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Sample records for cycle-specific ung2 phosphorylations

  1. Rev1 is essential in generating G to C transversions downstream of the Ung2 pathway but not the Msh2+Ung2 hybrid pathway.

    PubMed

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Wit, Niek; van den Berk, Paul Cornelius Maria; de Wind, Niels; Jacobs, Heinz

    2013-10-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes are initiated by the enzymatic deamination of cytosine (C) to uracil (U). Uracil-DNA-glycosylase (Ung2) converts uracils into apyrimidinic (AP) sites, which is essential for the generation of transversions (TVs) at G/C basepairs during SHM and for efficient DNA break formation during CSR. Besides Ung2, the mismatch repair protein Msh2 and the translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase (Pol) Rev1 are implicated in SHM and CSR. To further unravel the role of Rev1, we studied WT, Rev1-deficient, Msh2-deficient, and Rev1, Msh2 double-deficient B cells. Loss of Rev1 only slightly reduced CSR. During SHM G/C to C/G TVs are generated in both Ung2- and Ung+Msh2-dependent fashions. We found that Rev1 is essential for the Msh2-independent generation of these TVs downstream of Ung2-induced AP sites. In the Ung+Msh2 hybrid pathway, Rev1 is not essential and can be substituted by an alternative TLS Pol, especially when Rev1 is lacking.

  2. The DDB1–DCAF1–Vpr–UNG2 crystal structure reveals how HIV-1 Vpr steers human UNG2 toward destruction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying; Zhou, Xiaohong; Barnes, Christopher O.; DeLucia, Maria; Cohen, Aina E.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Calero, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr is required for efficient viral infection of macrophages and promotion of viral replication in T cells. Vpr’s biological activities are closely linked to the interaction with human DCAF1, a cellular substrate receptor of the Cullin4–RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL4) of the host ubiquitin–proteasome-mediated protein degradation pathway. The molecular details of how Vpr usurps the protein degradation pathway have not been delineated. Here we present the crystal structure of the DDB1–DCAF1–HIV-1–Vpr–uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG2) complex. The structure reveals how Vpr engages with DCAF1, creating a binding interface for UNG2 recruitment, in a manner distinct from the recruitment of SAMHD1 by Vpx protein for degradation by Vpx proteins. Vpr and Vpx use similar N-terminal and helical regions to bind the substrate receptor, whereas different regions target the specific cellular substrates. Furthermore, Vpr uses molecular mimicry of DNA by a variable loop for specific recruitment of the UNG2 substrate. PMID:27571178

  3. [Over-expression of uracil DNA glycosylase 2 (UNG2) enhances the resistance to oxidative damage in HepG2 cells].

    PubMed

    Cao, Liyan; Cheng, Shan; Du, Juan; Guo, Yanhai; Huang, Xiaofeng

    2017-04-01

    Objective To investigate the uracil glycosidic enzyme activity of uracil DNA glycosylase 2 (UNG2) and study the role of UNG2 in the resistance of antioxidant stress of HepG2 cells. Methods The UNG2-expressing vector was built. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of UNG2. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to observe the cellular location of UNG2. Oligonucleotide was used as substrate for the determination of the UNG2 glycosidic enzyme activity. H2O2 toxicity assay was done to study the function of UNG2 in the antioxidant resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Results UNG2 was successfully over-expressed in HEK293FT cells, and UNG2 was found to be mainly located in nucleus. Enzyme activity assay showed that UNG2 had significant oligonucleotide dU glycosidic enzyme activity. H2O2 toxicity assay showed that over-expressed UNG2 could remarkably increase the survival of HepG2 cells after exposed to H2O2. Conclusion UNG2 possesses specific DNA glycosidic enzyme activity, and it can protect HepG2 cells against oxidative stress damage.

  4. HIV-1 and HIV-2 exhibit divergent interactions with HLTF and UNG2 DNA repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hrecka, Kasia; Hao, Caili; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Kaur, Sarabpreet; Swanson, Selene K.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Skowronski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication in nondividing host cells occurs in the presence of high concentrations of noncanonical dUTP, apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) cytidine deaminases, and SAMHD1 (a cell cycle-regulated dNTP triphosphohydrolase) dNTPase, which maintains low concentrations of canonical dNTPs in these cells. These conditions favor the introduction of marks of DNA damage into viral cDNA, and thereby prime it for processing by DNA repair enzymes. Accessory protein Vpr, found in all primate lentiviruses, and its HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) SIVsm paralogue Vpx, hijack the CRL4DCAF1 E3 ubiquitin ligase to alleviate some of these conditions, but the extent of their interactions with DNA repair proteins has not been thoroughly characterized. Here, we identify HLTF, a postreplication DNA repair helicase, as a common target of HIV-1/SIVcpz Vpr proteins. We show that HIV-1 Vpr reprograms CRL4DCAF1 E3 to direct HLTF for proteasome-dependent degradation independent from previously reported Vpr interactions with base excision repair enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG2) and crossover junction endonuclease MUS81, which Vpr also directs for degradation via CRL4DCAF1 E3. Thus, separate functions of HIV-1 Vpr usurp CRL4DCAF1 E3 to remove key enzymes in three DNA repair pathways. In contrast, we find that HIV-2 Vpr is unable to efficiently program HLTF or UNG2 for degradation. Our findings reveal complex interactions between HIV-1 and the DNA repair machinery, suggesting that DNA repair plays important roles in the HIV-1 life cycle. The divergent interactions of HIV-1 and HIV-2 with DNA repair enzymes and SAMHD1 imply that these viruses use different strategies to guard their genomes and facilitate their replication in the host. PMID:27335459

  5. Proximity to AGCT sequences dictates MMR-independent versus MMR-dependent mechanisms for AID-induced mutation via UNG2.

    PubMed

    Thientosapol, Eddy Sanchai; Sharbeen, George; Lau, K K Edwin; Bosnjak, Daniel; Durack, Timothy; Stevanovski, Igor; Weninger, Wolfgang; Jolly, Christopher J

    2016-12-29

    AID deaminates C to U in either strand of Ig genes, exclusively producing C:G/G:C to T:A/A:T transition mutations if U is left unrepaired. Error-prone processing by UNG2 or mismatch repair diversifies mutation, predominantly at C:G or A:T base pairs, respectively. Here, we show that transversions at C:G base pairs occur by two distinct processing pathways that are dictated by sequence context. Within and near AGCT mutation hotspots, transversion mutation at C:G was driven by UNG2 without requirement for mismatch repair. Deaminations in AGCT were refractive both to processing by UNG2 and to high-fidelity base excision repair (BER) downstream of UNG2, regardless of mismatch repair activity. We propose that AGCT sequences resist faithful BER because they bind BER-inhibitory protein(s) and/or because hemi-deaminated AGCT motifs innately form a BER-resistant DNA structure. Distal to AGCT sequences, transversions at G were largely co-dependent on UNG2 and mismatch repair. We propose that AGCT-distal transversions are produced when apyrimidinic sites are exposed in mismatch excision patches, because completion of mismatch repair would require bypass of these sites.

  6. Cell cycle regulation as a mechanism for functional separation of the apparently redundant uracil DNA glycosylases TDG and UNG2

    PubMed Central

    Hardeland, Ulrike; Kunz, Christophe; Focke, Frauke; Szadkowski, Marta; Schär, Primo

    2007-01-01

    Human Thymine-DNA Glycosylase (TDG) is a member of the uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) superfamily. It excises uracil, thymine and a number of chemical base lesions when mispaired with guanine in double-stranded DNA. These activities are not unique to TDG; at least three additional proteins with similar enzymatic properties are present in mammalian cells. The successful co-evolution of these enzymes implies the existence of non-redundant biological functions that must be coordinated. Here, we report cell cycle regulation as a mechanism for the functional separation of apparently redundant DNA glycosylases. We show that cells entering S-phase eliminate TDG through the ubiquitin–proteasome system and then maintain a TDG-free condition until G2. Incomplete degradation of ectopically expressed TDG impedes S-phase progression and cell proliferation. The mode of cell cycle regulation of TDG is strictly inverse to that of UNG2, which peaks in and throughout S-phase and then declines to undetectable levels until it appears again just before the next S-phase. Thus, TDG- and UNG2-dependent base excision repair alternates throughout the cell cycle, and the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway constitutes the underlying regulatory system. PMID:17526518

  7. Monitoring of the spatial and temporal dynamics of BER/SSBR pathway proteins, including MYH, UNG2, MPG, NTH1 and NEIL1-3, during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Bj Rås, Karine Ø; Sousa, Mirta M L; Sharma, Animesh; Fonseca, Davi M; S Gaard, Caroline K; Bj Rås, Magnar; Otterlei, Marit

    2017-08-21

    Base lesions in DNA can stall the replication machinery or induce mutations if bypassed. Consequently, lesions must be repaired before replication or in a post-replicative process to maintain genomic stability. Base excision repair (BER) is the main pathway for repair of base lesions and is known to be associated with DNA replication, but how BER is organized during replication is unclear. Here we coupled the iPOND (isolation of proteins on nascent DNA) technique with targeted mass-spectrometry analysis, which enabled us to detect all proteins required for BER on nascent DNA and to monitor their spatiotemporal orchestration at replication forks. We demonstrate that XRCC1 and other BER/single-strand break repair (SSBR) proteins are enriched in replisomes in unstressed cells, supporting a cellular capacity of post-replicative BER/SSBR. Importantly, we identify for the first time the DNA glycosylases MYH, UNG2, MPG, NTH1, NEIL1, 2 and 3 on nascent DNA. Our findings suggest that a broad spectrum of DNA base lesions are recognized and repaired by BER in a post-replicative process. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Novel Sexual-Cycle-Specific Gene Silencing in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Wioletta; Miller, Karen Y.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel sexual-cycle-specific gene-silencing system in the genetic model Aspergillus nidulans. Duplication of the mating type matAHMG gene in this haploid organism triggers Mat-induced silencing (MatIS) of both endogenous and transgenic matA genes, eliminates function of the encoded SRY structural ortholog, and results in formation of barren fruiting bodies. MatIS is spatiotemporally restricted to the prezygotic stage of the sexual cycle and does not interfere with vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, differentiation of early sexual tissues, or fruiting body development. MatIS is reversible upon deletion of the matA transgene. In contrast to other sex-specific silencing phenomena, MatIS silencing has nearly 100% efficiency and appears to be independent of homologous duplicated DNA segments. Remarkably, transgene-derived matA RNA might be sufficient to induce MatIS. A unique feature of MatIS is that RNA-mediated silencing is RNA interference/Argonaute-independent and is restricted to the nucleus having the duplicated gene. The silencing phenomenon is recessive and does not spread between nuclei within the common cytoplasm of a multinucleate heterokaryon. Gene silencing induced by matA gene duplication emerges as a specific feature associated with matAHMG regulation during sexual development. PMID:23341415

  9. Novel sexual-cycle-specific gene silencing in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Wioletta; Miller, Karen Y; Miller, Bruce L

    2013-04-01

    We report a novel sexual-cycle-specific gene-silencing system in the genetic model Aspergillus nidulans. Duplication of the mating type matA(HMG) gene in this haploid organism triggers Mat-induced silencing (MatIS) of both endogenous and transgenic matA genes, eliminates function of the encoded SRY structural ortholog, and results in formation of barren fruiting bodies. MatIS is spatiotemporally restricted to the prezygotic stage of the sexual cycle and does not interfere with vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, differentiation of early sexual tissues, or fruiting body development. MatIS is reversible upon deletion of the matA transgene. In contrast to other sex-specific silencing phenomena, MatIS silencing has nearly 100% efficiency and appears to be independent of homologous duplicated DNA segments. Remarkably, transgene-derived matA RNA might be sufficient to induce MatIS. A unique feature of MatIS is that RNA-mediated silencing is RNA interference/Argonaute-independent and is restricted to the nucleus having the duplicated gene. The silencing phenomenon is recessive and does not spread between nuclei within the common cytoplasm of a multinucleate heterokaryon. Gene silencing induced by matA gene duplication emerges as a specific feature associated with matA(HMG) regulation during sexual development.

  10. Histone phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Dorine; Avvakumov, Nikita; Côté, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications are key components of diverse processes that modulate chromatin structure. These marks function as signals during various chromatin-based events, and act as platforms for recruitment, assembly or retention of chromatin-associated factors. The best-known function of histone phosphorylation takes place during cellular response to DNA damage, when phosphorylated histone H2A(X) demarcates large chromatin domains around the site of DNA breakage. However, multiple studies have also shown that histone phosphorylation plays crucial roles in chromatin remodeling linked to other nuclear processes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of histone phosphorylation and describe the many kinases and phosphatases that regulate it. We discuss the key roles played by this histone mark in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin compaction during cell division and apoptosis. Additionally, we describe the intricate crosstalk that occurs between phosphorylation and other histone modifications and allows for sophisticated control over the chromatin remodeling processes. PMID:22948226

  11. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fin1 protein forms cell cycle-specific filaments between spindle pole bodies.

    PubMed

    van Hemert, Martijn J; Lamers, Gerda E M; Klein, Dionne C G; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H; Steensma, H Yde; van Heusden, G Paul H

    2002-04-16

    The FIN1 gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a basic protein with putative coiled-coil regions. Here we show that in large-budded cells a green fluorescent protein-Fin1 fusion protein is visible as a filament between the two spindle pole bodies. In resting cells the protein is undetectable, and in small-budded cells it is localized in the nucleus. During late mitosis it localizes on the spindle pole bodies. Filaments of cyano fluorescent protein-tagged Fin1 colocalize with filaments of green fluorescent protein-tagged Tub1 only in large-budded cells. By electron and atomic force microscopy we showed that purified recombinant Fin1p self-assembles into filaments with a diameter of approximately 10 nm. Our results indicate that the Fin1 protein forms a cell cycle-specific filament, additional to the microtubules, between the spindle pole bodies of dividing yeast cells.

  12. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fin1 protein forms cell cycle-specific filaments between spindle pole bodies

    PubMed Central

    van Hemert, Martijn J.; Lamers, Gerda E. M.; Klein, Dionne C. G.; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H.; Steensma, H. Yde; van Heusden, G. Paul H.

    2002-01-01

    The FIN1 gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a basic protein with putative coiled-coil regions. Here we show that in large-budded cells a green fluorescent protein-Fin1 fusion protein is visible as a filament between the two spindle pole bodies. In resting cells the protein is undetectable, and in small-budded cells it is localized in the nucleus. During late mitosis it localizes on the spindle pole bodies. Filaments of cyano fluorescent protein-tagged Fin1 colocalize with filaments of green fluorescent protein-tagged Tub1 only in large-budded cells. By electron and atomic force microscopy we showed that purified recombinant Fin1p self-assembles into filaments with a diameter of ≈10 nm. Our results indicate that the Fin1 protein forms a cell cycle-specific filament, additional to the microtubules, between the spindle pole bodies of dividing yeast cells. PMID:11929974

  13. Cell cycle specific distribution of killin: evidence for negative regulation of both DNA and RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Man; Luo, Dan; Kuang, Yi; Feng, Haiyan; Luo, Guangping; Liang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    p53 tumor-suppressor gene is a master transcription factor which controls cell cycle progression and apoptosis. killin was discovered as one of the p53 target genes implicated in S-phase control coupled to cell death. Due to its extreme proximity to pten tumor-suppressor gene on human chromosome 10, changes in epigenetic modification of killin have also been linked to Cowden syndrome as well as other human cancers. Previous studies revealed that Killin is a high-affinity DNA-binding protein with preference to single-stranded DNA, and it inhibits DNA synthesis in vitro and in vivo. Here, co-localization studies of RFP-Killin with either GFP-PCNA or endogenous single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA during S-phase show that Killin always adopts a mutually exclusive punctuated nuclear expression pattern with the 2 accessory proteins in DNA replication. In contrast, when cells are not in S-phase, RFP-Killin largely congregates in the nucleolus where rRNA transcription normally occurs. Both of these cell cycle specific localization patterns of RFP-Killin are stable under high salt condition, consistent with Killin being tightly associated with nucleic acids within cell nuclei. Together, these cell biological results provide a molecular basis for Killin in competitively inhibiting the formation of DNA replication forks during S-phase, as well as potentially negatively regulate RNA synthesis during other cell cycle phases.

  14. Development of a high-performance transtibial cycling-specific prosthesis for the London 2012 Paralympic Games.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Bryce; Woolley, Howard

    2017-10-01

    It has been reported that cycling-specific research relating to participants with an amputation is extremely limited in both volume and frequency. However, practitioners might participate in the development of cycling-specific prosthetic limbs. This technical note presents the development of a successful design of a prosthetic limb developed specifically for competitive cycling. This project resulted in a hollow composite construction which was low in weight and shaped to reduce a rider's aerodynamic drag. The new prosthesis reduces the overall mass of more traditional designs by a significant amount yet provides a more aerodynamic shape over traditional approaches. These decisions have yielded a measurable increase in cycling performance. While further refinement is needed to reduce the aerodynamic drag as much as possible, this project highlights the benefits that can exist by optimising the design of sports-specific prosthetic limbs. Clinical relevance This project resulted in the creation of a cycling-specific prosthesis which was tailored to the needs of a high-performance environment. Whilst further optimisation is possible, this project provides insight into the development of sports-specific prostheses.

  15. [Phosphorylation of tau protein].

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Ishiguro, K

    1990-05-01

    In aged human brain and particularly in Alzheimer's disease brain, paired helical filaments (PHFs) accumulate in the neuronal cell. Recently, it has been found that the highly phosphorylated tau protein, one of the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), is a component of PHF. The authors attempted to clarify the mechanism underlying the accumulation of PHF from the following two aspects; 1) What is the mechanism of phosphorylation of tau protein? 2) Is the highly phosphorylated tau protein capable of forming PHFs? From rat or bovine microtubule proteins we partially purified and characterized a novel protein kinase that specifically phosphorylated tau and MAP2 among many proteins in the brain extract, and which formed a PHF epitope on the phosphorylated human tau. This enzyme was one of the protein serine/threonine kinases and was independent of known second messengers. The phosphorylation of tau by this enzyme was stimulated by tubulin under the condition of microtubule formation, suggesting that the phosphorylation of tau could occur concomitantly with microtubule formation in the brain. Since this kinase was usually bound to tau but not directly to tubulin, the enzyme was associated with microtubules through tau. From these properties related to tau, this kinase is designated as tau protein kinase. The tau that been phosphorylated with this kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP as a phosphate donor, was digested by endoprotinase Lys-C to produce three labeled fragments, K1, K2 and K3. These three fragments were sequenced and the phosphorylation sites on tau by this kinase were identified. The K2 fragment overlapped with the tau-1 site known to be one of the phosphorylation site in PHF. This result strengthens the possibility that tau protein phosphorylated by tau protein kinase is incorporated into PHF. Tubulin binding sites on tau were located between K1 and K3 fragments, while K2 fragment was located in the neighboring to N-terminus of K1. No phosphorylated sites were

  16. H3S10 phosphorylation-mediated transcriptional regulation by Aurora kinase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Ryeon; Kim, Kee-Beom; Chae, Yun-Cheol; Park, Jin Woo; Seo, Sang-Beom

    2016-01-01

    Histone H3S10 phosphorylation has been known as a cell cycle-specific marker and has a role in transcriptional activation. Various kinases phosphorylate H3S10 in different species, however, the role of the mitotic serine/threonine protein kinase Aurora A (AURKA) is largely unknown. Here we present evidence that AURKA phosphorylates H3S10 and activates target gene transcription. We show that down-regulation of AURKA level during leukemia cell differentiation results in decreased H3S10 phosphorylation level. We further show that AURKA is recruited to target gene promoters and activates transcription via H3S10 phosphorylation. Furthermore, this recruitment can be disrupted by the AURKA inhibitor Alisertib and results in H3K9-me2 recruitment by G9a.

  17. Phosphorylation: Implications in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishakha; Ram, Mahendra; Kumar, Rajesh; Prasad, Raju; Roy, Birendra Kumar; Singh, Kaushal Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Post translational modifications (PTMs) are involved in variety of cellular activities and phosphorylation is one of the most extensively studied PTM, which regulates a number of cellular functions like cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and cell signaling in healthy condition. However, alterations in phosphorylation pathways result in serious outcomes in the form of diseases, especially cancer. Many signalling pathways including Tyrosine kinase, MAP kinase, Cadherin-catenin complex, Cyclin-dependent kinase etc. are major players of the cell cycle and deregulation in their phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cascade has been shown to be manifested in the form of various types of cancers. Tyrosine kinase family encompasses the greatest number of oncoproteins. MAPK cascade has an importance role in cancer growth and progression. Bcl-2 family proteins serve either proapoptotic or antiapoptotic function. Cadherin-catenin complex regulates cell adhesion properties and cyclins are the key regulators of cell cycle. Altered phosphorylations in any of the above pathways are strongly associated with cancer, at the same time they serve as the potential tergets for drug development against cancer. Drugs targeting tyrosine kinase are potent anticancer drugs. Inhibitors of MEK, PI3K and ERK signalling pathways are undergoing clinical trials. Thus, drugs targeting phosphorylation pathways represent a promising area for cancer therapy.

  18. Struvite and prebiotic phosphorylation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, G. J.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Struvite rather than apatite or amorphous calcium phosphate is precipitated when phosphate is added to seawater containing more than 0.01M NH4+ ions. Struvite may have precipitated from evaporating seawater on the primitive earth, and may have been important for prebiotic phosphorylation.

  19. Phosphorylation regulates mycobacterial proteasome.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Tripti; Han, Jaeil; Baun, Heather; Nyayapathy, Seeta; Brown, Jacob T; Dial, Rebekah L; Moltalvo, Juan A; Kim, Min-Seon; Yang, Seung Hwan; Ronning, Donald R; Husson, Robert N; Suh, Joowon; Kang, Choong-Min

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a proteasome system that is required for the microbe to resist elimination by the host immune system. Despite the importance of the proteasome in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms by which proteasome activity is controlled remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the α-subunit (PrcA) of the M. tuberculosis proteasome is phosphorylated by the PknB kinase at three threonine residues (T84, T202, and T178) in a sequential manner. Furthermore, the proteasome with phosphorylated PrcA enhances the degradation of Ino1, a known proteasomal substrate, suggesting that PknB regulates the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Previous studies showed that depletion of the proteasome and the proteasome-associated proteins decreases resistance to reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) but increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we show that PknA phosphorylation of unprocessed proteasome β-subunit (pre-PrcB) and α-subunit reduces the assembly of the proteasome complex and thereby enhances the mycobacterial resistance to H2O2 and that H2O2 stress diminishes the formation of the proteasome complex in a PknA-dependent manner. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of the M. tuberculosis proteasome not only modulates proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but also affects the proteasome complex formation contributing to the survival of M. tuberculosis under oxidative stress conditions.

  20. Struvite and prebiotic phosphorylation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, G. J.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Struvite rather than apatite or amorphous calcium phosphate is precipitated when phosphate is added to seawater containing more than 0.01M NH4+ ions. Struvite may have precipitated from evaporating seawater on the primitive earth, and may have been important for prebiotic phosphorylation.

  1. Protein phosphorylation and photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Hodges, M; Jossier, M; Boex-Fontvieille, E; Tcherkez, G

    2013-07-01

    Photorespiration allows the recycling of carbon atoms of 2-phosphoglycolate produced by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) oxygenase activity, as well as the removal of potentially toxic metabolites. The photorespiratory pathway takes place in the light, encompasses four cellular compartments and interacts with several other metabolic pathways and functions. Therefore, the regulation of this cycle is probably of paramount importance to plant metabolism, however, our current knowledge is poor. To rapidly respond to changing conditions, proteins undergo a number of different post-translational modifications that include acetylation, methylation and ubiquitylation, but protein phosphorylation is probably the most common. The reversible covalent addition of a phosphate group to a specific amino acid residue allows the modulation of protein function, such as activity, subcellular localisation, capacity to interact with other proteins and stability. Recent data indicate that many photorespiratory enzymes can be phosphorylated, and thus it seems that the photorespiratory cycle is, in part, regulated by protein phosphorylation. In this review, the known phosphorylation sites of each Arabidopsis thaliana photorespiratory enzyme and several photorespiratory-associated proteins are described and discussed. A brief account of phosphoproteomic protocols is also given since the published data compiled in this review are the fruit of this approach.

  2. Regulatory substances produced by lymphocytes. VI. Cell cycle specificity of inhibitor of DNA synthesis action in L cells.

    PubMed

    Wagshal, A B; Jegasothy, B V; Waksman, B H

    1978-01-01

    IDS inhibits DNA synthesis and mitosis of L cells only when present during the late G1 phase of the cell cycle, as shown with L cells synchronized by a variety of methods. This corresponds well with earlier findings that IDS inhibits DNA synthesis in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes when present between 16 and 24 h after adding mitogen. In both cell types, the inhibition produced by IDS appears to be totally the result of elevation of cAMP level. Thus, inhibitors of cAMP phosphodiesterase work synergistically with IDS, and activators of cAMP phosphodiesterase overcome the inhibition by IDS. This paper shows that IDS raises cAMP levels in L cells only within a narrow interval of the cell cycle, around 6-8 h after mitosis. This cell cycle specificity, which may be related to appearance of receptors for IDS only at discrete times, may be important in limiting IDS action to suppression, as elevated cAMP levels have a variety of other effects during other phases of the cell cycle.

  3. Differential cell cycle-specificity for chromosomal damage induced by merbarone and etoposide in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Roy, Shambhu K; Eastmond, David A

    2007-03-01

    Merbarone, a topoisomerase II (topo II) inhibitor which, in contrast to etoposide, does not stabilize topo II-DNA cleavable complexes, was previously shown to be a potent clastogen in vitro and in vivo. To investigate the possible mechanisms, we compared the cell cycle-specificity of the clastogenic effects of merbarone and etoposide in V79 cells. Using flow cytometry and BrdU labeling techniques, etoposide was shown to cause a rapid and persistent G2 delay while merbarone was shown to cause a prolonged S-phase followed by a G2 delay. To identify the stages which are susceptible to DNA damage, we performed the micronucleus (MN) assay with synchronized cells or utilized a combination of BrdU pulse labeling and the cytokinesis-blocked MN assay with non-synchronized cells. Treatment of M phase cells with either agent did not result in increased MN formation. Etoposide but not merbarone caused a significant increase in MN when cells were treated during G2 phase. When treated during S-phase, both chemicals induced highly significant increases in MN. However, the relative proportion of MN induced by merbarone was substantially higher than that induced by etoposide. Both chemicals also caused significant increases in MN in cells that were treated during G1 phase. To confirm the observations in the MN assay, first division metaphases were evaluated in the chromosome aberration assay. The chromosomes of cells treated with merbarone and etoposide showed increased frequencies of both chromatid- and chromosome-type of aberrations. Our findings indicate that while etoposide causes DNA damage more evenly throughout the G1, S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, an outcome which may be closely associated with topo II-mediated DNA strand cleavage, merbarone induces DNA breakage primarily during S-phase, an effect which is likely due to the stalling of replication forks by inhibition of topo II activity.

  4. Deciphering the Rb phosphorylation code

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Seth M.

    2012-01-01

    Multisite phosphorylation modulates the function of regulatory proteins with complex signaling properties and outputs. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) is inactivated by Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) phosphorylation in normal and cancer cell cycles, so understanding the molecular mechanisms and effects of Rb phosphorylation is imperative. Rb functions in diverse processes regulating proliferation, and it has been speculated that multisite phosphorylation might act as a code in which discrete phosphorylations control specific activities. The idea of an Rb phosphorylation code is evaluated here in light of recent studies of Rb structure and function. Rb inactivation is discussed with an emphasis on how multisite phosphorylation changes Rb structure and associations with protein partners. PMID:23218751

  5. Determination of GPCR Phosphorylation Status: Establishing a Phosphorylation Barcode.

    PubMed

    Prihandoko, Rudi; Bradley, Sophie J; Tobin, Andrew B; Butcher, Adrian J

    2015-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are rapidly phosphorylated following agonist occupation in a process that mediates receptor uncoupling from its cognate G protein, a process referred to as desensitization. In addition, this process provides a mechanism by which receptors can engage with arrestin adaptor molecules and couple to downstream signaling pathways. The importance of this regulatory process has been highlighted recently by the understanding that ligands can direct receptor signaling along one pathway in preference to another, the phenomenon of signaling bias that is partly mediated by the phosphorylation status or phosphorylation barcode of the receptor. Methods to determine the phosphorylation status of a GPCR in vitro and in vivo are necessary to understand not only the physiological mechanisms involved in GPCR signaling, but also to fully examine the signaling properties of GPCR ligands. This unit describes detailed methods for determining the overall phosphorylation pattern on a receptor (the phosphorylation barcode), as well as mass spectrometry approaches that can define the precise sites that become phosphorylated. These techniques, coupled with the generation and characterization of receptor phosphorylation-specific antibodies, provide a full palate of techniques necessary to determine the phosphorylation status of any given GPCR subtype.

  6. Phosphorylation site prediction in plants.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuming; Schulze, Waltraud X; Xu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation events on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues are the most pervasive protein covalent bond modifications in plant signaling. Both low and high throughput studies reveal the importance of phosphorylation in plant molecular biology. Although becoming more and more common, the proteome-wide screening on phosphorylation by experiments remains time consuming and costly. Therefore, in silico prediction methods are proposed as a complementary analysis tool to enhance the phosphorylation site identification, develop biological hypothesis, or help experimental design. These methods build statistical models based on the experimental data, and they do not have some of the technical-specific bias, which may have advantage in proteome-wide analysis. More importantly computational methods are very fast and cheap to run, which makes large-scale phosphorylation identifications very practical for any types of biological study. Thus, the phosphorylation prediction tools become more and more popular. In this chapter, we will focus on plant specific phosphorylation site prediction tools, with essential illustration of technical details and application guidelines. We will use Musite, PhosPhAt and PlantPhos as the representative tools. We will present the results on the prediction of the Arabidopsis protein phosphorylation events to give users a general idea of the performance range of the three tools, together with their strengths and limitations. We believe these prediction tools will contribute more and more to the plant phosphorylation research community.

  7. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation.

  8. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  9. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Waters, B; Vujaklija, D; Gold, M R; Davies, J

    1994-07-01

    Using phosphotyrosine-specific antibodies, we demonstrate that in several Streptomyces spp. a variety of proteins are phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. Tyrosine phosphorylation was found in a number of Streptomyces species including Streptomyces lividans, Streptomyces hygroscopicus and Streptomyces lavendulae. Each species exhibited a unique pattern of protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Moreover, the patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation varied during the growth phase and were also influenced by culture conditions. We suggest that metabolic shifts during the complex growth cycle of these filamentous bacteria, and possibly secondary metabolic pathways, may be controlled by the action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, as has been demonstrated in signal transduction pathways in eukaryotic organisms.

  10. N-->S phosphoryl migration in phosphoryl glutathion.

    PubMed

    Yang, H J; Liu, J; Zhao, Y F

    1993-07-01

    It was found that in the case of N-(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion (reduced form), 2, N-->S phosphoryl migration took place, but not for N,N-bis(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion (oxidized form) or N-diisopropylphosphoryl cysteine. These results were deduced by 31P-NMR tracing experiments. It was shown that phosphoryl migration was catalyzed by an intramolecular carboxyl group, and a mechanism involving a mixed carboxyl-phosphoric anhydride was proposed. A competitive reaction between the amino and thiol group toward diisopropyl phosphite indicated that the phospho-thiol derived from N-(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion (reduced form), 2, did not result from direct phosphorylation of the thiol group. N,S-Bis(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion provides an authentic sample to confirm the migrated phosphoryl thiol product.

  11. Oxidative and Photosynthetic Phosphorylation Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jui H.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes a molecular mechanism for the coupling of phosphorylation to electron transport in both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Justifies the proposed reaction schemes in terms of thermodynamics and biochemical data. Suggests how areobic respiration could have evolved. (EB)

  12. Oxidative and Photosynthetic Phosphorylation Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jui H.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes a molecular mechanism for the coupling of phosphorylation to electron transport in both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Justifies the proposed reaction schemes in terms of thermodynamics and biochemical data. Suggests how areobic respiration could have evolved. (EB)

  13. Phosphorylation regulates human OCT4.

    PubMed

    Brumbaugh, Justin; Hou, Zhonggang; Russell, Jason D; Howden, Sara E; Yu, Pengzhi; Ledvina, Aaron R; Coon, Joshua J; Thomson, James A

    2012-05-08

    The transcription factor OCT4 is fundamental to maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal. To better understand protein-level regulation of OCT4, we applied liquid chromatography-MS to identify 14 localized sites of phosphorylation, 11 of which were previously unknown. Functional analysis of two sites, T234 and S235, suggested that phosphorylation within the homeobox region of OCT4 negatively regulates its activity by interrupting sequence-specific DNA binding. Mutating T234 and S235 to mimic constitutive phosphorylation at these sites reduces transcriptional activation from an OCT4-responsive reporter and decreases reprogramming efficiency. We also cataloged 144 unique phosphopeptides on known OCT4 interacting partners, including SOX2 and SALL4, that copurified during immunoprecipitation. These proteins were enriched for phosphorylation at motifs associated with ERK signaling. Likewise, OCT4 harbored several putative ERK phosphorylation sites. Kinase assays confirmed that ERK2 phosphorylated these sites in vitro, providing a direct link between ERK signaling and the transcriptional machinery that governs pluripotency.

  14. Phosphorylation regulates human OCT4

    PubMed Central

    Brumbaugh, Justin; Russell, Jason D.; Howden, Sara E.; Yu, Pengzhi; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Coon, Joshua J.; Thomson, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor OCT4 is fundamental to maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal. To better understand protein-level regulation of OCT4, we applied liquid chromatography–MS to identify 14 localized sites of phosphorylation, 11 of which were previously unknown. Functional analysis of two sites, T234 and S235, suggested that phosphorylation within the homeobox region of OCT4 negatively regulates its activity by interrupting sequence-specific DNA binding. Mutating T234 and S235 to mimic constitutive phosphorylation at these sites reduces transcriptional activation from an OCT4-responsive reporter and decreases reprogramming efficiency. We also cataloged 144 unique phosphopeptides on known OCT4 interacting partners, including SOX2 and SALL4, that copurified during immunoprecipitation. These proteins were enriched for phosphorylation at motifs associated with ERK signaling. Likewise, OCT4 harbored several putative ERK phosphorylation sites. Kinase assays confirmed that ERK2 phosphorylated these sites in vitro, providing a direct link between ERK signaling and the transcriptional machinery that governs pluripotency. PMID:22474382

  15. Regulation of cell cycle-specific gene expression in fission yeast by the Cdc14p-like phosphatase Clp1p.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Kyriaki; Chen, Jun-Song; Mead, Emma; Feoktistova, Anna; Petit, Claudia; Agarwal, Monica; Jamal, Mohhammed; Malik, Asrar; Spanos, Adonis; Sedgwick, Steven G; Karagiannis, Jim; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Gould, Kathleen L; McInerny, Christopher J

    2010-12-15

    Regulated gene expression makes an important contribution to cell cycle control mechanisms. In fission yeast, a group of genes is coordinately expressed during a late stage of the cell cycle (M phase and cytokinesis) that is controlled by common cis-acting promoter motifs named pombe cell cycle boxes (PCBs), which are bound by a trans-acting transcription factor complex, PCB binding factor (PBF). PBF contains at least three transcription factors, a MADS box protein Mbx1p and two forkhead transcription factors, Sep1p and Fkh2p. Here we show that the fission yeast Cdc14p-like phosphatase Clp1p (Flp1p) controls M-G1 specific gene expression through PBF. Clp1p binds in vivo both to Mbx1p, a MADS box-like transcription factor, and to the promoters of genes transcribed at this cell cycle time. Because Clp1p dephosphorylates Mbx1p in vitro, and is required for Mbx1p cell cycle-specific dephosphorylation in vivo, our observations suggest that Clp1p controls cell cycle-specific gene expression through binding to and dephosphorylating Mbx1p.

  16. Glycogen Phosphorylation and Lafora disease

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Covalent phosphorylation of glycogen, first described 35 years ago, was put on firm ground through the work of the Whelan laboratory in the 1990s. But glycogen phosphorylation lay fallow until interest was rekindled in the mid 2000s by the finding that it could be removed by a glycogen-binding phosphatase, laforin, and that mutations in laforin cause a fatal teenage-onset epilepsy, called Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylation is due to phosphomonoesters at C2, C3 and C6 of glucose residues. Phosphate is rare, ranging from 1:500 - 1:5000 phosphates/glucose depending on the glycogen source. The mechanisms of glycogen phosphorylation remain under investigation but one hypothesis to explain C2 and perhaps C3 phosphate is that it results from a rare side reaction of the normal synthetic enzyme glycogen synthase. Lafora disease is likely caused by over-accumulation of abnormal glycogen in insoluble deposits termed Lafora bodies in neurons. The abnormality in the glycogen correlates with elevated phosphorylation (at C2, C3 and C6), reduced branching, insolubility and an enhanced tendency to aggregate and become insoluble. Hyperphosphorylation of glycogen is emerging as an important feature of this deadly childhood disease PMID:26278984

  17. Adjusting ammonium uptake via phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lanquar, Viviane; Frommer, Wolf B

    2010-06-01

    In plants, AMT/MEP/Rh superfamily mediates high affinity ammonium uptake. AMT/MEP transporters form a trimeric complex, which requires a productive interaction between subunits in order to be functional. The AMT/MEP C-terminal domain is highly conserved in more than 700 AMT homologs from cyanobacteria to higher plants with no cases found to be lacking this domain. AMT1;1 exists in active and inactive states, probably controlled by the spatial positioning of the C-terminus. Ammonium triggers the phosphorylation of a conserved threonine residue (T460) in the C-terminus of AMT1;1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The T460 phosphorylation level correlates with a decrease of root ammonium uptake. We propose that ammonium-induced phosphorylation modulates ammonium uptake as a general mechanism to protect against ammonium toxicity.

  18. Adjusting ammonium uptake via phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Lanquar, Viviane

    2010-01-01

    In plants, AMT/MEP/Rh superfamily mediates high affinity ammonium uptake. AMT/MEP transporters form a trimeric complex, which requires a productive interaction between subunits in order to be functional. The AMT/MEP C-terminal domain is highly conserved in more than 700 AMT homologs from cyanobacteria to higher plants with no cases found to be lacking this domain. AMT1;1 exists in active and inactive states, probably controlled by the spatial positioning of the C-terminus. Ammonium triggers the phosphorylation of a conserved threonine residue (T460) in the C-terminus of AMT1;1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The T460 phosphorylation level correlates with a decrease of root ammonium uptake. We propose that ammonium-induced phosphorylation modulates ammonium uptake as a general mechanism to protect against ammonium toxicity. PMID:20418663

  19. Nucleoside phosphorylation by phosphate minerals.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Saladino, Raffaele; Crestini, Claudia; Ciciriello, Fabiana; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2007-06-08

    In the presence of formamide, crystal phosphate minerals may act as phosphate donors to nucleosides, yielding both 5'- and, to a lesser extent, 3'-phosphorylated forms. With the mineral Libethenite the formation of 5'-AMP can be as high as 6% of the adenosine input and last for at least 10(3) h. At high concentrations, soluble non-mineral phosphate donors (KH(2)PO(4) or 5'-CMP) afford 2'- and 2':3'-cyclic AMP in addition to 5'-and 3'-AMP. The phosphate minerals analyzed were Herderite Ca[BePO(4)F], Hureaulite Mn(2+)(5)(PO(3)(OH)(2)(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(4), Libethenite Cu(2+)(2)(PO(4))(OH), Pyromorphite Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl, Turquoise Cu(2+)Al(6)(PO(4))(4)(OH)(8)(H(2)O)(4), Fluorapatite Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)F, Hydroxylapatite Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)OH, Vivianite Fe(2+)(3)(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(8), Cornetite Cu(2+)(3)(PO(4))(OH)(3), Pseudomalachite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4), Reichenbachite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4), and Ludjibaite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4)). Based on their behavior in the formamide-driven nucleoside phosphorylation reaction, these minerals can be characterized as: 1) inactive, 2) low level phosphorylating agents, or 3) active phosphorylating agents. Instances were detected (Libethenite and Hydroxylapatite) in which phosphorylation occurs on the mineral surface, followed by release of the phosphorylated compounds. Libethenite and Cornetite markedly protect the beta-glycosidic bond. Thus, activated nucleic monomers can form in a liquid non-aqueous environment in conditions compatible with the thermodynamics of polymerization, providing a solution to the standard-state Gibbs free energy change (DeltaG degrees ') problem, the major obstacle for polymerizations in the liquid phase in plausible prebiotic scenarios.

  20. Nucleoside phosphorylation in amide solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoffstall, A. M.; Kokko, B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with phosphorylation in possible prebiotic nonaqueous solvents. To this end, phosphorylation of nucleosides using inorganic phosphates in amide solutions is studied at room and elevated temperatures. Reaction proceeds most readily in formamide and N-methylformamide. Products obtained at elevated temperature are nucleotides, nucleoside 2',3'-cyclic phosphates, and when the phosphate concentration is high, nucleoside diphosphates. At room temperature, adenosine afforded a mixture of nucleotides, but none of the cyclic nucleotide. Conditions leading to the highest relative percentage of cyclic nucleotide involve the use of low concentrations of phosphate and an excess of nucleoside.

  1. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  2. Thiamine phosphorylated derivatives and bioelectrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schoffeniels, E

    1983-09-01

    Kinetic as well as thermodynamic considerations favour the idea that the change in sodium conductance explaining the action potential, must result from a bimolecular reaction system. The fact that thiamine phosphorylated derivatives are associated with the specific protein forming the sodium channel could well mean that these thiamine derivatives and more specifically thiamine triphosphate are directly involved in the conductance change.

  3. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of spectrin.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, G; Avruch, J; Dino, J E; Patel, V P

    1978-01-01

    The phosphorylation of spectrin polypeptide 2 is thought to be involved in the metabolically dependent regulation of red cell shape and deformability. Spectrin phosphorylation is not affected by cAMP. The reaction in isolated membranes resembles the cAMP-independent, salt-stimulated phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate, casein, by enzyme(s) present both in isolated membranes and cytoplasmic extracts. Spectrin kinase is selectively eluted from membranes by 0.5 M NaCl and co-fractionates with eluted casein kinase. Phosphorylation of band 3 in the membrane is inhibited by salt, but the band 3 kinase is otherwise indistinguishable operationally from spectrin kinase. The membrane-bound casein (spectrin) kinase is not eluted efficiently with spectrin at low ionic strength; about 80% of the activity is apparently bound at sites (perhaps on or near band 3) other than spectrin. Partitioning of casein kinase between cytoplasm and membrane is metabolically dependent; the proportion of casein kinase on the membrane can range from 25% to 75%, but for fresh cells is normally about 40%. Dephosphorylation of phosphorylated spectrin has not been studied intensively. Slow release of 32Pi from [32P] spectrin on the membrane can be demonstrated, but phosphatase activity measured against solubilized [32P] spectrin is concentrated in the cytoplasm. The crude cytoplasmic phosphospectrin phosphatase is inhibited by various anions--notably, ATP and 2,3-DPG at physiological concentrations. Regulation of spectrin phosphorylation in intact cells has not been studied. We speculate that spectrin phosphorylation state may be regulated 1) by metabolic intermediates and other internal chemical signals that modulate kinase and phosphatase activities per se or determine their intracellular localization and 2) by membrane deformation that alters enzyme-spectrin interaction locally. Progress in the isolation and characterization of spectrin kinase and phosphospectrin phosphatase should lead to

  4. Glucose-activated RUNX2 phosphorylation promotes endothelial cell proliferation and an angiogenic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Adam D; Anglin, Ian E; Vitolo, Michele I; Mochin, Maria T; Underwood, Karen F; Goldblum, Simeon E; Kommineni, Sravya; Passaniti, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    The runt-related protein-2 (RUNX2) is a DNA-binding transcription factor that regulates bone formation, tumor cell metastasis, endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, and angiogenesis. RUNX2 DNA binding is glucose and cell cycle regulated. We propose that glucose may activate RUNX2 through changes in post-translational phosphorylation that are cell cycle-specific and will regulate EC function. Glucose increased cell cycle progression in EC through both G2/M and G1 phases with entry into S-phase occurring only in subconfluent cells. In the absence of nutrients and growth factors (starvation), subconfluent EC were delayed in G1 when RUNX2 expression was reduced. RUNX2 phosphorylation, activation of DNA binding, and pRb phosphorylation were stimulated by glucose and were necessary to promote cell cycle progression. Glucose increased RUNX2 localization at focal subnuclear sites, which co-incided with RUNX2 occupancy of the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p21(Cip1) promoter, a gene normally repressed by RUNX2. Mutation of the RUNX2 cdk phosphorylation site in the C-terminal domain (S451A.RUNX2) reduced RUNX2 phosphorylation and DNA binding. Expression of this cdk site mutant in EC inhibited glucose-stimulated differentiation (in vitro tube formation), monolayer wound healing, and proliferation. These results define a novel relationship between glucose-activated RUNX2 phosphorylation, cell cycle progression, and EC differentiation. These data suggest that inhibition of RUNX2 expression or DNA binding may be a useful strategy to inhibit EC proliferation in tumor angiogenesis.

  5. Phosphorylation in halobacterial signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, J; Tolliday, N; Schmitt, C; Schuster, S C; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-01-01

    Regulated phosphorylation of proteins has been shown to be a hallmark of signal transduction mechanisms in both Eubacteria and Eukarya. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are also the underlying mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in Archaea, the third branch of the living world. Cloning and sequencing of the region upstream of the cheA gene, known to be required for chemo- and phototaxis in Halobacterium salinarium, has identified cheY and cheB analogs which appear to form part of an operon which also includes cheA and the following open reading frame of 585 nucleotides. The CheY and CheB proteins have 31.3 and 37.5% sequence identity compared with the known signal transduction proteins CheY and CheB from Escherichia coli, respectively. The biochemical activities of both CheA and CheY were investigated following their expression in E.coli, isolation and renaturation. Wild-type CheA could be phosphorylated in a time-dependent manner in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP and Mg2+, whereas the mutant CheA(H44Q) remained unlabeled. Phosphorylated CheA was dephosphorylated rapidly by the addition of wild-type CheY. The mutant CheY(D53A) had no effect on phosphorylated CheA. The mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in the Archaeon H.salinarium, therefore, is similar to the two-component signaling system known from chemotaxis in the eubacterium E.coli. Images PMID:7556066

  6. Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    6219 TITLE: Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matthew R. Yudt CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of...Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation ~DAMD17-96-1-6219 6. AUTHOR(S) Matthew R. Yudt 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME11S) AND AODRESS(ES...this model, tyrosine 537 (Y537) phosphorylation of one monomer interacts with another tyrosine phosphorylated monomer to constitute an hER dimer

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation of WW proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reuven, Nina; Shanzer, Matan

    2015-01-01

    A number of key regulatory proteins contain one or two copies of the WW domain known to mediate protein–protein interaction via proline-rich motifs, such as PPxY. The Hippo pathway components take advantage of this module to transduce tumor suppressor signaling. It is becoming evident that tyrosine phosphorylation is a critical regulator of the WW proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on the involved tyrosine kinases and their roles in regulating the WW proteins. PMID:25627656

  8. Identification of potential Plk1 targets in a cell-cycle specific proteome through structural dynamics of kinase and Polo box-mediated interactions.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Nousheen; Parveen, Zahida; Rashid, Sajid

    2013-01-01

    Polo like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a key player in orchestrating the wide variety of cell-cycle events ranging from centrosome maturation, mitotic entry, checkpoint recovery, transcriptional control, spindle assembly, mitotic progression, cytokinesis and DNA damage checkpoints recovery. Due to its versatile nature, Plk1 is considered an imperative regulator to tightly control the diverse aspects of the cell cycle network. Interactions among Plk1 polo box domain (PBD) and its putative binding proteins are crucial for the activation of Plk1 kinase domain (KD). To date, only a few substrate candidates have been characterized through the inclusion of both polo box and kinase domain-mediated interactions. Thus it became compelling to explore precise and specific Plk1 substrates through reassessment and extension of the structure-function paradigm. To narrow this apparently wide gap in knowledge, here we employed a thorough sequence search of Plk1 phosphorylation signature containing proteins and explored their structure-based features like conceptual PBD-binding capabilities and subsequent recruitment of KD directed phosphorylation to dissect novel targets of Plk1. Collectively, we identified 4,521 phosphodependent proteins sharing similarity to the consensus phosphorylation and PBD recognition motifs. Subsequent application of filters including similarity index, Gene Ontology enrichment and protein localization resulted in stringent pre-filtering of irrelevant candidates and isolated unique targets with well-defined roles in cell-cycle machinery and carcinogenesis. These candidates were further refined structurally using molecular docking and dynamic simulation assays. Overall, our screening approach enables the identification of several undefined cell-cycle associated functions of Plk1 by uncovering novel phosphorylation targets.

  9. Identification of Potential Plk1 Targets in a Cell-Cycle Specific Proteome through Structural Dynamics of Kinase and Polo Box-Mediated Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Nousheen; Parveen, Zahida; Rashid, Sajid

    2013-01-01

    Polo like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a key player in orchestrating the wide variety of cell-cycle events ranging from centrosome maturation, mitotic entry, checkpoint recovery, transcriptional control, spindle assembly, mitotic progression, cytokinesis and DNA damage checkpoints recovery. Due to its versatile nature, Plk1 is considered an imperative regulator to tightly control the diverse aspects of the cell cycle network. Interactions among Plk1 polo box domain (PBD) and its putative binding proteins are crucial for the activation of Plk1 kinase domain (KD). To date, only a few substrate candidates have been characterized through the inclusion of both polo box and kinase domain-mediated interactions. Thus it became compelling to explore precise and specific Plk1 substrates through reassessment and extension of the structure-function paradigm. To narrow this apparently wide gap in knowledge, here we employed a thorough sequence search of Plk1 phosphorylation signature containing proteins and explored their structure-based features like conceptual PBD-binding capabilities and subsequent recruitment of KD directed phosphorylation to dissect novel targets of Plk1. Collectively, we identified 4,521 phosphodependent proteins sharing similarity to the consensus phosphorylation and PBD recognition motifs. Subsequent application of filters including similarity index, Gene Ontology enrichment and protein localization resulted in stringent pre-filtering of irrelevant candidates and isolated unique targets with well-defined roles in cell-cycle machinery and carcinogenesis. These candidates were further refined structurally using molecular docking and dynamic simulation assays. Overall, our screening approach enables the identification of several undefined cell-cycle associated functions of Plk1 by uncovering novel phosphorylation targets. PMID:23967120

  10. Phosphorylation of tau is regulated by PKN.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, T; Kawamata, T; Mukai, H; Hasegawa, H; Isagawa, T; Yasuda, M; Hashimoto, T; Terashima, A; Nakai, M; Mori, H; Ono, Y; Tanaka, C

    2001-03-30

    For the phosphorylation state of microtubule-associated protein, tau plays a pivotal role in regulating microtubule networks in neurons. Tau promotes the assembly and stabilization of microtubules. The potential for tau to bind to microtubules is down-regulated after local phosphorylation. When we investigated the effects of PKN activation on tau phosphorylation, we found that PKN triggers disruption of the microtubule array both in vitro and in vivo and predominantly phosphorylates tau in microtubule binding domains (MBDs). PKN has a catalytic domain highly homologous to protein kinase C (PKC), a kinase that phosphorylates Ser-313 (= Ser-324, the number used in this study) in MBDs. Thus, we identified the phosphorylation sites of PKN and PKC subtypes (PKC-alpha, -betaI, -betaII, -gamma, -delta, -epsilon, -zeta, and -lambda) in MBDs. PKN phosphorylates Ser-258, Ser-320, and Ser-352, although all PKC subtypes phosphorylate Ser-258, Ser-293, Ser-324, and Ser-352. There is a PKN-specific phosphorylation site, Ser-320, in MBDs. HIA3, a novel phosphorylation-dependent antibody recognizing phosphorylated tau at Ser-320, showed immunoreactivity in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing tau and the active form of PKN, but not in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing tau and the inactive form of PKN. The immunoreactivity for phosphorylated tau at Ser-320 increased in the presence of a phosphatase inhibitor, FK506 treatment, which means that calcineurin (protein phosphatase 2B) may be involved in dephosphorylating tau at Ser-320 site. We also noted that PKN reduces the phosphorylation recognized by the phosphorylation-dependent antibodies AT8, AT180, and AT270 in vivo. Thus PKN serves as a regulator of microtubules by specific phosphorylation of tau, which leads to disruption of tubulin assembly.

  11. FPD: A comprehensive phosphorylation database in fungi.

    PubMed

    Bai, Youhuang; Chen, Bin; Li, Mingzhu; Zhou, Yincong; Ren, Silin; Xu, Qin; Chen, Ming; Wang, Shihua

    2017-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation, one of the most classic post-translational modification, plays a critical role in diverse cellular processes including cell cycle, growth, and signal transduction pathways. However, the available information about phosphorylation in fungi is limited. Here, we provided a Fungi Phosphorylation Database (FPD) that comprises high-confidence in vivo phosphosites identified by MS-based proteomics in various fungal species. This comprehensive phosphorylation database contains 62 272 non-redundant phosphorylation sites in 11 222 proteins across eight organisms, including Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus nidulans, Fusarium graminearum, Magnaporthe oryzae, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and Cryptococcus neoformans. A fungi-specific phosphothreonine motif and several conserved phosphorylation motifs were discovered by comparatively analysing the pattern of phosphorylation sites in plants, animals, and fungi. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Starch phosphorylation: insights and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mahlow, Sebastian; Orzechowski, Sławomir; Fettke, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    During starch metabolism, the phosphorylation of glucosyl residues of starch, to be more precise of amylopectin, is a repeatedly observed process. This phosphorylation is mediated by dikinases, the glucan, water dikinase (GWD) and the phosphoglucan, water dikinase (PWD). The starch-related dikinases utilize ATP as dual phosphate donor transferring the terminal γ-phosphate group to water and the β-phosphate group selectively to either C6 position or C3 position of a glucosyl residue within amylopectin. By the collaborative action of both enzymes, the initiation of a transition of α-glucans from highly ordered, water-insoluble state to a less order state is realized and thus the initial process of starch degradation. Consequently, mutants lacking either GWD or PWD reveal a starch excess phenotype as well as growth retardation. In this review, we focus on the increased knowledge collected over the last years related to enzymatic properties, the precise definition of the substrates, the physiological implications, and discuss ongoing questions.

  13. The Geometry of Multisite Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Manrai, Arjun Kumar; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation on multiple sites is a key regulatory mechanism in most cellular processes. We consider here a kinase-phosphatase-substrate system with two sites, under mass-action kinetics, with no restrictions on the order of phosphorylation or dephosphorylation. We show that the concentrations of the four phosphoforms at steady state satisfy an algebraic formula—an invariant—that is independent of the other chemical species, such as free enzymes or enzyme-substrate complexes, and holds irrespective of the starting conditions and the total amounts of enzymes and substrate. Such invariants allow stringent quantitative predictions to be made without requiring any knowledge of site-specific parameter values. We introduce what we believe are novel methods from algebraic geometry—Gröbner bases, rational curves—to calculate invariants. These methods are particularly significant because they make it possible to treat parameters symbolically without having to specify their numerical values, and thereby allow us to sidestep the parameter problem. We anticipate that this approach will have much wider applications in biological modeling. PMID:18849417

  14. The Analysis of Fixed Final State Optimal Control in Bilinear System Applied to Bone Marrow by Cell-Cycle Specific (CCS) Chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainarli, E.; E Dewi, K.

    2017-04-01

    The research conducted by Fister & Panetta shown an optimal control model of bone marrow cells against Cell Cycle Specific chemotherapy drugs. The model used was a bilinear system model. Fister & Panetta research has proved existence, uniqueness, and characteristics of optimal control (the chemotherapy effect). However, by using this model, the amount of bone marrow at the final time could achieve less than 50 percent from the amount of bone marrow before given treatment. This could harm patients because the lack of bone marrow cells made the number of leukocytes declining and patients will experience leukemia. This research would examine the optimal control of a bilinear system that applied to fixed final state. It will be used to determine the length of optimal time in administering chemotherapy and kept bone marrow cells on the allowed level at the same time. Before simulation conducted, this paper shows that the system could be controlled by using a theory of Lie Algebra. Afterward, it shows the characteristics of optimal control. Based on the simulation, it indicates that strong chemotherapy drug given in a short time frame is the most optimal condition to keep bone marrow cells spine on the allowed level but still could put playing an effective treatment. It gives preference of the weight of treatment for keeping bone marrow cells. The result of chemotherapy’s effect (u) is not able to reach the maximum value. On the other words, it needs to make adjustments of medicine’s dosage to satisfy the final treatment condition e.g. the number of bone marrow cells should be at the allowed level.

  15. MCM-BP is required for repression of life-cycle specific genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I in the mammalian infectious form of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Sook; Park, Sung Hee; Günzl, Arthur; Cross, George A M

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression is a classic example of allelic exclusion. While the genome of T. brucei contains >2,000 VSG genes and VSG pseudogenes, only one allele is expressed at the surface of each infectious trypanosome and the others are repressed. Along with recombinatorial VSG switching, allelic exclusion provides a major host evasion mechanism for trypanosomes, a phenomenon known as antigenic variation. To extend our understanding of how trypanosomes escape host immunity by differential expression of VSGs, we attempted to identify genes that contribute to VSG silencing, by performing a loss-of-silencing screen in T. brucei using a transposon-mediated random insertional mutagenesis. One identified gene, which we initially named LOS1, encodes a T. brucei MCM-Binding Protein (TbMCM-BP). Here we show that TbMCM-BP is essential for viability of infectious bloodstream-form (BF) trypanosome and is required for proper cell-cycle progression. Tandem affinity purification of TbMCM-BP followed by mass spectrometry identified four subunits (MCM4-MCM7) of the T. brucei MCM complex, a replicative helicase, and MCM8, a subunit that is uniquely co-purified with TbMCM-BP. TbMCM-BP is required not only for repression of subtelomeric VSGs but also for silencing of life-cycle specific, insect-stage genes, procyclin and procyclin-associated genes (PAGs), that are normally repressed in BF trypanosomes and are transcribed by RNA polymerase I. Our study uncovers a functional link between chromosome maintenance and RNA pol I-mediated gene silencing in T. brucei.

  16. Prebiotic phosphorylation of nucleosides in formamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoffstall, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study intended to assess phosphorylation under neither aqueous nor dry thermal conditions. Instead, phosphorylations were attempted in possible nonaqueous prebiotic solvents. Formamide appeared to be the most obvious candidate for phosphorylation studies. Three main classes of phosphorylated products were formed in formamide solution: adenosine monophosphates, cyclic adenosine phosphate, and adenosine diphosphates. Experiments were designed to investigate the extent of phosphorylation of nucleosides in formamide, the relative amounts of nucleoside monophosphate, diphosphates and cyclic phosphate formed and the relative effectiveness of different sources of phosphate as phosphorylating agents in formamide. Reaction variables were temperature, nature of the phosphate or condensed phosphate, nucleoside, concentration of reactants and possible effects of additives. Product identification was based on qualitative and quantitative thin layer chromatography.

  17. FT-IR analysis of phosphorylated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshihashi, Sachiko S.; Chihara, Kunihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-09-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which are the most remarkable posttranslational modifications, are considered to be important chemical reactions that control the activation of proteins. We examine the phosphorylation analysis method by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group that observed at about 1070cm-1 (9.4μm) with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FT-IR). This study indicates that it is possible to identify a phosphorylation by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group observed at about 1070 cm-1 with FT-IR method. As long as target peptides have the same amino acid sequence, it is possible to identify the phosphorylated sites (threonine, serine and tyrosine).

  18. Chkl binds and phosphorylates BAD protein.

    PubMed

    Han, Edward Kyu-ho; Butler, Chris; Zhang, Haichao; Severin, Jean M; Qin, Wenying; Holzman, Tom F; Gubbins, Earl J; Simmer, Robert L; Rosenberg, Saul; Giranda, Vincent L; Ng, Shi-Chung; Luo, Y

    2004-01-01

    Chk1 (checkpoint kinase 1) is a serine-threonine kinase that is critical for G2/M arrest in response to DNA damage. Chk1 phosphorylates Cdc25C at serine-216, a major regulatory site, in response to DNA damage. Furthermore, Chk1 also phosphorylates Cdc25A on serine 123 which accelerates its degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and arrests cells in late G2-phase after DNA damage. In the present study, we demonstrated that Chk1 phosphorylates pro-apoptotic protein BAD (Bcl-2/Bcl-XL-Antagonist, causing cell Death) in vitro. In vitro phosphorylation analysis with various mouse BAD peptides has revealed two phosphorylation sites for Chk1 at serine-155 and serine-170. When wild-type and mutant BAD (S155A) constructs were transfected into 293T cells, an association between BAD and Chk1 was observed by co-immunoprecipitation. In addition, there was an increase in the phosphorylation of serine-155 following DNA damage by adriamycin treatment. Our results suggest that Chk1 associates with BAD and phosphorylates the BAD protein at serine-155. Taken together, our results suggest that Chk1 may inactivate BAD by associating with and phosphorylating residues critical for BAD function in response to DNA damage.

  19. Evaluation of protein phosphorylation during adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Zeng, Rong; Tang, Qi-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is a complex process that involves the sequential expression of various adipocyte-specific genes controlled by signaling pathways and transcription factors for which phosphorylation plays a crucial regulatory role. CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are the most important transcriptional regulators in adipogenesis, and the functions of these proteins are regulated by various phosphorylation events. Because cultured 3T3-L1 preadipocytes are commonly used as a model for adipocyte differentiation, we used these cells for a proteomic analysis to identify kinases, phosphatases, and phosphosites that participate in adipogenesis. In addition to the phosphoproteomic analysis, we provide a detailed description of Western blotting, an in vitro phosphorylation assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and phosphorylation site mutagenesis to fully characterize the phosphorylation of proteins and verify their roles in adipogenesis. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    PubMed

    Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Crowther, R A; Six, J; Lübke, U; Vandermeeren, M; Cras, P; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-06-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development.

  1. Ser1333 phosphorylation indicates ROCKI activation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiang-Hao; Liang, Shao-Wei; Chang, Zee-Fen; Lee, Hsiao-Hui

    2013-10-29

    Two isoforms of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), ROCKI and ROCKII, play a pivotal role in regulation of cytoskeleton and are involved in multiple cellular processes in mammalian cells. Knockout mice experiments have indicated that the functions of ROCKI and II are probably non-redundant in physiology. However, it is difficult to differentiate the activation status of ROCKI and ROCKII in biological samples. Previously, we have identified phosphorylation site of ROCKII at Ser1366 residue sensitive to ROCK inhibition. We further investigated the activity-dependent phosphorylation site in ROCKI to establish the reagents that can be used to detect their individual activation. The phosphorylation site of ROCKI sensitive to its inhibition was identified to be the Ser1333 residue. The ROCKI pSer1333-specific antibody does not cross-react with phosphorylated ROCKII. The extent of S1333 phosphorylation of ROCKI correlates with myosin II light chain phosphorylation in cells in response to RhoA stimulation. Active ROCKI is phosphorylated at Ser1333 site. Antibodies that recognize phospho-Ser1333 of ROCKI and phospho-S1366 residues of ROCKII offer a means to discriminate their individual active status in cells and tissues.

  2. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The specialized plasma membrane structures termed caveolae and the caveolar-coat protein caveolin are highly expressed in insulin- sensitive cells such as adipocytes and muscle. Stimulation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with insulin significantly increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin and a 29-kD caveolin-associated protein in caveolin-enriched Triton-insoluble complexes. Maximal phosphorylation occurred within 5 min, and the levels of phosphorylation remained elevated for at least 30 min. The insulin-dose responses for the tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin and the 29-kD caveolin-associated protein paralleled those for the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor. The stimulation of caveolin tyrosine phosphorylation was specific for insulin and was not observed with PDGF or EGF, although PDGF stimulated the tyrosine phosphorylation of the 29-kD caveolin- associated protein. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin, its associated 29-kD protein, and a 60-kD protein was observed in an in vitro kinase assay after incubation of the caveolin-enriched Triton- insoluble complexes with Mg-ATP, suggesting the presence of an intrinsic tyrosine kinase in these complexes. These fractions contain only trace amounts of the activated insulin receptor. In addition, these complexes contain a 60-kD kinase detected in an in situ gel kinase assay and an approximately 60 kD protein that cross-reacts with an antibody against the Src-family kinase p59Fyn. Thus, the insulin- dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin represents a novel, insulin-specific signal transduction pathway that may involve activation of a tyrosine kinase downstream of the insulin receptor. PMID:7540611

  3. Examining site-specific GPCR phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Adrian J; Tobin, Andrew B; Kong, Kok Choi

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the most prominent post-translation modifications mediated by agonist stimulation. This process has been shown to result not only in receptor desensitisation but also, via the recruitment of arrestin adaptor proteins, to promote receptor coupling to numerous signalling pathways. Furthermore, there is now a growing body of evidence suggesting that GPCRs may employ phosphorylation as a mechanism to regulate their cell-type-specific signalling, hence generating tissue-specific functions. These advances have resulted partly from improved methods used in the determination of phospho-acceptor sites on GPCRs and improved analysis of the consequences of phosphorylation. This chapter aims to describe the methods used in our laboratory for the investigation of site-specific phosphorylation of the M₃-muscarinic receptor. These methods could easily be applied in the study of other receptors.

  4. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Domains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    terminus in the enzyme’s substrate or product binding. Keywords: botulinum neurotoxin, tyrosine phosphorylation, zinc endoporotease, protease, clostridium ...associated membrane protein. These 150 kDa exotoxins are produced by strains of Clostridium botulinum as sevendistinct serotypes,designatedBoNT/A-G.After...A) anti-phosphotyrosine antibody Western blot (B). (A) Relative abundance of the m/z species representing phosphorylated LcB was plotted as a% of

  5. How do kinases transfer phosphoryl groups?

    PubMed

    Matte, A; Tari, L W; Delbaere, L T

    1998-04-15

    Understanding how phosphoryl transfer is accomplished by kinases, a ubiquitous group of enzymes, is central to many biochemical processes. Qualitative analysis of the crystal structures of enzyme-substrate complexes of kinases reveals structural features of these enzymes important to phosphoryl transfer. Recently determined crystal structures which mimic the transition state complex have added new insight into the debate as to whether kinases use associative or dissociative mechanisms of catalysis.

