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Sample records for cyclic compressive loading

  1. Investigation of Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue of Polycrystalline Cu under Pure Compression Cyclic Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tzu-Yin Jean

    It is commonly accepted that fatigue crack is initiated under tensile fatigue stresses. However, practical examples demonstrate that cracks may also initiate under pure compressive fluctuating loads such as the failures observed in aircraft landing gear frames. However, the mechanism of such failures is rarely investigated. Furthermore, knowledge on cyclic deformation response under pure compressive fatigue condition is also very limited or non-existent. Our recent work already verified that fatigue cracks may nucleate from stress concentration sites under pure compression fatigue, but whether or not a form of stress concentration is always needed to initiate a crack under pure compression fatigue remains uncertain. In this study, compression fatigue tests under different peak stresses were carried out on smooth bars of fully annealed OFHC Copper. The purpose of these tests is to investigate not only the cyclic deformation response but also the possibility of crack nucleation without the stress concentrator. Results showed that overall the cyclic stress-strain response and microstructural evolution of OFHC Copper under pure compression fatigue exhibits rather dissimilar behaviour compared to those under symmetrical fatigue. The specimens hardened rapidly within 10 cycles under pure compression fatigue unlike the gradual cyclic hardening behaviour in symmetrical fatigue with the same peak stress amplitude. Compressive cyclic creep behaviour was also observed under the same testing conditions. Moreover, unlike conventional tension-compression fatigue, only moderate slip activity was detectable on the surface instead of typical PSB features detected from TEM observations. The surface observations has revealed that surface slip bands did not increase in number nor did they become more pronounced in height with increasing number of cycles. In addition, surface roughening by grain boundary extrusion was detected to become more severe as the cycling progressed. Therefore

  2. Investigation of Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue of Polycrystalline Cu under Pure Compression Cyclic Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tzu-Yin Jean

    It is commonly accepted that fatigue crack is initiated under tensile fatigue stresses. However, practical examples demonstrate that cracks may initiate under pure compressive fluctuating loads, e.g. the failures observed in aircraft landing gear frames. As the mechanism of such failures is rarely investigated, there is very limited or non-existent knowledge pool on cyclic deformation response under pure compressive fatigue condition. Our recent work verified that fatigue cracks may nucleate from stress concentration sites under pure compression fatigue, but whether or not a form of stress concentration is always needed to initiate a crack remains uncertain. In this study, compression fatigue tests under different peak stresses were carried out on smooth bars of fully annealed OFHC Copper. The purpose of these tests is to investigate not only the cyclic deformation response but also the possibility of crack nucleation without the stress concentrator. Results showed that overall the cyclic stress-strain response and microstructural evolution of OFHC Copper under pure compression fatigue exhibits rather dissimilar behaviour compared to those under symmetrical fatigue. The specimens hardened rapidly within 10 cycles under pure compression fatigue unlike the gradual cyclic hardening behaviour in symmetrical fatigue with the same peak stress amplitude. Compressive cyclic creep behaviour was also observed. Moreover, TEM observation showed that only moderate slip activity was detectable on the surface instead of typical PSB features. The surface observations revealed that surface slip bands did not increase in number nor height as cycling progressed. In addition, surface roughening by grain boundary extrusion was detected to become more severe with further cycling. Therefore, the plastic strain accommodated within the samples was not mainly related to dislocation activities. Instead, the mechanism of cyclic creep response for pure compression fatigue was correlated and

  3. Nucleotomy reduces the effects of cyclic compressive loading with unloaded recovery on human intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Brent L; Malhotra, Neil R; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-08-22

    The first objective of this study was to determine the effects of physiological cyclic loading followed by unloaded recovery on the mechanical response of human intervertebral discs. The second objective was to examine how nucleotomy alters the disc's mechanical response to cyclic loading. To complete these objectives, 15 human L5-S1 discs were tested while intact and subsequent to nucleotomy. The testing consisted of 10,000 cycles of physiological compressive loads followed by unloaded hydrated recovery. Cyclic loading increased compression modulus (3%) and strain (33%), decreased neutral zone modulus (52%), and increased neutral zone strain (31%). Degeneration was not correlated with the effect of cyclic loading in intact discs, but was correlated with cyclic loading effects after nucleotomy, with more degenerate samples experiencing greater increases in both compressive and neutral zone strain following cyclic loading. Partial removal of the nucleus pulposus decreased the compression and neutral zone modulus while increasing strain. These changes correspond to hypermobility, which will alter overall spinal mechanics and may impact low back pain via altered motion throughout the spinal column. Nucleotomy also reduced the effects of cyclic loading on mechanical properties, likely due to altered fluid flow, which may impact cellular mechanotransduction and transport of disc nutrients and waste. Degeneration was not correlated with the acute changes of nucleotomy. Results of this study provide an ideal protocol and control data for evaluating the effectiveness of a mechanically-based disc degeneration treatment, such as a nucleus replacement.

  4. Responses of intramembranous bone and sutures upon in vivo cyclic tensile and compressive loading.

    PubMed

    Peptan, Alexandra I; Lopez, Aurora; Kopher, Ross A; Mao, Jeremy J

    2008-02-01

    Cranial vault and facial sutures interpose between mineralized bones of the skull, and may function analogously to appendicular and cranial base growth plates. However, unlike growth plates that are composed of chondrocyte lineage, cranial and facial sutures possess heterogeneous cell lineages such as mesenchymal cells, fibroblasts, and osteoblasts, in addition to vascular-derived cells. Despite recently intensified effort, the biological responses of intramembranous bone and sutures to mechanical loading are not well understood. This study was designed to investigate whether brief doses of tensile or compressive forces induce modeling and growth responses of intramembranous bone and sutures. In different groups of growing rabbits in vivo, cyclic tensile or compressive forces at 1 N and 8 Hz were applied to the maxilla for 20 min/day over 12 consecutive days. Computerized histomorphometric analyses revealed that the average sutural widths of both the premaxillomaxillary suture (PMS) and nasofrontal suture (NFS) loaded in either tension or compression were significantly higher than age- and sex-matched sham controls (P<0.01). The average cell densities of tension- or compression-loaded PMS and NFS were significantly higher than sham controls (P<0.01). The average osteoblast occupied sutural bone surface loaded under tension was significantly higher than that of sham control (P<0.05). Interestingly, tensile loading significantly reduced the average osteoclast surface, in comparison to sham control (P<0.05). For the NFS, tensile loading significantly increased the average osteoblast occupied sutural bone surface, in comparison with that of sham control (P<0.05). Also for the NFS suture, compression significantly reduced the average sutural osteoclast surface in comparison with sham control (P<0.05). Taken together, the present data suggest that high-frequency cyclic forces in either tension or compression induce modeling and growth changes in cranial sutures. Due to

  5. Strain-energy release rate analysis of cyclic delamination growth in compressively loaded laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates was studied analytically and experimentally. The configuration used was a laminate with an across-the-width delamination. An approximate super-position stress analysis was developed to quantify the effects of various geometric, material, and load parameters on mode 1 and mode 2 strain energy release rates G sub 1 and G sub 2, respectively. Calculated values of G sub 1 and G sub 2 were then compared with measured cyclic delamination growth rates to determine the relative importance of G sub 1 and G sub 2. High growth rates were observed only when G sub 1 was large. However, slow growth was observed even when G sub 1 was negligibly small. This growth was apparently due to a large value of G sub 2.

  6. Strain energy release rate analysis of cyclic delamination growth in compressively loaded laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates was studied analytically and experimentally. The configuration used was a laminate with an across-the-width delamination. An approximate super-position stress analysis was developed to quantify the effects of various geometric, material, and load parameters on mode 2 and mode 2 strain energy release rates G sub/1 and G sub 2, respectively. Calculated values of G sub 1 and G sub 2 were then compared with measured cyclic delamination growth rates to determine the relative importance of G sub 1 and G sub 2. High growth rates were observed only when G sub 1 was large. However, slow growth was observed even when G sub 1 was negligibly small. This growth apparently was due to a large value of G sub 2.

  7. Effects of Acoustic Emission and Energy Evolution of Rock Specimens Under the Uniaxial Cyclic Loading and Unloading Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingbin; Zhang, Mingwei; Han, Lijun; Pu, Hai; Nie, Taoyi

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics of energy accumulation, evolution, and dissipation in uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading compression of 30 sandstone rock specimens under six different loading rates were explored. Stress-strain relations and acoustic emission characteristics of the deformation and failure of rock specimens were analyzed. The densities and rates of stored energy, elastic energy, and dissipated energy under different loading rates were confirmed, and an effective approach for the equivalent energy surface was presented. The energy evolution of rock deformation and failure were revealed. It turns out that the rock deformation behavior under uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading compression remained almost unchanged compared with that of uniaxial compression. The degree of match between reloading stress-strain curves and previous unloading curves was high, thereby demonstrating the memory function of rock masses. The intensity of acoustic emission fluctuated continually during the entire cyclic process. Emissions significantly increased as the stress exceeded the unloading level. The peak of acoustic emission increased with increasing loading stress level. Relationships between energy density and axial load indicate that the rock mass possesses a certain energy storage limitation. The energy evolution of rock masses is closely related to the axial loading stress, rather than to the axial loading rate. With increasing axial loading stress, stored energy varied most rapidly, followed by that of the elastic energy, then dissipated energy. Energy accumulation dominates prior to the axial load reaching peak strength; thereafter, energy dissipation becomes dominant. The input energy causes the irreversible initiation and extension of microcracks in the rock body. Elastic energy release leads to sudden instability of rock bodies and drives rock damage.

  8. Prolonged matrix metalloproteinase-3 high expression after cyclic compressive load on human synovial cells in three-dimensional cultured tissue.

    PubMed

    Akamine, Y; Kakudo, K; Kondo, M; Ota, K; Muroi, Y; Yoshikawa, H; Nakata, K

    2012-07-01

    Excessive mechanical stress is thought to be a factor in the development of joint disorders through the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and related cytokines. Although studies revealed that mechanical stress on the synovium induces MMP expression, it is still not known which MMPs prolonged high level expression. The authors focused on MMP-3, which is one of the major factors in joint disorders such as rheumatism and temporomandibular joint disorders. They examined mRNA and protein levels of MMP-3, other MMPs and related cytokines after loading stress. Human synovial cells were seeded onto a collagen scaffold and different magnitudes of cyclic compressive load were applied for 1h. Time-dependent mRNA and protein levels for catabolic genes were examined after loading. mRNA expressions of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-1β increased after excessive compression. In particular, only mRNA of MMP-3 was up-regulated and maintained at a high level for 24h after excessive loading. The concentrations of MMP-3, IL-6 and IL-8 in culture media after loading increased with excessive compression. These results may account for the pathomechanism of MMP-3 induced by cyclic load on synovial cells in joint disorders.

  9. Post buckling behaviour of stiffened composite panels loaded in cyclic compression and shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, A.; Frostig, Y.; Shalev, D.; Weller, T.; Sheinman, Y.

    1993-02-01

    This paper presents the summary of a multiphase experimental - analytical study of the post-buckling mechanical behavior of a graphite/epoxy integrally stiffened panel. The first phase of the study included cyclic compression tests in the post-buckling regime of flat panels stiffened by either 'I' or 'J' shaped stiffeners. Static residual strength of the panels after 250,000 cycles was greater than the reference strength; however, some stiffness loss was observed. A series of tests of individual stiffeners, identical to those in the panels, was also carried out and the results showed the same trends as had been observed in the panels. There were no cases of early failure during the cyclic tests. The second phase included an experimental study of the post-buckling behavior of cylindrical panels integrally stiffened in the axial and transverse directions. Panels were tested in cyclic compression, cyclic torsion, and in combinations of both. The panels were stressed through 40,000 cycles, damage was inflicted, and an additional 40,000 cycles were imposed. No damage development was observed. The third phase of the study included an analytical effort for the development of a computer code, PBCOMP, for the buckling and post-buckling analysis of stiffened laminated flat and curved panels. The results of this study clearly show a great potential for the safe use of stiffened graphite/epoxy panels in aircraft structures.

  10. Mortar constituent of concrete under cyclic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, A.; Darwin, D.

    1980-10-01

    The behavior of the mortar constituent of concrete under cyclic compression was studied and a simple analytic model was developed to represent its cyclic behavior. Experimental work consisted of monotonic and cyclic compressive loading of mortar. Two mixes were used, with proportions corresponding to concretes having water cement ratios of 0.5 and 0.6. Forty-four groups of specimens were tested at ages ranging from 5 to 70 days. complete monotonic and cyclic stress strain envelopes were obtained. A number of loading regimes were investigated, including cycles to a constant maximum strain. Major emphasis was placed on tests using relatively high stress cycles. Degradation was shown to be a continuous process and a function of both total strain and load history. No stability or fatigue limit was apparent.

  11. The Impact of Posture on the Mechanical Properties of a Functional Spinal Unit During Cyclic Compressive Loading.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jeff M; Gooyers, Chad E; Karakolis, Thomas; Callaghan, Jack P

    2016-08-01

    To assess how posture affects the transmission of mechanical energy up the spinal column during vibration, 18 porcine functional spinal units (FSUs) were exposed to a sinusoidal force (1500 ± 1200 N) at 5 Hz for 120 min in either a flexed, extended, or neutral posture. Force and FSU height were measured continuously throughout the collection. From these data, specimen height loss, dynamic stiffness, hysteresis, and parameters from a standard linear solid (SLS) model were determined and analyzed for differences between postures. Posture had an influence on all of these parameters. In extension, the FSU had higher dynamic stiffness values than when neutral or flexed (p < 0.0001). In flexion, the FSU had higher hysteresis than both an extended or neutral posture (p < 0.0001). Height loss was greatest in a flexed posture and smallest in an extended posture (p < 0.0001). In extension, the series spring element in the SLS model had a stiffness value higher than both flexed and neutral posture conditions, whereas the stiffness in the parallel spring was the same between extension and neutral (p < 0.01), both higher than in flexion. Viscosity coefficients were highest in extension compared to both flexed and neutral (p < 0.01). Based on these results, it was determined that posture had a significant influence in determining the mechanical properties of the spine when exposed to cyclic compressive loading. PMID:27322199

  12. Thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) and its thermal contact resistance with fuel cell gas diffusion layers: Effect of compression, PTFE, micro porous layer (MPL), BPP out-of-flatness and cyclic load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza; Djilali, Ned; Bahrami, Majid

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on measurements of thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) as a function of temperature and its thermal contact resistance (TCR) with treated and untreated gas diffusion layers (GDLs). The thermal conductivity of the BPP decreases with temperature and its thermal contact resistance with GDLs, which has been overlooked in the literature, is found to be dominant over a relatively wide range of compression. The effects of PTFE loading, micro porous layer (MPL), compression, and BPP out-of-flatness are also investigated experimentally. It is found that high PTFE loadings, MPL and even small BPP out-of-flatness increase the BPP-GDL thermal contact resistance dramatically. The paper also presents the effect of cyclic load on the total resistance of a GDL-BPP assembly, which sheds light on the behavior of these materials under operating conditions in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  13. Cyclic Deformation Response of β-Annealed Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr Alloy Under Compressive Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Wang, Zhirui; Zhou, Jie

    2011-09-01

    This article reports the cyclic deformation behavior of the β-annealed metastable Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (Ti-5553) alloy under the condition of pure compressive fatigue stress. The following three aspects, namely, the mechanical response, the surface morphology evolution, and the dislocation structures, were systematically investigated. Under all testing conditions, the material demonstrated cyclic softening in the initial cycles followed by saturation. The progressive observation of surface morphology at fixed locations, but after different numbers of cycles, elucidated typical planar slip behavior and the early appearance of fatigue microcracks, which were found often to be induced by the highly localized planar slip bands. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study revealed dislocation annihilation upon cycling, i.e., the reduction of dislocation density as well as the simplification of dislocation configurations. In addition, detwinning and changed twin boundary structures upon cycling were also detected. Such activities, together with the intersection of coherent ω precipitates by moving dislocations, are considered to be responsible for the initial softening, whereas the dislocation dipole flip-flop mechanism is presumably responsible for the cyclic saturation behavior. An attempt was made to explain the strain-localized planar slip behavior by considering the stacking fault energy (SFE) as well as the free-electron-to-atom ( e/ a) ratio. The nanoscaled ω and α precipitation in the β matrix may also contribute to the planar slip behavior. The effect of the microstructure in the as-received material was also analyzed for the strain localization and planar-slip mode.

  14. Cyclic loading in knee ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Weisman, G; Pope, M H; Johnson, R J

    1980-01-01

    The effect of cyclic loading on knee ligaments was studied both in vivo and in vitro. The compliance of the medial collateral ligaments of athletes participating in hockey, basketball, soccer, and downhill skiing was determined by using a specially built machine. Tests were conducted before and after participation in the various sports. Most subjects tested showed an increased compliance after their respective sporting activities. This observation was confirmed in the laboratory by imparting cyclic loading to 10 people under controlled conditions. The in vitro studies were conducted on the medial collateral ligaments of rats. These were tested to determine the effect of cyclic loading on the strength and stiffness of the ligaments. Results show a clear relationship between decreased stiffness or softening and a reduction in strength of the ligament. The amount of softening was related to the cyclic stress in the ligament.

  15. Cyclic Loading Effects on the Creep and Dilation of Salt Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Lance A.; Buchholz, Stuart A.; Mellegard, Kirby D.; Düsterloh, Uwe

    2015-11-01

    The Solution Mining Research Institute (SMRI) has embarked on inquiries into the effect cyclic loading might have on salt. This interest stems from the concept of using salt caverns as a storage medium for renewable energy projects such as compressed air energy storage where daily pressure cycles in the cavern are conceivable as opposed to the seasonal cycles that are typical for natural gas storage projects. RESPEC and the Institut für Aufbereitung und Deponietechnik at Clausthal University of Technology jointly executed a rock mechanics laboratory study using both facilities for performing triaxial cyclic loading creep tests on rock salt recovered from the Avery Island Mine in Louisiana, USA. The cyclic triaxial creep tests were performed under various load paths including compression, extension, and compression/extension. The tests were performed under both dilative and nondilative stress regimes. The cyclic compression creep data were compared to static creep tests performed under similar conditions to assess the effect of cycling of the applied stress. Furthermore, the cyclic compression tests were compared to a numerically simulated static creep test at the same stress and temperature conditions to determine if the creep behavior was similar under cyclic loading.

  16. Stable crack growth in polycrystalline magnesia under monotonic and cyclic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takeshi . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Llorca, J. . Dept. of Materials Science)

    1994-04-01

    The quasi-static, stable growth of cracks in polycrystalline magnesia under various loading conditions (cyclic compression, monotonic tension, and tension-compression fatigue) was studied. Crack length was monitored continuously through a conductive film attached to the specimen surface. The fracture surfaces and the crack path were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The different fracture mechanisms responsible for the observed stable crack growth in each loading conditions are discussed.

  17. Stress Relaxation for Granular Materials near Jamming under Cyclic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Somayeh; Zhu, Alex Z.; Behringer, Robert P.

    2015-10-01

    We have explored isotropically jammed states of semi-2D granular materials through cyclic compression. In each compression cycle, systems of either identical ellipses or bidisperse disks transition between jammed and unjammed states. We determine the evolution of the average pressure P and structure through consecutive jammed states. We observe a transition point ϕm above which P persists over many cycles; below ϕm, P relaxes slowly. The relaxation time scale associated with P increases with packing fraction, while the relaxation time scale for collective particle motion remains constant. The collective motion of the ellipses is hindered compared to disks because of the rotational constraints on elliptical particles.

  18. Stress Relaxation for Granular Materials near Jamming under Cyclic Compression.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Somayeh; Zhu, Alex Z; Behringer, Robert P

    2015-10-30

    We have explored isotropically jammed states of semi-2D granular materials through cyclic compression. In each compression cycle, systems of either identical ellipses or bidisperse disks transition between jammed and unjammed states. We determine the evolution of the average pressure P and structure through consecutive jammed states. We observe a transition point ϕ_{m} above which P persists over many cycles; below ϕ_{m}, P relaxes slowly. The relaxation time scale associated with P increases with packing fraction, while the relaxation time scale for collective particle motion remains constant. The collective motion of the ellipses is hindered compared to disks because of the rotational constraints on elliptical particles. PMID:26565498

  19. Fatigue failure of dentin-composite disks subjected to cyclic diametral compression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuping; Carrera, Carola; Chen, Ruoqiong; Li, Jianying; Chen, Yungchung; Lenton, Patricia; Rudney, Joel. D.; Jones, Robert S.; Aparicio, Conrado; Fok, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to establish the relationship between cyclic loading and fatigue life of the dentin-composite interface using the newly developed disk in diametral compression tests. The results were then used to estimate the fatigue life of restored teeth under occlusal loading. Methods Disk specimens (5mm dia. × 2mm thick) were prepared using bovine incisors and restored with either a methacrylate-based composite Z100™ with Adper Single Bond Plus (Z100) or silorane-based composite Filtek ™ LS with LS System adhesive (LS). The dentin-composite disks were tested under cyclic diametral compression to determine the number of cycles to failure (Nf) at three load levels (n = 3 per group). Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to calculate the interfacial stresses (σ) within the specimen, to establish the σ vs. Nf curves, and those within a restored tooth under normal chewing forces (15N maximum). These were then used to estimate the lifetime of the restored tooth for the two restorative systems. Results The disks restored with LS had a higher fatigue resistance than those restored with Z100. The maximum interfacial stress in the restored tooth determined by FEA was ∼0.5MPa. Based on the estimate of 300,000 cycles of chewing per year, the predicted lifetime under occlusal loading for teeth restored with LS and Z100 was 33 and 10 years, respectively. Significance The disk in cyclic diametral compression has been used successfully to provide fatigue data which allows the lifetime of composite-restored teeth under occlusal loading to be predicted using numerical simulation. PMID:25958269

  20. Specific Features of the Nucleation and Growth of Fatigue Cracks in Steel under Cyclic Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelyukh, A. I.; Popelyukh, P. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Nikulina, A. A.; Smirnov, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    The processes of the fracture of 40Kh and U8 steels under cyclic dynamic compression are studied. It has been found that the main cause for the fracture of the cyclically compressed specimens is the propagation of cracks due to the effect of residual tensile stresses, which arise near the tips of the cracks at the stage of the unloading of the specimens. The growth rate of a crack has the maximum value at the initial stage of its propagation in the vicinity of the stress concentrator. As the crack propagates deep into the specimen, its growth rate decreases and depends only slightly on the real cross section of the specimen. The model of the process of the fatigue fracture of the steels under dynamic loading by a cyclically varied compressive force is proposed. It has been found that the high fatigue endurance is provided by tempering at 200°C for the 40Kh steel and at 300°C for the U8 steel.

  1. Fuel cell stack compressive loading system

    DOEpatents

    Fahle, Ronald W.; Reiser, Carl A.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell module comprising a stack of fuel cells with reactant gas manifolds sealed against the external surfaces of the stack includes a constraint system for providing a compressive load on the stack wherein the constraint system maintains the stack at a constant height (after thermal expansion) and allows the compressive load to decrease with time as a result of the creep characteristics of the stack. Relative motion between the manifold sealing edges and the stack surface is virtually eliminated by this constraint system; however it can only be used with a stack having considerable resiliency and appropriate thermal expansion and creep characteristics.

  2. Compressive cyclic ratcheting and fatigue of synthetic, soft biomedical polymers in solution.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew T; Safranski, David L; Smith, Kathryn E; Guldberg, Robert E; Gall, Ken

    2016-02-01

    The use of soft, synthetic materials for the replacement of soft, load-bearing tissues has been largely unsuccessful due to a lack of materials with sufficient fatigue and wear properties, as well as a lack of fundamental understanding on the relationship between material structure and behavior under cyclic loads. In this study, we investigated the response of several soft, biomedical polymers to cyclic compressive stresses under aqueous conditions and utilized dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry to evaluate the role of thermo-mechanical transitions on such behavior. Studied materials include: polycarbonate urethane, polydimethylsiloxane, four acrylate copolymers with systematically varied thermo-mechanical transitions, as well as bovine meniscal tissue for comparison. Materials showed compressive moduli between 2.3 and 1900MPa, with polycarbonate urethane (27.3MPa) matching closest to meniscal tissue (37.0MPa), and also demonstrated a variety of thermo-mechanical transition behaviors. Cyclic testing resulted in distinct fatigue-life curves, with failure defined as either classic fatigue fracture or a defined increased in maximum strain due to ratcheting. Our study found that polymers with sufficient dissipation mechanisms at the testing temperature, as evidenced by tan delta values, were generally tougher than those with less dissipation and exhibited ratcheting rather than fatigue fracture much like meniscal tissue. Strain recovery tests indicated that, for some toughened polymers, the residual strain following our cyclic loading protocol could be fully recovered. The similarity in ratcheting behavior, and lack of fatigue fracture, between the meniscal tissue and toughened polymers indicates that such polymers may have potential as artificial soft tissue.

  3. The immediate effect of repeated loading on the compressive strength of young porcine lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Thoreson, Olof; Baranto, Adad; Ekström, Lars; Holm, Sten; Hellström, Mikael; Swärd, Leif

    2010-05-01

    The human spine is exposed to repeated loading during daily activities and more extremely during sports. Despite this, there remains a lack of knowledge regarding the immediate effects on the spine due to this mode of loading. Age-specific spinal injury patterns has been demonstrated and this implies differences in reaction to load mode and load history The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of cyclic pre-loading on the biomechanical properties and fracture patterns of the adolescent spine in an experimental model. Eight functional spinal units from four young porcine spines were harvested. The functional spinal units were cyclic loaded with 20,000 cycles and then axially compressed to failure. The compression load at failure, ultimate stress and viscoelastic parameters were calculated. The functional spinal units were examined with plain radiography, computer tomography and MRI before and after the loading, and finally macroscopically and histologically. The median compression load at failure in this study was 8.3 kN (range 5.6-8.7 kN). The median deformation for all cases was 2.24 mm (range 2.30-2.7 mm) and stiffness was 3.45 N/mm (range 3.5-4.5 N/mm). A fracture was seen on radiograph in one case, on CT and macroscopically in seven, and on MRI and histologically in all eight cases. The cyclic loaded functional spinal units in the present study were not more sensitive to axial compression than non-cyclic loaded functional spinal units from young porcine. The endplate and the growth zone were the weakest part in the cyclic loaded functional spinal units. Disc signal reduction and disc height reduction was found on MRI. The E-modulus value found in this study was of the same order of magnitude as found by others using a porcine animal model.

  4. Mechanical annealing under low-amplitude cyclic loading in micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yi-nan; Liu, Zhan-li; Wang, Zhang-jie; Zhuang, Zhuo

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical annealing has been demonstrated to be an effective method for decreasing the overall dislocation density in submicron single crystal. However, simultaneously significant shape change always unexpectedly happens under extremely high monotonic loading to drive the pre-existing dislocations out of the free surfaces. In the present work, through in situ TEM experiments it is found that cyclic loading with low stress amplitude can drive most dislocations out of the submicron sample with virtually little change of the shape. The underlying dislocation mechanism is revealed by carrying out discrete dislocation dynamic (DDD) simulations. The simulation results indicate that the dislocation density decreases within cycles, while the accumulated plastic strain is small. By comparing the evolution of dislocation junction under monotonic, cyclic and relaxation deformation, the cumulative irreversible slip is found to be the key factor of promoting junction destruction and dislocation annihilation at free surface under low-amplitude cyclic loading condition. By introducing this mechanics into dislocation density evolution equations, the critical conditions for mechanical annealing under cyclic and monotonic loadings are discussed. Low-amplitude cyclic loading which strengthens the single crystal without seriously disturbing the structure has the potential applications in the manufacture of defect-free nano-devices.

  5. Fatigue crack growth under general-yielding cyclic-loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzhong, Z.; Liu, H. W.

    1986-01-01

    In low cycle fatigue, cracks are initiated and propagated under general yielding cyclic loading. For general yielding cyclic loading, Dowling and Begley have shown that fatigue crack growth rate correlates well with the measured delta J. The correlation of da/dN with delta J was also studied by a number of other investigators. However, none of thse studies have correlated da/dN with delta J calculated specifically for the test specimens. Solomon measured fatigue crack growth in specimens in general yielding cyclic loading. The crack tips fields for Solomon's specimens are calculated using the finite element method and the J values of Solomon's tests are evaluated. The measured crack growth rate in Solomon's specimens correlates very well with the calculated delta J.

  6. Nonlinear behavior of shells of revolution under cyclic loading.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H. S.; Armen, H., Jr.; Winter, R.; Pifko, A.

    1973-01-01

    A large deflection elastic-plastic analysis is presented applicable to orthotropic axisymmetric plates and shells of revolution subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. The analysis is based on the finite-element method. It employs a new higher order, fully compatible, doubly curved orthotropic shell-of-revolution element using cubic Hermitian expansions for both meridional and normal displacements. Both perfectly plastic and strain hardening behavior are considered. Strain hardening is incorporated through use of the Prager-Ziegler kinematic hardening theory, which predicts an ideal Bauschinger effect. Numerous sample problems involving monotonic and cyclic loading conditions are analyzed.

  7. A test method to measure the response of composite materials under reversed cyclic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakis, Charles E.; Simonds, Robert A.; Stinchcomb, Wayne W.

    1989-01-01

    A test method to measure the response of composite materials under reversed cyclic loads is described. The method approximates the long-term response of a component by permitting the composite specimen to respond to the imposed loads and fail in an unconstrained mode rather than in a constrained mode. The method has been successfully used for the reversed cyclic loading of unnotched and notched graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK laminates of various stacking sequences. Included in the paper are monotonic tensile and compressive stiffness and strength data at several points in the fatigue lifetime, and damage development information obtained via X-ray radiography for quasi-isotropic T300/5208 and AS4/PEEK laminates with unloaded circular holes.

  8. Cyclic mechanical loading enables solute transport and oxygen supply in bone healing: an in vitro investigation.

    PubMed

    Witt, Florian; Duda, Georg N; Bergmann, Camilla; Petersen, Ansgar

    2014-02-01

    Bone healing is a complex process with an increased metabolic activity and consequently high demand for oxygen. In the hematoma phase, inflammatory cells and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are initially cut off from direct nutritional supply via blood vessels. Cyclic mechanical loading that occurs, for example, during walking is expected to have an impact on the biophysical environment of the cells but meaningful quantitative experimental data are still missing. In this study, the hypothesis that cyclic mechanical loading within a physiological range significantly contributes to oxygen transport into the fracture hematoma was investigated by an in vitro approach. MSCs were embedded in a fibrin matrix to mimic the hematoma phase during bone healing. Construct geometry, culture conditions, and parameters of mechanical loading in a bioreactor system were chosen to resemble the in vivo situation based on data from human studies and a well-characterized large animal model. Oxygen tension was measured before and after mechanical loading intervals by a chemical optical microsensor. The increase in oxygen tension at the center of the constructs was significant and depended on loading time with maximal values of 9.9%±5.1%, 14.8%±4.9%, and 25.3%±7.2% of normal atmospheric oxygen tension for 5, 15, and 30 min of cyclic loading respectively. Histological staining of hypoxic cells after 48 h of incubation confirmed sensor measurements by showing an increased number of normoxic cells with intermittent cyclic compression compared with unloaded controls. The present study demonstrates that moderate cyclic mechanical loading leads to an increased oxygen transport and thus to substantially enhanced supply conditions for cells entrapped in the hematoma. This link between mechanical conditions and nutrition supply in the early regenerative phases could be employed to improve the environmental conditions for cell metabolism and consequently prevent necrosis.

  9. Prediction of delamination growth under cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, R.; Koenig, M.

    1997-12-31

    The growth of delaminations in carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy (CFRE) specimens during R = 0.1 and R = {minus}1 fatigue loading has been studied. Artificial circular and square delaminations as well as ply cuts have been introduced at various interfaces during manufacturing to simulate a pre-damaged structure and to cause delamination growth. Criteria based on fracture mechanics will be used to describe the delamination failure. Predicting delamination growth with this approach requires the distribution of the local energy release rate along the delamination front. For obtaining this energy release rate distribution, the virtual crack closure method was found to be most favorable for three-dimensional finite element analysis as the separation of the total energy release rate into the contributing modes is inherent to the method and only one complete finite element analysis is necessary. Plots of measured delamination progression per load cycle (da/dN-values) versus computed energy release rates have been included in a Paris law diagram as obtained experimentally using double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens to characterize Mode 1 and end-notched flexure (ENF) and transverse crack tension (TCT) specimens to characterize Mode 2 failure, respectively. Computed mixed-mode results lie well within the scatter band of the experimentally determined Paris law for Mode 1 and Mode 2 failure.

  10. Response of notched AS4/PEEK laminates to tension/compression loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonds, Robert A.; Stinchcomb, Wayne W.

    1989-01-01

    Fatigue life, damage-initiation and propagation, and residual strength data are presently examined to ascertain the response of notched AS4/PEEK specimens to fully reversed tension/compression loading. Stiffness measurements made during the low-level fatigue history show that compression stiffness and tension stiffness degrade throughout the fatigue life. Damage to specimens fatigued at higher cyclic stresses developed primarily in the direction perpendicular to the loading. As in the case of specimens fatigued at lower stress levels, residual compressive stress decreased with damage development.

  11. Predicting the residual strength of open-hole (OH) composite specimens subjected to cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceparano, Angelo; Dell'Aversano, Raffaella

    2016-05-01

    A procedure is reported that allows the prediction of the fatigue life and the residual strength of "open hole" composite specimens subjected to constant amplitude cyclic loadings. Based on a two-parameter phenomenological model explicitly accounting for the maximum applied stress, σmax, and the stress ratio, R, the procedure relies on a relatively small set of experimental fatigue life data. The approach reliability is checked in predicting the fatigue life and residual strength of AS4 carbon/epoxy 3k/E7K8 Plain Weave Fabric "open-hole" (OH) samples subjected to a very broad loading conditions from prevailing tension (R=0 and R=-0.2) to compression (R=5) to mixed tension/compression (R=-1) loadings.

  12. Dynamic performance of angle-steel concrete columns under low cyclic loading-II: parametric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenzhong; Ji, Jing

    2008-06-01

    Tests of nine angle-steel concrete column (ASCC) specimens under low cyclic loading are described in a companion paper (Zheng and Ji, 2008). In this paper, the skeleton curves from the numerical simulation are presented, and show good agreement with the test results. Furthermore, parametric studies are conducted to explore the influence of factors such as the axial compression ratio, shear steel plate ratio, steel ratio, prismatic concrete compression strength, yield strength of angle steel and shear span ratio, etc., on the monotonic load-displacement curves of the ASCCs. Based on a statistical analysis of the calculated results, hysteretic models for load-displacement and moment-curvature are proposed, which agree well with the test results. Finally, some suggestions concerning the conformation of ASCCs are proposed, which could be useful in engineering practice.

  13. Durability of Polymeric Coatings: Cyclic Loading and Free Volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongmin; Peng, Qinghua; Wu, Yichu; Li, Ying; Zhang, Junjie; Sandreczki, T. C.; Zhang, Renwu; Jean, Y. C.; Richardson, J. R.

    2002-03-01

    The mechanical durability of seven commercially polymeric coatings is investigated using slow positron beam techniques to monitor changes in sub nanometer defects during the cyclic loading process. Doppler broadened energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime measurements were performed as a function of the slow positron energy at different periods of cycling loading. The positron annihilation dada show that both S-defect parameter and ortho-positronium intensity decrease as the loading cycles increase. The results indicate a loss of free volumes due to mechanical loading and cycling. A direct correlation between the loss of free-volume parameter and of loading cycle is observed. This is interpreted as that durability of polymeric coatings is controlled by the atomic level defects. It is shown that the slow positron beam is very successful probe in detecting the very early stages of coating degradation due to mechanical processes. Supported by NSF-CMS-9812717

  14. Matrix cracking in laminated composites under monotonic and cyclic loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.; Lee, Jong-Won

    1991-01-01

    An analytical model based on the internal state variable (ISV) concept and the strain energy method is proposed for characterizing the monotonic and cyclic response of laminated composites containing matrix cracks. A modified constitution is formulated for angle-ply laminates under general in-plane mechanical loading and constant temperature change. A monotonic matrix cracking criterion is developed for predicting the crack density in cross-ply laminates as a function of the applied laminate axial stress. An initial formulation for a cyclic matrix cracking criterion for cross-ply laminates is also discussed. For the monotonic loading case, a number of experimental data and well-known models are compared with the present study for validating the practical applicability of the ISV approach.

  15. Analysis Of The Interface Behavior Under Cyclic Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Mortara, Giuseppe

    2008-07-08

    This paper analyses the frictional behavior between soil and structures under cyclic loading conditions. In particular, the attention is focused on the stress degradation occurring in sand-metal interface tests and on the relevant parameters playing a role in such kind of tests. Also, the paper reports the analysis of the experimental data from the constitutive point of view with a two-surface elastoplastic model.

  16. DEFORMATION CHARACTERISTICS OF CRUSHED-STONE LAYER UNDER CYCLIC IMPACT LOADING FROM MICRO-MECHANICAL VIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akiko; Matsushima, Takashi

    'Hanging sleepers', which have gaps between sleepers and ballast layer are often found in the neighborhood of rail joints or rugged surface rails. This suggests that differential settlement of the ballast layer is due to impact loading generated by the contact between running wheel and rugged surface rail. Then cyclic loading tests were performed on crushed-stone layer with two loading patterns, the one is a cyclic impact loading and the other one is cyclic 'standard' loading controlled at 1/10 loading velocity of the impact loading. It was shown that the crashed-stone layer deforms with volumetric expansion during every off-loading processes under the cyclic impact loading. This phenomena prevents crushed stone layer from forming stable grain columns, then the residual settlement under the cyclic impact loading is larger than that under the cyclic 'standard' loading. A simple mass-spring model simulates that two masses move in the opposite direction with increased frequency of harmonic excitation.

  17. Preload substantially influences the intervertebral disc stiffness in loading-unloading cycles of compression.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Schilling, Christoph; Dreischarf, Marcel

    2016-06-14

    Disc hydration is controlled by fluid imbibition and exudation and hence by applied load magnitude and history, internal osmotic pressure and disc conditions. It affects both the internal load distribution and external load-bearing of a disc while variations therein give rise to the disc time-dependent characteristics. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of changes in compression preload magnitude on the disc axial cyclic compression stiffness under physiological loading. After 20h of free hydration, effects of various preload magnitudes (no preload, 0.06 and 0.28MPa, applied for eight hours) and disc-bone preparation conditions on disc height and axial stiffness were investigated using 36 disc-bone and 24 isolated disc (without bony endplates) bovine specimens. After preloading, specimens were subjected to ten loading/unloading cycles each of 7.5min compression at 0.5MPa followed by 7.5min at 0.06MPa. Under 0.06MPa preload, the specimen height losses during high loading periods of cyclic loading were greater than corresponding height recoveries during low loading phases. This resulted in a progressive reduction in the specimen height and increase in its stiffness. Differences between disc height losses in high cyclic loads and between stiffness in both load increase and release phases were significant for 0 and 0.06MPa vs. 0.28MPa preload. Results highlight the significant role of disc preload magnitude/history and hence disc height and hydration on disc stiffness in loading/unloading and disc height loss in loading periods. Proper preconditioning and hence hydration level should be achieved if recovery in height loss similar to in vivo conditions is expected. PMID:27209550

  18. Dual-phase steel sheets under cyclic tension–compression to large strains: Experiments and crystal plasticity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecevic, Milovan; Korkolis, Yannis P.; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Knezevic, Marko

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop a physically-based crystal plasticity model for the prediction of cyclic tension-compression deformation of multi-phase materials, specifically dual-phase (DP) steels. The model is elasto-plastic in nature and integrates a hardening law based on statistically stored dislocation density, localized hardening due to geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs), slip-system-level kinematic backstresses, and annihilation of dislocations. The model further features a two level homogenization scheme where the first level is the overall response of a two-phase polycrystalline aggregate and the second level is the homogenized response of the martensite polycrystalline regions. The model is applied to simulate a cyclic tension-compression-tension deformation behavior of DP590 steel sheets. From experiments, we observe that the material exhibits a typical decreasing hardening rate during forward loading, followed by a linear and then a non-linear unloading upon the load reversal, the Bauschinger effect, and changes in hardening rate during strain reversals. To predict these effects, we identify the model parameters using a portion of the measured data and validate and verify them using the remaining data. The developed model is capable of predicting all the particular features of the cyclic deformation of DP590 steel, with great accuracy. From the predictions, we infer and discuss the effects of GNDs, the backstresses, dislocation annihilation, and the two-level homogenization scheme on capturing the cyclic deformation behavior of the material.

  19. Inverse Slip Accompanying Twinning and Detwinning during Cyclic Loading of Magnesium Single Crystal

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Qin; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Yanyao

    2013-01-01

    In situ , observation of twinning and detwinning in magnesium single crystals during tension-compression cyclic loading was made using optical microscopy. A quantitative analysis of plastic strain indicates that twinning and detwinning experience two stages, low and high work hardening de-twinning, and pure re-twinning and fresh twinning combined with retwinning. Slip is always activated. For the first time, inverse slip accompanying with pure retwinning and high work hardening detwinning was experimentally identified, which provides insights in better understanding of the activity of twining, detwinning, and slips.

  20. Cyclic stretch and compression forces alter microRNA-29 expression of human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinghua; Mohammed, Arshad; Oubaidin, Maysaa; Evans, Carla A; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Atsawasuwan, Phimon

    2015-07-15

    MicroRNAs (miRs) play an important role in the development and remodeling of tissues through the regulation of large cohorts of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes. The purpose of the present study was to determine the response of miR-29 family expression to loading forces and their effects on ECM gene expression in periodontal ligament cells, the key effector cell population during orthodontic tooth movement. In a comparison between miRs from human periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) and alveolar bone cells (ABCs) from healthy human subjects, the ABC cohort of miRs was substantially greater than the corresponding PDLC cohort. Cyclic mechanical stretch forces at 12% deformation at 0.1Hz for 24h decreased expression of miR-29 family member miRs about 0.5 fold while 2g/cm(2) compression force for 24h increased miR-29 family member expression in PDLCs 1.8-4 folds. Cyclic stretch up-regulated major ECM genes in PDLCs, such as COL1A1, COL3A1 and COL5A1, while the compression force resulted in a down-regulation of these ECM genes. Direct interactions of miR-29 and Col1a1, Col3a1 and Col5a1 were confirmed using a dual luciferase reporter gene assay. In addition, transient transfection of a miR-29b mimic in mouse PDLCs down-regulated Col1a1, Col3a1 and Col5a1 while the transfection of miR-29b inhibitor up-regulated these genes compared to control transfection indicating that these target ECM genes directly responded to the altered level of miR-29b. These results provided a possible explanation for the effects of the miR-29 family on loaded PDLCS and their roles in extracellular matrix gene expression. PMID:25827718

  1. Fluid pressure response in poroelastic materials subjected to cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameo, Yoshitaka; Adachi, Taiji; Hojo, Masaki

    2009-11-01

    When cyclic loading is applied to poroelastic materials, a transient stage of interstitial fluid pressure occurs, preceding a steady state. In each stage, the fluid pressure exhibits a characteristic mechanical behavior. In this study, an analytical solution for fluid pressure in two-dimensional poroelastic materials, which is assumed to be isotropic, under cyclic axial and bending loading is presented, based on poroelasticity. The obtained analytical solution contains transient and steady-state responses. Both of these depend on three dimensionless parameters: the dimensionless stress coefficient; the dimensionless frequency; and, the axial-bending loading ratio. We focus particularly on the transient behavior of interstitial fluid pressure with changes in the dimensionless frequency and the axial-bending loading ratio. The transient properties, such as half-value period and contribution factor, depend largely on the dimensionless frequency and have peak values when its value is about 10. This suggests that, under these conditions, the transient response can significantly affect the mechanical behavior of poroelastic materials.

  2. Compressed magnetic flux amplifier with capacitive load

    SciTech Connect

    Stuetzer, O.M.

    1980-03-01

    A first-order analysis is presented for a compressed magnetic flux (CMF) current amplifier working into a load with a capacitive component. Since the purpose of the investigation was to gain a general understanding of the arrangement, a number of approximations and limitations were accepted. The inductance of the transducer varies with time; the inductance/resistance/capacitance (LRC) circuit therefore is parametric and solutions are different for the stable regime (high C), the oscillation regime (low C), and the transition case. Solutions and performance depend strongly on circuit boundary conditions, i.e., energization of the circuit by either an injected current or by an applied capacitor charge. The behavior of current and energy amplification for the various cases are discussed in detail. A number of experiments with small CMF devices showed that the first-order theory presented predicts transducer performance well in the linear regime.

  3. Cyclic Plasticity under Shock Loading in an HCP Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B.; Hunter, Abigail; Canfield, Thomas R.; Adams, Chris D.

    2012-06-08

    Plate impact experiments with pressures from 2 to 20 GPa, including one shock-partial release-reshock experiment, were performed on vacuum hot-pressed S-200F Beryllium. This hexagonal close-packed (HCP) metal shows significant plasticity effects in such conditions. The experiments were modeled in a Lagrangian hydrocode using an experimentally calibrated Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) constitutive model. By using the shock data to constrain a high rate portion of PTW, the model was able to generally match plasticity effects on the measured wave profile (surface velocity) during the shock loading, but not unloading. A backstress-based cyclic plasticity model to capture the quasi-elastic release (Bauschinger-type effect) was explored in order to match the unloading and reloading portions of the measured wave profiles. A comparison is made with other approaches in the literature to capture the cyclic plasticity in shock conditions.

  4. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  5. Damage Evolution On Mechanical Parts Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestriez, P.; Bogard, F.; Shan, J. L.; Guo, Y. Q.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a fatigue damage model, based on the continuum damage mechanics and general thermodynamic theory, proposed by Lemaitre and Chaboche, for rolling bearings under very numerous loading cycles. A flow surface of fatigue using the Sines criterion is adopted. The coupling between the hardening plasticity and damage effects is considered in the constitutive equations. An explicit algorithm of weak coupling leads to a calculation very fast. This fatigue damage model is implemented into Abaqus/Explicit using a Vumat user's subroutine. Moreover, the damage variable in function of time is transformed into a function of number of cycles. An algorithm of cycle jump, with a criterion for choosing the number increment of cycles, is proposed, which allows to largely reduce the CPU time. The present damage simulation allows to determine the lifetime of mechanical parts under cyclic loading.

