation by Fox et al. (1988) that brief intense brain activation increases glycolysis (pyruvate formation from glucose) much more than oxidative metabolism has been abundantly confirmed. Specifically glycolytic increase was unexpected because the amount of ATP it generates is much smaller than that formed by subsequent oxidative metabolism of pyruvate. The present article shows that preferential glycolysis can be explained by metabolic processes associated with activation of the glutamate-glutamine cycle. The flux in this cycle, which is essential for production of transmitter glutamate and GABA, equals 75% of brain glucose utilization and each turn is associated with utilization of ~1 glucose molecule. About one half of the association between cycle flux and glucose metabolism occurs during neuronal conversion of glutamine to glutamate in a process similar to the malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS) except that glutamate is supplied from glutamine, not formed from α-ketoglutarate (αKG) as during operation of conventional MAS. Regular MAS function is triggered by one oxidative process in the cytosol during glycolysis causing NAD(+) reduction to NADH. Since NADH cannot cross the mitochondrial membrane (MEM) for oxidation NAD(+) is re-generated by conversion of cytosolic oxaloacetate (OAA) to malate, which enters the mitochondria for oxidation and in a cyclic process regenerates cytosolic OAA. Therefore MAS as well as the "pseudo-MAS" necessary for neuronal glutamate formation can only operate together with cytosolic reduction of NAD(+) to NADH. The major process causing NAD(+) reduction is glycolysis which therefore also must occur during neuronal conversion of glutamine to glutamate and may energize vesicular glutamate uptake which preferentially uses glycolytically derived energy. Another major contributor to the association between glutamate-glutamine cycle and glucose utilization is the need for astrocytic pyruvate to generate glutamate. Although some

  17. Integration between Glycolysis and Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle Flux May Explain Preferential Glycolytic Increase during Brain Activation, Requiring Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Leif; Chen, Ye

    2017-01-01

    The 1988 observation by Fox et al. (1988) that brief intense brain activation increases glycolysis (pyruvate formation from glucose) much more than oxidative metabolism has been abundantly confirmed. Specifically glycolytic increase was unexpected because the amount of ATP it generates is much smaller than that formed by subsequent oxidative metabolism of pyruvate. The present article shows that preferential glycolysis can be explained by metabolic processes associated with activation of the glutamate-glutamine cycle. The flux in this cycle, which is essential for production of transmitter glutamate and GABA, equals 75% of brain glucose utilization and each turn is associated with utilization of ~1 glucose molecule. About one half of the association between cycle flux and glucose metabolism occurs during neuronal conversion of glutamine to glutamate in a process similar to the malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS) except that glutamate is supplied from glutamine, not formed from α-ketoglutarate (αKG) as during operation of conventional MAS. Regular MAS function is triggered by one oxidative process in the cytosol during glycolysis causing NAD+ reduction to NADH. Since NADH cannot cross the mitochondrial membrane (MEM) for oxidation NAD+ is re-generated by conversion of cytosolic oxaloacetate (OAA) to malate, which enters the mitochondria for oxidation and in a cyclic process regenerates cytosolic OAA. Therefore MAS as well as the “pseudo-MAS” necessary for neuronal glutamate formation can only operate together with cytosolic reduction of NAD+ to NADH. The major process causing NAD+ reduction is glycolysis which therefore also must occur during neuronal conversion of glutamine to glutamate and may energize vesicular glutamate uptake which preferentially uses glycolytically derived energy. Another major contributor to the association between glutamate-glutamine cycle and glucose utilization is the need for astrocytic pyruvate to generate glutamate. Although some

  18. Complexity of glutamine metabolism in kidney tubules from fed and fasted rats.

    PubMed Central

    Vercoutère, Barbara; Durozard, Daniel; Baverel, Gabriel; Martin, Guy

    2004-01-01

    Glutamine is an important renal glucose precursor and energy provider. In order to advance our understanding of the underlying metabolic processes, we studied the metabolism of variously labelled [13C]glutamine and [14C]glutamine molecules and the effects of fasting in isolated rat renal proximal tubules. Absolute fluxes through the enzymes involved, including enzymes of four different cycles operating concomitantly, were assessed by combining mainly the 13C NMR data with an appropriate model of glutamine metabolism. In both nutritional states, unidirectional glutamine removal by glutaminase was partially masked by the concomitant operation of glutamine synthetase; fasting accelerated glutamine removal by increasing flux solely through glutaminase, without changing that through glutamine synthetase. Fasting stimulated net glutamate degradation only by decreasing flux through glutamate dehydrogenase in the reductive amination direction, but surprisingly did not significantly alter complete oxidation of the glutamine carbon skeleton. Finally, gluconeogenesis from glutamine involved not only substantial recycling through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, but also an important anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylase that was accelerated dramatically by fasting. Thus renal glutamine metabolism follows an unexpectedly complex route that is precisely regulated during fasting. PMID:14616091

  19. Glutamate-glutamine cycle and exchange in the placenta-fetus unit during late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Xie, Chunyan; Zhang, Yuzhe; Fan, Zhiyong; Yin, Yulong; Blachier, Francois

    2015-01-01

    The present review focuses on the physiological functions of glutamate-glutamine exchange involving placental amino acid transport and umbilical amino acid uptake in mammals (particularly in sows), with special emphasis on the associated regulating mechanisms. Glutamate plus glutamine are among the most abundant and the most utilized amino acids in fetus during late gestation. During pregnancy, amino acids, notably as precursors of macromolecules including proteins and nucleotides are involved in fetal development and growth. Amino acid concentrations in fetus are generally higher than in the mother. Among amino acids, the transport and metabolism of glutamate and glutamine during fetal development exhibit characteristics that clearly emphasize the importance of the interaction between the placenta and the fetal liver. Glutamate is quite remarkable among amino acids, which originate from the placenta, and is cleared from fetal plasma. In addition, the flux of glutamate through the placenta from the fetal plasma is highly correlated with the umbilical glutamate delivery rate. Glutamine plays a central role in fetal carbon and nitrogen metabolism and exhibits one of the highest fetal/maternal plasma ratio among all amino acids in human and other mammals. Glutamate is taken up by placenta from the fetal circulation and then converted to glutamine before being released back into the fetal circulation. Works are required on the glutamate-glutamine metabolism during late pregnancy in physiological and pathophysiological situations since such works may help to improve fetal growth and development both in humans and other mammals. Indeed, glutamine supplementation appears to ameliorate fetal growth retardation in sows and reduces preweaning mortality of piglets.

  20. BLOOD AMMONIA AND GLUTAMINE AS PREDICTORS OF HYPERAMMONEMIC CRISES IN UREA CYCLE DISORDER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Brendan; Diaz, George A.; Rhead, William; Lichter-Konecki, U.; Feigenbaum, Annette; Berry, Susan A.; Le Mons, C.; Bartley, James A; Longo, Nicola; Nagamani, Sandesh C.; Berquist, William; Gallagher, Renata; Bartholomew, Dennis; Harding, Cary O.; Korson, Mark S.; McCandless, Shawn E.; Smith, Wendy; Cederbaum, Stephen; Wong, Derek; Merritt, J. Lawrence; Schulze, A.; Vockley, Gerard.; Kronn, David; Zori, Roberto; Summar, Marshall; Milikien, D.A.; Marino, M.; Coakley, D.F.; Mokhtarani, M.; Scharschmidt, B.F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine predictors of ammonia exposure and hyperammonemic crises (HAC) in patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs). Methods The relationships between fasting ammonia, daily ammonia exposure, and HACs were analyzed in >100 UCD patients. Results Fasting ammonia correlated strongly with daily ammonia exposure (r=0.764, p<0.001). For patients with fasting ammonia levels <0.5 ULN, 0.5 to <1.0 ULN, and ≥1.0 ULN, the probability of a normal average daily ammonia value was 87%, 60%, and 39%, respectively, and 10.3%, 14.1%, and 37.0% of these patients experienced ≥1 HAC over 12 months. Time to first HAC was shorter (p=0.008) and relative risk (4.5×; p=0.011) and rate (~5×, p=0.006) of HACs higher in patients with fasting ammonia ≥1.0 ULN vs. <0.5ULN; relative risk was even greater (20×; p=0.009) in patients ≥6 years. A 10 or 25 μmol/L increase in ammonia exposure increased the relative risk of a HAC by 50% and >200% (p<0.0001), respectively. The relationship between ammonia and HAC risk appeared independent of treatment, age, UCD subtype, dietary protein intake, or blood urea nitrogen. Fasting glutamine correlated weakly with AUC0-24 and was not a significant predictor of HACs. Conclusions Fasting ammonia correlates strongly and positively with daily ammonia exposure and with the risk and rate of HACs, suggesting that UCD patients may benefit from tight ammonia control. PMID:25503497

  1. Impairment of glutamine/glutamate-γ-aminobutyric acid cycle in manganese toxicity in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, M

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is required for maintaining the proper function and regulation of many biochemical and cellular reactions. Despite its essentiality, at excessive levels Mn is toxic to the central nervous system. The overdose accumulation of Mn in specific brain areas, such as the substantia nigra, the globus pallidus and the striatum, triggers neurotoxicity resulting in a neurological brain disorder, referred to as manganism. Manganese toxicity is associated with the disruption of glutamine (Gln)/glutamate (Glu) GABA cycle (GGC). The GGC represents a complex process, since Gln efflux from astrocytes must be met by its influx in neurons. Mn toxicity is associated with the disruption of both of these critical points in the cycle. In cultured astrocytes, pre-treatment with Mn inhibits the initial net uptake of Gln in a concentration-dependent manner. Manganese added directly to astrocytes induces deregulation in the expression of SNAT3, SNAT2, ASCT2 and LAT2 transporters and significantly decreases in Gln uptake mediated by the transporting Systems N and ASC, and a decrease in Gln efflux mediated by Systems N, ASC and L. Further, Mn disrupts Glu transporting systems leading to both a reduction in Glu uptake and elevation in extracellular Glu levels. Interestingly, there appear to be common signaling targets of Mn in GGC cycling in glial cells. Namely, the PKC signaling is affected by Mn in Gln and Glu transporters expression and function. Additionally, Mn was identified to deregulate glutamine synthetase (GS) expression and activity. Those evidences could triggers depletion of Gln synthesis/metabolism in glia cells and consequently diminish astrocytic-derived glutamine, while disruption of Glu removal/transport can mediate dyshomeostasis in neurotransmission of functioning neurons. Overdose and excessive Mn accumulations in astrocytes not only culminate in pathology, but also affect astrocytic protective properties and defect or

  2. Functional importance of Asp56 from the alpha-polypeptide of Phaseolus vulgaris glutamine synthetase. An essential residue for transferase but not for biosynthetic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Clemente, M T; Márquez, A J

    1999-09-01

    Replacement of Asp56 by site-directed mutagenesis of the alpha-gene from Phaseolus vulgaris glutamine synthetase heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli produces a complete loss of transferase enzyme activity, thus revealing essentiality of the residue for this particular enzyme activity. This happens independent of Asp56 being replaced by Ala or Glu, suggesting that the essentiality of this residue cannot be attributed to its negative electrical charge. However, a high level of glutamine synthetase biosynthetic specific activity (referred to glutamine synthetase protein, as determined immunologically), is present in D56A and D56E mutants, suggesting that Asp56 is an example of a residue that has a different role in the catalytic mechanism of both enzyme activities of this protein. Km for ATP, glutamate and Mg2+, as well as energy of activation, can be altered as a consequence of the performed mutations. However, the Km and catalytic efficiency for ammonium remains unaffected. Therefore, the catalytic role of Asp56 in the alpha-polypeptide of higher plant glutamine synthetase is quite different from the role proposed for its highly conserved homologue in bacteria (Asp50 in E. coli), which has been associated with binding and deprotonation of ammonium. On the other hand, we also show other results indicating that Asp56 is important in the spatial conformation of the active site and/or the protein, Asp56 being a crucial residue in the salting-out aggregation properties of the enzyme.

  3. Glutamine fuels proliferation but not migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Boa; Li, Jia; Jang, Cholsoon; Arany, Zoltan

    2017-08-15

    Endothelial metabolism is a key regulator of angiogenesis. Glutamine metabolism in endothelial cells (ECs) has been poorly studied. We used genetic modifications and (13)C tracing approaches to define glutamine metabolism in these cells. Glutamine supplies the majority of carbons in the tricyclic acid (TCA) cycle of ECs and contributes to lipid biosynthesis via reductive carboxylation. EC-specific deletion in mice of glutaminase, the initial enzyme in glutamine catabolism, markedly blunts angiogenesis. In cell culture, glutamine deprivation or inhibition of glutaminase prevents EC proliferation, but does not prevent cell migration, which relies instead on aerobic glycolysis. Without glutamine catabolism, there is near complete loss of TCA intermediates, with no compensation from glucose-derived anaplerosis. Mechanistically, addition of exogenous alpha-ketoglutarate replenishes TCA intermediates and rescues cellular growth, but simultaneously unveils a requirement for Rac1-dependent macropinocytosis to provide non-essential amino acids, including asparagine. Together, these data outline the dependence of ECs on glutamine for cataplerotic processes; the need for glutamine as a nitrogen source for generation of biomass; and the distinct roles of glucose and glutamine in EC biology. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. Purification and characterization of papaya glutamine cyclotransferase, a plant enzyme highly resistant to chemical, acid and thermal denaturation.

    PubMed

    Zerhouni, S; Amrani, A; Nijs, M; Smolders, N; Azarkan, M; Vincentelli, J; Looze, Y

    1998-09-08

    Papaya glutamine cyclotransferase (PQC), present in the laticiferous cells of the tropical species Carica papaya, was purified near to homogeneity. Starting from the soluble fraction of the collected plant latex, a combination of ion-exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose Fast Flow, hydrophobic interaction chromatography on Fractogel TSK Butyl-650 and affinity chromatography on immobilized trypsin provided a purification factor of 279 with an overall yield of 80%. In the course of the purification procedure, the two solvent accessible thiol functions located on the hydrophobic surface of the enzyme were converted into their S-methylthioderivatives. Papaya QC, a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 33000 Da, contains a unique and highly basic polypeptide chain devoid of disulfide bridges as well as of covalently attached phosphate groups. Its absorption spectrum is dominated by the chromophores tyrosine which, nonetheless, do not contribute to the fluorescence emission of the plant enzyme. With a lambdamax of emission at 338 nm and a moderate susceptibility to be quenched by acrylamide, most of the tryptophyl residues of papaya QC appear to be sterically shielded by surrounding protein atoms. Fluorescence can thus be used to monitor unfolding of this enzyme. Preliminary experiments show that papaya QC is exceptionally resistant to chemical (guanidinium hydrochloride), acid and thermal denaturation. At first sight also, this enzyme exhibits high resistance to proteolysis by the papaya cysteine proteinases, yet present in great excess (around 100 mol of proteinases per mol of PQC) in the plant latex. Altogether, these results awaken much curiosity and interest to further investigate how the structure of this plant enzyme is specified.

  5. Evidence for Altered Glutamine Metabolism in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infected Primary Human CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hegedus, Andrea; Kavanagh Williamson, Maia; Khan, Mariam B; Dias Zeidler, Julianna; Da Poian, Andrea T; El-Bacha, Tatiana; Struys, Eduard A; Huthoff, Hendrik

    2017-10-04

    Glutamine is a conditionally essential amino acid that is an important metabolic resource for proliferating tissues by acting as a proteinogenic amino acid, a nitrogen donor for biosynthetic reactions and as a substrate for the citric acid or tricarboxylic acid cycle. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) productively infects activated CD4(+) T cells that are known to require glutamine for proliferation and for carrying out effector functions. As a virus, HIV-1 is furthermore entirely dependent on host metabolism to support its replication. In this study, we compared HIV-1 infected with uninfected activated primary human CD4(+) T cells with regard to glutamine metabolism. We report that glutamine concentrations are elevated in HIV-1-infected cells and that glutamine is important to support HIV-1 replication, although the latter is closely linked to the glutamine dependency of cell survival. Metabolic tracer experiments showed that entry of glutamine-derived carbon into the citric acid cycle is unaffected by HIV-1 infection, but that there is an increase in the secretion of glutamine-derived glutamic acid from HIV-1-infected cells. Western blotting of key enzymes that metabolize glutamine revealed marked differences in the expression of glutaminase isoforms, KGA and CAG, as well as the PPAT enzyme that targets glutamine-derived nitrogen toward nucleotide synthesis. Altogether, this demonstrates that infection of CD4(+) T cells with HIV-1 leads to considerable changes in the cellular glutamine metabolism.

  6. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Ana R; Carvalho, Helena G

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of GS isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context.

  7. Asparagine Plays a Critical Role in Regulating Cellular Adaptation to Glutamine Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji; Fan, Jing; Venneti, Sriram; Cross, Justin R.; Takagi, Toshimitsu; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Djaballah, Hakim; Kanai, Masayuki; Cheng, Emily H; Judkins, Alexander R.; Pawel, Bruce; Baggs, Julie; Cherry, Sara; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Thompson, Craig B.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Many cancer cells consume large quantities of glutamine to maintain TCA cycle anaplerosis and support cell survival. It was therefore surprising when RNAi screening revealed that suppression of citrate synthase (CS), the first TCA cycle enzyme, prevented glutamine-withdrawal-induced apoptosis. CS suppression reduced TCA cycle activity and diverted oxaloacetate, the substrate of CS, into production of the nonessential amino acids aspartate and asparagine. We found that asparagine was necessary and sufficient to suppress glutamine-withdrawal-induced apoptosis without restoring the levels of other nonessential amino acids or TCA cycle intermediates. In complete medium, tumor cells exhibiting high rates of glutamine consumption underwent rapid apoptosis when glutamine-dependent asparagine synthesis was suppressed and expression of asparagine synthetase was statistically correlated with poor prognosis in human tumors. Coupled with the success of L-asparaginase as a therapy for childhood leukemia, the data suggest that intracellular asparagine is a critical suppressor of apoptosis in many human tumors. PMID:25242145

  8. α-Ketoglutaramate: An overlooked metabolite of glutamine and a biomarker for hepatic encephalopathy and inborn errors of the urea cycle

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Kuhara, Tomiko

    2013-01-01

    Glutamine metabolism is generally regarded as proceeding via glutaminase-catalyzed hydrolysis to glutamate and ammonia, followed by conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate catalyzed by glutamate dehydrogenase or by a glutamate-linked aminotransferase (transaminase). However, another pathway exists for the conversion of glutamine to α-ketoglutarate that is often overlooked, but is widely distributed in nature. This pathway, referred to as the glutaminase II pathway, consists of a glutamine transaminase coupled to ω-amidase. Transamination of glutamine results in formation of the corresponding α-keto acid, namely, α-ketoglutaramate (KGM). KGM is hydrolyzed by ω-amidase to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia. The net glutaminase II reaction is: L-Glutamine + α-keto acid + H2O → α-ketoglutarate + L-amino acid + ammonia. In this mini-review the biochemical importance of the glutaminase II pathway is summarized, with emphasis on the key component KGM. Forty years ago it was noted that the concentration of KGM is increased in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and that the level of KGM in the CSF correlates well with the degree of encephalopathy. In more recent work, we have shown that KGM is markedly elevated in the urine of patients with inborn errors of the urea cycle. It is suggested that KGM may be a useful biomarker for many hyperammonemic diseases including hepatic encephalopathy, inborn errors of the urea cycle, citrin deficiency and lysinuric protein intolerance. PMID:24234505

  9. Glutamine Synthetase: Role in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Norenberg, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an ATP-dependent enzyme found in most species that synthesizes glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In brain, GS is exclusively located in astrocytes where it serves to maintain the glutamate-glutamine cycle, as well as nitrogen metabolism. Changes in the activity of GS, as well as its gene expression, along with excitotoxicity, have been identified in a number of neurological conditions. The literature describing alterations in the activation and gene expression of GS, as well as its involvement in different neurological disorders, however, is incomplete. This review summarizes changes in GS gene expression/activity and its potential contribution to the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders, including hepatic encephalopathy, ischemia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, and astroglial neoplasms. This review also explores the possibility of targeting GS in the therapy of these conditions.

  10. A sensitive single-enzyme assay system using the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase BpsA for measurement of L-glutamine in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alistair S; Robins, Katherine J; Ackerley, David F

    2017-01-31

    The ability to rapidly, economically and accurately measure L-glutamine concentrations in biological samples is important for many areas of research, medicine or industry, however there is room for improvement on existing methods. We describe here how the enzyme BpsA, a single-module non-ribosomal peptide synthetase able to convert L-glutamine into the blue pigment indigoidine, can be used to accurately measure L-glutamine in biological samples. Although indigoidine has low solubility in aqueous solutions, meaning direct measurements of indigoidine synthesis do not reliably yield linear standard curves, we demonstrate that resolubilisation of the reaction end-products in DMSO overcomes this issue and that spontaneous reduction to colourless leuco-indigoidine occurs too slowly to interfere with assay accuracy. Our protocol is amenable to a 96-well microtitre format and can be used to measure L-glutamine in common bacterial and mammalian culture media, urine, and deproteinated plasma. We show that active BpsA can be prepared in high yield by expressing it in the apo-form to avoid the toxicity of indigoidine to Escherichia coli host cells, then activating it to the holo-form in cell lysates prior to purification; and that BpsA has a lengthy shelf-life, retaining >95% activity when stored at either -20 °C or 4 °C for 24 weeks.

  11. A sensitive single-enzyme assay system using the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase BpsA for measurement of L-glutamine in biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alistair S.; Robins, Katherine J.; Ackerley, David F.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to rapidly, economically and accurately measure L-glutamine concentrations in biological samples is important for many areas of research, medicine or industry, however there is room for improvement on existing methods. We describe here how the enzyme BpsA, a single-module non-ribosomal peptide synthetase able to convert L-glutamine into the blue pigment indigoidine, can be used to accurately measure L-glutamine in biological samples. Although indigoidine has low solubility in aqueous solutions, meaning direct measurements of indigoidine synthesis do not reliably yield linear standard curves, we demonstrate that resolubilisation of the reaction end-products in DMSO overcomes this issue and that spontaneous reduction to colourless leuco-indigoidine occurs too slowly to interfere with assay accuracy. Our protocol is amenable to a 96-well microtitre format and can be used to measure L-glutamine in common bacterial and mammalian culture media, urine, and deproteinated plasma. We show that active BpsA can be prepared in high yield by expressing it in the apo-form to avoid the toxicity of indigoidine to Escherichia coli host cells, then activating it to the holo-form in cell lysates prior to purification; and that BpsA has a lengthy shelf-life, retaining >95% activity when stored at either −20 °C or 4 °C for 24 weeks. PMID:28139746

  12. Blocking anaplerotic entry of glutamine into the TCA cycle sensitizes K-Ras mutant cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs.

    PubMed

    Saqcena, M; Mukhopadhyay, S; Hosny, C; Alhamed, A; Chatterjee, A; Foster, D A

    2015-05-14

    Cancer cells undergo a metabolic transformation that allows for increased anabolic demands, wherein glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates are shunted away for the synthesis of biological molecules required for cell growth and division. One of the key shunts is the exit of citrate from the mitochondria and the TCA cycle for the generation of cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A that can be used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. With the loss of mitochondrial citrate, cancer cells rely on the 'conditionally essential' amino acid glutamine (Q) as an anaplerotic carbon source for TCA cycle intermediates. Although Q deprivation causes G1 cell cycle arrest in non-transformed cells, its impact on the cancer cell cycle is not well characterized. We report here a correlation between bypass of the Q-dependent G1 checkpoint and cancer cells harboring K-Ras mutations. Instead of arresting in G1 in response to Q-deprivation, K-Ras-driven cancer cells arrest in either S- or G2/M-phase. Inhibition of K-Ras effector pathways was able to revert cells to G1 arrest upon Q deprivation. Blocking anaplerotic utilization of Q mimicked Q deprivation--causing S- and G2/M-phase arrest in K-Ras mutant cancer cells. Significantly, Q deprivation or suppression of anaplerotic Q utilization created synthetic lethality to the cell cycle phase-specific cytotoxic drugs, capecitabine and paclitaxel. These data suggest that disabling of the G1 Q checkpoint could represent a novel vulnerability of cancer cells harboring K-Ras and possibly other mutations that disable the Q-dependent checkpoint.

  13. Pyruvate carboxylase is required for glutamine-independent growth of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tzuling; Sudderth, Jessica; Yang, Chendong; Mullen, Andrew R.; Jin, Eunsook S.; Matés, José M.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells require a constant supply of macromolecular precursors, and interrupting this supply has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy in cancer. Precursors for lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins are generated in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and removed from the mitochondria to participate in biosynthetic reactions. Refilling the pool of precursor molecules (anaplerosis) is therefore crucial to maintain cell growth. Many tumor cells use glutamine to feed anaplerosis. Here we studied how “glutamine-addicted” cells react to interruptions of glutamine metabolism. Silencing of glutaminase (GLS), which catalyzes the first step in glutamine-dependent anaplerosis, suppressed but did not eliminate the growth of glioblastoma cells in culture and in vivo. Profiling metabolic fluxes in GLS-suppressed cells revealed induction of a compensatory anaplerotic mechanism catalyzed by pyruvate carboxylase (PC), allowing the cells to use glucose-derived pyruvate rather than glutamine for anaplerosis. Although PC was dispensable when glutamine was available, forcing cells to adapt to low-glutamine conditions rendered them absolutely dependent on PC for growth. Furthermore, in other cell lines, measuring PC activity in nutrient-replete conditions predicted dependence on specific anaplerotic enzymes. Cells with high PC activity were resistant to GLS silencing and did not require glutamine for survival or growth, but displayed suppressed growth when PC was silenced. Thus, PC-mediated, glucose-dependent anaplerosis allows cells to achieve glutamine independence. Induction of PC during chronic suppression of glutamine metabolism may prove to be a mechanism of resistance to therapies targeting glutaminolysis. PMID:21555572

  14. Acetate stimulates flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle in rabbit renal proximal tubules synthesizing glutamine from alanine: a 13C NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Dugelay, S; Chauvin, M F; Megnin-Chanet, F; Martin, G; Laréal, M C; Lhoste, J M; Baverel, G

    1999-01-01

    Although glutamine synthesis has a major role in the control of acid-base balance and ammonia detoxification in the kidney of herbivorous species, very little is known about the regulation of this process. We therefore studied the influence of acetate, which is readily metabolized by the kidney and whose metabolism is accompanied by the production of bicarbonate, on glutamine synthesis from variously labelled [(13)C]alanine and [(14)C]alanine molecules in isolated rabbit renal proximal tubules. With alanine as sole exogenous substrate, glutamine and, to a smaller extent, glutamate and CO(2), were the only significant products of the metabolism of this amino acid, which was removed at high rates. Absolute fluxes through the enzymes involved in alanine conversion into glutamine were assessed by using a novel model describing the corresponding reactions in conjunction with the (13)C NMR, and to a smaller extent, the radioactive and enzymic data. The presence of acetate (5 mM) led to a large stimulation of fluxes through citrate synthase and alpha-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. These effects were accompanied by increases in the removal of alanine, in the accumulation of glutamate and in flux through the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase. Acetate did not alter fluxes through glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase; as a result, acetate did not change the accumulation of ammonia, which was negligible under both experimental conditions. We conclude that acetate, which seems to be an important energy-provider to the rabbit renal proximal tubule, simultaneously traps as glutamate the extra nitrogen removed as alanine, thus preventing the release of additional ammonia by the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. PMID:10477267

  15. Kinetics for glutamine-synthetase inhibition by phosphinothricin and measurement of other enzyme activities in situ in isolated asparagus cells using a freeze-thaw technique.

    PubMed

    Fraser, A R; Ridley, S M

    1984-07-01

    Kinetics for the inhibition of glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) in situ by the herbicidal glutamate analogue, phosphinothricin, have been generated, and produce an inhibitor dissociation constant (Ki) of 6.5 μM. This has been achieved through the development of a rapid technique for the isolation of mesophyll cells from the cladophylls of young asparagus (Asparagus sprengeri) plants to provide starting material for the direct measurement of enzyme activities in situ. A modification of the technique developed by Rhodes and Stewart (Planta 118, 133-144 (1974) for the direct determination of enzyme activities in higher-plant tissues has been applied to these asparagus cells. Treatment of the cells by a single freezing in liquid nitrogen for a very short period (10 s), followed by thawing, alters the permeability of cell and organelle membranes allowing enzymes to become accessible to many small molecules, and yet remain concentrated and active within the cell. The activities of enzymes known to be located specifically in the organelles as well as the cytoplasm can be measured in asparagus cells treated in this way. Comparisons have been made between the activity and inhibition of glutamine synthetase in situ, and the enzyme isolated and partially purified from asparagus cells by fast protein liquid chromatography. Similarities in Km and Ki values obtained between these two emphasize the efficacy of the freeze-thaw technique. There is only a single glutamine-synthetase isoenzyme in asparagus mesophyll cells, which copurifies with the one normally associated with the chloroplast (GS2).

  16. Involvement of the glutamate/glutamine cycle and glutamate transporter GLT-1 in antidepressant-like effects of Xiao Yao san on chronically stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiu-Fang; Li, Yue-Hua; Chen, Jia-Xu; Sun, Long-Ji; Jiao, Hai-Yan; Wang, Xin-Xin; Zhou, Yan

    2017-06-19

    Xiao Yao San (XYS) is an herbal prescription which is used in the treatment of depression for thousands of years from Song dynasty in China (960-1127 A.D.), and is the bestselling and most popular herb formula for treating major depression. This study aimed to assess the chronic antidepressant effects of XYS and fluoxetine in depressed mice induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) and its association with  alterations in glutamate/glutamine cycle and glutamate transporters. Mice in the control and model group were given 0.5 ml physiological saline by intragastric administration. Mice in two treatment groups were given XYS (0.25 g/kg/d) and fluoxetine (2.6 mg/kg/d), respectively. The depressive-like behaviors such as forced swim test (FST), sucrose preference test (SPT) and novelty-suppressed feeding (NSF) test were measured after mice exposed to CUMS for 21 days. Body weight, contents of glutamate and glutamine, glutamine/glutamate ratio that is usually thought to reflect glutamate/glutamine cycle, and the protein and mRNA expressions of glutamate transporters (excitatory amino acid transporter 1-2,GLAST/EAAT1 and GLT-1/EAAT2) were measured. The immunoreactivities of GLAST and GLT-1 in the hippocampus were also investigated. After CUMS exposure, mice exhibited depressive-like behaviors, body weight loss, increased glutamate level, decreased glutamine level, elevated glutamine/glutamate ratio, decreased GLT-1 protein expression and mRNA level, and decreased average optical density (AOD) of GLT-1 in the CA1, CA3 and DG in the hippocampus. These abnormalities could be effectively reversed by XYS or fluoxetine treatment. In addition, the study also found that GLAST expression in the hippocampus could not be altered by 21-d CUMS. The studies indicated that XYS may have therapeutic actions on depression -like behavior s induced by CUMS in mice possibly mediated by modulation of glutamate/glutamine cycle and glutamate transporter GLT-1 in the hippocampus.

  17. Decision for cell fate: deubiquitinating enzymes in cell cycle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Lim, Key-Hwan; Song, Myoung-Hyun; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    All organs consisting of single cells are consistently maintaining homeostasis in response to stimuli such as free oxygen, DNA damage, inflammation, and microorganisms. The cell cycle of all mammalian cells is regulated by protein expression in the right phase to respond to proliferation and apoptosis signals. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins by several protein-editing enzymes are associated with cell cycle regulation by their enzymatic functions. Ubiquitination, one of the PTMs, is also strongly related to cell cycle regulation by protein degradation or signal transduction. The importance of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which have a reversible function for ubiquitination, has recently suggested that the function of DUBs is also important for determining the fate of proteins during cell cycle processing. This article reviews and summarizes the diverse roles of DUBs, including DNA damage, cell cycle processing, and regulation of histone proteins, and also suggests the possibility for therapeutic targets.

  18. Folate cycle enzyme MTHFD1L confers metabolic advantages in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Derek; Xu, Iris Ming-Jing; Chiu, David Kung-Chun; Lai, Robin Kit-Ho; Tse, Aki Pui-Wah; Lan Li, Lynna; Law, Cheuk-Ting; Tsang, Felice Ho-Ching; Wei, Larry Lai; Chan, Cerise Yuen-Ki; Wong, Chun-Ming; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin; Wong, Carmen Chak-Lui

    2017-04-10

    Cancer cells preferentially utilize glucose and glutamine, which provide macromolecules and antioxidants that sustain rapid cell division. Metabolic reprogramming in cancer drives an increased glycolytic rate that supports maximal production of these nutrients. The folate cycle, through transfer of a carbon unit between tetrahydrofolate and its derivatives in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments, produces other metabolites that are essential for cell growth, including nucleotides, methionine, and the antioxidant NADPH. Here, using hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a cancer model, we have observed a reduction in growth rate upon withdrawal of folate. We found that an enzyme in the folate cycle, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1-like (MTHFD1L), plays an essential role in support of cancer growth. We determined that MTHFD1L is transcriptionally activated by NRF2, a master regulator of redox homeostasis. Our observations further suggest that MTHFD1L contributes to the production and accumulation of NADPH to levels that are sufficient to combat oxidative stress in cancer cells. The elevation of oxidative stress through MTHFD1L knockdown or the use of methotrexate, an antifolate drug, sensitizes cancer cells to sorafenib, a targeted therapy for HCC. Taken together, our study identifies MTHFD1L in the folate cycle as an important metabolic pathway in cancer cells with the potential for therapeutic targeting.

  19. Regulation of Glutamine Transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, R C; Iwata, K K; Furlong, C E

    1975-01-01

    The formation of the high-affinity (Km equal to 0.2 muM) L-glutamine transport system of Escherichia coli strain 7 (Lin) appears to be subject to the same major control as the glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) of this gram-negative organism. Culture of cells under nitrogen-limited conditions provides maximum derepression of both the glutamine synthetase and the glutamine transport system. Nutritional conditions providing a rich supply of ammonium salts or available sources of nitrogen, i.e., conditions which repress the formation of glutamine synthetase, provide three- and 20-fold repression, respectively, of the glutamine transport system. Culture of cells with glutamine supplements of 2 mM does not increase the repression of high-affinity glutamine transport system beyond the level observed in the absence of glutamine. A second kinetically distinct low-affinity component of glutamine. A second kinetically distinct low-affinity component of glutamine uptake is observed in cells cultured with a glutamine-depleted nutrient broth. This second component is associated with the appearance of glutaminase A (EC 3.5.1.2) and asparaginase I (EC 3.5.1.1), a periplasmic enzyme. Parallel changes were observed in the levels of the high-affinity glutamine transport system and the glutamine synthetase when cells were cultured with the carbon sources: glucose, glycerol, or succinate. PMID:238938

  20. Microbial extracellular enzymes and the marine carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Arnosti, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular enzymes initiate microbial remineralization of organic matter by hydrolyzing substrates to sizes sufficiently small to be transported across cell membranes. As much of marine primary productivity is processed by heterotrophic microbes, the substrate specificities of extracellular enzymes, the rates at which they function in seawater and sediments, and factors controlling their production, distribution, and active lifetimes, are central to carbon cycling in marine systems. In this review, these topics are considered from biochemical, microbial/molecular biological, and geochemical perspectives. Our understanding of the capabilities and limitations of heterotrophic microbial communities has been greatly advanced in recent years, in part through genetic and genomic approaches. New methods to measure enzyme activities in the field are needed to keep pace with these advances and to pursue intriguing evidence that patterns of enzyme activities in different environments are linked to differences in microbial community composition that may profoundly affect the marine carbon cycle.

  1. Measurement of (15)N enrichment of glutamine and urea cycle amino acids derivatized with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate using liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Karakawa, Sachise; Watanabe, Akiko; Kawamata, Yasuko; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Sakai, Ryosei

    2015-05-01

    6-Aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) is an amino acid-specific derivatizing reagent that has been used for sensitive amino acid quantification by liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the ability of this method to measure the isotopic enrichment of amino acids and to determine the positional (15)N enrichment of urea cycle amino acids (i.e., arginine, ornithine, and citrulline) and glutamine. The distribution of the M and M+1 isotopomers of each natural AQC-amino acid was nearly identical to the theoretical distribution. The standard deviation of the (M+1)/M ratio for each amino acid in repeated measurements was approximately 0.1%, and the ratios were stable regardless of the injected amounts. Linearity in the measurements of (15)N enrichment was confirmed by measuring a series of (15)N-labeled arginine standards. The positional (15)N enrichment of urea cycle amino acids and glutamine was estimated from the isotopic distribution of unique fragment ions generated at different collision energies. This method was able to identify their positional (15)N enrichment in the plasma of rats fed (15)N-labeled glutamine. These results suggest the utility of LC-MS/MS detection of AQC-amino acids for the measurement of isotopic enrichment in (15)N-labeled amino acids and indicate that this method is useful for the study of nitrogen metabolism in living organisms.

  2. Evidence of a vicious cycle in glutamine synthesis and breakdown in pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy-therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Holecek, Milan

    2014-03-01

    There is substantial clinical and experimental evidence that ammonia is a major factor in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. In the article is demonstrated that in hepatocellular dysfunction, ammonia detoxification to glutamine (GLN) in skeletal muscle, brain, and likely the lungs, is activated. In addition to ammonia detoxification, enhanced GLN production may exert beneficial effects on the immune system and gut barrier function. However, enhanced GLN synthesis may exert adverse effects in the brain (swelling of astrocytes or altered neurotransmission) and stimulate catabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the majority of GLN produced is released to the blood and catabolized in enterocytes and the kidneys to ammonia, which due to liver injury escapes detoxification to urea and appears in peripheral blood. As only one molecule of ammonia is detoxified in GLN synthesis whereas two molecules may appear in GLN breakdown, these events can be seen as a vicious cycle in which enhanced ammonia concentration activates synthesis of GLN leading to its subsequent catabolism and increase in ammonia levels in the blood. These alterations may explain why therapies targeted to intestinal bacteria have only a limited effect on ammonia levels in patients with liver failure and indicate the needs of new therapeutic strategies focused on GLN metabolism. It is demonstrated that each of the various treatment options targeting only one the of the ammonia-lowering mechanisms that affect GLN metabolism, such as enhancing GLN synthesis (BCAA), suppressing ammonia production from GLN breakdown (glutaminase inhibitors and alpha-ketoglutarate), and promoting GLN elimination (phenylbutyrate) exerts substantial adverse effects that can be avoided if their combination is tailored to the specific needs of each patient.

  3. Chronotherapeutic effect of fisetin on expression of urea cycle enzymes and inflammatory markers in hyperammonaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Perumal; Jayakumar, Murugesan; Jayapalan, Jaime Jacqueline; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2014-12-01

    Elevated blood ammonia leads to hyperammonaemia that affects vital central nervous system (CNS) functions. Fisetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, exhibits therapeutic benefits, such as anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant, anti-angiogenic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects. In this study, the chronotherapeutic effect of fisetin on ammonium chloride (AC)-induced hyperammonaemic rats was investigated, to ascertain the time point at which the maximum drug effect is achieved. The anti-hyperammonaemic potential of fisetin (50mg/kg b.w. oral) was analysed when administered to AC treated (100mg/kg b.w. i.p.) rats at 06:00, 12:00, 18:00 and 00:00h. Amelioration of pathophysiological conditions by fisetin at different time points was measured by analysing the levels of expression of liver urea cycle enzymes (carbamoyl phosphate synthetase-I (CPS-I), ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC) and argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS)), nuclear transcription factor kappaB (NF-κB p65), brain glutamine synthetase (GS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by Western blot analysis. Fisetin increased the expression of CPS-I, OTC, ASS and GS and decreased iNOS and NF-κB p65 in hyperammonaemic rats. Fisetin administration at 00:00h showed more significant effects on the expression of liver and brain markers, compared with other time points. Fisetin could exhibit anti-hyperammonaemic effect owing to its anti-oxidant and cytoprotective influences. The temporal variation in the effect of fisetin could be due to the (i) chronopharmacological, chronopharmacokinetic properties of fisetin and (ii) modulations in the endogenous circadian rhythms of urea cycle enzymes, brain markers, redox enzymes and renal clearance during hyperammonaemia by fisetin. However, future studies in these lines are necessitated. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. Kynurenine Aminotransferase III and Glutamine Transaminase L Are Identical Enzymes that have Cysteine S-Conjugate β-Lyase Activity and Can Transaminate l-Selenomethionine*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, John T.; Krasnikov, Boris F.; Alcutt, Steven; Jones, Melanie E.; Dorai, Thambi; Villar, Maria T.; Artigues, Antonio; Li, Jianyong; Cooper, Arthur J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Three of the four kynurenine aminotransferases (KAT I, II, and IV) that synthesize kynurenic acid, a neuromodulator, are identical to glutamine transaminase K (GTK), α-aminoadipate aminotransferase, and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, respectively. GTK/KAT I and aspartate aminotransferase/KAT IV possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. The gene for the former enzyme, GTK/KAT I, is listed in mammalian genome data banks as CCBL1 (cysteine conjugate beta-lyase 1). Also listed, despite the fact that no β-lyase activity has been assigned to the encoded protein in the genome data bank, is a CCBL2 (synonym KAT III). We show that human KAT III/CCBL2 possesses cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity, as does mouse KAT II. Thus, depending on the nature of the substrate, all four KATs possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. These present studies show that KAT III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes. This report also shows that KAT I, II, and III differ in their ability to transaminate methyl-l-selenocysteine (MSC) and l-selenomethionine (SM) to β-methylselenopyruvate (MSP) and α-ketomethylselenobutyrate, respectively. Previous studies have identified these seleno-α-keto acids as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors. Methylselenol (CH3SeH), also purported to have chemopreventive properties, is the γ-elimination product of SM and the β-elimination product of MSC catalyzed by cystathionine γ-lyase (γ-cystathionase). KAT I, II, and III, in part, can catalyze β-elimination reactions with MSC generating CH3SeH. Thus, the anticancer efficacy of MSC and SM will depend, in part, on the endogenous expression of various KAT enzymes and cystathionine γ-lyase present in target tissue coupled with the ability of cells to synthesize in situ either CH3SeH and/or seleno-keto acid metabolites. PMID:25231977

  5. Reducing the serine availability complements the inhibition of the glutamine metabolism to block leukemia cell growth.

    PubMed

    Polet, Florence; Corbet, Cyril; Pinto, Adan; Rubio, Laila Illan; Martherus, Ruben; Bol, Vanesa; Drozak, Xavier; Grégoire, Vincent; Riant, Olivier; Feron, Olivier

    2016-01-12

    Leukemia cells are described as a prototype of glucose-consuming cells with a high turnover rate. The role of glutamine in fueling the tricarboxylic acid cycle of leukemia cells was however recently identified confirming its status of major anaplerotic precursor in solid tumors. Here we examined whether glutamine metabolism could represent a therapeutic target in leukemia cells and whether resistance to this strategy could arise. We found that glutamine deprivation inhibited leukemia cell growth but also led to a glucose-independent adaptation maintaining cell survival. A proteomic study revealed that glutamine withdrawal induced the upregulation of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) and phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), two enzymes of the serine pathway. We further documented that both exogenous and endogenous serine were critical for leukemia cell growth and contributed to cell regrowth following glutamine deprivation. Increase in oxidative stress upon inhibition of glutamine metabolism was identified as the trigger of the upregulation of PHGDH. Finally, we showed that PHGDH silencing in vitro and the use of serine-free diet in vivo inhibited leukemia cell growth, an effect further increased when glutamine metabolism was blocked. In conclusion, this study identified serine as a key pro-survival actor that needs to be handled to sensitize leukemia cells to glutamine-targeting modalities.

  6. Reducing the serine availability complements the inhibition of the glutamine metabolism to block leukemia cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Polet, Florence; Corbet, Cyril; Pinto, Adan; Rubio, Laila Illan; Martherus, Ruben; Bol, Vanesa; Drozak, Xavier; Grégoire, Vincent; Riant, Olivier; Feron, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia cells are described as a prototype of glucose-consuming cells with a high turnover rate. The role of glutamine in fueling the tricarboxylic acid cycle of leukemia cells was however recently identified confirming its status of major anaplerotic precursor in solid tumors. Here we examined whether glutamine metabolism could represent a therapeutic target in leukemia cells and whether resistance to this strategy could arise. We found that glutamine deprivation inhibited leukemia cell growth but also led to a glucose-independent adaptation maintaining cell survival. A proteomic study revealed that glutamine withdrawal induced the upregulation of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) and phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), two enzymes of the serine pathway. We further documented that both exogenous and endogenous serine were critical for leukemia cell growth and contributed to cell regrowth following glutamine deprivation. Increase in oxidative stress upon inhibition of glutamine metabolism was identified as the trigger of the upregulation of PHGDH. Finally, we showed that PHGDH silencing in vitro and the use of serine-free diet in vivo inhibited leukemia cell growth, an effect further increased when glutamine metabolism was blocked. In conclusion, this study identified serine as a key pro-survival actor that needs to be handled to sensitize leukemia cells to glutamine-targeting modalities. PMID:26625201

  7. Role of Bioflavonoid Quercetin on Expression of Urea Cycle Enzymes, Astrocytic and Inflammatory Markers in Hyperammonemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Kanimozhi, Sivamani; Subramanian, Perumal; Shanmugapriya, Sakkaravarthy; Sathishkumar, Subramanian

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluates the role of quercetin on the expression of urea cycle enzymes, astrocytic, neuronal and inflammatory markers in hyperammonemic rats. Hyperammonemia (provoked by intraperitonial injections of (ammonium chloride-100 mg/kg b.w for 56 days), showed diminished expression of urea cycle enzymes [carbamyl phosphate synthetase-1 (CPS-1), ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC), argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) and arginase (ARG)] in liver and decreased expression of neuronal and astrocytic markers-glutamine synthase (GS) and phosphate activated glutaminase (PAG) in brain and increased expression of brain inflammatory markers such as interleukin 6 (IL6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) (by western blot analysis) and exhibited downregulated expression of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in brain and ASS in liver investigated (by RT-PCR). Oral treatment of quercetin (50 mg/kg b.w) to hyperammonemic rats (1) increased the expression of urea cycle enzymes (CPS-1, OTC, ASS and ARG), neuronal and astrocytic markers (GS and PAG) (2) decreased the expression of IL6, iNOS and NF-κB and (3) upregulated mRNA expression of SGC, GFAP and ASS. Our results specify that quercetin's antihyperammonemic effects could be through its, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and hepatoprotective effects.

  8. Hepatic and extrahepatic distribution of ornithine urea cycle enzymes in holocephalan elephant fish (Callorhinchus milii).

    PubMed

    Takagi, Wataru; Kajimura, Makiko; Bell, Justin D; Toop, Tes; Donald, John A; Hyodo, Susumu

    2012-04-01

    Cartilaginous fish comprise two subclasses, the Holocephali (chimaeras) and Elasmobranchii (sharks, skates and rays). Little is known about osmoregulatory mechanisms in holocephalan fishes except that they conduct urea-based osmoregulation, as in elasmobranchs. In the present study, we examined the ornithine urea cycle (OUC) enzymes that play a role in urea biosynthesis in the holocephalan elephant fish, Callorhinchus milii (cm). We obtained a single mRNA encoding carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III (cmCPSIII) and ornithine transcarbamylase (cmOTC), and two mRNAs encoding glutamine synthetases (cmGSs) and two arginases (cmARGs), respectively. The two cmGSs were structurally and functionally separated into two types: brain/liver/kidney-type cmGS1 and muscle-type cmGS2. Furthermore, two alternatively spliced transcripts with different sizes were found for cmgs1 gene. The longer transcript has a putative mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) and was predominantly expressed in the liver and kidney. MTS was not found in the short form of cmGS1 and cmGS2. A high mRNA expression and enzyme activities were found in the liver and muscle. Furthermore, in various tissues examined, mRNA levels of all the enzymes except cmCPSIII were significantly increased after hatching. The data show that the liver is the important organ for urea biosynthesis in elephant fish, but, extrahepatic tissues such as the kidney and muscle may also contribute to the urea production. In addition to the role of the extrahepatic tissues and nitrogen metabolism, the molecular and functional characteristics of multiple isoforms of GSs and ARGs are discussed.

  9. Activity of Krebs cycle enzymes in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Comim, Clarissa M; Hoepers, Andreza; Ventura, Letícia; Freiberger, Viviane; Dominguini, Diogo; Mina, Francielle; Mendonça, Bruna P; Scaini, Giselli; Vainzof, Mariz; Streck, Emílio L; Quevedo, João

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative disease of skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscles caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. More recently, brain involvement has been verified. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may underlie the pathophysiology of DMD. In this study we evaluate Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the cerebral cortex, diaphragm, and quadriceps muscles of mdx mice. Cortex, diaphragm, and quadriceps tissues from male dystrophic mdx and control mice were used. We observed increased malate dehydrogenase activity in the cortex; increased malate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in the diaphragm; and increased citrate synthase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase activities in the quadriceps of mdx mice. This study showed increased activity of Krebs cycle enzymes in cortex, quadriceps, and diaphragm in mdx mice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pivotal role of glutamine synthetase in ammonia detoxification.

    PubMed

    Hakvoort, Theodorus B M; He, Youji; Kulik, Wim; Vermeulen, Jacqueline L M; Duijst, Suzanne; Ruijter, Jan M; Runge, Jurgen H; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Koehler, S Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H

    2017-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes condensation of ammonia with glutamate to glutamine. Glutamine serves, with alanine, as a major nontoxic interorgan ammonia carrier. Elimination of hepatic GS expression in mice causes only mild hyperammonemia and hypoglutaminemia but a pronounced decrease in the whole-body muscle-to-fat ratio with increased myostatin expression in muscle. Using GS-knockout/liver and control mice and stepwise increments of enterally infused ammonia, we show that ∼35% of this ammonia is detoxified by hepatic GS and ∼35% by urea-cycle enzymes, while ∼30% is not cleared by the liver, independent of portal ammonia concentrations ≤2 mmol/L. Using both genetic (GS-knockout/liver and GS-knockout/muscle) and pharmacological (methionine sulfoximine and dexamethasone) approaches to modulate GS activity, we further show that detoxification of stepwise increments of intravenously (jugular vein) infused ammonia is almost totally dependent on GS activity. Maximal ammonia-detoxifying capacity through either the enteral or the intravenous route is ∼160 μmol/hour in control mice. Using stable isotopes, we show that disposal of glutamine-bound ammonia to urea (through mitochondrial glutaminase and carbamoylphosphate synthetase) depends on the rate of glutamine synthesis and increases from ∼7% in methionine sulfoximine-treated mice to ∼500% in dexamethasone-treated mice (control mice, 100%), without difference in total urea synthesis. Hepatic GS contributes to both enteral and systemic ammonia detoxification. Glutamine synthesis in the periphery (including that in pericentral hepatocytes) and glutamine catabolism in (periportal) hepatocytes represents the high-affinity ammonia-detoxifying system of the body. The dependence of glutamine-bound ammonia disposal to urea on the rate of glutamine synthesis suggests that enhancing peripheral glutamine synthesis is a promising strategy to treat hyperammonemia. Because total urea synthesis does not depend on

  11. Autophagy is required for PDAC glutamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ju-Won; Choi, Jungwon; Lee, So-Yeon; Sung, Suhyun; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Kang, Min-Ji; Cheong, Heesun; Son, Jaekyoung

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is believed to maintain energy homeostasis by degrading unnecessary cellular components and molecules. Its implication in regulating cancer metabolism recently started to be uncovered. However, the precise roles of autophagy in cancer metabolism are still unclear. Here, we show that autophagy plays a critical role in glutamine metabolism, which is required for tumor survival. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells require both autophagy and typical glutamine transporters to maintain intracellular glutamine levels. Glutamine deprivation, but not that of glucose, led to the activation of macropinocytosis-associated autophagy through TFEB induction and translocation into the nucleus. In contrast, glutamine uptake increased as a compensatory response to decreased intracellular glutamine levels upon autophagy inhibition. Moreover, autophagy inhibition and glutamine deprivation did not induce cell death, while glutamine deprivation dramatically activated apoptotic cell death upon autophagy inhibition. Interestingly, the addition of α-ketoglutarate significantly rescued the apoptotic cell death caused by the combination of the inhibition of autophagy with glutamine deprivation. Our data suggest that macropinocytosis-associated autophagy is a critical process providing glutamine for anaplerosis of the TCA cycle in PDAC. Thus, targeting both autophagy and glutamine metabolism to completely block glutamine supply may provide new therapeutic approaches to treat refractory tumors. PMID:27892481

  12. Role of the C-terminal extension peptide of plastid located glutamine synthetase from Medicago truncatula: Crucial for enzyme activity and needless for protein import into the plastids.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria João; Vale, Diogo; Cunha, Luis; Melo, Paula

    2017-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in plant nitrogen metabolism, is encoded by a small family of highly homologous nuclear genes that produce cytosolic (GS1) and plastidic (GS2) isoforms. Compared to GS1, GS2 proteins have two extension peptides, one at the N- and the other at the C-terminus, which show a high degree of conservation among plant species. It has long been known that the N-terminal peptide acts as a transit peptide, targeting the protein to the plastids however, the function of the C-terminal extension is still unknown. To investigate whether the C-terminal extension influences the activity of the enzyme, we produced a C-terminal truncated version of Medicago truncatula GS2a in Escherechia coli and studied its catalytic properties. The activity of the truncated protein was found to be lower than that of MtGS2a and with less affinity for glutamate. The importance of the C-terminal extension for the protein import into the chloroplast was also assessed by transient expression of fluorescently-tagged MtGS2a truncated at the C-terminus, which was correctly detected in the chloroplast. The results obtained in this work demonstrate that the C-terminal extension of M. truncatula GS2a is important for the activity of the enzyme and does not contain crucial information for the import process.

  13. Hepatocytes explanted in the spleen preferentially express carbamoylphosphate synthetase rather than glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Lamers, W H; Been, W; Charles, R; Moorman, A F

    1990-10-01

    Urea cycle enzymes and glutamine synthetase are essential for NH3 detoxification and systemic pH homeostasis in mammals. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase, the first and flux-determining enzyme of the cycle, is found only in a large periportal compartment, and glutamine synthetase is found only in a small, complementary pericentral compartment. Because it is not possible to manipulate experimentally the intrahepatic distribution of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and glutamine synthetase, we looked for conditions in which explanted hepatocytes would exhibit either the carbamoylphosphate synthetase phenotype or glutamine synthetase phenotype. In the spleen hepatocytes either settle as individual cells or in small agglomerates. The dispersed cells only express the carbamoylphosphate synthetase phenotype. Within the agglomerates, sinusoids that drain on venules develop. Hepatocytes surrounding the venules stain only weakly for carbamoylphosphate synthetase but are strongly positive for glutamine synthetase. These observations were made for explanted embryonic hepatocytes (no prior expression of either carbamoylphosphate synthetase or glutamine synthetase), neonatal hepatocytes (compartments of gene expression not yet established) and adult periportal and pericentral hepatocytes.

  14. Kynurenine aminotransferase III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes that have cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity and can transaminate L-selenomethionine.

    PubMed

    Pinto, John T; Krasnikov, Boris F; Alcutt, Steven; Jones, Melanie E; Dorai, Thambi; Villar, Maria T; Artigues, Antonio; Li, Jianyong; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2014-11-07

    Three of the four kynurenine aminotransferases (KAT I, II, and IV) that synthesize kynurenic acid, a neuromodulator, are identical to glutamine transaminase K (GTK), α-aminoadipate aminotransferase, and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, respectively. GTK/KAT I and aspartate aminotransferase/KAT IV possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. The gene for the former enzyme, GTK/KAT I, is listed in mammalian genome data banks as CCBL1 (cysteine conjugate beta-lyase 1). Also listed, despite the fact that no β-lyase activity has been assigned to the encoded protein in the genome data bank, is a CCBL2 (synonym KAT III). We show that human KAT III/CCBL2 possesses cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity, as does mouse KAT II. Thus, depending on the nature of the substrate, all four KATs possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. These present studies show that KAT III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes. This report also shows that KAT I, II, and III differ in their ability to transaminate methyl-L-selenocysteine (MSC) and L-selenomethionine (SM) to β-methylselenopyruvate (MSP) and α-ketomethylselenobutyrate, respectively. Previous studies have identified these seleno-α-keto acids as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors. Methylselenol (CH3SeH), also purported to have chemopreventive properties, is the γ-elimination product of SM and the β-elimination product of MSC catalyzed by cystathionine γ-lyase (γ-cystathionase). KAT I, II, and III, in part, can catalyze β-elimination reactions with MSC generating CH3SeH. Thus, the anticancer efficacy of MSC and SM will depend, in part, on the endogenous expression of various KAT enzymes and cystathionine γ-lyase present in target tissue coupled with the ability of cells to synthesize in situ either CH3SeH and/or seleno-keto acid metabolites. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Extracellular enzyme activity and biogeochemical cycling in restored prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, L.; Hernandez, D.; Schade, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    during the spring. Microbial biomass C:N ratios increased from October to March, and decreased through the summer, while production of CBH, LAP and PHOS all showed the opposite pattern, decreasing through March and increasing in the summer. Following snowmelt, enzyme production preceded a recovery in microbial biomass, possibly as a result of increased competition for available resources between plant and microbial communities, or a shift to organic sources of C, N, and P which required a higher investment in enzymes. Due to their rapid growth rates and turnover, microbes are a particularly reactive component of terrestrial ecosystems and significantly influence biogeochemical cycling. Because carbon degradation may be constrained by nutrient availability, understanding how extracellular enzyme production, decomposition rate, and nutrient flux change over time is essential if we are to anticipate ecosystem responses to environmental changes.

  16. Key enzymes of the retinoid (visual) cycle in vertebrate retina

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Philip D.; Golczak, Marcin; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    A major goal in vision research over the past few decades has been to understand the molecular details of retinoid processing within the retinoid (visual) cycle. This includes the consequences of side reactions that result from delayed all-trans-retinal clearance and condensation with phospholipids that characterize a variety of serious retinal diseases. Knowledge of the basic retinoid biochemistry involved in these diseases is essential for development of effective therapeutics. Photoisomerization of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore of rhodopsin triggers a complex set of metabolic transformations collectively termed phototransduction that ultimately lead to light perception. Continuity of vision depends on continuous conversion of all-trans-retinal back to the 11-cis-retinal isomer. This process takes place in a series of reactions known as the retinoid cycle, which occur in photoreceptor and RPE cells. All-trans-retinal, the initial substrate of this cycle, is a chemically reactive aldehyde that can form toxic conjugates with proteins and lipids. Therefore, much experimental effort has been devoted to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the retinoid cycle and all-trans-retinal-mediated retinal degeneration, resulting in delineation of many key steps involved in regenerating 11-cis-retinal. Three particularly important reactions are catalyzed by enzymes broadly classified as acyltransferases, short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases and carotenoid/retinoid isomerases/oxygenases. PMID:21447403

  17. Key enzymes of the retinoid (visual) cycle in vertebrate retina.

    PubMed

    Kiser, Philip D; Golczak, Marcin; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    A major goal in vision research over the past few decades has been to understand the molecular details of retinoid processing within the retinoid (visual) cycle. This includes the consequences of side reactions that result from delayed all-trans-retinal clearance and condensation with phospholipids that characterize a variety of serious retinal diseases. Knowledge of the basic retinoid biochemistry involved in these diseases is essential for development of effective therapeutics. Photoisomerization of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore of rhodopsin triggers a complex set of metabolic transformations collectively termed phototransduction that ultimately lead to light perception. Continuity of vision depends on continuous conversion of all-trans-retinal back to the 11-cis-retinal isomer. This process takes place in a series of reactions known as the retinoid cycle, which occur in photoreceptor and RPE cells. All-trans-retinal, the initial substrate of this cycle, is a chemically reactive aldehyde that can form toxic conjugates with proteins and lipids. Therefore, much experimental effort has been devoted to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the retinoid cycle and all-trans-retinal-mediated retinal degeneration, resulting in delineation of many key steps involved in regenerating 11-cis-retinal. Three particularly important reactions are catalyzed by enzymes broadly classified as acyltransferases, short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases and carotenoid/retinoid isomerases/oxygenases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinoid and Lipid Metabolism. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Aberrant expression and distribution of enzymes of the urea cycle and other ammonia metabolizing pathways in dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts.

    PubMed

    van Straten, Giora; van Steenbeek, Frank G; Grinwis, Guy C M; Favier, Robert P; Kummeling, Anne; van Gils, Ingrid H; Fieten, Hille; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Holstege, Frank C P; Rothuizen, Jan; Spee, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The detoxification of ammonia occurs mainly through conversion of ammonia to urea in the liver via the urea cycle and glutamine synthesis. Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) in dogs cause hyperammonemia eventually leading to hepatic encephalopathy. In this study, the gene expression of urea cycle enzymes (carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS1), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC), argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1), argininosuccinate lyase (ASL), and arginase (ARG1)), N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), Glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD1), and glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL) was evaluated in dogs with CPSS before and after surgical closure of the shunt. Additionally, immunohistochemistry was performed on urea cycle enzymes and GLUL on liver samples of healthy dogs and dogs with CPSS to investigate a possible zonal distribution of these enzymes within the liver lobule and to investigate possible differences in distribution in dogs with CPSS compared to healthy dogs. Furthermore, the effect of increasing ammonia concentrations on the expression of the urea cycle enzymes was investigated in primary hepatocytes in vitro. Gene-expression of CPS1, OTC, ASL, GLUD1 and NAGS was down regulated in dogs with CPSS and did not normalize after surgical closure of the shunt. In all dogs GLUL distribution was localized pericentrally. CPS1, OTC and ASS1 were localized periportally in healthy dogs, whereas in CPSS dogs, these enzymes lacked a clear zonal distribution. In primary hepatocytes higher ammonia concentrations induced mRNA levels of CPS1. We hypothesize that the reduction in expression of urea cycle enzymes, NAGS and GLUD1 as well as the alterations in zonal distribution in dogs with CPSS may be caused by a developmental arrest of these enzymes during the embryonic or early postnatal phase.