  6. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Domains

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Stephen; Brueggmann, Ernst E.; Oyler, George A.; Smith, Leonard A.; Hines, Harry B.; Ahmed, S. Ashraf

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are most potent of all toxins. Their N-terminal light chain domain (Lc) translocates into peripheral cholinergic neurons to exert its endoproteolytic action leading to muscle paralysis. Therapeutic development against these toxins is a major challenge due to their in vitro and in vivo structural differences. Although three-dimensional structures and reaction mechanisms are very similar, the seven serotypes designated A through G vastly vary in their intracellular catalytic stability. To investigate if protein phosphorylation could account for this difference, we employed Src-catalyzed tyrosine phosphorylation of the Lc of six serotypes namely LcA, LcB, LcC1, LcD, LcE, and LcG. Very little phosphorylation was observed with LcD and LcE but LcA, LcB, and LcG were maximally phosphorylated by Src. Phosphorylation of LcA, LcB, and LcG did not affect their secondary and tertiary structures and thermostability significantly. Phosphorylation of Y250 and Y251 made LcA resistant to autocatalysis and drastically reduced its kcat/Km for catalysis. A tyrosine residue present near the essential cysteine at the C-terminal tail of LcA, LcB, and LcG was readily phosphorylated in vitro. Inclusion of a competitive inhibitor protected Y426 of LcA from phosphorylation, shedding light on the role of the C-terminus in the enzyme’s substrate or product binding. PMID:22675300

  7. M phase phosphorylation of the epigenetic regulator UHRF1 regulates its physical association with the deubiquitylase USP7 and stability

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Honghui; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xue; Wang, Zhentian; Sowa, Mathew E.; Zheng, Lijuan; Hu, Shibin; Zeng, Pingyao; Guo, Rui; Diao, Jianbo; Lan, Fei; Harper, J. Wade; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Xu, Yanhui; Shi, Yang

    2012-01-01

    UHRF1 (Ubiquitin-like, with PHD and RING finger domains 1) plays an important role in DNA CpG methylation, heterochromatin function and gene expression. Overexpression of UHRF1 has been suggested to contribute to tumorigenesis. However, regulation of UHRF1 is largely unknown. Here we show that the deubiquitylase USP7 interacts with UHRF1. Using interaction-defective and catalytic mutants of USP7 for complementation experiments, we demonstrate that both physical interaction and catalytic activity of USP7 are necessary for UHRF1 ubiquitylation and stability regulation. Mass spectrometry analysis identified phosphorylation of serine (S) 652 within the USP7-interacting domain of UHRF1, which was further confirmed by a UHRF1 S652 phosphor (S652ph)-specific antibody. Importantly, the S652ph antibody identifies phosphorylated UHRF1 in mitotic cells and consistently S652 can be phosphorylated by the M phase-specific kinase CDK1-cyclin B in vitro. UHRF1 S652 phosphorylation significantly reduces UHRF1 interaction with USP7 in vitro and in vivo, which is correlated with a decreased UHRF1 stability in the M phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, UHRF1 carrying the S652A mutation, which renders UHRF1 resistant to phosphorylation at S652, is more stable. Importantly, cells carrying the S652A mutant grow more slowly suggesting that maintaining an appropriate level of UHRF1 is important for cell proliferation regulation. Taken together, our findings uncovered a cell cycle-specific signaling event that relieves UHRF1 from its interaction with USP7, thus exposing UHRF1 to proteasome-mediated degradation. These findings identify a molecular mechanism by which cellular UHRF1 level is regulated, which may impact cell proliferation. PMID:22411829

  8. M phase phosphorylation of the epigenetic regulator UHRF1 regulates its physical association with the deubiquitylase USP7 and stability.

    PubMed

    Ma, Honghui; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xue; Wang, Zhentian; Sowa, Mathew E; Zheng, Lijuan; Hu, Shibin; Zeng, Pingyao; Guo, Rui; Diao, Jianbo; Lan, Fei; Harper, J Wade; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Xu, Yanhui; Shi, Yang

    2012-03-27

    UHRF1 (Ubiquitin-like, with PHD and RING finger domains 1) plays an important role in DNA CpG methylation, heterochromatin function and gene expression. Overexpression of UHRF1 has been suggested to contribute to tumorigenesis. However, regulation of UHRF1 is largely unknown. Here we show that the deubiquitylase USP7 interacts with UHRF1. Using interaction-defective and catalytic mutants of USP7 for complementation experiments, we demonstrate that both physical interaction and catalytic activity of USP7 are necessary for UHRF1 ubiquitylation and stability regulation. Mass spectrometry analysis identified phosphorylation of serine (S) 652 within the USP7-interacting domain of UHRF1, which was further confirmed by a UHRF1 S652 phosphor (S652ph)-specific antibody. Importantly, the S652ph antibody identifies phosphorylated UHRF1 in mitotic cells and consistently S652 can be phosphorylated by the M phase-specific kinase CDK1-cyclin B in vitro. UHRF1 S652 phosphorylation significantly reduces UHRF1 interaction with USP7 in vitro and in vivo, which is correlated with a decreased UHRF1 stability in the M phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, UHRF1 carrying the S652A mutation, which renders UHRF1 resistant to phosphorylation at S652, is more stable. Importantly, cells carrying the S652A mutant grow more slowly suggesting that maintaining an appropriate level of UHRF1 is important for cell proliferation regulation. Taken together, our findings uncovered a cell cycle-specific signaling event that relieves UHRF1 from its interaction with USP7, thus exposing UHRF1 to proteasome-mediated degradation. These findings identify a molecular mechanism by which cellular UHRF1 level is regulated, which may impact cell proliferation.

  9. Compartment-Specific Phosphorylation of Squid Neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the giant axon and synapse of third-order neurons in the squid stellate ganglion have provided a vast literature on neuronal physiology and axon transport. Large neuronal size also lends itself to comparative biochemical studies of cell body versus axon. These have focused on the regulation of synthesis, assembly, posttranslational modification and function of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules (MTs) and neurofilaments (NFs)), the predominant proteins in axoplasm. These contribute to axonal organization, stability, transport, and impulse transmission responsible for rapid contractions of mantle muscles underlying jet propulsion. Studies of vertebrate NFs have established an extensive literature on NF structure, organization, and function; studies of squid NFs, however, have made it possible to compare compartment-specific regulation of NF synthesis, assembly, and function in soma versus axoplasm. Since NFs contain over 100 eligible sites for phosphorylation by protein kinases, the compartment-specific patterns of phosphorylation have been a primary focus of biochemical studies. We have learned that NF phosphorylation is tightly compartmentalized; extensive phosphorylation occurs only in the axonal compartment in squid and in vertebrate neurons. This extensive phosphorylation plays a key role in organizing NFs, in association with microtubules (MTs), into a stable, dynamic functional lattice that supports axon growth, diameter, impulse transmission, and synaptic activity. To understand how cytoskeletal phosphorylation is topographically regulated, the kinases and phosphatases, bound to NFs isolated from cell bodies and axoplasm, have also been studied. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-term dynamics of multisite phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Boris Y.; Mattingly, Henry H.; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2016-01-01

    Multisite phosphorylation cycles are ubiquitous in cell regulation systems and are studied at multiple levels of complexity, from molecules to organisms, with the ultimate goal of establishing predictive understanding of the effects of genetic and pharmacological perturbations of protein phosphorylation in vivo. Achieving this goal is essentially impossible without mathematical models, which provide a systematic framework for exploring dynamic interactions of multiple network components. Most of the models studied to date do not discriminate between the distinct partially phosphorylated forms and focus on two limiting reaction regimes, distributive and processive, which differ in the number of enzyme–substrate binding events needed for complete phosphorylation or dephosphorylation. Here we use a minimal model of extracellular signal-related kinase regulation to explore the dynamics of a reaction network that includes all essential phosphorylation forms and arbitrary levels of reaction processivity. In addition to bistability, which has been studied extensively in distributive mechanisms, this network can generate periodic oscillations. Both bistability and oscillations can be realized at high levels of reaction processivity. Our work provides a general framework for systematic analysis of dynamics in multisite phosphorylation systems. PMID:27226482

  11. Phosphorylation of human skeletal muscle myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, M.E.; Lingley, M.D.; Stuart, D.S.; Hoffman-Goetz, L.

    1986-03-01

    Phosphorylation of the P-light chains (phosphorylatable light chains) in human skeletal muscle myosin was studied in vitro and in vivo under resting an d contracted conditions. biopsy samples from rested vastus lateralis muscle of male and female subjects were incubated in oxygenated physiological solution at 30/sup 0/C. Samples frozen following a quiescent period showed the presence of only unphosphorylated P-light chains designated LC2f (light chain two of fast myosin) CL2s and LC2s'(light chains two of slow myosin). Treatment with caffeine (10 mM) or direct electrical stimulation resulted in the appearance of three additional bands which were identified as the phosphorylated forms of the P-light chains i.e. LC2f-P, LC2s-P and LC2s'-P. The presence of phosphate was confirmed by prior incubation with (/sup 30/P) orthophosphate. Muscle samples rapidly frozen from resting vastus lateralis muscle revealed the presence of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P-light chains in approximately equal ratios. Muscle samples rapidly frozen following a maximal 10 second isometric contraction showed virtually only phosphorylated fast and slow P-light chains. These results reveal that the P-light chains in human fast and slow myosin may be rapidly phosphorylated, but the basal level of phosphorylation in rested human muscle considerably exceeds that observed in animal muscles studied in vitro or in situ.

  12. Protein phosphorylation in neurodegeneration: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Tenreiro, Sandra; Eckermann, Katrin; Outeiro, Tiago F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation is a common hallmark in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). In these disorders, the misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins occurs alongside neuronal degeneration in somewhat specific brain areas, depending on the disorder and the stage of the disease. However, we still do not fully understand the mechanisms governing protein aggregation, and whether this constitutes a protective or detrimental process. In PD, alpha-synuclein (aSyn) forms protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies, and is phosphorylated at serine 129. Other residues have also been shown to be phosphorylated, but the significance of phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still controversial. In AD and in FTD, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein causes its misfolding and aggregation. Again, our understanding of the precise consequences of tau phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still limited. Through the use of a variety of model organisms and technical approaches, we are now gaining stronger insight into the effects of phosphorylation in the behavior of these proteins. In this review, we cover recent findings in the field and discuss how targeting phosphorylation events might be used for therapeutic intervention in these devastating diseases of the nervous system. PMID:24860424

  13. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    SciTech Connect

    Larrivee, D. )

    1990-09-01

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of (3H)proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the (3H)proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced (3H)proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins (3H)proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons.

  14. PKA regulates calcineurin function through the phosphorylation of RCAN1: Identification of a novel phosphorylation site

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seon Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Kooyeon; Jo, Su-Hyun; Seo, Su Ryeon

    2015-04-17

    Calcineurin is a calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase that has been implicated in T cell activation through the induction of nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT). We have previously suggested that endogenous regulator of calcineurin (RCAN1, also known as DSCR1) is targeted by protein kinase A (PKA) for the control of calcineurin activity. In the present study, we characterized the PKA-mediated phosphorylation site in RCAN1 by mass spectrometric analysis and revealed that PKA directly phosphorylated RCAN1 at the Ser 93. PKA-induced phosphorylation and the increase in the half-life of the RCAN1 protein were prevented by the substitution of Ser 93 with Ala (S93A). Furthermore, the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 potentiated the inhibition of calcineurin-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression by RCAN1. Our results suggest the presence of a novel phosphorylation site in RCAN1 and that its phosphorylation influences calcineurin-dependent inflammatory target gene expression. - Highlights: • We identify novel phosphorylation sites in RCAN1 by LC-MS/MS analysis. • PKA-dependent phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 inhibits calcineurin-mediated intracellular signaling. • We show the immunosuppressive function of RCAN1 phosphorylation at Ser 93 in suppressing cytokine expression.

  15. Phosphorylation of Recombinant Tristetraprolin in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Heping; Lin, Rui

    2009-01-01

    Tristetraprolin/zinc finger protein 36 (TTP/ZFP36) binds and destabilizes some proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs. TTP-deficient mice develop a profound inflammatory syndrome due to excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines. TTP gene expression is induced by various factors including insulin, cinnamon, and green tea extracts. Previous studies have shown that TTP is highly phosphorylated in vivo and multiple phosphorylation sites are identified in human TTP. This study evaluated the potential protein kinases that could phosphorylate recombinant TTP in vitro. Motif scanning suggested that TTP was a potential substrate for various kinases. SDS-PAGE showed that in vitro phosphorylation of TTP with p42 and p38 MAP kinases resulted in visible electrophoretic mobility shift of TTP to higher molecular masses. Autoradiography showed that TTP was phosphorylated in vitro by GSK3b, PKA, PKB, PKC, but not Cdc2, in addition to p42, p38, and JNK. These results demonstrate that TTP is a substrate for a number of protein kinases in vitro. PMID:18071886

  16. Phosphorylation state-dependent interaction between AKAP7δ/γ and phospholamban increases phospholamban phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rigatti, Marc; Le, Andrew V.; Gerber, Claire; Moraru, Ion I.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in heart rate and contractility in response to sympathetic stimulation occur via activation of cAMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA), leading to phosphorylation of numerous substrates that alter Ca2+ cycling. Phosphorylation of these substrates is coordinated by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), which recruit PKA to specific substrates [1]. Phosphorylation of the PKA substrate phospholamban (PLB) is a critical determinant of Ca2+ re-entry into the sarcoplasmic reticulum and is coordinated by AKAP7δ/γ [2,3]. Here, we further these findings by showing that phosphorylation of PLB requires interaction with AKAP7δ/γ and that this interaction occurs only when PLB is unphosphorylated. Additionally, we find that two mutants of PLB (R9C and Δ14), which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in humans, prevent association with AKAP7δ/γ and display reduced phosphorylation in vitro. This finding implicates the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB interaction in the pathology of the disease phenotype. Further exploration of the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB association demonstrated a phosphorylation state-dependence of the interaction. Computational modeling revealed that this mode of interaction allows for small amounts of AKAP and PKA (100–200nM) to regulate the phosphorylation of large quantities of PLB (50µM). Our results confirm that AKAP7γ/δ binding to PLB is important for phosphorylation of PLB, and describe a novel phosphorylation state-dependent binding mechanism that explains how phosphorylation of highly abundant PKA substrates can be regulated by AKAPs present at ~100–200 fold lower concentrations. PMID:26027516

  17. Phosphorylation of RACK1 in plants

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Jay -Gui

    2015-08-31

    Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that interacts with a large, diverse group of proteins to regulate various signaling cascades. RACK1 has been shown to regulate hormonal signaling, stress responses and multiple processes of growth and development in plants. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis RACK1 is phosphorylated by an atypical serine/threonine protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE 8 (WNK8). Furthermore, RACK1 phosphorylation by WNK8 negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability. In conclusion, these findings promote a new regulatory systemmore » in which the action of RACK1 is controlled by phosphorylation and subsequent protein degradation.« less

  18. Phosphorylation mechanisms in dopamine transporter regulation.

    PubMed

    Foster, James D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2016-11-09

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane phosphoprotein that actively translocates extracellular dopamine (DA) into presynaptic neurons. The transporter is the primary mechanism for control of DA levels and subsequent neurotransmission, and is the target for abused and therapeutic drugs that exert their effects by suppressing reuptake. The transport capacity of DAT is acutely regulated by signaling systems and drug exposure, providing neurons the ability to fine-tune DA clearance in response to specific conditions. Kinase pathways play major roles in these mechanisms, and this review summarizes the current status of DAT phosphorylation characteristics and the evidence linking transporter phosphorylation to control of reuptake and other functions. Greater understanding of these processes may aid in elucidation of their possible contributions to DA disease states and suggest specific phosphorylation sites as targets for therapeutic manipulation of reuptake.

  19. Phosphorylation of RACK1 in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jay -Gui

    2015-08-31

    Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that interacts with a large, diverse group of proteins to regulate various signaling cascades. RACK1 has been shown to regulate hormonal signaling, stress responses and multiple processes of growth and development in plants. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis RACK1 is phosphorylated by an atypical serine/threonine protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE 8 (WNK8). Furthermore, RACK1 phosphorylation by WNK8 negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability. In conclusion, these findings promote a new regulatory system in which the action of RACK1 is controlled by phosphorylation and subsequent protein degradation.

  20. Reversible phosphorylation of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xing; Huang, Xiuliang; Chen, Mark J

    2017-04-01

    The 26S proteasome at the center of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is essential for virtually all cellular processes of eukaryotes. A common misconception about the proteasome is that, once made, it remains as a static and uniform complex with spontaneous and constitutive activity for protein degradation. Recent discoveries have provided compelling evidence to support the exact opposite insomuch as the 26S proteasome undergoes dynamic and reversible phosphorylation under a variety of physiopathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the history and current understanding of proteasome phosphorylation, and advocate the idea of targeting proteasome kinases/phosphatases as a new strategy for clinical interventions of several human diseases.

  1. Rapid alteration of protein phosphorylation during postmortem: implication in the study of protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Yanchong; Hu, Wen; Xie, Shutao; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification of proteins. Postmortem tissues are widely being utilized in the biomedical studies, but the effects of postmortem on protein phosphorylation have not been received enough attention. In the present study, we found here that most proteins in mouse brain, heart, liver, and kidney were rapidly dephosphorylated to various degrees during 20 sec to 10 min postmortem. Phosphorylation of tau at Thr212 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 was reduced by 50% in the brain with 40 sec postmortem, a regular time for tissue processing. During postmortem, phosphorylation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and AMP activated kinase (AMPK) was increased in the brain, but not in other organs. Perfusion of the brain with cold or room temperature phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) also caused significant alteration of protein phosphorylation. Cooling down and maintaining mouse brains in the ice-cold buffer prevented the alteration effectively. This study suggests that phosphorylation of proteins is rapidly changed during postmortem. Thus, immediate processing of tissues followed by cooling down in ice-cold buffer is vitally important and perfusion has to be avoided when protein phosphorylation is to be studied. PMID:26511732

  2. Controlling cytokinesis through promiscuous phosphorylation outside BARs.

    PubMed

    Glotzer, Michael

    2010-07-09

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Roberts-Galbraith and colleagues report that a key cytokinetic regulator in fission yeast, Cdc15, is phosphorylated on numerous sites that collectively, but not individually, control its oligomerization state and its associations with the plasma membrane and interacting proteins.

  3. Pathogenic PS1 phosphorylation at Ser367

    PubMed Central

    Maesako, Masato; Horlacher, Jana; Zoltowska, Katarzyna M; Kastanenka, Ksenia V; Kara, Eleanna; Svirsky, Sarah; Keller, Laura J; Li, Xuejing; Hyman, Bradley T; Bacskai, Brian J; Berezovska, Oksana

    2017-01-01

    The high levels of serine (S) and threonine (T) residues within the Presenilin 1 (PS1) N-terminus and in the large hydrophilic loop region suggest that the enzymatic function of PS1/γ-secretase can be modulated by its ‘phosphorylated’ and ‘dephosphorylated’ states. However, the functional outcome of PS1 phosphorylation and its significance for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis is poorly understood. Here, comprehensive analysis using FRET-based imaging reveals that activity-driven and Protein Kinase A-mediated PS1 phosphorylation at three domains (domain 1: T74, domain 2: S310 and S313, domain 3: S365, S366, and S367), with S367 being critical, is responsible for the PS1 pathogenic ‘closed’ conformation, and resulting increase in the Aβ42/40 ratio. Moreover, we have established novel imaging assays for monitoring PS1 conformation in vivo, and report that PS1 phosphorylation induces the pathogenic conformational shift in the living mouse brain. These phosphorylation sites represent potential new targets for AD treatment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19720.001 PMID:28132667

  4. Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction Snapshots in Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gerlits, Oksana; Tian, Jianhui; Das, Amit; Langan, Paul; Heller, William T.; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. The present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date. PMID:25925954

  5. Accurate quantitation of phospholamban phosphorylation by immunoblot

    PubMed Central

    Ablorh, Naa-Adjeley; Miller, Tyler; Nitu, Florentin; Gruber, Simon J.; Karim, Christine; Thomas, David D.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a quantitative immunoblot method to measure the mole fraction of phospholamban (PLB) phosphorylated at Ser16 (Xp) in biological samples. In cardiomyocytes, PLB phosphorylation activates the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), which reduces cytoplasmic Ca++ to relax the heart during diastole. Unphosphorylated PLB (uPLB) inhibits SERCA at low [Ca++] and phosphorylated PLB (pPLB) is less inhibitory, so myocardial physiology and pathology depend critically on Xp. Current methods of Xp determination by immunoblot provide moderate precision but poor accuracy. We have solved this problem using purified uPLB and pPLB standards, produced by solid-phase peptide synthesis. In each assay, a pair of blots is performed with identical standards and unknowns, using antibodies partially selective for uPLB and pPLB, respectively. When performed on mixtures of uPLB and pPLB, the assay measures both total PLB (tPLB) and Xp with accuracy of 96% or better. We assayed pig cardiac SR and found that Xp varied widely among four animals, from 0.08 to 0.38, but there was remarkably little variation in the ratios of Xp/tPLB and uPLB/SERCA, suggesting that PLB phosphorylation is tuned to maintain homeostasis in SERCA regulation. PMID:22369895

  6. Regulation of protein phosphorylation in oat mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, C.; Kopeck, K.; Sceppa, E. )

    1989-04-01

    We sought to identify phosphorylated proteins in isolated oat mitocchondria and to characterize the enzymatic and regulatory properties of the protein kinase(s). Mitochondria from oats (Avena sativa L. cv. Garry) were purified on Percoll gradients. Mitochondria were incubated with {sup 32}P-{gamma}-ATP; proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. A small number of bands was detected on autoradiograms, most prominently at 70 kD and 42 kD; the latter band has been tentatively identified as a subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a well-known phosphoprotein. The protein kinase(s) could also phosphorylate casein, but not histone. Spermine enhanced the phosphorylation of casein and inhibited the phosphorylation of the 42 kD band. These studies were carried out on both intact and burst mitochondria. Control by calcium and other ions was investigated. The question of the action of regulators on protein kinase or protein phosphatase was studied by the use of {sup 35}S-adenosine thiotriphosphate.

  7. Phosphorylation of native porcine olfactory binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Nagnan-Le Meillour, Patricia; Le Danvic, Chrystelle; Brimau, Fanny; Chemineau, Philippe; Michalski, Jean-Claude

    2009-07-01

    The identification of various isoforms of olfactory binding proteins is of major importance to elucidate their involvement in detection of pheromones and other odors. Here, we report the characterization of the phosphorylation of OBP (odorant binding protein) and Von Ebner's gland protein (VEG) from the pig, Sus scrofa. After labeling with specific antibodies raised against the three types of phosphorylation (Ser, Thr, Tyr), the phosphate-modified residues were mapped by using the beta-elimination followed by Michael addition of dithiothreitol (BEMAD) method. Eleven phosphorylation sites were localized in the pOBP sequence and nine sites in the VEG sequence. OBPs are secreted by Bowman's gland cells in the extracellular mucus lining the nasal cavity. After tracking the secretion pathway in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of these cells, we hypothesize that these proteins may be phosphorylated by ectokinases that remain to be characterized. The existence of such a regulatory mechanism theoretically increases the number of OBP variants, and it suggests a more specific role for OBPs in odorant coding than the one of odorant solubilizer and transporter.

  8. Phosphorylation of plastoglobular proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lohscheider, Jens N.; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2016-01-01

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid–protein particles with a small specialized proteome and metabolome. Among the 30 core PG proteins are six proteins of the ancient ABC1 atypical kinase (ABC1K) family and their locations in an Arabidopsis mRNA-based co-expression network suggested central regulatory roles. To identify candidate ABC1K targets and a possible ABC1K hierarchical phosphorylation network within the chloroplast PG proteome, we searched Arabidopsis phosphoproteomics data from publicly available sources. Evaluation of underlying spectra and/or associated information was challenging for a variety of reasons, but supported pSer sites and a few pThr sites in nine PG proteins, including five FIBRILLINS. PG phosphorylation motifs are discussed in the context of possible responsible kinases. The challenges of collection and evaluation of published Arabidopsis phosphorylation data are discussed, illustrating the importance of deposition of all mass spectrometry data in well-organized repositories such as PRIDE and ProteomeXchange. This study provides a starting point for experimental testing of phosho-sites in PG proteins and also suggests that phosphoproteomics studies specifically designed toward the PG proteome and its ABC1K are needed to understand phosphorylation networks in these specialized particles. PMID:26962209

  9. Ion channels, phosphorylation and mammalian sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Visconti, Pablo E; Krapf, Dario; de la Vega-Beltrán, José Luis; Acevedo, Juan José; Darszon, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Sexually reproducing animals require an orchestrated communication between spermatozoa and the egg to generate a new individual. Capacitation, a maturational complex phenomenon that occurs in the female reproductive tract, renders spermatozoa capable of binding and fusing with the oocyte, and it is a requirement for mammalian fertilization. Capacitation encompasses plasma membrane reorganization, ion permeability regulation, cholesterol loss and changes in the phosphorylation state of many proteins. Novel tools to study sperm ion channels, image intracellular ionic changes and proteins with better spatial and temporal resolution, are unraveling how modifications in sperm ion transport and phosphorylation states lead to capacitation. Recent evidence indicates that two parallel pathways regulate phosphorylation events leading to capacitation, one of them requiring activation of protein kinase A and the second one involving inactivation of ser/thr phosphatases. This review examines the involvement of ion transporters and phosphorylation signaling processes needed for spermatozoa to achieve capacitation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to fertilization is central for societies to deal with rising male infertility rates, to develop safe male gamete-based contraceptives and to preserve biodiversity through better assisted fertilization strategies. PMID:21540868

  10. Nucleoside phosphorylation by the mineral schreibersite.

    PubMed

    Gull, Maheen; Mojica, Mike A; Fernández, Facundo M; Gaul, David A; Orlando, Thomas M; Liotta, Charles L; Pasek, Matthew A

    2015-11-26

    Phosphorylation of the nucleosides adenosine and uridine by the simple mixing and mild heating of aqueous solutions of the organic compounds with synthetic analogs of the meteoritic mineral schreibersite, (Fe,Ni)3P under slightly basic conditions (pH ~9) is reported. These results suggest a potential role for meteoritic phosphorus in the origin and development of early life.

  11. Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    localization of the receptors, ligand binding, DNA binding, transcriptional activation, and receptor turnover ( LeGoff et al. 1994; Lahooti et al. 1994...1040-1049 (1995). LeGoff P., M.M. Montano, D.J. Schodin, and B. Katzenellenbogen. Phosphorylation of the Human Estrogen Receptor. J. Biol. Chem

  12. Nucleoside phosphorylation by the mineral schreibersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Maheen; Mojica, Mike A.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Gaul, David A.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Liotta, Charles L.; Pasek, Matthew A.

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorylation of the nucleosides adenosine and uridine by the simple mixing and mild heating of aqueous solutions of the organic compounds with synthetic analogs of the meteoritic mineral schreibersite, (Fe,Ni)3P under slightly basic conditions (pH ~9) is reported. These results suggest a potential role for meteoritic phosphorus in the origin and development of early life.

  13. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  14. Mechanism and specificity of rhodopsin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Frank, R N; Buzney, S M

    1975-11-18

    Partial separation of protein kinase activity from rhodopsin in isolated bovine retinal photoreceptor outer segments was accomplished by mild ultrasonic treatment followed by ultracentrifugation. Residual kinase activity in the rhodopsin-rich sediment was destroyed by chemical denaturation which did not affect the spectral properties of the rhodopsin. The retinal outer segment kinase was found to be specific for rhodopsin, since in these preparations it alone of several bovine protein kinases was capable of phosphorylating rhodopsin in the light. The phosphorylation reaction apparently requires a specific conformation of the rhodopsin molecule since it is abolished by heat denaturation of rhodopsin, and it is greatly reduced or abolished by treatment of the visual pigment protein with potassium alum after the rhodopsin has been "bleached" by light. When kinase and rhodopsin or opsin fractions were prepared from dark-adapted and bleached outer segments and the resultant fractions were mixed in various combinations of bleached and unbleached preparations, the observed pattern of light-activated phosphorylation was consistent only with the interpretation that a conformational change in the rhodopsin molecule in the light exposes a site on the visual pigment protein to the kinase and ATP. These results rule out the possibility of a direct or indirect (rhodopsin-mediated) light activation of the kinase. Finally, phosphorylation of retinal outer segment protein in monochromatic lights of various wavelengths followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicates that both rhodopsin and the higher molecular weight visual pigment protein reported by several laboratories have the same action spectrum for phosphorylation. This result is consistent with the suggestion that the higher molecular weight species is a rhodopsin dimer.

  15. Glucose-induced phosphorylation of the insulin receptor. Functional effects and characterization of phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, T S; Xiao, S; Olefsky, J M

    1996-01-01

    Elevated glucose concentrations have been reported to inhibit insulin receptor kinase activity. We studied the effects of high glucose on insulin action in Rat1 fibroblasts transfected with wild-type human insulin receptor (HIRcB) and a truncated receptor lacking the COOH-terminal 43 amino acids (delta CT). In both cell lines, 25 mM glucose impaired receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 phosphorylation by 34%, but IGF-1 receptor phosphorylation was unaffected. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity and bromodeoxyuridine uptake were decreased by 85 and 35%, respectively. This was reversed by coincubation with a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor or microinjection of a PKC inhibitor peptide. Phosphopeptide mapping revealed that high glucose or PMA led to serine/threonine phosphorylation of similar peptides. Inhibition of the microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase cascade by the MAP kinase kinase inhibitor PD98059 did not reverse the impaired phosphorylation. We conclude that high glucose inhibits insulin action by inducing serine phosphorylation through a PKC-mediated mechanism at the level of the receptor at sites proximal to the COOH-terminal 43 amino acids. This effect is independent of activation of the MAP kinase cascade. Proportionately, the impairment of insulin receptor substrate-1 tyrosine phosphorylation is greater than that of the insulin receptor resulting in attenuated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation and mitogenic signaling. PMID:8609215

  16. Chemical dephosphorylation for identification of multiply phosphorylated peptides and phosphorylation site determination.

    PubMed

    Kyono, Yutaka; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Tomita, Masaru; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2010-08-15

    We have developed a novel strategy to improve the efficiency of identification of multiply phosphorylated peptides isolated by hydroxy acid modified metal oxide chromatography (HAMMOC). This strategy consists of alkali-induced chemical dephosphorylation (beta-elimination reaction) of phosphopeptides isolated by HAMMOC prior to analysis by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). This approach identified 1.9-fold more multiply phosphorylated peptides than the conventional approach without beta-elimination from a digested mixture of three standard phosphoproteins. In addition, the accuracy of phosphorylation site determination in synthetic phosphopeptides was significantly improved. Finally, we applied this approach to a cell lysate. By combining this dephosphorylation approach with the conventional approach, we successfully identified 1649 unique phosphopeptides, including 325 multiply phosphorylated phosphopeptides, from 200 microg of cultured Arabidopsis cells. These results indicate that chemical dephosphorylation prior to LC/MS analysis increases the efficiency of identification of multiply phosphorylated peptides, as well as the accuracy of phosphorylation site determination. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Protein phosphorylation in isolated human adipocytes - Adrenergic control of the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Smiley, R.M. Columbia Univ College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY ); Paul, S.; Browning, M.D.; Leibel, R.L.; Hirsch, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of adrenergic agents on protein phosphorylation in human adipocytes was examined. Freshly isolated human fat cells were incubated with {sup 32}PO{sub 4} in order to label intracellular ATP, then treated with a variety of adrenergic and other pharmacologic agents. Treatment with the {beta}-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol led to a significant increase in phosphate content of at least five protein bands (M{sub r} 52, 53, 63, 67, 84 kDa). The increase in phosphorylation was partially inhibited by the {alpha}-2 agonist clonidine. Epinephrine, a combined {alpha} and {beta} agonist, was less effective at increasing phosphate content of the proteins than was isoproterenol. Neither insulin nor the {alpha}-1 agonist phenylephrine had any discernible effect on the pattern of protein phosphorylation. The 84 kDa phosphorylated peptide band appears to contain hormone-sensitive lipase, a key enzyme in the lipolytic pathway which is activated by phosphorylation. These results are somewhat different than previously reported results for rat adipocytes, and represent the first report of overall pattern and adrenergic modulation of protein phosphorylation in human adipocytes.

  18. Phosphorylation of Kraft fibers with phosphate esters.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ying; Belosinschi, Dan; Brouillette, François; Belfkira, Ahmed; Chabot, Bruno

    2014-06-15

    Phosphate esters, derived from two different long-chain aliphatic alcohols, were used as phosphorylating reagents for Kraft pulp fibers. High phosphorus contents and almost non-degraded fibers were obtained by following this pathway. The phosphorylation efficiency was influenced by the alkyl chain length of PEs since the phosphorus content in modified fibers was higher for the shorter chain reagent. Due to the heterogeneous reaction environment, the amount of grafted phosphorus was found to be almost three times higher at the surface than in the bulk of the fibers. Analyses also indicated that the phosphorus was bonded to fibers as a phosphate-like structure. Furthermore, the situation seemed to be different for the fiber surface where significant amounts of phosphorus were present in more complex structures like pyrophosphate or even oligo-phosphate.

  19. MAP kinases phosphorylate rice WRKY45.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Riichiro; Kishi-Kaboshi, Mitsuko; Matsushita, Akane; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Goto, Shingo; Takahashi, Akira; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    WRKY45 transcription factor is a central regulator of disease resistance mediated by the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway in rice. SA-activated WRKY45 protein induces the accumulation of its own mRNA. However, the mechanism underlying this regulation is still unknown. Here, we report three lines of evidence showing that a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is involved in this regulation. An inhibitor of MAPK kinase (MAPKK) suppressed the increase in WRKY45 transcript level in response to SA. Two MAPKs, OsMPK4 and OsMPK6, phosphorylated WRKY45 protein in vitro. The activity of OsMPK6 was rapidly upregulated by SA treatment in rice cells. These results suggest that WRKY45 is regulated by MAPK-dependent phosphorylation in the SA pathway.

  20. Phenobarbital Meets Phosphorylation of Nuclear Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Phenobarbital was the first therapeutic drug to be characterized for its induction of hepatic drug metabolism. Essentially at the same time, cytochrome P450, an enzyme that metabolizes drugs, was discovered. After nearly 50 years of investigation, the molecular target of phenobarbital induction has now been delineated to phosphorylation at threonine 38 of the constitutive androstane receptor (NR1I3), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Determining this mechanism has provided us with the molecular basis to understand drug induction of drug metabolism and disposition. Threonine 38 is conserved as a phosphorylation motif in the majority of both mouse and human nuclear receptors, providing us with an opportunity to integrate diverse functions of nuclear receptors. Here, I review the works and accomplishments of my laboratory at the National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the future research directions of where our study of the constitutive androstane receptor might take us. PMID:28356313

  1. Solid polymer electrolyte from phosphorylated chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Fauzi, Iqbal Arcana, I Made

    2014-03-24

    Recently, the need of secondary battery application continues to increase. The secondary battery which using a liquid electrolyte was indicated had some weakness. A solid polymer electrolyte is an alternative electrolytes membrane which developed in order to replace the liquid electrolyte type. In the present study, the effect of phosphorylation on to polymer electrolyte membrane which synthesized from chitosan and lithium perchlorate salts was investigated. The effect of the component’s composition respectively on the properties of polymer electrolyte, was carried out by analyzed of it’s characterization such as functional groups, ion conductivity, and thermal properties. The mechanical properties i.e tensile resistance and the morphology structure of membrane surface were determined. The phosphorylation processing of polymer electrolyte membrane of chitosan and lithium perchlorate was conducted by immersing with phosphoric acid for 2 hours, and then irradiated on a microwave for 60 seconds. The degree of deacetylation of chitosan derived from shrimp shells was obtained around 75.4%. Relative molecular mass of chitosan was obtained by viscometry method is 796,792 g/mol. The ionic conductivity of chitosan membrane was increase from 6.33 × 10{sup −6} S/cm up to 6.01 × 10{sup −4} S/cm after adding by 15 % solution of lithium perchlorate. After phosphorylation, the ionic conductivity of phosphorylated lithium chitosan membrane was observed 1.37 × 10{sup −3} S/cm, while the tensile resistance of 40.2 MPa with a better thermal resistance. On the strength of electrolyte membrane properties, this polymer electrolyte membrane was suggested had one potential used for polymer electrolyte in field of lithium battery applications.

  2. Syntheses and insulin-like activity of phosphorylated galactose derivatives.

    PubMed

    Caro, H N; Martín-Lomas, M; Bernabé, M

    1993-02-24

    The syntheses of the poly-phosphorylated galactosides 6, 8, 10, 13, 16, and 20, isolated as sodium salts, have been performed. The non-phosphorylated disaccharide 17 and trisaccharide 21 have been prepared via glycosylation of the 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethyl galactosides 3 and 2, respectively, and subsequent complete deprotection. Preliminary insulin-like activity of the phosphorylated derivatives is reported.

  3. Mixed mechanisms of multi-site phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Suwanmajo, Thapanar; Krishnan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-site phosphorylation is ubiquitous in cell biology and has been widely studied experimentally and theoretically. The underlying chemical modification mechanisms are typically assumed to be distributive or processive. In this paper, we study the behaviour of mixed mechanisms that can arise either because phosphorylation and dephosphorylation involve different mechanisms or because phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation can occur through a combination of mechanisms. We examine a hierarchy of models to assess chemical information processing through different mixed mechanisms, using simulations, bifurcation analysis and analytical work. We demonstrate how mixed mechanisms can show important and unintuitive differences from pure distributive and processive mechanisms, in some cases resulting in monostable behaviour with simple dose–response behaviour, while in other cases generating new behaviour-like oscillations. Our results also suggest patterns of information processing that are relevant as the number of modification sites increases. Overall, our work creates a framework to examine information processing arising from complexities of multi-site modification mechanisms and their impact on signal transduction. PMID:25972433

  4. Regulation of peroxisome dynamics by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schummer, Andreas; Mastalski, Thomas; Platta, Harald W; Warscheid, Bettina

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisomes are highly dynamic organelles that can rapidly change in size, abundance, and protein content in response to alterations in nutritional and other environmental conditions. These dynamic changes in peroxisome features, referred to as peroxisome dynamics, rely on the coordinated action of several processes of peroxisome biogenesis. Revealing the regulatory mechanisms of peroxisome dynamics is an emerging theme in cell biology. These mechanisms are inevitably linked to and synchronized with the biogenesis and degradation of peroxisomes. To date, the key players and basic principles of virtually all steps in the peroxisomal life cycle are known, but regulatory mechanisms remained largely elusive. A number of recent studies put the spotlight on reversible protein phosphorylation for the control of peroxisome dynamics and highlighted peroxisomes as hubs for cellular signal integration and regulation. Here, we will present and discuss the results of several studies performed using yeast and mammalian cells that convey a sense of the impact protein phosphorylation may have on the modulation of peroxisome dynamics by regulating peroxisomal matrix and membrane protein import, proliferation, inheritance, and degradation. We further put forward the idea to make use of current data on phosphorylation sites of peroxisomal and peroxisome-associated proteins reported in advanced large-scale phosphoproteomic studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mixed mechanisms of multi-site phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Suwanmajo, Thapanar; Krishnan, J

    2015-06-06

    Multi-site phosphorylation is ubiquitous in cell biology and has been widely studied experimentally and theoretically. The underlying chemical modification mechanisms are typically assumed to be distributive or processive. In this paper, we study the behaviour of mixed mechanisms that can arise either because phosphorylation and dephosphorylation involve different mechanisms or because phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation can occur through a combination of mechanisms. We examine a hierarchy of models to assess chemical information processing through different mixed mechanisms, using simulations, bifurcation analysis and analytical work. We demonstrate how mixed mechanisms can show important and unintuitive differences from pure distributive and processive mechanisms, in some cases resulting in monostable behaviour with simple dose-response behaviour, while in other cases generating new behaviour-like oscillations. Our results also suggest patterns of information processing that are relevant as the number of modification sites increases. Overall, our work creates a framework to examine information processing arising from complexities of multi-site modification mechanisms and their impact on signal transduction.

  6. Function of platelet 47K protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Imaoka, T.

    1987-05-01

    To provide insight into the biochemical pathway of platelet activation, they purified both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P47 to homogeneity from human platelets. This study represents the first demonstration of a change of physiological action of P47 in response to phosphorylation in platelet activation. SVI labelled unphosphorylated P47 had an ability to bind with platelet membrane fraction in the presence of phosphatidylserine. Effect of diacylglycerol was inhibitory in this PS dependent P47 binding with membrane. Unphosphorylated P47 had an inhibitory activity in platelet actin polymerization. Molar ratio to inhibit actin polymerization was 1:8 (P47:actin). These activities were Ca independent. Purified TSP-labelled P47 lost the binding ability with membrane, also the inhibitory activity in actin polymerization. Therefore, they propose the hypothesis that unphosphorylated P47 may loosely bind with the inside of plasma membrane of platelet and inhibit actin polymerization as a modulator, when stimulated, protein Kinase C rapidly phosphorylate P47 and induce the activation of cytoskeletal network and subsequently release reaction.

  7. Phosphorylation of erythrocyte membrane liberates calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, V.P.S.; Brockerhoff, H.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphorylation of permeabilized erythrocyte ghost membranes with ATP results in an increase free calcium level as measured with the help of Ca/sup 2 +/ electrode and /sup 45/Ca. This effect could not be observed in the presence of p/sup -/ chloromercuric benzoate, an inhibitor of kinases. The rise in the free calcium due to phosphorylation of the membrane was accompanied by a decrease in the level of phosphatidylinositol (PI) and an increase in phosphatidylinositolmonophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositolbisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/). These results support the proposal that an inositol shuttle, PI in equilibrium PIP in equilibrium PIP/sub 2/, operates to maintain the intracellular calcium concentration. The cation is believed to be sequestered in a cage formed by the head groups of two acidic phospholipid molecules, e.g., phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol, with the participation of both PO and fatty acid ester CO groups. When the inositol group of such a cage is phosphorylated, inter-headgroup hydrogen bonding between the lipids is broken. As a result the cage opens and calcium is released.

  8. Phosphorylation of Astrin Regulates Its Kinetochore Function*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Eun; Lee, Nam Soo; Kim, Hongtae; Jang, Chang-Young

    2016-01-01

    The error-free segregation of chromosomes, which requires the precisely timed search and capture of chromosomes by spindles during early mitotic and meiotic cell division, is responsible for genomic stability and is achieved by the spindle assembly checkpoint in the metaphase-anaphase transition. Mitotic kinases orchestrate M phase events, such as the reorganization of cell architecture and kinetochore (KT) composition with the exquisite phosphorylation of mitotic regulators, to ensure timely and temporal progression. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the changes of KT composition for stable spindle attachment during mitosis are poorly understood. Here, we show that the sequential action of the kinase Cdk1 and the phosphatase Cdc14A control spindle attachment to KTs. During prophase, the mitotic spindle protein Spag5/Astrin is transported into centrosomes by Kinastrin and phosphorylated at Ser-135 and Ser-249 by Cdk1, which, in prometaphase, is loaded onto the spindle and targeted to KTs. We also demonstrate that Cdc14A dephosphorylates Astrin, and therefore the overexpression of Cdc14A sequesters Astrin in the centrosome and results in aberrant chromosome alignment. Mechanistically, Plk1 acts as an upstream kinase for Astrin phosphorylation by Cdk1 and targeting phospho-Astrin to KTs, leading to the recruitment of outer KT components, such as Cenp-E, and the stable attachment of spindles to KTs. These comprehensive findings reveal a regulatory circuit for protein targeting to KTs that controls the KT composition change of stable spindle attachment and chromosome integrity. PMID:27325694

  9. Mammalian FMRP S499 Is Phosphorylated by CK2 and Promotes Secondary Phosphorylation of FMRP

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, Rachel A.; Blice-Baum, Anna; Gong, Xuan; Karaca, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an mRNA-binding regulator of protein translation that associates with 4-6% of brain transcripts and is central to neurodevelopment. Autism risk genes’ transcripts are overrepresented among FMRP-binding mRNAs, and FMRP loss-of-function mutations are responsible for fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of monogenetic autism. It is thought that FMRP-dependent translational repression is governed by the phosphorylation of serine residue 499 (S499). However, recent evidence suggests that S499 phosphorylation is not modulated by metabotropic glutamate receptor class I (mGluR-I) or protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), two molecules shown to regulate FMRP translational repression. Moreover, the mammalian FMRP S499 kinase remains unknown. We found that casein kinase II (CK2) phosphorylates murine FMRP S499. Further, we show that phosphorylation of FMRP S499 permits phosphorylation of additional, nearby residues. Evidence suggests that these nearby residues are modulated by mGluR-I and PP2A pathways. These data support an alternative phosphodynamic model of FMRP that is harmonious with prior studies and serves as a framework for further investigation. PMID:27957526

  10. Phosphorylated tyrosine in the flagellum filament protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly-Wintenberg, K.; Anderson, T.; Montie, T.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Purified flagella from two strains of {sup 32}P-labeled Pseudomonas aeruginosa were shown to be phosphorylated. This was confirmed by autoradiography of flagellin protein in polyacrylamide gels. Thin-layer electrophoresis and autoradiography of flagellin partial hydrolysates indicated that phosphotyrosine was the major phosphorylated amino acid. High-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis confirmed the presence of phosphotyrosine in flagellum filament protein. Preliminary data indicated that less than one tyrosine per subunit was phosphorylated. No evidence was found for phosphorylation of serine or threonine. A function related to tyrosine phosphorylation has not been determined.

  11. A strategy to quantitate global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-04-15

    Current studies of protein phosphorylation focus primarily on the importance of specific phosphoproteins and their landscapes of phosphorylation in the regulation of different cellular functions. However, global changes in phosphorylation of extracellular matrix phosphoproteins measured "in bulk" are equally important. For example, correct global phosphorylation of different bone matrix proteins is critical to healthy tissue biomineralization. To study changes of bone matrix global phosphorylation, we developed a strategy that combines a procedure for in vitro phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of fully mineralized bone in addition to quantitation of the global phosphorylation levels of bone matrix proteins. For the first time, we show that it is possible to enzymatically phosphorylate/dephosphorylate fully mineralized bone originating from either cadaveric human donors or laboratory animals (mice). Using our strategy, we detected the difference in the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from wild-type and osteopontin knockout mice. We also observed that the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from human cortical bone were lower than those isolated from trabecular bone. The developed strategy has the potential to open new avenues for studies on the global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins and their role in biomineralization as well for other tissues/cells and protein-based materials.

  12. Multistep phosphorylation systems: tunable components of biological signaling circuits

    PubMed Central

    Valk, Evin; Venta, Rainis; Örd, Mihkel; Faustova, Ilona; Kõivomägi, Mardo; Loog, Mart

    2014-01-01

    Multisite phosphorylation of proteins is a powerful signal processing mechanism that plays crucial roles in cell division and differentiation as well as in disease. We recently demonstrated a novel phenomenon in cell cycle regulation by showing that cyclin-dependent kinase–dependent multisite phosphorylation of a crucial substrate is performed sequentially in the N-to-C terminal direction along the disordered protein. The process is controlled by key parameters, including the distance between phosphorylation sites, the distribution of serines and threonines in sites, and the position of docking motifs. According to our model, linear patterns of phosphorylation along disordered protein segments determine the signal-response function of a multisite phosphorylation switch. Here we discuss the general advantages and engineering principles of multisite phosphorylation networks as processors of kinase signals. We also address the idea of using the mechanistic logic of linear multisite phosphorylation networks to design circuits for synthetic biology applications. PMID:25368420

  13. Ethanol-induced phosphorylation of cytokeratin in cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hiromu; Cadrin, M.; French, S.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors studied the effect of ethanol on the phosphorylation of cytokeratins (CKs) in cultured hepatocytes since CK filaments are resulted by phosphorylation and they are abnormal in alcoholic liver disease. Hepatocytes were obtained from 14-day-old rats and cultured for 48 hrs. The hepatocytes were exposed to ethanol for 30 min. The residual insoluble cytoskeletons were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. 2D gel electrophoresis showed CK 55 and CK 49 or 8 and 18 and actin. The CKs had several isoelectric variants. The most basic spot was the dominant protein which was not phosphorylated. The more acidic spots were phosphorylated. After ethanol treatment, the phosphorylation of CK 55 and CK 49 were markedly increased over controls. They compared these results, with the effect of vasopressin, TPA and db-cAMP on the phosphorylation of CKs. Vasopressin and TPA caused the phosphorylation of CK 55 and 49 but db-cAMP did not.

  14. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Rab7 by Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaosi; Zhang, Jiaming; Chen, Lingqiu; Chen, Yongjun; Xu, Xiaohui; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2017-03-20

    The small molecular weight GTPase Rab7 is a key regulator for late endosomal/lysosomal membrane trafficking, it was known that Rab7 is phosphorylated, but the corresponding kinase and the functional regulation of Rab7 phosphorylation remain unclear. We provide evidence here that Rab7 is a substrate of Src kinase, and is tyrosine-phosphorylated by Src, withY183 residue of Rab7 being the optimal phosphorylation site for Src. Further investigations demonstrated that the tyrosine phosphorylation of Rab7 depends on the guanine nucleotide binding activity of Rab7 and the activity of Src kinase. The tyrosine phosphorylation of Rab7 is physiologically induced by EGF, and impairs the interaction of Rab7 with RILP, consequently inhibiting EGFR degradation and sustaining Akt signaling. These results suggest that the tyrosine phosphorylation of Rab7 may be involved in coordinating membrane trafficking and cell signaling.

  15. Complex kinase requirements for Chlamydia trachomatis Tarp phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Mehlitz, Adrian; Banhart, Sebastian; Hess, Simone; Selbach, Matthias; Meyer, Thomas F

    2008-12-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis translocates the effector protein Tarp (translocated actin-recruiting phosphoprotein) into the host cell cytoplasm where it is quickly tyrosine phosphorylated. Abl and Src kinases have been implicated in Tarp phosphorylation; however, we observed that the situation is more complex. Chemical inhibition of Src family kinases confirmed a role for these kinases in Tarp phosphorylation. Infection of Src, Yes, Fyn (SYF)-deficient cells showed a dampened, but incompletely blocked, Tarp phosphorylation. Inhibition of Abl in an SYF background still did not completely block Tarp phosphorylation. Consequently, we tested additional kinases and found that Syk, but not Btk or Jak2, is a potent kinase of Tarp in vitro. Inhibition of Syk in an SYF background further blocked Tarp phosphorylation. Under these conditions, inclusion formation still proceeded normally. These data reveal a highly promiscuous substrate property of Tarp and set the stage for further functional characterization of Tarp phosphorylation during host cell infection.

  16. Protein phosphorylation and sodium conductance in nerve membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Schoffeniels, E; Dandrifosse, G

    1980-01-01

    High molecular weight proteins extracted from the walking nerves of the shore crab (Carcinus maenas) exhibit a cycle of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation that is influenced by neurotropic compounds and inorganic ions. The net phosphorylation state of the proteins is increased in the presence of K+ ions and decreased with Na+ ions. In the absence of Mg2+ there is no phosphorylation. Ca2+ ions at low concentrations are necessary for optimal phosphorylation. At high concentration (above 0.1 mM), Ca2+ ions are inhibitory. Neurotropic compounds generally inhibit the phosphorylation process. More specifically, tetrodotoxin and veratridine, depending on the ionic composition of the medium, have opposite effects on the phosphorylation process, a result in agreement with their known physiological action. It is suggested that the high molecular weight components thus identified are part of the sodium permeation sites and that the conductance state of those sites is controlled by a phosphorylation process. Images PMID:6928680

  17. Phosphorylated testis-specific serine/threonine kinase 4 may phosphorylate Crem at Ser-117.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guolong; Wei, Youheng; Wang, Xiaoli; Yu, Long

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the internal existence status of testis-specific serine/threonine kinase 4 (Tssk4) and the interaction of Tssk4 and Cre-responsive element modulator (Crem). The internal existence status of Tssk4 in testis of mice was detected using western blotting and dephosphorylation method. The interaction of Tssk4 and Crem was analyzed by western blotting, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, in vitro co-immunoprecipitation assays, and in vitro kinase assay. The results revealed that Tssk4 existed in testis both in phosphorylation and unphosphorylation status by a temporal manner with the development of testis. Immunofluorescence results showed that Tssk4 had identical distribution pattern with Crem in testis, which was utterly different to the localization of Cre-responsive element binding (Creb). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that phosphorylated Tssk4 might participate in testis genes expressions by phosphorylating Crem at Ser-117.

  18. Puzzling over protein cysteine phosphorylation--assessment of proteomic tools for S-phosphorylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Buchowiecka, A K

    2014-09-07

    Cysteine phosphorylation has recently been discovered in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, and is thought to play crucial roles in signaling and regulation of cellular responses. This article explores the topics of chemical stability of this type of structural modification and the resulting issues regarding affinity enrichment of S-phosphopeptides and their mass spectrometry-based detection in the course of general proteomics studies. Together, this work suggests that the current advances in phosphoproteomic methodologies provide adequate tools for investigating protein cysteine phosphorylation and appear to be immediately available for practical implementation. The article provides useful information necessary for designing experiments in the emerging cysteine phosphoproteomics. The examples of methodological proposals for S-linked phosphorylation detection are included herein in order to stimulate development of new approaches by the phosphoproteomic community.

  19. Modulation of tau phosphorylation and intracellular localization by cellular stress.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, S M; Zinnerman, M; Garner, C; Johnson, G V

    2000-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that is functionally modulated by phosphorylation and hyperphosphorylated in several neurodegenerative diseases. Because phosphorylation regulates both normal and pathological tau functioning, it is of great interest to identify the signalling pathways and enzymes capable of modulating tau phosphorylation in vivo. The present study examined changes in tau phosphorylation and localization in response to osmotic stress, which activates the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs), a family of proline-directed protein kinases shown to phosphorylate tau in vitro and hypothesized to phosphorylate tau in Alzheimer's disease. Immunoblot analysis with phosphorylation-dependent antibodies revealed that osmotic stress increased tau phosphorylation at the non-Ser/Thr-Pro sites Ser-262/356, within the microtubule-binding domain, as well as Ser/Thr-Pro sites outside of tau's microtubule-binding domain. Although all SAPKs examined were activated by osmotic stress, none of the endogenous SAPKs mediated the increase in tau phosphorylation. However, when transfected into SH-SY5Y cells, SAPK3, but not the other SAPKs examined, phosphorylated tau in situ in response to activation by osmotic stress. Osmotic-stress-induced tau phosphorylation correlated with a decrease in the amount of tau associated with the cytoskeleton and an increase in the amount of soluble tau. This stress-induced alteration in tau localization was only partially due to phosphorylation at Ser-262/356 by a staurosporine-sensitive, non-proline-directed, protein kinase. Taken together, these results suggest that osmotic stress activates at least two tau-directed protein kinases, one proline-directed and one non-proline-directed, that SAPK3 can phosphorylate tau on Ser/Thr-Pro residues in situ, and that Ser-262/356 phosphorylation only partially regulates tau localization in the cell. PMID:10620503

  20. Transforming growth factor-{beta}-inducible phosphorylation of Smad3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guannan; Matsuura, Isao; He, Dongming; Liu, Fang

    2009-04-10

    Smad proteins transduce the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signal at the cell surface into gene regulation in the nucleus. Upon TGF-beta treatment, the highly homologous Smad2 and Smad3 are phosphorylated by the TGF-beta receptor at the SSXS motif in the C-terminal tail. Here we show that in addition to the C-tail, three (S/T)-P sites in the Smad3 linker region, Ser(208), Ser(204), and Thr(179) are phosphorylated in response to TGF-beta. The linker phosphorylation peaks at 1 h after TGF-beta treatment, behind the peak of the C-tail phosphorylation. We provide evidence suggesting that the C-tail phosphorylation by the TGF-beta receptor is necessary for the TGF-beta-induced linker phosphorylation. Although the TGF-beta receptor is necessary for the linker phosphorylation, the receptor itself does not phosphorylate these sites. We further show that ERK is not responsible for TGF-beta-dependent phosphorylation of these three sites. We show that GSK3 accounts for TGF-beta-inducible Ser(204) phosphorylation. Flavopiridol, a pan-CDK inhibitor, abolishes TGF-beta-induced phosphorylation of Thr(179) and Ser(208), suggesting that the CDK family is responsible for phosphorylation of Thr(179) and Ser(208) in response to TGF-beta. Mutation of the linker phosphorylation sites to nonphosphorylatable residues increases the ability of Smad3 to activate a TGF-beta/Smad-target gene as well as the growth-inhibitory function of Smad3. Thus, these observations suggest that TGF-beta-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 linker sites inhibits its antiproliferative activity.

  1. Binding to serine 65-phosphorylated ubiquitin primes Parkin for optimal PINK1-dependent phosphorylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Martínez-Torres, R Julio; Wilkie, Scott; Kumar, Atul; Peltier, Julien; Gonzalez, Alba; Johnson, Clare; Zhang, Jinwei; Hope, Anthony G; Peggie, Mark; Trost, Matthias; van Aalten, Daan MF; Alessi, Dario R; Prescott, Alan R; Knebel, Axel; Walden, Helen; Muqit, Miratul MK

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 are associated with autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). We and other groups have reported that PINK1 activates Parkin E3 ligase activity both directly via phosphorylation of Parkin serine 65 (Ser65)—which lies within its ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl)—and indirectly through phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser65. How Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65) contributes to Parkin activation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 binding to Parkin dramatically increases the rate and stoichiometry of Parkin phosphorylation at Ser65 by PINK1 in vitro. Analysis of the Parkin structure, corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis, shows that the conserved His302 and Lys151 residues play a critical role in binding of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, thereby promoting Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation and activation of its E3 ligase activity in vitro. Mutation of His302 markedly inhibits Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation at the mitochondria, which is associated with a marked reduction in its E3 ligase activity following mitochondrial depolarisation. We show that the binding of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 to Parkin disrupts the interaction between the Ubl domain and C-terminal region, thereby increasing the accessibility of Parkin Ser65. Finally, purified Parkin maximally phosphorylated at Ser65 in vitro cannot be further activated by the addition of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65. Our results thus suggest that a major role of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 is to promote PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser65, leading to maximal activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. His302 and Lys151 are likely to line a phospho-Ser65-binding pocket on the surface of Parkin that is critical for the ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 interaction. This study provides new mechanistic insights into Parkin activation by ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, which could aid in the development of Parkin activators that mimic the effect of

  2. Binding to serine 65-phosphorylated ubiquitin primes Parkin for optimal PINK1-dependent phosphorylation and activation.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Martínez-Torres, R Julio; Wilkie, Scott; Kumar, Atul; Peltier, Julien; Gonzalez, Alba; Johnson, Clare; Zhang, Jinwei; Hope, Anthony G; Peggie, Mark; Trost, Matthias; van Aalten, Daan M F; Alessi, Dario R; Prescott, Alan R; Knebel, Axel; Walden, Helen; Muqit, Miratul M K

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 are associated with autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). We and other groups have reported that PINK1 activates Parkin E3 ligase activity both directly via phosphorylation of Parkin serine 65 (Ser(65))--which lies within its ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl)--and indirectly through phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser(65). How Ser(65)-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65)) contributes to Parkin activation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) binding to Parkin dramatically increases the rate and stoichiometry of Parkin phosphorylation at Ser(65) by PINK1 in vitro. Analysis of the Parkin structure, corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis, shows that the conserved His302 and Lys151 residues play a critical role in binding of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65), thereby promoting Parkin Ser(65) phosphorylation and activation of its E3 ligase activity in vitro. Mutation of His302 markedly inhibits Parkin Ser(65) phosphorylation at the mitochondria, which is associated with a marked reduction in its E3 ligase activity following mitochondrial depolarisation. We show that the binding of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) to Parkin disrupts the interaction between the Ubl domain and C-terminal region, thereby increasing the accessibility of Parkin Ser(65). Finally, purified Parkin maximally phosphorylated at Ser(65) in vitro cannot be further activated by the addition of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65). Our results thus suggest that a major role of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) is to promote PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser(65), leading to maximal activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. His302 and Lys151 are likely to line a phospho-Ser(65)-binding pocket on the surface of Parkin that is critical for the ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) interaction. This study provides new mechanistic insights into Parkin activation by ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65), which could aid in the development of Parkin

  3. PHOSPHORYLATION BY EXTRACTS OF NITROSOMONAS EUROPAEA

    PubMed Central

    Burge, W. D.; Malavolta, E.; Delwiche, C. C.

    1963-01-01

    Burge, W. D. (University of California, Berkeley), E. Malavolta, and C. C. Delwiche. Phosphorylation by extracts of Nitrosomonas europaea. J. Bacteriol. 85:106–110. 1963.—Cellfree preparations of Nitrosomonas europaea are capable of oxidizing hydroxylamine, but not ammonium ion, to nitrite. The quantity of nitrite formed by our preparations was, at most, equivalent to only 70% of the hydroxylamine added. Although the preparations had a strong phosphatase activity, resulting in a net loss of organic phosphate during the experimental period, P32-labeled inorganic phosphate was found to be incorporated into the organic fraction, including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). The provision of hydroxylamine as substrate resulted in the formation of nitrite and an increased incorporation of P32 into the organic fraction. It is concluded that the chemosynthetic autotroph Nitrosomonas, in common with certain other autotrophic organisms and heterotrophs, is capable of converting energy released in the oxidation of its inorganic substrate into high-energy phosphate units (ATP and ADP) for the mediation of other energy-requiring reactions. The simultaneous formation of ATP and ADP is interpreted as evidence for an adenylate kinase activity. The preparations used exhibited a considerable endogenous incorporation of P32 into organic phosphate in the absence of added hydroxylamine. Cyanide inhibited both phosphorylation and the oxidation of hydroxylamine. Both the supernatant and particulate fractions of a Nitrosomonas extract subjected to centrifugal fields of 100,000 × g were active in phosphorylation and nitrite formation, but these activities appeared to be uncoupled in the particulate fraction and only partially coupled in the supernatant solution. This most likely reflects a significant endogenous respiration, and not a real lack of coupling between the two reactions. PMID:14016952

  4. Genetic Manipulation of Neurofilament Protein Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Maria R; Villalón, Eric; Garcia, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Neurofilament biology is important to understanding structural properties of axons, such as establishment of axonal diameter by radial growth. In order to study the function of neurofilaments, a series of genetically modified mice have been generated. Here, we describe a brief history of genetic modifications used to study neurofilaments, as well as an overview of the steps required to generate a gene-targeted mouse. In addition, we describe steps utilized to analyze neurofilament phosphorylation status using immunoblotting. Taken together, these provide comprehensive analysis of neurofilament function in vivo, which can be applied to many systems.

  5. SH3 Domain Tyrosine Phosphorylation – Sites, Role and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tatárová, Zuzana; Brábek, Jan; Rösel, Daniel; Novotný, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Background SH3 domains are eukaryotic protein domains that participate in a plethora of cellular processes including signal transduction, proliferation, and cellular movement. Several studies indicate that tyrosine phosphorylation could play a significant role in the regulation of SH3 domains. Results To explore the incidence of the tyrosine phosphorylation within SH3 domains we queried the PhosphoSite Plus database of phosphorylation sites. Over 100 tyrosine phosphorylations occurring on 20 different SH3 domain positions were identified. The tyrosine corresponding to c–Src Tyr-90 was by far the most frequently identified SH3 domain phosphorylation site. A comparison of sequences around this tyrosine led to delineation of a preferred sequence motif ALYD(Y/F). This motif is present in about 15% of human SH3 domains and is structurally well conserved. We further observed that tyrosine phosphorylation is more abundant than serine or threonine phosphorylation within SH3 domains and other adaptor domains, such as SH2 or WW domains. Tyrosine phosphorylation could represent an important regulatory mechanism of adaptor domains. Conclusions While tyrosine phosphorylation typically promotes signaling protein interactions via SH2 or PTB domains, its role in SH3 domains is the opposite - it blocks or prevents interactions. The regulatory function of tyrosine phosphorylation is most likely achieved by the phosphate moiety and its charge interfering with binding of polyproline helices of SH3 domain interacting partners. PMID:22615764

  6. Phosphorylation regulates coilin activity and RNA association

    PubMed Central

    Broome, Hanna J.; Carrero, Zunamys I.; Douglas, Heather E.; Hebert, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Cajal body (CB) is a domain of concentrated components found within the nucleus of cells in an array of species that is functionally important for the biogenesis of telomerase and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins. The CB is a dynamic structure whose number and size change during the cell cycle and is associated with other nuclear structures and gene loci. Coilin, also known as the marker protein for the CB, is a phosphoprotein widely accepted for its role in maintaining CB integrity. Recent studies have been done to further elucidate functional activities of coilin apart from its structural role in the CB in an attempt to explore the rationale for coilin expression in cells that have few CBs or lack them altogether. Here we show that the RNA association profile of coilin changes in mitosis with respect to that during interphase. We provide evidence of transcriptional and/or processing dysregulation of several CB-related RNA transcripts as a result of ectopic expression of both wild-type and phosphomutant coilin proteins. We also show apparent changes in transcription and/or processing of these transcripts upon coilin knockdown in both transformed and primary cell lines. Additionally, we provide evidence of specific coilin RNase activity regulation, on both U2 and hTR transcripts, by phosphorylation of a single residue, serine 489. Collectively, these results point to additional functions for coilin that are regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:23616925

  7. Modelling the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Korla, Kalyani; Mitra, Chanchal K

    2014-01-01

    The Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation are the two most important sets of reactions in a eukaryotic cell that meet the major part of the total energy demands of a cell. In this paper, we present a computer simulation of the coupled reactions using open source tools for simulation. We also show that it is possible to model the Krebs cycle with a simple black box with a few inputs and outputs. However, the kinetics of the internal processes has been modelled using numerical tools. We also show that the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation together can be combined in a similar fashion - a black box with a few inputs and outputs. The Octave script is flexible and customisable for any chosen set-up for this model. In several cases, we had no explicit idea of the underlying reaction mechanism and the rate determining steps involved, and we have used the stoichiometric equations that can be easily changed as and when more detailed information is obtained. The script includes the feedback regulation of the various enzymes of the Krebs cycle. For the electron transport chain, the pH gradient across the membrane is an essential regulator of the kinetics and this has been modelled empirically but fully consistent with experimental results. The initial conditions can be very easily changed and the simulation is potentially very useful in a number of cases of clinical importance.

  8. Changes in tau phosphorylation in hibernating rodents.

    PubMed

    León-Espinosa, Gonzalo; García, Esther; García-Escudero, Vega; Hernández, Félix; Defelipe, Javier; Avila, Jesús

    2013-07-01

    Tau is a cytoskeletal protein present mainly in the neurons of vertebrates. By comparing the sequence of tau molecule among different vertebrates, it was found that the variability of the N-terminal sequence in tau protein is higher than that of the C-terminal region. The N-terminal region is involved mainly in the binding of tau to cellular membranes, whereas the C-terminal region of the tau molecule contains the microtubule-binding sites. We have compared the sequence of Syrian hamster tau with the sequences of other hibernating and nonhibernating rodents and investigated how differences in the N-terminal region of tau could affect the phosphorylation level and tau binding to cell membranes. We also describe a change, in tau phosphorylation, on a casein kinase 1 (ck1)-dependent site that is found only in hibernating rodents. This ck1 site seems to play an important role in the regulation of tau binding to membranes. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Phosphorylated silica nanotubes: preparation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Xu, Yan; Lu, Yiren; Zhao, Lili; Song, Lixin

    2013-08-01

    Recently, the strategy of doping inorganic particles into polymer membranes to modify them has been studied intensively. However, these inorganic particles have a disadvantage without being in good compatibility with the polymers. To enhance the compatibility between inorganic particles and polymers, phosphorylated silica nanotubes (PSNTs) with specific high ratios of length to diameter are prepared. Silica nanotubes (SNTs) are prepared through the hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate in a mixture of aqueous ammonia and dl-tartaric acid, then PSNTs are obtained by silylation and phosphorylation modifications. The optimum synthesis conditions of PSNTs are explored; in addition, the as-prepared PSNTs are characterized by Fourier transform infrared, transmission electron microscope, BET, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. The results indicate that the ratio of length to diameter of the PSNTs is approximately 20, the thickness of the tube wall is 20 nm, the specific surface area of the PSNTs is 460.2 m2 g-1, the inner diameter of the PSNTs is 76 nm, many mesopores are distributed in the tube walls of the PSNTs, and the PSNTs have numerous hydroxyl active sites along their length direction. Therefore, PSNTs are desirable as suitable fillers of polymer membranes.

  10. Phosphorylated silica nanotubes: preparation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqing; Xu, Yan; Lu, Yiren; Zhao, Lili; Song, Lixin

    2013-08-09

    Recently, the strategy of doping inorganic particles into polymer membranes to modify them has been studied intensively. However, these inorganic particles have a disadvantage without being in good compatibility with the polymers. To enhance the compatibility between inorganic particles and polymers, phosphorylated silica nanotubes (PSNTs) with specific high ratios of length to diameter are prepared. Silica nanotubes (SNTs) are prepared through the hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate in a mixture of aqueous ammonia and dl-tartaric acid, then PSNTs are obtained by silylation and phosphorylation modifications. The optimum synthesis conditions of PSNTs are explored; in addition, the as-prepared PSNTs are characterized by Fourier transform infrared, transmission electron microscope, BET, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. The results indicate that the ratio of length to diameter of the PSNTs is approximately 20, the thickness of the tube wall is 20 nm, the specific surface area of the PSNTs is 460.2 m(2) g(-1), the inner diameter of the PSNTs is 76 nm, many mesopores are distributed in the tube walls of the PSNTs, and the PSNTs have numerous hydroxyl active sites along their length direction. Therefore, PSNTs are desirable as suitable fillers of polymer membranes.