  6. High load operation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    DOEpatents

    Duffy, Kevin P.; Kieser, Andrew J.; Liechty, Michael P.; Hardy, William L.; Rodman, Anthony; Hergart, Carl-Anders

    2008-12-23

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine is set up by first identifying combinations of compression ratio and exhaust gas percentages for each speed and load across the engines operating range. These identified ratios and exhaust gas percentages can then be converted into geometric compression ratio controller settings and exhaust gas recirculation rate controller settings that are mapped against speed and load, and made available to the electronic

  7. Compressive failure of fiber composites under multi-axial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shiladitya; Waas, Anthony M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the compressive strength of a fiber reinforced lamina under multi-axial stress states. An equilibrium analysis is carried out in which a kinked band of rotated fibers, described by two angles, is sandwiched between two regions in which the fibers are nominally straight. Proportional multi-axial stress states are examined. The analysis includes the possibility of bifurcation from the current equilibrium state. The compressive strength of the lamina is contingent upon either attaining a load maximum in the equilibrium response or satisfaction of a bifurcation condition, whichever occurs first. The results show that for uniaxial loading a non-zero kink band angle β produces the minimum limit load. For multi-axial loading, different proportional loading paths show regimes of bifurcation dominated and limit load dominated behavior. The present results are able to capture the beneficial effect of transverse compression in raising the composite compressive strength as observed in experiments.

  8. Cyclic-loading Induced Lattice-Strain Asymmetry in Loading and Transverse Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E-Wen; Barabash, Rozaliya; Clausen, Bjorn; Liaw, Peter K

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic-loading effects on a nickel-based superalloy are investigated with in-situ neutron-diffraction measurements. The thermoelastic-temperature evolution subjected to cyclic loading is estimated based on the lattice-strain evolution. The atomic thermoelastic responses are compared with the measured bulk temperature evolution. Two transitions in the temperature-evolution are observed. The first transition, observed with the neutron-measurement results, is associated with the cyclic hardening/softening-structural transformation. The second transition is observed at larger number of fatigue cycles. It has a distinct origin and is related to the start of irreversible structural transformations during fatigue. A lattice-strain asymmetry behavior is observed. The lattice-strain asymmetry is quantified as a grain-orientation-dependent transverse/loading parameter (P-ratio). The P-ratio parameter evolution reveals the irreversible plastic deformation subjected to the fatigue. The irreversible fatigue phenomena might relate to the formation of the microcracks. At elevated temperatures the cyclic hardening/softening transition starts at lower fatigue cycles as compared to room temperature. A comparison between the room-temperature and the elevated-temperature fatigue experiments is performed. The P-ratio parameters show the same irreversible trends at both the room and the elevated temperatures.

  9. Fatigue life of anti-friction bearings subjected to cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Dominik, W.K.

    1986-01-01

    Cyclic loading is defined as external loading that varies within the revolution of a bearing and is repeated for every revolution. The cyclicly varying loads may consist of a series of discrete loads that occur in a repeating pattern or a continuously varying force or a combination of these. A simple example of cyclic loading is a single cylinder, double acting piston pump in which the force on the bearings reverse every 180/sup 0/ of a revolution; as a result, the same half of the rotating bearing race passes under the load twice in a single revolution. More complex patterns of cyclic loads occur in rotary engines, fuel injection pumps, nutating engines, etc. The paper presents the theoretical relationships and methods that predict the effect of cyclic loading on the fatigue life of anti-friction bearings. An example problem solved with the aid of a special analysis program illustrates the results from these methods.

  10. Assessment of Composite Delamination Self-Healing Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the promise of self-healing materials for enhanced autonomous durability has been introduced using a micro-encapsulation technique where a polymer based healing agent is encapsulated in thin walled spheres and embedded into a base polymer along with a catalyst phase. For this study, composite skin-stiffener flange debonding specimens were manufactured from composite prepreg containing interleaf layers with a polymer based healing agent encapsulated in thin-walled spheres. Constant amplitude fatigue tests in three-point bending showed the effect of self-healing on the fatigue response of the skin-stiffener flange coupons. After the cycling that created debonding, fatigue tests were held at the mean load for 24 hours. For roughly half the specimens tested, when the cyclic loading was resumed a decrease in compliance (increase in stiffness) was observed, indicating that some healing had occurred. However, with continued cycling, the specimen compliance eventually increased to the original level before the hold, indicating that the damage had returned to its original state. As was noted in a prevoius study conducted with specimens tested under monotonically increasing loads to failure, healing achieved via the micro-encapsulation technique may be limited to the volume of healing agent available relative to the crack volume.

  11. Reliability of piezoceramic patch sensors under cyclic mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielicke, Bärbel; Gesang, Thomas; Wierach, Peter

    2003-12-01

    Piezoceramic patch sensors have to withstand the primary stresses and strains of a structure during operation. In the leading project 'Adaptronics' a lifespan of 106 cycles at 0.1% strain was required for sensors applied on components of steel and carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP). In order to test the reliability of the patches themselves and of their adhesion on the substrate, special four-point bending tests were carried out under quasistatic loading and under cyclic loading at different strain levels. The specimens consisted in sheets of steel and CFRP as substrates on which the newly developed patches with embedded piezoelectric foils and fibres were glued. In the quasistatic bending tests the performance of each sensor was characterized by measuring the sensor signal (charge) as a function of strain before and after cycling. Damage of the specimens would result in a decreasing slope of the charge-strain-curve after cycling. However, all the specimens tested survived 107 cycles up to 0.12% strain without marked loss of performance.

  12. Loading and Boundary Condition Influences in a Poroelastic Finite Element Model of Cartilage Stresses in a Triaxial Compression Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Kallemeyn, Nicole A; Grosland, Nicole M; Pedersen, Doug R; Martin, James A; Brown, Thomas D

    2006-01-01

    Background: We developed a poroelastic finite element (FE) model of cartilage in dynamic triaxial compression to parametrically analyze the effects of loading and boundary conditions on a baseline model. Conventional mechanical tests on articular cartilage such as confined and unconfined compression, indentation, etc., do not fully allow for modulation of compression and shear at physiological levels whereas triaxial compression does. A Triaxial Compression Bioreactor, or TRIAX, has been developed to study chondrocyte responses to multi-axial stress conditions under cyclic loading. In the triaxial setting, however, a cartilage explant's physical testing environment departs from the ideal homogeneous stress state that would occur from strict linear superposition of the applied axial and transverse pressure. Method of Approach: An axisymmetric poroelastic FE model of a cartilage explant (4 mm diameter, 1.5 mm thick) in cyclic triaxial compression was created. Axial and transverse loads (2 MPa at 1 Hz.) were applied via a platen and containment sheath. Parameters of interest included the rise time and magnitude of the applied load, in addition to the containment sheath modulus and the friction coefficient at the cartilage/platen interfaces. Metrics of interest in addition to whole explant axial strain included axial (surface normal) stress, shear stress, pore pressure, and the fluid load carriage fraction within the explant. Results: Strain results were compared to experimental data from explants tested in the TRIAX under conditions similar to the baseline model. Explant biomechanics varied considerably over numbers of load cycles and parameter values. Cyclic loading caused an increase in accumulated strain for the various loading and boundary conditions. Conclusions: Unlike what would be expected from linear superposition of the homogeneous stresses from the applied axial and transverse pressure, we have shown that the stress state within the TRIAX is considerably

  13. 78. PIPING CHANNEL FOR FUEL LOADING, FUEL TOPPING, COMPRESSED AIR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. PIPING CHANNEL FOR FUEL LOADING, FUEL TOPPING, COMPRESSED AIR, GASEOUS NITROGEN, AND HELIUM - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  14. Characterization of ultrafine-grained aluminum tubes processed by Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression (TCEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Babaei, A. Mashhadi, M.M.

    2014-09-15

    Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression as a novel severe plastic deformation technique for tubes was utilized for processing ultrafine grained 1050 aluminum alloy for the first time. In this method, aluminum tube is fully constrained and deformed between mandrel and chamber with a small neck zone. The material deformation during Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression processing analyzed and the grain refinement mechanism were described. The capability of Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression in grain refinement of the aluminum alloy was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy observations and X-ray diffraction line profile analysis. The micrographs of the evolved microstructure show grain size of 850 nm and 550 nm after the first and second processing cycles of Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression, respectively. Mechanical properties of the initial and processed specimens were extracted from ring-hoop tensile tests. The documented results confirm grain refinement by showing remarkable increase in the yield and ultimate strengths. The main increase in strength and decrease in elongation take place after the first cycle. The microhardness assessments illustrate increase from the initial value of 29 Hv to 44 and 49 Hv respectively after the first and second cycles of Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression. There is a good homogeneity in peripheral microhardness and microhardness across the tube thickness. - Highlights: • Tubes of AA1050 for the first time were successfully SPD processed by TCEC. • The grain size was refined to 550 nm after two cycles of TCEC. • Notable increase in the strength and decrease in the elongation were documented. • The microhardness increased to 49 Hv from the initial value of 29 Hv. • Good homogeneity in the microhardness distribution was recorded.

  15. Behavior of tunnel form buildings under quasi-static cyclic lateral loading

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuksel, S.B.; Kalkan, E.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, experimental investigations on the inelastic seismic behavior of tunnel form buildings (i.e., box-type or panel systems) are presented. Two four-story scaled building specimens were tested under quasi-static cyclic lateral loading in longitudinal and transverse directions. The experimental results and supplemental finite element simulations collectively indicate that lightly reinforced structural walls of tunnel form buildings may exhibit brittle flexural failure under seismic action. The global tension/compression couple triggers this failure mechanism by creating pure axial tension in outermost shear-walls. This type of failure takes place due to rupturing of longitudinal reinforcement without crushing of concrete, therefore is of particular interest in emphasizing the mode of failure that is not routinely considered during seismic design of shear-wall dominant structural systems.

  16. Effect of load introduction on graphite epoxy compression specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, R.; Yao, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    Compression testing of modern composite materials is affected by the manner in which the compressive load is introduced. Two such effects are investigated: (1) the constrained edge effect which prevents transverse expansion and is common to all compression testing in which the specimen is gripped in the fixture; and (2) nonuniform gripping which induces bending into the specimen. An analytical model capable of quantifying these foregoing effects was developed which is based upon the principle of minimum complementary energy. For pure compression, the stresses are approximated by Fourier series. For pure bending, the stresses are approximated by Legendre polynomials.

  17. Evaluation of an In Situ Gelable and Injectable Hydrogel Treatment to Preserve Human Disc Mechanical Function Undergoing Physiologic Cyclic Loading Followed by Hydrated Recovery.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Brent L; Elliott, Dawn M; Chen, Weiliam; Malhotra, Neil R

    2015-08-01

    Despite the prevalence of disc degeneration and its contributions to low back problems, many current treatments are palliative only and ultimately fail. To address this, nucleus pulposus replacements are under development. Previous work on an injectable hydrogel nucleus pulposus replacement composed of n-carboxyethyl chitosan, oxidized dextran, and teleostean has shown that it has properties similar to native nucleus pulposus, can restore compressive range of motion in ovine discs, is biocompatible, and promotes cell proliferation. The objective of this study was to determine if the hydrogel implant will be contained and if it will restore mechanics in human discs undergoing physiologic cyclic compressive loading. Fourteen human lumbar spine segments were tested using physiologic cyclic compressive loading while intact, following nucleotomy, and again following treatment of injecting either phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (sham, n = 7) or hydrogel (implant, n = 7). In each compressive test, mechanical parameters were measured immediately before and after 10,000 cycles of compressive loading and following a period of hydrated recovery. The hydrogel implant was not ejected from the disc during 10,000 cycles of physiological compression testing and appeared undamaged when discs were bisected following all mechanical tests. For sham samples, creep during cyclic loading increased (+15%) from creep during nucleotomy testing, while for implant samples creep strain decreased (-3%) toward normal. There was no difference in compressive modulus or compressive strains between implant and sham samples. These findings demonstrate that the implant interdigitates with the nucleus pulposus, preventing its expulsion during 10,000 cycles of compressive loading and preserves disc creep within human L5-S1 discs. This and previous studies provide a solid foundation for continuing to evaluate the efficacy of the hydrogel implant.

  18. Internal loading of an inhomogeneous compressible Earth with phase boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defraigne, P.; Dehant, V.; Wahr, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The geoid and the boundary topography caused by mass loads inside the earth were estimated. It is shown that the estimates are affected by compressibility, by a radially varying density distribution, and by the presence of phase boundaries with density discontinuities. The geoid predicted in the chemical boundary case is 30 to 40 percent smaller than that predicted in the phase case. The effects of compressibility and radially varying density are likely to be small. The inner core-outer core topography for loading inside the mantle and for loading inside the inner core were computed.

  19. Structural strength of cancellous specimens from bovine femur under cyclic compression

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Kaori; Yamada, Satoshi; Todoh, Masahiro; Takahata, Masahiko; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic fractures was estimated as nine million worldwide in 2000, with particular occurrence at the proximity of joints rich in cancellous bone. Although most of these fractures spontaneously heal, some fractures progressively collapse during the early post-fracture period. Prediction of bone fragility during progressive collapse following initial fracture is clinically important. However, the mechanism of collapse, especially the gradual loss of the height in the cancellous bone region, is not clearly proved. The strength of cancellous bone after yield stress is difficult to predict since structural and mechanical strength cannot be determined a priori. The purpose of this study was to identify whether the baseline structure and volume of cancellous bone contributed to the change in cancellous bone strength under cyclic loading. A total of fifteen cubic cancellous bone specimens were obtained from two 2-year-old bovines and divided into three groups by collection regions: femoral head, neck, and proximal metaphysis. Structural indices of each 5-mm cubic specimen were determined using micro-computed tomography. Specimens were then subjected to five cycles of uniaxial compressive loading at 0.05 mm/min with initial 20 N loading, 0.3 mm displacement, and then unloading to 0.2 mm with 0.1 mm displacement for five successive cycles. Elastic modulus and yield stress of cancellous bone decreased exponentially during five loading cycles. The decrease ratio of yield stress from baseline to fifth cycle was strongly correlated with bone volume fraction (BV/TV, r = 0.96, p < 0.01) and structural model index (SMI, r = − 0.81, p < 0.01). The decrease ratio of elastic modulus from baseline to fifth cycle was also correlated with BV/TV (r = 0.80, p < 0.01) and SMI (r = − 0.78, p < 0.01). These data indicate that structural deterioration of cancellous bone is associated with bone strength after yield stress. This study suggests that baseline cancellous

  20. Experimental investigation on mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Ranjith, P. G.; Huang, Yan-Hua; Yin, Peng-Fei; Jing, Hong-Wen; Gui, Yi-Lin; Yu, Qing-Lei

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone subjected to cyclic loading is very significant to evaluate the stability and safety of deep excavation damage zones. However to date, there are very few triaxial experimental studies of sandstone under cyclic loading. Moreover, few X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) observations have been adopted to reveal the damage mechanism of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading. Therefore, in this research, a series of triaxial cyclic loading tests and X-ray micro-CT observations were conducted to analyse the mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone with respect to different confining pressures. The results indicated that at lower confining pressures, the triaxial strength of sandstone specimens under cyclic loading is higher than that under monotonic loading; whereas at confining pressures above 20 MPa, the triaxial strength of sandstone under cyclic loading is approximately equal to that under monotonic loading. With the increase of cycle number, the crack damage threshold of sandstone first increases, and then significantly decreases and finally remains constant. Based on the damage evolution of irreversible deformation, it appears that the axial damage value of sandstone is all higher than the radial damage value before the peak strength; whereas the radial damage value is higher than the axial damage value after the peak strength. The evolution of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of sandstone can be characterized as having four stages: (i) Stage I: material strengthening; (ii) Stage II: material degradation; (iii) Stage III: material failure and (iv) Stage IV: structure slippage. X-ray micro-CT observations demonstrated that the CT scanning surface images of sandstone specimens are consistent with actual surface crack photographs. The analysis of the cross-sections of sandstone supports that the system of crack planes under triaxial cyclic loading is much more complicated than that under triaxial

  1. Elevated Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Silicon Nitride Under Dynamic, Static and Cyclic Flexural Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Nemeth, Noel; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1994-01-01

    The slow crack growth parameters of a hot-pressed silicon nitride were determined at 1200 and 1300 C in air by statically, dynamically and cyclicly loading bend specimens. The fatigue parameters were estimated using the recently developed CARES/Life computer code. Good agreement exists between the flexural results. However, fatigue susceptibility under static uniaxial tensile loading, reported elsewhere, was greater than in flexure. Cyclic flexural loading resulted in the lowest apparent flexural fatigue susceptibility.

  2. The convergence of block cyclic projection with underrelaxation parameters for compressed sensing based tomography.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Fangjun; Arroyo, Edward; Li, Xiezhang; Zhu, Jiehua

    2014-01-01

    The block cyclic projection method in the compressed sensing framework (BCPCS) was introduced for image reconstruction in computed tomography and its convergence had been proven in the case of unity relaxation (λ=1). In this paper, we prove its convergence with underrelaxation parameters λ∈(0,1). As a result, the convergence of compressed sensing based block component averaging algorithm (BCAVCS) and block diagonally-relaxed orthogonal projection algorithm (BDROPCS) with underrelaxation parameters under a certain condition are derived. Experiments are given to illustrate the convergence behavior of these algorithms with selected parameters. PMID:24699347

  3. Effects of cyclic loading on the tensile properties of human patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Naveen; Slauterbeck, James; Hashemi, Javad

    2012-01-01

    Bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) graft is a popular choice for ACL reconstruction. These grafts are subjected to cyclic loading during the activities of daily living. Significant knee laxity is observed in reconstructed knee shortly after reconstruction. The source of this laxity is not clear. The change in the tensile properties of the graft due to cyclic loading can be one of the reasons for the change in knee laxity. Twenty patellar tendons from fresh frozen cadaver knees were cyclically loaded at a stress amplitude equivalent to 33% of the failure strength of the contralateral patellar tendon for 5000 cycles at 1.4Hz. They were then tested in tension to failure. Failure properties and the low load properties such as toe-region modulus were calculated. The results were compared with those of contralateral patellar tendons that were not subjected to cyclic loading before testing to failure. Fatigue loading did not alter the failure and low load properties with the exception of failure strain which decreased by about 10% (P<.05). Cyclically loaded patellar tendons with higher tissue mass density possess higher strength, modulus of elasticity, toughness, and transition stress (P<.05). The results indicate that there is no significant change in graft properties because of cyclic loading with the above load magnitude. The change in knee laxity observed after reconstruction, hence, is not because of change in graft properties due to moderate cyclic loading. Other factors, such as plastic deformation (yielding) of the graft, might play a role in increased knee laxity after reconstruction.

  4. Effects of cyclic loading and toothbrush abrasion on cervical lesion formation.

    PubMed

    Dickson, William J; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Lien, Wen; Dixon, Sara A; Summitt, James B

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine the effect of cyclic loading and toothbrush abrasion (with and without abrasive slurries) on cervical lesion formation. The roots of extracted human third molars were embedded in acrylic resin, leaving 2 mm of root structure and crowns exposed. Teeth were divided into 6 groups (n = 10) with the following treatments: no treatment (control), cyclic load in distilled water, brushing with distilled water, cyclic load followed by brushing with distilled water, brushing with toothpaste slurry, and cyclic load followed by brushing with toothpaste slurry. Cyclic loading and toothbrushing machines subjected the teeth to 1.6 million cyclic loads and 30,000 brushing strokes, the equivalent of 4 years of function and brushing for an average patient. The teeth were scanned with a 3-dimensional optical profilometer to determine the volumetric loss of tooth structure. Load cycling had no significant effect on cervical tooth loss. Brushing with toothpaste resulted in significantly greater cervical tooth loss than brushing with water, which in turn was significantly greater than no treatment at all.

  5. Electrical conductivity and compressibility of sulfur under shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    Postnov, V.I.; Anan'eva, L.A.; Dremin, A.N.; Nabatov, S.S.; Yakushev, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors mathematically and experimentally assess the transition of orthorhombic elementary sulfur from a dielectric to a superconducting regime under the influence of pressure generated by shock wave loading. They also determine its compressibility over a range of 4-38 GPa.

  6. Loading rate sensitivity of open hole composites in compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubowinski, Steve J.; Guynn, E. G.; Elber, Wolf; Whitcomb, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    The results are reported of an experimental study on the compressive, time-dependent behavior of graphite fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates with open holes. The effect of loading rate on compressive strength was determined for six material systems ranging from brittle epoxies to thermoplastics at both 75 F and 220 F. Specimens were loaded to failure using different loading rates. The slope of the strength versus elapsed time-to-failure curve was used to rank the materials' loading rate sensitivity. All of the materials had greater strength at 75 F than at 220 F. All the materials showed loading rate effects in the form of reduced failure strength for longer elapsed-time-to-failure. Loading rate sensitivity was less at 220 F than the same material at 70 F. However, C12000/ULTEM and IM7/8551-7 were more sensitive to loading rate than the other materials at 220 F. AS4/APC2 laminates with 24, 32, and 48 plies and 1/16 and 1/4 inch diameter holes were tested. The sensitivity to loading rate was less for either increasing number of plies or larger hole size. The failure of the specimens made from brittle resins was accompanied by extensive delaminations while the failure of the roughened systems was predominantly by shear crippling. Fewer delamination failures were observed at the higher temperature.

  7. A biomechanical comparison of the effects of constant and cyclic compression on fracture healing in rabbit long bones.

    PubMed

    Panjabi, M M; White, A A; Wolf, J W

    1979-12-01

    In a biomechanical study, the strength of healing experimental fractures in rabbit tibias was compared for two different healing environments. During the healing period large constant compression was applied to one leg, while the other leg was subjected to cyclic compression forces. Rabbits were sacrificed at 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 weeks after the operation. The healing bones were tested in a dynamic torsion testing machine. Results indicate that on an average basis the cyclic compression treated bones exhibited higher torque and energy absorption to failure, but lower stiffness as compared with the constant compression treated bones, during the 30 to 50 days' healing period. These differences were statistically significant. Additionally, it was estimated that a 27 per cent saving in healing time may be realized for a bone treated with cyclic as compared with constant compression.

  8. Ultrasonic Measurement of Strain Distribution Inside Object Cyclically Compressed by Dual Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagiri, Yoshitaka; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2008-05-01

    One possible way to evaluate acupuncture therapy quantitatively is to measure the change in the elastic property of muscle after application of the therapy. Many studies have been conducted to measure mechanical properties of tissues using ultrasound-induced acoustic radiation force. To assess mechanical properties, strain must be generated in an object. However, a single radiation force is not effective because it mainly generates translational motion when the object is much harder than the surrounding medium. In this study, two cyclic radiation forces are simultaneously applied to a muscle phantom from two opposite horizontal directions so that the object is cyclically compressed in the horizontal direction. By the horizontal compression, the object is expanded vertically based on its incompressibility. The resultant vertical displacement is measured using another ultrasound pulse. Two ultrasonic transducers for actuation were both driven by the sum of two continuous sinusoidal signals at two slightly different frequencies [1 MHz and (1 M + 5) Hz]. The displacement of several micrometers in amplitude, which fluctuated at 5 Hz, was measured by the ultrasonic phased tracking method. Increase in thickness inside the object was observed just when acoustic radiation forces increased. Such changes in thickness correspond to vertical expansion due to horizontal compression.

  9. Analysis of delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tratt, Matthew D.

    The present analytical and empirical study of composite structure delamination has attempted to predict the threshold stress for the initiation of delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates. The strain-energy release-rate distributions around circular delaminations are computed via MSC/NASTRAN analysis in conjunction with a virtual crack-opening technique. Static compression tests were conducted on specimens of graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy having circular delaminations of various sizes. Computed delamination growth threshold-stress prediction results were at substantial variance with the test data, but confirmed trends and gave qualitative insight into quasi-static delamination growth.

  10. Region Specific Response of Intervertebral Disc Cells to Complex Dynamic Loading: An Organ Culture Study Using a Dynamic Torsion-Compression Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Samantha C. W.; Walser, Jochen; Käppeli, Patrick; Shamsollahi, Mohammad Javad; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Gantenbein-Ritter, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The spine is routinely subjected to repetitive complex loading consisting of axial compression, torsion, flexion and extension. Mechanical loading is one of the important causes of spinal diseases, including disc herniation and disc degeneration. It is known that static and dynamic compression can lead to progressive disc degeneration, but little is known about the mechanobiology of the disc subjected to combined dynamic compression and torsion. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the mechanobiology of the intervertebral disc when subjected to combined dynamic compression and axial torsion or pure dynamic compression or axial torsion using organ culture. We applied four different loading modalities [1. control: no loading (NL), 2. cyclic compression (CC), 3. cyclic torsion (CT), and 4. combined cyclic compression and torsion (CCT)] on bovine caudal disc explants using our custom made dynamic loading bioreactor for disc organ culture. Loads were applied for 8 h/day and continued for 14 days, all at a physiological magnitude and frequency. Our results provided strong evidence that complex loading induced a stronger degree of disc degeneration compared to one degree of freedom loading. In the CCT group, less than 10% nucleus pulposus (NP) cells survived the 14 days of loading, while cell viabilities were maintained above 70% in the NP of all the other three groups and in the annulus fibrosus (AF) of all the groups. Gene expression analysis revealed a strong up-regulation in matrix genes and matrix remodeling genes in the AF of the CCT group. Cell apoptotic activity and glycosaminoglycan content were also quantified but there were no statistically significant differences found. Cell morphology in the NP of the CCT was changed, as shown by histological evaluation. Our results stress the importance of complex loading on the initiation and progression of disc degeneration. PMID:24013824

  11. Insentropic compression of solid using pulsed magnetic loading

    SciTech Connect

    HALL,CLINT A.; ASAY,JAMES R.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; ROSENTHAL,STEPHEN E.; KNUDSON,MARCUS D.; REISMAN,D.; TOOR,A.; CAUBLE,R.; HAYES,D.B.

    2000-04-18

    Shock loading techniques are often used to determine material response along a specific pressure loading curve referred to as the Hugoniot. However, many technological and scientific applications require accurate determination of dynamic material response that is off-Hugoniot, covering large regions of the equation-of-state surface. Unloading measurements from the shocked state provide off-Hugoniot information, but experimental techniques for measuring compressive off-Hugoniot response have been limited. A new pulsed magnetic loading technique is presented which provides previously unavailable information on isentropic loading of materials to pressures of several hundred kbar. This smoothly increasing pressure loading provides a good approximation to the high-pressure material isentrope centered at ambient conditions. The approach uses high current densities to create ramped magnetic loading to a few hundred kbar over time intervals of 100--200 ns. The method has successfully determined the isentropic mechanical response of copper to about 200 kbar and has been used to evaluate the kinetics of the alpha-epsilon phase transition occurring in iron at 130 kbar. With refinements in progress, the method shows promise for performing isentropic compression experiments to multi-Mbar pressures.

  12. Initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the intervertebral disc under cyclic loading using continuum damage mechanics methodology: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Muhammad; Natarajan, Raghu N.; An, Howard S.; Andersson, Gunnar B.J.

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to study the breakdown of disc tissue over several years of exposure to bending and lifting by experimental methods. There is also no finite element model that elucidates the failure mechanism due to repetitive loading of the lumbar motion segment. The aim of this study was to refine an already validated poro-elastic finite element model of lumbar motion segment to investigate the initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the disc under simple and complex cyclic loading conditions. Continuum damage mechanics methodology was incorporated into the finite element model to track the damage accumulation in the annulus in response to the repetitive loading. The analyses showed that the damage initiated at the posterior inner annulus adjacent to the endplates and propagated outwards towards its periphery under all loading conditions simulated. The damage accumulated preferentially in the posterior region of the annulus. The analyses also showed that the disc failure is unlikely to happen with repetitive bending in the absence of compressive load. Compressive cyclic loading with low peak load magnitude also did not create the failure of the disc. The finite element model results were consistent with the experimental and clinical observations in terms of the region of failure, magnitude of applied loads and the number of load cycles survived. PMID:22682891

  13. Finite-element analysis of crack growth under monotonic and cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An elastic-plastic (incremental) finite-element analysis, in conjunction with a crack-growth criterion, was used to study crack-growth behavior under monotonic and cyclic loading. The crack-growth criterion was based on crack-tip strain. Whenever the crack-tip strain equals or exceeds a critical strain value, the crack grows. The effects of element-mesh size, critical strain, strain hardening, and specimen type (tension or bending) on crack growth under monotonic loading were investigated. Crack growth under cyclic loading (constant amplitude and simple variable amplitude) were also studied. A combined hardening theory, which incorporates features of both isotropic and kinematic hardening under cyclic loading, was also developed for smooth yield surfaces and was used in the analysis.

  14. A constitutive model for AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composites under cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rui, Yuting; Sun, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Based on the basic and essential features of the elastic-plastic response of the AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite subjected to off-axis cyclic loadings, a simple rate-independent constitutive model is proposed to describe the orthotropic material behavior for cyclic loadings. A one-parameter memory surface is introduced to distinguish the virgin deformation and the subsequent deformation process and to characterize the loading range effect. Cyclic softening is characterized by the change of generalized plastic modulus. By the vanishing yield surface assumption, a yield criterion is not needed and it is not necessary to consider loading and unloading separately. The model is compared with experimental results and good agreement is obtained.

  15. Compression loading behaviour of sunflower seeds and kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, Thasaiya A.; Manikantan, Musuvadi R.; Chand, Tarsem; Sharma, Rajiv; Seerangurayar, Thirupathi

    2014-10-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the compression loading behaviour of five Indian sunflower varieties (NIRMAL-196, NIRMAL-303, CO-2, KBSH-41, and PSH- 996) under four different moisture levels (6-18% d.b). The initial cracking force, mean rupture force, and rupture energy were measured as a function of moisture content. The observed results showed that the initial cracking force decreased linearly with an increase in moisture content for all varieties. The mean rupture force also decreased linearly with an increase in moisture content. However, the rupture energy was found to be increasing linearly for seed and kernel with moisture content. NIRMAL-196 and PSH-996 had maximum and minimum values of all the attributes studied for both seed and kernel, respectively. The values of all the studied attributes were higher for seed than kernel of all the varieties at all moisture levels. There was a significant effect of moisture and variety on compression loading behaviour.

  16. Physical properties and compression loading behaviour of corn seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić, Lj.; Radojèin, M.; Pavkov, I.; Babić, M.; Turan, J.; Zoranović, M.; Stanišić, S.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to acquire data on the physical properties and compression loading behaviour of seed of six corn hybrid varieties. The mean values of length, width, thickness, geometric diameter, surface area, porosity, single kernel mass, sphericity, bulk and true density, 1 000 kernelmass and coefficient of friction were studied at single level of corn seed moisture content. The calculated secant modulus of elasticity during compressive loading for dent corn was 0.995 times that of the semi-flint type; there were no significant differences in the value of this mechanical property between semi-flint and dent corn varieties. The linear model showed a decreasing tendency of secant modulus of elasticity for all hybrids as the moisture content of seeds increased.

  17. Research on crack width evolution of RC beams strengthened with CFL under cyclic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chen; Huang, Peiyan; Guo, Xinyan

    2008-11-01

    Using carbon fiber laminate (CFL) invented by our group, we take the lead in studying the fatigue behaviors of the beams strengthened with FRP under the cyclic loads. The maximum crack width of the RC beams strengthened with CFL conforms to the law of three-stages, and the main factors which affect the fatigue crack propagation behavior was analyzed. Theoretical analyses are performed for the evolvement rule of maximum crack width of the strengthened RC beams under constant amplitude and random fatigue loads. Then, a method for calculating the propagation rule of maximum flexural crack width under fatigue loads is proposed, based on the initial crack width under static loads and the coefficient of the strain of CFL. This method can be used not only for crack width determination under constant amplitude cyclic load but also the random fatigue load. Using the method, permissive fatigue life can be estimated.

  18. Interaction of mixed mode loading on cyclic debonding in adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Rezaizadeh, M. A.; Ramamurthy, G.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively-bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize the fracture mode dependence of cyclic debonding. The system studied consisted of graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 adhesive. Several types of specimens are tested which provide the cyclic debond growth rate measurements under various load conditions: mode 1, mixed mode 1 to 2, and mostly mode 2. This study shows that the total strain-energy-release rate is the governing factor for cyclic debonding.

  19. Direct contribution of axial impact compressive load to anterior tibial load during simulated ski landing impact.

    PubMed

    Yeow, C H; Lee, P V S; Goh, J C H

    2010-01-19

    Anterior tibial loading is a major factor involved in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury mechanism during ski impact landing. We sought to investigate the direct contribution of axial impact compressive load to anterior tibial load during simulated ski landing impact of intact knee joints without quadriceps activation. Twelve porcine knee specimens were procured. Four specimens were used as non-impact control while the remaining eight were mounted onto a material-testing system at 70 degrees flexion and subjected to simulated landing impact, which was successively repeated with incremental actuator displacement. Four specimens from the impacted group underwent pre-impact MRI for tibial plateau angle measurements while the other four were subjected to histology and microCT for cartilage morphology and volume assessment. The tibial plateau angles ranged from 29.4 to 38.8 degrees . There was a moderate linear relationship (Y=0.16X; R(2)=0.64; p<0.001) between peak axial impact compressive load (Y) and peak anterior tibial load (X). The anterior and posterior regions in the impacted group sustained surface cartilage fraying, superficial clefts and tidemark disruption, compared to the control group. MicroCT scans displayed visible cartilage deformation for both anterior and posterior regions in the impacted group. Due to the tibial plateau angle, increased axial impact compressive load can directly elevate anterior tibial load and hence contribute to ACL failure during simulated landing impact. Axial impact compressive load resulted in shear cartilage damage along anterior-posterior tibial plateau regions, due to its contribution to anterior tibial loading. This mechanism plays an important role in elevating ACL stress and cartilage deformation during impact landing.

  20. Instantaneous angular speed monitoring of gearboxes under non-cyclic stationary load conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stander, C. J.; Heyns, P. S.

    2005-07-01

    Recent developments in the condition monitoring and asset management market have led to the commercialisation of online vibration-monitoring systems. These systems are primarily utilised to monitor large mineral mining equipment such as draglines, continuous miners and hydraulic shovels. Online monitoring systems make diagnostic information continuously available for asset management, production outsourcing and maintenance alliances with equipment manufacturers. However, most online vibration-monitoring systems are based on conventional vibration-monitoring technologies, which are prone to giving false equipment deterioration warnings on gears that operate under fluctuating load conditions. A simplified mathematical model of a gear system was developed to illustrate the feasibility of monitoring the instantaneous angular speed (IAS) as a means of monitoring the condition of gears that are subjected to fluctuating load conditions. A distinction is made between cyclic stationary load modulation and non-cyclic stationary load modulation. It is shown that rotation domain averaging will suppress the modulation caused by non-cyclic stationary load conditions but will not suppress the modulation caused by cyclic stationary load conditions. An experimental investigation on a test rig indicated that the IAS of a gear shaft could be monitored with a conventional shaft encoder to indicate a deteriorating gear fault condition.

  1. Cyclic mechanical loading promotes bacterial penetration along composite restoration marginal gaps

    PubMed Central

    Khvostenko, D.; Salehi, S.; Naleway, S. E.; Hilton, T. J.; Ferracane, J. L.; Mitchell, J. C.; Kruzic, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Secondary caries is the most common reason for composite restoration replacement and usually forms between dentin and the filling. The objective of this study was to investigate the combined effect of cyclic loading and bacterial exposure on bacterial penetration into gaps at the interface between dentin and resin composite restorative material using a novel bioreactor system and test specimen design. Methods Human molars were machined into 3 mm thick disks with 2 mm deep × 5 mm diameter cavity preparations into which composite restorations were placed. A ∼15-30 micrometer (small) or ∼300 micrometer wide (large) dentin-restoration gap was introduced along half of the interface between the dentin and restoration. Streptococcus mutans UA 159 biofilms were grown on each sample prior to testing in a bioreactor both with and without cyclic loading. Both groups of samples were tested for 2 weeks and post-test biofilm viability was confirmed with a live-dead assay. Samples were fixed, mounted and cross-sectioned to reveal the gaps and observe the depth of bacterial penetration. Results It was shown that for large gap samples the bacteria easily penetrated to the full depth of the gap independent of loading or non-loading conditions. The results for all cyclically loaded small gap samples show a consistently deep bacterial penetration down 100% of the gap while the average penetration depth was only 67% for the non-loaded samples with only two of six samples reaching 100%. Significance A new bioreactor was developed that allows combining cyclic mechanical loading and bacterial exposure of restored teeth for bacterial biofilm and demineralization studies. Cyclic loading was shown to aid bacterial penetration into narrow marginal gaps, which could ultimately promote secondary caries formation. PMID:25900624

  2. Strength degradation and lifetime prediction of dental zirconia ceramics under cyclic normal loading.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanzhong; Xu, Yingqiang; He, Huiming; Zhao, Haidan; Sun, Jian; Hou, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Clinical cases show that zirconia restoration could happen fracture by accident under overloading after using a period of time. The purpose of this study is to research mechanical behavior and predict lifetime of dental zirconia ceramics under cyclic normal contact loading with experiments. Cyclic normal contact loading test and three point bending test are carried on specimens made of two brands of dental zirconia ceramic to obtain flexure strength and damage degree after different number of loading cycles. By means of damage mechanics model, damage degree under different number of contact loading cycles are calculated according to flexure strength, and verified by SEM photographs of cross section morphology of zirconia ceramics specimen phenomenologically. Relation curve of damage degree and number of cycles is fitted by polynomial fitting, then the number of loading cycles can be concluded when the specimen is complete damage. Strength degradation of two brands dental zirconia ceramics are researched in vitro, and prediction method of contact fatigue lifetime is established.

  3. Fatigue Damage in Notched Composite Laminates Under Tension-Tension Cyclic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinchcomb, W. W.; Henneke, E. G.; Reifsnider, K. L.; Kress, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    The results are given of an investigation to determine the damage states which develop in graphite epoxy laminates with center holes due to tension-tension cyclic loads, to determine the influence of stacking sequence on the initiation and interaction of damage modes and the process of damage development, and to establish the relationships between the damage states and the strength, stiffness, and life of the laminates. Two quasi-isotropic laminates were selected to give different distributions of interlaminar stresses around the hole. The laminates were tested under cyclic loads (R=0.1, 10 Hz) at maximum stresses ranging between 60 and 95 percent of the notched tensile strength.

  4. Recent developments in reassessment of jacket structures under extreme storm cyclic loading. Part 1: Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Eide, O.I.; Skallerud, B.H.; Johansen, A.; Amdahl, J.

    1995-12-31

    An attractive approach to integrity assessment of jacket structures subjected to extreme storm cyclic loading is based on considerations of system strength rather than component strength. The system strength is determined by nonlinear pushover analyses. Nonlinear cyclic analyses are undertaken to determine if the system strength will be degraded due to repeated action of extreme waves. In the present series of papers, conditions for application and extension of such a procedure are addressed. Tubular members with D/t ratio in the range 35--80 were tested under extreme cyclic loading to investigate criteria for onset of local buckling and number of cycles to through thickness cracking. Tubular T-joints were tested under extreme cyclic loading to investigate degradation of cyclic capacity imposed by low cycle fatigue cracking. In part 1 of this series of papers, an overview of the developed methodology for integrity assessment of jacket structures is given. Conditions for application are addressed and illustrated by way of an example study.

  5. An in-situ neutron diffraction study of a multi-phase transformation and twinning-induced plasticity steel during cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Brown, Donald W.; Clausen, Bjørn; Tomé, Carlos N.; Pereloma, Elena V.; Davies, Christopher H. J.; Gazder, Azdiar A.

    2015-04-27

    In-situ neutron diffraction during cyclic tension-compression loading (∼+3.5% to −2.8%) of a 17Mn-3Al-2Si-1Ni-0.06C steel that exhibits concurrent transformation and twinning -induced plasticity effects indicated a significant contribution of intragranular back stresses to the observed Bauschinger effect. Rietveld analysis revealed a higher rate of martensitic transformation during tension compared to compression. Throughout cycling, α′-martensite exhibited the highest phase strains such that it bears an increasing portion of the macroscopic load as its weight fraction evolves. On the other hand, the ε-martensite strain remained compressive as it accommodated most of the internal strains caused by the shape misfit associated with the γ→ε and/or ε→α′ transformations.

  6. Finite Element Analysis of Sacroiliac Joint Fixation under Compression Loads

    PubMed Central

    Bruna-Rosso, Claire; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Bianco, Rohan-Jean; Godio-Raboutet, Yves; Fradet, Léo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a known chronic pain-generator. The last resort of treatment is the arthrodesis. Different implants allow fixation of the joint, but to date there is no tool to analyze their influence on the SIJ biomechanics under physiological loads. The objective was to develop a computational model to biomechanically analyze different parameters of the stable SIJ fixation instrumentation. Methods A comprehensive finite element model (FEM) of the pelvis was built with detailed SIJ representation. Bone and sacroiliac joint ligament material properties were calibrated against experimentally acquired load-displacement data of the SIJ. Model evaluation was performed with experimental load-displacement measurements of instrumented cadaveric SIJ. Then six fixation scenarios with one or two implants on one side with two different trajectories (proximal, distal) were simulated and assessed with the FEM under vertical compression loads. Results The simulated S1 endplate displacement reduction achieved with the fixation devices was within 3% of the experimentally measured data. Under compression loads, the uninstrumented sacrum exhibited mainly a rotation motion (nutation) of 1.38° and 2.80° respectively at 600 N and 1000 N, with a combined relative translation (0.3 mm). The instrumentation with one screw reduced the local displacement within the SIJ by up to 62.5% for the proximal trajectory vs. 15.6% for the distal trajectory. Adding a second implant had no significant additional effect. Conclusion A comprehensive finite element model was developed to assess the biomechanics of SIJ fixation. SIJ devices enable to reduce the motion, mainly rotational, between the sacrum and ilium. Positioning the implant farther from the SIJ instantaneous rotation center was an important factor to reduce the intra-articular displacement. Clinical relevance Knowledge provided by this biomechanical study enables improvement of SIJ fixation through optimal implant

  7. On the capacity of tubular T-joints subjected to severe cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Skallerud, B.H.; Eide, O.I.; Johansen, A.; Amdahl, J.

    1995-12-31

    Tubular T-joints with chord diameter 503 mm and wall thickness 20 mm were tested under monotonic and cyclic axial loading. The brace to chord diameter ratio ({beta}) and the brace to chord thickness ratio ({tau}) were both 0.5. The chord length to radius ratio ({alpha}) was 8.35. The cyclic tests were conducted under constant amplitude displacement loading. During testing, the specimens were instrumented for measurements of deflections and hot spot strains. All models fractured by extensive cracking at the chord weld toe. For the cyclic tests, the number of cycles to through thickness cracking was in the range 7--70 cycles. The tests results are compared with test data reported in the literature and with current design recommendations. The ability of nonlinear finite element methods to predict the observed behavior was investigated by numerical simulations of selected tests.

  8. One-dimensional consolidation in unsaturated soils under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Sposito, Garrison; Lee, Jhe-Wei; Chu, Hsiuhua

    2016-05-01

    The one-dimensional consolidation model of poroelasticity of Lo et al. (2014) for an unsaturated soil under constant loading is generalized to include an arbitrary time-dependent loading. A closed-form solution for the pore water and air pressures along with the total settlement is derived by employing a Fourier series representation in the spatial domain and a Laplace transformation in the time domain. This solution is illustrated for the important example of a fully-permeable soil cylinder with an undrained initial condition acted upon by a periodic stress. Our results indicate that, in terms of a dimensionless time scale, the transient solution decays to zero most slowly in a water-saturated soil, whereas for an unsaturated soil, the time for the transient solution to die out is inversely proportional to the initial water saturation. The generalization presented here shows that the diffusion time scale for pore water in an unsaturated soil is orders of magnitude greater than that in a water-saturated soil, mainly because of the much smaller hydraulic conductivity of the former.

  9. Inhomogeneous deformation in INCONEL 718 during monotonic and cyclic loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthem, D. W.; Robertson, I. M.; Leckie, F. A.; Socie, D. F.; Altstetter, C. J.

    1990-12-01

    The deformation microstructures produced by room-temperature monotonie tensile and uniaxial low-cycle fatigue tests in aged (precipitate-hardened) INCONEL 718 were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Regularly spaced arrays of deformation bands on {111} slip planes were observed. Under monotonie loading, the dislocation structure within a deformation band formed an inverse pileup at a grain boundary, indicating that the boundary was the probable dislocation source. Under fatigue loading, the bands contained a high density of dislocations in a complex arrangement, which was attained after relatively few cycles. Samples of homogenized (precipitate-free) material were deformed monotonically in tension for comparison with the aged material. Early in the deformation, there was only one deformation band per grain and little evidence of work hardening; that is, there was a region of constant flow stress. With increased deformation, work hardening began, more bands nucleated, and their spacing became similar to that in the aged material. This result demonstrates that the degree of coarseness of inhomogeneous deformation in this material was not necessarily a result of a softening process within the bands because of precipitate shearing, but rather, it was primarily a function of the amount of work hardening within the bands. The regularity of the bands and the dislocation structure can be rationalized in terms of a periodic resistance to glide of the dislocations due to the presence of the precipitates and a distribution of dislocation sources along the grain boundaries.

  10. Cyclic tension compression testing of AHSS flat specimens with digital image correlation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoerr, Lay; Sever, Nimet; McKune, Paul; Faath, Timo

    2013-12-01

    A cyclic tension-compression testing program was conducted on flat specimens of TPN-W®780 (Three Phase Nano) and DP980 (Dual Phase) Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS). This experimental method was enabled utilizing an anti-buckling clamping device performed in a test machine, and the surface strains along the thickness edge are measured with a three-dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system. The in-plane pre-strain and reversed strain values, at specified strain rates, are investigated to observe the potential plastic flow and the nonlinear strain hardening behavior of the materials. The validity of the test results is established with the monotonic tension tests, to substantiate the true stress-strain curves corrected for the frictional and biaxial stresses induced by the clamping device. A process method for analyzing the correction using a macro script is shown to simplify the output of the true stress-strain results for material model calibration. An in progress study to validate the forming and spring-back predictive capabilities of a calibrated TPN-W®780 complex material model to an actual stamping of an automotive component will demonstrate the usefulness of the experimental cyclic test method. Suggestions to improve the testing, strain analysis and calibration of the model parameters are proposed for augmented use of this test method.