  19. Aberrant Expression and Distribution of Enzymes of the Urea Cycle and Other Ammonia Metabolizing Pathways in Dogs with Congenital Portosystemic Shunts

    PubMed Central

    van Straten, Giora; van Steenbeek, Frank G.; Grinwis, Guy C. M.; Favier, Robert P.; Kummeling, Anne; van Gils, Ingrid H.; Fieten, Hille; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J. A.; Holstege, Frank C. P.; Rothuizen, Jan; Spee, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The detoxification of ammonia occurs mainly through conversion of ammonia to urea in the liver via the urea cycle and glutamine synthesis. Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) in dogs cause hyperammonemia eventually leading to hepatic encephalopathy. In this study, the gene expression of urea cycle enzymes (carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS1), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC), argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1), argininosuccinate lyase (ASL), and arginase (ARG1)), N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), Glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD1), and glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL) was evaluated in dogs with CPSS before and after surgical closure of the shunt. Additionally, immunohistochemistry was performed on urea cycle enzymes and GLUL on liver samples of healthy dogs and dogs with CPSS to investigate a possible zonal distribution of these enzymes within the liver lobule and to investigate possible differences in distribution in dogs with CPSS compared to healthy dogs. Furthermore, the effect of increasing ammonia concentrations on the expression of the urea cycle enzymes was investigated in primary hepatocytes in vitro. Gene-expression of CPS1, OTC, ASL, GLUD1 and NAGS was down regulated in dogs with CPSS and did not normalize after surgical closure of the shunt. In all dogs GLUL distribution was localized pericentrally. CPS1, OTC and ASS1 were localized periportally in healthy dogs, whereas in CPSS dogs, these enzymes lacked a clear zonal distribution. In primary hepatocytes higher ammonia concentrations induced mRNA levels of CPS1. We hypothesize that the reduction in expression of urea cycle enzymes, NAGS and GLUD1 as well as the alterations in zonal distribution in dogs with CPSS may be caused by a developmental arrest of these enzymes during the embryonic or early postnatal phase. PMID:24945279

  20. Glutamine Addiction In Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Javier; Alonso, Francisco J; Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Campos-Sandoval, José A

    2017-03-09

    Cancer cells develop and succeed by shifting to different metabolic programs compared with their normal cell counterparts. One of the classical hallmarks of cancer cells is their higher glycolysis rate and lactate production even in the presence of abundant O2 (Warburg effect). Another common metabolic feature of cancer cells is a high rate of glutamine (Gln) consumption normally exceeding their biosynthetic and energetic needs. The term Gln addiction is now widely used to reflect the strong dependence shown by most cancer cells for this essential nitrogen substrate after metabolic reprogramming. A Gln/glutamate (Glu) cycle occurs between host tissues and the tumor in order to maximize its growth and proliferation rates. The mechanistic basis for this deregulated tumor metabolism and how these changes are connected to oncogenic and tumor suppressor pathways are becoming increasingly understood. Based on these advances, new avenues of research have been initiated to find novel therapeutic targets and to explore strategies that interfere with glutamine metabolism as anticancer therapies. In this review, we provided an updated overview of glutamine addiction in glioma, the most prevalent type of brain tumor.

  1. In Situ Glutamine Synthetase Activity in a Marine Unicellular Alga (Development of a Sensitive Colorimetric Assay and the Effects of Nitrogen Status on Enzyme Activity).

    PubMed Central

    Rees, TAV.; Larson, T. R.; Heldens, JWG.; Huning, FGJ.

    1995-01-01

    A malachite green colorimetric assay for glutamine synthetase is described. Glutamine synthetase activity was determined in situ in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin using cells permeabilized by freeze/thawing. Higher activities were obtained with cells permeabilized in N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N[prime]-2-ethanesulfonic acid compared with N-tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-3-aminopropanesulfonic acid, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane, or imidazole, and the optimum pH was 7.9. Activities were higher in cells permeabilized in the presence of reductant, particularly dithiothreitol. Glutamine synthetase activities were markedly decreased in the presence of methionine sulfoximine. In the presence of saturating concentrations of glutamate and ATP, the apparent Km for ammonia was 320 [mu]M, but this value decreased to 110 [mu]M with subsaturating concentrations of glutamate and ATP. The apparent Km values for glutamate and ATP, in the presence of saturating concentrations of ammonia, were 9.7 and 2.9 mM, respectively. Ammonia-grown cells had lower glutamine synthetase activities than did nitrate-grown cells. During nitrogen starvation of both ammonia- and nitrate-grown cells, glutamine synthetase activities increased rapidly during the first 8 h, reaching maximum values after 24 to 48 h. Moreover, the time course for the increases in glutamine synthetase activities and rate of methylamine uptake following the transfer of nitrate-grown cells to nitrogen-deficient medium were very similar. In nitrate-grown cells and cells deprived of combined nitrogen, glutamine synthetase activities and maximum rates of ammonia uptake gave comparable values when measured at the same temperature (20[deg]C). PMID:12228676

  2. Visualization of glutamine transporter activities in living cells using genetically encoded glutamine sensors.

    PubMed

    Gruenwald, Katrin; Holland, John Todd; Stromberg, Verlyn; Ahmad, Altaf; Watcharakichkorn, Daisy; Okumoto, Sakiko

    2012-01-01

    Glutamine plays a central role in the metabolism of critical biological molecules such as amino acids, proteins, neurotransmitters, and glutathione. Since glutamine metabolism is regulated through multiple enzymes and transporters, the cellular glutamine concentration is expected to be temporally dynamic. Moreover, differentiation in glutamine metabolism between cell types in the same tissue (e.g. neuronal and glial cells) is often crucial for the proper function of the tissue as a whole, yet assessing cell-type specific activities of transporters and enzymes in such heterogenic tissue by physical fractionation is extremely challenging. Therefore, a method of reporting glutamine dynamics at the cellular level is highly desirable. Genetically encoded sensors can be targeted to a specific cell type, hence addressing this knowledge gap. Here we report the development of Föster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) glutamine sensors based on improved cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins, monomeric Teal Fluorescent Protein (mTFP)1 and venus. These sensors were found to be specific to glutamine, and stable to pH-changes within a physiological range. Using cos7 cells expressing the human glutamine transporter ASCT2 as a model, we demonstrate that the properties of the glutamine transporter can easily be analyzed with these sensors. The range of glutamine concentration change in a given cell can also be estimated using sensors with different affinities. Moreover, the mTFP1-venus FRET pair can be duplexed with another FRET pair, mAmetrine and tdTomato, opening up the possibility for real-time imaging of another molecule. These novel glutamine sensors will be useful tools to analyze specificities of glutamine metabolism at the single-cell level.

  3. Visualization of Glutamine Transporter Activities in Living Cells Using Genetically Encoded Glutamine Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gruenwald, Katrin; Holland, John Todd; Stromberg, Verlyn; Ahmad, Altaf; Watcharakichkorn, Daisy; Okumoto, Sakiko

    2012-01-01

    Glutamine plays a central role in the metabolism of critical biological molecules such as amino acids, proteins, neurotransmitters, and glutathione. Since glutamine metabolism is regulated through multiple enzymes and transporters, the cellular glutamine concentration is expected to be temporally dynamic. Moreover, differentiation in glutamine metabolism between cell types in the same tissue (e.g. neuronal and glial cells) is often crucial for the proper function of the tissue as a whole, yet assessing cell-type specific activities of transporters and enzymes in such heterogenic tissue by physical fractionation is extremely challenging. Therefore, a method of reporting glutamine dynamics at the cellular level is highly desirable. Genetically encoded sensors can be targeted to a specific cell type, hence addressing this knowledge gap. Here we report the development of Föster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) glutamine sensors based on improved cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins, monomeric Teal Fluorescent Protein (mTFP)1 and venus. These sensors were found to be specific to glutamine, and stable to pH-changes within a physiological range. Using cos7 cells expressing the human glutamine transporter ASCT2 as a model, we demonstrate that the properties of the glutamine transporter can easily be analyzed with these sensors. The range of glutamine concentration change in a given cell can also be estimated using sensors with different affinities. Moreover, the mTFP1-venus FRET pair can be duplexed with another FRET pair, mAmetrine and tdTomato, opening up the possibility for real-time imaging of another molecule. These novel glutamine sensors will be useful tools to analyze specificities of glutamine metabolism at the single-cell level. PMID:22723868

  4. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  5. A Critical Role of Glutamine and Asparagine γ-Nitrogen in Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Cancer Cells Hijacked by an Oncogenic Virus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Li, Tingting; Ramos da Silva, Suzane; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lu, Chun; Eoh, Hyungjin; Jung, Jae U; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2017-08-15

    While glutamine is a nonessential amino acid that can be synthesized from glucose, some cancer cells primarily depend on glutamine for their growth, proliferation, and survival. Numerous types of cancer also depend on asparagine for cell proliferation. The underlying mechanisms of the glutamine and asparagine requirement in cancer cells in different contexts remain unclear. In this study, we show that the oncogenic virus Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) accelerates the glutamine metabolism of glucose-independent proliferation of cancer cells by upregulating the expression of numerous critical enzymes, including glutaminase 2 (GLS2), glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GLUD1), and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase 2 (GOT2), to support cell proliferation. Surprisingly, cell crisis is rescued only completely by supplementation with asparagine but minimally by supplementation with α-ketoglutarate, aspartate, or glutamate upon glutamine deprivation, implying an essential role of γ-nitrogen in glutamine and asparagine for cell proliferation. Specifically, glutamine and asparagine provide the critical γ-nitrogen for purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis, as knockdown of four rate-limiting enzymes in the pathways, including carbamoylphosphate synthetase 2 (CAD), phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase (PPAT), and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetases 1 and 2 (PRPS1 and PRPS2, respectively), suppresses cell proliferation. These findings indicate that glutamine and asparagine are shunted to the biosynthesis of nucleotides and nonessential amino acids from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to support the anabolic proliferation of KSHV-transformed cells. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism by which an oncogenic virus hijacks a metabolic pathway for cell proliferation and imply potential therapeutic applications in specific types of cancer that depend on this pathway.IMPORTANCE We have previously found that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) can

  6. Operating regimes of covalent modification cycles at high enzyme concentrations.

    PubMed

    Straube, Ronny

    2017-10-27

    The Goldbeter-Koshland model has been a paradigm for ultrasensitivity in biological networks for more than 30 years. Despite its simplicity the validity of this model is restricted to conditions when the substrate is in excess over the converter enzymes - a condition that is easy to satisfy in vitro, but which is rarely satisfied in vivo. Here, we analyze the Goldbeter-Koshland model by means of the total quasi-steady state approximation which yields a comprehensive classification of the steady state operating regimes under conditions when the enzyme concentrations are comparable to or larger than that of the substrate. Where possible we derive simple expressions characterizing the input-output behavior of the system. Our analysis suggests that enhanced sensitivity occurs if the concentration of at least one of the converter enzymes is smaller (but not necessarily much smaller) than that of the substrate and if that enzyme is saturated. Conversely, if both enzymes are saturated and at least one of the enzyme concentrations exceeds that of the substrate the system exhibits concentration robustness with respect to changes in that enzyme concentration. Also, depending on the enzyme's saturation degrees and the ratio between their maximal reaction rates the total fraction of phosphorylated substrate may increase, decrease or change nonmonotonically as a function of the total substrate concentration. The latter finding may aid the interpretation of experiments involving genetic perturbations of enzyme and substrate abundances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinetic study of an enzymic cycling system coupled to an enzymic step: determination of alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Valero, E; Varón, R; García-Carmona, F

    1995-01-01

    A kinetic study is made of a system consisting of a specific enzymic cycling assay coupled to an enzymic reaction. A kinetic analysis of this system is presented, and the accumulation of chromophore involved in the cycle is seen to be parabolic, i.e. the rate of the reaction increases continuously with constant acceleration. The system is illustrated by the measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity using beta-NADP+ as substrate. The enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase and diaphorase are used to cycle beta-NAD+ in the presence of ethanol and p-Iodonitrotetrazolium Violet. During each turn of the cycle, one molecule of the tetrazolium salt is reduced to an intensely coloured formazan. A simple procedure for evaluating the kinetic parameters involved in the system and for optimizing this cycling assay is described. The method is applicable to the measurement of any enzyme, and its amplification capacity as well as the simplicity of determining kinetic parameters enable it to be employed in enzyme immunoassays to increase the magnitude of the measured response. PMID:7619054

  8. Nitrogen excretion and expression of urea cycle enzymes in the atlantic cod (Gadus morhua l.): a comparison of early life stages with adults

    PubMed

    Chadwick; Wright

    1999-10-01

    For many years, the urea cycle was considered to be relatively unimportant in the life history of most teleost fishes. In previous studies, we were surprised to find that newly hatched freshwater rainbow trout embryos had relatively high activities of the key urea cycle enzyme, carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III (CPSase III), and other enzymes in the pathway, whereas adult trout had much lower or non-detectable activities. The present study tested the hypothesis that urea cycle enzyme expression is unique to early stages of rainbow trout. In marine Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) embryos, CPSase III, ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTCase), glutamine synthetase (GSase) and arginase activities were all expressed prior to hatching. Urea excretion was detected shortly after fertilization and rates were high relative to those of ammonia excretion (50-100 % of total nitrogen excreted as urea nitrogen; total=ammonia+urea). Urea concentration was relatively constant in embryos, but ammonia concentration increased by about fourfold during embryogenesis. Two populations of cod embryos were studied (from Newfoundland and New Brunswick), and significant differences in enzyme activities and excretion rates were detected between the two populations. In adult cod, CPSase III was not detectable in liver, white muscle, intestine and kidney tissues, but OTCase, GSase and arginase were present. Adult cod excreted about 17 % of nitrogenous waste as urea. Taken together, these data indicate that early urea cycle enzyme expression is not unique to rainbow trout but is also a feature of Atlantic cod development, and possibly other teleosts. The relatively high urea excretion rates underline the importance of urea as the primary nitrogen excretory product in Atlantic cod during early embryogenesis.

  9. L-glutamine

    MedlinePlus

    L-glutamine is used to is used to reduce the frequency of painful episodes (crises) in adults and children ... oxygen to all parts of the body). L-glutamine is in a class of medications called amino ...

  10. Cultures of rat astrocytes challenged with a steady supply of glutamate: new model to study flux distribution in the glutamate-glutamine cycle.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Luís L; Monteiro, Miguel A R; Alves, Paula M; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Santos, Helena

    2005-09-01

    Glutamate metabolism in astrocytes was studied using an experimental setup that simulates the role of neurons (glutamate producers and glutamine consumers) by the addition of glutaminase to the culture medium. Thereby, a steady supply of glutamate was imposed at the expense of glutamine, and the stress intensity was manipulated by changing the glutaminase concentration. Glutamate supply rates in the range 8-23 nmol/min/mg protein were examined for periods of up to 48 h. When the glutamate supply rate exceeded the uptake rate of this amino acid, a transient increase in the extracellular concentration of glutamate was observed. In response to this stress, the fluxes through the glutamate transporter and glutamine synthetase were increased considerably, and the extracellular concentration of glutamate was eventually restored to a low level. The increased levels of glutamine synthetase were demonstrated by immunoblotting analysis. The effect on glutamate metabolism of the transaminase inhibitor, aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), and of NH4Cl was also investigated. The supply of glutamate caused a concomitant reduction in the levels of phosphocreatine, phosphoethanolamine, and phosphocholine without affecting the ATP pool. Glutamine synthetase was shown to be is a key element in the control of glutamate metabolism in astrocytic cultures. The metabolic fate of glutamate depends greatly on the time of endurance to the challenge: in naive cells, glutamate was primarily metabolized through the transaminase pathway, while in well-adapted cells glutamate was converted almost exclusively through glutamine synthetase.

  11. Rethinking glutamine addiction.

    PubMed

    Krall, Abigail S; Christofk, Heather R

    2015-12-01

    Tumours reprogram their metabolism to maximize macromolecule biosynthesis for growth. However, which of the common tumour-associated metabolic activities are critical for proliferation remains unclear. Glutamate-derived glutamine is now shown to satisfy the glutamine needs of glioblastoma, indicating that glutamine anaplerosis is dispensable for growth.

  12. Novel enzyme reactions related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle: phylogenetic/functional implications and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Miho

    2007-05-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is an energy-producing pathway for aerobic organisms. However, it is widely accepted that the phylogenetic origin of the TCA cycle is the reductive TCA cycle, which is a non-Calvin-type carbon-dioxide-fixing pathway. Most of the enzymes responsible for the oxidative and reductive TCA cycles are common to the two pathways, the difference being the direction in which the reactions operate. Because the reductive TCA cycle operates in an energetically unfavorable direction, some specific mechanisms are required for the reductive TCA-cycle-utilizing organisms. Recently, the molecular mechanism for the "citrate cleavage reaction" and the "reductive carboxylating reaction from 2-oxoglutarate to isocitrate" in Hydrogenobacter thermophilus have been demonstrated. Both of these reactions comprise two distinct consecutive reactions, each catalyzed by two novel enzymes. Sequence analyses of the newly discovered enzymes revealed phylogenetic and functional relationships between other TCA-cycle-related enzymes. The occurrence of novel enzymes involved in the citrate-cleaving reaction seems to be limited to the family Aquificaceae. In contrast, the key enzyme in the reductive carboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate appears to be more widely distributed in extant organisms. The four newly discovered enzymes have a number of potential biotechnological applications.

  13. Quantitative full time course analysis of nonlinear enzyme cycling kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme inhibition due to the reversible binding of reaction products is common and underlies the origins of negative feedback inhibition in many metabolic and signaling pathways. Product inhibition generates non-linearity in steady-state time courses of enzyme activity, which limits the utility of well-established enzymology approaches developed under the assumption of irreversible product release. For more than a century, numerous attempts to find a mathematical solution for analysis of kinetic time courses with product inhibition have been put forth. However, no practical general method capable of extracting common enzymatic parameters from such non-linear time courses has been successfully developed. Here we present a simple and practical method of analysis capable of efficiently extracting steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters and product binding constants from non-linear kinetic time courses with product inhibition and/or substrate depletion. The method is general and applicable to all enzyme systems, independent of reaction schemes and pathways.

  14. A source of ultrasensitivity in the glutamine response of the bicyclic cascade system controlling glutamine synthetase adenylylation state and activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Ninfa, Alexander J

    2011-12-20

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in Escherichia coli is regulated by reversible adenylylation, brought about by a bicyclic system comprised of uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme (UTase/UR), its substrate, PII, adenylyltransferase (ATase), and its substrate, GS. The modified and unmodified forms of PII produced by the upstream UTase/UR-PII cycle regulate the downstream ATase-GS cycle. A reconstituted UTase/UR-PII-ATase-GS bicyclic system has been shown to produce a highly ultrasensitive response of GS adenylylation state to the glutamine concentration, but its composite UTase/UR-PII and ATase-GS cycles displayed moderate glutamine sensitivities when examined separately. Glutamine sensitivity of the bicyclic system was significantly reduced when the trimeric PII protein was replaced by a heterotrimeric form of PII that was functionally monomeric, and coupling between the two cycles was different in systems containing wild-type or heterotrimeric PII. Thus, the trimeric nature of PII played a role in the glutamine response of the bicyclic system. We therefore examined regulation of the individual AT (adenylylation) and AR (deadenylylation) activities of ATase by PII preparations with various levels of uridylylation. AR activity was affected in a linear fashion by PII uridylylation, but partially modified wild-type PII activated the AT much less than expected based on the extent of PII modification. Partially modified wild-type PII also bound to ATase less than expected based upon the fraction of modified subunits. Our results suggest that the AT activity is only bound and activated by completely unmodified PII and that this design is largely responsible for ultrasensitivity of the bicyclic system.

  15. Beyond Vmax and Km: How details of enzyme function influence geochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes catalyze the vast majority of chemical reactions relevant to geomicrobiology. Studies of the activities of enzymes in environmental systems often report Vmax (the maximum possible rate of reaction; often proportional to the concentration of enzymes in the system) and sometimes Km (a measure of the affinity between enzymes and their substrates). However, enzyme studies - particularly those related to enzymes involved in organic carbon oxidation - are often limited to only those parameters, and a relatively limited and mixed set of enzymes. Here I will discuss some novel methods to assay and characterize the specific sets of enzymes that may be important to the carbon cycle in aquatic environments. First, kinetic experiments revealed the collective properties of the complex mixtures of extracellular peptidases that occur where microbial communities are diverse. Crystal structures combined with biochemical characterization of specific enzymes can yield more detailed information about key steps in organic carbon transformations. These new techniques have the potential to provide mechanistic grounding to geomicrobiological models.

  16. {open_quotes}The effects of diabetes on the activity of the enzyme glutamine: fructose-6-phosphate amindotransferase{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.P.

    1994-12-31

    Hexsoamine synthetic pathway (HexNSP) controls the supply of essential substrates for glycoprotein synthesis. In vitro studies suggest that increased flux of glucose via the hexsoamine synthetic pathway may play a role in glucose induced insulin resistance of glucose transport. Glutamine: fructose-6-phosphate amindotransferase (GFAT) controls flux into the hexsoamine synthetic pathway; the major products are UDPN-acetylhexosamines (UDP.HexNac=UDP.GlcNAc= UDP.GalNac). I examined whether diabetes ({approximately} 7 days post intravenous streptozotocin, and genetically linked) affects the activity of glutamine: fructose-6-phosphate in rat and mouse skeletal muscle in vivo. Nucleotide linked HexNAc were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography(HPLC) in deproteinized hind limb muscle extracts.

  17. [Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on metabolism of glutamine in the liver].

    PubMed

    Savilov, P N

    2014-01-01

    The effect of three-day course of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO; 3 atm, 50 min, 1 session per day) on glutamine metabolism in the liver has been investigated in 72 adult albino rats. The content of ammonia, glutamate, glutamine, activity of glutamine synthetase (GS), phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were studied in left (LLL) and median (MLL) lobes of the liver. The course of HBO had an inhibitory effect on all the enzymes studied. Inhibitory effect of hyperoxia on GDH activity persisted up to day 11 after the course of HBO in both lobes of the liver, while decreased glutamate normalized in both lobes. Reduced glutamine concentration normalized to day 4, and the concentration of ammonia and remained elevated for 11 days after the end of hyperoxic exposure. Inhibitory effect of hyperoxia on GS activity in LLL and MLL disappeared on day 4 and day 11 day after the end of the HBO course. PDG activity reduced by HBO in both lobes normalized to the day 4 day after oxygenation; however, on day 11 it selectively decreased in LLL, where simultaneous stimulation of GS activity was also observed. The results demonstrate different sensitivity of liver GS, PDG and GDH of normal rats to the inhibitory effect of HBO. Different dynamics of GS and PDG activity in LLL and MLL of oxygenated rats suggests functional heterogeneity of the glutamine cycle in hepatocytes of liver lobes after HBO.

  18. Krebs cycle metabolon formation: metabolite concentration gradient enhanced compartmentation of sequential enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Pelster, Lindsey N; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-01-25

    Dynamics of metabolon formation in mitochondria was probed by studying diffusional motion of two sequential Krebs cycle enzymes in a microfluidic channel. Enhanced directional co-diffusion of both enzymes against a substrate concentration gradient was observed in the presence of intermediate generation. This reveals a metabolite directed compartmentation of metabolic pathways.

  19. Structural and functional insights into enzymes of the vitamin K cycle.

    PubMed

    Tie, J-K; Stafford, D W

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin K-dependent proteins require carboxylation of certain glutamates for their biological functions. The enzymes involved in the vitamin K-dependent carboxylation include: gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX), vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) and an as-yet-unidentified vitamin K reductase (VKR). Due to the hydrophobicity of vitamin K, these enzymes are likely to be integral membrane proteins that reside in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, structure-function studies on these enzymes have been challenging, and some of the results are notably controversial. Patients with naturally occurring mutations in these enzymes, who mainly exhibit bleeding disorders or are resistant to oral anticoagulant treatment, provide valuable information for the functional study of the vitamin K cycle enzymes. In this review, we discuss: (i) the discovery of the enzymatic activities and gene identifications of the vitamin K cycle enzymes; (ii) the identification of their functionally important regions and their active site residues; (iii) the membrane topology studies of GGCX and VKOR; and (iv) the controversial issues regarding the structure and function studies of these enzymes, particularly, the membrane topology, the role of the conserved cysteines and the mechanism of active site regeneration of VKOR. We also discuss the possibility that a paralogous protein of VKOR, VKOR-like 1 (VKORL1), is involved in the vitamin K cycle, and the importance of and possible approaches for identifying the unknown VKR. Overall, we describe the accomplishments and the remaining questions in regard to the structure and function studies of the enzymes in the vitamin K cycle.

  20. Microplate quantification of enzymes of the plant ascorbate-glutathione cycle.

    PubMed

    Murshed, Ramzi; Lopez-Lauri, Félicie; Sallanon, Huguette

    2008-12-15

    Here, we describe microplate assays for determining the specific activities of four enzymes that constitute the ascorbate-glutathione cycle: APX, MDHAR, DHAR, and GR. In plants, these enzymes play a major role in detoxifying reactive oxygen species produced in cells under environmental stress. This work presents the development of plate reader assays to allow rapid analysis of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle activity using tomato fruits subjected to salt stress as a model. With this method, it is possible to analyze easily in one day the activities of the four enzymes for 30 experimental samples, all in triplicate and with blanks.

  1. Glutamate and asparagine cataplerosis underlie glutamine addiction in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ratnikov, Boris; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Ronai, Ze'ev A.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Scott, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine dependence is a prominent feature of cancer metabolism, and here we show that melanoma cells, irrespective of their oncogenic background, depend on glutamine for growth. A quantitative audit of how carbon from glutamine is used showed that TCA-cycle-derived glutamate is, in most melanoma cells, the major glutamine-derived cataplerotic output and product of glutaminolysis. In the absence of glutamine, TCA cycle metabolites were liable to depletion through aminotransferase-mediated α-ketoglutarate-to-glutamate conversion and glutamate secretion. Aspartate was an essential cataplerotic output, as melanoma cells demonstrated a limited capacity to salvage external aspartate. Also, the absence of asparagine increased the glutamine requirement, pointing to vulnerability in the aspartate-asparagine biosynthetic pathway within melanoma metabolism. In contrast to melanoma cells, melanocytes could grow in the absence of glutamine. Melanocytes use more glutamine for protein synthesis rather than secreting it as glutamate and are less prone to loss of glutamate and TCA cycle metabolites when starved of glutamine. PMID:25749035

  2. Functional Study of the Vitamin K Cycle Enzymes in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Tie, J-K; Stafford, D W

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin K-dependent carboxylation, an essential posttranslational modification catalyzed by gamma-glutamyl carboxylase, is required for the biological functions of proteins that control blood coagulation, vascular calcification, bone metabolism, and other important physiological processes. Concomitant with carboxylation, reduced vitamin K (KH2) is oxidized to vitamin K epoxide (KO). KO must be recycled back to KH2 by the enzymes vitamin K epoxide reductase and vitamin K reductase in a pathway known as the vitamin K cycle. Our current knowledge about the enzymes of the vitamin K cycle is mainly based on in vitro studies of each individual enzymes under artificial conditions, which are of limited usefulness in understanding how the complex carboxylation process is carried out in the physiological environment. In this chapter, we review the current in vitro activity assays for vitamin K cycle enzymes. We describe the rationale, establishment, and application of cell-based assays for the functional study of these enzymes in the native cellular milieu. In these cell-based assays, different vitamin K-dependent proteins were designed and stably expressed in mammalian cells as reporter proteins to accommodate the readily used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for carboxylation efficiency evaluation. Additionally, recently emerged genome-editing techniques TALENs and CRISPR-Cas9 were used to knock out the endogenous enzymes in the reporter cell lines to eliminate the background. These cell-based assays are easy to scale up for high-throughput screening of inhibitors of vitamin K cycle enzymes and have been successfully used to clarify the genotypes and their clinical phenotypes of enzymes of the vitamin K cycle.

  3. Waiting cycle times and generalized Haldane equality in the steady-state cycle kinetics of single enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hao

    2008-01-10

    Enzyme kinetics are cyclic. A more realistic reversible three-step mechanism of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics is investigated in detail, and three kinds of waiting cycle times T, T+, T- are defined. It is shown that the mean waiting cycle times T, T+, and T- are the reciprocal of the steady-state cycle flux Jss, the forward steady-state cycle flux Jss+ and the backward steady-state cycle flux Jss, respectively. We also show that the distribution of T+ conditioned on T+cycle time of T+ conditioned on T+cycle fluxes and waiting cycle times. Furthermore, we extend the same results to the n-step cycle, and finally, experimental and theoretically based evidence are also included.

  4. Measuring in vivo elasticities of Calvin cycle enzymes: network structure and patterns of modulations.

    PubMed

    Kreim, Michael; Giersch, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    To measure the kinetics of enzymes, the proteins are usually assayed in vitro after isolation from their parent organisms. We make an attempt to show how one might determine enzyme elasticities in an intact system by a multiple modulation approach. Certain target enzymes are modulated in their activities and the changes in metabolite concentrations and flux rates upon the modulations are used to calculate the enzyme elasticities. Central to this approach is that the modulations must be independent of each other, and an algorithm is developed for finding all independent modulations that allow determining the elasticities of a given enzyme. This approach is applied to a mass-action model of the Calvin cycle. The goal is to determine the elasticities of as many enzymes as possible by modulating the activities of as few of them as possible. It is shown that the elasticities of 20 (out of 22) Calvin cycle enzymes can be determined by modulating just five reactions. Moreover, visualization of independence of modulations may be used to decompose the Calvin cycle into several sections that are independent of each other regarding flow of matter and information.

  5. Role of glutamine and interlinked asparagine metabolism in vessel formation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongling; Vandekeere, Saar; Kalucka, Joanna; Bierhansl, Laura; Zecchin, Annalisa; Brüning, Ulrike; Visnagri, Asjad; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Goveia, Jermaine; Cruys, Bert; Brepoels, Katleen; Wyns, Sabine; Rayport, Stephen; Ghesquière, Bart; Vinckier, Stefan; Schoonjans, Luc; Cubbon, Richard; Dewerchin, Mieke; Eelen, Guy; Carmeliet, Peter

    2017-08-15

    Endothelial cell (EC) metabolism is emerging as a regulator of angiogenesis, but the precise role of glutamine metabolism in ECs is unknown. Here, we show that depriving ECs of glutamine or inhibiting glutaminase 1 (GLS1) caused vessel sprouting defects due to impaired proliferation and migration, and reduced pathological ocular angiogenesis. Inhibition of glutamine metabolism in ECs did not cause energy distress, but impaired tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle anaplerosis, macromolecule production, and redox homeostasis. Only the combination of TCA cycle replenishment plus asparagine supplementation restored the metabolic aberrations and proliferation defect caused by glutamine deprivation. Mechanistically, glutamine provided nitrogen for asparagine synthesis to sustain cellular homeostasis. While ECs can take up asparagine, silencing asparagine synthetase (ASNS, which converts glutamine-derived nitrogen and aspartate to asparagine) impaired EC sprouting even in the presence of glutamine and asparagine. Asparagine further proved crucial in glutamine-deprived ECs to restore protein synthesis, suppress ER stress, and reactivate mTOR signaling. These findings reveal a novel link between endothelial glutamine and asparagine metabolism in vessel sprouting. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. Expression and clinical role of small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein alpha (SGTA) as a novel cell cycle protein in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qun; Lv, Liting; Wan, Chunhua; Chen, Buyou; Li, Mei; Ni, Tingting; Liu, Yifei; Liu, Yanhua; Cong, Xia; Zhou, Yiqun; Ni, Runzhou; Mao, Guoxin

    2013-09-01

    A small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein alpha (SGTA) is a 35 kDa protein involved in a number of biological processes. However, the role of SGTA in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumorigenesis has never been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine whether SGTA could serve as a biomarker for stratification and prediction of prognosis in NSCLC. Small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein alpha expression was evaluated by Western blot in 8 paired fresh lung cancer tissues and immunohistochemistry on 83 paraffin-embedded sections. The effect of SGTA was assessed by RNA interference in A549 cells. Serum starvation and refeeding, flow cytometry, CCK-8, and tunnel assays were performed. Small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein alpha was highly expressed in NSCLC and significantly correlated with NSCLC histological differentiation, clinical stage, and Ki-67. Multivariate analysis indicated that SGTA was an independent prognostic factor for NSCLC patients' survival. The present investigation demonstrated that suppression of SGTA expression resulted in a significant decline of proliferation in A549 cells. Besides, SGTA could abolish the toxicity of cisplatin in A549 cells. These findings suggested that SGTA might play an important role in promoting the tumorigenesis of NSCLC, and thus be a promising therapeutic target to prevent NSCLC progression.

  7. Integrated structural biology and molecular ecology of N-cycling enzymes from ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    DOE PAGES

    Tolar, Bradley B.; Herrmann, Jonathan; Bargar, John R.; ...

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, knowledge of the molecular ecology and environmental determinants of ammonia-oxidizing organisms is critical to understanding and predicting the global nitrogen (N) and carbon cycles, but an incomplete biochemical picture hinders in vitro studies of N-cycling enzymes. Although an integrative structural and dynamic characterization at the atomic scale would advance our understanding of function tremendously, structural knowlede of key N-cycling enzymes from ecologically-relevant ammonia oxidizers is unfortunately extremely limited. Here, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for examining the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing organisms, particularly uncultivated Thaumarchaeota, though (meta)genome-driven structural biology of the enzymes ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) andmore » nitrite reductase (NirK).« less

  8. Characterization of a bifunctional glyoxylate cycle enzyme, malate synthase/isocitrate lyase, of Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Masami; Nishimura, Masaaki; Inoue, Kengo; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Inui, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    The glyoxylate cycle is a modified form of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which enables organisms to synthesize carbohydrates from C2 compounds. In the protozoan Euglena gracilis, the key enzyme activities of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS), are conferred by a single bifunctional protein named glyoxylate cycle enzyme (Euglena gracilis glyoxylate cycle enzyme [EgGCE]). We analyzed the enzymatic properties of recombinant EgGCE to determine the functions of its different domains. The 62-kDa N-terminal domain of EgGCE was sufficient to provide the MS activity as expected from an analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence. In contrast, expression of the 67-kDa C-terminal domain of EgGCE failed to yield ICL activity even though this domain was structurally similar to ICL family enzymes. Analyses of truncation mutants suggested that the N-terminal residues of EgGCE are critical for both the ICL and MS activities. The ICL activity of EgGCE increased in the presence of micro-molar concentrations of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Acetyl-CoA also increased the activity in a mutant type EgGCE with a mutation at the acetyl-CoA binding site in the MS domain of EgGCE. This suggests that acetyl-CoA regulates the ICL reaction by binding to a site other than the catalytic center of the MS reaction.

  9. Sodium butyrate reverses the inhibition of Krebs cycle enzymes induced by amphetamine in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Valvassori, Samira S; Calixto, Karen V; Budni, Josiane; Resende, Wilson R; Varela, Roger B; de Freitas, Karolina V; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the possibility that mitochondrial impairment may play an important role in bipolar disorder (BD). The Krebs cycle is the central point of oxidative metabolism, providing carbon for biosynthesis and reducing agents for generation of ATP. Recently, studies have suggested that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may have antimanic effects. The present study aims to investigate the effects of sodium butyrate (SB), a HDAC inhibitor, on Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the brain of rats subjected to an animal model of mania induced by D-amphetamine (D-AMPH). Wistar rats were first given D-AMPH or saline (Sal) for 14 days, and then, between days 8 and 14, rats were treated with SB or Sal. The citrate synthase (CS), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were evaluated in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats. The D-AMPH administration inhibited Krebs cycle enzymes activity in all analyzed brain structures and SB reversed D-AMPH-induced dysfunction analyzed in all brain regions. These findings suggest that Krebs cycle enzymes' inhibition can be an important link for the mitochondrial dysfunction seen in BD and SB exerts protective effects against the D-AMPH-induced Krebs cycle enzymes' dysfunction.

  10. Glutamine Metabolism in Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Szeliga, Monika; Albrecht, Jan

    2016-01-01

    By histological, morphological criteria, and malignancy, brain tumors are classified by WHO into grades I (most benign) to IV (highly malignant), and gliomas are the most frequently occurring class throughout the grades. Similar to peripheral tumors, the growth of glia-derived tumor cells largely depends on glutamine (Gln), which is vividly taken up by the cells, using mostly ASCT2 and SN1 as Gln carriers. Tumor growth-promoting effects of Gln are associated with its phosphate-activated glutaminase (GA) (specifically KGA)-mediated degradation to glutamate (Glu) and/or with its entry to the energy- and intermediate metabolite-generating pathways related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. However, a subclass of liver-type GA are absent in glioma cells, a circumstance which allows phenotype manipulations upon their transfection to the cells. Gln-derived Glu plays a major role in promoting tumor proliferation and invasion. Glu is relatively inefficiently recycled to Gln and readily leaves the cells by exchange with the extracellular pool of the glutathione (GSH) precursor Cys mediated by xc- transporter. This results in (a) cell invasion-fostering interaction of Glu with ionotropic Glu receptors in the surrounding tissue, (b) intracellular accumulation of GSH which increases tumor resistance to radio- and chemotherapy.

  11. Glutamine deprivation initiates reversible assembly of mammalian rods and rings.

    PubMed

    Calise, S John; Carcamo, Wendy C; Krueger, Claire; Yin, Joyce D; Purich, Daniel L; Chan, Edward K L

    2014-08-01

    Rods and rings (RR) are protein assemblies composed of cytidine triphosphate synthetase type 1 (CTPS1) and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase type 2 (IMPDH2), key enzymes in CTP and GTP biosynthesis. Small-molecule inhibitors of CTPS1 or IMPDH2 induce RR assembly in various cancer cell lines within 15 min to hours. Since glutamine is an essential amide nitrogen donor in these nucleotide biosynthetic pathways, glutamine deprivation was examined to determine whether it leads to RR formation. HeLa cells cultured in normal conditions did not show RR, but after culturing in media lacking glutamine, short rods (<2 μm) assembled after 24 h, and longer rods (>5 μm) formed after 48 h. Upon supplementation with glutamine or guanosine, these RR underwent almost complete disassembly within 15 min. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase with methionine sulfoximine also increased RR assembly in cells deprived of glutamine. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that CTP/GTP biosynthetic enzymes polymerize to form RR in response to a decreased intracellular level of glutamine. We speculate that rod and ring formation is an adaptive metabolic response linked to disruption of glutamine homeostasis.

  12. Overexpression of alfalfa cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nodules and flowers of transgenic Lotus japonicus plants.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Ramón; Márquez, Judith; Shishkova, Svetlana; Hernández, Georgina

    2003-03-01

    Legumes can obtain nitrogen from symbiotic nitrogen fixation in root nodules. The glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase cycle is responsible for the initial nitrogen assimilation. This work reports the analysis of transgenic Lotus japonicus plants with the chimeric gene containing the alfalfa cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1) (EC 6.3.1.2) gene controlled by the Sesbania rostrata leghemoglobin gene promoter (Srglb3p). Surprisingly, all of the transgenic primary transformants analysed were sterile. Two transformants designated GS39 and GS44 were further analysed. GS in nodules of GS39 and GS44 plants was upregulated, at the level of transcript and protein. The transgenic plants had 2-fold higher nodule GS activity and similar root GS activity compared to control plants. The GS39 and GS44 sterile plants showed morphological alterations in pollen grains and in ovules. An increase in GS transcript abundance and enzyme activity was measured during early and late stages of flower development of GS plants. Flowers of GS plants showed higher glutamine content, resulting in an increased glutamine/glutamate ratio. The GS transcript and protein were detected in ovules. These data indicate that overexpression of GS1 in reproductive organs critically affects their development and might be a reason for sterility of L. japonicus plants.

  13. Binge ethanol withdrawal: Effects on post-withdrawal ethanol intake, glutamate-glutamine cycle and monoamine tissue content in P rat model

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sujan C.; Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Alshehri, Fahad S.; Sari, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a medical emergency situation which appears after abrupt cessation of ethanol intake. Decreased GABA-A function and increased glutamate function are known to exist in the AWS. However, the involvement of glutamate transporters in the context of AWS requires further investigation. In this study, we used a model of ethanol withdrawal involving abrupt cessation of binge ethanol administration (4 g/kg/gavage three times a day for three days) using male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. After 48 hours of withdrawal, P rats were re-exposed to voluntary ethanol intake. The amount of ethanol consumed was measured during post-withdrawal phase. In addition, the expression of GLT-1, GLAST and xCT were determined in both medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). We also measured glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and the tissue content of glutamate, glutamine, dopamine and serotonin in both mPFC and NAc. We found that binge ethanol withdrawal escalated post-withdrawal ethanol intake, which was associated with downregulation of GLT-1 expression in both mPFC and NAc. The expression of GLAST and xCT were unchanged in the ethanol-withdrawal (EW) group compared to control group. Tissue content of glutamate was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of glutamine was higher in mPFC but unchanged in NAc in the EW group compared to control group. The GS activity was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. The tissue content of DA was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of serotonin was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. These findings provide important information of the critical role of GLT-1 in context of AWS. PMID:26821293

  14. Binge ethanol withdrawal: Effects on post-withdrawal ethanol intake, glutamate-glutamine cycle and monoamine tissue content in P rat model.

    PubMed

    Das, Sujan C; Althobaiti, Yusuf S; Alshehri, Fahad S; Sari, Youssef

    2016-04-15

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a medical emergency situation which appears after abrupt cessation of ethanol intake. Decreased GABA-A function and increased glutamate function are known to exist in the AWS. However, the involvement of glutamate transporters in the context of AWS requires further investigation. In this study, we used a model of ethanol withdrawal involving abrupt cessation of binge ethanol administration (4 g/kg/gavage three times a day for three days) using male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. After 48 h of withdrawal, P rats were re-exposed to voluntary ethanol intake. The amount of ethanol consumed was measured during post-withdrawal phase. In addition, the expression of GLT-1, GLAST and xCT were determined in both medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). We also measured glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and the tissue content of glutamate, glutamine, dopamine and serotonin in both mPFC and NAc. We found that binge ethanol withdrawal escalated post-withdrawal ethanol intake, which was associated with downregulation of GLT-1 expression in both mPFC and NAc. The expression of GLAST and xCT were unchanged in the ethanol-withdrawal (EW) group compared to control group. Tissue content of glutamate was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of glutamine was higher in mPFC but unchanged in NAc in the EW group compared to control group. The GS activity was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. The tissue content of DA was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of serotonin was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. These findings provide important information of the critical role of GLT-1 in context of AWS.

  15. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J; Schilling, Joel D

    2016-04-12

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli.

  16. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J.; Schilling, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27077881

  17. In the aging housefly aconitase is the only citric acid cycle enzyme to decline significantly.

    PubMed

    Yarian, Connie S; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2005-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine if the activities of the mitochondrial citric acid cycle enzymes are altered during the normal aging process. Flight muscle mitochondria of houseflies of different ages were used as a model system because of their apparent age-related decline in bioenergetic efficiency, evident as a failure of flying ability. The maximal activities of each of the citric acid cycle enzymes were determined in preparations of mitochondria from flies of relatively young, middle, and old age. Aconitase was the only enzyme exhibiting altered activity during aging. The maximal activity of aconitase from old flies was decreased by 44% compared to that from young flies while the other citric acid cycle enzymes showed no change in activity with age. It is suggested that the selective age-related decrease in aconitase activity is likely to contribute to a decline in the efficiency of mitochondrial bioenergetics, as well as result in secondary effects associated with accumulation of citrate and redox-active iron.

  18. Immunoelectron Microscopy for Locating Calvin Cycle Enzymes in the Thylakoids of Synechocystis 6803

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rachna; Ortleb, Stefan; Sainis, Jayashree Krishna; Melzer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria Synechocystis 6803 were fixed using high-pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze substitution without any chemical cross-linkers. Immunoelectron microscopy of these cells showed that five sequential enzymes of the Calvin cycle (phosphoriboisomerase, phosphoribulokinase, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), 3-phosphoglyceratekinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and the catalytic portion of the chloroplast H+-ATP synthase (CF1) are located adjacent to the thylakoid membranes. Cell-free extracts of Synechocystis were processed by ultracentrifugation to isolate thylakoid fractions sedimenting at 40 000, 90 000, and 150 000 g. Among these, the 150 000-g fraction showed the highest linked activity of the above five sequential Calvin cycle enzymes and also the highest coordinated activity of light and dark reactions as assessed by ribose-5-phosphate (R-5-P) +ADP dependent CO2 fixation. Immunogold labeling of this membrane fraction confirmed the presence of the above five enzymes as well as the catalytic portion of the CF1 ATP synthase. Notably, the protein A-gold labeling of the thylakoids was observed without use of chemical cross-linkers and in spite of the normal washing steps used during standard immunolabeling. The results showed that soluble Calvin cycle enzymes might be organized along the thylakoid membranes. PMID:19529819

  19. Immunoelectron microscopy for locating calvin cycle enzymes in the thylakoids of synechocystis 6803.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rachna; Ortleb, Stefan; Sainis, Jayashree Krishna; Melzer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria Synechocystis 6803 were fixed using high-pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze substitution without any chemical cross-linkers. Immunoelectron microscopy of these cells showed that five sequential enzymes of the Calvin cycle (phosphoriboisomerase, phosphoribulokinase, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), 3-phosphoglyceratekinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and the catalytic portion of the chloroplast H+-ATP synthase (CF1) are located adjacent to the thylakoid membranes. Cell-free extracts of Synechocystis were processed by ultracentrifugation to isolate thylakoid fractions sedimenting at 40,000, 90,000, and 150,000 g. Among these, the 150,000-g fraction showed the highest linked activity of the above five sequential Calvin cycle enzymes and also the highest coordinated activity of light and dark reactions as assessed by ribose-5-phosphate (R-5-P) +ADP dependent CO2 fixation. Immunogold labeling of this membrane fraction confirmed the presence of the above five enzymes as well as the catalytic portion of the CF1 ATP synthase. Notably, the protein A-gold labeling of the thylakoids was observed without use of chemical cross-linkers and in spite of the normal washing steps used during standard immunolabeling. The results showed that soluble Calvin cycle enzymes might be organized along the thylakoid membranes.

  20. Krebs cycle enzymes from livers of old mice are differentially regulated by caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, Kevork; Ramsey, Jon J; Weindruch, Richard

    2004-08-01

    Krebs cycle enzyme activities and levels of five metabolites were determined from livers of old mice (30 months) maintained either on control or on long-term caloric restriction (CR) diets (28 months). In CR mice, the cycle was divided into two major blocks, the first containing citrate synthase, aconitase and NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase which showed decreased activities, while the second block, containing the remaining enzymes, displayed increased activity (except for fumarase, which was unchanged). CR also resulted in decreased levels of citrate, glutamate and alpha-ketoglutarate, increased levels of malate, and unchanged levels of aspartate. The alpha-ketoglutarate/glutamate and malate/alpha-ketoglutarate ratios were higher in CR, in parallel with previously reported increases with CR in pyruvate carboxylase activity and glucagon levels, respectively. The results indicate that long-term CR induces a differential regulation of Krebs cycle in old mice and this regulation may be the result of changes in gene expression levels, as well as a complex interplay between enzymes, hormones and other effectors. Truncation of Krebs cycle by CR may be an important adaptation to utilize available substrates for the gluconeogenesis necessary to sustain glycolytic tissues, such as brain.

  1. Evolution of enzymes involved in the photorespiratory 2-phosphoglycolate cycle from cyanobacteria via algae toward plants.

    PubMed

    Kern, Ramona; Bauwe, Hermann; Hagemann, Martin

    2011-09-01

    The photorespiratory pathway was shown to be essential for organisms performing oxygenic photosynthesis, cyanobacteria, algae, and plants, in the present day O(2)-containing atmosphere. The identification of a plant-like 2-phosphoglycolate cycle in cyanobacteria indicated that not only genes of oxygenic photosynthesis but also genes encoding photorespiratory enzymes were endosymbiotically conveyed from ancient cyanobacteria to eukaryotic oxygenic phototrophs. Here, we investigated the origin of the photorespiratory pathway in photosynthetic eukaryotes by phylogenetic analysis. We found that a mixture of photorespiratory enzymes of either cyanobacterial or α-proteobacterial origin is present in algae and higher plants. Three enzymes in eukaryotic phototrophs clustered closely with cyanobacterial homologs: glycolate oxidase, glycerate kinase, and hydroxypyruvate reductase. On the other hand, the mitochondrial enzymes of the photorespiratory cycle in algae and plants, glycine decarboxylase subunits and serine hydroxymethyltransferase, evolved from proteobacteria. Other than most genes for proteins of the photosynthetic machinery, nearly all enzymes involved in the 2-phosphogylcolate metabolism coexist in the genomes of cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria.

  2. Reprogramming of proline and glutamine metabolism contributes to the proliferative and metabolic responses regulated by oncogenic transcription factor c-MYC

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Le, Anne; Hancock, Chad; Lane, Andrew N.; Dang, Chi V.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.; Phang, James M.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to glycolysis, the oncogenic transcription factor c-MYC (MYC) stimulates glutamine catabolism to fuel growth and proliferation of cancer cells through up-regulating glutaminase (GLS). Glutamine is converted to glutamate by GLS, entering the tricarboxylic acid cycle as an important energy source. Less well-recognized, glutamate can also be converted to proline through Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) and vice versa. This study suggests that some MYC-induced cellular effects are due to MYC regulation of proline metabolism. Proline oxidase, also known as proline dehydrogenase (POX/PRODH), the first enzyme in proline catabolism, is a mitochondrial tumor suppressor that inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis. MiR-23b* mediates POX/PRODH down-regulation in human kidney tumors. MiR-23b* is processed from the same transcript as miR-23b; the latter inhibits the translation of GLS. Using MYC-inducible human Burkitt lymphoma model P493 and PC3 human prostate cancer cells, we showed that MYC suppressed POX/PRODH expression primarily through up-regulating miR-23b*. The growth inhibition in the absence of MYC was partially reversed by POX/PRODH knockdown, indicating the importance of suppression of POX/PRODH in MYC-mediated cellular effects. Interestingly, MYC not only inhibited POX/PRODH, but also markedly increased the enzymes of proline biosynthesis from glutamine, including P5C synthase and P5C reductase 1. MYC-induced proline biosynthesis from glutamine was directly confirmed using 13C,15N-glutamine as a tracer. The metabolic link between glutamine and proline afforded by MYC emphasizes the complexity of tumor metabolism. Further studies of the relationship between glutamine and proline metabolism should provide a deeper understanding of tumor metabolism while enabling the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:22615405

  3. In vivo modification of Azotobacter chroococcum glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Centeno, M C; Cejudo, F J; Paneque, A

    1994-03-15

    A monospecific anti-(glutamine synthetase) antibody raised against glutamine synthetase of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 immunoreacted with glutamine synthetase from the N2-fixing heterotrophic bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum. In Western-blotting experiments this antibody recognized a single protein of a molecular mass of 59 kDa corresponding to glutamine synthetase subunit. This protein was in vivo-labelled in response to addition of ammonium, both [3H]adenine and H(3)32PO4 preincubation of the cells being equally effective. Nevertheless, the amount of glutamine synthetase present in A. chroococcum was independent of the available nitrogen source. Modified, inactive glutamine synthetase was re-activated by treatment with snake-venom phosphodiesterase but not by alkaline phosphatase. L-Methionine-DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, prevented the enzyme from being covalently modified. We conclude that, in A. chroococcum, glutamine synthetase is adenylylated in response to ammonium and that for the modification to take place ammonium must be metabolized.

  4. In vivo modification of Azotobacter chroococcum glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Centeno, M C; Cejudo, F J; Paneque, A

    1994-01-01

    A monospecific anti-(glutamine synthetase) antibody raised against glutamine synthetase of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 immunoreacted with glutamine synthetase from the N2-fixing heterotrophic bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum. In Western-blotting experiments this antibody recognized a single protein of a molecular mass of 59 kDa corresponding to glutamine synthetase subunit. This protein was in vivo-labelled in response to addition of ammonium, both [3H]adenine and H(3)32PO4 preincubation of the cells being equally effective. Nevertheless, the amount of glutamine synthetase present in A. chroococcum was independent of the available nitrogen source. Modified, inactive glutamine synthetase was re-activated by treatment with snake-venom phosphodiesterase but not by alkaline phosphatase. L-Methionine-DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, prevented the enzyme from being covalently modified. We conclude that, in A. chroococcum, glutamine synthetase is adenylylated in response to ammonium and that for the modification to take place ammonium must be metabolized. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7908189

  5. Heterogeneity of Glutamine Synthetase Polypeptides in Phaseolus vulgaris L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Miguel; Porta, Helena; Padilla, Jaime; Folch, Jorge; Sánchez, Federico

    1984-01-01

    Glutamine synthetases from roots, nodules, and leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris L. have been purified to homogeneity and their polypeptide composition determined. The leaf enzyme is composed of six polypeptides. The cytosolic fraction contains two 43,000 dalton polypeptides and the chloroplastic enzyme is formed by four 45,000 dalton polypeptides. Root glutamine synthetase consists only of the same two polypeptides of 43,000 dalton that are present in the leaf enzyme. The nodule enzyme is formed by two polypeptides of 43,000 dalton, one is common to the leaf and root enzyme but the other is specific for N2-fixing nodule tissue. The two glutamine synthetase forms of the nodule contain a different proportion of the 43,000 dalton polypeptides. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:16663942

  6. Glutamine deprivation induces interleukin-8 expression in ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Hyun; Kim, Aryung; Yu, Ji Hoon; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2014-05-01

    To investigate whether glutamine deprivation induces expression of inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) by determining NF-κB activity and levels of oxidative indices (ROS, reactive oxygen species; hydrogen peroxide; GSH, glutathione) in fibroblasts isolated from patients with ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). We used A-T fibroblasts stably transfected with empty vector (Mock) or with human full-length ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) cDNA (YZ5) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) transiently transfected with ATM small interfering RNA (siRNA) or with non-specific control siRNA. The cells were cultured with or without glutamine or GSH. ROS levels were determined using a fluorescence reader and confocal microscopy. IL-8 or murine IL-8 homolog, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), and hydrogen peroxide levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and colorimetric assay. GSH level was assessed by enzymatic assay, while IL-8 (KC) mRNA level was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and/or quantitative real-time PCR. NF-κB DNA-binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Catalase activity and ATM protein levels were determined by O2 generation and Western blotting. While glutamine deprivation induced IL-8 expression and increased NF-κB DNA-binding activity in Mock cells, both processes were decreased by treatment of cells with glutamine or GSH or both glutamine and GSH. Glutamine deprivation had no effect on IL-8 expression or NF-κB DNA-binding activity in YZ5 cells. Glutamine-deprived Mock cells had higher oxidative stress indices (increases in ROS and hydrogen peroxide, reduction in GSH) than glutamine-deprived YZ5 cells. In Mock cells, glutamine deprivation-induced oxidative stress indices were suppressed by treatment with glutamine or GSH or both glutamine and GSH. GSH levels and catalase activity were lower in Mock cells than YZ5 cells. MEFs transfected with ATM siRNA and

  7. Reduced density of glutamine synthetase immunoreactive astrocytes in different cortical areas in major depression but not in bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Meyer-Lotz, Gabriela; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Bannier, Jana; Steiner, Johann; Walter, Martin; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for disturbances within the glutamate system in patients with affective disorders, which involve disruptions of the glutamate-glutamine-cycle. The mainly astroglia-located enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, thus playing a central role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis. However, GS is also expressed in numerous oligodendrocytes (OLs), another class of glial cells implicated in mood disorder pathology. To learn more about the role of glia-associated GS in mental illnesses, we decided to find out if numerical densities of glial cells immunostained for the enzyme protein differ between subjects with major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder (BD), and psychically healthy control cases. Counting of GS expressing astrocytes (ACs) and OLs in eight cortical and two subcortical brain regions of subjects with mood disorder (N = 14), BD (N = 15), and controls (N = 16) revealed that in major depression the densities of ACs were significantly reduced in some cortical but not subcortical gray matter areas, whereas no changes were found for OLs. In BD no alterations of GS-immunoreactive glia were found. From our findings we conclude that (1) GS expressing ACs are prominently involved in glutamate-related disturbances in major depression, but not in BD and (2) GS expressing OLs, though being present in significant numbers in prefrontal cortical areas, play a minor (if any) role in mood disorder pathology. The latter assumption is supported by findings of others showing that - at least in the mouse brain cortex - GS immunoreactive oligodendroglial cells are unable to contribute to the glutamate-glutamine-cycle due to the complete lack of amino acid transporters (Takasaki et al., 2010).

  8. Reduced density of glutamine synthetase immunoreactive astrocytes in different cortical areas in major depression but not in bipolar I disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Meyer-Lotz, Gabriela; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Bannier, Jana; Steiner, Johann; Walter, Martin; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for disturbances within the glutamate system in patients with affective disorders, which involve disruptions of the glutamate–glutamine-cycle. The mainly astroglia-located enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, thus playing a central role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis. However, GS is also expressed in numerous oligodendrocytes (OLs), another class of glial cells implicated in mood disorder pathology. To learn more about the role of glia-associated GS in mental illnesses, we decided to find out if numerical densities of glial cells immunostained for the enzyme protein differ between subjects with major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder (BD), and psychically healthy control cases. Counting of GS expressing astrocytes (ACs) and OLs in eight cortical and two subcortical brain regions of subjects with mood disorder (N = 14), BD (N = 15), and controls (N = 16) revealed that in major depression the densities of ACs were significantly reduced in some cortical but not subcortical gray matter areas, whereas no changes were found for OLs. In BD no alterations of GS-immunoreactive glia were found. From our findings we conclude that (1) GS expressing ACs are prominently involved in glutamate-related disturbances in major depression, but not in BD and (2) GS expressing OLs, though being present in significant numbers in prefrontal cortical areas, play a minor (if any) role in mood disorder pathology. The latter assumption is supported by findings of others showing that – at least in the mouse brain cortex – GS immunoreactive oligodendroglial cells are unable to contribute to the glutamate–glutamine-cycle due to the complete lack of amino acid transporters (Takasaki et al., 2010). PMID:26321908

  9. Asymmetry of glutamine transporters in cultured neural cells.

    PubMed

    Heckel, Tobias; Bröer, Angelika; Wiesinger, Heinrich; Lang, Florian; Bröer, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    Transfer of glutamine between astrocytes and neurons is an essential part of the glutamate-glutamine cycle in the brain. Transport of glutamine was investigated in primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons and compared to glutamine transport in cell lines with glial and neuronal properties. Glutamine uptake in astrocytes was mainly mediated by general amino acid transporters with properties similar to ASCT2, LAT1, LAT2, SN1 and y(+)LAT2. In cultured neurons, transport activities were detected consistent with the presence of LAT1, LAT2 and y(+)LAT2, but the most prominent activity was a novel Na(+)-dependent glutamine transporter that could be inhibited by D-aspartate. The mRNA for system A isoforms ATA1 and ATA2 was detected in both neurons and astrocytes, but system A activity was only detected in neurons. ASCT2 on the other hand appeared to be astrocyte-specific. The cell lines F98 and 108CC-15, having astroglial and neuronal properties, respectively, expressed sets of glutamine transporters that were unrelated to those of the corresponding primary culture and are thus of limited use as models to study transfer of glutamine between astrocytes and neurons.

  10. Another unusual type of citric acid cycle enzyme in Helicobacter pylori: the malate:quinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Kather, B; Stingl, K; van der Rest, M E; Altendorf, K; Molenaar, D

    2000-06-01

    The only enzyme of the citric acid cycle for which no open reading frame (ORF) was found in the Helicobacter pylori genome is the NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase. Here, it is shown that in this organism the oxidation of malate to oxaloacetate is catalyzed by a malate:quinone oxidoreductase (MQO). This flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent membrane-associated enzyme donates electrons to quinones of the electron transfer chain. Similar to succinate dehydrogenase, it is part of both the electron transfer chain and the citric acid cycle. MQO activity was demonstrated in isolated membranes of H. pylori. The enzyme is encoded by the ORF HP0086, which is shown by the fact that expression of the HP0086 sequence from a plasmid induces high MQO activity in mqo deletion mutants of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum. Furthermore, this plasmid was able to complement the phenotype of the C. glutamicum mqo deletion mutant. Interestingly, the protein predicted to be encoded by this ORF is only distantly related to known or postulated MQO sequences from other bacteria. The presence of an MQO shown here and the previously demonstrated presence of a 2-ketoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetoacetyl-CoA transferase indicate that H. pylori possesses a complete citric acid cycle, but one which deviates from the standard textbook example in three steps.

  11. CP12-mediated protection of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Marri, Lucia; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Lebrun, Régine; Puppo, Rémy; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Trost, Paolo; Gontero, Brigitte; Sparla, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) are two energy-consuming enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle, whose regulation is crucial for the global balance of the photosynthetic process under different environmental conditions. In oxygen phototrophs, GAPDH and PRK regulation involves the redox-sensitive protein CP12. In the dark, oxidized chloroplast thioredoxins trigger the formation of a GAPDH/CP12/PRK complex in which both enzyme activities are down-regulated. In this report, we show that free GAPDH (A4-isoform) and PRK are also inhibited by oxidants like H2O2, GSSG and GSNO. Both in the land plant Arabidopsis thaliana and in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, both enzymes can be glutathionylated as shown by biotinylated-GSSG assay and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. CP12 is not glutathionylated but homodisulfides are formed upon oxidant treatments. In Arabidopsis but not in Chlamydomonas, the interaction between oxidized CP12 and GAPDH provides full protection from oxidative damage. In both organisms, preformed GAPDH/CP12/PRK complexes are protected from GSSG or GSNO oxidation, and in Arabidopsis also from H2O2 treatment. Overall, the results suggest that the role of CP12 in oxygen phototrophs needs to be extended beyond light/dark regulation, and include protection of enzymes belonging to Calvin-Benson cycle from oxidative stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Control of Glutamine Metabolism By the Tumor Suppressor Rb

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Miriam R.; Lane, Andrew N.; Robertson, Brian; Kemp, Sharen; Liu, Yongqing; Hill, Bradford G.; Dean, Douglas C.; Clem, Brian F.