  11. Phenobarbital Meets Phosphorylation of Nuclear Receptors.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Masahiko

    2017-05-01

    Phenobarbital was the first therapeutic drug to be characterized for its induction of hepatic drug metabolism. Essentially at the same time, cytochrome P450, an enzyme that metabolizes drugs, was discovered. After nearly 50 years of investigation, the molecular target of phenobarbital induction has now been delineated to phosphorylation at threonine 38 of the constitutive androstane receptor (NR1I3), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Determining this mechanism has provided us with the molecular basis to understand drug induction of drug metabolism and disposition. Threonine 38 is conserved as a phosphorylation motif in the majority of both mouse and human nuclear receptors, providing us with an opportunity to integrate diverse functions of nuclear receptors. Here, I review the works and accomplishments of my laboratory at the National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the future research directions of where our study of the constitutive androstane receptor might take us. U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  12. Protein phosphorylation networks in motor neuron death.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie Hong; Krieger, Charles

    2002-01-01

    The disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by the death of specific groups of neurons, especially motor neurons, which innervate skeletal muscle, and neurons connecting the cerebral cortex with motor neurons, such as corticospinal tract neurons. There have been numerous attempts to elucidate why there is selective involvement of motor neurons in ALS. Recent observations have demonstrated altered activities and protein levels of diverse kinases in the brain and spinal cord of transgenic mice that overexpress a mutant superoxide dismutase (mSOD) gene that is found in patients with the familial form of ALS, as well as in patients who have died with ALS. These results suggest that the alteration of protein phosphorylation may be involved in the pathogenesis of ALS. The changes in protein kinase and phosphatase expression and activity can affect the activation of important neuronal neurotransmitter receptors such as NMDA receptors or other signaling proteins and can trigger, or modify, the process producing neuronal loss in ALS. These various kinases, phosphatases and signaling proteins are involved in many signaling pathways; however, they have close interactions with each other. Therefore, an understanding of the role of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and the molecular organization of protein phosphorylation networks are useful to determine the mechanisms of selective motor neuron death.

  13. Regulation of cardiac C-protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic responses were addressed by studying subcellular changes in protein phosphorylation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity and protein phosphatase activity in frog hearts. B-adrenergic agonists increased and muscarinic cholinergic agonists decreased (/sup 32/P)phosphate incorporation into C-protein, a thick filament component. Regulation of protein phosphatase activity by Iso and methacholine (MCh) was assayed using extracts of drug treated frog hearts and (/sup 32/P)phospho-C-protein as substrate. Total phosphatase activity decreased 21% in extracts from hearts perfused with 0.1 ..mu..M Iso and 17% in hearts exposed to Iso plus 1 ..mu..M methacholine. This decrease reflected decreased phosphatase-2A activity. No changes in total phosphatase activity were measurable in broken cells treated with Iso or MCh. The results suggest adrenergic stimulation changes contractile activity in frog hearts by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase associated with particulate cellular elements and inactivating soluble protein phosphatase-2A. This is the first demonstration of coordinated regulation of these enzymes by B-adrenergic agonists favoring phosphorylation of effector proteins. Coordinated regulation by methacholine in the presence of Iso was not observed.

  14. Stat5a serine phosphorylation. Serine 779 is constitutively phosphorylated in the mammary gland, and serine 725 phosphorylation influences prolactin-stimulated in vitro DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Beuvink, I; Hess, D; Flotow, H; Hofsteenge, J; Groner, B; Hynes, N E

    2000-04-07

    The activity of transcription factors of the Stat family is controlled by phosphorylation of a conserved, carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Tyrosine phosphorylation is essential for Stat dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation of Stats on specific serine residues has also been described. We have previously shown that in HC11 mammary epithelial cells Stat5a is phosphorylated on Tyr(694) in a prolactin-sensitive manner, whereas serine phosphorylation is constitutive (Wartmann, M., Cella, N., Hofer, P., Groner, B., Xiuwen, L., Hennighausen, L., and Hynes, N. E. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31863-31868). By using mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, we have now identified Ser(779), located in a unique Stat5a SP motif, as the site of serine phosphorylation. By using phospho-Ser(779)-specific antiserum, we have determined that Ser(779) is constitutively phosphorylated in mammary glands taken from different developmental stages. Stat5a isolated from spleen, heart, brain, and lung was also found to be phosphorylated on Ser(779). Ser(725) in Stat5a has also been identified as a phosphorylation site (Yamashita, H., Xu, J., Erwin, R. A., Farrar, W. L., Kirken, R. A., and Rui, H. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 30218-30224). Here we show that mutagenesis of Ser(725), Ser(779), or a combination of Ser(725/779) to an Ala had no effect on prolactin-induced transcriptional activation of a beta-casein reporter construct. However, following prolactin induction the Ser(725) mutant displayed sustained DNA binding activity compared with that of wild type Stat5a. The results suggest that Ser(725) phosphorylation has an impact on signal duration.

  15. Kinetic analyses of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E binding to mRNA cap analogues.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mateen A; Goss, Dixie J

    2017-08-08

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factors was previously shown to interact with m(7)G cap and play an important role in the regulation of translation initiation of protein synthesis. To gain further insight into the phosphorylation process of plant protein synthesis, the kinetics of phosphorylated wheat eIFiso4E binding to m(7)G cap analogues were examined. Phosphorylation of wheat eIFiso4E showed similar kinetic effects to human eIF4E binding to m(7)-G cap. Phosphorylation of eIFiso4E decreased the kinetic rate (2-fold) and increased the dissociation rate (2-fold) as compared to non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E binding to both mono- and di-nucleotide analogues at 22°C. Phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E-m(7)G cap binding rates were found to be independent of concentration, suggesting conformational changes were rate limiting. Rate constant for phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E binding to m(7)-G cap increased with temperature. Phosphorylation of eIFiso4E decreased (2-fold) the activation energy for both m(7)-G cap analogues binding as compared to non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E. The reduced energy barrier for the formation of eIFiso4E-m(7)-G cap complex suggests a more stable platform for further initiation complex formation and possible means of adapting variety of environmental conditions. Furthermore, the formation of phosphorylated eIFiso4E-cap complex may contribute to modulation of the initiation of protein synthesis in plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.

    2016-09-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICBGlc, which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes.

  17. Tyrosine phosphorylation of clathrin heavy chain under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Yasuoka, Chie; Kageyama, Kan; Wada, Yoshinao; Kondo, Takahito

    2002-09-20

    In mouse pancreatic insulin-producing betaTC cells, oxidative stress due to H(2)O(2) causes tyrosine phosphorylation in various proteins. To identify proteins bearing phosphotyrosine under stress, the proteins were affinity purified using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody-conjugated agarose column. A protein of 180kDa was identified as clathrin heavy chain (CHC) by electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Immunoprecipitated CHC showed tyrosine phosphorylation upon H(2)O(2) treatment and the phosphorylation was suppressed by the Src kinase inhibitor, PP2. The phosphorylation status of CHC affected the intracellular localization of CHC and the clathrin-dependent endocytosis of transferrin under oxidative stress. In conclusion, CHC is a protein that is phosphorylated at tyrosine by H(2)O(2) and this phosphorylation status is implicated in the intracellular localization and functions of CHC under oxidative stress. The present study demonstrates that oxidative stress affects intracellular vesicular trafficking via the alteration of clathrin-dependent vesicular trafficking.

  18. Phosphorylation modifies the molecular stability of β-amyloid deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Amininasab, Mehriar; Kumar, Sathish; Walter, Jochen; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Protein aggregation plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases. A key feature of protein aggregates is their ubiquitous modification by phosphorylation. Little is known, however, about the molecular consequences of phosphorylation of protein aggregates. Here we show that phosphorylation of β-amyloid at serine 8 increases the stability of its pathogenic aggregates against high-pressure and SDS-induced dissociation. We further demonstrate that phosphorylation results in an elevated number of hydrogen bonds at the N terminus of β-amyloid, the region that is critically regulated by a variety of post-translational modifications. Because of the increased lifetime of phosphorylated β-amyloid aggregates, phosphorylation can promote the spreading of β-amyloid in Alzheimer pathogenesis. Our study suggests that regulation of the molecular stability of protein aggregates by post-translational modifications is a crucial factor for disease progression in the brain.

  19. Chemical Approaches to Studying Labile Amino Acid Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Marmelstein, Alan M; Moreno, Javier; Fiedler, Dorothea

    2017-04-01

    Phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is the archetypal posttranslational modification of proteins. While phosphorylation of these residues has become standard textbook knowledge, phosphorylation of other amino acid side chains is underappreciated and minimally characterized by comparison. This disparity is rooted in the relative instability of these chemically distinct amino acid side chain moieties, namely phosphoramidates, acyl phosphates, thiophosphates, and phosphoanhydrides. In the case of the O-phosphorylated amino acids, synthetic constructs were critical to assessing their stability and developing tools for their study. As the chemical biology community has become more aware of these alternative phosphorylation sites, methodology has been developed for the synthesis of well-characterized standards and close mimics of these phosphorylated amino acids as well. In this article, we review the synthetic chemistry that is a prerequisite to progress in this field.

  20. Phosphorylation modifies the molecular stability of β-amyloid deposits

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Amininasab, Mehriar; Kumar, Sathish; Walter, Jochen; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases. A key feature of protein aggregates is their ubiquitous modification by phosphorylation. Little is known, however, about the molecular consequences of phosphorylation of protein aggregates. Here we show that phosphorylation of β-amyloid at serine 8 increases the stability of its pathogenic aggregates against high-pressure and SDS-induced dissociation. We further demonstrate that phosphorylation results in an elevated number of hydrogen bonds at the N terminus of β-amyloid, the region that is critically regulated by a variety of post-translational modifications. Because of the increased lifetime of phosphorylated β-amyloid aggregates, phosphorylation can promote the spreading of β-amyloid in Alzheimer pathogenesis. Our study suggests that regulation of the molecular stability of protein aggregates by post-translational modifications is a crucial factor for disease progression in the brain. PMID:27072999

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis tarp is phosphorylated by src family tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Travis J; Dooley, Cheryl A; Mead, David J; Hackstadt, Ted

    2008-06-27

    The translocated actin recruiting phosphoprotein (Tarp) is injected into the cytosol shortly after Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to a target cell and subsequently phosphorylated by an unidentified tyrosine kinase. A role for Tarp phosphorylation in bacterial entry is unknown. In this study, recombinant C. trachomatis Tarp was employed to identify the host cell kinase(s) required for phosphorylation. Each tyrosine rich repeat of L2 Tarp harbors a sequence similar to a Src and Abl kinase consensus target. Furthermore, purified p60-src, Yes, Fyn, and Abl kinases were able to phosphorylate Tarp. Mutagenesis of potential tyrosines within a single tyrosine rich repeat peptide indicated that both Src and Abl kinases phosphorylate the same residues suggesting that C. trachomatis Tarp may serve as a substrate for multiple host cell kinases. Surprisingly, chemical inhibition of Src and Abl kinases prevented Tarp phosphorylation in culture and had no measurable effect on bacterial entry into host cells.

  2. Control of Collagen Triple Helix Stability by Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Jake, Amanda M; Ngo, Daniel H; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2017-03-10

    The phosphorylation of the collagen triple helix plays an important role in collagen synthesis, assembly, signaling, and immune response, although no reports detailing the effect this modification has on the structure and stability of the triple helix exist. Here we investigate the changes in stability and structure resulting from the phosphorylation of collagen. Additionally, the formation of pairwise interactions between phosphorylated residues and lysine is examined. In all tested cases, phosphorylation increases helix stability. When charged-pair interactions are possible, stabilization via phosphorylation can play a very large role, resulting inasmuch as a 13.0 °C increase in triple helix stability. Two-dimensional NMR and molecular modeling are used to study the local structure of the triple helix. Our results suggest a mechanism of action for phosphorylation in the regulation of collagen and also expand upon our understanding of pairwise amino acid stabilization of the collagen triple helix.

  3. Evolutionary constraints of phosphorylation in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gnad, Florian; Forner, Francesca; Zielinska, Dorota F; Birney, Ewan; Gunawardena, Jeremy; Mann, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    High accuracy mass spectrometry has proven to be a powerful technology for the large scale identification of serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation in the living cell. However, despite many described phosphoproteomes, there has been no comparative study of the extent of phosphorylation and its evolutionary conservation in all domains of life. Here we analyze the results of phosphoproteomics studies performed with the same technology in a diverse set of organisms. For the most ancient organisms, the prokaryotes, only a few hundred proteins have been found to be phosphorylated. Applying the same technology to eukaryotic species resulted in the detection of thousands of phosphorylation events. Evolutionary analysis shows that prokaryotic phosphoproteins are preferentially conserved in all living organisms, whereas-site specific phosphorylation is not. Eukaryotic phosphosites are generally more conserved than their non-phosphorylated counterparts (with similar structural constraints) throughout the eukaryotic domain. Yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans are two exceptions, indicating that the majority of phosphorylation events evolved after the divergence of higher eukaryotes from yeast and reflecting the unusually large number of nematode-specific kinases. Mitochondria present an interesting intermediate link between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic domains. Applying the same technology to this organelle yielded 174 phosphorylation sites mapped to 74 proteins. Thus, the mitochondrial phosphoproteome is similarly sparse as the prokaryotic phosphoproteomes. As expected from the endosymbiotic theory, phosphorylated as well as non-phosphorylated mitochondrial proteins are significantly conserved in prokaryotes. However, mitochondrial phosphorylation sites are not conserved throughout prokaryotes, consistent with the notion that serine/threonine phosphorylation in prokaryotes occurred relatively recently in evolution. Thus, the phosphoproteome reflects major events in the

  4. Myc oncoproteins are phosphorylated by casein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Lüscher, B; Kuenzel, E A; Krebs, E G; Eisenman, R N

    1989-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CK-II) is a ubiquitous protein kinase, localized to both nucleus and cytoplasm, with strong specificity for serine residues positioned within clusters of acidic amino acids. We have found that a number of nuclear oncoproteins share a CK-II phosphorylation sequence motif, including Myc, Myb, Fos, E1a and SV40 T antigen. In this paper we show that cellular myc-encoded proteins, derived from avian and human cells, can serve as substrates for phosphorylation by purified CK-II in vitro and that this phosphorylation is reversible. One- and two-dimensional mapping experiments demonstrate that the major phosphopeptides from in vivo phosphorylated Myc correspond to the phosphopeptides produced from Myc phosphorylated in vitro by CK-II. In addition, synthetic peptides with sequences corresponding to putative CK-II phosphorylation sites in Myc are subject to multiple, highly efficient phosphorylations by CK-II, and can act as competitive inhibitors of CK-II phosphorylation of Myc in vitro. We have used such peptides to map the phosphorylated regions in Myc and have located major CK-II phosphorylations within the central highly acidic domain and within a region proximal to the C terminus. Our results, along with previous studies on myc deletion mutants, show that Myc is phosphorylated by CK-II, or a kinase with similar specificity, in regions of functional importance. Since CK-II can be rapidly activated after mitogen treatment we postulate that CK-II mediated phosphorylation of Myc plays a role in signal transduction to the nucleus. Images PMID:2663470

  5. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chang, Audrey N; Battiprolu, Pavan K; Cowley, Patrick M; Chen, Guohua; Gerard, Robert D; Pinto, Jose R; Hill, Joseph A; Baker, Anthony J; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2015-04-24

    In beating hearts, phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) at a single site to 0.45 mol of phosphate/mol by cardiac myosin light chain kinase (cMLCK) increases Ca(2+) sensitivity of myofilament contraction necessary for normal cardiac performance. Reduction of RLC phosphorylation in conditional cMLCK knock-out mice caused cardiac dilation and loss of cardiac performance by 1 week, as shown by increased left ventricular internal diameter at end-diastole and decreased fractional shortening. Decreased RLC phosphorylation by conventional or conditional cMLCK gene ablation did not affect troponin-I or myosin-binding protein-C phosphorylation in vivo. The extent of RLC phosphorylation was not changed by prolonged infusion of dobutamine or treatment with a β-adrenergic antagonist, suggesting that RLC is constitutively phosphorylated to maintain cardiac performance. Biochemical studies with myofilaments showed that RLC phosphorylation up to 90% was a random process. RLC is slowly dephosphorylated in both noncontracting hearts and isolated cardiac myocytes from adult mice. Electrically paced ventricular trabeculae restored RLC phosphorylation, which was increased to 0.91 mol of phosphate/mol of RLC with inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP). The two RLCs in each myosin appear to be readily available for phosphorylation by a soluble cMLCK, but MLCP activity limits the amount of constitutive RLC phosphorylation. MLCP with its regulatory subunit MYPT2 bound tightly to myofilaments was constitutively phosphorylated in beating hearts at a site that inhibits MLCP activity. Thus, the constitutive RLC phosphorylation is limited physiologically by low cMLCK activity in balance with low MLCP activity.

  6. Sequential Phosphorylation of Smoothened Transduces Graded Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ying; Ospina, Jason K.; Zhang, Junzheng; Michelson, Andrew P.; Schoen, Adam M.; Zhu, Alan Jian

    2012-01-01

    The correct interpretation of a gradient of the morphogen Hedgehog (Hh) during development requires phosphorylation of the Hh signaling activator Smoothened (Smo); however, the molecular mechanism by which Smo transduces graded Hh signaling is not well understood. We show that regulation of the phosphorylation status of Smo by distinct phosphatases at specific phosphorylated residues creates differential thresholds of Hh signaling. Phosphorylation of Smo was initiated by adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP)–dependent protein kinase (PKA) and further enhanced by casein kinase I (CKI). We found that protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) directly dephosphorylated PKA-phosphorylated Smo to reduce signaling mediated by intermediate concentrations of Hh, whereas PP2A specifically dephosphorylated PKA-primed, CKI-phosphorylated Smo to restrict signaling by high concentrations of Hh. We also established a functional link between sequentially phosphorylated Smo species and graded Hh activity. Thus, we propose a sequential phosphorylation model in which precise interpretation of morphogen concentration can be achieved upon versatile phosphatase-mediated regulation of the phosphorylation status of an essential activator in developmental signaling. PMID:21730325

  7. Mapping of phosphorylation sites in polyomavirus large T antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hassauer, M.; Scheidtmann, K.H.; Walter, G.

    1986-06-01

    The phosphorylation sites of polyomavirus large T antigen from infected or transformed cells were investigated. Tryptic digestion of large T antigen from infected, /sup 32/P/sub i/-labeled cells revealed seven major phosphopeptides. Five of these were phosphorylated only at serine residues, and two were phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues. The overall ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine was 6:1. The transformed cell line B4 expressed two polyomavirus-specific phosphoproteins: large T antigen, which was only weakly phosphorylated, and a truncated form of large T antigen of 34,000 molecular weight which was heavily phosphorylated. Both showed phosphorylation patterns similar to that of large T antigen from infected cells. Peptide analyses of large T antigens encoded by the deletion mutants dl8 and dl23 or of specific fragments of wild-type large T antigen indicated that the phosphorylation sites are located in an amino-terminal region upstream of residue 194. The amino acid composition of the phosphopeptides as revealed by differential labeling with various amino acids indicated that several phosphopeptides contain overlapping sequences and that all phosphorylation sites are located in four tryptic peptides derived from a region between Met71 and Arg191. Two of the potential phosphorylation sites were identified as Ser81 and Thr187. The possible role of this modification of large T antigen is discussed.

  8. Kinases, tails and more: regulation of PTEN function by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Rita; Barata, João T

    2015-05-01

    Phosphorylation regulates the conformation, stability, homo- and heterotypic protein interactions, localization, and activity of the tumor suppressor PTEN. From a simple picture, at the beginning of this millennium, recognizing that CK2 phosphorylated PTEN at the C-terminus and thereby impacted on PTEN stability and activity, research has led to a significantly more complex scenario today, where for instance GSK3, Plk3, ATM, ROCK or Src-family kinases are also gaining the spotlight in this evolving play. Here, we review the current knowledge on the kinases that phosphorylate PTEN, and on the impact that specific phosphorylation events have on PTEN function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phosphorylation of Dopamine Transporter Serine 7 Modulates Cocaine Analog Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Amy E.; Foster, James D.; Gorentla, Balachandra K.; Mazei-Robison, Michelle S.; Yang, Jae-Won; Sitte, Harald H.; Blakely, Randy D.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2013-01-01

    As an approach to elucidating dopamine transporter (DAT) phosphorylation characteristics, we examined in vitro phosphorylation of a recombinant rat DAT N-terminal peptide (NDAT) using purified protein kinases. We found that NDAT becomes phosphorylated at single distinct sites by protein kinase A (Ser-7) and calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Ser-13) and at multiple sites (Ser-4, Ser-7, and Ser-13) by protein kinase C (PKC), implicating these residues as potential sites of DAT phosphorylation by these kinases. Mapping of rat striatal DAT phosphopeptides by two-dimensional thin layer chromatography revealed basal and PKC-stimulated phosphorylation of the same peptide fragments and comigration of PKC-stimulated phosphopeptide fragments with NDAT Ser-7 phosphopeptide markers. We further confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and mass spectrometry that Ser-7 is a site for PKC-stimulated phosphorylation in heterologously expressed rat and human DATs. Mutation of Ser-7 and nearby residues strongly reduced the affinity of rat DAT for the cocaine analog (−)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl) tropane (CFT), whereas in rat striatal tissue, conditions that promote DAT phosphorylation caused increased CFT affinity. Ser-7 mutation also affected zinc modulation of CFT binding, with Ala and Asp substitutions inducing opposing effects. These results identify Ser-7 as a major site for basal and PKC-stimulated phosphorylation of native and expressed DAT and suggest that Ser-7 phosphorylation modulates transporter conformational equilibria, shifting the transporter between high and low affinity cocaine binding states. PMID:23161550

  10. A coulombic hypothesis of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Malpress, F H

    1984-08-21

    A coulombic hypothesis of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is presented, founded upon the evidence for negative fixed charge formation during electron transport chain activity. The intermediary force is electrostatic (psi H) and not electrochemical (delta mu H). The electrochemical potential of the chemiosmotic hypothesis is identified as a "phantom" parameter which owes its delusive existence to the procedures by which it is measured. The connection between psi H and the conditional delta mu H values is examined; it entails the use of a variable conversion factor, f, where delta mu H (mV) = f psi H, and the concept of the "protonic status" of the diffuse double layer. A number of problems which beset the chemiosmotic view are reappraised in the light of the new interpretation, and find authentic solutions.

  11. Two Pdk1 phosphorylation sites on the plant cell death suppressor Adi3 contribute to substrate phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Joel W.; Nelson Dittrich, Anna C.; Chen, Sixue; Avila, Julian; Giavalisco, Patrick; Devarenne, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    The tomato AGC kinase Adi3 is phosphorylated by Pdk1 for activation of its cell death suppression activity. The Pdk1 phosphorylation site for activation of Adi3 is at Ser539. However, there is at least one additional Pdk1 phosphorylation site on Adi3 that has an unknown function. Here we identify an Arabidopsis thaliana sequence homologue of Adi3 termed AGC1-3. Two Pdk1 phosphorylation sites were identified on AGC1-3, activation site Ser596 and Ser269, and by homology Ser212 on Adi3 was identified as a second Pdk1 phosphorylation site. While Ser212 is not required for Adi3 autophosphorylation, Ser212 was shown to be required for full phosphorylation of the Adi3 substrate Gal83. PMID:23507047

  12. The regulation of STIM1 by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pozo-Guisado, Eulalia; Martin-Romero, Francisco Javier

    2013-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) concentration plays a key role in cell signaling in eukaryotic cells. At the cellular level, Ca2+ directly participates in such diverse cellular events as adhesion and migration, differentiation, contraction, secretion, synaptic transmission, fertilization, and cell death. As a consequence of these diverse actions, the cytosolic concentration of free Ca2+ is tightly regulated by the coordinated activity of Ca2+ channels, Ca2+ pumps, and Ca2+-binding proteins. Although many of these regulators have been studied in depth, other proteins have been described recently, and naturally far less is known about their contribution to cell physiology. Within this last group of proteins, STIM1 has emerged as a major contributor to Ca2+ signaling by means of its activity as Ca2+ channel regulator. STIM1 is a protein resident mainly, but not exclusively, in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and activates a set of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels termed store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) when the concentration of free Ca2+ within the ER drops transiently as a result of Ca2+ release from this compartment. Knowledge regarding the molecular architecture of STIM1 has grown considerably during the last years, and several structural domains within STIM1 have been reported to be required for the specific molecular interactions with other important players in Ca2+ signaling, such as Ca2+ channels and microtubules. Within the modulators of STIM1, phosphorylation has been shown to both activate and inactivate STIM1-dependent Ca2+ entry depending on the cell type, cell cycle phase, and the specific residue that becomes modified. Here we shall review current knowledge regarding the modulation of STIM1 by phosphorylation. PMID:24505502

  13. Phosphorylation of proteoglycans from human articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.S.; Schwartz, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sulfated proteoglycans from human articular and epiphyseal cartilage were phosphorylated. These macromolecules contribute to the stiffness and resiliency of this tissue. We demonstrate here that the phosphate moieties are an integral part of proteoglycan subunits. Specifically, evidence is presented which indicates that proteoglycan monomers contain 3 to 4 phosphate moieties per core protein and that these appear to exist as phosphoserine residues. Furthermore, the data illustrate that human articular cartilage also contains more than 20 different phosphoproteins, some of which are closely associated with proteoglycan aggregates. Proteoglycan subunits were purified from extracts of articular cartilage or from media fractions which had been used to label tissue specimens with 32P-orthophosphate. Chemical and radiographic analyses revealed that the phosphate concentration with respect to sulfate and uronic acid content remained constant when purified proteoglycan monomers were subjected to equilibrium ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography. That the phosphate moieties were bound to proteoglycan monomers via monoester linkages was indicated by the release of 32P-orthophosphate from proteoglycan subunits incubated under mild alkaline conditions or reacted with acid or alkaline phosphatases. Identification of serine residues in the core protein as the sites of phosphorylation was made by autoradiography of thin layer plates on which hydrolyzed samples of purified 32P-proteoglycan subunits had been subjected to 2-dimensional electrophoresis/chromatography. Quantification of 3 to 4 phosphate moieties per core protein of 200,000 daltons was made by chemical analysis of inorganic phosphate released from proteoglycans by acid hydrolysis.

  14. Mitogen-independent phosphorylation of S6K1 and decreased ribosomal S6 phosphorylation in senescent human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Hoff, H; Marinucci, T; Cristofalo, V J; Sell, C

    2000-08-25

    The p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (S6K1) is rapidly activated following growth factor stimulation of quiescent fibroblasts and inhibition of this enzyme results in a G(1) arrest. Phosphorylation of the ribosomal S6 protein by S6K1 regulates the translation of both ribosomal proteins and initiation factors, leading to an increase in protein synthesis. We have examined the activation of S6K1 in human fibroblasts following mitogen stimulation. In early passage fibroblasts S6K1 is activated following serum stimulation as evidenced by increased kinase activity and site-specific phosphorylation. In contrast, site-specific phosphorylation of S6K1 at Thr421/Ser424 is diminished in senescent fibroblast cultures. A second phosphorylation site within S6K1 (Ser411) is phosphorylated even in the absence of serum stimulation and the enzyme shows increased phosphorylation as judged by decreased electrophoretic mobility. Inhibitor studies indicate that this phosphorylation is dependent upon the mammalian target of rapamycin, PI 3-kinase, and the MAPK pathway. In order to understand the consequences of the altered phosphorylation of the S6K1, we examined the phosphorylation state of the ribosomal S6 protein. In early passage fibroblasts the ribosomal S6 protein is phosphorylated upon serum stimulation while the phosphorylation of the ribosomal S6 protein is drastically reduced in senescent fibroblasts. These results suggest that the intracellular regulators of S6K1 are altered during replicative senescence leading to a deregulation of the enzyme and a loss of ribosomal S6 phosphorylation.

  15. The Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System: Regulation by Protein Phosphorylation and Phosphorylation-Dependent Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  16. A grammar inference approach for predicting kinase specific phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sutapa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    Kinase mediated phosphorylation site detection is the key mechanism of post translational mechanism that plays an important role in regulating various cellular processes and phenotypes. Many diseases, like cancer are related with the signaling defects which are associated with protein phosphorylation. Characterizing the protein kinases and their substrates enhances our ability to understand the mechanism of protein phosphorylation and extends our knowledge of signaling network; thereby helping us to treat such diseases. Experimental methods for predicting phosphorylation sites are labour intensive and expensive. Also, manifold increase of protein sequences in the databanks over the years necessitates the improvement of high speed and accurate computational methods for predicting phosphorylation sites in protein sequences. Till date, a number of computational methods have been proposed by various researchers in predicting phosphorylation sites, but there remains much scope of improvement. In this communication, we present a simple and novel method based on Grammatical Inference (GI) approach to automate the prediction of kinase specific phosphorylation sites. In this regard, we have used a popular GI algorithm Alergia to infer Deterministic Stochastic Finite State Automata (DSFA) which equally represents the regular grammar corresponding to the phosphorylation sites. Extensive experiments on several datasets generated by us reveal that, our inferred grammar successfully predicts phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner. It performs significantly better when compared with the other existing phosphorylation site prediction methods. We have also compared our inferred DSFA with two other GI inference algorithms. The DSFA generated by our method performs superior which indicates that our method is robust and has a potential for predicting the phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner.

  17. In vivo phosphorylation of adaptors regulates their interaction with clathrin.

    PubMed

    Wilde, A; Brodsky, F M

    1996-11-01

    The coat proteins of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCV) spontaneously self-assemble in vitro, but, in vivo, their self-assembly must be regulated. To determine whether phosphorylation might influence coat formation in the cell, the in vivo phosphorylation state of CCV coat proteins was analyzed. Individual components of the CCV coat were isolated by immunoprecipitation from Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells, labeled with [32P]orthophosphate under normal culture conditions. The predominant phosphoproteins identified were subunits of the AP1 and AP2 adaptors. These included three of the four 100-kD adaptor subunits, alpha and beta 2 of AP2 and beta 1 of AP1, but not the gamma subunit of AP1. In addition, the mu 1 and mu 2 subunits of AP1 and AP2 were phosphorylated under these conditions. Lower levels of in vivo phosphorylation were detected for the clathrin heavy and light chains. Analysis of phosphorylation sites of the 100-kD adaptor subunits indicated they were phosphorylated on serines in their hinge regions, domains that have been implicated in clathrin binding. In vitro clathrin-binding assays revealed that, upon phosphorylation, adaptors no longer bind to clathrin. In vivo analysis further revealed that adaptors with phosphorylated 100-kD subunits predominated in the cytosol, in comparison with adaptors associated with cellular membranes, and that phosphorylated beta 2 subunits of AP2 were exclusively cytosolic. Kinase activity, which converts adaptors to a phosphorylated state in which they no longer bind clathrin, was found associated with the CCV coat. These results suggest that adaptor phosphorylation influences adaptor-clathrin interactions in vivo and could have a role in controlling coat disassembly and reassembly.

  18. PKCβ–dependent phosphorylation of the glycine transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Medrano, Javier; Castrejon-Tellez, Vicente; Fernando, Plenge; Ramirez, Ivan; Miranda, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The extracellular levels of the neurotransmitter glycine in the brain are tightly regulated by the glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) and the clearance rate for glycine depends on its rate of transport and the levels of cell surface GlyT1. Over the years, it has been shown that PKC tightly regulates the activity of several neurotransmitter transporters. In the present work, by stably expressing three N-terminus GlyT1 isoforms in porcine aortic endothelial cells and assaying for [32P]-orthophosphate metabolic labeling, we demonstrated that the isoforms GlyT1a, GlyT1b, and GlyT1c were constitutively phosphorylated, and that phosphorylation was dramatically enhanced, in a time dependent fashion, after PKC activation by phorbol ester. The phosphorylation was PKC-dependent, since pre-incubation of the cells with bisindolylmaleimide I, a selective PKC inhibitor, abolished the phorbol ester-induced phosphorylation. Blotting with specific anti-phospho-tyrosine antibodies did not yield any signal that could correspond to GlyT1 tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting that the phosphorylation occurs at serine and/or threonine residues. In addition, a 23-40% -inhibition on Vmax was obtained by incubation with phorbol ester without a significant change on the apparent Km value. Furthermore, pre-incubation of the cells with the selective PKCα/β inhibitor Gö6976 abolished the downregulation effect of phorbol ester on uptake and phosphorylation, whereas the selective PKCβ inhibitors (PKCβ inhibitor or LY333531) prevented the phosphorylation without affecting glycine uptake, defining a specific role of classical PKC on GlyT1 uptake and phosphorylation. Taken together, these data suggest that phosphorylation that conventional PKCα/β regulates the uptake of glycine, whereas PKCβ is responsible for GlyT1 phosphorylation. PMID:21864610

  19. ROCKII Ser1366 phosphorylation reflects the activation status.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiang-Hao; Yang, Chih-Hsuan; Tsay, Yeou-Guang; Hsu, Chih-Yi; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Chang, Zee-Fen; Lee, Hsiao-Hui

    2012-04-01

    ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase), a downstream effector of RhoA, plays an important role in many cellular processes. Accumulating evidence has shown the involvement of ROCK activation in the pathogenesis of many diseases. However, a reagent capable of detecting ROCK activation directly is lacking. In the present study, we show autophosphorylation of ROCKII in an in vitro kinase reaction. The phosphorylation sites were identified by MS, and the major phosphorylation site was found to be at the highly conserved residue Ser1366. A phospho-specific antibody was generated that can specifically recognize ROCKII Ser1366 phosphorylation. We found that the extent of Ser1366 phosphorylation of endogenous ROCKII is correlated with that of myosin light chain phosphorylation in cells in response to RhoA stimulation, showing that Ser1366 phosphorylation reflects its kinase activity. In addition, ROCKII Ser1366 phosphorylation could be detected in human breast tumours by immunohistochemical staining. The present study provides a new approach for revealing the ROCKII activation status by probing ROCKII Ser1366 phosphorylation directly in cells or tissues.

  20. The role of the VQIVYK peptide in tau protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Mar; Santa-María, Ismael; Tortosa, Elena; Cuadros, Raquel; Del Valle, Mercedes; Hernández, Felix; Moreno, Francisco J; Avila, Jesús

    2007-11-01

    Although it remains unclear whether they are related to one another, tau aggregation and phosphorylation are the main pathological hallmarks of the neuronal disorders known as tauopathies. The capacity to aggregate is impaired in a variant of the tau 3R isoform that lacks residues 306-311 (nomenclature for the largest CNS tau isoform) and hence, we have taken advantage of this feature to study how phosphorylation and aggregation may be related as well as the role of this six amino acid peptide (VQIVYK). Through these analyses, we found that the phosphorylation of the tau variant was higher than that of the complete tau protein and that not only the deletion of these residues, but also the interaction of these residues, in tau 3R, with thioflavin-S augmented tau phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3. In addition, the binding of the peptide containing the residues 306-311 to the whole tau protein provoked an increase in tau phosphorylation. This observation could be physiologically relevant as may suggest that tau-tau interactions, through those residues, facilitate tau phosphorylation. In summary, our data indicate that deletion of residues VQIVYK, in tau protein produces an increase in tau phosphorylation, without tau aggregation, because the VQIVYK peptide, that favors aggregation, is missing. On the other hand, when the whole tau protein interacts with thioflavin-S or the peptide VQIVYK, an increase in both aggregation and phosphorylation occurs.

  1. Anillin Phosphorylation Controls Timely Membrane Association and Successful Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjung; Johnson, James M.; Brahma, Sarang; Burkard, Mark E.

    2017-01-01

    During cytokinesis, a contractile ring generates the constricting force to divide a cell into two daughters. This ring is composed of filamentous actin and the motor protein myosin, along with additional structural and regulatory proteins, including anillin. Anillin is a required scaffold protein that links the actomyosin ring to membrane and its organizer, RhoA. However, the molecular basis for timely action of anillin at cytokinesis remains obscure. Here, we find that phosphorylation regulates efficient recruitment of human anillin to the equatorial membrane. Anillin is highly phosphorylated in mitosis, and is a substrate for mitotic kinases. We surveyed function of 46 residues on anillin previously found to be phosphorylated in human cells to identify those required for cytokinesis. Among these sites, we identified S635 as a key site mediating cytokinesis. Preventing S635 phosphorylation adjacent to the AH domain disrupts anillin concentration at the equatorial cortex at anaphase, whereas a phosphomimetic mutant, S635D, partially restores this localization. Time-lapse videomicroscopy reveals impaired recruitment of S635A anillin to equatorial membrane and a transient unstable furrow followed by ultimate failure in cytokinesis. A phosphospecific antibody confirms phosphorylation at S635 in late cytokinesis, although it does not detect phosphorylation in early cytokinesis, possibly due to adjacent Y634 phosphorylation. Together, these findings reveal that anillin recruitment to the equatorial cortex at anaphase onset is enhanced by phosphorylation and promotes successful cytokinesis. PMID:28081137

  2. Phosphorylation of the Goodpasture antigen by type A protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Revert, F; Penadés, J R; Plana, M; Bernal, D; Johansson, C; Itarte, E; Cervera, J; Wieslander, J; Quinones, S; Saus, J

    1995-06-02

    Collagen IV is the major component of basement membranes. The human alpha 3 chain of collagen IV contains an antigenic domain called the Goodpasture antigen that is the target for the circulating immunopathogenic antibodies present in patients with Goodpasture syndrome. Characteristically, the gene region encoding the Goodpasture antigen generates multiple alternative products that retain the antigen amino-terminal region with a five-residue motif (KRGDS). The serine therein appears to be the major in vitro cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site in the isolated antigen and can be phosphorylated in vitro by two protein kinases of approximately 50 and 41 kDa associated with human kidney plasma membrane, suggesting that it can also be phosphorylated in vivo. Consistent with this, the Goodpasture antigen is isolated from human kidney in phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms and only the non-phosphorylated form is susceptible to phosphorylation in vitro. Since this motif is exclusive to the human alpha 3(IV) chain and includes the RGD cell adhesion motif, its phosphorylation might play a role in pathogenesis and influence cell attachment to basement membrane.

  3. Toward a systems-level view of dynamic phosphorylation networks

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Robert H.; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Heng

    2014-01-01

    To better understand how cells sense and respond to their environment, it is important to understand the organization and regulation of the phosphorylation networks that underlie most cellular signal transduction pathways. These networks, which are composed of protein kinases, protein phosphatases and their respective cellular targets, are highly dynamic. Importantly, to achieve signaling specificity, phosphorylation networks must be regulated at several levels, including at the level of protein expression, substrate recognition, and spatiotemporal modulation of enzymatic activity. Here, we briefly summarize some of the traditional methods used to study the phosphorylation status of cellular proteins before focusing our attention on several recent technological advances, such as protein microarrays, quantitative mass spectrometry, and genetically-targetable fluorescent biosensors, that are offering new insights into the organization and regulation of cellular phosphorylation networks. Together, these approaches promise to lead to a systems-level view of dynamic phosphorylation networks. PMID:25177341

  4. Importance of tyrosine phosphorylation in receptor kinase complexes.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-05-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that is known to regulate receptor kinase (RK)-mediated signaling in animals. Plant RKs are annotated as serine/threonine kinases, but recent work has revealed that tyrosine phosphorylation is also crucial for the activation of RK-mediated signaling in plants. These initial observations have paved the way for subsequent detailed studies on the mechanism of activation of plant RKs and the biological relevance of tyrosine phosphorylation for plant growth and immunity. In this Opinion article we review recent reports on the contribution of RK tyrosine phosphorylation in plant growth and immunity; we propose that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a major regulatory role in the initiation and transduction of RK-mediated signaling in plants.

  5. Identification of a single phosphorylation site within octopus rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ohguro, H; Yoshida, N; Shindou, H; Crabb, J W; Palczewski, K; Tsuda, M

    1998-12-01

    Light-dependent phosphorylation of rhodopsin (Rho) is a first step in the desensitization of the signaling state of the receptor during vertebrate and invertebrate visual transduction. We found that only 358Ser of the photoactivated octopus Rho (oRho*) was phosphorylated by octopus rhodopsin kinase (oRK). Tryptic truncation of the C-terminal PPQGY repeats of oRho that follow the phosphorylation region did not influence spectral or G-protein activation properties of oRho but abolished phosphorylation. Despite significant structural differences between oRK and mammalian RK, these results provide further evidence of the importance of singly phosphorylated species of Rho* in the generation of arrestin binding sites.

  6. Altered protein phosphorylation as a resource for potential AD biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Müller, Thorsten; Oliveira, Joana Machado; Cova, Marta; da Cruz e Silva, Cristóvão B.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ, provokes a series of events affecting distinct cellular pathways regulated by protein phosphorylation. Aβ inhibits protein phosphatases in a dose-dependent manner, thus it is expected that the phosphorylation state of specific proteins would be altered in response to Aβ. In fact several Alzheimer’s disease related proteins, such as APP and TAU, exhibit pathology associated hyperphosphorylated states. A systems biology approach was adopted and the phosphoproteome, of primary cortical neuronal cells exposed to Aβ, was evaluated. Phosphorylated proteins were recovered and those whose recovery increased or decreased, upon Aβ exposure across experimental sets, were identified. Significant differences were evident for 141 proteins and investigation of their interactors revealed key protein clusters responsive to Aβ treatment. Of these, 73 phosphorylated proteins increased and 68 decreased upon Aβ addition. These phosphorylated proteins represent an important resource of potential AD phospho biomarkers that should be further pursued. PMID:27466139

  7. Biocatalytic Asymmetric Phosphorylation Catalyzed by Recombinant Glycerate-2-Kinase.

    PubMed

    Hardt, Norman; Kinfu, Birhanu M; Chow, Jennifer; Schoenenberger, Bernhard; Streit, Wolfgang R; Obkircher, Markus; Wohlgemuth, Roland

    2017-08-04

    The efficient synthesis of pure d-glycerate-2-phosphate is of great interest due to its importance as an enzyme substrate and metabolite. Therefore, we investigated a straightforward one-step biocatalytic phosphorylation of glyceric acid. Glycerate-2-kinase from Thermotoga maritima was expressed in Escherichia coli, allowing easy purification. The selective glycerate-2-kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation was followed by (31) P NMR and showed excellent enantioselectivity towards phosphorylation of the d-enantiomer of glyceric acid. This straightforward phosphorylation reaction and subsequent product isolation enabled the preparation of enantiomerically pure d-glycerate 2-phosphate. This phosphorylation reaction, using recombinant glycerate-2-kinase, yielded d-glycerate 2-phosphate in fewer reaction steps and with higher purity than chemical routes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Altered protein phosphorylation as a resource for potential AD biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Müller, Thorsten; Oliveira, Joana Machado; Cova, Marta; da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão B; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A B

    2016-07-28

    The amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ, provokes a series of events affecting distinct cellular pathways regulated by protein phosphorylation. Aβ inhibits protein phosphatases in a dose-dependent manner, thus it is expected that the phosphorylation state of specific proteins would be altered in response to Aβ. In fact several Alzheimer's disease related proteins, such as APP and TAU, exhibit pathology associated hyperphosphorylated states. A systems biology approach was adopted and the phosphoproteome, of primary cortical neuronal cells exposed to Aβ, was evaluated. Phosphorylated proteins were recovered and those whose recovery increased or decreased, upon Aβ exposure across experimental sets, were identified. Significant differences were evident for 141 proteins and investigation of their interactors revealed key protein clusters responsive to Aβ treatment. Of these, 73 phosphorylated proteins increased and 68 decreased upon Aβ addition. These phosphorylated proteins represent an important resource of potential AD phospho biomarkers that should be further pursued.

  9. Modulation of soluble guanylate cyclase activity by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Karnam S

    2004-11-01

    The levels of the cGMP in smooth muscle of the gut reflect continued synthesis by soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) and breakdown by phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5). Soluble GC is a haem-containing, heterodimeric protein consisting alpha- and beta-subunits: each subunit has N-terminal regulatory domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The haem moiety acts as an intracellular receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and determines the ability of NO to activate the enzyme and generate cGMP. In the present study the mechanism by which protein kinases regulate soluble GC in gastric smooth muscle was examined. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) acting as a NO donor stimulated soluble GC activity and increased cGMP levels. SNP induced soluble GC phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent fashion. SNP-induced soluble GC phosphorylation was abolished by the selective cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitors, Rp-cGMPS and KT-5823. In contrast, SNP-stimulated soluble GC activity and cGMP levels were significantly enhanced by Rp-cGMPS and KT-5823. Phosphorylation and inhibition of soluble GC were PKG specific, as selective activator of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, Sp-5, 6-DCl-cBiMPS had no effect on SNP-induced soluble GC phosphorylation and activity. The ability of PKG to stimulate soluble GC phosphorylation was demonstrated in vitro by back phosphorylation technique. Addition of purified phosphatase 1 inhibited soluble GC phosphorylation in vitro, and inhibition was reversed by a high concentration (10 microM) of okadaic acid. In gastric smooth muscle cells, inhibition of phosphatase activity by okadaic acid increased soluble GC phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent fashion. The increase in soluble GC phosphorylation inhibited SNP-stimulated soluble GC activity and cGMP formation. The results implied the feedback inhibition of soluble GC activity by PKG-dependent phosphorylation impeded further formation of cGMP.

  10. Cardiac mitochondrial matrix and respiratory complex protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Covian, Raul

    2012-01-01

    It has become appreciated over the last several years that protein phosphorylation within the cardiac mitochondrial matrix and respiratory complexes is extensive. Given the importance of oxidative phosphorylation and the balance of energy metabolism in the heart, the potential regulatory effect of these classical signaling events on mitochondrial function is of interest. However, the functional impact of protein phosphorylation and the kinase/phosphatase system responsible for it are relatively unknown. Exceptions include the well-characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase and branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase regulatory system. The first task of this review is to update the current status of protein phosphorylation detection primarily in the matrix and evaluate evidence linking these events with enzymatic function or protein processing. To manage the scope of this effort, we have focused on the pathways involved in energy metabolism. The high sensitivity of modern methods of detecting protein phosphorylation and the low specificity of many kinases suggests that detection of protein phosphorylation sites without information on the mole fraction of phosphorylation is difficult to interpret, especially in metabolic enzymes, and is likely irrelevant to function. However, several systems including protein translocation, adenine nucleotide translocase, cytochrome c, and complex IV protein phosphorylation have been well correlated with enzymatic function along with the classical dehydrogenase systems. The second task is to review the current understanding of the kinase/phosphatase system within the matrix. Though it is clear that protein phosphorylation occurs within the matrix, based on 32P incorporation and quantitative mass spectrometry measures, the kinase/phosphatase system responsible for this process is ill-defined. An argument is presented that remnants of the much more labile bacterial protein phosphoryl transfer system may be present in the matrix and that the

  11. Regulation of renal fibrosis by Smad3 Thr388 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xinli; Li, Xueling; Zheng, Yaowu; Ren, Yi; Puelles, Victor G; Caruana, Georgina; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Li, Jinhua

    2014-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) promotes tissue fibrosis via receptor-mediated phosphorylation of the receptor-activated Smad2/3, together with Smad4. Of these, Smad3 plays a major profibrotic role in mouse models of tissue fibrosis. Transcriptional activity of the Smad3 protein is regulated by phosphorylation of residues in the C-terminal domain and the linker region. Herein, we examined the role of a novel phosphorylation site within the MH2 domain (T388) in the regulation of Smad3 activity. Confocal microscopy using an Smad3 phosphorylated T388-specific antibody identified phosphorylation of Smad3 T388 in myofibroblasts and tubular epithelial cells in human focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis and mouse models of unilateral ureteric obstruction and diabetic nephropathy, whereas phosphorylated T388 was largely absent in normal kidney. In vitro, TGF-β1 induced phosphorylation of Smad3 T388 in a biphasic pattern. A point mutation of T388/V in an Smad3 construct demonstrated that phosphorylation of T388 promotes Smad3 binding to Smad4 and CDK8, but was not necessary for nuclear translocation. Furthermore, T388 phosphorylation was required for TGF-β-induced collagen I gene promoter activity and extracellular matrix production in cultured fibroblasts. In conclusion, our study identifies phosphorylation of T388 in the Smad3 MH2 domain as an important mechanism that regulates the profibrotic TGF-β/Smad3 signaling pathway, which has direct relevance to human and experimental fibrotic kidney disease.

  12. Tyrosine phosphorylation events during coxsackievirus B3 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, M; Selinka, H C; Kandolf, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study cellular and viral determinants of pathogenicity, interactions between coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) replication and cellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation were investigated. During CVB3 infection of HeLa cells, distinct proteins become phosphorylated on tyrosine residues, as detected by the use of antiphosphotyrosine Western blotting. Two proteins of 48 and 200 kDa showed enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation 4 to 5 h postinfection (p.i.), although virus-induced inhibition of cellular protein synthesis had already occurred 3 to 4 h p.i. Subcellular fractionation experiments revealed distinct localization of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins of 48 and 200 kDa in the cytosol and membrane fractions of infected cells, respectively. In addition, in Vero cells infected with CVB3, echovirus (EV)11, or EV12, increased tyrosine phosphorylation of a 200-kDa protein was detected 6 h p.i. Herbimycin A, a specific inhibitor of Src-like protein tyrosine kinases, was shown to inhibit virus-induced tyrosine phosphorylations and to reduce the production of progeny virions. In contrast, in cells treated with the inhibitors staurosporine and calphostin C, the synthesis of progeny virions was not affected. Immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that the tyrosine-phosphorylated 200-kDa protein in CVB3-infected cells is of cellular origin. In summary, these investigations have begun to unravel the effect of CVB3 as well as EV11 and EV12 replication on cellular tyrosine phosphorylation and support the importance of tyrosine phosphorylation events for effective virus replication. Such cellular phosphorylation events triggered in the course of enterovirus infection may enhance virus replication. PMID:8985388

  13. PKCβ-dependent phosphorylation of the glycine transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Medrano, Javier; Castrejon-Tellez, Vicente; Plenge, Fernando; Ramirez, Ivan; Miranda, Manuel

    2011-12-01

    The extracellular levels of the neurotransmitter glycine in the brain are tightly regulated by the glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) and the clearance rate for glycine depends on its rate of transport and the levels of cell surface GlyT1. Over the years, it has been shown that PKC tightly regulates the activity of several neurotransmitter transporters. In the present work, by stably expressing three N-terminus GlyT1 isoforms in porcine aortic endothelial cells and assaying for [(32)P]-orthophosphate metabolic labeling, we demonstrated that the isoforms GlyT1a, GlyT1b, and GlyT1c were constitutively phosphorylated, and that phosphorylation was dramatically enhanced, in a time dependent fashion, after PKC activation by phorbol ester. The phosphorylation was PKC-dependent, since pre-incubation of the cells with bisindolylmaleimide I, a selective PKC inhibitor, abolished the phorbol ester-induced phosphorylation. Blotting with specific anti-phospho-tyrosine antibodies did not yield any signal that could correspond to GlyT1 tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting that the phosphorylation occurs at serine and/or threonine residues. In addition, a 23-40%-inhibition on V(max) was obtained by incubation with phorbol ester without a significant change on the apparent Km value. Furthermore, pre-incubation of the cells with the selective PKCα/β inhibitor Gö6976 abolished the downregulation effect of phorbol ester on uptake and phosphorylation, whereas the selective PKCβ inhibitors (PKCβ inhibitor or LY333531) prevented the phosphorylation without affecting glycine uptake, defining a specific role of classical PKC on GlyT1 uptake and phosphorylation. Taken together, these data suggest that conventional PKCα/β regulates the uptake of glycine, whereas PKCβ is responsible for GlyT1 phosphorylation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Identification of a phosphorylation site on skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase that becomes phosphorylated during muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Haydon, Claire E; Watt, Peter W; Morrice, Nick; Knebel, Axel; Gaestel, Matthias; Cohen, Philip

    2002-01-15

    A protein phosphorylated efficiently in vitro by MAP kinase-activated protein kinase-2 (MAPKAP-K2) was purified from skeletal muscle extracts and identified as the calcium/calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). The phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(161), a residue shown previously to be autophosphorylated by MLCK. The residue equivalent to Ser(161) became phosphorylated in vivo when rat hindlimbs were stimulated electrically. However, phosphorylation was triggered within seconds, whereas activation of MAPKAP-K2 required several minutes. Moreover, contraction-induced Ser(161) phosphorylation was similar in wild-type or MAPKAP-K2-/- mice. These results indicate that contraction-induced phosphorylation is probably catalyzed by MLCK and not MAPKAP-K2. Ser(161) phosphorylation induced the binding of MLCK to 14-3-3 proteins, but did not detectably affect the kinetic properties of MLCK. The sequence surrounding Ser(161) is unusual in that residue 158 is histidine. Previously, an arginine located three residues N-terminal to the site of phosphorylation was thought to be critical for the specificity of MAPKAP-K2. (c)2001 Elsevier Science.

  15. Impaired oxidative phosphorylation in overtrained rat myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Kadaja, Lumme; Eimre, Margus; Paju, Kalju; Roosimaa, Mart; Põdramägi, Taavi; Kaasik, Priit; Pehme, Ando; Orlova, Ehte; Mudist, Margareeta; Peet, Nadezhda; Piirsoo, Andres; Seene, Teet; Gellerich, Frank N; Seppet, Enn K

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize and review the changes in energy metabolism in rat myocardium in response to chronic exhaustive exercise. It was shown that a treadmill exercise program applied for six weeks led the rats into a state characterized by decreased performance, loss of body weight and enhanced muscle catabolism, indicating development of overtraining syndrome. Electron microscopy revealed disintegration of the cardiomyocyte structure, cellular swelling and appearance of peroxisomes. Respirometric assessment of mitochondria in saponin-permeabilized cells in situ revealed a decreased rate of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) due to diminished control over it by ADP and impaired functional coupling of adenylate kinase to OXPHOS. In parallel, reduced tissue content of cytochrome c was observed, which could limit the maximal rate of OXPHOS. The results are discussed with respect to relationships between the volume of work and corresponding energy metabolism. It is concluded that overtraining syndrome is not restricted to skeletal muscle but can affect cardiac muscle as well. PMID:21264069

  16. Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica for uranium adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guo; Yurun, Feng; Li, Ma; Dezhi, Gao; Jie, Jing; Jincheng, Yu; Haibin, Sun; Hongyu, Gong; Yujun, Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica (TBP-SBA-15) was synthesized by modified mesoporous silica with γ-amino propyl triethoxy silane and tributyl phosphate. The obtained samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), thermo-gravimetric/differential thermalanalyzer (TG/DTA), N2 adsorption-desorption (BET) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. Results showed that TBP-SBA-15 had large surface areas with ordered channel structure. Moreover, the effects of adsorption time, sorbent dose, solution pH, initial uranium concentration and temperature on the uranium adsorption behaviors were investigated. TBP-SBA-15 showed a high uranium adsorption capacity in a broad range of pH values. The U(VI) adsorption rate of TBP-SBA-15 was fast and nearly achieved completion in 10 min with the sorbent dose of 1 g/L. The U(VI) adsorption of TBP-SBA-15 followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model, indicating that the process was belonged to chemical adsorption. Furthermore, the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0) confirmed that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous.

  17. Non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is post-translationally phosphorylated in heterotrophic cells of wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Bustos, Diego M; Iglesias, Alberto A

    2002-10-23

    In wheat, non-phosphorylating, NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPN) was found to be encoded by one gene giving rise to a single protein. However, Western blots revealed two different subunits of about 58 and 60 kDa in endosperm and shoots. The latter was attributed to in vivo phosphorylation of shoot GAPN. No modification occurred in leaves, where the enzyme is composed by a single 58 kDa polypeptide. GAPN partially purified from shoots and endosperm was dephosphorylated in vitro with alkaline phosphatase. Phosphorylated GAPN exhibited similar affinity for substrates but a lower V(max) compared to the non-phosphorylated enzyme. Results suggest that reversible phosphorylation of GAPN could regulate NADPH production in the cytosol of heterotrophic plant cells.

  18. Signal processing by protein tyrosine phosphorylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification controlling many biological processes. Most phosphorylation occurs on serine and threonine, and to a less extend on tyrosine (Tyr). In animals, Tyr phosphorylation is crucial for the regulation of many responses such as growth or differentiation. Only recently with the development of mass spectrometry, it has been reported that Tyr phosphorylation is as important in plants as in animals. The genes encoding protein Tyr kinases and protein Tyr phosphatases have been identified in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Putative substrates of these enzymes, and thus Tyr-phosphorylated proteins have been reported by proteomic studies based on accurate mass spectrometry analysis of the phosphopeptides and phosphoproteins. Biochemical approaches, pharmacology and genetic manipulations have indicated that responses to stress and developmental processes involve changes in protein Tyr phosphorylation. The aim of this review is to present an update on Tyr phosphorylation in plants in order to better assess the role of this post-translational modification in plant physiology. PMID:21628997

  19. Comprehensive Analysis of Phosphorylated Proteins of E. coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soung, George Y.; Miller, Jennifer L.; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in twenty-four E. coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Specific detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr, or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and the loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given site of the phosphorylation in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  20. Role of Phosphorylated HDAC4 in Stroke-Induced Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Qing; Zhou, Shu-Min; Hu, Bin; Hu, Guo-Wen; Niu, Xin; Guo, Shang-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Acetylation or deacetylation of chromatin proteins and transcription factors is part of a complex signaling system that is involved in the control of neurological disorders. Recent studies have demonstrated that histone deacetylases (HDACs) exert protective effects in attenuating neuronal injury after ischemic insults. Class IIa HDAC4 is highly expressed in the brain, and neuronal activity depends on the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC4. However, little is known about HDAC4 and its roles in ischemic stroke. In this study, we report that phosphorylation of HDAC4 was remarkably upregulated after stroke and blockade of HDAC4 phosphorylation with GÖ6976 repressed stroke-induced angiogenesis. Phosphorylation of HDAC4 was also increased in endothelial cells hypoxia model and suppression of HDAC4 phosphorylation inhibited the tube formation and migration of endothelial cells in vitro. Furthermore, in addition to the inhibition of angiogenesis, blockade of HDAC4 phosphorylation suppressed the expression of genes downstream of HIF-VEGF signaling in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that phosphorylated HDAC4 may serve as an important regulator in stroke-induced angiogenesis. The protective mechanism of phosphorylated HDAC4 is associated with HIF-VEGF signaling, implicating a novel therapeutic target in stroke. PMID:28127553

  1. Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 mediates compensatory renal hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinxian; Chen, Jianchun; Dong, Zheng; Meyuhas, Oded; Chen, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying renal hypertrophy and progressive nephron damage remains poorly understood. Here we generated congenic ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) knockin mice expressing non-phosphorylatable rpS6 and found that uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy was significantly blunted in these knockin mice. Uninephrectomy-induced increases in cyclin D1 and decreases in cyclin E in the remaining kidney were attenuated in the knockin mice compared to their wild-type littermates. Uninephrectomy induced rpS6 phosphorylation in the wild type mice; however, no rpS6 phosphorylation was detected in uninephrectomized or sham-operated knockin mice. Nonetheless, uninephrectomy stimulated comparable 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in both knockin and wild type mice, indicating that mTORC1 was still activated in the knockin mice. Moreover, the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin prevented both rpS6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, significantly blunted uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy in wild type mice, but did not prevent residual renal hypertrophy despite inhibiting 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in uninephrectomized knockin mice. Thus, both genetic and pharmacological approaches unequivocally demonstrate that phosphorylated rpS6 is a downstream effector of the mTORC1-S6K1 signaling pathway mediating renal hypertrophy. Hence, rpS6 phosphorylation facilitates the increase in cyclin D1 and decrease in cyclin E1 that underlie the hypertrophic nature of uninephrectomy-induced kidney growth. PMID:25229342

  2. Phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from Ascaris suum

    SciTech Connect

    Thissen, J.; Komuniecki, R.

    1987-05-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) from body wall muscle of the porcine nematode, Ascaris suum, plays a pivotal role in anaerobic mitochondrial metabolism. As in mammalian mitochondria, PDC activity is inhibited by the phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit, catalyzed by an associated PDH/sub a/ kinase. However, in contrast to PDC's isolated from all other eukaryotic sources, phosphorylation decreases the mobility of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit on SDS-PAGE and permits the separation of the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH's. Phosphorylation and the inactivation of the Ascaris PDC correspond directly, and the additional phosphorylation that occurs after complete inactivation in mammalian PDC's is not observed. The purified ascarid PDC incorporates 10 nmoles /sup 32/P/mg P. Autoradiography of the radiolabeled PDC separated by SDS-PAGE yields a band which corresponds to the phosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH and a second, faint band which is present only during the first three minutes of PDC inactivation, intermediate between the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH subunit. Tryptic digests of the /sup 32/P-PDC yields one major phosphopeptide, when separated by HPLC, and its amino acid sequence currently is being determined.

  3. Multistep phosphorylation systems: tunable components of biological signaling circuits.

    PubMed

    Valk, Evin; Venta, Rainis; Ord, Mihkel; Faustova, Ilona; Kõivomägi, Mardo; Loog, Mart

    2014-11-05

    Multisite phosphorylation of proteins is a powerful signal processing mechanism that plays crucial roles in cell division and differentiation as well as in disease. We recently demonstrated a novel phenomenon in cell cycle regulation by showing that cyclin-dependent kinase-dependent multisite phosphorylation of a crucial substrate is performed sequentially in the N-to-C terminal direction along the disordered protein. The process is controlled by key parameters, including the distance between phosphorylation sites, the distribution of serines and threonines in sites, and the position of docking motifs. According to our model, linear patterns of phosphorylation along disordered protein segments determine the signal-response function of a multisite phosphorylation switch. Here we discuss the general advantages and engineering principles of multisite phosphorylation networks as processors of kinase signals. We also address the idea of using the mechanistic logic of linear multisite phosphorylation networks to design circuits for synthetic biology applications. © 2014 Valk et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Phosphorylation at serine 331 is required for Aurora B activation

    PubMed Central

    Petsalaki, Eleni; Akoumianaki, Tonia; Black, Elizabeth J.; Gillespie, David A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Aurora B kinase activity is required for successful cell division. In this paper, we show that Aurora B is phosphorylated at serine 331 (Ser331) during mitosis and that phosphorylated Aurora B localizes to kinetochores in prometaphase cells. Chk1 kinase is essential for Ser331 phosphorylation during unperturbed prometaphase or during spindle disruption by taxol but not nocodazole. Phosphorylation at Ser331 is required for optimal phosphorylation of INCENP at TSS residues, for Survivin association with the chromosomal passenger complex, and for complete Aurora B activation, but it is dispensable for Aurora B localization to centromeres, for autophosphorylation at threonine 232, and for association with INCENP. Overexpression of Aurora BS331A, in which Ser331 is mutated to alanine, results in spontaneous chromosome missegregation, cell multinucleation, unstable binding of BubR1 to kinetochores, and impaired mitotic delay in the presence of taxol. We propose that Chk1 phosphorylates Aurora B at Ser331 to fully induce Aurora B kinase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation at Ser331 is an essential mechanism for Aurora B activation. PMID:22024163

  5. Comprehensive analysis of phosphorylated proteins of Escherichia coli ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Soung, George Y; Miller, Jennifer L; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C

    2009-07-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in 24 Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining, and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr; or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, and L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given phosphorylation sites in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins.

  6. Structural Impact of Tau Phosphorylation at Threonine 231.

    PubMed

    Schwalbe, Martin; Kadavath, Harindranath; Biernat, Jacek; Ozenne, Valery; Blackledge, Martin; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2015-08-04

    Phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau influences the assembly and stabilization of microtubules and is deregulated in several neurodegenerative diseases. The high flexibility of Tau, however, has prevented an atomic-level description of its phosphorylation-induced structural changes. Employing an extensive set of distance and orientational restraints together with a novel ensemble calculation approach, we determined conformational ensembles of Tau fragments in the non-phosphorylated state and, when phosphorylated at T231/S235 or T231/S235/S237/S238, four important sites of phosphorylation in Alzheimer disease. Comparison of the molecular ensembles showed that phosphorylation of the regulatory T231 does not perturb the backbone conformation of the proximal microtubule-binding (225)KVAVVR(230) motif. Instead, phosphorylated T231 selectively engages in a salt bridge with R230 that can compete with the formation of intermolecular salt bridges to tubulin. Our study provides an ensemble description which will be useful for the analysis of conformational transitions in Tau and other intrinsically disordered proteins.

  7. Functional dissection of phosphorylation of Dishevelled in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yanfeng, Wang A.; Berhane, Hebist; Mola, Marion; Singh, Jaskirat; Jenny, Andreas; Mlodzik, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Dishevelled/Dsh proteins (Dvl in mammals) are core components of both Wnt/Wg-signaling pathways: canonical β-catenin signaling and Frizzled (Fz)-planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling. Although Dsh is a key cytoplasmic component of both Wnt/Fz-pathways, regulation of its signaling specificity is not well understood. Dsh is phosphorylated, but the functional significance of its phosphorylation remains unclear. We have systematically investigated the phosphorylation of Dsh by combining mass-spectrometry analyses, biochemical studies, and in vivo genetic methods in Drosophila. Our approaches identified multiple phospho-residues of Dsh in vivo. Our data define three novel and unexpected conclusions: (1) Strikingly and in contrast to common assumptions, all conserved serines/threonines are non-essential for Dsh function in either pathway; (2) phosphorylation of conserved Tyrosine473 in the DEP domain is critical for PCP-signaling - DshY473F behaves like a PCP-specific allele; and (3) defects associated with the PCP specific dsh1 allele, DshK417M, located within a putative Protein Kinase C consensus site, are likely due to a post-translational modification requirement of Lys417, rather than phosphorylation nearby. In summary, our combined data indicate that while many Ser/Thr and Tyr residues are indeed phosphorylated in vivo, strikingly most of these phosphorylation events are not critical for Dsh function with the exception of DshY473. PMID:21963539

  8. L1 modulates PKD1 phosphorylation in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang-xi; Hu, Cheng-liang; Liao, Yong-hong; Zhao, Wei-jiang

    2015-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 (L1CAM) is crucial for the development of the nervous system, with an essential role in regulating multiple cellular activities. Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) serves as a key kinase given its diverse array of functions within the cell. Here, we investigated various aspects of the functional relationship between L1 and phosphorylated PKD1 (pPKD1) in cerebellar granule neurons. To study the relationship between L1 and PKD1 phosphorylation, human cerebellar tissue microarrays were subject to immunofluorescence staining. We observed a positive correlation between L1 protein levels and PKD1 phosphorylation. In addition, L1 also co-localized with pPKD1. To analyze the regulatory role of L1 on PKD1 phosphorylation, primary mouse cerebellar granule neurons were treated with various concentrations of rL1 for 48 h. Using Western blot, we revealed that L1 significantly increased PKD1 phosphorylation compared with vehicle control, with the maximal effect observed at 5 nM. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was significantly increased by 2.5 nM and 10nM L1, with no apparent change in SRC phosphorylation. However, SRC expression was markedly reduced by 10nM rL1. AKT1 expression and phosphorylation levels were significantly increased by rL1, with the maximal effect observed at 2.5 and 5 nM, respectively. Our combined data revealed a positive relationship between L1 and pPKD1 in both cultured cerebellar neurons and human cerebellar tissue, suggesting that L1 functions in the modulation of PKD1 phosphorylation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  10. Role of energy in oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Matsuno-Yagi, A; Hatefi, Y

    1988-08-01

    This article reviews the current status of information regarding the role of energy in the process of oxidative phosphorylation by mitochondria. The available data suggest that in submitochondrial particles (SMP) energy is utilized for the binding of ADP and Pi and for the release of ATP bound at the catalytic sites of F1-ATPase. The process of ATP synthesis on the surface of F1 from F1-bound ADP and Pi appears to be associated with negligible free energy change. The rate of energy production by the respiratory chain modulates the kinetics of ATP synthesis between a low Km (for ADP and Pi)-low Vmax mode and a high Km-high Vmax mode. The Km extremes for ADP are 2-3 microM and 120-150 microM, and Vmax for ATP synthesis at high rates of energy production by bovine-heart SMP is about 440 S-1 (mole F1)-1 at 30 degrees C, which corresponds to 11 mumol ATP (min.mg of protein)-1. The interaction of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) or oligomycin at the proteolipid (subunit c) of the membrane sector (F0) of the ATP synthase complex alters the mode of ATP binding at the catalytic sites of F1, probably to one of lower affinity. It has been suggested that protonic energy might be conveyed to the catalytic sites of F1 in an analogous manner, i.e., via conformation changes in the ATP synthase complex initiated by proton-induced alterations in the structure of the DCCD-binding proteolipid. Finally, the relationship between the steady-state membrane potential (delta psi) and the rates of electron transfer and ATP synthesis has been discussed. It has been shown, in agreement with the delocalized chemiosmotic mechanism, that under appropriate conditions delta psi is exquisitely sensitive to changes in the rates of energy production and consumption.