  11. Life prediction of materials exposed to monotonic and cyclic loading: A technology survey and bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhrke, W. F.; Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.; Mandel, G.

    1975-01-01

    Announced survey directs attention toward low cycle fatigue and thermal fatigue experienced at elevated temperatures equivalent to those found in hot end of gas turbine engine. Majority of bibliographic references are on life prediction for materials exposed to monotonic and cyclic loading in high temperature environments.

  12. Fatigue degradation in compressively loaded composite laminates. [graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramkumar, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of imbedded delaminations on the compression fatigue behavior of quasi-isotropic, T300/5208, graphite/epoxy laminates was investigated. Teflon imbedments were introduced during panel layup to create delaminations. Static and constant amplitude (R=10, omega = 10 Hz) fatigue tests were conducted. S-N data and half life residual strength data were obtained. During static compression loading, the maximum deflection of the buckled delaminated region was recorded. Under compression fatigue, growth of the imbedded delamination was identified as the predominant failure mode in most of the test cases. Specimens that exhibited others failures had a single low stiffness ply above the Teflon imbedment. Delamination growth during fatigue was monitored using DIB enhanced radiography. In specimens with buried delaminations, the dye penetrant (DIB) was introduced into the delaminated region through a minute laser drilled hole, using a hypodermic needle. A low kV, microfocus, X-ray unit was mounted near the test equipment to efficiently record the cyclic growth of buried delaminations on Polaroid film.

  13. Mechanics of cranial sutures during simulated cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Jasinoski, S C; Reddy, B D

    2012-07-26

    Previous computational and experimental analyses revealed that cranial sutures, fibrous joints between the bones, can reduce the strain experienced by the surrounding skull bones during mastication. This damping effect reflects the importance of including sutures in finite element (FE) analyses of the skull. Using the FE method, the behaviour of three suture morphologies of increasing complexity (butt-ended, moderate interdigitated, and complex interdigitated) during static loading was recently investigated, and the sutures were assumed to have linear elastic properties. In the current study, viscoelastic properties, derived from published experimental results of the nasofrontal suture of young pigs (Sus scrofa), are applied to the three idealised bone-suture models. The effects of suture viscoelasticity on the stress, strain, and strain energy in the models were computed for three different frequencies (corresponding to periods of 1, 10, and 100s) and compared to the results of a static, linear elastic analysis. The range of applied frequencies broadly represents different physiological activities, with the highest frequency simulating mastication and the lowest frequency simulating growth and pressure of the surrounding tissues. Comparing across all three suture morphologies, strain energy and strain in the suture decreased with the increase in suture complexity. For each suture model, the magnitude of strain decreased with an increase in frequency, and the magnitudes were similar for both the elastic and 1s frequency analyses. In addition, a viscous response is less apparent in the higher frequency analyses, indicating that viscous properties are less important to the behaviour of the suture during those analyses. The FE results suggest that implementation of viscoelastic properties may not be necessary for computational studies of skull behaviour during masticatory loading but instead might be more relevant for studies examining lower frequency physiological

  14. Changes in the amplitude of cyclic load biphasically modulate endothelial cell DNA synthesis and division.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, G R; Loscalzo, J; Banes, A J

    1997-01-01

    Several physical factors, including shear stress and cyclic load, modulate the ability of endothelial cells to respond to injury. The objective of these experiments was to test the hypothesis that cyclic mechanical load stimulates endothelial cell DNA synthesis and division in vitro. Rabbit aortic endothelial cells were cultured on Flex I flexible-bottomed culture plates, and subjected to load amplitudes of increasing magnitude (0, 0.18, 0.24 and 0.27 load at 1 Hz) using a Flexercell strain unit. Cells were harvested enzymatically and cell numbers determined on days 1, 3 and 5 after initiating the load regimen. DNA synthesis was quantified after trichloroacetic acid precipitation of [3H]thymidine-labeled cells from: (1) whole culture wells and (2) areas of minimum and maximum strain in culture cells. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and a Tukey's test (n = 6 observations/strain regimen per day in triplicate). Results from analysis of endothelial cells in whole, subconfluent cultures showed that cells subjected to strains of 0.18 had a decreased rate of cell division (76% of control) and DNA synthesis (63% of control), while cells subjected to strains of 0.24 and 0.27 had an increased rate of cell division (108 and 83% increase, respectively, compared with control; p < 0.001) and DNA synthesis (39 and 172% increase, respectively, compared with control; p < 0.001 for 0.27) on day 3 when compared with control cells. The results indicate that endothelial cells respond to various physiologic levels of cyclic load in a biphasic manner to initiate DNA synthesis and cell division. These data suggest that endothelial cell mitogenesis may be modulated by specific levels of cyclic load. PMID:9546945

  15. Effective Widths of Compression-Loaded Plates With a Cutout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A study of the effects of cutouts and laminate construction on the prebuckling and initial postbuckling stiffnesses, and the effective widths of compression-loaded, laminated-composite and aluminum square plates is presented. The effective-width concept is extended to plates with cutouts, and experimental and nonlinear finite-element analysis results are presented. Behavioral trends are compared for seven plate families and for cutout-diameter-to-plate-width ratios up to 0.66. A general compact design curve that can be used to present and compare the effective widths for a wide range of laminate constructions is also presented. A discussion of how the results can be used and extended to include certain types of damage, cracks, and other structural discontinuities or details is given. Several behavioral trends are described that initially appear to be nonintuitive. The results demonstrate a complex interaction between cutout size and plate orthotropy that affects the axial stiffness and effective width of a plate subjected to compression loads.

  16. Thermomechanical characterization of Hastelloy-X under uniaxial cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, J. R.; Bartolotta, P. A.; Allen, G. P.; Robinson, D. N.

    1986-01-01

    In most high-temperature engineering applications, components are subjected to complex combinations of thermal and mechanical loading during service. A number of viscoplastic constitutive models were proposed which potentially can provide mathematical descriptions of material response under such conditions. Implementation of these models into large finite element codes such as MARC has already resulted in much improved inelastic analysis capability for hot-section aircraft engine components. However, a number of questions remain regarding the validity of methods adopted in characterizing these constitutive models for particular high-temperature materials. One area of concern is that the majority of experimental data available for this purpose are determined under isothermal conditions. This is in contrast to service conditions which, as noted above, almost always involve some form of thermal cycling. The obvious question arises as to whether a constitutive model characterized using an isothermal data base can adequately predict material response under thermomechanical conditions. An experimental program was initiated within the HOST program to address this particular concern. The results of the most recent isothermal and thermomechanical experiments are described.

  17. Case study of preliminary cyclic load evaluation and triaxial soil testing in offshore wind farm planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Daniel; Ossig, Benjamin; Kreiter, Stefan; Kouery, Saed; Moerz, Tobias

    2010-05-01

    In 2020 Germany aims to produce 20% of its electrical power trough renewable energy sources. Assigned Offshore Wind farms in the German exclusive economic zone of the North- and the Baltic Sea are important step toward a fulfilment of this goal. However the save erecting of 5-6 MW wind power plants (total construction size: > 200m) in water depth of around 40 m is related to unprecedented technical, logistical and financial challenges. With an intended lifetime expectation of 50 years for the foundations, construction materials and the soils around the foundation are subject to high and continued stresses from self-weight, waves, wind and current. These stresses are not only static, but have also a significant cyclic component. An estimated 250 million cyclic load changes may lead to an accumulation of plastic deformation in the soil that potentially may affect operability or lifespan of the plant. During a preliminary geotechnical site survey of one of the largest (~150 km2) offshore wind project sites within the German Bight (~45 km North off the island Juist) a total of 16 drill cores with in situ cone penetration data and a total sample length of ~800 m where recovered. Preliminary foundation designs and static self weight and lateral load calculations were used to design a cycling triaxial lab testing program on discrete natural soil samples. Individual tests were performed by foundation type and at vertical and lateral load maxima to evaluate the long-term soil behaviour under cyclic load. Tests have been performed on granular, cohesive and intermediate natural soils. Following an introduction to the unique MARUM triaxial apparatus and testing conditions, the cyclic triaxial test results are shown and explained. Furthermore cyclic shear strength and stiffness are compared to their static counterparts. Unique soil behaviour like abrupt partial failure, pore pressure response and unexpected in part load independent cyclic deformation behaviour is discussed and

  18. TEST AND ANALYSIS ON THE PROGRESSIVE COLLAPSE OF STEEL TRUSSES UNDER CYCLIC LOADING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imase, Fumiaki; Usami, Tsutomu; Funayama, Jyunki; Wang, Chun-Lin

    The objective of this study is to examine experimentally and analytically the damage progress of steel truss structures in cyclic loadings. The adequacy of a numerical model developed in the past study for analyzing truss structures under cyclic or dynamic loadings is examined in view of the test results of model truss structures. Seven steel truss specimens whose panel points are rigidly connected through gusset plates by high-tension bolts were tested under constant vertical loads and cyclically increasing horizontal loads. Two truss models equipped with buckling restrained braces as diagonal members were tested. Moreover, elastic-plastic large displacement analysis is executed with appropriate modeling of test truss structures and with initial lateral loads simulating initial imperfections. In many cases, good correlation between test and analysis is observed up to the points where local bolt hole damages appear near the lower panel points of test truss structures. In addition an analytical model that can examine the up-lift effect of a base plate on the hinge-support has been proposed to improve the analytical modeling.

  19. Structural effects of three-dimensional angle-interlock woven composite undergoing bending cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, LiMin; Yao, Yao; Yu, YiMin; Rotich, Gideon; Sun, BaoZhong; Gu, BoHong

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports the structural effects of three-dimensional (3-D) angle-interlock woven composite (3DAWC) undergoing three-point bending cyclic loading from experimental and finite element analysis (FEA) approaches. In experiment, the fatigue tests were conducted to measure the bending deflection and to observe the damage morphologies. By the FEA approach, a micro-structural unit-cell model of the 3DAWC was established at the yarn level to simulate the fatigue damage. The stress degradation at the loading condition of constant deformation amplitude was calculated to show the degradation of mechanical properties. In addition, the stress distribution, fatigue damage evolution and critical damage regions were also obtained to qualitatively reveal the structural effects and damage mechanisms of the 3DAWC subjected to three-point bending cyclic loading.

  20. Behavior of pile group with elevated cap subjected to cyclic lateral loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun-min; Gu, Ming; Chen, Ren-peng; Kong, Ling-gang; Zhang, Zhe-hang; Bian, Xue-cheng

    2015-06-01

    The pile group with elevated cap is widely used as foundation of offshore structures such as turbines, power transmission towers and bridge piers, and understanding its behavior under cyclic lateral loads induced by waves, tide water and winds, is of great importance to designing. A large-scale model test on 3×3 pile group with elevated cap subjected to cyclic lateral loads was performed in saturated silts. The preparation and implementation of the test is presented. Steel pipes with the outer diameter of 114 mm, thickness of 4.5 mm, and length of 6 m were employed as model piles. The pile group was cyclic loaded in a multi-stage sequence with the lateral displacement controlled. In addition, a single pile test was also conducted at the same site for comparison. The displacement of the pile cap, the internal forces of individual piles, and the horizontal stiffness of the pile group are presented and discussed in detail. The results indicate that the lateral cyclic loads have a greater impact on pile group than that on a single pile, and give rise to the significant plastic strain in the soil around piles. The lateral loads carried by each row of piles within the group would be redistributed with loading cycles. The lateral stiffness of the pile group decreases gradually with cycles and broadly presents three different degradation patterns in the test. Significant axial forces were measured out in some piles within the group, owing to the strong restraint provided by the cap, and finally lead to a large settlement of the pile group. These findings can be referred for foundation designing of offshore structures.

  1. Cyclic loading increases friction and changes cartilage surface integrity in lubricin-mutant mouse knees

    PubMed Central

    Drewniak, Elizabeth I; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C; Zhang, Ling; Warman, Matthew L; Crisco, Joseph J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of lubricin gene dosage and cyclic loading on whole joint coefficient of friction and articular cartilage surface integrity in mouse knee joints. Methods Joints from mice with 2 (Prg4+/+), 1 (Prg4+/−), or no (Prg4−/−) functioning lubricin alleles were subjected to 26 hours of cyclic loading using a custom-built pendulum. Coefficient of friction values were measured at multiple time points. Contralateral control joints were left unloaded. Following testing, joints were examined for histologic evidence of damage and cell viability. Results At baseline, the coefficient of friction values in Prg4−/− mice were significantly higher than those in Prg4+/+ and Prg4+/− mice (P < 0.001). Cyclic loading continuously increased the coefficient of friction in Prg4−/− mouse joints. In contrast, Prg4+/− and Prg4+/+ mouse joints had no coefficient of friction increases during the first 4 hours of loading. After 26 hours of loading, joints from all genotypes had increased coefficient of friction values compared to baseline and unloaded controls. Significantly greater increases occurred in Prg4−/− and Prg4+/− mouse joints compared to Prg4+/+ mouse joints. The coefficient of friction values were not significantly associated with histologic evidence of damage or loss of cell viability. Conclusion Our findings indicate that mice lacking lubricin have increased baseline coefficient of friction values and are not protected against further increases caused by loading. Prg4+/− mice are indistinguishable from Prg4+/+ mice at baseline, but have significantly greater coefficient of friction values following 26 hours of loading. Lubricin dosage affects joint properties during loading, and may have clinical implications in patients for whom injury or illness alters lubricin abundance. PMID:21905020

  2. Multiple spatio-temporal scale modeling of composites subjected to cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, Robert; Oskay, Caglar; Clay, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript presents a multiscale modeling methodology for failure analysis of composites subjected to cyclic loading conditions. Computational homogenization theory with multiple spatial and temporal scales is employed to devise the proposed methodology. Multiple spatial scales address the disparity between the length scale of material heterogeneities and the overall structure, whereas multiple temporal scales with almost periodic fields address the disparity between the load period and overall life under cyclic loading. The computational complexity of the multiscale modeling approach is reduced by employing a meso-mechanical model based on eigendeformation based homogenization with symmetric coefficients in the space domain, and an adaptive time stepping strategy based on a quadratic multistep method with error control in the time domain. The proposed methodology is employed to simulate the response of graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy composites. Model parameters are calibrated using a suite of experiments conducted on unidirectionally reinforced specimens subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading. The calibrated model is employed to predict damage progression in quasi-isotropic specimens. The capabilities of the model are validated using acoustic emission testing.

  3. Distributed strain measurement of a large-scale reinforced concrete beam-column assembly under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Genda; Xu, Bin; McDaniel, Ryan D.; Ying, Xiaofei; Pommerenke, David J.; Wu, Zhishen

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, comparisons are made between the performances of two kinds of distributed sensors, Electric Time Domain Reflectometry (ETDR) cable sensor that is based on the propagation of electromagnetic waves in an electrical cable and Brillouin Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (BOTDR) optical sensor that is based on the propagation of optic pulses and Brillouin scattering that occurs when light is transmitted through the optic fiber. A cable sensor was mounted near the surface of the 80% scale beam-column reinforced concrete assembly that was loaded cyclically until the shear failure occurred. The embedded depth was 0.5 inches. At the same time, a fiber optic sensor was mounted on the surface of the assembly with two installation procedures called Point Fixation (PF) Method and Overall Bonding (OB) Method to measure the strain distribution. Both BOTDR and ETDR sensors were subjected to tension and compression in one loading cycle. Strain distributions obtained from the ETDR and BOTDR sensing systems under different cycle loadings were compared with each other. They were also compared with those measured from the traditional strain gauge.

  4. Subcritical crack growth in glasses under cyclic loads: Effect of hydrodynamic pressure in aqueous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, K.S.; Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of hydrodynamic pressure developed in the wake of a crack growing in a brittle material under cyclic loads in an aqueous environment is considered. The pressure acts in opposition to the movement of the crack faces, thus shielding the crack up from the applied loads. A general hydrodynamic fluid pressure relation based on a one-dimensional Reynolds equation, which applicable to a crack with an arbitrary crack opening profile, is developed. The model is modified to account for side flow through the thickness of the sample and cavitation near the crack tip. Both effects significantly modify the hydrodynamic pressure distribution. Finally, the resulting hydrodynamic pressure relations are combined with a fracture mechanics model to account for the change in the near-tip stress intensity. Resulting predictions of the cyclic crack-growth rate are found to be in good agreement with measured values for a borosilicate glass tested at various frequencies in a water environment.

  5. Modeling and Simulation of the Effects of Cyclic Loading on Articular Cartilage Lesion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiayi; Ayati, Bruce P.; Brouillete, Marc J.; Graham, Jason M.; Ramakrishnan, Prem S.; Martin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a model of articular cartilage lesion formation to simulate the effects of cyclic loading. This model extends and modifies the reaction-diffusion-delay model by Graham et al. [20] for the spread of a lesion formed though a single traumatic event. Our model represents “implicitly” the effects of loading, meaning through a cyclic sink term in the equations for live cells. Our model forms the basis for in silico studies of cartilage damage relevant to questions in osteoarthritis, for example, that may not be easily answered through in vivo or in vitro studies. Computational results are presented that indicate the impact of differing levels of EPO on articular cartilage lesion abatement. PMID:24753483

  6. Life prediction of materials exposed to monotonic and cyclic loading: Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    This bibliography is comprised of approximately 1200 reference citations related to the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures. Most of the references are for information on life prediction for materials exposed to monotonic and cyclic loading in elevated temperature environments such as that in the hot end of a gas turbine engine. Additional citations listed are for documents on the thermal and mechanical effects on solar cells in the cryogenic vacuum environment; radiation effects on high temperature mechanical properties; and high cycle fatigue technology as applicable to gas turbine engine bearings. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the period April 1962 through April 1974 and is largely limited to documents published in the United States. It is a companion volume to NASA CR-134750, Life Prediction of Materials Exposed to Monotonic and cyclic Loading - A Technology Survey.

  7. Life prediction of materials exposed to monotonic and cyclic loading: A new technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhrke, W. F.; Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Reviewed and evaluated technical abstracts for about 100 significant documents are reported relating primarily to life prediction for structural materials exposed to monotonic and cyclic loading, particularly in elevated temperature environments. The abstracts in the report are mostly for publications in the period April 1962 through April 1974. The purpose of this report is to provide, in quick reference form, a dependable source for current information

  8. Electrical Conductivity, Thermal Stability, and Lattice Defect Evolution During Cyclic Channel Die Compression of OFHC Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh Kumar, S. S.; Raghu, T.

    2015-02-01

    Oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper samples are severe plastically deformed by cyclic channel die compression (CCDC) technique at room temperature up to an effective plastic strain of 7.2. Effect of straining on variation in electrical conductivity, evolution of deformation stored energy, and recrystallization onset temperatures are studied. Deformation-induced lattice defects are quantified using three different methodologies including x-ray diffraction profile analysis employing Williamson-Hall technique, stored energy based method, and electrical resistivity-based techniques. Compared to other severe plastic deformation techniques, electrical conductivity degrades marginally from 100.6% to 96.6% IACS after three cycles of CCDC. Decrease in recrystallization onset and peak temperatures is noticed, whereas stored energy increases and saturates at around 0.95-1.1J/g after three cycles of CCDC. Although drop in recrystallization activation energy is observed with the increasing strain, superior thermal stability is revealed, which is attributed to CCDC process mechanics. Low activation energy observed in CCDC-processed OFHC copper is corroborated to synergistic influence of grain boundary characteristics and lattice defects distribution. Estimated defects concentration indicated continuous increase in dislocation density and vacancy with strain. Deformation-induced vacancy concentration is found to be significantly higher than equilibrium vacancy concentration ascribed to hydrostatic stress states experienced during CCDC.

  9. The effect of cyclic feathering motions on dynamic rotor loads. [for helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, K. W.

    1974-01-01

    The dynamic loads of a helicopter rotor in forward flight are influenced significantly by the geometric pitch angles between the structural axes of the hub and blade sections and the plane of rotation. The analytical study presented includes elastic coupling between inplane and out-of-plane deflections as a function of geometric pitch between the plane of rotation and the principal axes of inertia of each blade. The numerical evaluation is based on a transient analysis using lumped masses and elastic substructure techniques. A comparison of cases with and without cyclic feathering motion shows the effect on computed dynamic rotor loads.

  10. Strength degradation and lifetime prediction of dental zirconia ceramics under cyclic normal loading.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanzhong; Xu, Yingqiang; He, Huiming; Zhao, Haidan; Sun, Jian; Hou, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Clinical cases show that zirconia restoration could happen fracture by accident under overloading after using a period of time. The purpose of this study is to research mechanical behavior and predict lifetime of dental zirconia ceramics under cyclic normal contact loading with experiments. Cyclic normal contact loading test and three point bending test are carried on specimens made of two brands of dental zirconia ceramic to obtain flexure strength and damage degree after different number of loading cycles. By means of damage mechanics model, damage degree under different number of contact loading cycles are calculated according to flexure strength, and verified by SEM photographs of cross section morphology of zirconia ceramics specimen phenomenologically. Relation curve of damage degree and number of cycles is fitted by polynomial fitting, then the number of loading cycles can be concluded when the specimen is complete damage. Strength degradation of two brands dental zirconia ceramics are researched in vitro, and prediction method of contact fatigue lifetime is established. PMID:26405889

  11. Modelling of Fiber/Matrix Debonding of Composites Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naghipour, Paria; Pineda, Evan J.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The micromechanics theory, generalized method of cells (GMC), was employed to simulate the debonding of fiber/matrix interfaces, within a repeating unit cell subjected to global, cyclic loading, utilizing a cyclic crack growth law. Cycle dependent, interfacial debonding was implemented as a new module to the available GMC formulation. The degradation of interfacial stresses, with applied load cycles, was achieved via progressive evolution of the interfacial compliance. A periodic repeating unit cell, representing the fiber/matrix architecture of a composite, was subjected to combined normal and shear loadings, and degradation of the global transverse stress in successive cycles was monitored. The obtained results were compared to values from a corresponding finite element model. Reasonable agreement was achieved for combined normal and shear loading conditions, with minimal variation for pure loading cases. The local effects of interfacial debonding, and fatigue damage will later be combined as sub-models to predict the experimentally obtained fatigue life of Ti-15-3/Sic composites at the laminate level.

  12. The Characterization of Mechanical Properties of a Rabbit Femur-Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Tibia Complex During Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Hidetaka; Han, Jungsoo; Ryu, Jaiyoung; Han, Changsoo

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclic loading, which produced the condition of ACLs during sports activities, on tensile properties of femur-ACL-tibia complexes (FATCs). Paired FATCs of 40 New Zealand white rabbits were tested on a materials testing machine. One specimen of each pair was designated as a control and loaded until failure. The contralateral specimen was loaded cyclically (1.4 Hz, 1 hr.) with 20%, 30%, 40%, or 50% of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the control and then loaded until failure. The UTS and mode of failure were recorded after each test. Five specimens ruptured during cyclic loading in the 50% group. In the 40% group, the mean value of UTS of cycled specimens was significantly lower than that of controls. There was no statistically significant difference in UTS values between control and cycled specimens in the 20% and 30% groups. Cycled specimens had a significantly higher incidence of substance failure than controls. Our results demonstrated that FATCs have the strength to withstand cyclic loading within normal sports activity levels. However, FACTs can be damaged by cyclic loading under strenuous sports activity levels. We speculate that cyclic loading makes the ACL substance weaker than the insertion site.

  13. Interplay of stresses induced by phase transformation and plastic deformation during cyclic load of austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Yu. V.; Daymond, M. R.; Schreiber, J.

    2004-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 samples subjected to low-cycle fatigue (LCF) were analysed using in situ neutron diffraction stress rig experiments on the ENGIN instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron facility. The elastoplastic properties of the austenitic matrix and martensitic inclusions as well as the residual stresses of the both phases were studied. The martensite formation is connected with volume dilation. Since the specific volume of martensite is larger (about 2%) than that one of austenite, the martensite phase is generally expected to be in hydrostatic compression, whereas the austenite one is in tension. However, these phase transformation stresses can be superimposed on the deformation stresses caused by the plastic deformation during LCF. The resulting residual stresses have a nonhydrostatic nature. In this study, only deviatoric components of the residual stress tensor were obtained because of the lack of the strain free lattice parameters of both phases. We have established that in the axial direction (along cyclic load) the deviatoric phase stress and the microstress of the austenitic phase were compressive and tensile for the martensite phase, i.e. an overshot of the deformation stress is observed.

  14. Strain Amplification Analysis of an Osteocyte under Static and Cyclic Loading: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    Osteocytes, the major type of bone cells which reside in their lacunar and canalicular system within the bone matrix, function as biomechanosensors and biomechanotransducers of the bone. Although biomechanical behaviour of the osteocyte-lacunar-canalicular system has been investigated in previous studies mostly using computational 2-dimensional (2D) geometric models, only a few studies have used the 3-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model. In the current study, a 3D FE model was used to predict the responses of strain distributions of osteocyte-lacunar-canalicular system analyzed under static and cyclic loads. The strain amplification factor was calculated for all simulations. Effects on the strain of the osteocyte system were investigated under 500, 1500, 2000, and 3000 microstrain loading magnitudes and 1, 5, 10, 40, and 100 Hz loading frequencies. The maximum strain was found to change with loading magnitude and frequency. It was observed that maximum strain under 3000-microstrain loading was higher than those under 500, 1500, and 2000 microstrains. When the loading strain reached the maximum magnitude, the strain amplification factor of 100 Hz was higher than those of the other frequencies. Data from this 3D FE model study suggests that the strain amplification factor of the osteocyte-lacunar-canalicular system increases with loading frequency and loading strain increasing. PMID:25664319

  15. Effect of dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading on fracture behavior for Japanese carbon steel pipe STS410

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Kanji; Murayama, Kouichi; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    1997-04-01

    The fracture behavior for Japanese carbon steel pipe STS410 was examined under dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading through a research program of International Piping Integrity Research Group (EPIRG-2), in order to evaluate the strength of pipe during the seismic event The tensile test and the fracture toughness test were conducted for base metal and TIG weld metal. Three base metal pipe specimens, 1,500mm in length and 6-inch diameter sch.120, were employed for a quasi-static monotonic, a dynamic monotonic and a dynamic cyclic loading pipe fracture tests. One weld joint pipe specimen was also employed for a dynamic cyclic loading test In the dynamic cyclic loading test, the displacement was controlled as applying the fully reversed load (R=-1). The pipe specimens with a circumferential through-wall crack were subjected four point bending load at 300C in air. Japanese STS410 carbon steel pipe material was found to have high toughness under dynamic loading condition through the CT fracture toughness test. As the results of pipe fracture tests, the maximum moment to pipe fracture under dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading condition, could be estimated by plastic collapse criterion and the effect of dynamic monotonic loading and cyclic loading was a little on the maximum moment to pipe fracture of the STS410 carbon steel pipe. The STS410 carbon steel pipe seemed to be less sensitive to dynamic and cyclic loading effects than the A106Gr.B carbon steel pipe evaluated in IPIRG-1 program.

  16. In vitro lifetime of dental ceramics under cyclic loading in water.

    PubMed

    Studart, A R; Filser, F; Kocher, P; Gauckler, L J

    2007-06-01

    All-ceramic dental restorations exhibit enhanced esthetics and biocompatibility as compared to traditional metal-based prosthesis. However, long-term fatigue and subcritical crack growth in the presence of water and cyclic loading can decrease the strength of ceramic components over time. We investigated the cyclic fatigue in water of three dental materials currently used as frameworks in all-ceramic restorations: a 3 mol%-yttria partially stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP, Cercon, Degudent GmbH), a Al(2)O(3)-ZrO(2)-Glass composite (Inceram-Zirconia, Vita Zahnfabrik GmbH) and a Li(2)O.2SiO(2) glass ceramic (Empress 2, Ivoclar Vivadent AG). Fatigue and fast fracture tests were performed to determine the Weibull distribution of lifetime and initial mechanical strength for each framework component. In spite of its noticeable susceptibility to fatigue in water, the 3Y-TZP material was found to be particularly suitable for the preparation of posterior all-ceramic bridges due to its high initial mechanical strength. Guidelines are provided for the selection of materials and the design of all-ceramic posterior bridges exhibiting lifetime longer than 20 years under severe wet and cyclic loading conditions.

  17. Influence of varying compressive loading methods on physiologic motion patterns in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Bell, Kevin M; Yan, Yiguo; Debski, Richard E; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Kang, James D; Tashman, Scott

    2016-01-25

    The human cervical spine supports substantial compressive load in-vivo arising from muscle forces and the weight of the head. However, the traditional in-vitro testing methods rarely include compressive loads, especially in investigations of multi-segment cervical spine constructs. Various methods of modeling physiologic loading have been reported in the literature including axial forces produced with inclined loading plates, eccentric axial force application, follower load, as well as attempts to individually apply/model muscle forces in-vitro. The importance of proper compressive loading to recreate the segmental motion patterns exhibited in-vivo has been highlighted in previous studies. However, appropriate methods of representing the weight of head and muscle loading are currently unknown. Therefore, a systematic comparison of standard pure moment with no compressive loading versus published and novel compressive loading techniques (follower load - FL, axial load - AL, and combined load - CL) was performed. The present study is unique in that a direct comparison to continuous cervical kinematics over the entire extension to flexion motion path was possible through an ongoing intra-institutional collaboration. The pure moment testing protocol without compression or with the application of follower load was not able to replicate the typical in-vivo segmental motion patterns throughout the entire motion path. Axial load or a combination of axial and follower load was necessary to mimic the in-vivo segmental contributions at the extremes of the extension-flexion motion path. It is hypothesized that dynamically altering the compressive loading throughout the motion path is necessary to mimic the segmental contribution patterns exhibited in-vivo. PMID:26708967

  18. Characterization of Focal Muscle Compression Under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Ben; Sory, David; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien; Curry, Richard; Clasper, Jon; Proud, William; Williams, Alun; Brown, Kate

    2015-06-01

    The pattern of battle injuries sustained in modern wars shows that over 70% of combat wounds are to the extremities. These injuries are characterized by disruption and contamination of the limb soft tissue envelope. The extent of this tissue trauma and contamination determine the outcome in extremity injury. In military injury, common post-traumatic complications at amputation sites include heterotopic ossification (formation of bone in soft tissue), and severe soft tissue and bone infections. We are currently developing a model of soft tissue injury that recreates pathologies observed in combat injuries. Here we present characterization of a controlled focal compression of the rabbit flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscle group. The FCU was previously identified as a suitable site for studying impact injury because its muscle belly can easily be mobilized from the underlying bone without disturbing anatomical alignment in the limb. We show how macroscopic changes in tissue organization, as visualized using optical microscopy, can be correlated with data from temporally resolved traces of loading conditions. Funding provided by the Royal British Legion.

  19. Implementation of DSC model and application for analysis of field pile tests under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Changming; Desai, Chandra S.

    2000-05-01

    The disturbed state concept (DSC) model, and a new and simplified procedure for unloading and reloading behavior are implemented in a nonlinear finite element procedure for dynamic analysis for coupled response of saturated porous materials. The DSC model is used to characterize the cyclic behavior of saturated clays and clay-steel interfaces. In the DSC, the relative intact (RI) behavior is characterized by using the hierarchical single surface (HISS) plasticity model; and the fully adjusted (FA) behavior is modeled by using the critical state concept. The DSC model is validated with respect to laboratory triaxial tests for clay and shear tests for clay-steel interfaces. The computer procedure is used to predict field behavior of an instrumented pile subjected to cyclic loading. The predictions provide very good correlation with the field data. They also yield improved results compared to those from a HISS model with anisotropic hardening, partly because the DSC model allows for degradation or softening and interface response.

  20. Micro-CT and histologic analyses of bone surrounding immediately loaded miniscrew implants: comparing compression and tension loading.

    PubMed

    Nakagaki, Susumu; Iijima, Masahiro; Handa, Keisuke; Koike, Toshiyuki; Yasuda, Yoshitaka; Saito, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of immediate force on bone adaptations surrounding miniscrew implants. Ten miniscrew implants were placed on the mandibles in three beagle dogs. Five pairs of miniscrew implants were immediately loaded with 150 g of continuous force using nickel-titanium coil springs for 8 weeks. The values of bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and bone volume (BV) of cortical and trabecular bone for compression loading and tension loading were obtained by µCT analysis. The percentages of bone-to-implant contact (BIC) in the compression and tension regions for cortical and trabecular bone were obtained by histologic analysis. The BMD values for the compression region of cortical bone were significantly higher compared to the tension region. The BIC values in cortical and trabecular bone at tension and compression regions were similar. In conclusion, immediate loading does not inhibit osseointegration of miniscrew implants but may stimulate bone mineralization. PMID:24583644

  1. A Fatigue Life Prediction Model of Welded Joints under Combined Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes, Keurrie C.; Camarao, Arnaldo F.; Pereira, Marcos Venicius S.; Ferreira Batalha, Gilmar

    2011-01-01

    A practical and robust methodology is developed to evaluate the fatigue life in seam welded joints when subjected to combined cyclic loading. The fatigue analysis was conducted in virtual environment. The FE stress results from each loading were imported to fatigue code FE-Fatigue and combined to perform the fatigue life prediction using the S x N (stress x life) method. The measurement or modelling of the residual stresses resulting from the welded process is not part of this work. However, the thermal and metallurgical effects, such as distortions and residual stresses, were considered indirectly through fatigue curves corrections in the samples investigated. A tube-plate specimen was submitted to combined cyclic loading (bending and torsion) with constant amplitude. The virtual durability analysis result was calibrated based on these laboratory tests and design codes such as BS7608 and Eurocode 3. The feasibility and application of the proposed numerical-experimental methodology and contributions for the technical development are discussed. Major challenges associated with this modelling and improvement proposals are finally presented.

  2. Damage & fracture of high-explosive mock subject to cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng; Rae, Philip J; Cady, Carl M; Lovato, Manuel L

    2011-01-11

    We use four-point bend specimen with a single shallow edge notch to study the fracture process in Mock 900-21, a PBX 9501 high explosive simulant mock. Subject to monotonic loading we determine quantitatively the threshold load for macroscopic crack initiation from the notch tip. The four-point bend specimen is then subject to cyclic loading in such a way that during the first cycle, the applied force approaches but does not exceed the threshold load determined from the monotonic loading test and in the subsequent cycles, the overall maximum deformation is maintained to be equal to that of the first cycle. It is expected and is also confirmed that no macroscopic damage and cracking occur during the first cycle. However, we observe that sizable macroscopic crack is generated and enlarged during the subsequent cycles, even though the applied force never exceeds the threshold load. Details of the process of damage fonnation, accumulation, and crack extension are presented and the mechanical mechanism responsible for such failure process is postulated and discussed.

  3. Fabric Evolution in Granular Materials Subject to Drained, Strain Controlled Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, C.; Cui, L.

    2009-06-01

    While there have been many discrete element method (DEM) publications considering the micromechanics of granular materials subject to monotonic loading, studies of the particle-scale material response to cyclic or repeated loading have been comparatively rare. From a geotechnical perspective soil is subjected to repeated loading in a variety of situations. Examples include foundations to railways and roads, foundations to wind turbines, soil adjacent to integral bridges, etc. The work described in this paper extends an earlier study by O'Sullivan et al.. [1]. In this earlier study, DEM simulations of strain controlled cyclic triaxial tests were coupled with laboratory experiments to validate a DEM model. The simulations were performed using the axi-symmetric DEM formulation proposed by [2] and a stress controlled membrane algorithm was used to apply forces to balls along the outer vertical boundaries to model the latex membrane used in the laboratory tests. Specimens of uniform spheres and mixtures of sphere sizes were considered in the validation stage of this research. The earlier study considered strain amplitudes of 1%, 0.5% and 0.1%. In the current study the response is extended to consider the smaller strain amplitude of 0.01%. All of the simulations were carried out in a quasi-static mode and in all cases the maximum stress level mobilized was significantly lower than the peak stress measured in equivalent monotonic physical tests and DEM simulations [2]. In examining the response of the material to the smaller strain amplitude, the macro scale analyses considered the stress strain response and specimen stiffness. At the particle scale, the variation in coordination number and deviator fabric are considered as well as the distribution of the contact forces orientations. The findings may provide insight to the development of continuum constitutive models for cyclic soil response that include fabric parameters [3].

  4. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, D. G.; Dassios, K. G.; Kordatos, E. Z.; Matikas, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    Barium osumilite (BMAS) ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE) sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism. PMID:24381524

  5. Effect of loading rate on the compressive mechanics of the immature baboon cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Elias, Paul Z; Nuckley, David J; Ching, Randal P

    2006-02-01

    Thirty-four cervical spine segments were harvested from 12 juvenile male baboons and compressed to failure at displacement rates of 5, 50, 500, or 5000 mm/s. Compressive stiffness, failure load, and failure displacement were measured for comparison across loading rate groups. Stiffness showed a significant concomitant increase with loading rate, increasing by 62% between rates of 5 and 5000 mm/s. Failure load also demonstrated an increasing relationship with loading rate, while displacement at failure showed no rate dependence. These data may help in the development of improved pediatric automotive safety standards and more biofidelic physical and computational models.

  6. Self-Sensing of Damage Progression in Unidirectional Multiscale Hierarchical Composites Subjected to Cyclic Tensile Loading.

    PubMed

    Ku-Herrera, J J; Pacheco-Salazar, O F; Ríos-Soberanis, C R; Domínguez-Rodríguez, G; Avilés, F

    2016-01-01

    The electrical sensitivity of glass fiber/multiwall carbon nanotube/vinyl ester hierarchical composites containing a tailored electrically-percolated network to self-sense accumulation of structural damage when subjected to cyclic tensile loading-unloading is investigated. The hierarchical composites were designed to contain two architectures differentiated by the location of the multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), viz. MWCNTs deposited on the fibers and MWCNTs dispersed within the matrix. The changes in electrical resistance of the hierarchical composites are associated to their structural damage and correlated to acoustic emissions. The results show that such tailored hierarchical composites are able to self-sense damage onset and accumulation upon tensile loading-unloading cycles by means of their electrical response, and that the electrical response depends on the MWCNT location.

  7. Self-Sensing of Damage Progression in Unidirectional Multiscale Hierarchical Composites Subjected to Cyclic Tensile Loading

    PubMed Central

    Ku-Herrera, J. J.; Pacheco-Salazar, O. F.; Ríos-Soberanis, C. R.; Domínguez-Rodríguez, G.; Avilés, F.

    2016-01-01

    The electrical sensitivity of glass fiber/multiwall carbon nanotube/vinyl ester hierarchical composites containing a tailored electrically-percolated network to self-sense accumulation of structural damage when subjected to cyclic tensile loading-unloading is investigated. The hierarchical composites were designed to contain two architectures differentiated by the location of the multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), viz. MWCNTs deposited on the fibers and MWCNTs dispersed within the matrix. The changes in electrical resistance of the hierarchical composites are associated to their structural damage and correlated to acoustic emissions. The results show that such tailored hierarchical composites are able to self-sense damage onset and accumulation upon tensile loading-unloading cycles by means of their electrical response, and that the electrical response depends on the MWCNT location. PMID:26999158

  8. Test method for the determination of crack-growth rates and crack growth resistance under cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, S.Ya.

    1995-05-01

    This article describes the test method for the determination of crack growth rates and crack growth resistance under cyclic loading conditions. The text of the article is limited to two appendices with the following subjects: (1) general requirements for specimens for testing with a constant cycle of the stress intensity factor, and (2) descriptions of the loading fixtures.

  9. Loosening torque of Universal Abutment screws after cyclic loading: influence of tightening technique and screw coating

    PubMed Central

    Regalin, Alexandre; Bhering, Claudia Lopes Brilhante; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tightening technique and the screw coating on the loosening torque of screws used for Universal Abutment fixation after cyclic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty implants (Titamax Ti Cortical, HE, Neodent) (n=10) were submerged in acrylic resin and four tightening techniques for Universal Abutment fixation were evaluated: A - torque with 32 Ncm (control); B - torque with 32 Ncm holding the torque meter for 20 seconds; C - torque with 32 Ncm and retorque after 10 minutes; D - torque (32 Ncm) holding the torque meter for 20 seconds and retorque after 10 minutes as initially. Samples were divided into subgroups according to the screw used: conventional titanium screw or diamond like carbon-coated (DLC) screw. Metallic crowns were fabricated for each abutment. Samples were submitted to cyclic loading at 106 cycles and 130 N of force. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). RESULTS The tightening technique did not show significant influence on the loosening torque of screws (P=.509). Conventional titanium screws showed significant higher loosening torque values than DLC (P=.000). CONCLUSION The use of conventional titanium screw is more important than the tightening techniques employed in this study to provide long-term stability to Universal Abutment screws. PMID:26576253

  10. Phase Transformation Evolution in NiTi Shape Memory Alloy under Cyclic Nanoindentation Loadings at Dissimilar Rates

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Abbas; Cheng, Chun; Kan, Qianhua; Naebe, Minoo; Song, Haisheng

    2013-01-01

    Hysteresis energy decreased significantly as nanocrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy was under triangular cyclic nanoindentation loadings at high rate. Jagged curves evidenced discrete stress relaxations. With a large recovery state of maximum deformation in each cycle, this behavior concluded in several nucleation sites of phase transformation in stressed bulk. Additionally, the higher initial propagation velocity of interface and thermal activation volume, and higher levels of phase transition stress in subsequent cycles explained the monotonic decreasing trend of dissipated energy. In contrast, the dissipated energy showed an opposite increasing trend during triangular cyclic loadings at a low rate and 60 sec holding time after each unloading stage. Due to the isothermal loading rate and the holding time, a major part of the released latent heat was transferred during the cyclic loading resulting in an unchanged phase transition stress. This fact with the reorientation phenomenon explained the monotonic increasing trend of hysteresis energy. PMID:24336228

  11. Phase transformation evolution in NiTi shape memory alloy under cyclic nanoindentation loadings at dissimilar rates.

    PubMed

    Amini, Abbas; Cheng, Chun; Kan, Qianhua; Naebe, Minoo; Song, Haisheng

    2013-12-13

    Hysteresis energy decreased significantly as nanocrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy was under triangular cyclic nanoindentation loadings at high rate. Jagged curves evidenced discrete stress relaxations. With a large recovery state of maximum deformation in each cycle, this behavior concluded in several nucleation sites of phase transformation in stressed bulk. Additionally, the higher initial propagation velocity of interface and thermal activation volume, and higher levels of phase transition stress in subsequent cycles explained the monotonic decreasing trend of dissipated energy. In contrast, the dissipated energy showed an opposite increasing trend during triangular cyclic loadings at a low rate and 60 sec holding time after each unloading stage. Due to the isothermal loading rate and the holding time, a major part of the released latent heat was transferred during the cyclic loading resulting in an unchanged phase transition stress. This fact with the reorientation phenomenon explained the monotonic increasing trend of hysteresis energy.

  12. Direct and indirect loading of the Ilizarov external fixator: the effect on the interfragmentary movements and compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Jan; Baecker, Hinnerk; Jettkant, Birger; Muhr, Gert; Seybold, Dominik

    2011-04-01

    The amount of weight bearing and the force transmission to the frame have an important influence on the results of treatment with an Ilizarov external fixator. The frame provides beneficial interfragmentary movements and compressive loads at the fracture site through elastic wires. Mobilisation can be achieved by applying a weight-bearing platform at the distal end of the fixator. The effect on the interfragmentary movements and the compressive loads in indirect and direct loading were analysed in this study using a composite tibia bone model. Displacement transducers were attached to measure the interfragmentary movements and to detect relative movements of the bone fragments and movements between the rings. The compressive loads in the osteotomy were measured with loading cells in the defect zone. The weight-bearing platform had a substantial effect on the biomechanical behaviour of the frame. It led to an indirect force transmission through the fixator with respect to the osteotomy, resulting in lower compressive loads, lower interfragmentary movements and higher mechanical stress on the frame.

  13. Damage development under compression-compression fatigue loading in a stitched uniwoven graphite/epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandermey, Nancy E.; Morris, Don H.; Masters, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Damage initiation and growth under compression-compression fatigue loading were investigated for a stitched uniweave material system with an underlying AS4/3501-6 quasi-isotropic layup. Performance of unnotched specimens having stitch rows at either 0 degree or 90 degrees to the loading direction was compared. Special attention was given to the effects of stitching related manufacturing defects. Damage evaluation techniques included edge replication, stiffness monitoring, x-ray radiography, residual compressive strength, and laminate sectioning. It was found that the manufacturing defect of inclined stitches had the greatest adverse effect on material performance. Zero degree and 90 degree specimen performances were generally the same. While the stitches were the source of damage initiation, they also slowed damage propagation both along the length and across the width and affected through-the-thickness damage growth. A pinched layer zone formed by the stitches particularly affected damage initiation and growth. The compressive failure mode was transverse shear for all specimens, both in static compression and fatigue cycling effects.

  14. Cyclic debonding of unidirectional composite bonded to aluminum sheet for constant-amplitude loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roderick, G. L.; Everett, R. A., Jr.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Cyclic debonding rates were measured during constant-amplitude loading of specimens made of graphite/epoxy bonded to aluminum and S-glass/epoxy bonded to aluminum. Both room-temperature and elevated-temperature curing adhesives were used. Debonding was monitored with a photoelastic coating technique. The debonding rates were compared with three expressions for strain-energy release rate calculated in terms of the maximum stress, stress range, or a combination of the two. The debonding rates were influenced by both adherent thickness and the cyclic stress ratio. For a given value of maximum stress, lower stress ratios and thicker specimens produced faster debonding. Microscopic examination of the debonded surfaces showed different failure mechanisms both for identical adherends bonded with different adhesive and, indeed, even for different adherends bonded with identical adhesives. The expressions for strain-energy release rate correlated the data for different specimen thicknesses and stress ratios quite well for each material system, but the form of the best correlating expression varied among material systems. Empirical correlating expressions applicable to one material system may not be appropriate for another system.