    2014-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) protein is a tumor suppressor that is dysregulated in a majority of human cancers. Rb functions to inhibit cell cycle progression in part by directly disabling the E2F family of cell cycle-promoting transcription factors. Because the de novo synthesis of multiple glutamine-derived anabolic precursors is required for cell cycle progression, we hypothesized that Rb also may directly regulate proteins involved in glutamine metabolism. We examined glutamine metabolism in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from mice that have triple knock-outs (TKO) of all three Rb family members (Rb-1, Rbl1, and Rbl2) and found that loss of global Rb function caused a marked increase in 13C-glutamine uptake and incorporation into glutamate and TCA cycle intermediates in part via upregulated expression of the glutamine transporter ASCT2 and the activity of glutaminase 1 (GLS1). The Rb-controlled transcription factor E2F-3 altered glutamine uptake by direct regulation of ASCT2 mRNA and protein expression, and E2F-3 was observed to associate with the ASCT2 promoter. We next examined the functional consequences of the observed increase in glutamine uptake and utilization and found that glutamine exposure potently increased oxygen consumption whereas glutamine deprivation selectively decreased ATP concentration in the Rb TKO MEFs but not the WT MEFs. In addition, TKO MEFs exhibited elevated production of glutathione from exogenous glutamine, and had increased expression of gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase relative to WT MEFs. Importantly, this metabolic shift towards glutamine utilization was required for the proliferation of Rb TKO MEFs but not for the proliferation of the WT MEFs. Last, addition of the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate to the Rb TKO MEFs reversed the inhibitory effects of glutamine deprivation on ATP, GSH levels, and viability. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that the Rb/E2F cascade directly regulates a major energetic and

  13. Control of glutamine metabolism by the tumor suppressor Rb.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, M R; Lane, A N; Robertson, B; Kemp, S; Liu, Y; Hill, B G; Dean, D C; Clem, B F

    2014-01-30

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) protein is a tumor suppressor that is dysregulated in a majority of human cancers. Rb functions to inhibit cell cycle progression in part by directly disabling the E2F family of cell cycle-promoting transcription factors. Because the de novo synthesis of multiple glutamine-derived anabolic precursors is required for cell cycle progression, we hypothesized that Rb also may directly regulate proteins involved in glutamine metabolism. We examined glutamine metabolism in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from mice that have triple knock-outs (TKO) of all three Rb family members (Rb-1, Rbl1 and Rbl2) and found that loss of global Rb function caused a marked increase in (13)C-glutamine uptake and incorporation into glutamate and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) intermediates in part via upregulated expression of the glutamine transporter ASCT2 and the activity of glutaminase 1 (GLS1). The Rb-controlled transcription factor E2F-3 altered glutamine uptake by direct regulation of ASCT2 mRNA and protein expression, and E2F-3 was observed to associate with the ASCT2 promoter. We next examined the functional consequences of the observed increase in glutamine uptake and utilization and found that glutamine exposure potently increased oxygen consumption, whereas glutamine deprivation selectively decreased ATP concentration in the Rb TKO MEFs but not the wild-type (WT) MEFs. In addition, TKO MEFs exhibited elevated production of glutathione from exogenous glutamine and had increased expression of gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase relative to WT MEFs. Importantly, this metabolic shift towards glutamine utilization was required for the proliferation of Rb TKO MEFs but not for the proliferation of the WT MEFs. Last, addition of the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate to the Rb TKO MEFs reversed the inhibitory effects of glutamine deprivation on ATP, GSH levels and viability. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that the Rb/E2F cascade directly

  14. Nitrophenide (Megasul) blocks Eimeria tenella development by inhibiting the mannitol cycle enzyme mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Allocco, J J; Nare, B; Myers, R W; Feiglin, M; Schmatz, D M; Profous-Juchelka, H

    2001-12-01

    Unsporulated oocysts of the protozoan parasite Eimeria tenella contain high levels of mannitol, which is thought to be the principal energy source for the process of sporulation. Biosynthesis and utilization of this sugar alcohol occurs via a metabolic pathway known as the mannitol cycle. Here, results are presented that suggest that 3-nitrophenyl disulfide (nitrophenide, Megasul), an anticoccidial drug commercially used in the 1950s, inhibits mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (M1PDH), which catalyzes the committed enzymatic step in the mannitol cycle. Treatment of E. tenella-infected chickens with nitrophenide resulted in a 90% reduction in oocyst shedding. The remaining oocysts displayed significant morphological abnormalities and were largely incapable of further development. Nitrophenide treatment did not affect parasite asexual reproduction, suggesting specificity for the sexual stage of the life cycle. Isolated oocysts from chickens treated with nitrophenide exhibited a dose-dependent reduction in mannitol, suggesting in vivo inhibition of parasite mannitol biosynthesis. Nitrophenide-mediated inhibition of MIPDH was observed in vitro using purified native enzyme. Moreover, MIPDH activity immunoprecipitated from E. tenella-infected cecal tissues was significantly lower in nitrophenide-treated compared with untreated chickens. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that parasites from nitrophenide-treated and untreated chickens contained similar enzyme levels. These data suggest that nitrophenide blocks parasite development at the sexual stages by targeting M1PDH. Thus, targeting of the mannitol cycle with drugs could provide an avenue for controlling the spread of E. tenella in commercial production facilities by preventing oocyst shedding.

  15. Fat-to-glucose interconversion by hydrodynamic transfer of two glyoxylate cycle enzyme genes

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, P; Campion, J; Milagro, FI; Marzo, F; Martinez, JA

    2008-01-01

    The glyoxylate cycle, which is well characterized in higher plants and some microorganisms but not in vertebrates, is able to bypass the citric acid cycle to achieve fat-to-carbohydrate interconversion. In this context, the hydrodynamic transfer of two glyoxylate cycle enzymes, such as isocytrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS), could accomplish the shift of using fat for the synthesis of glucose. Therefore, 20 mice weighing 23.37 ± 0.96 g were hydrodinamically gene transferred by administering into the tail vein a bolus with ICL and MS. After 36 hours, body weight, plasma glucose, respiratory quotient and energy expenditure were measured. The respiratory quotient was increased by gene transfer, which suggests that a higher carbohydrate/lipid ratio is oxidized in such animals. This application could help, if adequate protocols are designed, to induce fat utilization for glucose synthesis, which might be eventually useful to reduce body fat depots in situations of obesity and diabetes. PMID:19077206

  16. Lateral transfer and recompartmentalization of Calvin cycle enzymes of plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Matthew; Keeling, Patrick J

    2004-04-01

    Certain Calvin cycle enzymes also function in glycolysis or gluconeogenisis, thus photosynthetic eukaryotes would be predicted to have ancestrally possessed cytosolic homologues of these enzymes derived from the eukaryotic host and plastid homologues from the cyanobacterial endosymbiont. In practice, the evolutionary histories of these enzymes are often more complex. Focusing on eukaryotes with secondary plastids, we have examined the evolution of four such genes: class I and II fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBA), sedoheptulose bisphosphatase (SBPase), and fructose bisphosphatase (FBPase). We show that previously observed distributions of plastid and cytosolic homologues are not always found in algae with secondary plastids: there is evidence for multiple events of both lateral gene transfer and retargeting to a new cellular compartment for both cytosolic and plastid enzymes of plants and algae. In particular, we show that a clade of class II FBAs spans a greater diversity of eukaryotes that previously recognized and contains both plastid-targeted (Phaeodactylum, Odontella) and cytosolic (ascomycetes, oomycetes, Euglena, and Bigelowiella) forms. Lateral transfer events also gave rise to a subset of plant cytosolic FBA, as well as cytosolic FBPase in Toxoplasma and other coccidian apicomplexa. In contrast, it has recently been suggested that the Trypanosoma FBA and SBPase are derived from a plastid, however, greater taxonomic sampling shows that these enzymes provide no evidence for a plastid-containing ancestor of Trypanosoma. Altogether, the evolutionary histories of the FBA and SBPase/FBPase gene families are complex, including extensive paralogy, lateral transfer, and retargeting between cellular compartments.

  17. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Stéphanie M; Habash, Dimah Z

    2009-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  18. Circumstantial evidence for a role of glutamine-synthetase in suicide.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Hans O

    2011-06-01

    Suicide occurs during depression, schizophrenia, diabetes and epilepsy. A common denominator of these disorders is the presence of inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines affect function and expression of the glial enzyme glutamine synthetase and post mortem studies indicate that brain glutamine synthetase function is suppressed in mood disorders and epilepsy. In a study of schizophrenia brains, the expression of glutamine synthetase was reduced in those cases where the cause of death was suicide. The glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inhibitor, lithium, which has a proven efficacy against suicide, increased in an animal experiment the expression of glutamine synthetase. Based on these data one could reason that suicide may be prevented by centrally acting GSK3 inhibitors. However, since inhibition of glutamine synthetase may lead to a deficit in glutamine and as consequence a GABA and glutamate deficit, even simple food supplementation with glutamine might help to reduce suicide.

  19. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  20. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  1. Viral affects on metabolism: changes in glucose and glutamine utilization during human cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongjun; Clippinger, Amy J.; Alwine, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection causes dramatic alterations of intermediary metabolism, similar to those found in tumor cells. In infected cells, glucose carbon is not completely broken down by the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for energy; instead it is used biosynthetically. This process requires increased glucose uptake, increased glycolysis and the diversion of glucose carbon, in the form of citrate, from the TCA cycle for use in HCMV-induced fatty acid biosynthesis. The diversion of citrate from the TCA cycle (cataplerosis) requires induction of enzymes to promote glutaminolysis, the conversion of glutamine to -ketoglutarate in order to maintain the TCA cycle (anaplerosis) and ATP production. Such changes could result in heretofore uncharacterized pathogenesis, potentially implicating HCMV as a subtle co-factor in many maladies, including oncogenesis. Recognition of the effects of HCMV, and other viruses, on host cell metabolism will provide new understanding of viral pathogenesis and novel avenues for antiviral therapy. PMID:21570293

  2. Evolution of glyoxylate cycle enzymes in Metazoa: evidence of multiple horizontal transfer events and pseudogene formation

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashov, Fyodor A; Koonin, Eugene V; Morgunov, Igor G; Finogenova, Tatiana V; Kondrashova, Marie N

    2006-01-01

    Background The glyoxylate cycle is thought to be present in bacteria, protists, plants, fungi, and nematodes, but not in other Metazoa. However, activity of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes, malate synthase (MS) and isocitrate lyase (ICL), in animal tissues has been reported. In order to clarify the status of the MS and ICL genes in animals and get an insight into their evolution, we undertook a comparative-genomic study. Results Using sequence similarity searches, we identified MS genes in arthropods, echinoderms, and vertebrates, including platypus and opossum, but not in the numerous sequenced genomes of placental mammals. The regions of the placental mammals' genomes expected to code for malate synthase, as determined by comparison of the gene orders in vertebrate genomes, show clear similarity to the opossum MS sequence but contain stop codons, indicating that the MS gene became a pseudogene in placental mammals. By contrast, the ICL gene is undetectable in animals other than the nematodes that possess a bifunctional, fused ICL-MS gene. Examination of phylogenetic trees of MS and ICL suggests multiple horizontal gene transfer events that probably went in both directions between several bacterial and eukaryotic lineages. The strongest evidence was obtained for the acquisition of the bifunctional ICL-MS gene from an as yet unknown bacterial source with the corresponding operonic organization by the common ancestor of the nematodes. Conclusion The distribution of the MS and ICL genes in animals suggests that either they encode alternative enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle that are not orthologous to the known MS and ICL or the animal MS acquired a new function that remains to be characterized. Regardless of the ultimate solution to this conundrum, the genes for the glyoxylate cycle enzymes present a remarkable variety of evolutionary events including unusual horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to animals. Reviewers Arcady Mushegian (Stowers Institute for Medical

  3. Antagonistic Enzymes in a Biocatalytic pH Feedback System Program Autonomous DNA Hydrogel Life Cycles.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Laura; Heuser, Thomas; Steinschulte, Alexander; Walther, Andreas

    2017-08-09

    Enzymes regulate complex functions and active behavior in natural systems and have shown increasing prospect for developing self-regulating soft matter systems. Striving for advanced autonomous hydrogel materials with fully programmable, self-regulated life cycles, we combine two enzymes with an antagonistic pH-modulating effect in a feedback-controlled biocatalytic reaction network (BRN) and couple it to pH-responsive DNA hydrogels to realize hydrogel systems with distinct preprogrammable lag times and lifetimes in closed systems. The BRN enables precise and orthogonal internal temporal control of the "ON" and "OFF" switching times of the temporary gel state by modulation of programmable, nonlinear pH changes. The time scales are tunable by variation of the enzyme concentrations and additional buffer substances. The resulting material system operates in full autonomy after injection of the chemical fuels driving the BRN. The concept may open new applications inherent to DNA hydrogels, for instance, autonomous shape memory behavior for soft robotics. We further foresee general applicability to achieve autonomous life cycles in other pH switchable systems.

  4. Preparation and cross-reactivity of anti-avian glutamine synthetase antibody.

    PubMed

    Smith, D D; Vorhaben, J E; Campbell, J W

    1983-04-01

    Rabbit antibody to chicken liver mitochondrial glutamine synthetase was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography for analysis of the immunological relatedness of vertebrate glutamine synthetases. The antibody cross-reacted with enzymes from representatives of all five vertebrate classes, indicating a high degree of evolutionary conservatism in the structure of the enzymes. A unique aspect of the immunological similarity of these enzymes is that it exists between cytosolic and mitochondrial enzymes which are, in general, immunologically distinct. The antibody did not cross-react with two insect glutamine synthetases. Compositional difference indices, calculated from the amino acid compositions of glutamine synthetases from several species, gave a mean estimate of over 80% sequence homology for the vertebrate enzymes. The avian mitochondrial enzyme gave a mean 78% homology with the mammalian cytosolic enzyme.

  5. Glutamine alimentation in catabolic state.

    PubMed

    Boelens, P G; Nijveldt, R J; Houdijk, A P; Meijer, S; van Leeuwen, P A

    2001-09-01

    Glutamine should be reclassified as a conditionally essential amino acid in the catabolic state because the body's glutamine expenditures exceed synthesis and low glutamine levels in plasma are associated with poor clinical outcome. After severe stress, several amino acids are mobilized from muscle tissue to supply energy and substrate to the host. Glutamine is one of the most important amino acids that provide this function. Glutamine acts as the preferred respiratory fuel for lymphocytes, hepatocytes and intestinal mucosal cells and is metabolized in the gut to citrulline, ammonium and other amino acids. Low concentrations of glutamine in plasma reflect reduced stores in muscle and this reduced availability of glutamine in the catabolic state seems to correlate with increased morbidity and mortality. Adding glutamine to the nutrition of clinical patients, enterally or parenterally, may reduce morbidity. Several excellent clinical trials have been performed to prove efficacy and feasibility of the use of glutamine supplementation in parenteral and enteral nutrition. The increased intake of glutamine has resulted in lower septic morbidity in certain critically ill patient populations. This review will focus on the efficacy and the importance of glutamine supplementation in diverse catabolic states.

  6. Golgi enzymes do not cycle through the endoplasmic reticulum during protein secretion or mitosis.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Julien; Duran, Juan; Scarpa, Margherita; Bassaganyas, Laia; Van Galen, Josse; Malhotra, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Golgi-specific sialyltransferase (ST) expressed as a chimera with the rapamycin-binding domain of mTOR, FRB, relocates to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells exposed to rapamycin that also express invariant chain (Ii)-FKBP in the ER. This result has been taken to indicate that Golgi-resident enzymes cycle to the ER constitutively. We show that ST-FRB is trapped in the ER even without Ii-FKBP upon rapamycin addition. This is because ER-Golgi-cycling FKBP proteins contain a C-terminal KDEL-like sequence, bind ST-FRB in the Golgi, and are transported together back to the ER by KDEL receptor-mediated retrograde transport. Moreover, depletion of KDEL receptor prevents trapping of ST-FRB in the ER by rapamycin. Thus ST-FRB cycles artificially by binding to FKBP domain-containing proteins. In addition, Golgi-specific O-linked glycosylation of a resident ER protein occurs only upon artificial fusion of Golgi membranes with ER. Together these findings support the consensus view that there is no appreciable mixing of Golgi-resident enzymes with ER under normal conditions.

  7. Evolutionary History of the Enzymes Involved in the Calvin-Benson Cycle in Euglenids.

    PubMed

    Markunas, Chelsea M; Triemer, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    Euglenids are an ancient lineage that may have existed as early as 2 billion years ago. A mere 65 years ago, Melvin Calvin and Andrew A. Benson performed experiments on Euglena gracilis and elucidated the series of reactions by which carbon was fixed and reduced during photosynthesis. However, the evolutionary history of this pathway (Calvin-Benson cycle) in euglenids was more complex than Calvin and Benson could have imagined. The chloroplast present today in euglenophytes arose from a secondary endosymbiosis between a phagotrophic euglenid and a prasinophyte green alga. A long period of evolutionary time existed before this secondary endosymbiotic event took place, which allowed for other endosymbiotic events or gene transfers to occur prior to the establishment of the green chloroplast. This research revealed the evolutionary history of the major enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle throughout the euglenid lineage and showed that the majority of genes for Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes shared an ancestry with red algae and/or chromophytes suggesting they may have been transferred to the nucleus prior to the acquisition of the green chloroplast. © 2015 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2015 International Society of Protistologists.

  8. Glutamine and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, T R; Bazargan, N; Leader, L M; Martindale, R G

    2000-09-01

    The amino acid glutamine has become one of the most intensively studied nutrients in the field of nutrition and metabolic support. A variety of studies in cell culture systems, animal models of gut mucosal atrophy, injury/repair and adaptation and a limited number of clinical trials demonstrate trophic and cytoprotective effects of glutamine in small bowel and colonic mucosal cells. Although the routine clinical use of glutamine-enriched parenteral and enteral nutrient solutions remains controversial, available data demonstrate both the safety and metabolic and clinical efficacy of glutamine treatment in selected patient groups. Basic investigations are elucidating underlying mechanisms of glutamine action in intestinal cells. These will inform preclinical and clinical investigations designed to determine glutamine efficacy in selected gastrointestinal disorders. Emerging clinical trials will further define the utility of adjunctive glutamine supplementation as a component of specialized nutrition support in gastrointestinal disease.

  9. Vaccinia Virus Requires Glutamine but Not Glucose for Efficient Replication

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Krystal A.; Camarda, Roman

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses require host cell metabolism to provide the necessary energy and biosynthetic precursors for successful viral replication. Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a member of the Poxviridae family, and its use as a vaccine enabled the eradication of variola virus, the etiologic agent of smallpox. A global metabolic screen of VACV-infected primary human foreskin fibroblasts suggested that glutamine metabolism is altered during infection. Glutamine and glucose represent the two main carbon sources for mammalian cells. Depriving VACV-infected cells of exogenous glutamine led to a substantial decrease in infectious virus production, whereas starving infected cells of exogenous glucose had no significant impact on replication. Viral yield in glutamine-deprived cells or in cells treated with an inhibitor of glutaminolysis, the pathway of glutamine catabolism, could be rescued by the addition of multiple tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Thus, VACV infection induces a metabolic alteration to fully rely on glutamine to anaplerotically maintain the TCA cycle. VACV protein synthesis, but not viral transcription, was decreased in glutamine-deprived cells, which corresponded with a dramatic reduction in all VACV morphogenetic intermediates. This study reveals the unique carbon utilization program implemented during poxvirus infection and provides a potential metabolic pathway to target viral replication. IMPORTANCE Viruses are dependent on the metabolic machinery of the host cell to supply the energy and molecular building blocks needed for critical processes including genome replication, viral protein synthesis, and membrane production. This study investigates how vaccinia virus (VACV) infection alters global cellular metabolism, providing the first metabolomic analysis for a member of the poxvirus family. Unlike most viruses examined to date, VACV does not activate glycolysis, and exogenous glucose is not required for maximal virus production. Instead, VACV

  10. Structural Dissection of the Maltodextrin Disproportionation Cycle of the Arabidopsis Plastidial Disproportionating Enzyme 1 (DPE1)*

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Ellis C.; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Tantanarat, Krit; Latousakis, Dimitrios; Donaldson, Matthew I.; Rejzek, Martin; Nepogodiev, Sergey A.; Limpaseni, Tipaporn; Field, Robert A.; Lawson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of transitory starch in the chloroplast to provide fuel for the plant during the night requires a suite of enzymes that generate a series of short chain linear glucans. However, glucans of less than four glucose units are no longer substrates for these enzymes, whereas export from the plastid is only possible in the form of either maltose or glucose. In order to make use of maltotriose, which would otherwise accumulate, disproportionating enzyme 1 (DPE1; a 4-α-glucanotransferase) converts two molecules of maltotriose to a molecule of maltopentaose, which can now be acted on by the degradative enzymes, and one molecule of glucose that can be exported. We have determined the structure of the Arabidopsis plastidial DPE1 (AtDPE1), and, through ligand soaking experiments, we have trapped the enzyme in a variety of conformational states. AtDPE1 forms a homodimer with a deep, long, and open-ended active site canyon contained within each subunit. The canyon is divided into donor and acceptor sites with the catalytic residues at their junction; a number of loops around the active site adopt different conformations dependent on the occupancy of these sites. The “gate” is the most dynamic loop and appears to play a role in substrate capture, in particular in the binding of the acceptor molecule. Subtle changes in the configuration of the active site residues may prevent undesirable reactions or abortive hydrolysis of the covalently bound enzyme-substrate intermediate. Together, these observations allow us to delineate the complete AtDPE1 disproportionation cycle in structural terms. PMID:26504082

  11. The enzyme NBAD-synthase plays diverse roles during the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Martín M; Schachter, Julieta; Berni, Jimena; Quesada-Allué, Luis A

    2010-01-01

    This report shows the biochemical characterization and life cycle-dependent expression of Drosophila melanogaster N-beta-alanyldopamine synthase (NBAD-synthase or Ebony protein). This enzyme not only catalyzes the synthesis of NBAD, the main sclerotization and pigmentation precursor of insect brown cuticles, but also plays a role in brain neurotransmitter metabolism. In addition to the epidermis expression our immunodetection experiments show the novel localization of NBAD-synthase in different regions of the adult brain, in the foregut of pharate adult and, surprisingly, in the epidermis of the trachea during embryogenesis. These results demonstrate that NBAD-synthase is a versatile enzyme involved in different, previously unknown, time- and tissue-dependent processes.

  12. MYC-induced reprogramming of glutamine catabolism supports optimal virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Minh; Thaker, Shivani K.; Feng, Jun; Du, Yushen; Hu, Hailiang; Ting Wu, Ting; Graeber, Thomas G.; Braas, Daniel; Christofk, Heather R.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses rewire host cell glucose and glutamine metabolism to meet the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of viral propagation. However, the mechanism by which viruses reprogram glutamine metabolism and the metabolic fate of glutamine during adenovirus infection have remained elusive. Here, we show MYC activation is necessary for adenovirus-induced upregulation of host cell glutamine utilization and increased expression of glutamine transporters and glutamine catabolism enzymes. Adenovirus-induced MYC activation promotes increased glutamine uptake, increased use of glutamine in reductive carboxylation and increased use of glutamine in generating hexosamine pathway intermediates and specific amino acids. We identify glutaminase (GLS) as a critical enzyme for optimal adenovirus replication and demonstrate that GLS inhibition decreases replication of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus 1 and influenza A in cultured primary cells. Our findings show that adenovirus-induced reprogramming of glutamine metabolism through MYC activation promotes optimal progeny virion generation, and suggest that GLS inhibitors may be useful therapeutically to reduce replication of diverse viruses. PMID:26561297

  13. Regulation of hepatic stellate cell proliferation and activation by glutamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Ghazwani, Mohammed; Liu, Ke; Huang, Yixian; Chang, Na; Fan, Jie; He, Fengtian; Li, Liying; Bu, Shizhong; Xie, Wen; Ma, Xiaochao; Li, Song

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, which is mainly caused by accumulation of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). The mechanisms of activation and proliferation of HSCs, two key events after liver damage, have been studied for many years. Here we report a novel pathway to control HSCs by regulating glutamine metabolism. We demonstrated that the proliferation of HSCs is critically dependent on glutamine that is used to generate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and non-essential amino acid (NEAA). In addition, both culture- and in vivo-activated HSCs have increased glutamine utilization and increased expression of genes related to glutamine metabolism, including GLS (glutaminase), aspartate transaminase (GOT1) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD1). Inhibition of these enzymes, as well as glutamine depletion, had a significant inhibitory effect on HSCs activation. In addition to providing energy expenditure, conversion of glutamine to proline is enhanced. The pool of free proline may also be increased via downregulation of POX expression. Hedgehog signaling plays an important role in the regulation of glutamine metabolism, as well as TGF-β1, c-Myc, and Ras signalings, via transcriptional upregulation and repression of key metabolic enzymes in this pathway. Finally, changes in glutamine metabolism were also found in mouse liver tissue following CCl4-induced acute injury. Glutamine metabolism plays an important role in regulating the proliferation and activation of HSCs. Strategies that are targeted at glutamine metabolism may represent a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  14. Design principles of autocatalytic cycles constrain enzyme kinetics and force low substrate saturation at flux branch points

    PubMed Central

    Barenholz, Uri; Davidi, Dan; Reznik, Ed; Bar-On, Yinon; Antonovsky, Niv; Noor, Elad; Milo, Ron

    2017-01-01

    A set of chemical reactions that require a metabolite to synthesize more of that metabolite is an autocatalytic cycle. Here, we show that most of the reactions in the core of central carbon metabolism are part of compact autocatalytic cycles. Such metabolic designs must meet specific conditions to support stable fluxes, hence avoiding depletion of intermediate metabolites. As such, they are subjected to constraints that may seem counter-intuitive: the enzymes of branch reactions out of the cycle must be overexpressed and the affinity of these enzymes to their substrates must be relatively weak. We use recent quantitative proteomics and fluxomics measurements to show that the above conditions hold for functioning cycles in central carbon metabolism of E. coli. This work demonstrates that the topology of a metabolic network can shape kinetic parameters of enzymes and lead to seemingly wasteful enzyme usage. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20667.001 PMID:28169831

  15. Expression of glutamine synthetase in balloon cells: a basis of their antiepileptic role?

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Barba, Carmen; Giordano, Flavio; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Guerrini, Renzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is an enzyme involved in the clearance of glutamate, the most potent excitatory neurotransmitter. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of glutamine synthetase in neocortical samples from 5 children who underwent surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy and a histological diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia IIb. In all cases, balloon cells, but not dysmorphic neurons, were immunopositive for glutamine synthetase. This finding suggests that balloon cells can be involved in the neutralization of glutamate and play a protective anti-seizure role.

  16. Kinetics and Energetics of Light-driven Chloroplast Glutamine Synthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cary A.; Stocking, C. Ralph

    1975-01-01

    Chloroplasts contain the enzyme glutamine synthetase. Formation of glutamine by isolated chloroplasts is light-dependent and requires an intact outer envelope. Addition of exogenous glutamic acid, as well as nitrogen donors such as nitrite or ammonium, stimulate the synthesis of this amide. Photosynthetic generation of ATP satisfies the light requirement of glutamine synthesis. The process is supported by cyclic as well as noncyclic photophosphorylation. PMID:16659028

  17. Glutathione Degradation by the Alternative Pathway (DUG Pathway) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Initiated by (Dug2p-Dug3p)2 Complex, a Novel Glutamine Amidotransferase (GATase) Enzyme Acting on Glutathione*

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Hardeep; Ganguli, Dwaipayan; Bachhawat, Anand K.

    2012-01-01

    The recently identified, fungi-specific alternative pathway of glutathione degradation requires the participation of three genes, DUG1, DUG2, and DUG3. Dug1p has earlier been shown to function as a Cys-Gly-specific dipeptidase. In the present study, we describe the characterization of Dug2p and Dug3p. Dug3p has a functional glutamine amidotransferase (GATase) II domain that is catalytically important for glutathione degradation as demonstrated through mutational analysis. Dug2p, which has an N-terminal WD40 and a C-terminal M20A peptidase domain, has no peptidase activity. The previously demonstrated Dug2p-Dug3p interaction was found to be mediated through the WD40 domain of Dug2p. Dug2p was also shown to be able to homodimerize, and this was mediated by its M20A peptidase domain. In vitro reconstitution assays revealed that Dug2p and Dug3p were required together for the cleavage of glutathione into glutamate and Cys-Gly. Purification through gel filtration chromatography confirmed the formation of a Dug2p-Dug3p complex. The functional complex had a molecular weight that corresponded to (Dug2p-Dug3p)2 in addition to higher molecular weight oligomers and displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. (Dug2p-Dug3p)2 had a Km for glutathione of 1.2 mm, suggesting a novel GATase enzyme that acted on glutathione. Dug1p activity in glutathione degradation was found to be restricted to its Cys-Gly peptidase activity, which functioned downstream of the (Dug2p-Dug3p)2 GATase. The DUG2 and DUG3 genes, but not DUG1, were derepressed by sulfur limitation. Based on these studies and the functioning of GATases, a mechanism is proposed for the functioning of the Dug proteins in the degradation of glutathione. PMID:22277648

  18. The role of glutamine synthetase in energy production and glutamine metabolism during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Aldarini, Nohaiah; Alhasawi, Azhar A; Thomas, Sean C; Appanna, Vasu D

    2017-01-17

    Oxidative stress is known to severely impede aerobic adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. However, the metabolically-versatile Pseudomonas fluorescens survives this challenge by invoking alternative ATP-generating networks. When grown in a medium with glutamine as the sole organic nutrient in the presence of H2O2, the microbe utilizes glutamine synthetase (GS) to modulate its energy budget. The activity of this enzyme that mediates the release of energy stored in glutamine was sharply increased in the stressed cells compared to the controls. The enhanced activities of such enzymes as acetate kinase, adenylate kinase and nucleotide diphosphate kinase ensured the efficacy of this ATP producing-machine by transferring the high energy phosphate. The elevated amounts of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase recorded in the H2O2 exposed cells provided another route to ATP independent of the reduction of O2. This is the first demonstration of a metabolic pathway involving GS dedicated to ATP synthesis. The phospho-transfer network that is pivotal to the survival of the microorganism under oxidative stress may reveal therapeutic targets against infectious microbes reliant on glutamine for their proliferation.

  19. Altered glutamine metabolism in platinum resistant ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Chantelle D.; Savadelis, Alyssa; Nagaraj, Anil Belur; Joseph, Peronne; Avril, Stefanie; DiFeo, Analisa; Avril, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is characterized by an increase in cellular energy metabolism, which is predominantly satisfied by glucose and glutamine. Targeting metabolic pathways is an attractive approach to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness and to potentially overcome drug resistance in ovarian cancer. In platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines the metabolism of both, glucose and glutamine was initially up-regulated in response to platinum treatment. In contrast, platinum-resistant cells revealed a significant dependency on the presence of glutamine, with an upregulated expression of glutamine transporter ASCT2 and glutaminase. This resulted in a higher oxygen consumption rate compared to platinum-sensitive cell lines reflecting the increased dependency of glutamine utilization through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The important role of glutamine metabolism was confirmed by stable overexpression of glutaminase, which conferred platinum resistance. Conversely, shRNA knockdown of glutaminase in platinum resistant cells resulted in re-sensitization to platinum treatment. Importantly, combining the glutaminase inhibitor BPTES with platinum synergistically inhibited platinum sensitive and resistant ovarian cancers in vitro. Apoptotic induction was significantly increased using platinum together with BPTES compared to either treatment alone. Our findings suggest that targeting glutamine metabolism together with platinum based chemotherapy offers a potential treatment strategy particularly in drug resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:27191653

  20. Altered glutamine metabolism in platinum resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Chantelle D; Savadelis, Alyssa; Nagaraj, Anil Belur; Joseph, Peronne; Avril, Stefanie; DiFeo, Analisa; Avril, Norbert

    2016-07-05

    Ovarian cancer is characterized by an increase in cellular energy metabolism, which is predominantly satisfied by glucose and glutamine. Targeting metabolic pathways is an attractive approach to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness and to potentially overcome drug resistance in ovarian cancer. In platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines the metabolism of both, glucose and glutamine was initially up-regulated in response to platinum treatment. In contrast, platinum-resistant cells revealed a significant dependency on the presence of glutamine, with an upregulated expression of glutamine transporter ASCT2 and glutaminase. This resulted in a higher oxygen consumption rate compared to platinum-sensitive cell lines reflecting the increased dependency of glutamine utilization through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The important role of glutamine metabolism was confirmed by stable overexpression of glutaminase, which conferred platinum resistance. Conversely, shRNA knockdown of glutaminase in platinum resistant cells resulted in re-sensitization to platinum treatment. Importantly, combining the glutaminase inhibitor BPTES with platinum synergistically inhibited platinum sensitive and resistant ovarian cancers in vitro. Apoptotic induction was significantly increased using platinum together with BPTES compared to either treatment alone. Our findings suggest that targeting glutamine metabolism together with platinum based chemotherapy offers a potential treatment strategy particularly in drug resistant ovarian cancer.

  1. Glutamine deprivation stimulates mTOR-JNK-dependent chemokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Shanware, Naval P.; Bray, Kevin; Eng, Christina H.; Wang, Fang; Follettie, Maximillian; Myers, Jeremy; Fantin, Valeria R.; Abraham, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    The non-essential amino acid, glutamine, exerts pleiotropic effects on cell metabolism, signalling and stress resistance. Here we demonstrate that short-term glutamine restriction triggers an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response that leads to production of the pro-inflammatory chemokine, interleukin-8 (IL-8). Glutamine deprivation-induced ER stress triggers colocalization of autophagosomes, lysosomes and the Golgi into a subcellular structure whose integrity is essential for IL-8 secretion. The stimulatory effect of glutamine restriction on IL-8 production is attributable to depletion of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. The protein kinase, mTOR, is also colocalized with the lysosomal membrane clusters induced by glutamine deprivation, and inhibition of mTORC1 activity abolishes both endomembrane reorganization and IL-8 secretion. Activated mTORC1 elicits IL8 gene expression via the activation of an IRE1-JNK signalling cascade. Treatment of cells with a glutaminase inhibitor phenocopies glutamine restriction, suggesting that these results will be relevant to the clinical development of glutamine metabolism inhibitors as anticancer agents. PMID:25254627

  2. Evaluation of Krebs cycle enzymes in the brain of rats after chronic administration of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Scaini, Giselli; Santos, Patricia M; Benedet, Joana; Rochi, Natália; Gomes, Lara M; Borges, Lislaine S; Rezin, Gislaine T; Pezente, Daiana P; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2010-05-31

    Several works report brain impairment of metabolism as a mechanism underlying depression. Citrate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase are enzymes localized within cells in the mitochondrial matrix and are important steps of Krebs cycle. In addition, citrate synthase has been used as a quantitative enzyme marker for the presence of intact mitochondria. Thus, we investigated citrate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase activities from rat brain after chronic administration of paroxetine, nortriptiline and venlafaxine. Adult male Wistar rats received daily injections of paroxetine (10mg/kg), nortriptiline (15mg/kg), venlafaxine (10mg/kg) or saline in 1.0mL/kg volume for 15 days. Twelve hours after the last administration, the rats were killed by decapitation, the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex were immediately removed, and activities of citrate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase were measured. We verified that chronic administration of paroxetine increased citrate synthase activity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex of adult rats; cerebellum was not affected. Chronic administration of nortriptiline and venlafaxine did not affect the enzyme activity in these brain areas. Succinate dehydrogenase activity was increased by chronic administration of paroxetine and nortriptiline in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex of adult rats; cerebellum was not affected either. Chronic administration of venlafaxine increased succinate dehydrogenase activity in prefrontal cortex, but did not affect the enzyme activity in cerebellum, hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. Considering that metabolism impairment is probably involved in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders, an increase in these enzymes by antidepressants may be an important mechanism of action of these drugs. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bidirectional substrate fluxes through the System N (SNAT5) glutamine transporter may determine net glutamine flux in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Baird, F E; Beattie, K J; Hyde, A R; Ganapathy, V; Rennie, M J; Taylor, P M

    2004-01-01

    System N (SNAT3 and SNAT5) amino acid transporters are key mediators of glutamine transport across the plasma membrane of mammalian cell types, including hepatocytes and astrocytes. We demonstrate that SNAT5 shows simultaneous bidirectional glutamine fluxes when overexpressed in Xenopus oocytes. Influx and efflux are both apparently Na+ dependent but, since they are not directly coupled, the carrier is capable of mediating net amino acid movement across the cell membrane. The apparent Km values for glutamine influx and efflux are similar (∼1 mm) and the transporter behaviour is consistent with a kinetic model in which re-orientation of the carrier from outside- to inside-facing conformations (either empty or substrate loaded) is the limiting step in the transport cycle. In perfused rat liver, the observed relationship between influent (portal) glutamine concentration and net hepatic glutamine flux may be described by a simple kinetic model, assuming the balance between influx and efflux through System N determines net flux, where under physiological conditions efflux is generally saturated owing to high intracellular glutamine concentration. SNAT5 shows a more periportal mRNA distribution than SNAT3 in rat liver, indicating that SNAT5 may have particular importance for modulation of net hepatic glutamine flux. PMID:15218073

  4. Structure-function relationships in the Na,K-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: site-directed mutagenesis of glutamine-111 to arginine and asparagine-122 to aspartic acid generates a ouabain-resistant enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Lingrel, J.B.

    1988-11-01

    Na,K-ATPases from various species differ greatly in their sensitivity to cardiac glycosides such as ouabain. The sheep and human enzymes are a thousand times more sensitive than the corresponding ones from rat and mouse. To define the region of the ..cap alpha..1 subunit responsible for this differential sensitivity, chimeric cDNAs of sheep and rat were constructed and expressed in ouabain-sensitive HeLa cells. The construct containing the amino-terminal half of the rat ..cap alpha..1 subunit coding region and carboxyl-terminal half of the sheep conferred the ouabain-resistant phenotype to HeLa cells while the reverse construct did not. This indicates that the determinants involved in ouabain sensitivity are located in the amino-terminal half of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit. By use of site-directed mutagenesis, the amino acid sequence of the first extracellular domain (H1-H2) of the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit was changed to that of the rat. When expressed in HeLa cells, this mutated sheep ..cap alpha..1 construct, like the rat/sheep chimera, was able to confer ouabain resistance to these cells. Furthermore, similar results were observed when HeLa cells were transfected with a sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNA containing only two amino acid substitutions. The resistant cells, whether transfected with the rat ..cap alpha..1 cDNA, the rat/sheep chimera, or the mutant sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNAs, exhibited identical biochemical characteristics including ouabain-inhibitable cell growth, /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake, and Na,K-ATPase activity. These results demonstrate that the presence of arginine and aspartic acid on the amino end and carboxyl end, respectively, of the H1-H2 extracellular domain of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit together is responsible for the ouabain-resistant character of the rat enzyme and the corresponding residues in the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit (glutamine and asparagine) are somehow involved in ouabain binding.

  5. Glutamine Synthetase in Muscle Is Required for Glutamine Production during Fasting and Extrahepatic Ammonia Detoxification*

    PubMed Central

    He, Youji; Hakvoort, Theodorus B. M.; Köhler, S. Eleonore; Vermeulen, Jacqueline L. M.; de Waart, D. Rudi; de Theije, Chiel; ten Have, Gabrie A. M.; van Eijk, Hans M. H.; Kunne, Cindy; Labruyere, Wilhelmina T.; Houten, Sander M.; Sokolovic, Milka; Ruijter, Jan M.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2010-01-01

    The main endogenous source of glutamine is de novo synthesis in striated muscle via the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS). The mice in which GS is selectively but completely eliminated from striated muscle with the Cre-loxP strategy (GS-KO/M mice) are, nevertheless, healthy and fertile. Compared with controls, the circulating concentration and net production of glutamine across the hindquarter were not different in fed GS-KO/M mice. Only a ∼3-fold higher escape of ammonia revealed the absence of GS in muscle. However, after 20 h of fasting, GS-KO/M mice were not able to mount the ∼4-fold increase in glutamine production across the hindquarter that was observed in control mice. Instead, muscle ammonia production was ∼5-fold higher than in control mice. The fasting-induced metabolic changes were transient and had returned to fed levels at 36 h of fasting. Glucose consumption and lactate and ketone-body production were similar in GS-KO/M and control mice. Challenging GS-KO/M and control mice with intravenous ammonia in stepwise increments revealed that normal muscle can detoxify ∼2.5 μmol ammonia/g muscle·h in a muscle GS-dependent manner, with simultaneous accumulation of urea, whereas GS-KO/M mice responded with accumulation of glutamine and other amino acids but not urea. These findings demonstrate that GS in muscle is dispensable in fed mice but plays a key role in mounting the adaptive response to fasting by transiently facilitating the production of glutamine. Furthermore, muscle GS contributes to ammonia detoxification and urea synthesis. These functions are apparently not vital as long as other organs function normally. PMID:20064933

  6. Calvin-Benson Cycle Enzymes in Guard-Cell Protoplasts from Vicia faba L

    PubMed Central

    Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro; Terada, Junko; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Noriaki

    1989-01-01

    Activities of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes were found in protoplasts of guard cells from Vicia faba L. The activities of NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NADP-GAPD) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPC) were 2670 and 52 micromoles per milligrams chlorophyll per hour, respectively. Activities of NADP-GAPD and RuBPC in guard cells were increased by red light illumination, and the light activations were inhibited completely by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosystem II. Enzymes related to the Calvin-Benson cycle such as 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGAK), triose phosphate (TP) isomerase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) were shown to be present in guard-cell chloroplasts. From these results, we conclude that the photosynthetic carbon reduction pathway is present in guard-cell chloroplasts of Vicia faba. We compared these enzyme activities in guard cells with those in mesophyll cells. The activities of NADP-GAPD and PGAK were more than several-fold higher and that of TP isomerase was much higher in guard-cell chloroplasts than in mesophyll chloroplasts. In contrast, activities of RuBPC and FBPase were estimated to be roughly half of those in mesophyll chloroplasts. High activities of PGAK, NAD-GAPD, and TP isomerase were found in fractions enriched in cytosol of guard cells. Illumination of guard-cell protoplasts with red light increased the cellular ATP/ADP ratio from 5 to 14. These results support the interpretation that guard cells utilize a shuttle system (e.g. phosphoglycerate [PGA]/dihydroxyacetone phosphate [DHAP] shuttle) for an indirect transfer of ATP and reducing equivalents from chloroplasts to the cytosol. PMID:16666851

  7. Association of carbonic anhydrase with a Calvin cycle enzyme complex in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Jebanathirajah, J A; Coleman, J R

    1998-02-01

    Chloroplast-localized carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1), an enzyme which catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2, appears to be associated with other enzymes of the Calvin cycle in a large multienzyme complex. Gel-filtration fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) of soluble proteins obtained by osmotic lysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Carlson) chloroplasts results in the co-elution of a protein complex of greater than 600 kDa which includes CA, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), phosphoribulokinase (PRK), and ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. Anion-exchange FPLC of chloroplast extracts indicates that there is an association of CA with other proteins that modifies its elution profile in a NaCl gradient, and that Rubisco co-elutes with the fractions containing CA. Following a protocol described by Süss et al. (1993, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90: 5514-5518), limited protease treatment of chloroplast extracts was used to show that the association of PRK with other chloroplast proteins appears to protect a number of lysine and arginine residues which may be involved in specific protein-protein interactions. A similar treatment of CA indicates some protection of these residues when CA is associated with other chloroplast polypeptides but the level of protection is not as profound as that exhibited by PRK. In concert with previously published immunolocalization studies, these data indicate that CA may be associated with Rubisco at the stromal periphery of a Calvin cycle enzyme complex in which PRK is more centrally located and associated with thylakoid membranes.

  8. Stability of Rat Brain Glutamine Synthetase to Oxygen Toxicity (Oxygen at High Pressure).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    Enzyme assays using the gamma-glutamyl transferase method provided estimates of glutamine synthetase activity in rat brain homogenates subjected to a...supports the lack of any connection between convulsions caused by in vivo inhibition of glutamine synthetase and convulsions caused by oxygen toxicity (oxygen at high pressure). (Author)

  9. Clinical consequences of urea cycle enzyme deficiencies and potential links to arginine and nitric oxide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Fernando; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Kleppe, Soledad; Marini, Juan; Carter, Susan; Garlick, Peter; Jahoor, Farook; O'Brien, William; Lee, Brendan

    2004-10-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are human conditions caused by the dysregulation of nitrogen transfer from ammonia nitrogen into urea. The biochemistry and the genetics of these disorders were well elucidated. Earlier diagnosis and improved treatments led to an emerging, longer-lived cohort of patients. The natural history of some of these disorders began to point to pathophysiological processes that may be unrelated to the primary cause of acute morbidity and mortality, i.e., hyperammonemia. Carbamyl phosphate synthetase I single nucleotide polymorphisms may be associated with altered vascular resistance that becomes clinically relevant when specific environmental stressors are present. Patients with argininosuccinic aciduria due to a deficiency of argininosuccinic acid lyase are uniquely prone to chronic hepatitis, potentially leading to cirrhosis. Moreover, our recent observations suggest that there may be an increased prevalence of essential hypertension. In contrast, hyperargininemia found in patients with arginase 1 deficiency is associated with pyramidal tract findings and spasticity, without significant hyperammonemia. An intriguing potential pathophysiological link is the dysregulation of intracellular arginine availability and its potential effect on nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. By combining detailed natural history studies with the development of tissue-specific null mouse models for urea cycle enzymes and measurement of nitrogen flux through the cycle to urea and NO in UCD patients, we may begin to dissect the contribution of different sources of arginine to NO production and the consequences on both rare genetic and common multifactorial diseases.

  10. Enzymes of the Glyoxylate Cycle in Rhizobia and Nodules of Legumes 1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gordon V.; Evans, Harold J.; Ching, Temay

    1966-01-01

    The relatively high level of fatty acids in soybean nodules and rhizobia from soybean nodules suggested that the glyoxylate cycle might have a role in nodule metabolism. Several species of rhizobia in pure culture were found to have malate synthetase activity when grown on a number of different carbon sources. Significant isocitrate lyase activity was induced when oleate, which presumably may act as an acetyl CoA precursor, was utilized as the principle carbon source. Malate synthetase was active in extracts of rhizobia from nodules of bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), cowpea (Vigna sinensis L.), lupine (Lupinus angustifolius L.) and soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.). Activity of malate synthetase was, however, barely detectable in rhizobia from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and pea (Pisum sativum L.) nodules. Appreciable isocitrate lyase activity was not detected in rhizobia from nodules nor was it induced by depletion of endogenous substrates by incubation of excised bush bean nodules. Although rhizobia has the potential for the formation of the key enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle, the absence of isocitrate lyase activity in bacteria isolated from nodules indicated that the glyoxylate cycle does not operate in the symbiotic growth of rhizobia and that the observed high content of fatty acids in nodules and nodule bacteria probably is related to a structural role. PMID:16656404

  11. Involvement of thylakoid membranes in supramolecular organisation of Calvin cycle enzymes in Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Sainis, Jayashree Krishna; Dani, Diksha Narhar; Dey, Gautam Kumar

    2003-01-01

    The cells of unicellular photosynthetic cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans were permeated with lysozyme, toluene, toluene-triton, toluene-triton-lysozyme. Transmission electron microscopy of semi-thin sections (500 nm) using TEM at 160 kV showed that cells permeated with only lysozyme or toluene showed the typical concentric arrangement of thylakoid membranes. However, when toluene-treated cells were further treated with triton and lysozyme the thylakoid membranes were disrupted. Sequential reactions of Calvin cycle were studied in the differentially permeated cells in vivo, using various intermediates such as 3-PGA, GA-3-P, FDP, SDP, R-5-P, RuBP and cofactors like ATP, NADPH depending on the requirement. RuBP and R-5-P + ATP dependent activities could be observed in all types of permeated cells. Sequential reactions of the entire Calvin cycle using 3-PGA could be detected in the cells that had retained the internal organisation of the thylakoid membranes after permeation and were lost on disruption of this organisation. Light dependent CO2 fixation could be detected only in the cells permeated with lysozyme. This activity was abolished in the cells after treatment with toluene. The results suggested that the integrity of thylakoid membranes may be essential for the organisation of sequential enzymes of the Calvin cycle in vivo and facilitate their functioning.

  12. The mTORC1/S6K1 pathway regulates glutamine metabolism through the eIF4B-dependent control of c-Myc translation

    PubMed Central

    Csibi, Alfredo; Lee, Gina; Yoon, Sang-Oh; Tong, Haoxuan; Ilter, Didem; Elia, Ilaria; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Roberts, Thomas M.; Blenis, John

    2014-01-01

    Growth-promoting signaling molecules including the mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) drive the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells required to support their biosynthetic needs for rapid growth and proliferation [1]. Glutamine is catabolyzed to α-ketoglutarate (αKG), a TCA cycle intermediate, through two deamination reactions, the first requiring glutaminase (GLS) to generate glutamate, and the second reaction occurring via glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) or transaminases [2]. Activation of the mTORC1 pathway was previously shown to promote the anaplerotic entry of glutamine to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle via GDH. Moreover, mTORC1 activation also stimulates the uptake of glutamine, but the mechanism is unknown [3]. It is generally thought that rates of glutamine utilization are limited by mitochondrial uptake via GLS, suggesting that in addition to GDH, mTORC1 could regulate GLS. Here, we demonstrate that mTORC1 positively regulates GLS and flux through this enzyme. We show that mTORC1 controls GLS levels through the S6K1-dependent regulation of c-Myc (Myc). Molecularly, S6K1 enhances Myc translation efficiency by modulating the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4B, which is critical to unwind its structured 5’ untranslated region (5’UTR). Finally, our data show that the pharmacological inhibition of GLS is a promising target in pancreatic cancers expressing low levels of PTEN. PMID:25220053

  13. Interrelationships between glutamine and citrulline metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article analyzes the contribution of glutamine to the synthesis of citrulline and reviews the evidence that glutamine supplementation increases citrulline production. Glutamine supplementation has been proposed in the treatment of critically ill patients; however, a recent large multicenter ran...

  14. Glutamine metabolism in a holostean (Amia calva) and teleost fish (Salvelinus namaycush).

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, M E; Glemet, H C; Ballantyne, J S

    1991-01-01

    Amino acid metabolism was examined in mitochondria from the lateral red muscle of a teleost (lake char, Salvelinus namaycush) and a nonteleost fish (bowfin, Amia calva). Isolated mitochondria oxidize a wide variety of substrates and have high respiratory control ratios. In both species, glutamine is oxidized more rapidly than any other amino acid. The rate of glutamine oxidation by bowfin mitochondria exceeds that of lake char mitochondria, and the bowfin displays correspondingly higher levels of mitochondrial phosphate-dependent glutaminase. It is suggested that amino acids in general, and glutamine in particular, are important oxidative substrates for nonteleost red muscle. The teleost red muscle, however, may rely on both glutamine and fatty acids as oxidative substrates. It appears that glutamate derived from glutamine is oxidized primarily via glutamate dehydrogenase, whereas exogenous glutamate is oxidized primarily via aspartate aminotransferase. Complete oxidation of glutamine may be accomplished in the absence of other substrates by conversion of glutamine-derived malate to pyruvate via malic enzyme. To assess the relative abilities of various tissues to synthesize and oxidize glutamine, the activities of glutamine synthetase and glutaminase were measured. The results of these studies indicate that the organization of glutamine metabolism of fish differs markedly from that in mammals.

  15. Supplementation with L-Glutamine and L-Alanyl-L-Glutamine Changes Biochemical Parameters and Jejunum Morphophysiology in Type 1 Diabetic Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Carlos Vinicius D; Azevedo, Silvia C S F; Bazotte, Roberto B; Peralta, Rosane M; Buttow, Nilza C; Pedrosa, Maria Montserrat D; de Godoi, Vilma A F; Natali, Maria Raquel M

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of the supplementation with L-glutamine and glutamine dipeptide (GDP) on biochemical and morphophysiological parameters in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. For this purpose, thirty animals were distributed into six groups treated orally (gavage) during thirty days: non diabetic rats (Control) + saline, diabetic + saline; Control + L-glutamine (248 mg/kg), Diabetic + L-glutamine (248 mg/kg), Control + GDP (400 mg/kg), Diabetic + GDP (400 mg/kg). Diabetes was induced by an intravenous injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg) and confirmed by fasting glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL. Physiological parameters, i.e., body mass, food intake, blood glucose, water intake, urine and faeces were evaluated during supplementation. After the period of supplementation, the animals were euthanized. The blood was collected for biochemical assays (fructosamine, transaminases, lipid profile, total protein, urea, ammonia). Moreover, the jejunum was excised and stored for morphophysiological assays (intestinal enzyme activity, intestinal wall morphology, crypt proliferative index, number of serotoninergic cells from the mucosa, and vipergic neurons from the submucosal tunica). The physiological parameters, protein metabolism and intestinal enzyme activity did not change with the supplementation with L-glutamine or GDP. In diabetic animals, transaminases and fructosamine improved with L-glutamine and GDP supplementations, while the lipid profile improved with L-glutamine. Furthermore, both forms of supplementation promoted changes in jejunal tunicas and wall morphometry of control and diabetic groups, but only L-glutamine promoted maintenance of serotoninergic cells and vipergic neurons populations. On the other hand, control animals showed changes that may indicate negative effects of L-glutamine. Thus, the supplementation with L-glutamine was more efficient for maintaining intestinal morphophysiology and the supplementation with GDP was more efficient to the organism as a

  16. Supplementation with L-Glutamine and L-Alanyl-L-Glutamine Changes Biochemical Parameters and Jejunum Morphophysiology in Type 1 Diabetic Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    da Rosa, Carlos Vinicius D.; Azevedo, Silvia C. S. F.; Bazotte, Roberto B.; Peralta, Rosane M.; Buttow, Nilza C.; Pedrosa, Maria Montserrat D.; de Godoi, Vilma A. F.; Natali, Maria Raquel M.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of the supplementation with L-glutamine and glutamine dipeptide (GDP) on biochemical and morphophysiological parameters in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. For this purpose, thirty animals were distributed into six groups treated orally (gavage) during thirty days: non diabetic rats (Control) + saline, diabetic + saline; Control + L-glutamine (248 mg/kg), Diabetic + L-glutamine (248 mg/kg), Control + GDP (400 mg/kg), Diabetic + GDP (400 mg/kg). Diabetes was induced by an intravenous injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg) and confirmed by fasting glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL. Physiological parameters, i.e., body mass, food intake, blood glucose, water intake, urine and faeces were evaluated during supplementation. After the period of supplementation, the animals were euthanized. The blood was collected for biochemical assays (fructosamine, transaminases, lipid profile, total protein, urea, ammonia). Moreover, the jejunum was excised and stored for morphophysiological assays (intestinal enzyme activity, intestinal wall morphology, crypt proliferative index, number of serotoninergic cells from the mucosa, and vipergic neurons from the submucosal tunica). The physiological parameters, protein metabolism and intestinal enzyme activity did not change with the supplementation with L-glutamine or GDP. In diabetic animals, transaminases and fructosamine improved with L-glutamine and GDP supplementations, while the lipid profile improved with L-glutamine. Furthermore, both forms of supplementation promoted changes in jejunal tunicas and wall morphometry of control and diabetic groups, but only L-glutamine promoted maintenance of serotoninergic cells and vipergic neurons populations. On the other hand, control animals showed changes that may indicate negative effects of L-glutamine. Thus, the supplementation with L-glutamine was more efficient for maintaining intestinal morphophysiology and the supplementation with GDP was more efficient to the organism as a

  17. Specific Detection of Cellular Glutamine Hydrolysis in Live Cells Using HNCO Triple Resonance NMR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sujin; Wen, He; Cha, Jin Wook; Park, Sunghyouk

    2016-11-18

    Glutamine plays key roles as a biosynthetic precursor or an energy source in cancers, and interest in its metabolism is rapidly growing. However, the proper evaluation of glutamine hydrolysis, the very first reaction in the entire glutaminolysis, has been difficult. Here, we report a triple resonance NMR-based assay for specific detection of glutaminase activity carrying out this reaction using stable-isotope labeled glutamine. Compared to conventional methods involving coupled enzyme assays, the proposed approach is direct because it detects the presence of the H-N-CO amide spin system. In addition, the method is unique in enabling the measurement of glutamine hydrolysis reaction in real-time in live cells. The approach was applied to investigating the effects of a glutaminase inhibitor and the inhibitory effects of glucose on glutamine metabolism in live cells. It can be easily applied to studying other signals that affect cellular glutamine metabolism.

  18. [Imbalance of system of glutamin - glutamic acid in the placenta and amniotic fluid at placental insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Pogorelova, T N; Gunko, V O; Linde, V A

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamine and glutamic acid has been investigated in the placenta and amniotic fluid under conditions of placental insufficiency. The development of placental insufficiency is characterized by the increased content of glutamic acid and a decrease of glutamine in both placenta and amniotic fluid. These changes changes were accompanied by changes in the activity of enzymes involved in the metabolism of these amino acids. There was a decrease in glutamate dehydrogenase activity and an increase in glutaminase activity with the simultaneous decrease of glutamine synthetase activity. The compensatory decrease in the activity of glutamine keto acid aminotransferase did not prevent a decrease in the glutamine level. The impairments in the system glutamic acid-glutamine were more pronounced during the development of premature labor.

  19. Comparative analysis on the key enzymes of the glycerol cycle metabolic pathway in Dunaliella salina under osmotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Lu, Yan; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The glycerol metabolic pathway is a special cycle way; glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pdh), glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (G3pp), dihydroxyacetone reductase (Dhar), and dihydroxyacetone kinase (Dhak) are the key enzymes around the pathway. Glycerol is an important osmolyte for Dunaliella salina to resist osmotic stress. In this study, comparative activities of the four enzymes in D. salina and their activity changes under various salt stresses were investigated, from which glycerol metabolic flow direction in the glycerol metabolic pathway was estimated. Results showed that the salinity changes had different effects on the enzymes activities. NaCl could stimulate the activities of all the four enzymes in various degrees when D. salina was grown under continuous salt stress. When treated by hyperosmotic or hypoosmotic shock, only the activity of G3pdh in D. salina was significantly stimulated. It was speculated that, under osmotic stresses, the emergency response of the cycle pathway in D. salina was driven by G3pdh via its response to the osmotic stress. Subsequently, with the changes of salinity, other three enzymes started to respond to osmotic stress. Dhar played a role of balancing the cycle metabolic pathway by its forward and backward reactions. Through synergy, the four enzymes worked together for the effective flow of the cycle metabolic pathways to maintain the glycerol requirements of cells in order to adapt to osmotic stress environments.

  20. Inhibition of Plant Glutamine Synthetases by Substituted Phosphinothricins

    PubMed Central

    Logusch, Eugene W.; Walker, Daniel M.; McDonald, John F.; Franz, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) utilizes various substituted glutamic acids as substrates. We have used this information to design herbicidal α- and γ-substituted analogs of phosphinothricin (l-2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)butanoic acid, PPT), a naturally occurring GS inhibitor and a potent herbicide. The substituted phosphinothricins inhibit cytosolic sorghum GS1 and chloroplastic GS2 competitively versusl-glutamate, with Ki values in the low micromolar range. At higher concentrations, these inhibitors inactivate glutamine synthetase, while dilution restores activity through enzyme-inhibitor dissociation. Herbicidal phosphinothricins exhibit low Ki values and slow enzyme turnover, as described by reactivation characteristics. Both the GS1 and GS2 isoforms of plant glutamine synthetase are similarly inhibited by the phosphinothricins, consistent with the broad-spectrum herbicidal activity observed for PPT itself as well as other active compounds in this series. PMID:16668090

  1. Lipid utilization, gluconeogenesis, and seedling growth in Arabidopsis mutants lacking the glyoxylate cycle enzyme malate synthase.

    PubMed

    Cornah, Johanna E; Germain, Véronique; Ward, Jane L; Beale, Michael H; Smith, Steven M

    2004-10-08

    The aim of this research was to test the role of the glyoxylate cycle enzyme malate synthase (MLS) in lipid utilization, gluconeogenesis, and seedling growth in Arabidopsis. We hypothesized that in the absence of MLS, succinate produced by isocitrate lyase (ICL) could still feed into the tricarboxylic acid cycle, whereas glyoxylate could be converted to sugars using enzymes of the photorespiratory pathway. To test this hypothesis we isolated knock-out mls mutants and studied their growth and metabolism in comparison to wild type and icl mutant seedlings. In contrast to icl seedlings, which grow slowly and are unable to convert lipid into sugars (Eastmond, P. J., Germain, V., Lange, P. R., Bryce, J. H., Smith, S. M. & Graham, I. A. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 97, 5669-5674), mls seedlings grow faster, use their lipid more rapidly, and are better able to establish as plantlets. Transcriptome and metabolome analyses show that icl seedlings exhibit many features characteristic of carbohydrate starvation, whereas mls seedlings differ relatively little from wild type. In the light mls seedlings generate more sugars than icl seedlings, and when fed with [14C]acetate, 14C-labeling of sugars is three times greater than in icl seedlings and more than half that in wild type seedlings. The mls seedlings also accumulate more glycine and serine than icl or wild type seedlings, consistent with a diversion of glyoxylate into these intermediates of the photorespiratory pathway. We conclude that, in contrast to bacteria and fungi in which MLS is essential for gluconeogenesis from acetate or fatty acids, MLS is partially dispensable for lipid utilization and gluconeogenesis in Arabidopsis seedlings.

  2. Nutritional therapy improves growth and protein status of children with a urea cycle enzyme defect.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Phyllis B; Yannicelli, Steven; Ryan, Alan S; Arnold, Georgianne; Marriage, Barbara J; Plewinska, Magda; Bernstein, Laurie; Fox, Joyce; Lewis, Vyonne; Miller, Marvin; Velazquez, Antonio

    2005-12-01

    Poor growth has been described in patients with urea cycle enzyme defects treated with protein-restricted diets, while protein status is seldom reported. To assess the effects of nutritional therapy with a medical food on growth and protein status of patients with a urea cycle enzyme defect. A 6-mo multicenter outpatient study was conducted with infants and toddlers managed by nutrition therapy with Cyclinex-1 Amino Acid-Modified Medical Food with Iron (Ross Products Division, Abbott Laboratories, Columbus, OH). Main outcome variables were anthropometrics and plasma amino acids (selected), albumin, and transthyretin concentrations. Seventeen patients completed the study. Mean (+/-SE) baseline age was 11.30+/-3.20 months (median 4.40 months; range 0.22-38.84 months). Length and weight z-scores increased significantly during the 6-month study. Head circumference increased, but not significantly. Three patients were stunted and two were wasted (-2.0 z-score) at baseline while at study end, only one patient was both stunted and wasted. The majority of patients increased in length, head circumference, and weight z-scores during study. Mean (+/-SE) plasma albumin concentration increased from 34+/-2g/L at baseline to 38+/-1g/L at study end. Plasma transthyretin increased from a mean (+/-SE) of 177+/-13 mg/L at baseline to 231+/-15 mg/L at study end. No correlation was found between plasma NH(3) concentrations and medical food intake. Plasma NH(3) concentration was positively correlated with the percentage of Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization/United Nations recommended protein ingested. Intakes of adequate protein and energy for age result in anabolism and linear growth without increasing plasma NH(3) concentrations. Medical food intakes did not correlate with plasma NH(3) concentrations.

  3. Environmental cystine drives glutamine anaplerosis and sensitizes cancer cells to glutaminase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Muir, Alexander; Danai, Laura V; Gui, Dan Y; Waingarten, Chiara Y; Lewis, Caroline A; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2017-08-15

    Many mammalian cancer cell lines depend on glutamine as a major tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle anaplerotic substrate to support proliferation. However, some cell lines that depend on glutamine anaplerosis in culture rely less on glutamine catabolism to proliferate in vivo. We sought to understand the environmental differences that cause differential dependence on glutamine for anaplerosis. We find that cells cultured in adult bovine serum, which better reflects nutrients available to cells in vivo, exhibit decreased glutamine catabolism and reduced reliance on glutamine anaplerosis compared to cells cultured in standard tissue culture conditions. We find that levels of a single nutrient, cystine, accounts for the differential dependence on glutamine in these different environmental contexts. Further, we show that cystine levels dictate glutamine dependence via the cystine/glutamate antiporter xCT/SLC7A11. Thus, xCT/SLC7A11 expression, in conjunction with environmental cystine, is necessary and sufficient to increase glutamine catabolism, defining important determinants of glutamine anaplerosis and glutaminase dependence in cancer.

  4. Glutamine promotes ovarian cancer cell proliferation through the mTOR/S6 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lingqin; Sheng, Xiugui; Willson, Adam K; Roque, Dario R; Stine, Jessica E; Guo, Hui; Jones, Hannah M; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine is one of the main nutrients used by tumor cells for biosynthesis. Therefore, targeted inhibition of glutamine metabolism may have anti-tumorigenic implications. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of glutamine on ovarian cancer cell growth. Three ovarian cancer cell lines, HEY, SKOV3, and IGROV-1, were assayed for glutamine dependence by analyzing cytotoxicity, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, cell stress, and glucose/glutamine metabolism. Our results revealed that administration of glutamine increased cell proliferation in all three ovarian cancer cell lines in a dose dependent manner. Depletion of glutamine induced reactive oxygen species and expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins. In addition, glutamine increased the activity of glutaminase (GLS) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) by modulating the mTOR/S6 and MAPK pathways. Inhibition of mTOR activity by rapamycin or blocking S6 expression by siRNA inhibited GDH and GLS activity, leading to a decrease in glutamine-induced cell proliferation. These studies suggest that targeting glutamine metabolism may be a promising therapeutic strategy in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:26045471

  5. Proteomic and activity profiles of ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in germinating barley embryo.

    PubMed

    Bønsager, Birgit C; Shahpiri, Azar; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2010-10-01

    Enzymes involved in redox control are important during seed germination and seedling growth. Ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in barley embryo extracts were monitored both by 2D-gel electrophoresis and activity measurements from 4 to 144 h post imbibition (PI). Strikingly different activity profiles were observed. No ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was present in mature seeds but activity was detected after 24 h PI and increased 14-fold up to 144 h PI. In contrast, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activity was present at 4h PI and first decreased by 9-fold until 72 h PI followed by a 5-fold increase at 144 h PI. Glutathione reductase and monodehydroascorbate reductase activities were also detected at 4 h PI, and showed modest increases of 1.8- and 2.7-fold, respectively, by 144 h PI. The combination of functional analysis with the proteomics approach enabled correlation of the activity profiles and protein abundance. While gel spots containing APX showed intensity changes consistent with the activity profile from 0 to 72 h PI, DHAR spot intensities indicated that post-translational regulation may be responsible for the observed changes in activity. Transcript profiling, 2D-western blotting and mass spectrometric characterization of multiple APX spots demonstrated the presence of APX1 and minor amounts of APX2.