  11. Rosamines Targeting the Cancer Oxidative Phosphorylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Siang Hui; Wu, Liangxing; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chung, Lip Yong; Burgess, Kevin; Lee, Hong Boon

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming of energy metabolism is pivotal to cancer, so mitochondria are potential targets for anticancer therapy. A prior study has demonstrated the anti-proliferative activity of a new class of mitochondria-targeting rosamines. This present study describes in vitro cytotoxicity of second-generation rosamine analogs, their mode of action, and their in vivo efficacies in a tumor allografted mouse model. Here, we showed that these compounds exhibited potent cytotoxicity (average IC50<0.5 µM), inhibited Complex II and ATP synthase activities of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway and induced loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. A NCI-60 cell lines screen further indicated that rosamine analogs 4 and 5 exhibited potent antiproliferative effects with Log10GI50 = −7 (GI50 = 0.1 µM) and were more effective against a colorectal cancer sub-panel than other cell lines. Preliminary in vivo studies on 4T1 murine breast cancer-bearing female BALB/c mice indicated that treatment with analog 5 in a single dosing of 5 mg/kg or a schedule dosing of 3 mg/kg once every 2 days for 6 times (q2d×6) exhibited only minimal induction of tumor growth delay. Our results suggest that rosamine analogs may be further developed as mitochondrial targeting agents. Without a doubt proper strategies need to be devised to enhance tumor uptake of rosamines, i.e. by integration to carrier molecules for better therapeutic outcome. PMID:24622277

  12. Cyanogen induced phosphorylation of D-fructose. [prebiotic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, CH.; Kawatsuji, M.; Halmann, M.

    1975-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a phosphorylated sugar, identified as alpha-D-fructopyranose, can be formed as the result of cyanogen-induced phosphorylation of D-fructose at pH 8.8. The product was isolated from barium and cyclohexylammonium salts and identified on the basis of its chromatographic and electrophoretic properties, its lability to hydrolysis by alkaline phosphatase, the rate of its acid-catalyzed hydrolysis, and the results of periodate oxidation and optical rotatory measurements. These results support the suggestion that the cyanogen-induced phosphorylation of free sugars could be a possible process for formation of sugar phosphates under prebiotic conditions (Halman et al., 1969).

  13. Cyanogen induced phosphorylation of D-fructose. [prebiotic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, CH.; Kawatsuji, M.; Halmann, M.

    1975-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a phosphorylated sugar, identified as alpha-D-fructopyranose, can be formed as the result of cyanogen-induced phosphorylation of D-fructose at pH 8.8. The product was isolated from barium and cyclohexylammonium salts and identified on the basis of its chromatographic and electrophoretic properties, its lability to hydrolysis by alkaline phosphatase, the rate of its acid-catalyzed hydrolysis, and the results of periodate oxidation and optical rotatory measurements. These results support the suggestion that the cyanogen-induced phosphorylation of free sugars could be a possible process for formation of sugar phosphates under prebiotic conditions (Halman et al., 1969).

  14. Mass spectrometric phosphoproteome analysis of HIV-infected brain reveals novel phosphorylation sites and differential phosphorylation patterns

    PubMed Central

    Uzasci, Lerna; Auh, Sungyoung; Cotter, Robert J.; Nath, Avindra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To map the phosphoproteome and identify changes in the phosphorylation patterns in the HIV-infected and uninfected brain using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Experimental Design Parietal cortex from brain of individuals with and without HIV infection were lysed and trypsinized. The peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents, combined, phospho-enriched by titanium dioxide chromatography, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with high-resolution. Results Our phosphoproteomic workflow resulted in the identification of 112 phosphorylated proteins and 17 novel phosphorylation sites in all the samples that were analyzed. The phosphopeptide sequences were searched for kinase substrate motifs which revealed potential kinases involved in important signaling pathways. The site-specific phosphopeptide quantification showed that peptides from neurofilament medium polypeptide, myelin basic protein, and 2′–3′-cyclic nucleotide-3′ phosphodiesterase have relatively higher phosphorylation levels during HIV infection. Clinical Relevance This study has enriched the global phosphoproteome knowledge of the human brain by detecting novel phosphorylation sites on neuronal proteins and identifying differentially phosphorylated brain proteins during HIV infection. Kinases that lead to unusual phosphorylations could be therapeutic targets for the treatment of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). PMID:26033855

  15. In vivo phosphorylation of WRKY transcription factor by MAPK.

    PubMed

    Ishihama, Nobuaki; Adachi, Hiroaki; Yoshioka, Miki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Plants activate signaling networks in response to diverse pathogen-derived signals, facilitating transcriptional reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. Identification of phosphorylation targets of MAPK and in vivo detection of the phosphorylated substrates are important processes to elucidate the signaling pathway in plant immune responses. We have identified a WRKY transcription factor, which is phosphorylated by defense-related MAPKs, SIPK and WIPK. Recent evidence demonstrated that some group I WRKY transcription factors, which contain a conserved motif in the N-terminal region, are activated by MAPK-dependent phosphorylation. In this chapter, we describe protocols for preparation of anti-phosphopeptide antibodies, detection of activated MAPKs using anti-phospho-MAPK antibody, and activated WRKY using anti-phospho-WRKY antibody, respectively.

  16. Biological Phosphoryl-Transfer Reactions: Understanding Mechanism and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, Jonathan K.; Zalatan, Jesse G.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoryl-transfer reactions are central to biology. These reactions also have some of the slowest nonenzymatic rates and thus require enormous rate accelerations from biological catalysts. Despite the central importance of phosphoryl transfer and the fascinating catalytic challenges it presents, substantial confusion persists about the properties of these reactions. This confusion exists despite decades of research on the chemical mechanisms underlying these reactions. Here we review phosphoryl-transfer reactions with the goal of providing the reader with the conceptual and experimental background to understand this body of work, to evaluate new results and proposals, and to apply this understanding to enzymes. We describe likely resolutions to some controversies, while emphasizing the limits of our current approaches and understanding. We apply this understanding to enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer and provide illustrative examples of how this mechanistic background can guide and deepen our understanding of enzymes and their mechanisms of action. Finally, we present important future challenges for this field. PMID:21513457

  17. Doubling down on phosphorylation as a variable peptide modification.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Bret

    2016-09-01

    Some mass spectrometrists believe that searching for variable PTMs like phosphorylation of serine or threonine when using database-search algorithms to interpret peptide tandem mass spectra will increase false-positive matching. The basis for this is the premise that the algorithm compares a spectrum to both a nonphosphorylated peptide candidate and a phosphorylated candidate, which is double the number of candidates compared to a search with no possible phosphorylation. Hence, if the search space doubles, false-positive matching could increase accordingly as the algorithm considers more candidates to which false matches could be made. In this study, it is shown that the search for variable phosphoserine and phosphothreonine modifications does not always double the search space or unduly impinge upon the FDR. A breakdown of how one popular database-search algorithm deals with variable phosphorylation is presented.

  18. Phosphorylation of Mad controls competition between wingless and BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Eivers, Edward; Demagny, Hadrien; Choi, Renee H; De Robertis, Edward M

    2011-10-11

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and Wnts are growth factors that provide essential patterning signals for cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism by which the phosphorylation state of the Drosophila transcription factor Mad determines its ability to transduce either BMP or Wingless (Wg) signals. Previously, Mad was thought to function in gene transcription only when phosphorylated by BMP receptors. We found that the unphosphorylated form of Mad was required for canonical Wg signaling by interacting with the Pangolin-Armadillo transcriptional complex. Phosphorylation of the carboxyl terminus of Mad by BMP receptor directed Mad toward BMP signaling, thereby preventing Mad from functioning in the Wg pathway. The results show that Mad has distinct signal transduction roles in the BMP and Wnt pathways depending on its phosphorylation state.

  19. Biological phosphoryl-transfer reactions: understanding mechanism and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Jonathan K; Zalatan, Jesse G; Herschlag, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Phosphoryl-transfer reactions are central to biology. These reactions also have some of the slowest nonenzymatic rates and thus require enormous rate accelerations from biological catalysts. Despite the central importance of phosphoryl transfer and the fascinating catalytic challenges it presents, substantial confusion persists about the properties of these reactions. This confusion exists despite decades of research on the chemical mechanisms underlying these reactions. Here we review phosphoryl-transfer reactions with the goal of providing the reader with the conceptual and experimental background to understand this body of work, to evaluate new results and proposals, and to apply this understanding to enzymes. We describe likely resolutions to some controversies, while emphasizing the limits of our current approaches and understanding. We apply this understanding to enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer and provide illustrative examples of how this mechanistic background can guide and deepen our understanding of enzymes and their mechanisms of action. Finally, we present important future challenges for this field.

  20. Regulation of ataxin-1 phosphorylation and its impact on biology.

    PubMed

    Lagalwar, Sarita; Orr, Harry T

    2013-01-01

    Ataxin-1 protein expression is found in the cytoplasm and nucleus of Purkinje cells, the primary site of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1). Phosphorylation at S776 occurs in the cytoplasm and stabilizes the protein through interaction with 14-3-3, allowing it to translocate into the nucleus where disease is initiated. Phosphorylation and stabilization are enhanced when the polyglutamine expansion is present. In this chapter, we present a model of neurodegeneration in SCA1 initiated through phosphorylation at S776 by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and enhanced by the presence of the polyglutamine expansion. The biological methods used to uncover SCA1 pathogenesis and phosphorylation at S776 are described.

  1. Phosphorylation of Mad Controls Competition Between Wingless and BMP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Eivers, Edward; Demagny, Hadrien; Choi, Renee H.; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and Wnts are growth factors that provide essential patterning signals for cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism by which the phosphorylation state of the Drosophila transcription factor Mad determines its ability to transduce either BMP or Wingless (Wg) signals. Previously, Mad was thought to function in gene transcription only when phosphorylated by BMP receptors. We found that the unphosphorylated form of Mad was required for canonical Wg signaling by interacting with the Pangolin-Armadillo transcriptional complex. Phosphorylation of the carboxyl terminus of Mad by BMP receptor directed Mad toward BMP signaling, thereby preventing Mad from functioning in the Wg pathway. The results show that Mad has distinct signal transduction roles in the BMP and Wnt pathways depending on its phosphorylation state. PMID:21990430

  2. Enrichment of phosphorylated peptides and proteins by selective precipitation methods.

    PubMed

    Rainer, Matthias; Bonn, Günther K

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most prominent post-translational modifications involved in the regulation of cellular processes. Fundamental understanding of biological processes requires appropriate bioanalytical methods for selectively enriching phosphorylated peptides and proteins. Most of the commonly applied enrichment approaches include chromatographic materials including Fe(3+)-immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography or metal oxides. In the last years, the introduction of several non-chromatographic isolation technologies has increasingly attracted the interest of many scientists. Such approaches are based on the selective precipitation of phosphorylated peptides and proteins by applying various metal cations. The excellent performance of precipitation-based enrichment methods can be explained by the absence of any stationary phase, resin or sorbent, which usually leads to unspecific binding. This review provides an overview of recently published methods for the selective precipitation of phosphorylated peptides and proteins.

  3. Microfluidic IEF technique for sequential phosphorylation analysis of protein kinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Nakchul; Song, Simon; Choi, Hoseok; Lim, Bu-Taek; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-11-01

    Sequential phosphorylation of protein kinases play the important role in signal transduction, protein regulation, and metabolism in living cells. The analysis of these phosphorylation cascades will provide new insights into their physiological functions in many biological functions. Unfortunately, the existing methods are limited to analyze the cascade activity. Therefore, we suggest a microfluidic isoelectric focusing technique (μIEF) for the analysis of the cascade activity. Using the technique, we show that the sequential phosphorylation of a peptide by two different kinases can be successfully detected on a microfluidic chip. In addition, the inhibition assay for kinase activity and the analysis on a real sample have also been conducted. The results indicate that μIEF is an excellent means for studies on phosphorylation cascade activity.

  4. Calcineurin regulates phosphorylation status of transcription factor osterix.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hirohiko; Amorim, Bruna Rabelo; Wang, Jie; Yoshida, Kaya; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2009-02-06

    Osterix is an osteoblast-specific transcriptional factor that is essential for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Calcineurin regulates bone formation through modulating osteoblast differentiation. However, post-translational modification of osterix such as phosphorylation and interactions between osterix and calcineurin remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that calcineurin interacted with osterix determined by immunoprecipitation assay and Western analysis. Immunocytochemical study also revealed that osterix and calcineurin were co-localized in nucleus. Deletion of calcineurin binding motif on osterix molecule disrupted osterix-calcineurin interaction. Phosphorylation status of osterix was augmented by treatment with phosphatase inhibitors, FK506 and calyculin A. In contrast, treatment of recombinant calcineurin reduced phosphorylation status of osterix. Our present study suggests that calcineurin has an important role in the function of osterix through its modification of phosphorylation.

  5. On Stationary States in the Double Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersani, Alberto Maria; Dell'Acqua, Guido; Tomassetti, Giovanna

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we study the double phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, which is a special case of multiple futile cycle. We study the stationary states, finding some classes of explicit solutions.

  6. Aging effects on oxidative phosphorylation in rat adrenocortical mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Solinas, Paola; Fujioka, Hisashi; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L

    2014-06-01

    Does aging in itself lead to alteration in adrenocortical mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation? Mitochondria from Fischer 344 (F344) rats (6 and 24 months old), Brown Norway rats (6 and 32 months old) and F344-Brown Norway hybrid rats (6 and 30 months old) were compared. Mitochondria were isolated from extirpated adrenal cortex. The yields of mitochondria were quantitatively similar in all rat strains irrespective of age. In order to assess the activity of each mitochondrial complex, several different substrates were tested and the rate of oxidative phosphorylation measured. Aging does not affect mitochondrial activity except in the F344 rat adrenal cortex where the maximal ADP-stimulated oxidative phosphorylation decreased with age. We hypothesize that impaired synthesis of steroid hormones by the adrenal cortex with age in F344 rats might be due to decreased adrenocortical mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. We conclude that aging results in adrenocortical mitochondria effects that are non-uniform across different rat strains.

  7. Methods for generating phosphorylation site-specific immunological reagents

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Appella, Ettore; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods for generating phosphorylation site-specific immunological reagents. More specifically, a phosphopeptide mimetic is incorporated into a polypeptide in place of a phosphorylated amino acid. The polypeptide is used as antigen by standard methods to generate either monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies which cross-react with the naturally phosphorylated polypeptide. The phosphopeptide mimetic preferably contains a non-hydrolyzable linkage from the appropriate carbon atom of the amino acid residue to a phosphate group. A preferred linkage is a CF.sub.2 group. Such a linkage is used to generate the phosphoserine mimetic F.sub.2 Pab, which is incorporated into a polypeptide sequence derived from p53 to produce antibodies which recognize a specific phosphorylation state of p53. A CF.sub.2 group linkage is also used to produce the phosphothreonine mimetic F.sub.2 Pmb, and to produce the phosphotyrosine mimetic, F.sub.2 Pmp.

  8. Phosphorylation sites in human erythrocyte band 3 protein.

    PubMed

    Yannoukakos, D; Vasseur, C; Piau, J P; Wajcman, H; Bursaux, E

    1991-01-30

    The human red cell anion-exchanger, band 3 protein, is one of the main phosphorylated proteins of the erythrocyte membrane. Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that ATP-depletion of the red blood cell decreased the anion-exchange rate, suggesting that band 3 protein phosphorylation could be involved in the regulation of anion transport function (Bursaux et al. (1984) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 777, 253-260). Phosphorylation occurs mainly on the cytoplasmic domain of the protein and the major site of phosphorylation was assigned to tyrosine-8 (Dekowski et al. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 2750-2753). This site being very far from the integral, anion-exchanger domain, the aim of the present study was to determine whether phosphorylation sites exist in the integral domain. The phosphorylation reaction was carried out on isolated membranes in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP and phosphorylated band 3 protein was then isolated. Both the cytoplasmic and the membrane spanning domains were purified. The predominant phosphorylation sites were found on the cytoplasmic domain. RP-HPLC analyses of the tryptic peptides of whole band 3 protein, and of the isolated cytoplasmic and membrane-spanning domains allowed for the precise localization of the phosphorylated residues. 80% of the label was found in the N-terminal tryptic peptide (T-1), (residues 1-56). In this region, all the residues susceptible to phosphorylation were labeled but in varying proportion. Under our conditions, the most active membrane kinase was a tyrosine kinase, activated preferentially by Mn2+ but also by Mg2+. Tyrosine-8 was the main phosphate acceptor residue (50-70%) of the protein, tyrosine-21 and tyrosine-46 residues were also phosphorylated but to a much lesser extent. The main targets of membrane casein kinase, preferentially activated by Mg2+, were serine-29, serine-50, and threonine(s)-39, -42, -44, -48, -49, -54 residue(s) located in the T-1 peptide. A tyrosine phosphatase activity was

  9. Phosphorylation of mammalian initiation factor eIF-4B

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, R.F.; Milburn, S.C.; Cooper, R.; Gould, K.; Hunter, T.; Hershey, J.W.B.

    1987-05-01

    The phosphorylation of initiation factors appears to be an important mechanism for regulating the rate of translation in mammalian cells. eIF-4B (80 kDa) purified from HeLa cells exhibits a complex array of 8 to 12 spots when analyzed by 2-dimensional isoelectric focusing - SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A similar array of eIF-4B spots is seen when total lysate proteins are analyzed by immunoblotting with anti-eIF-4B antiserum or with antibodies affinity-purified from the most basic eIF-4B spot. The multiple forms of eIF-4B are due to phosphorylation, since all but the most basic spot are labeled with (/sup 32/P)phosphate in vivo and the action of alkaline phosphatase in vitro reduces the array to only two spots. Tryptic peptide maps of phosphopeptides from each of the various isoelectric variants of eIF-4B show a similar complexity, suggesting that a number of different sites are phosphorylated in a random order. When serum-deprived HeLa cells are treated with phorbol ester, both the protein synthesis rate and the extent of eIF-4B phosphorylation increase, suggesting that C kinase may be a regulator of translation. Purified C kinase phosphorylates a number of pure initiation factors in vitro, but eIF-4B is the strongest target protein. When pure eIF-4B is treated, the entire mass of eIF-4B is shifted to the most acidic spots, indicating very strong phosphorylation. Attempts are being made to detect differences in the in vitro activities of the non-phosphorylated and highly phosphorylated forms.

  10. Phosphorylation of proteins during human myometrial contractions: A phosphoproteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Claire A; López Bernal, Andrés

    2017-01-22

    Phasic myometrial contractility is a key component of human parturition and the contractions are driven by reversible phosphorylation of myosin light chains catalyzed by the calcium (Ca(2+))-dependent enzyme myosin light chain kinase (MYLK). Other yet unknown phosphorylation or de-phosphorylation events may contribute to myometrial contraction and relaxation. In this study we have performed a global phosphoproteomic analysis of human myometrial tissue using tandem mass tagging to detect changes in the phosphorylation status of individual myometrial proteins during spontaneous and oxytocin-driven phasic contractions. We were able to detect 22 individual phosphopeptides whose relative ratio changed (fold > 2 or < 0.5) in response to spontaneous or oxytocin-stimulated contraction. The most significant changes in phosphorylation were to MYLK on serine 1760, a site associated with reductions in calmodulin binding and subsequent kinase activity. Phosphorylated MYLK (ser1760) increased significantly during spontaneous (9.83 ± 3.27 fold, P < 0.05) and oxytocin -induced (18.56 ± 8.18 fold, P < 0.01) contractions and we were able to validate these data using immunoblotting. Pathway analysis suggested additional proteins involved in calcium signalling, cGMP-PRKG signalling, adrenergic signalling and oxytocin signalling were also phosphorylated during contractions. This study demonstrates that a global phosphoproteomic analysis of myometrial tissue is a sensitive approach to detect changes in the phosphorylation of proteins during myometrial contractions, and provides a platform for further validation of these changes and for identification of their functional significance.

  11. Protein kinase C alpha-dependent phosphorylation of Golgi proteins.

    PubMed

    Radau, B; Otto, A; Müller, E C; Westermann, P

    2000-07-01

    Golgi-enriched membranes were phosphorylated in order to understand the mechanism for protein kinase C (PKC) regulation of exocytic vesicle formation at the trans-Golgi network. Two of the main PKC substrates were identified as MARCKS and Mac-MARCKS by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometric sequencing. Annexin IV and profilin I, two other Golgi-associated proteins--although known as in vitro PKC substrates--were not phosphorylated in the Golgi-bound state.

  12. Tau Phosphorylation by GSK3 in Different Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Jesús; León-Espinosa, Gonzalo; García, Esther; García-Escudero, Vega; Hernández, Félix; DeFelipe, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Almost a 20% of the residues of tau protein are phosphorylatable amino acids: serine, threonine, and tyrosine. In this paper we comment on the consequences for tau of being a phosphoprotein. We will focus on serine/threonine phosphorylation. It will be discussed that, depending on the modified residue in tau molecule, phosphorylation could be protective, in processes like hibernation, or toxic like in development of those diseases known as tauopathies, which are characterized by an hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau. PMID:22675648

  13. Palmitoylation gates phosphorylation-dependent regulation of BK potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lijun; Jeffries, Owen; McClafferty, Heather; Molyvdas, Adam; Rowe, Iain C M; Saleem, Fozia; Chen, Lie; Greaves, Jennifer; Chamberlain, Luke H; Knaus, Hans-Guenther; Ruth, Peter; Shipston, Michael J

    2008-12-30

    Large conductance calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels are important regulators of physiological homeostasis and their function is potently modulated by protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation. PKA regulates the channel through phosphorylation of residues within the intracellular C terminus of the pore-forming alpha-subunits. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which phosphorylation of the alpha-subunit effects changes in channel activity are unknown. Inhibition of BK channels by PKA depends on phosphorylation of only a single alpha-subunit in the channel tetramer containing an alternatively spliced insert (STREX) suggesting that phosphorylation results in major conformational rearrangements of the C terminus. Here, we define the mechanism of PKA inhibition of BK channels and demonstrate that this regulation is conditional on the palmitoylation status of the channel. We show that the cytosolic C terminus of the STREX BK channel uniquely interacts with the plasma membrane via palmitoylation of evolutionarily conserved cysteine residues in the STREX insert. PKA phosphorylation of the serine residue immediately upstream of the conserved palmitoylated cysteine residues within STREX dissociates the C terminus from the plasma membrane, inhibiting STREX channel activity. Abolition of STREX palmitoylation by site-directed mutagenesis or pharmacological inhibition of palmitoyl transferases prevents PKA-mediated inhibition of BK channels. Thus, palmitoylation gates BK channel regulation by PKA phosphorylation. Palmitoylation and phosphorylation are both dynamically regulated; thus, cross-talk between these 2 major posttranslational signaling cascades provides a mechanism for conditional regulation of BK channels. Interplay of these distinct signaling cascades has important implications for the dynamic regulation of BK channels and physiological homeostasis.

  14. Phosphorylation of Cytokinin by Adenosine Kinase from Wheat Germ 1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong-Maw; Eckert, Richard L.

    1977-01-01

    Adenosine kinase was partially purified from wheat germ. This enzyme preparation, which was devoid of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and nearly free of adenosine deaminase but contained adenylate kinase, rapidly phosphorylated adenosine and a cytokinin, N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine. Electrophoretic analysis indicated that only N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine-monophosphate was formed from the cytokinin while about 55% AMP, 45% ADP, and a trace of ATP were formed from adenosine. The biosynthesized nucleoside monophosphates were quantitatively hydrolyzed to the corresponding nucleosides by 5′-nucleotidase and the isopentenyl side chain of the phosphorylated cytokinin was not cleaved. The enzyme did not catalyze phosphorylation of inosine. The phosphorylation of the cytokinin and adenosine required ATP and Mg2+. The pH optimum was from 6.8 to 7.2 for both the cytokinin and adenosine. At pH 7 and 37 C the Km and Vmax for the cytokinin were 31 μm and 8.3 nmoles per mg protein per minute, and the values for adenosine were 8.7 μm and 46 nmoles per mg protein per minute. Crude enzyme preparations from tobacco callus tissue and wheat germ phosphorylated N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine. These preparations also phosphorylated N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenine when 5-phosphorylribose-1-pyrophosphate was present. PMID:16659870

  15. The regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, S C; Woods, A; Jones, N A; Davison, M D; Carling, D

    2000-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cascade is activated by an increase in the AMP/ATP ratio within the cell. AMPK is regulated allosterically by AMP and by reversible phosphorylation. Threonine-172 within the catalytic subunit (alpha) of AMPK (Thr(172)) was identified as the major site phosphorylated by the AMP-activated protein kinase kinase (AMPKK) in vitro. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to study the role of phosphorylation of Thr(172) on AMPK activity. Mutation of Thr(172) to an aspartic acid residue (T172D) in either alpha1 or alpha2 resulted in a kinase complex with approx. 50% the activity of the corresponding wild-type complex. The activity of wild-type AMPK decreased by greater than 90% following treatment with protein phosphatases, whereas the activity of the T172D mutant complex fell by only 10-15%. Mutation of Thr(172) to an alanine residue (T172A) almost completely abolished kinase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation of Thr(172) accounts for most of the activation by AMPKK, but that other sites are involved. In support of this we have shown that AMPKK phosphorylates at least two other sites on the alpha subunit and one site on the beta subunit. Furthermore, we provide evidence that phosphorylation of Thr(172) may be involved in the sensitivity of the AMPK complex to AMP. PMID:10642499

  16. Protein Phosphorylation during Coconut Zygotic Embryo Development1

    PubMed Central

    Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Oropeza, Carlos; Hernández-Sotomayor, S.M. Teresa

    1998-01-01

    Evidence was obtained on the occurrence of protein threonine, serine, and tyrosine (Tyr) kinases in developing coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) zygotic embryos, based on in vitro phosphorylation of proteins in the presence of [γ-32P]ATP, alkaline treatment, and thin-layer chromatography analysis, which showed the presence of [32P]phosphoserine, [32P]phosphothreonine, and [32P]phosphotyrosine in [32P]-labeled protein hydrolyzates. Tyr kinase activity was further confirmed in extracts of embryos at different stages of development using antiphosphotyrosine monoclonal antibodies and the synthetic peptide derived from the amino acid sequence surrounding the phosphorylation site in pp60src (RR-SRC), which is specific for Tyr kinases. Anti-phosphotyrosine western blotting revealed a changing profile of Tyr-phosphorylated proteins during embryo development. Tyr kinase activity, as assayed using RR-SRC, also changed during embryo development, showing two peaks of activity, one during early and another during late embryo development. In addition, the use of genistein, a Tyr kinase inhibitor, diminished the ability of extracts to phosphorylate RR-SRC. Results presented here show the occurrence of threonine, serine, and Tyr kinases in developing coconut zygotic embryos, and suggest that protein phosphorylation, and the possible inference of Tyr phosphorylation in particular, may play a role in the coordination of the development of embryos in this species. PMID:9733545

  17. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation. PMID:27088325

  18. Synthetic phosphorylation of p38α recapitulates protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chooi, K Phin; Galan, Sébastien R G; Raj, Ritu; McCullagh, James; Mohammed, Shabaz; Jones, Lyn H; Davis, Benjamin G

    2014-02-05

    Through a "tag-and-modify" protein chemical modification strategy, we site-selectively phosphorylated the activation loop of protein kinase p38α. Phosphorylation at natural (180) and unnatural (172) sites created two pure phospho-forms. p38α bearing only a single phosphocysteine (pCys) as a mimic of pThr at 180 was sufficient to switch the kinase to an active state, capable of processing natural protein substrate ATF2; 172 site phosphorylation did not. In this way, we chemically recapitulated triggering of a relevant segment of the MAPK-signaling pathway in vitro. This allowed detailed kinetic analysis of global and stoichiometric phosphorylation events catalyzed by p38α and revealed that site 180 is a sufficient activator alone and engenders dominant mono-phosphorylation activity. Moreover, a survey of kinase inhibition using inhibitors with different (Type I/II) modes (including therapeutically relevant) revealed unambiguously that Type II inhibitors inhibit phosphorylated p38α and allowed discovery of a predictive kinetic analysis based on cooperativity to distinguish Type I vs II.

  19. Phospho-oligosaccharide dependent phosphorylation of ATP citrate lyase.

    PubMed

    Puerta, J; Mato, J M; Alemany, S

    1990-01-01

    The effect of insulin on ATP citrate lyase phosphorylation has been shown to be mimicked by a phospho-oligosaccharide in intact adipocytes. We demonstrate that the addition of phospho-oligosaccharide to intact adipocytes enhances the phosphorylation of ATP citrate lyase in the same tryptic peptide as insulin does. The addition of phospho-oligosaccharide to an adipocyte extract also results in an increase in ATP citrate lyase phosphorylation but in a different site than that observed in intact cells. The phospho-oligosaccharide-dependent incorporation of phosphate into ATP citrate lyase in intact cells is resistant to isopropanol and acetic acid, but the phosphoenzyme phosphorylated in cell extracts is acid labile. In cell extracts, the addition of phospho-oligosaccharide markedly inhibits ATP hydrolysis, which may explain the effect of this molecule on ATP citrate lyase phosphorylation in broken cells. These results support the hypothesis that this phospho-oligosaccharide mediates some of the effects of insulin on protein phosphorylation. They also indicate that caution should be exercised in interpreting the results obtained by adding phospho-oligosaccharide to broken cell preparations.

  20. Control of serotonin transporter phosphorylation by conformational state.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Turk, Benjamin E; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-05-17

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) is responsible for reuptake and recycling of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) after its exocytotic release during neurotransmission. Mutations in human SERT are associated with psychiatric disorders and autism. Some of these mutations affect the regulation of SERT activity by cGMP-dependent phosphorylation. Here we provide direct evidence that this phosphorylation occurs at Thr276, predicted to lie near the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5 (TM5). Using membranes from HeLa cells expressing SERT and intact rat basophilic leukemia cells, we show that agents such as Na(+) and cocaine that stabilize outward-open conformations of SERT decreased phosphorylation and agents that stabilize inward-open conformations (e.g., 5-HT, ibogaine) increased phosphorylation. The opposing effects of the inhibitors cocaine and ibogaine were each reversed by an excess of the other inhibitor. Inhibition of phosphorylation by Na(+) and stimulation by ibogaine occurred at concentrations that induced outward opening and inward opening, respectively, as measured by the accessibility of cysteine residues in the extracellular and cytoplasmic permeation pathways, respectively. The results are consistent with a mechanism of SERT regulation that is activated by the transport of 5-HT, which increases the level of inward-open SERT and may lead to unwinding of the TM5 helix to allow phosphorylation.

  1. Control of serotonin transporter phosphorylation by conformational state

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Turk, Benjamin E.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) is responsible for reuptake and recycling of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) after its exocytotic release during neurotransmission. Mutations in human SERT are associated with psychiatric disorders and autism. Some of these mutations affect the regulation of SERT activity by cGMP-dependent phosphorylation. Here we provide direct evidence that this phosphorylation occurs at Thr276, predicted to lie near the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5 (TM5). Using membranes from HeLa cells expressing SERT and intact rat basophilic leukemia cells, we show that agents such as Na+ and cocaine that stabilize outward-open conformations of SERT decreased phosphorylation and agents that stabilize inward-open conformations (e.g., 5-HT, ibogaine) increased phosphorylation. The opposing effects of the inhibitors cocaine and ibogaine were each reversed by an excess of the other inhibitor. Inhibition of phosphorylation by Na+ and stimulation by ibogaine occurred at concentrations that induced outward opening and inward opening, respectively, as measured by the accessibility of cysteine residues in the extracellular and cytoplasmic permeation pathways, respectively. The results are consistent with a mechanism of SERT regulation that is activated by the transport of 5-HT, which increases the level of inward-open SERT and may lead to unwinding of the TM5 helix to allow phosphorylation. PMID:27140629

  2. Plasma membrane ATPase of red beet forms a phosphorylated intermediate.

    PubMed

    Briskin, D P; Poole, R J

    1983-03-01

    When a plasma membrane-enriched fraction isolated from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) was incubated in the presence of 40 micromolar [gamma-(32)P] ATP, 40 micromolar MgSO(4) at pH 6.5, a rapidly turning over phosphorylated protein was formed. Phosphorylation of the protein was substrate-specific for ATP, sensitive to diethylstilbestrol and vanadate, but insensitive to azide. When the dephosphorylation reaction was specifically studied, KCl was found to increase the turnover of the phosphorylated protein consistent with its stimulatory effect upon plasma membrane ATPase. The protein-bound phosphate was found to be most stable at a pH between 2 and 3 and under cold temperature, suggesting that the protein phosphate bond was an acyl-phosphate. When the phosphorylated protein was analyzed with lithium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis, a labeled polypeptide with a molecular weight of about 100,000 daltons was observed. Phosphorylation of this polypeptide was rapidly turning over and Mg-dependent. It is concluded that the phosphorylation observed represents a reaction intermediate of the red beet plasma membrane ATPase.

  3. Formation and Dissociation of Phosphorylated Peptide Radical Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ricky P. W.; Quan, Quan; Hao, Qiang; Lai, Cheuk-Kuen; Siu, Chi-Kit; Chu, Ivan K.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we generated phosphoserine- and phosphothreonine-containing peptide radical cations through low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the ternary metal-ligand phosphorylated peptide complexes [CuII(terpy) p M]·2+ and [CoIII(salen) p M]·+ [ p M: phosphorylated angiotensin III derivative; terpy: 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; salen: N, N '-ethylenebis(salicylideneiminato)]. Subsequent CID of the phosphorylated peptide radical cations ( p M·+) revealed fascinating gas-phase radical chemistry, yielding (1) charge-directed b- and y-type product ions, (2) radical-driven product ions through cleavages of peptide backbones and side chains, and (3) different degrees of formation of [M - H3PO4]·+ species through phosphate ester bond cleavage. The CID spectra of the p M·+ species and their non-phosphorylated analogues featured fragment ions of similar sequence, suggesting that the phosphoryl group did not play a significant role in the fragmentation of the peptide backbone or side chain. The extent of neutral H3PO4 loss was influenced by the peptide sequence and the initial sites of the charge and radical. A preliminary density functional theory study, at the B3LYP 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, of the neutral loss of H3PO4 from a prototypical model— N-acetylphosphorylserine methylamide—revealed several factors governing the elimination of neutral phosphoryl groups through charge- and radical-induced mechanisms.

  4. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites on Extracellular Corneal Epithelial Cell Maspin

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Malathi; Mirza, Shama P.; Twining, Sally S.

    2011-01-01

    Maspin, a 42-kDa non classical serine protease inhibitor (serpin) is expressed by epithelial cells of various tissues including the cornea. The protein localizes to the nucleus and cytosol, and is present in the extracellular space. While extracellular maspin regulates corneal stromal fibroblast adhesion and inhibits angiogenesis during wound healing in the cornea, the molecular mechanism of its extracellular functions is unclear. We hypothesized that identifying post-translational modifications of maspin, such as phosphorylation, may help decipher its mode of action. The focus of this study was on the identification of phosphorylation sites on extracellular maspin, since the extracellular form of the molecule is implicated in several functions. Multi-stage fragmentation mass spectrometry was used to identify sites of phosphorylation on extracellular corneal epithelial cell maspin. A total of eight serine and threonine phosphorylation sites (Thr50, Ser97, Thr118, Thr157, Ser240, Ser298, Thr310, Ser316) were identified on the extracellular forms of the molecule. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on extracellular maspin was not detected on extracellular maspin from corneal epithelial cell, in contrast to breast epithelial cells. This study provides the basis for further investigation into the functional role of phosphorylation of corneal epithelial maspin. PMID:21365746

  5. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICBGlc, which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes. PMID:27586301

  6. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  7. ZDHHC3 Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulates Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Palmitoylation

    PubMed Central

    Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Cesca, Fabrizia; Gorinski, Natalya; Galil, Dalia Abdel; Cherkas, Volodimir; Ronkina, Natalia; Lafera, Juri; Gaestel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. It is broadly expressed in the nervous system and regulates neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. Previous in vitro studies revealed that palmitoylation of NCAM is required for fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2)-stimulated neurite outgrowth and identified the zinc finger DHHC (Asp-His-His-Cys)-containing proteins ZDHHC3 and ZDHHC7 as specific NCAM-palmitoylating enzymes. Here, we verified that FGF2 controlled NCAM palmitoylation in vivo and investigated molecular mechanisms regulating NCAM palmitoylation by ZDHHC3. Experiments with overexpression and pharmacological inhibition of FGF receptor (FGFR) and Src revealed that these kinases control tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 and that ZDHHC3 is phosphorylated by endogenously expressed FGFR and Src proteins. By site-directed mutagenesis, we found that Tyr18 is an FGFR1-specific ZDHHC3 phosphorylation site, while Tyr295 and Tyr297 are specifically phosphorylated by Src kinase in cell-based and cell-free assays. Abrogation of tyrosine phosphorylation increased ZDHHC3 autopalmitoylation, enhanced interaction with NCAM, and upregulated NCAM palmitoylation. Expression of ZDHHC3 with tyrosine mutated in cultured hippocampal neurons promoted neurite outgrowth. Our findings for the first time highlight that FGFR- and Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 modulates ZDHHC3 enzymatic activity and plays a role in neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:27247265

  8. Phosphorescent sensor for phosphorylated peptides based on an iridium complex.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung Hyun; Kim, Hee Jin; Kwon, Tae-Hyuk; Hong, Jong-In

    2014-07-03

    A bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)pyridinato-N,C(2')]iridium(III) picolinate (FIrpic) derivative coupled with bis(Zn(2+)-dipicolylamine) (ZnDPA) was developed as a sensor (1) for phosphorylated peptides, which are related to many cellular mechanisms. As a control, a fluorescent sensor (2) based on anthracene coupled to ZnDPA was also prepared. When the total negative charge on the phosphorylated peptides was changed to -2, -4, and -6, the emission intensity of sensor 1 gradually increased by factors of up to 7, 11, and 16, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in the emission intensity of sensor 1 upon the addition of a neutral phosphorylated peptide, non-phosphorylated peptides, or various anions such as CO3(2-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), phosphate, azide, and pyrophosphate. Furthermore, sensor 1 could be used to visually discriminate between phosphorylated peptides and adenosine triphosphate in aqueous solution under a UV-vis lamp, unlike fluorescent sensor 2. This enhanced luminance of phosphorescent sensor 1 upon binding to a phosphorylated peptide is attributed to a reduction in the repulsion between the Zn(2+) ions due to the phenoxy anion, its strong metal-to-ligand charge transfer character, and a reduction in self-quenching.

  9. Small molecules that target phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobumoto; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Protein-protein interaction is one of the key events in the signal transduction pathway. The interaction changes the conformations, activities, localization and stabilities of the proteins, and transduces the signal to the next step. Frequently, this interaction occurs upon the protein phosphorylation. When upstream signals are stimulated, protein kinase(s) is/are activated and phosphorylate(s) their substrates, and induce the phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction. For this interaction, several domains in proteins are known to specifically recognize the phosphorylated residues of target proteins. These specific domains for interaction are important in the progression of the diseases caused by disordered signal transduction such as cancer. Thus small molecules that modulate this interaction are attractive lead compounds for the treatment of such diseases. In this review, we focused on three examples of phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction modules (14-3-3, polo box domain of Plk1 and F-box proteins in SCF ubiquitin ligases) and summarize small molecules that modulate their interaction. We also introduce our original screening system to identify such small molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. PHOSPHORYLATED TAU: TOXIC, PROTECTIVE, OR NONE OF THE ABOVE

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Rudy J.; Nunomura, Akihiko; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of phosphorylated tau as the major protein component of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) led to the concept that phosphorylated tau was inherently toxic and, as such, intimately involved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. While superficially logical, this construct ignores a number of key findings in AD, including i) that NFTs are encountered in viable neurons until late stage disease; ii) that NFTs persist within the neuronal cytoplasm for decades; iii) that NFTs are encountered, sometimes in significant numbers, in cognitively intact elderly; and iv) that neurons with NFTs contain normal content and structure of microtubules. Experimental data in transgenic animal models has further demonstrated that NFTs accumulate in neurons in spite of tau suppression and behavior normalization. These data call into question the inherent toxicity of phosphorylated tau, seemingly leaving the only viable hypothesis of the ad hoc “toxic intermediate” phosphorylated tau concept. However, since we also know that phosphorylated tau sequesters redox active heavy metals and protects against oxidative stress, here we suggest that phosphorylated tau serves a protective role against cellular toxicity. PMID:18688087

  11. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. © FEMS 2016.

  12. Huntingtin-Interacting Protein 1 Phosphorylation by Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Heather M.; Wang, Anmin A.; Coughran, Alanna; Evaul, Kristen; Huang, Sha; Graves, Chiron W.; Soyombo, Abigail A.

    2013-01-01

    Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) binds inositol lipids, clathrin, actin, and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). HIP1 is elevated in many tumors, and its expression is prognostic in prostate cancer. HIP1 overexpression increases levels of the RTK epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transforms fibroblasts. Here we report that HIP1 is tyrosine phosphorylated in the presence of EGFR and platelet-derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) as well as the oncogenic derivatives EGFRvIII, HIP1/PDGFβR (H/P), and TEL/PDGFβR (T/P). We identified a four-tyrosine “HIP1 phosphorylation motif” (HPM) in the N-terminal region of HIP1 that is required for phosphorylation mediated by both EGFR and PDGFβR but not by the oncoproteins H/P and T/P. We also identified a tyrosine residue (Y152) within the HPM motif of HIP1 that inhibits HIP1 tyrosine phosphorylation. The HPM tyrosines are conserved in HIP1's only known mammalian relative, HIP1-related protein (HIP1r), and are also required for HIP1r phosphorylation. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine point mutations in the HPM of HIP1 result in proapoptotic activity, indicating that an intact HPM may be necessary for HIP1's role in cellular survival. These data suggest that phosphorylation of HIP1 by RTKs in an N-terminal region contributes to the promotion of cellular survival. PMID:23836884

  13. Multisite phosphorylation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.; Huber, S.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase is phosphorylated both in vivo and in vitro on serine residues. Phosphorylation of SPS in vivo yields twelve major phosphopeptides after a tryptic digest and two dimensional mapping. The in vivo labeling of three of these SPS P-peptides is reduced in illuminated leaves where the extracted enzyme is activated relative to that of dark leaves. Two of these inhibitory sites are phosphorylated as well when SPS is inactivated in vitro using ({sup 32}P)ATP. In vivo phosphorylation of two other sites is enhanced during mannose feeding of the leaves (in light or dark) which produces the highest activation state of SPS. Overall, the results confirm that light-dark regulation of SPS activity occurs as a result of regulatory seryl-phosphorylation and involves a balance between phosphorylation of sites which inhibit or stimulate activity. Regulation of the SPS protein kinase that inhibits activity is relatively unaffected by phosphate but inhibited by G1c 6-P (IC{sub 50}{approx}5 mM), which may explain the control of SPS activation state by light-dark signals.

  14. HIV-1 Tat-associated RNA polymerase C-terminal domain kinase, CDK2, phosphorylates CDK7 and stimulates Tat-mediated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Nekhai, Sergei; Zhou, Meisheng; Fernandez, Anne; Lane, William S; Lamb, Ned J C; Brady, John; Kumar, Ajit

    2002-01-01

    HIV-1 gene expression is regulated by a viral transactivator protein (Tat) which induces transcriptional elongation of HIV-1 long tandem repeat (LTR). This induction requires hyperphosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) repeats of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). To achieve CTD hyperphosphorylation, Tat stimulates CTD kinases associated with general transcription factors of the promoter complex, specifically TFIIH-associated CDK7 and positive transcription factor b-associated CDK9 (cyclin-dependent kinase 9). Other studies indicate that Tat may bind an additional CTD kinase that regulates the target-specific phosphorylation of RNA Pol II CTD. We previously reported that Tat-associated T-cell-derived kinase (TTK), purified from human primary T-cells, stimulates Tat-dependent transcription of HIV-1 LTR in vivo [Nekhai, Shukla, Fernandez, Kumar and Lamb (2000) Virology 266, 246-256]. In the work presented here, we characterized the components of TTK by biochemical fractionation and the function of TTK in transcription assays in vitro. TTK uniquely co-purified with CDK2 and not with either CDK9 or CDK7. Tat induced the TTK-associated CDK2 kinase to phosphorylate CTD, specifically at Ser-2 residues. The TTK fraction restored Tat-mediated transcription activation of HIV-1 LTR in a HeLa nuclear extract immunodepleted of CDK9, but not in the HeLa nuclear extract double-depleted of CDK9 and CDK7. Direct microinjection of the TTK fraction augmented Tat transactivation of HIV-1 LTR in human primary HS68 fibroblasts. The results argue that TTK-associated CDK2 may function to maintain target-specific phosphorylation of RNA Pol II that is essential for Tat transactivation of HIV-1 promoter. They are also consistent with the observed cell-cycle-specific induction of viral gene transactivation. PMID:12049628

  15. The structure of phosphorylated GSK-3beta complexed with a peptide, FRATtide, that inhibits beta-catenin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Bax, B; Carter, P S; Lewis, C; Guy, A R; Bridges, A; Tanner, R; Pettman, G; Mannix, C; Culbert, A A; Brown, M J; Smith, D G; Reith, A D

    2001-12-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) sequentially phosphorylates four serine residues on glycogen synthase (GS), in the sequence SxxxSxxxSxxx-SxxxS(p), by recognizing and phosphorylating the first serine in the sequence motif SxxxS(P) (where S(p) represents a phosphoserine). FRATtide (a peptide derived from a GSK-3 binding protein) binds to GSK-3 and blocks GSK-3 from interacting with Axin. This inhibits the Axin-dependent phosphorylation of beta-catenin by GSK-3. Structures of uncomplexed Tyr216 phosphorylated GSK-3beta and of its complex with a peptide and a sulfate ion both show the activation loop adopting a conformation similar to that in the phosphorylated and active forms of the related kinases CDK2 and ERK2. The sulfate ion, adjacent to Val214 on the activation loop, represents the binding site for the phosphoserine residue on 'primed' substrates. The peptide FRATtide forms a helix-turn-helix motif in binding to the C-terminal lobe of the kinase domain; the FRATtide binding site is close to, but does not obstruct, the substrate binding channel of GSK-3. FRATtide (and FRAT1) does not inhibit the activity of GSK-3 toward GS. The Axin binding site on GSK-3 presumably overlaps with that for FRATtide; its proximity to the active site explains how Axin may act as a scaffold protein promoting beta-catenin phosphorylation. Tyrosine 216 phosphorylation can induce an active conformation in the activation loop. Pre-phosphorylated substrate peptides can be modeled into the active site of the enzyme, with the P1 residue occupying a pocket partially formed by phosphotyrosine 216 and the P4 phosphoserine occupying the 'primed' binding site.

  16. Cyclin B targets p34cdc2 for tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Meijer, L; Azzi, L; Wang, J Y

    1991-06-01

    A universal intracellular factor, the 'M phase-promoting factor' (MPF), triggers the G2/M transition of the cell cycle in all organisms. In late G2, it is present as an inactive complex of tyrosine-phosphorylated p34cdc2 and unphosphorylated cyclin Bcdc13. In M phase, its activation as an active MPF displaying histone H1 kinase (H1K) originates from the concomitant tyrosine dephosphorylation of the p34cdc2 subunit and the phosphorylation of the cylin Bcdc13 subunit. We have investigated the role of cyclin in the formation of this complex and the tyrosine phosphorylation of p34cdc2, using highly synchronous mitotic sea urchin eggs as a model. As cells leave the S phase and enter the G2 phase, a massive tyrosine phosphorylation of p34cdc2 occurs. This large p34cdc2 tyrosine phosphorylation burst does not arise from a massive increase in p34cdc2 concentration. It even appears to affect only a fraction (non-immunoprecipitable by anti-PSTAIR antibodies) of the total p34cdc2 present in the cell. Several observations point to an extremely close association between accumulation of unphosphorylated cyclin and p34cdc2 tyrosine phosphorylation: (i) both events coincide perfectly during the G2 phase; (ii) both tyrosine-phosphorylated p34cdc2 and cyclin are not immunoprecipitated by anti-PSTAIR antibodies; (iii) accumulation of unphosphorylated cyclin by aphidicolin treatment of the cells, triggers a dramatic accumulation of tyrosine-phosphorylated p34cdc2; and (iv) inhibition of cyclin synthesis by emetine inhibits p34cdc2 tyrosine phosphorylation without affecting the p34cdc2 concentration. These results show that, as it is synthesized, cyclin B binds and recruits p34cdc2 for tyrosine phosphorylation; this inactive complex then requires the completion of DNA replication before it can be turned into fully active MPF. These results fully confirm recent data obtained in vitro with exogenous cyclin added to cycloheximide-treated Xenopus egg extracts.

  17. PP2A(Cdc55) Phosphatase Imposes Ordered Cell-Cycle Phosphorylation by Opposing Threonine Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Molly; Touati, Sandra A; Kataria, Meghna; Jones, Andrew; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Uhlmann, Frank

    2017-02-02

    In the quantitative model of cell-cycle control, progression from G1 through S phase and into mitosis is ordered by thresholds of increasing cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activity. How such thresholds are read out by substrates that respond with the correct phosphorylation timing is not known. Here, using the budding yeast model, we show that the abundant PP2A(Cdc55) phosphatase counteracts Cdk phosphorylation during interphase and delays phosphorylation of late Cdk substrates. PP2A(Cdc55) specifically counteracts phosphorylation on threonine residues, and consequently, we find that threonine-directed phosphorylation occurs late in the cell cycle. Furthermore, the late phosphorylation of a model substrate, Ndd1, depends on threonine identity of its Cdk target sites. Our results support a model in which Cdk-counteracting phosphatases contribute to cell-cycle ordering by imposing Cdk thresholds. They also unveil a regulatory principle based on the phosphoacceptor amino acid, which is likely to apply to signaling pathways beyond cell-cycle control. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thr175-phosphorylated tau induces pathologic fibril formation via GSK3β-mediated phosphorylation of Thr231 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moszczynski, Alexander J; Gohar, May; Volkening, Kathryn; Leystra-Lantz, Cheryl; Strong, Wendy; Strong, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    We have previously shown that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with cognitive impairment can be characterized by pathologic inclusions of microtubule-associated protein tau (tau) phosphorylated at Thr(175) (pThr(175)) in association with GSK3β activation. We have now examined whether pThr(175) induces GSK3β activation and whether this leads to pathologic fibril formation through Thr(231) phosphorylation. Seventy-two hours after transfection of Neuro2A cells with pseudophosphorylated green fluorescent protein-tagged 2N4R tau (Thr(175)Asp), phosphorylated kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (active GSK3β) levels were significantly increased as was pathologic fibril formation and cell death. Treatment with each of 4 GSK3β inhibitors or small hairpin RNA knockdown of GSK3β abolished fibril formation and prevented cell death. Inhibition of Thr(231) phosphorylation (Thr(231)Ala) prevented pathologic tau fibril formation, regardless of Thr(175) state, whereas Thr(231)Asp (pseudophosphorylated at Thr(231)) developed pathologic tau fibrils. Ser(235) mutations did not affect fibril formation, indicating an unprimed mechanism of Thr(231) phosphorylation. These findings suggest a mechanism of tau pathology by which pThr(175) induces GSK3β phosphorylation of Thr(231) leading to fibril formation, indicating a potential therapeutic avenue for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 mediates compensatory renal hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinxian; Chen, Jianchun; Dong, Zheng; Meyuhas, Oded; Chen, Jian-Kang

    2015-03-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying renal hypertrophy and progressive nephron damage remains poorly understood. Here we generated congenic ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) knock-in mice expressing nonphosphorylatable rpS6 and found that uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy was significantly blunted in these knock-in mice. Uninephrectomy-induced increases in cyclin D1 and decreases in cyclin E in the remaining kidney were attenuated in the knock-in mice compared with their wild-type littermates. Uninephrectomy induced rpS6 phosphorylation in the wild-type mice; however, no rpS6 phosphorylation was detected in uninephrectomized or sham-operated knock-in mice. Nonetheless, uninephrectomy stimulated comparable 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in both knock-in and wild-type mice, indicating that mTORC1 was still activated in the knock-in mice. Moreover, the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin prevented both rpS6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, significantly blunted uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy in wild-type mice, but did not prevent residual renal hypertrophy despite inhibiting 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in uninephrectomized knock-in mice. Thus, both genetic and pharmacological approaches unequivocally demonstrate that phosphorylated rpS6 is a downstream effector of the mTORC1-S6K1 signaling pathway mediating renal hypertrophy. Hence, rpS6 phosphorylation facilitates the increase in cyclin D1 and decrease in cyclin E1 that underlie the hypertrophic nature of uninephrectomy-induced kidney growth.

  20. Actin Tyrosine-53-Phosphorylation in Neuronal Maturation and Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bertling, Enni; Englund, Jonas; Minkeviciene, Rimante; Koskinen, Mikko; Segerstråle, Mikael; Castrén, Eero; Taira, Tomi; Hotulainen, Pirta

    2016-05-11

    Rapid reorganization and stabilization of the actin cytoskeleton in dendritic spines enables cellular processes underlying learning, such as long-term potentiation (LTP). Dendritic spines are enriched in exceptionally short and dynamic actin filaments, but the studies so far have not revealed the molecular mechanisms underlying the high actin dynamics in dendritic spines. Here, we show that actin in dendritic spines is dynamically phosphorylated at tyrosine-53 (Y53) in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons. Our findings show that actin phosphorylation increases the turnover rate of actin filaments and promotes the short-term dynamics of dendritic spines. During neuronal maturation, actin phosphorylation peaks at the first weeks of morphogenesis, when dendritic spines form, and the amount of Y53-phosphorylated actin decreases when spines mature and stabilize. Induction of LTP transiently increases the amount of phosphorylated actin and LTP induction is deficient in neurons expressing mutant actin that mimics phosphorylation. Actin phosphorylation provides a molecular mechanism to maintain the high actin dynamics in dendritic spines during neuronal development and to induce fast reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in synaptic plasticity. In turn, dephosphorylation of actin is required for the stabilization of actin filaments that is necessary for proper dendritic spine maturation and LTP maintenance. Dendritic spines are small protrusions from neuronal dendrites where the postsynaptic components of most excitatory synapses reside. Precise control of dendritic spine morphology and density is critical for normal brain function. Accordingly, aberrant spine morphology is linked to many neurological diseases. The actin cytoskeleton is a structural element underlying the proper morphology of dendritic spines. Therefore, defects in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons have been implicated in neurological diseases. Here, we revealed a novel mechanism for

  1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of NEDD4 activates its ubiquitin ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Persaud, Avinash; Alberts, Philipp; Mari, Sara; Tong, Jiefei; Murchie, Ryan; Maspero, Elena; Safi, Frozan; Moran, Michael F; Polo, Simona; Rotin, Daniela

    2014-10-07

    Ligand binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor 1 (FGFR1) causes dimerization and activation by transphosphorylation of tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. FGFR1 is ubiquitylated by the E3 ligase NEDD4 (also known as NEDD4-1), which promotes FGFR1 internalization and degradation. Although phosphorylation of FGFR1 is required for NEDD4-dependent endocytosis, NEDD4 directly binds to a nonphosphorylated region of FGFR1. We found that activation of FGFR1 led to activation of c-Src kinase-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of NEDD4, enhancing the ubiquitin ligase activity of NEDD4. Using mass spectrometry, we identified several FGF-dependent phosphorylated tyrosines in NEDD4, including Tyr(43) in the C2 domain and Tyr(585) in the HECT domain. Mutating these tyrosines to phenylalanine to prevent phosphorylation inhibited FGF-dependent NEDD4 activity and FGFR1 endocytosis and enhanced cell proliferation. Mutating the tyrosines to glutamic acid to mimic phosphorylation enhanced NEDD4 activity. Moreover, the NEDD4 C2 domain bound the HECT domain, and the presence of phosphomimetic mutations inhibited this interaction, suggesting that phosphorylation of NEDD4 relieves an inhibitory intra- or intermolecular interaction. Accordingly, activation of FGFR1 was not required for activation of NEDD4 that lacked its C2 domain. Activation of c-Src by epidermal growth factor (EGF) also promoted tyrosine phosphorylation and enhanced the activity of NEDD4. Thus, we identified a feedback mechanism by which receptor tyrosine kinases promote catalytic activation of NEDD4 and that may represent a mechanism of receptor crosstalk. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Phosphorylation regulates TRPV1 association with β-arrestin-2.

    PubMed

    Por, Elaine D; Gomez, Ruben; Akopian, Armen N; Jeske, Nathaniel A

    2013-04-01

    Post-translational modifications in TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) play a critical role in channel activity. Phosphorylation of serine/threonine residues within the N- and C-termini of TRPV1 are implicated in receptor sensitization and activation. Conversely, TRPV1 desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism and leads to receptor de-phosphorylation. Importantly, we recently demonstrated that TRPV1 association with β-arrestin-2 is critical to receptor desensitization via its ability to scaffold the phosphodiesterase PDE4D5 to the receptor, regulating TRPV1 phosphorylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of TRPV1 and β-arrestin-2 regulates this association at the membrane. Under serum-free media conditions, we observed a significant decrease in TRPV1 and β-arrestin-2 association in transfected CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cells. Pharmacological activation of the kinases PKA (protein kinase A) and PKC (protein kinase C) led to a robust increase in TRPV1 and β-arrestin-2 association, whereas inhibition of PKA and PKC decreased association. Previously, we identified potential PKA residues (Ser(116), Thr(370)) in the N-terminus of TRPV1 modulated by β-arrestin-2. In the present study we reveal that the phosphorylation status of Thr(370) dictates the β-arrestin-2 and TRPV1 association. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CK2 (casein kinase 2)-mediated phosphorylation of β-arrestin-2 at Thr(382) is critical for its association with TRPV1. Taken together, the findings of the present study suggest that phosphorylation controls the association of TRPV1 with β-arrestin-2.

  3. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  4. Phosphorylation of NLRC4 is critical for inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yan; Misaghi, Shahram; Izrael-Tomasevic, Anita; Newton, Kim; Gilmour, Laurie L; Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Louie, Salina; Kayagaki, Nobuhiko; Liu, Jinfeng; Kömüves, László; Cupp, James E; Arnott, David; Monack, Denise; Dixit, Vishva M

    2012-10-25

    NLRC4 is a cytosolic member of the NOD-like receptor family that is expressed in innate immune cells. It senses indirectly bacterial flagellin and type III secretion systems, and responds by assembling an inflammasome complex that promotes caspase-1 activation and pyroptosis. Here we use knock-in mice expressing NLRC4 with a carboxy-terminal 3×Flag tag to identify phosphorylation of NLRC4 on a single, evolutionarily conserved residue, Ser 533, following infection of macrophages with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (also known as Salmonella typhimurium). Western blotting with a NLRC4 phospho-Ser 533 antibody confirmed that this post-translational modification occurs only in the presence of stimuli known to engage NLRC4 and not the related protein NLRP3 or AIM2. Nlrc4(-/-) macrophages reconstituted with NLRC4 mutant S533A, unlike those reconstituted with wild-type NLRC4, did not activate caspase-1 and pyroptosis in response to S. typhimurium, indicating that S533 phosphorylation is critical for NLRC4 inflammasome function. Conversely, phosphomimetic NLRC4 S533D caused rapid macrophage pyroptosis without infection. Biochemical purification of the NLRC4-phosphorylating activity and a screen of kinase inhibitors identified PRKCD (PKCδ) as a candidate NLRC4 kinase. Recombinant PKCδ phosphorylated NLRC4 S533 in vitro, immunodepletion of PKCδ from macrophage lysates blocked NLRC4 S533 phosphorylation in vitro, and Prkcd(-/-) macrophages exhibited greatly attenuated caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion specifically in response to S. typhimurium. Phosphorylation-defective NLRC4 S533A failed to recruit procaspase-1 and did not assemble inflammasome specks during S. typhimurium infection, so phosphorylation of NLRC4 S533 probably drives conformational changes necessary for NLRC4 inflammasome activity and host innate immunity.

  5. Raptor is phosphorylated by cdc2 during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, Dana M; Asara, John M; Shaw, Reuben J

    2010-02-12

    The appropriate control of mitotic entry and exit is reliant on a series of interlocking signaling events that coordinately drive the biological processes required for accurate cell division. Overlaid onto these signals that promote orchestrated cell division are checkpoints that ensure appropriate mitotic spindle formation, a lack of DNA damage, kinetochore attachment, and that each daughter cell has the appropriate complement of DNA. We recently discovered that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulates the G2/M phase of cell cycle progression in part through its suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. AMPK directly phosphorylates the critical mTOR binding partner raptor inhibiting mTORC1 (mTOR-raptor rapamycin sensitive mTOR kinase complex 1). As mTOR has been previously tied to mitotic control, we examined further how raptor may contribute to this process. We have discovered that raptor becomes highly phosphorylated in cells in mitosis. Utilizing tandem mass spectrometry, we identified a number of novel phosphorylation sites in raptor, and using phospho-specific antibodies demonstrated that raptor becomes phosphorylated on phospho-serine/threonine-proline sites in mitosis. A combination of site-directed mutagenesis in a tagged raptor cDNA and analysis with a series of new phospho-specific antibodies generated against different sites in raptor revealed that Serine 696 and Threonine 706 represent two key sites in raptor phosphorylated in mitosis. We demonstrate that the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase cdc2/CDK1 is the kinase responsible for phosphorylating these sites, and its mitotic partner Cyclin B efficiently coimmunoprecipitates with raptor in mitotic cells. This study demonstrates that the key mTOR binding partner raptor is directly phosphorylated during mitosis by cdc2. This reinforces previous studies suggesting that mTOR activity is highly regulated and important for mitotic progression, and points to a direct modulation of the

  6. Squid neurofilaments. Phosphorylation and Ca2+-dependent proteolysis in situ.

    PubMed

    Brown, A; Eagles, P A

    1986-10-01

    Three major polypeptides co-purify with neurofilaments from squid (Loligo forbesi) axoplasm: P60 (apparent Mr 60,000), P200 (apparent Mr 200,000) and Band 1 (apparent Mr 400,000). Anti-IFA, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes an epitope common to all classes of intermediate filaments, binds to P200 and P60. When axoplasm is incubated with [32P]Pi, the major phosphorylated polypeptides are P200 and Band 1. We have investigated Ca2+-dependent proteolysis of [32P]phosphorylated axoplasm in order to localize the major sites of phosphorylation and to probe the arrangement of the polypeptides in the filament. The proteinase preferentially cleaves P200 and Band 1, liberating the phosphorylated domains. Analysis of proteolysed filaments by electron microscopy and gel electrophoresis shows that most of P200 and Band 1 can be cleaved while still maintaining intact filaments. We suggest that P200 is initially cleaved within a single highly sensitive region, generating two major fragments called P100p (apparent Mr 100,000) and P110s (apparent Mr 110,000). P100p contains the Anti-IFA epitope and co-sediments with filaments, whereas P110s is highly phosphorylated and does not sediment with filaments. Band 1 is cleaved to produce a soluble high-Mr fragment that is phosphorylated and that represents a major portion of the undigested component, whereas P60 is relatively resistant to limited proteolysis. Thus proteolysis appears to define two major filament domains: a conserved core that forms the backbone of the filament, and a highly phosphorylated peripheral region that is not essential for filament integrity.

  7. Regulation of divalent metal transporter-1 by serine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young Ah; Kumara, Ruvin; Wetli, Herbert; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) mediates dietary iron uptake across the intestinal mucosa and facilitates peripheral delivery of iron released by transferrin in the endosome. Here, we report that classical cannabinoids (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC), nonclassical cannabinoids (CP 55,940), aminoalkylindoles (WIN 55,212-2) and endocannabinoids (anandamide) reduce 55Fe and 54Mn uptake by HEK293T(DMT1) cells stably expressing the transporter. siRNA knockdown of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) abrogated inhibition. CB2 is a G-protein (GTP-binding protein)-coupled receptor that negatively regulates signal transduction cascades involving serine/threonine kinases. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that DMT1 is serine-phosphorylated under basal conditions, but that treatment with Δ9-THC reduced phosphorylation. Site-directed mutation of predicted DMT1 phosphosites further showed that substitution of serine with alanine at N-terminal position 43 (S43A) abolished basal phosphorylation. Concordantly, both the rate and extent of 55Fe uptake in cells expressing DMT1(S43A) was reduced compared with those expressing wild-type DMT1. Among kinase inhibitors that affected DMT1-mediated iron uptake, staurosporine also reduced DMT1 phosphorylation confirming a role for serine phosphorylation in iron transport regulation. These combined data indicate that phosphorylation at serine 43 of DMT1 promotes transport activity, whereas dephosphorylation is associated with loss of iron uptake. Since anti-inflammatory actions mediated through CB2 would be associated with reduced DMT1 phosphorylation, we postulate that this pathway provides a means to reduce oxidative stress by limiting iron uptake. PMID:27681840

  8. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4–7 and 8–12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  9. Phosphorylation of the Yeast Choline Kinase by Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Kurnov, Vladlen; Kersting, Michael C.; Sreenivas, Avula; Carman, George M.