  15. Cyclic fatigue damage characteristics observed for simple loadings extended to multiaxial life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, David J.; Kurath, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Fully reversed uniaxial strain controlled fatigue tests were performed on smooth cylindrical specimens made of 304 stainless steel. Fatigue life data and cracking observations for uniaxial tests were compared with life data and cracking behavior observed in fully reversed torsional tests. It was determined that the product of maximum principle strain amplitude and maximum principle stress provided the best correlation of fatigue lives for these two loading conditions. Implementation of this parameter is in agreement with observed physical damage and it accounts for the variation of stress-strain response, which is unique to specific loading conditions. Biaxial fatigue tests were conducted on tubular specimens employing both in-phase and out-of-phase tension torsion cyclic strain paths. Cracking observations indicated that the physical damage which occurred in the biaxial tests was similar to the damage observed in uniaxial and torsional tests. The Smith, Watson, and Topper parameter was then extended to predict the fatigue lives resulting from the more complex loading conditions.

  16. Damage mechanisms in PBT-GF30 under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Schaaf, A. De Monte, M. Hoffmann, C.; Vormwald, M.; Quaresimin, M.

    2014-05-15

    The scope of this paper is the investigation of damage mechanisms at microscopic scale on a short glass fiber reinforced polybutylene terephthalate (PBT-GF30) under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. In addition the principal mechanisms are verified through micro mechanical FE models. In order to investigate the fatigue behavior of the material both isothermal strain controlled fatigue (ISCF) tests at three different temperatures and thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) tests were conducted on plain and notched specimens, manufactured by injection molding. The goal of the work is to determine the damage mechanisms occurring under TMF conditions and to compare them with the mechanisms occurring under ISCF. For this reason fracture surfaces of TMF and ISCF samples loaded at different temperature levels were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, specimens that failed under TMF were examined on microsections revealing insight into both crack initiation and crack propagation. The findings of this investigation give valuable information about the main damage mechanisms of PBT-GF30 under TMF loading and serve as basis for the development of a TMF life estimation methodology.

  17. Mechanical durability of polymeric coatings studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy: correlation between cyclic loading and free volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Peng, Q.; Huang, Y. Y.; Zhang, R.; Mallon, P. E.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.; Wu, Y.; Richardson, J. R.; Sandreczki, T. C.; Jean, Y. C.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.

    2002-06-01

    The mechanical durability of seven commercially polymeric coatings is investigated using slow positron beam techniques to monitor changes in sub-nanometer defects during the process of cyclic loading. Doppler broadened energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) measurements were performed as a function of the slow positron energy at different periods of cycling loading. The positron annihilation dada show that both S-defect parameter and o-positronium (Ps) lifetime decrease as the loading cycle increases. The results indicate a loss of free volumes due to the loss of mechanical durability by cyclic loading. A direct correlation between the loss of S-defect parameter and the period of loading cycle is observed. This is interpreted as that durability of polymeric coatings is controlled by the atomic level free volumes. It is shown that the slow positron beam is a very successful probe in detecting the very early stages of coating degradation due to mechanical processes.

  18. Compressive Loading and Modeling of Stitched Composite Stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Linton, Kim A.

    2016-01-01

    A series of single-frame and single-stringer compression tests were conducted at NASA Langley Research Center on specimens harvested from a large panel built using the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. Different frame and stringer designs were used in fabrication of the PRSEUS panel. In this paper, the details of the experimental testing of single-frame and single-stringer compression specimens are presented, as well as discussions on the performance of the various structural configurations included in the panel. Nonlinear finite element models were developed to further understand the failure processes observed during the experimental campaign.

  19. Electrochemical Behavior of Novel Superelastic Biomedical Alloys in Simulated Physiological Media Under Cyclic Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukova, Yu. S.; Pustov, Yu. A.; Konopatsky, A. S.; Filonov, M. R.; Prokoshkin, S. D.

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to study corrosion and electrochemical behavior of Ti-22Nb-6Ta and Ti-22Nb-6Zr (at.%) superelastic alloys under conditions which imitate the performance mode of target devices (bone implants), i.e., under cyclic load in simulated physiological solutions. Open circuit potential (OCP) measurements were carried out on wire specimens in Hank's solution and artificial saliva at 37 °C with various strain values up to 1.5%. It is shown that at clinically relevant strain values (about 0.2%) the alloys exhibit OCP growth indicating their high stability and resistance to corrosion fatigue under these cycling conditions. At much higher strains (about 1%), fatigue crack initiation and propagation take place, however, the corresponding OCP variation indicates that the fracture process is significantly restrained by reversible martensitic transformation during cycling.

  20. Results of a Cyclic Load Test of an RB-47E Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, Wilber B.

    1959-01-01

    Results of a cyclic load test made by NASA on an EB-47E airplane are given. The test reported on is for one of three B-47 airplanes in a test program set up by the U. S. Air Force to evaluate the effect of wing structural reinforcements on fatigue life. As a result of crack development in the upper fuselage longerons of the other two airplanes in the program, a longeron and fuselage skin modification was incorporated early in the test. Fuselage strain-gage measurements made before and after the longeron modification and wing strain-gage measurements made only after wing reinforcement are summarized. The history of crack development and repair is given in detail. Testing was terminated one sequence short of the planned end of the program with the occurrence of a major crack in the lower right wing skin.

  1. Models for predicting damage evolution in metal matrix composites subjected to cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.H.; Hurtado, L.D.; Helms, K.L.E.

    1995-03-01

    A thermomechanical analysis of a continuous fiber metal matrix composite (MMC) subjected to cyclic loading is performed herein. The analysis includes the effects of processing induced residual thermal stresses, matrix inelasticity, and interface cracking. Due to these complexities, the analysis is performed computationally using the finite element method. Matrix inelasticity is modelled with a rate dependent viscoplasticity model. Interface fracture is modelled by the use of a nonlinear interface constitutive model. The problem formulation is summarized, and results are given for a four-ply unidirectional SCS-6/{beta}21S titanium composite under high temperature isothermal mechanical fatigue. Results indicate rate dependent viscoplasticity can be a significant mechanism for dissipating the energy available for damage propagation, thus contributing to improved ductility of the composite. Results also indicate that the model may be useful for inclusion in life prediction methodologies for MMC`s.

  2. Mechanical behaviors of multi-filament twist superconducting strand under tensile and cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Li, Yingxu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2016-01-01

    The superconducting strand, serving as the basic unit cell of the cable-in-conduit-conductors (CICCs), is a typical multi-filament twist composite which is always subjected to a cyclic loading under the operating condition. Meanwhile, the superconducting material Nb3Sn in the strand is sensitive to strain frequently relating to the performance degradation of the superconductivity. Therefore, a comprehensive study on the mechanical behavior of the strand helps understanding the superconducting performance of the strained Nb3Sn strands. To address this issue, taking the LMI (internal tin) strand as an example, a three-dimensional structural finite element model, named as the Multi-filament twist model, of the strand with the real configuration of the LMI strand is built to study the influences of the plasticity of the component materials, the twist of the filament bundle, the initial thermal residual stress and the breakage and its evolution of the filaments on the mechanical behaviors of the strand. The effective properties of superconducting filament bundle with random filament breakage and its evolution versus strain are obtained based on the damage theory of fiber-reinforced composite materials proposed by Curtin and Zhou. From the calculation results of this model, we find that the occurrence of the hysteresis loop in the cyclic loading curve is determined by the reverse yielding of the elastic-plastic materials in the strand. Both the initial thermal residual stress in the strand and the pitch length of the filaments have significant impacts on the axial and hysteretic behaviors of the strand. The damage of the filaments also affects the axial mechanical behavior of the strand remarkably at large axial strain. The critical current of the strand is calculated by the scaling law with the results of the Multi-filament twist model. The predicted results of the Multi-filament twist model show an acceptable agreement with the experiment.

  3. Buckling and Failure of Compression-loaded Composite Cylindrical Shells with Reinforced Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Results from a numerical and experimental study that illustrate the effects of selected cutout reinforcement configurations on the buckling and failure response of compression-loaded composite cylindrical shells with a cutout are presented. The effects of reinforcement size, thickness, and orthotropy on the overall response of compression-loaded shells are described. In general, reinforcement around a cutout in a compression-loaded shell can retard or eliminate the local buckling response and material failure near the cutout and increase the buckling load of the shell. However, some results show that certain reinforcement configurations can cause a significant increase in the local interlaminar failures that can accumulate near the free edges of a cutout during a local buckling event.

  4. Multiscale Electrophysiology Format: An Open Open-source Electrophysiology Format Using Data Compression, Encryption, and Cyclic Redundancy Check

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Bower, Mark R.; Stengel, Keith A.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Stead, Matt

    2010-01-01

    Continuous, long-term (up to 10 days) electrophysiological monitoring using hybrid intracranial electrodes is an emerging tool for presurgical epilepsy evaluation and fundamental investigations of seizure generation. Detection of high-frequency oscillations and microseizures could provide valuable insights into causes and therapies for the treatment of epilepsy, but requires high spatial and temporal resolution. Our group is currently using hybrid arrays composed of up to 320 micro- and clinical macroelectrode arrays sampled at 32 kHz per channel with 18-bits of A/D resolution. Such recordings produce approximately 3 terabytes of data per day. Existing file formats have limited data compression capabilities, and do not offer mechanisms for protecting patient identifying information or detecting data corruption during transmission or storage. We present a novel file format that employs range encoding to provide a high degree of data compression, a three-tiered 128-bit encryption system for patient information and data security, and a 32-bit cyclic redundancy check to verify the integrity of compressed data blocks. Open-source software to read, write, and process these files are provided. PMID:19963940

  5. Multiscale electrophysiology format: an open-source electrophysiology format using data compression, encryption, and cyclic redundancy check.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Bower, Mark R; Stengel, Keith A; Worrell, Gregory A; Stead, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Continuous, long-term (up to 10 days) electrophysiological monitoring using hybrid intracranial electrodes is an emerging tool for presurgical epilepsy evaluation and fundamental investigations of seizure generation. Detection of high-frequency oscillations and microseizures could provide valuable insights into causes and therapies for the treatment of epilepsy, but requires high spatial and temporal resolution. Our group is currently using hybrid arrays composed of up to 320 micro- and clinical macroelectrode arrays sampled at 32 kHz per channel with 18-bits of A/D resolution. Such recordings produce approximately 3 terabytes of data per day. Existing file formats have limited data compression capabilities, and do not offer mechanisms for protecting patient identifying information or detecting data corruption during transmission or storage. We present a novel file format that employs range encoding to provide a high degree of data compression, a three-tiered 128-bit encryption system for patient information and data security, and a 32-bit cyclic redundancy check to verify the integrity of compressed data blocks. Open-source software to read, write, and process these files are provided.

  6. Subcritical crack-growth behavior of borosilicate glass under cyclic loads: Evidence of a mechanical fatigue effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Bennison, S.J.

    1997-03-01

    Amorphous glasses are generally considered immune to mechanical fatigue effects associated with cyclic loading. In this study surprising new evidence is presented for a mechanical fatigue effect in borosilicate glass, in both moist air and dry nitrogen environments. The fatigue effect occurs at near threshold subcritical crack-growth rates (da/dt < 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s) as the crack extension per cycle approaches the dimensions of the borosilicate glass network. While subcritical crack growth under cyclic loads at higher load levels is entirely consistent with environmentally assisted crack growth, lower growth rates actually exceed those measured under monotonic loads. This suggests a mechanical fatigue effect which accelerates subcritical crack-growth rates. Likely mechanisms for the mechanical fatigue effect are presented.

  7. Fascicles from energy-storing tendons show an age-specific response to cyclic fatigue loading.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2014-03-01

    Some tendons, such as the human Achilles and equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), act as energy stores, stretching and recoiling to increase efficiency during locomotion. Our previous observations of rotation in response to applied strain in SDFT fascicles suggest a helical structure, which may provide energy-storing tendons with a greater ability to extend and recoil efficiently. Despite this specialization, energy-storing tendons are prone to age-related tendinopathy. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cyclic fatigue loading (FL) on the microstructural strain response of SDFT fascicles from young and old horses. The data demonstrate two independent age-related mechanisms of fatigue failure; in young horses, FL caused low levels of matrix damage and decreased rotation. This suggests that loading causes alterations to the helix substructure, which may reduce their ability to recoil and recover. By contrast, fascicles from old horses, in which the helix is already compromised, showed greater evidence of matrix damage and suffer increased fibre sliding after FL, which may partially explain the age-related increase in tendinopathy. Elucidation of helix structure and the precise alterations occurring owing to both ageing and FL will help to develop appropriate preventative and repair strategies for tendinopathy.

  8. Portevin-Le Chatelier effect under cyclic loading: experimental and numerical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazière, M.; Pujol d'Andrebo, Q.

    2015-10-01

    The Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) effect is generally evidenced by the apparition of serrated yielding under monotonic tensile loading conditions. It appears at room temperature in some aluminium alloys, around ? in some steels and in many other metallic materials. This effect is associated with the propagation of bands of plastic deformation in tensile specimens and can in some cases lead to unexpected failures. The PLC effect has been widely simulated under monotonic conditions using finite elements and an appropriate mechanical model able to reproduce serrations and strain localization. The occurrence of serrations can be predicted using an analytical stability analysis. Recently, this serrated yielding has also been observed in specimens made of Cobalt-based superalloy under cyclic loading, after a large number of cycles. The mechanical model has been identified in this case to accurately reproduce this critical number of cycle where serrations appear. The associated apparition of localized bands of deformation in specimens and their influence on its failure has also been investigated using finite element simulations.

  9. Fascicles from energy-storing tendons show an age-specific response to cyclic fatigue loading

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Riley, Graham P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Some tendons, such as the human Achilles and equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), act as energy stores, stretching and recoiling to increase efficiency during locomotion. Our previous observations of rotation in response to applied strain in SDFT fascicles suggest a helical structure, which may provide energy-storing tendons with a greater ability to extend and recoil efficiently. Despite this specialization, energy-storing tendons are prone to age-related tendinopathy. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cyclic fatigue loading (FL) on the microstructural strain response of SDFT fascicles from young and old horses. The data demonstrate two independent age-related mechanisms of fatigue failure; in young horses, FL caused low levels of matrix damage and decreased rotation. This suggests that loading causes alterations to the helix substructure, which may reduce their ability to recoil and recover. By contrast, fascicles from old horses, in which the helix is already compromised, showed greater evidence of matrix damage and suffer increased fibre sliding after FL, which may partially explain the age-related increase in tendinopathy. Elucidation of helix structure and the precise alterations occurring owing to both ageing and FL will help to develop appropriate preventative and repair strategies for tendinopathy. PMID:24402919

  10. A coupled damage-plasticity model for the cyclic behavior of shear-loaded interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, P.; De Lorenzis, L.

    2015-12-01

    The present work proposes a novel thermodynamically consistent model for the behavior of interfaces under shear (i.e. mode-II) cyclic loading conditions. The interface behavior is defined coupling damage and plasticity. The admissible states' domain is formulated restricting the tangential interface stress to non-negative values, which makes the model suitable e.g. for interfaces with thin adherends. Linear softening is assumed so as to reproduce, under monotonic conditions, a bilinear mode-II interface law. Two damage variables govern respectively the loss of strength and of stiffness of the interface. The proposed model needs the evaluation of only four independent parameters, i.e. three defining the monotonic mode-II interface law, and one ruling the fatigue behavior. This limited number of parameters and their clear physical meaning facilitate experimental calibration. Model predictions are compared with experimental results on fiber reinforced polymer sheets externally bonded to concrete involving different load histories, and an excellent agreement is obtained.

  11. Inelastic behavior of cold-formed braced walls under monotonic and cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerami, Mohsen; Lotfi, Mohsen; Nejat, Roya

    2015-06-01

    The ever-increasing need for housing generated the search for new and innovative building methods to increase speed and efficiency and enhance quality. One method is the use of light thin steel profiles as load-bearing elements having different solutions for interior and exterior cladding. Due to the increase in CFS construction in low-rise residential structures in the modern construction industry, there is an increased demand for performance inelastic analysis of CFS walls. In this study, the nonlinear behavior of cold-formed steel frames with various bracing arrangements including cross, chevron and k-shape straps was evaluated under cyclic and monotonic loading and using nonlinear finite element analysis methods. In total, 68 frames with different bracing arrangements and different ratios of dimensions were studied. Also, seismic parameters including resistance reduction factor, ductility and force reduction factor due to ductility were evaluated for all samples. On the other hand, the seismic response modification factor was calculated for these systems. It was concluded that the highest response modification factor would be obtained for walls with bilateral cross bracing systems with a value of 3.14. In all samples, on increasing the distance of straps from each other, shear strength increased and shear strength of the wall with bilateral bracing system was 60 % greater than that with lateral bracing system.

  12. The Resistance of Cortical Bone Tissue to Failure under Cyclic Loading is Reduced with Alendronate

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Devendra; Geissler, Joseph R.; Allen, Matthew R.; Burr, David B.; Fritton, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most prescribed preventative treatment for osteoporosis. However, their long-term use has recently been associated with atypical fractures of cortical bone in patients who present with low-energy induced breaks of unclear pathophysiology. The effects of bisphosphonates on the mechanical properties of cortical bone have been exclusively studied under simple, monotonic, quasi-static loading. This study examined the cyclic fatigue properties of bisphosphonate-treated cortical bone at a level in which tissue damage initiates and is accumulated prior to frank fracture in low-energy situations. Physiologically relevant, dynamic, 4-point bending applied to beams (1.5 mm × 0.5 mm × 10 mm) machined from dog rib (n=12/group) demonstrated mechanical failure and micro-architectural features that were dependent on drug dose (3 groups: 0, 0.2, 1.0 mg/kg/day; Alendronate [ALN] for 3 years) with cortical bone tissue elastic modulus (initial cycles of loading) reduced by 21% (p<0.001) and fatigue life (number of cycles to failure) reduced in a stress-life approach by greater than 3-fold with ALN1.0 (p<0.05). While not affecting the number of osteons, ALN treatment reduced other features associated with bone remodeling, such as the size of osteons (−14%, ALN1.0: 10.5±1.8, VEH: 12.2±1.6, ×103 µm2; p<0.01) and the density of osteocyte lacunae (−20%; ALN1.0: 11.4±3.3, VEH: 14.3±3.6, ×102 #/mm2; p<0.05). Furthermore, the osteocyte lacunar density was directly proportional to initial elastic modulus when the groups were pooled (R=0.54, p<0.01). These findings suggest that the structural components normally contributing to healthy cortical bone tissue are altered by high-dose ALN treatment and contribute to reduced mechanical properties under cyclic loading conditions. PMID:24704262

  13. The resistance of cortical bone tissue to failure under cyclic loading is reduced with alendronate.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Devendra; Geissler, Joseph R; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David B; Fritton, J C

    2014-07-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most prescribed preventative treatment for osteoporosis. However, their long-term use has recently been associated with atypical fractures of cortical bone in patients who present with low-energy induced breaks of unclear pathophysiology. The effects of bisphosphonates on the mechanical properties of cortical bone have been exclusively studied under simple, monotonic, quasi-static loading. This study examined the cyclic fatigue properties of bisphosphonate-treated cortical bone at a level in which tissue damage initiates and is accumulated prior to frank fracture in low-energy situations. Physiologically relevant, dynamic, 4-point bending applied to beams (1.5 mm × 0.5 mm × 10 mm) machined from dog rib (n=12/group) demonstrated mechanical failure and micro-architectural features that were dependent on drug dose (3 groups: 0, 0.2, 1.0mg/kg/day; alendronate [ALN] for 3 years) with cortical bone tissue elastic modulus (initial cycles of loading) reduced by 21% (p<0.001) and fatigue life (number of cycles to failure) reduced in a stress-life approach by greater than 3-fold with ALN1.0 (p<0.05). While not affecting the number of osteons, ALN treatment reduced other features associated with bone remodeling, such as the size of osteons (-14%; ALN1.0: 10.5±1.8, VEH: 12.2±1.6, ×10(3) μm2; p<0.01) and the density of osteocyte lacunae (-20%; ALN1.0: 11.4±3.3, VEH: 14.3±3.6, ×10(2) #/mm2; p<0.05). Furthermore, the osteocyte lacunar density was directly proportional to initial elastic modulus when the groups were pooled (R=0.54, p<0.01). These findings suggest that the structural components normally contributing to healthy cortical bone tissue are altered by high-dose ALN treatment and contribute to reduced mechanical properties under cyclic loading conditions.

  14. Buckling behavior of composite cylinders subjected to compressive loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carri, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Room temperature compressive buckling strengths of eight cylinders, four boron-epoxy and four boron-epoxy reinforced-titanium, with diameter to thickness ratios ranging between 40 and 67 are determined experimentally and compared with analytical predictions. Numerical buckling strengths are presented for Donnell's, Flugge's and Sanders' shell theories for anisotropic and orthotropic material cases. Comparison of analytical predictions with experimental results indicates good agreement and the recommended correlation factor suggested in the literature is applicable for design. For the cylinders tested, the correlation between experiment and theory ranged from 0.73 to 0.97.

  15. Monotonic and fatigue properties of kenaf /glass hybrid composites under fully reversed cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharba, M. J.; Leman, Z.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Ishak, M. R.; Hanim, M. A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of hybridization of kenaf-glass fibers reinforced unsaturated polyester on fatigue life. Three types of composites were fabricated using hands lay-up method, namely, kenaf, glass, and hybrid composites with 30% of weight fraction, the hybrid was mixed with a ratio of kenaf: glass 10:20. Monotonic tests were achieved (Tensile and compression) to determine the fatigue stress levels. Fully reversed fatigue loading was conducted with a stress ratio of -1 and stress levels 55-85% of the ultimate static stresses, all tests were conducted at 10 Hz of frequency. The results proof a positive hybrid composite; also agree with the rule of mixture that can predict the final composite properties. Moreover, it's been observed an improvement in overall mechanical properties of hybrid compared to individual ones.

  16. Load-bearing capacity of screw-retained CAD/CAM-produced titanium implant frameworks (I-Bridge®2) before and after cyclic mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    DITTMER, Marc Philipp; NENSA, Moritz; STIESCH, Meike; KOHORST, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Implant-supported screw-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) produced by CAD/ CAM have been introduced in recent years for the rehabilitation of partial or total endentulous jaws. However, there is a lack of data about the long-term mechanical characteristics. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the failure mode and the influence of extended cyclic mechanical loading on the load-bearing capacity of these frameworks. Material and Methods Ten five-unit FDP frameworks simulating a free-end situation in the mandibular jaw were manufactured according to the I-Bridge®2-concept (I-Bridge®2, Biomain AB, Helsingborg, Sweden) and each was screw-retained on three differently angulated Astra Tech implants (30º buccal angulation/0º angulation/30º lingual angulation). One half of the specimens was tested for static load-bearing capacity without any further treatment (control), whereas the other half underwent five million cycles of mechanical loading with 100 N as the upper load limit (test). All specimens were loaded until failure in a universal testing machine with an occlusal force applied at the pontics. Load-displacement curves were recorded and the failure mode was macro- and microscopically analyzed. The statistical analysis was performed using a t-test (p=0.05). Results All the specimens survived cyclic mechanical loading and no obvious failure could be observed. Due to the cyclic mechanical loading, the load-bearing capacity decreased from 8,496 N±196 N (control) to 7,592 N±901 N (test). The cyclic mechanical loading did not significantly influence the load-bearing capacity (p=0.060). The failure mode was almost identical in all specimens: large deformations of the framework at the implant connection area were obvious. Conclusion The load-bearing capacity of the I-Bridge®2 frameworks is much higher than the clinically relevant occlusal forces, even with considerably angulated implants. However, the performance under functional loading in vivo

  17. Dynamic Crush Behaviors Of Aluminum Honeycomb Specimens Under Compression Dominant Inclined Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Pan, Jwo; Tyan, Tau; Prasad, Priya

    2008-01-01

    The quasi-static and dynamic crush behaviors of aluminum 5052-H38 honeycomb specimens under out-of-plane inclined loads are investigated by experiments. Different types of honeycomb specimens were designed for crush tests under pure compressive and inclined loads with respect to the out-of-plane direction. A test fixture was designed for both quasi-static and dynamic crush tests under inclined loads. The results of the quasi-static crush tests indicate that the normal crush and shear strengths under inclined loads are consistent with the corresponding results under combined loads. The results of the dynamic crush tests indicate that as the impact velocity increases, the normal crush strength increases and the shear strength remains nearly the same. The trends of the normalized normal crush strengths under inclined loads for specimens with different in-plane orientation angles as functions of the impact velocity are very similar to each other. Based on the experimental results, a macroscopic yield criterion as a function of the impact velocity is proposed. The experimental results suggest that as the impact velocity increases, the shape of the macroscopic yield surface changes, or more specifically, the curvature of the yield surface increases near the pure compression state. The experimental results also show similar microscopic progressive folding mechanisms in honeycomb specimens under pure compressive and inclined loads. However, honeycomb specimens under inclined loads show inclined stacking patterns of folds due to the asymmetric location of horizontal plastic hinge lines.

  18. Recent developments in reassessment of jacket structures under extreme storm cyclic loading. Part 2: Cyclic capacity of tubular members

    SciTech Connect

    Amdahl, J.; Skallerud, B.H.; Eide, O.I.; Johansen, A.

    1995-12-31

    Tubular members with D/t ratio 35, 45, 60 and 80 were tested under controlled axial displacement described by an amplitude and a mean level. The material was structural steel to St. 52-3N, with minimum yield stress 345 MPa. The slenderness ratio of the specimens were in the range 50--70. During testing, the specimens were instrumented for measurements of longitudinal and transversal deflections, ovalization, and extreme fiber strains. Number of cycles to local buckling and through thickness cracking was recorded. Selected tests were simulated by use of the nonlinear beam-column FE program USFOS and the shell FE program ABAQUS. Comparisons were made to the corresponding test results. Monotonic and cyclic capacity criteria of tubular members are discussed on the basis of the results obtained.

  19. Micromechanics of ambient temperature cyclic fatigue loading in a composite of CAS glass ceramic reinforced with Nicalon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, C.Q.; Davidson, D.L.; Campbell, J.B. )

    1994-04-01

    The behavior of a Nicalon fiber reinforced glass ceramic composite cyclicly loaded has been evaluated at ambient temperature using high-resolution micromechanical test methods. On this basis, the events leading to fracture have been found to be similar to those accompanying fracture in unidirectional tension tests. Matrix strains were determined locally at the point of matrix fracture. Crack opening displacements (CODs) were measured as a function of loading cycles, and fiber strains were determined, in some cases. It is concluded that debonding of fibers begins at the point of matrix cracking and rapidly increases. Most of the cyclic lifetime of the material is spent with fibers debonded over large distances (fractions of a millimeter); these fibers are pulled out of the matrix on each loading cycle. Final debond length, as determined by fractography, is a function of the number of cycles to fracture, and of the applied stress level. 23 refs.

  20. Laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE) for dynamically loading materials at high strain rates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Eggert, J; Celliers, P; Jankowski, A; Lorenz, T; Moon, S; Edwards, M J; Collins, G

    2006-03-30

    We demonstrate the recently developed technique of laser driven isentropic compression (ICE) for dynamically compressing Al samples at high loading rates close to the room temperature isentrope and up to peak stresses above 100GPa. Upon analysis of the unloading profiles from a multi-stepped Al/LiF target a continuous path through Stress-Density space may be calculated. For materials with phase transformations ramp compression techniques reveals the location of equilibrium phase boundaries and provide information on the kinetics of the lattice re-ordering.

  1. Longitudinal Weld Land Buckling in Compression-Loaded Orthogrid Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Large stiffened cylinders used in launch vehicles (LV), such as the Space Shuttle External Tank, are manufactured by welding multiple curved panel sections into complete cylinders. The effects of the axial weld lands between the panel sections on the buckling load were studied, along with the interaction between the acreage stiffener arrangement and the weld land geometry. This document contains the results of the studies.

  2. Human Intervertebral Disc Internal Strain in Compression: The Effect of Disc Region, Loading Position, and Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Grace D.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of the disc is mechanical; therefore, degenerative changes in disc mechanics and the interactions between the annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) in nondegenerate and degenerate discs are important to functional evaluation. The disc experiences complex loading conditions, including mechanical interactions between the pressurized NP and the surrounding fiber-reinforced AF. Our objective was to noninvasively evaluate the internal deformations of nondegenerate and degenerate human discs under axial compression with flexion, neutral, and extension positions using magnetic resonance imaging and image correlation. The side of applied bending (e.g., anterior AF in flexion) had higher tensile radial and compressive axial strains, and the opposite side of bending exhibited tensile axial strains even though the disc was loaded under axial compression. Degenerated discs exhibited higher compressive axial and tensile radial strains, which suggest that load distribution through the disc subcomponents are altered with degeneration, likely due to the depressurized NP placing more of the applied load directly on the AF. The posterior AF exhibited higher compressive axial and higher tensile radial strains than the other AF regions, and the strains were not correlated with degeneration, suggesting this region undergoes high strains throughout life, which may predispose it to failure and tears. In addition to understanding internal disc mechanics, this study provides important new data into the changes in internal strain with degeneration, data for validation of finite element models, and provides a technique and baseline data for evaluating surgical treatments. PMID:21337394

  3. Effect of cyclic loading on microleakage of silorane based composite compared with low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites

    PubMed Central

    Kermanshah, Hamid; Yasini, Esmail; Hoseinifar, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are many concerns regarding the marginal seal of composite restorations, especially when composite restorations are subjected to cyclic loading. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cyclic loading on the microleakage of silorane based composite compared with low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites in class V cavities. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, class V cavities were prepared on the facial and lingual surfaces of 48 human premolars (96 cavities). The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 12 teeth (24 cavities) each and restored as follows: Group 1 (Siloran System Adhesive + Filtek P90), Group 2 (All Bond SE + Aelite LS Posterior), Group 3 (Futurabond NR + Grandio), and Group 4 (G-Bond + Kalore-GC). All the specimens were thermocycled for 2000 cycles (5-55°C) and then half of the specimens from each group, were Load cycled. All teeth were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye, sectioned, and observed under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon test, Kruskal–Wallis, and Mann–Whitney U-tests. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: In both unloaded and loaded groups, no statistically significant differences were observed among four composites at the occlusal margin, but a significant difference in gingival microleakage was found between Aelite and silorane. Occlusal and gingival microleakage was not affected by cyclic loading in none of the four restorative materials. Conclusion: Silorane did not provide better marginal seal than the low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites (except Aelite). In addition, cyclic loading did not affect the marginal microleakage of evaluated composite restorations. PMID:27274348

  4. In vitro analysis of resistance to cyclic load and preload distribution of two implant/abutment screwed connections.

    PubMed

    Murmura, Giovanna; Di Iorio, Donato; Cicchetti, Angelo Raffaele; Sinjari, Bruna; Caputi, Sergio

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present research is an in vitro evaluation of the preload distribution in screw-retained implant systems under cyclic load. Two implant systems with internal connection were tested: fifteen 4.5 × 10 mm implants with internal hexagon and fifteen 4.5 × 10 mm implants with internal octagon. Samples underwent cyclic load that was between 20 N and 200 N for 1 × 10(6) cycles. After mechanical tests, samples were sectioned along the long axis and analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. Five 4.5 × 10 mm implants with internal hexagon and five 4.5 × 10 mm implants with internal octagon were collected for photoelastic analysis. Each fixture was mounted in a wax-made parallelepiped measuring 20 mm × 20 mm × 10 mm. A mold was made for each wax parallelepiped/fixture assembly using a silicone-based impression material, and an epoxy resin was poured in each mold. After setting of the resin, 25° angled titanium abutments were screwed onto each replica; afterwards, assemblies underwent photoelastic analysis. After cyclic load, screw threads and heads were still in contact with internal fixture threads and abutment holes, respectively, suggesting that preload has not been lost during load. During load, SSO and Xsigñ implants behave in a different way. SSO samples revealed the presence of fringes radiating from the base of the abutment. Xsigñ implants showed the presence of fringes radiating from the threads of the retention screw. From the present in vitro research, it is possible to state that screw-retained abutment based on an internal octagonal connection is less likely to come loose after cyclic load.

  5. Experimental and Numerical Studies on Development of Fracture Process Zone (FPZ) in Rocks under Cyclic and Static Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamgosar, M.; Erarslan, N.

    2016-03-01

    The development of fracture process zones (FPZ) in the Cracked Chevron Notched Brazilian Disc (CCNBD) monsonite and Brisbane tuff specimens was investigated to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of brittle rocks under static and various cyclic loadings. An FPZ is a region that involves different types of damage around the pre-existing and/or stress-induced crack tips in engineering materials. This highly damaged area includes micro- and meso-cracks, which emerge prior to the main fracture growth or extension and ultimately coalescence to macrofractures, leading to the failure. The experiments and numerical simulations were designed for this study to investigate the following features of FPZ in rocks: (1) ligament connections and (2) microcracking and its coalescence in FPZ. A Computed Tomography (CT) scan technique was also used to investigate the FPZ behaviour in selected rock specimens. The CT scan results showed that the fracturing velocity is entirely dependent on the appropriate amount of fracture energy absorbed in rock specimens due to the change of frequency and amplitudes of the dynamic loading. Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM) was used to compute the displacements, tensile stress distribution and plastic energy dissipation around the propagating crack tip in FPZ. One of the most important observations, the shape of FPZ and its extension around the crack tip, was made using numerical and experimental results, which supported the CT scan results. When the static rupture and the cyclic rupture were compared, the main differences are twofold: (1) the number of fragments produced is much greater under cyclic loading than under static loading, and (2) intergranular cracks are formed due to particle breakage under cyclic loading compared with smooth and bright cracks along cleavage planes under static loading.

  6. Calibration of hyperelastic material properties of the human lumbar intervertebral disc under fast dynamic compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Wagnac, Eric; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Garo, Anaïs; El-Rich, Marwan; Aubin, Carl-Eric

    2011-10-01

    Under fast dynamic loading conditions (e.g. high-energy impact), the load rate dependency of the intervertebral disc (IVD) material properties may play a crucial role in the biomechanics of spinal trauma. However, most finite element models (FEM) of dynamic spinal trauma uses material properties derived from quasi-static experiments, thus neglecting this load rate dependency. The aim of this study was to identify hyperelastic material properties that ensure a more biofidelic simulation of the IVD under a fast dynamic compressive load. A hyperelastic material law based on a first-order Mooney-Rivlin formulation was implemented in a detailed FEM of a L2-L3 functional spinal unit (FSU) to represent the mechanical behavior of the IVD. Bony structures were modeled using an elasto-plastic Johnson-Cook material law that simulates bone fracture while ligaments were governed by a viscoelastic material law. To mimic experimental studies performed in fast dynamic compression, a compressive loading velocity of 1 m/s was applied to the superior half of L2, while the inferior half of L3 was fixed. An exploratory technique was used to simulate dynamic compression of the FSU using 34 sets of hyperelastic material constants randomly selected using an optimal Latin hypercube algorithm and a set of material constants derived from quasi-static experiments. Selection or rejection of the sets of material constants was based on compressive stiffness and failure parameters criteria measured experimentally. The two simulations performed with calibrated hyperelastic constants resulted in nonlinear load-displacement curves with compressive stiffness (7335 and 7079 N/mm), load (12,488 and 12,473 N), displacement (1.95 and 2.09 mm) and energy at failure (13.5 and 14.7 J) in agreement with experimental results (6551 ± 2017 N/mm, 12,411 ± 829 N, 2.1 ± 0.2 mm and 13.0 ± 1.5 J respectively). The fracture pattern and location also agreed with experimental results. The simulation performed with

  7. Experimental investigation on yield behavior of PMMA under combined shear-compression loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianjun; Jin, Tao; Wang, Zhihua; Zhao, Longmao

    The work experimentally studies the yielding behavior of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at three different loading rates through a developed combined shear-compression test technique which contains a universal materials testing machine, mental blocks with double beveled ends (combined shear-compression loading setup) and a column sleeve made of Teflon. The results show that the failure loci agree well with theoretical predictions involving the strain rate dependence, which indicates the validity of this test method. Additionally, the experimental data enrich the previous experimental work about polymer yielding surface in the principle stress space.

  8. An experimental investigation of domain wall motion in polycrystalline Ni during high-rate compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Bah, Abubakarr; Carman, Gregory P.; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes experimental data on a polycrystalline nickel subjected to compressive loads induced in a split Hopkinson pressure bar test. A perpendicular bias magnetic field with respect to the loading direction is used to orient the domains and a pick-up coil measures the magnetic response of the sample during loading. Utilizing this experimental configuration, this study investigated the coupled effects of the magnetic and mechanical fields on domain wall motion in a polycrystalline magnetostrictive material (Ni) during the high-rate elastic loading. The experimental measurements reveal that the magnitude of the stress-induced magnetization change is dependent upon bias magnetic field.

  9. Creep-fatigue of High Temperature Materials for VHTR: Effect of Cyclic Loading and Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Celine Cabet; L. Carroll; R. Wright; R. Madland

    2011-05-01

    Alloy 617 is the one of the leading candidate materials for Intermediate Heat eXchangers (IHX) of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). System start-ups and shut-downs as well as power transients will produce low cycle fatigue (LCF) loadings of components. Furthermore, the anticipated IHX operating temperature, up to 950°C, is in the range of creep so that creep-fatigue interaction, which can significantly increase the fatigue crack growth, may be one of the primary IHX damage modes. To address the needs for Alloy 617 codification and licensing, a significant creep-fatigue testing program is underway at Idaho National Laboratory. Strain controlled LCF tests including hold times up to 1800s at maximum tensile strain were conducted at total strain range of 0.3% and 0.6% in air at 950°C. Creep-fatigue testing was also performed in a simulated VHTR impure helium coolant for selected experimental conditions. The creep-fatigue tests resulted in failure times up to 1000 hrs. Fatigue resistance was significantly decreased when a hold time was added at peak stress and when the total strain was increased. The fracture mode also changed from transgranular to intergranular with introduction of a tensile hold. Changes in the microstructure were methodically characterized. A combined effect of temperature, cyclic and static loading and environment was evidenced in the targeted operating conditions of the IHX. This paper This paper reviews the data previously published by Carroll and co-workers in references 10 and 11 focusing on the role of inelastic strain accumulation and of oxidation in the initiation and propagation of surface fatigue cracks.

  10. Experimental study of hollow rectangular bridge column performance under vertical and cyclically bilateral loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qiang; Du, Xiuli; Zhou, Yihui; Lee, George C.

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the seismic performance of hollow reinforced concrete (RC) bridge columns of rectangular cross section under constant axial load and cyclically biaxial bending, five specimens were tested. A parametric study is carried out for different axial load ratios, longitudinal reinforcement ratios and lateral reinforcement ratios. The experimental results showed that all tested specimens failed in the flexural failure mode and their ultimate performance was dominated by flexural capacity, which is represented by the rupture/buckling of tensile longitudinal rebars at the bottom of the bridge columns. Biaxial force and displacement hysteresis loops showed significant stiffness and strength degradations, and the pinching effect and coupling interaction effect of both directions severely decrease the structural seismic resistance. However, the measured ductility coefficient varying from 3.5 to 5.7 and the equivalent viscous damping ratio varying from 0.19 and 0.26 can meet the requirements of the seismic design. The hollow RC rectangular bridge columns with configurations of lateral reinforcement in this study have excellent performance under bidirectional earthquake excitations, and may be considered as a substitute for current hollow RC rectangular section configurations described in the Guideline for Seismic Design of Highway Bridges (JTG/T B02-01-2008). The length of the plastic hinge region was found to approach one sixth of the hollow RC rectangular bridge column height for all specimen columns, and it was much less than those specified in the current JTG/T. Thus, the length of the plastic hinge region is more concentrated for RC rectangular hollow bridge columns.

  11. Numerical analyses of caisson breakwaters on soft foundations under wave cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-zhan; Yan, Zhen; Wang, Yu-chi

    2016-03-01

    A caisson breakwater is built on soft foundations after replacing the upper soft layer with sand. This paper presents a dynamic finite element method to investigate the strength degradation and associated pore pressure development of the intercalated soft layer under wave cyclic loading. By combining the undrained shear strength with the empirical formula of overconsolidation clay produced by unloading and the development model of pore pressure, the dynamic degradation law that describes the undrained shear strength as a function of cycle number and stress level is derived. Based on the proposed dynamic degradation law and M-C yield criterion, a dynamic finite element method is numerically implemented to predict changes in undrained shear strength of the intercalated soft layer by using the general-purpose FEM software ABAQUS, and the accuracy of the method is verified. The effects of cycle number and amplitude of the wave force on the degradation of the undrained shear strength of the intercalated soft layer and the associated excess pore pressure response are investigated by analyzing an overall distribution and three typical sections underneath the breakwater. By comparing the undrained shear strength distributions obtained by the static method and the quasi-static method with the undrained shear strength distributions obtained by the dynamic finite element method in the three typical sections, the superiority of the dynamic finite element method in predicting changes in undrained shear strength is demonstrated.

  12. Buckling Behavior of Compression-Loaded Composite Cylindrical Shells with Reinforced Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the response of thin-wall compression-loaded quasi-isotropic laminated composite cylindrical shells with reinforced and unreinforced square cutouts are presented. The effects of cutout reinforcement orthotropy, size, and thickness on the nonlinear response of the shells are described. A high-fidelity nonlinear analysis procedure has been used to predict the nonlinear response of the shells. The analysis procedure includes a nonlinear static analysis that predicts stable response characteristics of the shells and a nonlinear transient analysis that predicts unstable dynamic buckling response characteristics. The results illustrate how a compression-loaded shell with an unreinforced cutout can exhibit a complex nonlinear response. In particular, a local buckling response occurs in the shell near the cutout and is caused by a complex nonlinear coupling between local shell-wall deformations and in-plane destabilizing compression stresses near the cutout. In general, the addition of reinforcement around a cutout in a compression-loaded shell can retard or eliminate the local buckling response near the cutout and increase the buckling load of the shell, as expected. However, results are presented that show how certain reinforcement configurations can actually cause an unexpected increase in the magnitude of local deformations and stresses in the shell and cause a reduction in the buckling load. Specific cases are presented that suggest that the orthotropy, thickness, and size of a cutout reinforcement in a shell can be tailored to achieve improved response characteristics.

  13. Modeling the buckling behavior of carbon nanotubes under simultaneous combination of compressive and torsional loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, B.; Montazeri, A.; Tavakoli-Darestani, R.; Rafii-Tabar, H.

    2012-09-01

    A number of studies have been performed on the mechanical and deformational properties of carbon nanotubes under different loading conditions, such as compression, tension, torsion, bending, and hydrostatic pressure. However, in practical applications, such as in nanotube-reinforced nanocomposites, these different loading conditions are present simultaneously. We employ molecular dynamics simulation to compute the behavior and deformation properties of carbon nanotubes under combined application of compression and torsion. The buckling properties and the corresponding mode shapes are investigated, for the first time, for different rotational and axial displacement rates. It is found that the critical loads and the buckling deformations strongly depend upon the ratio of these displacement rates. Finally, a relationship between the shear and normal stresses is established, which can be used for determining the stress limits when designing practical carbon nanotube-based systems in which combined loads may be applied.

  14. Cyclic-loading-induced Accumulation of Geometrically Necessary Dislocations Near Grain Boundaries in an Ni-based Superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E-Wen; Barabash, Rozaliya I.; Ice, Gene E.; Liu, Wenjun; Liu, Yee-Lang; Kai, Ji-Jung; Liaw, Peter K.

    2011-12-14

    In this study, the fatigue-induced microstructure produced in a nickel-based polycrystalline superalloy that was subjected to cyclic loading was characterized by polychromatic x-ray microdiffraction (PXM) together with in-situ neutron diffraction and transmission-electron microscopy (TEM). In-situ neutron-diffraction measurements reveal two distinct stages of the fatigue damage: cyclic hardening followed by cyclic softening. Three-dimensional spatially resolved PXM micro-Laue measurements find an increase in the density of geometrically necessary dislocations near the grain boundaries, which is accompanied by lattice rotations and grain subdivisions. The PXM results are in agreement with the in-situ neutron-diffraction and TEM results.

  15. Cyclic-loading-induced accumulation of geometrically necessary dislocations near grain boundaries in a an ni-based superalloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E. W.; Barabash, R. I.; Ice, G. I.; Liu, W.; Liu, Y. L.; Kai, J. J.; Liaw, P. K.; Univ.of Tennessee; ORNL; Tsing-Hua Univ.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the fatigue-induced microstructure produced in a nickel-based polycrystalline superalloy that was subjected to cyclic loading was characterized by polychromatic x-ray microdiffraction (PXM) together with in-situ neutron diffraction and transmission-electron microscopy (TEM). In-situ neutron-diffraction measurements reveal two distinct stages of the fatigue damage: cyclic hardening followed by cyclic softening. Three-dimensional spatially resolved PXM micro-Laue measurements find an increase in the density of geometrically necessary dislocations near the grain boundaries, which is accompanied by lattice rotations and grain subdivisions. The PXM results are in agreement with the in-situ neutron-diffraction and TEM results.