  6. Oncogenic PIK3CA mutations reprogram glutamine metabolism in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yujun; Samuels, Yardena; Li, Qingling; Krokowski, Dawid; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Wang, Chao; Jin, Zhicheng; Dong, Bohan; Cao, Bo; Feng, Xiujing; Xiang, Min; Xu, Claire; Fink, Stephen; Meropol, Neal J; Xu, Yan; Conlon, Ronald A; Markowitz, Sanford; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Velculescu, Victor E; Brunengraber, Henri; Willis, Joseph E; LaFramboise, Thomas; Hatzoglou, Maria; Zhang, Guo-Fang; Vogelstein, Bert; Wang, Zhenghe

    2016-06-20

    Cancer cells often require glutamine for growth, thereby distinguishing them from most normal cells. Here we show that PIK3CA mutations reprogram glutamine metabolism by upregulating glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells, making them more dependent on glutamine. Compared with isogenic wild-type (WT) cells, PIK3CA mutant CRCs convert substantially more glutamine to α-ketoglutarate to replenish the tricarboxylic acid cycle and generate ATP. Mutant p110α upregulates GPT2 gene expression through an AKT-independent, PDK1-RSK2-ATF4 signalling axis. Moreover, aminooxyacetate, which inhibits the enzymatic activity of aminotransferases including GPT2, suppresses xenograft tumour growth of CRCs with PIK3CA mutations, but not with WT PIK3CA. Together, these data establish oncogenic PIK3CA mutations as a cause of glutamine dependency in CRCs and suggest that targeting glutamine metabolism may be an effective approach to treat CRC patients harbouring PIK3CA mutations.

  7. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan; Trnka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70-4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes.

  8. Coevolution and Life Cycle Specialization of Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes in a Hemibiotrophic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Patrick C.; Torriani, Stefano F.F.; Croll, Daniel; Stukenbrock, Eva H.; McDonald, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Zymoseptoria tritici is an important fungal pathogen on wheat that originated in the Fertile Crescent. Its closely related sister species Z. pseudotritici and Z. ardabiliae infect wild grasses in the same region. This recently emerged host–pathogen system provides a rare opportunity to investigate the evolutionary processes shaping the genome of an emerging pathogen. Here, we investigate genetic signatures in plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) that are likely affected by or driving coevolution in plant-pathogen systems. We hypothesize four main evolutionary scenarios and combine comparative genomics, transcriptomics, and selection analyses to assign the majority of PCWDEs in Z. tritici to one of these scenarios. We found widespread differential transcription among different members of the same gene family, challenging the idea of functional redundancy and suggesting instead that specialized enzymatic activity occurs during different stages of the pathogen life cycle. We also find that natural selection has significantly affected at least 19 of the 48 identified PCWDEs. The majority of genes showed signatures of purifying selection, typical for the scenario of conserved substrate optimization. However, six genes showed diversifying selection that could be attributed to either host adaptation or host evasion. This study provides a powerful framework to better understand the roles played by different members of multigene families and to determine which genes are the most appropriate targets for wet laboratory experimentation, for example, to elucidate enzymatic function during relevant phases of a pathogen’s life cycle. PMID:23515261

  9. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70–4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes. PMID:27537184

  10. DUBbing Cancer: Deubiquitylating Enzymes Involved in Epigenetics, DNA Damage and the Cell Cycle As Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Fernandez, Adan; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling cell proliferation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. A number of critical checkpoints ascertain progression through the different stages of the cell cycle, which can be aborted when perturbed, for instance by errors in DNA replication and repair. These molecular checkpoints are regulated by a number of proteins that need to be present at the right time and quantity. The ubiquitin system has emerged as a central player controlling the fate and function of such molecules such as cyclins, oncogenes and components of the DNA repair machinery. In particular, proteases that cleave ubiquitin chains, referred to as deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), have attracted recent attention due to their accessibility to modulation by small molecules. In this review, we describe recent evidence of the critical role of DUBs in aspects of cell cycle checkpoint control, associated DNA repair mechanisms and regulation of transcription, representing pathways altered in cancer. Therefore, DUBs involved in these processes emerge as potentially critical targets for the treatment of not only hematological, but potentially also solid tumors. PMID:27516771

  11. Effect of Different Nutritional Conditions on the Synthesis of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Richard S.; Cox, Donald P.

    1967-01-01

    The effect of various nutritional conditions on the levels of Krebs cycle enzymes in Bacillus subtilis, B. licheniformis, and Escherichia coli was determined. The addition of glutamate, α-ketoglutarate, or compounds capable of being catabolized to glutamate, to a minimal glucose medium resulted in complete repression of aconitase in B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. The synthesis of fumarase, succinic dehydrogenase, malic dehydrogenase, and isocitric dehydrogenase was not repressed by these compounds. It is postulated that glutamate or α-ketoglutarate is the true corepressor for the repression of aconitase. A rapidly catabolizable carbon source and α-ketoglutarate or glutamate must be simultaneously present for complete repression of the formation of aconitase. Conditions which repress the synthesis of aconitase in B. subtilis restrict the flow of carbon in the sequence of reactions leading to α-ketoglutarate but do not prevent glutamate oxidation in vivo. The data indicate that separate and independent mechanisms regulate the activity of the anabolic and catabolic reactions of the Krebs cycle in B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. The addition of glutamate to the minimal glucose medium results in the repression of aconitase, isocitric dehydrogenase, and fumarase, but not malic dehydrogenase in E. coli K-38. PMID:4960893

  12. IKKβ promotes metabolic adaptation to glutamine deprivation via phosphorylation and inhibition of PFKFB3.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michael A; Lowman, Xazmin H; Pan, Min; Tran, Thai Q; Warmoes, Marc O; Ishak Gabra, Mari B; Yang, Ying; Locasale, Jason W; Kong, Mei

    2016-08-15

    Glutamine is an essential nutrient for cancer cell survival and proliferation. Enhanced utilization of glutamine often depletes its local supply, yet how cancer cells adapt to low glutamine conditions is largely unknown. Here, we report that IκB kinase β (IKKβ) is activated upon glutamine deprivation and is required for cell survival independently of NF-κB transcription. We demonstrate that IKKβ directly interacts with and phosphorylates 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase isoform 3 (PFKFB3), a major driver of aerobic glycolysis, at Ser269 upon glutamine deprivation to inhibit its activity, thereby down-regulating aerobic glycolysis when glutamine levels are low. Thus, due to lack of inhibition of PFKFB3, IKKβ-deficient cells exhibit elevated aerobic glycolysis and lactate production, leading to less glucose carbons contributing to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and the pentose phosphate pathway, which results in increased glutamine dependence for both TCA cycle intermediates and reactive oxygen species suppression. Therefore, coinhibition of IKKβ and glutamine metabolism results in dramatic synergistic killing of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. In all, our results uncover a previously unidentified role of IKKβ in regulating glycolysis, sensing low-glutamine-induced metabolic stress, and promoting cellular adaptation to nutrient availability. © 2016 Reid et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. IKKβ promotes metabolic adaptation to glutamine deprivation via phosphorylation and inhibition of PFKFB3

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Michael A.; Lowman, Xazmin H.; Pan, Min; Tran, Thai Q.; Warmoes, Marc O.; Ishak Gabra, Mari B.; Yang, Ying; Locasale, Jason W.; Kong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine is an essential nutrient for cancer cell survival and proliferation. Enhanced utilization of glutamine often depletes its local supply, yet how cancer cells adapt to low glutamine conditions is largely unknown. Here, we report that IκB kinase β (IKKβ) is activated upon glutamine deprivation and is required for cell survival independently of NF-κB transcription. We demonstrate that IKKβ directly interacts with and phosphorylates 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase isoform 3 (PFKFB3), a major driver of aerobic glycolysis, at Ser269 upon glutamine deprivation to inhibit its activity, thereby down-regulating aerobic glycolysis when glutamine levels are low. Thus, due to lack of inhibition of PFKFB3, IKKβ-deficient cells exhibit elevated aerobic glycolysis and lactate production, leading to less glucose carbons contributing to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and the pentose phosphate pathway, which results in increased glutamine dependence for both TCA cycle intermediates and reactive oxygen species suppression. Therefore, coinhibition of IKKβ and glutamine metabolism results in dramatic synergistic killing of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. In all, our results uncover a previously unidentified role of IKKβ in regulating glycolysis, sensing low-glutamine-induced metabolic stress, and promoting cellular adaptation to nutrient availability. PMID:27585591

  14. Cell cycle effect on the activity of deoxynucleoside analogue metabolising enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Fyrberg, Anna; Albertioni, Freidoun; Lotfi, Kourosh . E-mail: koulo@imv.liu.se

    2007-06-15

    Deoxynucleoside analogues (dNAs) are cytotoxic towards both replicating and indolent malignancies. The impact of fluctuations in the metabolism of dNAs in relation to cell cycle could have strong implications regarding the activity of dNAs. Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK) are important enzymes for phosphorylation/activation of dNAs. These drugs can be dephosphorylated/deactivated by 5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTs) and elevated activities of 5'-NTs and decreased dCK and/or dGK activities represent resistance mechanisms towards dNAs. The activities of dCK, dGK, and three 5'-NTs were investigated in four human leukemic cell lines in relationship to cell cycle progression and cytotoxicity of dNAs. Synchronization of cell cultures to arrest in G0/G1 by serum-deprivation was performed followed by serum-supplementation for cell cycle progression. The activities of dCK and dGK increased up to 3-fold in CEM, HL60, and MOLT-4 cells as they started to proliferate, while the activity of cytosolic nucleotidase I was reduced in proliferating cells. CEM, HL60, and MOLT-4 cells were also more sensitive to cladribine, cytarabine, 9-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylguanine and clofarabine than K562 cells which demonstrated lower levels and less alteration of these enzymes and were least susceptible to the cytotoxic effects of most dNAs. The results suggest that, in the cell lines studied, the proliferation process is associated with a general shift in the direction of activation of dNAs by inducing activities of dCK/dGK and reducing the activity of cN-I which is favourable for the cytotoxic effects of cladribine, cytarabine and, 9-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylguanine. These results emphasize the importance of cellular proliferation and dNA metabolism by both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation for susceptibility to dNAs. It underscores the need to understand the mechanisms of action and resistance to dNAs in order to increase efficacy of dNAs treatment by new rational.

  15. Crystal structures of a purple acid phosphatase, representing different steps of this enzyme's catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Gerhard; Elliott, Tristan W; Leung, Eleanor; Carrington, Lyle E; Mitić, Natasa; Gahan, Lawrence R; Guddat, Luke W

    2008-01-31

    Purple acid phosphatases belong to the family of binuclear metallohydrolases and are involved in a multitude of biological functions, ranging from bacterial killing and bone metabolism in animals to phosphate uptake in plants. Due to its role in bone resorption purple acid phosphatase has evolved into a promising target for the development of anti-osteoporotic chemotherapeutics. The design of specific and potent inhibitors for this enzyme is aided by detailed knowledge of its reaction mechanism. However, despite considerable effort in the last 10 years various aspects of the basic molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Red kidney bean purple acid phosphatase is a heterovalent enzyme with an Fe(III)Zn(II) center in the active site. Two new structures with bound sulfate (2.4 A) and fluoride (2.2 A) provide insight into the pre-catalytic phase of its reaction cycle and phosphorolysis. The sulfate-bound structure illustrates the significance of an extensive hydrogen bonding network in the second coordination sphere in initial substrate binding and orientation prior to hydrolysis. Importantly, both metal ions are five-coordinate in this structure, with only one nucleophilic mu-hydroxide present in the metal-bridging position. The fluoride-bound structure provides visual support for an activation mechanism for this mu-hydroxide whereby substrate binding induces a shift of this bridging ligand towards the divalent metal ion, thus increasing its nucleophilicity. In combination with kinetic, crystallographic and spectroscopic data these structures of red kidney bean purple acid phosphatase facilitate the proposal of a comprehensive eight-step model for the catalytic mechanism of purple acid phosphatases in general.

  16. Carbon dioxide fixation by Calvin-Cycle enzymes improves ethanol yield in yeast.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe-Medina, Víctor; Wisselink, H Wouter; Luttik, Marijke Ah; de Hulster, Erik; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius Ja

    2013-08-29

    Redox-cofactor balancing constrains product yields in anaerobic fermentation processes. This challenge is exemplified by the formation of glycerol as major by-product in yeast-based bioethanol production, which is a direct consequence of the need to reoxidize excess NADH and causes a loss of conversion efficiency. Enabling the use of CO2 as electron acceptor for NADH oxidation in heterotrophic microorganisms would increase product yields in industrial biotechnology. A hitherto unexplored strategy to address this redox challenge is the functional expression in yeast of enzymes from autotrophs, thereby enabling the use of CO2 as electron acceptor for NADH reoxidation. Functional expression of the Calvin cycle enzymes phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae led to a 90% reduction of the by-product glycerol and a 10% increase in ethanol production in sugar-limited chemostat cultures on a mixture of glucose and galactose. Co-expression of the Escherichia coli chaperones GroEL and GroES was key to successful expression of CbbM, a form-II Rubisco from the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans in yeast. Our results demonstrate functional expression of Rubisco in a heterotrophic eukaryote and demonstrate how incorporation of CO2 as a co-substrate in metabolic engineering of heterotrophic industrial microorganisms can be used to improve product yields. Rapid advances in molecular biology should allow for rapid insertion of this 4-gene expression cassette in industrial yeast strains to improve production, not only of 1st and 2nd generation ethanol production, but also of other renewable fuels or chemicals.

  17. Glutamate, GABA, and glutamine are synchronously upregulated in the mouse lateral septum during the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changjiu; Gammie, Stephen C

    2014-12-03

    Dramatic structural and functional remodeling occurs in the postpartum brain for the establishment of maternal care, which is essential for the growth and development of young offspring. Glutamate and GABA signaling are critically important in modulating multiple behavioral performances. Large scale signaling changes occur in the postpartum brain, but it is still not clear to what extent the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA change and whether the ratio of glutamate/GABA remains balanced. In this study, we examined the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle in the lateral septum (LS) of postpartum female mice. In postpartum females (relative to virgins), tissue levels of glutamate and GABA were elevated in LS and increased mRNA was found for the respective enzymes producing glutamate and GABA, glutaminase (Gls) and glutamate decarboxylase 1 and 2 (Gad1 and Gad2). The common precursor, glutamine, was elevated as was the enzyme that produces it, glutamate-ammonia ligase (Glul). Additionally, glutamate, GABA, and glutamine were positively correlated and the glutamate/GABA ratio was almost identical in the postpartum and virgin females. Collectively, these findings indicate that glutamate and GABA signaling are increased and that the ratio of glutamate/GABA is well balanced in the maternal LS. The postpartum brain may provide a useful model system for understanding how glutamate and GABA are linked despite large signaling changes. Given that some mental health disorders, including depression and schizophrenia display dysregulated glutamate/GABA ratio, and there is increased vulnerability to mental disorders in mothers, it is possible that these postpartum disorders emerge when glutamate and GABA changes are not properly coordinated.

  18. De Novo Glutamine Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiao; Shi, Xinchong; Zhang, Linqi; Yi, Chang; Zhang, Xuezhen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of de novo glutamine (Gln) synthesis in the proliferation of C6 glioma cells and its detection with 13N-ammonia. Methods: Chronic Gln-deprived C6 glioma (0.06C6) cells were established. The proliferation rates of C6 and 0.06C6 cells were measured under the conditions of Gln deprivation along with or without the addition of ammonia or glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor. 13N-ammonia uptake was assessed in C6 cells by gamma counting and in rats with C6 and 0.06C6 xenografts by micro–positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. The expression of GS in C6 cells and xenografts was assessed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: The Gln-deprived C6 cells showed decreased proliferation ability but had a significant increase in GS expression. Furthermore, we found that low concentration of ammonia was sufficient to maintain the proliferation of Gln-deprived C6 cells, and 13N-ammonia uptake in C6 cells showed Gln-dependent decrease, whereas inhibition of GS markedly reduced the proliferation of C6 cells as well as the uptake of 13N-ammoina. Additionally, microPET/computed tomography exhibited that subcutaneous 0.06C6 xenografts had higher 13N-ammonia uptake and GS expression in contrast to C6 xenografts. Conclusion: De novo Gln synthesis through ammonia–glutamate reaction plays an important role in the proliferation of C6 cells. 13N-ammonia can be a potential metabolic PET tracer for Gln-dependent tumors. PMID:27118759

  19. Phloem-Specific Expression of Yang Cycle Genes and Identification of Novel Yang Cycle Enzymes in Plantago and Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Feussner, Kirstin; Zierer, Wolfgang; Rabinovych, Valentyna; Klebl, Franz; Feussner, Ivo; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    The 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA) or Yang cycle is a set of reactions that recycle MTA to Met. In plants, MTA is a byproduct of polyamine, ethylene, and nicotianamine biosynthesis. Vascular transcriptome analyses revealed phloem-specific expression of the Yang cycle gene 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE KINASE1 (MTK1) in Plantago major and Arabidopsis thaliana. As Arabidopsis has only a single MTK gene, we hypothesized that the expression of other Yang cycle genes might also be vascular specific. Reporter gene studies and quantitative analyses of mRNA levels for all Yang cycle genes confirmed this hypothesis for Arabidopsis and Plantago. This includes the Yang cycle genes 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE-1-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE1 and DEHYDRATASE-ENOLASE-PHOSPHATASE-COMPLEX1. We show that these two enzymes are sufficient for the conversion of methylthioribose-1-phosphate to 1,2-dihydroxy-3-keto-5-methylthiopentene. In bacteria, fungi, and animals, the same conversion is catalyzed in three to four separate enzymatic steps. Furthermore, comparative analyses of vascular and nonvascular metabolites identified Met, S-adenosyl Met, and MTA preferentially or almost exclusively in the vascular tissue. Our data represent a comprehensive characterization of the Yang cycle in higher plants and demonstrate that the Yang cycle works primarily in the vasculature. Finally, expression analyses of polyamine biosynthetic genes suggest that the Yang cycle in leaves recycles MTA derived primarily from polyamine biosynthesis. PMID:21540433

  20. Isolation and Compositional Analysis of a CP12-Associated Complex of Calvin Cycle Enzymes from Nicotiana tabacum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    CP12 is a small intrinsically unstructured protein that forms a multiprotein complex with two Calvin Cycle enzymes, phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and NAD(P)-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The complex can be reconstituted in vitro from recombinant proteins under conditions t...

  1. Phosphoribulokinase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a Benson-Calvin cycle enzyme enslaved to its cysteine residues.

    PubMed

    Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Remy, Thérèse; Lignon, Sabrina; Lebrun, Régine; Gontero, Brigitte

    2015-04-01

    Phosphoribulokinase (PRK) in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a finely regulated and well-studied enzyme of the Benson-Calvin cycle. PRK can form a complex with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and the small chloroplast protein CP12. This study aimed to determine the molecular determinants on PRK involved in the complex and the mechanism of action of a recently described novel regulation of PRK that involves glutathionylation. A combination of mass spectrometry, mutagenesis and activity analyses showed that Cys16, besides its role as the binding site of ATP, was also the site for S-glutathionylation. Previous kinetic analysis of the C55S mutant showed that in the oxidized inactive form of PRK, this residue formed a disulfide bridge with the Cys16 residue. This is the only bridge reported for PRK in the literature. Our data show for the first time that a disulfide bridge between Cys243 and Cys249 on PRK is required to form the PRK-GAPDH-CP12 complex. These results uncover a new mechanism for the PRK-GAPDH-CP12 formation involving a thiol disulfide exchange reaction with CP12 and identify Cys16 of PRK as a target of glutathionylation acting against oxidative stress. Although Cys16 is the key residue involved in binding ATP and acting as a defense against oxidative damage, the formation of the algal ternary complex requires the formation of another disulfide bridge on PRK involving Cys243 and Cys249.

  2. Structure of Trypanosoma brucei glutathione synthetase: Domain and loop alterations in the catalytic cycle of a highly conserved enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Paul K.; Alphey, Magnus S.; Hunter, William N.

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione synthetase catalyses the synthesis of the low molecular mass thiol glutathione from l-γ-glutamyl-l-cysteine and glycine. We report the crystal structure of the dimeric enzyme from Trypanosoma brucei in complex with the product glutathione. The enzyme belongs to the ATP-grasp family, a group of enzymes known to undergo conformational changes upon ligand binding. The T. brucei enzyme crystal structure presents two dimers in the asymmetric unit. The structure reveals variability in the order and position of a small domain, which forms a lid for the active site and serves to capture conformations likely to exist during the catalytic cycle. Comparisons with orthologous enzymes, in particular from Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisae, indicate a high degree of sequence and structure conservation in part of the active site. Structural differences that are observed between the orthologous enzymes are assigned to different ligand binding states since key residues are conserved. This suggests that the molecular determinants of ligand recognition and reactivity are highly conserved across species. We conclude that it would be difficult to target the parasite enzyme in preference to the host enzyme and therefore glutathione synthetase may not be a suitable target for antiparasitic drug discovery. PMID:20045436

  3. Glutamine versus Ammonia Utilization in the NAD Synthetase Family

    PubMed Central

    Shatalin, Konstantin; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Sorci, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    NAD is a ubiquitous and essential metabolic redox cofactor which also functions as a substrate in certain regulatory pathways. The last step of NAD synthesis is the ATP-dependent amidation of deamido-NAD by NAD synthetase (NADS). Members of the NADS family are present in nearly all species across the three kingdoms of Life. In eukaryotic NADS, the core synthetase domain is fused with a nitrilase-like glutaminase domain supplying ammonia for the reaction. This two-domain NADS arrangement enabling the utilization of glutamine as nitrogen donor is also present in various bacterial lineages. However, many other bacterial members of NADS family do not contain a glutaminase domain, and they can utilize only ammonia (but not glutamine) in vitro. A single-domain NADS is also characteristic for nearly all Archaea, and its dependence on ammonia was demonstrated here for the representative enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschi. However, a question about the actual in vivo nitrogen donor for single-domain members of the NADS family remained open: Is it glutamine hydrolyzed by a committed (but yet unknown) glutaminase subunit, as in most ATP-dependent amidotransferases, or free ammonia as in glutamine synthetase? Here we addressed this dilemma by combining evolutionary analysis of the NADS family with experimental characterization of two representative bacterial systems: a two-subunit NADS from Thermus thermophilus and a single-domain NADS from Salmonella typhimurium providing evidence that ammonia (and not glutamine) is the physiological substrate of a typical single-domain NADS. The latter represents the most likely ancestral form of NADS. The ability to utilize glutamine appears to have evolved via recruitment of a glutaminase subunit followed by domain fusion in an early branch of Bacteria. Further evolution of the NADS family included lineage-specific loss of one of the two alternative forms and horizontal gene transfer events. Lastly, we identified NADS structural

  4. Glutamine Assimilation and Feedback Regulation of L-acetyl-N-glutamate Kinase Activity in Chlorella variabilis NC64A Results in Changes in Arginine Pools.

    PubMed

    Minaeva, Ekaterina; Forchhammer, Karl; Ermilova, Elena

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine is a metabolite of central importance in nitrogen metabolism of microorganisms and plants. The Chlorella PII signaling protein controls, in a glutamine-dependent manner, the key enzyme of the ornithine/arginine biosynthesis pathway, N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) that leads to arginine formation. We provide evidence that glutamine promotes effective growth of C. variabilis strain NC64A. The present study shows that externally supplied glutamine directly influences the internal pool of arginine in NC64A. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of glutamate and ammonium to glutamine. The results of this study demonstrate that glutamine acts as a negative effector of GS activity. These data emphasize the importance of glutamine-dependent coupling of metabolism and signaling as components of an efficient pathway allowing the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis and sustaining growth of Chlorella.

  5. [Ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes activity in Zea mays leaves under salinity and treatment by adaptogenic compounds].

    PubMed

    Konturs'ka, O O; Palladina, T O

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different salinity levels and synthetic compounds treatments on ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes activity in maize leaves has been investigated. One-day seedlings exposition with 0.05 M NaCl increased ascorbate peroxidase activity, whereas 10-day exposition did not affect it. However the exposition with 0.1 M NaCl, which is extreme for maize, decreased ascorbate peroxidase activity in leaves during 10 days. On the other hand glutathione reductase activity in leaves increased under both salt concentrations. Seeds treatments with Methyure and Ivine increased ascorbate peroxidase activity in the leaves of seedlings under 0.1 M NaCl, but did not affect glutathione reductase activity as compared to the salt control. The results obtained have shown differences of ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes responses to salt exposition of seedlings and the effects of adaptogenic compounds on the ascorbate-glutathione cycle via ascorbate peroxidase activation.

  6. Glutamine Acts as a Neuroprotectant against DNA Damage, Beta-Amyloid and H2O2-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianmin; Herrup, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Glutamine is the most abundant free amino acid in the human blood stream and is ‘conditionally essential’ to cells. Its intracellular levels are regulated both by the uptake of extracellular glutamine via specific transport systems and by its intracellular synthesis by glutamine synthetase (GS). Adding to the regulatory complexity, when extracellular glutamine is reduced GS protein levels rise. Unfortunately, this excess GS can be maladaptive. GS overexpression is neurotoxic especially if the cells are in a low-glutamine medium. Similarly, in low glutamine, the levels of multiple stress response proteins are reduced rendering cells hypersensitive to H2O2, zinc salts and DNA damage. These altered responses may have particular relevance to neurodegenerative diseases of aging. GS activity and glutamine levels are lower in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, and a fraction of AD hippocampal neurons have dramatically increased GS levels compared with control subjects. We validated the importance of these observations by showing that raising glutamine levels in the medium protects cultured neuronal cells against the amyloid peptide, Aβ. Further, a 10-day course of dietary glutamine supplementation reduced inflammation-induced neuronal cell cycle activation, tau phosphorylation and ATM-activation in two different mouse models of familial AD while raising the levels of two synaptic proteins, VAMP2 and synaptophysin. Together, our observations suggest that healthy neuronal cells require both intracellular and extracellular glutamine, and that the neuroprotective effects of glutamine supplementation may prove beneficial in the treatment of AD. PMID:22413000

  7. Purification and properties of glutamine synthetase from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Ericson, M C

    1985-12-01

    The chloroplastic glutamine synthetase of spinach leaves has been purified to homogeneity using affinity chromatography. This involves a tandem ;reactive blue A-agarose' and ;reactive red-A-agarose' as the final step in the procedure. This procedure results in a yield of 18 milligrams of pure glutamine synthetase per kilogram of starting material. The purity of our enzyme has been demonstrated on both one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels.Purified glutamine synthetase has a molecular weight of 360,000 daltons and consists of eight 44,000 dalton subunits. The K(m) is 6.7 millimolar for glutamate, 1.8 millimolar for ATP (synthetase assay), and 37.6 millimolar for glutamine (transferase assay). The isoelectric point is 6.5 and the pH optima are 7.3 in the synthetase assay and 6.4 in the transferase assay. The irreversible, competitive inhibitors methionine sulfoxamine and phosphinothricin have K(i) values of 0.1 millimolar and 6.1 micromolar, respectively. Amino acid analysis has been carried out and the results compared with published analyses for other isoforms of glutamine synthetase.

  8. Glutamine metabolism in advanced age.

    PubMed

    Meynial-Denis, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Glutamine, reviewed extensively in the last century, is a key substrate for the splanchnic bed in the whole body and is a nutrient of particular interest in gastrointestinal research. A marked decrease in the plasma glutamine concentration has recently been observed in neonates and adults during acute illness and stress. Although some studies in newborns have shown parenteral and enteral supplementation with glutamine to be of benefit (by decreasing proteolysis and activating the immune system), clinical trials have not demonstrated prolonged advantages such as reductions in mortality or risk of infections in adults. In addition, glutamine is not able to combat the muscle wasting associated with disease or age-related sarcopenia. Oral glutamine supplementation initiated before advanced age in rats increases gut mass and improves the villus height of mucosa, thereby preventing the gut atrophy encountered in advanced age. Enterocytes from very old rats continuously metabolize glutamine into citrulline, which allowed, for the first time, the use of citrulline as a noninvasive marker of intestinal atrophy induced by advanced age. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Glutamine metabolism in advanced age

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine, reviewed extensively in the last century, is a key substrate for the splanchnic bed in the whole body and is a nutrient of particular interest in gastrointestinal research. A marked decrease in the plasma glutamine concentration has recently been observed in neonates and adults during acute illness and stress. Although some studies in newborns have shown parenteral and enteral supplementation with glutamine to be of benefit (by decreasing proteolysis and activating the immune system), clinical trials have not demonstrated prolonged advantages such as reductions in mortality or risk of infections in adults. In addition, glutamine is not able to combat the muscle wasting associated with disease or age-related sarcopenia. Oral glutamine supplementation initiated before advanced age in rats increases gut mass and improves the villus height of mucosa, thereby preventing the gut atrophy encountered in advanced age. Enterocytes from very old rats continuously metabolize glutamine into citrulline, which allowed, for the first time, the use of citrulline as a noninvasive marker of intestinal atrophy induced by advanced age. PMID:26936258

  10. Transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Ksenia; Kayumov, Airat; Woyda, Kathrin; Ilinskaja, Olga; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-05-02

    The Bacillus subtilis glutamine synthetase (GS) plays a dual role in cell metabolism by functioning as catalyst and regulator. GS catalyses the ATP-dependent synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonium. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, GS becomes feedback-inhibited by high intracellular glutamine levels and then binds transcription factors GlnR and TnrA, which control the genes of nitrogen assimilation. While GS-bound TnrA is no longer able to interact with DNA, GlnR-DNA binding is shown to be stimulated by GS complex formation. In this paper we show a new physiological feature of the interaction between glutamine synthetase and TnrA. The transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in vivo and in vitro, while the GlnR protein does not affect the activity of the enzyme.

  11. Interrelationships between glutamine and citrulline metabolism.

    PubMed

    Marini, Juan C

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes the contribution of glutamine to the synthesis of citrulline and reviews the evidence that glutamine supplementation increases citrulline production. Glutamine supplementation has been proposed in the treatment of critically ill patients; however, a recent large multicenter randomized controlled trial resulted in increased mortality in the glutamine-supplemented group. Within this context, defining the contribution of glutamine to the production of citrulline, and thus to de-novo arginine synthesis, has become a pressing issue. The beneficial effects of glutamine supplementation may be partially mediated by the effects of glutamine on citrulline synthesis by the gut and the de-novo synthesis of arginine by the kidney and other tissues. Although there is no strong evidence to support that glutamine is a major precursor for citrulline synthesis in humans, glutamine has the potential to increase overall gut function and in this way increase citrulline production.

  12. Interrelationships between glutamine and citrulline metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To analyze the evidence that glutamine supplementation increases citrulline production. To determine the contribution of glutamine to the synthesis of citrulline. Recent findings Glutamine supplementation has been proposed in the treatment of critically ill patients; however, a recent large multicenter randomized controlled trial resulted in increased mortality in the glutamine supplemented group. Within this context, defining the contribution of glutamine to the production of citrulline, and thus to de novo arginine synthesis, has become a pressing issue. Summary The beneficial effects of glutamine supplementation may be partially mediated by the effects of glutamine on citrulline synthesis by the gut and the de novo synthesis of arginine by the kidney and other tissues. Although there is no strong evidence to support that glutamine is a major precursor for citrulline synthesis in humans, glutamine has the potential to increase overall gut function and in this way increase citrulline production. PMID:26560519

  13. Gene and protein expression of O-GlcNAc-cycling enzymes in human laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Starska, Katarzyna; Forma, Ewa; Brzezińska-Błaszczyk, Ewa; Lewy-Trenda, Iwona; Bryś, Magdalena; Jóźwiak, Paweł; Krześlak, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Aberrant protein O-GlcNAcylation may contribute to the development and malignant behavior of many cancers. This modification is controlled by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA). The aim of this study was to determine the expression of O-GlcNAc cycling enzymes mRNA/protein and to investigate their relationship with clinicopathological parameters in laryngeal cancer. The mRNA levels of OGT and MGEA5 genes were determined in 106 squamous cell laryngeal cancer (SCLC) cases and 73 non-cancerous adjacent laryngeal mucosa (NCLM) controls using quantitative real-time PCR. The level of OGT and OGA proteins was analyzed by Western blot. A positive expression of OGT and MGEA5 transcripts and OGT and OGA proteins was confirmed in 75.5 and 68.9 % and in 43.7 and 59.4 % samples of SCLC, respectively. Higher levels of mRNA/protein for both OGT and OGA as well as significant increases of 60 % in total protein O-GlcNAcylation levels were noted in SCLC compared with NCLM (p < 0.05). As a result, an increased level of OGT and MGEA5 mRNA was related to larger tumor size, nodal metastases, higher grade and tumor behavior according to TFG scale, as well as incidence of disease recurrence (p < 0.05). An inverse association between OGT and MGEA5 transcripts was determined with regard to prognosis (p < 0.05). In addition, the highest OGT and OGA protein levels were observed in poorly differentiated tumors (p < 0.05). No correlations with other parameters were noted, but the results showed a trend of more advanced tumors to be more frequently OGT and OGA positive. The results suggest that increased O-GlcNAcylation may have an effect on tumor aggressiveness and prognosis in laryngeal cancer.

  14. DT-Diaphorase as a Bifunctional Enzyme Label That Allows Rapid Enzymatic Amplification and Electrochemical Redox Cycling.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheolho; Kang, Juyeon; Lee, Nam-Sihk; Yoon, Young Ho; Yang, Haesik

    2017-08-01

    The most common enzyme labels in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays are alkaline phosphatase and horseradish peroxidase, which, however, have some limitations for use in electrochemical immunosensors. This Article reports that the small and thermostable DT-diaphorase (DT-D) and electrochemically inactive 4-nitroso-1-naphthol (4-NO-1-N) can be used as a bifunctional enzyme label and a rapidly reacting substrate, respectively, for electrochemical immunosensors. This enzyme-substrate combination allows high signal amplification via rapid enzymatic amplification and electrochemical redox cycling. DT-D can convert an electrochemically inactive nitroso or nitro compound into an electrochemically active amine compound, which can then be involved in electrochemical-chemical (EC) and electrochemical-enzymatic (EN) redox cycling. Six nitroso and nitro compounds are tested in terms of signal-to-background ratio. Among them, 4-NO-1-N exhibits the highest signal-to-background ratio. The electrochemical immunosensor using DT-D and 4-NO-1-N detects parathyroid hormone (PTH) in phosphate-buffered saline containing bovine serum albumin over a wide range of concentrations with a low detection limit of 2 pg/mL. When the PTH concentration in clinical serum samples is measured using the developed immunosensor, the calculated concentrations are in good agreement with the concentrations obtained using a commercial instrument. Thus, the use of DT-D as an enzyme label is highly promising for sensitive electrochemical detection and point-of-care testing.

  15. Chloroplastic thioredoxin m functions as a major regulator of Calvin cycle enzymes during photosynthesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Okegawa, Yuki; Motohashi, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) regulate the activity of various chloroplastic proteins in a light-dependent manner. Five types of Trxs function in different physiological processes in the chloroplast of Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous in vitro experiments have suggested that the f-type Trx (Trx f) is the main redox regulator of chloroplast enzymes, including Calvin cycle enzymes. To investigate the in vivo contribution of each Trx isoform to the redox regulatory system, we first quantified the protein concentration of each Trx isoform in the chloroplast stroma. The m-type Trx (Trx m), which consists of four isoforms, was the most abundant type. Next, we analyzed several Arabidopsis Trx-m-deficient mutants to elucidate the physiological role of Trx m in vivo. Deficiency of Trx m impaired plant growth and decreased the CO2 assimilation rate. We also determined the redox state of Trx target enzymes to examine their photo-reduction, which is essential for enzyme activation. In the Trx-m-deficient mutants, the reduction level of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase was lower than that in the wild type. Inconsistently with the historical view, our in vivo study suggested that Trx m plays a more important role than Trx f in the activation of Calvin cycle enzymes. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Targeting glutamine metabolism in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Huichun; Ciano, Kristen; Dong, Katherine; Zucker, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    JAK2V617F mutation can be detected in the majority of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients. The JAK2 inhibitor Ruxolitinib is the first FDA-approved treatment for MPNs. However, its use is limited by various dose related toxicities. Here, we studied the metabolic state and glutamine metabolism of BaF3-hEPOR-JAK2V617F and BaF3-hEPOR-JAK2WT cells. We found that the JAK2V617F-mutant cells were associated with increased oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate than the JAK2WT cells and there was an increased glutamine metabolism in JAK2V617F-mutant cells compared to wild-type cells. Glutaminase (GLS), the key enzyme in gluta-mine metabolism, was upregulated in the JAK2V617F-mutant BaF3 cells compared to the JAK2WT BaF3 cells. In MPN patient peripheral blood CD34+ cells, GLS expression was increased in JAK2V617F-mutant progenitor cells compared to JAK2 wild-type progenitor cells from the same patients and GLS levels were increased at the time of disease progression compared to at earlier time points. Moreover, GLS inhibitor increased the growth inhibitory effect of Ruxolitinib in both JAK2V617F-mutant cell lines and peripheral blood CD34+ cells from MPN patients. Therefore, GLS inhibitor should be further explored to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of JAK2 inhibitor and allow the administration of lower doses of the drug to avoid its toxicity. PMID:26227854

  17. Glutamate-Dependent Translational Control of Glutamine Synthetase in Bergmann Glia Cells.

    PubMed

    Tiburcio-Félix, Reynaldo; Escalante-López, Miguel; López-Bayghen, Bruno; Martínez, Daniel; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Zinker, Samuel; Hernández-Melchor, Dinorah; López-Bayghen, Esther; Olivares-Bañuelos, Tatiana N; Ortega, Arturo

    2017-09-05

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter of the vertebrate brain. It exerts its actions through the activation of specific plasma membrane receptors expressed both in neurons and in glial cells. Recent evidence has shown that glutamate uptake systems, particularly enriched in glia cells, trigger biochemical cascades in a similar fashion as receptors. A tight regulation of glutamate extracellular levels prevents neuronal overstimulation and cell death, and it is critically involved in glutamate turnover. Glial glutamate transporters are responsible of the majority of the brain glutamate uptake activity. Once internalized, this excitatory amino acid is rapidly metabolized to glutamine via the astrocyte-enriched enzyme glutamine synthetase. A coupling between glutamate uptake and glutamine synthesis and release has been commonly known as the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. Taking advantage of the established model of cultured Bergmann glia cells, in this contribution, we explored the gene expression regulation of glutamine synthetase. A time- and dose-dependent regulation of glutamine synthetase protein and activity levels was found. Moreover, glutamate exposure resulted in the transient shift of glutamine synthetase mRNA from the monosomal to the polysomal fraction. These results demonstrate a novel mode of glutamate-dependent glutamine synthetase regulation and strengthen the notion of an exquisite glia neuronal interaction in glutamatergic synapses.

  18. Glutamine as a major nitrogen carrier to the liver in suckling rat pups.

    PubMed Central

    Casado, J; Felipe, A; Pastor-Anglada, M; Remesar, X

    1988-01-01

    We measured the amino acid concentrations in the afferent and efferent vessels of the liver in anaesthetized fed adult rats and in fed suckling rat pups. A much higher content of glutamine in the portal vein and the aorta than in hepatic veins suggests that this amino acid is actively taken up by the liver of fed suckling rat pups, conversely to what is found in adult rats. In an attempt to characterize further the mechanism(s) contributing to this enhanced glutamine uptake, we monitored the time course of 1 mM-glutamine transport into plasma-membrane vesicles purified from the livers of either adult or suckling rats. The concentrative Na+-dependent uptake of glutamine was lower in those vesicles obtained from pups than in those obtained from adult rats. Glutaminase and glutamine synthetase activities in livers from both experimental groups were also measured. Glutaminase and glutamine synthetase activities in suckling rats were about 3-fold higher and 2-fold lower respectively than those in adult rats. It is concluded that glutamine is a main nitrogen carrier to the liver in fed suckling rats. A high availability of this amino acid and an enzyme imbalance between glutamine-synthesizing and -degrading activities may account for the net uptake found in vivo. PMID:2906242

  19. Changes in Glucose and Glutamine Lymphocyte Metabolisms Induced by Type I Interferon α

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Francisco; Bacurau, Aline V. N.; Vanzelli, Andréa; Meneguello-Coutinho, Marcela; Uchida, Marco C.; Moraes, Milton R.; Almeida, Sandro S.; Wasinski, Frederick; Barros, Carlos C.; Würtele, Martin; Araújo, Ronaldo C.; Costa Rosa, Luís F. B.; Bacurau, Reury F. P.

    2010-01-01

    In lymphocytes (LY), the well-documented antiproliferative effects of IFN-α are associated with inhibition of protein synthesis, decreased amino acid incorporation, and cell cycle arrest. However, the effects of this cytokine on the metabolism of glucose and glutamine in these cells have not been well investigated. Thus, mesenteric and spleen LY of male Wistar rats were cultured in the presence or absence of IFN-α, and the changes on glucose and glutamine metabolisms were investigated. The reduced proliferation of mesenteric LY was accompanied by a reduction in glucose total consumption (35%), aerobic glucose metabolism (55%), maximal activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (49%), citrate synthase activity (34%), total glutamine consumption (30%), aerobic glutamine consumption (20.3%) and glutaminase activity (56%). In LY isolated from spleen, IFNα also reduced the proliferation and impaired metabolism. These data demonstrate that in LY, the antiproliferative effects of IFNα are associated with a reduction in glucose and glutamine metabolisms. PMID:21234393

  20. Glutamine Synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U.; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L.; Hock, Andreas K.; Barnett, Susan C.; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P.; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance tissue requirements of carbon and nitrogen. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle and, that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by Glutamine Synthetase (GS) (cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, 13C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA cycle-derived carbons. Finally, while it is contributed only marginally by the circulation, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes. PMID:26595383

  1. Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform.

    PubMed

    Theron, A; Roth, R L; Hoppe, H; Parkinson, C; van der Westhuyzen, C W; Stoychev, S; Wiid, I; Pietersen, R D; Baker, B; Kenyon, C P

    2017-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is a ubiquitous central enzyme in nitrogen metabolism that is controlled by up to four regulatory mechanisms, including adenylylation of some or all of the twelve subunits by adenylyl transferase. It is considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of tuberculosis, being essential for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and is found extracellularly only in the pathogenic Mycobacterium strains. Human glutamine synthetase is not regulated by the adenylylation mechanism, so the adenylylated form of bacterial glutamine synthetase is of particular interest. Previously published reports show that, when M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase is expressed in Escherichia coli, the E. coli adenylyl transferase does not optimally adenylylate the M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase. Here, we demonstrate the production of soluble adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase in E. coli by the co-expression of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase and M. tuberculosis adenylyl transferase. The differential inhibition of adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase and deadenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase by ATP based scaffold inhibitors are reported. Compounds selected on the basis of their enzyme inhibition were also shown to inhibit M. tuberculosis in the BACTEC 460TB™ assay as well as the intracellular inhibition of M. tuberculosis in a mouse bone-marrow derived macrophage assay.

  2. Enzymes in Glycolysis and the Citric Acid Cycle in the Yeast and Mycelial Forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori; Carbonell, Luis M.

    1966-01-01

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela), and Luis M. Carbonell. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1315–1320. 1966.—Enzymatic activities in glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, and the citric acid cycle in cell-free extracts of the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were examined comparatively. Both forms have the enzymes of these pathways. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase of the mycelial form were higher than those of the yeast form. Another 15 enzymatic activities of the mycelial form were lower than those of the yeast form. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed the most marked difference between the two forms, its activity in the mycelial form being about 20% of that in the yeast form. PMID:5924267

  3. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Kanetsuna, F; Carbonell, L M

    1966-11-01

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela), and Luis M. Carbonell. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1315-1320. 1966.-Enzymatic activities in glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, and the citric acid cycle in cell-free extracts of the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were examined comparatively. Both forms have the enzymes of these pathways. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase of the mycelial form were higher than those of the yeast form. Another 15 enzymatic activities of the mycelial form were lower than those of the yeast form. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed the most marked difference between the two forms, its activity in the mycelial form being about 20% of that in the yeast form.

  4. Glucose is essential for proliferation and the glycolytic enzyme induction that provokes a transition to glycolytic energy production.

    PubMed

    Greiner, E F; Guppy, M; Brand, K

    1994-12-16

    A transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism occurs as mitogen-activated thymocytes undergo proliferation. Glucose utilization and lactate formation increases 18- and 38-fold, respectively, during proliferation. The absolute amount of 14CO2 production by pyruvate dehydrogenase remains constant, while 14CO2 production by the tricarboxylic acid cycle is reduced during transition from a resting to a proliferating state. Addition of 2,4-dinitrophenol, an agent uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation, and phenacinemethosulfate, an electron acceptor, provide evidence that the reduction of glucose oxidation in proliferating thymocytes is caused neither by limitation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle itself nor by an insufficient supply of ADP. Our data suggest that enhanced cytosolic regeneration of NAD+ by induction of the glycolytic enzymes during proliferation effectively competes with NADH transport and its subsequent oxidation in the mitochondria. Mitogen-stimulated rat thymocytes cultured in a conventional medium containing glucose induce their glycolytic enzymes 8-10-fold in the S phase of the cell cycle and divide within a culture period of 72 h. Replacement of glucose by glutamine, glutamine and ribose, or glutamine and uridine prevents glycolytic enzyme induction and thymocyte proliferation. The effect of glucose on glycolytic enzyme induction cannot be mimicked by 3-O-methylglucose or 2-deoxyglucose. In conclusion, glucose is required for proliferation and the glycolytic enzyme induction that mediates the transition from oxidative to glycolytic energy production during the G1/S transition of rat thymocytes.

  5. Glutamine and intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wu, Guoyao; Zhou, Zhigang; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Yuli; Ji, Yun; Li, Wei; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Chuang; Han, Feng; Wu, Zhenlong

    2015-10-01

    The intestinal barrier integrity is essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Dysfunction of the mucosal barrier is associated with increased gut permeability and development of multiple gastrointestinal diseases. Recent studies highlighted a critical role for glutamine, which had been traditionally considered as a nutritionally non-essential amino acid, in activating the mammalian target of rapamycin cell signaling in enterocytes. In addition, glutamine has been reported to enhance intestinal and whole-body growth, to promote enterocyte proliferation and survival, and to regulate intestinal barrier function in injury, infection, weaning stress, and other catabolic conditions. Mechanistically, these effects were mediated by maintaining the intracellular redox status and regulating expression of genes associated with various signaling pathways. Furthermore, glutamine stimulates growth of the small intestinal mucosa in young animals and also enhances ion transport by the gut in neonates and adults. Growing evidence supports the notion that glutamine is a nutritionally essential amino acid for neonates and a conditionally essential amino acid for adults. Thus, as a functional amino acid with multiple key physiological roles, glutamine holds great promise in protecting the gut from atrophy and injury under various stress conditions in mammals and other animals.

  6. A universal RNA polymerase II CTD cycle is orchestrated by complex interplays between kinase, phosphatase, and isomerase enzymes along genes.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Alain R; Jeronimo, Célia; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Laramée, Louise; Fortin, Marie-Ève; Forest, Audrey; Bergeron, Maxime; Hanes, Steven D; Robert, François

    2012-01-27

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is coupled to mRNA processing and chromatin modifications via the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit, consisting of multiple repeats of the heptapeptide YSPTSPS. Pioneering studies showed that CTD serines are differentially phosphorylated along genes in a prescribed pattern during the transcription cycle. Genome-wide analyses challenged this idea, suggesting that this cycle is not uniform among different genes. Moreover, the respective role of enzymes responsible for CTD modifications remains controversial. Here, we systematically profiled the location of the RNAPII phosphoisoforms in wild-type cells and mutants for most CTD modifying enzymes. Together with results of in vitro assays, these data reveal a complex interplay between the modifying enzymes, and provide evidence that the CTD cycle is uniform across genes. We also identify Ssu72 as the Ser7 phosphatase and show that proline isomerization is a key regulator of CTD dephosphorylation at the end of genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Purification and determination of glutamine synthetase by high-performance immunoaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Alhama, J; López-Barea, J; Toribio, F; Roldán, J M

    1992-01-10

    High-performance immunoaffinity chromatography (HPIAC) with anti-glutamine synthetase polyclonal antibodies bound to epoxy-activated silica was used to purify and determine this enzyme from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. A single-step HPIAC procedure with cell-free extracts yielded electroporetically homogeneous glutamine synthetase. In the determination of glutamine synthetase by HPIAC a linear response in the range 10-60 micrograms of enzyme was observed. Recoveries of 70% of the loaded enzymatic activity and 100% of protein were obtained. The determination of glutamine synthetase protein by HPIAC was compared with that obtained by rocket immunoelectrophoresis. The chromatographic method is proposed as a possible alternative to other immunochemical quantitative techniques, particularly when non-limiting amounts of samples are available.

  8. Identification of the glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase of Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Van Dommelen, Anne; Spaepen, Stijn; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2009-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is strictly regulated. One means of regulation is the modulation of activity through adenylylation catalyzed by adenylyltransferases. Using PCR primers based on conserved sequences in glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferases, we amplified part of the glnE gene of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. The complete glnE sequence of A. brasilense Sp245 was retrieved from the draft genome sequence of this organism (http://genomics.ornl.gov/research/azo/). Adenylyltransferase is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of an N-terminal domain responsible for deadenylylation activity and a C-terminal domain responsible for adenylylation activity. Both domains are partially homologous to each other. Residues important for catalytic activity were present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the A. brasilense Sp245 glnE sequence. A glnE mutant was constructed in A. brasilense Sp7 by inserting a kanamycin resistance cassette between the two active domains of the enzyme. The resulting mutant was unable to adenylylate the glutamine synthetase enzyme and was impaired in growth when shifted from nitrogen-poor to nitrogen-rich medium.

  9. Glutamine synthetase induced spinal seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Won; Yoon, Young Sul; Matsumoto, Masato; Huang, Wencheng; Ceraulo, Phil; Young, Wise

    2003-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in the regulation of glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. It is responsible for converting glutamate to glutamine, consuming one ATP and NH3 in the process. Glutamate is neurotoxic when it accumulates in extracellular fluids. We investigated the effects of GS in both a spinal cord injury (SCI) model and normal rats. 0.1-ml of low (2- micro M) and high (55- micro M) concentrations of GS were applied, intrathecally, to the spinal cord of rats under pentobarbital anesthesia. Immediately after an intrathecal injection into the L1-L3 space, the rats developed convulsive movements. These movements initially consisted of myoclonic twitches of the paravertebral muscles close to the injection site, repeated tonic and clonic contractions and extensions of the hind limbs (hind limb seizures) that spread to the fore limbs, and finally rotational axial movements of the body. An EMG of the paravertebral muscles, fore and hind limbs, showed the extent of the muscle activities. GS (2- micro M) caused spinal seizures in the rats after the SCI, and GS (6- micro M) produced seizures in the uninjured anesthetized rats. Denatured GS (70 degrees C, 1 hour) also produced spinal seizures, although higher concentrations were required. We suggest that GS may be directly blocking the release of GABA, or the receptors, in the spinal cord.

  10. Kinetics and spatial distribution of enzymes of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in earthworm biopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang Thi Thu, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2016-04-01

    Earthworms boost microbial activities and consequently form hotspots in soil. The distribution of enzyme activities inside the earthworm biopores is completely unknown. For the first time, we analyzed enzyme kinetics and visualized enzyme distribution inside and outside biopores by in situ soil zymography. Kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) of 6 enzymes β-glucosidase (GLU), cellobiohydrolase (CBH), xylanase (XYL), chitinase (NAG), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and acid phosphatase (APT) were determined in biopores formed by Lumbricus terrestris L.. The spatial distributions of GLU, NAG and APT become visible via zymograms in comparison between earthworm-inhabited and earthworm-free soil. Zymography showed heterogeneous distribution of hotspots in the rhizosphere and biopores. The hotspot areas were 2.4 to 14 times larger in the biopores than in soil without earthworms. The significantly higher Vmax values for GLU, CBH, XYL, NAG and APT in biopores confirmed the stimulation of enzyme activities by earthworms. For CBH, XYL and NAG, the 2- to 3-fold higher Km values in biopores indicated different enzyme systems with lower substrate affinity compared to control soil. The positive effects of earthworms on Vmax were cancelled by the Km increase for CBH, XYL and NAG at a substrate concentration below 20 μmol g-1 soil. The change of enzyme systems reflected a shift in dominant microbial populations toward species with lower affinity to holo-celluloses and to N-acetylglucosamine, and with higher affinity to proteins as compared to the biopores-free soil. We conclude that earthworm biopores are microbial hotspots with much higher and dense distribution of enzyme activities compared to bulk soil. References Spohn M, Kuzyakov Y. (2014) Spatial and temporal dynamics of hotspots of enzyme activity in soil as affected by living and dead roots - a soil zymography analysis, Plant Soil 379: 67-77. Blagodatskaya, E., Kuzyakov, Y., 2013. Review paper: Active microorganisms in soil

  11. Targeting glutamine transport to suppress melanoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Beaumont, Kimberley A; Otte, Nicholas J; Font, Josep; Bailey, Charles G; van Geldermalsen, Michelle; Sharp, Danae M; Tiffen, Jessamy C; Ryan, Renae M; Jormakka, Mika; Haass, Nikolas K; Rasko, John E J; Holst, Jeff

    2014-09-01

    Amino acids, especially leucine and glutamine, are important for tumor cell growth, survival and metabolism. A range of different transporters deliver each specific amino acid into cells, some of which are increased in cancer. These amino acids consequently activate the mTORC1 pathway and drive cell cycle progression. The leucine transporter LAT1/4F2hc heterodimer assembles as part of a large complex with the glutamine transporter ASCT2 to transport amino acids. In this study, we show that the expression of LAT1 and ASCT2 is significantly increased in human melanoma samples and is present in both BRAF(WT) (C8161 and WM852) and BRAF(V600E) mutant (1205Lu and 451Lu) melanoma cell lines. While inhibition of LAT1 by BCH did not suppress melanoma cell growth, the ASCT2 inhibitor BenSer significantly reduced both leucine and glutamine transport in melanoma cells, leading to inhibition of mTORC1 signaling. Cell proliferation and cell cycle progression were significantly reduced in the presence of BenSer in melanoma cells in 2D and 3D cell culture. This included reduced expression of the cell cycle regulators CDK1 and UBE2C. The importance of ASCT2 expression in melanoma was confirmed by shRNA knockdown, which inhibited glutamine uptake, mTORC1 signaling and cell proliferation. Taken together, our study demonstrates that ASCT2-mediated glutamine transport is a potential therapeutic target for both BRAF(WT) and BRAF(V600E) melanoma.

  12. Compartmentalization and cyclic variation of immunoreactivity of renin and angiotensin converting enzyme in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Li, X F; Ahmed, A

    1997-12-01

    Renin and angiotensin converting enzymes (ACE) are responsible for the generation of angiotensin II which regulates blood pressure and fluid/electrolyte homeostasis. The cellular localization and cyclic distribution of renin and ACE in human endometrium are demonstrated in this study. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that both renin and ACE were consistently localized in the endometrial glandular epithelia throughout the menstrual cycle; however, the immunostainings respectively for ACE and renin were weak and moderate in stromal cells of proliferative endometrium and negligible in secretory endometrium. No renin immunostaining was detected around endometrial blood vessels. Although endothelial cells consistently stained for ACE, no renin immunoreactivity was detected in these cells during the menstrual cycle. Western blot analysis using ACE antibody directed against human kidney identified a single protein band with a relative molecular mass of approximately 153 kDa. The intensity of this band showed cyclic variation during the menstrual cycle with the highest ACE expression during the late secretory phase and at menses suggesting that ACE plays a role in the initiation of menstruation. The differences in the cellular distribution patterns of these two enzymes further supports our previous proposition that angiotensin II has different functions at the different stages of the menstrual cycle.

  13. Laser excitation studies of the product release steps in the catalytic cycle of the light-driven enzyme, protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Derren J; Sakuma, Michiyo; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2007-11-02

    The latter stages of the catalytic cycle of the light-driven enzyme, protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase, have been investigated using novel laser photoexcitation methods. The formation of the ternary product complex was initiated with a 6-ns laser pulse, which allowed the product release steps to be kinetically accessed for the first time. Subsequent absorbance changes associated with the release of the NADP+ and chlorophyllide products from the enzyme could be followed on a millisecond timescale. This has facilitated a detailed kinetic and thermodynamic characterization for the interconversion of all the various bound and unbound product species. Initially, NADP+ is released from the enzyme in a biphasic process with rate constants of 1210 and 237 s(-1). The rates of both phases show a significant dependence on the viscosity of the solvent and become considerably slower at higher glycerol concentrations. The fast phase of this process exhibits no dependence on NADP+ concentration, suggesting that conformational changes are required prior to NADP+ release. Following NADP+ release, the NADPH rebinds to the enzyme with a maximum rate constant of approximately 72 s(-1). At elevated temperatures (>298 K) chlorophyllide is released from the enzyme to yield the free product with a maximum rate constant of 20 s(-1). The temperature dependencies of the rates of each of these steps were measured, and enthalpies and entropies of activation were calculated using the Eyring equation. A comprehensive kinetic and thermodynamic scheme for these final stages of the reaction mechanism is presented.

  14. ALDH Enzyme Expression Is Independent of the Spermatogenic Cycle, and Their Inhibition Causes Misregulation of Murine Spermatogenic Processes1

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Travis; Arnold, Samuel L.; Fasnacht, Rachael; Rowsey, Ross; Mitchell, Debra; Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Isoherranen, Nina; Griswold, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Perturbations in the vitamin A metabolism pathway could be a significant cause of male infertility, as well as a target toward the development of a male contraceptive, necessitating the need for a better understanding of how testicular retinoic acid (RA) concentrations are regulated. Quantitative analyses have recently demonstrated that RA is present in a pulsatile manner along testis tubules. However, it is unclear if the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes, which are responsible for RA synthesis, contribute to the regulation of these RA concentration gradients. Previous studies have alluded to fluctuations in ALDH enzymes across the spermatogenic cycle, but these inferences have been based primarily on qualitative transcript localization experiments. Here, we show via various quantitative methods that the three well-known ALDH enzymes (ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3), and an ALDH enzyme previously unreported in the murine testis (ALDH8A1), are not expressed in a stage-specific manner in the adult testis, but do fluctuate throughout juvenile development in perfect agreement with the first appearance of each advancing germ cell type. We also show, via treatments with a known ALDH inhibitor, that lowered testicular RA levels result in an increase in blood-testis barrier permeability, meiotic recombination, and meiotic defects. Taken together, these data further our understanding of the complex regulatory actions of RA on various spermatogenic events and, in contrast with previous studies, also suggest that the ALDH enzymes are not responsible for regulating the recently measured RA pulse. PMID:26632609

  15. Chemical modification of E. coli glutamine synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    DiIanni, C.L.; Colanduoni, J.A.; Collins, R.; Villafranca, J.J.

    1986-05-01

    Thiourea trioxide partially inactivates E. coli glutamine synthetase (GS) (approx.25%) by reacting only with lysine residues, producing homoarginine. Thiourea dioxide totally inactivates GS by reacting with both lysine and histidine residues. The K/sub m/ values for thiourea trioxide modified enzyme are 0.21 mM for ATP and 10 mM for glutamate which are about threefold higher than for native GS. Using (/sup 14/C) thiourea trioxide, 2.3 +/- 0.2 moles of reagent were incorporated per monomer. The same number of homoarginine residues were found by amino acid analysis. Modification of GS with hydroxylamine results in total inactivation resulting from reaction with histidine. Fluorescence titrations indicate that substrate binding to the modified enzyme is weaker than to the native enzyme. EPR spectra of bound Mn/sup 2 +/ indicate that metal ion binding is unaffected by hydroxylamine modification. However, metal ion binding is weaker to the modified enzyme. Protection from hydroxylamine inactivation is observed with ATP + Glutamate, AMPPNP + Glutamate, and MgCl/sub 2/.

  16. Novel control of S-phase of the cell cycle by ubiquitin conjugating enzyme H7

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Timely degradation of regulatory proteins by the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway (UPP) is an established paradigm of cell cycle regulation during the G2/M and G1/S transitions. Less is known about roles for the UPP during S phase. Here we present evidence that dynamic cell cycle dependent changes in l...

  17. Antisense reduction of NADP-malic enzyme in Flaveria bidentis reduces flow of CO2 through the C4 cycle.

    PubMed

    Pengelly, Jasper J L; Tan, Jackie; Furbank, Robert T; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2012-10-01

    An antisense construct targeting the C(4) isoform of NADP-malic enzyme (ME), the primary enzyme decarboxylating malate in bundle sheath cells to supply CO(2) to Rubisco, was used to transform the dicot Flaveria bidentis. Transgenic plants (α-NADP-ME) exhibited a 34% to 75% reduction in NADP-ME activity relative to the wild type with no visible growth phenotype. We characterized the effect of reducing NADP-ME on photosynthesis by measuring in vitro photosynthetic enzyme activity, gas exchange, and real-time carbon isotope discrimination (Δ). In α-NADP-ME plants with less than 40% of wild-type NADP-ME activity, CO(2) assimilation rates at high intercellular CO(2) were significantly reduced, whereas the in vitro activities of both phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and Rubisco were increased. Δ measured concurrently with gas exchange in these plants showed a lower Δ and thus a lower calculated leakiness of CO(2) (the ratio of CO(2) leak rate from the bundle sheath to the rate of CO(2) supply). Comparative measurements on antisense Rubisco small subunit F. bidentis plants showed the opposite effect of increased Δ and leakiness. We use these measurements to estimate the C(4) cycle rate, bundle sheath leak rate, and bundle sheath CO(2) concentration. The comparison of α-NADP-ME and antisense Rubisco small subunit demonstrates that the coordination of the C(3) and C(4) cycles that exist during environmental perturbations by light and CO(2) can be disrupted through transgenic manipulations. Furthermore, our results suggest that the efficiency of the C(4) pathway could potentially be improved through a reduction in C(4) cycle activity or increased C(3) cycle activity.