    2005-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae CKI1-encoded choline kinase catalyzes the committed step in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. The enzyme is phosphorylated on multiple serine residues, and some of this phosphorylation is mediated by protein kinase A. In this work, we examined the hypothesis that choline kinase is also phosphorylated by protein kinase C. Using choline kinase as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was dose- and time-dependent, and dependent on the concentrations of choline kinase (Km = 27 μg/ml) and ATP (Km = 15 μM). This phosphorylation, which occurred on a serine residue, was accompanied by a 1.6-fold stimulation of choline kinase activity. The synthetic peptide SRSSS25QRRHS (Vmax/Km = 17.5 mM-1 μmol min-1 mg-1) that contains the protein kinase C motif for Ser25 was a substrate for protein kinase C. A Ser25 to Ala (S25A) mutation in choline kinase resulted in a 60% decrease in protein kinase C phosphorylation of the enzyme. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of the S25A mutant enzyme confirmed that Ser25 was a protein kinase C target site. In vivo, the S25A mutation correlated with a decrease (55%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway whereas an S25D phosphorylation site mimic correlated with an increase (44%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Whereas the S25A (protein kinase C site) mutation did not affect the phosphorylation of choline kinase by protein kinase A, the S30A (protein kinase A site) mutation caused a 46% reduction in enzyme phosphorylation by protein kinase C. A choline kinase synthetic peptide (SQRRHS30LTRQ) containing Ser30 was a substrate (Vmax/Km = 3.0 mM−1 μmol min−1 mg−1) for protein kinase C. Comparison of phosphopeptide maps of the wild type and S30A mutant choline kinase enzymes phosphorylated by protein kinase C confirmed that Ser30 was also a target site for protein kinase C. PMID:15919656

  10. Regulation of Arrestin Binding by Rhodopsin Phosphorylation Level

    PubMed Central

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Raman, Dayanidhi; Wei, Junhua; Kennedy, Matthew J.; Hurley, James B.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2008-01-01

    Arrestins ensure the timely termination of receptor signaling. The role of rhodopsin phosphorylation in visual arrestin binding was established more than 20 years ago, but the effects of the number of receptor-attached phosphates on this interaction remain controversial. Here we use purified rhodopsin fractions with carefully quantified content of individual phosphorylated rhodopsin species to elucidate the impact of phosphorylation level on arrestin interaction with three biologically relevant functional forms of rhodopsin: light-activated and dark phosphorhodopsin and phospho-opsin. We found that a single receptor-attached phosphate does not facilitate arrestin binding, two are necessary to induce high affinity interaction, and three phosphates fully activate arrestin. Higher phosphorylation levels do not increase the stability of arrestin complex with light-activated rhodopsin but enhance its binding to the dark phosphorhodopsin and phospho-opsin. The complex of arrestin with hyperphosphorylated light-activated rhodopsin is less sensitive to high salt and appears to release retinal faster. These data suggest that arrestin likely quenches rhodopsin signaling after the third phosphate is added by rhodopsin kinase. The complex of arrestin with heavily phosphorylated rhodopsin, which appears to form in certain disease states, has distinct characteristics that may contribute to the phenotype of these visual disorders. PMID:17848565

  11. Queuine mediated inhibition in phosphorylation of tyrosine phosphoproteins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Chandramani; Jaiswal, Yogesh K; Vinayak, Manjula

    2008-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation or dephosphorylation is the most important regulatory switch of signal transduction contributing to control of cell proliferation. The reversibility of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is due to the activities of kinases and phosphatase, which determine protein phosphorylation level of cell under different physiological and pathological conditions. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) mediated cellular signaling is precisely coordinated and tightly controlled in normal cells which ensures regulated mitosis. Deregulation of RTK signaling resulting in aberrant activation in RTKs leads to malignant transformation. Queuine is one of the modified base of tRNA which participates in down regulation of tyrosine kinase activity. The guanine analogue queuine is a nutrient factor to eukaryotes and occurs as free base or modified nucleoside queuosine into the first anticodon position of specific tRNAs. The tRNAs are often queuine deficient in cancer and fast proliferating tissues. The present study is aimed to investigate queuine mediated inhibition in phosphorylation of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins in lymphoma bearing mouse. The result shows high level of cytosolic and membrane associated tyrosine phosphoprotein in DLAT cancerous mouse liver compared to normal. Queuine treatments down regulate the level of tyrosine phosphoproteins, which suggests that queuine is involved in regulation of mitotic signaling pathways.

  12. Structural changes accompanying phosphorylation of tarantula muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to study the structural changes that occur in the myosin filaments of tarantula striated muscle when they are phosphorylated. Myosin filaments in muscle homogenates maintained in relaxing conditions (ATP, EGTA) are found to have nonphosphorylated regulatory light chains as shown by urea/glycerol gel electrophoresis and [32P]phosphate autoradiography. Negative staining reveals an ordered, helical arrangement of crossbridges in these filaments, in which the heads from axially neighboring myosin molecules appear to interact with each other. When the free Ca2+ concentration in a homogenate is raised to 10(-4) M, or when a Ca2+-insensitive myosin light chain kinase is added at low Ca2+ (10(-8) M), the regulatory light chains of myosin become rapidly phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is accompanied by potentiation of the actin activation of the myosin Mg- ATPase activity and by loss of order of the helical crossbridge arrangement characteristic of the relaxed filament. We suggest that in the relaxed state, when the regulatory light chains are not phosphorylated, the myosin heads are held down on the filament backbone by head-head interactions or by interactions of the heads with the filament backbone. Phosphorylation of the light chains may alter these interactions so that the crossbridges become more loosely associated with the filament backbone giving rise to the observed changes and facilitating crossbridge interaction with actin. PMID:2958483

  13. Inhibition of Jak2 phosphorylation attenuates pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Beckles, Daniel L; Mascareno, Eduardo; Siddiqui, M A Q

    2006-12-01

    We examined the role of Jak2 kinase phosphorylation in the development of pressure overload hypertrophy in mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and treated with tyrphostin AG490, a pharmacological inhibitor of Jak2. Control mice (sham), subjected to TAC for 15 days (TAC) or to TAC and treated with 48 microg/kg/day i.p. of tyrphostin AG490 (TAC+AG490) were evaluated for morphological, physiological, and molecular changes associated with pressure overload hypertrophy. Mice subjected to TAC alone developed concentric hypertrophy that accompanied activation of the components of the Jak/STAT signaling pathway manifested by an increase in phosphorylation of Jak2 and STAT3. We also observed increased phosphorylation of MAPK p44/p42, p38 MAPK and JNK in the TAC group, as well as, an increase in expression of MKP-1 phosphatase which negatively regulates MAPK kinases. Treatment of aortic constricted mice with tyrphostin AG490 failed to develop hypertrophy and showed a marked reduction in phosphorylation of Jak2 and STAT3. There was, however, in TAC and AG490 treated mice, a notable increase in the phosphorylation state of the MAPK p44/42, whereas MKP-1 phosphatase was downregulated. These findings suggest that Jak2 kinase plays an important role in left ventricular remodeling during pressure overload hypertrophy. Pharmacological inhibition of Jak2 kinase during pressure overload blocks the development of concentric hypertrophy.

  14. Tau phosphorylation affects its axonal transport and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Noble, Wendy; Nyenya, Fanon; Anderton, Brian H.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of microtubule-associated protein tau accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the effects of specific phosphorylated tau residues on its function, wild type or phosphomutant tau was expressed in cells. Elevated tau phosphorylation decreased its microtubule binding and bundling, and increased the number of motile tau particles, without affecting axonal transport kinetics. In contrast, reducing tau phosphorylation enhanced the amount of tau bound to microtubules and inhibited axonal transport of tau. To determine whether differential tau clearance is responsible for the increase in phosphomimic tau, we inhibited autophagy in neurons which resulted in a 3-fold accumulation of phosphomimic tau compared with wild type tau, and endogenous tau was unaffected. In autophagy-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, but not in neurons, proteasomal degradation of phosphomutant tau was also reduced compared with wild type tau. Therefore, autophagic and proteasomal pathways are involved in tau degradation, with autophagy appearing to be the primary route for clearing phosphorylated tau in neurons. Defective autophagy might contribute to the accumulaton of tau in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23601672

  15. Histamine-stimulated phosphorylation of gastric parietal cell proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, C.S.; Brown, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    Parietal cells from rabbit gastric mucosa respond to histamine with increased HCl secretion. Histamine also increases cAMP and activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase(s) in these cells. cAMP analogues and forskolin appear to mimic these effects. More recently histamine and forskolin but not cAMP-stimulated increases in (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ have been detected in parietal cells enriched to 98 +/- 2% (n=10) purity using a combined Nycodenz density gradient/centrifugal elutriation technique. In the present experiments parietal cells were loaded with /sup 32/P to label ATP pools then stimulated with histamine or chlorophenylthio-cAMP plus the H/sub 2/ receptor antagonist, cimetidine. Total cell extracts were separated via 2D-gel electrophoresis and analyzed with a Masscomp computer and PDQuest software. Results indicate that histamine stimulates phosphorylation of at least two proteins with molecular weights 49 and 33 kDa and respective pI's of 6.4 and 6.0. Changes in phosphorylation are detected within 1 min of stimulation and remain elevated for at least 15 min. No change in specific activity of samples was detected during this time. A third protein also showed increased phosphorylation but the response appeared more transient. They conclude that histamine increases phosphorylation of several parietal cell proteins via a cAMP-dependent mechanism. The relationship between changes in phosphorylation and onset of HCl secretion remains to be determined.

  16. Akt phosphorylates and regulates Pdcd4 tumor suppressor protein.

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, Alexey; Efanov, Alexey; Maximov, Vadim; Aqeilan, Rami I; Croce, Carlo M; Pekarsky, Yuri

    2005-12-15

    Programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) is a tumor suppressor protein that interacts with eukaryotic initiation factor 4A and inhibits protein synthesis. Pdcd4 also suppresses the transactivation of activator protein-1 (AP-1)-responsive promoters by c-Jun. The Akt (protein kinase B) serine/threonine kinase is a key mediator of phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, and growth. Because Pdcd4 has two putative Akt phosphorylation sites at Ser(67) and Ser(457), we investigated whether Akt phosphorylates and regulates Pdcd4. Our results show that Akt specifically phosphorylates Ser(67) and Ser(457) residues of Pdcd4 in vitro and in vivo. We further show that phosphorylation of Pdcd4 by Akt causes nuclear translocation of Pdcd4. Using luciferase assay, we show that phosphorylation of Pdcd4 by Akt also causes a significant decrease of the ability of Pdcd4 to interfere with the transactivation of AP-1-responsive promoter by c-Jun.

  17. Akt phosphorylates Tal1 oncoprotein and inhibits its repressor activity.

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, Alexey; Efanov, Alexey; Maximov, Vadim; Aqeilan, Rami I; Croce, Carlo M; Pekarsky, Yuri

    2005-06-01

    The helix-loop-helix transcription factor Tal1 is required for blood cell development and its activation is a frequent event in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The Akt (protein kinase B) kinase is a key player in transduction of antiapoptotic and proliferative signals in T cells. Because Tal1 has a putative Akt phosphorylation site at Thr90, we investigated whether Akt regulates Tal1. Our results show that Akt specifically phosphorylates Thr90 of the Tal1 protein within its transactivation domain in vitro and in vivo. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed the presence of Tal1 in Akt immune complexes, suggesting that Tal1 and Akt physically interact. We further showed that phosphorylation of Tal1 by Akt causes redistribution of Tal1 within the nucleus. Using luciferase assay, we showed that phosphorylation of Tal1 by Akt decreased repressor activity of Tal1 on EpB42 (P4.2) promoter. Thus, these data indicate that Akt interacts with Tal1 and regulates Tal1 by phosphorylation at Thr90 in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent manner.

  18. Phosphoglycerate Kinase 1 Phosphorylates Beclin1 to Induce Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xu; Li, Xinjian; Cai, Qingsong; Zhang, Chuanbao; Yu, Qiujing; Jiang, Yuhui; Lee, Jong-Ho; Hawke, David; Wang, Yugang; Xia, Yan; Zheng, Yanhua; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Liu, David X; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Zhimin

    2017-03-02

    Autophagy is crucial for maintaining cell homeostasis. However, the precise mechanism underlying autophagy initiation remains to be defined. Here, we demonstrate that glutamine deprivation and hypoxia result in inhibition of mTOR-mediated acetyl-transferase ARD1 S228 phosphorylation, leading to ARD1-dependent phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) K388 acetylation and subsequent PGK1-mediated Beclin1 S30 phosphorylation. This phosphorylation enhances ATG14L-associated class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase VPS34 activity by increasing the binding of phosphatidylinositol to VPS34. ARD1-dependent PGK1 acetylation and PGK1-mediated Beclin1 S30 phosphorylation are required for glutamine deprivation- and hypoxia-induced autophagy and brain tumorigenesis. Furthermore, PGK1 K388 acetylation levels correlate with Beclin1 S30 phosphorylation levels and poor prognosis in glioblastoma patients. Our study unearths an important mechanism underlying cellular-stress-induced autophagy initiation in which the protein kinase activity of the metabolic enzyme PGK1 plays an instrumental role and reveals the significance of the mutual regulation of autophagy and cell metabolism in maintaining cell homeostasis.

  19. Determining in vivo Phosphorylation Sites using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Asara, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most studied protein post-translational modification (PTM) in biological systems since it controls cell growth, proliferation, survival, etc. High resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometers are used to identify protein phosphorylation sites due to their speed, sensitivity, selectivity and throughput. The protocol described here focuses on two common strategies: 1) Identifying phosphorylation sites from individual proteins and small protein complexes, and 2) Identifying global phosphorylation sites from whole cell and tissue extracts. For the first, endogenous or epitope tagged proteins are typically immunopurified (IP) from cell lysates, purified via gel electrophoresis or precipitation and enzymatically digested into peptides. Samples can be optionally enriched for phosphopeptides using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or titanium dioxide (TiO2) and then analyzed by microcapillary liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Global phosphorylation site analyses that capture pSer/pThr/pTyr sites from biological sources sites are more resource and time-consuming and involve digesting the whole cell lysate, followed by peptide fractionation by strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX), phosphopeptide enrichment by IMAC or TiO2 and LC-MS/MS. Alternatively, one can fractionate the protein lysate by SDS-PAGE, followed by digestion, phosphopeptide enrichment and LC-MS/MS. One can also IP only phospho-tyrosine peptides using a pTyr antibody followed by LC-MS/MS. PMID:22470061

  20. Phosphorylation of GABAA receptors influences receptor trafficking and neurosteroid actions.

    PubMed

    Comenencia-Ortiz, Eydith; Moss, Stephen J; Davies, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) are the principal mediators of inhibitory transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. GABAARs can be localized at post-synaptic inhibitory specializations or at extrasynaptic sites. While synaptic GABAARs are activated transiently following the release of GABA from presynaptic vesicles, extrasynaptic GABAARs are typically activated continuously by ambient GABA concentrations and thus mediate tonic inhibition. The tonic inhibitory currents mediated by extrasynaptic GABAARs control neuronal excitability and the strength of synaptic transmission. However, the mechanisms by which neurons control the functional properties of extrasynaptic GABAARs had not yet been explored. We review GABAARs, how they are assembled and trafficked, and the role phosphorylation has on receptor insertion and membrane stabilization. Finally, we review the modulation of GABAARs by neurosteroids and how GABAAR phosphorylation can influence the actions of neurosteroids. Trafficking and stability of functional channels to the membrane surface are critical for inhibitory efficacy. Phosphorylation of residues within GABAAR subunits plays an essential role in the assembly, trafficking, and cell surface stability of GABAARs. Neurosteroids are produced in the brain and are highly efficacious allosteric modulators of GABAAR-mediated current. This allosteric modulation by neurosteroids is influenced by the phosphorylated state of the GABAAR which is subunit dependent, adding temporal and regional variability to the neurosteroid response. Possible links between neurosteroid actions, phosphorylation, and GABAAR trafficking remain to be explored, but potential novel therapeutic targets may exist for numerous neurological and psychological disorders which are linked to fluctuations in neurosteroid levels and GABAA subunit expression.

  1. Reciprocal Phosphorylation and Palmitoylation Control Dopamine Transporter Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Amy E.; Rastedt, Danielle E.; Stanislowski, Daniel J.; Shetty, Madhur; Smith, Margaret A.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Foster, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter is a neuronal protein that drives the presynaptic reuptake of dopamine (DA) and is the major determinant of transmitter availability in the brain. Dopamine transporter function is regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) and other signaling pathways through mechanisms that are complex and poorly understood. Here we investigate the role of Ser-7 phosphorylation and Cys-580 palmitoylation in mediating steady-state transport kinetics and PKC-stimulated transport down-regulation. Using both mutational and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that these post-translational modifications are reciprocally regulated, leading to transporter populations that display high phosphorylation-low palmitoylation or low phosphorylation-high palmitoylation. The balance between the modifications dictates transport capacity, as conditions that promote high phosphorylation or low palmitoylation reduce transport Vmax and enhance PKC-stimulated down-regulation, whereas conditions that promote low phosphorylation or high palmitoylation increase transport Vmax and suppress PKC-stimulated down-regulation. Transitions between these functional states occur when endocytosis is blocked or undetectable, indicating that the modifications kinetically regulate the velocity of surface transporters. These findings reveal a novel mechanism for control of DA reuptake that may represent a point of dysregulation in DA imbalance disorders. PMID:26424792

  2. Inhibition of peptide aggregation by means of enzymatic phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Folmert, Kristin; Broncel, Malgorzata; v. Berlepsch, Hans; Ullrich, Christopher Hans; Siegert, Mary-Ann

    2016-01-01

    As is the case in numerous natural processes, enzymatic phosphorylation can be used in the laboratory to influence the conformational populations of proteins. In nature, this information is used for signal transduction or energy transfer, but has also been shown to play an important role in many diseases like tauopathies or diabetes. With the goal of determining the effect of phosphorylation on amyloid fibril formation, we designed a model peptide which combines structural characteristics of α-helical coiled-coils and β-sheets in one sequence. This peptide undergoes a conformational transition from soluble structures into insoluble amyloid fibrils over time and under physiological conditions and contains a recognition motif for PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) that enables enzymatic phosphorylation. We have analyzed the pathway of amyloid formation and the influence of enzymatic phosphorylation on the different states along the conformational transition from random-coil to β-sheet-rich oligomers to protofilaments and on to insoluble amyloid fibrils, and we found a remarkable directing effect from β-sheet-rich structures to unfolded structures in the initial growth phase, in which small oligomers and protofilaments prevail if the peptide is phosphorylated. PMID:28144314

  3. Neurofilament subunit (NFL) head domain phosphorylation regulates axonal transport of neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Yates, Darran M; Manser, Catherine; De Vos, Kurt J; Shaw, Christopher E; McLoughlin, Declan M; Miller, Christopher C J

    2009-04-01

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are synthesised in neuronal cell bodies and then transported through axons. Neurofilament light chain (NFL) is a principal component of neurofilaments, and phosphorylation of NFL head domain is believed to regulate the assembly of neurofilaments. However, the role that NFL phosphorylation has on transport of neurofilaments is poorly understood. To address this issue, we monitored axonal transport of phosphorylation mutants of NFL. We mutated four known phosphorylation sites in NFL head domain to either preclude phosphorylation, or mimic permanent phosphorylation. Mutation to preclude phosphorylation had no effect on transport but mutation of three sites to mimic permanent phosphorylation inhibited transport. Mutation of all four sites together to mimic permanent phosphorylation proved especially potent at inhibiting transport and also disrupted neurofilament assembly. Our results suggest that NFL head domain phosphorylation is a regulator of neurofilament axonal transport.

  4. Foxp3 drives oxidative phosphorylation and protection from lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cobbold, Stephen Paul; Adams, Elizabeth; Necula, Andra Stefania; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Honglei; Thomas, Benjamin; Hester, Svenja S.; Betz, Alexander G.

    2017-01-01

    Tregs can adopt a catabolic metabolic program with increased capacity for fatty acid oxidation–fueled oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). It is unclear why this form of metabolism is favored in Tregs and, more specifically, whether this program represents an adaptation to the environment and developmental cues or is “hardwired” by Foxp3. Here we show, using metabolic analysis and an unbiased mass spectroscopy–based proteomics approach, that Foxp3 is both necessary and sufficient to program Treg-increased respiratory capacity and Tregs’ increased ability to utilize fatty acids to fuel oxidative phosphorylation. Foxp3 drives upregulation of components of all the electron transport complexes, increasing their activity and ATP generation by oxidative phosphorylation. Increased fatty acid β-oxidation also results in selective protection of Foxp3+ cells from fatty acid–induced cell death. This observation may provide novel targets for modulating Treg function or selection therapeutically. PMID:28194435

  5. Modification of EWS/WT1 functional properties by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungho; Lee, Joseph M.; Branton, Philip E.; Pelletier, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    In many human cancers, tumor-specific chromosomal rearrangements are known to create chimeric products with the ability to transform cells. The EWS/WT1 protein is such a fusion product, resulting from a t(11;22) chromosomal translocation in desmoplastic small round cell tumors, where 265 aa from the EWS amino terminus are fused to the DNA binding domain of the WT1 tumor suppressor gene. Herein, we find that EWS/WT1 is phosphorylated in vivo on serine and tyrosine residues and that this affects DNA binding and homodimerization. We also show that EWS/WT1 can interact with, and is a substrate for, modification on tyrosine residues by c-Abl. Tyrosine phosphorylation of EWS/WT1 by c-Abl negatively regulates its DNA binding properties. These results indicate that the biological activity of EWS/WT1 is closely linked to its phosphorylation status. PMID:10588700

  6. Protein kinase C coordinates histone H3 phosphorylation and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Darieva, Zoulfia; Webber, Aaron; Warwood, Stacey; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The re-assembly of chromatin following DNA replication is a critical event in the maintenance of genome integrity. Histone H3 acetylation at K56 and phosphorylation at T45 are two important chromatin modifications that accompany chromatin assembly. Here we have identified the protein kinase Pkc1 as a key regulator that coordinates the deposition of these modifications in S. cerevisiae under conditions of replicative stress. Pkc1 phosphorylates the histone acetyl transferase Rtt109 and promotes its ability to acetylate H3K56. Our data also reveal novel cross-talk between two different histone modifications as Pkc1 also enhances H3T45 phosphorylation and this modification is required for H3K56 acetylation. Our data therefore uncover an important role for Pkc1 in coordinating the deposition of two different histone modifications that are important for chromatin assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09886.001 PMID:26468616

  7. Regulatory Phosphorylation of Ikaros by Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Ishkhanian, Rita; Uckun, Fatih M.

    2013-01-01

    Diminished Ikaros function has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer. Therefore, a stringent regulation of Ikaros is of paramount importance for normal lymphocyte ontogeny. Here we provide genetic and biochemical evidence for a previously unknown function of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) as a partner and posttranslational regulator of Ikaros, a zinc finger-containing DNA-binding protein that plays a pivotal role in immune homeostasis. We demonstrate that BTK phosphorylates Ikaros at unique phosphorylation sites S214 and S215 in the close vicinity of its zinc finger 4 (ZF4) within the DNA binding domain, thereby augmenting its nuclear localization and sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Our results further demonstrate that BTK-induced activating phosphorylation is critical for the optimal transcription factor function of Ikaros. PMID:23977012

  8. Ultrasensitive dual phosphorylation dephosphorylation cycle kinetics exhibits canonical competition behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qingdao; Qian, Hong

    2009-09-01

    We establish a mathematical model for a cellular biochemical signaling module in terms of a planar differential equation system. The signaling process is carried out by two phosphorylation-dephosphorylation reaction steps that share common kinase and phosphatase with saturated enzyme kinetics. The pair of equations is particularly simple in the present mathematical formulation, but they are singular. A complete mathematical analysis is developed based on an elementary perturbation theory. The dynamics exhibits the canonical competition behavior in addition to bistability. Although widely understood in ecological context, we are not aware of a full range of biochemical competition in a simple signaling network. The competition dynamics has broad implications to cellular processes such as cell differentiation and cancer immunoediting. The concepts of homogeneous and heterogeneous multisite phosphorylation are introduced and their corresponding dynamics are compared: there is no bistability in a heterogeneous dual phosphorylation system. A stochastic interpretation is also provided that further gives intuitive understanding of the bistable behavior inside the cells.

  9. [Mechanism of opiate of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, V V; Gegenava, G P

    1976-01-01

    Effect of morphine, codeine, dionine and nalorphine on the oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria was studied. Morphine is found to inhibit both ATP-synthetase and ATP-ase activities in mitochondria, but not in submitochondrial particles. Morphine-suppressed oxidative phosphorylation was competitively reversed with high concentrations of ADP, but not of inorganic phosphate. The effect of other opiates (i.e. codeine, dionine, nalorphine) was similar. It is suggested, that opiates inhibit the transport of adenine nucleotides through inner mitochondrial membrane, as it does atractyloside. A significance of the hydrophobic interaction between the inhibitor and adenine nucleotide translocase is outlined, since the degree of the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation is increased with the increase in the number of non-ionized opiate molecules (at alkaline pH values) and in the length of the carbon chain of narcotic molecule as follows: morphine--codeine--dionine--nalorphine.

  10. Multisite phosphorylation networks as signal processors for Cdk1.

    PubMed

    Kõivomägi, Mardo; Ord, Mihkel; Iofik, Anna; Valk, Ervin; Venta, Rainis; Faustova, Ilona; Kivi, Rait; Balog, Eva Rose M; Rubin, Seth M; Loog, Mart

    2013-12-01

    The order and timing of cell-cycle events is controlled by changing substrate specificity and different activity thresholds of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). However, it is not understood how a single protein kinase can trigger hundreds of switches in a sufficiently time-resolved fashion. We show that cyclin-Cdk1-Cks1-dependent phosphorylation of multisite targets in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is controlled by key substrate parameters including distances between phosphorylation sites, distribution of serines and threonines as phosphoacceptors and positioning of cyclin-docking motifs. The component mediating the key interactions in this process is Cks1, the phosphoadaptor subunit of the cyclin-Cdk1-Cks1 complex. We propose that variation of these parameters within networks of phosphorylation sites in different targets provides a wide range of possibilities for differential amplification of Cdk1 signals, thus providing a mechanism to generate a wide range of thresholds in the cell cycle.

  11. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylation-coupled Saccharide Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Y Cao; X Jin; E Levin; H Huang; Y Zong; W Hendrickson; J Javitch; K Rajashankar; M Zhou; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Saccharides have a central role in the nutrition of all living organisms. Whereas several saccharide uptake systems are shared between the different phylogenetic kingdoms, the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system exists almost exclusively in bacteria. This multi-component system includes an integral membrane protein EIIC that transports saccharides and assists in their phosphorylation. Here we present the crystal structure of an EIIC from Bacillus cereus that transports diacetylchitobiose. The EIIC is a homodimer, with an expansive interface formed between the amino-terminal halves of the two protomers. The carboxy-terminal half of each protomer has a large binding pocket that contains a diacetylchitobiose, which is occluded from both sides of the membrane with its site of phosphorylation near the conserved His250 and Glu334 residues. The structure shows the architecture of this important class of transporters, identifies the determinants of substrate binding and phosphorylation, and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of sugar translocation.

  12. Phosphorylation of lamins determine their structural properties and signaling functions

    PubMed Central

    Torvaldson, Elin; Kochin, Vitaly; Eriksson, John E

    2015-01-01

    Lamin A/C is part of the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments underlying the inner nuclear membrane. The lamin network is anchoring a complex set of structural and linker proteins and is either directly or through partner proteins also associated or interacting with a number of signaling protein and transcription factors. During mitosis the nuclear lamina is dissociated by well established phosphorylation- dependent mechanisms. A-type lamins are, however, also phosphorylated during interphase. A recent study identified 20 interphase phosphorylation sites on lamin A/C and explored their functions related to lamin dynamics; movements, localization and solubility. Here we discuss these findings in the light of lamin functions in health and disease. PMID:25793944

  13. Biodistribution, kinetics, and efficacy of highly phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated beta-glucuronidase in the murine model of mucopolysaccharidosis VII.

    PubMed

    Sands, M S; Vogler, C A; Ohlemiller, K K; Roberts, M S; Grubb, J H; Levy, B; Sly, W S

    2001-11-16

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been shown to be effective at reducing the accumulation of undegraded substrates in lysosomal storage diseases. Most ERT studies have been performed with recombinant proteins that are mixtures of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated enzyme. Because different cell types use different receptors to take up phosphorylated or non-phosphorylated enzyme, it is difficult to determine which form of enzyme contributed to the clinical response. Here we compare the uptake, distribution, and efficacy of highly phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated beta-glucuronidase (GUSB) in the MPS VII mouse. Highly phosphorylated murine GUSB was efficiently taken up by a wide range of tissues. In contrast, non-phosphorylated murine GUSB was taken up primarily by tissues of the reticuloendothelial (RE) system. Although the tissue distribution was different, the half-lives of both enzymes in any particular tissue were similar. Both preparations of enzyme were capable of preventing the accumulation of lysosomal storage in cell types they targeted. An important difference in clinical efficacy emerged in that phosphorylated GUSB was more efficient than non-phosphorylated enzyme at preventing the hearing loss associated with this disease. These data suggest that both forms of enzyme contribute to the clinical responses of ERT in MPS VII mice but that enzyme preparations containing phosphorylated GUSB are more broadly effective than non-phosphorylated enzyme.

  14. Partial high-resolution structure of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated leucine-rich amelogenin protein adsorbed to hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Masica, David L.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2011-07-21

    The formation of biogenic materials requires the interaction of organic molecules with the mineral phase. In forming enamel, the amelogenin proteins contribute to the mineralization of hydroxyapatite (HAp). Leucine-rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) is a naturally occurring splice variant of amelogenin that comprises amelogenin’s predicted HAp binding domains. We determined the partial structure of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated LRAP variants bound to HAp using combined solid-state NMR (ssNMR) and ssNMR-biased computational structure prediction. The ssNMR measurements indicate a largely extended structure for both variants, though some measurements are consistent with a partially helical N-terminal segment. Structure prediction was biased using 21 ssNMR measurements at five HAp crystal faces. The predicted fold of LRAP is similar at all HAp faces studied, regardless of phosphorylation. LRAP’s predicted structure is relatively extended with a helix-turn-helix motif in the N-terminal domain and some helix in the C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain of the phosphorylated variant binds HAp more tightly than the N-terminal domain of the non-phosphorylated variant. Both variants are predicted to preferentially bind the {010} HAp crystal face providing further evidence that amelogenins block crystal growth on the a and b faces to allow elongated crystals in the c-axis. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  15. P2X7 receptors stimulate AKT phosphorylation in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jacques-Silva, Maria C; Rodnight, Richard; Lenz, Guido; Liao, Zhongji; Kong, Qiongman; Tran, Minh; Kang, Yuan; Gonzalez, Fernando A; Weisman, Gary A; Neary, Joseph T

    2004-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that nucleotide receptors are widely expressed in the nervous system. Here, we present evidence that P2Y and P2X receptors, particularly the P2X7 subtype, are coupled to the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway in astrocytes. P2Y and P2X receptor agonists ATP, uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP) and 2′,3′-O-(4-benzoyl)-benzoyl ATP (BzATP) stimulated Akt phosphorylation in primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes. BzATP induced Akt phosphorylation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, similar to the effect of BzATP on Akt phosphorylation in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells stably transfected with the rat P2X7 receptor. Activation was maximal at 5 – 10 min and was sustained for 60 min; the EC50 for BzATP was approximately 50 μM. In rat cortical astrocytes, the positive effect of BzATP on Akt phosphorylation was independent of glutamate release. The effect of BzATP on Akt phosphorylation in rat cortical astrocytes was significantly reduced by the P2X7 receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G and the P2X receptor antagonist iso-pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid, but was unaffected by trinitrophenyl-ATP, oxidized ATP, suramin and reactive blue 2. Results with specific inhibitors of signal transduction pathways suggest that extracellular and intracellular calcium, PI3K and a Src family kinase are involved in the BzATP-induced Akt phosphorylation pathway. In conclusion, our data indicate that stimulation of astrocytic P2X7 receptors, as well as other P2 receptors, leads to Akt activation. Thus, signaling by nucleotide receptors in astrocytes may be important in several cellular downstream effects related to the Akt pathway, such as cell cycle and apoptosis regulation, protein synthesis, differentiation and glucose metabolism. PMID:15023862

  16. Zidovudine Inhibits Thymidine Phosphorylation in the Isolated Perfused Rat Heart▿

    PubMed Central

    Susan-Resiga, Delia; Bentley, Alice T.; Lynx, Matthew D.; LaClair, Darcy D.; McKee, Edward E.

    2007-01-01

    Zidovudine (AZT; 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine), a thymidine analog, has been a staple of highly active antiretroviral therapy. It is phosphorylated in the host to the triphosphate and functions by inhibiting the viral reverse transcriptase. However, long-term use of AZT is linked to various tissue toxicities, including cardiomyopathy. These toxicities are associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion, which is hypothesized to be caused by AZT triphosphate inhibition of mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ. In previous work with isolated heart mitochondria, we demonstrated that AZT phosphorylation beyond the monophosphate was not detected and that AZT itself was a potent inhibitor of thymidine phosphorylation. This suggests an alternative hypothesis in which depletion of the TTP pool may limit mitochondrial DNA replication. The present work extends these studies to the whole cell by investigating the metabolism of thymidine and AZT in the intact isolated perfused rat heart. [3H]thymidine is converted to [3H]TTP in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The level of [3H]TMP is low, suggesting that the reaction catalyzed by thymidine kinase is the rate-limiting step in phosphorylation. [3H]AZT is converted in a time- and concentration-dependent manner to AZT monophosphate, the only phosphorylated product detected after 3 h of perfusion. Both compounds display negative cooperativity, similar to the observations with cloned and purified mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2. The presence of AZT in the perfusate inhibits the phosphorylation of [3H]thymidine with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 24 ± 4 μM. These data support the hypothesis that AZT-induced mitochondrial cardiotoxicity may be caused by a limiting pool of TTP that lowers mitochondrial DNA replication. PMID:17220403

  17. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Phosphorylation and Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Gulick, James; Osinska, Hanna; Martin, Lisa A.; Hahn, Harvey S.; Dorn, Gerald W.; Klevitsky, Raisa; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Robbins., Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    The role of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation in cardiac physiology or pathophysiology is unclear. To investigate the status of cMyBP-C phosphorylation in vivo, we determined its phosphorylation state in stressed and unstressed mouse hearts. cMyBP-C phosphorylation is significantly decreased during the development of heart failure or pathologic hypertrophy. We then generated transgenic (TG) mice in which cMyBP-C’s phosphorylation sites were changed to nonphosphorylatable alanines (MyBP-CAllP−). A TG line showing ~40% replacement with MyBP-CAllP− showed no changes in morbidity or mortality but displayed depressed cardiac contractility, altered sarcomeric structure and upregulation of transcripts associated with a hypertrophic response. To explore the effect of complete replacement of endogenous cMyBP-C with MyBP-CAllP−, the mice were bred into the MyBP-C(t/t) background, in which less than 10% of normal levels of a truncated MyBP-C are present. Although MyBP-CAllP− was incorporated into the sarcomere and expressed at normal levels, the mutant protein could not rescue the MyBP-C(t/t) phenotype. The mice developed significant cardiac hypertrophy with myofibrillar disarray and fibrosis, similar to what was observed in the MyBP-C(t/t) animals. In contrast, when the MyBP-C(t/t) mice were bred to a TG line expressing normal MyBP-C (MyBP-CWT), the MyBP-C(t/t) phenotype was rescued. These data suggest that cMyBP-C phosphorylation is essential for normal cardiac function. PMID:16224063

  18. BAD phosphorylation determines ovarian cancer chemosensitivity and patient survival.

    PubMed

    Marchion, Douglas C; Cottrill, Hope M; Xiong, Yin; Chen, Ning; Bicaku, Elona; Fulp, William J; Bansal, Nisha; Chon, Hye Sook; Stickles, Xiaomang B; Kamath, Siddharth G; Hakam, Ardeshir; Li, Lihua; Su, Dan; Moreno, Carolina; Judson, Patricia L; Berchuck, Andrew; Wenham, Robert M; Apte, Sachin M; Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Bloom, Gregory C; Eschrich, Steven A; Sebti, Said; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Lancaster, Johnathan M

    2011-10-01

    Despite initial sensitivity to chemotherapy, ovarian cancers (OVCA) often develop drug resistance, which limits patient survival. Using specimens and/or genomic data from 289 patients and a panel of cancer cell lines, we explored genome-wide expression changes that underlie the evolution of OVCA chemoresistance and characterized the BCL2 antagonist of cell death (BAD) apoptosis pathway as a determinant of chemosensitivity and patient survival. Serial OVCA cell cisplatin treatments were performed in parallel with measurements of genome-wide expression changes. Pathway analysis was carried out on genes associated with increasing cisplatin resistance (EC(50)). BAD-pathway expression and BAD protein phosphorylation were evaluated in patient samples and cell lines as determinants of chemosensitivity and/or clinical outcome and as therapeutic targets. Induced in vitro OVCA cisplatin resistance was associated with BAD-pathway expression (P < 0.001). In OVCA cell lines and primary specimens, BAD protein phosphorylation was associated with platinum resistance (n = 147, P < 0.0001) and also with overall patient survival (n = 134, P = 0.0007). Targeted modulation of BAD-phosphorylation levels influenced cisplatin sensitivity. A 47-gene BAD-pathway score was associated with in vitro phosphorylated BAD levels and with survival in 142 patients with advanced-stage (III/IV) serous OVCA. Integration of BAD-phosphorylation or BAD-pathway score with OVCA surgical cytoreductive status was significantly associated with overall survival by log-rank test (P = 0.004 and P < 0.0001, respectively). The BAD apoptosis pathway influences OVCA chemosensitivity and overall survival, likely via modulation of BAD phosphorylation. The pathway has clinical relevance as a biomarker of therapeutic response, patient survival, and as a promising therapeutic target. ©2011 AACR

  19. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G.; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A.; Brunner, Michael R.; Davidson, Iain F.; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/CCDC20 activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/CCDC20 activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/CCDC20 activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis. PMID:27114510

  20. Human Cytomegalovirus UL97 Phosphorylates the Viral Nuclear Egress Complex

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mayuri; Bender, Brian J.; Kamil, Jeremy P.; Lye, Ming F.; Pesola, Jean M.; Reim, Natalia I.; Hogle, James M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpesvirus nucleocapsids exit the host cell nucleus in an unusual process known as nuclear egress. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL97 protein kinase is required for efficient nuclear egress, which can be explained by its phosphorylation of the nuclear lamina component lamin A/C, which disrupts the nuclear lamina. We found that a dominant negative lamin A/C mutant complemented the replication defect of a virus lacking UL97 in dividing cells, validating this explanation. However, as complementation was incomplete, we investigated whether the HCMV nuclear egress complex (NEC) subunits UL50 and UL53, which are required for nuclear egress and recruit UL97 to the nuclear rim, are UL97 substrates. Using mass spectrometry, we detected UL97-dependent phosphorylation of UL50 residue S216 (UL50-S216) and UL53-S19 in infected cells. Moreover, UL53-S19 was specifically phosphorylated by UL97 in vitro. Notably, treatment of infected cells with the UL97 inhibitor maribavir or infection with a UL97 mutant led to a punctate rather than a continuous distribution of the NEC at the nuclear rim. Alanine substitutions in both UL50-S216 and UL53-S19 resulted in a punctate distribution of the NEC in infected cells and also decreased virus production and nuclear egress in the absence of maribavir. These results indicate that UL97 phosphorylates the NEC and suggest that this phosphorylation modulates nuclear egress. Thus, the UL97-NEC interaction appears to recruit UL97 to the nuclear rim both for disruption of the nuclear lamina and phosphorylation of the NEC. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) causes birth defects and it can cause life-threatening diseases in immunocompromised patients. HCMV assembles in the nucleus and then translocates to the cytoplasm in an unusual process termed nuclear egress, an attractive target for antiviral therapy. A viral enzyme, UL97, is important for nuclear egress. It has been proposed that this is due to its role in disruption of the

  1. Regulation of Rho proteins by phosphorylation in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Loirand, Gervaise; Guilluy, Christophe; Pacaud, Pierre

    2006-08-01

    The small G protein Rho signaling pathways are recognized as major regulators of cardiovascular functions, and activation of Rho proteins appears to be a common component for the pathogenesis of hypertension and vascular proliferative disorders. Rho proteins are tightly regulated, and recent evidence suggests that modulation of Rho protein signaling by phosphorylation of Rho proteins provides an additional simple mechanism for coordinating Rho protein functions. This regulation by phosphorylation is particularly important in the arterial wall, where RhoA protein expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells is controlled by the endothelium through the nitric oxide/cGMP-dependent kinase pathway.

  2. Phosphorylation and recruitment of Syk by immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-based phosphorylation of tamalin.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Masayuki; Kitano, Jun; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Moriyoshi, Koki; Yanagi, Shigeru; Yamamura, Hirohei; Muto, Takanori; Jingami, Hisato; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2004-07-30

    Tamalin is a scaffold protein that forms a multiple protein assembly including metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and several postsynaptic and protein-trafficking scaffold proteins in distinct mode of protein-protein association. In the present investigation, we report that tamalin possesses a typical immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), which enables Syk kinase to be recruited and phosphorylated by the Src family kinases. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis of rat brain membrane fractions showed that tamalin is present in a multimolecular protein assembly comprising not only mGluR1 but also c-Src, Fyn, and a protein phosphatase, SHP-2. The protein association of both tamalin and c-Src, as determined by truncation analysis of mGluR1 in COS-7 cells, occurred at the carboxyl-terminal tail of mGluR1. Mutation analysis of tyrosine with phenylalanine in COS-7 cells revealed that paired tyrosines at the ITAM sequence of tamalin are phosphorylated preferentially by c-Src and Fyn, and this phosphorylation can recruit Syk kinase and enables it to be phosphorylated by the Src family kinases. The phosphorylated tyrosines at the ITAM sequence of tamalin were highly susceptible to dephosphorylation by protein-tyrosine phosphatases in COS-7 cells. Importantly, tamalin was endogenously phosphorylated and associated with Syk in retinoic acid-treated P19 embryonal carcinoma cells that undergo neuron-like differentiation. The present investigation demonstrates that tamalin is a novel signaling molecule that possesses a PDZ domain and a PDZ binding motif and mediates Syk signaling in an ITAM-based fashion.

  3. Phosphorylation Status of the Parvovirus Minute Virus of Mice Particle: Mapping and Biological Relevance of the Major Phosphorylation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Maroto, Beatriz; Ramírez, Juan C.; Almendral, José M.

    2000-01-01

    The core of the VP-1 and VP-2 proteins forming the T=1 icosahedral capsid of the prototype strain of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVMp) share amino acids sequence and a common three-dimensional structure; however, the roles of these polypeptides in the virus infection cycle differ. To gain insights into this paradox, the nature, distribution, and biological significance of MVMp particle phosphorylation was investigated. The VP-1 and VP-2 proteins isolated from purified empty capsids and from virions containing DNA harbored phosphoserine and phosphothreonine amino acids, which in two-dimensional tryptic analysis resulted in complex patterns reproducibly composed by more than 15 unevenly phosphorylated peptides. Whereas secondary protease digestions and comigration of most weak peptides in the fingerprints revealed common phosphorylation sites in the VP-1 and VP-2 subunits assembled in capsids, the major tryptic phosphopeptides were remarkably characteristic of either polypeptide. The VP-2-specific peptide named B, containing the bulk of the 32P label of the MVMp particle in the form of phosphoserine, was mapped to the structurally unordered N-terminal domain of this polypeptide. Mutations in any or all four serine residues present in peptide B showed that the VP-2 N-terminal domain is phosphorylated at multiple sites, even though none of them was essential for capsid assembly or virus formation. Chromatographic analysis of purified wild-type (wt) and mutant peptide B digested with a panel of specific proteases allowed us to identify the VP-2 residues Ser-2, Ser-6, and Ser-10 as the main phosphate acceptors for MVMp capsid during the natural viral infection. Phosphorylation at VP-2 N-terminal serines was not necessary for the externalization of this domain outside of the capsid shell in particles containing DNA. However, the plaque-forming capacity and plaque size of VP-2 N-terminal phosphorylation mutants were severely reduced, with the evolutionarily

  4. The phosphatase calcineurin regulates pathological TDP-43 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Liachko, Nicole F; Saxton, Aleen D; McMillan, Pamela J; Strovas, Timothy J; Currey, Heather N; Taylor, Laura M; Wheeler, Jeanna M; Oblak, Adrian L; Ghetti, Bernardino; Montine, Thomas J; Keene, C Dirk; Raskind, Murray A; Bird, Thomas D; Kraemer, Brian C

    2016-10-01

    Detergent insoluble inclusions of TDP-43 protein are hallmarks of the neuropathology in over 90 % of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases and approximately half of frontotemporal dementia (FTLD-TDP) cases. In TDP-43 proteinopathy disorders, lesions containing aggregated TDP-43 protein are extensively post-translationally modified, with phosphorylated TDP-43 (pTDP) being the most consistent and robust marker of pathological TDP-43 deposition. Abnormally phosphorylated TDP-43 has been hypothesized to mediate TDP-43 toxicity in many neurodegenerative disease models. To date, several different kinases have been implicated in the genesis of pTDP, but no phosphatases have been shown to reverse pathological TDP-43 phosphorylation. We have identified the phosphatase calcineurin as an enzyme binding to and catalyzing the removal of pathological C-terminal phosphorylation of TDP-43 in vitro. In C. elegans models of TDP-43 proteinopathy, genetic elimination of calcineurin results in accumulation of excess pTDP, exacerbated motor dysfunction, and accelerated neurodegenerative changes. In cultured human cells, treatment with FK506 (tacrolimus), a calcineurin inhibitor, results in accumulation of pTDP species. Lastly, calcineurin co-localizes with pTDP in degenerating areas of the central nervous system in subjects with FTLD-TDP and ALS. Taken together, these findings suggest calcineurin acts on pTDP as a phosphatase in neurons. Furthermore, patient treatment with calcineurin inhibitors may have unappreciated adverse neuropathological consequences.

  5. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adi, Y. A.; Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L.; Hardianti, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.

  6. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Adi, Y. A.; Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L.; Hardianti, M. S.

    2016-04-06

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.

  7. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of exogenous /sup 32/Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-(/sup 32/P)ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments.

  8. CDC7 inhibition blocks pathological TDP-43 phosphorylation and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liachko, Nicole F.; McMillan, Pamela J.; Guthrie, Chris R.; Bird, Thomas D.; Leverenz, James B.; Kraemer, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Kinase hyperactivity occurs in both neurodegenerative disease and cancer. Lesions containing hyperphosphorylated aggregated TDP-43 characterize amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions. Dual phosphorylation of TDP-43 at serines 409/410 drives neurotoxicity in disease models; therefore, TDP-43 specific kinases are candidate targets for intervention. Methods To find therapeutic targets for the prevention of TDP-43 phosphorylation, we assembled and screened a comprehensive RNA interference library targeting kinases in TDP-43 transgenic C. elegans. Results We show CDC7 robustly phosphorylates TDP-43 at pathological residues S409/410 in C. elegans, in vitro, and in human cell culture. In FTLD-TDP cases, CDC7 immunostaining overlaps with the phospho-TDP-43 pathology found in frontal cortex. Furthermore PHA767491, a small molecule inhibitor of CDC7, reduces TDP-43 phosphorylation and prevents TDP-43 dependent neurodegeneration in TDP-43 transgenic animals. Interpretation Taken together these data support CDC7 as a novel therapeutic target for TDP-43 proteinopathies including FTLD-TDP and ALS. PMID:23424178

  9. Mechanism of Ribonuclease III Catalytic Regulation by Serine Phosphorylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gone, Swapna; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Paudyal, Samridhdi; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a conserved, gene-regulatory bacterial endonuclease that cleaves double-helical structures in diverse coding and noncoding RNAs. RNase III is subject to multiple levels of control, reflective of its global regulatory functions. Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III catalytic activity is known to increase during bacteriophage T7 infection, reflecting the expression of the phage-encoded protein kinase, T7PK. However, the mechanism of catalytic enhancement is unknown. This study shows that Ec-RNase III is phosphorylated on serine in vitro by purified T7PK, and identifies the targets as Ser33 and Ser34 in the N-terminal catalytic domain. Kinetic experiments reveal a 5-fold increase in kcat and a 1.4-fold decrease in Km following phosphorylation, providing a 7.4–fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Phosphorylation does not change the rate of substrate cleavage under single-turnover conditions, indicating that phosphorylation enhances product release, which also is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a mechanism for facilitated product release, in which the Ser33 phosphomonoester forms a salt bridge with the Arg95 guanidinium group, thereby weakening RNase III engagement of product. The simulations also show why glutamic acid substitution at either serine does not confer enhancement, thus underscoring the specific requirement for a phosphomonoester.

  10. Syndecan-4 Phosphorylation Is a Control Point for Integrin Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Mark R.; Hamidi, Hellyeh; Bass, Mark D.; Warwood, Stacey; Ballestrem, Christoph; Humphries, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Precise spatiotemporal coordination of integrin adhesion complex dynamics is essential for efficient cell migration. For cells adherent to fibronectin, differential engagement of α5β1 and αVβ3 integrins is used to elicit changes in adhesion complex stability, mechanosensation, matrix assembly, and migration, but the mechanisms responsible for receptor regulation have remained largely obscure. We identify phosphorylation of the membrane-intercalated proteoglycan syndecan-4 as an essential switch controlling integrin recycling. Src phosphorylates syndecan-4 and, by driving syntenin binding, leads to suppression of Arf6 activity and recycling of αVβ3 to the plasma membrane at the expense of α5β1. The resultant elevation in αVβ3 engagement promotes stabilization of focal adhesions. Conversely, abrogation of syndecan-4 phosphorylation drives surface expression of α5β1, destabilizes adhesion complexes, and disrupts cell migration. These data identify the dynamic spatiotemporal regulation of Src-mediated syndecan-4 phosphorylation as an essential switch controlling integrin trafficking and adhesion dynamics to promote efficient cell migration. PMID:23453597

  11. Phytophthora infestans specific phosphorylation patterns and new putative control targets.

    PubMed

    Frades, Itziar; Andreasson, Erik

    2016-04-01

    In this study we applied biomathematical searches of gene regulatory mechanisms to learn more about oomycete biology and to identify new putative targets for pesticides or biological control against Phytophthora infestans. First, oomycete phylum-specific phosphorylation motifs were found by discriminative n-gram analysis. We found 11.600 P. infestans specific n-grams, mapping 642 phosphoproteins. The most abundant group among these related to phosphatidylinositol metabolism. Due to the large number of possible targets found and our hypothesis that multi-level control is a sign of usefulness as targets for intervention, we identified overlapping targets with a second screen. This was performed to identify proteins dually regulated by small RNA and phosphorylation. We found 164 proteins to be regulated by both sRNA and phosphorylation and the dominating functions where phosphatidylinositol signalling/metabolism, endocytosis, and autophagy. Furthermore we performed a similar regulatory study and discriminative n-gram analysis of proteins with no clear orthologs in other species and proteins that are known to be unique to P. infestans such as the RxLR effectors, Crinkler (CRN) proteins and elicitins. We identified CRN proteins with specific phospho-motifs present in all life stages. PITG_12626, PITG_14042 and PITG_23175 are CRN proteins that have species-specific phosphorylation motifs and are subject to dual regulation.

  12. Phosphorylation of proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum during development

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    The phosphoproteins in D. discoideum were studied with respect to their formation, metabolic stability, cellular and subcellular distribution. Special emphasis was on the role of cAMP on the pattern of phosphorylation. Amoebae were metabolically labeled with /sup 32/P/sub i/; subsequently proteins of the total lysate, nuclei and membranes were resolved by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to autoradiography. Numerous changes in the profile of phosphoproteins were observed during development. Functions were assigned to four membranal phosphoproteins; only one protein, the heavy chain of myosin, was susceptible to phosphorylation in vitro when purified membranes and /sup 32/P-ATP were used. A comparison between the time of protein synthesis and phosphorylation, as examined in vivo using /sup 35/S-methionine and /sup 32/P/sub i/ labeling of amoebae and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, indicated that phosphorylation is concurrent with synthesis. It appears then that there are two classes of membranal phosphoproteins in D. discoideum which differ with respect to the stability of the phosphate moiety. It is evident that the turnover of the phosphate moiety in myosin heavy chain plays a crucial role in the function of myosin; a role for the metabolically inert phosphate of other membranal proteins remains to be established. The G protein which couples occupancy of hormone receptor to stimulation of adenylate cyclase in higher multicellular eukaryotes was detected in D. discoideum. The G protein is present in approximately equal amounts in vegetative and in developing amoebae.

  13. Stem rust spores elicit rapid RPG1 phosphorylation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stem rust threatens cereal production worldwide. Understanding the mechanism by which durable resistance genes, such as Rpg1, function is critical. We show that the RPG1 protein is phosphorylated within 5 min by exposure to spores from avirulent but not virulent races of stem rust. Transgenic mutant...

  14. Animation Model to Conceptualize ATP Generation: A Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jena, Ananta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the molecular unit of intracellular energy and it is the product of oxidative phosphorylation of cellular respiration uses in cellular processes. The study explores the growth of the misconception levels amongst the learners and evaluates the effectiveness of animation model over traditional methods. The data…

  15. Chk2 Activation and Phosphorylation-Dependent Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xingzhi; Tsvetkov, Lyuben M.; Stern, David F.

    2002-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene CHK2 encodes a versatile effector serine/threonine kinase involved in responses to DNA damage. Chk2 has an amino-terminal SQ/TQ cluster domain (SCD), followed by a forkhead-associated (FHA) domain and a carboxyl-terminal kinase catalytic domain. Mutations in the SCD or FHA domain impair Chk2 checkpoint function. We show here that autophosphorylation of Chk2 produced in a cell-free system requires trans phosphorylation by a wortmannin-sensitive kinase, probably ATM or ATR. Both SQ/TQ sites and non-SQ/TQ sites within the Chk2 SCD can be phosphorylated by active Chk2. Amino acid substitutions in the SCD and the FHA domain impair auto- and trans-kinase activities of Chk2. Chk2 forms oligomers that minimally require the FHA domain of one Chk2 molecule and the SCD within another Chk2 molecule. Chk2 oligomerization in vivo increases after DNA damage, and when damage is induced by gamma irradiation, this increase requires ATM. Chk2 oligomerization is phosphorylation dependent and can occur in the absence of other eukaryotic proteins. Chk2 can cross-phosphorylate another Chk2 molecule in an oligomeric complex. Induced oligomerization of a Chk2 chimera in vivo concomitant with limited DNA damage augments Chk2 kinase activity. These results suggest that Chk2 oligomerization regulates Chk2 activation, signal amplification, and transduction in DNA damage checkpoint pathways. PMID:12024051

  16. TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptors through lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sumioka, Akio; Yan, Dan; Tomita, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Summary Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate across synapses, constructing neural circuits in the brain. AMPA-type glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors mediating fast synaptic transmission. AMPA receptors localize at synapses by forming protein complexes with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) and PSD-95-like MAGUKs. Among the three classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA-, NMDA, kainate-type), AMPA receptor activity is most regulatable by neuronal activity to adjust synaptic strength. Here, we mutated the prototypical TARP, stargazin, and found that TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptor activity in vivo. We also found that stargazin interacts with negatively-charged lipid bilayers in its phosphorylation dependent manner, and that the lipid interaction inhibited stargazin binding to PSD-95. Cationic lipids dissociated stargazin from lipid bilayers and enhanced synaptic AMPA receptor activity in a stargazin phosphorylation-dependent manner. Thus, TARP phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission via a lipid bilayer interaction. PMID:20547132

  17. Anxiolytic action of pterostilbene: involvement of hippocampal ERK phosphorylation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pterostilbene, a natural analog of resveratrol, has diverse health-beneficial properties. However, the neurological activities of this compound are largely unexplored. Here we report that pterostilbene shows anxiolytic action by downregulating phosphorylated levels of ERKs in the hippocampus of mice...

  18. Syndecan-4 phosphorylation is a control point for integrin recycling.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Mark R; Hamidi, Hellyeh; Bass, Mark D; Warwood, Stacey; Ballestrem, Christoph; Humphries, Martin J

    2013-03-11

    Precise spatiotemporal coordination of integrin adhesion complex dynamics is essential for efficient cell migration. For cells adherent to fibronectin, differential engagement of α5β1 and αVβ3 integrins is used to elicit changes in adhesion complex stability, mechanosensation, matrix assembly, and migration, but the mechanisms responsible for receptor regulation have remained largely obscure. We identify phosphorylation of the membrane-intercalated proteoglycan syndecan-4 as an essential switch controlling integrin recycling. Src phosphorylates syndecan-4 and, by driving syntenin binding, leads to suppression of Arf6 activity and recycling of αVβ3 to the plasma membrane at the expense of α5β1. The resultant elevation in αVβ3 engagement promotes stabilization of focal adhesions. Conversely, abrogation of syndecan-4 phosphorylation drives surface expression of α5β1, destabilizes adhesion complexes, and disrupts cell migration. These data identify the dynamic spatiotemporal regulation of Src-mediated syndecan-4 phosphorylation as an essential switch controlling integrin trafficking and adhesion dynamics to promote efficient cell migration.

  19. MenaINV dysregulates cortactin phosphorylation to promote invadopodium maturation

    PubMed Central

    Weidmann, Maxwell D.; Surve, Chinmay R.; Eddy, Robert J.; Chen, Xiaoming; Gertler, Frank B.; Sharma, Ved P.; Condeelis, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Invadopodia, actin-based protrusions of invasive carcinoma cells that focally activate extracellular matrix-degrading proteases, are essential for the migration and intravasation of tumor cells during dissemination from the primary tumor. We have previously shown that cortactin phosphorylation at tyrosine residues, in particular tyrosine 421, promotes actin polymerization at newly-forming invadopodia, promoting their maturation to matrix-degrading structures. However, the mechanism by which cells regulate the cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle at invadopodia is unknown. Mena, an actin barbed-end capping protein antagonist, is expressed as various splice-isoforms. The MenaINV isoform is upregulated in migratory and invasive sub-populations of breast carcinoma cells, and is involved in tumor cell intravasation. Here we show that forced MenaINV expression increases invadopodium maturation to a far greater extent than equivalent expression of other Mena isoforms. MenaINV is recruited to invadopodium precursors just after their initial assembly at the plasma membrane, and promotes the phosphorylation of cortactin tyrosine 421 at invadopodia. In addition, we show that cortactin phosphorylation at tyrosine 421 is suppressed by the phosphatase PTP1B, and that PTP1B localization to the invadopodium is reduced by MenaINV expression. We conclude that MenaINV promotes invadopodium maturation by inhibiting normal dephosphorylation of cortactin at tyrosine 421 by the phosphatase PTP1B. PMID:27824079

  20. Eph-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of citron kinase controls abscission

    PubMed Central

    Jungas, Thomas; Perchey, Renaud T.; Fawal, Mohamad; Callot, Caroline; Froment, Carine; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Besson, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the last step of cell division, culminating in the physical separation of daughter cells at the end of mitosis. Cytokinesis is a tightly regulated process that until recently was mostly viewed as a cell-autonomous event. Here, we investigated the role of Ephrin/Eph signaling, a well-known local cell-to-cell communication pathway, in cell division. We show that activation of Eph signaling in vitro leads to multinucleation and polyploidy, and we demonstrate that this is caused by alteration of the ultimate step of cytokinesis, abscission. Control of abscission requires Eph kinase activity, and Src and citron kinase (CitK) are downstream effectors in the Eph-induced signal transduction cascade. CitK is phosphorylated on tyrosines in neural progenitors in vivo, and Src kinase directly phosphorylates CitK. We have identified the specific tyrosine residues of CitK that are phosphorylated and show that tyrosine phosphorylation of CitK impairs cytokinesis. Finally, we show that, similar to CitK, Ephrin/Eph signaling controls neuronal ploidy in the developing neocortex. Our study indicates that CitK integrates intracellular and extracellular signals provided by the local environment to coordinate completion of cytokinesis. PMID:27551053

  1. Phosphorylation of Chs2p regulates interaction with COPII

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Mia Kyed; Cheng, Zhiliang; Lam, Sheung Kwan; Roth-Johnson, Elizabeth; Barfield, Robyn M.; Schekman, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Summary Trafficking of the chitin synthase Chs2p from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the bud-neck in late mitosis is tightly regulated by the cell cycle via phosphorylation of serine residues in the N-terminus of the protein. Here, we describe the effects of Chs2p phosphorylation on the interaction with coat protein complex II (COPII). Identification of a cdc5ts mutant, which fails to transport Chs2p–3xGFP to the bud-neck and instead accumulates the protein in intracellular puncta, led us to discover that Chs2p–3xGFP accumulates at ER exit sites in metaphase-arrested wild-type cells. Using an in vitro ER vesicle formation assay we showed that phosphorylation of Chs2p by the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK1 prevents packaging into COPII vesicles, whereas dephosphorylation of Chs2p by the phosphatase Cdc14p stimulates selection into the vesicles. We found that the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of Chs2p, which contains the CDK1 phosphorylation sites, interacts with the COPII component Sec24p in a yeast two-hybrid assay and that phosphomimetic substitutions of serines at the CDK1 consensus sites reduces the interaction. Our data suggest that dephosphorylation functions as a molecular switch for regulated ER exit of Chs2p. PMID:23525003

  2. An Argonaute phosphorylation cycle promotes microRNA-mediated silencing.

    PubMed

    Golden, Ryan J; Chen, Beibei; Li, Tuo; Braun, Juliane; Manjunath, Hema; Chen, Xiang; Wu, Jiaxi; Schmid, Vanessa; Chang, Tsung-Cheng; Kopp, Florian; Ramirez-Martinez, Andres; Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Chen, Zhijian J; Xie, Yang; Mendell, Joshua T

    2017-02-09

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) perform critical functions in normal physiology and disease by associating with Argonaute proteins and downregulating partially complementary messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Here we use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) genome-wide loss-of-function screening coupled with a fluorescent reporter of miRNA activity in human cells to identify new regulators of the miRNA pathway. By using iterative rounds of screening, we reveal a novel mechanism whereby target engagement by Argonaute 2 (AGO2) triggers its hierarchical, multi-site phosphorylation by CSNK1A1 on a set of highly conserved residues (S824-S834), followed by rapid dephosphorylation by the ANKRD52-PPP6C phosphatase complex. Although genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that AGO2 phosphorylation on these residues inhibits target mRNA binding, inactivation of this phosphorylation cycle globally impairs miRNA-mediated silencing. Analysis of the transcriptome-wide binding profile of non-phosphorylatable AGO2 reveals a pronounced expansion of the target repertoire bound at steady-state, effectively reducing the active pool of AGO2 on a per-target basis. These findings support a model in which an AGO2 phosphorylation cycle stimulated by target engagement regulates miRNA:target interactions to maintain the global efficiency of miRNA-mediated silencing.

  3. TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptors through lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sumioka, Akio; Yan, Dan; Tomita, Susumu

    2010-06-10

    Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate across synapses, constructing neural circuits in the brain. AMPA-type glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors mediating fast synaptic transmission. AMPA receptors localize at synapses by forming protein complexes with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) and PSD-95-like membrane-associated guanylate kinases. Among the three classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, NMDA, and kainate type), AMPA receptor activity is most regulatable by neuronal activity to adjust synaptic strength. Here, we mutated the prototypical TARP, stargazin, and found that TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptor activity in vivo. We also found that stargazin interacts with negatively charged lipid bilayers in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and that the lipid interaction inhibited stargazin binding to PSD-95. Cationic lipids dissociated stargazin from lipid bilayers and enhanced synaptic AMPA receptor activity in a stargazin phosphorylation-dependent manner. Thus, TARP phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission via a lipid bilayer interaction.

  4. Phosphorylation of K+ channels at single residues regulates memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Jeffrey; Irvine, Elaine E.; Peters, Marco; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification of proteins, and a known physiological regulator of K+ channel function. Phosphorylation of K+ channels by kinases has long been presumed to regulate neuronal processing and behavior. Although circumstantial evidence has accumulated from behavioral studies of vertebrates and invertebrates, the contribution to memory of single phosphorylation sites on K+ channels has never been reported. We have used gene targeting in mice to inactivate protein kinase A substrate residues in the fast-inactivating subunit Kv4.2 (T38A mutants), and in the small-conductance Ca2+-activated subunit SK1 (S105A mutants). Both manipulations perturbed a specific form of memory, leaving others intact. T38A mutants had enhanced spatial memory for at least 4 wk after training, whereas performance in three tests of fear memory was unaffected. S105A mutants were impaired in passive avoidance memory, sparing fear, and spatial memory. Together with recent findings that excitability governs the participation of neurons in a memory circuit, this result suggests that the memory type supported by neurons may depend critically on the phosphorylation of specific K+ channels at single residues. PMID:26980786

  5. Inhibition of cell adhesion by phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Kouichi; Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Miyake, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphorylation status of the C-terminal Thr residues of Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin (ERM) is often linked to cell shape change. To determine the role of phophorylated ERM, we modified phosphorylation status of ERM and investigated changes in cell adhesion and morphology. Treatment with Calyculin-A (Cal-A), a protein phosphatase inhibitor, dramatically augmented phosphorylated ERM (phospho-ERM). Cal-A-treatment or expression of phospho-mimetic Moesin mutant (Moesin-TD) induced cell rounding in adherent cells. Moreover, reattachment of detached cells to substrate was inhibited by either treatment. Phospho-ERM, Moesin-TD and actin cytoskeleton were observed at the plasma membrane of such round cells. Augmented cell surface rigidity was also observed in both cases. Meanwhile, non-adherent KG-1 cells were rather rich in phospho-ERM. Treatment with Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor that dephosphorylates phospho-ERM, up-regulated the integrin-dependent adhesion of KG-1 cells to substrate. These findings strongly suggest the followings: (1) Phospho-ERM inhibit cell adhesion, and therefore, dephosphorylation of ERM proteins is essential for cell adhesion. (2) Phospho-ERM induce formation and/or maintenance of spherical cell shape. (3) ERM are constitutively both phosphorylated and dephosphorylated in cultured adherent and non-adherent cells.

  6. Plk phosphorylation regulates the microtubule-stabilizing protein TCTP.

    PubMed

    Yarm, Frederic R

    2002-09-01

    The mitotic polo-like kinases have been implicated in the formation and function of bipolar spindles on the basis of their respective localizations and mutant phenotypes. To date, this putative regulation has been limited to a kinesin-like motor protein, a centrosomal structural protein, and two microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). In this study, another spindle-regulating protein, the mammalian non-MAP microtubule-binding and -stabilizing protein, the translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), was identified as a putative Plk-interacting clone by a two-hybrid screen. Plk phosphorylates TCTP on two serine residues in vitro and cofractionates with the majority of kinase activity toward TCTP in mitotic cell lysates. In addition, these sites were demonstrated to be phosphorylated in vivo. Overexpression of a Plk phosphorylation site-deficient mutant of TCTP induced a dramatic increase in the number of multinucleate cells, rounded cells with condensed ball-like nuclei, and cells undergoing cell death, similar to both the reported anti-Plk antibody microinjection and the low-concentration taxol treatment phenotypes. These results suggest that phosphorylation decreases the microtubule-stabilizing activity of TCTP and promotes the increase in microtubule dynamics that occurs after metaphase.

  7. Doubling down on peptide phosphorylation as a variable mass modification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Some mass spectrometrists believe that searching for variable post-translational modifications like phosphorylation of serine or threonine when using database-search algorithms to interpret peptide tandem mass spectra will increase false positive rates. The basis for this is the premise that the al...

  8. Activation of purified calcium channels by stoichiometric protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Nunoki, K.; Florio, V.; Catterall, W.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Purified dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels from rabbit skeletal muscle were reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine vesicles to evaluate the effect of phosphorylation by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-A) on their function. Both the rate and extent of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into vesicles containing reconstituted calcium channels were increased severalfold after incubation with ATP and PK-A. The degree of stimulation of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake was linearly proportional to the extent of phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the calcium channel up to a stoichiometry of approximately 1 mol of phosphate incorporated into each subunit. The calcium channels activated by phosphorylation were determined to be incorporated into the reconstituted vesicles in the inside-out orientation and were completely inhibited by low concentrations of dihydropyridines, phenylalkylamines, Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+}. The results demonstrate a direct relationship between PK-A-catalyzed phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the purified calcium channel and activation of the ion conductance activity of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels.