  16. Engineering the periodontal ligament in hyaluronan-gelatin-type I collagen constructs: upregulation of apoptosis and alterations in gene expression by cyclic compressive strain.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, Aarthi; Sriram, Gopu; Vinoth, Jayasaleen Kumar; Cao, Tong; Meikle, Murray C

    2015-02-01

    To engineer constructs of the periodontal ligament (PDL), human PDL cells were incorporated into a matrix of hyaluronan, gelatin, and type I collagen (COLI) in sample holders (13×1 mm) of six-well Biopress culture plates. The loading dynamics of the PDL were mimicked by applying a cyclic compressive strain of 33.4 kPa (340.6 gm/cm(2)) to the constructs for 1.0 s every 60 s, for 6, 12, and 24 h in a Flexercell FX-4000C Strain Unit. Compression significantly increased the number of nonviable cells and increased the expression of several apoptosis-related genes, including initiator and executioner caspases. Of the 15 extracellular matrix genes screened, most were upregulated at some point after 6-12 h deformation, but all were downregulated at 24 h, except for MMPs1-3 and CTGF. In culture supernatants, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) protein levels were upregulated at 24 h; receptor activator of nuclear kappa factor B (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) were unchanged; and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) not detected. The low modulus of elasticity of the constructs was a disadvantage-future mechanobiology studies and tissue engineering applications will require constructs with much higher stiffness. Since the major structural protein of the PDL is COLI, a more rational approach would be to permeabilize preformed COLI scaffolds with PDL-populated matrices. PMID:25181942

  17. Response of thoracolumbar vertebral bodies to high rate compressive loading - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Dooley, C J; Wester, B A; Wing, I D; Voo, L M; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2013-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events created by improvised explosive devices are threats to warfighter survivability. High intensity blast waves emitted from these devices transfer large forces through vehicle structures to occupants, often resulting in injuries including debilitating spinal fractures. The vertical loading vector through the spine generates significant compressive forces at high strain rates. To better understand injury mechanisms and ultimately better protect vehicle occupants against UBB attacks, high-fidelity computational models are being developed to predict the human response to dynamic loading characteristic of these events. This effort details the results from a series of 23 high-rate compression tests on vertebral body specimen. A high-rate servo-hydraulic test system applied a range of compressive loading rates (.01 mm/s to 1238 mm/s) to vertebral bodies in the thoracolumbar region (T7-L5). The force-deflection curves generated indicate rate dependent sensitivity of vertebral stiffness, ultimate load and ultimate deflection. Specimen subjected to high-rate dynamic loading to failure experienced critical structural damage at 5.5% ± 2.1% deflection. Compared to quasi-static loading, vertebral bodies had greater stiffness, greater force to failure, and lower ultimate failure deflection at high rates. Post-failure, an average loss in height of 15% was observed, along with a mean reduction in strength of 48%. The resulting data from these tests will allow for enhanced biofidelity of computational models by characterizing the vertebral stiffness response and ultimate deflection at rates representative of UBB events.

  18. The influence of low-temperature degradation and cyclic loading on the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia molar crowns.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Harada, A; Kanno, T; Inagaki, R; Niwano, Y; Milleding, P; Örtengren, U

    2015-07-01

    The present study analyzed the kinetics of low-temperature degradation (LTD) in zirconia, and evaluated the influence of LTD and cyclic loading on the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia molar crowns. Bar-shaped zirconia specimens were divided into nine groups and autoclaved at 134°C for 0-200h to induce LTD. The surface fraction and penetration depth of the monoclinic phase were examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Monolithic zirconia molar crowns were prepared for crown fracture testing. The crowns were autoclaved for 0-100h (n=6) and cemented to dies. Six crown-die samples that were not autoclaved and six samples that were autoclaved for 100h were subjected to cyclic loading with a load of 300N for 240,000 cycles. All samples were tested in a load-to-failure test. The monoclinic fraction on the surface increased with autoclaving time and reached a plateau after 50h. The depth of the monoclinic phase increased without reaching a plateau. The fracture load of the crowns significantly decreased from 5683N (SD: 342) to 3975N (SD: 194) after 100h of autoclaving. Cyclic loading did not significantly affect the fracture resistance of the crowns in all cases. Kinetic analysis showed no linear correlation between the surface fraction and depth of the monoclinic phase after 50h of autoclaving. Even though LTD increased the monoclinic phase, resulting in lower strength, the fracture resistance of the monolithic zirconia crowns was still sufficient to withstand the loading conditions in the molar regions.

  19. Effects of saline loading during head down tilt on ANP and cyclic GMP levels and on urinary fluid excretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, C.; Lang, R. E.; Baisch, F.; Blomqvist, G.; Heer, M.; Gerzer, R.

    In the present study the renal and humoral effects of acute saline infusions were investigated in six healthy male volunteers before, during and after a ten day period of -6° head-down-tilt (HDT). During the whole 23-day study period the subjects received a standardized diet including 40 ml water and 125 mg NaCl per kg body weight per day. After the infusion of 0.9% saline (22 ml/kg within 20 minutes) plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels were only slightly increased (not significant) at the end of the infusion, while plasma cyclic GMP levels were significantly increased by about 40% (p<0.05) one hour later. No difference was observed in the plasma ANP and cyclic GMP changes between the pre-HDT, the HDT and the post-HDT infusion experiment. Urine flow, sodium excretion and urinary cyclic GMP excretion were significantly increased (p<0.05 and below) by 100 to 300% during the second and third hour after each saline infusion. However, during these short-term periods only 20% of the infused water and less than 20% of the infused sodium were excreted. Furthermore, a significantly increased volume, sodium and cyclic GMP excretion was observed for over 48 hours after each fluid load experiment. These data suggest that HDT does not induce major alterations in the regulation of an acute saline infusion and plasma ANP does not play a major role in the diuretic/natriuretic effects of volume loading.

  20. Effects of Nesting on Compression-Loaded 2-D Woven Textile Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Daniel OHare; Breiling, Kurtis B.; Verhulst, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Layer nesting was investigated in five harness satin weave textile composite laminates under static compression loading. Two carbon/epoxy material systems, AS4/3501-6 and IM7/8551-7A were considered. Laminates were fabricated with three idealized nesting cases: stacked, split-span and diagonal. Similar compression strength reductions due to the effects of idealized nesting were identified for each material. The diagonal nesting geometry produced the largest reduction in static strength when compared to the compression strength of a conventional textile composite. All three nesting cases produced reductions in strength and ultimate strain due to the effects of idealized nesting. Finite element results showed consistent strength reduction trends for the idealized nesting cases, however the magnitudes of compressive strengths were overpredicted.

  1. Polycrystal plasticity modeling of nickel-based superalloy IN 617 subjected to cyclic loading at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Oskay, Caglar

    2016-06-01

    A crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model considering isothermal, large deformation and cyclic loading conditions has been formulated and employed to investigate the mechanical response of a nickel-based alloy at high temperature. The investigations focus on fatigue and creep-fatigue hysteresis response of IN 617 subjected to fatigue and creep-fatigue cycles. A new slip resistance evolution equation is proposed to account for cyclic transient features induced by solute drag creep that occur in IN 617 at 950 °C. The crystal plasticity model parameters are calibrated against the experimental fatigue and creep-fatigue data based on an optimization procedure that relies on a surrogate modeling (i.e. Gaussian process) technique to accelerate multi-parameter optimizations. The model predictions are validated against experimental data, which demonstrates the capability of the proposed model in capturing the hysteresis behavior for various hold times and strain ranges in the context of fatigue and creep-fatigue loading.

  2. Dynamic compressive response of the human pelvis axial loading of the sacroiliac joint.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the biomechanical response of the intact human pelvis subjected to dynamic axial compressive loading. Axial compression tests were performed on a total of six fresh frozen human cadaver pelves, five male and one female. The intact pelves were fixed to a load cell with a custom aluminum pot placed around the sacrum. Special care was taken when potting the pelves in order to ensure that the orientation of the pelves was representative of that seen in normal upright seating. The pelves were then subjected to dynamic compressive loading at a rate of approximately 2 m/s using a servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS). The average peak force, moment, and displacement at the point of failure were 5,896 +/- 1455 N, 33.4 +/- 28.6 N-m, and 6.4 +/- 0.7 mm, respectively. The failure of the all pelvis specimens corresponded to a bilateral dislocation of the sacroiliac joint. As a general trend, strain gage data showed that the right and left superior ramus were placed in tension and the right and left ischium were placed in compression. The peak strain values ranged from 746 mstr to 5717 mstr in tension and from -356 mstr to -2677 mstr in compression. The current study will help future researchers reduce the number of incidences and severity of pelvic fractures that can result from falls from heights, ejection seat loading, or motor vehicle crash environments by providing valuable test data that quantifies biomechanical response of the human pelvis in vertical loading. PMID:19141911

  3. Behavior of Compression-Loaded Composite Panels with Stringer Terminations and Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental study of graphite-epoxy stiffened panels with impact-damaged stringer terminations are presented. Five stitched graphite-epoxy panels with stiffeners with a gradual reduction in either thickness or height were examined. Panels were analyzed using finite element analysis and tested by loading them in axial compression to a predetermined load. The panels were then subjected to impact damage and loaded to failure. Axial midplane strains, surface strains, interlaminar strains and failure results are discussed.

  4. A Numerical and Experimental Study of Compression-Loaded Composite Panels With Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2006-01-01

    Results from a numerical and experimental study on the effects of laminate orthotropy and circular cutout size on the response of compression-loaded composite curved panels are presented. Several 60-in-radius composite panels with four different laminate configurations were tested with cutout diameters that range from 10% to 60% of the panel width. Finite-element analyses were performed for each panel in order to identify the effects boundary conditions, measured initial geometric imperfections and thickness variations had on the nonlinear and buckling behavior of the panels. The compression-loaded panels considered herein exhibited two separate types of behavior depending on the laminate stacking sequence and cutout size. More specifically, some of the panels exhibited the classical snap-through type buckling response; however, some of the panels exhibited a monotonically increasing stable response and achieved compressive loads in excess of twice the predicted linear bifurcation buckling load. In general, the finite-element analyses were able to predict accurately the nonlinear response and buckling loads of the panels and the prebuckling and postbuckling out-of-plane deformations and strains.

  5. Buckling Behavior of Compression-Loaded Composite Cylindrical Shells With Reinforced Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Sarnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the response of thin-walled compression-loaded quasi-isotropic laminated composite cylindrical shells with unreinforced and reinforced square cutouts are presented. The effects of cutout reinforcement orthotropy, size, and thickness on the nonlinear response of the shells are described. A nonlinear analysis procedure has been used to predict the nonlinear response of the shells. The results indicate that a local buckling response occurs in the shell near the cutout when subjected to load and is caused by a nonlinear coupling between local shell-wall deformations and in-plane destabilizing compression stresses near the cutout. In general, reinforcement around a cutout in a compression-loaded shell is shown to retard or eliminate the local buckling response near the cutout and increase the buckling load of the shell. However, some results show that certain reinforcement configurations can cause an unexpected increase in the magnitude of local deformations and stresses in the shell and cause a reduction in the buckling load. Specific cases are presented that suggest that the orthotropy, thickness, and size of a cutout reinforcement in a shell can be tailored to achieve improved buckling response characteristics.

  6. Intraocular pressure effects of water loading and venous compression tests in normal and denervated pigmented rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gual, A; Mintenig, G M; Belmonte, C

    1989-03-01

    We have compared IOP elevations induced by water-loading and by increased cephalic venous pressure in normal and denervated pigmented rabbits. Denervations were performed by sympathetic ganglionectomy and/or blockade of the sensory and autonomic innervation of the eye through retrobulbar anesthesia; retrobulbar anesthesia induced significant decreases of the basal IOP in control but not in ganglionectomized eyes. The water-loading test induced a peak pressure elevation approximately 30 min after water administration that could be counteracted by retrobulbar anesthesia. Ganglionectomized rabbits exhibited steeper IOP rises and greater IOP increases following water-loading than the control eyes; retrobulbar anesthesia in ganglionectomized eyes delayed the IOP response to water-loading. Compressions of the neck lasting 30 min elicited significant IOP elevations that were more pronounced in ganglionectomized eyes. In these eyes, retrobulbar anesthesia further increased the IOP rise elicited by neck compression. An IOP decrease below control values was observed at the end of the venous compression. The results indicate that an intact efferent innervation of the eye contributes to buffer IOP elevations induced by water-loading or cephalic venous stasis, presumably through the vascular effects of the ocular autonomic nerves.

  7. Compression loading-induced stress responses in intervertebral disc cells encapsulated in 3D collagen constructs

    PubMed Central

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Cells protect themselves from stresses through a cellular stress response. In the interverebral disc, such response was also demonstrated to be induced by various environmental stresses. However, whether compression loading will cause cellular stress response in the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) is not well studied. By using an in vitro collagen microencapsulation model, we investigated the effect of compression loading on the stress response of NPCs. Cell viability tests, and gene and protein expression experiments were conducted, with primers for the heat shock response (HSR: HSP70, HSF1, HSP27 and HSP90), and unfolded protein response (UPR: GRP78, GRP94, ATF4 and CHOP) genes and an antibody to HSP72. Different gene expression patterns occurred due to loading type throughout experiments. Increasing the loading strain for a short duration did not increase the stress response genes significantly, but over longer durations, HSP70 and HSP27 were upregulated. Longer loading durations also resulted in a continuous upregulation of HSR genes and downregulation of UPR genes, even after load removal. The rate of apoptosis did not increase significantly after loading, suggesting that stress response genes might play a role in cell survival following mechanical stress. These results demonstrate how mechanical stress might induce and control the expression of HSR and UPR genes in NPCs. PMID:27197886

  8. THE EFFECT OF REPEATED COMPRESSIVE DYNAMIC LOADING ON THE STRESS-INDUCED MARTENSITIC TRANSFORMATION IN NiTi SHAPE MEMORY ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    D. MILLER; W. THISSELL; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    It has been shown that quasi-static, cyclic, isothermal mechanical loading influences the mechanical response of the stress-induced martensitic transformation in fully annealed NiTi Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs). As the cycle number increases, hardening of the stress-strain response during the martensitic phase transformation is seen along with a decrease in the threshold stress for initiation of stress-induced martensite. Also, the amount of plastic strain and detwinned martensitic strain decreases as the cycle number increases. However, NiTi SMAs have not been experimentally explored under high compressive strain rates. This research explores the cyclic near-adiabatic stress-induced martensitic loading using a Split Hopkinskin Pressure Bar (SHPB). The results of the dynamic loading tests are presented with emphasis on the loading rate, stress-strain response, specimen temperature and post-test microstructural evaluation. The results from the high strain rate tests show similarities with the quasi-static results in the hardening of the stress-strain response and shifting of the threshold stress for initiation of stress-induced martensite.

  9. Design of a miniature hydraulic compression load frame for microdiffraction tests at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Varma, R.; Krasnicki, S.; Sinha, S.

    1999-10-11

    In support of the x-ray synchrotrons radiation multidiffraction project of Los Alamos National Laboratory at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), we have designed and fabricated a miniature hydraulic compression load frame with 20000 N load capacity for metal specimen tests at the APS. The compact design allows the load frame to sit on the center of a 6-circle goniometer with six degrees of freedom and maximum solid angle accessibility for the incoming x-ray beam and diffraction beam detectors. A set of compact precision stages with submicron resolution has been designed for the load frame positioning to compensate the sample internal elastic and/or plastic deformation during the loading process. The system design, specifications, and test results are presented.

  10. A Novel Blasted and Grooved Low Profile Pedicle Screw Able to Resist High Compression Bending Loads

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Sung; Choi, Hong-June; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Jeong, Hyun-Yong; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Yoon, Young-Sul; Lee, Yoon-Chul; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2012-01-01

    Objective Polyaxial pedicle screws are a safe, useful adjunct to transpedicular fixation. However, the large screw head size can cause soft tissue irritation, high rod positioning, and facet joint injury. However, the mechanical resistance provided by small and low profile pedicle screws is very limited. We therefore developed a novel, low profile pedicle screw using grooving and blasting treatment that is able to resist a high compression bending load. Methods We evaluated the compression bending force to displacement and yield loads for seven different screw head types that differed with regard to their groove intervals and whether or not they had been blasted. Results The rank order of screw types that had the greatest compression bending force to displacement was as follows: (1) universal polyaxial, (2) low polyaxial with 0.1mm grooves and blasting, (3) low polyaxial with blasting, (4) low polyaxial with 0.15mm grooves and blasting, (5) low polyaxial with 0.05mm grooves and blasting, (6) low polyaxial with 0.05mm grooves, (7) and low polyaxial. Low polyaxial screws with 0.1mm grooves and blasting had the maximum yield load and highest compression bending force to displacement of all seven polyaxial screw head systems evaluated. Conclusion Blasting and grooving treatment of pedicle screw heads resulted in screw heads with a high yield load and compression bending force relative to displacement because of increased friction. Low polyaxial pedicle screws with 0.1 mm grooves treated by blasting have mechanical characteristics similar to those of universal polyaxial pedicle screws. PMID:25983790

  11. On core compressibility of sandwich composite panels subjected to intense underwater shock loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Ritwik; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2014-01-01

    Novel analytical models have been proposed in this study which extends current available fluid-structure interaction (FSI) theories for explosion induced shock loading on monolithic and laminated composite plates to sandwich composite panels, featuring core compression. The proposed models have been asymptotically validated against other FSI existing theories in low pressure range. A qualitative comparative analysis of the proposed models has been made with other existing FSI theories from the viewpoint of energy conservation. Core compression as predicted by the proposed models can be utilized for more economical, robust design of blast resistant sandwich composite structures.

  12. Evaluation of a Compression-Loaded-Stitched-Multi-Bay Fuselage Panel With Barely Visible Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Li, Ji-An

    2005-01-01

    The experimental results from a stitched VaRTM carbon-epoxy composite panel tested under uni-axial compression loading are presented along with nonlinear finite element analysis prediction of the response. The curved panel is divided by frames and stringers into six bays with a column of three bays along the compressive loading direction. The frames are supported at the frame ends to resist out-of-plane translation. Back-to-back strain gages are used to record the strain and displacement transducers were used to record the out-of-plane displacements. In addition a full-field-displacement measurement technique that utilizes a camera-based-stereo-vision system was used to record the displacements. The panel was loaded to 1.5 times the predicted initial buckling load (1st bay buckling load, P(sub er) from the nonlinear finite element analysis and then was removed from the test machine for impact testing. After impacting with 20 ft-lbs of energy using a spherical impactor to produce barely visible damage the panel was loaded in compression until failure. The buckling load of the first bay to buckle was 97% of the buckling load before impact. The stitching constrained the impact damage from growing during the loading to failure. Impact damage had very little overall effect on panel stiffness. Panel stiffness measured by the full-field-displacement technique indicated a 13% loss in stiffness after impact. The panel failed at 1.64 times the first panel buckling load. The barely visible impact damage did not grow noticeably as the panel failed by global instability due to stringer-web terminations at the frame locations. The predictions from the nonlinear analysis of the finite element modeling of the entire specimen were very effective in the capture of the initial buckling and global behavior of the panel. In addition, the prediction highlighted the weakness of the panel under compression due to stringer web terminations. Both the test results and the nonlinear

  13. Intervertebral disc responses during spinal loading with MRI-compatible spinal compression apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Iwane; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2004-07-01

    This study addresses the development of an MRI-compatible spinal compression harness for use as a research and diagnostic tool. This apparatus adds valuable information to MRI imaging regarding the physiology/biomechanics of intervertebral discs and pathophysiology of back pain in patients and astronauts in space. All materials of the spinal compression apparatus are non-metallic for MRI compatibility. The compact design fits into standard MRI or CT scanners and loading is adjusted to specific percentages of BW with elastic cords. Previously this capability has not been available. Three healthy male subjects were fitted with a spinal compression harness and placed supine in a MRI scanner. Longitudinal distance between T7/8 and L5/S1 discs decreased 5.6 mm with 50% BW compression. Lumbosacral angle increased 17.2 degrees. T2 values of nucleus pulposus from L1/2 to L5/S1 discs increased 18.2+/-6.1% (+/-SD) during 50% BW compression and 25.3+/-7.4% (+/-SD) during 75% BW compression.

  14. Failure of woven carbon-polyimide laminates under off-axis compression loading

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, V.; Anand, K.; Grape, J.

    1998-01-05

    This paper reports the failure mechanisms in a woven 0/90 carbon-polyimide laminate under 45{degree} off-axis compression loading. The stress carried by the composite increased linearly with increasing levels of applied displacements and, at about 188 MPa, the load dropped suddenly to 172 MPa and remained constant thereafter till about 8.9% strain, at which point the load reduced drastically and resulted in the ultimate failure of the sample. The damage started with the nucleation of several in-plane cracks which split both the wrap and fill yarns completely, and ran diagonally across the sample`s entire width. Upon further loading, the cracking progressed in bundles towards the sample`s interior, and eventually, at a strain of about 5%, a saturation cracking state was reached with each bundle split by at least three-to-four longitudinal cracks. The sample was able to accommodate further strain via nucleation of additional cracks formed at the edges of the longitudinal cracks with their planes parallel to the loading axis and orthogonal to those occupied by the longitudinal cracks. Essentially, these new cracks separated the longitudinally-split bundles in the sample`s thickness direction and resulted in the creation of three-to-four independent bundles from the original well-bonded warp or fill bundle. At this stage, the compressive load carrying capacity of the original bundle was largely compromised and the sample failed through gross delaminations, resulting in the bulging of the sample normal to its largest faces. The above deformation was remarkably different from that observed under bundle-aligned compression loading where the samples failed at an average stress of 588 MPa in more or less brittle catastrophic manner after undergoing only 1.5% strain.

  15. High-resolution time-lapse tomography of rat vertebrae during compressive loading: deformation response analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fíla, T.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Kumpová, I.; Doktor, T.; Koudelka, P.; Jiroušek, O.

    2014-05-01

    This paper is focused on investigation of mechanical properties of rat vertebrae during compressive loading in the longitudinal direction of rat's spine. High-resolution time-lapse micro-tomography was used as a tool to create models of the inner structure and deformed shape in pre-defined deformation steps. First, peripheral areas of vertebra specimen were embedded in polymethyl methacrylate to obtain proper boundary conditions of contact between specimen and loading plattens. Experimental loading device designed for application in X-ray setups was utilized to compress the vertebrae in several deformation steps. High-resolution micro-tomography scanning was carried out at each deformation step. Specimen was irradiated in tomography device equipped with microfocus X-ray tube with 5μm focal spot size and large area flat panel detector. Spatial resolution of reconstructed three-dimensional images was approximately 10μm. Digital volume correlation algorithm was utilized in order to assess displacements in the microstructure in every loading increment. Finite element model of vertebra was created from volumetric data reconstructed from tomography of the undeformed specimen. Simulated compressive test of the developed finite element model was performed in order to compare stiffness and displacements obtained by digital volume correlation and finite element simulation.

  16. High dose compressive loads attenuate bone mineral loss in humans with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Dudley-Javoroski, S.; Saha, P. K.; Liang, G.; Li, C.; Gao, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Summary People with spinal cord injury (SCI) lose bone and muscle integrity after their injury. Early doses of stress, applied through electrically induced muscle contractions, preserved bone density at high-risk sites. Appropriately prescribed stress early after the injury may be an important consideration to prevent bone loss after SCI. Introduction Skeletal muscle force can deliver high compressive loads to bones of people with spinal cord injury (SCI). The effective osteogenic dose of load for the distal femur, a chief site of fracture, is unknown. The purpose of this study is to compare three doses of bone compressive loads at the distal femur in individuals with complete SCI who receive a novel stand training intervention. Methods Seven participants performed unilateral quadriceps stimulation in supported stance [150% body weight (BW) compressive load—“High Dose” while opposite leg received 40% BW—“Low Dose”]. Five participants stood passively without applying quadriceps electrical stimulation to either leg (40% BW load—“Low Dose”). Fifteen participants performed no standing (0% BW load—“Untrained”) and 14 individuals without SCI provided normative data. Participants underwent bone mineral density (BMD) assessment between one and six times over a 3-year training protocol. Results BMD for the High Dose group significantly exceeded BMD for both the Low Dose and the Untrained groups (p<0.05). No significant difference existed between the Low Dose and Untrained groups (p>0.05), indicating that BMD for participants performing passive stance did not differ from individuals who performed no standing. High-resolution CT imaging of one High Dose participant revealed 86% higher BMD and 67% higher trabecular width in the High Dose limb. Conclusion Over 3 years of training, 150% BW compressive load in upright stance significantly attenuated BMD decline when compared to passive standing or to no standing. High-resolution CT indicated that

  17. Deformation behavior of reinforced ECC flexural members under reversed cyclic loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Gregor D.

    In this dissertation, the use of engineered cementitious composites (ECC) in reinforced members and model seismic resistant frames is investigated. The development from composite material to structural system behavior is presented, bridging the dimensional scales associated with microstructures, composite materials and composite structures. The fundamental cause of damage in reinforced concrete (R/C) structures is the brittle deformation behavior of concrete in tension. Engineered cementitious composites (ECC) are fiber reinforced cementitious composites designed to achieve a deformation behavior analogous to that of metals, specifically strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior. The combination of such a ductile ECC with ductile reinforcing steel in direct tension results in deformation compatibility of these R/ECC components, leading to a reduction of interfacial bond stresses and bond splitting cracks while maintaining composite integrity. Test results show that the performance of R/ECC structural composites in reversed cyclic flexure benefits from this deformation compatibility, resulting in a decrease of peak curvature at a given flexural deformation. It is further observed that beyond localization of cracking in ECC, enhanced confinement, shear strength and buckling resistance in R/ECC members make transverse steel reinforcement redundant and lead to stable energy dissipation by yielding of longitudinal steel reinforcement. Furthermore, R/ECC members with longitudinal FRP reinforcement show reduced residual displacements after unloading. On the structural system scale, the particular interaction of R/ECC members reinforced with steel and FRP reinforcement in a moment resisting frame is found to result in a structural system with considerable energy dissipation capacity and reduced residual displacement. This composite structural system shows a bi-linear elastic load-deformation behavior and intrinsic stiffness modification capabilities, which are

  18. Effect of abutment screw length and cyclic loading on removal torque in external and internal hex implants

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Hnd Hadi; Lee, Jin-Han; Bae, Ji-Myung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment screw length and cyclic loading on the removal torque (RTV) in external hex (EH) and internal hex (IH) implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty screw-retained single crowns were connected to external and internal hex implants. The prepared titanium abutment screws were classified into 8 groups based on the number of threads (n = 5 per group): EH 12.5, 6.5, 3.5, 2.5 and IH 6.5, 5, 3.5, 2.5 threads. The abutment screws were tightened with 20 Ncm torque twice with 10-minute intervals. After 5 minutes, the initial RTVs of the abutment screws were measured with a digital torque gauge (MGT12). A customized jig was constructed to apply a load along the implant long axis at the central fossa of the maxillary first molar. The post-loading RTVs were measured after 16,000 cycles of mechanical loading with 50 N at a 1-Hz frequency. Statistical analysis included one-way analysis of variance and paired t-tests. RESULTS The post-loading RTVs were significantly lower than the initial RTVs in the EH 2.5 thread and IH 2.5 thread groups (P<.05). The initial RTVs exhibited no significant differences among the 8 groups, whereas the post-loading RTVs of the EH 6.5 and EH 3.5 thread groups were higher than those of the IH 3.5 thread group (P<.05). CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this study, the external hex implants with short screw lengths were more advantageous than internal hex implants with short screw lengths in torque maintenance after cyclic loading. PMID:26949489

  19. The Effects of Geometric and Loading Imperfections on the Response and Lower-Bound Buckling Load of a Compression-Loaded Cylindrical Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriegesmann, Benedikt; Hilburger, Mark W.; Rolfes, Raimund

    2012-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the buckling response of a thin-walled compressionloaded isotropic circular cylindrical shell with initial geometric and loading imperfections are used to determine a lower bound buckling load estimate suitable for preliminary design. The lower bound prediction techniques presented herein include an imperfection caused by a lateral perturbation load, an imperfection in the shape of a single stress-free dimple (similar to the lateral pertubation imperfection), and a distributed load imperfection that induces a nonuniform load in the shell. The ABAQUS finite element code is used for the analyses. Responses of the cylinders for selected imperfection amplitudes and imperfection types are considered, and the effect of each imperfection is compared to the response of a geometrically perfect cylinder. The results indicate that compression-loaded shells subjected to a lateral perturbation load or a single dimple imperfection, and a nonuniform load imperfection, exhibit similar buckling behavior and lower bound trends and the predicted lower bounds are much less conservative than the corresponding design recommendation NASA SP-8007 for the design of buckling-critical shells. In addition, the lateral perturbation technique and the distributed load imperfection produce response characteristics that are physically meaningful and can be validated via laboratory testing.

  20. Response of thoracolumbar vertebral bodies to high rate compressive loading - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Dooley, C J; Wester, B A; Wing, I D; Voo, L M; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2013-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events created by improvised explosive devices are threats to warfighter survivability. High intensity blast waves emitted from these devices transfer large forces through vehicle structures to occupants, often resulting in injuries including debilitating spinal fractures. The vertical loading vector through the spine generates significant compressive forces at high strain rates. To better understand injury mechanisms and ultimately better protect vehicle occupants against UBB attacks, high-fidelity computational models are being developed to predict the human response to dynamic loading characteristic of these events. This effort details the results from a series of 23 high-rate compression tests on vertebral body specimen. A high-rate servo-hydraulic test system applied a range of compressive loading rates (.01 mm/s to 1238 mm/s) to vertebral bodies in the thoracolumbar region (T7-L5). The force-deflection curves generated indicate rate dependent sensitivity of vertebral stiffness, ultimate load and ultimate deflection. Specimen subjected to high-rate dynamic loading to failure experienced critical structural damage at 5.5% ± 2.1% deflection. Compared to quasi-static loading, vertebral bodies had greater stiffness, greater force to failure, and lower ultimate failure deflection at high rates. Post-failure, an average loss in height of 15% was observed, along with a mean reduction in strength of 48%. The resulting data from these tests will allow for enhanced biofidelity of computational models by characterizing the vertebral stiffness response and ultimate deflection at rates representative of UBB events. PMID:23686197

  1. Uniaxial and triaxial compression tests of silicon carbide ceramics under quasi-static loading condition.

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, Rebecca Moss; Lee, Moo Yul; Bronowski, David R.

    2005-02-01

    To establish mechanical properties and failure criteria of silicon carbide (SiC-N) ceramics, a series of quasi-static compression tests has been completed using a high-pressure vessel and a unique sample alignment jig. This report summarizes the test methods, set-up, relevant observations, and results from the constitutive experimental efforts. Results from the uniaxial and triaxial compression tests established the failure threshold for the SiC-N ceramics in terms of stress invariants (I{sub 1} and J{sub 2}) over the range 1246 < I{sub 1} < 2405. In this range, results are fitted to the following limit function (Fossum and Brannon, 2004) {radical}J{sub 2}(MPa) = a{sub 1} - a{sub 3}e -a{sub 2}(I{sub 1}/3) + a{sub 4} I{sub 1}/3, where a{sub 1} = 10181 MPa, a{sub 2} = 4.2 x 10{sup -4}, a{sub 3} = 11372 MPa, and a{sub 4} = 1.046. Combining these quasistatic triaxial compression strength measurements with existing data at higher pressures naturally results in different values for the least-squares fit to this function, appropriate over a broader pressure range. These triaxial compression tests are significant because they constitute the first successful measurements of SiC-N compressive strength under quasistatic conditions. Having an unconfined compressive strength of {approx}3800 MPa, SiC-N has been heretofore tested only under dynamic conditions to achieve a sufficiently large load to induce failure. Obtaining reliable quasi-static strength measurements has required design of a special alignment jig and load-spreader assembly, as well as redundant gages to ensure alignment. When considered in combination with existing dynamic strength measurements, these data significantly advance the characterization of pressure-dependence of strength, which is important for penetration simulations where failed regions are often at lower pressures than intact regions.

  2. Buckling and Failure of Compression-Loaded Composite Laminated Shells With Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.

    2007-01-01

    Results from a numerical and experimental study that illustrate the effects of laminate orthotropy on the buckling and failure response of compression-loaded composite cylindrical shells with a cutout are presented. The effects of orthotropy on the overall response of compression-loaded shells is described. In general, preliminary numerical results appear to accurately predict the buckling and failure characteristics of the shell considered herein. In particular, some of the shells exhibit stable post-local-buckling behavior accompanied by interlaminar material failures near the free edges of the cutout. In contrast another shell with a different laminate stacking sequence appears to exhibit catastrophic interlaminar material failure at the onset of local buckling near the cutout and this behavior correlates well with corresponding experimental results.

  3. The fatigue behaviour of orthotropic laminates under tension-compression loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotem, A.

    1991-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of orthotropic laminates (0, +/-45, 0 deg)2s and (90, +/-45, 90 deg)2s, has been evaluated under alternating tension-compression loading. Even though the first laminate is much stronger than the second, both started to fail by delamination. Visual damage started to show only at the very end of the fatigue life but measurement of the stiffness showed that degradation starts at about 80 percent of the fatigue life. The first laminate failed in compression after delamination between the 0 and the 45 deg laminae, while the second failed in tension after delamination between the +45 and -45 deg laminae. It is shown that the interlaminar fatigue strength of both laminate structures can be correlated to the applied fatigue load.

  4. Damage Progression in Buckle-Resistant Notched Composite Plates Loaded in Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David M.; Davila, Carlos G.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2001-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical evaluation of damage progression in three stitched composite plates containing an angled central notch and subjected to compression loading are presented. Parametric studies were conducted systematically to identify the relative effects of the material strength parameters on damage initiation and growth. Comparisons with experiments were conducted to determine the appropriate in situ values of strengths for progressive failure analysis. These parametric studies indicated that the in situ value of the fiber buckling strength is the most important parameter in the prediction of damage initiation and growth in these notched composite plates. Analyses of the damage progression in the notched, compression-loaded plates were conducted using in situ material strengths. Comparisons of results obtained from these analyses with experimental results for displacements and axial strains show good agreement.

  5. Origin of compression-induced failure in brittle solids under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. Y.; Li, Y.; Liu, Q. C.; Zhou, X. M.; Liu, L. W.; Liu, C. L.; Zhu, M. H.; Luo, S. N.

    2015-10-01

    The origin of compression-induced failure in brittle solids has been a subject of debate. Using in situ, high-speed, strain field mapping of a representative material, polymethylmethacrylate, we reveal that shock loading leads to heterogeneity in a compressive strain field, which in turn gives rise to localized lateral tension and shear through Poisson's effects, and, subsequently, localized microdamage. A failure wave nucleates from the impact surface and its propagation into the microdamage zone is self-sustained, triggering interior failure. Its velocity increases with increasing shock strength and eventually approaches the shock velocity. The seemingly puzzling phenomena observed in previous experiments, including incubation time, failure wave velocity variations, and surface roughness effects, can all be explained consistently with the nucleation and growth of the microdamage, and the effects of loading strength and preexisting defects.

  6. MA-core loaded untuned RF compression cavity for HIRFL-CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Li-rong; Xu, Zhe; Yuan, You-jin; Jin, Peng; Bian, Zhi-bin; Zhao, Hong-wei; Xia, Jia-wen

    2012-01-01

    To meet the requirements of high energy density physics and plasma physics research at HIRFL-CSR the goal of achieving a higher accelerating gap voltage was proposed. Therefore, a magnetic alloy (MA)-core loaded radio frequency (RF) cavity that can provide a higher accelerating gap voltage compared to standard ferrite loaded cavities has been studied at IMP. In order to select the proper magnetic alloy material to load the RF compression cavity, measurements of four different kinds of sample MA-cores have been carried out. By testing the small cores, the core composition was selected to obtain the desired performance. According to the theoretical calculation and simulation, which show reasonable consistency for the MA-core loaded cavity, the desired performance can be achieved. Finally about 1000 kW power will be needed to meet the requirements of 50 kV accelerating gap voltage by calculation.

  7. A nonlinear CDM model for ductile failure analysis of steel bridge columns under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Van Do, Vuong; Lee, Chin-Hyung; Chang, Kyong-Ho

    2014-06-01

    A nonlinear cyclic plasticity damage model for ductile metals, which is able to take large deformation effects into consideration, has been developed using a new damage dissipation potential formulation in order to predict the cyclic inelastic behavior of steel bridge piers. The cyclic constitutive equations that employ the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening rule for plastic deformation is incorporated into the damage mechanics in conjunction with the large strain formulation. The damage growth law is based on the experimental observations that the evolution of microvoids results in nonlinear damage accumulation with plastic deformation. The damage model parameters and the procedure for their identification are presented. The proposed model has been validated and successfully applied to thin-walled steel bridge tubular columns subjected to alternating lateral displacements to evaluate the seismic performance.

  8. The high temperature deformation in cyclic loading of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Welsch, G.

    1989-01-01

    The high temperature cyclic stress softening response of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy PWA 1480 was investigated. Specimens oriented near the 001- and 111-lines were tested at 1050 C in low-cycle fatigue and then microstructurally evaluated. The 001- and 111-line specimens had dissimilar flow behavior in monotonic tensile tests, but comparable softening in low-cycle fatigue. This softening was accompanied by rapid generation of dislocation networks at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces and by a slower time-dependent coarsening of gamma-prime precipitates. Due to the rapid formation of a dislocation substructure at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces, the cyclic stress softening could be modeled with an existing theory which related cyclic stress to the evolving microstructure and dislocation structure.

  9. Evaluation of Composite Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Under Compressive Loads at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.

    1998-01-01

    Fourteen composite honeycomb sandwich panels were tested to failure under compressive loading. The test specimens included panels with both 8 and 24-ply graphite-bismaleimide composite facesheets and both titanium and graphite-polyimide core materials. The panels were designed to have the load introduced through fasteners attached to pairs of steel angles on the ends of the panels to simulate double shear splice joints. The unloaded edges were unconstrained. Test temperatures included room temperature, 250F, and 300F. For the room and 250F temperature tests, the 24-ply specimen failure strains were close to the unnotched allowable strain values and failure loads were well above the design loads. However, failure strains much lower than the unnotched allowable strain values, and failure loads below the design loads were observed with several of the 8-ply specimens. For each individual test temperature, large variations in the failure strains and loads were observed for the 8-ply specimens. Dramatic decreases in the failure strains and loads were observed for the 24-ply specimens as the test temperature was increased from 250F to 300F. All 8-ply specimens appeared to have failed in a facesheet strength failure mode for all test temperatures. The 24-ply specimens displayed appreciably greater amounts of bending prior to failure than the 8-ply specimens, and panel buckling occurred prior to facesheet strength failure for the 24-ply room and 250F temperature tests.

  10. Effects of specimen size on limiting compressive loading for silicate, ceramic, and other materials

    SciTech Connect

    Okhrimenko, G.M.

    1995-06-01

    Published data are examined on the ultimate strength in uniaxial compression for glass, glass ceramics, porcelain, crystalline silicon, periclase - spinel - chromite material PSCM, and ferrite in relation to the specimen dimensions. Two methods are proposed for combined experimental and computational estimation of the effects from the volume on the limiting load, which are based only on the data obtained from testing specimens with one or two standard dimensions.

  11. Isentropic Compression Loading of HMX and the Pressure-induced Phase Transition at 27 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, D E; Reisman, D B; Dick, J J; Forbes, J W

    2004-02-25

    The 27 GPa pressure-induced epsilon-phi phase transition in HMX is explored using the Isentropic Compression Experiment (ICE) technique at the Sandia National Laboratories Z-machine facility. Our data indicate that this phase transition is sluggish and if it does occur to any extent under the time scales (200-500 ns) and strain rates (5 x 10{sup 5}) typical of ICE loading conditions, the amount of conversion is small.

  12. Dry plant extracts loaded on fumed silica for direct compression: preparation and preformulation.

    PubMed

    Palma, S D; Manzo, R H; Allemandi, D A

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a method to load fumed silica with vegetal material (solid residue) from a liquid extract to obtain a solid loaded silica product (LSP) with satisfactory flow properties and compressibility to be processed by direct-compression technology. Extracts of Melissa officinalis L. (M.o.), Cardus marianus L. (C.m.), and Peumus boldus L. (P.b.) were used to load silica support. The release of boldine from LSP (P.b.) reached 100% in HCl 0.1 N solution and only approximately 70% in water. Some physical-mechanical properties of LSP (M.o. and C.m.) alone and LSP-excipient mixtures were determined. The densities (bulk and tap) of LSP were higher than those of fumed silica alone. Consequently, good flow properties of LSP products were observed. On the other hand, flowability, densities, and compactibility of directly compressible excipients (lactose, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, and microcrystalline cellulose) were not adversely affected when mixed with LSP. PMID:10578506

  13. Mass loading and fate of linear and cyclic siloxanes in a wastewater treatment plant in Greece.

    PubMed

    Bletsou, Anna A; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G; Stasinakis, Athanasios S; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2013-02-19

    The occurrence and fate of 5 cyclic (D3 to D7) and 12 linear (L3 to L14) siloxanes were investigated in raw and treated wastewater (both particulate and dissolved phases) as well as in sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Athens, Greece. Cyclic and linear siloxanes (except for L3) were detected in all influent wastewater and sludge samples at mean concentrations of (sum of 17 siloxanes) 20 μg L(-1) and 75 mg kg(-1), respectively. The predominant compounds in wastewater were L11 (24% of the total siloxane concentration), L10 (16%), and D5 (13%), and in sludge were D5 (20%) and L10 (15%). The distribution of siloxanes between particulate and dissolved phases in influents differed significantly for linear and cyclic siloxanes. Linear siloxanes showed higher solid-liquid distribution coefficients (log K(d)) than did cyclic compounds. For 10 of the 16 compounds detected in influents, the removal efficiency was higher than 80%. Sorption to sludge and biodegradation and/or volatilization losses are important factors that affect the fate of siloxanes in WWTPs. The mean total mass of siloxanes that enter into the WWTP via influent was 15.1 kg per day(-1), and the mean total mass released into the environment via effluent was 2.67 kg per day(-1).

  14. Effect of cyclic loading on the creep performance of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Kirkland, T.P.; Lin, C.K.J.

    1995-04-01

    Tension-tension cyclic fatigue tests (triangular waveform, {sigma}{sub max} = 100 MPa, R = 0.1) were conducted on hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitride at frequencies spanning several orders of magnitude (5.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 0.1 Hz or 10{sup {minus}3} MPa/s to 18 MPa/s) at 1,370 C in air. The amount of cyclic creep strain was found to be a function of the frequency or stressing rate with greater strains to failure observed as the frequency or stressing rate decreased. The total strain was viewed as the sum of elastic, anelastic (or transient recoverable), and plastic (viscous or non-recoverable) strain contributions, after the empirical Pao and Marin model. The plastic strain was found to be the dominant component of the total creep and was unsatisfactorily represented by the Pao and Marin model. To circumvent this, a time exponent was introduced in the plastic strain term in the Pao and Marin model. This modification resulted in good correlation between model and experiment at the slower frequencies examined but over-predicted the cyclic creep strain at the faster frequencies. The utility of using the modified Pao and Marin model to predict cyclic creep response from static creep and strain relaxation tests is described.

  15. MRI Evaluation of Spinal Length and Vertebral Body Angle During Loading with a Spinal Compression Harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James A.; Hargens, Alan R.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan, R.; Sanchez, E.; Yang, C.; Mitsui, I.; Schwandt, D.; Fechner, K. P.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Weight bearing by the spinal column during upright posture often plays a role in the common problem of low back pain. Therefore, we developed a non-ferromagnetic spinal compression harness to enable MRI investigations of the spinal column during axial loading. Human subjects were fitted with a Nest and a footplate which were connected by adjustable straps to an analog load cell. MRI scans of human subjects (5 males and 1 female with age range of 27-53 yrs) during loaded and unloaded conditions were accomplished with a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa scanner. Studies of two subjects undergoing sequentially increasing spinal loads revealed significant decreases (r(sup 2) = 0.852) in spinal length between T4 and L5 culminating in a 1.5 to 2% length decrease during loading with 75% body weight. Sagittal vertebral body angles of four subjects placed under a constant 50% body weight load for one hour demonstrated increased lordotic and kyphotic curvatures. In the lumbar spine, the L2 vertebral body experienced the greatest angular change (-3 deg. to -5 deg.) in most subjects while in the thoracic spine, T4 angles increased from the unloaded state by +2 deg. to +9 deg. Overall, our studies demonstrate: 1) a progressive, although surprisingly small, decrease in spinal length with increasing load and 2) relatively large changes in spinal column angulation with 50% body weight.

  16. Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth of a plain carbon pipeline steel under conditions of cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1976-01-01

    The investigation described was aimed at establishing the degree of compatibility between a plain carbon pipeline-type steel and hydrogen and also hydrogen-rich environments containing small additions of H2S, O2, H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, and natural gas at pressures near 1 atm. Test were carried out under conditions of static and cyclic loading; the subcritical crack growth was monitored. The rates of crack growth observed in the hydrogen and hydrogen-rich environments are compared with the crack rate observed in a natural gas environment to determine the compatibility of the present natural gas transmission system with gaseous hydrogen transport.

  17. Cyclic-loading-induced Accumulation of the Geometrically Necessary Dislocations Near the Grain Boundaries of the Ni-Based Superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E-Wen; Barabash, Rozaliya; Ice, Gene E; Liu, Wenjun; Liu, Yee-Lang; Kai, Ji-Jung; Liaw, Peter K

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a nickel-based polycrystalline superalloy is subjected to cyclic loading. The fatigue-induced microstructure is characterized by novel polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction (PXM) together with in-situ neutron diffraction and TEM. In-situ neutron strain measurements reveal two distinct stages of the fatigue damage. Three-dimensional (3D) spatially-resolved PXM micro-Laue measurements demonstrate the development of local texture and formation of geometrically necessary dislocations near the grain boundaries, which is accompanied by lattice rotations and grain subdivisions. The PXM results are in agreement with the in-situ neutron diffraction and TEM results.

  18. Semi-stochastic cell-level computational modelling of cellular forces: application to contractures in burns and cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Vermolen, F J; Gefen, A

    2015-11-01

    A phenomenological model is formulated to model cellular forces on extracellular material. The model is capable of modelling both expansion and contractile forces. This work is based on the assumption of linear elasticity, which allows a superposition argument to arrive at fundamental expressions for cellular forces. It is also shown how the cellular forces can be implemented using different strategies, as well as an extension to cellular point sources. Illustrations are given for modelling a (permanent) contraction (e.g. a contracture) of burns and for cyclic loading by the cells.