  18. Cofactor Balance by Nicotinamide Nucleotide Transhydrogenase (NNT) Coordinates Reductive Carboxylation and Glucose Catabolism in the Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA) Cycle*♦

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Paulo A.; Laviolette, Laura A.; Kelleher, Joanne K.; Iliopoulos, Othon; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Cancer and proliferating cells exhibit an increased demand for glutamine-derived carbons to support anabolic processes. In addition, reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate by isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and 2 (IDH2) was recently shown to be a major source of citrate synthesis from glutamine. The role of NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ cofactors in coordinating glucose and glutamine utilization in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is not well understood, with the source(s) of NADPH for the reductive carboxylation reaction remaining unexplored. Nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT) is a mitochondrial enzyme that transfers reducing equivalents from NADH to NADPH. Here, we show that knockdown of NNT inhibits the contribution of glutamine to the TCA cycle and activates glucose catabolism in SkMel5 melanoma cells. The increase in glucose oxidation partially occurred through pyruvate carboxylase and rendered NNT knockdown cells more sensitive to glucose deprivation. Importantly, knocking down NNT inhibits reductive carboxylation in SkMel5 and 786-O renal carcinoma cells. Overexpression of NNT is sufficient to stimulate glutamine oxidation and reductive carboxylation, whereas it inhibits glucose catabolism in the TCA cycle. These observations are supported by an impairment of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratios. Our findings underscore the role of NNT in regulating central carbon metabolism via redox balance, calling for other mechanisms that coordinate substrate preference to maintain a functional TCA cycle. PMID:23504317

  19. Glutamine Synthetase Is a Genetic Determinant of Cell Type–Specific Glutamine Independence in Breast Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Hsiu-Ni; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2011-01-01

    Although significant variations in the metabolic profiles exist among different cells, little is understood in terms of genetic regulations of such cell type–specific metabolic phenotypes and nutrient requirements. While many cancer cells depend on exogenous glutamine for survival to justify the therapeutic targeting of glutamine metabolism, the mechanisms of glutamine dependence and likely response and resistance of such glutamine-targeting strategies among cancers are largely unknown. In this study, we have found a systematic variation in the glutamine dependence among breast tumor subtypes associated with mammary differentiation: basal- but not luminal-type breast cells are more glutamine-dependent and may be susceptible to glutamine-targeting therapeutics. Glutamine independence of luminal-type cells is associated mechanistically with lineage-specific expression of glutamine synthetase (GS). Luminal cells can also rescue basal cells in co-culture without glutamine, indicating a potential for glutamine symbiosis within breast ducts. The luminal-specific expression of GS is directly induced by GATA3 and represses glutaminase expression. Such distinct glutamine dependency and metabolic symbiosis is coupled with the acquisition of the GS and glutamine independence during the mammary differentiation program. Understanding the genetic circuitry governing distinct metabolic patterns is relevant to many symbiotic relationships among different cells and organisms. In addition, the ability of GS to predict patterns of glutamine metabolism and dependency among tumors is also crucial in the rational design and application of glutamine and other metabolic pathway targeted therapies. PMID:21852960

  20. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming) is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1) and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2). Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types. PMID:21867507

  1. Cloning and characterization of subunit genes of ribonucleotide reductase, a cell-cycle-regulated enzyme, from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, D; Schuster, S M; Chakrabarti, R

    1993-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (EC 1.17.4.1; RNR), a cell-cycle-regulated enzyme, catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides by the reduction of the corresponding ribonucleotides. The important role of the RNR in DNA synthesis and cell division makes this enzyme an excellent target for chemotherapy. However, nothing is known about this enzyme from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We have isolated cDNA clones encoding both the large and small RNR subunits. The sequences of full-length clones of the large and small RNR subunits revealed an open reading frame encoding 806 and 349 amino acids, respectively, and showed significant identity with other RNR sequences in the data base. RNA blot analysis showed that the size of the large and small RNR subunit transcripts are 5.4 kb and 2.2 kb, respectively. Both the RNR subunit transcripts fluctuate in level during the cell cycle, reaching a peak preceding maximal DNA synthesis activity. An oligodeoxynucleotide phosphorothioate that is complementary to sequences around the translational initiation codon of the small RNR subunit showed significant inhibition of growth, as measured by the inhibition in DNA synthesis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8265664

  2. Evolution of the enzymes of the citric acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle of higher plants. A case study of endosymbiotic gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Schnarrenberger, Claus; Martin, William

    2002-02-01

    The citric acid or tricarboxylic acid cycle is a central element of higher-plant carbon metabolism which provides, among other things, electrons for oxidative phosphorylation in the inner mitochondrial membrane, intermediates for amino-acid biosynthesis, and oxaloacetate for gluconeogenesis from succinate derived from fatty acids via the glyoxylate cycle in glyoxysomes. The tricarboxylic acid cycle is a typical mitochondrial pathway and is widespread among alpha-proteobacteria, the group of eubacteria as defined under rRNA systematics from which mitochondria arose. Most of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes, and several have been previously shown to branch with their homologues from alpha-proteobacteria, indicating that the eukaryotic nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. Here, we investigate the individual evolutionary histories of all of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle using protein maximum likelihood phylogenies, focusing on the evolutionary origin of the nuclear-encoded proteins in higher plants. The results indicate that about half of the proteins involved in this eukaryotic pathway are most similar to their alpha-proteobacterial homologues, whereas the remainder are most similar to eubacterial, but not specifically alpha-proteobacterial, homologues. A consideration of (a) the process of lateral gene transfer among free-living prokaryotes and (b) the mechanistics of endosymbiotic (symbiont-to-host) gene transfer reveals that it is unrealistic to expect all nuclear genes that were acquired from the alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria to branch specifically with their homologues encoded in the genomes of contemporary alpha-proteobacteria. Rather, even if molecular phylogenetics were to work perfectly (which it does not), then some nuclear-encoded proteins that were acquired from the alpha

  3. [Progress and application prospects of glutamine synthase in plants].

    PubMed

    Feng, Wanjun; Xing, Guofang; Niu, Xulong; Dou, Chen; Han, Yuanhuai

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most important nutrient elements for plants and a major limiting factor in plant growth and crop productivity. Glutamine synthase (GS) is a key enzyme involved in the nitrogen assimilation and recycling in plants. So far, members of the glutamine synthase gene family have been characterized in many plants such as Arabidopsis, rice, wheat, and maize. Reports show that GS are involved in the growth and development of plants, in particular its role in seed production. However, the outcome has generally been inconsistent, which are probably derived from the transcriptional and post-translational regulation of GS genes. In this review, we outlined studies on GS gene classification, QTL mapping, the relationship between GS genes and plant growth with nitrogen and the distribution characters, the biological functions of GS genes, as well as expression control at different regulation levels. In addition, we summarized the application prospects of glutamine synthetase genes in enhancing plant growth and yield by improving the nitrogen use efficiency. The prospects were presented on the improvement of nitrogen utility efficiency in crops and plant nitrogen status diagnosis on the basis of glutamine synthase gene regulation.

  4. 'Futile cycle' enzymes in the flight muscles of North American bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Staples, James F; Koen, Erin L; Laverty, Terence M

    2004-02-01

    In the flight muscles of European bumblebees, high activities of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FbPase) relative to phosphofructokinase (PFK) have suggested a thermogenic 'futile cycle' important for regional endothermy. We find generally low activities of FbPase (0.7-19.7 units g(-1) thorax) in North American Bombus species, with the exception of Bombus rufocinctus, where activity (43.1 units g(-1) thorax) is comparable with that of European congeners. These data, taken with estimates of maximal rates of heat production by cycling, do not support a significant thermogenic role for the PFK/FbPase cycle. In agreement with earlier studies, both PFK and FbPase activities were found to scale allometrically with body size (allometric exponents -0.18 and -1.33, respectively). The cycle may serve to supplement thermogenesis or amplify glycolytic flux in rest-to-flight transitions, especially in smaller bees.

  5. Impact of repeated dry-wet cycles on soil greenhouse gas emissions, extracellular enzyme activity and nutrient cycling in a temperate forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Sonja; Zimmermann, Michael; Bockholt, Jan; Schartner, Markus; Brugner, Paul; Holtermann, Christian; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    Climate change research predicts that both frequency and intensity of weather extremes such as long drought periods and heavy rainfall events will increase in mid Europe over the next decades. Soil moisture is one of the major factors controlling microbial soil processes, and it has been widely agreed that feedback effects between altered precipitation and changed soil fluxes of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4 and N2O could intensify climate change. In a field experiment in an Austrian beech forest, we established a precipitation manipulation experiment, which will be conducted for 3 years. We use roofs to exclude rainfall from reaching the forest soil and simulate drought periods, and a sprinkler system to simulate heavy rainfall events. We applied repeated dry-wet cycles in two intensities: one treatment received 6 cycles of 1 month drought followed by 75mm irrigation within 2 hours, and a parallel treatment received 3 cycles of 2 months drought followed by 150mm irrigation within 3 hours. We took soil samples 1 day before, 1 day after and 1 week after rewetting events and analyzed them for soil nutrients and extracellular enzyme activities. Soil fluxes of CO2, N2O and CH4 were constantly monitored with an automated flux chamber system, and environmental parameters were recorded via dataloggers. In addition, we determined fluxes and nutrient concentrations of bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, litter percolate and soil water. Next we plan to analyze soil microbial community composition via PLFAs to investigate microbial stress resistance and resilience, and we will use ultrasonication to measure soil aggregate stability and protection of soil organic matter in stressed and control plots. The results of the first year show that experimental rainfall manipulation has influenced soil extracellular enzymes. Potential phenoloxidase activity was significantly reduced in stressed treatments compared to control plots. All measured hydrolytic enzymes (cellulase

  6. Exogenous glutamine--compensating a shortage?

    PubMed

    Tjader, Inga; Berg, Agneta; Wernerman, Jan

    2007-09-01

    There is still insufficient knowledge about in vivo glutamine metabolism and the regulation of glutamine homeostasis, particularly during metabolic stress. A shortage of glutamine is associated with a poor outcome, whereas for septic patients in the intensive care unit an increased availability of glutamine can prevent mortality and morbidity. Cellular defense mechanisms depend on normal glutamine availability to respond adequately to challenges presented. In clinical practice, treatment of plasma glutamine depletion improves outcome for the critically ill patient. An increased metabolic need for glutamine must be met with an increased consumption of glutamine. Ordinary food is not a sufficient supply of glutamine for the patient with multiple organ failure in the intensive care unit, but that is also true for several other nutrients. It is, therefore, debatable whether an exogenous supply of glutamine should be regarded as a pharmacologic treatment or whether this just represents physiology in stressed states. If a glutamine shortage requires substitution, supplementation to the normal concentration is compensation of a shortage, and the effect is physiological.

  7. Dominant mycorrhizal association of trees alters carbon and nutrient cycling by selecting for microbial groups with distinct enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Cheeke, Tanya E; Phillips, Richard P; Brzostek, Edward R; Rosling, Anna; Bever, James D; Fransson, Petra

    2017-04-01

    While it is well established that plants associating with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi cycle carbon (C) and nutrients in distinct ways, we have a limited understanding of whether varying abundance of ECM and AM plants in a stand can provide integrative proxies for key biogeochemical processes. We explored linkages between the relative abundance of AM and ECM trees and microbial functioning in three hardwood forests in southern Indiana, USA. Across each site's 'mycorrhizal gradient', we measured fungal biomass, fungal : bacterial (F : B) ratios, extracellular enzyme activities, soil carbon : nitrogen ratio, and soil pH over a growing season. We show that the percentage of AM or ECM trees in a plot promotes microbial communities that both reflect and determine the C to nutrient balance in soil. Soils dominated by ECM trees had higher F : B ratios and more standing fungal biomass than AM stands. Enzyme stoichiometry in ECM soils shifted to higher investment in extracellular enzymes needed for nitrogen and phosphorus acquisition than in C-acquisition enzymes, relative to AM soils. Our results suggest that knowledge of mycorrhizal dominance at the stand or landscape scale may provide a unifying framework for linking plant and microbial community dynamics, and predicting their effects on ecological function.

  8. Nitric oxide inhibits specific enzymes in the Krebs cycle and the respiratory chain of rat hepatocyte mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, J.; Billiar, T.R.; Curran, R.D.; Kim, R.; Simmons, R.L. )

    1990-02-26

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly-reactive molecule produced from L-arginine as recently described. In macrophages and tumor cells, NO inhibits specific mitochondrial enzymes presumably by attacking their intrinsic 4Fe-4S centers. The susceptible enzymes include aconitase of the Krebs cycle and oxidoreductase (complex II) of the electron transport chain. The authors have recently demonstrated that hepatocytes (HC) produce NO in large amounts in response to endotoxin and inflammatory cytokines. To determine whether HC suffer a similar enzyme inhibition, the authors exposed rat HC to increasing concentrations of NO solutions for 5 minutes. The activity of aconitase, complex 1, complex 2, and complex 4 (cytochrome oxidase) was determined by measuring O{sub 2} consumption after addition of enzyme-specific substrates. An NO concentration-dependent inhibition of aconitase, complex 1, and complex 2 was measured. After exposure to 0.6 mM solution, the activity of aconitase was blocked to non-measurable values while complex 1 was reduced to 11 + 8%, and complex 2 to 36 + 2% of the activity of control HC. Complex 4 of the respiratory chain remained intact at 100 + 8%. These data indicate that HC, like other cell types, are susceptible to inhibition of important steps of energy production by NO. As NO is produced in response to septic stimuli, this mechanism may play a role in the metabolic dysfunction of HC in sepsis.

  9. Identification of the algal dimethyl sulfide-releasing enzyme: A missing link in the marine sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcolombri, Uria; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Feldmesser, Ester; Levin, Yishai; Tawfik, Dan S.; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-06-01

    Algal blooms produce large amounts of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a volatile with a diverse signaling role in marine food webs that is emitted to the atmosphere, where it can affect cloud formation. The algal enzymes responsible for forming DMS from dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) remain unidentified despite their critical role in the global sulfur cycle. We identified and characterized Alma1, a DMSP lyase from the bloom-forming algae Emiliania huxleyi. Alma1 is a tetrameric, redox-sensitive enzyme of the aspartate racemase superfamily. Recombinant Alma1 exhibits biochemical features identical to the DMSP lyase in E. huxleyi, and DMS released by various E. huxleyi isolates correlates with their Alma1 levels. Sequence homology searches suggest that Alma1 represents a gene family present in major, globally distributed phytoplankton taxa and in other marine organisms.

  10. Inhibitors of the Glyoxylate Cycle Enzyme ICL1 in Candida albicans for Potential Use as Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Hong-Leong; Lim, Vuanghao; Sandai, Doblin

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that causes candidiasis in humans. In recent years, metabolic pathways in C. albicans have been explored as potential antifungal targets to treat candidiasis. The glyoxylate cycle, which enables C. albicans to survive in nutrient-limited host niches and its. Key enzymes (e.g., isocitrate lyase (ICL1), are particularly attractive antifungal targets for C. albicans. In this study, we used a new screening approach that better reflects the physiological environment that C. albicans cells experience during infection to identify potential inhibitors of ICL. Three compounds (caffeic acid (CAFF), rosmarinic acid (ROS), and apigenin (API)) were found to have antifungal activity against C. albicans when tested under glucose-depleted conditions. We further confirmed the inhibitory potential of these compounds against ICL using the ICL enzyme assay. Lastly, we assessed the bioavailability and toxicity of these compounds using Lipinski's rule-of-five and ADMET analysis. PMID:24781056

  11. Distribution of Two C Cycle Enzymes in Soil Aggregates of a Prairie Chronosequence

    SciTech Connect

    Fansler, Sarah J.; Smith, Jeffery L.; Bolton, Harvey; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2005-11-01

    Recently attention has focused on the potential of using soil as a sink for atmospheric CO2. The objective of this study was to use soil enzymes and classical methods of soil aggregate fractionation to explore the relationship between microbial community function and soil structure of a tallgrass prairie chronosequence. The soils within the chronosequence were: (1) remnant native prairie, (2) agricultural soil, and (3, 4) tallgrass prairies restored from agriculture in 1979 and 1993. β-glucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.21) and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase (NAGase, EC 3.2.1.30) assays were conducted on four different aggregate size fractions (>2 mm, 1 -2 mm, 250µm-1 mm, and 2 - 250 µm) from each soil. Specific activities for both enzymes (µg PNP g-1 soil h-1) were greatest in the microaggregate (2 µm -250 µm) fractions across the chronosequence; however, this size fraction makes up only a small proportion of the whole soil. Therefore, it is the larger macroaggregate-derived enzyme activities that have the greatest impact on the activity of the whole soil. Analyzing both enzymes and the physical structure, a reversion from an agricultural soil through the restored to more like the prairie soil, was not detected. It appears that the function of these microbial community systems in the native tallgrass prairie and agricultural soils of the chronosequence are in equilibria while the lands restored to tallgrass prairie are in an ongoing state of recovery.

  12. Microbial regulation of the soil carbon cycle: evidence from gene-enzyme relationships.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Trivedi, Chanda; Hu, Hangwei; Anderson, Ian C; Jeffries, Thomas C; Zhou, Jizhong; Singh, Brajesh K

    2016-11-01

    A lack of empirical evidence for the microbial regulation of ecosystem processes, including carbon (C) degradation, hinders our ability to develop a framework to directly incorporate the genetic composition of microbial communities in the enzyme-driven Earth system models. Herein we evaluated the linkage between microbial functional genes and extracellular enzyme activity in soil samples collected across three geographical regions of Australia. We found a strong relationship between different functional genes and their corresponding enzyme activities. This relationship was maintained after considering microbial community structure, total C and soil pH using structural equation modelling. Results showed that the variations in the activity of enzymes involved in C degradation were predicted by the functional gene abundance of the soil microbial community (R(2)>0.90 in all cases). Our findings provide a strong framework for improved predictions on soil C dynamics that could be achieved by adopting a gene-centric approach incorporating the abundance of functional genes into process models.

  13. Phosphotransferase-dependent accumulation of (p)ppGpp in response to glutamine deprivation in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Ronneau, Séverin; Petit, Kenny; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    The alarmone (p)ppGpp is commonly used by bacteria to quickly respond to nutrient starvation. Although (p)ppGpp synthetases such as SpoT have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms stimulating alarmone synthesis upon starvation. Here, we describe an essential role of the nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system (PTSNtr) in controlling (p)ppGpp accumulation in Caulobacter crescentus. We show that cells sense nitrogen starvation by way of detecting glutamine deprivation using the first enzyme (EINtr) of PTSNtr. Decreasing intracellular glutamine concentration triggers phosphorylation of EINtr and its downstream components HPr and EIIANtr. Once phosphorylated, both HPr∼P and EIIANtr∼P stimulate (p)ppGpp accumulation by modulating SpoT activities. This burst of second messenger primarily impacts the non-replicative phase of the cell cycle by extending the G1 phase. This work highlights a new role for bacterial PTS systems in stimulating (p)ppGpp accumulation in response to metabolic cues and in controlling cell cycle progression and cell growth. PMID:27109061

  14. Reductive glutamine metabolism by IDH1 mediates lipogenesis under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, Christian M.; Gameiro, Paulo A.; Bell, Eric L.; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Yang, Juanjuan; Hiller, Karsten; Jewell, Christopher M.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Guarente, Leonard; Kelleher, Joanne K.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Iliopoulos, Othon; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) is the central biosynthetic precursor for fatty acid synthesis and protein acetylation. In the conventional view of mammalian cell metabolism, AcCoA is primarily generated from glucose-derived pyruvate through the citrate shuttle and adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase (ACL) in the cytosol1-3. However, proliferating cells that exhibit aerobic glycolysis and those exposed to hypoxia convert glucose to lactate at near stoichiometric levels, directing glucose carbon away from the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and fatty acid synthesis4. Although glutamine is consumed at levels exceeding that required for nitrogen biosynthesis5, the regulation and utilization of glutamine metabolism in hypoxic cells is not well understood. Here we show that human cells employ reductive metabolism of alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG) to synthesize AcCoA for lipid synthesis. This isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) dependent pathway is active in most cell lines under normal culture conditions, but cells grown under hypoxia rely almost exclusively on the reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived αKG for de novo lipogenesis. Furthermore, renal cell lines deficient in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein preferentially utilize reductive glutamine metabolism for lipid biosynthesis even at normal oxygen levels. These results identify a critical role for oxygen in regulating carbon utilization in order to produce AcCoA and support lipid synthesis in mammalian cells. PMID:22101433

  15. Evidence for an operative glutamine translocator in chloroplasts from maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Claros, M G; Aguilar, M L; Cánovas, F M

    2010-09-01

    In higher plants, ammonium is assimilated into amino acids through the glutamine synthetase (GS)/glutamate synthase (GOGAT) cycle. This metabolic cycle is distributed in different cellular compartments in conifer seedlings: glutamine synthesis occurs in the cytosol and glutamate synthesis within the chloroplast. A method for preparing intact chloroplasts of pine cotyledons is presented with the aim of identifying a glutamine-glutamate translocator. Glutamine-glutamate exchange has been studied using the double silicone layer system, suggesting the existence of a translocator that imports glutamine into the chloroplast and exports glutamate to the cytoplasm. The translocator identified is specific for glutamine and glutamate, and the kinetic constants for both substrates indicate that it is unsaturated at intracellular concentrations. Thus, the experimental evidence obtained supports the model of the GS/GOGAT cycle in developing pine seedlings that accounts for the stoichiometric balance of metabolites. As a result, the efficient assimilation of free ammonia produced by photorespiration, nitrate reduction, storage protein mobilisation, phenylpropanoid pathway or S-adenosylmethionine synthesis is guaranteed.

  16. Distribution of immunoreactive glutamine synthetase in the adult human and mouse brain. Qualitative and quantitative observations with special emphasis on extra-astroglial protein localization.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bannier, Jana; Meyer-Lotz, Gabriela; Steiner, Johann; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Walter, Martin; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, thus playing a pivotal role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis. Despite a plethora of studies on this enzyme, knowledge about the regional and cellular distribution of this enzyme in human brain is still fragmentary. Therefore, we mapped fourteen post-mortem brains of psychically healthy individuals for the distribution of the glutamine synthetase immunoreactive protein. It was found that glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity is expressed in multiple gray and white matter astrocytes, but also in oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and certain neurons. Since a possible extra-astrocytic expression of glutamine synthetase is highly controversial, we paid special attention to its appearance in oligodendrocytes and neurons. By double immunolabeling of mouse brain slices and cultured mouse brain cells for glutamine synthetase and cell-type-specific markers we provide evidence that besides astrocytes subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, microglial cells and neurons express glutamine synthetase. Moreover, we show that glutamine synthetase-immunopositive neurons are not randomly distributed throughout human and mouse brain, but represent a subpopulation of nitrergic (i.e. neuronal nitric oxide synthase expressing) neurons. Possible functional implications of an extra-astrocytic localization of glutamine synthetase are discussed.

  17. Determination of Compartmented Metabolite Pools by a Combination of Rapid Fractionation of Oat Mesophyll Protoplasts and Enzymic Cycling 1

    PubMed Central

    Hampp, Rüdiger; Goller, Marion; Füllgraf, Helene

    1984-01-01

    In vivo pool sizes of a range of metabolites have been determined in subcellular fractions of darkened and illuminated mesophyll protoplasts of Avena sativa L. These estimations were made by combining a method of rapid protoplast fractionation with enzymic cycling techniques. Results are given for reduced and oxidized pyridine nucleotides, triose phosphates, 3-phosphoglycerate, inorganic phosphate, aspartate, malate, oxaloacetate, glutamate, 2-oxoglutarate, and citrate, from chloroplasts, mitochondria, and a fraction representing the remainder of the protoplast. The results indicate distinct differences of compartmented levels of certain metabolites between darkened and illuminated protoplasts. PMID:16663726

  18. The MYC mRNA 3'-UTR couples RNA polymerase II function to glutamine and ribonucleotide levels.

    PubMed

    Dejure, Francesca R; Royla, Nadine; Herold, Steffi; Kalb, Jacqueline; Walz, Susanne; Ade, Carsten P; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Vanselow, Jens T; Schlosser, Andreas; Wolf, Elmar; Kempa, Stefan; Eilers, Martin

    2017-07-03

    Deregulated expression of MYC enhances glutamine utilization and renders cell survival dependent on glutamine, inducing "glutamine addiction". Surprisingly, colon cancer cells that express high levels of MYC due to WNT pathway mutations are not glutamine-addicted but undergo a reversible cell cycle arrest upon glutamine deprivation. We show here that glutamine deprivation suppresses translation of endogenous MYC via the 3'-UTR of the MYC mRNA, enabling escape from apoptosis. This regulation is mediated by glutamine-dependent changes in adenosine-nucleotide levels. Glutamine deprivation causes a global reduction in promoter association of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and slows transcriptional elongation. While activation of MYC restores binding of MYC and RNAPII function on most promoters, restoration of elongation is imperfect and activation of MYC in the absence of glutamine causes stalling of RNAPII on multiple genes, correlating with R-loop formation. Stalling of RNAPII and R-loop formation can cause DNA damage, arguing that the MYC 3'-UTR is critical for maintaining genome stability when ribonucleotide levels are low. © 2017 The Authors.

  19. The effects of acidosis and alkalosis on the metabolism of glutamine and glutamate in renal cortex slices

    PubMed Central

    Kamm, Donald E.; Strope, Gerald L.

    1972-01-01

    Studies of the metabolism of glutamine and glutamate by renal cortex slices from acidotic, alkalotic, and control rats were performed. 88-95% of the glutamine and 104-115% of the glutamate taken up from the medium could be accounted for by the products found. Acidosis increased glutamine uptake and conversion to ammonia, CO2, glucose, lactate, pyruvate, lipid, and protein. The increase in glutamine conversion to ammonia after acidosis could be completely accounted for by the associated increase in its conversion to glucose, glutamate, lactate, and pyruvate. When glutamate metabolism was examined, acidosis did not affect substrate uptake but did increase its conversion to ammonia, glucose, lactate, CO2, and lipid. The increase in 14CO2 from U-14C-glutamine and U-14C-glutamate found with cortex slices from acidotic animals could be explained by the CO2 production calculated to be associated with the enhanced conversion of these substrates to other products during acidosis. 14CO2 production from 1.2-14C-acetate was found to be significantly increased in alkalosis rather than acidosis. These studies suggest that in the rat, the rate at which glutamine is completely oxidized in the Krebs cycle is not a factor regulating renal ammonia production. A comparison of the effects of acidbase status on glutamine and glutamate metabolism suggests that either glutamine transport or glutamine transaminase activity are significantly increased by acidosis. Images PMID:5057130

  20. Sub-lethal concentrations of activated complement increase rat lymphocyte glutamine utilization and oxidation while lethal concentrations cause death by a mechanism involving ATP depletion.

    PubMed

    Bacurau, R F P; O'Toole, C E; Newsholme, P; Costa Rosa, L F B P

    2002-09-01

    Nucleated cells are more resistant to complement-mediated cell death than anucleated cells such as erythrocytes. There are few reports concerning the metabolic response of nucleated cells subjected to sub-lethal complement attack. It is possible that the rate of utilization of specific metabolic fuels by the cell is increased to enhance cell defence. We have measured the maximum activity of hexokinase, citrate synthase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutaminase in rat mesenteric lymphocytes exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of activated complement (present in zymosan-activated serum, ZAS). These enzymes were carefully selected as they indicate changes of flux in glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose phosphate pathway and glutaminolysis, respectively. The only enzyme activity to change on exposure of lymphocytes to ZAS was glutaminase, which was enhanced approximately by two-fold. Although rates of both glutamine and glucose utilization were enhanced by exposure to ZAS, only the rate of oxidation of glutamine was increased. Complement kills anucleated cells by simple osmotic lysis. However, it is likely that some nucleated cells will display characteristics of an ordered death mechanism and we have demonstrated that the concentration of lymphocyte ATP is dramatically decreased by activated complement. Nevertheless, the extent of cell death could be significantly reduced by the addition of inhibitors of the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). We conclude that glutamine metabolism is not only important for lymphocyte proliferative responses but is also important for cell defence from sub-lethal concentrations of activated complement. The rapid rate of complement-induced lymphocyte death reported here is suggested to be a consequence of over-activation of the nuclear enzyme PARP and ATP depletion.

  1. Ammonia Fixation via Glutamine Synthetase and Glutamate Synthase in the CAM Plant Cissus quadrangularis L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael G.; Sprengart, Michael L.; Kusnan, Misri; Fock, Heinrich P.

    1986-01-01

    Succulent stems of Cissus quadrangularis L. (Vitaceae) contain glutamine synthetase, glutamate synthase, and glutamate dehydrogenase. The CO2 and water gas exchanges of detached internodes were typical for Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. During three physiological phases, e.g. in the dark, in the early illumination period after stomata closure, and during the late light phase with the stomata wide open, 15NH4Cl was injected into the central pith of stem sections. The kinetics of 15N labeling in glutamate and glutamine suggested that glutamine synthetase was involved in the initial ammonia fixation. In the presence of methionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, the incorporation of 15N derived from 15NH4Cl was almost completely inhibited. Injections of amido-15N glutamine demonstrated a potential for 15N transfer from the amido group of glutamine into glutamate which was suppressed by the glutamate synthase inhibitor, azaserine. The evidence indicates that glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase could assimilate ammonia and cycle nitrogen during all phases of Crassulacean acid metabolism. PMID:16664820

  2. Ammonia Fixation via Glutamine Synthetase and Glutamate Synthase in the CAM Plant Cissus quadrangularis L.

    PubMed

    Berger, M G; Sprengart, M L; Kusnan, M; Fock, H P

    1986-06-01

    Succulent stems of Cissus quadrangularis L. (Vitaceae) contain glutamine synthetase, glutamate synthase, and glutamate dehydrogenase. The CO(2) and water gas exchanges of detached internodes were typical for Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. During three physiological phases, e.g. in the dark, in the early illumination period after stomata closure, and during the late light phase with the stomata wide open, (15)NH(4)Cl was injected into the central pith of stem sections. The kinetics of (15)N labeling in glutamate and glutamine suggested that glutamine synthetase was involved in the initial ammonia fixation. In the presence of methionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, the incorporation of (15)N derived from (15)NH(4)Cl was almost completely inhibited. Injections of amido-(15)N glutamine demonstrated a potential for (15)N transfer from the amido group of glutamine into glutamate which was suppressed by the glutamate synthase inhibitor, azaserine. The evidence indicates that glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase could assimilate ammonia and cycle nitrogen during all phases of Crassulacean acid metabolism.

  3. Effect of glutamine limitation on the death of attached Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfeliu, A.; Stephanopoulos, G. )

    1999-07-05

    The effect of glutamine depletion on the death of attached Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was investigated. Experiments were performed using an anchorage dependent CHO cell line expressing [gamma]-IFN and a second cell line obtained by transfection of that cell line with the human bcl-2 (hbcl-2). Either cell line could grow in media devoid of glutamine with minimal cell death due to endogenous glutamine synthetase activity that allowed cells to synthesize glutamine from glutamic acid in the medium. However, compared to control cultures in glutamine-containing media, the cell growth rate in glutamine-free media was slower with an increased fraction of cells distributed in the G[sub 0]/G[sub 1] phase. The slower rate of cell cycling apparently protected the cells from entering apoptosis when they were stimulated to proliferate in an environment devoid of other protective factors, such as serum or over-expressed hbcl-2. The depletion of both glutamine and glutamic acid did cause cell death, which could be mitigated by hbcl-2 over-expression.

  4. Electrocatalytic mechanism of reversible hydrogen cycling by enzymes and distinctions between the major classes of hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Hexter, Suzannah V.; Grey, Felix; Happe, Thomas; Climent, Victor; Armstrong, Fraser A.

    2012-01-01

    The extraordinary ability of Fe- and Ni-containing enzymes to catalyze rapid and efficient H+/H2 interconversion—a property otherwise exclusive to platinum metals—has been investigated in a series of experiments combining variable-temperature protein film voltammetry with mathematical modeling. The results highlight important differences between the catalytic performance of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and [NiFe]-hydrogenases and justify a simple model for reversible catalytic electron flow in enzymes and electrocatalysts that should be widely applicable in fields as diverse as electrochemistry, catalysis, and bioenergetics. The active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenases, an intricate Fe-carbonyl complex known as the “H cluster,” emerges as a supreme catalyst. PMID:22802675

  5. Biochemical and inhibition studies of glutamine synthetase from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay; Yadav, Shailendra; Soumya, Neelagiri; Kumar, Rohit; Babu, Neerupudi Kishore; Singh, Sushma

    2017-03-25

    Leishmaniasis is a group of tropical diseases caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Leishmania donovani is a protozoan parasite that causes visceral leishmaniasis, a fatal disease if left untreated. Chemotherapy for leishmaniasis is problematic as the available drugs are toxic, costly and shows drug resistance, hence, there is a necessity to look out for the novel drug targets, chemical entities and vaccine. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In the present study, we have identified and characterized GS from L. donovani. The nucleotide sequence encoding putative glutamine synthetase like sequence from L. donovani (LdGS, LDBPK_060370) was cloned. A 43.5 kDa protein with 6X-His tag at the C-terminal end was obtained by overexpression of LdGS in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain. Expression of native LdGS in promastigotes and recombinant L. donovani glutamine synthetase (rLdGS) was confirmed by western blot analysis. An increase in expression of GS was observed at different phases of growth of the parasite. Expression of LdGS in promastigote and amastigote was confirmed by western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence studies of both the promastigote and amastigote stages of the parasite revealed the presence of LdGS in cytoplasm. GS exists as a single copy gene in parasite genome. Kinetic analysis of GS enzyme revealed Km value of 26.3 ± 0.4 mM for l- glutamate and Vmax value of 2.15 ± 0.07 U mg(-1). Present study confirms the presence of glutamine synthetase in L. donovani and provides comprehensive overview of LdGS for further validating it as a potential drug target.

  6. Complementary Enzymes Activities in Organic Phosphorus Mineralization and Cycling by Phosphohydrolases in Soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inorganic and organic phosphates react strongly with soil constituents, resulting in relatively low concentrations of soluble phosphates in the soil solution. Multiple competing reactions control the solution-phase concentration and the cycling of phosphorus-containing organic substrates and the re...

  7. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  8. Intravenous glutamine appears to reduce the severity of symptomatic platinum-induced neuropathy: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Seng; Wu, Chia-Lung; Fan, Chung-Wei; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Chang, Pei-Hung

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (IV) glutamine or calcium/magnesium (Ca/Mg) infusion against platinum-induced neuropathy. Patients undergoing platinum-based (oxaliplatin or cisplatin) therapy were randomized to receive IV glutamine or Ca/Mg infusion during four cycles of chemotherapy, from the fifth cycle of therapy to the eighth cycle. The total neuropathy score (TNS) was evaluated at the end of the fourth course of chemotherapy (as baseline) and at the end of the eighth cycle (as end-of treatment). The intent-to-treat analysis of the end point included 29 patients in the glutamine arm and 26 patients in the Ca/Mg arm. The mean TNS of both cohorts increased significantly. The baseline and end-of-treatment TNSs between the two groups were not statistically different. Patients with symptoms at baseline (N = 29) had significantly lower scores at the end of the study in the glutamine group (P = 0.045). Besides, glutamine group patients who initially had only sensory symptoms (N = 23) also had significantly lower scores at the study's end (P = 0.035). Neither IV glutamine nor Ca/Mg infusion prevented further worsening of platinum-induced neuropathy. However, IV glutamine apparently reduced the severity of symptomatic platinum-induced neuropathy.

  9. Endogenous glutamine production in critically ill patients: the effect of exogenous glutamine supplementation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Glutamine rate of appearance (Ra) may be used as an estimate of endogenous glutamine production. Recently a technique employing a bolus injection of isotopically labeled glutamine was introduced, with the potential to allow for multiple assessments of the glutamine Ra over time in critically ill patients, who may not be as metabolically stable as healthy individuals. Here the technique was used to evaluate the endogenous glutamine production in critically ill patients in the fed state with and without exogenous glutamine supplementation intravenously. Methods Mechanically ventilated patients (n = 11) in the intensive care unit (ICU) were studied on two consecutive days during continuous parenteral feeding. To allow the patients to be used as their own controls, they were randomized for the reference measurement during basal feeding without supplementation, before or after the supplementation period. Glutamine Ra was determined by a bolus injection of 13C-glutamine followed by a period of frequent sampling to establish the decay-curve for the glutamine tracer. Exogenous glutamine supplementation was given by intravenous infusion of a glutamine containing dipeptide, L-alanyl-L-glutamine, 0.28 g/kg during 20 hours. Results A 14% increase of endogenous glutamine Ra was seen at the end of the intravenous supplementation period as compared to the basal measurements (P = 0.009). Conclusions The bolus injection technique to measure glutamine Ra to estimate the endogenous production of glutamine in critically ill patients was demonstrated to be useful for repetitive measurements. The hypothesized attenuation of endogenous glutamine production during L-alanyl-L-glutamine infusion given as a part of full nutrition was not seen. PMID:24731231

  10. Studies on cartilage formation XXL Activity of enzymes belonging to the pentose-phosphate cycle in the regenerating articular surface.

    PubMed

    Oláh, E H; Hadházy, C; Glant, T

    1979-01-01

    The distal articular surface of the femur was removed operatively in 36 dogs. In the regenerating chondrifying articular surface and in the granulation tissue adhering to the capsule glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activities were determined 7, 33 and 70 days after operation. In both tissues the activity of these enzymes characteristic of the pentose phosphate cycle ws the highest in the early postoperative stage. This initial increase in activity was followed by a marked reduction in the regenerating articular surface and by a moderate decrease in the tissue adhering to the capsule. For the loss in activity occurring in the chondrifying articular surface, the connective tissue cells (fibroblasts) are responsible. Cartilage precursors and young chondrocytes show a high glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate activity. Presumably, in the given case of the functions of the pentose-phosphate cycle the NADPH generation and supply of building stones prevail. The activity of these enzymes ws determined in the articular cartilage and in the synovial membrane of the knee joint in further 18 dogs. The activity in the articular cartilage was very slight as compared to that in the synovial membrane.

  11. Isolation and compositional analysis of a CP12-associated complex of calvin cycle enzymes from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Marri, Lucia; Sparla, Francesca; Salvucci, Michael E

    2011-06-01

    Two Calvin Cycle enzymes, NAD(P)-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) form a multiprotein complex with CP12, a small intrinsically-unstructured protein. Under oxidizing conditions, association with CP12 confers redox-sensitivity to the otherwise redox-insensitive A isoform of GAPDH (GapA) and provides an additional level of down-regulation to the redox-regulated PRK. To determine if CP12-mediated regulation is specific for GAPDH and PRK in vivo, a high molecular weight complex containing CP12 was isolated from tobacco chloroplasts and leaves and its protein composition was characterized. Gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analyses after separation of stromal proteins by size fractionation verified that the GAPDH (both isoforms) and PRK co-migrated with CP12 in dark- but not light-adapted chloroplasts. Nano-liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry of the isolated complex identified only CP12, GAPDH and PRK. Since nearly all of the CP12 from darkened chloroplasts migrates with GADPH and PRK as a high molecular mass species, these data indicate that the tight association of tobacco CP12 with GAPDH and PRK is specific and involves no other Calvin Cycle enzymes.

  12. The purification and properties of the glutamine synthetase from the cytosol of Soya-bean root nodules.

    PubMed Central

    McParland, R H; Guevara, J G; Becker, R R; Evans, H J

    1976-01-01

    The major portion of glutamine synthetase activity in root nodules of soya-bean plants is associated with the cytosol rather than with Rhizobium japonicum bacteroids. Glutamine synthetase accounts for about 2% of the total soluble protein in nodule cytosol. Glutamine synthetase from nodule cytosol has been purified by a procedure involving fractionation with protamine sulphate, ammonium sulphate and polypropylene glycol, chromatography on DEAE-Bio-Gel A and Bio-Gel A-5m and affinity chromatography on glutamate-agarose columns. The purified preparation appeared to be homogeneous in the analytical ultracentrifuge. From sedimentation-equilibrium experiments a mol. wt. of about 376000 was determined for the native enzyme and 47300 for the enzyme in guanidinium chloride. From these data and measurements of electron micrographs, we have concluded that glutamine synthetase from nodule cytosol consists of eight subunits arranged in two sets of planar tetramers which form a cubical configuration with dimensions of about 10 nm (100 A) across each side. Glutamine synthetase from nodule cytosol has a higher glycine and proline content and a lower content of phenylalanine than the glutamine synthetase that has been prepared from pea seed. The cytosol enzyme contains four half-cystine molecules per subunit, which is in contrast with two reported for the enzyme from pea seed. Enzyme activity is striking influenced by the relative proportion of Mg2+ and Mn2+ in the assay medium. Activity is inhibited by feedback inhibitors and is influenced by energy charge. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:8035

  13. Combining multi-mutant and modular thermodynamic cycles to measure energetic coupling networks in enzyme catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Charles W.; Chandrasekaran, Srinivas Niranj; Weinreb, Violetta; Li, Li; Williams, Tishan

    2017-01-01

    We measured and cross-validated the energetics of networks in Bacillus stearothermophilus Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) using both multi-mutant and modular thermodynamic cycles. Multi-dimensional combinatorial mutagenesis showed that four side chains from this “molecular switch” move coordinately with the active-site Mg2+ ion as the active site preorganizes to stabilize the transition state for amino acid activation. A modular thermodynamic cycle consisting of full-length TrpRS, its Urzyme, and the Urzyme plus each of the two domains deleted in the Urzyme gives similar energetics. These dynamic linkages, although unlikely to stabilize the transition-state directly, consign the active-site preorganization to domain motion, assuring coupled vectorial behavior. PMID:28191480

  14. Starch-Branching Enzyme IIa Is Required for Proper Diurnal Cycling of Starch in Leaves of Maize1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Yandeau-Nelson, Marna D.; Laurens, Lieve; Shi, Zi; Xia, Huan; Smith, Alison M.; Guiltinan, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Starch-branching enzyme (SBE), a glucosyl transferase, is required for the highly regular pattern of α-1,6 bonds in the amylopectin component of starch. In the absence of SBEIIa, as shown previously in the sbe2a mutant of maize (Zea mays), leaf starch has drastically reduced branching and the leaves exhibit a severe senescence-like phenotype. Detailed characterization of the maize sbe2a mutant revealed that SBEIIa is the primary active branching enzyme in the leaf and that in its absence plant growth is affected. Both seedling and mature sbe2a mutant leaves do not properly degrade starch during the night, resulting in hyperaccumulation. In mature sbe2a leaves, starch hyperaccumulation is greatest in visibly senescing regions but also observed in green tissue and is correlated to a drastic reduction in photosynthesis within the leaf. Starch granules from sbe2a leaves observed via scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses are larger, irregular, and amorphous as compared with the highly regular, discoid starch granules observed in wild-type leaves. This appears to trigger premature senescence, as shown by an increased expression of genes encoding proteins known to be involved in senescence and programmed cell death processes. Together, these results indicate that SBEIIa is required for the proper diurnal cycling of transitory starch within the leaf and suggest that SBEIIa is necessary in producing an amylopectin structure amenable to degradation by starch metabolism enzymes. PMID:21508184

  15. Citric-acid cycle key enzyme activities during in vitro growth and metacyclogenesis of Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Louassini, M; Foulquié, M; Benítez, R; Adroher, J

    1999-08-01

    The activities of 5 key regulatory enzymes in most energetic systems, namely citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7, CS), NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.42, ICDH), succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1, SDH), L-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37, MDH), and decarboxylating malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40, ME), were measured during the growth and metacyclogenesis of a cutaneous (CL) and a visceral (VL) strain of Leishmania infantum. As occurs with other Leishmania species, infective promastigotes were present along all phases of growth, but their percentages were higher at the early stationary phase for VL and the end of the same phase for CL. High CS and SDH activities were detected in both strains, as compared with other trypanosomatids, bringing more evidence for an actively functional citric-acid cycle in L. infantum. Both strains showed higher levels of CS, ICDH, and MDH and lower SDH and ME activities when more metacyclic promastigotes were present, but in VL these changes paralleled an increase in glucose consumption, whereas in CL these changes coincided with an NH3 hyperproduction. This suggests that the energy metabolism during L. infantum growth and metacyclogenesis is affected by regulated enzymes that probably respond to changes in the culture medium in the levels of glucose and amino acids.

  16. Starch-branching enzyme IIa is required for proper diurnal cycling of starch in leaves of maize.

    PubMed

    Yandeau-Nelson, Marna D; Laurens, Lieve; Shi, Zi; Xia, Huan; Smith, Alison M; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2011-06-01

    Starch-branching enzyme (SBE), a glucosyl transferase, is required for the highly regular pattern of α-1,6 bonds in the amylopectin component of starch. In the absence of SBEIIa, as shown previously in the sbe2a mutant of maize (Zea mays), leaf starch has drastically reduced branching and the leaves exhibit a severe senescence-like phenotype. Detailed characterization of the maize sbe2a mutant revealed that SBEIIa is the primary active branching enzyme in the leaf and that in its absence plant growth is affected. Both seedling and mature sbe2a mutant leaves do not properly degrade starch during the night, resulting in hyperaccumulation. In mature sbe2a leaves, starch hyperaccumulation is greatest in visibly senescing regions but also observed in green tissue and is correlated to a drastic reduction in photosynthesis within the leaf. Starch granules from sbe2a leaves observed via scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses are larger, irregular, and amorphous as compared with the highly regular, discoid starch granules observed in wild-type leaves. This appears to trigger premature senescence, as shown by an increased expression of genes encoding proteins known to be involved in senescence and programmed cell death processes. Together, these results indicate that SBEIIa is required for the proper diurnal cycling of transitory starch within the leaf and suggest that SBEIIa is necessary in producing an amylopectin structure amenable to degradation by starch metabolism enzymes.

  17. Fresh insight to functioning of selected enzymes of the nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Eady, Robert R; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Hasnain, S Samar

    2016-04-01

    The global nitrogen cycle is the process in which different forms of environmental N are interconverted by microorganisms either for assimilation into biomass or in respiratory energy-generating pathways. This short review highlights developments over the last 5 years in our understanding of functionality of nitrogenase, Cu-nitrite reductase, NO reductase and N2O reductase, complex metalloenzymes that catalyze electron/proton-coupled substrate reduction reactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutations in MDH2, Encoding a Krebs Cycle Enzyme, Cause Early-Onset Severe Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ait-El-Mkadem, Samira; Dayem-Quere, Manal; Gusic, Mirjana; Chaussenot, Annabelle; Bannwarth, Sylvie; François, Bérengère; Genin, Emmanuelle C; Fragaki, Konstantina; Volker-Touw, Catharina L M; Vasnier, Christelle; Serre, Valérie; van Gassen, Koen L I; Lespinasse, Françoise; Richter, Susan; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Rouzier, Cécile; Mochel, Fanny; De Saint-Martin, Anne; Abi Warde, Marie-Thérèse; de Sain-van der Velde, Monique G M; Jans, Judith J M; Amiel, Jeanne; Avsec, Ziga; Mertes, Christian; Haack, Tobias B; Strom, Tim; Meitinger, Thomas; Bonnen, Penelope E; Taylor, Robert W; Gagneur, Julien; van Hasselt, Peter M; Rötig, Agnès; Delahodde, Agnès; Prokisch, Holger; Fuchs, Sabine A; Paquis-Flucklinger, Véronique

    2017-01-05

    MDH2 encodes mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (MDH), which is essential for the conversion of malate to oxaloacetate as part of the proper functioning of the Krebs cycle. We report bi-allelic pathogenic mutations in MDH2 in three unrelated subjects presenting with early-onset generalized hypotonia, psychomotor delay, refractory epilepsy, and elevated lactate in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Functional studies in fibroblasts from affected subjects showed both an apparently complete loss of MDH2 levels and MDH2 enzymatic activity close to null. Metabolomics analyses demonstrated a significant concomitant accumulation of the MDH substrate, malate, and fumarate, its immediate precursor in the Krebs cycle, in affected subjects' fibroblasts. Lentiviral complementation with wild-type MDH2 cDNA restored MDH2 levels and mitochondrial MDH activity. Additionally, introduction of the three missense mutations from the affected subjects into Saccharomyces cerevisiae provided functional evidence to support their pathogenicity. Disruption of the Krebs cycle is a hallmark of cancer, and MDH2 has been recently identified as a novel pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma susceptibility gene. We show that loss-of-function mutations in MDH2 are also associated with severe neurological clinical presentations in children. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhanced mitochondrial glutamine anaplerosis suppresses pancreatic cancer growth through autophagy inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Min; Hwang, Sunsook; Park, Kyungsoo; Yang, Seungyeon; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells use precursors derived from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to support their unlimited growth. However, continuous export of TCA cycle intermediates results in the defect of mitochondrial integrity. Mitochondria glutamine metabolism plays an essential role for the maintenance of mitochondrial functions and its biosynthetic roles by refilling the mitochondrial carbon pool. Here we report that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells have a distinct dependence on mitochondrial glutamine metabolism. Whereas glutamine flux into mitochondria contributes to proliferation of most cancer cells, enhanced glutamine anaplerosis results in a pronounced suppression of PDAC growth. A cell membrane permeable α-ketoglutarate analog or overexpression of glutamate dehydrogenase lead to decreased proliferation and increased apoptotic cell death in PDAC cells but not other cancer cells. We found that enhanced glutamine anaplerosis inhibits autophagy, required for tumorigenic growth of PDAC, by activating mammalian TORC1. Together, our results reveal that glutamine anaplerosis is a crucial regulator of growth and survival of PDAC cells, which may provide novel therapeutic approaches to treat these cancers. PMID:27477484

  20. Enzymology of Glutamine Metabolism Related to Senescence and Seed Development in the Pea (Pisum sativum L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Richard; Beevers, Leonard

    1978-01-01

    The metabolism of glutamine in the leaf and subtended fruit of the aging pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Burpeeana) has been studied in relation to changes in the protein, chlorophyll, and free amino acid content of each organ during ontogenesis. Glutamine synthetase [EC 6.3.1.2] activity was measured during development and senescence in each organ. Glutamate synthetase [EC 2.6.1.53] activity was followed in the pod and cotyledon during development and maturation. Maximal glutamine synthetase activity and free amino acid accumulation occurred together in the young leaf. Glutamine synthetase (in vitro) in leaf extracts greatly exceeded the requirement (in vivo) for reduced N in the organ. Glutamine synthetase activity, although declining in the senescing leaf, was sufficient (in vitro) to produce glutamine from all of the N released during protein hydrolysis (in vivo). Maximal glutamine synthetase activity in the pod was recorded 6 days after the peak accumulation of the free amino acids in this organ. In the young pod, free amino acids accumulated as glutamate synthetase activity increased. Maximal pod glutamate synthetase activity occurred simultaneously with maximal leaf glutamine synthetase activity, but 6 days prior to the corresponding maximum of glutamine synthetase in the pod. Cotyledonary glutamate synthetase activity increased during the assimilatory phase of embryo growth which coincided with the loss of protein and free amino acids from the leaf and pod; maximal activity was recorded simultaneously with maximal pod glutamine synthetase. We suggest that the activity of glutamine synthetase in the supply organs (leaf, pod) furnishes the translocated amide necessary for the N nutrition of the cotyledon. The subsequent activity of glutamate synthetase could provide a mechanism for the transfer of imported amide N to alpha amino N subsequently used in protein synthesis. In vitro measurements of enzyme activity indicate there was sufficient catalytic potential in

  1. The krebs cycle enzyme α-ketoglutarate decarboxylase is an essential glycosomal protein in bloodstream African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Steven; Szempruch, Anthony; Hajduk, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    α-Ketoglutarate decarboxylase (α-KDE1) is a Krebs cycle enzyme found in the mitochondrion of the procyclic form (PF) of Trypanosoma brucei. The bloodstream form (BF) of T. brucei lacks a functional Krebs cycle and relies exclusively on glycolysis for ATP production. Despite the lack of a functional Krebs cycle, α-KDE1 was expressed in BF T. brucei and RNA interference knockdown of α-KDE1 mRNA resulted in rapid growth arrest and killing. Cell death was preceded by progressive swelling of the flagellar pocket as a consequence of recruitment of both flagellar and plasma membranes into the pocket. BF T. brucei expressing an epitope-tagged copy of α-KDE1 showed localization to glycosomes and not the mitochondrion. We used a cell line transfected with a reporter construct containing the N-terminal sequence of α-KDE1 fused to green fluorescent protein to examine the requirements for glycosome targeting. We found that the N-terminal 18 amino acids of α-KDE1 contain overlapping mitochondrion- and peroxisome-targeting sequences and are sufficient to direct localization to the glycosome in BF T. brucei. These results suggest that α-KDE1 has a novel moonlighting function outside the mitochondrion in BF T. brucei. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. The Krebs Cycle Enzyme α-Ketoglutarate Decarboxylase Is an Essential Glycosomal Protein in Bloodstream African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Steven; Szempruch, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    α-Ketoglutarate decarboxylase (α-KDE1) is a Krebs cycle enzyme found in the mitochondrion of the procyclic form (PF) of Trypanosoma brucei. The bloodstream form (BF) of T. brucei lacks a functional Krebs cycle and relies exclusively on glycolysis for ATP production. Despite the lack of a functional Krebs cycle, α-KDE1 was expressed in BF T. brucei and RNA interference knockdown of α-KDE1 mRNA resulted in rapid growth arrest and killing. Cell death was preceded by progressive swelling of the flagellar pocket as a consequence of recruitment of both flagellar and plasma membranes into the pocket. BF T. brucei expressing an epitope-tagged copy of α-KDE1 showed localization to glycosomes and not the mitochondrion. We used a cell line transfected with a reporter construct containing the N-terminal sequence of α-KDE1 fused to green fluorescent protein to examine the requirements for glycosome targeting. We found that the N-terminal 18 amino acids of α-KDE1 contain overlapping mitochondrion- and peroxisome-targeting sequences and are sufficient to direct localization to the glycosome in BF T. brucei. These results suggest that α-KDE1 has a novel moonlighting function outside the mitochondrion in BF T. brucei. PMID:25416237

  3. Glutamine homeostasis: role of pCO2 in regulating arterial glutamine in metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Phromphetcharat, V; Welbourne, T C

    1984-10-15

    In chronic metabolic acidosis arterial plasma glutamine concentration is reduced 46%. This effect is attributable to a reduction in arterial pCO2 rather than acidemia since elevating pCO2 returns glutamine toward the control level. The extracellular glutamine precursors ammonia and glutamate exhibit a reciprocal decline with the elevation in pCO2. This reduction in metabolic acidosis appears to play an important role in sparing glutamine for renal base generation.

  4. Targeting ASCT2-mediated glutamine uptake blocks prostate cancer growth and tumour development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Hardie, Rae-Anne; Hoy, Andrew J; van Geldermalsen, Michelle; Gao, Dadi; Fazli, Ladan; Sadowski, Martin C; Balaban, Seher; Schreuder, Mark; Nagarajah, Rajini; Wong, Justin J-L; Metierre, Cynthia; Pinello, Natalia; Otte, Nicholas J; Lehman, Melanie L; Gleave, Martin; Nelson, Colleen C; Bailey, Charles G; Ritchie, William; Rasko, John E J; Holst, Jeff

    2015-07-01

    Glutamine is conditionally essential in cancer cells, being utilized as a carbon and nitrogen source for macromolecule production, as well as for anaplerotic reactions fuelling the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In this study, we demonstrated that the glutamine transporter ASCT2 (SLC1A5) is highly expressed in prostate cancer patient samples. Using LNCaP and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines, we showed that chemical or shRNA-mediated inhibition of ASCT2 function in vitro decreases glutamine uptake, cell cycle progression through E2F transcription factors, mTORC1 pathway activation and cell growth. Chemical inhibition also reduces basal oxygen consumption and fatty acid synthesis, showing that downstream metabolic function is reliant on ASCT2-mediated glutamine uptake. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of ASCT2 in PC-3 cell xenografts significantly inhibits tumour growth and metastasis in vivo, associated with the down-regulation of E2F cell cycle pathway proteins. In conclusion, ASCT2-mediated glutamine uptake is essential for multiple pathways regulating the cell cycle and cell growth, and is therefore a putative therapeutic target in prostate cancer. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Hepatic zonation of carbon and nitrogen fluxes derived from glutamine and ammonia transformations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glutaminase predominates in periportal hepatocytes and it has been proposed that it determines the glutamine-derived nitrogen flow through the urea cycle. Glutamine-derived urea production should, thus, be considerably faster in periportal hepatocytes. This postulate, based on indirect observations, has not yet been unequivocally demonstrated, making a direct investigation of ureogenesis from glutamine highly desirable. Methods Zonation of glutamine metabolism was investigated in the bivascularly perfused rat liver with [U-14C]glutamine infusion (0.6 mM) into the portal vein (antegrade perfusion) or into the hepatic vein (retrograde perfusion). Results Ammonia infusion into the hepatic artery in retrograde and antegrade perfusion allowed to promote glutamine metabolism in the periportal region and in the whole liver parenchyma, respectively. The results revealed that the space-normalized glutamine uptake, indicated by 14CO2 production, gluconeogenesis, lactate production and the associated oxygen uptake, predominates in the periportal region. Periportal predominance was especially pronounced for gluconeogenesis. Ureogenesis, however, tended to be uniformly distributed over the whole liver parenchyma at low ammonia concentrations (up to 1.0 mM); periportal predominance was found only at ammonia concentrations above 1 mM. The proportions between the carbon and nitrogen fluxes in periportal cells are not the same along the liver acinus. Conclusions In conclusion, the results of the present work indicate that the glutaminase activity in periportal hepatocytes is not the rate-controlling step of the glutamine-derived nitrogen flow through the urea cycle. The findings corroborate recent work indicating that ureogenesis is also an important ammonia-detoxifying mechanism in cells situated downstream to the periportal region. PMID:20055990

  6. Characterization of Anammox Hydrazine Dehydrogenase, a Key N2-producing Enzyme in the Global Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Maalcke, Wouter J; Reimann, Joachim; de Vries, Simon; Butt, Julea N; Dietl, Andreas; Kip, Nardy; Mersdorf, Ulrike; Barends, Thomas R M; Jetten, Mike S M; Keltjens, Jan T; Kartal, Boran

    2016-08-12

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria derive their energy for growth from the oxidation of ammonium with nitrite as the electron acceptor. N2, the end product of this metabolism, is produced from the oxidation of the intermediate, hydrazine (N2H4). Previously, we identified N2-producing hydrazine dehydrogenase (KsHDH) from the anammox organism Kuenenia stuttgartiensis as the gene product of kustc0694 and determined some of its catalytic properties. In the genome of K. stuttgartiensis, kustc0694 is one of 10 paralogs related to octaheme hydroxylamine (NH2OH) oxidoreductase (HAO). Here, we characterized KsHDH as a covalently cross-linked homotrimeric octaheme protein as found for HAO and HAO-related hydroxylamine-oxidizing enzyme kustc1061 from K. stuttgartiensis Interestingly, the HDH trimers formed octamers in solution, each octamer harboring an amazing 192 c-type heme moieties. Whereas HAO and kustc1061 are capable of hydrazine oxidation as well, KsHDH was highly specific for this activity. To understand this specificity, we performed detailed amino acid sequence analyses and investigated the catalytic and spectroscopic (electronic absorbance, EPR) properties of KsHDH in comparison with the well defined HAO and kustc1061. We conclude that HDH specificity is most likely derived from structural changes around the catalytic heme 4 (P460) and of the electron-wiring circuit comprising seven His/His-ligated c-type hemes in each subunit. These nuances make HDH a globally prominent N2-producing enzyme, next to nitrous oxide (N2O) reductase from denitrifying microorganisms. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Glutamine at focus: versatile roles in cancer.

    PubMed

    De Vitto, Humberto; Pérez-Valencia, Juan; Radosevich, James A

    2016-02-01

    During the past decade, a heightened understanding of metabolic pathways in cancer has significantly increased. It is recognized that many tumor cells are genetically programmed and have involved an abnormal metabolic state. Interestingly, this increased metabolic autonomy generates dependence on various nutrients such as glucose and glutamine. Both of these components participate in various facets of metabolic activity that allow for energy production, synthesis of biomass, antioxidant defense, and the regulation of cell signaling. Here, we outline the emerging data on glutamine metabolism and address the molecular mechanisms underlying glutamine-induced cell survival. We also discuss novel therapeutic strategies to exploit glutamine addiction of certain cancer cell lines.

  8. Kinetic commitment in the catalysis of glutamine synthesis by GS1 from Arabidopsis using (14)N/(15)N and solvent isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Mauve, Caroline; Giraud, Nicolas; Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard R A; Antheaume, Ingrid; Tea, Illa; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) catalyzes the production of glutamine from glutamate, ammonium and ATP. Although being essential in plants for N assimilation and recycling, kinetic commitments and transition states of the reaction have not been clearly established yet. Here, we examined (12)C/(13)C, (14)N/(15)N and H2O/D2O isotope effects in Arabidopsis GS1 catalysis and compared to the prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) enzyme. A(14)N/(15)N isotope effect ((15)V/K ≈ 1.015, with respect to substrate NH4(+)) was observed in the prokaryotic enzyme, indicating that ammonium utilization (deprotonation and/or amidation) was partially rate-limiting. In the plant enzyme, the isotope effect was inverse ((15)V/K = 0.965), suggesting that the reaction intermediate is involved in an amidation-deamidation equilibrium favoring (15)N. There was no (12)C/(13)C kinetic isotope effect ((13)V/K = 1.000), suggesting that the amidation step of the catalytic cycle involves a transition state with minimal alteration of overall force constants at the C-5 carbon. Surprisingly, the solvent isotope effect was found to be inverse, that is, with a higher turn-over rate in heavy water ((D)V ≈ 0.5), showing that restructuration of the active site due to displacement of H2O by D2O facilitates the processing of intermediates.

  9. Irradiation-induced protein inactivation reveals Golgi enzyme cycling to cell periphery

    PubMed Central

    Jarvela, Timothy; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2012-01-01

    Acute inhibition is a powerful technique to test proteins for direct roles and order their activities in a pathway, but as a general gene-based strategy, it is mostly unavailable in mammalian systems. As a consequence, the precise roles of proteins in membrane trafficking have been difficult to assess in vivo. Here we used a strategy based on a genetically encoded fluorescent protein that generates highly localized and damaging reactive oxygen species to rapidly inactivate exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during live-cell imaging and address the long-standing question of whether the integrity of the Golgi complex depends on constant input from the ER. Light-induced blockade of ER exit immediately perturbed Golgi membranes, and surprisingly, revealed that cis-Golgi-resident proteins continuously cycle to peripheral ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) membranes and depend on ER exit for their return to the Golgi. These experiments demonstrate that ER exit and extensive cycling of cis-Golgi components to the cell periphery sustain the mammalian Golgi complex. PMID:22421362

  10. Regulation of glutamine synthetase activity in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 by the nitrogen source: effect of ammonium.