  9. Canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma tyrosine kinase receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluated tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) expression and activation in canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (cpAC) biospecimens. As histological similarities exist between human and cpAC, we hypothesized that cpACs will have increased TKR mRNA and protein expression as well as TKR phosphorylation. The molecular profile of cpAC has not been well characterized making the selection of therapeutic targets that would potentially have relevant biological activity impossible. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to define TKR expression and their phosphorylation state in cpAC as well as to evaluate the tumors for the presence of potential epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase activating mutations in exons 18–21. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for TKR expression was performed using a tissue microarray (TMA) constructed from twelve canine tumors and companion normal lung samples. Staining intensities of the IHC were quantified by a veterinary pathologist as well as by two different digitalized algorithm image analyses software programs. An antibody array was used to evaluate TKR phosphorylation of the tumor relative to the TKR phosphorylation of normal tissues with the resulting spot intensities quantified using array analysis software. Each EGFR exon PCR product from all of the tumors and non-affected lung tissues were sequenced using sequencing chemistry and the sequencing reactions were run on automated sequencer. Sequence alignments were made to the National Center for Biotechnology Information canine EGFR reference sequence. Results The pro-angiogenic growth factor receptor, PDGFRα, had increased cpAC tumor mRNA, protein expression and phosphorylation when compared to the normal lung tissue biospecimens. Similar to human pulmonary adenocarcinoma, significant increases in cpAC tumor mRNA expression and receptor phosphorylation of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine receptor were present when compared to the

  10. The phosphorylation of coated membrane proteins in intact neurons

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    To complement studies that have demonstrated the prominent phosphorylation of a 50-kD coated vesicle polypeptide in vitro, we have evaluated the phosphorylation of coated membrane proteins in intact cells. A co-assembly assay has been devised in which extracts of cultured rat sympathetic neurons labeled with [32P]-Pi were combined with unlabeled carrier bovine brain coat proteins and reassembled coat structures were isolated by gradient centrifugation. Two groups of phosphorylated polypeptides, of 100-110 kD (pp100-110) and 155 kD (pp155) apparent molecular mass, were incorporated into reassembled coats. The neuronal pp100-110 are structurally and functionally related to the 100-110-kD component of the bovine brain assembly protein (AP), a protein complex that also contains 50-kD and 16.5-kD components and is characterized by its ability to promote the reassembly of clathrin coat structures under physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength (Zaremba, S. and J. H. Keen, 1983, J. Cell Biol., 97:1337-1348). The neuronal pp155 detected in reassembled coat structures was readily observable in total extracts of [32P]-Pi-labeled neurons dissolved in SDS-containing buffer. A bovine brain counterpart to the neuronal pp155 was also observed when brain coated vesicles were subjected to two- dimensional gel electrophoresis. Phosphoserine was the predominant phosphoaminoacid found in both the pp100 and pp155. A structural and functional counterpart to the 50-kD brain assembly polypeptide (AP50) was also identified in these neurons. Although the brain AP50 is prominently phosphorylated by an endogenous protein kinase in isolated coated vesicle preparations, the neuronal AP50 was not detectably phosphorylated in intact cells as assessed by two-dimensional non- equilibrium pH gradient gel electrophoresis of labeled cells dissolved directly in SDS-containing buffers. These results demonstrate that the bovine brain assembly polypeptides of 50 kD and 100-110 kD that we have

  11. Bioinformatics study of cancer-related mutations within p53 phosphorylation site motifs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaona; Huang, Qiang; Yu, Long; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2014-07-29

    p53 protein has about thirty phosphorylation sites located at the N- and C-termini and in the core domain. The phosphorylation sites are relatively less mutated than other residues in p53. To understand why and how p53 phosphorylation sites are rarely mutated in human cancer, using a bioinformatics approaches, we examined the phosphorylation site and its nearby flanking residues, focusing on the consensus phosphorylation motif pattern, amino-acid correlations within the phosphorylation motifs, the propensity of structural disorder of the phosphorylation motifs, and cancer mutations observed within the phosphorylation motifs. Many p53 phosphorylation sites are targets for several kinases. The phosphorylation sites match 17 consensus sequence motifs out of the 29 classified. In addition to proline, which is common in kinase specificity-determining sites, we found high propensity of acidic residues to be adjacent to phosphorylation sites. Analysis of human cancer mutations in the phosphorylation motifs revealed that motifs with adjacent acidic residues generally have fewer mutations, in contrast to phosphorylation sites near proline residues. p53 phosphorylation motifs are mostly disordered. However, human cancer mutations within phosphorylation motifs tend to decrease the disorder propensity. Our results suggest that combination of acidic residues Asp and Glu with phosphorylation sites provide charge redundancy which may safe guard against loss-of-function mutations, and that the natively disordered nature of p53 phosphorylation motifs may help reduce mutational damage. Our results further suggest that engineering acidic amino acids adjacent to potential phosphorylation sites could be a p53 gene therapy strategy.

  12. Evaluation of Phosphorylated Psyllium Seed Polysaccharide as a Release Retardant

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Monica R. P.; Warrier, Deepa U.; Rao, Shivani H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to modify psyllium seed polysaccharide and evaluate the modified polysaccharide as release retardant in tablets employing ciprofloxacin hydrochloride as model drug. Studies on polysaccharide from psyllium husk has been reported but no work has been reported on characterization and modification of the polysaccharide present in the psyllium (Plantago ovata) seed and the use of the modified polysaccharide as a release retardant in tablets. In this study, the seed gum was modified using sodium trimetaphosphate as crosslinking agent. Sustained release matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride were prepared by wet granulation using various drug-polymer ratios. The polymers investigated were psyllium polysaccharide, phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide and widely used release retardant hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K100M. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, drug content, swelling profile and in vitro dissolution studies. The matrix tablets containing 1:3 proportion of drug-phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide was found to have higher hardness as compared to tablets containing 1:1 and 1:2 proportions. The results of swelling behavior in water showed that the tablets containing 1:3 drug:phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide ratio had swelling comparable to that of tablets containing 1:3 drug:hydroxypropyl methylcellulose ratio. The in vitro dissolution studies shows that the dissolution rate was retarded from 98.41 to 37.6% in 6 h with increase in concentration of phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide from 100 to 300 mg. Formulations containing psyllium polysaccharide showed complete drug release in 8 h whereas those formulated with phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide exhibited extended drug release over the 12 h period. Drug release kinetic studies revealed that drug release followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model. PMID:26798177

  13. Phosphorylation Regulates NCC Stability and Transporter Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Sen; Fang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Min-Hua; Chu, Pei-Yi; Yu, I-Shing; Wu, Han-Chung; Lin, Shu-Wha; Chau, Tom; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Sytwu, Huey-Kang

    2013-01-01

    A T60M mutation in the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) is common in patients with Gitelman’s syndrome (GS). This mutation prevents Ste20-related proline and alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)/oxidative stress responsive kinase-1 (OSR1)–mediated phosphorylation of NCC and alters NCC transporter activity in vitro. Here, we examined the physiologic effects of NCC phosphorylation in vivo using a novel Ncc T58M (human T60M) knock-in mouse model. NccT58M/T58M mice exhibited typical features of GS with a blunted response to thiazide diuretics. Despite expressing normal levels of Ncc mRNA, these mice had lower levels of total Ncc and p-Ncc protein that did not change with a low-salt diet that increased p-Spak. In contrast to wild-type Ncc, which localized to the apical membrane of distal convoluted tubule cells, T58M Ncc localized primarily to the cytosolic region and caused an increase in late distal convoluted tubule volume. In MDCK cells, exogenous expression of phosphorylation-defective NCC mutants reduced total protein expression levels and membrane stability. Furthermore, our analysis found diminished total urine NCC excretion in a cohort of GS patients with homozygous NCC T60M mutations. When Wnk4D561A/+ mice, a model of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II expressing an activated Spak/Osr1-Ncc, were crossed with NccT58M/T58M mice, total Ncc and p-Ncc protein levels decreased and the GS phenotype persisted over the hypertensive phenotype. Overall, these data suggest that SPAK-mediated phosphorylation of NCC at T60 regulates NCC stability and function, and defective phosphorylation at this residue corrects the phenotype of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II. PMID:23833262

  14. Phosphorylation regulates NCC stability and transporter activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Sen; Fang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Min-Hua; Chu, Pei-Yi; Yu, I-Shing; Wu, Han-Chung; Lin, Shu-Wha; Chau, Tom; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2013-10-01

    A T60M mutation in the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) is common in patients with Gitelman's syndrome (GS). This mutation prevents Ste20-related proline and alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)/oxidative stress responsive kinase-1 (OSR1)-mediated phosphorylation of NCC and alters NCC transporter activity in vitro. Here, we examined the physiologic effects of NCC phosphorylation in vivo using a novel Ncc T58M (human T60M) knock-in mouse model. Ncc(T58M/T58M) mice exhibited typical features of GS with a blunted response to thiazide diuretics. Despite expressing normal levels of Ncc mRNA, these mice had lower levels of total Ncc and p-Ncc protein that did not change with a low-salt diet that increased p-Spak. In contrast to wild-type Ncc, which localized to the apical membrane of distal convoluted tubule cells, T58M Ncc localized primarily to the cytosolic region and caused an increase in late distal convoluted tubule volume. In MDCK cells, exogenous expression of phosphorylation-defective NCC mutants reduced total protein expression levels and membrane stability. Furthermore, our analysis found diminished total urine NCC excretion in a cohort of GS patients with homozygous NCC T60M mutations. When Wnk4(D561A/+) mice, a model of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II expressing an activated Spak/Osr1-Ncc, were crossed with Ncc(T58M/T58M) mice, total Ncc and p-Ncc protein levels decreased and the GS phenotype persisted over the hypertensive phenotype. Overall, these data suggest that SPAK-mediated phosphorylation of NCC at T60 regulates NCC stability and function, and defective phosphorylation at this residue corrects the phenotype of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II.

  15. Disruption of GluA2 phosphorylation potentiates stress responsivity.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Alexandra S; Fosnocht, Anne Q; Lucerne, Kelsey E; Briand, Lisa A

    2017-08-30

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by persistent craving and addicts frequently relapse even after long periods of abstinence. Exposure to stress can precipitate relapse in humans and rodents. Stress and drug use can lead to common alterations in synaptic plasticity and these commonalities may contribute to the ability of stress to elicit relapse. These common changes in synaptic plasticity are mediated, in part, by alterations in the trafficking and stabilization of AMPA receptors. Exposure to both cocaine and stress can lead to alterations in protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of GluA2 AMPA subunits and thus alter the trafficking of GluA2-containing AMPARs. However, it is not clear what role AMPAR trafficking plays in the interactions between stress and cocaine. The current study utilized a mouse with a point mutation within the GluA2 subunit c-terminus resulting in a disruption of PKC-mediated GluA2 phosphorylation to examine stress responsivity. Although no differences were seen in the response to a forced swim stress in naïve mice, GluA2 K882A knock-in mice exhibited an increased stress response following cocaine self-administration. Furthermore, we demonstrated that disrupting GluA2 phosphorylation increases vulnerability to stress-induced reinstatement of both cocaine seeking and cocaine-conditioned reward. Finally, GluA2 K882A knock-in mice exhibit an increased vulnerability to social defeat as indicated by increased social avoidance. Taken together these results indicate that disrupting GluA2 phosphorylation leads to increased responsivity to acute stress following cocaine exposure and increased vulnerability to chronic stress. These results highlight the GluA2 phosphorylation site as a novel target for the stress-related disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Phosphorylation of Yeast Phosphatidylserine Synthase by Protein Kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.

    2010-01-01

    The CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is phosphorylated and inhibited by protein kinase A in vitro. CHO1 alleles bearing Ser46 → Ala and/or Ser47 → Ala mutations were constructed and expressed in a cho1Δ mutant lacking phosphatidylserine synthase. In vitro, the S46A/S47A mutation reduced the total amount of phosphorylation by 90% and abolished the inhibitory effect protein kinase A had on phosphatidylserine synthase activity. The enzyme phosphorylation by protein kinase A, which was time- and dose-dependent and dependent on the concentration of ATP, caused a electrophoretic mobility shift from a 27-kDa form to a 30-kDa form. The two electrophoretic forms of phosphatidylserine synthase were present in exponential phase cells, whereas only the 27-kDa form was present in stationary phase cells. In vivo labeling with 32Pi and immune complex analysis showed that the 30-kDa form was predominantly phosphorylated when compared with the 27-kDa form. However, the S46A/S47A mutations abolished the protein kinase A-mediated electrophoretic mobility shift. The S46A/S47A mutations also caused a 55% reduction in the total amount of phosphatidylserine synthase in exponential phase cells and a 66% reduction in the amount of enzyme in stationary phase cells. In phospholipid composition analysis, cells expressing the S46A/S47A mutant enzyme exhibited a 57% decrease in phosphatidylserine and a 40% increase in phosphatidylinositol. These results indicate that phosphatidylserine synthase is phosphorylated on Ser46 and Ser47 by protein kinase A, which results in a higher amount of enzyme for the net effect of stimulating the synthesis of phosphatidylserine. PMID:20145252

  17. Functional dissection of myosin binding protein C phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manish K; Gulick, James; James, Jeanne; Osinska, Hanna; Lorenz, John N; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation is differentially regulated in the normal heart and during disease development. Our objective was to examine in detail three phosphorylatable sites (Ser-273, Ser-282, and Ser-302) present in the protein's cardiac-specific sequences, as these residues are differentially and reversibly phosphorylated during normal and abnormal cardiac function. Three transgenic lines were generated: DAA, which expressed cMyBP-C containing Asp-273, Ala-282, and Ala-302, in which a charged amino acid was placed at residue 273 and the remaining two sites rendered nonphosphorylatable by substituting alanines for the two serines; AAD containing Ala-273, Ala-282, and Asp-302, in which aspartate was placed at residue 302 and the remaining two sites rendered nonphosphorylatable; and SDS containing Ser-273, Asp-282, and Ser-302. These mice were compared to mice constructed previously along similar lines: wild type, in which normal cMyBP-C is transgenically expressed, AllP-, in which alanines were substituted and ADA mice as well. DAA and AAD mice showed pathology that was more severe than cMyBP-C nulls. DAA and AAD animals exhibited left ventricular chamber dilation, interstitial fibrosis, irregular cardiac rhythm and sudden cardiac death. Our results define the effects of the sites' post-translational modifications on cMyBP-C functionality and together, give a comprehensive picture of the potential consequences of site-specific phosphorylation. Ser-282 is a key residue in controlling S2 interaction with the thick and thin filaments. The new DAA and AAD constructs show that phosphorylation at one site in the absence of the ability to phosphorylate the other sites, depending upon the particular residues involved, can lead to severe cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. © 2013.

  18. Functional dissection of myosin binding protein C phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Manish K.; Gulick, James; James, Jeanne; Osinska, Hanna; Lorenz, John N.; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation is differentially regulated in the normal heart and during disease development. Our objective was to examine in detail three phosphorylatable sites (Ser-273, Ser-282, and Ser-302) present in the protein’s cardiac-specific sequences, as these residues are differentially and reversibly phosphorylated during normal and abnormal cardiac function. Three transgenic lines were generated: DAA, which expressed cMyBP-C containing Asp-273, Ala-282, Ala302, in which a charged amino acid was placed at residue 273 and the remaining two sites rendered nonphosphorylatable by substituting alanines for the two serines; AAD containing Ala-273, Ala-282, Asp-302), in which aspartate was placed at residue 302 and the remaining two sites rendered nonphosphorylatable; and SDS containing Ser-273, Asp-282, Ser-302. These mice were compared to mice constructed previously along similar lines: wild type, in which normal cMyBP-C is transgenically expressed, AllP−, in which alanines were substituted and ADA mice as well. DAA and AAD mice showed pathology that was more severe than cMyBP-C nulls. DAA and AAD animals exhibited left ventricular chamber dilation, interstitial fibrosis, irregular cardiac rhythm and sudden cardiac death. Our results define the effects of the sites’ post-translational modifications on cMyBP-C functionality and together, give a comprehensive picture of the potential consequences of site-specific phosphorylation. Ser-282 is a key residue in controlling S2 interaction with the thick and thin filaments. The new DAA and AAD constructs show that phosphorylation at one site in the absence of the ability to phosphorylate the other sites, depending upon the particular residues involved, can lead to severe cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. PMID:24001940

  19. Calcium-phospholipid enhanced protein phosphorylation in human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Moore, R.; Cardaman, R.C.

    1986-07-01

    Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation has not been studied in placenta. Human placental cytosol was subjected to an endogenous protein phosphorylation assay using (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP in the presence of calcium and phosphatidylserine. Protein phosphorylation was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. When compared to basal levels, calcium (10/sup -6/ M) in combination with phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml) significantly enhanced (P < 100) /sup 32/P incorporation into phosphoproteins having mol wt 47,000, 43,000, and 37,000. Half-maximal /sup 22/P incorporation was observed with 3.5 x 10/sup -7/ M Ca/sup 2 +/ in the presence of phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml). The effect of phosphatidylserine was biphasic. In the presence of Ca 10/sup -6/ M, /sup 32/P incorporation increased to a maximum at 70 /sup +/g/ml of phosphatidylserine. The increase was suppressed at 150 ..mu..g/ml. Tetracaine caused a dose-dependent inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent enhancement of the three phosphoproteins. Calcium in the absence of phospholipid enhanced the phosphorylation of a protein of 98,000 mol wt. Phosphatidylserine suppressed this enhancement. Calmodulin (10/sup -6/ M) had no detectable effect upon phosphorylation beyond that of calcium alone, but the calmodulin inhibitor R-24571 specifically inhibited the calcium-stimulated 98,000 mol wt phosphoprotein. Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent phospholipid-dependent phosphoproteins are present in human placental cytosol; whether calcium-activated, calmodulin-dependent phosphoproteins also are present remains a question.

  20. A redox-regulated tyrosine phosphorylation cascade in rat spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B; Aitken, R J

    2001-01-01

    Rat spermatozoa from both the caput and cauda epididymidis were shown to generate superoxide anion (O2-.) both spontaneously and following stimulation with NAD(P)H. Caput spermatozoa gave a significantly greater O2- response to NADPH stimulation than caudal cells, whereas in both cell types the responses to exogenous NADPH and NADH were approximately equivalent. Analysis of H2O2 production revealed that this oxidant was generated only by caudal epididymal cells and only in these cells did the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production with NADPH lead to an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. Stimulation of ROS production with NADPH increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in both caput and caudal epididymal cells, but only in caudal cells did cAMP stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation, in keeping with the NADPH results. On the basis of these findings we propose that tyrosine phosphorylation in rat spermatozoa is driven by ROS acting via 2 different but complementary mechanisms; O2-. stimulates tyrosine kinase activity indirectly through the elevation of intracellular cAMP while H2O2 acts directly on the kinase/phosphatase system, stimulating the former and inhibiting the latter. Zinc was examined as a potential regulator of this signal transduction cascade and was shown to suppress tyrosine phosphorylation in caput cells but to promote this activity in caudal spermatozoa, possibly through an inhibitory effect on tyrosine phosphatase activity. These results reveal the maturation of a redox-regulated, cAMP-mediated, signal transduction cascade during epididymal transit in the rat that is sensitive to zinc and plays a key role in the control of tyrosine phosphorylation events associated with capacitation.

  1. Normal phosphorylation of duck hepatitis B virus L protein is dispensable for infectivity.

    PubMed

    Grgacic, E V; Lin, B; Gazina, E V; Snooks, M J; Anderson, D A

    1998-11-01

    A fraction of the large surface protein (L) of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) is phosphorylated at serine or threonine residues (E. Grgacic & D. Anderson, Journal of Virology 68, 7344-7350, 1994). We now report the identification of phosphorylation sites in DHBV L protein. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified serine-118 (S118) as the major phosphorylation site, accepting approximately 64% of the total phosphate groups incorporated in L, and resulting in retarded migration of phosphorylated L in SDS-PAGE. Proline-119 is indispensable for S118 phosphorylation. Mutation of other serine/threonine residues which are followed by prolines (T79, T89, S117 and T155) together with S118 further reduced phosphorylation to around 19% of wild-type. Non-equilibrium pH gel electrophoresis (NEPHGE) and SDS-PAGE of 33P-labelled L protein revealed two phosphorylated L species, while protein with the S118 to alanine mutation was detected as only one labelled species, consistent with multiple phosphorylations in wild-type L. Together, these results demonstrate that serine 118 is the major phosphorylation site for a proline-directed kinase, and that a proportion of L molecules are additionally phosphorylated at one of a number of secondary sites. DHBV mutants encoding L proteins with minimal phosphorylation (alanine mutants) or mimicking constitutive phosphorylation (aspartic acid mutants) remained infectious both in cell culture and in ducks, demonstrating that L phosphorylation may play only a minor role in DHBV replication.

  2. Quantitative and combinatory determination of in situ phosphorylation of tau and its FTDP-17 mutants

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Taeko; Hosokawa, Tomohisa; Taoka, Masato; Tsutsumi, Koji; Ando, Kanae; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hosokawa, Masato; Hasegawa, Masato; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Tau is hyperphosphorylated in the brains of patients with tauopathies, such as Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). However, neither the mechanism of hyperphosphorylation nor its contribution to pathogenesis is known. We applied Phos-tag SDS-PAGE, a phosphoaffinity electrophoresis, to the analysis of tau phosphorylation in vitro by Cdk5, in cultured cells and in mouse brain. Here, we found that Cdk5-p25 phosphorylated tau in vitro at Ser404, Ser235, Thr205 and Ser202 in this order. In contrast in cultured cells, Ser404 was preferentially phosphorylated by Cdk5-p35, whereas Thr205 was not phosphorylated. Ser202 and Ser235 were phosphorylated by endogenous kinases. Tau exhibited ~12 phosphorylation isotypes in COS-7 cells with different combinations of phosphorylation at Thr181, Ser202, Thr231, Ser235 and Ser404. These phosphorylation sites were similar to tau phosphorylated in mouse brains. FTDP-17 tau with a mutation in the C-terminal region had different banding patterns, indicating a different phosphorylation pattern. In particular, it was clear that the R406W mutation causes loss of Ser404 phosphorylation. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the Phos-tag technique in the quantitative analysis of site-specific in vivo phosphorylation of tau and provide detailed information on in situ combinatory phosphorylation of tau. PMID:27641626

  3. Environmental effects on phosphoryl group bonding probed by vibrational spectroscopy: implications for understanding phosphoryl transfer and enzymatic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hu; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Wang, Jianghua H; Deng, Hua; O'Brien, Patrick J; Wu, Li; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Herschlag, Daniel; Callender, Robert

    2002-09-25

    We have used vibrational spectroscopy to study bonding in monosubstituted dianionic phosphates, both to learn more about basic properties intrinsic to this important class of biological substrates and to assess the ability of vibrational spectroscopy to provide a "sensor" or probe of the local environment experienced by the phosphoryl group. We examined the bonding properties of the phosphoryl group via vibrational spectroscopy for a series of compounds in which the phosphoryl substituent was varied systematically and extensively. A broad linear correlation of the bridging P-O(R) bond length and the pK(a) of the substituent alcohol was observed. The results indicate that the P-O(R) bond changes by only approximately 0.04 A with alcohol substituents that vary in pK(a) by approximately 12 units, suggesting that phosphoryl group bonding responds in a subtle but regular manner to changes in the local environment. We also determined the effect on the phosphoryl bonding from changes in the solvent environment. Addition of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) elongates the bridging bond, presumably as a result of lessened solvation to the nonbridging oxygens and conservation of bond order to phosphorus. Finally, we have addressed the relationship between ground-state bonding properties and reactivity, as changing the leaving group substituent and adding DMSO have large rate effects, and it was previously proposed that lengthening of the bond to be broken is the cause of the increased reactivity. The results herein suggest, however, that the change in the bridging bond energy is small compared to the changes in energy that accompany the observed reactivity differences. Further analysis indicates that electrostatic interactions can provide a common driving force underlying both bond lengthening and the observed rate increases. We suggest that ground-state distortions of substrates bound to enzymes can provide a readout of the electrostatic active site environment, an environment that

  4. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase A: IDENTIFICATION OF Thr455 AS A MAJOR SITE OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    CTP synthetase is an essential enzyme that generates the CTP required for the synthesis of nucleic acids and membrane phospholipids. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of the human CTPS1-encoded CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase A. CTP synthetase 1 was expressed and purified from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. Using purified CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase A activity was time- and dose-dependent. The phosphorylation, which primarily occurred on a threonine residue, was accompanied by a 50% decrease in CTP synthetase 1 activity. The synthetic peptide LGKRRTLFQT that contains the protein kinase A motif for Thr455 was a substrate for protein kinase A. A Thr455 to Ala (T455A) mutation in CTP synthetase 1 was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and was expressed and purified from the S. cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant. The T455A mutation caused a 78% decrease in protein kinase A phosphorylation, and the loss of the phosphothreonine residue and a major phosphopeptide that were present in the purified wild type enzyme phosphorylated by protein kinase A. The CTP synthetase 1 activity of the T455A mutant enzyme was 2-fold higher than the wild type enzyme. In addition, the T455A mutation caused a 44% decrease in the amount of human CTP synthetase 1 that was phosphorylated in S. cerevisiae cells, and this was accompanied by a 2.5-fold increase in the cellular concentration of CTP and a 1.5-fold increase in the choline-dependent synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. PMID:17189248

  5. Identification of a phosphorylation site in the hinge region of the human progesterone receptor and additional amino-terminal phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Knotts, T A; Orkiszewski, R S; Cook, R G; Edwards, D P; Weigel, N L

    2001-03-16

    We have previously reported the identification of seven in vivo phosphorylation sites in the amino-terminal region of the human progesterone receptor (PR). From our previous in vivo studies, it was evident that several phosphopeptides remained unidentified. In particular, we wished to determine whether human PR contains a phosphorylation site in the hinge region, as do other steroid receptors including chicken PR, human androgen receptor, and mouse estrogen receptor. Previously, problematic trypsin cleavage sites hampered our ability to detect phosphorylation sites in large incomplete tryptic peptides. Using a combination of mass spectrometry and in vitro phosphorylation, we have identified six previously unidentified phosphorylation sites in human PR. Using nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry, we have identified two new in vivo phosphorylation sites, Ser(20) and Ser(676), in baculovirus-expressed human PR. Ser(676) is analogous to the hinge site identified in other steroid receptors. Additionally, precursor ion scans identified another phosphopeptide that contains Ser(130)-Pro(131), a likely candidate for phosphorylation. In vitro phosphorylation of PR with Cdk2 has revealed five additional in vitro Cdk2 phosphorylation sites: Ser(25), Ser(213), Thr(430), Ser(554), and Ser(676). At least two of these, Ser(213) and Ser(676), are authentic in vivo sites. We confirmed the presence of the Cdk2-phosphorylated peptide containing Ser(213) in PR from in vivo labeled T47D cells, indicating that this is an in vivo site. Our combined studies indicate that most, if not all, of the Ser-Pro motifs in human PR are sites for phosphorylation. Taken together, these data indicate that the phosphorylation of PR is highly complex, with at least 14 phosphorylation sites.

  6. Identification of novel in vivo phosphorylation sites of the human proapoptotic protein BAD: pore-forming activity of BAD is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Polzien, Lisa; Baljuls, Angela; Rennefahrt, Ulrike E E; Fischer, Andreas; Schmitz, Werner; Zahedi, Rene P; Sickmann, Albert; Metz, Renate; Albert, Stefan; Benz, Roland; Hekman, Mirko; Rapp, Ulf R

    2009-10-09

    BAD is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 protein family that is regulated by phosphorylation in response to survival factors. Although much attention has been devoted to the identification of phosphorylation sites in murine BAD, little data are available with respect to phosphorylation of human BAD protein. Using mass spectrometry, we identified here besides the established phosphorylation sites at serines 75, 99, and 118 several novel in vivo phosphorylation sites within human BAD (serines 25, 32/34, 97, and 124). Furthermore, we investigated the quantitative contribution of BAD targeting kinases in phosphorylating serine residues 75, 99, and 118. Our results indicate that RAF kinases represent, besides protein kinase A, PAK, and Akt/protein kinase B, in vivo BAD-phosphorylating kinases. RAF-induced phosphorylation of BAD was reduced to control levels using the RAF inhibitor BAY 43-9006. This phosphorylation was not prevented by MEK inhibitors. Consistently, expression of constitutively active RAF suppressed apoptosis induced by BAD and the inhibition of colony formation caused by BAD could be prevented by RAF. In addition, using the surface plasmon resonance technique, we analyzed the direct consequences of BAD phosphorylation by RAF with respect to association with 14-3-3 and Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) proteins. Phosphorylation of BAD by active RAF promotes 14-3-3 protein association, in which the phosphoserine 99 represented the major binding site. Finally, we show here that BAD forms channels in planar bilayer membranes in vitro. This pore-forming capacity was dependent on phosphorylation status and interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. Collectively, our findings provide new insights into the regulation of BAD function by phosphorylation.

  7. Alterations of ciliate phosducin phosphorylation in Blepharisma japonicum cells.

    PubMed

    Sobierajska, Katarzyna; Fabczak, Hanna; Fabczak, Stanisław

    2005-05-13

    We have previously reported that motile photophobic response in ciliate Blepharisma japonicum correlates with dephosphorylation of a cytosolic 28 kDa phosphoprotein (PP28) exhibiting properties similar to those of phosducin. Here we demonstrate in in vivo phosphorylation assay that the light-elicited dephosphorylation of the PP28 is significantly modified by cell incubation with substances known to modulate protein phosphatase and kinase activities. Immunoblot analyses showed that incubation of ciliates with okadaic acid and calyculin A, potent inhibitors of type 1 or 2A protein phosphatases, distinctly increased phosphorylation of PP28 in dark-adapted cells and markedly weakened dephosphorylation of the ciliate phosducin following cell illumination. An enhancement of PP28 phosphorylation was also observed in dark-adapted ciliates exposed to 8-Br-cAMP and 8-Br-cGMP, slowly hydrolysable cyclic nucleotide analogs and 3-isobutyryl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), a non-specific cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDEs) inhibitor. Only slight changes in light-evoked dephosphorylation levels of PP28 were observed in cells treated with the cyclic nucleotide analogs and IBMX. Incubation of ciliates with H 89 or KT 5823, highly selective inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), respectively, decreased PP28 phosphorylation levels in dark-adapted cells, whereas the extent of light-evoked dephosphorylation of the phosphoprotein was only slightly influenced. Cell treatment with higher Ca2+ concentration together with ionophore A23187 in culture medium resulted in marked increase in PP28 phosphorylation levels, while quite an opposite effect was observed in cells exposed to Ca2+ chelators, EGTA or BAPTA/AM as well as calmodulin antagonists, such as trifluoperazine (TFP), W-7 or calmidazolium. Light-dependent dephosphorylation was not considerably affected by these treatments. The experimental findings presented here suggest that an

  8. Phosphorylation of the transit sequence of chloroplast precursor proteins.

    PubMed

    Waegemann, K; Soll, J

    1996-03-15

    A protein kinase was located in the cytosol of pea mesophyll cells. The protein kinase phosphorylates, in an ATP-dependent manner, chloroplast-destined precursor proteins but not precursor proteins, which are located to plant mitochondria or plant peroxisomes. The phosphorylation occurs on either serine or threonine residues, depending on the precursor protein used. We demonstrate the specific phosphorylation of the precursor forms of the chloroplast stroma proteins ferredoxin (preFd), small subunit of ribulose-bisphosphate-carboxylase (preSSU), the thylakoid localized light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein (preLHCP), and the thylakoid lumen-localized proteins of the oxygen-evolving complex of 23 kDa (preOE23) and 33 kDa (preOE33). In the case of thylakoid lumen proteins which possess bipartite transit sequences, the phosphorylation occurs within the stroma-targeting domain. By using single amino acid substitution within the presequences of preSSU, preOE23, and preOE33, we were able to tentatively identify a consensus motif for the precursor protein protein kinase. This motif is (P/G)X(n)(R/K)X(n)(S/T)X(n) (S*/T*), were n = 0-3 amino acids spacer and S*/T* represents the phosphate acceptor. The precursor protein protein kinase is present only in plant extracts, e.g. wheat germ and pea, but not in a reticulocyte lysate. Protein import experiments into chloroplasts revealed that phosphorylated preSSU binds to the organelles, but dephosphorylation seems required to complete the translocation process and to obtain complete import. These results suggest that a precursor protein protein phosphatase is involved in chloroplast import and represents a so far unidentified component of the import machinery. In contrast to sucrose synthase, a cytosolic marker protein, the precursor protein protein kinase seems to adhere partially to the chloroplast surface. A phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle of chloroplast-destined precursor proteins might represent one step

  9. FSCB phosphorylation regulates mouse spermatozoa capacitation through suppressing SUMOylation of ROPN1/ROPN1L

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinqi; Chen, Mingrui; Yu, Renyi; Liu, Benli; Tian, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shunli

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous sheath CABYR binding protein (FSCB) is regulated by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation in the spermatozoa capacitation. Recently, we showed that FSCB phosphorylation activated spermatozoa motility. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. Here, we showed that FSCB phosphorylation inhibited SUMOylation of two crucial proteins ROPN1/ROPN1L that are associated with PKA/A kinase activity and spermatozoa motility. Suppression of SUMOylation of ROPN1/ROPN1L mimicked the effects of FSCB phosphorylation on spermatozoa motility. Immunoprecipitation assay showed that phosphorylated FSCB had a significantly higher affinity to ROPN1/ROPN1L than non-phosphorylated FSCB. Together, our data suggest that FSCB phosphorylation may regulate mouse spermatozoa capacitation through suppressing SUMOylation of ROPN1/ROPN1L, which sheds new light on creating a therapeutic strategy targeting FSCB phosphorylation in the study of infertility. PMID:27398160

  10. Phosphorylation of myosin-binding subunit (MBS) of myosin phosphatase by Rho-kinase in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Y; Fukata, Y; Oshiro, N; Amano, M; Nakamura, T; Ito, M; Matsumura, F; Inagaki, M; Kaibuchi, K

    1999-11-29

    Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase), which is activated by the small GTPase Rho, phosphorylates myosin-binding subunit (MBS) of myosin phosphatase and thereby inactivates the phosphatase activity in vitro. Rho-kinase is thought to regulate the phosphorylation state of the substrates including myosin light chain (MLC), ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) family proteins and adducin by their direct phosphorylation and by the inactivation of myosin phosphatase. Here we identified the sites of phosphorylation of MBS by Rho-kinase as Thr-697, Ser-854 and several residues, and prepared antibody that specifically recognized MBS phosphorylated at Ser-854. We found by use of this antibody that the stimulation of MDCK epithelial cells with tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced the phosphorylation of MBS at Ser-854 under the conditions in which membrane ruffling and cell migration were induced. Pretreatment of the cells with Botulinum C3 ADP-ribosyltransferase (C3), which is thought to interfere with Rho functions, or Rho-kinase inhibitors inhibited the TPA- or HGF-induced MBS phosphorylation. The TPA stimulation enhanced the immunoreactivity of phosphorylated MBS in the cytoplasm and membrane ruffling area of MDCK cells. In migrating MDCK cells, phosphorylated MBS as well as phosphorylated MLC at Ser-19 were localized in the leading edge and posterior region. Phosphorylated MBS was localized on actin stress fibers in REF52 fibroblasts. The microinjection of C3 or dominant negative Rho-kinase disrupted stress fibers and weakened the accumulation of phosphorylated MBS in REF52 cells. During cytokinesis, phosphorylated MBS, MLC and ERM family proteins accumulated at the cleavage furrow, and the phosphorylation level of MBS at Ser-854 was increased. Taken together, these results indicate that MBS is phosphorylated by Rho-kinase downstream of Rho in vivo, and suggest that myosin phosphatase and Rho-kinase spatiotemporally regulate the

  11. Calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal was studied using corn roots of a light-insensitive variety (Zea mays L., cv. Patriot). The gravitropic response was calcium-dependent. Horizontal placement of roots preloaded with 32P for three minutes resulted in changes in protein phosphorylation of polypeptides of 32 and 35 kD. Calcium depletion resulted in decreased phosphorylation of these phosphoproteins and replenishment of calcium restored the phosphorylation.

  12. Rapid changes in protein phosphorylation associated with light-induced gravity perception in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, J. J.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of light and calcium depletion on in vivo protein phosphorylation was tested using dark-grown roots of Merit corn. Light caused rapid and specific promotion of phosphorylation of three polypeptides. Pretreatment of roots with ethylene glycol bis N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid and A23187 prevented light-induced changes in protein phosphorylation. We postulate that these changes in protein phosphorylation are involved in the light-induced gravity response.

  13. Rapid changes in protein phosphorylation associated with light-induced gravity perception in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, J. J.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of light and calcium depletion on in vivo protein phosphorylation was tested using dark-grown roots of Merit corn. Light caused rapid and specific promotion of phosphorylation of three polypeptides. Pretreatment of roots with ethylene glycol bis N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid and A23187 prevented light-induced changes in protein phosphorylation. We postulate that these changes in protein phosphorylation are involved in the light-induced gravity response.

  14. Calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal was studied using corn roots of a light-insensitive variety (Zea mays L., cv. Patriot). The gravitropic response was calcium-dependent. Horizontal placement of roots preloaded with 32P for three minutes resulted in changes in protein phosphorylation of polypeptides of 32 and 35 kD. Calcium depletion resulted in decreased phosphorylation of these phosphoproteins and replenishment of calcium restored the phosphorylation.

  15. Mapping and analysis of phosphorylation sites: a quick guide for cell biologists.

    PubMed

    Dephoure, Noah; Gould, Kathleen L; Gygi, Steven P; Kellogg, Douglas R

    2013-03-01

    A mechanistic understanding of signaling networks requires identification and analysis of phosphorylation sites. Mass spectrometry offers a rapid and highly sensitive approach to mapping phosphorylation sites. However, mass spectrometry has significant limitations that must be considered when planning to carry out phosphorylation-site mapping. Here we provide an overview of key information that should be taken into consideration before beginning phosphorylation-site analysis, as well as a step-by-step guide for carrying out successful experiments.

  16. Regulatory roles of phosphorylation in model and pathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Albataineh, Mohammad T.; Kadosh, David

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, considerable advances have been made toward our understanding of how post-translational modifications affect a wide variety of biological processes, including morphology and virulence, in medically important fungi. Phosphorylation stands out as a key molecular switch and regulatory modification that plays a critical role in controlling these processes. In this article, we first provide a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of the regulatory roles that both Ser/Thr and non-Ser/Thr kinases and phosphatases play in model and pathogenic fungi. Next, we discuss the impact of current global approaches that are being used to define the complete set of phosphorylation targets (phosphoproteome) in medically important fungi. Finally, we provide new insights and perspectives into the potential use of key regulatory kinases and phosphatases as targets for the development of novel and more effective antifungal strategies. PMID:26705834

  17. Thermophysical and flammability characterization of phosphorylated epoxy adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Giants, T. W.; Bilow, N.; Hsu, M.-T.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the thermophysical and flammability properties of a phosphorylated epoxy adhesive, which has potential applications in aircraft interior panels, are described. The adhesive consists of stoichiometric ratios of bis(3-glycidyloxphenyl)methylphosphine oxide and bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide containing approximately 7.5% phosphorus. Preliminary data are presented from adhesive bonding studies conducted utilizing this adhesive with polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) film and phenolic-glass laminates. Limiting oxygen index and smoke density data are presented and compared with those of the tetraglycidyl methylene dianiline epoxy resin-adhesive system currently used in aircraft interiors. Initial results indicate that the phosphorylated epoxy compound has excellent adhesive properties when used with PVF film and that desirable fire-resistant properties are maintained.

  18. Ser/Thr phosphorylation as a regulatory mechanism in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    This review will discuss some recent work describing the role of Ser/Thr phosphorylation as a post-translational mechanism of regulation in bacteria. I will discuss the interaction between bacterial eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr kinases (eSTKs) and two-component systems as well as hints as to physiological function of eSTKs and their cognate eukaryotic-like phosphatases (eSTPs). In particular, I will highlight the role of eSTKs and eSTPs in the regulation of peptidoglycan metabolism and protein synthesis. In addition, I will discuss how data from phosphoproteomic surveys suggest that Ser/Thr phosphorylation plays a much more significant physiological role than would be predicted simply based on in vivo and in vitro analyses of individual kinases.

  19. Molecular Profiling of Activated Neurons by Phosphorylated Ribosome Capture

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Zachary A.; Tan, Keith; Birsoy, Kivanc; Schmidt, Sarah; Garrison, Jennifer L.; Wysocki, Robert W.; Emiliano, Ana; Ekstrand, Mats I.; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The mammalian brain is composed of thousands of interacting neural cell types. Systematic approaches to establish the molecular identity of functional populations of neurons would advance our understanding of neural mechanisms controlling behavior. Here, we show that ribosomal protein S6, a structural component of the ribosome, becomes phosphorylated in neurons activated by a wide range of stimuli. We show that these phosphorylated ribosomes can be captured from mouse brain homogenates, thereby enriching directly for the mRNAs expressed in discrete subpopulations of activated cells. We use this approach to identify neurons in the hypothalamus regulated by changes in salt balance or food availability. We show that galanin neurons are activated by fasting and that prodynorphin neurons restrain food intake during scheduled feeding. These studies identify elements of the neural circuit that controls food intake and illustrate how the activity-dependent capture of cell-type-specific transcripts can elucidate the functional organization of a complex tissue. PMID:23178128

  20. Phosphorylation events during viral infections provide potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Julie A.; Striker, Rob

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY For many medically relevant viruses, there is now considerable evidence that both viral and cellular kinases play important roles in viral infection. Ultimately, these kinases, and the cellular signaling pathways that they exploit, may serve as therapeutic targets for treating patients. Currently, small molecule inhibitors of kinases are under investigation as therapy for herpes viral infections. Additionally, a number of cellular or host-directed tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have been previously FDA-approved for cancer treatment are under study in animal models and clinical trials, as they have shown promise for the treatment of various viral infections as well. This review will highlight the wide range of viral proteins phosphorylated by viral and cellular kinases, and the potential for variability of kinase recognition sites within viral substrates to impact phosphorylation and kinase prediction. Research studying kinase-targeting prophylactic and therapeutic treatments for a number of viral infections will also be discussed. PMID:22113983

  1. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation regulate APC/CCdh1 substrate degradation

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Lavy, Kobi J; Zenvirth, Drora; Brandeis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase activated by its G1 specific adaptor protein Cdh1 is a major regulator of the cell cycle. The APC/CCdh1 mediates degradation of dozens of proteins, however, the kinetics and requirements for their degradation are largely unknown. We demonstrate that overexpression of the constitutive active CDH1m11 mutant that is not inhibited by phosphorylation results in mitotic exit in the absence of the FEAR and MEN pathways, and DNA re-replication in the absence of Cdc7 activity. This mode of mitotic exit also reveals additional requirements for APC/CCdh1 substrate degradation, which for some substrates such as Pds1 or Clb5 is dephosphorylation, but for others such as Cdc5 is phosphorylation. PMID:26252546

  2. Regulation of casein kinase 2 by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Agostinis, P; Goris, J; Pinna, L A; Merlevede, W

    1987-01-01

    The effects of various polycation-stimulated (PCS) phosphatases and of the active catalytic subunit of the ATPMg-dependent (AMDc) protein phosphatase on the activity of casein kinase 2 (CK-2) were investigated by using the synthetic peptide substrate Ser-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu, whose phosphorylated derivative is entirely insensitive to these protein phosphatases. Previous dephosphorylation of native CK-2 enhances its specific activity 2-3-fold. Such an effect, accounted for by an increase in Vmax, is more readily promoted by the PCS phosphatases than by the AMDc phosphatase. The phosphate incorporated by autophosphorylation could not be removed by the protein phosphatases, suggesting the involvement of phosphorylation site(s) other than the one(s) affected by intramolecular autophosphorylation. The activation of CK-2 by the phosphatase pretreatment is neutralized during the kinase assay; the mechanism of this phenomenon, which is highly dependent on the kinase concentration, is discussed. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2829841

  3. Regulation of casein kinase 2 by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Agostinis, P; Goris, J; Pinna, L A; Merlevede, W

    1987-12-15

    The effects of various polycation-stimulated (PCS) phosphatases and of the active catalytic subunit of the ATPMg-dependent (AMDc) protein phosphatase on the activity of casein kinase 2 (CK-2) were investigated by using the synthetic peptide substrate Ser-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu, whose phosphorylated derivative is entirely insensitive to these protein phosphatases. Previous dephosphorylation of native CK-2 enhances its specific activity 2-3-fold. Such an effect, accounted for by an increase in Vmax, is more readily promoted by the PCS phosphatases than by the AMDc phosphatase. The phosphate incorporated by autophosphorylation could not be removed by the protein phosphatases, suggesting the involvement of phosphorylation site(s) other than the one(s) affected by intramolecular autophosphorylation. The activation of CK-2 by the phosphatase pretreatment is neutralized during the kinase assay; the mechanism of this phenomenon, which is highly dependent on the kinase concentration, is discussed.

  4. Integration of Troponin I Phosphorylation with Cardiac Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Solaro, R. John; Henze, Marcus; Kobayashi, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-01

    We focus here on the modulation of thin filament activity by cardiac troponin I (cTnI) phosphorylation as an integral and adaptive mechanism in cardiac homeostasis and as a mechanism vulnerable to maladaptive response to stress. We discuss a current concept of cTnI function in the A-band region of the sarcomere, and potential signaling to cTnI in a network involving the ends of the thin filaments at the Z-disk and the M-band regions. The cardiac sarcomere represents a remarkable set of interacting proteins that functions not only as a molecular machine generating the heartbeat, but also as a hub of signaling. We review how phosphorylation signaling to cardiac troponin I is integrated with parallel signals controlling excitation-contraction coupling, hypertrophy, and metabolism. PMID:23329791

  5. Cell entry of Lassa virus induces tyrosine phosphorylation of dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pythoud, Christelle; Turk, Rolf; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Pasquato, Antonella; Campbell, Kevin P; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor dystroglycan (DG) serves as a cellular receptor for the highly pathogenic arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) that causes a haemorrhagic fever with high mortality in human. In the host cell, DG provides a molecular link between the ECM and the actin cytoskeleton via the adapter proteins utrophin or dystrophin. Here we investigated post-translational modifications of DG in the context of LASV cell entry. Using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, we found that tyrosine kinases are required for efficient internalization of virus particles, but not virus-receptor binding. Engagement of cellular DG by LASV envelope glycoprotein (LASV GP) in human epithelial cells induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of DG. LASV GP binding to DG further resulted in dissociation of the adapter protein utrophin from virus-bound DG. This virus-induced dissociation of utrophin was affected by genistein treatment, suggesting a role of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in the process.

  6. Thermophysical and flammability characterization of phosphorylated epoxy adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Giants, T. W.; Bilow, N.; Hsu, M.-T.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the thermophysical and flammability properties of a phosphorylated epoxy adhesive, which has potential applications in aircraft interior panels, are described. The adhesive consists of stoichiometric ratios of bis(3-glycidyloxphenyl)methylphosphine oxide and bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide containing approximately 7.5% phosphorus. Preliminary data are presented from adhesive bonding studies conducted utilizing this adhesive with polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) film and phenolic-glass laminates. Limiting oxygen index and smoke density data are presented and compared with those of the tetraglycidyl methylene dianiline epoxy resin-adhesive system currently used in aircraft interiors. Initial results indicate that the phosphorylated epoxy compound has excellent adhesive properties when used with PVF film and that desirable fire-resistant properties are maintained.

  7. Antineoplastic agents. 511. Direct phosphorylation of phenpanstatin and pancratistatin.

    PubMed

    Pettit, George R; Melody, Noeleen; Herald, Delbert L

    2004-03-01

    Selective phosphorylation of phenpanstatin (3a) with tetrabutylammonium dihydrogen phosphate and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in pyridine followed by cation-exchange chromatographic procedures was found to provide an efficient route to a new series (3b-3d) of promising 3,4-O-cyclic phosphate prodrugs designated phenpanstatin phosphates. Application of analogous reaction conditions to pancratistatin (1a) led to a mixture of monophosphate derivatives where sodium pancratistatin 4-O-phosphate (4a) was isolated and the structure confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Modification of the reaction conditions allowed direct phosphorylation of pancratistatin followed by cation-exchange chromatography to afford sodium pancratistatin 3,4-O-cyclic phosphate (5a), which was selected for preclinical development.

  8. Biocatalytic functionalization of hydroxyalkyl acrylates and phenoxyethanol via phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tasnádi, Gábor; Hall, Mélanie; Baldenius, Kai; Ditrich, Klaus; Faber, Kurt

    2016-09-10

    The enzymatic phosphorylation of phenoxyethanol, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate and 4-hydroxybutyl acrylate catalyzed by acid phosphatases PhoN-Sf and PiACP at the expense of inorganic di-, tri-, hexameta- or polyphosphate was applied to the preparative-scale synthesis of phosphorylated compounds. The reaction conditions were optimized with respect to enzyme immobilization, substrate concentration, pH and type of phosphate donor. The mild reaction conditions prevented undesired polymerization and hydrolysis of the acrylate ester moiety. Application of a continuous flow system allowed facile scale-up and mono-phosphates were obtained in up to 26% isolated yield with space-time yields of 0.89kgL(-1)h(-1).

  9. Nucleoside kinases in adult Schistosoma mansoni: phosphorylation of pyrimidine nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Fardos N M; El Kouni, Mahmoud H

    2014-01-01

    Competition studies and column chromatography demonstrated that adults Schistosoma mansoni contains three nucleoside kinases that can phosphorylate pyrimidine nucleosides; a non-specific deoxyriboside kinase (EC 2.7.1.145), a specific uridine kinase and a specific cytidine kinase. The non-specific deoxyriboside kinase can phosphorylate all naturally occurring pyrimidine and purine 2'-deoxyribosides. Uridine and cytidine kinases are specific for uridine and cytidine, respectively. Various nucleoside 5'-triphosphate act as phosphate donors for the three kinases albeit to different degrees. Nucleoside kinases are critical in the activation of potential anti-parasitic drugs which may be identified among the numerous available pyrimidine nucleoside analogues. The finding that S. mansoni have nucleoside kinases that differ from their host enzymes raises the possibilities that certain pyrimidine nucleoside analogues could be selectively toxic to schistosomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell entry of Lassa virus induces tyrosine phosphorylation of dystroglycan

    PubMed Central

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pythoud, Christelle; Turk, Rolf; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Pasquato, Antonella; Campbell, Kevin P.; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor dystroglycan (DG) serves as a cellular receptor for the highly pathogenic arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) that causes a hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in man. In the host cell, DG provides a molecular link between the ECM and the actin cytoskeleton via the adapter proteins utrophin or dystrophin. Here we investigated post-translational modifications of DG in the context of LASV cell entry. Using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, we found that tyrosine kinases are required for efficient internalization of virus particles, but not virus-receptor binding. Engagement of cellular DG by LASV envelope glycoprotein (LASV GP) in human epithelial cells induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of DG. LASV GP binding to DG further resulted in dissociation of the adapter protein utrophin from virus-bound DG. This virus-induced dissociation of utrophin was affected by genistein treatment, suggesting a role of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in the process. PMID:23279385

  11. OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION IN MITOCHONDRIA FROM LIVERS SHOWING CLOUDY SWELLING

    PubMed Central

    Fonnesu, Alberto; Severi, Clara

    1956-01-01

    Using succinate and α-ketoglutarate as substrates, oxidative phosphorylation has been measured in mitochondria isolated from livers showing cloudy swelling. This cellular change was obtained by injecting rats with S. typhi murium toxin and guinea pigs with diphtheria toxin. It has been found that phosphorylation associated with the oxidation of either of these substrates was partially inhibited in mitochondria from livers showing cloudy swelling, while the oxygen consumption was unchanged. Thus, the P:O ratios for both succinate and α-ketoglutarate were lower in mitochondria from treated animals than they were in normal mitochondria. Dephosphorylation of ATP was not significantly modified in mitochondria from livers showing cloudy swelling as compared with normal controls. No dephosphorylation of AMP and G-6-P was observed either in normal mitochondria or in mitochondria from treated animals. PMID:13331961

  12. ERK Phosphorylation Regulates Sleep and Plasticity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Vanderheyden, William M.; Gerstner, Jason R.; Tanenhaus, Anne; Yin, Jerry C.; Shaw, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the relationship between sleep and plasticity, we examined the role of Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in regulating baseline sleep, and modulating the response to waking experience. Both sleep deprivation and social enrichment increase ERK phosphorylation in wild-type flies. The effects of both sleep deprivation and social enrichment on structural plasticity in the LNvs can be recapitulated by expressing an active version of ERK (UAS-ERKSEM) pan-neuronally in the adult fly using GeneSwitch (Gsw) Gsw-elav-GAL4. Conversely, disrupting ERK reduces sleep and prevents both the behavioral and structural plasticity normally induced by social enrichment. Finally, using transgenic flies carrying a cAMP response Element (CRE)-luciferase reporter we show that activating ERK enhances CRE-Luc activity while disrupting ERK reduces it. These data suggest that ERK phosphorylation is an important mediator in transducing waking experience into sleep. PMID:24244744

  13. Insulin antagonizes ischemia-induced Thr172 phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase alpha-subunits in heart via hierarchical phosphorylation of Ser485/491.

    PubMed

    Horman, Sandrine; Vertommen, Didier; Heath, Richard; Neumann, Dietbert; Mouton, Véronique; Woods, Angela; Schlattner, Uwe; Wallimann, Theo; Carling, David; Hue, Louis; Rider, Mark H

    2006-03-03

    Previous studies showed that insulin antagonizes AMP-activated protein kinase activation by ischemia and that protein kinase B might be implicated. Here we investigated whether the direct phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase by protein kinase B might participate in this effect. Protein kinase B phosphorylated recombinant bacterially expressed AMP-activated protein kinase heterotrimers at Ser(485) of the alpha1-subunits. In perfused rat hearts, phosphorylation of the alpha1/alpha2 AMP-activated protein kinase subunits on Ser(485)/Ser(491) was increased by insulin and insulin pretreatment decreased the phosphorylation of the alpha-subunits at Thr(172) in a subsequent ischemic episode. It is proposed that the effect of insulin to antagonize AMP-activated protein kinase activation involves a hierarchical mechanism whereby Ser(485)/Ser(491) phosphorylation by protein kinase B reduces subsequent phosphorylation of Thr(172) by LKB1 and the resulting activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

  14. Role of Protein Phosphorylation in the Regulation of Neuronal Sensitivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-29

    substrate of a GTP- preferring protein kinase, ana the substrates of ectokinase acti- vity . These antibodies will be used in experiments designed to provide...adding y - SP - TP (2uM; lOuCi/well). Intact NG cells utilized extracellu- lar AT 3 2 p to phosphorylate endogenous proteins, as well as exo- genous...began in the preparation of mono- clonal antibodies to the 54KDa protein substrate of a GTP-prefer- ring kinase in neuronal membranes. Specific

  15. Epidermal growth factor-stimulated protein phosphorylation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, P.A.; Sisk, R.B.; Johnson, R.M.; Garrison, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) causes a 6-fold increase in the phosphorylation state of a cytosolic protein (pp36, M/sub r/ = 36,000, pI = 5.5) in hepatocytes isolated from fasted, male, Wistar rats. Stimulation of /sup 32/P incorporation is observed as early as 1 min following treatment of hepatocytes with EGF and is still present at 30 min after exposure to the growth factor. The phosphate incorporated into pp36 in response to EGF is located predominantly in serine but not tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of pp36 does not occur in response to insulin or to agents which specifically activate the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (S/sub p/ -cAMPS), protein kinase C (PMA) or Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (A23187) in these cells. Prior treatment of hepatocytes with the cAMP analog, S/sub p/-cAMPS, or ADP-ribosylation of N/sub i/, the inhibitory GTP-binding protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, does not prevent EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of pp36. However, as seen in other cell types, pretreatment of hepatocytes with PMA abolishes all EGF-mediated responses including phosphorylation of pp36. These results suggest that EGP specifically activates an uncharacterized, serine protein kinase in hepatocytes that is distal to the intrinsic EGF receptor tyrosine protein kinase. The rapid activation of this kinase suggests that it may play an important role in the early response of the cell to EGF.

  16. Phosphorylation of Glyceric Acid in Aqueous Solution Using Trimetaphosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Vera; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    The phosphorylation of glyceric acid is an interesting prebiotic reaction because it converts a simple, potentially prebiotic organic molecule into phosphate derivatives that are central to carbohydrate metabolism. We find that 0.05 M glyceric acid in the presence of 0.5 M trimetaphosphate in alkaline solution gives a mixture of 2- and 3-phosphoglyceric acids in combined yields of up to 40%.

  17. Phosphorylation of glyceric acid in aqueous solution using trimetaphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-02-01

    The phosphorylation of glyceric acid is an interesting prebiotic reaction because it converts a simple, potentially prebiotic organic molecule into phosphate derivatives that are central to carbohydrate metabolism. We find that 0.05 M glyceric acid in the presence of 0.5 M trimetaphosphate in alkaline solution gives a mixture of 2- and 3-phosphoglyceric acids in combined yields of up to 40%.

  18. Importance of Phosphorylation for Osteopontin Regulation of Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gericke, A.; Qin, C.; Spevak, L.; Fujimoto, Y.; Butler, W. T.; Sørensen, E. S.; Boskey, A. L.

    2006-01-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that osteopontin (OPN) is an inhibitor of the formation and growth of hydroxyapatite (HA) and other biominerals. The present study tests the hypotheses that the interaction of OPN with HA is determined by the extent of protein phosphorylation and that this interaction regulates the mineralization process. Bone OPN as previously reported inhibited HA formation and HA-seeded growth in a gelatin-gel system. A transglutaminase-linked OPN polymer had similar effects. Recombinant, nonphosphorylated OPN and chemically dephosphorylated OPN, had no effect on HA formation or growth in this system. In contrast, highly phosphorylated milk OPN (mOPN) promoted HA formation. The mOPN stabilized the conversion of amorphous calcium phosphate (a noncrystalline constituent of milk) to HA, whereas bone OPN had a lesser effect on this conversion. Mixtures of OPN and osteocalcin known to form a complex in vitro, unexpectedly promoted HA formation. To test the hypothesis that small alterations in protein conformation caused by phosphorylation account for the differences in the observed ability of OPN to interact with HA, the conformation of bone OPN and mOPN in the presence and absence of crystalline HA was determined by attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Both proteins exhibited a predominantly random coil structure, which was unaffected by the addition of Ca2+. Binding to HA did not alter the secondary structure of bone OPN, but induced a small increase of β-sheet (few percent) in mOPN. These data taken together suggest that the phosphorylation of OPN is an important factor in regulating the OPN-mediated mineralization process. PMID:16007483

  19. Phosphorylation of Thymidine and AZT in Heart Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Edward E.; Bentley, Alice T.; Hatch, Matthew; Gingerich, Joel; Susan-Resiga, Delia

    2006-01-01

    Antiretroviral nucleoside analogs used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) are associated with cardiovascular and other tissue toxicity associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion, suggesting a block in mitochondrial (mt)-DNA replication. Because the triphosphate forms of these analogs variably inhibit mt-DNA polymerase, this enzyme has been promoted as the major target of toxicity associated with HAART. We have used isolated mitochondria from rat heart to study the mitochondrial transport and phosphorylation of thymidine and AZT (azidothymidine, or zidovudine), a component used in HAART. We demonstrate that isolated mitochondria readily transport thymidine and phosphorylate it to thymidine 5′-triphosphate (TTP) within the matrix. Under identical conditions, AZT is phosphorylated only to AZT-5′-monophosphate (AZT-MP). The kinetics of thymidine and AZT suggest negative cooperativity of substrate interaction with the enzyme, consistent with work by others on mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2. Results show that TMP and AZT-MP are not transported across the inner membrane, suggesting that AZT-MP may accumulate with time in the matrix. Given the lack of AZT-5′-triphosphate (AZT-TP), it seems unlikely that the toxicity of AZT in the heart is mediated by AZT-TP inhibition of DNA polymerase γ. Rather, our work shows that AZT is a potent inhibitor of thymidine phosphorylation in heart mitochondria, having an inhibitory concentration (IC)50 of 7.0 ± 0.9 μM. Thus, the toxicity of AZT in some tissues may be mediated by disrupting the substrate supply of TTP for mt-DNA replication. PMID:15371631

  20. The Impact of Protein Phosphorylation on Chlamydial Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Claywell, Ja E.; Matschke, Lea M.; Fisher, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia are Gram negative bacterial pathogens responsible for disease in humans and economically important domesticated animals. As obligate intracellular bacteria, they must gain entry into a host cell where they propagate within a parasitophorous organelle that serves as an interactive interface between the bacterium and the host. Nutrient acquisition, growth, and evasion of host defense mechanisms occur from this location. In addition to these cellular and bacterial dynamics, Chlamydia differentiate between two morphologically distinct forms, the elementary body and reticulate body, that are optimized for either extracellular or intracellular survival, respectively. The mechanisms regulating and mediating these diverse physiological events remain largely unknown. Reversible phosphorylation, including classical two-component signaling systems, partner switching mechanisms, and the more recently appreciated bacterial Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases and phosphatases, has gained increasing attention for its role in regulating important physiological processes in bacteria including metabolism, development, and virulence. Phosphorylation modulates these events via rapid and reversible modification of protein substrates leading to changes in enzyme activity, protein oligomerization, cell signaling, and protein localization. The characterization of several conserved chlamydial protein kinases and phosphatases along with phosphoproteome analysis suggest that Chlamydia are capable of global and growth stage-specific protein phosphorylation. This mini review will highlight the current knowledge of protein phosphorylation in Chlamydia and its potential role in chlamydial physiology and, consequently, virulence. Comparisons with other minimal genome intracellular bacterial pathogens also will be addressed with the aim of illustrating the importance of this understudied regulatory mechanism on pathogenesis and the principle questions that remain unanswered. PMID:28066729

  1. Evaluation of myosin light chain phosphorylation in isolated pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, D.B.; Soeling, H.D.; Williams, J.A. Universitaet Goettingen )

    1988-01-01

    The role of contractile proteins in secretory granule exocytosis was evaluated by determining whether myosin light chain phosphorylation was altered during stimulation of secretion in mouse pancreatic acini. Acinar myosin was purified by extraction into isosmotic sucrose solution containing 40 mM pyrophosphate followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sepharose 4B-CL chromatography. Myosin was eluted as a single peak of K{sup +}-EDTA ATPase activity and was purified over 2,000-fold to a final ATPase specific activity of 0.96 {mu}mol{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}mg protein {sup {minus}1}. Three major myosin subunits of apparent M{sub r} of 200,000, 20,000, and 17,000 were present in the purified myosin preparation. A fourth protein of M{sub r} 21,000 was also present. Purification of myosin from {sup 32}P-labeled acini revealed that M{sub r} 200,000, 21,000, and 20,000 proteins to be heavily labeled. The effect of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) on myosin phosphorylation was studied after isolation of myosin from {sup 32}P-labeled acinar lysates by immunoprecipitation. Treatment of acini for 1-10 min with a concentration of CCK-8 that gives a maximal secretory response caused a 25-40% increase in light chain labeling. Treatment with a supramaximal CCK-8 concentration produced a 50-80% increase in light chain labeling. Phosphorylation of myosin heavy chain was not significantly affected by secretagogue treatment. These results indicate that stimulation of pancreatic acinar secretion is accompanied by an increase in myosin light chain phosphorylation.

  2. Serine-71 Phosphorylation of Rac1 Modulates Downstream Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Janett; Proff, Julia; Hävemeier, Anika; Ladwein, Markus; Rottner, Klemens; Barlag, Britta; Pich, Andreas; Tatge, Helma; Just, Ingo; Gerhard, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 regulate a variety of cellular functions by signaling to different signal pathways. It is believed that the presence of a specific effector at the location of GTPase activation determines the route of downstream signaling. We previously reported about EGF-induced Ser-71 phosphorylation of Rac1/Cdc42. By using the phosphomimetic S71E-mutants of Rac1 and Cdc42 we investigated the impact of Ser-71 phosphorylation on binding to selected effector proteins. Binding of the constitutively active (Q61L) variants of Rac1 and Cdc42 to their specific interaction partners Sra-1 and N-WASP, respectively, as well as to their common effector protein PAK was abrogated when Ser-71 was exchanged to glutamate as phosphomimetic substitution. Interaction with their common effector proteins IQGAP1/2/3 or MRCK alpha was, however, hardly affected. This ambivalent behaviour was obvious in functional assays. In contrast to Rac1 Q61L, phosphomimetic Rac1 Q61L/S71E was not able to induce increased membrane ruffling. Instead, Rac1 Q61L/S71E allowed filopodia formation, which is in accordance with abrogation of the dominant Sra-1/Wave signalling pathway. In addition, in contrast to Rac1 transfected cells Rac1 S71E failed to activate PAK1/2. On the other hand, Rac1 Q61L/S71E was as effective in activation of NF-kappaB as Rac1 Q61L, illustrating positive signal transduction of phosphorylated Rac1. Together, these data suggest that phosphorylation of Rac1 and Cdc42 at serine-71 represents a reversible mechanism to shift specificity of GTPase/effector coupling, and to preferentially address selected downstream pathways. PMID:22970203

  3. Formation and activation by phosphorylation of activin receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Willis, S A; Zimmerman, C M; Li, L I; Mathews, L S

    1996-04-01

    Activin is a protein growth and differentiation factor that initiates intracellular events through the activation of a complex of transmembrane protein serine kinases. Two subfamilies of receptor serine kinases, type I and type II, have been identified, and both receptor types may be required to generate a transmembrane signal. Investigation of the interaction between various activin receptors (ActRs) revealed that ActRs I and II could exist in a stable complex and that formation of that complex between transiently overexpressed molecules was not regulated by ligand. Analysis of phosphorylation suggested that activin induced phosphorylation of receptor I, probably at residues within a conserved glycine and serine-rich sequence in the juxtamembrane region referred to as the GS domain. Phosphorylation of the GS domain was dependent upon a functional ActRII. Introduction of an activin type I receptor, ALK4, into the mink lung epithelial cell line, L17, conferred activin responsiveness on those cells. Mutation of specific combinations of serines and threonines in the core sequence of the ALK4 GS domain to alanine rendered that receptor incompetent for signaling. Mutation of the same sets of residues to glutamic acid produced molecules that supported activin signaling but that did not display elevated basal signaling anticipated for a constitutively active receptor. However, mutation of a threonine residue in the carboxy-terminal half of the GS domain, T206, to glutamic acid yielded receptors with constitutive activity. Taken together, these results support a role for phosphorylation of type I ActRs in the generation of a biological signal.

  4. Spatial proximity statistics suggest a regulatory role of protein phosphorylation on compound binding.

    PubMed

    Korkuć, Paula; Walther, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that regulates protein function by the attachment of negatively charged phosphate groups to phosphorylatable amino acid residues. As a mode of action, an influence of phosphorylation on the binding of compounds to proteins has been discussed and described for a number of proteins in the literature. However, a systematic statistical survey probing for enriched phosphorylation sites close to compound binding sites in support of this notion and with properly chosen random reference distributions has not been presented yet. Using high-resolution protein structures from the Protein Data Bank including their co-crystallized non-covalently bound compounds and experimentally determined phosphorylation sites, we analyzed the pairwise distance distributions of phosphorylation and compound binding sites on protein surfaces. We found that phosphorylation sites are indeed located at significantly closer distances to compounds than expected by chance holding true specifically also for the subset of compound binding sites serving as catalytic sites of metabolic reactions. This tendency was particularly evident when treating phosphorylation sites as collective sets supporting the relevance of phosphorylation hotspots. Interestingly, phosphorylation sites were found to be closer to negatively charged than to positively charged compounds suggesting a stronger modulation of the binding of negatively charged compounds in dependence on phosphorylation status than on positively charged compounds. The enrichment of phosphorylation sites near compound binding sites confirms a regulatory role of phosphorylation in compound binding and provides a solid statistical basis for the literature-reported selected events.

  5. In vivo phosphorylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Egeria densa, a submersed aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Lara, M V; Casati, P; Andreo, C S

    2001-04-01

    In vivo phosphorylation of PEPC in Egeria densa was studied using plants at high temperature and in light, and plants kept at low temperature and in light. The isoform induced by high temperature and light was more phosphorylated in the light. Changes in kinetic and regulatory properties correlated with changes in the phosphorylation state of PEPC.

  6. Synaptic Activation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation Occurs Locally in Activated Dendritic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6)…

  7. Absolute Phosphorylation Stoichiometry Analysis by Motif-Targeting Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Feng; Ku, Wei-Chi; Chen, Yu-Ju; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    Direct measurement of site-specific phosphorylation stoichiometry can unambiguously distinguish whether the degree of phosphorylation is regulated by upstream kinase/phosphatase activity or by transcriptional regulation to alter protein expression level. Here, we describe a motif-targeting quantitative proteomic approach that integrates dephosphorylation, isotope tag labeling, and enzymatic kinase reaction for large-scale phosphorylation stoichiometry measurement of the human proteome.