  19. The failure of brittle materials under overall compression: Effects of loading rate and defect distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Bhasker

    The constitutive behaviors and failure processes of brittle materials under far-field compressive loading are studied in this work. Several approaches are used: experiments to study the compressive failure behavior of ceramics, design of experimental techniques by means of finite element simulations, and the development of micro-mechanical damage models to analyze and predict mechanical response of brittle materials under far-field compression. Experiments have been conducted on various ceramics, (primarily on a transparent polycrystalline ceramic, aluminum oxynitride or AlON) under loading rates ranging from quasi-static (˜ 5X10-6) to dynamic (˜ 200 MPa/mus), using a servo-controlled hydraulic test machine and a modified compression Kolsky bar (MKB) technique respectively. High-speed photography has also been used with exposure times as low as 20 ns to observe the dynamic activation, growth and coalescence of cracks and resulting damage zones in the specimen. The photographs were correlated in time with measurements of the stresses in the specimen. Further, by means of 3D finite element simulations, an experimental technique has been developed to impose a controlled, homogeneous, planar confinement in the specimen. The technique can be used in conjunction with a high-speed camera to study the in situ dynamic failure behavior of materials under confinement. AlON specimens are used for the study. The statically pre-compressed specimen is subjected to axial dynamic compressive loading using the MKB. Results suggest that confinement not only increases the load carrying capacity, it also results in a non-linear stress evolution in the material. High-speed photographs also suggest an inelastic deformation mechanism in AlON under confinement which evolves more slowly than the typical brittle-cracking type of damage in the unconfined case. Next, an interacting micro-crack damage model is developed that explicitly accounts for the interaction among the micro-cracks in

  20. Investigation of Anomalous Behavior in Metallic-Based Materials Under Compressive Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gil, Christopher M.; Lissenden, Cliff J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1998-01-01

    An anomalous material response has been observed under the action of applied compressive loads in fibrous SiC/Ti (both Ti-6242 and Ti-15-3 alloys) and the monolithic nickel-base alloy IN-718 in the aged condition. The observed behavior is an increase, rather than a decrease, in the instantaneous Young's modulus with increasing load. This increase is small, but can be significant in yield surface determination tests, where an equivalent offset strain on the order of 10 micron(1 x 10(exp -6) m/m) is being used. Stiffening has been quantified by calculating offset strains from the linear elastic loading line. The offset strains associated with stiffening during compressive loading are positive and of the same order as the target offset strains in yield surface determination tests. At this time we do not have a reasonable explanation for this response nor can we identify a deformation mechanism that might cause it. On the other hand, we are not convinced that it is an artifact of the experimental procedure because a number of issues have been identified and seemingly ruled out. In fact, stiffening appears to be temperature dependent, since it decreases as the temperature increases.

  1. A polynomial equation to predict low back compression force: accounting for the effects of load height on instability.

    PubMed

    Calder, Inger Christina; Potvin, Jim R

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a regression equation that, incorporating the potential energy of the load in the hands, was capable of improved predictions of spinal compression forces. A stepwise polynomial equation was developed from EMG profiles of 15 muscles, and its spinal joint loading predictions at L4/L5 were compared to current methods of calculating spinal compression. Absolute muscle activation was shown to increase with increased loading height, indicating that the central nervous system responds to changes in spinal stability. The inclusion of potential energy into the calculation of spinal disc compression at L4/L5 improved estimates of the compressive forces acting on the spine. This is the first model to incorporate potential energy into a predictive model for lumbar spine compression without the use of electromyography. It was concluded that potential energy plays a vital role in dictating the recruitment patterns of the trunk.

  2. The effect of microstructure on stress-induced martensitic transformation under cyclic loading in the SMA Nickel-Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimiecik, Michael; Jones, J. Wayne; Daly, Samantha

    2016-04-01

    A combined experimental and analytical study to determine the configurations of transforming martensite during ambient temperature cyclic deformation of superelastic Nickel-Titanium has been conducted. Full-field, sub-grain-size microscale strain measurements were made in situ during cycling using distortion-corrected Digital Image Correlation combined with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-DIC). Using grain orientation maps from Electron Backscatter Diffraction analysis, possible configurations of martensite formed during cyclic deformation were identified by matching the calculated and measured strain fields. This analysis showed that the inclusion of Correspondence Variants (CVs) in addition to Habit Plane Variants (HPVs) of transformed martensite was necessary to provide a robust fit between calculated and measured strain fields. The approach also provided evidence that there was a more rapid accumulation of residual strain in CV regions and that a correlation existed between residual strain accumulation and the loss of actively transforming martensite in later cycles. It was also found that regions of CVs could coexist with untransformed austenite and Habit Plane Variants (HPVs) in individual grains throughout the microstructure, and that these regions of CVs formed before the end of the macroscopic stress plateau. The CV structure that forms during the initial superelastic deformation of Nickel-Titanium plays a critical role in shaping and stabilizing subsequent martensite recovery during cyclic loading.

  3. Observation of the initiation and progression of damage in compressively loaded composite plates containing a cutout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waas, A.; Babcock, C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments was carried out to determine the mechanism of failure in compressively loaded laminated plates with a circular cutout. Real time holographic interferometry and photomicrography are used to observe the progression of failure. These observations together with post experiment plate sectioning and deplying for interior damage observation provide useful information for modelling the failure process. It is revealed that the failure is initiated as a localised instability in the zero layers, at the hole surface. With increasing load extensive delamination cracking is observed. The progression of failure is by growth of these delaminations induced by delamination buckling. Upon reaching a critical state, catastrophic failure of the plate is observed. The levels of applied load and the rate at which these events occur depend on the plate stacking sequence.

  4. Buckling and Failure of Compression-Loaded Composite Cylindrical Shells With Geometric and Material Imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The results of an experimental and numerical study of the effects of initial imperfections on the buckling response and failure of unstiffened thin-walled compression-loaded graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells are presented. The shells considered in the study have six different orthotropic or quasi-isotropic shell-wall laminates and two different shell-radius-to-thickness ratios. The numerical results include the effects of geometric shell-wall mid-surface imperfections, shell-wall thickness variations, local shell-wall ply-gaps associated with the fabrication process, shell-end geometric imperfections, nonuniform end loads, and the effects of elastic boundary conditions. Selected cylinder parameter uncertainties were also considered. Results that illustrate the effects of imperfections and uncertainties on the nonlinear response characteristics, buckling loads and failure the shells are presented. In addition, a common failure analysis is used to predict material failures in the shells.

  5. Parametric Study on the Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Shells With Geometric and Material Imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The results of a parametric study of the effects of initial imperfections on the buckling and postbuckling response of three unstiffened thinwalled compression-loaded graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells with different orthotropic and quasi-isotropic shell-wall laminates are presented. The imperfections considered include initial geometric shell-wall midsurface imperfections, shell-wall thickness variations, local shell-wall ply-gaps associated with the fabrication process, shell-end geometric imperfections, nonuniform applied end loads, and variations in the boundary conditions including the effects of elastic boundary conditions. A high-fidelity nonlinear shell analysis procedure that accurately accounts for the effects of these imperfections on the nonlinear responses and buckling loads of the shells is described. The analysis procedure includes a nonlinear static analysis that predicts stable response characteristics of the shells and a nonlinear transient analysis that predicts unstable response characteristics.

  6. Design, fabrication and test of lightweight shell structure. [axial compression loads and torsion stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lager, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A cylindrical shell structure 3.66 m (144 in.) high by 4.57 m (180 in.) diameter was designed using a wide variety of materials and structural concepts to withstand design ultimate combined loading 1225.8 N/cm (700 lb/in.) axial compression and 245.2 N/cm (140 lb/in.) torsion. The overall cylinder geometry and design loading are representative of that expected on a high performance space tug vehicle. The relatively low design load level results in designs that use thin gage metals and fibrous-composite laminates. Fabrication and structural tests of small panels and components representative of many of the candidate designs served to demonstrate proposed fabrication techniques and to verify design and analysis methods. Three of the designs evaluated, honeycomb sandwich with aluminum faceskins, honeycomb sandwich with graphite/epoxy faceskins, and aluminum truss with fiber-glass meteoroid protection layers, were selected for further evaluation.

  7. Characterization of light emission from mechanoluminescent composites subjected to high-rate compressive loading (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Donghyeon; Castaño, Nicolas; Bhakta, Raj; Romero, Michael; Kimberley, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to devise multifunctional composites using fracto-mechanoluminescent (FML) materials and photoactive sensing thin films for autonomous and self-powered impact damage detection. In previous studies, multifunctional photoactive thin films were suggested as a strain sensor that does not require any external electrical source. Instead, the photoactive thin films generated direct current (DC) (or photocurrent) under ambient light, whose magnitude varied linearly with applied strain. In this study, multifunctional FML materials-photoactive thin film composites will be devised for autonomously sensing high-speed compressive strains without supplying any external photonic or electrical energy. FML materials exhibit transformative properties that emit light when its crystalline structures are fractured. The developed photoactive strain sensing thin film will be integrated with the FML materials. Thus, it is envisioned that the FML materials will emit light, which will be supplied to the photoactive sensing thin films when the high-speed compressive loadings break FML materials' crystalline structures. First, synthesized europium tetrakit(dibenzoylmethide) triethylammonium (EuD4TEA) crystals will be embedded in the elastomeric and transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix to prepare test specimens. Second, the FML properties of the EuD4TEA-PDMS composites will be characterized at various compressive strains, which will be applied by Kolsky bar testing setup. Light emission from the EuD4TEA-PDMS test specimens will be recorded using a high-speed camera. Intensity of the light emissions will be quantified via image processing techniques by taking into account pixel profiles of the high-speed camera captured images (e.g., pixel values, counts of pixels, and RGB values) at various levels of compressive strains. Lastly, the autonomous high-speed compressive sensor modules will be fabricated by integrating the EuD4TEA-PDMS composites with the photoactive thin

  8. A Users manual for the nonlinear kinematic hardening model for cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M

    2000-09-15

    This report describes the implementation of the Chaboche type Nonlinear Kinematic Hardening Model developed for the PNGV SPP (Partnership for the Next Generation Vehicle, Spring-back Predictability Project). The material model includes a nonlinear kinematic and isotropic hardening law, transverse anisotropy, strain range memorization for cyclic hardening/softening and viscoplasticity. This report is a companion to the report: ''A Return Mapping Algorithm for Cyclic Viscoplastic Constitutive Models'' which concentrates on the theoretical aspects of the model. This report summarizes the necessary parameters for the model, briefly discusses their interpretation and shows some numerical simulations. The report also specifies the data structure requirements for linking the material model software by explicitly referencing the source code delivered to the SPP collaborators.

  9. A potential means of using acoustic emission for crack detection under cyclic-load conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Klima, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary investigation was conducted to assess the feasibility of monitoring acoustic emission signals from fatigue cracks during cyclic bend tests. Plate specimens of 6A1-4V titanium, 2219-T87 aluminum, and 18-Ni maraging steel were tested with and without crack starter notches. It was found that significant acoustic emission signals could be detected in the frequency range from 100 kHz to 400 kHz. Cracks emanating from starter notches were monitored by the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique and periodically measured by micro-optical examination. Methods used to reduce the effects of extraneous noises (i.e., machine noises, fretting) are described. A frequency spectrum analyzer was used to characterize the emissions and to evaluate methods used to acquire the signals (i.e., transducer location, bandwidth selection). The investigation indicated that it was possible to extract meaningful acoustic emission signals in a cyclic bend machine environment.

  10. Evaluation of flawed composite structural components under static and cyclic loading. [fatigue life of graphite-epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of initial defects on the fatigue and fracture response of graphite-epoxy composite laminates are presented. The structural laminates investigated were a typical angle ply laminate, a polar/hoop wound pressure vessel laminate, and a typical engine fan blade laminate. Defects investigated were full and half penetration circular holes, full and half penetration slits, and countersink holes. The effects of the defect size and type on the static fracture strength, fatigue performance, and residual static strength are shown as well as the results of loadings on damage propagation in composite laminates. The data obtained were used to define proof test levels as a qualification procedure in composite structure subjected to cyclic loading.

  11. Effect of Luting Cement Space on the Strain Response of Gold Crowns Under Static Compressive Loading.

    PubMed

    Asbia, S; Ibbetson, R; Reuben, B

    2015-03-01

    The aim the work was to investigate the effect of varying degrees of luting cement thickness on the strain of the cemented gold alloy crowns under compression. Five dies with their corresponding crowns were fabricated using a lost wax technique. Three gold crowns for each die were fabricated under the control of specific die spacer layers to provide a space of 40 µm (10 layers of die-spacer thickness) and 80 µm (20 layers of die-spacer thickness). The crowns were subsequently cemented using zinc phosphate cement. The crowns were subjected to gradual static compressive loading between 10N to 250N (Newton) and the strain measured simultaneously. The results were statistically analysed using Independent t-test for the different die-spacer thickness at the 95% confidence interval (p = 0.05). It was found that a significant relationship in the three thicknesses. It was concluded that the absence of die-spacer significantly reduced strain response, whereas a very little change in the strain recorded as the die spacer layers has increased. Clinically, decreasing the number of die-spacer layers is advantageous as it provides a lower strain response under static compressive loading that would improve the longevity of the cemented full crowns inside the patient's mouth.

  12. Deformation of PEM fuel cell gas diffusion layers under compressive loading: An analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzifard, Vahid; Bahrami, Majid

    2014-10-01

    In the PEM fuel cell stack, the fibrous porous gas diffusion layer (GDL) provides mechanical support for the membrane assembly against the compressive loads imposed by bipolar plates. In this study, a new mechanistic model is developed using fundamental beam theory that can accurately predict the mechanical deflection of GDL under compressive loads. The present analytical model is built on a unit cell approach, which assumes a simplified geometry for the complex and random GDL microstructure. The model includes salient microstructural parameters and properties of the fibrous porous medium including: carbon fiber diameter, fiber elastic modulus, pore size distribution, and porosity. Carbon fiber bending is proved to be the main deformation mechanism at the unit cell level. A comprehensive optical measurement study with statistical analysis is performed to determine the geometrical parameters of the model for a number of commercially available GDL samples. A comparison between the present model and our experimental stress-strain data shows a good agreement for the linear deformation region, where the compressive pressure is higher than 1 MPa.

  13. Compression-Loaded Composite Panels With Elastic Edge Restraints and Initial Prestress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Riddick, Jaret C.; Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2005-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of test-fixture-induced initial prestress and elastic edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling responses of a compression-loaded, quasi-isotropic curved panel is presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code with high-fidelity models. The results presented show that a wide range of prebuckling and buckling behavior can be obtained by varying parameters that represent circumferential loaded-edge restraint and rotational unloaded-edge restraint provided by a test fixture and that represent the mismatch in specimen and test-fixture radii of curvature. For a certain range of parameters, the panels exhibit substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations that yield buckling loads nearly twice the corresponding buckling load predicted by a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis for shallow curved panels. In contrast, the results show another range of parameters exist for which the nonlinear prebuckling deformations either do not exist or are relatively benign, and the panels exhibit buckling loads that are nearly equal to the corresponding linear bifurcation buckling load. Overall, the results should be of particular interest to scientists, engineers, and designers involved in simulating flight-hardware boundary conditions in structural verification and certification tests, involved in validating structural analysis tools, and interested in tailoring buckling performance.

  14. The effect of compressive loading magnitude on in situ chondrocyte calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Madden, Ryan M J; Han, Sang-Kuy; Herzog, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Chondrocyte metabolism is stimulated by deformation and is associated with structural changes in the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM), suggesting that these cells are involved in maintaining tissue health and integrity. Calcium signaling is an initial step in chondrocyte mechanotransduction that has been linked to many cellular processes. Previous studies using isolated chondrocytes proposed loading magnitude as an important factor regulating this response. However, calcium signaling in the intact cartilage differs compared to isolated cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of loading magnitude on chondrocyte calcium signaling in intact cartilage. We hypothesized that the percentage of cells exhibiting at least one calcium signal increases with increasing load. Fully intact rabbit femoral condyle and patellar bone/cartilage samples were incubated in calcium-sensitive dyes and imaged continuously under compressive loads of 10-40 % strain. Calcium signaling was primarily associated with the dynamic loading phase and greatly increased beyond a threshold deformation of about 10 % nominal tissue strain. There was a trend toward more cells exhibiting calcium signaling as loading magnitude increased (p = 0.133). These results provide novel information toward identifying mechanisms underlying calcium-dependent signaling pathways related to cartilage homeostasis and possibly the onset and progression of osteoarthritis.

  15. The effect of cyclic and dynamic loads on carbon steel pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; Scott, P.M.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the results of four 152-mm (6-inch) diameter, unpressurized, circumferential through-wall-cracked, dynamic pipe experiments fabricated from STS410 carbon steel pipe manufactured in Japan. For three of these experiments, the through-wall crack was in the base metal. The displacement histories applied to these experiments were a quasi-static monotonic, dynamic monotonic, and dynamic, cyclic (R = {minus}1) history. The through-wall crack for the third experiment was in a tungsten-inert-gas weld, fabricated in Japan, joining two lengths of STS410 pipe. The displacement history for this experiment was the same history applied to the dynamic, cyclic base metal experiment. The test temperature for each experiment was 300 C (572 F). The objective of these experiments was to compare a Japanese carbon steel pipe material with US pipe material, to ascertain whether this Japanese steel was as sensitive to dynamic and cyclic effects as US carbon steel pipe. In support of these pipe experiments, quasi-static and dynamic, tensile and fracture toughness tests were conducted. An analysis effort was performed that involved comparing experimental crack initiation and maximum moments with predictions based on available fracture prediction models, and calculating J-R curves for the pipe experiments using the {eta}-factor method.

  16. Fatigue data for polyether ether ketone (PEEK) under fully-reversed cyclic loading

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rakish; Simsiriwong, Jutima; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the data obtained from the uniaxial fully-reversed fatigue experiments conducted on polyether ether ketone (PEEK), a semi-crystalline thermoplastic, are presented. The tests were performed in either strain-controlled or load-controlled mode under various levels of loading. The data are categorized into four subsets according to the type of tests, including (1) strain-controlled fatigue tests with adjusted frequency to obtain the nominal temperature rise of the specimen surface, (2) strain-controlled fatigue tests with various frequencies, (3) load-controlled fatigue tests without step loadings, and (4) load-controlled fatigue tests with step loadings. Accompanied data for each test include the fatigue life, the maximum (peak) and minimum (valley) stress–strain responses for each cycle, and the hysteresis stress–strain responses for each collected cycle in a logarithmic increment. A brief description of the experimental method is also given. PMID:26937465

  17. Fatigue data for polyether ether ketone (PEEK) under fully-reversed cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rakish; Simsiriwong, Jutima; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-03-01

    In this article, the data obtained from the uniaxial fully-reversed fatigue experiments conducted on polyether ether ketone (PEEK), a semi-crystalline thermoplastic, are presented. The tests were performed in either strain-controlled or load-controlled mode under various levels of loading. The data are categorized into four subsets according to the type of tests, including (1) strain-controlled fatigue tests with adjusted frequency to obtain the nominal temperature rise of the specimen surface, (2) strain-controlled fatigue tests with various frequencies, (3) load-controlled fatigue tests without step loadings, and (4) load-controlled fatigue tests with step loadings. Accompanied data for each test include the fatigue life, the maximum (peak) and minimum (valley) stress-strain responses for each cycle, and the hysteresis stress-strain responses for each collected cycle in a logarithmic increment. A brief description of the experimental method is also given. PMID:26937465

  18. Short-period cyclic loading system for in situ X-ray observation of anelastic properties at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Takashi; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Tange, Yoshinori; Higo, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    To determine the anelastic properties of materials of the Earth's interior, a short-period cyclic loading system was installed for in situ X-ray radiographic observation under high pressure to the multi-anvil deformation DIA press at the bending magnet beam line BL04B1 at SPring-8. The hydraulic system equipped with a piston controlled by a solenoid was designed so as to enable producing smooth sinusoidal stress in a wide range of oscillation period from 0.2 to 100 s and generating variable amplitudes. Time resolved X-ray radiography imaging of the sample and reference material provides their strain as a function of time during cyclic loading. A synchrotron X-ray radiation source allows us to resolve their strain variation with time even at the short period (<1 s). The minimum resolved strain is as small as 10-4, and the shortest oscillation period to detect small strain is 0.5 s. Preliminary experimental results exhibited that the new system can resolve attenuation factor Q-1 at upper mantle conditions. These results are in quantitative agreement with previously reported data obtained at lower pressures.

  19. A quantitatively accurate theory of stable crack growth in single phase ductile metal alloys under the influence of cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Peter oel

    Although fatigue has been a well studied phenomenon over the past century and a half, there has yet to be found a quantitative link between fatigue crack growth rates and materials properties. This work serves to establish that link, in the case of well behaved, single phase, ductile metals. The primary mechanisms of fatigue crack growth are identified in general terms, followed by a description of the dependence of the stress intensity factor range on those mechanisms. A method is presented for calculating the crack growth rate for an ideal, linear elastic, non-brittle material, which is assumed to be similar to the crack growth rate for a real material at very small crack growth rate values. The threshold stress intensity factor is discussed as a consequence of "crack tip healing". Residual stresses are accounted for in the form of an approximated residual stress intensity factor. The results of these calculations are compared to data available in the literature. It is concluded that this work presents a new way to consider crack growth with respect to cyclic loading which is quantitatively accurate, and introduces a new way to consider fracture mechanics with respect to the relatively small, cyclic loads, normally associated with fatigue.

  20. Degradation of Terfenol-D particle epoxy composites under low-frequency cyclic magneto-mechanical loading at the matrix glass transition start and finish temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, William D.; Shanmugham, Manikantan; Bailey, Harold

    2004-07-01

    The present paper presents cyclic strain amplitude and longitudinal strain measurements of longitudinally compressed Terfenol-D particle samples subjected to magneto-strain cycling. A comparison is made of the responses of material strain cycle tested at temperatures near the matrix glass transition start temperature, and material strain cycle tested at a temperature near the matrix glass transition finish temperature. The cyclic strain amplitude of the material was significantly larger when tested at a temperature near the matrix glass transition finish temperature. A useful range of longitudinal applied stress exists where the composite suffers little apparent degradation. Beyond this range the composite exhibits steadily decreasing cyclic strain amplitude with increases in longitudinal compressive stress magnitude.

  1. Study on the Aging Behaviors of Rubber Materials in Tension and Compression Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Can; Wang, Hongyu; Ma, Xiaobing

    Rubber materials are widely used in aviation, aerospace, shipbuilding, automobile and other military field. However, rubber materials are easy to aging, which largely restricts its using life. In working environment, due to the combined effect of heat and oxygen, vulcanized rubber will undergo degradation and crosslinking reaction which will cause elasticity decease and permanent deformation, so mostly rubber products are used under stress state. Due to the asymmetric structure and asymmetric stress distribution, mechanical stress may cause serious damage to molecular structure; therefore, this paper is aimed to analyze the aging behavior of rubber materials under tensile and compressive loadings, through analyzing experiment data, and adopting Gauss function to describe stress relaxation coefficient, to build an aging equation containing compression ratio parameter and aging time.

  2. ACCELERATORS Study of a magnetic alloy-loaded RF cavity for bunch compression at the CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Da-Yu; Liu, Yong; Xia, Jia-Wen; Li, Peng; Zhao, Yong-Tao; Yang, Lei; Qi, Xin

    2010-12-01

    The Heavy Ion Research Facility and Cooling Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR) accelerator in Lanzhou offers a unique possibility for the generation of high density and short pulse heavy ion beams by non-adiabatic bunch compression longitudinally, which is implemented by a fast jump of the RF-voltage amplitude. For this purpose, an RF cavity with high electric field gradient loaded with Magnetic Alloy cores has been developed. The results show that the resonant frequency range of the single-gap RF cavity is from 1.13 MHz to 1.42 MHz, and a maximum RF voltage of 40 kV with a total length of 100 cm can be obtained, which can be used to compress heavy ion beams of 238U72+ with 250 MeV/u from the initial bunch length of 200 ns to 50 ns with the coaction of the two single-gap RF cavity mentioned above.

  3. Assessing Viscoelastic Properties of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) Using Loading and Unloading of the Macroscopic Compression Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincan, Mustafa

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mechanical properties were measured using custom-built compression test device. PDMS elastic modulus can be varied with the elastomer base to the curing agent ratio, i.e. by changing the cross-linking density. PDMS samples with different crosslink density in terms of their elastic modulus were measured. In this project the PDMS samples with the base/curing agent ratio ranging from 5:1 to 20:1 were tested. The elastic modulus varied with the amount of the crosslinker, and ranged from 0.8 MPa to 4.44 MPa. The compression device was modified by adding digital displacement gauges to measure the lateral strain of the sample, which allowed obtaining the true stress-strain data. Since the unloading behavior was different than the loading behavior of the viscoelastic PDMS, it was utilized to asses viscoelastic properties of the polymer. The thesis describes a simple method for measuring mechanical properties of soft polymeric materials.

  4. Static and dynamic moduli of posterior dental resin composites under compressive loading.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Hirayama, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Nishiwaki, Tsuyoshi

    2011-10-01

    Dental resin composites are commonly used as restorative materials for dental treatment. To comprehend the static and dynamic moduli of dental resin composites, we investigated the mechanical behaviors of resin composites under static and dynamic loading conditions. Four commercially available resin composites for posterior restorations were evaluated. The percentages, by weight, of inorganic fillers of resin composites were examined by the ashing technique. The static compressive tests were undertaken with a constant loading speed of 1.0 mm/min using a computer-controlled INSTRON testing machine. The dynamic properties of composites were determined using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique. When inorganic filler content was increased, a remarkable increase in the static modulus and dynamic modulus were observed. Furthermore, there was a strong relationship between the static modulus and dynamic modulus (r(2) = 0.947). The SHPB technique clearly demonstrated the dynamic properties of composites, and was a useful technique for determining the mechanical behavior of composites under dynamic compressive loading.

  5. Closed-form solution of the Ogden-Hill's compressible hyperelastic model for ramp loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezvai, Szabolcs; Kossa, Attila

    2016-09-01

    This article deals with the visco-hyperelastic modelling approach for compressible polymer foam materials. Polymer foams can exhibit large elastic strains and displacements in case of volumetric compression. In addition, they often show significant rate-dependent properties. This material behaviour can be accurately modelled using the visco-hyperelastic approach, in which the large strain viscoelastic description is combined with the rate-independent hyperelastic material model. In case of polymer foams, the most widely used compressible hyperelastic material model, the so-called Ogden-Hill's model, was applied, which is implemented in the commercial finite element (FE) software uc(Abaqus). The visco-hyperelastic model is defined in hereditary integral form, therefore, obtaining a closed-form solution for the stress is not a trivial task. However, the parameter-fitting procedure could be much faster and accurate if closed-form solution exists. In this contribution, exact stress solutions are derived in case of uniaxial, biaxial and volumetric compression loading cases using ramp-loading history. The analytical stress solutions are compared with the stress results in uc(Abaqus) using FE analysis. In order to highlight the benefits of the analytical closed-form solution during the parameter-fitting process experimental work has been carried out on a particular open-cell memory foam material. The results of the material identification process shows significant accuracy improvement in the fitting procedure by applying the derived analytical solutions compared to the so-called separated approach applied in the engineering practice.

  6. Cyclic hardening in copper described in terms of combined monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, H.D. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    Hardening of polycrystalline copper subjected to tension-compression loading cycles in the plastic region is discussed with reference to changes in flow stress determined from equations describing dislocation glide. It is suggested that hardening is as a result of the accumulation of strain on a monotonic stress-strain curve. On initial loading, the behavior is monotonic. On stress reversal, a characteristic cyclic stress-strain curve is followed until the stress reaches a value in reverse loading corresponding to the maximum attained during the preceding half cycle. Thereafter, the monotonic path is followed until strain reversal occurs at completion of the half cycle. Repetition of the process results in cyclic hardening. Steady state cyclic behavior is reached when a stress associated with the monotonic stress-strain curve is reached which is equal to the stress associated with the cyclic stress-strain curve corresponding to the imposed strain amplitude.

  7. Compressive sampling based approach for identification of moving loads distribution on cable-stayed bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yuequan; Li, Hui; Zhang, Fujian; Ou, Jinping

    2013-04-01

    A moving loads distribution identification method for cable-stayed bridges based on compressive sampling (CS) technique is proposed. CS is a technique for obtaining sparse signal representations to underdetermined linear measurement equations. In this paper, CS is employed to localize moving loads of cable-stayed bridges by limit cable force measurements. First, a vehicle-bridge model for cable-stayed bridges is presented. Then the relationship between the cable force and moving loads is constructed based on the influence lines. With the hypothesis of sparsity distribution of vehicles on bridge deck (which is practical for long-span bridges), the moving loads are identified by minimizing the `l2-norm of the difference between the observed and simulated cable forces caused by moving vehicles penalized by the `l1-norm' of the moving load vector. The resultant minimization problem is convex and can be solved efficiently. A numerical example of a real cable-stayed bridge is carried out to verify the proposed method. The robustness and accuracy of the identification approach with limit cable force measurement for multi-vehicle spatial localization are validated.

  8. Statistical analysis of compositional factors affecting the compressive strength of alumina-loaded epoxy (ALOX).

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Stephen Tedford; Ahn, Sung K. (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Lee, Moo Yul

    2006-02-01

    Detailed statistical analysis of the experimental data from testing of alumina-loaded epoxy (ALOX) composites was conducted to better understand influences of the selected compositional properties on the compressive strength of these ALOX composites. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for different models with different sets of parameters identified the optimal statistical model as, y{sub l} = -150.71 + 29.72T{sub l} + 204.71D{sub l} + 160.93S{sub 1l} + 90.41S{sub 2l}-20.366T{sub l}S{sub 2l}-137.85D{sub l}S{sub 1l}-90.08D{sub l}S{sub 2l} where y{sub l} is the predicted compressive strength, T{sub l} is the powder type, D{sub l} is the density as the covariate for powder volume concentration, and S{sub il}(i=1,2) is the strain rate. Based on the optimal statistical model, we conclude that the compressive strength of the ALOX composite is significantly influenced by the three main factors examined: powder type, density, and strain rate. We also found that the compressive strength of the ALOX composite is significantly influenced by interactions between the powder type and the strain rate and between the powder volume concentration and the strain rate. However, the interaction between the powder type and the powder volume concentration may not significantly influence the compressive strength of the ALOX composite.

  9. Failure modes for compression loaded angle-ply plates with holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, S. W.; Herakovich, C. T.; Williams, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    A combined theoretical-experimental investigation of failure in notched, graphite-epoxy, angle-ply laminates subjected to far-field compression loading indicates that failure generally initiates on the hole boundary and propagates along a line parallel to the fiber orientation of the laminate. The strength of notched laminates with specimen width-to-hole diameter ratios of 5 and 10 are compared to the strength of unnotched laminates. The experimental results are complemented by a three-dimensional finite element stress analysis that includes interlaminar stresses around holes in (+/- theta)s laminates. The finite element predictions indicate that failure is initiated by shear stresses at the hole boundary.

  10. Effects of method of loading and specimen configuration on compressive strength of graphite/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. K.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    Three test schemes were examined for testing graphite/epoxy (Narmco T300/5208) composite material specimens to failure in compression, including an adaptation of the IITRI "wedge grip" compression fixture, a face-supported-compression fixture, and an end-loaded-coupon fixture. The effects of specimen size, specimen support arrangement and method of load transfer on compressive behavior of graphite/epoxy were investigated. Compressive stress strain, strength, and modulus data obtained with the three fixtures are presented with evaluations showing the effects of all test parameters, including fiber orientation. The IITRI fixture has the potential to provide good stress/strain data to failure for unidirectional and quasi-isotropic laminates. The face supported fixture was found to be the most desirable for testing + or - 45 s laminates.

  11. Permeability Evolution in Natural Fractures Subject to Cyclic Loading and Gouge Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Daniel; Amann, Florian; Bayer, Peter; Elsworth, Derek

    2016-09-01

    Increasing fracture aperture by lowering effective normal stress and by inducing dilatant shearing and thermo-elastic effects is essential for transmissivity increase in enhanced geothermal systems. This study investigates transmissivity evolution for fluid flow through natural fractures in granodiorite at the laboratory scale. Processes that influence transmissivity are changing normal loads, surface deformation, the formation of gouge and fracture offset. Normal loads were varied in cycles between 1 and 68 MPa and cause transmissivity changes of up to three orders of magnitude. Similarly, small offsets of fracture surfaces of the order of millimeters induced changes in transmissivity of up to three orders of magnitude. During normal load cycling, the fractures experienced significant surface deformation, which did not lead to increased matedness for most experiments, especially for offset fractures. The resulting gouge material production may have caused clogging of the main fluid flow channels with progressing loading cycles, resulting in reductions of transmissivity by up to one order of magnitude. During one load cycle, from low to high normal loads, the majority of tests show hysteretic behavior of the transmissivity. This effect is stronger for early load cycles, most likely when surface deformation occurs, and becomes less pronounced in later cycles when asperities with low asperity strength failed. The influence of repeated load cycling on surface deformation is investigated by scanning the specimen surfaces before and after testing. This allows one to study asperity height distribution and surface deformation by evaluating the changes of the standard deviation of the height, distribution of asperities and matedness of the fractures. Surface roughness, as expressed by the standard deviation of the asperity height distribution, increased during testing. Specimen surfaces that were tested in a mated configuration were better mated after testing, than

  12. Characterization of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polyamide-6 thermoplastic composite under longitudinal compression loading at high strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploeckl, Marina; Kuhn, Peter; Koerber, Hannes

    2015-09-01

    In the presented work, an experimental investigation has been performed to characterize the strain rate dependency of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polyamide-6 composite for longitudinal compression loading. An end-loaded compression specimen geometry, suitable for contactless optical strain measurement via digital image correlation and dynamic loading in a split-Hopkinson pressure bar, was developed. For the dynamic experiments at a constant strain rate of 100 s-1 a modified version of the Dynamic Compression Fixture, developed by Koerber and Camanho [Koerber and Camanho, Composites Part A, 42, 462-470, 2011] was used. The results were compared with quasi-static test results at a strain rate of 3 · 10-4 s-1 using the same specimen geometry. It was found that the longitudinal compressive strength increased by 61% compared to the strength value obtained from the quasi-static tests.

  13. Identifying and Characterizing Discrepancies Between Test and Analysis Results of Compression-Loaded Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2005-01-01

    Results from a study to identify and characterize discrepancies between validation tests and high-fidelity analyses of compression-loaded panels are presented. First, potential sources of the discrepancies in both the experimental method and corresponding high-fidelity analysis models were identified. Then, a series of laboratory tests and numerical simulations were conducted to quantify the discrepancies and develop test and analysis methods to account for the discrepancies. The results indicate that the discrepancies between the validation tests and high-fidelity analyses can be attributed to imperfections in the test fixture and specimen geometry; test-fixture-induced changes in specimen geometry; and test-fixture-induced friction on the loaded edges of the test specimen. The results also show that accurate predictions of the panel response can be obtained when these specimen imperfections and edge conditions are accounted for in the analysis. The errors in the tests and analyses, and the methods used to characterize these errors are presented.

  14. Failure mechanism analysis under compression loading of unidirectional carbon/epoxy composites using micromechanical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effendi, R. R.; Barrau, J.-J.; Guedra-Degeorges, D.

    An experimental study of the compression fracture of unidirectional composites (T300/914, T800/5245C, M40J/913, GY70/V108 and AS4/PEEK) shows that fiber kinking is the main failure mode. All materials tested exhibited a non-linear elastic behavior characterized by a continuous decrease of the tangent modulus as soon as the load was applied. A micromechanical model taking into account initial geometric imperfections was developed. Stress evolution in the constituents was analysed and then compared with their strength. Two failure modes were distinguished: failure due to the fracture of fibers and failure due to the fracture of matrix. This model demonstrates that the non-linear behavior is not due to the initial geometric imperfections. To refine modelling, a numerical analysis using a finite element method with elastoplastic and large displacement hypothesis was developed. This model not only shows the principals governing failure parameters: initial geometric impertions, yield stress of matrix and fiber compressive strength, but also demonstrates two failure mechanisms: fracture of fibers in compression and fiber kinking. This model confirms that the non-linear behavior is not attributed to the initial geometric imperfections.

  15. Structural Response of Compression-Loaded, Tow-Placed, Variable Stiffness Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Guerdal, Zafer; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Results of an analytical and experimental study to characterize the structural response of two compression-loaded variable stiffness composite panels are presented and discussed. These variable stiffness panels are advanced composite structures, in which tows are laid down along precise curvilinear paths within each ply and the fiber orientation angle varies continuously throughout each ply. The panels are manufactured from AS4/977-3 graphite-epoxy pre-preg material using an advanced tow placement system. Both variable stiffness panels have the same layup, but one panel has overlapping tow bands and the other panel has a constant-thickness laminate. A baseline cross-ply panel is also analyzed and tested for comparative purposes. Tests performed on the variable stiffness panels show a linear prebuckling load-deflection response, followed by a nonlinear response to failure at loads between 4 and 53 percent greater than the baseline panel failure load. The structural response of the variable stiffness panels is also evaluated using finite element analyses. Nonlinear analyses of the variable stiffness panels are performed which include mechanical and thermal prestresses. Results from analyses that include thermal prestress conditions correlate well with measured variable stiffness panel results. The predicted response of the baseline panel also correlates well with measured results.

  16. An investigation of the self-heating phenomenon in viscoelastic materials subjected to cyclic loadings accounting for prestress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, A. M. G.; Rade, D. A.; Lacerda, H. B.; Araújo, C. A.

    2015-06-01

    It has been demonstrated by many authors that the internal damping mechanism of the viscoelastic materials offers many possibilities for practical engineering applications. However, in traditional procedures of analysis and design of viscoelastic dampers subjected to cyclic loadings, uniform, constant temperature is generally assumed and do not take into account the self-heating phenomenon. Moreover, for viscoelastic materials subjected to dynamic loadings superimposed on static preloads, such as engine mounts, these procedures can lead to poor designs or even severe failures since the energy dissipated within the volume of the material leads to temperature rises. In this paper, a hybrid numerical-experimental investigation of effects of the static preloads on the self-heating phenomenon in viscoelastic dampers subjected to harmonic loadings is reported. After presenting the theoretical foundations, the numerical and experimental results obtained in terms of the temperature evolutions at different points within the volume of the viscoelastic material for various static preloads are compared, and the main features of the methodology are discussed.

  17. Static and Cyclic Load-Deflection Characteristics of NiTi Orthodontic Archwires Using Modified Bending Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nili Ahmadabadi, Mahmoud; Shahhoseini, Tahereh; Habibi-Parsa, Mohamad; Haj-Fathalian, Maryam; Hoseinzadeh-Nik, Tahereh; Ghadirian, Hananeh

    2009-08-01

    Near-equiatomic nickel-titanium (nitinol) has the ability to return to a former shape when subjected to an appropriate thermomechanical procedure. One of the most successful applications of nitinol is orthodontic archwire. One of the suitable characteristics of these wires is superelasticity, a phenomenon that allows better-tolerated loading conditions during clinical therapy. Superelastic nitinol wires deliver clinically desired light continuous force enabling effective tooth movement with minimal damage for periodontal tissues. In this research, a special three-point bending fixture was invented and designed to determine the superelastic property in simulated clinical conditions, where the wire samples were held in the fixture similar to an oral cavity. In this experimental study, the load-deflection characteristics of superelastic NiTi commercial wires were studied through three-point bending test. The superelastic behavior was investigated by focusing on bending time, temperature, and number of cycles which affects the energy dissipating capacity. Experimental results show that the NiTi archwires are well suited for cyclic load-unload dental applications. Results show reduction in superelastic property for used archwires after long-time static bending.

  18. Mechanical strength of the silicon carbide-bearing materials under cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Babaev, E.I.; Berdichevskii, I.M.; Kozlovskii, L.V.; Mei, E.P.; Rozhkova, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    The authors seek to optimize the firing process for porcelain both for the resulting properties of the porcelain and for the thermal efficiency of the furnace by finding a structural furnace material which will withstand the designated optimal firing regime. To this end they select and test a silicon carbide refractory for its ultimate flexural and compression strength and its resistance to fracture under thermal cycling and stress conditions.In actual service the refractory is found to increase the service life and reduce the frequency of maintenance of the furnace.

  19. Cyclic-load crack growth in ASME SA-105 grade II steel in high-pressure hydrogen at ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    ASME SA-105 Grade II steel, which is used in high-pressure hydrogen compressor systems, is similar to steels used or considered for use in high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels and pipelines. This paper summarizes the results of a program conducted to provide cyclic-load crack growth rate (da/dN) data for a fracture mechanics analysis of a 15,000 psi hydrogen compressor facility which contains pulse quieter and after-cooler separator vessels constructed of the ASME SA-105 Grade II steel. Included in the program were tests performed to assist in establishing operating procedures that could minimize the effect of hydrogen on crack growth rates during operation.

  20. Cruciform specimen design for testing advanced aeropropulsion materials under cyclic in-plane biaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Krause, David

    2006-03-01

    Investigating material behavior under complex stress states is often done using in-plane biaxial loading approach. Utilizing such techniques requires using cruciform type specimens fabricated from plate material tested by gripping the specimen at four locations and loaded along two orthogonal axes. Servohydraulic systems are generally used in this application which is similar to those used for uniaxial testing. These kind of testing capabilities are currently being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center via a new in-house testing facility. This is in support of the development of major components for the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). It is also used to assist in the generation of an analytical life prediction methodology [1] and to experimentally verify the flight-design component's life. Further, this work is intended to carry the immediate goal of developing a specimen design that is fully compatible with the in-plane biaxial testing systems installed at NASA Glenn Research Center [2]. Thus, details of the specimen design and its applicability to the ongoing experimental activities are being reported and discussed. Finite element analyses were carried out to optimize the geometry of specimen and to evaluate the stress response under biaxial loading conditions [3, 4]. The material of interest used in this research is nickel based superalloy. The data presented concluded that the specimen can be used to investigate the deformation behavior under general forms of biaxial loading. The provided measurement and observation are limited to 1-in [2.54 cm] diameter circular region at the specimen center.

  1. Particle loading time and humidity effects on the efficiency of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator model under constant and inhalation cyclic flows.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Alireza; Haghighat, Fariborz; Bahloul, Ali; Brochot, Clothilde; Ostiguy, Claude

    2015-06-01

    It is necessary to investigate the efficiencies of filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) exposed to ultrafine particles (UFPs) for long periods of time, since the particle loading time may potentially affect the efficiency of FFRs. This article aims to investigate the filtration efficiency for a model of electrostatic N95 FFRs with constant and 'inhalation-only' cyclic flows, in terms of particle loading time effect, using different humidity conditions. Filters were exposed to generated polydisperse NaCl particles. Experiments were performed mimicking an 'inhalation-only' scenario with a cyclic flow of 85 l min(-1) as the minute volume [or 170 l min(-1) as mean inhalation flow (MIF)] and for two constant flows of 85 and 170 l min(-1), under three relative humidity (RH) levels of 10, 50, and 80%. Each test was performed for loading time periods of 6h and the particle penetration (10-205.4nm in electrical mobility diameter) was measured once every 2h. For a 10% RH, the penetration of smaller size particles (<80nm), including the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), decreased over time for both constant and cyclic flows. For 50 and 80% RH levels, the changes in penetration were typically observed in an opposite direction with less magnitude. The penetrations at MPPS increased with respect to loading time under constant flow conditions (85 and 170 l min(-1)): it did not substantially increase under cyclic flows. The comparison of the cyclic flow (85 l min(-1) as minute volume) and constant flow equal to the cyclic flow minute volume indicated that, for all conditions the penetration was significantly less for the constant flow than that of cyclic flow. The comparison between the cyclic (170 l min(-1) as MIF) and constant flow equal to cyclic flow MIF indicated that, for the initial stage of loading, the penetrations were almost equal, but they were different for the final stages of the loading time. For a 10% RH, the penetration of a wide range of sizes was observed

  2. Particle loading time and humidity effects on the efficiency of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator model under constant and inhalation cyclic flows.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Alireza; Haghighat, Fariborz; Bahloul, Ali; Brochot, Clothilde; Ostiguy, Claude

    2015-06-01

    It is necessary to investigate the efficiencies of filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) exposed to ultrafine particles (UFPs) for long periods of time, since the particle loading time may potentially affect the efficiency of FFRs. This article aims to investigate the filtration efficiency for a model of electrostatic N95 FFRs with constant and 'inhalation-only' cyclic flows, in terms of particle loading time effect, using different humidity conditions. Filters were exposed to generated polydisperse NaCl particles. Experiments were performed mimicking an 'inhalation-only' scenario with a cyclic flow of 85 l min(-1) as the minute volume [or 170 l min(-1) as mean inhalation flow (MIF)] and for two constant flows of 85 and 170 l min(-1), under three relative humidity (RH) levels of 10, 50, and 80%. Each test was performed for loading time periods of 6h and the particle penetration (10-205.4nm in electrical mobility diameter) was measured once every 2h. For a 10% RH, the penetration of smaller size particles (<80nm), including the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), decreased over time for both constant and cyclic flows. For 50 and 80% RH levels, the changes in penetration were typically observed in an opposite direction with less magnitude. The penetrations at MPPS increased with respect to loading time under constant flow conditions (85 and 170 l min(-1)): it did not substantially increase under cyclic flows. The comparison of the cyclic flow (85 l min(-1) as minute volume) and constant flow equal to the cyclic flow minute volume indicated that, for all conditions the penetration was significantly less for the constant flow than that of cyclic flow. The comparison between the cyclic (170 l min(-1) as MIF) and constant flow equal to cyclic flow MIF indicated that, for the initial stage of loading, the penetrations were almost equal, but they were different for the final stages of the loading time. For a 10% RH, the penetration of a wide range of sizes was observed

  3. Capacity fade modelling of lithium-ion battery under cyclic loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwin, T. R.; Chung, Yongmann M.; Wang, Jihong

    2016-10-01

    A pseudo two-dimensional (P2D) electro-chemical lithium-ion battery model is presented in this paper to study the capacity fade under cyclic charge-discharge conditions. The Newman model [1,2] has been modified to include a continuous solvent reduction reaction responsible for the capacity fade and power fade. The temperature variation inside the cell is accurately predicted using a distributed thermal model coupled with the internal chemical heat generation. The model is further improved by linking the porosity variation with the electrolyte partial molar concentration, thereby proving a stronger coupling between the battery performance and the chemical properties of electrolyte. The solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer growth is estimated for different cut-off voltages and charging current rates. The results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient as well as the porosity variation influences the SEI layer growth and the battery life significantly. The choice of an electrolyte decides the conductivity and partial molar concentration, which is found to have a strong influence on the capacity fade of the battery. The present battery model integrates all essential electro-chemical processes inside a lithium-ion battery under a strong implicit algorithm, proving a useful tool for computationally fast battery monitoring system.