    PubMed Central

    Mérida, A; Candau, P; Florencio, F J

    1991-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase activity from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is regulated as a function of the nitrogen source available in the medium. Addition of 0.25 mM NH4Cl to nitrate-grown cells promotes a clear short-term inactivation of glutamine synthetase, whose enzyme activity decreases to 5 to 10% of the initial value in 25 min. The intracellular levels of glutamine, determined under various conditions, taken together with the results obtained with azaserine (an inhibitor of transamidases), rule out the possibility that glutamine per se is responsible for glutamine synthetase inactivation. Nitrogen starvation attenuates the ammonium-mediated glutamine synthetase inactivation, indicating that glutamine synthetase regulation is modulated through the internal balance between carbon-nitrogen compounds and carbon compounds. The parallelism observed between the glutamine synthetase activity and the internal concentration of alpha-ketoglutarate suggests that this metabolite could play a role as a positive effector of glutamine synthetase activity in Synechocystis sp. Despite the similarities of this physiological system to that described for enterobacteria, the lack of in vivo 32P labeling of glutamine synthetase during the inactivation process excludes the existence of an adenylylation-deadenylylation system in this cyanobacterium. Images PMID:1676397

  11. Regulation of glutamine synthetase activity in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 by the nitrogen source: effect of ammonium.

    PubMed

    Mérida, A; Candau, P; Florencio, F J

    1991-07-01

    Glutamine synthetase activity from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is regulated as a function of the nitrogen source available in the medium. Addition of 0.25 mM NH4Cl to nitrate-grown cells promotes a clear short-term inactivation of glutamine synthetase, whose enzyme activity decreases to 5 to 10% of the initial value in 25 min. The intracellular levels of glutamine, determined under various conditions, taken together with the results obtained with azaserine (an inhibitor of transamidases), rule out the possibility that glutamine per se is responsible for glutamine synthetase inactivation. Nitrogen starvation attenuates the ammonium-mediated glutamine synthetase inactivation, indicating that glutamine synthetase regulation is modulated through the internal balance between carbon-nitrogen compounds and carbon compounds. The parallelism observed between the glutamine synthetase activity and the internal concentration of alpha-ketoglutarate suggests that this metabolite could play a role as a positive effector of glutamine synthetase activity in Synechocystis sp. Despite the similarities of this physiological system to that described for enterobacteria, the lack of in vivo 32P labeling of glutamine synthetase during the inactivation process excludes the existence of an adenylylation-deadenylylation system in this cyanobacterium.

  12. SIRT4 has tumor suppressive activity and regulates the cellular metabolic response to DNA damage by inhibiting mitochondrial glutamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Min; Xiao, Cuiying; Finley, Lydia W.S; Lahusen, Tyler; Souza, Amanda L.; Pierce, Kerry; Li, Ying-Hua; Wang, Xiaoxu; Laurent, Gaëlle; German, Natalie J.; Xu, Xiaoling; Li, Cuiling; Wang, Rui-Hong; Lee, Jaewon; Csibi, Alfredo; Cerione, Richard; Blenis, John; Clish, Clary B.; Kimmelman, Alec; Deng, Chu-Xia; Haigis, Marcia C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA damage elicits a cellular signaling response that initiates cell cycle arrest and DNA repair. Here we find that DNA damage triggers a critical block in glutamine metabolism, which is required for proper DNA damage responses. This block requires the mitochondrial SIRT4, which is induced by numerous genotoxic agents and represses the metabolism of glutamine into TCA cycle. SIRT4 loss leads to both increased glutamine-dependent proliferation and stress-induced genomic instability, resulting in tumorigenic phenotypes. Moreover, SIRT4 knockout mice spontaneously develop lung tumors. Our data uncover SIRT4 as an important component of the DNA damage response pathway that orchestrates a metabolic block in glutamine metabolism, cell cycle arrest and tumor suppression. PMID:23562301

  13. In vivo and in vitro liver cancer metabolism observed with hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabella, C.; Karlsson, M.; Canapè, C.; Catanzaro, G.; Colombo Serra, S.; Miragoli, L.; Poggi, L.; Uggeri, F.; Venturi, L.; Jensen, P. R.; Lerche, M. H.; Tedoldi, F.

    2013-07-01

    Glutamine metabolism is, with its many links to oncogene expression, considered a crucial step in cancer metabolism and it is thereby a key target for alteration in cancer development. In particular, strong correlations have been reported between oncogene expression and expression and activity of the enzyme glutaminase. This mitochondrial enzyme, which is responsible for the deamidation of glutamine to form glutamate, is overexpressed in many tumour tissues. In animal models, glutaminase expression is correlated with tumour growth rate and it is readily possible to limit tumour growth by suppression of glutaminase activity. In principle, hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy can provide insight to glutamine metabolism and should hence be a valuable tool to study changes in glutaminase activity as tumours progress. However, no such successful in vivo studies have been reported, even though several good biological models have been tested. This may, at least partly, be due to problems in preparing glutamine for hyperpolarization. This paper reports a new and improved preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, which provides a highly sensitive 13C MR marker. With this preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, glutaminase activity in vivo in a rat liver tumour was investigated. Moreover, this marker was also used to measure response to drug treatment in vitro in cancer cells. These examples of [5-13C]glutamine used in tumour models warrant the new preparation to allow metabolic studies with this conditionally essential amino acid.

  14. Conversion into GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) may reduce the capacity of L-glutamine as an insulin secretagogue.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pascual, Sergio; Mukala-Nsengu-Tshibangu, André; Martín Del Río, Rafael; Tamarit-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2004-05-01

    We have carried out a detailed examination of L-glutamine metabolism in rat islets in order to elucidate the paradoxical failure of L-glutamine to stimulate insulin secretion. L-Glutamine was converted by isolated islets into GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), L-aspartate and L-glutamate. Saturation of the intracellular concentrations of all of these amino acids occurred at approx. 10 mmol/l L-glutamine, and their half-maximal values were attained at progressively increasing concentrations of L-glutamine (0.3 mmol/l for GABA; 0.5 and 1.0 mmol/l for Asp and Glu respectively). GABA accumulation accounted for most of the 14CO2 produced at various L-[U-14C]glutamine concentrations. Potentiation by L-glutamine of L-leucine-induced insulin secretion in perifused islets was suppressed by malonic acid dimethyl ester, was accompanied by a significant decrease in islet GABA accumulation, and was not modified in the presence of GABA receptor antagonists [50 micromol/l saclofen or 10 micromol/l (+)-bicuculline]. L-Leucine activated islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity, but had no effect on either glutamate decarboxylase or GABA transaminase activity, in islet homogenates. We conclude that (i) L-glutamine is metabolized preferentially to GABA and L-aspartate, which accumulate in islets, thus preventing its complete oxidation in the Krebs cycle, which accounts for its failure to stimulate insulin secretion; (ii) potentiation by L-glutamine of L-leucine-induced insulin secretion involves increased metabolism of L-glutamate and GABA via the Krebs cycle (glutamate dehydrogenase activation) and the GABA shunt (2-oxoglutarate availability for GABA transaminase) respectively, and (iii) islet release of GABA does not seem to play an important role in the modulation of the islet secretory response to the combination of L-leucine and L-glutamine.

  15. Conversion into GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) may reduce the capacity of L-glutamine as an insulin secretagogue.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pascual, Sergio; Mukala-Nsengu-Tshibangu, André; Martín Del Río, Rafael; Tamarit-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed examination of L-glutamine metabolism in rat islets in order to elucidate the paradoxical failure of L-glutamine to stimulate insulin secretion. L-Glutamine was converted by isolated islets into GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), L-aspartate and L-glutamate. Saturation of the intracellular concentrations of all of these amino acids occurred at approx. 10 mmol/l L-glutamine, and their half-maximal values were attained at progressively increasing concentrations of L-glutamine (0.3 mmol/l for GABA; 0.5 and 1.0 mmol/l for Asp and Glu respectively). GABA accumulation accounted for most of the 14CO2 produced at various L-[U-14C]glutamine concentrations. Potentiation by L-glutamine of L-leucine-induced insulin secretion in perifused islets was suppressed by malonic acid dimethyl ester, was accompanied by a significant decrease in islet GABA accumulation, and was not modified in the presence of GABA receptor antagonists [50 micromol/l saclofen or 10 micromol/l (+)-bicuculline]. L-Leucine activated islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity, but had no effect on either glutamate decarboxylase or GABA transaminase activity, in islet homogenates. We conclude that (i) L-glutamine is metabolized preferentially to GABA and L-aspartate, which accumulate in islets, thus preventing its complete oxidation in the Krebs cycle, which accounts for its failure to stimulate insulin secretion; (ii) potentiation by L-glutamine of L-leucine-induced insulin secretion involves increased metabolism of L-glutamate and GABA via the Krebs cycle (glutamate dehydrogenase activation) and the GABA shunt (2-oxoglutarate availability for GABA transaminase) respectively, and (iii) islet release of GABA does not seem to play an important role in the modulation of the islet secretory response to the combination of L-leucine and L-glutamine. PMID:14763900

  16. Minireview on Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency, an Ultra-Rare Inborn Error of Amino Acid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Spodenkiewicz, Marta; Diez-Fernandez, Carmen; Rüfenacht, Véronique; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Häberle, Johannes

    2016-10-19

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a cytosolic enzyme that produces glutamine, the most abundant free amino acid in the human body. Glutamine is a major substrate for various metabolic pathways, and is thus an important factor for the functioning of many organs; therefore, deficiency of glutamine due to a defect in GS is incompatible with normal life. Mutations in the human GLUL gene (encoding for GS) can cause an ultra-rare recessive inborn error of metabolism-congenital glutamine synthetase deficiency. This disease was reported until now in only three unrelated patients, all of whom suffered from neonatal onset severe epileptic encephalopathy. The hallmark of GS deficiency in these patients was decreased levels of glutamine in body fluids, associated with chronic hyperammonemia. This review aims at recapitulating the clinical history of the three known patients with congenital GS deficiency and summarizes the findings from studies done along with the work-up of these patients. It is the aim of this paper to convince the reader that (i) this disorder is possibly underdiagnosed, since decreased concentrations of metabolites do not receive the attention they deserve; and (ii) early detection of GS deficiency may help to improve the outcome of patients who could be treated early with metabolites that are lacking in this condition.

  17. Recurrent seizures and brain pathology after inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the hippocampus in rats.

    PubMed

    Eid, Tore; Ghosh, Arko; Wang, Yue; Beckström, Henning; Zaveri, Hitten P; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Lai, James C K; Malthankar-Phatak, Gauri H; de Lanerolle, Nihal C

    2008-08-01

    An excess of extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus has been linked to the generation of recurrent seizures and brain pathology in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). However, the mechanism which results in glutamate excess in MTLE remains unknown. We recently reported that the glutamate-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase is deficient in the hippocampus in patients with MTLE, and we postulated that this deficiency is critically involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. To further explore the role of glutamine synthetase in MTLE we created a novel animal model of hippocampal glutamine synthetase deficiency by continuous (approximately 28 days) microinfusion of methionine sulfoximine (MSO: 0.625 to 2.5 microg/h) unilaterally into the hippocampus in rats. This treatment led to a deficiency in hippocampal glutamine synthetase activity by 82-97% versus saline. The majority (>95%) of the MSO-treated animals exhibited recurrent seizures that continued for several weeks. Some of the MSO-treated animals exhibited neuropathological features that were similar to mesial temporal sclerosis, such as hippocampal atrophy and patterned loss of hippocampal neurons. However, many MSO-treated animals displayed only minimal injury to the hippocampus, with no clear evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis. These findings support the hypothesis that a deficiency in hippocampal glutamine synthetase causes recurrent seizures, even in the absence of classical mesial temporal sclerosis, and that restoration of glutamine synthetase may represent a novel approach to therapeutic intervention in this disease.

  18. l-Glutamine supplementation promotes an improved energetic balance in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Martins, Heber Amilcar; Bazotte, Roberto Barbosa; Vicentini, Geraldo Emilio; Lima, Mariana Machado; Guarnier, Flavia Alessandra; Hermes-Uliana, Catchia; Frez, Flavia Cristina Vieira; Bossolani, Gleison Daion Piovezana; Fracaro, Luciane; Fávaro, Larissa Dos Santos; Manzano, Mariana Inocêncio; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the effects of supplementation with oral l-glutamine in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats. A total of 32 male Wistar rats aged 54 days were randomly divided into four groups: rats without Walker-256 tumor, that is, control rats (C group); control rats supplemented with l-glutamine (CG group); Walker-256 tumor rats without l-glutamine supplementation (WT group); and WT rats supplemented with l-glutamine (WTG group). l-Glutamine was incorporated into standard food at a proportion of 2 g/100 g (2%). After 10 days of the experimental period, the jejunum and duodenum were removed and processed. Protein expression levels of key enzymes of gluconeogenesis, that is, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase, were analyzed by western blot and immunohistochemical techniques. In addition, plasma corticosterone, glucose, insulin, and urea levels were evaluated. The WTG group showed significantly increased plasma glucose and insulin levels ( p < 0.05); however, plasma corticosterone and urea remained unchanged. Moreover, the WTG group showed increased immunoreactive staining for jejunal phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and increased expression of duodenal glucose-6-phosphatase. Furthermore, the WTG group presented with less intense cancer cachexia and slower tumor growth. These results could be attributed, at least partly, to increased intestinal gluconeogenesis and insulinemia, and better glycemia maintenance during fasting in Walker-256 tumor rats on a diet supplemented with l-glutamine.

  19. Minireview on Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency, an Ultra-Rare Inborn Error of Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Spodenkiewicz, Marta; Diez-Fernandez, Carmen; Rüfenacht, Véronique; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Häberle, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a cytosolic enzyme that produces glutamine, the most abundant free amino acid in the human body. Glutamine is a major substrate for various metabolic pathways, and is thus an important factor for the functioning of many organs; therefore, deficiency of glutamine due to a defect in GS is incompatible with normal life. Mutations in the human GLUL gene (encoding for GS) can cause an ultra-rare recessive inborn error of metabolism—congenital glutamine synthetase deficiency. This disease was reported until now in only three unrelated patients, all of whom suffered from neonatal onset severe epileptic encephalopathy. The hallmark of GS deficiency in these patients was decreased levels of glutamine in body fluids, associated with chronic hyperammonemia. This review aims at recapitulating the clinical history of the three known patients with congenital GS deficiency and summarizes the findings from studies done along with the work-up of these patients. It is the aim of this paper to convince the reader that (i) this disorder is possibly underdiagnosed, since decreased concentrations of metabolites do not receive the attention they deserve; and (ii) early detection of GS deficiency may help to improve the outcome of patients who could be treated early with metabolites that are lacking in this condition. PMID:27775558

  20. In vitro reactivation of in vivo ammonium-inactivated glutamine synthetase from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Mérida, A; Candau, P; Florencio, F J

    1991-12-16

    Glutamine synthetase from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is inactivated by ammonium addition to cells growing with nitrate as the nitrogen source. The enzyme can be reactivated in vitro by different methods such as alkaline phosphatase treatment, but not phosphodiesterase, by raising the pH of the crude extract to values higher than 8, by increasing the ionic strength of the cell-free extract, or by preincubation with organic solvents, such as 2-propanol and ethanol. These results suggest that the loss of glutamine synthetase activity promoted by ammonium involves the non-covalent binding of a phosphorylated compound to the enzyme and support previous results that rule out the existence of an adenylylation/deadenylylation system functioning in the regulation of cyanobacterial glutamine synthetase.

  1. Profiling Hyporheic Microbial Community Nitrogen Cycle and Carbohydrate Active Enzyme Gene Abundances across Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W. C.; Graham, E.; Stegen, J.

    2016-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) is the permanently inundated sediment layer between a surface channel and adjacent groundwater-saturated sediments. It has been hypothesized to play a major role in macronutrient (C, N, P) cycling in rivers. The correlation between community taxonomic composition dynamics and functional gene representation is poorly understood for hyporheic communities. To explore how microbial communities respond to temporal changes in environmental conditions, metagenomes were derived from communities captured in sterile sandpacks deployed within the HZ of the Columbia River. HMM databases were used to enumerate protein families present. Functional classification of reads allowed a general assessment of community function over time, while targeted assembly of specific genes enabled investigation of the diversity of organisms encoding these functions. Preliminary analysis of nitrogen cycle pathways shows most gene families examined to have quite steady representation across seasons, with most observed changes being less than an order of magnitude. Analysis of ammonia oxidation genes showed bacterial ammonia oxidizers (AOB) to be stably present across the year, while the archaeal amoA gene increased in late summer, peaking sharply in November, mirroring results from 16S rRNA amplicon analysis which showed an increase in Thaumarcheal OTUs during that same period. Most glycosyl hydrolase GH families had low representation. Highly abundant classes of GH included the GH94 (beta-glucosidase), GH95 (1-2-alpha-L-fucosidase) and GH103 (lytic transglycosylase) families, suggesting activity on plant, fungus and insect polysaccharides and peptidoglycans. Further work is investigating the taxonomy of the sequences identified, to determine how changes in the community composition contribute to the stable gene family profiles observed. These results are intended to work towards a greater understanding of the role of species diversity and functional redundancy in the

  2. Tumor-associated mutant p53 promotes cancer cell survival upon glutamine deprivation through p21 induction.

    PubMed

    Tran, T Q; Lowman, X H; Reid, M A; Mendez-Dorantes, C; Pan, M; Yang, Y; Kong, M

    2017-04-06

    Cancer cells depend on glutamine to sustain their increased proliferation and manage oxidative stress, yet glutamine is often depleted at tumor sites owing to excessive cellular consumption and poor vascularization. We have previously reported that p53 protein, although a well-known tumor suppressor, can contribute to cancer cell survival and adaptation to low-glutamine conditions. However, the TP53 gene is frequently mutated in tumors, and the role of mutant p53 (mutp53) in response to metabolic stress remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that tumor-associated mutp53 promotes cancer cell survival upon glutamine deprivation both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, cancer cells expressing mutp53 proteins are more resistant to glutamine deprivation than cells with wild-type p53. Depletion of endogenous mutp53 protein in human lymphoma cells leads to cell sensitivity to glutamine withdrawal, whereas expression of mutp53 in p53 null cells results in resistance to glutamine deprivation. Furthermore, we found that mutp53 proteins hyper-transactivate p53-target gene CDKN1A upon glutamine deprivation, thus triggering cell cycle arrest and promoting cell survival. Together, our results reveal an unidentified mechanism by which mutp53 confers oncogenic functions by promoting cancer cell adaptation to metabolic stress.

  3. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders.

  4. The alpha glycerophosphate cycle in Drosophila melanogaster VI. structure and evolution of enzyme paralogs in the genus Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Carmon, Amber; MacIntyre, Ross

    2010-01-01

    The genome sequences of 12 Drosophila species contain 3 paralogs for alpha glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) and for the mitochondrial alpha glycerophosphate oxidase (GPO). These 2 enzymes participate in the alpha glycerophosphate cycle in the adult thoracic flight muscles. The flight muscle enzymes are encoded by gpdh-1 at 26A2 and gpo-1 at 52C8. In this paper, we show that the GPDH paralogs share the same evolutionarily conserved functional domains and most intron positions, whereas the GPO paralogs share only some of the functional domains of mitochondrial oxidoreductases. The GPO paralogs not expressed in the flight muscles essentially lack introns. GPDH paralogs encoded by gpdh-2 and gpdh-3 and the GPO paralogs encoded by gpo-2 and gpo-3 are expressed only in the testes. Gene trees for the GPDH and GPO paralogs indicate that the genes expressed in the flight muscles are evolving very slowly presumably under strong purifying selection whereas the paralogs expressed in the testes are evolving more rapidly. The concordance between species and gene trees, d(N)/d(S) ratios, phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood-based tests, and analyses of radical and conservative substitutions all indicate that the additional GPDH and GPO paralogs are also evolving under purifying selection.

  5. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) warfarin interaction: NAPQI, the toxic metabolite of paracetamol, is an inhibitor of enzymes in the vitamin K cycle.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Henk H; Soute, Berry A; Vervoort, Lily M; Claessens, Jolanda G

    2004-10-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is generally considered to be the analgesic of choice for patients undergoing oral anticoagulant therapy. Occasionally, however, interactions have been reported with therapeutic doses of the analgesic, e.g. if the drug is taken for a longer period of time. The mechanism of this interaction is not clearly understood. We investigated the effects of paracetamol and its toxic metabolite N-acetyl-para-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) on in vitro vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylase (VKD-carb) and vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) activities. Paracetamol had no effect in either enzymatic reactions. NAPQI, on the other hand, appeared to interfere with VKD carb activity via two mechanisms; 1) oxidation of the cofactor vitamin K-hydroquinone, 2) inactivation of the enzyme. The inactivation, in micromolar ranges, is not reversible and may be the result of covalent binding of NAPQI with functional amino acids. NAPQI also inhibited VKOR, but at higher concentrations. Unexpectedly, N-acetylcysteine was found to inhibit VKOR activity at concentrations that are obtained during rescue therapy of paracetamol intoxication. We conclude that, the potentiation of the oral anticoagulant effect by paracetamol is likely to result from NAPQI-induced inhibition of enzymes of the vitamin K cycle, particularly VKD-carb.

  6. Time course of the uridylylation and adenylylation states in the glutamine synthetase bicyclic cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Varón-Castellanos, R; Havsteen, B H; García-Moreno, M; Valero-Ruiz, E; Molina-Alarcón, M; García-Cánovas, F

    1993-01-01

    A kinetic analysis of the glutamine synthetase bicyclic cascade is presented. It includes the dependence on time from the onset of the reaction of both the uridylylation of Shapiro's regulatory protein and the adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase. The transient phase equations obtained allow an estimation of the time elapsed until the states of uridylylation and adenylylation reach their steady-states, and therefore an evaluation of the effective sensitivity of the system. The contribution of the uridylylation cycle to the adenylylation cycle has been studied, and an equation relating the state of adenylylation at any time to the state of uridylylation at the same instant has been derived. PMID:8104399

  7. Glutamine activates STAT3 to control cancer cell proliferation independently of glutamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cacace, Andrea; Sboarina, Martina; Vazeille, Thibaut; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Cancer cells can use a variety of metabolic substrates to fulfill the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of their oncogenic program. Besides bioenergetics, cancer cell metabolism also directly influences genetic, epigenetic and signaling events associated with tumor progression. Many cancer cells are addicted to glutamine, and this addiction is observed in oxidative as well as in glycolytic cells. Although both oxidative and bioreductive glutamine metabolism can contribute to cancer progression and glutamine can further serve to generate peptides (including glutathione) and proteins, we report that glutamine promotes the proliferation of cancer cells independently of its use as a metabolic fuel or as a precursor of glutathione. Extracellular glutamine activates transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is necessary and sufficient to mediate the proliferative effects of glutamine on glycolytic and oxidative cancer cells. Glutamine also activates transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1, mammalian target of rapamycin and c-Myc, but these factors do not mediate the effects of glutamine on cancer cell proliferation. Our findings shed a new light on the anticancer effects of l-asparaginase that possesses glutaminase activity and converts glutamine into glutamate extracellularly. Conversely, cancer resistance to treatments that block glutamine metabolism could arise from glutamine-independent STAT3 reactivation.

  8. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-04-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover.

  9. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-01-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover. Images PMID:6113590

  10. Differentiated effect of ageing on the enzymes of Krebs' cycle, electron transfer complexes and glutamate metabolism of non-synaptic and intra-synaptic mitochondria from cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Villa, R F; Gorini, A; Hoyer, S

    2006-11-01

    The effect of ageing on the activity of enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain and glutamate metabolism was studied in three different types of mitochondria of cerebral cortex of 1-year old and 2-year old male Wistar rats. We assessed the maximum rate (V(max)) of the mitochondrial enzyme activities in non-synaptic perikaryal mitochondria, and in two populations of intra-synaptic mitochondria. The results indicated that: (i) in normal, steady-state cerebral cortex the values of the catalytic activities of the enzymes markedly differed in the various populations of mitochondria; (ii) in intra-synaptic mitochondria, ageing affected the catalytic properties of the enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain and glutamate metabolism; (iii) these changes were more evident in intra-synaptic "heavy" than "light" mitochondria. These results indicate a different age-related vulnerability of subpopulations of mitochondria in vivo located into synapses than non-synaptic ones.

  11. Oncogenic PIK3CA mutations reprogram glutamine metabolism in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yujun; Samuels, Yardena; Li, Qingling; Krokowski, Dawid; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Wang, Chao; Jin, Zhicheng; Dong, Bohan; Cao, Bo; Feng, Xiujing; Xiang, Min; Xu, Claire; Fink, Stephen; Meropol, Neal J.; Xu, Yan; Conlon, Ronald A.; Markowitz, Sanford; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Brunengraber, Henri; Willis, Joseph E.; LaFramboise, Thomas; Hatzoglou, Maria; Zhang, Guo-Fang; Vogelstein, Bert; Wang, Zhenghe

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells often require glutamine for growth, thereby distinguishing them from most normal cells. Here we show that PIK3CA mutations reprogram glutamine metabolism by upregulating glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells, making them more dependent on glutamine. Compared with isogenic wild-type (WT) cells, PIK3CA mutant CRCs convert substantially more glutamine to α-ketoglutarate to replenish the tricarboxylic acid cycle and generate ATP. Mutant p110α upregulates GPT2 gene expression through an AKT-independent, PDK1–RSK2–ATF4 signalling axis. Moreover, aminooxyacetate, which inhibits the enzymatic activity of aminotransferases including GPT2, suppresses xenograft tumour growth of CRCs with PIK3CA mutations, but not with WT PIK3CA. Together, these data establish oncogenic PIK3CA mutations as a cause of glutamine dependency in CRCs and suggest that targeting glutamine metabolism may be an effective approach to treat CRC patients harbouring PIK3CA mutations. PMID:27321283

  12. Coupled effects of light and nitrogen source on the urea cycle and nitrogen metabolism over a diel cycle in the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Bender, Sara J; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2012-03-01

    Diatoms are photoautotrophic organisms capable of growing on a variety of inorganic and organic nitrogen sources. Discovery of a complete urea cycle in diatoms was surprising, as this pathway commonly functions in heterotrophic organisms to rid cells of waste nitrogen. To determine how the urea cycle is integrated into cellular nitrogen metabolism and energy management, the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was maintained in semi-continuous batch cultures on nitrate, ammonium, or urea as the sole nitrogen source, under a 16: 8 light: dark cycle and at light intensities that were low, saturating, or high for growth. Steady-state transcript levels were determined for genes encoding enzymes linked to the urea cycle, urea hydrolysis, glutamine synthesis, pyrimidine synthesis, photorespiration, and energy storage. Transcript abundances were significantly affected by nitrogen source, light intensity and a diel cycle. The impact of N source on differential transcript accumulation was most apparent under the highest light intensity. Models of cellular metabolism under high light were developed based on changes in transcript abundance and predicted enzyme localizations. We hypothesize that the urea cycle is integrated into nitrogen metabolism through its connection to glutamine and in the eventual production of urea. These findings have important implications for nitrogen flow in the cell over diel cycles at surface ocean irradiances.

  13. A metabolic core model elucidates how enhanced utilization of glucose and glutamine, with enhanced glutamine-dependent lactate production, promotes cancer cell growth: The WarburQ effect.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Chiara; Colombo, Riccardo; Gaglio, Daniela; Mastroianni, Fabrizia; Pescini, Dario; Westerhoff, Hans Victor; Mauri, Giancarlo; Vanoni, Marco; Alberghina, Lilia

    2017-09-01

    Cancer cells share several metabolic traits, including aerobic production of lactate from glucose (Warburg effect), extensive glutamine utilization and impaired mitochondrial electron flow. It is still unclear how these metabolic rearrangements, which may involve different molecular events in different cells, contribute to a selective advantage for cancer cell proliferation. To ascertain which metabolic pathways are used to convert glucose and glutamine to balanced energy and biomass production, we performed systematic constraint-based simulations of a model of human central metabolism. Sampling of the feasible flux space allowed us to obtain a large number of randomly mutated cells simulated at different glutamine and glucose uptake rates. We observed that, in the limited subset of proliferating cells, most displayed fermentation of glucose to lactate in the presence of oxygen. At high utilization rates of glutamine, oxidative utilization of glucose was decreased, while the production of lactate from glutamine was enhanced. This emergent phenotype was observed only when the available carbon exceeded the amount that could be fully oxidized by the available oxygen. Under the latter conditions, standard Flux Balance Analysis indicated that: this metabolic pattern is optimal to maximize biomass and ATP production; it requires the activity of a branched TCA cycle, in which glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation cooperates to the production of lipids and proteins; it is sustained by a variety of redox-controlled metabolic reactions. In a K-ras transformed cell line we experimentally assessed glutamine-induced metabolic changes. We validated computational results through an extension of Flux Balance Analysis that allows prediction of metabolite variations. Taken together these findings offer new understanding of the logic of the metabolic reprogramming that underlies cancer cell growth.

  14. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P.; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed. PMID:26270653

  15. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed.

  16. L-glutamine is a key parameter in the immunosuppression phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Hammami, Ines; Chen, Jingkui; Bronte, Vincenzo; DeCrescenzo, Gregory; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2012-09-07

    Suppression of tumour-specific T-cell functions by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) is a dominant mechanism of tumour escape. MDSCs express two enzymes, i.e. inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and arginase (ARG1), which metabolize the semi-essential amino acid L-arginine (L-Arg) whose bioavailability is crucial for T-cell proliferation and functions. Recently, we showed that glutaminolysis supports MDSC maturation process by ensuring the supply of intermediates and energy. In this work, we used an immortalized cell line derived from mouse MDSCs (MSC-1 cell line) to further investigate the role of L-glutamine (L-Gln) in the maintenance of MDSC immunosuppressive activity. Culturing MSC-1 cells in L-Gln-limited medium inhibited iNOS activity, while ARG1 was not affected. MSC-1 cells inhibited Jukat cell growth without any noticeable effect on their viability. The characterization of MSC-1 cell metabolic profile revealed that L-Gln is an important precursor of lactate production via the NADP(+)-dependent malic enzyme, which co-produces NADPH. Moreover, the TCA cycle activity was down-regulated in the absence of L-Gln and the cell bioenergetic status was deteriorated accordingly. This strongly suggests that iNOS activity, but not that of ARG1, is related to an enhanced central carbon metabolism and a high bioenergetic status. Taken altogether, our results suggest that the control of glutaminolysis fluxes may represent a valuable target for immunotherapy.

  17. Influence of time, storage temperature and freeze/thaw cycles on the activity of digestive enzymes from gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Mikhail; Gisbert, Enric

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we tested the effects of long-term storage (2 years) at -20 °C and short-term storage (several hours) in ice and freeze/thaw cycles on the activities of pancreatic, gastric and intestinal (brush border and cytosolic) digestive enzymes in a teleost fish species. The results revealed a significant lose in activity of pancreatic (trypsin, chymotrypsin, total alkaline proteases and α-amylase) and intestinal cytosolic (leucine-alanine peptidase) enzymes between 140 and 270 days of storage at -20 °C, whereas in contrast, the activity of all the assayed brush border enzymes remained constant during the first 2 years of storage at -20 °C. During short-term storage conditions, the most stable enzymes assayed were those of the enterocytes of the brush border, which did not show any change in activity after being held for 5 h in ice. Five freezing and thawing cycles did not affect the activity of the intestinal brush border enzymes and the cytosolic ones, whereas the activity of trypsin, α-amylase and bile-salt-activated lipase was significantly affected by the number of freezing and thawing cycles. No changes in pepsin activity were found in samples exposed to 1 and 2 freezing and thawing cycles.

  18. Aspartate-107 and leucine-109 facilitate efficient coupling of glutamine hydrolysis to CTP synthesis by Escherichia coli CTP synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, Akshai; Bearne, Stephen L

    2003-01-01

    CTP synthase catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of CTP from UTP using either NH(3) or L-glutamine as the nitrogen source. GTP is required as an allosteric effector to promote glutamine hydrolysis. In an attempt to identify nucleotide-binding sites, scanning alanine mutagenesis was conducted on a highly conserved region of amino acid sequence (residues 102-118) within the synthase domain of Escherichia coli CTP synthase. Mutant K102A CTP synthase exhibited wild-type activity with respect to NH(3) and glutamine; however, the R105A, D107A, L109A and G110A enzymes exhibited wild-type NH(3)-dependent activity and affinity for glutamine, but impaired glutamine-dependent CTP formation. The E103A, R104A and H118A enzymes exhibited no glutamine-dependent activity and were only partially active with NH(3). Although these observations were compatible with impaired activation by GTP, the apparent affinity of the D107A, L109A and G110A enzymes for GTP was reduced only 2-4-fold, suggesting that these residues do not play a significant role in GTP binding. In the presence of GTP, the k (cat) values for glutamine hydrolysis by the D107A and L109A enzymes were identical with that of wild-type CTP synthase. Overall, the kinetic properties of L109A CTP synthase were consistent with an uncoupling of glutamine hydrolysis from CTP formation that occurs because an NH(3) tunnel has its normal structure altered or fails to form. L109F CTP synthase was prepared to block totally the putative NH(3) tunnel; however, this enzyme's rate of glutamine-dependent CTP formation and glutaminase activity were both impaired. In addition, we observed that mutation of amino acids located between residues 102 and 118 in the synthase domain can affect the enzyme's glutaminase activity, suggesting that these residues interact with residues in the glutamine amide transfer domain because they are in close proximity or via a conformationally dependent signalling mechanism. PMID:12383057

  19. 2H2O incorporation into hepatic acetyl-CoA and de novo lipogenesis as measured by Krebs cycle-mediated 2H-enrichment of glutamate and glutamine.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Maria; Martins, Fatima; Jones, John G; Carvalho, Rui

    2011-12-01

    Deuterated water is widely used for measuring de novo lipogenesis on the basis of quantifying lipid (2)H-enrichment relative to that of body water. However, incorporation of (2)H-enrichment from body water into newly synthesized lipid molecules is incomplete therefore the true lipid precursor enrichment differs from that of body water. We describe a novel measurement of de novo lipogenesis that is based on a true precursor-product analysis of hepatic acetyl-CoA and triglyceride methyl enrichments from deuterated water. After deuterated water administration to seven in situ and seven perfused livers, acetyl-CoA methyl enrichment was inferred from (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of hepatic glutamate/glutamine (Glx) enrichment and triglyceride methyl enrichment was directly determined by (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance of triglycerides. Acetyl-CoA (2) H-enrichment was 71% ± 1% that of body water for in situ livers and 53% ± 2% of perfusate water for perfused livers. From the ratio of triglyceride-methyl/acetyl-CoA enrichments, fractional de novo lipogenesis rates of 0.97% ± 0.09%/2 hr and 7.92% ± 1.47%/48 hr were obtained for perfused and in situ liver triglycerides, respectively. Our method reveals that acetyl-CoA enrichment is significantly less than body water both for in situ and perfused livers. Furthermore, the difference between acetyl-CoA and body water enrichments is sensitive to the experimental setting. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Plasma Glutamine Concentrations in Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Helling, Gunnel; Wahlin, Staffan; Smedberg, Marie; Pettersson, Linn; Tjäder, Inga; Norberg, Åke; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Higher than normal plasma glutamine concentration at admission to an intensive care unit is associated with an unfavorable outcome. Very high plasma glutamine levels are sometimes seen in both acute and chronic liver failure. We aimed to systematically explore the relation between different types of liver failure and plasma glutamine concentrations. Four different groups of patients were studies; chronic liver failure (n = 40), acute on chronic liver failure (n = 20), acute fulminant liver failure (n = 20), and post-hepatectomy liver failure (n = 20). Child-Pugh and Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores were assessed as indices of liver function. All groups except the chronic liver failure group were followed longitudinally during hospitalisation. Outcomes were recorded up to 48 months after study inclusion. All groups had individuals with very high plasma glutamine concentrations. In the total group of patients (n = 100), severity of liver failure correlated significantly with plasma glutamine concentration, but the correlation was not strong. Liver failure, regardless of severity and course of illness, may be associated with a high plasma glutamine concentration. Further studies are needed to understand whether high glutamine levels should be regarded as a biomarker or as a contributor to symptomatology in liver failure.

  1. Plasma Glutamine Concentrations in Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Gunnel; Wahlin, Staffan; Smedberg, Marie; Pettersson, Linn; Tjäder, Inga; Norberg, Åke; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Higher than normal plasma glutamine concentration at admission to an intensive care unit is associated with an unfavorable outcome. Very high plasma glutamine levels are sometimes seen in both acute and chronic liver failure. We aimed to systematically explore the relation between different types of liver failure and plasma glutamine concentrations. Methods Four different groups of patients were studies; chronic liver failure (n = 40), acute on chronic liver failure (n = 20), acute fulminant liver failure (n = 20), and post-hepatectomy liver failure (n = 20). Child-Pugh and Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores were assessed as indices of liver function. All groups except the chronic liver failure group were followed longitudinally during hospitalisation. Outcomes were recorded up to 48 months after study inclusion. Results All groups had individuals with very high plasma glutamine concentrations. In the total group of patients (n = 100), severity of liver failure correlated significantly with plasma glutamine concentration, but the correlation was not strong. Conclusion Liver failure, regardless of severity and course of illness, may be associated with a high plasma glutamine concentration. Further studies are needed to understand whether high glutamine levels should be regarded as a biomarker or as a contributor to symptomatology in liver failure. PMID:26938452

  2. Quantitation of phenylbutyrate metabolites by UPLC-MS/MS demonstrates inverse correlation of phenylacetate:phenylacetylglutamine ratio with plasma glutamine levels.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Almannai, Mohammed; Sutton, V Reid; Sun, Qin; Elsea, Sarah H

    2017-08-31

    Urea cycle disorders (UCDs) are genetic conditions characterized by nitrogen accumulation in the form of ammonia and caused by defects in the enzymes required to convert ammonia to urea for excretion. UCDs include a spectrum of enzyme deficiencies, namely n-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency (NAGS), carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency (CPS1), ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTC), argininosuccinate lyase deficiency (ASL), citrullinemia type I (ASS1), and argininemia (ARG). Currently, sodium phenylbutyrate and glycerol phenylbutyrate are primary medications used to treat patients with UCDs, and long-term monitoring of these compounds is critical for preventing drug toxic levels. Therefore, a fast and simple ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for quantification of phenylbutyrate (PB), phenylacetate (PA), and phenylacetylglutamine (PAG) in plasma and urine. The separation of all three analytes was achieved in 2min, and the limits of detection were <0.04μg/ml. Intra-precision and inter-precision were <8.5% and 4% at two quality control concentrations, respectively. Average recoveries for all compounds ranged from 100% to 106%. With the developed assay, a strong correlation between PA and the PA/PAG ratio and an inverse correlation between PA/PAG ratio and plasma glutamine were observed in 35 patients with confirmed UCDs. Moreover, all individuals with a ratio ≥0.6 had plasma glutamine levels<1000μmol/l. Our data suggest that a PA/PAG ratio in the range of 0.6-1.5 will result in a plasma glutamine level<1000μmol/l without reaching toxic levels of PA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Methylphenidate treatment leads to abnormalities on krebs cycle enzymes in the brain of young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Scaini, Giselli; Furlanetto, Camila B; Morais, Meline O S; Jeremias, Isabela C; Mello-Santos, Lis Mairá; Freitas, Karolina V; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Studies have shown a relationship between energy metabolism and methylphenidate (MPH); however, there are no studies evaluating the effects of MPH in Krebs cycle. So, we investigated if MPH treatment could alter the activity of citrate synthase (CS), malate dehydrogenase (MD), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ID) in the brain of young and adult Wistar rats. Our results showed that MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) reduced CS in the striatum and prefrontal cortex (PF), with MPH at all doses in the cerebellum and hippocampus after chronic treatment in young rats. In adult rats the CS was reduced in the cerebellum after acute treatment with MPH at all doses, and after chronic treatment in the PF and cerebellum with MPH (10 mg/kg), and in the hippocampus with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg). The ID decreased in the hippocampus and striatum with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg), and in the cortex (10 mg/kg) after acute treatment in young rats. In adult rats acute treatment with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) reduced ID in the cerebellum, and with MPH (10 mg/kg) in the cortex; chronic treatment with MPH (10 mg/kg) decreased ID in the PF; with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) in the cerebellum, and with MPH at all doses in the hippocampus. The MD did not alter. In conclusion, our results suggest that MPH can alter enzymes of Krebs cycle in brain areas involved with circuits related with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; however, such effects depend on age of animal and treatment regime.

  4. The effect of portacaval anastomosis on the expression of glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in perivenous hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Robin; Levillain, Oliver; Brosnan, John T; Araneda, Silvia; Brosnan, Margaret E

    2013-05-01

    There is functional zonation of metabolism across the liver acinus, with glutamine synthetase restricted to a narrow band of cells around the terminal hepatic venules. Portacaval anastomosis, where there is a major rerouting of portal blood flow from the portal vein directly to the vena cava bypassing the liver, has been reported to result in a marked decrease in the activity of glutamine synthetase. It is not known whether this represents a loss of perivenous hepatocytes or whether there is a specific loss of glutamine synthetase. To answer this question, we have determined the activity of glutamine synthetase and another enzyme from the perivenous compartment, ornithine aminotransferase, as well as the immunochemical localization of both glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in rats with a portacaval shunt. The portacaval shunt caused a marked decrease in glutamine synthetase activity and an increase in ornithine aminotransferase activity. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase proteins maintained their location in the perivenous cells. These results indicate that there is no generalized loss of perivenous hepatocytes, but rather, there is a significant alteration in the expression of these proteins and hence metabolism in this cell population.

  5. Effects of starvation on the maximal activities of some glycolytic and citric acid-cycle enzymes and glutaminase in mucosa of the small intestine of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Budohoski, Leszek; Challis, R. A. John; Newsholme, Eric A.

    1982-01-01

    Starvation decreases activities of some glycolytic and citric acid-cycle enzymes, and increases those of glucose 6-phosphatase and fructose bisphosphatase, whereas that of glutaminase is unchanged. These findings may be of significance for the control of glucose metabolism in the absorptive cells of the intestine. PMID:7126190

  6. Overexpression of a brassinosteroid biosynthetic gene Dwarf enhances photosynthetic capacity through activation of Calvin cycle enzymes in tomato.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jing; Guo, Xie; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Jing-Quan; Xia, Xiao-Jian

    2016-01-28

    Genetic manipulation of brassinosteroid (BR) biosynthesis or signaling is a promising strategy to improve crop yield and quality. However, the relationships between the BR-promoted growth and photosynthesis and the exact mechanism of BR-regulated photosynthetic capacity are not clear. Here, we generated transgenic tomato plants by overexpressing Dwarf, a BR biosynthetic gene that encodes the CYP85A1, and compared the photosynthetic capacity with the BR biosynthetic mutant d (im) and wild type. Overexpression of Dwarf promoted net photosynthetic rate (P N), whereas BR deficiency in d (im) led to a significant inhibition in P N as compared with WT. The activation status of RuBisCO, and the protein content and activity of RuBisCO activase, but not the total content and transcripts of RuBisCO were closely related to the endogenous BR levels in different genotypes. However, endogenous BR positively regulated the expression and activity of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. Dwarf overexpression enhanced the activity of dehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase, leading to a reduced redox status, whereas BR deficiency had the contrasting effects. In addition, BR induced a reduction of 2-cystein peroxiredoxin without altering the protein content. BR plays a role in the regulation of photosynthesis. BR can increase the photosynthetic capacity by inducing a reduced redox status that maintains the activation states of Calvin cycle enzymes.

  7. Glutamine carbon disposal and net glutamine uptake in fetuses of fed and fasted ewes.

    PubMed

    Levitsky, L L; Stonestreet, B S; Mink, K; Zheng, Q

    1993-11-01

    We have traced ovine fetal glutamine carbon uptake and disposal in 7 chronically catheterized fetuses of fed ewes and 10 fetuses of 48-h fasted ewes. Net fetal glutamine uptake (Fick principle, antipyrine blood flow) was 10.0 +/- 2.0 mumol.kg-1 x min-1 in fed fetuses and 6.4 +/- 1.4 mumol.kg-1 x min-1 in fasted fetuses [not significant (NS)]. However, net fetal glutamine uptake was linearly related to the umbilical vein glutamine level (P < 0.05) in fed and fasted fetuses. In contrast, fetal glutamate transfer to the placenta was 4.0 +/- 0.8 mumol.kg-1.min-1 in the fed state and 2.7 +/- 0.1 mumol.kg-1 x min-1 in the fasted state. Net fetal glutamine uptake and fetal glutamate transfer to the placenta were directly correlated (P < 0.05). Fetal glutamine carbon disposal was measured using a primed continuous infusion of [U-14C]-glutamine over a 3-h period and blood sampling during the last hour of infusion (steady state). Disposal was 20.9 +/- 2.6 mumol.kg-1 x min-1 in the fed state and 18.6 +/- 2.3 mumol.kg-1 x min-1 in the maternal fasted state (NS). Glutamine carbon disposal did not correlate with fetal arterial glutamine levels and was not influenced by maternal nutritional state.

  8. ACR11 is an Activator of Plastid-Type Glutamine Synthetase GS2 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Otsuki, Hitomi; Saito, Kazuki; Yokota Hirai, Masami

    2017-03-06

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an important enzyme for nitrogen assimilation, and GS2, encoded by GLN2, is the only plastid-type GS in Arabidopsis thaliana. A co-expression analysis suggested that the expression level of the gene encoding a uridylyltransferase-like protein, ACR11, is strongly correlated with GLN2 expression levels. Here we showed that the recombinant ACR11 protein increased GS2 activity in vitro by reducing the Km values of its substrate glutamine. A T-DNA insertion mutant of ACR11 exhibited a reduced GS activity under low nitrate conditions and reduced glutamine levels. Biochemical analyses revealed that ACR11 and GS2 interacted both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that ACR11 is an activator of GS2, giving it a mechanistic role in the nitrogen assimilation of A. thaliana.

  9. Therapeutic strategies impacting cancer cell glutamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lukey, Michael J; Wilson, Kristin F; Cerione, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic adaptations that support oncogenic growth can also render cancer cells dependent on certain nutrients. Along with the Warburg effect, increased utilization of glutamine is one of the metabolic hallmarks of the transformed state. Glutamine catabolism is positively regulated by multiple oncogenic signals, including those transmitted by the Rho family of GTPases and by c-Myc. The recent identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of glutaminase, which can selectively block cellular transformation, has revived interest in the possibility of targeting glutamine metabolism in cancer therapy. Here, we outline the regulation and roles of glutamine metabolism within cancer cells and discuss possible strategies for, and the consequences of, impacting these processes therapeutically. PMID:24047273

  10. Glutamine synthetase 2 is not essential for biosynthesis of compatible solutes in Halobacillus halophilus.

    PubMed

    Shiyan, Anna; Thompson, Melanie; Köcher, Saskia; Tausendschön, Michaela; Santos, Helena; Hänelt, Inga; Müller, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Halobacillus halophilus, a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from salt marshes, produces various compatible solutes to cope with osmotic stress. Glutamate and glutamine are dominant compatible solutes at mild salinities. Glutamine synthetase activity in cell suspensions of Halobacillus halophilus wild type was shown to be salt dependent and chloride modulated. A possible candidate to catalyze glutamine synthesis is glutamine synthetase A2, whose transcription is stimulated by chloride. To address the role of GlnA2 in the biosynthesis of the osmolytes glutamate and glutamine, a deletion mutant (ΔglnA2) was generated and characterized in detail. We compared the pool of compatible solutes and performed transcriptional analyses of the principal genes controlling the solute production in the wild type strain and the deletion mutant. These measurements did not confirm the hypothesized role of GlnA2 in the osmolyte production. Most likely the presence of another, yet to be identified enzyme has the main contribution in the measured activity in crude extracts and probably determines the total chloride-modulated profile. The role of GlnA2 remains to be elucidated.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of glutamine synthetase, a tegumental protein from Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chunhui; Hong, Yang; Cao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Fu, Zhiqiang; Shi, Yaojun; Wei, Meimei; Liu, Shengfa; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2012-12-01

    Glutamine synthetase catalyzes the synthesis of glutamine, providing nitrogen for the production of purines, pyrimidines, amino acids, and other compounds required in many pivotal cellular events. Herein, a full-length cDNA encoding Schistosoma japonicum glutamine synthetase (SjGS) was isolated from 21-day schistosomes. The entire open reading frame of SjGS contains a 1,095-bp coding region corresponding to 364 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 40.7 kDa. NCBIP blast shows that the putative amino acid of SjGS contains a classic β-grasp domain and a catalytic domain of glutamine synthetase. The relative mRNA expression of SjGS was evaluated in 7-, 13-, 21-, 28-, 35-, and 42-day worms of S. japonicum in the final host and higher expression at day 21, and 42 worms were observed. This protein was also detected in worm extracts using Western blot. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that the SjGS protein was mainly distributed on tegument and parenchyma in 28-day adult worms. The recombinant glutamine synthetase with a molecular weight of 45 kDa was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified in its active form. The enzyme activity of the recombinant protein was 3.30 ± 0.67 U.μg-1. The enzyme activity was highly stable over a wide range of pH (6-9) and temperature (25-40 °C) under physiological conditions. The transcription of SjGS was upregulated in praziquantel-treated worms at 2-, 4-, and 24-h posttreatment compared with the untreated control. As a first step towards the clarification of the role of glutamine synthetase in schistosome species, we have cloned and characterized cDNAs encoding SjGS in S. japonicum, and the data presented suggest that SjGS is an important molecule in the development of the schistosome.

  12. Subunit Interactions and Glutamine Utilization by Escherichia coli Imidazole Glycerol Phosphate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Klem, Thomas J.; Chen, Yuan; Davisson, V. Jo

    2001-01-01

    A selection strategy has been developed to identify amino acid residues involved in subunit interactions that coordinate the two half-reactions catalyzed by glutamine amidotransferases. The protein structures known for this class of enzymes have revealed that ammonia is shuttled over long distances and that each amidotransferase evolved different molecular tunnels for this purpose. The heterodimeric Escherichia coli imidazole glycerol phosphate (IGP) synthase was probed to assess if residues in the substrate amination subunit (HisF) are critical for the glutaminase activity in the HisH subunit. The activity of the HisH subunit is dependent upon binding of the nucleotide substrate at the HisF active site. This regulatory function has been exploited as a biochemical selection of mutant HisF subunits that retain full activity with ammonia as a substrate but, when constituted as a holoenzyme with wild-type HisH, impair the glutamine-dependent activity of IGP synthase. The steady-state kinetic constants for these IGP synthases with HisF alleles showed three distinct effects depending upon the site of mutation. For example, mutation of the R5 residue has similar effects on the glutamine-dependent amidotransfer reaction; however, kcat/Km for the glutaminase half-reaction was increased 10-fold over that for the wild-type enzyme with nucleotide substrate. This site appears essential for coupling of the glutamine hydrolysis and ammonia transfer steps and is the first example of a site remote to the catalytic triad that modulates the process. The results are discussed in the context of recent X-ray crystal structures of glutamine amidotransferases that relate the glutamine binding and acceptor binding sites. PMID:11208798

  13. Does oral glutamine improve insulin sensitivity in adolescents with type 1 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Torres-Santiago, Lournaris; Mauras, Nelly; Hossain, Jobayer; Weltman, Arthur L; Darmaun, Dominique

    2017-02-01

    The decline in insulin sensitivity (SI) associated with puberty increases the difficulty of achieving glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The aim of this study was to determine whether glutamine supplementation affects blood glucose by enhancing SI in adolescents with T1D. Thirteen adolescents with T1D (HbA1C 8.2 ± 0.1%) were admitted to perform afternoon exercise (four 15-min treadmill/5-min rest cycles of exercise) on two occasions within a 4-wk period. They were randomized to receive a drink containing either glutamine (0.25 g/kg) or placebo before exercise, at bedtime, and early morning in a double-blind, crossover design. Blood glucose was monitored overnight, and a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp was performed the following morning. Blood glucose concentration dropped comparably during exercise on both days. However, the total number of nocturnal hypoglycemic events (17 versus 7, P = 0.045) and the cumulative probability of overnight hypoglycemia (50% versus 33%, P = 0.02) were higher on the glutamine day than on the placebo day. During clamp, glucose infusion rate was not affected by glutamine supplementation (7.7 ± 1 mg • kg(-1) • min(-1) versus 7.0 ± 1; glutamine versus placebo; P = 0.4). Oral glutamine supplementation decreases blood glucose in adolescents with T1D after exercise. Insulin sensitivity, however, was unaltered during the euglycemic clamp. Although the mechanisms involved remain to be elucidated, studies to explore the potential use of glutamine to improve blood glucose control are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic Imaging of Glutamine in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Ploessl, Karl; Zhou, Rong; Mankoff, David; Kung, Hank F

    2017-04-01

    Glucose and glutamine are the most abundant nutrients for producing energy and building blocks in normal and tumor cells. Increased glycolysis in tumors, the Warburg Effect, is the basis for (18)F-FDG PET imaging. Cancer cells can also be genetically reprogrammed to use glutamine. 5-(11)C-(2S)-glutamine and (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine may be useful complementary tools to measure changes in tumor metabolism. In glioma patients, the tracer (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine showed tumor-to-background contrast different from that of (18)F-FDG and differences in uptake in glioma patients with clinical progression of disease versus stable disease (tumor-to-brain ratio > 3.7 in clinically active glioma tumors, minimal or no specific uptake in clinically stable tumors). These preliminary results suggest that (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine PET may be a new tool for probing in vivo metabolism of glutamine in cancer patients and for guiding glutamine-targeted therapeutics. Further studies of uptake mechanism, and comparison of kinetics for (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine versus the (11)C-labeled native glutamine, will be important and enlightening. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  15. Latent KSHV Infected Endothelial Cells Are Glutamine Addicted and Require Glutaminolysis for Survival

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Erica L.; Carroll, Patrick A.; Thalhofer, Angel B.; Lagunoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi’s Sarcoma (KS). KSHV establishes a predominantly latent infection in the main KS tumor cell type, the spindle cell, which is of endothelial cell origin. KSHV requires the induction of multiple metabolic pathways, including glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis, for the survival of latently infected endothelial cells. Here we demonstrate that latent KSHV infection leads to increased levels of intracellular glutamine and enhanced glutamine uptake. Depletion of glutamine from the culture media leads to a significant increase in apoptotic cell death in latently infected endothelial cells, but not in their mock-infected counterparts. In cancer cells, glutamine is often required for glutaminolysis to provide intermediates for the tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and support for the production of biosynthetic and bioenergetic precursors. In the absence of glutamine, the TCA cycle intermediates alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG) and pyruvate prevent the death of latently infected cells. Targeted drug inhibition of glutaminolysis also induces increased cell death in latently infected cells. KSHV infection of endothelial cells induces protein expression of the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5. Chemical inhibition of SLC1A5, or knockdown by siRNA, leads to similar cell death rates as glutamine deprivation and, similarly, can be rescued by αKG. KSHV also induces expression of the heterodimeric transcription factors c-Myc-Max and related heterodimer MondoA-Mlx. Knockdown of MondoA inhibits expression of both Mlx and SLC1A5 and induces a significant increase in cell death of only cells latently infected with KSHV, again, fully rescued by the supplementation of αKG. Therefore, during latent infection of endothelial cells, KSHV activates and requires the Myc/MondoA-network to upregulate the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5, leading to increased glutamine uptake for glutaminolysis. These findings expand our

  16. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and microscale thermophoresis as tools for investigation of protein complex formation between thymidylate synthesis cycle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Antosiewicz, Anna; Senkara, Elżbieta; Cieśla, Joanna

    2015-02-15

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) play essential role in DNA synthesis, repair and cell division by catalyzing two subsequent reactions in thymidylate biosynthesis cycle. The lack of either enzyme leads to thymineless death of the cell, therefore inhibition of the enzyme activity is a common and successful tool in cancer chemotherapy and treatment of other diseases. However, the detailed mechanism of thymidylate synthesis cycle, especially the interactions between cycle enzymes and its role remain unknown. In this paper we are the first to show that human TS and DHFR enzymes form a strong complex which might be essential for DNA synthesis. Using two unique biosensor techniques, both highly sensitive to biomolecular interactions, namely quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and microscale thermophoresis (MST) we have been able to determine DHFR-TS binding kinetic parameters such as the Kd value being below 10 µM (both methods), k(on) = 0.46 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and k(off) = 0.024 s(-1) (QCM-D). We also calculated Gibbs free energy as in the order of -30 kJ/mol and DHFR/TS molar ratio pointing to binding of 6 DHFR monomers per 1 TS dimer (both methods). Moreover, our data from MST analysis have pointed to positive binding cooperativity in TS-DHFR complex formation. The results obtained with both methods are comparable and complementary.

  17. O-GlcNAc cycling enzymes control vascular development of the placenta by modulating the levels of HIF-1α.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong Ryoul; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Lee, Yong Hwa; Kim, Il Shin; Lee, Ho; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2015-10-01

    Placental vasculogenesis is essential for fetal growth and development, and is affected profoundly by oxygen tension (hypoxia). Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which is stabilized at the protein level in response to hypoxia, is essential for vascular morphogenesis in the placenta. Many studies suggested that responses to hypoxia is influenced by O-GlcNAcylation. O-GlcNAcylation is regulated by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) that catalyze the addition and removal of O-GlcNAc respectively. We generated OGA deficient mice and evaluated OGA(-/-) placentas. The analysis of OGA(-/-) placentas was focused on morphological change and placental vasculogenesis. HIF-1α protein stability or transcriptional activity under dysregulation of O-GlcNAcylation were evaluated by Western blot, RT-qPCR and luciferase reporter gene assays in MEFs or MS1 cell line. Deletion of OGA results in defective placental vasculogenesis. OGA(-/-) placentas showed an abnormal placental shape and reduced vasculature in the labyrinth, which caused a developmental delay in the embryos. OGA deletion, which elevates O-GlcNAcylation and downregulates O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), suppressed HIF-1α stabilization and the transcription of its target genes. In contrast, the overexpression of O-GlcNAc cycling enzymes enhanced the expression and transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that OGA plays a critical role in placental vasculogenesis by modulating HIF-1α stabilization. Control of O-GlcNAcylation is essential for placental development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Glutamine supplementation maintains intramuscular glutamine concentrations and normalizes lymphocyte function in infected early weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S S; Field, C J; McBurney, M I

    1997-11-01

    Numerous studies in humans and rats have shown that glutamine supplementation during stressful conditions has favorable outcomes. However, the requirements for glutamine during weaning are unknown. Thus, the effects of glutamine supplementation in healthy and infected weaned pigs were investigated. At 21 d of age, pigs were weaned to an elemental diet supplemented with glutamine (+Gln) or an isonitrogenous diet containing nonessential amino acids (-Gln). At 26 d of age, pigs were intraperitoneally injected with Escherichia coli (+Ecoli) or buffered saline (-Ecoli) and killed at 28 d of age. Infection decreased (P < 0.05) plasma and intramuscular glutamine concentrations, but infected pigs that received +Gln diets had higher intramuscular glutamine levels than those that received -Gln diets. Infected pigs had elevated (P < 0.05) total leukocyte counts, and blood lymphocyte responses ([3H]-thymidine incorporation) to a mixture of phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin were reduced. White blood cell counts were greater (P < 0.05) in +Gln than -Gln pigs. The peak responses to concanavalin A (Con A) by lymphocytes of +Ecoli+Gln pigs were greater (P < 0.05) than those of +Ecoli-Gln pigs and not different than those of noninfected pigs. Hence, glutamine supplementation maintained muscular glutamine concentrations and normalized lymphocyte function in infected pigs.

  19. Glutamine synthetase desensitizes differentiated adipocytes to proinflammatory stimuli by raising intracellular glutamine levels.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Erika Mariana; Spera, Iolanda; Menga, Alessio; Infantino, Vittoria; Iacobazzi, Vito; Castegna, Alessandra

    2014-12-20

    The role of glutamine synthetase (GS) during adipocyte differentiation is unclear. Here, we assess the impact of GS on the adipocytic response to a proinflammatory challenge at different differentiation stages. GS expression at the late stages of differentiation desensitized mature adipocytes to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by increasing intracellular glutamine levels. Furthermore, LPS-activated mature adipocytes were unable to produce inflammatory mediators; LPS sensitivity was rescued following GS inhibition and the associated drop in intracellular glutamine levels. The ability of adipocytes to differentially respond to LPS during differentiation negatively correlates to GS expression and intracellular glutamine levels. Hence, modulation of intracellular glutamine levels by GS expression represents an endogenous mechanism through which mature adipocytes control the inflammatory response.

  20. Plant nutritional status modulates glutamine synthetase levels in ripe tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom).

    PubMed

    Scarpeci, Telma E; Marro, Martin L; Bortolotti, Santiago; Boggio, Silvana B; Valle, Estela M

    2007-02-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening implies that chloroplastic proteins are degraded and new proteins are synthesized. Supplementary nutrition is frequently required when tomato plants begin to fruit and continues until the end of the plant's life cycle. Ammonium assimilation is crucial in these fruit maturation and ripening processes. Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2), the main ammonium-fixing enzyme in plants, could not be detected in red fruits of several tomato varieties when growing under standard nutrition. In this paper, we analyze the influence of the nutritional status on the ammonium assimilation capacity of ripe tomato (cv. Micro-Tom) fruit. For this purpose, GS expression and protein profiles were followed in mature green and red fruits harvested from plants grown under standard or supplemented nutrition. Under standard nutrient regime (weekly supplied with 0.5 x Hoagland solution) GS activity was found in chloroplasts (GS2) of mature green fruits, but it was not detected either in the chromoplasts or in the cytosol of red fruits. When plants were shifted to a supplemented nutritional regime (daily supplied with 0.5 x Hoagland solution), GS was found in red fruits. Also, cytosolic transcripts (gs1) preferentially accumulated in red fruits under high nutrition. These results indicate that mature green Micro-Tom fruits assimilate ammonia through GS2 under standard nutrition, while ripe red fruits accumulate GS1 under high nutrition, probably in order to assimilate the extra N-compounds made available through supplemented nutrition.

  1. In vivo urea cycle flux distinguishes and correlates with phenotypic severity in disorders of the urea cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Brendan; Yu, Hong; Jahoor, Farook; O'Brien, William; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Reeds, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Urea cycle disorders are a group of inborn errors of hepatic metabolism that result in often life-threatening hyperammonemia and hyperglutaminemia. Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of partial deficiencies during asymptomatic periods is difficult, and correlation of phenotypic severity with either genotype and/or in vitro enzyme activity is often imprecise. We hypothesized that stable isotopically determined in vivo rates of total body urea synthesis and urea cycle-specific nitrogen flux would correlate with both phenotypic severity and carrier status in patients with a variety of different enzymatic deficiencies of the urea cycle. We studied control subjects, patients, and their relatives with different enzymatic deficiencies affecting the urea cycle while consuming a low protein diet. On a separate occasion the subjects either received a higher protein intake or were treated with an alternative route medication sodium phenylacetate/benzoate (Ucephan), or oral arginine supplementation. Total urea synthesis from all nitrogen sources was determined from [18O]urea labeling, and the utilization of peripheral nitrogen was estimated from the relative isotopic enrichments of [15N]urea and [15N]glutamine during i.v. co-infusions of [5-(amide)15N]glutamine and [18O]urea. The ratio of the isotopic enrichments of 15N-urea/15N-glutamine distinguished normal control subjects (ratio = 0.42 ± 0.06) from urea cycle patients with late (0.17 ± 0.03) and neonatal (0.003 ± 0.007) presentations irrespective of enzymatic deficiency. This index of urea cycle activity also distinguished asymptomatic heterozygous carriers of argininosuccinate synthetase deficiency (0.22 ± 0.03), argininosuccinate lyase deficiency (0.35 ± 0.11), and partial ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (0.26 ± 0.06) from normal controls. Administration of Ucephan lowered, and arginine increased, urea synthesis to the degree predicted from their respective rates of metabolism. The 15N-urea/15N-glutamine ratio

  2. Neuromuscular Dysfunction in Experimental Sepsis and Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Çankayalı, İlkin; Boyacılar, Özden; Demirağ, Kubilay; Uyar, Mehmet; Moral, Ali Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrophysiological studies show that critical illness polyneuromyopathy appears in the early stage of sepsis before the manifestation of clinical findings. The metabolic response observed during sepsis causes glutamine to become a relative essential amino acid. Aims: We aimed to assess the changes in neuromuscular transmission in the early stage of sepsis after glutamine supplementation. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups. Rats in both groups were given normal feeding for one week. In the study group, 1 g/kg/day glutamine was added to normal feeding by feeding tube for one week. Cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) surgery was performed at the end of one week. Before and 24 hours after CLP, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle. Results: Latency measurements before and 24 hours after CLP were 0.68±0.05 ms and 0.80±0.09 ms in the control group and 0.69±0.07 ms and 0.73±0.07 ms in the study group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Since enteral glutamine prevented compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) latency prolongation in the early phase of sepsis, it was concluded that enteral glutamine replacement might be promising in the prevention of neuromuscular dysfunction in sepsis; however, further studies are required. PMID:27308070

  3. A novel mechanism of glutamine synthetase inactivation by ammonium in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Involvement of an inactivating protein.