  8. Synaptic Activation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation Occurs Locally in Activated Dendritic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6)…

  9. Yap4 PKA- and GSK3-dependent phosphorylation affects its stability but not its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jorge; Pimentel, Catarina; Amaral, Catarina; Menezes, Regina A; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2009-12-01

    Yap4 is a nuclear-resident transcription factor induced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae when exposed to several stress conditions, which include mild hyperosmotic and oxidative stress, temperature shift or metal exposure. This protein is also phosphorylated. Here we report that this modification is driven by PKA and GSK3. In order to ascertain whether Yap4 is directly or indirectly phosphorylated by PKA, we searched for stress and PKA-related kinases that could phosphorylate Yap4. We show that phosphorylation is independent of the kinases Rim15, Yak1, Sch9, Slt2, Ste20 and Ptk2. In addition, we showed that Yap4 phosphorylation is also abrogated in the triple GSK3 mutant mck1 rim11 yol128c. Furthermore, our data reveal that Yap4 nuclear localization is independent of its phosphorylation state. This protein has several putative phosphorylation sites, but only the mutation of residues T192 and S196 impairs its phosphorylation under different stress conditions. The ability of the non-phosphorylated forms of Yap4 to partially rescue the hog1 severe sensitivity phenotype is not affected, suggesting that Yap4 activity is maintained in the absence of phosphorylation. However, this modification seems to be required for stability of the protein, as the non-phosphorylated form has a shorter half-life than the phosphorylated one.

  10. Myosin Regulatory Light Chain (RLC) Phosphorylation Change as a Modulator of Cardiac Muscle Contraction in Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Toepfer, Christopher; Caorsi, Valentina; Kampourakis, Thomas; Sikkel, Markus B.; West, Timothy G.; Leung, Man-Ching; Al-Saud, Sara A.; MacLeod, Kenneth T.; Lyon, Alexander R.; Marston, Steven B.; Sellers, James R.; Ferenczi, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation alters cardiac muscle mechanics is important because it is often altered in cardiac disease. The effect this protein phosphorylation has on muscle mechanics during a physiological range of shortening velocities, during which the heart generates power and performs work, has not been addressed. We have expressed and phosphorylated recombinant Rattus norvegicus left ventricular RLC. In vitro we have phosphorylated these recombinant species with cardiac myosin light chain kinase and zipper-interacting protein kinase. We compare rat permeabilized cardiac trabeculae, which have undergone exchange with differently phosphorylated RLC species. We were able to enrich trabecular RLC phosphorylation by 40% compared with controls and, in a separate series, lower RLC phosphorylation to 60% of control values. Compared with the trabeculae with a low level of RLC phosphorylation, RLC phosphorylation enrichment increased isometric force by more than 3-fold and peak power output by more than 7-fold and approximately doubled both maximum shortening speed and the shortening velocity that generated peak power. We augmented these measurements by observing increased RLC phosphorylation of human and rat HF samples from endocardial left ventricular homogenate. These results demonstrate the importance of increased RLC phosphorylation in the up-regulation of myocardial performance and suggest that reduced RLC phosphorylation is a key aspect of impaired contractile function in the diseased myocardium. PMID:23530050

  11. Protein phosphorylation and regulation of adaptive responses in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stock, J B; Ninfa, A J; Stock, A M

    1989-01-01

    Bacteria continuously adapt to changes in their environment. Responses are largely controlled by signal transduction systems that contain two central enzymatic components, a protein kinase that uses adenosine triphosphate to phosphorylate itself at a histidine residue and a response regulator that accepts phosphoryl groups from the kinase. This conserved phosphotransfer chemistry is found in a wide range of bacterial species and operates in diverse systems to provide different regulatory outputs. The histidine kinases are frequently membrane receptor proteins that respond to environmental signals and phosphorylate response regulators that control transcription. Four specific regulatory systems are discussed in detail: chemotaxis in response to attractant and repellent stimuli (Che), regulation of gene expression in response to nitrogen deprivation (Ntr), control of the expression of enzymes and transport systems that assimilate phosphorus (Pho), and regulation of outer membrane porin expression in response to osmolarity and other culture conditions (Omp). Several additional systems are also examined, including systems that control complex developmental processes such as sporulation and fruiting-body formation, systems required for virulent infections of plant or animal host tissues, and systems that regulate transport and metabolism. Finally, an attempt is made to understand how cross-talk between parallel phosphotransfer pathways can provide a global regulatory curcuitry. PMID:2556636

  12. Phosphorylation of unique domains of Src family kinases

    PubMed Central

    Amata, Irene; Maffei, Mariano; Pons, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Src family of kinases (SFKs) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases involved in numerous signal transduction pathways. The catalytic, SH3 and SH2 domains are attached to the membrane-anchoring SH4 domain through the intrinsically disordered “Unique” domains, which exhibit strong sequence divergence among SFK members. In the last decade, structural and biochemical studies have begun to uncover the crucial role of the Unique domain in the regulation of SFK activity. This mini-review discusses what is known about the phosphorylation events taking place on the SFK Unique domains, and their biological relevance. The modulation by phosphorylation of biologically relevant inter- and intra- molecular interactions of Src, as well as the existence of complex phosphorylation/dephosphorylation patterns observed for the Unique domain of Src, reinforces the important functional role of the Unique domain in the regulation mechanisms of the Src kinases and, in a wider context, of intrinsically disordered regions in cellular processes. PMID:25071818

  13. PKCζ PHOSPHORYLATES OCCLUDIN AND PROMOTES ASSEMBLY OF EPITHELIAL TIGHT JUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Suneet; Suzuki, Takuya; Seth, Ankur; Samak, Geetha; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Evidence indicates that protein kinases play an important role in the regulation of epithelial tight junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of PKCζ in tight junction regulation in Caco-2 and MDCK cell monolayers. Inhibition of PKCζ by a specific PKCζ-pseudosubstrate peptide results in redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the intercellular junctions and disruption of barrier function without affecting cell viability. Reduced expression of PKCζ by antisense oligonucleotide or shRNA also results in compromised tight junction integrity. Inhibition or knock down of PKCζ delays calcium-induced assembly of tight junctions. Tight junction disruption by PKCζ-pseudosubstrate is associated with the dephosphorylation of occludin and ZO-1 on Ser and Thr residues. PKCζ directly binds to the C-terminal domain of occludin and phosphorylates it on Thr residues. T403, T404, T424 and T438 in occludin C-terminal domain are the predominant sites of PKCζ-dependent phosphorylation. T424A or T438A mutation in full length occludin delays its assembly into the tight junctions. Inhibition of PKCζ also induces redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the tight junctions and dissociates these proteins from the detergent-insoluble fractions in mouse ileum. This study demonstrates that PKCζ phosphorylates occludin on specific Thr residues and promotes assembly of epithelial tight junctions. PMID:21545357

  14. Phosphorylation and proteolysis of HMGCoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.A.; Lanier, T.L.; Miller, S.J.; Gibson, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    The phosphorylation of rat liver microsomal 97 kDa HMGCoA reductase (HMGR) was examined by immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE using antibodies to 53 kDa HMGR. MgATP preincubation decreased expressed HMGR activity from 10.1 +/- 2.4 to 0.81 +/- 0.2 U/mg. Concomitant incorporation of TSP from el-TSP-ATP into 97 kDa HMGR protein was observed. Competitive antibody binding by affinity-purified 53 kDa HMGR showed that the 97 kDa TSP band was authentic HMGR. HMGR was reactivated and the TSP label was removed by protein phosphatase in a concentration-dependent manner: the increase in expressed/total activity ratio (E/T) correlated linearly with a decrease in 97 kDa TSP. Therefore, the E/T ratio provides a valid index of the phosphorylation state of microsomal 97 kDa HMGR. Protease cleavage patterns of HMGR mass and TSP were compared using calpain: a 52-56 kDa doublet of HMGR mass was observed in immunoblots under conditions in which only the 56 kDa band contained TSP. Further proteolysis decreased the TSP label as the 52 kDa mass product increased. The data suggest that the major phosphorylation site in 97 kDa HMGR lies between two main calpain cleavage sites in the linker region joining the cytoplasmic domain to the membrane-spanning domain of the native enzyme.

  15. Strengths of hydrogen bonds involving phosphorylated amino acid side chains.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Daniel J; Chorny, Ilya; Groban, Eli S; Wong, Sergio E; Levine, Elisheva; Rapp, Chaya S; Jacobson, Matthew P

    2007-01-31

    Post-translational phosphorylation plays a key role in regulating protein function. Here, we provide a quantitative assessment of the relative strengths of hydrogen bonds involving phosphorylated amino acid side chains (pSer, pAsp) with several common donors (Arg, Lys, and backbone amide groups). We utilize multiple levels of theory, consisting of explicit solvent molecular dynamics, implicit solvent molecular mechanics, and quantum mechanics with a self-consistent reaction field treatment of solvent. Because the approximately 6 pKa of phosphate suggests that -1 and -2 charged species may coexist at physiological pH, hydrogen bonds involving both protonated and deprotonated phosphates for all donor-acceptor pairs are considered. Multiple bonding geometries for the charged-charged interactions are also considered. Arg is shown to be capable of substantially stronger salt bridges with phosphorylated side chains than Lys. A pSer hydrogen-bond acceptor tends to form more stable interactions than a pAsp acceptor. The effect of phosphate protonation state on the strengths of the hydrogen bonds is remarkably subtle, with a more pronounced effect on pAsp than on pSer.

  16. The Regulation of NF-κB Subunits by Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Frank; Smith, Emma L.; Carmody, Ruaidhrí J.

    2016-01-01

    The NF-κB transcription factor is the master regulator of the inflammatory response and is essential for the homeostasis of the immune system. NF-κB regulates the transcription of genes that control inflammation, immune cell development, cell cycle, proliferation, and cell death. The fundamental role that NF-κB plays in key physiological processes makes it an important factor in determining health and disease. The importance of NF-κB in tissue homeostasis and immunity has frustrated therapeutic approaches aimed at inhibiting NF-κB activation. However, significant research efforts have revealed the crucial contribution of NF-κB phosphorylation to controlling NF-κB directed transactivation. Importantly, NF-κB phosphorylation controls transcription in a gene-specific manner, offering new opportunities to selectively target NF-κB for therapeutic benefit. This review will focus on the phosphorylation of the NF-κB subunits and the impact on NF-κB function. PMID:26999213

  17. Rat1p maintains RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation balance

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Schmid, Manfred; Malagon, Francisco; Haaning, Line Lindegaard; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2014-01-01

    In S. cerevisiae, the 5′-3′ exonuclease Rat1p partakes in transcription termination. Although Rat1p-mediated RNA degradation has been suggested to play a role for this activity, the exact mechanisms by which Rat1p helps release RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) from the DNA template are poorly understood. Here we describe a function of Rat1p in regulating phosphorylation levels of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1p, during transcription elongation. The rat1-1 mutant exhibits highly elevated levels of CTD phosphorylation as well as RNAPII distribution and transcription termination defects. These phenotypes are all rescued by overexpression of the CTD phosphatase Fcp1p, suggesting a functional relationship between the absence of Rat1p activity, elevated CTD phosphorylation, and transcription defects. We also demonstrate that rat1-1 cells display increased RNAPII transcription kinetics, a feature that may contribute to the cellular phenotypes of the mutant. Consistently, the rat1-1 allele is synthetic lethal with the rpb1-E1103G mutation, causing increased RNAPII speed, and is suppressed by the rpb2-10 mutation, causing slowed transcription. Thus, Rat1p plays more complex roles in controlling transcription than previously thought. PMID:24501251

  18. Sec24 phosphorylation regulates autophagosome abundance during nutrient deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Saralin; Wang, Juan; Zhu, Ming; Stahmer, Kyle; Lakshminarayan, Ramya; Ghassemian, Majid; Jiang, Yu; Miller, Elizabeth A; Ferro-Novick, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-derived COPII coated vesicles constitutively transport secretory cargo to the Golgi. However, during starvation-induced stress, COPII vesicles have been implicated as a membrane source for autophagosomes, distinct organelles that engulf cellular components for degradation by macroautophagy (hereafter called autophagy). How cells regulate core trafficking machinery to fulfill dramatically different cellular roles in response to environmental cues is unknown. Here we show that phosphorylation of conserved amino acids on the membrane-distal surface of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COPII cargo adaptor, Sec24, reprograms COPII vesicles for autophagy. We also show casein kinase 1 (Hrr25) is a key kinase that phosphorylates this regulatory surface. During autophagy, Sec24 phosphorylation regulates autophagosome number and its interaction with the C-terminus of Atg9, a component of the autophagy machinery required for autophagosome initiation. We propose that the acute need to produce autophagosomes during starvation drives the interaction of Sec24 with Atg9 to increase autophagosome abundance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21167.001 PMID:27855785

  19. Catalytic constants enable the emergence of bistability in dual phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Conradi, Carsten; Mincheva, Maya

    2014-06-06

    Dual phosphorylation of proteins is a principal component of intracellular signalling. Bistability is considered an important property of such systems and its origin is not yet completely understood. Theoretical studies have established parameter values for multistationarity and bistability for many types of proteins. However, up to now no formal criterion linking multistationarity and bistability to the parameter values characterizing dual phosphorylation has been established. Deciding whether an unclassified protein has the capacity for bistability, therefore requires careful numerical studies. Here, we present two general algebraic conditions in the form of inequalities. The first employs the catalytic constants, and if satisfied guarantees multistationarity (and hence the potential for bistability). The second involves the catalytic and Michaelis constants, and if satisfied guarantees uniqueness of steady states (and hence absence of bistability). Our method also allows for the direct computation of the total concentration values such that multistationarity occurs. Applying our results yields insights into the emergence of bistability in the ERK-MEK-MKP system that previously required a delicate numerical effort. Our algebraic conditions present a practical way to determine the capacity for bistability and hence will be a useful tool for examining the origin of bistability in many models containing dual phosphorylation.

  20. Multisite phosphorylation networks as signal processors for Cdk1

    PubMed Central

    Kõivomägi, Mardo; Örd, Mihkel; Iofik, Anna; Valk, Ervin; Venta, Rainis; Faustova, Ilona; Kivi, Rait; Balog, Eva Rose M.; Rubin, Seth M.; Loog, Mart

    2013-01-01

    The order and timing of cell cycle events is controlled by changing substrate specificity and different activity thresholds of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). However, it is not understood how a single protein kinase can trigger hundreds of switches in a sufficiently time-resolved fashion. We show that the cyclin-Cdk1-Cks1-dependent phosphorylation of multisite targets in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is controlled by key substrate parameters including distances between phosphorylation sites, the distribution of serines and threonines as phospho-acceptors, and the positioning of cyclin-docking motifs. The component mediating the key interactions in this process is Cks1, the phospho-adaptor subunit of the cyclin-Cdk1-Cks1 complex. We propose that variation of these parameters within the networks of phosphorylation sites in different targets provides a wide range of possibilities for the differential amplification of Cdk1 signals, providing a mechanism to generate a wide range of thresholds in the cell cycle. PMID:24186061

  1. Synthesis of rigid polyurethane foams from phosphorylated biopolyols.

    PubMed

    de Haro, Juan Carlos; López-Pedrajas, Daniel; Pérez, Ángel; Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Carmona, Manuel

    2017-08-18

    Renewable resources are playing a key role on the synthesis of biodegradable polyols. Moreover, the incorporation of covalently linked additives is increasing in importance in the polyurethane (PU) market. In this work, previously epoxidized grape seed oil and methyl oleate were transformed into phosphorylated biopolyols through an acid-catalyzed ring-opening hydrolysis in the presence of H3PO4. The formation of phosphate polyesters was confirmed by FT-IR and (31)P-NMR. However, the synthesis of a high-quality PU rigid foam was not possible using exclusively these polyols attending to their low hydroxyl value. In that way, different rigid PU foams were prepared from the phosphorylated biopolyols and the commercial polyol Alcupol R4520. It was observed that phosphorylated biopolyols can be incorporated up to a 57 wt.% in the PU synthesis without significant structural changes with respect to the commercial foam. Finally, thermogravimetric and EDAX analyses revealed an improvement of thermal stability by the formation of a protective phosphorocarbonaceous char layer.

  2. Shear stress regulates HUVEC hydraulic conductivity by occludin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhengyu; Antonetti, David A; Tarbell, John M

    2005-11-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) display hydraulic conductivity (L(P)) responses to shear stress that differ markedly from the responses of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). In HUVECs, 5, 10, and 20 dyn cm(-2) steady shear stress transiently increased L(P) with a return to preshear baseline after a 2-h exposure to shear stress. Pure oscillatory shear stress of 0 +/- 20 dyn cm(-2) (mean+/-amplitude) had no effect on L(P), whereas superposition of oscillatory shear stress on steady shear stress suppressed the effect induced by steady shear stress alone. Shear reversal (amplitude greater than mean) was not necessary for the inhibitory influence of oscillatory shear stress. The transient increase of L(P) by steady shear stress was not affected by incubation with BAPTA-AM (10 microM), suggesting calcium independence of the shear response. Decreasing nitric oxide (NO) concentration with L-NMMA (100 microM), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, did not inhibit the HUVEC L(P) response to shear stress. At the protein level, 10 dyn cm(-2) shear stress did not affect the total content of occludin, but it did elevate the phosphorylation level transiently. The positive correlation between occludin phosphorylation and hydraulic conductivity parallels observations in BAECs and suggests that occludin phosphorylation may be a general mediator of shear-L(P) responses in diverse endothelial cell types.

  3. Acetylcholine-induced phosphorylation in isolated outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Szõnyi, M; Csermely, P; Sziklai, I

    1999-03-01

    Two groups of isolated, surviving outer hair cells (OHCs) of guinea pig cochleas (n = 20, for each group) were treated with 10 microM acetylcholine or acetylcholine plus strichnine (an alpha9 nAChR antagonist), respectively, under short-term tissue culture conditions. The protein content of the cell homogenates was separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotted and labelled with an antibody against phosphoserine residues. Signals were detected using the ECL system. Acetylcholine challenge of the OHCs resulted in a difference in the pattern of phosphorylated proteins from those of strichnine pretreated cells. A 220 kDa and a 120 kDa protein expressed a more intense phosphorylated state in the ACh group compared with the ACh plus strichnine group. The 220 kDa phosphoprotein is in the range of the cytoskeletal protein beta-fodrin, whereas the 120 kDa fraction is similar to alpha-fodrin or an ankyrin isoform. Phosphorylation of proteins due to activation of the AChR by agonist can play a role in the signalling mechanism between receptor activation and increase in the electromotile capability of isolated OHCs.

  4. JNK phosphorylates Yes-associated protein (YAP) to regulate apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, V; Gudmundsdottir, K; Luong, P; Leung, K-Y; Knebel, A; Basu, S

    2010-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) regulates DNA damage and chemosensitivity, as well as functioning as a pro-growth, cell size regulator. For both of its roles, regulation by phosphorylation is crucial. We undertook an in vitro screen to identify novel YAP kinases to discover new signaling pathways to better understand YAP's function. We identified JNK1 and JNK2 as robust YAP kinases, as well as mapped multiple sites of phosphorylation. Using inhibitors and siRNA, we showed that JNK specifically phosphorylates endogenous YAP in a number of cell types. We show that YAP protects keratinocytes from UV irradiation but promotes UV-induced apoptosis in a squamous cell carcinoma. We defined the mechanism for this dual role to be YAP's ability to bind and stabilize the pro-proliferative ΔNp63α isoform in a JNK-dependent manner. Our report indicates that an evaluation of the expression of the different isoforms of p63 and p73 is crucial in determining YAP's function. PMID:21364637

  5. CDK1 phosphorylates WRN at collapsed replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Valentina; Rinalducci, Sara; Sanchez, Massimo; Grillini, Francesca; Sommers, Joshua A.; Brosh, Robert M.; Zolla, Lello; Franchitto, Annapaola; Pichierri, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of end-processing is critical for accurate repair and to switch between homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). End resection is a two-stage process but very little is known about regulation of the long-range resection, especially in humans. WRN participates in one of the two alternative long-range resection pathways mediated by DNA2 or EXO1. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation of WRN by CDK1 is essential to perform DNA2-dependent end resection at replication-related DSBs, promoting HR, replication recovery and chromosome stability. Mechanistically, S1133 phosphorylation of WRN is dispensable for relocalization in foci but is involved in the interaction with the MRE11 complex. Loss of WRN phosphorylation negatively affects MRE11 foci formation and acts in a dominant negative manner to prevent long-range resection altogether, thereby licensing NHEJ at collapsed forks. Collectively, we unveil a CDK1-dependent regulation of the WRN-DNA2-mediated resection and identify an undescribed function of WRN as a DSB repair pathway switch. PMID:27634057

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation during meiotic divisions of starfish oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peaucellier, G.; Andersen, A.C.; Kinsey, W.H. )

    1990-04-01

    We have used an antibody specific for phosphotyrosine to investigate protein phosphorylation on tyrosine during hormone-induced maturation of starfish oocytes. Analysis of immunoprecipitates from cortices of in vivo labeled Marthasterias glacialis oocytes revealed the presence of labeled phosphotyrosine-containing proteins only after hormone addition. Six major phosphoproteins of 195, 155, 100, 85, 45, and 35 kDa were detected. Total activity in immunoprecipitates increased until first polar body emission and was greatly reduced upon completion of meiosis but some proteins exhibited different kinetics. The labeling of the 155-kDa protein reached a maximum at germinal vesicle breakdown, while the 35-kDa appeared later and disappeared after polar body emission. Similar results were obtained with Asterias rubens oocytes. In vitro phosphorylation of cortices showed that tyrosine kinase activity is a major protein kinase activity in this fraction, the main endogenous substrate being a 68-kDa protein. The proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro were almost similar in extracts from oocytes treated or not with the hormone.

  7. Oxidative phosphorylation in fractionated bacterial systems: effect of chloramphenicol.

    PubMed

    Cavari, B Z; Kalra, V K; Brodie, A F

    1971-12-01

    Chloramphenicol was found to have a direct effect on the respiratory chain of Mycobacterium phlei cells grown in the presence of this drug. Analysis of the respiratory chain components revealed that the presence of chloramphenicol during growth resulted in a partial inhibition in the synthesis of the cytochromes. However, a stimulation in oxidative phosphorylation was observed with the cell-free extract of cells grown in the presence of chloramphenicol. The oxidation of succinate was found to be stimulated 20 to 130%, depending on the particular extract, whereas the oxidation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) was found to be similar to that of extracts obtained from cells grown in the absence of the drug. Of particular interest was the finding that the cell-free extract of cells grown in the presence of the drug exhibited an increased level of phosphorylation (17 to 100%) when NADH was used as the electron donor. Chloramphenicol appears to affect a component of the respiratory chain between the flavoprotein and cytochrome c. Fractionation of the electron transport particles revealed an increased level of cytochrome b in the fractions which exhibited a stimulation in oxidative phosphorylation.

  8. The GAGA protein of Drosophila is phosphorylated by CK2.

    PubMed

    Bonet, Carles; Fernández, Irene; Aran, Xavier; Bernués, Jordi; Giralt, Ernest; Azorín, Fernando

    2005-08-19

    The GAGA factor of Drosophila is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that contributes to multiple processes from the regulation of gene expression to the structural organisation of heterochromatin and chromatin remodelling. GAGA is known to interact with various other proteins (tramtrack, pipsqueak, batman and dSAP18) and protein complexes (PRC1, NURF and FACT). GAGA functions are likely regulated at the level of post-translational modifications. Little is known, however, about its actual pattern of modification. It was proposed that GAGA can be O-glycosylated. Here, we report that GAGA519 isoform is a phosphoprotein that is phosphorylated by CK2 at the region of the DNA-binding domain. Our results indicate that phosphorylation occurs at S388 and, to a lesser extent, at S378. These two residues are located in a region of the DNA-binding domain that makes no direct contact with DNA, being dispensable for sequence-specific recognition. Phosphorylation at these sites does not abolish DNA binding but reduces the affinity of the interaction. These results are discussed in the context of the various functions and interactions that GAGA supports.

  9. Mitotic arrest-induced phosphorylation of Mcl-1 revisited using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and phosphoproteomics: nine phosphorylation sites identified

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Katherine; Kothari, Anisha; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Kovak, Matthew R.; Chambers, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule targeting agents (MTAs) characteristically promote phosphorylation and degradation of Mcl-1, and this represents a critical pro-apoptotic signal in mitotic death. While several phosphorylation sites and kinases have been implicated in mitotic arrest-induced Mcl-1 phosphorylation, a comprehensive biochemical analysis has been lacking. Contrary to previous reports suggesting that T92 phosphorylation by Cdk1 regulates Mcl-1 degradation, a T92A Mcl-1 mutant expressed in HeLa cells was phosphorylated and degraded with the same kinetics as wild-type Mcl-1 following vinblastine treatment. Similarly, when Mcl-1 with alanine replacements of all five putative Cdk sites (S64, T92, S121, S159, T163) was expressed, it was also phosphorylated and degraded in response to vinblastine. To analyze Mcl-1 phosphorylation in more detail, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) was performed. While untreated cells expressed mainly unphosphorylated Mcl-1 with two minor phosphorylated species, Mcl-1 from vinblastine treated cells migrated during 2D-PAGE as a train of acidic spots representing nine or more phosphorylated species. Immunopurification and mass spectrometry of phosphorylated Mcl-1 derived from mitotically arrested HeLa cells revealed nine distinct sites, including several previously unreported. Mcl-1 bearing substitutions of all nine sites had a longer half-life than wild-type Mcl-1 under basal conditions, but still underwent phosphorylation and degradation in response to vinblastine treatment, and, like wild-type Mcl-1, was unable to protect cells from MTA treatment. These results reveal an unexpected complexity in Mcl-1 phosphorylation in response to MTAs and indicate that previous work has severely underestimated the number of sites, and thus encourage major revisions to the current model. PMID:27738316

  10. CaMKII Phosphorylation of Na(V)1.5: Novel in Vitro Sites Identified by Mass Spectrometry and Reduced S516 Phosphorylation in Human Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Herren, Anthony W; Weber, Darren M; Rigor, Robert R; Margulies, Kenneth B; Phinney, Brett S; Bers, Donald M

    2015-05-01

    The cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel, Na(V)1.5, drives the upstroke of the cardiac action potential and is a critical determinant of myocyte excitability. Recently, calcium (Ca(2+))/calmodulin(CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has emerged as a critical regulator of Na(V)1.5 function through phosphorylation of multiple residues including S516, T594, and S571, and these phosphorylation events may be important for the genesis of acquired arrhythmias, which occur in heart failure. However, phosphorylation of full-length human Na(V)1.5 has not been systematically analyzed and Na(V)1.5 phosphorylation in human heart failure is incompletely understood. In the present study, we used label-free mass spectrometry to assess phosphorylation of human Na(V)1.5 purified from HEK293 cells with full coverage of phosphorylatable sites and identified 23 sites that were phosphorylated by CaMKII in vitro. We confirmed phosphorylation of S516 and S571 by LC-MS/MS and found a decrease in S516 phosphorylation in human heart failure, using a novel phospho-specific antibody. This work furthers our understanding of the phosphorylation of Na(V)1.5 by CaMKII under normal and disease conditions, provides novel CaMKII target sites for functional validation, and provides the first phospho-proteomic map of full-length human Na(V)1.5.

  11. Mcm2 phosphorylation and the response to replicative stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The replicative helicase in eukaryotic cells is comprised of minichromosome maintenance (Mcm) proteins 2 through 7 (Mcm2-7) and is a key target for regulation of cell proliferation. In addition, it is regulated in response to replicative stress. One of the protein kinases that targets Mcm2-7 is the Dbf4-dependent kinase Cdc7 (DDK). In a previous study, we showed that alanine mutations of the DDK phosphorylation sites at S164 and S170 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm2 result in sensitivity to caffeine and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) leading us to suggest that DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2 is required in response to replicative stress. Results We show here that a strain with the mcm2 allele lacking DDK phosphorylation sites (mcm2AA) is also sensitive to the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, hydroxyurea (HU) and to the base analogue 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) but not the radiomimetic drug, phleomycin. We screened the budding yeast non-essential deletion collection for synthetic lethal interactions with mcm2AA and isolated deletions that include genes involved in the control of genome integrity and oxidative stress. In addition, the spontaneous mutation rate, as measured by mutations in CAN1, was increased in the mcm2AA strain compared to wild type, whereas with a phosphomimetic allele (mcm2EE) the mutation rate was decreased. These results led to the idea that the mcm2AA strain is unable to respond properly to DNA damage. We examined this by screening the deletion collection for suppressors of the caffeine sensitivity of mcm2AA. Deletions that decrease spontaneous DNA damage, increase homologous recombination or slow replication forks were isolated. Many of the suppressors of caffeine sensitivity suppressed other phenotypes of mcm2AA including sensitivity to genotoxic drugs, the increased frequency of cells with RPA foci and the increased mutation rate. Conclusions Together these observations point to a role for DDK-mediated phosphorylation of Mcm2 in the

  12. Both total and phosphorylated tau are increased in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sjogren, M; Davidsson, P; Tullberg, M; Minthon, L; Wallin, A; Wikkelso, C; Granerus, A; Vanderstichele, H; Vanmechelen, E; Blennow, K

    2001-01-01

    BACKROUND—Pathological tau protein concentrations in CSF are found in both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but studies on brain tissue have suggested that the tau pathology in AD differs from that in FTD and that the difference may be related to the degree of phosphorylation. As CSF tau protein is increased after stroke, tau may also be implicated in the pathophysiology of vascular dementia, of which subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE) is a putative subtype.
OBJECTIVES—To investigate the nature of tau protein in CSF and the involvement of total CSF tau and phosphorylated CSF tau (phosphotau) in various types of dementia.
METHODS—Using ELISAs for total tau and tau phosphorylated at Thr181 (phosphotau), the CSF concentrations of total tau and phosphotau were determined in patients with probable and possible AD (n=41 and 19, respectively), FTD (n=18), SAE (n=17), and Parkinson's disease (PD; n=15) and in age matched controls (n=17). All the antibodies stained the lower molecular weight bands, whereas only the antibodies that recognise phosphorylated tau stained the higher molecular bands.
RESULTS—Both CSF tau and CSF phosphotau were increased in probable AD compared with FTD (p<0.001), SAE (p<0.001), PD (p<0.001), and controls (p<0.001). CSF phosphotau was increased in possible AD compared with FTD (p<0.001) and SAE (p<0.001). CSF tau and CSF phosphotau were positively correlated in all the groups. Molecular weight forms of tau ranging from 25 kDa to 80 kDa were found in the CSF
CONCLUSION—Both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated tau isoforms were present in the CSF, and tau protein appeared in both truncated and full length forms. The results suggest that the CSF concentrations of tau and phosphotau are increased in about two thirds of patients with probable AD and in half of those with possible AD but are normal in FTD, SAE, and PD compared with normal aging. Values in the normal range do not exclude AD

  13. The upper and lower limits of the mechanistic stoichiometry of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Stoichiometry of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Beavis, A D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-07-15

    Determination of the intrinsic or mechanistic P/O ratio of oxidative phosphorylation is difficult because of the unknown magnitude of leak fluxes. Applying a new approach developed to overcome this problem (see our preceding paper in this journal), the relationships between the rate of O2 uptake [( Jo)3], the net rate of phosphorylation (Jp), the P/O ratio, and the respiratory control ratio (RCR) have been determined in rat liver mitochondria when the rate of phosphorylation was systematically varied by three specific means. (a) When phosphorylation is titrated with carboxyatractyloside, linear relationships are observed between Jp and (Jo)3. These data indicate that the upper limit of the mechanistic P/O ratio is 1.80 for succinate and 2.90 for 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation. (b) Titration with malonate or antimycin yields linear relationships between Jp and (Jo)3. These data give the lower limit of the mechanistic P/O ratio of 1.63 for succinate and 2.66 for 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation. (c) Titration with a protonophore yields linear relationships between Jp, (Jo)3, and (Jo)4 and between P/O and 1/RCR. Extrapolation of the P/O ratio to 1/RCR = 0 yields P/O ratios of 1.75 for succinate and 2.73 for 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation which must be equal to or greater than the mechanistic stoichiometry. When published values for the H+/O and H+/ATP ejection ratios are taken into consideration, these measurements suggest that the mechanistic P/O ratio is 1.75 for succinate oxidation and 2.75 for NADH oxidation.

  14. PPARγ1 phosphorylation enhances proliferation and drug resistance in human fibrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Xiaojuan; Shu, Yuxin; Niu, Zhiyuan; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Haochen; Lu, Yan; Shen, Pingping

    2014-03-10

    Post-translational regulation plays a critical role in the control of cell growth and proliferation. The phosphorylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is the most important post-translational modification. The function of PPARγ phosphorylation has been studied extensively in the past. However, the relationship between phosphorylated PPARγ1 and tumors remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of PPARγ1 phosphorylation in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line. Using the nonphosphorylation (Ser84 to alanine, S84A) and phosphorylation (Ser84 to aspartic acid, S84D) mutant of PPARγ1, the results suggested that phosphorylation attenuated PPARγ1 transcriptional activity. Meanwhile, we demonstrated that phosphorylated PPARγ1 promoted HT1080 cell proliferation and this effect was dependent on the regulation of cell cycle arrest. The mRNA levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} descended in PPARγ1{sup S84D} stable HT1080 cell, whereas the expression of p18{sup INK4C} was not changed. Moreover, compared to the PPARγ1{sup S84A}, PPARγ1{sup S84D} up-regulated the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin A. Finally, PPARγ1 phosphorylation reduced sensitivity to agonist rosiglitazone and increased resistance to anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in HT1080 cell. Our findings establish PPARγ1 phosphorylation as a critical event in human fibrosarcoma growth. These findings raise the possibility that chemical compounds that prevent the phosphorylation of PPARγ1 could act as anticancer drugs. - Highlights: • Phosphorylation attenuates PPARγ1 transcriptional activity. • Phosphorylated PPARγ1 promotes HT1080 cells proliferation. • PPARγ1 phosphorylation regulates cell cycle by mediating expression of cell cycle regulators. • PPARγ1 phosphorylation reduces sensitivity to agonist and anticancer drug. • Our findings establish PPARγ1 phosphorylation as a critical event in HT1080

  15. Phosphorylation of the VP16 transcriptional activator protein during herpes simplex virus infection and mutational analysis of putative phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Ottosen, Søren; Herrera, Francisco J.; Doroghazi, James R.; Hull, Angela; Mittal, Sheenu; Lane, William S.; Triezenberg, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    VP16 is a virion phosphoprotein of herpes simplex virus and a transcriptional activator of the viral immediate-early (IE) genes. We identified four novel VP16 phosphorylation sites (Ser18, Ser353, Ser411, and Ser452) at late times in infection, but found no evidence of phosphorylation of Ser375, a residue reportedly phosphorylated when VP16 is expressed from a transfected plasmid. A virus carrying a S375A mutation of VP16 was viable in cell culture but with a slow growth rate. The association of the mutant VP16 protein with IE gene promoters and subsequent IE gene expression was markedly reduced during infection, consistent with prior transfection and in vitro results. Surprisingly, the association of Oct-1 with IE promoters was also diminished during infection by the mutant strain. We propose that Ser375 is important for the interaction of VP16 with Oct-1, and that the interaction is required to enable both proteins to bind to IE promoters. PMID:16297954

  16. Cdk5/p35 phosphorylates lemur tyrosine kinase-2 to regulate protein phosphatase-1C phosphorylation and activity.

    PubMed

    Manser, Catherine; Vagnoni, Alessio; Guillot, Florence; Davies, Jennifer; Miller, Christopher C J

    2012-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (cdk5)/p35 and protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) are two major enzymes that control a variety of physiological processes within the nervous system including neuronal differentiation, synaptic plasticity and axonal transport. Defective cdk5/p35 and PP1 function are also implicated in several major human neurodegenerative diseases. Cdk5/p35 and the catalytic subunit of PP1 (PP1C) both bind to the brain-enriched, serine-threonine kinase lemur tyrosine kinase-2 (LMTK2). Moreover, LMTK2 phosphorylates PP1C on threonine-320 (PP1Cthr³²⁰) to inhibit its activity. Here, we demonstrate that LMTK2 is phosphorylated on serine-1418 (LMTK2ser¹⁴¹⁸) by cdk5/p35 and present evidence that this regulates its ability to phosphorylate PP1Cthr³²⁰. We thus describe a new signalling pathway within the nervous system that links cdk5/p35 with PP1C and which has implications for a number of neuronal functions and neuronal dysfunction.

  17. Phosphorylation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulatory subunit modulates PKA-AKAP interaction, substrate phosphorylation, and calcium signaling in cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Manni, Sabrina; Mauban, Joseph H; Ward, Christopher W; Bond, Meredith

    2008-08-29

    Subcellular compartmentalization of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) by protein kinase A-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) facilitates local protein phosphorylation. However, little is known about how PKA targeting to AKAPs is regulated in the intact cell. PKA binds to an amphipathic helical region of AKAPs via an N-terminal domain of the regulatory subunit. In vitro studies showed that autophosphorylation of type II regulatory subunit (RII) can alter its affinity for AKAPs and the catalytic subunit (PKA(cat)). We now investigate whether phosphorylation of serine 96 on RII regulates PKA targeting to AKAPs, downstream substrate phosphorylation and calcium cycling in primary cultured cardiomyocytes. We demonstrated that, whereas there is basal phosphorylation of RII subunits, persistent maximal activation of PKA results in a phosphatase-dependent loss of RII phosphorylation. To investigate the functional effects of RII phosphorylation, we constructed adenoviral vectors incorporating mutants which mimic phosphorylated (RIIS96D), nonphosphorylated (RIIS96A) RII, or wild-type (WT) RII and performed adenoviral infection of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Coimmunoprecipitation showed that more AKAP15/18 was pulled down by the phosphomimic, RIIS96D, than RIIS96A. Phosphorylation of phospholamban and ryanodine receptor was significantly increased in cells expressing RIIS96D versus RIIS96A. Expression of recombinant RII constructs showed significant effects on cytosolic calcium transients. We propose a model illustrating a central role of RII phosphorylation in the regulation of local PKA activity. We conclude that RII phosphorylation regulates PKA-dependent substrate phosphorylation and may have significant implications for modulation of cardiac function.

  18. Mumps Virus Nucleoprotein Enhances Phosphorylation of the Phosphoprotein by Polo-Like Kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Pickar, Adrian; Zengel, James; Xu, Pei; Li, Zhuo; He, Biao

    2015-11-25

    The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (vRdRps) of nonsegmented, negative-sense viruses (NNSVs) consist of the enzymatic large protein (L) and the phosphoprotein (P). P is heavily phosphorylated, and its phosphorylation plays a critical role in viral RNA synthesis. Since NNSVs do not encode kinases, P is phosphorylated by host kinases. In this study, we investigate the roles that viral proteins play in the phosphorylation of mumps virus (MuV) P. We found that nucleoprotein (NP) enhances the phosphorylation of P. We have identified the serine/threonine kinase Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) as a host kinase that phosphorylates P and have found that phosphorylation of P by PLK1 is enhanced by NP. The PLK1 binding site in MuV P was mapped to residues 146 to 148 within the S(pS/T)P motif, and the phosphorylation site was identified as residues S292 and S294. It has previously been shown that P acts as a chaperone for NP, which encapsidates viral genomic RNA to form the NP-RNA complex, the functional template for viral RNA synthesis. Thus, it is assumed that phosphorylation of P may regulate NP's ability to form the NP-RNA complex, thereby regulating viral RNA synthesis. Our work demonstrates that MuV NP affects phosphorylation of P, suggesting that NP can regulate viral RNA synthesis by regulating phosphorylation of P. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Mumps Virus Nucleoprotein Enhances Phosphorylation of the Phosphoprotein by Polo-Like Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, Adrian; Zengel, James; Xu, Pei; Li, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (vRdRps) of nonsegmented, negative-sense viruses (NNSVs) consist of the enzymatic large protein (L) and the phosphoprotein (P). P is heavily phosphorylated, and its phosphorylation plays a critical role in viral RNA synthesis. Since NNSVs do not encode kinases, P is phosphorylated by host kinases. In this study, we investigate the roles that viral proteins play in the phosphorylation of mumps virus (MuV) P. We found that nucleoprotein (NP) enhances the phosphorylation of P. We have identified the serine/threonine kinase Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) as a host kinase that phosphorylates P and have found that phosphorylation of P by PLK1 is enhanced by NP. The PLK1 binding site in MuV P was mapped to residues 146 to 148 within the S(pS/T)P motif, and the phosphorylation site was identified as residues S292 and S294. IMPORTANCE It has previously been shown that P acts as a chaperone for NP, which encapsidates viral genomic RNA to form the NP-RNA complex, the functional template for viral RNA synthesis. Thus, it is assumed that phosphorylation of P may regulate NP's ability to form the NP-RNA complex, thereby regulating viral RNA synthesis. Our work demonstrates that MuV NP affects phosphorylation of P, suggesting that NP can regulate viral RNA synthesis by regulating phosphorylation of P. PMID:26608325

  20. In cellulo phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 by DNA-PK induced by DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Samarth, Ravindra Mahadeo; Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    XRCC4 is a protein associated with DNA Ligase IV, which is thought to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break repair through non-homologous end joining. In response to treatment with ionizing radiation or DNA damaging agents, XRCC4 undergoes DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation. Furthermore, Ser260 and Ser320 (or Ser318 in alternatively spliced form) of XRCC4 were identified as the major phosphorylation sites by purified DNA-PK in vitro through mass spectrometry. However, it has not been clear whether these sites are phosphorylated in vivo in response to DNA damage. In the present study, we generated an antibody that reacts with XRCC4 phosphorylated at Ser320 and examined in cellulo phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was induced by γ-ray irradiation and treatment with Zeocin. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was detected even after 1 Gy irradiation and increased in a manner dependent on radiation dose. The phosphorylation was observed immediately after irradiation and remained mostly unchanged for up to 4 h. The phosphorylation was inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441 and was undetectable in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells, indicating that the phosphorylation was mainly mediated by DNA-PK. These results suggested potential usefulness of the phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320 as an indicator of DNA-PK functionality in living cells. PMID:26666690

  1. dbPPT: a comprehensive database of protein phosphorylation in plants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han; Deng, Wankun; Wang, Yongbo; Ren, Jian; Liu, Zexian; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important protein post-translational modifications, the reversible phosphorylation is critical for plants in regulating a variety of biological processes such as cellular metabolism, signal transduction and responses to environmental stress. Numerous efforts especially large-scale phosphoproteome profiling studies have been contributed to dissect the phosphorylation signaling in various plants, while a large number of phosphorylation events were identified. To provide an integrated data resource for further investigations, here we present a comprehensive database of dbPPT (database of Phosphorylation site in PlanTs, at http://dbppt.biocuckoo.org), which contains experimentally identified phosphorylation sites in proteins from plants. The phosphorylation sites in dbPPT were manually curated from the literatures, whereas datasets in other public databases were also integrated. In total, there were 82,175 phosphorylation sites in 31,012 proteins from 20 plant organisms in dbPPT, presenting a larger quantity of phosphorylation sites and a higher coverage of plant species in comparison with other databases. The proportions of residue types including serine, threonine and tyrosine were 77.99, 17.81 and 4.20%, respectively. All the phosphoproteins and phosphorylation sites in the database were critically annotated. Since the phosphorylation signaling in plants attracted great attention recently, such a comprehensive resource of plant protein phosphorylation can be useful for the research community. Database URL: http://dbppt.biocuckoo.or © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. The effect of phosphorylation on arrestin-rhodopsin interaction in the squid visual system.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Kelly A; Ou, Wei-Lin; Guan, Xinyu; Sugamori, Kim S; Bandyopadhyay, Abhishek; Ernst, Oliver P; Mitchell, Jane

    2015-12-01

    Invertebrate visual opsins are G protein-coupled receptors coupled to retinoid chromophores that isomerize reversibly between inactive rhodopsin and active metarhodopsin upon absorption of photons of light. The squid visual system has an arrestin protein that binds to metarhodopsin to block signaling to Gq and activation of phospholipase C. Squid rhodopsin kinase (SQRK) can phosphorylate both metarhodopsin and arrestin, a dual role that is unique among the G protein-coupled receptor kinases. The sites and role of arrestin phosphorylation by SQRK were investigated here using recombinant proteins. Arrestin was phosphorylated on serine 392 and serine 397 in the C-terminus. Unphosphorylated arrestin bound to metarhodopsin and phosphorylated metarhodopsin with similar high affinities (Kd 33 and 21 nM respectively), while phosphorylation of arrestin reduced the affinity 3- to 5-fold (Kd 104 nM). Phosphorylation of metarhodopsin slightly increased the dissociation of arrestin observed during a 1 hour incubation. Together these studies suggest a unique role for SQRK in phosphorylating both receptor and arrestin and inhibiting the binding of these two proteins in the squid visual system. Invertebrate visual systems are inactivated by arrestin binding to metarhodopsin that does not require receptor phosphorylation. Here we show that squid rhodopsin kinase phosphorylates arrestin on two serines (S392,S397) in the C-terminus and phosphorylation decreases the affinity of arrestin for squid metarhodopsin. Metarhodopsin phosphorylation has very little effect on arrestin binding but does increase arrestin dissociation. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Proline-directed phosphorylation of the dopamine transporter N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Gorentla, Balachandra K.; Moritz, Amy E.; Foster, James D.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) on N-terminal serines and unidentified threonines occurs concomitantly with PKC- and substrate-induced alterations in transporter activity, subcellular distribution, and dopamine efflux, but the residues phosphorylated and identities of protein kinases and phosphatases involved are not known. As one approach to investigating these issues we recombinantly expressed the N-terminal tail of rat DAT (NDAT) and examined its phosphorylation and dephosphorylation properties in vitro. We found that NDAT could be phosphorylated to significant levels by PKCα, PKA, PKG, and CaMKII, which catalyzed serine phosphorylation, and ERK1, JNK, and p38, which catalyzed threonine phosphorylation. We identified Thr53, present in a membrane proximal proline-directed kinase motif as the NDAT site phosphorylated in vitro by ERK1, JNK and p38, and confirmed by peptide mapping and mutagenesis that Thr53 is phosphorylated in vivo. Dephosphorylation studies showed that protein phosphatase 1 catalyzed near-complete in vitro dephosphorylation of PKCα-phosphorylated NDAT, similar to its in vivo and in vitro effects on native DAT. These findings demonstrate the ability of multiple enzymes to directly recognize the DAT N-terminal domain and for kinases to act at multiple distinct sites. The strong correspondence between NDAT and rDAT phosphorylation characteristics suggests the potential for the enzymes that are active on NDAT in vitro to act on DAT in vivo and indicates the usefulness of NDAT for guiding future DAT phosphorylation analyses. PMID:19146407

  4. Multi-site Phosphorylation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel α Subunits from Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Berendt, Frank J.; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of ion channels underlies cellular plasticity in mammalian neurons. Voltage-gated sodium or Nav channels underlie action potential initiation and propagation, dendritic excitability, and many other aspects of neuronal excitability. Various protein kinases have been suggested to phosphorylate the primary α subunit of Nav channels, affecting diverse aspects of channel function. Previous studies of Nav α subunit phosphorylation have led to the identification of a small set of phosphorylation sites important in meditating aspects of Nav channel function. Here we use nanoflow liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC MS/MS) on Nav α subunits affinity-purified from rat brain with two distinct monoclonal antibodies to identify 15 phosphorylation sites on Nav1.2, 12 of which have not been previously reported. We also found 3 novel phosphorylation sites on Nav1.1. In general, commonly used phosphorylation site prediction algorithms did not accurately predict these novel in vivo phosphorylation sites. Our results demonstrate that specific Nav α subunits isolated from rat brain are highly phosphorylated, and suggest extensive modulation of Nav channel activity in mammalian brain. Identification of phosphorylation sites using monoclonal antibody-based immunopurification and mass spectrometry is an effective approach to define the phosphorylation status of Nav channels and important membrane proteins in mammalian brain. PMID:20131913

  5. dbPPT: a comprehensive database of protein phosphorylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Han; Deng, Wankun; Wang, Yongbo; Ren, Jian; Liu, Zexian; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important protein post-translational modifications, the reversible phosphorylation is critical for plants in regulating a variety of biological processes such as cellular metabolism, signal transduction and responses to environmental stress. Numerous efforts especially large-scale phosphoproteome profiling studies have been contributed to dissect the phosphorylation signaling in various plants, while a large number of phosphorylation events were identified. To provide an integrated data resource for further investigations, here we present a comprehensive database of dbPPT (database of Phosphorylation site in PlanTs, at http://dbppt.biocuckoo.org), which contains experimentally identified phosphorylation sites in proteins from plants. The phosphorylation sites in dbPPT were manually curated from the literatures, whereas datasets in other public databases were also integrated. In total, there were 82 175 phosphorylation sites in 31 012 proteins from 20 plant organisms in dbPPT, presenting a larger quantity of phosphorylation sites and a higher coverage of plant species in comparison with other databases. The proportions of residue types including serine, threonine and tyrosine were 77.99, 17.81 and 4.20%, respectively. All the phosphoproteins and phosphorylation sites in the database were critically annotated. Since the phosphorylation signaling in plants attracted great attention recently, such a comprehensive resource of plant protein phosphorylation can be useful for the research community. Database URL: http://dbppt.biocuckoo.org PMID:25534750

  6. Phosphorylation of C-protein, troponin I and phospholamban in isolated rabbit hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, J L; Kranias, E G; Solaro, R J

    1988-01-01

    Phosphorylation of myofibrillar and sacroplasmic-reticulum (SR) proteins was studied in Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts subjected to various inotropic interventions. Stimulation of hearts with isoprenaline resulted in the phosphorylation of both troponin I (TnI) and C-protein in myofibrils and phospholamban in SR. Phosphorylation of phospholamban could be reversed by a 15 min perfusion with drug-free buffer, after a 1 minute pulse perfusion with isoprenaline, at which time the mechanical effects of isoprenaline stimulation had also been reversed. However, both TnI and C-protein remained phosphorylated at this time. Moreover, the inhibition of Ca2+ activation of the Mg2+-dependent ATPase (Mg-ATPase) activity associated with myofibrillar phosphorylation persisted in myofibrils prepared from hearts frozen after 15 min of washout of isoprenaline. To assess the contribution of C-protein phosphorylation in the decrease of Ca2+ activation of the myofibrillar Mg-ATPase activity, we reconstituted a regulated actomyosin system in which only C-protein was phosphorylated. In this system, C-protein phosphorylation did not contribute to the decrease in Ca2+ activation of Mg-ATPase activity, indicating that TnI phosphorylation is responsible for the diminished sensitivity of the myofibrils to Ca2+. These observations support the hypothesis that phospholamban phosphorylation plays a more dominant role than TnI or C-protein phosphorylation in the mechanical response of the mammalian heart to beta-adrenergic stimulation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2895634

  7. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolomé, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-05-19

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of β-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in α-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of aggregated molecules and the aggregates had smaller hydrodynamic diameter than unphosphorylated chromatin, indicating that linker histone phosphorylation impaired chromatin aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the effects of linker histone phosphorylation in chromatin condensation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolomé, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of β-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in α-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of aggregated molecules and the aggregates had smaller hydrodynamic diameter than unphosphorylated chromatin, indicating that linker histone phosphorylation impaired chromatin aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the effects of linker histone phosphorylation in chromatin condensation. PMID:25870416

  9. Endoglin structure and function: Determinants of endoglin phosphorylation by transforming growth factor-beta receptors.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Rositsa I; Conley, Barbara A; Romero, Diana; Riley, Kristin S; Marto, Jarrod A; Lux, Andreas; Vary, Calvin P H

    2006-09-01

    Determination of the functional relationship between the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) receptor proteins endoglin and ALK1 is essential to the understanding of the human vascular disease, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. TGFbeta1 caused recruitment of ALK1 into a complex with endoglin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Therefore, we examined TGFbeta receptor-dependent phosphorylation of endoglin by the constitutively active forms of the TGFbeta type I receptors ALK1, ALK5, and the TGFbeta type II receptor, TbetaRII. Of these receptors, TbetaRII preferentially phosphorylated endoglin on cytosolic domain serine residues Ser(634) and Ser(635). Removal of the carboxyl-terminal tripeptide of endoglin, which comprises a putative PDZ-liganding motif, dramatically increased endoglin serine phosphorylation by all three receptors, suggesting that the PDZ-liganding motif is important for the regulation of endoglin phosphorylation. Constitutively active (ca)ALK1, but not caALK5, phosphorylated endoglin on cytosolic domain threonine residues. caALK1-mediated threonine phosphorylation required prior serine phosphorylation, suggesting a sequential mechanism of endoglin phosphorylation. Wild-type, but not a threonine phosphorylation-defective endoglin mutant blocked cell detachment and the antiproliferative effects of caALK1 expressed in HUVECs. These results suggest that ALK1 is a preferred TGFbeta receptor kinase for endoglin threonine phosphorylation in HUVECs and indicate a role for endoglin phosphorylation in the regulation of endothelial cell adhesion and growth by ALK1.

  10. Phosphorylated proteins of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome: implications in protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer L.; Cimen, Huseyin; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouse of eukaryotic cells, have their own translation machinery that is solely responsible for synthesis of 13 mitochondrially-encoded protein subunits of oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Phosphorylation is a well-known post-translational modification in regulation of many processes in mammalian mitochondria including oxidative phosphorylation. However, there is still very limited knowledge on phosphorylation of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and their role(s) in ribosome function. In this study, we have identified the mitochondrial ribosomal proteins that are phosphorylated at serine, threonine or tyrosine residues. Twenty-four phosphorylated proteins were visualized by phosphorylation-specific techniques including in vitro radiolabeling, residue specific antibodies for phosphorylated residues, or ProQ phospho dye and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Translation assays with isolated ribosomes that were phosphorylated in vitro by kinases PKA, PKCδ, or Abl Tyr showed up to 30% inhibition due to phosphorylation. Findings from this study should serve as the framework for future studies addressing the regulation mechanisms of mitochondrial translation machinery by phosphorylation and other post-translational modifications. PMID:19702336

  11. The Impact of Phosphorylation on Electron Capture Dissociation of Proteins: A Top-Down Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bifan; Guo, Xiao; Tucholski, Trisha; Lin, Ziqing; McIlwain, Sean; Ge, Ying

    2017-09-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) is well suited for the characterization of phosphoproteins, with which labile phosphate groups are generally preserved during the fragmentation process. However, the impact of phosphorylation on ECD fragmentation of intact proteins remains unclear. Here, we have performed a systematic investigation of the phosphorylation effect on ECD of intact proteins by comparing the ECD cleavages of mono-phosphorylated α-casein, multi-phosphorylated β-casein, and immunoaffinity-purified phosphorylated cardiac troponin I with those of their unphosphorylated counterparts, respectively. In contrast to phosphopeptides, phosphorylation has significantly reduced deleterious effects on the fragmentation of intact proteins during ECD. On a global scale, the fragmentation patterns are highly comparable between unphosphorylated and phosphorylated precursors under the same ECD conditions, despite a slight decrease in the number of fragment ions observed for the phosphorylated forms. On a local scale, single phosphorylation of intact proteins imposes minimal effects on fragmentation near the phosphorylation sites, but multiple phosphorylations in close proximity result in a significant reduction of ECD bond cleavages. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. A DNA break– and phosphorylation-dependent positive feedback loop promotes immunoglobulin class-switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Bao Q; Ucher, Anna J; Donghia, Nina M; Gu, Xiwen; Nicolas, Laura; Nowak, Urszula; Rahman, Numa; Strout, Matthew P; Mills, Kevin D; Stavnezer, Janet; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    The ability of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to efficiently mediate class-switch recombination (CSR) is dependent on its phosphorylation at Ser38; however, the trigger that induces AID phosphorylation and the mechanism by which phosphorylated AID drives CSR have not been elucidated. Here we found that phosphorylation of AID at Ser38 was induced by DNA breaks. Conversely, in the absence of AID phosphorylation, DNA breaks were not efficiently generated at switch (S) regions in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus (Igh), consistent with a failure of AID to interact with the endonuclease APE1. Additionally, deficiency in the DNA-damage sensor ATM impaired the phosphorylation of AID at Ser38 and the interaction of AID with APE1. Our results identify a positive feedback loop for the amplification of DNA breaks at S regions through the phosphorylation- and ATM-dependent interaction of AID with APE1. PMID:24097111

  13. Sequence- and Structure-Based Analysis of Tissue-Specific Phosphorylation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Karabulut, Nermin Pinar; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most widespread and well studied reversible posttranslational modification. Discovering tissue-specific preferences of phosphorylation sites is important as phosphorylation plays a role in regulating almost every cellular activity and disease state. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of global and tissue-specific sequence and structure properties of phosphorylation sites utilizing recent proteomics data. We identified tissue-specific motifs in both sequence and spatial environments of phosphorylation sites. Target site preferences of kinases across tissues indicate that, while many kinases mediate phosphorylation in all tissues, there are also kinases that exhibit more tissue-specific preferences which, notably, are not caused by tissue-specific kinase expression. We also demonstrate that many metabolic pathways are differentially regulated by phosphorylation in different tissues. PMID:27332813

  14. Effect of phosphorylation on antioxidant activities of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo, Lady godiva) polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Song, Yi; Ni, Yuanying; Hu, Xiaosong; Li, Quanhong

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorylated derivatives of pumpkin polysaccharide with different degree of substitution were synthesized using POCl3 and pyridine. Antioxidant activities and cytoprotective effects of unmodified polysaccharide and phosphorylated derivatives were investigated employing various in vitro systems. Results showed that high ratio of POCl3/pyridine could increase the degree of substitution and no remarkable degradation occurred in the phosphorylation process. Characteristic absorption of phosphorylation appeared both in the IR and (31)P NMR spectrum. The df values between 2.27 and 2.55 indicated the relatively expanded conformation of the phosphorylated derivatives. All the phosphorylated polysaccharides exhibited higher antioxidant activities. H2O2-induced oxidative damages on rat thymic lymphocyte were also prevented by the derivatives. In general, phosphorylation could improve the antioxidant activities of pumpkin polysaccharide both in vitro and in a cell system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Incorporating hidden Markov models for identifying protein kinase-specific phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Tzeng, Shih-Wei; Wu, Li-Cheng; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Tsou, Ann-Ping; Huang, Kuan-Tsae

    2005-07-30

    Protein phosphorylation, which is an important mechanism in posttranslational modification, affects essential cellular processes such as metabolism, cell signaling, differentiation, and membrane transportation. Proteins are phosphorylated by a variety of protein kinases. In this investigation, we develop a novel tool to computationally predict catalytic kinase-specific phosphorylation sites. The known phosphorylation sites from public domain data sources are categorized by their annotated protein kinases. Based on the concepts of profile Hidden Markov Models (HMM), computational models are trained from the kinase-specific groups of phosphorylation sites. After evaluating the trained models, we select the model with highest accuracy in each kinase-specific group and provide a Web-based prediction tool for identifying protein phosphorylation sites. The main contribution here is that we have developed a kinase-specific phosphorylation site prediction tool with both high sensitivity and specificity.

  16. Analysis and functional implications of phosphorylation of neuronal voltage-gated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Cerda, Oscar; Trimmer, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most common and abundant posttranslational modification to eukaryotic proteins, regulating a plethora of dynamic cellular processes. Here, we review and discuss recent advances in our knowledge of the breadth and importance of reversible phosphorylation in regulating the expression, localization and function of mammalian neuronal voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, key regulators of neuronal function. We highlight the role of modern mass spectrometric techniques and phosphospecific antibodies that reveal the extent and nature of phosphorylation at specific sites in Kv channels. We also emphasize the role of reversible phosphorylation in dynamically regulating diverse aspects of Kv channel biology. Finally, we discuss as important future directions the determination of the mechanistic basis for how altering phosphorylation state affects Kv channel expression, localization and function, the nature of macromolecular signaling complexes containing Kv channels and enzymes regulating their phosphorylation state, and the specific role of Kv channel phosphorylation in regulating neuronal function during physiological and pathophysiological events. PMID:20600597

  17. The physiological link between metabolic rate depression and tau phosphorylation in mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Stieler, Jens T; Bullmann, Torsten; Kohl, Franziska; Tøien, Øivind; Brückner, Martina K; Härtig, Wolfgang; Barnes, Brian M; Arendt, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    Abnormal phosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein are hallmarks of a variety of neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased tau phosphorylation is assumed to represent an early event in pathogenesis and a pivotal aspect for aggregation and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. However, the regulation of tau phosphorylation in vivo and the causes for its increased stage of phosphorylation in AD are still not well understood, a fact that is primarily based on the lack of adequate animal models. Recently we described the reversible formation of highly phosphorylated tau protein in hibernating European ground squirrels. Hence, mammalian hibernation represents a model system very well suited to study molecular mechanisms of both tau phosphorylation and dephosphorylation under in vivo physiological conditions. Here, we analysed the extent and kinetics of hibernation-state dependent tau phosphorylation in various brain regions of three species of hibernating mammals: arctic ground squirrels, Syrian hamsters and black bears. Overall, tau protein was highly phosphorylated in torpor states and phosphorylation levels decreased after arousal in all species. Differences between brain regions, hibernation-states and phosphosites were observed with respect to degree and kinetics of tau phosphorylation. Furthermore, we tested the phosphate net turnover of tau protein to analyse potential alterations in kinase and/or phosphatase activities during hibernation. Our results demonstrate that the hibernation-state dependent phosphorylation of tau protein is specifically regulated but involves, in addition, passive, temperature driven regulatory mechanisms. By determining the activity-state profile for key enzymes of tau phosphorylation we could identify kinases potentially involved in the differentially regulated, reversible tau phosphorylation that occurs during hibernation. We show that in black bears hibernation is associated with conformational

  18. Characterization of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyung Uk; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Bae, Chang-Dae; Park, Joobae

    2009-11-30

    Tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2), has been recently shown to be involved in the assembly and maintenance of mitotic spindle and also plays an essential role in maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation during mitosis. We have previously reported that TMAP is phosphorylated at multiple residues specifically during mitosis, and characterized the mechanism and functional importance of phosphorylation at one of the mitosis-specific phosphorylation residues (i.e., Thr-622). However, the phosphorylation events at the remaining mitotic phosphorylation sites of TMAP have not been fully characterized in detail. Here, we report on generation and characterization of phosphorylated Thr-578- and phosphorylated Thr-596-specific antibodies. Using the antibodies, we show that phosphorylation of TMAP at Thr-578 and Thr-596 indeed occurs specifically during mitosis. Immunofluorescent staining using the antibodies shows that these residues become phosphorylated starting at prophase and then become rapidly dephosphorylated soon after initiation of anaphase. Subtle differences in the kinetics of phosphorylation between Thr-578 and Thr-596 imply that they may be under different mechanisms of phosphorylation during mitosis. Unlike the phosphorylation-deficient mutant form for Thr-622, the mutant in which both Thr-578 and Thr-596 had been mutated to alanines did not induce significant delay in progression of mitosis. These results show that the majority of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of TMAP is limited to pre-anaphase stages and suggest that the multiple phosphorylation may not act in concert but serve diverse functions.

  19. Characterization of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kyung Uk; Kim, Hyun-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2), has been recently shown to be involved in the assembly and maintenance of mitotic spindle and also plays an essential role in maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation during mitosis. We have previously reported that TMAP is phosphorylated at multiple residues specifically during mitosis, and characterized the mechanism and functional importance of phosphorylation at one of the mitosis-specific phosphorylation residues (i.e., Thr-622). However, the phosphorylation events at the remaining mitotic phosphorylation sites of TMAP have not been fully characterized in detail. Here, we report on generation and characterization of phosphorylated Thr-578- and phosphorylated Thr-596-specific antibodies. Using the antibodies, we show that phosphorylation of TMAP at Thr-578 and Thr-596 indeed occurs specifically during mitosis. Immunofluorescent staining using the antibodies shows that these residues become phosphorylated starting at prophase and then become rapidly dephosphorylated soon after initiation of anaphase. Subtle differences in the kinetics of phosphorylation between Thr-578 and Thr-596 imply that they may be under different mechanisms of phosphorylation during mitosis. Unlike the phosphorylation-deficient mutant form for Thr-622, the mutant in which both Thr-578 and Thr-596 had been mutated to alanines did not induce significant delay in progression of mitosis. These results show that the majority of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of TMAP is limited to pre-anaphase stages and suggest that the multiple phosphorylation may not act in concert but serve diverse functions. PMID:19641375

  20. The Physiological Link between Metabolic Rate Depression and Tau Phosphorylation in Mammalian Hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Stieler, Jens T.; Bullmann, Torsten; Kohl, Franziska; Tøien, Øivind; Brückner, Martina K.; Härtig, Wolfgang; Barnes, Brian M.; Arendt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein are hallmarks of a variety of neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased tau phosphorylation is assumed to represent an early event in pathogenesis and a pivotal aspect for aggregation and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. However, the regulation of tau phosphorylation in vivo and the causes for its increased stage of phosphorylation in AD are still not well understood, a fact that is primarily based on the lack of adequate animal models. Recently we described the reversible formation of highly phosphorylated tau protein in hibernating European ground squirrels. Hence, mammalian hibernation represents a model system very well suited to study molecular mechanisms of both tau phosphorylation and dephosphorylation under in vivo physiological conditions. Here, we analysed the extent and kinetics of hibernation-state dependent tau phosphorylation in various brain regions of three species of hibernating mammals: arctic ground squirrels, Syrian hamsters and black bears. Overall, tau protein was highly phosphorylated in torpor states and phosphorylation levels decreased after arousal in all species. Differences between brain regions, hibernation-states and phosphosites were observed with respect to degree and kinetics of tau phosphorylation. Furthermore, we tested the phosphate net turnover of tau protein to analyse potential alterations in kinase and/or phosphatase activities during hibernation. Our results demonstrate that the hibernation-state dependent phosphorylation of tau protein is specifically regulated but involves, in addition, passive, temperature driven regulatory mechanisms. By determining the activity-state profile for key enzymes of tau phosphorylation we could identify kinases potentially involved in the differentially regulated, reversible tau phosphorylation that occurs during hibernation. We show that in black bears hibernation is associated with conformational

  1. Intracellular pharmacokinetic study of zidovudine and its phosphorylated metabolites.

    PubMed

    Mu, Lingli; Zhou, Rui; Tang, Fang; Liu, Xingling; Li, Sanwang; Xie, Feifan; Xie, Xiang; Peng, Jie; Yu, Peng

    2016-03-01

    Zidovudine (AZT), the first drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, is metabolized in the host cells to 5'-AZT triphosphate (AZT-TP) which inhibits HIV reverse transcriptase. As the pharmacokinetics of AZT and its phosphorylated metabolites in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) is limited, the aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of AZT and its phosphorylated metabolites in hPBMCs from 12 healthy Chinese male subjects after a single oral dose of 600 mg of AZT. Blood samples were collected prior to drug administration, then at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10 h after drug administration. Mononuclear cells collected by Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation were used for determination of AZT and metabolites [AZT monophosphate (AZT-MP), AZT diphosphate (AZT-DP) and AZT-TP] and the plasma was used to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of AZT. Plasma concentration of AZT peaked within 0.583 h and intracellular concentrations of AZT, AZT-MP, AZT-DP and AZT-TP peaked within 1.083, 1.500, 1.417 and 1.583 h, respectively. AZT in plasma was eliminated rapidly with t 1/2 of 2.022 h, and AZT-MP, AZT-DP and AZT-TP were eliminated with t 1/2 of 13.428, 8.285 and 4.240 h, respectively. The plasma concentration of the phosphorylated metabolites was not quantifiable.

  2. Further studies on phosphorylated pituitary somatotropin (growth hormone)

    SciTech Connect

    Kornberg, L.J.; Liberti, J.P.