  4. Dynamic mechanical response of magnesium single crystal under compression loading: Experiments, model, and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qizhen

    2011-05-01

    Magnesium single crystal samples are compressed at room temperature under quasistatic (˜0.001 s-1) loading in a universal testing machine and dynamic (430, 1000, and 1200 s-1) loading in a split Hopkinson pressure bar system. Stress-strain curves show that (a) the fracture strain slightly increases with the strain rate; and (b) the maximum strength and strain hardening rate increase significantly when the testing changes from quasistatic to dynamic, although they do not vary much when the strain rate for dynamic testing varies in the range of 430-1200 s-1. The operation of the secondary pyramidal slip system is the dominating deformation mechanism, which leads to a fracture surface with an angle of ˜42° with respect to the loading axial direction. A theoretical material model based on Johnson-Cook law is also derived. The model includes the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms, and provides the stress-strain relations matching with the experimental results. Finite element simulations for the strain rates used in the experiments predict the mechanical responses of the material that agree well with the experimental data.

  5. Effects of Imperfections on the Buckling Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The results of an experimental and numerical study of the effects of imperfections on the buckling response of unstiffened thin-walled composite cylindrical shells are presented. Results that identify the individual and combined effects of traditional initial geometric shell-wall imperfections and non-traditional shell-wall thickness variations, shell-end geometric imperfections and variations in loads applied to the ends of the shells on the shell buckling response are included. In addition, results illustrating the effects of manufacturing flaws in the form of gaps between adjacent pieces of graphite-epoxy tape in some of the laminate plies are presented in detail. The shells have been analyzed with a nonlinear finite-element analysis code that accurately accounts for these effects on the buckling and nonlinear responses of the shells. The numerical results indicate that traditional and nontraditional initial imperfections can cause a significant reduction in the buckling load of a compression-loaded composite shell. Furthermore, the results indicate that the imperfections couple in a nonlinear manner. The numerical results correlate well with the experimental results. The nonlinear analysis results are also compared to the results from a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis. The results suggest that the nonlinear analysis procedure can be used for determining accurate, high-fidelity design knockdown factors for shell buckling and collapse. The results can also be used to determine the effects of manufacturing tolerances on the buckling response of composite shells.

  6. Axially compressed buckling of an embedded boron nitride nanotube subjected to thermo-electro-mechanical loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Jalili, Nader

    2007-04-01

    Unlike widely-used carbon nanotubes, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have shown to possess stable semiconducting behavior and strong piezoelectricity. Such properties along with their outstanding mechanical properties and thermal conductivity, make BNNTs promising candidate reinforcement materials for a verity of applications especially nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Motivated by these abilities, we aim to study the buckling behavior of BNNT-reinforced piezoelectric polymeric composites when subjected to combined electro-thermo-mechanical loadings. For this, the multi-walled structure of BNNT is considered as elastic media and a set of concentric cylindrical shell with van der Waals interaction between them. Using three-dimensional equilibrium equations, Donnell shell theory is utilized to show that the axially compressive resistance of BNNT varies with applying thermal and electrical loads. The effect of BNNT piezoelectric property on the buckling behavior of the composites is demonstrated. More specifically, it is shown that applying direct and reverse voltages to BNNT changes the buckling loads for any axial and circumferential wavenumbers. Such capability could be uniquely utilized when designing BNNT-reinforced composites.

  7. Comparison of Methods to Predict Lower Bound Buckling Loads of Cylinders Under Axial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynie, Waddy T.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the buckling response of two different orthogrid stiffened circular cylindrical shells with initial imperfections and subjected to axial compression are used to compare three different lower bound buckling load prediction techniques. These lower bound prediction techniques assume different imperfection types and include an imperfection based on a mode shape from an eigenvalue analysis, an imperfection caused by a lateral perturbation load, and an imperfection in the shape of a single stress-free dimple. The STAGS finite element code is used for the analyses. Responses of the cylinders for ranges of imperfection amplitudes are considered, and the effect of each imperfection is compared to the response of a geometrically perfect cylinder. Similar behavior was observed for shells that include a lateral perturbation load and a single dimple imperfection, and the results indicate that the predicted lower bounds are much less conservative than the corresponding results for the cylinders with the mode shape imperfection considered herein. In addition, the lateral perturbation technique and the single dimple imperfection produce response characteristics that are physically meaningful and can be validated via testing.

  8. Tow-Steered Panels With Holes Subjected to Compression or Shear Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Tatting, Brian F.; Guerdal, Zafer

    2005-01-01

    Tailoring composite laminates to vary the fiber orientations within a fiber layer of a laminate to address non-uniform stress states and provide structural advantages such as the alteration of principal load paths has potential application to future low-cost, light-weight structures for commercial transport aircraft. Evaluation of this approach requires the determination of the effectiveness of stiffness tailoring through the use of curvilinear fiber paths in flat panels including the reduction of stress concentrations around the holes and the increase in load carrying capability. Panels were designed through the use of an optimization code using a genetic algorithm and fabricated using a tow-steering approach. Manufacturing limitations, such as the radius of curvature of tows the machine could support, avoidance of wrinkling of fibers and minimization of gaps between fibers were considered in the design process. Variable stiffness tow-steered panels constructed with curvilinear fiber paths were fabricated so that the design methodology could be verified through experimentation. Finite element analysis where each element s stacking sequence was accurately defined is used to verify the behavior predicted based on the design code. Experiments on variable stiffness flat panels with central circular holes were conducted with the panels loaded in axial compression or shear. Tape and tow-steered panels are used to demonstrate the buckling, post-buckling and failure behavior of elastically tailored panels. The experimental results presented establish the buckling performance improvements attainable by elastic tailoring of composite laminates.

  9. Experimental behaviour of concrete-filled rectangular thin welded steel stubs (compression load case)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferhoune, Noureddine; Zeghiche, Jahid

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, results of tests conducted on thin welded rectangular steel-concrete stubs are presented. The studied section was made of two cold steel plates with U shape and welded (with electric arc) to form a steel box. The cross section dimensions were: 100×70×2 mm. The main studied parameters were: the height (50, 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, 500 mm), the effect of the in filled concrete and its age, the discontinuous weld. The tests were carried out at 28 days and 3 years after the date of casting. All tests were achieved under axial compression in a 50 tf machine up to failure. A total of 21 stubs were tested, 8 were empty, 8 filled with concrete whose gravel was made of crushed crystallized slag tested at 28 days of casting and 8 composites as the previous but tested after 3 years. The aim of the study is to bring some light on the behaviour of such composite section. Also, to provide some evidence that the use of crushed slag could be integrated in the manufacturing of non-conventional concrete. All failure loads were predicted numerically and by using the Eurocodes EC3 and EC4 from test results it was confirmed that the length of empty stubs had a drastic effect on the load carrying capacity and the failure mode was rather a local buckling mode with steel sides deformed outwards and inwards. Both numerical EC3 predictions were higher and on the unsafe side when compared to experimental corresponding loads for empty steel samples. For composite stubs, the load carrying capacity increased significantly; the EC4 numerical load predictions were higher in the higher range 300-500 mm and lower in the higher range 50-200 mm. The failure mode of composite stubs was a local buckling mode with all steel sides deformed outwards. The experimental loads obtained after 3 years of casting were higher than the corresponding tested at 28 days. The load ratio (3 years/28 days) was found to be increasing linearly with the increase of the stubs height. More test results

  10. Buckling and postbuckling behavior of compression-loaded isotropic plates with cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study of the buckling and postbuckling behavior of square and rectangular compression loaded aluminum plates with centrally located circular, square, and elliptical cutouts is presented. Experimental results indicate that the plates exhibit overall trends of increasing buckling strain and decreasing initial postbuckling stiffness with increasing cutout width. Corresponding plates with circular and square cutouts of the same width buckle at approximately the same strain level, and exhibit approximately the same initial postbuckling stiffness. Results show that the reduction in initial postbuckling stiffness due to a cutout generally decreases as the plate aspect ratio increases. Other results presented indicate that square plates with elliptical cutouts having a large cutout-width-to-plate-width ratio generally lose prebuckling and initial postbuckling stiffness as the cutout height increases. However, the plates buckle at essentially the same strain level. Results also indicate that postbuckling stiffness is more sensitive to changes in elliptical cutout height than are prebuckling stiffness and buckling strain.

  11. Shear strength of irradiated insulation under combined shear/compression loading

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.; Fabian, P.; Hazelton, C.

    1997-06-01

    The shear strengths of irradiated insulation systems were measured at 4 K under combined shear and compression loads. Sandwich-type (316LN/bonded insulation/316LN) specimens were irradiated at 4 K and tested at 4 K after storage at room temperature. Some specimens were stored at room temperature; others, at 77 K. Insulation systems included diglycidylether of bisphenol-A and tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane epoxies and polyimide resins reinforced with S-2 glass. Some contained polyimide film or mica electrical barriers. All specimens were irradiated to a fast neutron fluence of 1.8 X 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2}. Insulation systems are compared on the basis of their irradiated and unirradiated shear strengths.

  12. Failure of Alzheimer's Aβ(1-40) amyloid nanofibrils under compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-04-01

    Amyloids are associated with severe degenerative diseases and show exceptional mechanical properties, in particular great stiffhess. Amyloid fibrils, forming protein nanotube structures, are elongated fibers with a diameter of ≈8 nm with a characteristic dense hydrogen-bond (H-bond)patterning in the form of beta-sheets (β-sheets). Here we report a series of molecular dynamics simulations to study mechanical failure properties of a twofold symmetric Aβ(l-40) amyloid fibril, a pathogen associated with Alzheimer’s disease. We carry out computational experiments to study the response of the amyloid fibril to compressive loading. Our investigations reveal atomistic details of the failure process, and confirm that the breakdown of H-bonds plays a critical role during the failure process of amyloid fibrils. We obtain a Young’s modulus of ≈12.43 GPa, in dose agreement with earlier experimental results. Our simulations show that failure by buck-ling and subsequent shearing in one of the layers initiates at ≈1% compressive strain, suggesting that amyloid fibrils can be rather brittle mechanical elements.

  13. High-Fidelity Nonlinear Analysis of Compression-Loaded Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical study of the effects of initial imperfections on the buckling and postbuckling response of unstiffened thin-walled compression-loaded graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells are presented. The shells considered in the study have four different shell-wall laminates and two different shell-radius-to-thickness ratios. The shell-wall laminates include two different orthotropic laminates and two different quasi-isotropic laminates. The shell-radius-to-thickness ratios include shell-radius-to-thickness ratios equal to 100 and 200. The results identify the effects of traditional and nontraditional initial imperfections on the nonlinear response characteristics and buckling loads of the shells. The traditional imperfections include the geometric shell-wall mid-surface imperfections that are commonly discussed in the literature on thin shell buckling. The nontraditional imperfections include shell-wall thickness variations, local shell-wall ply-gaps associated with the fabrication process, shell-end geometric imperfections, nonuniform applied end loads, and variations in the boundary conditions including the effects of elastic boundary conditions. A high-fidelity nonlinear shell analysis procedure that accurately accounts for the effects of these traditional and nontraditional imperfections on the nonlinear response characteristics and buckling loads of the shells is described. The analysis procedure includes a nonlinear static analysis that predicts the stable response characteristics of the shells, and a nonlinear transient analysis that predicts the unstable response characteristics. The results of a local shell-wall stress analysis used to estimate failure stresses are also described.

  14. Innovative design of composite structures: Axisymmetric deformations of unsymmetrically laminated cylinders loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Paraska, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The study focuses on the axisymmetric deformation response of unsymmetrically laminate cylinders loaded in axial compression by known loads. A geometrically nonlinear analysis is used. Though buckling is not studied, the deformations can be considered to be the prebuckling response. Attention is directed at three 16 layer laminates: a (90 sub 8/0 sub 8) sub T; a (0 sub 8/90 sub 8) sub T and a (0/90) sub 4s. The symmetric laminate is used as a basis for comparison, while the two unsymmetric laminates were chosen because they have equal but opposite bending-stretching effects. Particular attention is given to the influence of the thermally-induced preloading deformations that accompany the cool-down of any unsymmetric laminate from the consolidation temperature. Simple support and clamped boundary conditions are considered. It is concluded that: (1) The radial deformations of an unsymmetric laminate are significantly larger than the radial deformations of a symmetric laminate, although for both symmetric and unsymmetric laminates the large deformations are confined to a boundary layer near the ends of the cylinder; (2) For this nonlinear problem the length of the boundary layer is a function of the applied load; (3) The sign of the radial deformations near the supported end of the cylinder depends strongly on the sense (sign) of the laminate asymmetry; (4) For unsymmetric laminates, ignoring the thermally-induced preloading deformations that accompany cool-down results in load-induced deformations that are under predicted; and (5) The support conditions strongly influence the response but the influence of the sense of asymmetry and the influence of the thermally-induced preloading deformations are independent of the support conditions.

  15. Relation of cyclic loading pattern to microstructural fracture in creep fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Halford, G. R.; Oldrieve, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Creep-fatigue-environment interaction is discussed using the 'strainrange partitioning' (SRP) framework as a basis. The four generic SRP strainrange types are studied with a view of revealing differences in micromechanisms of deformation and fatigue degradation. Each combines in a different manner the degradation associated with slip-plane sliding, grain-boundary sliding, migration, cavitation, void development and environmental interaction; hence the approch is useful in delineating the relative importance of these mechanisms in the different loadings. Micromechanistic results are shown for a number of materials, including 316 SS, wrought heat resistant alloys, several nickel-base superalloys, and a tantalum base alloy, T-111. Although there is a commonality of basic behavior, the differences are useful in delineation several important principles of interpretation. Some quantitative results are presented for 316 SS, involving crack initiation and early crack growth, as well as the interaction of low-cycle fatigue with high-cycle fatigue.

  16. Numerical Modeling of Jointed Rock Under Compressive Loading Using X-ray Computerized Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qinglei; Yang, Shengqi; Ranjith, P. G.; Zhu, Wancheng; Yang, Tianhong

    2016-03-01

    As jointed rocks consist of joints embedded within intact rock blocks, the presence and geometrical fabric of joints have a great influence on the mechanical behavior of rock. With consideration of the actual spatial shape of joints, a numerical model is proposed to investigate the fracture evolution mechanism of jointed rocks. In the proposed model, computerized tomography (CT) scanning is first used to capture the microstructure of a jointed sandstone specimen, which is artificially fabricated by loading the intact sample until the residual strength, and then digital image processing (DIP) techniques are applied to characterize the geometrical fabric of joints from the CT images. A simple vectorization method is used to convert the microstructure based on a cross-sectional image into a layer of 3-D vectorized microstructure and the overall 3-D model of the jointed sandstone including the real spatial shape of the joints is established by stacking the layers in a specific sequence. The 3-D model is then integrated into a well-established code [three-dimensional Rock Failure Process Analysis, (RFPA3D)]. Using the proposed model, a uniaxial compression test of the jointed sandstone is simulated. The results show that the presence of joints can produce tensile stress zones surrounding them, which result in the fracture of jointed rocks under a relatively small external load. In addition, the spatial shape of the joints has a great influence on the fracture process of jointed rocks.

  17. Buckling and postbuckling behavior of square compression-loaded graphite-epoxy plates with circular cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study of the postbuckling behavior of square compression-loaded graphite-epoxy plates and isotropic plates with a central circular cutout is presented. Results are presented for unidirectional (0 sub 10)s and (90 sub 10)s plates, (0/90 sub 5)s plates, and for aluminum plates. Results are also presented for (+ or - O sub 6)s angle-ply plates for values of O = 30, 46, and 60 degrees. The experimental results indicate that the change in axial stiffness of a plate at buckling is strongly dependent upon cutout size and plate orthotropy. The presence of a cutout gives rise to an internal load distribution that changes, sometimes dramtically, as a function of cutout size coupled with the plate orthotropy. In the buckled state, the role of orthotropy becomes more significant since bending in addition to membrane orthotropy is present. Most of the plates with cutouts exhibited less postbuckling stiffness than the corresponding plate without a cutout, and the postbuckling stiffness decreased with increasing cutout size. However, some of the highly orthotropic plates with cutouts exhibited more postbuckling stiffness than the corresponding plate without a cutout.

  18. Evaluating the capability of time-of-flight cameras for accurately imaging a cyclically loaded beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahamy, Hervé; Lichti, Derek; El-Badry, Mamdouh; Qi, Xiaojuan; Detchev, Ivan; Steward, Jeremy; Moravvej, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Time-of-flight cameras are used for diverse applications ranging from human-machine interfaces and gaming to robotics and earth topography. This paper aims at evaluating the capability of the Mesa Imaging SR4000 and the Microsoft Kinect 2.0 time-of-flight cameras for accurately imaging the top surface of a concrete beam subjected to fatigue loading in laboratory conditions. Whereas previous work has demonstrated the success of such sensors for measuring the response at point locations, the aim here is to measure the entire beam surface in support of the overall objective of evaluating the effectiveness of concrete beam reinforcement with steel fibre reinforced polymer sheets. After applying corrections for lens distortions to the data and differencing images over time to remove systematic errors due to internal scattering, the periodic deflections experienced by the beam have been estimated for the entire top surface of the beam and at witness plates attached. The results have been assessed by comparison with measurements from highly-accurate laser displacement transducers. This study concludes that both the Microsoft Kinect 2.0 and the Mesa Imaging SR4000s are capable of sensing a moving surface with sub-millimeter accuracy once the image distortions have been modeled and removed.

  19. An Investigation of SiC/SiC Woven Composite Under Monotonic and Cyclic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, J.; Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A. D.; Bhatt, R. T.; Singh, M.; Lua, J.

    1997-01-01

    The desirable properties in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), such as high temperature strength, corrosion resistance, high toughness, low density, or good creep resistance have led to increased use of CMCs in high-speed engine structural components and structures that operate in extreme temperature and hostile aero-thermo-chemical environments. Ceramic matrix composites have been chosen for turbine material in the design of 21 st-century civil propulsion systems to achieve high fuel economy, improved reliability, extended life, and reduced cost. Most commercial CMCs are manufactured using a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process. However, a lower cost fabrication known as melt-infiltration process is also providing CMCs marked for use in hot sections of high-speed civil transports. The scope of this paper is to report on the material and mechanical characterization of the CMCs subjected to this process and to predict the behavior through an analytical model. An investigation of the SiC/SiC 8-harness woven composite is ongoing and its tensile strength and fatigue behavior is being characterized for room and elevated temperatures. The investigation is being conducted at below and above the matrix cracking stress once these parameters are identified. Fractography and light microscopy results are being studied to characterize the failure modes resulting from pure uniaxial loading. A numerical model is also being developed to predict the laminate properties by using the constituent material properties and tow undulation.

  20. Evaluation of Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Biochemical and Mechanical Properties of Trypsin-Treated Intervertebral Discs Under Physiological Compression Loading

    PubMed Central

    Mwale, Fackson; Demers, Caroline N.; Michalek, Arthur J.; Beaudoin, Gilles; Goswami, Tapas; Beckman, Lorne; Iatridis, James C.; Antoniou, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of targeted trypsin digestion and 16 hours compression loading on MR parameters and the mechanical and biochemical properties of bovine disc segments. Materials and Methods Twenty-two 3-disc bovine coccygeal segments underwent compression loading for 16 hours after the nucleus pulposus (NP) of each disc was injected with a solution of trypsin or buffer. The properties of the NP and annulus fibrosus (AF) tissues of each disc were analyzed by quantitative MRI, biochemical tests, and confined compression tests. Results Loading had a significant effect on the MR properties (T1, T2, T1ρ, MTR, ADC) of both the NP and AF tissues. Loading had a greater effect on the MR parameters and biochemical composition of the NP than trypsin. In contrast, trypsin had a larger effect on the mechanical properties. Our data also indicated that localized trypsin injection predominantly affected the NP. T1ρ was sensitive to loading and correlated with the water content of the NP and AF but not with their proteoglycan content. Conclusion Our studies indicate that physiological loading is an important parameter to consider and that T1ρ contributes new information in efforts to develop quantitative MRI as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to detect changes in early disc degeneration. PMID:18219615

  1. Effect of Degeneration on Fluid–Solid Interaction within Intervertebral Disk Under Cyclic Loading – A Meta-Model Analysis of Finite Element Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhoo, Mohammad; Khalaf, Kinda; Kuo, Ya-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Chun; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Parnianpour, Mohamad; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The risk of low back pain resulted from cyclic loadings is greater than that resulted from prolonged static postures. Disk degeneration results in degradation of disk solid structures and decrease of water contents, which is caused by activation of matrix digestive enzymes. The mechanical responses resulted from internal solid–fluid interactions of degenerative disks to cyclic loadings are not well studied yet. The fluid–solid interactions in disks can be evaluated by mathematical models, especially the poroelastic finite element (FE) models. We developed a robust disk poroelastic FE model to analyze the effect of degeneration on solid–fluid interactions within disk subjected to cyclic loadings at different loading frequencies. A backward analysis combined with in vitro experiments was used to find the elastic modulus and hydraulic permeability of intact and enzyme-induced degenerated porcine disks. The results showed that the averaged peak-to-peak disk deformations during the in vitro cyclic tests were well fitted with limited FE simulations and a quadratic response surface regression for both disk groups. The results showed that higher loading frequency increased the intradiscal pressure, decreased the total fluid loss, and slightly increased the maximum axial stress within solid matrix. Enzyme-induced degeneration decreased the intradiscal pressure and total fluid loss, and barely changed the maximum axial stress within solid matrix. The increase of intradiscal pressure and total fluid loss with loading frequency was less sensitive after the frequency elevated to 0.1 Hz for the enzyme-induced degenerated disk. Based on this study, it is found that enzyme-induced degeneration decreases energy attenuation capability of disk, but less change the strength of disk. PMID:25674562

  2. The Effects of Time-Compressed Instruction and Redundancy on Learning and Learners' Perceptions of Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastore, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Can increasing the speed of audio narration in multimedia instruction decrease training time and still maintain learning? The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of time-compressed instruction and redundancy on learning and learners' perceptions of cognitive load. 154 university students were placed into conditions that consisted of…

  3. Constitutive law describing the strength degradation kinetics of fibre-reinforced composites subjected to constant amplitude cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amore, Alberto; Grassia, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    A two-parameter model based on strength degradation was developed and its predictive reliability was checked on a series of fatigue life and residual strength data available in the literature. The modelling approach explicitly accounts for the maximum cyclic stress, σ_{max}, and the stress ratio, R= σ_{min} /σ_{max}, and requires a limited number of experimental fatigue life data to predict the cycle-by-cycle strength degradation kinetics until the "sudden drop" of strength before catastrophic failure. Different loading conditions were analysed for a large variety of composites, including short-glass-fibre-reinforced polycarbonate, [±45]S glass/epoxy laminates, [±35]_{2S} graphite/epoxy laminates, AS4 carbon/epoxy 3k/E7K8 plain weave fabric with [45/-45/90/45/-45/45/-45/0/45/-45]S layup, and [CSM/fabric/(CSM/UD)2]S glass/polyester laminate. The modelling approach indicates that the fatigue life and the residual strength are related to the statistical distribution of the static strength.

  4. Relationship Between Hysteresis Dissipated Energy and Temperature Rising in Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the relationship between hysteresis dissipated energy and temperature rising of the external surface in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) during the application of cyclic loading has been analyzed. The temperature rise, which is caused by frictional slip of fibers within the composite, is related to the hysteresis dissipated energy. Based on the fatigue hysteresis theories considering fibers failure, the hysteresis dissipated energy and a hysteresis dissipated energy-based damage parameter changing with the increase of cycle number have been investigated. The relationship between the hysteresis dissipated energy, a hysteresis dissipated energy-based damage parameter and a temperature rise-based damage parameter have been established. The experimental temperature rise-based damage parameter of unidirectional, cross-ply and 2D woven CMCs corresponding to different fatigue peak stresses and cycle numbers have been predicted. It was found that the temperature rise-based parameter can be used to monitor the fatigue damage evolution and predict the fatigue life of fiber-reinforced CMCs.

  5. Analysis of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings With Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Bond Coats Under Spatially Uniform Cyclic Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a numerical investigation into the spallation mechanism in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings observed under spatially-uniform cyclic thermal loading. The analysis focuses on the evolution of local stress and inelastic strain fields in the vicinity of the rough top/bond coat interface during thermal cycling, and how these fields are influenced by the presence of an oxide film and spatially uniform and graded distributions of alumina particles in the metallic bond coat aimed at reducing the top/bond coat thermal expansion mismatch. The impact of these factors on the potential growth of a local horizontal delamination at the rough interface's crest is included. The analysis is conducted using the Higher-Order Theory for Functionally Graded Materials with creep/relaxation constituent modeling capabilities. For two-phase bond coat microstructures, both the actual and homogenized properties are employed in the analysis. The results reveal the important contributions of both the normal and shear stress components to the delamination growth potential in the presence of an oxide film, and suggest mixed-mode crack propagation. The use of bond coats with uniform or graded microstructures is shown to increase the potential for delamination growth by increasing the magnitude of the crack-tip shear stress component.

  6. Liposomes loaded with a STING pathway ligand, cyclic di-GMP, enhance cancer immunotherapy against metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Miyabe, Hiroko; Hyodo, Mamoru; Sato, Yusuke; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-10-28

    Malignant melanomas escape immunosurveillance via the loss/down-regulation of MHC-I expression. Natural killer (NK) cells have the potential to function as essential effector cells for eliminating melanomas. Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a ligand of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signal pathway, can be thought of as a new class of adjuvant against cancer. However, it is yet to be tested, because technologies for delivering c-di-GMP to the cytosol are required. Herein, we report that c-di-GMP efficiently activates NK cells and induces antitumor effects against malignant melanomas when loaded in YSK05 lipid containing liposomes, by assisting in the efficient delivery of c-di-GMP to the cytosol. The intravenous administration of c-di-GMP encapsulated within YSK05-liposomes (c-di-GMP/YSK05-Lip) into mice efficiently induced the production of type I interferon (IFN) as well as the activation of NK cells, resulting in a significant antitumor effect in a lung metastasis mouse model using B16-F10. This antitumor effect was dominated by NK cells. The infiltration of NK cells was observed in the lungs with B16-F10 melanomas. These findings indicate that the c-di-GMP/YSK05-Lip induces MHC-I non-restricted antitumor immunity mediated by NK cells. Consequently, c-di-GMP/YSK05-Lip represents a potentially new adjuvant system for use in immunotherapy against malignant melanomas.

  7. Asymmetric ability of grain boundaries to generate dislocations under tensile or compressive loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokawa, T.

    2010-11-01

    In order to investigate the effect of structural units on the ability of grain boundaries to generate dislocations, tensile and compressive loading tests were performed on aluminum bicrystals with ⟨112⟩ tilt grain boundaries using molecular-dynamics simulations. Five favored boundaries were found for ⟨112⟩ boundaries in an energy minimization analysis. Each structure could be identified using only its single structural unit period: A unit for Σ1 with θ=0° , B unit for Σ11 with θ=62.96° , C unit for Σ5 with θ=90° , E unit for Σ7 with θ=120° , and D unit for Σ3 with θ=180° . The favored boundaries all show an energy cusp except for the Σ7 boundary. Other boundaries could be represented by a combination of these five structural units. When Σ11 with |B| period showing a minimum energy cusp was used as a reference structure, the core of 2/11[3¯11¯] or 2/11[31¯1] dislocations calculated for the displacement sift complete lattice of Σ11 were introduced at interfaces having larger or smaller misorientation angles than Σ11 , respectively. Each grain-boundary dislocation corresponds to A and C units, respectively. For example, Σ21 with θ=44.42° and Σ15 with θ=78.46° consists of |BBA| and |BBC| periods, respectively. When the Σ15 bicrystal was loaded in tension, lattice dislocations having the 1/2[11¯0] core were emitted from C units and then the C units change their structure to the B units. Therefore, the Σ15 boundary can change its structure to the energetically stable Σ11 structure by emitting dislocations from C units. For Σ21 , the same structural change occurred when the Σ21 bicrystal was deformed in compression. The simulation results show that there are tilt grain boundaries having the strong anisotropic strength and that the ability of grain boundaries to generate dislocations is closely related to their structural units.

  8. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized-bed-augmented compressed-air energy-storage system: system load following capability

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, R.D.; Blecher, W.A.; Merrick, D.

    1981-09-01

    The load-following capability of fluidized bed combustion-augmented compressed air energy storage systems was evaluated. The results are presented in two parts. The first part is an Executive Summary which provides a concise overview of all major elements of the study including the conclusions, and, second, a detailed technical report describing the part-load and load following capability of both the pressurized fluid bed combustor and the entire pressurized fluid bed combustor/compressed air energy storage system. The specific tasks in this investigation were to: define the steady-state, part-load operation of the CAES open-bed PFBC; estimate the steady-state, part-load performance of the PFBC/CAES system and evaluate any possible operational constraints; simulate the performance of the PFBC/CAES system during transient operation and assess the load following capability of the system; and establish a start-up procedure for the open-bed PFBC and evaluate the impact of this procedure. The conclusions are encouraging and indicate that the open-bed PFBC/CAES power plant should provide good part-load and transient performance, and should have no major equipment-related constraints, specifically, no major problems associated with the performance or design of either the open-end PFBC or the PFBC/CAES power plant in steady-state, part-load operation are envisioned. The open-bed PFBC/CAES power plant would have a load following capability which would be responsive to electric utility requirements for a peak-load power plant. The open-bed PFBC could be brought to full operating conditions within 15 min after routine shutdown, by employing a hot-start mode of operation. The PFBC/CAES system would be capable of rapid changes in output power (12% of design load per minute) over a wide output power range (25% to 100% of design output). (LCL)

  9. Processing-induced-transformations (PITs) during direct compression: Impact of tablet composition and compression load on phase transition of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Juban, Audrey; Briançon, Stéphanie; Puel, François

    2016-03-30

    In the pharmaceutical field, solid-state transitions that may occur during manufacturing of pharmaceuticals are of great importance. The phase transition of a model API, caffeine Form I (CFI), was studied during direct compression process by analysing the impacts of the operating conditions (process and formulation). This work is focused on two formulation parameters: nature of the diluent and impact of the caffeine dilution, and one process parameter: the compression pressure that may impact the phase transition of CFI. Tablets were made from pure CFI and from binary mixture of CFI/diluent (microcrystalline cellulose or anhydrous dicalcium phosphate). A kinetic study performed during six months helped to highlight the influence of these parameters on the CFI transition degree. Results showed a triggering effect of the direct compression process, transformation was higher in tablets than in uncompressed powders. Whatever the pressure applied, CFI transition degree was almost constant and uniformly occurring throughout the tablet volume. Nevertheless, several differences on the evolution of the CFI transition degree were observed between binary mixtures of CFI/diluent. An analysis of the transition mechanism with a stretched exponential law of the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model shows that tableting accelerates the polymorphic transition without modifying its mechanism controlled by nucleation only. PMID:26853314

  10. A method for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of compressively loaded prismatic composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, Frederick; Gurdal, Zafer; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A method was developed for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of the static response of thin-walled stiffened composite structures loaded in uniaxial or biaxial compression. The method is applicable to arbitrary prismatic configurations composed of linked plate strips, such as stiffened panels and thin-walled columns. The longitudinal ends of the structure are assumed to be simply supported, and geometric shape imperfections can be modeled. The method can predict the nonlinear phenomena of postbuckling strength and imperfection sensitivity which are exhibited by some buckling-dominated structures. The method is computer-based and is semi-analytic in nature, making it computationally economical in comparison to finite element methods. The method uses a perturbation approach based on the use of a series of buckling mode shapes to represent displacement contributions associated with nonlinear response. Displacement contributions which are of second order in the model amplitudes are incorported in addition to the buckling mode shapes. The principle of virtual work is applied using a finite basis of buckling modes, and terms through the third order in the model amplitudes are retained. A set of cubic nonlinear algebraic equations are obtained, from which approximate equilibrium solutions are determined. Buckling mode shapes for the general class of structure are obtained using the VIPASA analysis code within the PASCO stiffened-panel design code. Thus, subject to some additional restrictions in loading and plate anisotropy, structures which can be modeled with respect to buckling behavior by VIPASA can be analyzed with respect to nonlinear response using the new method. Results obtained using the method are compared with both experimental and analytical results in the literature. The configurations investigated include several different unstiffened and blade-stiffening panel configurations, featuring both homogeneous, isotropic materials, and laminated composite

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Transverse Compressive Loads on Superconducting Nb3Sn Wires Containing Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hauthuille, Luc; Zhai, Yuhu; Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Collaboration; University of Geneva Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    High field superconductors play an important role in many large-scale physics experiments, particularly particle colliders and fusion devices such as the LHC and ITER. The two most common superconductors used are NbTi and Nb3Sn. Nb3Sn wires are favored because of their significantly higher Jc, allowing them to produce much higher magnetic fields. The main disadvantage is that the superconducting performance of Nb3Sn is highly strain-sensitive and it is very brittle. The strain-sensitivity is strongly influenced by two factors: plasticity and cracked filaments. Cracks are induced by large stress concentrators due to the presence of voids. We will attempt to understand the correlation between Nb3Sn's irreversible strain limit and the void-induced stress concentrations around the voids. We will develop accurate 2D and 3D finite element models containing detailed filaments and possible distributions of voids in a bronze-route Nb3Sn wire. We will apply a compressive transverse load for the various cases to simulate the stress response of a Nb3Sn wire from the Lorentz force. Doing this will further improve our understanding of the effect voids have on the wire's mechanical properties, and thus, the connection between the shape & distribution of voids and performance degradation.

  12. A Numerical Simulation of Time-Dependent Interface Failure Under Shear and Compressive Loads in Single-Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyanagi, Jun; Yoshimura, Akinori; Kawada, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Yuichiro

    2010-02-01

    We performed a numerical simulation of a time-dependent interfacial failure accompanied by a fiber failure, and examined their evolution under shear and compressive loads in single-fiber composites. The compressive load on the interface consists of Poisson’s contraction for matrix resin subjected to longitudinal tensile load. As time progresses, compressive stress at the interface in the fiber radial direction relaxes under the constant longitudinal tensile strain condition for the specimen, directly causing the relaxation of the interface frictional stress. This relaxation facilitates the failure of the interface. In this analysis, a specific criterion for interface failure is applied; apparent interfacial shear strength is enhanced by compressive stress, which is referred as quasi-parabolic criterion in the present study. The results of the stress recovery profile around the fiber failure and the interfacial debonding length as a function of time simulated by the finite element analysis employing the criterion are very similar to experimental results obtained using micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  13. The effects of cyclic and dynamic loading on the fracture resistance of nuclear piping steels. Technical report, October 1992--April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; Brust, F.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the results of the material property evaluation efforts performed within Task 3 of the IPIRG-2 Program. Several related investigations were conducted. (1) Quasi-static, cyclic-load compact tension specimen experiments were conducted using parameters similar to those used in IPIRG-1 experiments on 6-inch nominal diameter through-wall-cracked pipes. These experiments were conducted on a TP304 base metal, an A106 Grade B base metal, and their respective submerged-arc welds. The results showed that when using a constant cyclic displacement increment, the compact tension experiments could predict the through-wall-cracked pipe crack initiation toughness, but a different control procedure is needed to reproduce the pipe cyclic crack growth in the compact tension tests. (2) Analyses conducted showed that for 6-inch diameter pipe, the quasi-static, monotonic J-R curve can be used in making cyclic pipe moment predictions; however, sensitivity analyses suggest that the maximum moments decrease slightly from cyclic toughness degradation as the pipe diameter increases. (3) Dynamic stress-strain and compact tension tests were conducted to expand on the existing dynamic database. Results from dynamic moment predictions suggest that the dynamic compact tension J-R and the quasi-static stress-strain curves are the appropriate material properties to use in making dynamic pipe moment predictions.

  14. Short-wavelength buckling and shear failures for compression-loaded composite laminates. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The short-wavelength buckling (or the microbuckling) and the interlaminar and inplane shear failures of multi-directional composite laminates loaded in uniaxial compression are investigated. A laminate model is presented that idealizes each lamina. The fibers in the lamina are modeled as a plate, and the matrix in the lamina is modeled as an elastic foundation. The out-of-plane w displacement for each plate is expressed as a trigonometric series in the half-wavelength of the mode shape for laminate short-wavelength buckling. Nonlinear strain-displacement relations are used. The model is applied to symmetric laminates having linear material behavior. The laminates are loaded in uniform end shortening and are simply supported. A linear analysis is used to determine the laminate stress, strain, and mode shape when short-wavelength buckling occurs. The equations for the laminate compressive stress at short-wavelength buckling are dominated by matrix contributions.

  15. Superplastic deformation in carbonate apatite ceramics under constant compressive loading for near-net-shape production of bioresorbable bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Masanori; Wakamatsu, Nobukazu; Doi, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    To produce carbonate apatite (CAP) ceramics with the desired complex shapes using superplastic deformation, deformation behavior of CAP ceramics under constant loading as well as physical properties after deformation were evaluated. Sintered CAP ceramics were plastically deformed in an electric furnace attached to a universal hydraulic testing machine under a constant load. CAP ceramics subjected to an initial compressive pressure of 10 MPa showed an appreciable amount of plastic deformation at temperatures ranging from 720 to 800 degrees C. Plastic deformation increased with increasing temperature from about 10% to 70% after two hours of loading. X-ray diffraction analysis and SEM observation further revealed that some CAP crystals were elongated and aligned with the c-axis normal to the loading direction during superplastic deformation. It was thus concluded that a marked plastic deformation of about 70% at 800 degrees C would be sufficient for near-net-shape production of bioresorbable CAP bone substitutes with complex shapes.

  16. Deformation of Ni20W20Cu20Fe20Mo20 high entropy alloy for tensile followed by compressive and compressive followed by tensile loading: A molecular dynamics simulation based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraj, Md; Pal, S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based study on deformation behavior during uniaxial tension followed by compression and compression followed by tension after 0.6 pre-strain for Ni20W20Cu20Fe20Mo20 high entropy alloy (20 at. % each element) single crystals has been reported. This MD simulation is carried out at strain rate of 108 s-1 and at the temperature of -10°C. The influence of observed nano twin on deformation behaviour for such two types of loading process (i.e. tensile followed by compressive and compressive followed by tensile) has been investigated thoroughly. It is found that the dominant deformation mechanism is twin for tensile forward loading in Ni20W20Cu20Fe20Mo20 high entropy alloy single crystal, whereas atomic diffusion is the dominating factor for deformation behaviour in compressive reverse loading direction of high entropy alloy.

  17. The Study of Stability of Compression-Loaded Multispan Composite Panel Upon Failure of Elements Binding it to Panel Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamula, G. N.; Ierusalimsky, K. M.; Fomin, V. P.; Grishin, V. I.; Kalmykova, G. S.

    1999-01-01

    The present document is a final technical report carried out within co-operation between United States'NASA Langley RC and Russia's Goskomoboronprom in aeronautics, and continues similar programs, accomplished in 1996, 1997, and 1998, respectively). The report provides results of "The study of stability of compression-loaded multispan composite panels upon failure of elements binding it to panel supports"; these comply with requirements established at TsAGI on 24 March 1998 and at NASA on 15 September 1998.

  18. Cyclic loading comparison of Bio-SutureTak-#2 FiberWire and Bio Mini-Revo-#2 Hi-Fi suture anchor-sutures in cadaveric scapulae.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Brad S; Nyland, John; Nawab, Akbar; Blackburn, Ethan; Krupp, Ryan; Burden, Robert

    2008-03-01

    This study compared tap-in Bio-SutureTak suture anchor-#2 FiberWire suture (Group 1) and screw-in Bio Mini-Revo suture anchor-#2 Hi-Fi suture (Group 2) fixation in the glenoid region of interest for Bankart repair, in addition to evaluation of isolated suture loop biomechanical properties under progressive incremental cyclic loads. With knowledge of glenoid apparent bone mineral density (BMD), implant preparation and fit characteristics, and following application of a light manual tensile load, the primary investigator scored each specimen for perceived within group biomechanical test performance using a 0-10 point modified visual analog scale. After scoring, 12 paired constructs were placed in a servo hydraulic device clamp, preloaded to 25 N, and cycled between 25 and 50 Hz with a 25 N load increase every 25 cycles. Group 2 withstood greater load (104.1 +/- 56 vs. 70 +/- 36.9 N, P = 0.04) and displaced more at failure (13 +/- 4.5 vs. 8.6 +/- 3.3 mm, P = 0.04). All Group 1 specimens failed prior to reaching 150 N, whereas 25% of Group 2 specimens (n = 3) failed at 200 N. All specimens failed by anchor pullout except for three Group 2 specimens that failed by eyelet breakage at 200 N. Isolated suture testing revealed that Group 1 sutures displaced less at each cyclic load (P = 0.028) and withstood greater failure loads (P = 0.028) than that of Group 2 sutures. Group 2 constructs displayed moderately strong relationships between perceived within group biomechanical test performance and ultimate load (r (2) = 0.55) and displacement at failure (r (2) = 0.67). Group 1 did not display significant relationships. Similar biomechanical performance between 50 and 125 N, greater load at failure, and superior biomechanical test prediction accuracy suggest that the screw-in type Bio Mini-Revo suture anchor-#2 Hi-Fi suture combination may be preferred for Bankart lesion repair in low apparent BMD glenoid processes. The #2 Hi-Fi suture, however, allowed significantly greater

  19. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. S.; Ding, J. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPS experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. In addition, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material model for

  20. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    DOE PAGES

    Alexander, C. Scott; Ding, Jow -Lian; Asay, James Russell

    2016-03-09

    Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPSmore » experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. Additionally, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material

  1. Effect of cyclic tensile load on the regulation of the expression of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs -1, -3) and structural components in synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Raïf, El Mostafa

    2008-12-01

    Synovial cells are reported to colonize synthetic ligament scaffolds following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction but the process leading to ligamentization is poorly understood. The present study investigated the effect of cyclic tensile strain on the expression of genes involved in matrix remodelling in bovine synovial cells seeded onto an artificial ligament scaffold. Synovial cells were seeded and cultured on polyester scaffolds for 3 weeks and subsequently subjected to cyclic tensile strain of 4.5% for 1 hr at frequency of 1 Hz. Changes in the levels of expression of genes for major ligament components (type I and type III collagen) and also metalloproteinases (MMP-1 and MMP-3), and TIMP-1 were examined using RT-PCR. Additionally, metalloproteinase activity was measured using both zymography and collagenase assays. The gene expression of MMP-3 transcripts in the loaded group was almost 3-fold that observed in control group but no differences were observed in other transcripts. Consistent with these findings, MMP-3 activity increased by 85% under mechanical stimulus, and MMP-1 activity showed no changes. Over expression of MMP-3 under cyclic tensile load may mediate the proteolysis of certain substrates surrounding the ligament scaffold. This will play a critical role in facilitating cell migration, proliferation and tissue remodelling by breaking down the provisional tissue formed by the synovium, and by generating factors that induce angiogenesis and chemotactic cell migration.

  2. Grain size dependence of dynamic mechanical behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under compressive shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Odeshi, A.G.; Szpunar, J.A.; Zeng, L.J.; Olsson, E.

    2015-08-15

    The effects of grain size on the dynamic deformation behavior of rolled AZ31B alloy at high strain rates were investigated. Rolled AZ31B alloy samples with grain sizes of 6, 18 and 37 μm, were subjected to shock loading tests using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar at room temperature and at a strain rate of 1100 s{sup −} {sup 1}. It was found that a double-peak basal texture formed in the shock loaded samples. The strength and ductility of the alloy under the high strain-rate compressive loading increased with decreasing grain size. However, twinning fraction and strain hardening rate were found to decrease with decreasing grain size. In addition, orientation imaging microscopy showed a higher contribution of double and contraction twins in the deformation process of the coarse-grained samples. Using transmission electron microscopy, pyramidal dislocations were detected in the shock loaded sample, proving the activation of pyramidal slip system under dynamic impact loading. - Highlights: • A double-peak basal texture developed in all shock loaded samples. • Both strength and ductility increased with decreasing grain size. • Twinning fraction and strain hardening rate decreased with decreasing grain size. • ‘g.b’ analysis confirmed the presence of dislocations in shock loaded alloy.

  3. Dislocation model of nucleation and development of slip bands and their effect on service life of structural materials subject to cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Shetulov, D. I.; Andreev, V. V. Myasnikov, A. M.

    2015-12-15

    Most of the destructions of machine parts are of fatigue character. Under cyclic loading, the surface layer, in which hardening–softening processes rapidly occur, is formed almost at once after its beginning. The interaction of plastic-deformation traces with each other and with other structural elements, such as grains, results in the formation of a characteristic microstructure of the machine-part surface subject to cyclic loadings. The character of accumulation of slip bands and their shape (narrow, wide, twisting, and broken) depends on the conditions under which (under what factors) the cyclic loading occurs. The fatigue-resistance index expressed in terms of the slope of left portion of the fatigue curve linearized in logarithmic coordinates also depends on the set of relevant factors. The dependence of the surface damageability on the fatigue resistance index makes it possible to implement the method of predicting the fatigue curve by the description of the factors acting on a detail or construction. The position of the inflection point on the curve in the highcycle fatigue region (the endurance limit and the number of loading cycles, the ordinate and abscissa of the inflection point on the fatigue curve, respectively) also depends on the set of relevant factors. In combination with the previously obtained value of the slope of the left portion of the curve in the high-cycle fatigue region, this makes it possible to construct an a priori fatigue curve, thus reducing the scope of required fatigue tests and, hence, high expenses because of their long duration and high cost. The scope of tests upon using the developed method of prediction may be reduced to a minimum of one or two samples at the predicted level of the endurance limit.