    PubMed

    Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J

    1995-06-19

    The glutamine synthetase of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 can be inactivated in vivo by ammonium addition by a new mechanism that involves the binding to the enzyme of an inactivating factor. This binding provokes a different mobility of the inactive enzyme with respect to the active form in non-denaturing PAGE, but not in SDS-PAGE. This modification of glutamine synthetase is for the first time visualized by Western blot analysis of the active and inactive forms. Cross-linking experiments using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) demonstrate the existence of two main complexes of 56 kDa and 67 kDa between the inactivating factor and the glutamine synthetase subunit (53 kDa) in the inactive but not in the active form of glutamine synthetase.

  4. The effect of glial glutamine synthetase inhibition on recognition and temporal memories in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kant, Deepika; Tripathi, Shweta; Qureshi, Munazah F; Tripathi, Shweta; Pandey, Swati; Singh, Gunjan; Kumar, Tankesh; Mir, Fayaz A; Jha, Sushil K

    2014-02-07

    The glutamate neurotransmitter is intrinsically involved in learning and memory. Glial glutamine synthetase enzyme synthesizes glutamine, which helps maintain the optimal neuronal glutamate level. However, the role of glutamine synthetase in learning and memory remains unclear. Using associative trace learning task, we investigated the effects of methionine sulfoximine (MSO) (glutamine synthetase inhibitor) on recognition and temporal memories. MSO and vehicle were injected (i.p.) three hours before training in separate groups of male Wistar rats (n=11). Animals were trained to obtain fruit juice after following a set of sequential events. Initially, house-light was presented for 15s followed by 5s trace interval. Thereafter, juice was given for 20s followed by 20s inter-presentation interval. A total of 75 presentations were made over five sessions during the training and testing periods. The average number of head entries to obtain juice per session and during individual phases at different time intervals was accounted as an outcome measure of recognition and temporal memories. The total head entries in MSO and vehicle treated animals were comparable on training and testing days. However, it was 174.90% (p=0.08), 270.61% (p<0.05), 143.20% (p<0.05) more on training day and 270.33% (p<0.05), 157.94% (p<0.05), 170.42% (p<0.05) more on testing day, during the house-light, trace-interval and inter-presentation interval phases in MSO animals. Glutamine synthetase inhibition did not induce recognition memory deficit, while temporal memory was altered, suggesting that glutamine synthetase modulates some aspects of mnemonic processes.

  5. Oxidative modification of glutamine synthetase. I. Inactivation is due to loss of one histidine residue.

    PubMed

    Levine, R L

    1983-10-10

    Intracellular proteolytic degradation of glutamine synthetase occurs in two distinct steps in Escherichia coli (Levine, R. L., Oliver, C. N., Fulks, R. M., and Stadtman, E. R. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78, 2120-2124). In the first step, a mixed function oxidation modifies the glutamine synthetase. The modified enzyme, which is catalytically inactive, becomes susceptible to proteolytic attack. In the second step, a protease specific for the modified enzyme catalyzes the actual proteolytic degradation. The oxidatively modified glutamine synthetase was studied to determine the chemical differences between it and the native enzyme. Only a single alteration was found; one of sixteen histidine residues/subunit was altered by the oxidative modification. The modification introduced a carbonyl group into the protein, permitting isolation of a stable dinitrophenylhydrazone. No other differences were detected between the native and modified proteins. Specifically, the cysteine, methionine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan contents were not altered. A number of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic enzymes are also susceptible to oxidative modification. This covalent modification may be important in intracellular proteolysis, in mammalian host defense systems, in prevention of autolysis, in aging processes, and in oxygen toxicity.

  6. Acquired Amino Acid Deficiencies: A Focus on Arginine and Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Morris, Claudia R; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill; Martindale, Robert G; Sarav, Menaka; Ochoa Gautier, Juan B

    2017-04-01

    Nonessential amino acids are synthesized de novo and therefore not diet dependent. In contrast, essential amino acids must be obtained through nutrition since they cannot be synthesized internally. Several nonessential amino acids may become essential under conditions of stress and catabolic states when the capacity of endogenous amino acid synthesis is exceeded. Arginine and glutamine are 2 such conditionally essential amino acids and are the focus of this review. Low arginine bioavailability plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of a growing number of varied diseases, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, malaria, acute asthma, cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, and trauma, among others. Catabolism of arginine by arginase enzymes is the most common cause of an acquired arginine deficiency syndrome, frequently contributing to endothelial dysfunction and/or T-cell dysfunction, depending on the clinical scenario and disease state. Glutamine, an arginine precursor, is one of the most abundant amino acids in the body and, like arginine, becomes deficient in several conditions of stress, including critical illness, trauma, infection, cancer, and gastrointestinal disorders. At-risk populations are discussed together with therapeutic options that target these specific acquired amino acid deficiencies.

  7. GLUTAMINE AS A MEDIATOR OF AMMONIA NEUROTOXICITY: A CRITICAL APPRAISAL

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jan; Zielińska, Magdalena; Norenberg, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia is a major neurotoxin implicated in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Here we discuss evidence that many aspects of ammonia toxicity in HE-affected brain are mediated by glutamine (Gln), synthesized in excess from ammonia and glutamate by glutamine synthetase (GS), an astrocytic enzyme. The degree to which Gln is increased in brains of patients with HE was found to positively correlate with the grade of HE. In animals with HE, a GS inhibitor, methionine sulfoximine (MSO), reversed a spectrum of manifestations of ammonia toxicity, including brain edema and increased intracranial pressure, even though MSO itself increased brain ammonia levels. MSO inhibited, while incubation with Gln reproduced the oxidative stress and cell swelling observed in ammonia-exposed cultured astrocytes. Recent studies have shown that astrocytes swell subsequent to Gln transport into mitochondria and its degradation back to ammonia, which then generates reactive oxygen species and the mitochondrial permeability transition. This sequence of events led to the formulation of the “Trojan Horse” hypothesis. Further verification of the role of Gln in the pathogenesis of HE will have to account for: 1) modification of the effects of Gln by interaction of astrocytes with other CNS cells; and 2) direct effects of Gln on these cells. Recent studies have demonstrated a “Trojan Horse”-like effect of Gln in microglia, as well as an interference by Gln with the activation of the NMDA/NO/cGMP pathway by ammonia as measured in whole brain, a process that likely also involves neurons. PMID:20654582

  8. An Inhibitor of Exported Mycobacterium tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Selectively Blocks the Growth of Pathogenic Mycobacteria in Axenic Culture and in Human Monocytes: Extracellular Proteins as Potential Novel Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Harth, Günter; Horwitz, Marcus A.

    1999-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogenic mycobacteria export abundant quantities of proteins into their extracellular milieu when growing either axenically or within phagosomes of host cells. One major extracellular protein, the enzyme glutamine synthetase, is of particular interest because of its link to pathogenicity. Pathogenic mycobacteria, but not nonpathogenic mycobacteria, export large amounts of this protein. Interestingly, export of the enzyme is associated with the presence of a poly-l-glutamate/glutamine structure in the mycobacterial cell wall. In this study, we investigated the influence of glutamine synthetase inhibitors on the growth of pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria and on the poly-l-glutamate/glutamine cell wall structure. The inhibitor l-methionine-S-sulfoximine rapidly inactivated purified M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase, which was 100-fold more sensitive to this inhibitor than a representative mammalian glutamine synthetase. Added to cultures of pathogenic mycobacteria, l-methionine- S-sulfoximine rapidly inhibited extracellular glutamine synthetase in a concentration-dependent manner but had only a minimal effect on cellular glutamine synthetase, a finding consistent with failure of the drug to cross the mycobacterial cell wall. Remarkably, the inhibitor selectively blocked the growth of pathogenic mycobacteria, all of which release glutamine synthetase extracellularly, but had no effect on nonpathogenic mycobacteria or nonmycobacterial microorganisms, none of which release glutamine synthetase extracellularly. The inhibitor was also bacteriostatic for M. tuberculosis in human mononuclear phagocytes (THP-1 cells), the pathogen's primary host cells. Paralleling and perhaps underlying its bacteriostatic effect, the inhibitor markedly reduced the amount of poly-l-glutamate/glutamine cell wall structure in M. tuberculosis. Although it is possible that glutamine synthetase inhibitors interact with additional extracellular

  9. Structural basis for specificity and promiscuity in a carrier protein/enzyme system from the sulfur cycle

    PubMed Central

    Grabarczyk, Daniel B.; Chappell, Paul E.; Johnson, Steven; Stelzl, Lukas S.; Berks, Ben C.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial Sox (sulfur oxidation) pathway is an important route for the oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds. Intermediates in the Sox pathway are covalently attached to the heterodimeric carrier protein SoxYZ through conjugation to a cysteine on a protein swinging arm. We have investigated how the carrier protein shuttles intermediates between the enzymes of the Sox pathway using the interaction between SoxYZ and the enzyme SoxB as our model. The carrier protein and enzyme interact only weakly, but we have trapped their complex by using a “suicide enzyme” strategy in which an engineered cysteine in the SoxB active site forms a disulfide bond with the incoming carrier arm cysteine. The structure of this trapped complex, together with calorimetric data, identifies sites of protein–protein interaction both at the entrance to the enzyme active site tunnel and at a second, distal, site. We find that the enzyme distinguishes between the substrate and product forms of the carrier protein through differences in their interaction kinetics and deduce that this behavior arises from substrate-specific stabilization of a conformational change in the enzyme active site. Our analysis also suggests how the carrier arm-bound substrate group is able to outcompete the adjacent C-terminal carboxylate of the carrier arm for binding to the active site metal ions. We infer that similar principles underlie carrier protein interactions with other enzymes of the Sox pathway. PMID:26655737

  10. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stehle, Peter; Kuhn, Katharina S.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care. PMID:26495301

  11. Recent molecular advances in mammalian glutamine transport.

    PubMed

    Bode, B P

    2001-09-01

    Much has been learned about plasma membrane glutamine transporter activities in health and disease over the past 30 years, including their potential regulatory role in metabolism. Since the 1960s, discrimination among individual glutamine transporters was based on functional characteristics such as substrate specificity, ion dependence, and kinetic and regulatory properties. Within the past two years, several genes encoding for proteins with these defined activities (termed "systems") have been isolated from human and rodent cDNA libraries and found to be distributed among four distinct gene families. The Na(+)-dependent glutamine transporter genes isolated thus far are System N (SN1), System A (ATA1, ATA2), System ASC/B(0) (ASCT2 or ATB(0)), System B(0,+) (ATB(0,+)) and System y(+)L (y(+)LAT1, y(+)LAT2). Na(+)-independent glutamine transporter genes encoding for System L (LAT1, LAT2) and System b(0,+) (b(0,+)AT) have also been recently isolated, and similar to y(+)L, have been shown to function as disulfide-linked heterodimers with the 4F2 heavy chain (CD98) or rBAT (related to b(0,+) amino acid transporter). In this review, the molecular features, catalytic mechanisms and tissue distributions of each are addressed. Although most of these transporters mediate the transmembrane movement of several other amino acids, their potential roles in regulating interorgan glutamine flux are discussed. Most importantly, these newly isolated transporter genes provide the long awaited tools necessary to study their molecular regulation during the catabolic states in which glutamine is considered to be "conditionally essential."

  12. A Tracer Bolus Method for Investigating Glutamine Kinetics in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Maiko; Smedberg, Marie; Klaude, Maria; Tjäder, Inga; Norberg, Åke; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Glutamine transport between tissues is important for the outcome of critically ill patients. Investigation of glutamine kinetics is, therefore, necessary to understand glutamine metabolism in these patients in order to improve future intervention studies. Endogenous glutamine production can be measured by continuous infusion of a glutamine tracer, which necessitates a minimum measurement time period. In order to reduce this problem, we used and validated a tracer bolus injection method. Furthermore, this method was used to measure the glutamine production in healthy volunteers in the post-absorptive state, with extra alanine and with glutamine supplementation and parenteral nutrition. Healthy volunteers received a bolus injection of [1-13C] glutamine, and blood was collected from the radial artery to measure tracer enrichment over 90 minutes. Endogenous rate of appearance (endoRa) of glutamine was calculated from the enrichment decay curve and corrected for the extra glutamine supplementation. The glutamine endoRa of healthy volunteers was 6.1±0.9 µmol/kg/min in the post-absorptive state, 6.9±1.0 µmol/kg/min with extra alanyl-glutamine (p = 0.29 versus control), 6.1±0.4 µmol/kg/min with extra alanine only (p = 0.32 versus control), and 7.5±0.9 µmol/kg/min with extra alanyl-glutamine and parenteral nutrition (p = 0.049 versus control). In conclusion, a tracer bolus injection method to measure glutamine endoRa showed good reproducibility and small variation at baseline as well as during parenteral nutrition. Additionally, we showed that parenteral nutrition including alanyl-glutamine increased glutamine endoRa in healthy volunteers, which was not attributable to the alanine part of the dipeptide. PMID:24810895

  13. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Torreira, Eva; Seabra, Ana Rita; Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min; Llorca, Óscar; Robinson, Carol V.; Carvalho, Helena G.; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-04-01

    The experimental models of dicotyledonous cytoplasmic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases unveil a conserved eukaryotic-type decameric architecture, with subtle structural differences in M. truncatula isoenzymes that account for their distinct herbicide resistance. The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  14. Low-frequency vibrational modes of glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Ning; Wang, Guo; Zhang, Yan

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution terahertz absorption and Raman spectra of glutamine in the frequency region 0.2 THz-2.8 THz are obtained by using THz time domain spectroscopy and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy. Based on the experimental and the computational results, the vibration modes corresponding to the terahertz absorption and Raman scatting peaks are assigned and further verified by the theoretical calculations. Spectral investigation of the periodic structure of glutamine based on the sophisticated hybrid density functional B3LYP indicates that the vibrational modes come mainly from the inter-molecular hydrogen bond in this frequency region.

  15. Intestinal and hepatic metabolism of glutamine and citrulline in humans

    PubMed Central

    van de Poll, Marcel C G; Ligthart-Melis, Gerdien C; Boelens, Petra G; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; Dejong, Cornelis H C

    2007-01-01

    Glutamine plays an important role in nitrogen homeostasis and intestinal substrate supply. It has been suggested that glutamine is a precursor for arginine through an intestinal–renal pathway involving inter-organ transport of citrulline. The importance of intestinal glutamine metabolism for endogenous arginine synthesis in humans, however, has remained unaddressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the intestinal conversion of glutamine to citrulline and the effect of the liver on splanchnic citrulline metabolism in humans. Eight patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery received a primed continuous intravenous infusion of [2-15N]glutamine and [ureido-13C–2H2]citrulline. Arterial, portal venous and hepatic venous blood were sampled and portal and hepatic blood flows were measured. Organ specific amino acid uptake (disposal), production and net balance, as well as whole body rates of plasma appearance were calculated according to established methods. The intestines consumed glutamine at a rate that was dependent on glutamine supply. Approximately 13% of glutamine taken up by the intestines was converted to citrulline. Quantitatively glutamine was the only important precursor for intestinal citrulline release. Both glutamine and citrulline were consumed and produced by the liver, but net hepatic flux of both amino acids was not significantly different from zero. Plasma glutamine was the precursor of 80% of plasma citrulline and plasma citrulline in turn was the precursor of 10% of plasma arginine. In conclusion, glutamine is an important precursor for the synthesis of arginine after intestinal conversion to citrulline in humans. PMID:17347276

  16. Glutamine: Precursor or nitrogen donor for citrulline synthesis?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although glutamine is considered the main precursor for citrulline synthesis, the current literature does not differentiate between the contribution of glutamine carbon skeleton, versus nonspecific nitrogen (i.e., ammonia) and carbon derived from glutamine oxidation. To elucidate the role of glutami...

  17. Distribution of glutamine synthetase in the chick forebrain: implications for passive avoidance memory formation.

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, B S; Ng, K T; Robinson, S R

    1997-01-01

    The glial enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) converts glutamate to glutamine; the latter is used by neurons for the resynthesis of glutamate and GABA. We have used a monoclonal antibody to GS to examine the regional distribution of this enzyme in the forebrains of day-old chicks. GS was detected in glia throughout the rostral and caudal regions of the forebrain and was particularly intense in the hippocampus, area parahippocampus and parts of the hyperstriatal and paleostriatal complex, regions widely considered to be involved in memory formation. Thus, our data provide an anatomical framework for the conclusion that neurons require the support of glia in order to restock their glutamate and/or GABA transmitter supplies during memory processing.

  18. The influence of cell growth and enzyme activity changes on intracellular metabolite dynamics in AGE1.HN.AAT cells.

    PubMed

    Rath, Alexander G; Rehberg, Markus; Janke, Robert; Genzel, Yvonne; Scholz, Sebastian; Noll, Thomas; Rose, Thomas; Sandig, Volker; Reichl, Udo

    2014-05-20

    Optimization of bioprocesses with mammalian cells mainly concentrates on cell engineering, cell screening and medium optimization to achieve enhanced cell growth and productivity. For improving cell lines by cell engineering techniques, in-depth understandings of the regulation of metabolism and product formation as well as the resulting demand for the different medium components are needed. In this work, the relationship of cell specific growth and uptake rates and of changes in maximum in vitro enzyme activities with intracellular metabolite pools of glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, citric acid cycle and energy metabolism were determined for batch cultivations with AGE1.HN.AAT cells. Results obtained by modeling cell growth and consumption of main substrates showed that the dynamics of intracellular metabolite pools is primarily linked to the dynamics of specific glucose and glutamine uptake rates. By analyzing maximum in vitro enzyme activities we found low activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase which suggest a reduced metabolite transfer into the citric acid cycle resulting in lactate release (Warburg effect). Moreover, an increase in the volumetric lactate production rate during the transition from exponential to stationary growth together with a transient accumulation of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, fructose 1-phosphate and ribose 5-phosphate point toward an upregulation of PK via FBP. Glutaminase activity was about 44-fold lower than activity of glutamine synthetase. This seemed to be sufficient for the supply of intermediates for biosynthesis but might lead to unnecessary dissipation of ATP. Taken together, our results elucidate regulation of metabolic networks of immortalized mammalian cells by changes of metabolite pools over the time course of batch cultivations. Eventually, it enables the use of cell engineering strategies to improve the availability of building blocks for biomass synthesis by increasing glucose as well as

  19. The Molecular Basis of TnrA Control by Glutamine Synthetase in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Hauf, Ksenia; Kayumov, Airat; Gloge, Felix; Forchhammer, Karl

    2016-02-12

    TnrA is a master regulator of nitrogen assimilation in Bacillus subtilis. This study focuses on the mechanism of how glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibits TnrA function in response to key metabolites ATP, AMP, glutamine, and glutamate. We suggest a model of two mutually exclusive GS conformations governing the interaction with TnrA. In the ATP-bound state (A-state), GS is catalytically active but unable to interact with TnrA. This conformation was stabilized by phosphorylated L-methionine sulfoximine (MSX), fixing the enzyme in the transition state. When occupied by glutamine (or its analogue MSX), GS resides in a conformation that has high affinity for TnrA (Q-state). The A- and Q-state are mutually exclusive, and in agreement, ATP and glutamine bind to GS in a competitive manner. At elevated concentrations of glutamine, ATP is no longer able to bind GS and to bring it into the A-state. AMP efficiently competes with ATP and prevents formation of the A-state, thereby favoring GS-TnrA interaction. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows that TnrA bound to a positively regulated promoter fragment binds GS in the Q-state, whereas it rapidly dissociates from a negatively regulated promoter fragment. These data imply that GS controls TnrA activity at positively controlled promoters by shielding the transcription factor in the DNA-bound state. According to size exclusion and multiangle light scattering analysis, the dodecameric GS can bind three TnrA dimers. The highly interdependent ligand binding properties of GS reveal this enzyme as a sophisticated sensor of the nitrogen and energy state of the cell to control the activity of DNA-bound TnrA.

  20. Contribution of active-site glutamine to rate enhancement in ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, David; Chaney, Joseph; Maiti, Tushar K.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are cysteine proteases featuring a classical cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad, also a highly conserved glutamine thought to be a part of the oxyanion hole. However, the contribution of this side chain to the catalysis by UCH enzymes is not known. Herein, we demonstrate that the glutamine side chain contributes to rate enhancement in UCHL1, UCHL3 and UCHL5. Mutation of the glutamine to alanine in these enzymes impairs the catalytic efficiency mainly due to a 16 to 30-fold reduction in kcat, which is consistent with a loss of approximately 2 kcal/mol in transition-state stabilization. However, the contribution to transition-state stabilization observed here is rather modest for the side chain’s role in oxyanion stabilization. Interestingly, we discovered that the carbonyl oxygen of this side chain is engaged in a C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding contact with the CεH group of the catalytic histidine. Upon further analysis, we found that this interaction is a common active-site structural feature in most cysteine proteases, including papain, belonging to families with the QCH(N/D) type of active-site configuration. It is possible that removal of the glutamine side chain might have abolished the C—H•••O interaction, which typically accounts for 2 kcal/mol of stabilization, leading to the effect on catalysis observed here. Additional studies performed on UCHL3 by mutating the glutamine to glutamate (strong C—H•••O acceptor but oxyanion destabilizer) and to lysine (strong oxyanion stabilizer but lacking C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding property) suggest that the C—H•••O hydrogen bond could contribute to catalysis. PMID:22284438

  1. The Molecular Basis of TnrA Control by Glutamine Synthetase in Bacillus subtilis*

    PubMed Central

    Hauf, Ksenia; Kayumov, Airat; Gloge, Felix; Forchhammer, Karl

    2016-01-01

    TnrA is a master regulator of nitrogen assimilation in Bacillus subtilis. This study focuses on the mechanism of how glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibits TnrA function in response to key metabolites ATP, AMP, glutamine, and glutamate. We suggest a model of two mutually exclusive GS conformations governing the interaction with TnrA. In the ATP-bound state (A-state), GS is catalytically active but unable to interact with TnrA. This conformation was stabilized by phosphorylated l-methionine sulfoximine (MSX), fixing the enzyme in the transition state. When occupied by glutamine (or its analogue MSX), GS resides in a conformation that has high affinity for TnrA (Q-state). The A- and Q-state are mutually exclusive, and in agreement, ATP and glutamine bind to GS in a competitive manner. At elevated concentrations of glutamine, ATP is no longer able to bind GS and to bring it into the A-state. AMP efficiently competes with ATP and prevents formation of the A-state, thereby favoring GS-TnrA interaction. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows that TnrA bound to a positively regulated promoter fragment binds GS in the Q-state, whereas it rapidly dissociates from a negatively regulated promoter fragment. These data imply that GS controls TnrA activity at positively controlled promoters by shielding the transcription factor in the DNA-bound state. According to size exclusion and multiangle light scattering analysis, the dodecameric GS can bind three TnrA dimers. The highly interdependent ligand binding properties of GS reveal this enzyme as a sophisticated sensor of the nitrogen and energy state of the cell to control the activity of DNA-bound TnrA. PMID:26635369

  2. Antisense Reduction of NADP-Malic Enzyme in Flaveria bidentis Reduces Flow of CO2 through the C4 Cycle[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pengelly, Jasper J.L.; Tan, Jackie; Furbank, Robert T.; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    An antisense construct targeting the C4 isoform of NADP-malic enzyme (ME), the primary enzyme decarboxylating malate in bundle sheath cells to supply CO2 to Rubisco, was used to transform the dicot Flaveria bidentis. Transgenic plants (α-NADP-ME) exhibited a 34% to 75% reduction in NADP-ME activity relative to the wild type with no visible growth phenotype. We characterized the effect of reducing NADP-ME on photosynthesis by measuring in vitro photosynthetic enzyme activity, gas exchange, and real-time carbon isotope discrimination (Δ). In α-NADP-ME plants with less than 40% of wild-type NADP-ME activity, CO2 assimilation rates at high intercellular CO2 were significantly reduced, whereas the in vitro activities of both phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and Rubisco were increased. Δ measured concurrently with gas exchange in these plants showed a lower Δ and thus a lower calculated leakiness of CO2 (the ratio of CO2 leak rate from the bundle sheath to the rate of CO2 supply). Comparative measurements on antisense Rubisco small subunit F. bidentis plants showed the opposite effect of increased Δ and leakiness. We use these measurements to estimate the C4 cycle rate, bundle sheath leak rate, and bundle sheath CO2 concentration. The comparison of α-NADP-ME and antisense Rubisco small subunit demonstrates that the coordination of the C3 and C4 cycles that exist during environmental perturbations by light and CO2 can be disrupted through transgenic manipulations. Furthermore, our results suggest that the efficiency of the C4 pathway could potentially be improved through a reduction in C4 cycle activity or increased C3 cycle activity. PMID:22846191

  3. Succinyl-CoA:Mesaconate CoA-Transferase and Mesaconyl-CoA Hydratase, Enzymes of the Methylaspartate Cycle in Haloarcula hispanica.

    PubMed

    Borjian, Farshad; Johnsen, Ulrike; Schönheit, Peter; Berg, Ivan A

    2017-01-01

    Growth on acetate or other acetyl-CoA-generating substrates as a sole source of carbon requires an anaplerotic pathway for the conversion of acetyl-CoA into cellular building blocks. Haloarchaea (class Halobacteria) possess two different anaplerotic pathways, the classical glyoxylate cycle and the novel methylaspartate cycle. The methylaspartate cycle was discovered in Haloarcula spp. and operates in ∼40% of sequenced haloarchaea. In this cycle, condensation of one molecule of acetyl-CoA with oxaloacetate gives rise to citrate, which is further converted to 2-oxoglutarate and then to glutamate. The following glutamate rearrangement and deamination lead to mesaconate (methylfumarate) that needs to be activated to mesaconyl-C1-CoA and hydrated to β-methylmalyl-CoA. The cleavage of β-methylmalyl-CoA results in the formation of propionyl-CoA and glyoxylate. The carboxylation of propionyl-CoA and the condensation of glyoxylate with another acetyl-CoA molecule give rise to two C4-dicarboxylic acids, thus regenerating the initial acetyl-CoA acceptor and forming malate, its final product. Here we studied two enzymes of the methylaspartate cycle from Haloarcula hispanica, succinyl-CoA:mesaconate CoA-transferase (mesaconate CoA-transferase, Hah_1336) and mesaconyl-CoA hydratase (Hah_1340). Their genes were heterologously expressed in Haloferax volcanii, and the corresponding enzymes were purified and characterized. Mesaconate CoA-transferase was specific for its physiological substrates, mesaconate and succinyl-CoA, and produced only mesaconyl-C1-CoA and no mesaconyl-C4-CoA. Mesaconyl-CoA hydratase had a 3.5-fold bias for the physiological substrate, mesaconyl-C1-CoA, compared to mesaconyl-C4-CoA, and virtually no activity with other tested enoyl-CoA/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA compounds. Our results further prove the functioning of the methylaspartate cycle in haloarchaea and suggest that mesaconate CoA-transferase and mesaconyl-CoA hydratase can be regarded as characteristic

  4. Role of pyruvate carboxylase in facilitation of synthesis of glutamate and glutamine in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gamberino, W C; Berkich, D A; Lynch, C J; Xu, B; LaNoue, K F

    1997-12-01

    CO2 fixation was measured in cultured astrocytes isolated from neonatal rat brain to test the hypothesis that the activity of pyruvate carboxylase influences the rate of de novo glutamate and glutamine synthesis in astrocytes. Astrocytes were incubated with 14CO2 and the incorporation of 14C into medium or cell extract products was determined. After chromatographic separation of 14C-labelled products, the fractions of 14C cycled back to pyruvate, incorporated into citric acid cycle intermediates, and converted to the amino acids glutamate and glutamine were determined as a function of increasing pyruvate carboxylase flux. The consequences of increasing pyruvate, bicarbonate, and ammonia were investigated. Increasing extracellular pyruvate from 0 to 5 mM increased pyruvate carboxylase flux as observed by increases in the 14C incorporated into pyruvate and citric acid cycle intermediates, but incorporation into glutamate and glutamine, although relatively high at low pyruvate levels, did not increase as pyruvate carboxylase flux increased. Increasing added bicarbonate from 15 to 25 mM almost doubled CO2 fixation. When 25 mM bicarbonate plus 0.5 mM pyruvate increased pyruvate carboxylase flux to approximately the same extent as 15 mM bicarbonate plus 5 mM pyruvate, the rate of appearance of [14C] glutamate and glutamine was higher with the lower level of pyruvate. The conclusion was drawn that, in addition to stimulating pyruvate carboxylase, added pyruvate (but not added bicarbonate) increases alanine aminotransferase flux in the direction of glutamate utilization, thereby decreasing glutamate as pyruvate + glutamate --> alpha-ketoglutarate + alanine. In contrast to previous in vivo studies, the addition of ammonia (0.1 and 5 mM) had no effect on net 14CO2 fixation, but did alter the distribution of 14C-labelled products by decreasing glutamate and increasing glutamine. Rather unexpectedly, ammonia did not increase the sum of glutamate plus glutamine (mass amounts or

  5. The relationship between leaf rolling and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in apoplastic and symplastic areas of Ctenanthe setosa subjected to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Saruhan, Neslihan; Terzi, Rabiye; Saglam, Aykut; Kadioglu, Asim

    2009-01-01

    The ascorbate-glutathione (ASC-GSH) cycle has an important role in defensive processes against oxidative damage generated by drought stress. In this study, the changes that take place in apoplastic and symplastic ASC-GSH cycle enzymes of the leaf and petiole were investigated under drought stress causing leaf rolling in Ctenanthe setosa (Rose.) Eichler (Marantaceae). Apoplastic and symplastic extractions of leaf and petiole were performed at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others are intermediate forms). Glutathione reductase (GR), a key enzyme in the GSH regeneration cycle, and ascorbate (ASC) were present in apoplastic spaces of the leaf and petiole, whereas dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), which uses glutathione as reductant, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), which uses NAD(P)H as reductant, and glutathione were absent. GR, DHAR and MDHAR activities increased in the symplastic and apoplastic areas of the leaf. Apoplastic and symplastic ASC and dehydroascorbate (DHA), the oxidized form of ascorbate, rose at all scores except score 4 of symplastic ASC in the leaf. On the other hand, while reduced glutathione (GSH) content was enhanced, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) content decreased in the leaf during rolling. As for the petiole, GR activity increased in the apoplastic area but decreased in the symplastic area. DHAR and MDHAR activities increased throughout all scores, but decreased to the score 1 level at score 4. The ASC content of the apoplast increased during leaf rolling. Conversely, symplastic ASC content increased at score 2, however decreased at the later scores. While the apoplastic DHA content declined, symplastic DHA rose at score 2, but later was down to the level of score 1. While GSH content enhanced during leaf rolling, GSSG content did not change except at score 2. As well, there were good correlations between leaf rolling and ASC-GSH cycle enzyme activities in the leaf (GR and DHAR

  6. Exploring the Catalytic Mechanism of Human Glutamine Synthetase by Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Issoglio, Federico M; Campolo, Nicolas; Zeida, Ari; Grune, Tilman; Radi, Rafael; Estrin, Dario A; Bartesaghi, Silvina

    2016-10-13

    Glutamine synthetase is an important enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In mammals, it plays a key role in preventing excitotoxicity in the brain and detoxifying ammonia in the liver. In plants and bacteria, it is fundamental for nitrogen metabolism, being critical for the survival of the organism. In this work, we show how the use of classical molecular dynamics simulations and multiscale quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations allowed us to examine the structural properties and dynamics of human glutamine synthetase (HsGS), as well as the reaction mechanisms involved in the catalytic process with atomic level detail. Our results suggest that glutamine formation proceeds through a two-step mechanism that includes a first step in which the γ-glutamyl phosphate intermediate forms, with a 5 kcal/mol free energy barrier and a -8 kcal/mol reaction free energy, and then a second rate-limiting step involving the ammonia nucleophilic attack, with a free energy barrier of 19 kcal/mol and a reaction free energy of almost zero. A detailed analysis of structural features within each step exposed the relevance of the acid-base equilibrium related to protein residues and substrates in the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions. These results provide a comprehensive study of HsGS dynamics and establish the groundwork for further analysis regarding changes in HsGS activity, as occur in natural variants and post-translational modifications.

  7. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies.

  8. Arginine Methylation of MDH1 by CARM1 Inhibits Glutamine Metabolism and Suppresses Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jian; Huang, Xian; Zuo, Yong; Wang, Tian-Shi; Gao, Xue; Xu, Ying-Ying; Zou, Shao-Wu; Liu, Ying-Bin; Cheng, Jin-Ke; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2016-11-17

    Distinctive from their normal counterparts, cancer cells exhibit unique metabolic dependencies on glutamine to fuel anabolic processes. Specifically, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells rely on an unconventional metabolic pathway catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase, malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1), and malic enzyme 1 to rewire glutamine metabolism and support nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) production. Here, we report that methylation on arginine 248 (R248) negatively regulates MDH1. Protein arginine methyltransferase 4 (PRMT4/CARM1) methylates and inhibits MDH1 by disrupting its dimerization. Knockdown of MDH1 represses mitochondria respiration and inhibits glutamine metabolism, which sensitizes PDAC cells to oxidative stress and suppresses cell proliferation. Meanwhile, re-expression of wild-type MDH1, but not its methylation-mimetic mutant, protects cells from oxidative injury and restores cell growth and clonogenic activity. Importantly, MDH1 is hypomethylated at R248 in clinical PDAC samples. Our study reveals that arginine methylation of MDH1 by CARM1 regulates cellular redox homeostasis and suppresses glutamine metabolism of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Disrupting glutamine metabolic pathways to sensitize gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Sullivan, Yumi; Wong, Melissa; Wang, Lei; Riddell, Jonah; Jung, Linda; Pillarisetty, Venu G; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2017-08-11

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease with poor prognosis. Gemcitabine has been the first line systemic treatment for pancreatic cancer. However, the rapid development of drug resistance has been a major hurdle in gemcitabine therapy leading to unsatisfactory patient outcomes. With the recent renewed understanding of glutamine metabolism involvement in drug resistance and immuno-response, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of a glutamine analog (6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine) as an adjuvant treatment to sensitize chemoresistant pancreatic cancer cells. We demonstrate that disruption of glutamine metabolic pathways improves the efficacy of gemcitabine treatment. Such a disruption induces a cascade of events which impacts glycan biosynthesis through Hexosamine Biosynthesis Pathway (HBP), as well as cellular redox homeostasis, resulting in global changes in protein glycosylation, expression and functional effects. The proteome alterations induced in the resistant cancer cells and the secreted exosomes are intricately associated with the reduction in cell proliferation and the enhancement of cancer cell chemosensitivity. Proteins associated with EGFR signaling, including downstream AKT-mTOR pathways, MAPK pathway, as well as redox enzymes were downregulated in response to disruption of glutamine metabolic pathways.

  10. Isolation and characterization of glutathione reductase from Physarum polycephalum and stage-specific expression of the enzyme in life-cycle stages with different oxidation-reduction levels.

    PubMed

    Minami, Yoshiko; Kohama, Takeshi; Sekimoto, Yu-Ji; Akasaka, Kenichi; Matsubara, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Physarum polycephalum has a life cycle with several distinct phases that have different oxidation-reduction requirements. To investigate the relationship between the life cycle and the oxidation-reduction state, we isolated glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) from Physarum microplasmodia. The enzyme was found to be a homodimer with a subunit M(r) of 49,000, and K(m) values for oxidized glutathione and NADPH of 40 and 28.6 microM, respectively. We then constructed a cDNA library from microplasmodium mRNA and cloned GR cDNA from the library. The isolated cDNA consisted of 1,475 bp encoding a polypeptide of 452 amino acids. The amino acid sequence similarity was about 50% with GRs of other organisms, and several conserved sequence motifs thought to be necessary for activity are evident in the Physarum enzyme. Escherichia coli transformed with an expression vector containing the cDNA synthesized the active GR. Genomic Southern blot analysis indicated that the GR gene is present as a single copy in the Physarum genome. Immunoblot analysis and RT-PCR analysis detected GR mRNA expression in the microplasmodium, plasmodium, and sclerotium, but not in the spore or flagellate. GR activity was low in the spore and flagellate. These results suggest that the glutathione oxidation-reduction system relates to the Physarum life cycle.

  11. Glutamine and cancer: cell biology, physiology, and clinical opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Christopher T.; Wasti, Ajla T.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2013-01-01

    Glutamine is an abundant and versatile nutrient that participates in energy formation, redox homeostasis, macromolecular synthesis, and signaling in cancer cells. These characteristics make glutamine metabolism an appealing target for new clinical strategies to detect, monitor, and treat cancer. Here we review the metabolic functions of glutamine as a super nutrient and the surprising roles of glutamine in supporting the biological hallmarks of malignancy. We also review recent efforts in imaging and therapeutics to exploit tumor cell glutamine dependence, discuss some of the challenges in this arena, and suggest a disease-focused paradigm to deploy these emerging approaches. PMID:23999442

  12. Multiple defects in the respiratory chain lead to the repression of genes encoding components of the respiratory chain and TCA cycle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bourges, Ingrid; Mucchielli, Marie-Helene; Herbert, Christopher J; Guiard, Bernard; Dujardin, Geneviève; Meunier, Brigitte

    2009-04-17

    Respiratory complexes III, IV and V are formed by components of both nuclear and mitochondrial origin and are embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Their assembly requires the auxiliary factor Oxa1, and the absence of this protein has severe consequences on these three major respiratory chain enzymes. We have studied, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the effect of the loss of Oxa1 function and of other respiratory defects on the expression of nuclear genes encoding components of the respiratory complexes and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. We observed that the concomitant decrease in the level of two respiratory enzymes, complexes III and IV, led to their repression. These genes are known targets of the transcriptional activator complex Hap2/3/4/5 that plays a central role in the reprogramming of yeast metabolism when cells switch from a fermenting, glucose-repressed state to a respiring, derepressed state. We found that the Hap4 protein, the regulatory subunit of the transcriptional complex, was present at a lower level in the oxa1 mutants whereas no change in HAP4 transcript level was observed, suggesting a posttranscriptional modulation. In addition, an altered mitochondrial morphology was observed in mutants with decreased expression of Hap2/3/4/5 target genes. We suggest that the aberrant mitochondrial morphology, presumably caused by the severely decreased level of at least two respiratory enzymes, might be part of the signalling pathway linking the mitochondrial defect and Hap2/3/4/5.

  13. Utilization and synthesis of glutamine in the lens

    SciTech Connect

    Jernigan, H.M. Jr.; Geller, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Previous studies with rat and calf lenses have shown that the primary source of lenticular glutamate for a wide variety of pathways is glutamine, which is more readily transported from the surrounding fluids than glutamate. In contrast, recent studies showed that monkey lenses utilize glutamate more rapidly than glutamine, although glutamine appears to enter monkey lenses more rapidly than glutamine. Further studies were initiated to elucidate the balance between transport, deamidation, and synthesis of glutamine in the lens. Glutamine synthesis in intact rat lenses was barely detectable; however, homogenates of adult rat lenses converted measurable amounts of (/sup 3/H)-glutamate to glutamine. The identity of the product was confirmed using glutaminase. Glutamine deamidation in intact rhesus monkey lenses incubated in TC-199 medium containing 2 mM glutamine was only 0.19 ..mu..mol g/sup -1/ hr/sup -1/, compared with 1.96 ..mu..mol g/sup -1/ hr/sup -1/ for rat lenses under identical conditions. However, under optimal assay conditions, glutaminase activity in monkey lens homogenates was similar to that of rat lens homogenates. Thus, the rate of synthesis and deamidation of glutamine by intact lenses is apparently limited factors other than total lenticular glutamine synthetase and glutaminase activity.

  14. Structural Basis for the Oxidation of Protein-bound Sulfur by the Sulfur Cycle Molybdohemo-Enzyme Sulfane Dehydrogenase SoxCD*

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Ulrich; Faust, Annette; Klink, Björn U.; de Sanctis, Daniele; Panjikar, Santosh; Quentmeier, Armin; Bardischewsky, Frank; Friedrich, Cornelius G.; Scheidig, Axel J.

    2011-01-01

    The sulfur cycle enzyme sulfane dehydrogenase SoxCD is an essential component of the sulfur oxidation (Sox) enzyme system of Paracoccus pantotrophus. SoxCD catalyzes a six-electron oxidation reaction within the Sox cycle. SoxCD is an α2β2 heterotetrameric complex of the molybdenum cofactor-containing SoxC protein and the diheme c-type cytochrome SoxD with the heme domains D1 and D2. SoxCD1 misses the heme-2 domain D2 and is catalytically as active as SoxCD. The crystal structure of SoxCD1 was solved at 1.33 Å. The substrate of SoxCD is the outer (sulfane) sulfur of Cys-110-persulfide located at the C-terminal peptide swinging arm of SoxY of the SoxYZ carrier complex. The SoxCD1 substrate funnel toward the molybdopterin is narrow and partially shielded by side-chain residues of SoxD1. For access of the sulfane-sulfur of SoxY-Cys-110 persulfide we propose that (i) the blockage by SoxD-Arg-98 is opened via interaction with the C terminus of SoxY and (ii) the C-terminal peptide VTIGGCGG of SoxY provides interactions with the entrance path such that the cysteine-bound persulfide is optimally positioned near the molybdenum atom. The subsequent oxidation reactions of the sulfane-sulfur are initiated by the nucleophilic attack of the persulfide anion on the molybdenum atom that is, in turn, reduced. The close proximity of heme-1 to the molybdopterin allows easy acceptance of the electrons. Because SoxYZ, SoxXA, and SoxB are already structurally characterized, with SoxCD1 the structures of all key enzymes of the Sox cycle are known with atomic resolution. PMID:21147779

  15. Short-Term Responses of Soil Respiration and C-Cycle Enzyme Activities to Additions of Biochar and Urea in a Calcareous Soil.

    PubMed

    Song, Dali; Xi, Xiangyin; Huang, Shaomin; Liang, Guoqing; Sun, Jingwen; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xiubin

    2016-01-01

    Biochar (BC) addition to soil is a proposed strategy to enhance soil fertility and crop productivity. However, there is limited knowledge regarding responses of soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities to BC and nitrogen (N) additions in a calcareous soil. A 56-day incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the combined effects of BC addition rates (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0% by mass) and urea (U) application on soil nutrients, soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities in a calcareous soil in the North China Plain. Our results showed soil pH values in both U-only and U plus BC treatments significantly decreased within the first 14 days and then stabilized, and CO2emission rate in all U plus BC soils decreased exponentially, while there was no significant difference in the contents of soil total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and C/N ratio in each treatment over time. At each incubation time, soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), TOC, TN, C/N ratio, DOC and cumulative CO2 emission significantly increased with increasing BC addition rate, while soil potential activities of the four hydrolytic enzymes increased first and then decreased with increasing BC addition rate, with the largest values in the U + 1.0%BC treatment. However, phenol oxidase activity in all U plus BC soils showed a decreasing trend with the increase of BC addition rate. Our results suggest that U plus BC application at a rate of 1% promotes increases in hydrolytic enzymes, does not highly increase C/N and C mineralization, and can improve in soil fertility.

  16. Short-Term Responses of Soil Respiration and C-Cycle Enzyme Activities to Additions of Biochar and Urea in a Calcareous Soil

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dali; Xi, Xiangyin; Huang, Shaomin; Liang, Guoqing; Sun, Jingwen; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xiubin

    2016-01-01

    Biochar (BC) addition to soil is a proposed strategy to enhance soil fertility and crop productivity. However, there is limited knowledge regarding responses of soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities to BC and nitrogen (N) additions in a calcareous soil. A 56-day incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the combined effects of BC addition rates (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0% by mass) and urea (U) application on soil nutrients, soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities in a calcareous soil in the North China Plain. Our results showed soil pH values in both U-only and U plus BC treatments significantly decreased within the first 14 days and then stabilized, and CO2emission rate in all U plus BC soils decreased exponentially, while there was no significant difference in the contents of soil total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and C/N ratio in each treatment over time. At each incubation time, soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), TOC, TN, C/N ratio, DOC and cumulative CO2 emission significantly increased with increasing BC addition rate, while soil potential activities of the four hydrolytic enzymes increased first and then decreased with increasing BC addition rate, with the largest values in the U + 1.0%BC treatment. However, phenol oxidase activity in all U plus BC soils showed a decreasing trend with the increase of BC addition rate. Our results suggest that U plus BC application at a rate of 1% promotes increases in hydrolytic enzymes, does not highly increase C/N and C mineralization, and can improve in soil fertility. PMID:27589265

  17. Effect of process parameters on succinic acid production in Escherichia coli W3110 and enzymes involved in the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Isar, Jasmine; Agarwal, Lata; Saran, Saurabh; Gupta, Pritesh; Saxena, Rajendra Kumar

    2006-09-01

    The effect of process optimization on succinic acid production by Escherichia coli W3110 and on enzymes involved in the reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle was studied. Approximately, 7.02 g L-1 of succinic acid was produced in 60 h at pH 7.0 in 500 mL anaerobic bottles containing 300 mL of the medium, wherein the sucrose concentration was 2.5%, the ratio of tryptone to ammonium hydrogen phosphate was 1:1, and the concentration of magnesium carbon ate was 1.5%. When these optimized fermentation conditions were employed in a 10 L bioreactor, 11.2 g L-1 of succinic acid was produced in 48 h. This is a 10-fold increase in succinic acid production from the initial titer of 0.94 g L-1. This clearly indicates the importance of process optimization, where by manipulating the media composition and production conditions, a remarkable increase in the production of the desired biomolecule can be obtained. The production of succinic acid is a multi-step reaction through the reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle. A linear relationship was observed between succinic acid production and the enzyme activities. The enzyme activities were found to increase in the order phospho-enol-pyruvate carboxylaseenzyme was not a very active participant in the production of succinic acid, since it catalyzes the phosphorylation of oxaloacetic acid to yield phospho-enol-pyruvate.

  18. Glutamine: precursor or nitrogen donor for citrulline synthesis?

    PubMed Central

    Didelija, Inka Cajo; Castillo, Leticia; Lee, Brendan

    2010-01-01

    Although glutamine is considered the main precursor for citrulline synthesis, the current literature does not differentiate between the contribution of glutamine carbon skeleton vs. nonspecific nitrogen (i.e., ammonia) and carbon derived from glutamine oxidation. To elucidate the role of glutamine and nonspecific nitrogen in the synthesis of citrulline, l-[2-15N]- and l-[5-15N]glutamine and 15N-ammonium acetate were infused intragastrically in mice. The amino group of glutamine labeled the three nitrogen groups of citrulline almost equally. The amido group and ammonium acetate labeled the ureido and amino groups of citrulline, but not the δ-nitrogen. D5-glutamine also infused in this arm of the study, which traces the carbon skeleton of glutamine, was utilized poorly, accounting for only 0.2–0.4% of the circulating citrulline. Dietary glutamine nitrogen (both N groups) incorporation was 25-fold higher than the incorporation of its carbon skeleton into citrulline. To investigate the relative contributions of the carbon skeleton and nonspecific carbon of glutamine, arginine, and proline to citrulline synthesis, U-13Cn tracers of these amino acids were infused intragastrically. Dietary arginine was the main precursor for citrulline synthesis, accounting for ∼40% of the circulating citrulline. Proline contribution was minor (3.4%), and glutamine was negligible (0.4%). However, the glutamine tracer resulted in a higher enrichment in the ureido group, indicating incorporation of nonspecific carbon from glutamine oxidation into carbamylphosphate used for citrulline synthesis. In conclusion, dietary glutamine is a poor carbon skeleton precursor for the synthesis of citrulline, although it contributes both nonspecific nitrogen and carbon to citrulline synthesis. PMID:20407005

  19. Measurement of (13) C turnover into glutamate and glutamine pools in brain tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Pichumani, Kumar; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Ijare, Omkar B; Mickey, Bruce E; Malloy, Craig R; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Baskin, David S; Bachoo, Robert M; Maher, Elizabeth A

    2017-09-30

    Malignant brain tumors are known to utilize acetate as an alternate carbon source in the citric acid cycle for their bioenergetics. (13) C NMR based isotopomer analysis has been used to measure turnover of (13) C-acetate carbons into glutamate and glutamine pools in tumors. Plasma from the patients infused with [1,2-(13) C]acetate further revealed the presence of (13) C isotopomers of glutamine, glucose and lactate in the circulation that were generated due to metabolism of [1,2-(13) C]acetate by peripheral organs. In the tumor cells, [4-(13) C] and [3,4-(13) C] glutamate and glutamine isotopomers were generated from blood-borne (13) C labeled glucose and lactate which were formed due to [1,2-(13) C[acetate metabolism of peripheral tissues. [4,5-(13) C] and [3,4,5-(13) C] glutamate and glutamine isotopomers were produced from [1,2-(13) C]acetyl-CoA that were derived from direct oxidation of [1,2-(13) C]acetate in the tumor This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Glutamine synthetase gene expression and glutamate transporters in C6-glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Baber, Zafeer; Haghighat, Nasrin

    2010-12-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the major glutamate-forming enzyme of vertebrae and is accepted to be a marker of astroglial cells. Maturation of astroglial cells is characterized by an increase in GS activity, and the regulation of this enzyme is the topic of many publications. The amino acid glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and mediates normal excitatory synaptic transmission by interaction with postsynaptic receptors. Glutamate also acts as a potent neurotoxin when present at high concentration. Glutamate neurotoxicity plays an important role in the pathophysiology of many neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In the normal condition, L-glutamate is predominantly taken up, metabolized and recycled by astrocytes through the glutamate transporters (GLAST/GLT1) and glutamine synthetase (GS) catalytic activity. Because of the fundamental role of these glutamate transporters and the glutamine synthetase enzyme in controlling cerebral glutamate level, regulation of GS and studying of the glutamate transporters in glial cells is important. Astrocytes are supportive cells and act as the site of detoxification of glutamate in the brain. However, their isolation from the brain is a tedious, costly and time consuming procedure. On the other hand, the C6-glioma cells are readily available on the market. They are well characterized and have been a useful model for CNS glia in many laboratories. For this study, we used the C6-glioma cell line as a model system. We examined the presence or absence of glial specific glutamate transporters (GLTI and GLAST) in C6-glioma cells, which was done by immunocytochemistry. We also examined glutamine synthetase gene expression in these cells by treatment of the C6-glioma cells with estrogen (17ß estradiol). The findings from this study provide useful information about C6-glioma cells which makes the study of the CNS tremendously inexpensive.

  1. Determining the N and O isotope effects of microbial nitrite reduction: the global N cycle implications of an enzyme-dependent isotope effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. S.; Casciotti, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    The marine nitrogen (N) cycle is a dynamic system of critical importance, since nitrogen is the limiting nutrient in over half of the world's oceans. Denitrification and anammox, the main N loss processes from the ocean, have different effects on carbon cycling and greenhouse gas emission. Understanding the balance between the two processes is vital to understanding the role of the N cycle in global climate change. One approach for investigating these processes is by using stable isotope analysis to estimate the relative magnitudes of N fluxes, particularly for biologically mediated processes. In order to make the most of the currently available isotope analysis techniques, it is necessary to know the isotope effects for each processes occurring in the environment. Nitrite reduction is an important step in denitrification. Previous work had begun to explore the N isotope effects for nitrite reduction, but no oxygen (O) isotope effect has been measured. Additionally, no consideration has been given to the type of nitrite reductase carrying out the reaction. There are two main types of respiratory nitrite reductase, one that is Cu-based and another that is Fe-based. We performed batch culture experiments with denitrifier strains possessing either a Cu-type or Fe-type nitrite reductase. Both N and O isotope effects for nitrite reduction were determined for each of these experiments by measuring the NO2- concentration, as well as the N and O isotopes of nitrite and applying a Rayleigh fractionation model. Both the N and O isotope effects were found to be significantly different between the two types of enzymes. This enzyme-linked difference in isotope effects emphasizes the importance of microbial community composition within the global N cycle.

  2. Fermented wheat germ extract inhibits glycolysis/pentose cycle enzymes and induces apoptosis through poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation in Jurkat T-cell leukemia tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Comin-Anduix, Begona; Boros, Laszlo G; Marin, Silvia; Boren, Joan; Callol-Massot, Carles; Centelles, Josep J; Torres, Josep L; Agell, Neus; Bassilian, Sara; Cascante, Marta

    2002-11-29

    The fermented extract of wheat germ, trade name Avemar, is a complex mixture of biologically active molecules with potent anti-metastatic activities in various human malignancies. Here we report the effect of Avemar on Jurkat leukemia cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and the activity of key glycolytic/pentose cycle enzymes that control carbon flow for nucleic acid synthesis. The cytotoxic IC(50) concentration of Avemar for Jurkat tumor cells is 0.2 mg/ml, and increasing doses of the crude powder inhibit Jurkat cell proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion. At concentrations higher than 0.2 mg/ml, Avemar inhibits cell growth by more than 50% (72 h of incubation), which is preceded by the appearance of a sub-G(1) peak on flow histograms at 48 h. Laser scanning cytometry of propidium iodide- and annexin V-stained cells indicated that the growth-inhibiting effect of Avemar was consistent with a strong induction of apoptosis. Inhibition by benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp fluoromethyl ketone of apoptosis but increased proteolysis of poly(ADP-ribose) indicate caspases mediate the cellular effects of Avemar. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and transketolase were inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion, which correlated with decreased (13)C incorporation and pentose cycle substrate flow into RNA ribose. This decrease in pentose cycle enzyme activities and carbon flow toward nucleic acid precursor synthesis provide the mechanistic understanding of the cell growth-controlling and apoptosis-inducing effects of fermented wheat germ. Avemar exhibits about a 50-fold higher IC(50) (10.02 mg/ml) for peripheral blood lymphocytes to induce a biological response, which provides the broad therapeutic window for this supplemental cancer treatment modality with no toxic effects.

  3. Glutamine stimulates argininosuccinate synthetase gene expression through cytosolic O-glycosylation of Sp1 in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Fairand, Alain; Lavoinne, Alain; Husson, Annie

    2003-12-26

    Glutamine stimulates the expression of the argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) gene at both the level of enzyme activity and mRNA in Caco-2 cells. Searching to identify the pathway involved, we observed that (i) the stimulating effect of glutamine was totally mimicked by glucosamine addition, and (ii) its effect but not that of glucosamine was totally blocked by 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), an inhibitor of amidotransferases, suggesting that the metabolism of glutamine to glucosamine 6-phosphate was required. Moreover, run-on assays revealed that glucosamine was acting at a transcriptional level. Because three functional GC boxes were identified on the ASS gene promoter (Anderson, G. M., and Freytag, S. O. (1991) Mol. Cell Biol. 11, 1935-1943), the potential involvement of Sp1 family members was studied. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using either the Sp1 consensus sequence or an appropriate fragment of the ASS promoter sequence as a probe demonstrated that both glutamine and glucosamine increased Sp1 DNA binding. Immunoprecipitation-Western blot experiments demonstrated that both compounds increased O-glycosylation of Sp1 leading to its translocation into nucleus. Again, the effect of glutamine on Sp1 was inhibited by the addition of DON but not of glucosamine. Taken together, the results clearly demonstrate that the metabolism of glutamine through the hexosamine pathway leads to the cytosolic O-glycosylation of Sp1, which, in turn, translocates into nucleus and stimulates the ASS gene transcription. Collectively, the results constitute the first demonstration of a functional relationship between a regulating signal (glutamine), a transcription factor (Sp1), and the transcription of the ASS gene.

  4. Differential effects in CGRPergic, nitrergic, and VIPergic myenteric innervation in diabetic rats supplemented with 2% L-glutamine.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Renata V F; Linden, David R; Miranda-Neto, Marcílio H; Zanoni, Jacqueline N

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 2% L-glutamine supplementation on myenteric innervation in the ileum of diabetic rats, grouped as follows: normoglycemic (N); normoglycemic supplemented with L-glutamine (NG); diabetic (D); and diabetic supplemented with L-glutamine (DG). The ileums were subjected to immunohistochemical techniques to localize neurons immunoreactive to HuC/D protein (HuC/D-IR) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase enzyme (nNOS-IR) and to analyze varicosities immunoreactive to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP-IR) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP-IR). L-Glutamine in the DG group (i) prevented the increase in the cell body area of nNOS-IR neurons, (ii) prevented the increase in the area of VIP-IR varicosities, (iii) did not prevent the loss of HuC/D-IR and nNOS-IR neurons per ganglion, and (iv) reduced the size of CGRP-IR varicosities. L-Glutamine in the NG group reduced (i) the number of HuC/D-IR and nNOS-IR neurons per ganglion, (ii) the cell body area of nNOS-IR neurons, and (iii) the size of VIP-IR and CGRP-IR varicosities. 2% L-glutamine supplementation exerted differential neuroprotective effects in experimental diabetes neuropathy that depended on the type of neurotransmitter analyzed. However, the effects of this dose of L-glutamine on normoglycemic animals suggests there are additional actions of this beyond its antioxidant capacity.

  5. Inter-species variation in the oligomeric states of the higher plant Calvin cycle enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoribulokinase

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Julie C.; Raines, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    In darkened leaves the Calvin cycle enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) form a regulatory multi-enzyme complex with the small chloroplast protein CP12. GAPDH also forms a high molecular weight regulatory mono-enzyme complex. Given that there are different reports as to the number and subunit composition of these complexes and that enzyme regulatory mechanisms are known to vary between species, it was reasoned that protein–protein interactions may also vary between species. Here, this variation is investigated. This study shows that two different tetramers of GAPDH (an A2B2 heterotetramer and an A4 homotetramer) have the capacity to form part of the PRK/GAPDH/CP12 complex. The role of the PRK/GAPDH/CP12 complex is not simply to regulate the ‘non-regulatory’ A4 GAPDH tetramer. This study also demonstrates that the abundance and nature of PRK/GAPDH/CP12 interactions are not equal in all species and that whilst NAD enhances complex formation in some species, this is not sufficient for complex formation in others. Furthermore, it is shown that the GAPDH mono-enzyme complex is more abundant as a 2(A2B2) complex, rather than the larger 4(A2B2) complex. This smaller complex is sensitive to cellular metabolites indicating that it is an important regulatory isoform of GAPDH. This comparative study has highlighted considerable heterogeneity in PRK and GAPDH protein interactions between closely related species and the possible underlying physiological basis for this is discussed. PMID:21498632

  6. Inter-species variation in the oligomeric states of the higher plant Calvin cycle enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoribulokinase.

    PubMed

    Howard, Thomas P; Lloyd, Julie C; Raines, Christine A

    2011-07-01

    In darkened leaves the Calvin cycle enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) form a regulatory multi-enzyme complex with the small chloroplast protein CP12. GAPDH also forms a high molecular weight regulatory mono-enzyme complex. Given that there are different reports as to the number and subunit composition of these complexes and that enzyme regulatory mechanisms are known to vary between species, it was reasoned that protein-protein interactions may also vary between species. Here, this variation is investigated. This study shows that two different tetramers of GAPDH (an A2B2 heterotetramer and an A4 homotetramer) have the capacity to form part of the PRK/GAPDH/CP12 complex. The role of the PRK/GAPDH/CP12 complex is not simply to regulate the 'non-regulatory' A4 GAPDH tetramer. This study also demonstrates that the abundance and nature of PRK/GAPDH/CP12 interactions are not equal in all species and that whilst NAD enhances complex formation in some species, this is not sufficient for complex formation in others. Furthermore, it is shown that the GAPDH mono-enzyme complex is more abundant as a 2(A2B2) complex, rather than the larger 4(A2B2) complex. This smaller complex is sensitive to cellular metabolites indicating that it is an important regulatory isoform of GAPDH. This comparative study has highlighted considerable heterogeneity in PRK and GAPDH protein interactions between closely related species and the possible underlying physiological basis for this is discussed.

  7. Phylogenetically-based variation in the regulation of the Calvin cycle enzymes, phosphoribulokinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, in algae.

    PubMed

    Maberly, Stephen C; Courcelle, Carine; Groben, Rene; Gontero, Brigitte

    2010-03-01

    Aquatic photosynthesis is responsible for about half of the global production and is undertaken by a huge phylogenetic diversity of algae that are poorly studied. The diversity of redox-regulation of phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was investigated in a wide range of algal groups under standard conditions. Redox-regulation of PRK was greatest in chlorophytes, low or absent in a red alga and most chromalveolates, and linked to the number of amino acids between two regulatory cysteine residues. GAPDH regulation was not strongly-related to the different forms of this enzyme and was less variable than for PRK. Addition of recombinant CP12, a protein that forms a complex with PRK and GAPDH, to crude extracts inhibited GAPDH and PRK inversely in the Plantae, but in most chromalveolates had little effect on GAPDH and inhibited or stimulated PRK depending on the species. Patterns of enzyme regulation were used to produce a phylogenetic tree in which cryptophytes and haptophytes, at the base of the chromalveolates, formed a distinct clade. A second clade comprised only chromalveolates. A third clade comprised a mixture of Plantae, an excavate and three chromalveolates: a marine diatom and two others (a xanthophyte and eustigmatophyte) that are distinguished by a low content of chlorophyll c and a lack of fucoxanthin. Regulation of both enzymes was greater in freshwater than in marine taxa, possibly because most freshwaters are more dynamic than oceans. This work highlights the importance of understanding enzyme regulation in diverse algae if their ecology and productivity is to be understood.

  8. Inhibition of human glutamine synthetase by L-methionine-S,R-sulfoximine-relevance to the treatment of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2014-12-01

    At high concentrations, the glutamine synthetase inhibitor L-methionine-S,R-sulfoximine (MSO) is a convulsant, especially in dogs. Nevertheless, sub-convulsive doses of MSO are neuroprotective in rodent models of hyperammonemia, acute liver disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and suggest MSO may be clinically useful. Previous work has also shown that much lower doses of MSO are required to produce convulsions in dogs than in primates. Evidence from the mid-20th century suggests that humans are also less sensitive. In the present work, the inhibition of recombinant human glutamine synthetase by MSO is shown to be biphasic-an initial reversible competitive inhibition (K i 1.19 mM) is followed by rapid irreversible inactivation. This K i value for the human enzyme accounts, in part, for relative insensitivity of primates to MSO and suggests that this inhibitor could be used to safely inhibit glutamine synthetase activity in humans.