    1987-05-01

    This laboratory made the original observation that naturally-occurring ovine growth hormone (GH) is phosphorylated and that slices of pituitary glands from male rats synthesize and secrete /sup 32/P-GH. This observation has been extended to explore the generality of this process. After incubation in PO/sub 4/-free Ham's F-10 medium (PFH) or in saline/Hepes (SH) containing 300..mu..Ci /sup 32/Pi/mL, tissue and medium were separated and a cell extract was prepared. GH in the medium and extract was recovered by immunoprecipitation using rat GH antiserum. The samples were electrophoresed under denaturating conditions and processed for autoradiography. /sup 32/P-GH was characterized by the presence of a protein-staining band and radioactive area which migrated the same as authentic GH and /sup 125/I-GH. Slices of glands from male rats incubated for 2h in PFH secreted /sup 32/P-GH. Similar results were found upon incubation of slices from female rats in the presence of SH. Short-term incubations of acutely dispersed pituitary cells obtained from young and old male rats also synthesized and secreted /sup 32/P-GH. Thus, the production of /sup 32/P-GH occurs (a) in simple and complex incubaton media, (b) in slices and cells from glands from older and younger rats and (c) in female as well as male rats. Therefore, phosphorylation of GH appears to be a general phenomenon. The physiological action(s) of phosphorylated GH in growth and development is under study.

  3. GFAT1 phosphorylation by AMPK promotes VEGF-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zibrova, Darya; Vandermoere, Franck; Göransson, Olga; Peggie, Mark; Mariño, Karina V; Knierim, Anne; Spengler, Katrin; Weigert, Cora; Viollet, Benoit; Morrice, Nicholas A; Sakamoto, Kei; Heller, Regine

    2017-03-07

    Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in endothelial cells regulates energy homeostasis, stress protection and angiogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Using a label-free phosphoproteomic analysis, we identified glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase 1 (GFAT1) as an AMPK substrate. GFAT1 is the rate-limiting enzyme in the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP) and as such controls the modification of proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that AMPK controls O-GlcNAc levels and function of endothelial cells via GFAT1 phosphorylation using biochemical, pharmacological, genetic and in vitro angiogenesis approaches. Activation of AMPK in primary human endothelial cells by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) or by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) led to GFAT1 phosphorylation at serine 243. This effect was not seen when AMPK was down-regulated by siRNA. Upon AMPK activation, diminished GFAT activity and reduced O-GlcNAc levels were observed in endothelial cells containing wild-type (WT)-GFAT1 but not in cells expressing non-phosphorylatable S243A-GFAT1. Pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated down-regulation of GFAT1 potentiated VEGF-induced sprouting, indicating that GFAT1 acts as a negative regulator of angiogenesis. In cells expressing S243A-GFAT1, VEGF-induced sprouting was reduced, suggesting that VEGF relieves the inhibitory action of GFAT1/HBP on angiogenesis via AMPK-mediated GFAT1 phosphorylation. Activation of GFAT1/HBP by high glucose led to impairment of vascular sprouting, whereas GFAT1 inhibition improved sprouting even if glucose level was high. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into the role of HBP in angiogenesis. They suggest that targeting AMPK in endothelium might help to ameliorate hyperglycaemia-induced vascular dysfunction associated with metabolic disorders.

  4. Phosphorylation releases constraints to domain motion in ERK2.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yao; Lee, Thomas; Latham, Michael Parker; Warner, Lisa Rose; Tanimoto, Akiko; Pardi, Arthur; Ahn, Natalie G

    2014-02-18

    Protein motions control enzyme catalysis through mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Here NMR (13)C relaxation dispersion experiments were used to monitor changes in side-chain motions that occur in response to activation by phosphorylation of the MAP kinase ERK2. NMR data for the methyl side chains on Ile, Leu, and Val residues showed changes in conformational exchange dynamics in the microsecond-to-millisecond time regime between the different activity states of ERK2. In inactive, unphosphorylated ERK2, localized conformational exchange was observed among methyl side chains, with little evidence for coupling between residues. Upon dual phosphorylation by MAP kinase kinase 1, the dynamics of assigned methyls in ERK2 were altered throughout the conserved kinase core, including many residues in the catalytic pocket. The majority of residues in active ERK2 fit to a single conformational exchange process, with kex ≈ 300 s(-1) (kAB ≈ 240 s(-1)/kBA ≈ 60 s(-1)) and pA/pB ≈ 20%/80%, suggesting global domain motions involving interconversion between two states. A mutant of ERK2, engineered to enhance conformational mobility at the hinge region linking the N- and C-terminal domains, also induced two-state conformational exchange throughout the kinase core, with exchange properties of kex ≈ 500 s(-1) (kAB ≈ 15 s(-1)/kBA ≈ 485 s(-1)) and pA/pB ≈ 97%/3%. Thus, phosphorylation and activation of ERK2 lead to a dramatic shift in conformational exchange dynamics, likely through release of constraints at the hinge.

  5. Intracellular pharmacokinetic study of zidovudine and its phosphorylated metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Lingli; Zhou, Rui; Tang, Fang; Liu, Xingling; Li, Sanwang; Xie, Feifan; Xie, Xiang; Peng, Jie; Yu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Zidovudine (AZT), the first drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, is metabolized in the host cells to 5′-AZT triphosphate (AZT-TP) which inhibits HIV reverse transcriptase. As the pharmacokinetics of AZT and its phosphorylated metabolites in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) is limited, the aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of AZT and its phosphorylated metabolites in hPBMCs from 12 healthy Chinese male subjects after a single oral dose of 600 mg of AZT. Blood samples were collected prior to drug administration, then at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10 h after drug administration. Mononuclear cells collected by Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation were used for determination of AZT and metabolites [AZT monophosphate (AZT-MP), AZT diphosphate (AZT-DP) and AZT-TP] and the plasma was used to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of AZT. Plasma concentration of AZT peaked within 0.583 h and intracellular concentrations of AZT, AZT-MP, AZT-DP and AZT-TP peaked within 1.083, 1.500, 1.417 and 1.583 h, respectively. AZT in plasma was eliminated rapidly with t1/2 of 2.022 h, and AZT-MP, AZT-DP and AZT-TP were eliminated with t1/2 of 13.428, 8.285 and 4.240 h, respectively. The plasma concentration of the phosphorylated metabolites was not quantifiable. PMID:27006900

  6. Thyroid states regulate subcellular glucose phosphorylation activity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Martins Peçanha, Flavia Letícia; Dos Santos, Reinaldo Sousa; da-Silva, Wagner Seixas

    2017-07-01

    The thyroid hormones (THs), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), are very important in organism metabolism and regulate glucose utilization. Hexokinase (HK) is responsible for the first step of glycolysis, catalyzing the conversion of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate. HK has been found in different cellular compartments, and new functions have been attributed to this enzyme. The effects of hyperthyroidism on subcellular glucose phosphorylation in mouse tissues were examined. Tissues were removed, subcellular fractions were isolated from eu- and hyperthyroid (T3, 0.25 µg/g, i.p. during 21 days) mice and HK activity was assayed. Glucose phosphorylation was increased in the particulate fraction in soleus (312.4% ± 67.1, n = 10), gastrocnemius (369.2% ± 112.4, n = 10) and heart (142.2% ± 13.6, n = 10) muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the control group. Hexokinase activity was not affected in brain or liver. No relevant changes were observed in HK activity in the soluble fraction for all tissues investigated. Acute T3 administration (single dose of T3, 1.25 µg/g, i.p.) did not modulate HK activity. Interestingly, HK mRNA levels remained unchanged and HK bound to mitochondria was increased by T3 treatment, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism. Analysis of the AKT pathway showed a 2.5-fold increase in AKT and GSK3B phosphorylation in the gastrocnemius muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the euthyroid group. Taken together, we show for the first time that THs modulate HK activity specifically in particulate fractions and that this action seems to be under the control of the AKT and GSK3B pathways. © 2017 The authors.

  7. Spectrin phosphorylation and shape change of human erythrocyte ghosts

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Human erthrocyte membranes in isotonic medium change shape from crenated spheres to biconcave disks and cup-forms when incubated at 37 degrees C in the presence of MgATP (M. P. Sheetz and S. J. Singer, 1977, J. Cell Biol. 73:638-646). The postulated relationship between spectrin phosphorylation and shape change (W. Birchmeier and S. J. Singer, 1977, J. Cell Biol. 73:647-659) is examined in this report. Salt extraction of white ghosts reduced spectrin phosphorylation during shape changes by 85-95%. Salt extraction did not alter crenation, rate of MgATP-dependent shape change, or the fraction (greater than 80%) ultimately converted to disks and cup-forms after 1 h. Spectrin was partially dephosphorylated in intact cells by subjection to metabolic depletion in vitro. Membranes from depleted cells exhibited normal shape-change behavior. Shape-change behavior was influenced by the hemolysis buffer and temperature and by the time required for membrane preparation. Tris and phosphate ghosts lost the capacity to change shape after standing for 1-2 h at 0 degrees C. Hemolysis in HEPES or N- tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid yielded ghosts that were converted rapidly to disks in the absence of ATP and did not undergo further conversion to cup-forms. These effects could not be attributed to differential dephsphorylation of spectrin, because dephosphorylation during ghost preparation and incubation was negligible. These results suggest that spectrin phosphorylation is not required for MgATP-dependent shape change. It is proposed that other biochemical events induce membrane curvature changes and that the role of spectrin is passive. PMID:7204501

  8. Enhancement of glycine receptor function by ethanol: role of phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Paola Mascia, Maria; Wick, Marilee J; Martinez, Larry D; Harris, R Adron

    1998-01-01

    The effects of several kinase inhibitors (staurosporine, GF 109203X, H89, KN62, genistein) and of the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A were studied on the ethanol potentiation and on the function of homomeric α1 glycine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes using a two electrode voltage clamp recording technique.The function of the homomeric α1 glycine receptor was not modified in Xenopus oocytes pretreated with kinase inhibitors or with the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A.The potentiation of the glycine receptor function induced by ethanol (10–200 mM) was significantly reduced in Xenopus oocytes pretreated with the PKC inhibitors staurosporine or GF 109203X.No differences in propofol (2.5 μM) or halothane (250 μM) actions were found after exposure of Xenopus oocytes to staurosporine.No differences in ethanol sensitivity were found after exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing glycine α1 receptors to H89, KN62, genistein or to the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A.The mutant α1 (S391A), in which the PKC phosphorylation site at serine 391 was mutated to alanine, was less sensitive to the effects of ethanol than was the α1 wild type receptor. Moreover, the ethanol potentiation of the glycine receptor function was not affected by treatment with staurosporine in oocytes expressing α1 (S391A).The splice variant of the α1 glycine receptor subunit, α1ins, containing eight additional amino acids and a potential phosphorylation site for PKA, did not differ from wild type for sensitivity to ethanol.These results indicate that phosphorylation by PKC of the homomeric α1 glycine receptor subunit modulates ethanol potentiation, but not the function of the glycine receptor. PMID:9786497

  9. Injectable hydrogels derived from phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Sem; Song, Minsoo; Lee, Eun-Jung; Shin, Ueon Sang

    2015-06-01

    Phosphorylation of sodium alginate salt (NaAlg) was carried out using H3PO4/P2O5/Et3PO4 followed by acid-base reaction with Ca(OAc)2 to give phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes (CaPAlg), as a water dispersible alginic acid derivative. The modified alginate derivatives including phosphorylated alginic acid (PAlg) and CaPAlg were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for (1)H, and (31)P nuclei, high resolution inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. CaPAlg hydrogels were prepared simply by mixing CaPAlg solution (2w/v%) with NaAlg solution (2w/v%) in various ratios (2:8, 4:6, 6:4, 8:2) of volume. No additional calcium salts such as CaSO4 or CaCl2 were added externally. The gelation was completed within about 3-40min indicating a high potential of hydrogel delivery by injection in vivo. Their mechanical properties were tested to be ≤6.7kPa for compressive strength at break and about 8.4kPa/mm for elastic modulus. SEM analysis of the CaPAlg hydrogels showed highly porous morphology with interconnected pores of width in the range of 100-800μm. Cell culture results showed that the injectable hydrogels exhibited comparable properties to the pure alginate hydrogel in terms of cytotoxicity and 3D encapsulation of cells for a short time period. The developed injectable hydrogels showed suitable physicochemical and mechanical properties for injection in vivo, and could therefore be beneficial for the field of soft tissue engineering.

  10. Protein phosphorylation cascades associated with methamphetamine-induced glial activation.

    PubMed

    Hebert, M A; O'Callaghan, J P

    2000-09-01

    Reactive gliosis is the most prominent response to diverse forms of central nervous system (CNS) injury. The signaling events that mediate this characteristic response to neural injury are under intense investigation. Several studies have demonstrated the activation of phosphoproteins within the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Janus kinase (JAK) pathways following neural insult. These signaling pathways may be involved or responsible for the glial response following injury, by virtue of their ability to phosphorylate and dynamically regulate the activity of various transcription factors. This study sought to delineate, in vivo, the relative contribution of MAPK- and JAK-signaling components to reactive gliosis as measured by induction of glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), following chemical-induced neural damage. At time points (6, 24, and 48 h) following methamphetamine (METH, 10 mg/kg x 4, s.c.) administration, female C57BL/6J mice were sacrificed by focused microwave irradiation, a technique that preserves steady-state phosphorylation. Striatal (target) and nontarget (hippocampus) homogenates were assayed for METH-induced changes in markers of dopamine (DA) neuron integrity as well as differences in the levels of activated phosphoproteins. GFAP upregulation occurred as early as 6 h, reaching a threefold induction 48 h following METH exposure. Neurotoxicant-induced reductions in striatal levels of DA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) paralleled the temporal profile of GFAP induction. Blots of striatal homogenates, probed with phosphorylation-state specific antibodies, demonstrated significant changes in activated forms of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2), c-jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK), MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK1/2), 70-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p70 S6), cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). MAPK-related phosphoproteins exhibited an

  11. Protein Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in the Archaea.

    PubMed

    Kennelly, Peter J

    2014-04-04

    The third domain of life, the Archaea (formerly Archaebacteria), is populated by a physiologically diverse set of microorganisms, many of which reside at the ecological extremes of our global environment. Although ostensibly prokaryotic in morphology, the Archaea share much closer evolutionary ties with the Eukarya than with the superficially more similar Bacteria. Initial genomic, proteomic, and biochemical analyses have revealed the presence of "eukaryotic" protein kinases and phosphatases and an intriguing set of serine-, threonine-, and tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in the Archaea that may offer new insights into this important regulatory mechanism.

  12. FUNGALOXPHOS: an integrated database for oxidative phosphorylation in fungi.

    PubMed

    Lavín, José L; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Gutiérrez-Vázquez, Raquel L; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Gabaldón, Toni; Oguiza, José A

    2013-07-01

    The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system is the main energy-producing pathway in aerobic organisms. Here we present FUNGALOXPHOS, a web based platform that stores OXPHOS proteins encoded in fungal nuclear genomes and that incorporates tools for the extraction, classification and bioinformatic screening of all the putative nuclear encoded fungal OXPHOS proteins. FUNGALOXPHOS includes local, parsing and remote tools that allow exploring the properties of OXPHOS proteins in fungal genomes. FUNGALOXPHOS is freely available on the web at http://bioinformatics.unavarra.es:1000/FUNGALOXPHOS_CSS/main.html.

  13. Supercomplex organization of the oxidative phosphorylation enzymes in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Rosemary A

    2008-10-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the enzymes involved in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are co-assembled into higher-ordered supercomplexes within the mitochondrial inner membrane. This review will focus largely on the OXPHOS supercomplexes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recent evidence to indicate that diversity in the populations of the cytochrome bc (1)-COX supercomplexes exist shall be outlined. In addition, the existence of dimeric/oligomeric F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase complexes and their proposed role in establishment of the cristae architecture of the inner mitochondrial membrane shall also be discussed.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of histidine-phosphorylated peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Medzihradszky, K. F.; Phillipps, N. J.; Senderowicz, L.; Wang, P.; Turck, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    Posttranslational phosphorylation of proteins is an important event in many cellular processes. Whereas phosphoesters of serine, threonine, and tyrosine have been studied extensively, only limited information is available for other amino acids modified by a phosphate group. The formation of phosphohistidine residues in proteins was discovered originally in prokaryotic organisms, but also has been found recently in eukaryotic cells. We describe methods for the synthesis and analysis of phosphohistidine-containing peptides, a prerequisite for the investigation of the role of this posttranslational modification in cellular processes. PMID:9232641

  15. Coordination of Protein Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation in Synaptic Plasticity*

    PubMed Central

    Woolfrey, Kevin M.; Dell'Acqua, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A central theme in nervous system function is equilibrium: synaptic strengths wax and wane, neuronal firing rates adjust up and down, and neural circuits balance excitation with inhibition. This push/pull regulatory theme carries through to the molecular level at excitatory synapses, where protein function is controlled through phosphorylation and dephosphorylation by kinases and phosphatases. However, these opposing enzymatic activities are only part of the equation as scaffolding interactions and assembly of multi-protein complexes are further required for efficient, localized synaptic signaling. This review will focus on coordination of postsynaptic serine/threonine kinase and phosphatase signaling by scaffold proteins during synaptic plasticity. PMID:26453308

  16. Microtubule-damaging drugs triggered bcl2 phosphorylation-requirement of phosphorylation on both serine-70 and serine-87 residues of bcl2 protein.

    PubMed

    Basu, A; Haldar, S

    1998-10-01

    Specifically anti-microtubule agents such as taxol, vincristine, vinblastine and dolastatin can trigger Bcl2 phosphorylation at G2-M phase of the cell cycle in malignant cells derived from a variety of human cancers. In this study, the status of Bcl2 phosphorylation was investigated in response to more antimicrotubule agents such as colchicine, colcemid or podophyllotoxin. Although these agents are not currently used for cancer therapy, they were able to trigger Bcl2 phosphorylation with simultaneous apoptosis in cancer cells. Previously, by using extensive site-directed mutagenesis studies we determined that mutation of serine-70 to alanine could not completely abrogate taxol induced Bcl2 phosphorylation. Studies reported here clearly indicate that serine-87 residue along with serine-70 of Bcl2 protein are necessary for microtubule damaging drug induced phosphorylation.

  17. Increased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 during meiotic maturation of Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, P J; Thomas, G; Maller, J L

    1982-01-01

    A single ribosomal protein (Mr, 32,000) becomes phosphorylated during progesterone-induced in vitro maturation of Xenopus laevis oocytes. The protein is identified as 40S ribosomal protein S6. Phosphorylation of S6 is monitored by incorporation of 32Pi and by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. S6 is minimally phosphorylated in unstimulated oocytes. After progesterone treatment, phosphorylation of S6 precedes germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and is maximal at the time when 50% of the oocytes have undergone GVBD. S6, when maximally phosphorylated, exists in derivatives that correspond to the most highly phosphorylated forms observed in other systems, and the increase in S6 phosphorylation occurs at approximately the same time as the increase in the overall protein synthesis rate reported to occur during oocyte maturation. S6 is also maximally phosphorylated in unfertilized eggs following maturation in vivo. Injection of a partially purified preparation of maturation-promoting factor into immature oocytes induces immediate phosphorylation of S6 and rapidly increases the rate of protein synthesis. Moreover, incubation of ribosomes with this factor and radiolabeled ATP results in labeling of S6. These findings suggest that S6 phosphorylation may be important in the control of protein synthesis during maturation and may also play a role in the mechanism of action of maturation-promoting factor. Images PMID:7045876

  18. Casein kinase II phosphorylates lens connexin 45.6 and is involved in its degradation.

    PubMed

    Yin, X; Jedrzejewski, P T; Jiang, J X

    2000-03-10

    Connexin (Cx) 45.6, an avian counterpart of rodent Cx50, is phosphorylated in vivo, but the sites and function of the phosphorylation have not been elucidated. Our peptide mapping experiments showed that the Ser(363) site in the carboxyl (COOH) terminus of Cx45.6 was phosphorylated and that this site is within casein kinase (CK) II consensus sequence, although showing some similarity to CKI sequence. The peptide containing Ser(363) could be phosphorylated in vitro by CKII, but not by CKI. Furthermore, CKII phosphorylated Cx45.6 in embryonic lens membrane and the fusion protein containing the COOH terminus of Cx45.6. Two-dimensional peptide mapping experiments showed that one of the Cx45.6 peptides phosphorylated in vivo migrated to the same spot as one of those phosphorylated by CKII in vitro. Furthermore, CKII activity could be detected in lens lysates. To assess the function of this phosphorylation event, exogenous wild type and mutant Cx45.6 (Ser(363) --> Ala) were expressed in lens primary cultures by retroviral infection. The mutant Cx45.6 was shown to be more stable having a longer half-life compared with wild type Cx45.6. Together, the evidence suggests that CKII is likely a kinase responsible for the Ser(363) phosphorylation, leading to the destablization and degradation of Cx45.6. The connexin degradation induced by phosphorylation has a broad functional significance in the regulation of gap junctions in vivo.

  19. Analysis of acetylcholine receptor phosphorylation sites using antibodies to synthetic peptides and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Safran, A; Neumann, D; Fuchs, S

    1986-01-01

    Three peptides corresponding to residues 354-367, 364-374, 373-387 of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) delta subunit were synthesized. These peptides represent the proposed phosphorylation sites of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, the tyrosine-specific protein kinase and the calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase respectively. Using these peptides as substrates for phosphorylation by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase it was shown that only peptides 354-367 was phosphorylated whereas the other two were not. These results verify the location of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site within the AChR delta subunit. Antibodies elicited against these peptides reacted with the delta subunit. The antipeptide antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies (7F2, 5.46) specific for the delta subunit were tested for their binding to non-phosphorylated receptor and to receptor phosphorylated by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Antibodies to peptide 354-367 were found to react preferentially with non-phosphorylated receptor whereas the two other anti-peptide antibodies bound equally to phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated receptors. Monoclonal antibody 7F2 reacted preferentially with the phosphorylated form of the receptor whereas monoclonal antibody 5.46 did not distinguish between the two forms. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3816758

  20. Phosphorylation at connexin43 serine-368 is necessary for myocardial conduction during metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    Nassal, Michelle MJ; Werdich, Andreas A.; Wan, Xiaoping; Hoshi, Malcolm; Deschênes, Isabelle; Rosenbaum, David S.; Donahue, J. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) phosphorylation alters gap junction localization and function. In particular, phosphorylation at serine-368 (S368) has been suggested to alter gap junctional conductance, but previous reports have shown inconsistent results for both timing and functional effects of S368 phosphorylation. The objective of this study was to determine the functional effects of isolated S368 phosphorylation. We evaluated wild type Cx43 (AdCx43) and mutations simulating permanent phosphorylation (Ad368E) or preventing phosphorylation (Ad368A) at S368. Function was assessed by optical mapping of electrical conduction in patterned cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, under baseline and metabolic stress (MS) conditions. Baseline conduction velocity (CV) was similar for all groups. In the AdCx43 and Ad368E groups, MS moderately decreased CV. Ad368A caused complete conduction block during MS. Triton-X solubility assessment showed no change in Cx43 location during conduction impairment. Western blot analysis showed that Cx43-S368 phosphorylation was present at baseline, and that it decreased during MS. Our data indicate that phosphorylation at S368 does not affect CV under baseline conditions, and that preventing S368 phosphorylation makes Cx43 hypersensitive to MS. These results show the critical role of S368 phosphorylation during stress conditions. PMID:26459193

  1. Phosphorylation at Connexin43 Serine-368 Is Necessary for Myocardial Conduction During Metabolic Stress.

    PubMed

    Nassal, Michelle M J; Werdich, Andreas A; Wan, Xiaoping; Hoshi, Malcolm; Deschênes, Isabelle; Rosenbaum, David S; Donahue, J Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) phosphorylation alters gap junction localization and function. In particular, phosphorylation at serine-368 (S368) has been suggested to alter gap junctional conductance, but previous reports have shown inconsistent results for both timing and functional effects of S368 phosphorylation. The objective of this study was to determine the functional effects of isolated S368 phosphorylation. We evaluated wild-type Cx43 (AdCx43) and mutations simulating permanent phosphorylation (Ad368E) or preventing phosphorylation (Ad368A) at S368. Function was assessed by optical mapping of electrical conduction in patterned cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, under baseline and metabolic stress (MS) conditions. Baseline conduction velocity (CV) was similar for all groups. In the AdCx43 and Ad368E groups, MS moderately decreased CV. Ad368A caused complete conduction block during MS. Triton-X solubility assessment showed no change in Cx43 location during conduction impairment. Western blot analysis showed that Cx43-S368 phosphorylation was present at baseline, and that it decreased during MS. Our data indicate that phosphorylation at S368 does not affect CV under baseline conditions, and that preventing S368 phosphorylation makes Cx43 hypersensitive to MS. These results show the critical role of S368 phosphorylation during stress conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. PSEA: Kinase-specific prediction and analysis of human phosphorylation substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Sheng-Bao; Qiu, Jian-Ding; Shi, Shao-Ping; Chen, Xiang; Liang, Ru-Ping

    2014-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation catalysed by kinases plays crucial regulatory roles in intracellular signal transduction. With the increasing number of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites and disease-related phosphorylation substrates that have been identified, the desire to explore the regulatory relationship between protein kinases and disease-related phosphorylation substrates is motivated. In this work, we analysed the kinases' characteristic of all disease-related phosphorylation substrates by using our developed Phosphorylation Set Enrichment Analysis (PSEA) method. We evaluated the efficiency of our method with independent test and concluded that our approach is reliable for identifying kinases responsible for phosphorylated substrates. In addition, we found that Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) families are more associated with abnormal phosphorylation. It can be anticipated that our method might be helpful to identify the mechanism of phosphorylation and the relationship between kinase and phosphorylation related diseases. A user-friendly web interface is now freely available at http://bioinfo.ncu.edu.cn/PKPred_Home.aspx.

  3. Granulovacuolar Degenerations Appear in Relation to Hippocampal Phosphorylated Tau Accumulation in Various Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Yuu; Matsubara, Tomoyasu; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Kurashige, Takashi; Dohi, Eisuke; Hiji, Masanori; Nagano, Yoshito; Yamawaki, Takemori; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2011-01-01

    Background Granulovacuolar degeneration (GVD) is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it is defined as electron-dense granules within double membrane-bound cytoplasmic vacuoles. Several lines of evidence have suggested that GVDs appear within hippocampal pyramidal neurons in AD when phosphorylated tau begins to aggregate into early-stage neurofibrillary tangles. The aim of this study is to investigate the association of GVDs with phosphorylated tau pathology to determine whether GVDs and phosphorylated tau coexist among different non-AD neurodegenerative disorders. Methods An autopsied series of 28 patients with a variety of neurodegenerative disorders and 9 control patients were evaluated. Standard histological stains along with immunohistochemistry using protein markers for GVD and confocal microscopy were utilized. Results The number of neurons with GVDs significantly increased with the level of phosphorylated tau accumulation in the hippocampal regions in non-AD neurodegenerative disorders. At the cellular level, diffuse staining for phosphorylated tau was detected in neurons with GVDs. Conclusions Our data suggest that GVDs appear in relation to hippocampal phosphorylated tau accumulation in various neurodegenerative disorders, while the presence of phosphorylated tau in GVD-harbouring neurons in non-AD neurodegenerative disorders was indistinguishable from age-related accumulation of phosphorylated tau. Although GVDs in non-AD neurodegenerative disorders have not been studied thoroughly, our results suggest that they are not incidental findings, but rather they appear in relation to phosphorylated tau accumulation, further highlighting the role of GVD in the process of phosphorylated tau accumulation. PMID:22073234

  4. Phosphorylation states of translational initiation factors affect mRNA cap binding in wheat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mateen A; Goss, Dixie J

    2004-07-20

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translational initiation factors (eIFs) has been shown to be an important means of regulating protein synthesis. Plant initiation factors undergo phosphorylation/dephosphorylation under a variety of stress and growth conditions. We have shown that recombinant wheat cap-binding protein, eIF(iso)4E, produced from E. coli can be phosphorylated in vitro. Phosphorylation of eIF(iso)4E has effects on m(7)G cap-binding affinity similar to those of phosphorylation of mammalian eIF4E even though eIF(iso)4E lacks an amino acid that can be phosphorylated at the residue corresponding to Ser-209, the phosphorylation site in mammalian eIF4E. The cap-binding affinity was reduced 1.2-2.6-fold when eIF(iso)4E was phosphorylated. The in vitro phosphorylation site for wheat eIF(iso)4E was identified as Ser-207. Addition of eIF(iso)4G and eIF4B that had also been phosphorylated in vitro further reduced cap-binding affinity. Temperature-dependent studies showed that DeltaH(degrees) was favorable for cap binding regardless of the phosphorylation state of the initiation factors. The entropy, however, was unfavorable (negative) except when eIF(iso)4E was phosphorylated and interacting with eIF(iso)4G. Phosphorylation may modulate not only cap-binding activity, but other functions of eukaryotic initiation factors as well.

  5. Mercury Alters B-Cell Protein Phosphorylation Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Nicholas J.; Stemmer, Paul M.; Shin, Namhee; Dombkowski, Alan; Caruso, Joseph A.; Gill, Randal; Rosenspire, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposure to mercury is suggested to contribute to human immune dysfunction. To shed light on the mechanism we identified changes in the phosphoproteomic profile of the WEHI-231 B cell line after intoxication with Hg2+. These changes were compared to changes in the phosphoproteome that were induced by pervanadate or okadaic acid exposure. Both 250 μM HgCl2 and pervanadate, a known phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, caused an increase in the number of proteins identified after TiO2 affinity selection and LC-MS/MS analysis. Pervanadate treatment had a larger effect than Hg2+ on the number of Scansite motifs which were tyrosine-phosphorylated, 17, and Ingenuity canonical signaling pathways activated, 4 with score > 5.0. However, Hg2+ had a more focused effect, primarily causing tyrosine-phosphorylation in SH2 domains in proteins that are in the B cell receptor signaling pathway. The finding that many of the changes induced by Hg2+ overlap with those of pervanadate, indicates that at high concentrations Hg2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:24224561

  6. Paxillin phosphorylation counteracts proteoglycan-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kuboyama, Tomoharu; Luo, Xueting; Park, Kevin; Blackmore, Murray G.; Tojima, Takuro; Tohda, Chihiro; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    In the adult central nervous system, the tips of axons severed by injury are commonly transformed into dystrophic endballs and cease migration upon encountering a rising concentration gradient of inhibitory proteoglycans. However, intracellular signaling networks mediating endball migration failure remain largely unknown. Here we show that manipulation of protein kinase A (PKA) or its downstream adhesion component paxillin can reactivate the locomotive machinery of endballs in vitro and facilitate axon growth after injury in vivo. In dissociated cultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, PKA is activated in endballs formed on gradients of the inhibitory proteoglycan aggrecan, and pharmacological inhibition of PKA promotes axon growth on aggrecan gradients most likely through phosphorylation of paxillin at serine 301. Remarkably, pre-formed endballs on aggrecan gradients resume forward migration in response to PKA inhibition. This resumption of endball migration is associated with increased turnover of adhesive point contacts dependent upon paxillin phosphorylation. Furthermore, expression of phosphomimetic paxillin overcomes aggrecan-mediated growth arrest of endballs, and facilitates axon growth after optic nerve crush in vivo. These results point to the importance of adhesion dynamics in restoring endball migration and suggest a potential therapeutic target for axon tract repair. PMID:23797153

  7. Paxillin phosphorylation counteracts proteoglycan-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kuboyama, Tomoharu; Luo, Xueting; Park, Kevin; Blackmore, Murray G; Tojima, Takuro; Tohda, Chihiro; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    In the adult central nervous system, the tips of axons severed by injury are commonly transformed into dystrophic endballs and cease migration upon encountering a rising concentration gradient of inhibitory proteoglycans. However, intracellular signaling networks mediating endball migration failure remain largely unknown. Here we show that manipulation of protein kinase A (PKA) or its downstream adhesion component paxillin can reactivate the locomotive machinery of endballs in vitro and facilitate axon growth after injury in vivo. In dissociated cultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, PKA is activated in endballs formed on gradients of the inhibitory proteoglycan aggrecan, and pharmacological inhibition of PKA promotes axon growth on aggrecan gradients most likely through phosphorylation of paxillin at serine 301. Remarkably, pre-formed endballs on aggrecan gradients resume forward migration in response to PKA inhibition. This resumption of endball migration is associated with increased turnover of adhesive point contacts dependent upon paxillin phosphorylation. Furthermore, expression of phosphomimetic paxillin overcomes aggrecan-mediated growth arrest of endballs, and facilitates axon growth after optic nerve crush in vivo. These results point to the importance of adhesion dynamics in restoring endball migration and suggest a potential therapeutic target for axon tract repair. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CaMKII phosphorylation of neuroligin-1 regulates excitatory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Bemben, Michael A; Shipman, Seth L; Hirai, Takaaki; Herring, Bruce E; Li, Yan; Badger, John D; Nicoll, Roger A; Diamond, Jeffrey S; Roche, Katherine W

    2014-01-01

    Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that are important for synaptic function through their trans-synaptic interaction with neurexins (NRXNs). The localization and synaptic effects of neuroligin-1 (NL-1, also called NLGN1) are specific to excitatory synapses with the capacity to enhance excitatory synapses dependent on synaptic activity or Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII). Here we report that CaMKII robustly phosphorylates the intracellular domain of NL-1. We show that T739 is the dominant CaMKII site on NL-1 and is phosphorylated in response to synaptic activity in cultured rodent neurons and sensory experience in vivo. Furthermore, a phosphodeficient mutant (NL-1 T739A) reduces the basal and activity-driven surface expression of NL-1, leading to a reduction in neuroligin-mediated excitatory synaptic potentiation. To the best of our knowledge, our results are the first to demonstrate a direct functional interaction between CaMKII and NL-1, two primary components of excitatory synapses. PMID:24336150

  9. Src promotes GTPase activity of Ras via tyrosine 32 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Bunda, Severa; Heir, Pardeep; Srikumar, Tharan; Cook, Jonathan D.; Burrell, Kelly; Kano, Yoshihito; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Zadeh, Gelareh; Raught, Brian; Ohh, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in Ras GTPase and various other components of the Ras signaling pathways are among the most common genetic alterations in human cancers and also have been identified in several familial developmental syndromes. Over the past few decades it has become clear that the activity or the oncogenic potential of Ras is dependent on the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src to promote the Ras/Raf/MAPK pathway essential for proliferation, differentiation, and survival of eukaryotic cells. However, no direct relationship between Ras and Src has been established. We show here that Src binds to and phosphorylates GTP-, but not GDP-, loaded Ras on a conserved Y32 residue within the switch I region in vitro and that in vivo, Ras-Y32 phosphorylation markedly reduces the binding to effector Raf and concomitantly increases binding to GTPase-activating proteins and the rate of GTP hydrolysis. These results suggest that, in the context of predetermined crystallographic structures, Ras-Y32 serves as an Src-dependent keystone regulatory residue that modulates Ras GTPase activity and ensures unidirectionality to the Ras GTPase cycle. PMID:25157176

  10. CK2 involvement in ESCRT-III complex phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Mauro; Raiborg, Camilla; Hanson, Phyllis I; Campsteijn, Coen; Stenmark, Harald; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2014-03-01

    The multivesicular body (MVB) sorting pathway is a mechanism for delivering transmembrane proteins into the lumen of the lysosome for degradation. ESCRT-III is the final complex in the pathway that assembles on endosomes and executes membrane scission of intraluminal vesicles. In addition, proteins of this complex are involved in other topologically similar processes such as cytokinesis, virus egress and autophagy. Here we show that protein kinase CK2α is involved in the phosphorylation of the ESCRT-III subunits CHMP3 and CHMP2B, as well as of VPS4B/SKD1, an ATPase that mediates ESCRT-III disassembly. This phosphorylation is observed both in vitro and in cells. While we do not observe recruitment of CK2α to endosomes, we demonstrate the localization of CK2α to midbodies during cytokinesis. Phosphomimetic and non-phosphorylatable mutants of ESCRT-III proteins can still bind endosomes and localize to midbodies, indicating that CK2α does not regulate ESCRT-III localization. Finally, we analyzed two cellular functions where CHMP3, CHMP2B and VPS4 are known to be involved, epidermal growth factor degradation and cytokinetic abscission. We demonstrate that the former is impaired by CK2α downregulation whereas the latter is not affected. Taken together, our results indicate that CK2α regulates the function of ESCRT-III proteins in MVB sorting.

  11. Phosphorylation induces distinct alpha-synuclein strain formation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Meng-Rong; Hu, Zhi-Wen; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Li, Yan-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Synucleinopathies are a group of neurodegenerative diseases associated with alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) aggregation. Recently, increasing evidence has demonstrated the existence of different structural characteristics or ‘strains’ of α-Syn, supporting the concept that synucleinopathies share several common features with prion diseases and possibly explaining how a single protein results in different clinical phenotypes within synucleinopathies. In earlier studies, the different strains were generated through the regulation of solution conditions, temperature, or repetitive seeded fibrillization in vitro. Here, we synthesize homogeneous α-Syn phosphorylated at serine 129 (pS129 α-Syn), which is highly associated with the pathological changes, and demonstrate that phosphorylation at Ser129 induces α-Syn to form a distinct strain with different structures, propagation properties, and higher cytotoxicity compared with the wild-type α-Syn. The results are the first demonstration that post-translational modification of α-Syn can induce different strain formation, offering a new mechanism for strain formation. PMID:27853185

  12. Activity-dependent inhibitory synapse remodeling through gephyrin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Flores, Carmen E; Nikonenko, Irina; Mendez, Pablo; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Tyagarajan, Shiva K; Muller, Dominique

    2015-01-06

    Maintaining a proper balance between excitation and inhibition is essential for the functioning of neuronal networks. However, little is known about the mechanisms through which excitatory activity can affect inhibitory synapse plasticity. Here we used tagged gephyrin, one of the main scaffolding proteins of the postsynaptic density at GABAergic synapses, to monitor the activity-dependent adaptation of perisomatic inhibitory synapses over prolonged periods of time in hippocampal slice cultures. We find that learning-related activity patterns known to induce N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent long-term potentiation and transient optogenetic activation of single neurons induce within hours a robust increase in the formation and size of gephyrin-tagged clusters at inhibitory synapses identified by correlated confocal electron microscopy. This inhibitory morphological plasticity was associated with an increase in spontaneous inhibitory activity but did not require activation of GABAA receptors. Importantly, this activity-dependent inhibitory plasticity was prevented by pharmacological blockade of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), it was associated with an increased phosphorylation of gephyrin on a site targeted by CaMKII, and could be prevented or mimicked by gephyrin phospho-mutants for this site. These results reveal a homeostatic mechanism through which activity regulates the dynamics and function of perisomatic inhibitory synapses, and they identify a CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation site on gephyrin as critically important for this process.

  13. Charge changing phosphorylated polymers: Proof of in situ mucoadhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Bonengel, Sonja; Jelkmann, Max; Oh, Sejin; Mahmood, Arshad; Ijaz, Muhammad; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to design a novel polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivative exhibiting mucus permeating and mucoadhesive properties. Therefore, the enzymatically degradable phosphate ester, phosphotyrosine (Ptyr) was covalently attached to PEG-diamine. The synthesized PEG-Ptyr was studied in terms of enzymatic degradability on Caco 2 cells and by isolated intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP). Furthermore, the influence of enzymatic degradation on charge distribution of the polymer as well as on mucus diffusion and mucoadhesion was investigated. Within this study, the phosphate ester in PEG-Ptyr could be cleaved on the cell monolayer and by the isolated IAP, whereby the degradation rate was 10-fold higher utilizing the isolated enzyme. Implementation of negative charges on PEG due to modification with Ptyr led to an increased electrophoretic mobility, which was reduced after enzymatic degradation of the phosphate ester, most likely due to the alterations in charge distribution on the polymeric backbone. Interactions with mucus components were determined within mucus diffusion studies and rheological investigations. Herein, PEG-Ptyr showed a 3-fold lower mucus diffusion, after incubation with IAP. Within rheological investigations, dynamic viscosities increased by the factor of 3, after the phosphate ester in PEG-Ptyr was degraded by IAP. Results obtained within these experiments provided evidence for the in situ mucoadhesive properties of charge changing phosphorylated polymers. The combination of mucus permeating and mucoadhesive features of phosphorylated PEGs could be a highly interesting tool for future applications, such as for coating nanoparticles.

  14. Coupling phosphoryl transfer and substrate interactions in protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Lieser, Scot A; Aubol, Brandon E; Wong, Lilly; Jennings, Patricia A; Adams, Joseph A

    2005-12-30

    Protein kinases control cell signaling events through the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of serine, threonine and tyrosine residues in protein targets. The recognition of these protein substrates by the kinases relies on two principal factors: proper subcellular co-localization and molecular interactions between the kinase and substrate. In this review, we will focus on the kinetic role of the latter in conveying favorable substrate recognition. Using rapid mixing technologies, we demonstrate that the intrinsic thermodynamic affinities of two protein substrates for their respective kinases (Csk with Src and Sky1p with Npl3) are weak compared to their apparent affinities measured in traditional steady-state kinetic assays (i.e.--Km < Kd). The source of the high apparent affinities rests in a very fast and highly favorable phosphoryl transfer step that serves as a clamp for substrate recognition. In this mechanism, both Csk and Sky1p utilize this step to draw the substrate toward product, thereby, converting a high Kd into a low Km. We propose that this one form of substrate recognition employed by protein kinases is advantageous since it simultaneously facilitates high apparent substrate affinity and fast protein turnover.

  15. (Patho-)physiological relevance of PINK1-dependent ubiquitin phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Fiesel, Fabienne C; Ando, Maya; Hudec, Roman; Hill, Anneliese R; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Caulfield, Thomas R; Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Bauer, Peter O; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Ferrer, Isidre; Arbelo, José M; Siuda, Joanna; Chen, Li; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Ross, Owen A; Dickson, Dennis W; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in PINK1 and PARKIN cause recessive, early-onset Parkinson’s disease (PD). Together, these two proteins orchestrate a protective mitophagic response that ensures the safe disposal of damaged mitochondria. The kinase PINK1 phosphorylates ubiquitin (Ub) at the conserved residue S65, in addition to modifying the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin. The structural and functional consequences of Ub phosphorylation (pS65-Ub) have already been suggested from in vitro experiments, but its (patho-)physiological significance remains unknown. We have generated novel antibodies and assessed pS65-Ub signals in vitro and in cells, including primary neurons, under endogenous conditions. pS65-Ub is dependent on PINK1 kinase activity as confirmed in patient fibroblasts and postmortem brain samples harboring pathogenic mutations. We show that pS65-Ub is reversible and barely detectable under basal conditions, but rapidly induced upon mitochondrial stress in cells and amplified in the presence of functional Parkin. pS65-Ub accumulates in human brain during aging and disease in the form of cytoplasmic granules that partially overlap with mitochondrial, lysosomal, and total Ub markers. Additional studies are now warranted to further elucidate pS65-Ub functions and fully explore its potential for biomarker or therapeutic development. PMID:26162776

  16. Regulation of mitochondrial functions by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sangbin; Smith, Kelly R; Lim, Ssang-Taek Steve; Tian, Rong; Lu, Jianrong; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondria are double membrane-bound organelles found in most eukaryotic cells. They generate most of the cell's energy supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are critical mechanisms in the regulation of cell signaling networks and are essential for almost all the cellular functions. For many decades, mitochondria were considered autonomous organelles merely functioning to generate energy for cells to survive and proliferate, and were thought to be independent of the cellular signaling networks. Consequently, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation processes of mitochondrial kinases and phosphatases were largely neglected. However, evidence accumulated in recent years on mitochondria-localized kinases/phosphatases has changed this longstanding view. Mitochondria are increasingly recognized as a hub for cell signaling, and many kinases and phosphatases have been reported to localize in mitochondria and play important functions. However, the strength of the evidence on mitochondrial localization and the activities of the reported kinases and phosphatases vary greatly, and the detailed mechanisms on how these kinases/phosphatases translocate to mitochondria, their subsequent function, and the physiological and pathological implications of their localization are still poorly understood. Here, we provide an updated perspective on the recent advancement in this area, with an emphasis on the implications of mitochondrial kinases/phosphatases in cancer and several other diseases.

  17. Occludin S471 Phosphorylation Contributes to Epithelial Monolayer Maturation.

    PubMed

    Bolinger, Mark T; Ramshekar, Aniket; Waldschmidt, Helen V; Larsen, Scott D; Bewley, Maria C; Flanagan, John M; Antonetti, David A

    2016-08-01

    Multiple organ systems require epithelial barriers for normal function, and barrier loss is a hallmark of diseases ranging from inflammation to epithelial cancers. However, the molecular processes regulating epithelial barrier maturation are not fully elucidated. After contact, epithelial cells undergo size-reductive proliferation and differentiate, creating a dense, highly ordered monolayer with high resistance barriers. We provide evidence that the tight junction protein occludin contributes to the regulation of epithelial cell maturation upon phosphorylation of S471 in its coiled-coil domain. Overexpression of a phosphoinhibitory occludin S471A mutant prevents size-reductive proliferation and subsequent tight junction maturation in a dominant manner. Inhibition of cell proliferation in cell-contacted but immature monolayers recapitulated this phenotype. A kinase screen identified G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) targeting S471, and GRK inhibitors delayed epithelial packing and junction maturation. We conclude that occludin contributes to the regulation of size-reductive proliferation and epithelial cell maturation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. FIP5 phosphorylation during mitosis regulates apical trafficking and lumenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongying; Mangan, Anthony; Cicchini, Louis; Margolis, Ben; Prekeris, Rytis

    2014-04-01

    Apical lumen formation is a key step during epithelial morphogenesis. The establishment of the apical lumen is a complex process that involves coordinated changes in plasma membrane composition, endocytic transport, and cytoskeleton organization. These changes are accomplished, at least in part, by the targeting and fusion of Rab11/FIP5-containing apical endosomes with the apical membrane initiation site (AMIS). Although AMIS formation and polarized transport of Rab11/FIP5-containing endosomes are crucial for the formation of a single apical lumen, the spatiotemporal regulation of this process remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the formation of the midbody during cytokinesis is a symmetry-breaking event that establishes the location of the AMIS. The interaction of FIP5 with SNX18, which is required for the formation of apical endocytic carriers, is inhibited by GSK-3 phosphorylation at FIP5-T276. Importantly, we show that FIP5-T276 phosphorylation occurs specifically during metaphase and anaphase, to ensure the fidelity and timing of FIP5-endosome targeting to the AMIS during apical lumen formation.

  19. Regulation of Endothelial Adherens Junctions by Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Alejandro Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells form a semipermeable, regulated barrier that limits the passage of fluid, small molecules, and leukocytes between the bloodstream and the surrounding tissues. The adherens junction, a major mechanism of intercellular adhesion, is comprised of transmembrane cadherins forming homotypic interactions between adjacent cells and associated cytoplasmic catenins linking the cadherins to the cytoskeleton. Inflammatory conditions promote the disassembly of the adherens junction and a loss of intercellular adhesion, creating openings or gaps in the endothelium through which small molecules diffuse and leukocytes transmigrate. Tyrosine kinase signaling has emerged as a central regulator of the inflammatory response, partly through direct phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the adherens junction components. This review discusses the findings that support and those that argue against a direct effect of cadherin and catenin phosphorylation in the disassembly of the adherens junction. Recent findings indicate a complex interaction between kinases, phosphatases, and the adherens junction components that allow a fine regulation of the endothelial permeability to small molecules, leukocyte migration, and barrier resealing. PMID:26556953

  20. Carotid body O2 chemoreception and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, E; Lahiri, S; Storey, B T

    1981-08-01

    The effect on carotid chemoreceptor afferents of oligomycin, an inhibitor of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation that does not affect energy conservation, was studied in 20 cats that were anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated. Responses of single or a few chemoreceptor afferents to changes in arterial O2 tension (PaO2) at constant arterial CO2 tension were recorded. In addition, responses to nicotine, cyanide, and antimycin A or carbonyl cyanide p-tri-fluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) were tested in normoxia. Oligomycin (50-500 microgram) was administered by close intra-arterial injection, and the same tests were repeated at timed intervals. Initially, oligomycin caused vigorous stimulation of carotid chemoreceptor activity. Subsequently, although the afferent fibers were still active and could be vigorously stimulated by nicotine, they no longer responded to changes in PaO2 or to doses of cyanide, antimycin A, or FCCP. These results separate stimulation of chemoreceptor afferents by hypoxia and metabolic inhibitors and uncouplers from that by nicotine and suggest that intact oxidative phosphorylation, required for maintenance of the intracellular high-energy phosphate levels, forms the basis of O2 chemoreception in the carotid body.

  1. (Patho-)physiological relevance of PINK1-dependent ubiquitin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fiesel, Fabienne C; Ando, Maya; Hudec, Roman; Hill, Anneliese R; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Caulfield, Thomas R; Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Bauer, Peter O; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Ferrer, Isidre; Arbelo, José M; Siuda, Joanna; Chen, Li; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Ross, Owen A; Dickson, Dennis W; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in PINK1 and PARKIN cause recessive, early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Together, these two proteins orchestrate a protective mitophagic response that ensures the safe disposal of damaged mitochondria. The kinase PINK1 phosphorylates ubiquitin (Ub) at the conserved residue S65, in addition to modifying the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin. The structural and functional consequences of Ub phosphorylation (pS65-Ub) have already been suggested from in vitro experiments, but its (patho-)physiological significance remains unknown. We have generated novel antibodies and assessed pS65-Ub signals in vitro and in cells, including primary neurons, under endogenous conditions. pS65-Ub is dependent on PINK1 kinase activity as confirmed in patient fibroblasts and postmortem brain samples harboring pathogenic mutations. We show that pS65-Ub is reversible and barely detectable under basal conditions, but rapidly induced upon mitochondrial stress in cells and amplified in the presence of functional Parkin. pS65-Ub accumulates in human brain during aging and disease in the form of cytoplasmic granules that partially overlap with mitochondrial, lysosomal, and total Ub markers. Additional studies are now warranted to further elucidate pS65-Ub functions and fully explore its potential for biomarker or therapeutic development.

  2. Occludin S471 Phosphorylation Contributes to Epithelial Monolayer Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bolinger, Mark T.; Waldschmidt, Helen V.; Larsen, Scott D.; Bewley, Maria C.; Flanagan, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple organ systems require epithelial barriers for normal function, and barrier loss is a hallmark of diseases ranging from inflammation to epithelial cancers. However, the molecular processes regulating epithelial barrier maturation are not fully elucidated. After contact, epithelial cells undergo size-reductive proliferation and differentiate, creating a dense, highly ordered monolayer with high resistance barriers. We provide evidence that the tight junction protein occludin contributes to the regulation of epithelial cell maturation upon phosphorylation of S471 in its coiled-coil domain. Overexpression of a phosphoinhibitory occludin S471A mutant prevents size-reductive proliferation and subsequent tight junction maturation in a dominant manner. Inhibition of cell proliferation in cell-contacted but immature monolayers recapitulated this phenotype. A kinase screen identified G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) targeting S471, and GRK inhibitors delayed epithelial packing and junction maturation. We conclude that occludin contributes to the regulation of size-reductive proliferation and epithelial cell maturation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:27185880

  3. Cholinesterase inhibitors may increase phosphorylated tau in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Katy A; Wilcock, Gordon K; Vinters, Harry V; Perry, Elaine K; Perry, Robert; Ballard, Clive G; Love, Seth

    2009-05-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vitro and in animal studies, ChEIs have been shown to influence the processing of Abeta and the phosphorylation of tau, proteins that are the principal constituents of the plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, respectively, in AD brain. However, little is known about the effects of these drugs on Abeta and tau pathology in AD. Using avidin-biotin immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted image analysis, we compared Abeta and tau loads in the frontal and temporal cortices of 72 brains from matched cohorts of AD patients who had or had not received ChEIs. Patients treated with ChEIs had accumulated significantly more phospho-tau in their cerebral cortex than had untreated patients (P = 0.004). Abeta accumulation was reduced but not significantly. These data raise the possibility that increased tau phosphorylation may influence long-term clinical responsiveness to ChEIs.

  4. Auto-phosphorylation Represses Protein Kinase R Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Die; de Weerd, Nicole A; Willard, Belinda; Polekhina, Galina; Williams, Bryan R G; Sadler, Anthony J

    2017-03-10

    The central role of protein kinases in controlling disease processes has spurred efforts to develop pharmaceutical regulators of their activity. A rational strategy to achieve this end is to determine intrinsic auto-regulatory processes, then selectively target these different states of kinases to repress their activation. Here we investigate auto-regulation of the innate immune effector protein kinase R, which phosphorylates the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α to inhibit global protein translation. We demonstrate that protein kinase R activity is controlled by auto-inhibition via an intra-molecular interaction. Part of this mechanism of control had previously been reported, but was then controverted. We account for the discrepancy and extend our understanding of the auto-inhibitory mechanism by identifying that auto-inhibition is paradoxically instigated by incipient auto-phosphorylation. Phosphor-residues at the amino-terminus instigate an intra-molecular interaction that enlists both of the N-terminal RNA-binding motifs of the protein with separate surfaces of the C-terminal kinase domain, to co-operatively inhibit kinase activation. These findings identify an innovative mechanism to control kinase activity, providing insight for strategies to better regulate kinase activity.

  5. Channel modulation by tyrosine phosphorylation in an identified leech neuron.

    PubMed Central

    Aniksztejn, L; Catarsi, S; Drapeau, P

    1997-01-01

    1. We have examined the effects of tyrosine phosphorylation on a spontaneously active cation channel that also participates in the modulation of pressure-sensitive (P) neurons in the leech. Cation channel activity in cell-attached or isolated, inside-out membrane patches from P cells in culture was monitored before and after treatments that altered the level of tyrosine phosphorylation. 2. In cell-attached recordings from intact P cells, bath application of genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, resulted in a 6.6 +/- 2.6-fold increase in channel activity with no change in the mean open time or amplitude. Daidzein, an inactive form of genistein, was without effect. Addition of pervanadate, a membrane-permeant inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, had no effect on its own and blocked the effect of subsequent addition of genistein. 3. In inside-out P cell membrane patch recordings, exposure to a catalytically active fragment of a tyrosine phosphatase resulted in a 10.3 +/- 3.6-fold increase in channel activity with no change in the mean open time or amplitude. Orthovanadate had no effect on channel activity and, when added with the phosphatase, prevented the increase in activity. 4. Our results demonstrate that the basal activity of cation channels is increased by tyrosine dephosphorylation, suggesting a constitutive modulation of channel activity under resting conditions. PMID:9023773

  6. Cigarette sidestream smoke induces phosphorylated histone H2AX.

    PubMed

    Toyooka, Tatsushi; Ibuki, Yuko

    2009-05-31

    Cigarette sidestream smoke (CSS) is a widespread environmental pollutant having highly genotoxic potency. In spite of the overwhelming evidence that CSS induces a wide range of DNA damage such as oxidative base damage and DNA adducts, evidence that CSS can result in DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) is little. In this study, we showed that CSS generated phosphorylated histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX), recently considered as a sensitive marker of the generation of DSBs, in a human pulmonary epithelial cell model, A549. Treatment with CSS drastically induced discrete foci of gamma-H2AX within the nucleus in a dose-dependent manner. CSS increased intracellular oxidation, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, significantly attenuated the formation of gamma-H2AX, suggesting that reactive oxygen species produced from CSS partially contributed to the phosphorylation. The generation of gamma-H2AX is considered to be accompanied the induction of DSBs. CSS in fact induced DSBs, which was also inhibited by NAC. DSBs are the worst type of DNA damage, related to genomic instability and carcinogenesis. Our results would increase the evidence of the strong genotoxicity of passive smoking.

  7. Uncovering Phosphorylation-Based Specificities through Functional Interaction Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Wagih, Omar; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ishihama, Yasushi; Beltrao, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases are an important class of enzymes involved in the phosphorylation of their targets, which regulate key cellular processes and are typically mediated by a specificity for certain residues around the target phospho-acceptor residue. While efforts have been made to identify such specificities, only ∼30% of human kinases have a significant number of known binding sites. We describe a computational method that utilizes functional interaction data and phosphorylation data to predict specificities of kinases. We applied this method to human kinases to predict substrate preferences for 57% of all known kinases and show that we are able to reconstruct well-known specificities. We used an in vitro mass spectrometry approach to validate four understudied kinases and show that predicted models closely resemble true specificities. We show that this method can be applied to different organisms and can be extended to other phospho-recognition domains. Applying this approach to different types of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and binding domains could uncover specificities of understudied PTM recognition domains and provide significant insight into the mechanisms of signaling networks. PMID:26572964

  8. Quantitative and dynamic analysis of PTEN phosphorylation by NMR.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Florence; Chaffotte, Alain; Wolff, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    The dual lipid and protein phosphatase PTEN is a tumor suppressor controlling key biological processes, such as cell growth, proliferation and neuro-survival. Its activity and intracellular trafficking is finely regulated notably by multi-site phosphorylation of its C-terminal tail. The reversible and highly dynamic character of these regulatory events confers a temporal dimension to the cell for triggering crucial decisions. In this review, we describe how a recently developed time-resolved NMR spectroscopy approach unveils the dynamic establishment of the phosphorylation events of PTEN C-terminal tail controlled by CK2 and GSK3β kinases. Two cascades of reactions have been identified, in vitro and in extracts of human neuroblastoma cells. They are triggered independently on two nearby clusters of sites (S380-S385 and S361-S370) and occur on different timescales. In each cascade, the reactions follow an ordered model with a distributive kinetic mechanism. The vision of these cascades as two delay timers activating distinct or time-delayed regulatory responses gives a temporal dimension on PTEN regulation and is discussed in relation to the known functional roles of each cluster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of diffusion on the kinetics of multisite phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Gopich, Irina V; Szabo, Attila

    2016-01-01

    When an enzyme modifies multiple sites on a substrate, the influence of the relative diffusive motion of the reactants cannot be described by simply altering the rate constants in the rate equations of chemical kinetics. We have recently shown that, even as a first approximation, new transitions between the appropriate species must also be introduced. The physical reason for this is that a kinase, after phosphorylating one site, can rebind and modify another site instead of diffusing away. The corresponding new rate constants depend on the capture or rebinding probabilities that an enzyme-substrate pair, which is formed after dissociation from one site, reacts at the other site rather than diffusing apart. Here we generalize our previous work to describe both random and sequential phosphorylation by considering inequivalent modification sites. In addition, anisotropic reactive sites (instead of uniformly reactive spheres) are explicitly treated by using localized sink and source terms in the reaction-diffusion equations for the enzyme-substrate pair distribution function. Finally, we show that our results can be rederived using a phenomenological approach based on introducing transient encounter complexes into the standard kinetic scheme and then eliminating them using the steady-state approximation.

  10. Phosphorylation of filamin A regulates chemokine receptor CCR2 recycling.

    PubMed

    Pons, Mònica; Izquierdo, Ismael; Andreu-Carbó, Mireia; Garrido, Georgina; Planagumà, Jesús; Muriel, Olivia; Del Pozo, Miguel A; Geli, M Isabel; Aragay, Anna M

    2017-01-15

    Proper endosomal trafficking of ligand-activated G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential to spatiotemporally tune their physiological responses. For the monocyte chemoattractant receptor 2 (CCR2B; one of two isoforms encoded by CCR2), endocytic recycling is important to sustain monocyte migration, whereas filamin A (FLNa) is essential for CCL2-induced monocyte migration. Here, we analyze the role of FLNa in the trafficking of CCR2B along the endocytic pathway. In FLNa-knockdown cells, activated CCR2B accumulated in enlarged EEA-1-positive endosomes, which exhibited slow movement and fast fluorescence recovery, suggesting an imbalance between receptor entry and exit rates. Utilizing super-resolution microscopy, we observed that FLNa-GFP, CCR2B and β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) were present in actin-enriched endosomal microdomains. Depletion of FLNa decreased CCR2B association with these microdomains and concomitantly delayed CCR2B endosomal traffic, without apparently affecting the number of microdomains. Interestingly, CCR2B and β2AR signaling induced phosphorylation of FLNa at residue S2152, and this phosphorylation event was contributes to sustain receptor recycling. Thus, our data strongly suggest that CCR2B and β2AR signals to FLNa to stimulate its endocytosis and recycling to the plasma membrane. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Auto-phosphorylation Represses Protein Kinase R Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Die; de Weerd, Nicole A.; Willard, Belinda; Polekhina, Galina; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Sadler, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    The central role of protein kinases in controlling disease processes has spurred efforts to develop pharmaceutical regulators of their activity. A rational strategy to achieve this end is to determine intrinsic auto-regulatory processes, then selectively target these different states of kinases to repress their activation. Here we investigate auto-regulation of the innate immune effector protein kinase R, which phosphorylates the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α to inhibit global protein translation. We demonstrate that protein kinase R activity is controlled by auto-inhibition via an intra-molecular interaction. Part of this mechanism of control had previously been reported, but was then controverted. We account for the discrepancy and extend our understanding of the auto-inhibitory mechanism by identifying that auto-inhibition is paradoxically instigated by incipient auto-phosphorylation. Phosphor-residues at the amino-terminus instigate an intra-molecular interaction that enlists both of the N-terminal RNA-binding motifs of the protein with separate surfaces of the C-terminal kinase domain, to co-operatively inhibit kinase activation. These findings identify an innovative mechanism to control kinase activity, providing insight for strategies to better regulate kinase activity. PMID:28281686

  12. Physiological signalling to myosin phosphatase targeting subunit‐1 phosphorylation in ileal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ning; Chang, Audrey N.; He, Weiqi; Chen, Cai‐Ping; Qiao, Yan‐Ning; Zhu, Minsheng; Kamm, Kristine E.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The extent of myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation (RLC) necessary for smooth muscle contraction depends on the respective activities of Ca2+/calmodulin‐dependent myosin light chain kinase and myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), which contains a regulatory subunit MYPT1 bound to the phosphatase catalytic subunit and myosin.MYPT1 showed significant constitutive T696 and T853 phosphorylation, which is predicted to inhibit MLCP activity in isolated ileal smooth muscle tissues, with additional phosphorylation upon pharmacological treatment with the muscarinic agonist carbachol.Electrical field stimulation (EFS), which releases ACh from nerves, increased force and RLC phosphorylation but not MYPT1 T696 or T853 phosphorylation.The conditional knockout of MYPT1 or the knockin mutation T853A in mice had no effect on the frequency‐maximal force responses to EFS in isolated ileal tissues.Physiological RLC phosphorylation and force development in ileal smooth muscle depend on myosin light chain kinase and MLCP activities without changes in constitutive MYPT1 phosphorylation. Abstract Smooth muscle contraction initiated by myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation is dependent on the relative activities of Ca2+/calmodulin‐dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP). We have investigated the physiological role of the MLCP regulatory subunit MYPT1 in ileal smooth muscle in adult mice with (1) smooth muscle‐specific deletion of MYPT1; (2) non‐phosphorylatable MYPT1 containing a T853A knockin mutation; and (3) measurements of force and protein phosphorylation responses to cholinergic neurostimulation initiated by electric field stimulation. Isolated MYPT1‐deficient tissues from MYPT1SM−/− mice contracted and relaxed rapidly with moderate differences in sustained responses to KCl and carbachol treatments and washouts, respectively. Similarly, measurements of regulatory proteins responsible for

  13. Identification and quantification of the phosphorylated ovalbumin by high resolution mass spectrometry under dry-heating treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Tu, Zong-Cai; Liu, Guang-Xian; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    The specific phosphorylation sites and degree of phosphorylation (DP) at each site are directly related to protein's structure and functional properties. Thus, characterizing the introduced phosphate groups is of great importance. This study was to monitor the phosphorylation sites, DP and the number of phosphorylation sites in P-Oval achieved by dry heating in the presence of pyrophosphate for 1, 2 and 5days by using Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Two phosphorylation sites were found in natural ovalbumin, but the number of phosphorylation sites increased to 8, 8 and 10 after dry-heating phosphorylation for 1, 2 and 5days, respectively. In addition, dual-phosphorylated peptides were detected for samples without extensive heating. The phosphorylation sites were found to be mainly on Ser residues, which could be the preferred phosphorylation site for dry heating in the presence of pyrophosphate.

  14. Structural insights into the recruitment of SMRT by the corepressor SHARP under phosphorylative regulation.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Suzuka; Kanaba, Teppei; Takizawa, Naoki; Kobayashi, Ayaho; Maesaki, Ryoko; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Ito, Yutaka; Mishima, Masaki

    2014-01-07

    The transcriptional corepressors SMRT/NCoR, components of histone deacetylase complexes, interact with nuclear receptors and many other transcription factors. SMRT is a target for the ubiquitously expressed protein kinase CK2, which is known to phosphorylate a wide variety of substrates. Increasing evidence suggests that CK2 plays a regulatory role in many cellular events, particularly, in transcription. However, little is known about the precise mode of action involved. Here, we report the three-dimensional structure of a SMRT/HDAC1-associated repressor protein (SHARP) in complex with phosphorylated SMRT, as determined by solution NMR. Phosphorylation of the CK2 site on SMRT significantly increased affinity for SHARP. We also confirmed the significance of CK2 phosphorylation by reporter assay and propose a mechanism involving the process of phosphorylation acting as a molecular switch. Finally, we propose that the SPOC domain functions as a phosphorylation binding module.

  15. Auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation in pea epicotyl segments

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.S.N.; Chengappa, S.; Raghothama, K.G.; Poovaiah, B.W.

    1987-04-01

    Auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation were studied by labeling pea epicotyl segments with (/sup 32/P) PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/ and analyzing the phosphoproteins by two dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. Analysis of phosphoproteins revealed auxin-regulated changes in the phosphorylation of specific polypeptides. In the presence of auxin, phosphorylation of 23,000, 82,000, 105,000 and 110,000 molecular weight polypeptides was markedly decreased whereas phosphorylation of 19,000, 24,000, 28,000 molecular weight polypeptides was increased. Some of these changes are very rapid and could be observed within minutes. Furthermore, their studies with calmodulin antagonists indicate the possible involvement of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and/or phosphatases in auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation. In view of these results, they suggest that auxin-regulated protein phosphorylation could be the one of the earliest events in regulating diverse physiological processes by this hormone.

  16. Heat shock and deciliation induce phosphorylation of histone H1 in T. pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Glover, C V; Vavra, K J; Guttman, S D; Gorovsky, M A

    1981-01-01

    Both heat shock and decilliation of Tetrahymena pyriformis lead to an increase in the level of histone H1 phosphorylation. After heat shock, starved or growing cells reach the same maximum level of H1 phosphorylation, although the increase is more easily detected in starved cells because of their relatively low initial level of phosphorylation. In starved cells, stress-induced phosphorylation is rapid, involves a large percentage of the H1, occurs at multiple sites on the H1 molecule and is inhibited by cycloheximide. Stress-induced phosphorylation of H1 in Tetrahymena thus has many properties in common with cell-cycle-dependent H1 phosphorylation although it is not coupled to the cell cycle.

  17. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylated Light Chain Domain of Scallop Smooth-Muscle Myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.S.; Robinson, H.; O-Neall-Hennessey, E.; Reshetnikova, L.; Brown, J. H.; Szent-Gyorgyi, A. G.; Cohen, C.

    2011-11-02

    We have determined the crystal structure of a phosphorylated smooth-muscle myosin light chain domain (LCD). This reconstituted LCD is of a sea scallop catch muscle myosin with its phosphorylatable regulatory light chain (RLC SmoA). In the crystal structure, Arg{sup 16}, an arginine residue that is present in this isoform but not in vertebrate smooth-muscle RLC, stabilizes the phosphorylation site. This arginine interacts with the carbonyl group of the phosphorylation-site serine in the unphosphorylated LCD (determined previously), and with the phosphate group when the serine is phosphorylated. However, the overall conformation of the LCD is essentially unchanged upon phosphorylation. This result provides additional evidence that phosphorylation