  9. Influence of Serum and Hypoxia on Incorporation of [(14)C]-D-Glucose or [(14)C]-L-Glutamine into Lipids and Lactate in Murine Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ta, Nathan L; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2015-12-01

    Glucose and glutamine are essential energy metabolites for brain tumor growth and survival under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Both metabolites can contribute their carbons to lipid biosynthesis. We used uniformly labeled [(14)C]-U-D-glucose and [(14)C]-U-L-glutamine to examine the profile of de novo lipid biosynthesis in the VM-M3 murine glioblastoma cells. The major lipids synthesized included phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho), phosphatidylethanolamine (EtnGpl), phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), phosphatidylserine (PtdSer), sphingomyelin (CerPCho), bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP)/phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), cholesterol (C), cardiolipin (Ptd2Gro), and gangliosides. Endogenous lipid synthesis, using either glucose or glutamine, was greater in media without fetal bovine serum (FBS) than in media containing 10 % FBS under normoxia. De novo lipid synthesis was greater using glucose carbons than glutamine carbons under normoxia. The reverse was observed for most lipids under hypoxia suggesting an attenuation of glucose entering the TCA cycle. Lactate was produced largely from glucose carbons with minimal lactate derived from glutamine under either normoxia or hypoxia. Accumulation of triacylglycerols (TAG), containing mostly saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids, was observed under hypoxia using carbons from either glucose or glutamine. The data show that the incorporation of labeled glucose and glutamine into most synthesized lipids was dependent on the type of growth environment, and that the VM-M3 glioblastoma cells could acquire lipids, especially cholesterol, from the external environment for growth and proliferation.

  10. Unraveling Δ1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate-Proline Cycle in Plants by Uncoupled Expression of Proline Oxidation Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Gad; Honig, Arik; Stein, Hanan; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Mittler, Ron; Zilberstein, Aviah

    2009-01-01

    The two-step oxidation of proline in all eukaryotes is performed at the inner mitochondrial membrane by the consecutive action of proline dehydrogenase (ProDH) that produces Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) and P5C dehydrogenase (P5CDH) that oxidizes P5C to glutamate. This catabolic route is down-regulated in plants during osmotic stress, allowing free Pro accumulation. We show here that overexpression of MsProDH in tobacco and Arabidopsis or impairment of P5C oxidation in the Arabidopsis p5cdh mutant did not change the cellular Pro to P5C ratio under ambient and osmotic stress conditions, indicating that P5C excess was reduced to Pro in a mitochondrial-cytosolic cycle. This cycle, involving ProDH and P5C reductase, exists in animal cells and now demonstrated in plants. As a part of the cycle, Pro oxidation by the ProDH-FAD complex delivers electrons to the electron transport chain. Hyperactivity of the cycle, e.g. when an excess of exogenous l-Pro is provided, generates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) by delivering electrons to O2, as demonstrated by the mitochondria-specific MitoSox staining of superoxide ions. Lack of P5CDH activity led to higher ROS production under dark and light conditions in the presence of Pro excess, as well as rendered plants hypersensitive to heat stress. Balancing mitochondrial ROS production during increased Pro oxidation is therefore critical for avoiding Pro-related toxic effects. Hence, normal oxidation of P5C to Glu by P5CDH is key to prevent P5C-Pro intensive cycling and avoid ROS production from electron run-off. PMID:19635803

  11. Glutamine: a major player in nitrogen catabolite repression in the yeast Dekkera bruxellensis.

    PubMed

    Cajueiro, Danielli Batista Bezerra; Parente, Denise Castro; Leite, Fernanda Cristina Bezerra; de Morais Junior, Marcos Antonio; de Barros Pita, Will

    2017-06-19

    In the present work we studied the expression of genes from nitrogen central metabolism in the yeast Dekkera bruxellensis and under regulation by the Nitrogen Catabolite Repression mechanism (NCR). These analyses could shed some light on the biological mechanisms involved in the adaptation and survival of this yeast in the sugarcane fermentation process for ethanol production. Nitrogen sources (N-sources) in the form of ammonium, nitrate, glutamate or glutamine were investigated with or without the addition of methionine sulfoximine, which inhibits the activity of the enzyme glutamine synthetase and releases cells from NCR. The results showed that glutamine might act as an intracellular sensor for nitrogen availability in D. bruxellensis, by activating NCR. Gene expression analyses indicated the existence of two different GATA-dependent NCR pathways, identified as glutamine-dependent and glutamine-independent mechanisms. Moreover, nitrate is sensed as a non-preferential N-source and releases NCR to its higher level. After grouping genes according to their regulation pattern, we showed that genes for ammonium assimilation represent a regulon with almost constitutive expression, while permease encoding genes are mostly affected by the nitrogen sensor mechanism. On the other hand, nitrate assimilation genes constitute a regulon that is primarily subjected to induction by nitrate and, to a lesser extent, to a repressive mechanism by preferential N-sources. This observation explains our previous reports showing that nitrate is co-consumed with ammonium, a trait that enables D. bruxellensis cells to scavenge limiting N-sources in the industrial substrate and, therefore, to compete with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in this environment.

  12. Role of NifS in maturation of glutamine phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Zheng, L; Dean, D R; Zalkin, H

    1997-12-01

    Glutamine phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase from Bacillus subtilis is synthesized as an inactive precursor that requires two maturation steps: incorporation of a [4Fe-4S] center and cleavage of an 11-residue NH2-terminal propeptide. Overproduction from a multicopy plasmid in Escherichia coli leads to the formation of soluble proenzyme and mature enzyme forms as well as a small fraction of insoluble proenzyme. Heterologous expression of Azotobacter vinelandii nifS from a compatible plasmid increased the maturation of the soluble proenzyme three- to fourfold without influencing the content of the insoluble fraction. These results support a role for NifS in heterologous Fe-S cluster assembly and enzyme maturation.

  13. Elevated glutamine metabolism in splenocytes from spontaneously diabetic BB rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, G Y; Field, C J; Marliss, E B

    1991-02-15

    To investigate the metabolic fates of glutamine in splenocytes from the BB rat with spontaneous immunologically mediated insulin-dependent diabetes, freshly isolated cells were incubated in Krebs-Ringer Hepes buffer with 1.0 mM-[U-14C]glutamine and 0, 4 mM- or 15 mM-glucose. (1) The major products of glutamine metabolism in splenocytes from normal and diabetic rats were ammonia, glutamate, aspartate and CO2. (2) The addition of glucose increased (P less than 0.01) glutamate production, but decreased (P less than 0.01) aspartate and CO2 production from glutamine, as compared with the values obtained in the absence of glucose. However, there were no differences in these metabolites of glutamine at 4 mM- and 15 mM-glucose. (3) At all glucose concentrations used, the productions of ammonia, glutamate, aspartate and CO2 from glutamine were all markedly increased (P less than 0.01) in splenocytes from diabetic rats. (4) Potential ATP production from glutamine in the splenocytes was similar to that from glucose, and was increased in cells from the diabetic rat. (5) ATP concentrations were increased (P less than 0.01) in diabetic-rat splenocytes in the presence of glutamine with or without glucose. (6) Our results demonstrate that glutamine is an important energy substrate for splenocytes and suggest that the increased glutamine metabolism may be associated with the activation of certain subsets of splenocytes in the immunologically mediated diabetic syndrome.

  14. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  15. The 3' untranslated region of the two cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS(1)) genes in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) regulates transcript stability in response to glutamine.

    PubMed

    Simon, Bindu; Sengupta-Gopalan, Champa

    2010-10-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia with glutamate to produce glutamine. The GS enzyme is located either in the chloroplast (GS(2)) or in the cytoplasm (GS(1)). GS(1) is encoded by a small gene family and the members exhibit differential expression pattern mostly attributed to transcriptional regulation. Based on our recent finding that a soybean GS(1) gene, Gmglnβ ( 1 ) is subject to its 3'UTR-mediated post-transcriptional regulation as a transgene in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) we have raised the question of whether the 3'UTR-mediated transcript destabilization is a more universal phenomenon. Gene constructs consisting of the CaMV35S promoter driving the reporter gene, GUS, followed by the 3'UTRs of the two alfalfa GS(1) genes, MsGSa and MsGSb, were introduced into alfalfa and tobacco. The analysis of these transformants suggests that while both the 3'UTRs promote transcript turnover, the MsGSb 3'UTR is more effective than the MsGSa 3'UTR. However, both the 3'UTRs along with Gmglnβ ( 1 ) 3'UTR respond to nitrate as a trigger in transcript turnover. More detailed analysis points to glutamine rather than nitrate as the mediator of transcript turnover. Our data suggests that the 3'UTR-mediated regulation of GS(1) genes at the level of transcript turnover is probably universal and is used for fine-tuning the expression in keeping with the availability of the substrates.

  16. Characterisation of glutamine fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (EC 2.6.1.16) and N-acetylglucosamine metabolism in Bifidobacterium.

    PubMed

    Foley, Sophie; Stolarczyk, Emilie; Mouni, Fadoua; Brassart, Colette; Vidal, Olivier; Aïssi, Eliane; Bouquelet, Stéphane; Krzewinski, Frédéric

    2008-02-01

    Bifidobacterium bifidum, in contrast to other bifidobacterial species, is auxotrophic for N-acetylglucosamine. Growth experiments revealed assimilation of radiolabelled N-acetylglucosamine in bacterial cell walls and in acetate, an end-product of central metabolism via the bifidobacterial D: -fructose-6-phosphate shunt. While supplementation with fructose led to reduced N-acetylglucosamine assimilation via the D: -fructose-6-phosphate shunt, no significant difference was observed in levels of radiolabelled N-acetylglucosamine incorporated into cell walls. Considering the central role played by glutamine fructose-6-phosphate transaminase (GlmS) in linking the biosynthetic pathway for N-acetylglucosamine to hexose metabolism, the GlmS of Bifidobacterium was characterized. The genes encoding the putative GlmS of B. longum DSM20219 and B. bifidum DSM20082 were cloned and sequenced. Bioinformatic analyses of the predicted proteins revealed 43% amino acid identity with the Escherichia coli GlmS, with conservation of key amino acids in the catalytic domain. The B. longum GlmS was over-produced as a histidine-tagged fusion protein. The purified C-terminal His-tagged GlmS possessed glutamine fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase activity as demonstrated by synthesis of glucosamine-6-phosphate from fructose-6-phosphate and glutamine. It also possesses an independent glutaminase activity, converting glutamine to glutamate in the absence of fructose-6-phosphate. This is of interest considering the apparently reduced coding potential in bifidobacteria for enzymes associated with glutamine metabolism.

  17. Effects of Glutamine Deamination on Glutamine Deamidation in Rat Kidney Slices

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Harry G.; Vivatsi-Manos, Olympia; Vertuno, Leonard L.

    1973-01-01

    Glutamate is known to inhibit the activity of isolated glutaminase I; however, its actual physiologic importance in regulating renal ammoniagenesis has not been established. To determine the regulatory role of glutamate on the metabolism of glutamine by rat kidney slices, we followed the effects on glutamine (2 mM) deamidation of increased removal of glutamate via augmented deamination. Three agents (malonate, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and methylene blue) were known to and shown here to hasten exogenous glutamate deamination. In slices from 10 control rats, 21.5±1.7 (SEM) μmol/g of ammonia were formed from amide nitrogen and 9.3±0.5 (SEM) μmol/g from the amino nitrogen of glutamine in vitro. Over 90% of the glutamine deamidated formed glutamate at one point in its catabolism. After addition of malonate (10 mM), 2,4-dinitrophenol (0.1 mM), or methylene blue (0.5 mM), the production of ammonia from the amino group rose to 29.3±6.0 (SEM) μmol/g, 20.0±1.8 (SEM) μmol/g, and 15.5±4.2 (SEM) μmol/g, respectively; ammonia production from the amide nitrogen rose also, 45.1±7.3 (SEM) μmol/g, 39.7±2.6 (SEM) μmol/g, and 41.9±3.7 (SEM) μmol/g. In the case of the former two, a minimum of 99% and 75% of the glutamine catabolized formed glutamate. Despite increased glutamine catabolism, there was no build up of glutamate in the media. A correlation between the formation of ammonia from the amino and amide nitrogen was apparent. Since none of the three agents selected affected phosphate activated glutaminase I activity directly or appeared to affect glutamine transport, we interpret the increase in deamidation as an expression of deinhibition of glutaminase I activity secondary to lowered glutamate concentrations at the deamidating sites through more rapid removal of glutamate via hastened deamination. Interestingly, slices removed from acidotic rats produced more ammonia from both the amino 29.1±3.8 (SEM) and amide nitrogens 45.9±4.3 (SEM) of glutamine, without a buildup

  18. Urease of Klebsiella aerogenes: control of its synthesis by glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, B; Magasanik, B

    1977-01-01

    Urease was purified 24-fold from extracts of Klebsiella aerogenes. The enzyme has a molecular weight of 230,000 as determined by gel filtration, is highly substrate specific, and has a Km for urea of 0.7 mM. A mutant strain lacking urease was isolated; it failed to grow with urea as the sole source of nitrogen but did grow on media containing other nitrogen sources such as ammonia, histidine, or arginine. Urease was present at a high level when the cells were starved for nitrogen; its synthesis was repressed when the external ammonia concentration was high. Formation of urease did not require induction by urea and was not subject to catabolite repression. Its synthesis was controlled by glutamine synthetase. Mutants lacking glutamine synthetase failed to produce urease, and mutants forming glutamine synthetase at a high constitutive level also formed urease constitutively. Thus, the formation of urease is regulated like that of other enzymes of K. aerogenes capable of supplying the cell with ammonia or glutamate. PMID:18438

  19. Effects of denervation on the activities of some tricarboxylic acid-cycle-associated dehydrogenases and adenine-metabolizing enzymes in rat diaphragm muscle

    PubMed Central

    Turner, L. V.; Manchester, K. L.

    1972-01-01

    1. The activity of several tricarboxylic acid-cycle-associated dehydrogenases, adenine-metabolizing enzymes and glutathione reductase and the content of myoglobin were measured in rat diaphragm muscle after unilateral nerve section. 2. Consistent with morphological disintegration of the mitochondria there was a rapid diminution in activity of NAD- and NADP-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase and glutamate dehydrogenase. 3. Creatine phosphokinase and adenylate kinase, by contrast, showed little change in activity; adenylate deaminase and glutathione reductase activities increased during the hypertrophic phase. The concentration of myoglobin at first declined, then increased again. 4. The distribution of enzymes between the left and right hemidiaphragms was found not to be uniform. 5. Activities of adenine-metabolizing enzymes in the diaphragm were as great as in white muscle. It is suggested that their reputedly lower activities in red muscle properly refer to muscle containing a high proportion of intermediate fibres, which is not the case with diaphragm. 6. The possible causes of the transient hypertrophy after nerve section are discussed. PMID:4404765

  20. Germinating Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Seedlings Attenuated Selenite-Induced Toxicity by Activating the Antioxidant Enzymes and Mediating the Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang; Zhang, Hong; Lai, Furao; Wu, Hui

    2016-02-17

    Selenite can enhance the selenium nutrition level of crops, but excessive selenite may be toxic to plant growth. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the role of selenite in production and detoxification of oxidative toxicity, peanut seedlings were developed with sodium selenite (0, 3, and 6 mg/L). The effects of selenite on antioxidant capacity, transcript levels of antioxidant enzyme genes, and enzyme activities in hypocotyl were investigated. The CuZn-SOD, GSH-Px, GST, and APX gene expression levels and their enzyme activities in selenite treatments were 1.0-3.6-fold of the control. Selenite also significantly increased the glutathione and ascorbate concentrations by mediating the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, and the selenite-induced hydrogen peroxide may act as a second messenger in the signaling pathways. This work has revealed a complex antioxidative response to selenite in peanut seedling. Understanding these mechanisms may help future research in increasing selenite tolerance and selenium accumulation in peanut and other crops.

  1. Compound- and enzyme-specific phosphodiester hydrolysis mechanisms revealed by δ18O of dissolved inorganic phosphate: Implications for marine P cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yuhong; Blake, Ruth E.

    2009-07-01

    We have studied the oxygen isotope signature of inorganic phosphate (P i) generated by hydrolysis of nucleic acid phosphodiester (P-diester) compounds by cell-free enzymes (Deoxyribonuclease 1, Phosphodiesterase 1, Alkaline phosphatase) and microbial cultures at natural isotopic abundances. We demonstrate that the diesterase-catalyzed hydrolytic step leads to incorporation of at least one water O into released P i for a total of two O atoms from water incorporated into P i released from P-diesters. In the presence of Phosphodiesterase 1, 16O is preferentially incorporated into nucleotides released from DNA; whereas 18O is preferentially incorporated into nucleotides released from RNA. A strong consistency between predicted O-isotope regeneration signatures based on results of cell-free enzyme experiments and measured isotopic signatures from independent experiments with E. coli cultures was observed and confirms proposed models for phosphoester hydrolysis. Results from these studies made at natural 18O abundance levels provide a new tool, enzyme-specific O-isotope fractionation, for investigations of organophosphate metabolism and phosphorus cycling pathways in natural aquatic systems.

  2. Acclimation of Arabidopsis Leaves Developing at Low Temperatures. Increasing Cytoplasmic Volume Accompanies Increased Activities of Enzymes in the Calvin Cycle and in the Sucrose-Biosynthesis Pathway1

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Åsa; Hurry, Vaughan; Henkes, Stefan; Huner, Norman; Gustafsson, Petter; Gardeström, Per; Stitt, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Photosynthetic and metabolic acclimation to low growth temperatures were studied in Arabidopsis (Heynh.). Plants were grown at 23°C and then shifted to 5°C. We compared the leaves shifted to 5°C for 10 d and the new leaves developed at 5°C with the control leaves on plants that had been left at 23°C. Leaf development at 5°C resulted in the recovery of photosynthesis to rates comparable with those achieved by control leaves at 23°C. There was a shift in the partitioning of carbon from starch and toward sucrose (Suc) in leaves that developed at 5°C. The recovery of photosynthetic capacity and the redirection of carbon to Suc in these leaves were associated with coordinated increases in the activity of several Calvin-cycle enzymes, even larger increases in the activity of key enzymes for Suc biosynthesis, and an increase in the phosphate available for metabolism. Development of leaves at 5°C also led to an increase in cytoplasmic volume and a decrease in vacuolar volume, which may provide an important mechanism for increasing the enzymes and metabolites in cold-acclimated leaves. Understanding the mechanisms underlying such structural changes during leaf development in the cold could result in novel approaches to increasing plant yield. PMID:10198098

  3. Acclimation of Arabidopsis leaves developing at low temperatures. Increasing cytoplasmic volume accompanies increased activities of enzymes in the Calvin cycle and in the sucrose-biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Strand, A; Hurry, V; Henkes, S; Huner, N; Gustafsson, P; Gardeström, P; Stitt, M

    1999-04-01

    Photosynthetic and metabolic acclimation to low growth temperatures were studied in Arabidopsis (Heynh.). Plants were grown at 23 degrees C and then shifted to 5 degrees C. We compared the leaves shifted to 5 degrees C for 10 d and the new leaves developed at 5 degrees C with the control leaves on plants that had been left at 23 degrees C. Leaf development at 5 degrees C resulted in the recovery of photosynthesis to rates comparable with those achieved by control leaves at 23 degrees C. There was a shift in the partitioning of carbon from starch and toward sucrose (Suc) in leaves that developed at 5 degrees C. The recovery of photosynthetic capacity and the redirection of carbon to Suc in these leaves were associated with coordinated increases in the activity of several Calvin-cycle enzymes, even larger increases in the activity of key enzymes for Suc biosynthesis, and an increase in the phosphate available for metabolism. Development of leaves at 5 degrees C also led to an increase in cytoplasmic volume and a decrease in vacuolar volume, which may provide an important mechanism for increasing the enzymes and metabolites in cold-acclimated leaves. Understanding the mechanisms underlying such structural changes during leaf development in the cold could result in novel approaches to increasing plant yield.

  4. Activity levels and expression of antioxidant enzymes in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in artificially aged rice seed.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guangkun; Xin, Xia; Song, Chao; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jinmei; Wu, Shuhua; Li, Ruifang; Liu, Xu; Lu, Xinxiong

    2014-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species are the main contributors to seed deterioration. In order to study scavenging systems for reactive oxygen species in aged seed, we performed analyses using western blotting, real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, high-performance liquid chromatography, and antioxidant enzyme activity analyses in artificially aged rice seeds (Oryza sativa L. cv. wanhua no.11). Aging seeds by storing them at 50 °C for 1, 9, or 17 months increased the superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide levels and reduced the germination percentage from 99% to 92%, 55%, and 2%, respectively. The activity levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) did not change in aged seeds. In contrast, the activity levels of catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) were significantly decreased in aged seeds, as were the expression of catalase and cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase protein. Transcript accumulation analysis showed that specific expression patterns were complex for each of the antioxidant enzyme types in the rice embryos. Overall, the expression of most genes was down-regulated, along with their protein expression. In addition, the reduction in the amount of ascorbate and glutathione was associated with the reduction in scavenging enzymes activity in aged rice embryos. Our data suggest that the depression of the antioxidant system, especially the reduction in the expression of CAT1, APX1 and MDHAR1, may be responsible for the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in artificially aged seed embryos, leading to a loss of seed vigor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Action of calcium ions on spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplast fructose bisphosphatase and other enzymes of the Calvin cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, S A; Halliwell, B

    1980-01-01

    Thiol-treated spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplast fructose bisphosphatase is powerfully inhibited by Ca2+ non-competitively with respect to its substrate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. 500 microM-Ca2+ causes virtually complete inhibition and the Ki is 40 microM. Severe inhibition of sedoheptulose bisphosphatase is also caused by Ca2+. A role for Ca2+ in regulation of the Calvin cycle in spinach chloroplasts is proposed. PMID:6258561

  6. Rotational Study of Natural Amino Acid Glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Marcelino; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Recent improvements in laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW) have allowed the investigation of glutamine (COOH-CH(NH2)-CH2-CH2-CONH2), a natural amino acid with a long polar side chain. One dominant structure has been detected in the rotational spectrum. The nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure of two 14N nuclei has been totally resolved allowing the conclusive identification of the observed species.

  7. Loss of RBF1 changes glutamine catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nicolay, Brandon N.; Gameiro, Paulo A.; Tschöp, Katrin; Korenjak, Michael; Heilmann, Andreas M.; Asara, John M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Iliopoulos, Othon; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (pRB) alters the expression of a myriad of genes. To understand the altered cellular environment that these changes create, we took advantage of the Drosophila model system and used targeted liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to profile the metabolic changes that occur when RBF1, the fly ortholog of pRB, is removed. We show that RBF1-depleted tissues and larvae are sensitive to fasting. Depletion of RBF1 causes major changes in nucleotide synthesis and glutathione metabolism. Under fasting conditions, these changes interconnect, and the increased replication demand of RBF1-depleted larvae is associated with the depletion of glutathione pools. In vivo 13C isotopic tracer analysis shows that RBF1-depleted larvae increase the flux of glutamine toward glutathione synthesis, presumably to minimize oxidative stress. Concordantly, H2O2 preferentially promoted apoptosis in RBF1-depleted tissues, and the sensitivity of RBF1-depleted animals to fasting was specifically suppressed by either a glutamine supplement or the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine. Effects of pRB activation/inactivation on glutamine catabolism were also detected in human cell lines. These results show that the inactivation of RB proteins causes metabolic reprogramming and that these consequences of RBF/RB function are present in both flies and human cell lines. PMID:23322302

  8. Comparison of different types of phacoemulsification tips. II. Morphologic alterations induced by multiple steam sterilization cycles with and without use of enzyme detergents.

    PubMed

    Tsaousis, Konstantinos T; Werner, Liliana; Reiter, Nicholas; Perez, Jesus Paulo; Li, He J; Guan, Jia J; Mamalis, Nick

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the alterations in the morphology and elemental composition of reusable phacoemulsification tips after cleaning and sterilization. John A. Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Experimental study. For the main experiment, 2 types of reusable phacoemulsification needles were studied. One tip of each type underwent 1, 2, and 3 autoclave sterilizations with the use of detergents followed by thorough rinsing with sterile water between cycles. Another set of tips underwent the same procedure but without rinsing. Subsequently, phaco tips were examined through scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to assess morphologic changes and surface deposits. In a second experiment, tips of 8 different types (both reusable and single use) underwent 10 sterilization autoclave cycles without detergents. Residues, mostly comprised of carbon-containing material, were found in extensive areas of tips that were sterilization with enzymes and without rinsing. Smaller and fewer residues were found in tips after sterilization with the use of enzymes and thorough rinsing. Tips that underwent autoclave sterilization without detergents had no bulky deposits on their surface; they mostly had thin layers of sodium and chloride or material discoloration. Rinsing the phaco tips significantly reduced the size and number of residues after use of enzymatic detergents. However, detergent residues were detected on phaco tip surfaces even after thorough rinsing with sterile water. No major noticeable changes were observed in either single-use or reusable phaco tips after 10 cycles of sterilization without detergents. None of the authors has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In Situ Association of Calvin Cycle Enzymes, Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activase, Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase, and Nitrite Reductase with Thylakoid and Pyrenoid Membranes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts as Revealed by Immunoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Suss, K. H.; Prokhorenko, I.; Adler, K.

    1995-04-01

    The in situ localization of the chloroplast enzymes ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), Rubisco activase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase was studied by immunoelectron microscopy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Immunogold labeling revealed that, despite Rubisco in the pyrenoid matrix, Calvin cycle enzymes, Rubisco activase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase are associated predominantly with chloroplast thylakoid membranes and the inner surface of the pyrenoid membrane. This is in accord with previous enzyme localization studies in higher plants (K.H. Suss, C. Arkona, R. Manteuffel, K. Adler [1993] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90: 5514-5518). Pyrenoid tubules do not contain these enzymes. The pyrenoid matrix consists of Rubisco but is devoid of the other photosynthetic enzymes investigated. Evidence for the occurrence of two Rubisco forms differing in their spatial localization has also been obtained: Rubisco form I appears to be membrane associated like other Calvin cycle components, whereas Rubisco form II is confined to the pyrenoid matrix. It is proposed that enzyme form I represents an active Rubisco when assembled into Calvin cycle enzyme complexes, whereas Rubisco form II may be part of a CO2-concentrating mechanism. Pyrenoidal Calvin cycle complexes are thought to be highly active in CO2 fixation and important for the synthesis of starch around the pyrenoid.

  10. ADP-ribosylation of glutamine synthetase in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed Central

    Silman, N J; Carr, N G; Mann, N H

    1995-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) inactivation was observed in crude cell extracts and in the high-speed supernatant fraction from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 following the addition of ammonium ions, glutamine, or glutamate. Dialysis of the high-speed supernatant resulted in loss of inactivation activity, but this could be restored by the addition of NADH, NADPH, or NADP+ and, to a lesser extent, NAD+, suggesting that inactivation of GS involved ADP-ribosylation. This form of modification was confirmed both by labelling experiments using [32P]NAD+ and by chemical analysis of the hydrolyzed enzyme. Three different forms of GS, exhibiting no activity, biosynthetic activity only, or transferase activity only, could be resolved by chromatography, and the differences in activity were correlated with the extent of the modification. Both biosynthetic and transferase activities were restored to the completely inactive form of GS by treatment with phosphodiesterase. PMID:7768863

  11. ADP-ribosylation of glutamine synthetase in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Silman, N J; Carr, N G; Mann, N H

    1995-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) inactivation was observed in crude cell extracts and in the high-speed supernatant fraction from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 following the addition of ammonium ions, glutamine, or glutamate. Dialysis of the high-speed supernatant resulted in loss of inactivation activity, but this could be restored by the addition of NADH, NADPH, or NADP+ and, to a lesser extent, NAD+, suggesting that inactivation of GS involved ADP-ribosylation. This form of modification was confirmed both by labelling experiments using [32P]NAD+ and by chemical analysis of the hydrolyzed enzyme. Three different forms of GS, exhibiting no activity, biosynthetic activity only, or transferase activity only, could be resolved by chromatography, and the differences in activity were correlated with the extent of the modification. Both biosynthetic and transferase activities were restored to the completely inactive form of GS by treatment with phosphodiesterase.

  12. Methylmercury induces oxidative injury, alterations in permeability and glutamine transport in cultured astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaobao; Milatovic, Dejan; Aschner, Judy L.; Syversen, Tore; Rocha, Joao B.T.; Souza, Diogo O.; Sidoryk, Marta; Albrecht, Jan; Aschner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The neurotoxicity of high levels of methylmercury (MeHg) is well established both in humans and experimental animals. Astrocytes accumulate MeHg and play a prominent role in mediating MeHg toxicity in the central nervous system (CNS). Although the precise mechanisms of MeHg neurotoxicity are ill-defined, oxidative stress and altered mitochondrial and cell membrane permeability appear to be critical factors in its pathogenesis. The present study examined the effects of MeHg treatment on oxidative injury, mitochondrial inner membrane potential, glutamine uptake and expression of glutamine transporters in primary astrocyte cultures. MeHg caused a significant increase in F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), lipid peroxidation biomarkers of oxidative damage, in astrocyte cultures treated with 5 or 10 μ M MeHg for 1 or 6 hours. Consistent with this observation, MeHg induced a concentration-dependant reduction in the inner mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), as assessed by the potentiometric dye, tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE). Our results demonstrate that ΔΨm is a very sensitive endpoint for MeHg toxicity, since significant reductions were observed after only 1 h exposure to concentrations of MeHg as low as 1 μ M. MeHg pretreatment (1, 5 and 10 μ M) for 30 min also inhibited the net uptake of glutamine (3H-glutamine) measured at 1 min and 5 min. Expression of the mRNA coding the glutamine transporters, SNAT3/SN1 and ASCT2, was inhibited only at the highest (10 μ M) MeHg concentration, suggesting that the reduction in glutamine uptake observed after 30 min treatment with lower concentrations of MeHg (1 and 5 μ M) was not due to inhibition of transcription. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that MeHg exposure is associated with increased mitochondrial membrane permeability, alterations in glutamine/glutamate cycling, increased ROS formation and consequent oxidative injury. Ultimately, MeHg initiates multiple additive or synergistic disruptive

  13. Reduction in water activity greatly retards the phosphoryl transfer from ATP to enzyme protein in the catalytic cycle of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Kanazawa, T

    1996-03-08

    Cys-674 of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase was labeled with N-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine without a loss of the catalytic activity. The ATP-induced drop in the fluorescence of the label, which was shown in our previous studies to reflect the conformational change upon formation of the calcium.enzyme.ATP complex, was followed by the stopped-flow method. The subsequent phosphoenzyme formation was followed by the rapid quenching method. Effects of a partial substitution of organic solvents for water in the medium on the conformational change and phosphoenzyme formation were investigated in the presence of 100 microM CaCl2 at pH 7.5, 0 degrees C. The rate of the conformational change increased with increasing ATP concentration (0.1 100 microM) and was unaffected by 30% (v/v) dimethyl sulfoxide. In contrast, the rate of phosphoenzyme formation decreased sharply with increasing concentration of dimethyl sulfoxide (20-40% (v/v)), even when phosphoenzyme formation was saturated with ATP. N,N-Dimethylformamide and glycerol had essentially the same effects as dimethyl sulfoxide. These results show that the reduction in water activity does not affect the rate of the conformational change upon formation of the calcium.enzyme.ATP complex, but greatly retards the subsequent phosphoryl transfer from ATP to the enzyme protein. This strongly suggests that in this early stage of the catalytic cycle water plays a critical role in ensuring the rapid turnover of the enzyme.

  14. Targeting Glutamine Induces Apoptosis: A Cancer Therapy Approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lian; Cui, Hengmin

    2015-09-22

    Glutamine metabolism has been proved to be dysregulated in many cancer cells, and is essential for proliferation of most cancer cells, which makes glutamine an appealing target for cancer therapy. In order to be well used by cells, glutamine must be transported to cells by specific transporters and converted to glutamate by glutaminase. There are currently several drugs that target glutaminase under development or clinical trials. Also, glutamine metabolism restriction has been proved to be effective in inhibiting tumor growth both in vivo and vitro through inducing apoptosis, growth arrest and/or autophagy. Here, we review recent researches about glutamine metabolism in cancer, and cell death induced by targeting glutamine, and their potential roles in cancer therapy.

  15. Targeting Glutamine Induces Apoptosis: A Cancer Therapy Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lian; Cui, Hengmin

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine metabolism has been proved to be dysregulated in many cancer cells, and is essential for proliferation of most cancer cells, which makes glutamine an appealing target for cancer therapy. In order to be well used by cells, glutamine must be transported to cells by specific transporters and converted to glutamate by glutaminase. There are currently several drugs that target glutaminase under development or clinical trials. Also, glutamine metabolism restriction has been proved to be effective in inhibiting tumor growth both in vivo and vitro through inducing apoptosis, growth arrest and/or autophagy. Here, we review recent researches about glutamine metabolism in cancer, and cell death induced by targeting glutamine, and their potential roles in cancer therapy. PMID:26402672

  16. Glutamine Triggers Acetylation-Dependent Degradation of Glutamine Synthetase via the Thalidomide Receptor Cereblon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T Van; Lee, J Eugene; Sweredoski, Michael J; Yang, Seung-Joo; Jeon, Seung-Je; Harrison, Joseph S; Yim, Jung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang Ghil; Handa, Hiroshi; Kuhlman, Brian; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Reitsma, Justin M; Park, Chul-Seung; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-03-17

    Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor for the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase 4 (CRL4) complex, is a direct protein target for thalidomide teratogenicity and antitumor activity of immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs). Here we report that glutamine synthetase (GS) is an endogenous substrate of CRL4(CRBN). Upon exposing cells to high glutamine concentration, GS is acetylated at lysines 11 and 14, yielding a degron that is necessary and sufficient for binding and ubiquitylation by CRL4(CRBN) and degradation by the proteasome. Binding of acetylated degron peptides to CRBN depends on an intact thalidomide-binding pocket but is not competitive with IMiDs. These findings reveal a feedback loop involving CRL4(CRBN) that adjusts GS protein levels in response to glutamine and uncover a new function for lysine acetylation.

  17. Glutamine-dependent α-ketoglutarate production regulates the balance between T helper 1 cell and regulatory T cell generation.

    PubMed

    Klysz, Dorota; Tai, Xuguang; Robert, Philippe A; Craveiro, Marco; Cretenet, Gaspard; Oburoglu, Leal; Mongellaz, Cédric; Floess, Stefan; Fritz, Vanessa; Matias, Maria I; Yong, Carmen; Surh, Natalie; Marie, Julien C; Huehn, Jochen; Zimmermann, Valérie; Kinet, Sandrina; Dardalhon, Valérie; Taylor, Naomi

    2015-09-29

    T cell activation requires that the cell meet increased energetic and biosynthetic demands. We showed that exogenous nutrient availability regulated the differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cells into distinct subsets. Activation of naïve CD4(+) T cells under conditions of glutamine deprivation resulted in their differentiation into Foxp3(+) (forkhead box P3-positive) regulatory T (Treg) cells, which had suppressor function in vivo. Moreover, glutamine-deprived CD4(+) T cells that were activated in the presence of cytokines that normally induce the generation of T helper 1 (TH1) cells instead differentiated into Foxp3(+) Treg cells. We found that α-ketoglutarate (αKG), the glutamine-derived metabolite that enters into the mitochondrial citric acid cycle, acted as a metabolic regulator of CD4(+) T cell differentiation. Activation of glutamine-deprived naïve CD4(+) T cells in the presence of a cell-permeable αKG analog increased the expression of the gene encoding the TH1 cell-associated transcription factor Tbet and resulted in their differentiation into TH1 cells, concomitant with stimulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. Together, these data suggest that a decrease in the intracellular amount of αKG, caused by the limited availability of extracellular glutamine, shifts the balance between the generation of TH1 and Treg cells toward that of a Treg phenotype. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Effect of dietary glutamine on growth performance, non-specific immunity, expression of cytokine genes, phosphorylation of target of rapamycin (TOR), and anti-oxidative system in spleen and head kidney of Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian).

    PubMed

    Hu, Kai; Zhang, Jing-Xiu; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of dietary glutamine on the growth performance, cytokines, target of rapamycin (TOR), and antioxidant-related parameters in the spleen and head kidney of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). Fish were fed the basal (control) and glutamine-supplemented (12.0 g glutamine kg(-1) diet) diets for 6 weeks. Results indicated that the dietary glutamine supplementation improved the growth performance, spleen protein content, serum complement 3 content, and lysozyme activity in fish. In the spleen, glutamine down-regulated the expression of the interleukin 1 and interleukin 10 genes, and increased the level of phosphorylation of TOR protein. In the head kidney, glutamine down-regulated the tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 10 gene expressions, phosphorylated and total TOR protein levels, while up-regulated the transforming growth factor β2 gene expression. Furthermore, the protein carbonyl content was decreased in the spleen of fish fed glutamine-supplemented diet; conversely, the anti-hydroxyl radical capacity and glutathione content in the spleen were increased by glutamine. However, diet supplemented with glutamine did not affect the lipid peroxidation, anti-superoxide anion capacity, and antioxidant enzyme activities in the spleen. Moreover, all of these antioxidant parameters in the head kidney were not affected by glutamine. Results from the present experiment showed the importance of dietary supplementation of glutamine in benefaction of the growth performance and several components of the innate immune system, and the deferential role in cytokine gene expression, TOR kinase activity, and antioxidant status between the spleen and head kidney of juvenile Jian carp.

  19. Biochemical parameters of glutamine synthetase from Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, R A; Janssen, K A; Resnick, A D; Blumenberg, M; Foor, F; Magasanik, B

    1977-01-01

    The glutamine synthetase (GS) from Klebsiella aerogenes is similar to that from Escherichia coli in several respects: (i) it is repressed by high levels of ammonia in the growth medium; (ii) its biosynthetic activity is greatly reduced by adenylylation; and (iii) adenylylation lowers the pH optimum and alters the response of the enzymes to various inhibitors in the gamma-glutamyl transferase (gammaGT) assay. There are, however, several important differences: (i) the isoactivity point for the adenylylated and non-adenylylated forms in the gammaGT assay occurs at pH 7.55 in K. aerogenes and at pH 7.15 in E. coli; (ii) the non-adenylylated form of the GS from K. aerogenes is stimulated by 60 mM MgCl2 in the gammaGT assay at pH 7.15. A biosynthetic reaction assay that correlates well with number of non-adenylylated enzyme subunits, as determined by the method of Mg2+ inhibition of the gammaGT assay, is described. Finally, we have found that it is necessary to use special methods to harvest growing cells to prevent changes in the adenylylation state of GS from occurring during harvesting. PMID:14104

  20. When Is It Appropriate to Use Glutamine in Critical Illness?

    PubMed

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Shah, Meera; Hurt, Ryan T

    2016-08-01

    Glutamine is a nonessential amino acid, which under trauma or critical illness can become essential. A number of historic small single-center randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated positive treatment effects on clinical outcomes with glutamine supplementation. Meta-analyses based on these trials demonstrated a significant reduction in hospital mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), and hospital LOS with intravenous (IV) glutamine. Similar results were not noted in 2 large multicenter RCTs (REDOXS and MetaPlus) assessing the efficacy of glutamine supplementation in ventilated ICU patients. The REDOXS trial of 40 ICUs randomized 1223 ventilated ICU patients to glutamine (IV and enteral), antioxidants, both glutamine and antioxidants, or placebo. The main conclusions were a trend toward increased 28-day mortality and significant increased hospital and 6-month mortality in those who received glutamine. The MetaPlus trial of 14 ICUs, which randomized 301 ventilated ICU patients to glutamine-enriched enteral vs an isocaloric diet, noted increased 6-month mortality in the glutamine-supplemented group. Newer RCTs have focused on specific populations and have demonstrated benefits in burn and elective surgery patients with glutamine supplementation. Whether larger studies will confirm these findings is yet to be determined. Recent American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition guidelines recommend that IV and enteral glutamine should not be used in the critical care setting based on the moderate quality of evidence available. We agree with these recommendations and would encourage larger multicenter studies to evaluate the risks and benefits of glutamine in burn and elective surgery patients. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. Structure of Escherichia coli Ribose-5-Phosphate Isomerase: A Ubiquitous Enzyme of the Pentose Phosphate Pathway and the Calvin Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong-guang; Andersson, C. Evalena; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Evdokimova, Elena; Beasley, Steven; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Edwards, Aled M.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mowbray, Sherry L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase A (RpiA; EC 5.3.1.6) interconverts ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. This enzyme plays essential roles in carbohydrate anabolism and catabolism; it is ubiquitous and highly conserved. The structure of RpiA from Escherichia coli was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing, and refined to 1.5 Å resolution (R factor 22.4%, Rfree 23.7%). RpiA exhibits an α/β/(α/β)/β/α fold, some portions of which are similar to proteins of the alcohol dehydrogenase family. The two subunits of the dimer in the asymmetric unit have different conformations, representing the opening/closing of a cleft. Active site residues were identified in the cleft using sequence conservation, as well as the structure of a complex with the inhibitor arabinose-5-phosphate at 1.25 Å resolution. A mechanism for acid-base catalysis is proposed. PMID:12517338

  2. Structure of escherichia coli ribose-5-phosphate isomerase : a ubiquitous enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Andersson, C. E.; Savchenko, A.; Skarina, T.; Evdokimova, E.; Beasley, S.; Arrowsmith, C. H.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Mowbray, S. L.; Biosciences Division; Uppsala Univ.; Univ. Health Network; Univ. of Toronto; Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences

    2003-01-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase A (RpiA; EC 5.3.1.6) interconverts ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. This enzyme plays essential roles in carbohydrate anabolism and catabolism; it is ubiquitous and highly conserved. The structure of RpiA from Escherichia coli was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing, and refined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution (R factor 22.4%, R{sub free} 23.7%). RpiA exhibits an {alpha}/{beta}/({alpha}/{beta})/{beta}/{alpha} fold, some portions of which are similar to proteins of the alcohol dehydrogenase family. The two subunits of the dimer in the asymmetric unit have different conformations, representing the opening/closing of a cleft. Active site residues were identified in the cleft using sequence conservation, as well as the structure of a complex with the inhibitor arabinose-5-phosphate at 1.25 A resolution. A mechanism for acid-base catalysis is proposed.

  3. Structure of Escherichia coli ribose-5-phosphate isomerase: a ubiquitous enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong guang; Andersson, C Evalena; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Evdokimova, Elena; Beasley, Steven; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Edwards, Aled M; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mowbray, Sherry L

    2003-01-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase A (RpiA; EC 5.3.1.6) interconverts ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. This enzyme plays essential roles in carbohydrate anabolism and catabolism; it is ubiquitous and highly conserved. The structure of RpiA from Escherichia coli was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing, and refined to 1.5 A resolution (R factor 22.4%, R(free) 23.7%). RpiA exhibits an alpha/beta/(alpha/beta)/beta/alpha fold, some portions of which are similar to proteins of the alcohol dehydrogenase family. The two subunits of the dimer in the asymmetric unit have different conformations, representing the opening/closing of a cleft. Active site residues were identified in the cleft using sequence conservation, as well as the structure of a complex with the inhibitor arabinose-5-phosphate at 1.25 A resolution. A mechanism for acid-base catalysis is proposed.

  4. Menstrual cycle and reproductive aging alters immune reactivity, NGF expression, antioxidant enzyme activities, and intracellular signaling pathways in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy women.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, Hannah P; Sharma, Utsav; Gopinath, Srinivasan; Sharma, Varun; Hima, Lalgi; ThyagaRajan, Srinivasan

    2013-08-01

    Reproductive senescence in women is a process that begins with regular menstrual cycles and culminates in menopause followed by gradual development of diseases such as autoimmune diseases, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and hormone-dependent cancers. The age-associated impairment in the functions of neuroendocrine system and immune system results in menopause which contributes to subsequent development of diseases and cancer. The aim of this study is to characterize the alterations in immune responses, compensatory factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and antioxidant enzyme activities, and the molecular mechanisms of actions in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of young (follicular and luteal phases), middle-aged, and old healthy women. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from young women in follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle (n=20; 22.6±2.9 yrs), middle-aged women (n=19; 47.1±3.8 yrs; perimenopausal) and old (n=16; 63.2±4.7 yrs; post-menopausal) women and analyzed for Concanavalin (Con A)-induced proliferation of lymphocytes and cytokine (IL-2 and IFN-γ) production, expression of NGF, p-NF-κB, p-ERK, p-CREB, and p-Akt, antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], extent of lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide (NO) production. Serum gonadal hormones (17β-estradiol and progesterone) were also measured. A characteristic age- and menstrual cycle-related change was observed in the serum gonadal hormone secretion (estrogen and progesterone), T lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ production. Salient features include the age-related decline observed in target-derived growth factors (lymphocyte NGF expression), signaling molecules (p-ERK/ERK and p-CREB/CREB ratios) and compensatory factors such as the activities of plasma and PBMC antioxidant enzymes (SOD and catalase) and NO production. Further, an age-associated increase in p

  5. Argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) is a common metabolic marker of chemosensitivity for targeted arginine- and glutamine-starvation therapy.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan; Tsai, Wen-Bin; Wang, Dajuan; Hawke, David H; Savaraj, Niramol; Feun, Lynn G; Hung, Mien-Chie; Chen, Helen H W; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2017-03-01

    Argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) is the rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of arginine (Arg). Many malignant human tumors are auxotrophic for Arg because ASS1 is silenced. ASS1 has been established as a sensor of Arg auxotrophic response and a chemosensitivity marker for Arg starvation therapy. Here, we report that ASS1 is also a sensor for glutamine (Gln)-deprivation response, and that upregulation of ASS1 expression is associated with resistance to Gln-starvation treatments. Knockdown of ASS1 expression resulted in increased sensitivity to both Arg- and Gln-starvation, whereas increased ASS1 expression by ectopic transfection is associated with resistance to both Arg- and Gln-starvation. The addition of permeable fumarate, a metabolite that bridges the tricarboxylic acid and urea cycles, resulted in downregulation of ASS1 expression and increased sensitivity to both Arg- and Gln-deprivation treatments. Mechanistically, the Gln-deprivation response, like the arginine-auxotrophic response, downregulates HIF-1α resulting in de-silencing of ASS1. Our results demonstrate that ASS1 is a common biosensor for Arg and Gln deprivation response and a shared target for Arg- and Gln-starvation therapies which have been in several current clinical trials.

  6. Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells Obtained from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Possess Functional Visual Cycle Enzymes in Vitro and in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Tadao; Lee, Mee Jee; Palczewska, Grazyna; Marsili, Stefania; Tesar, Paul J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Takahashi, Masayo; Maeda, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells have been obtained from human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells. However, the visual (retinoid) cycle in hiPS-RPE cells has not been adequately examined. Here we determined the expression of functional visual cycle enzymes in hiPS-RPE cells compared with that of isolated wild-type mouse primary RPE (mpRPE) cells in vitro and in vivo. hiPS-RPE cells appeared morphologically similar to mpRPE cells. Notably, expression of certain visual cycle proteins was maintained during cell culture of hiPS-RPE cells, whereas expression of these same molecules rapidly decreased in mpRPE cells. Production of the visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, and retinosome formation also were documented in hiPS-RPE cells in vitro. When mpRPE cells with luciferase activity were transplanted into the subretinal space of mice, bioluminance intensity was preserved for >3 months. Additionally, transplantation of mpRPE into blind Lrat−/− and Rpe65−/− mice resulted in the recovery of visual function, including increased electrographic signaling and endogenous 11-cis-retinal production. Finally, when hiPS-RPE cells were transplanted into the subretinal space of Lrat−/− and Rpe65−/− mice, their vision improved as well. Moreover, histological analyses of these eyes displayed replacement of dysfunctional RPE cells by hiPS-RPE cells. Together, our results show that hiPS-RPE cells can exhibit a functional visual cycle in vitro and in vivo. These cells could provide potential treatment options for certain blinding retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:24129572

  7. [DYNAMICS OF GLUTAMINE SYNTHASE ACTIVITY IN RAT BRAIN IN PRENATAL HYPOXIA MODEL].

    PubMed

    Khairova, V R; Safarov, M I

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal ontogenesis is a period of high sensitivity to stressful impact, so any stressor can lead to changes of physiological, biochemical indicators, behavioral and cognitive functions. The most common and clinically significant stress factor, which the embryo may be exposed during embryonic development, is hypoxia. In this case pathological changes in the central nervous system depend on the duration and severity of hypoxic exposure, individual tolerance and the stage of prenatal development, at each of which in the brain take place the basic histogenetic processes. By activating energetically disadvantageous anaerobic glycolysis hypoxia leads to excess of glutamate emission and cell apoptosis. Glutamine synthase is a basic enzyme that regulates metabolism of glutamate, catalyzing conversion of glutamate to glutamine with ammonia detoxification. The aim of the presented work was to reveal changes in the activity of one of the key enzyme of glutamate metabolism- glutamine synthetase in the brain of offspring of white rats undergone to hypoxia at different stages of prenatal ontogenesis. Hypoxia was created by placing female rats at stages of the pregnancy, corresponding to progestation period of organogenesis and fetal period of prenatal development, in the hypobaric chamber with exposure to 5% oxygen and 95% nitrogen gas mixture during 30 minutes per day. The offspring obtained from females of control and experimental groups were used for biochemical determinations in the age of 1 and 3 month. It has been established that hypoxia exposed to pregnant females during embryonic organogenesis causes significant changes in enzyme activity, particularly pronounced in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, as compared with progestational and fetal hypoxia. Enzyme activity decreased in a greater degree in one-month-old rats undergone to prenatal hypoxia, than three- month-old animals. Thus, stress during intensive processes of proliferation and migration of cells of the

  8. Carbon Nanotubes Influence the Enzyme Activity of Biogeochemical Cycles of Carbon, Nitrogen, Phosphorus and the Pathogenesis of Plants in Annual Agroecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishlya, O. B.; Osipov, N. N.; Guseva, N. V.

    2015-09-01

    We conducted pre-sowing seed treatment of spring wheat carbon nanotubes modified with thionyl chloride, ethylene diamine, azobenzole, and dodecylamine. CNTs did not disrupt the structure of the crop, but the activity of extracellular enzymes in the rhizosphere of plants in the flowering stage changed: laccase works more poorly in the variant of the CNTs with the amino groups exochitinase and phosphatase activity increased in the case of chlorinated CNTs, OH and COOH groups on the surface of the nanotubes twice accelerate work β-glucosidase. The changes observed in the biogeochemical cycles in the rhizosphere are a possible cause of the effect of nanotubes on the development of epidemic diseases of wheat.

  9. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D inhibits glutamine metabolism in Harvey-ras transformed MCF10A human breast epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuanzhu; Zheng, Wei; Nagana Gowda, G A; Raftery, Daniel; Donkin, Shawn S; Bequette, Brian; Teegarden, Dorothy

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women in the US. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), is proposed to inhibit cellular processes and to prevent breast cancer. The current studies investigated the effect of 1,25(OH)2D on glutamine metabolism during cancer progression employing Harvey-ras oncogene transformed MCF10A human breast epithelial cells (MCF10A-ras). Treatment with 1,25(OH)2D significantly reduced intracellular glutamine and glutamate levels measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by 23±2% each. Further, 1,25(OH)2D treatment reduced glutamine and glutamate flux, determined by [U-(13)C5] glutamine tracer kinetics, into the TCA cycle by 31±0.2% and 17±0.4%, respectively. The relative levels of mRNA and protein abundance of the major glutamine transporter, solute linked carrier family 1 member A5 (SLC1A5), was significantly decreased by 1,25(OH)2D treatment in both MCF10A-ras cells and MCF10A which overexpress ErbB2 (HER-2/neu). Consistent with these results, glutamine uptake was reduced by 1,25(OH)2D treatment and the impact was eliminated with the SLC1A5 inhibitor L-γ-Glutamyl-p-nitroanilide (GPNA). A consensus sequence to the vitamin D responsive element (VDRE) was identified in silico in the SLC1A5 gene promoter, and site-directed mutagenesis analyses with reporter gene studies demonstrate a functional negative VDRE in the promoter of the SLC1A5 gene. siRNA-SLC1A5 transfection in MCF10A-ras cells significantly reduced SLC1A5 mRNA expression as well as decreased viable cell number similar to 1,25(OH)2D treatment. SLC1A5 knockdown also induced an increase in apoptotic cells in MCF10A-ras cells. These results suggest 1,25(OH)2D alters glutamine metabolism in MCF10A-ras cells by inhibiting glutamine uptake and utilization, in part through down-regulation of SLC1A5 transcript abundance. Thus, 1,25(OH)2D down-regulation of the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5, may facilitate vitamin D prevention of breast

  10. The Calvin cycle enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase of Xanthobacter flavus required for autotrophic CO2 fixation is not encoded by the cbb operon.

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, W G

    1994-01-01

    During autotrophic growth of Xanthobacter flavus, energy derived from the oxidation of hydrogen methanol or formate is used to drive the assimilation of CO2 via the Calvin cycle. The genes encoding the Calvin cycle enzymes are organized in the cbb operon, which is expressed only during autotrophic growth. Although it has been established that the transcriptional activator CbbR is required for the expression of the cbb operon, it is unclear whether CbbR is the only factor contributing to the regulation of the cbb operon. This paper describes the isolation of X. flavus mutants which were affected in the regulation of the cbb operon. One of the mutant strains was subject to an enhanced repression of the cbb operon promoter by the gluconeogenic substrate succinate and in addition failed to grow autotrophically. The rate of growth of the X. flavus mutant on succinate-containing medium was lower than that of the wild-type strain, but rates of growth on medium supplemented with gluconate were identical. A genomic library of X. flavus was constructed and was used to complement the mutant strain. The nucleotide sequence of the DNA fragment required to restore autotrophic growth of the X. flavus mutant was determined. One open reading frame that displayed extensive similarities to phosphoglycerate kinase-encoding genes (pgk) was identified. The X. flavus mutant lacked phosphoglycerate kinase activity following growth on gluconate or succinate. Introduction of the pgk gene into the X. flavus mutant partially restored the activity of phosphoglycerate kinase. Induction of the cbb operon of the X. flavus wild-type strain resulted in a simultaneous and parallel increase in the activities of ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase and phosphoglycerate kinase, whereas the latter activity remained absent in the X. flavus pgk mutant. It is concluded that X. flavus employees a single phosphoglycerate kinase enzyme and this is not encoded within the cbb operon. PMID:7928974

  11. The reaction kinetics of 3-hydroxybenzoate 6-hydroxylase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 provide an understanding of the para-hydroxylation enzyme catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Tongsook, Chanakan; Pakotiprapha, Danaya; van Berkel, Willem J H; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2013-12-06

    3-Hydroxybenzoate 6-hydroxylase (3HB6H) from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 is an NADH-specific flavoprotein monooxygenase that catalyzes the para-hydroxylation of 3-hydroxybenzoate (3HB) to form 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (2,5-DHB). Based on results from stopped-flow spectrophotometry, the reduced enzyme-3HB complex reacts with oxygen to form a C4a-peroxy flavin with a rate constant of 1.13 ± 0.01 × 10(6) m(-1) s(-1) (pH 8.0, 4 °C). This intermediate is subsequently protonated to form a C4a-hydroperoxyflavin with a rate constant of 96 ± 3 s(-1). This step shows a solvent kinetic isotope effect of 1.7. Based on rapid-quench measurements, the hydroxylation occurs with a rate constant of 36 ± 2 s(-1). 3HB6H does not exhibit substrate inhibition on the flavin oxidation step, a common characteristic found in most ortho-hydroxylation enzymes. The apparent kcat at saturating concentrations of 3HB, NADH, and oxygen is 6.49 ± 0.02 s(-1). Pre-steady state and steady-state kinetic data were used to construct the catalytic cycle of the reaction. The data indicate that the steps of product release (11.7 s(-1)) and hydroxylation (36 ± 2 s(-1)) partially control the overall turnover.

  12. Crystal Structure of Reduced and of Oxidized Peroxiredoxin IV Enzyme Reveals a Stable Oxidized Decamer and a Non-disulfide-bonded Intermediate in the Catalytic Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhenbo; Tavender, Timothy J.; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Bulleid, Neil J.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin IV (PrxIV) is an endoplasmic reticulum-localized enzyme that metabolizes the hydrogen peroxide produced by endoplasmic reticulum oxidase 1 (Ero1). It has been shown to play a role in de novo disulfide formation, oxidizing members of the protein disulfide isomerase family of enzymes, and is a member of the typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. We have determined the crystal structure of both reduced and disulfide-bonded, as well as a resolving cysteine mutant of human PrxIV. We show that PrxIV has a similar structure to other typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and undergoes a conformational change from a fully folded to a locally unfolded form following the formation of a disulfide between the peroxidatic and resolving cysteine residues. Unlike other mammalian typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, we show that human PrxIV forms a stable decameric structure even in its disulfide-bonded state. In addition, the structure of a resolving cysteine mutant reveals an intermediate in the reaction cycle that adopts the locally unfolded conformation. Interestingly the peroxidatic cysteine in the crystal structure is sulfenylated rather than sulfinylated or sulfonylated. In addition, the peroxidatic cysteine in the resolving cysteine mutant is resistant to hyper-oxidation following incubation with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. These results highlight some unique properties of PrxIV and suggest that the equilibrium between the fully folded and locally unfolded forms favors the locally unfolded conformation upon sulfenylation of the peroxidatic cysteine residue. PMID:21994946

  13. Combined, Functional Genomic-Biochemical Approach to Intermediary Metabolism: Interaction of Acivicin, a Glutamine Amidotransferase Inhibitor, with Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Smulski, Dana R.; Huang, Lixuan L.; McCluskey, Michael P.; Reeve, Mary Jane Gladnick; Vollmer, Amy C.; Van Dyk, Tina K.; LaRossa, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Acivicin, a modified amino acid natural product, is a glutamine analog. Thus, it might interfere with metabolism by hindering glutamine transport, formation, or usage in processes such as transamidation and translation. This molecule prevented the growth of Escherichia coli in minimal medium unless the medium was supplemented with a purine or histidine, suggesting that the HisHF enzyme, a glutamine amidotransferase, was the target of acivicin action. This enzyme, purified from E. coli, was inhibited by low concentrations of acivicin. Acivicin inhibition was overcome by the presence of three distinct genetic regions when harbored on multicopy plasmids. Comprehensive transcript profiling using DNA microarrays indicated that histidine biosynthesis was the predominant process blocked by acivicin. The response to acivicin, however, was quite complex, suggesting that acivicin inhibition resonated through more than a single cellular process. PMID:11344143

  14. [Effects of applying different kind fertilizers on enzyme activities related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in reddish paddy soil].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Li; Wang, Qiu-Bing; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Sun, Xiao-Min; Dai, Xiao-Qin; Yang, Feng-Ting; Bu, Jin-Feng; Wang, Hui-min

    2013-04-01

    Based on the long-term fixed position experimental data from Qianyanzhou Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1998, this paper analyzed the effects of applying different kind fertilizers (straw, ST; pig manure, OM; and chemical fertilizer, NPK) on the nutrients (C, N, and P) status and the activities of related enzymes ( beta-1,4-glucosidase, betaG; beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, NAG; L-leucine aminopeptidase, LAP; and acid phosphatase, AP) in reddish paddy soil. With the application of OM, the activities of soil betaG, NAG, and LAP increased significantly, as compared with other treatments, and were 1.4, 2. 6, and 1.9 times higher than the control (CK) , respectively. Applying OM also improved the ratio of soil organic carbon to total nitrogen (C/N), but decreased the soil betaG/(NAG+LAP) ratio, suggesting that pig manure could benefit the degradation of soil cellulose and the accumulation of soil organic carbon. Applying NPK increased the activities of soil betaG, NAG, and LAP, but decreased the AP activity, with a decrement of 34% as compared with CK. Under the application of NPK, the soilbetaG/AP and (NAG+ LAP)/AP ratios increased, but the ratios of soil organic carbon to total phosphorus (C/P) and of soil total nitrogen to total phosphorus (N/P) decreased, indicating that chemical fertilizers could induce the accumulation of soil inorganic phosphorus, and inhibit the microbial functions of degrading polysaccharides and phosphate phospholipids.

  15. Over-expressing the C(3) photosynthesis cycle enzyme Sedoheptulose-1-7 Bisphosphatase improves photosynthetic carbon gain and yield under fully open air CO(2) fumigation (FACE).

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, David M; Locke, Anna M; Khozaei, Mahdi; Raines, Christine A; Long, Stephen P; Ort, Donald R

    2011-08-31

    Biochemical models predict that photosynthesis in C(3) plants is most frequently limited by the slower of two processes, the maximum capacity of the enzyme Rubisco to carboxylate RuBP (V(c,max)), or the regeneration of RuBP via electron transport (J). At current atmospheric [CO(2)] levels Rubisco is not saturated; consequently, elevating [CO(2)] increases the velocity of carboxylation and inhibits the competing oxygenation reaction which is also catalyzed by Rubisco. In the future, leaf photosynthesis (A) should be increasingly limited by RuBP regeneration, as [CO(2)] is predicted to exceed 550 ppm by 2050. The C(3) cycle enzyme sedoheptulose-1,7 bisphosphatase (SBPase, EC 3.1.3.17) has been shown to exert strong metabolic control over RuBP regeneration at light saturation. We tested the hypothesis that tobacco transformed to overexpressing SBPase will exhibit greater stimulation of A than wild type (WT) tobacco when grown under field conditions at elevated [CO(2)] (585 ppm) under fully open air fumigation. Growth under elevated [CO(2)] stimulated instantaneous A and the diurnal photosynthetic integral (A') more in transformants than WT. There was evidence of photosynthetic acclimation to elevated [CO(2)] via downregulation of V(c,max) in both WT and transformants. Nevertheless, greater carbon assimilation and electron transport rates (J and J(max)) for transformants led to greater yield increases than WT at elevated [CO(2)] compared to ambient grown plants. These results provide proof of concept that increasing content and activity of a single photosynthesis enzyme can enhance carbon assimilation and yield of C(3) crops grown at [CO(2)] expected by the middle of the 21st century.

  16. Over-expressing the C3 photosynthesis cycle enzyme Sedoheptulose-1-7 Bisphosphatase improves photosynthetic carbon gain and yield under fully open air CO2 fumigation (FACE)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biochemical models predict that photosynthesis in C3 plants is most frequently limited by the slower of two processes, the maximum capacity of the enzyme Rubisco to carboxylate RuBP (Vc,max), or the regeneration of RuBP via electron transport (J). At current atmospheric [CO2] levels Rubisco is not saturated; consequently, elevating [CO2] increases the velocity of carboxylation and inhibits the competing oxygenation reaction which is also catalyzed by Rubisco. In the future, leaf photosynthesis (A) should be increasingly limited by RuBP regeneration, as [CO2] is predicted to exceed 550 ppm by 2050. The C3 cycle enzyme sedoheptulose-1,7 bisphosphatase (SBPase, EC 3.1.3.17) has been shown to exert strong metabolic control over RuBP regeneration at light saturation. Results We tested the hypothesis that tobacco transformed to overexpressing SBPase will exhibit greater stimulation of A than wild type (WT) tobacco when grown under field conditions at elevated [CO2] (585 ppm) under fully open air fumigation. Growth under elevated [CO2] stimulated instant