  4. Dislocation model of nucleation and development of slip bands and their effect on service life of structural materials subject to cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetulov, D. I.; Andreev, V. V.; Myasnikov, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Most of the destructions of machine parts are of fatigue character. Under cyclic loading, the surface layer, in which hardening-softening processes rapidly occur, is formed almost at once after its beginning. The interaction of plastic-deformation traces with each other and with other structural elements, such as grains, results in the formation of a characteristic microstructure of the machine-part surface subject to cyclic loadings. The character of accumulation of slip bands and their shape (narrow, wide, twisting, and broken) depends on the conditions under which (under what factors) the cyclic loading occurs. The fatigue-resistance index expressed in terms of the slope of left portion of the fatigue curve linearized in logarithmic coordinates also depends on the set of relevant factors. The dependence of the surface damageability on the fatigue resistance index makes it possible to implement the method of predicting the fatigue curve by the description of the factors acting on a detail or construction. The position of the inflection point on the curve in the highcycle fatigue region (the endurance limit and the number of loading cycles, the ordinate and abscissa of the inflection point on the fatigue curve, respectively) also depends on the set of relevant factors. In combination with the previously obtained value of the slope of the left portion of the curve in the high-cycle fatigue region, this makes it possible to construct an a priori fatigue curve, thus reducing the scope of required fatigue tests and, hence, high expenses because of their long duration and high cost. The scope of tests upon using the developed method of prediction may be reduced to a minimum of one or two samples at the predicted level of the endurance limit.

  5. Study for the Effect of Continuously Applied Load on a Compressed Ag Nanoparticle at Room Temperature by Atomic Scale Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin

    2016-05-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations are reported for structural transition of a compressed Ag nanoparticle containing 2123 atoms with a crystal structure during the processes of continuously applied load at room temperature. Analytical tools are used to demonstrate the effect of the load on the packing patterns in this deformed particle including internal energy per atom, pair distribution functions, coordination number, pair number as well as the cross-sectional images, and mean square displacements. The simulation results show that the deformation processes of this particle include different stages. Owing to the atom sliding in the (111) plane in different regions of this particle, some interfaces are formed between these regions, and they are barriers of atom movements. With increasing the load, the interfaces in the middle of this particle are disappeared, and the deformation is able to carry out. At larger load, new interfaces are formed in the different regions of this heavily compressed particle with several atom layers, and these interfaces again become obstacles for the further deformation.

  6. A stack-based flex-compressive piezoelectric energy harvesting cell for large quasi-static loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianfeng; Shi, Zhifei; Wang, Jianjun; Xiang, Hongjun

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a flex-compressive piezoelectric energy harvesting cell (F-C PEHC) is proposed. This cell has a large load capacity and adjustable force transmission coefficient assembled from replaceable individual components. A statically indeterminate mechanical model for the cell is established and the theoretical force transmission coefficient is derived based on structural mechanics. An inverse correlation between the force transmission coefficient and the relative stiffness of Element 1’s limbs is found. An experimental study is also conducted to verify the theoretical results. Both weakened and enhanced modes are achieved for this experiment. The maximum power output approaches 4.5 mW at 120 kΩ resistive load under a 4 Hz harmonic excitation with 600 N amplitude for the weakened mode, whereas the maximum power output approaches 17.8 mW at 120 kΩ under corresponding load for the enhanced mode. The experimental measurements of output voltages are compared with the theoretical ones in both weakened and enhanced modes. The experimental measurements of open-circuit voltages are slightly smaller for harmonic excitations with amplitudes that vary from 400 N to 800 N and the errors are within 14%. During the experiment, the maximum load approaches 2.8 kN which is quite large but not the ultimate bearing capacity of the present device. The mechanical model and theoretical transmission coefficient can be used in other flex-compressive mode energy transducers.

  7. Anti-buckling fatigue test assembly. [for subjecting metal specimen to tensile and compressive loads at constant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenbrenner, F. F.; Imig, L. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An antibuckling fatigue test assembly is described for holding a metal specimen which is subjected to compression and to rapid cyclical heating and cooling while permitting visual observation. In an illustrative embodiment of this invention, the anti-buckling fatigue test apparatus includes first and second guide members between which the metal specimen is disposed and held, a heating assembly comprising a suitable heating source such as a quartz lamp and a reflecting assembly directing the heat onto the specimen, and a cooling assembly for directing a suitable cooling fluid such as air onto the specimen. The guide members each have a passage to permit the heat to be directed onto the specimen. An opening is provided in the reflecting assembly to permit visual inspection of that region of the specimen adjacent to the opening onto which the heat is directed.

  8. Electromechanical behaviour of REBCO tape lap splices under transverse compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grether, A.; Scheuerlein, C.; Ballarino, A.; Bottura, L.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the influence of transverse compressive stress on the resistance and critical current (I c ) of soldered REBCO tape lap splices. Internal contact resistances dominate the overall REBCO lap splice resistances. Application of transverse compressive stress up to 250 MPa during the resistance measurements does not alter the resistance and I c of the soldered REBCO splices that were studied. The resistance of unsoldered REBCO tape lap splices depends strongly on the contact pressure. At a transverse compressive stress of 100 MPa, to which Roebel cables are typically exposed in high field magnets, the crossover splice contact resistance is comparable to the internal tape resistances.

  9. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  10. Effects of Elastic Edge Restraints and Initial Prestress on the Buckling Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Riddick, Jaret C.; Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2004-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of test-fixture-induced initial prestress and elastic edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling responses of a compression-loaded, quasi-isotropic curved panel is presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code with high-fidelity models. The results presented show that a wide range of prebuckling and buckling behavior can be obtained by varying parameters that represent circumferential loaded-edge restraint and rotational unloaded-edge restraint provided by a test fixture and that represent the mismatch in specimen and test-fixture radii of curvature. For a certain range of parameters, the panels exhibit substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations that yield buckling loads nearly twice the corresponding buckling load predicted by a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis for shallow curved panels. In contrast, the results show another range of parameters exist for which the nonlinear prebuckling deformations either do not exist or are relatively benign, and the panels exhibit buckling loads that are nearly equal to the corresponding linear bifurcation buckling load. Overall, the results should also be of particular interest to scientists, engineers, and designers involved in simulating flight-hardware boundary conditions in structural verification and certification tests, involved in validating structural analysis tools, and interested in tailoring buckling performance.

  11. Comparative pull-out and cyclic-loading strength tests of anchorage of hamstring tendon grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Giurea, M; Zorilla, P; Amis, A A; Aichroth, P

    1999-01-01

    This study examined four devices for anchorage of hamstring tendons used as anterior cruciate ligament grafts: a stirrup, a clawed washer and screw, and "soft" and round-headed interference screws. Ultimate strength tests were performed using bovine tendons and bones. The stirrup was significantly stronger than the other anchorage devices, failing at 898 N. The clawed washer failed at 502 N, the soft screw at 691 N, and the round-headed screw at 445 N. Cyclic loading to 150 N (to simulate walking) caused elongation of 2.1 mm with the stirrup by 1100 cycles, and 6.7 mm with the clawed washer by 300 cycles. Different hole and soft screw diameters and placements (inside-out versus outside-in) allowed 1-to 3-mm slippage (no significant differences) by 1100 cycles. The round-headed screw allowed 6.8-mm slippage by 1100 cycles, and a sharp edge below the screw head caused tendon damage. Cyclic loads to 450 N (to simulate jogging) were then imposed until failure, and all specimens failed rapidly; only stirrup fixation kept all specimens intact after 300 load cycles. We concluded that anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions using hamstring tendons will slacken if rehabilitation is too aggressive, so forces on the reconstructed ligament should be minimized until tendon-to-bone healing occurs. PMID:10496580

  12. Effect of ion-beam treatment on structure and fracture resistance of 12Cr1MoV steel under static, cyclic and dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, S. V. Vlasov, I. V. Sergeev, V. P.; Maruschak, P. O.

    2015-10-27

    Features of the structure and properties modification of 12Cr1MoV steel subjected to irradiation by zirconium ion beam have been investigated with the use of optical and electron microscopy as well as microhardness measurement. It has been shown that upon treatment the structure modification occurred across the entire cross-section of specimens with the thickness of 1 mm. Changes in the mechanical properties of these specimens under static, cyclic and impact loading are interpreted in terms of identified structure changes.

  13. Strain distribution in the intervertebral disc under unconfined compression and tension load by the optimized digital image correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Tai-Yong; Yang, Xiu-Ping; Li, Kun; Gao, Li-Lan; Zhang, Chun-Qiu; Guo, Yue-Hong

    2014-04-01

    The unconfined compression and tension experiments of the intervertebral disc were conducted by applying an optimized digital image correlation technique, and the internal strain distribution was analysed for the disc. It was found that the axial strain values of different positions increased obviously with the increase in loads, while inner annulus fibrosus and posterior annulus fibrosus experienced higher axial strains than the outer annulus fibrosus and anterior annulus fibrosus. Deep annulus fibrosus exhibited higher compressive and tensile axial strains than superficial annulus fibrosus for the anterior region, while there was an opposite result for the posterior region. It was noted that all samples demonstrated a nonlinear stress-strain profile in the process of deforming, and an elastic region was shown once the sample was deformed beyond its toe region.

  14. Cyclic creep-rupture behavior of three high-temperature alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    Study of some important characteristics of the cyclic creep-rupture curves for the titanium alloy 6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo at 900 and 1100 F (755 and 865 K), the cobalt-base alloy L-605 at 1180 F (910 K), and for two hardness levels of 316 stainless steel at 1300 F (980 K). The cyclic creep-rupture curve relates tensile stress and tensile time-to-rupture for strain-limited cyclic loading and has been found to be independent of the total strain range and the level of compressive stress employed in the cyclic creep-rupture tests. The cyclic creep-rupture curve was always found to be above and to the right of the conventional (constant load) monotonic creep-rupture curve by factors ranging from 2 to 10 in time-to-rupture. This factor tends to be greatest when the creep ductility is large. Cyclic creep acceleration was observed in every cyclic creep-rupture test conducted. The phenomenon was most pronounced at the highest stress levels and when the tensile and compressive stresses were completely reversed. In general, creep rates were found to be lower in compression than in tension for equal true stresses. The differences, however, were strongly material-dependent.

  15. Quasi-three-dimensional analysis for composite cylinder under lateral compressive loading

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiwaki, Tsuyoshi |; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Maekawa, Zenichiro; Hamada, Hiroyuki; Mori, Sadaki

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a lateral compressive analytical method for CFRP cylinders using a quasi-three-dimensional model. This numerical model was constructed by shell and beam elements which represent fiber and resin respectively. The lateral compressive behaviors of CFRP cylinders with [{theta}/{minus}{theta}]sym ({theta} = 15{degree}, 30{degree}, 45{degree}, 60{degree}) were experimentally evaluated. The damage propagation was simulated using the quasi-three-dimensional model. The transverse cracking and interlaminar delamination were simulated independently. Furthermore comparing the analytical and experimental results, it is confirmed that the proposed analytical method is precise.

  16. Shock Compression and Recovery of Microorganism-Loaded Broths and AN Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazell, P. J.; Beveridge, C.; Groves, K.; Stennett, C.

    2009-12-01

    The microorganisms Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Zygosaccharomyces bailii and an oil-based emulsion, have been subjected to shock compression using the flyer-plate technique to initial pressures of 0.8 GPa (in the suspension). In each experiment, a stainless steel capsule was used to contain the broths and allow for recovery without contamination. Where cavitation was mostly suppressed by virtue of simultaneous shock and dynamic compression, no kill was observed. By introducing an air gap behind the suspension, limited kill was measured in the yeast. Results also suggest that stable emulsification occurs in coarse oil-based emulsions that are subjected to shock.

  17. Modelling off Hugoniot Loading Using Ramp Compression in Single Crystal Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Hawreliak, J; Remington, B A; Lorenzana, H; Bringa, E; Wark, J

    2010-11-29

    The application of a ramp load to a sample is a method by which the thermodynamic variables of the high pressure state can be controlled. The faster the loading rate, the higher the entropy and higher the temperature. This paper describes moleculer dynamics (MD) simulations with 25 million atoms which investigate ramp loading of single crystal copper. The simulations followed the propagation of a 300ps ramp load to 3Mbar along the [100] direction copper. The simulations were long enough to allow the wave front to steepen into a shock, at which point the simulated copper sample shock melted.

  18. Compression creep rupture of an E-glass/vinyl ester composite subjected to combined mechanical and fire loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Steven Earl

    Polymer matrix composites are seeing increasing use in structural systems (e.g. ships, bridges) and require a quantitative basis for describing their performance under combined mechanical load and fire. Although much work has been performed to characterize the flammability, fire resistance and toxicity of these composite systems, an understanding of the structural response of sandwich type structures and laminate panels under combined mechanical and thermal loads (simulating fire conditions) is still largely unavailable. Therefore a research effort to develop a model to describe the structural response of these glass/vinyl esters systems under fire loading conditions is relevant to the continuing and future application of polymer matrix composites aboard naval ships. The main goal of the effort presented here is to develop analytical models and finite element analysis methods and tools to predict limit states such as local compression failures due to micro-buckling, residual strength and times to failure for composite laminates at temperatures in the vicinity of the glass transition where failure is controlled by viscoelastic effects. Given the importance of compression loading to a structure subject to fire exposure, the goals of this work are succinctly stated as the: (a) Characterization of the non-linear viscoelastic and viscoplastic response of the E-glass/vinyl ester composite above Tg. (b) Description of the laminate compression mechanics as a function of stress and temperature including viscoelasticity. (c) Viscoelastic stress analysis of a laminated panel ([0/+45/90/-45/0] S) using classical lamination theory (CLT). Three manuscripts constitute this dissertation which is representative of the three steps listed above. First, a detailed characterization of the nonlinear thermoviscoelastic response of Vetrotex 324/Derakane 510A--40 through Tg was conducted using the Time--Temperature--Stress--Superposition Principle (TTSSP) and Zapas--Crissman model. Second

  19. The Study of Stability of Compression-loaded Multispan Composite Panel Upon Failure of elements Binding it to Panel Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamula, G. N.; Ierusalimsky, K. M.; Fomin, V. P.; Grishin, V. I.; Kalmykova, G. S.

    1999-01-01

    The present document is a final technical report under the NCC-1-233 research program (dated September 15, 1998; see Appendix 5) carried out within co-operation between United States'NASA Langley RC and Russia's Goskomoboronprom in aeronautics, and continues similar programs, NCCW-73, NCC-1-233 and NCCW 1-233 accomplished in 1996, 1997, and 1998, respectively. The report provides results of "The study of stability of compression-loaded multispan composite panels upon failure of elements binding it to panel supports"; these comply with requirements established at TsAGI on 24 March 1998 and at NASA on 15 September 1998.

  20. Bacterial Contamination of the Internal Cavity of Dental Implants After Application of Disinfectant or Sealant Agents Under Cyclic Loading In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Podhorsky, Anke; Putzier, Sven; Rehmann, Peter; Streckbein, Philipp; Domann, Eugen; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of two sealants (Kiero Seal, Kuss Dental, and Berutemp 500, Carl-Bechem) and a disinfectant agent (Chlorhexamed gel, GlaxoSmithKline) on bacterial colonization of the implant-abutment interface. Implants were pretreated with the substances or left without sealing before standard abutments were fixed. Half the specimens were subjected to cyclic loading, and the others were not loaded. Following 7 days of incubation in a bacterial solution, bacterial counts of the internal part of the implants were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. All pretreatments lowered bacterial counts, but no substance could guarantee sterility of the implants' internal portion. PMID:27611755

  1. Cyclic tensile stretch load and oxidized low density lipoprotein synergistically induce lectin-like oxidized ldl receptor-1 in cultured bovine chondrocytes, resulting in decreased cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Masao; Nishimura, Shunji; Yoshida, Kohji; Kakinuma, Takumi; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Munakata, Hiroshi; Hamanishi, Chiaki

    2006-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation is known to be an essential factor in the regulation of cartilage metabolism. We tested the hypothesis that expression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) can be modulated by cyclic tensile stretch load in chondrocytes. Cyclic loading of repeated stretch stress at 10 cycles per minute with 10 kPa of stress for 6 h induced expression of LOX-1 to 2.6 times control in cultured bovine articular chondrocytes, equivalent to the addition of 10 microg/mL oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) (2.4 times control). Application of the cyclic load to the chondrocytes along with 10 microg/mL ox-LDL resulted in synergistically increased LOX-1 expression to 6.3 times control. Individual application of cyclic loading and 10 microg/mL ox-LDL significantly suppressed chondrocytes viability (84.6% +/- 3.4% and 80.9% +/- 3.2% of control at 24 h, respectively; n = 3; p < 0.05) and proteoglycan synthesis [81.0% +/- 7.1% and 85.7% +/- 5.2% of control at 24 h, respectively; p < 0.05 when compared with 94.6% +/- 4.6% for native-LDL (n = 3)]. Cyclic loading and 10 microg/mL ox-LDL synergistically affected cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis, which were significantly suppressed to 45.6% +/- 4.9% and 48.7% +/- 6.7% of control at 24 h, respectively (n = 3; p < 0.01 when compared with individual application of cyclic loading or 10 microg/mL ox-LDL). In this study, we demonstrated synergistic effects of cyclic tensile stretch load and ox-LDL on cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes, which may be mediated through enhanced expression of LOX-1 and which has important implications in the progression of cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis.

  2. Modeling compressive reaction and estimating model uncertainty in shock loaded porous samples of Hexanitrostilbene (HNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundage, Aaron; Gump, Jared

    2011-06-01

    Neat pressings of HNS powders have been used in many explosive applications for over 50 years. However, characterization of its crystalline properties has lagged that of other explosives, and the solid stress has been inferred from impact experiments or estimated from mercury porosimetry. This lack of knowledge of the precise crystalline isotherm can contribute to large model uncertainty in the reacted response of pellets to shock impact. At high impact stresses, deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) processes initiated by compressive reaction have been interpreted from velocity interferometry at the surface of distended HNS-FP pellets. In particular, the Baer-Nunziato multiphase model in CTH, Sandia's Eulerian, finite volume shock propagation code, was used to predict compressive waves in pellets having approximately a 60% theoretical maximum density (TMD). These calculations were repeated with newly acquired isothermal compression measurements of fine-particle HNS using diamond anvil cells to compress the sample and powder x-ray diffraction to obtain the sample volume at each pressure point. Hence, estimating the model uncertainty provides a simple method for conveying the impact of future model improvements based upon new experimental data.

  3. Modeling compressive reaction and estimating model uncertainty in shock loaded porous samples of hexanitrostilbene (HNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundage, Aaron L.; Gump, Jared C.

    2012-03-01

    Neat pressings of HNS powders have been used in many explosive applications for over 50 years. However, characterization of its crystalline properties has lagged that of other explosives, and the solid stress has been inferred from impact experiments or estimated from mercury porosimetry. This lack of knowledge of the precise crystalline isotherm can contribute to large model uncertainty in the reacted response of pellets to shock impact. At high impact stresses, deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) processes initiated by compressive reaction have been interpreted from velocity interferometry at the surface of distended HNS-FP pellets. In particular, the Baer-Nunziato multiphase model in CTH, Sandia's Eulerian, finite volume shock propagation code, was used to predict compressive waves in pellets having approximately a 60% theoretical maximum density (TMD). These calculations were repeated with newly acquired isothermal compression measurements of fineparticle HNS using diamond anvil cells to compress the sample and powder x-ray diffraction to obtain the sample volume at each pressure point. Hence, estimating the model uncertainty provides a simple method for conveying the impact of future model improvements based upon new experimental data.

  4. The Behaviour of Reinforced Concrete Subjected to Reversed Cyclic Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, David Michael Volpe

    Reversed cyclic loading, as may occur during seismic events, can cause sudden and brittle shear failures in reinforced concrete structural members. This thesis presents both experimental and analytical investigations into the behaviour of members subjected to reversed cyclic shear loading, and culminates in the development of a new, rational model to describe this behaviour. In the experimental phase of the research, ten reinforced concrete shell elements were tested under reversed cyclic in-plane shear loads. Data collected by means of several acquisition systems allowed extensive analysis of the experiments, and provided insight into the behaviour of the crack interfaces. In comparison with existing models, such as the Modified Compression Field Theory, it was found that the shear strengths of these reversed cyclically loaded specimens were as much as 25% lower than monotonic predictions. The results of the experimental program informed the development of a new analytical model, the General Crack Component Model (GCCM). The central concept of the GCCM is that the reversed cyclic behaviour of a shear panel depends on the behaviour of multiple crack systems, each with its own constitutive properties. A rigorous framework based on the principles of compatibility and equilibrium was formulated in order to allow for the appropriate combination of the stiffnesses of the three components of the model: concrete, steel, and cracks. The GCCM was validated for reversed cyclic and monotonic loading by comparison with the experimental results as well as data from other researchers. It was shown that the model provides good estimates of the behaviour of reinforced concrete subjected to reversed cyclic loads, and that it can be used as part of a larger structural analysis, ultimately helping engineers to design safer structures and more accurately assess the safety of existing construction.

  5. Effects Of Polylactic Acid Coating and Compression Load on the Delivery of Protein and Steroid from HA Ceramic Devices.

    PubMed

    Benghuzzi, Hamed; Tucci, Michelle A; Ibrahim, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Density variations, due to particle size and time and temperature of sintering, affect the delivery profile of substances from ceramic delivery devices. This investigation was conducted to study the effect of polylactic acid (PLA) impregnation on the porosity of hydroxyapatite (HA) capsules by studying the delivery rate of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and testosterone (TE). HA capsules were fabricated by cold compressing calcined particles at 1000, 3000, and 5000 lbs. Each group was subdivided into PLA-impregnated and non-PLA impregnated capsules. Each capsule was loaded with either 40 mg of TE (impregnated or nonimpregnated with PLA polymer) or BSA. Data obtained in this study suggest that: (1) PLA impregnation of HA ceramic capsules decreases the rate of release of drugs from the ceramic reservoir, (2) Physiochemical characteristics of the drugs to be delivered is an instrumental key in the sustained release profiles, (3) Compression load of HA reservoirs is a key factor in predicting the duration and level of sustained delivery, and (4) Polymer coating of HA ceramic capsules reduces the pore size, as well as, blocking some of the pores on the surface.

  6. Modal parameter identification of a compression-loaded CFRP stiffened plate and correlation with its buckling behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves-Vargas, M.; Dafnis, A.; Reimerdes, H.-G.; Schröder, K.-U.

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the dynamic response and the buckling behaviour of several load-carrying structural components of civil aircraft when subjected to transient load scenarios such as gusts or a landing impact, a generic mid-size aircraft is defined within the European research project DAEDALOS. From this aircraft, several sections or panels in different regions such as wing, vertical tailplane and fuselage are defined. The stiffened carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) plate investigated within the present work represents a simplified version of the wing panel selected from the generic aircraft. As part of the current work, the buckling behaviour and the modal properties of the stiffened plate under the effect of a static in-plane compression load are studied. This is accomplished by means of a test series including quasi-static buckling tests and an experimental modal analysis (EMA). One of the key objectives pursued is the correlation of the modal properties to the buckling behaviour by studying the relationship between the natural frequencies of the stiffened plate and its corresponding buckling load. The experimental work is verified by a finite element analysis.

  7. High Temperature Expansion Due to Compression Test for the Determination of a Cladding Material Failure Criterion under RIA Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Le Saux, M.; Poussard, C.; Averty, X.; Sainte Catherine, C.; Carassou, S.

    2007-07-01

    This paper is mainly dedicated to the development of an out-of-pile test reproducing the thermo-mechanical loading conditions encountered during the first stage of a Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA) transient, dominated by Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction (PCMI). In particular, the strain-controlled clad loading under high strain rate associated with temperatures up to 600 deg. C expected during the PCMI phase is simulated by an Expansion Due to Compression (EDC) test achievable at high temperature. The use of appropriate materials for the inner pellet made it possible to achieve the tests from 20 deg. C up to 900 deg. C. The interpretation of the test data is supported by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) including parameters tuned using an inverse method coupling FEA and tests results. A deformation model, identified upon the PROMETRA (Transient Mechanical Properties) experimental database and describing the anisotropic viscoplastic behavior of Cold-Worked Stress Relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding alloys under typical RIA loading conditions, is exploited. The combined analysis of experimental results and finite element simulations provides a deeper understanding of the deformation mode (near pure hoop tension) that arises during the tests. The failure mode appears to be representative of that obtained on tubes during the PCMI stage of RIA experiments. An appropriate device is currently developed in order to reach a bi-axiality of the loading path closer to that expected during the PCMI stage (between plane-strain and equal-biaxial tension). (authors)

  8. Probabilistic Simulation of Combined Thermo-Mechanical Cyclic Fatigue in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    A methodology to compute probabilistically-combined thermo-mechanical fatigue life of polymer matrix laminated composites has been developed and is demonstrated. Matrix degradation effects caused by long-term environmental exposure and mechanical/thermal cyclic loads are accounted for in the simulation process. A unified time-temperature-stress-dependent multifactor-interaction relationship developed at NASA Glenn Research Center has been used to model the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. The fast probability-integration method is used to compute probabilistic distribution of response. Sensitivities of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables (e.g., constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness, etc.) computed and their significance in the reliability-based design for maximum life is discussed. The effect of variation in the thermal cyclic loads on the fatigue reliability for a (0/+/-45/90)s graphite/epoxy laminate with a ply thickness of 0.127 mm, with respect to impending failure modes has been studied. The results show that, at low mechanical-cyclic loads and low thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life for 0.999 reliability is most sensitive to matrix compressive strength, matrix modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and ply thickness. Whereas at high mechanical-cyclic loads and high thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life at 0.999 reliability is more sensitive to the shear strength of matrix, longitudinal fiber modulus, matrix modulus, and ply thickness.

  9. Probabilistic Simulation of Combined Thermo-Mechanical Cyclic Fatigue in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2011-01-01

    A methodology to compute probabilistically-combined thermo-mechanical fatigue life of polymer matrix laminated composites has been developed and is demonstrated. Matrix degradation effects caused by long-term environmental exposure and mechanical/thermal cyclic loads are accounted for in the simulation process. A unified time-temperature-stress-dependent multifactor-interaction relationship developed at NASA Glenn Research Center has been used to model the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. The fast probability-integration method is used to compute probabilistic distribution of response. Sensitivities of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables (e.g., constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness, etc.) computed and their significance in the reliability-based design for maximum life is discussed. The effect of variation in the thermal cyclic loads on the fatigue reliability for a (0/+/-45/90)s graphite/epoxy laminate with a ply thickness of 0.127 mm, with respect to impending failure modes has been studied. The results show that, at low mechanical-cyclic loads and low thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life for 0.999 reliability is most sensitive to matrix compressive strength, matrix modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and ply thickness. Whereas at high mechanical-cyclic loads and high thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life at 0.999 reliability is more sensitive to the shear strength of matrix, longitudinal fiber modulus, matrix modulus, and ply thickness.

  10. Fractal design for an efficient shell strut under gentle compressive loading.

    PubMed

    Farr, Robert S

    2007-11-01

    Because of Euler buckling, a simple strut of length L and Young modulus Y requires a volume of material proportional to L3f12} in order to support a compressive force F, where f=F/YL2 and f<1. By taking into account both Euler and local buckling, we provide a hierarchical design for such a strut consisting of intersecting curved shells, which requires a volume of material proportional to the much smaller quantity L3f exp[2 square root(ln 3)(ln f-1)].

  11. Strain localization in <111> single crystals of Hadfield steel under compressive load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurova, E. G.; Zakharova, G. G.; Melnikov, E. V.

    2010-07-01

    A study of strain localization under compression of <111> Hadfield steel single crystals at room temperature was done by light and transmission electron microscopy. At epsilon<1%, macro shear bands (MSB) form that have non-crystallographic and complex non-linear habit planes and are the results of the interaction of dislocation slip on conjugate slip planes. Mechanical twinning was experimentally found inside the MSB. After the stage of MSBs formation, deformation develops with high strain hardening coefficient and corresponds to interaction of slip and twinning inside as well as outside the MSBs.

  12. Analytical and experimental study of structurally efficient composite hat-stiffened panels loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Structural efficiency studies were made to determine the weight-saving potential of graphite/epoxy composite structures for compression panel applications. Minimum-weight hat-stiffened and open-corrugation configurations were synthesized using a nonlinear mathematical programing technique. Selected configurations were built and tested to study local and Euler buckling characteristics. Test results for 23 panels critical in local buckling and six panels critical in Euler buckling are compared with analytical results obtained using the BUCLASP-2 branched plate buckling program. A weight efficiency comparison is made between composite and aluminum compression panels using metal test data generated by the NACA. Theoretical studies indicate that potential weight savings of up to 50% are possible for composite hat-stiffened panels when compared with similar aluminum designs. Weight savings of 32% to 42% were experimentally achieved. Experience to date suggests that most of the theoretical weight-saving potential is available if design deficiencies are eliminated and strict fabrication control is exercised.

  13. Improvements to a method for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of compressively loaded stiffened composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, Frederick

    1993-01-01

    The NLPAN computer code uses a finite-strip approach to the analysis of thin-walled prismatic composite structures such as stiffened panels. The code can model in-plane axial loading, transverse pressure loading, and constant through-the-thickness thermal loading, and can account for shape imperfections. The NLPAN code represents an attempt to extend the buckling analysis of the VIPASA computer code into the geometrically nonlinear regime. Buckling mode shapes generated using VIPASA are used in NLPAN as global functions for representing displacements in the nonlinear regime. While the NLPAN analysis is approximate in nature, it is computationally economical in comparison with finite-element analysis, and is thus suitable for use in preliminary design and design optimization. A comprehensive description of the theoretical approach of NLPAN is provided. A discussion of some operational considerations for the NLPAN code is included. NLPAN is applied to several test problems in order to demonstrate new program capabilities, and to assess the accuracy of the code in modeling various types of loading and response. User instructions for the NLPAN computer program are provided, including a detailed description of the input requirements and example input files for two stiffened-panel configurations.

  14. A multi-surface model for ferroelectric ceramics - application to cyclic electric loading with changing maximum amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniprakash, S.; Arockiarajan, A.; Menzel, A.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the maximum amplitude of externally applied cyclic electric fields, ferroelectric ceramics show minor or major hysteresis. The materials also show asymmetric butterfly hysteresis in a prepoled material. Aiming at capturing these behaviour in a phenomenological constitutive model, a multi-surface modelling approach for ferroelectrics is introduced. In this paper, with the note on the motivation for a multi-surface model related to the results of new experimental investigations and also to experimental data reported in the literature, the constitutive relation for a rate dependent multi-surface ferroelectric model is developed. Following this, a brief graphical illustration shows how this model captures the objective phenomena. Consequently, the numerical implementation of the model to capture experimental results is demonstrated. Finally, the performance of this model to represent behaviour of decaying polarisation offset of electrically fatigued specimen is shown.

  15. Constitutive modeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene under large-deformation and cyclic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Bergström, J S; Kurtz, S M; Rimnac, C M; Edidin, A A

    2002-06-01

    When subjected to a monotonically increasing deformation state, the mechanical behavior of UHMWPE is characterized by a linear elastic response followed by distributed yielding and strain hardening at large deformations. During the unloading phases of an applied cyclic deformation process, the response is characterized by nonlinear recovery driven by the release of stored internal energy. A number of different constitutive theories can be used to model these experimentally observed events. We compare the ability of the J2-plasticity theory, the "Arruda-Boyce" model, the "Hasan-Boyce" model, and the "Bergström-Boyce" model to reproduce the observed mechanical behavior of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). In addition a new hybrid model is proposed, which incorporates many features of the previous theories. This hybrid model is shown to most effectively predict the experimentally observed mechanical behavior of UHMWPE. PMID:12013180

  16. Effects of Cyclic Loading on Mechanical Behavior of 24S-T4 and 75S-T6 Aluminum Alloys and SAE 4130 Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, C W; Grossman, N

    1952-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of cyclic loading on the mechanical behavior of 24S-T4 and 75S-T6 aluminum alloys and SAE 4130 steel. Specimens of the three materials were subjected to various numbers of prior fatigue cycles both below and above the fatigue limits. Special slow-bend tests were employed to show the effects of prior cycles of fatigue stressing on the transition temperature to brittle fracture for SAE 4130 steel and on the energy-absorption capacity of the aluminum alloys. Micrographic studies were made to observe and measure crack formation and propagation and additional special tests were conducted to supplement the results of the slow-bend tests. These included Charpy impact tests, mirohardness surveys, tension tests, and fretting-corrosion studies.

  17. Crack growth in a ductile-phase-toughened Nb/Nb[sub 3]Al in situ intermetallic composite under monotonic and cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Murugesh, L.; Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O. . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1993-10-15

    One approach to improving the ductility and toughness of brittle solids is to incorporate a ductile phase into the brittle matrix in order to impede the extension of incipient cracks. In this regard, recent word has shown that niobium can provide significant ductile-phase toughening in several intermetallic composites via crack bridging, plastic stretching and interfacial debonding mechanisms; however, under cyclic loading the role of the ductile phase appears to be less effective. Accordingly, the purpose of the current study is to examine the effect of the addition of ductile Nb phase on fracture and fatigue behavior in an equiaxed Nb/Nb[sub 3]Al in situ composite; results are compared with behavior in unreinforced Nb[sub 3]Al and Nb to determine possible mechanisms of crack propagation in Nb-toughened Nb[sub 3]Al intermetallic composites.

  18. Two-dimensional descent through a compressible atmosphere: Sequential deceleration of an unpowered load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, M. P.

    2010-02-01

    Equations, based on Rayleigh's drag law valid for high Reynolds number, are derived for two-dimensional motion through a compressible atmosphere in isentropic equilibrium, such as characterizes the Earth's troposphere. Solutions yield horizontal and vertical displacement, velocity, and acceleration as a function of altitude and ground-level temperature. An exact analytical solution to the equations linearized in the aero-thermodynamic parameter is given; in general the equations must be solved numerically. The theory, applied to the unpowered fall of a large aircraft stabilized to flat descent by symmetrical, sequential deployment of horizontal and vertical decelerators, shows that such an aircraft can be brought down with mean peak deployment and impact decelerations below 10g.

  19. Changes in the Structure and Properties of Welded Joints of Low-Alloy Steels, Subjected to Cyclic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskov, V. N.; Kovenskiy, I. M.; Kuskov, K. V.

    2016-04-01

    Time-varying loads negatively affect the properties and structure of materials. Structural failures typically occur at loads below the yield point. In this work, fatigue tests of welded joints of low-alloy steels were carried out in an asymmetric cycle at loads of 60 and 80% of the yield strength. The stress ratio was 0.8-0.9. On the basis of the results of the tests, equations linking the number of cycles to failure with test parameters were obtained. Such equations can be used for estimating the residual life of elements both under construction and in operation. It has been found that the failure is not instantaneous. Specimens of steels continue to resist variable loads for 4000 - 26000 cycles to failure, depending on steel grade and the parameters of the test. Under operating conditions, it gives an opportunity to discover the onset of failure and dispose of the defective part or to replace the entire structure. A standard technique was used to measure the microhardness on the fractured specimens. The distance between the nearest indentations was 0.2 mm. The results of the measurements were plotted in graphs of ahardness change characteristic for all steels under study. A microhardness “step” has been discovered in areas with high dislocation density, as evidenced by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. An intermediate stage of the investigation is the development of recommendations for determining the moment of failure of welded constructions with a probability of 95%.

  20. Post-buckling of geometrically imperfect shear-deformable flat panels under combined thermal and compressive edge loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Souza, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The static post-buckling of simply-supported flat panels exposed to a stationary nonuniform temperature field and subjected to a system of subcritical in-plane compressive edge loads is investigated. The study is performed within a refined theory of composite laminated plates incorporating the effect of transverse shear and the geometric nonlinearities. The influence played by a number of effects, among them transverse shear deformation, initial geometric imperfections, the character of the in-plane boundary conditions and thickness ratio are studied and a series of conclusions are outlined. The influence played by the complete temperature field (i.e., the uniform through thickness and thickness-wise gradient) as compared to the one induced by only the uniform one, is discussed and the peculiarities of the resulting post-buckling behaviors are enlightened.

  1. Particle and gaseous emissions from compressed natural gas and ultralow sulphur diesel-fuelled buses at four steady engine loads.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, E R; Ristovski, Z D; Meyer, N; Morawska, L

    2009-04-01

    Exhaust emissions from thirteen compressed natural gas (CNG) and nine ultralow sulphur diesel in-service transport buses were monitored on a chassis dynamometer. Measurements were carried out at idle and at three steady engine loads of 25%, 50% and 100% of maximum power at a fixed speed of 60 km h(-1). Emission factors were estimated for particle mass and number, carbon dioxide and oxides of nitrogen for two types of CNG buses (Scania and MAN, compatible with Euro 2 and 3 emission standards, respectively) and two types of diesel buses (Volvo Pre-Euro/Euro1 and Mercedez OC500 Euro3). All emission factors increased with load. The median particle mass emission factor for the CNG buses was less than 1% of that from the diesel buses at all loads. However, the particle number emission factors did not show a statistically significant difference between buses operating on the two types of fuel. In this paper, for the very first time, particle number emission factors are presented at four steady state engine loads for CNG buses. Median values ranged from the order of 10(12) particles min(-)(1) at idle to 10(15) particles km(-)(1) at full power. Most of the particles observed in the CNG emissions were in the nanoparticle size range and likely to be composed of volatile organic compounds The CO2 emission factors were about 20% to 30% greater for the diesel buses over the CNG buses, while the oxides of nitrogen emission factors did not show any difference due to the large variation between buses.

  2. Improvements to a method for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of compressively loaded stiffened composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This report describes progress made during the period July 1991 to December 1991 on the tasks identified in the technical proposals for the subject grant. The plans for further effort on each of the tasks are outlined. The computer implementation of the method of analysis under development is referred to in this document as NLPAN. These tasks included: (1) implementation of continuation methods; (2) dynamic analysis capability; (3) additional boundary condition options for the panel ends; (4) transverse pressure loading; (5) second-order displacement fields; and (6) results for an i-stiffened panel with a complex cross section.

  3. Influence of cyclic fatigue in water on the load-bearing capacity of dental bridges made of zirconia.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Dittmer, Marc Philipp; Borchers, Lothar; Stiesch-Scholz, Meike

    2008-09-01

    The humid atmosphere and permanent occurrence of chewing forces in the oral environment lead to degradation of ceramics used for prosthetic restorations. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of artificial aging on the load-bearing capacity of four-unit bridges, with both undamaged and predamaged zirconia frameworks. Additionally, different parameters for chewing simulation have been investigated and a finite element analysis was made to predict the location of highest tensile stresses within the bridges. A total of 60 frameworks were milled from presintered zirconia and divided into six homogeneous groups. Prior to veneering, frameworks of two groups were "damaged" by a defined saw cut similar to an accidental flaw generated during shape cutting. After veneering, FPDs were subjected to thermal and mechanical cycling - with the exception of control groups. The load-bearing capacity of tested FPDs was significantly reduced by artificial aging. In comparison to unaged specimens, fracture resistance decreased by about 40%, whereas preliminary damage did not have a significant effect. Increasing number of cycles and increasing upper load limit failed to show any additional effect on fracture force. To predict the progression of degradation under the terms of in vitro simulation for even longer periods, further aging experiments are required.

  4. Structural Performance of a Compressively Loaded Foam-Core Hat-Stiffened Textile Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Dexter, Benson H.

    1996-01-01

    A structurally efficient hat-stiffened panel concept that utilizes a structural foam as a stiffener core material has been designed and developed for aircraft primary structural applications. This stiffener concept is fabricated from textile composite material forms with a resin transfer molding process. This foam-filled hat-stiffener concept is structurally more efficient than most other prismatically stiffened panel configurations in a load range that is typical for both fuselage and wing structures. The panel design is based on woven/stitched and braided graphite-fiber textile preforms, an epoxy resin system, and Rohacell foam core. The structural response of this panel design was evaluated for its buckling and postbuckling behavior with and without low-speed impact damage. The results from single-stiffener and multi-stiffener specimen tests suggest that this structural concept responds to loading as anticipated and has excellent damage tolerance characteristics compared to a similar panel design made from preimpregnated graphite-epoxy tape material.

  5. Buckling of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Laminated Composite Materials Subjected to Axial Compression and Shear Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, J. C.; Gates, T. S.; Frankland, S.-J. V.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-scale method to predict the stiffness and stability properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced laminates has been developed. This method is used in the prediction of the buckling behavior of laminated carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites formed by stacking layers of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer with the nanotube alignment axes of each layer oriented in different directions. Linking of intrinsic, nanoscale-material definitions to finite scale-structural properties is achieved via a hierarchical approach in which the elastic properties of the reinforced layers are predicted by an equivalent continuum modeling technique. Solutions for infinitely long symmetrically laminated nanotube-reinforced laminates with simply-supported or clamped edges subjected to axial compression and shear loadings are presented. The study focuses on the influence of nanotube volume fraction, length, orientation, and functionalization on finite-scale laminate response. Results indicate that for the selected laminate configurations considered in this study, angle-ply laminates composed of aligned, non-functionalized carbon nanotube-reinforced lamina exhibit the greatest buckling resistance with 1% nanotube volume fraction of 450 nm uniformly-distributed carbon nanotubes. In addition, hybrid laminates were considered by varying either the volume fraction or nanotube length through-the-thickness of a quasi-isotropic laminate. The ratio of buckling load-to-nanotube weight percent for the hybrid laminates considered indicate the potential for increasing the buckling efficiency of nanotube-reinforced laminates by optimizing nanotube size and proportion with respect to laminate configuration.

  6. Nonlinear analysis for the response and failure of compression-loaded angle-ply laminates with a hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathison, Steven R.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Shuart, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to determine the effect of nonlinear material behavior on the response and failure of unnotched and notched angle-ply laminates under uniaxial compressive loading. The endochronic theory was chosen as the constitutive theory to model the AS4/3502 graphite-epoxy material system. Three-dimensional finite element analysis incorporating the endochronic theory was used to determine the stresses and strains in the laminates. An incremental/iterative initial strain algorithm was used in the finite element program. To increase computational efficiency, a 180 deg rotational symmetry relationship was utilized and the finite element program was vectorized to run on a supercomputer. Laminate response was compared to experimentation revealing excellent agreement for both the unnotched and notched angle-ply laminates. Predicted stresses in the region of the hole were examined and are presented, comparing linear elastic analysis to the inelastic endochronic theory analysis. A failure analysis of the unnotched and notched laminates was performed using the quadratic tensor polynomial. Predicted fracture loads compared well with experimentation for the unnotched laminates, but were very conservative in comparison with experiments for the notched laminates.

  7. Air-particle abrasion on zirconia ceramic using different protocols: effects on biaxial flexural strength after cyclic loading, phase transformation and surface topography.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rodrigo O A; Valandro, Luiz F; Melo, Renata M; Machado, João P B; Bottino, Marco A; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different air-particle abrasion protocols on the biaxial flexural strength and structural stability of zirconia ceramics. Zirconia ceramic specimens (ISO 6872) (Lava, 3M ESPE) were obtained (N=336). The specimens (N=118, n=20 per group) were randomly assigned to one of the air-abrasion protocols: Gr1: Control (as-sintered); Gr2: 50 µm Al2O3 (2.5 bar); Gr3: 50 µm Al2O3 (3.5 bar); Gr4: 110 µm Al2O3(2.5 bar); Gr5: 110 µm Al2O3 (3.5 bar); Gr6: 30 µm SiO2 (2.5 bar) (CoJet); Gr7: 30 µm SiO2(3.5 bar); Gr8: 110 µm SiO2 (2.5 bar) (Rocatec Plus); and Gr9: 110 µm SiO2 (3.5 bar) (duration: 20 s, distance: 10 mm). While half of the specimens were tested immediately, the other half was subjected to cyclic loading in water (100,000 cycles; 50 N, 4 Hz, 37 °°C) prior to biaxial flexural strength test (ISO 6872). Phase transformation (t→m), relative amount of transformed monoclinic zirconia (FM), transformed zone depth (TZD) and surface roughness were measured. Particle type (p=0.2746), pressure (p=0.5084) and cyclic loading (p=0.1610) did not influence the flexural strength. Except for the air-abraded group with 110 µm Al2O3 at 3.5 bar, all air-abrasion protocols increased the biaxial flexural strength (MPa) (Controlnon-aged: 1,030 ± 153, Controlaged: 1,138 ± 138; Experimentalnon-aged: 1,307 ± 184-1,554 ± 124; Experimentalaged: 1,308 ± 118-1,451 ± 135) in both non-aged and aged conditions, respectively. Surface roughness (Ra) was the highest with 110 µm Al2O3(0.84 µm. FM values ranged from 0% to 27.21%, higher value for the Rocatec Plus (110 µm SiO2) and 110 µm Al2O3 groups at 3.5 bar pressure. TZD ranged between 0 and 1.43 µm, with the highest values for Rocatec Plus and 110 µm Al2O3 groups at 3.5 bar pressure.

  8. Finite-element analysis of transverse compressive and thermal loads on Nb3Sn wires with voids

    DOE PAGES

    Zhai, Y.; D'Hauthuille, L.; Barth, C.; Senatore, C.

    2016-02-29

    High-field superconducting magnets play a very important role in many large-scale physics experiments, particularly particle colliders and fusion confinement devices such as Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The two most common superconductors used in these applications are NbTi and Nb3Sn. Nb3Sn wires are favored because of their significantly higher Jc (critical current density) for higher field applications. The main disadvantage of Nb3Sn is that the superconducting performance of the wire is highly strain sensitive and it is very brittle. This strain sensitivity is strongly influenced by two factors: plasticity and cracked filaments. Cracks are inducedmore » by large stress concentrators that can be traced to the presence of voids in the wire. We develop detailed 2-D and 3-D finite-element models containing wire filaments and different possible distributions of voids in a bronze-route Nb3Sn wire. We apply compressive transverse loads for various cases of void distributions to simulate the stress and strain response of a Nb3Sn wire under the Lorentz force. Furthermore, this paper improves our understanding of the effect voids have on the Nb3Sn wire's mechanical properties, and in so, the connection between the distribution of voids and performance degradation such as the correlation between irreversible strain limit and the void-induced local stress concentrations.« less

  9. In vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and the anti-tumor effect of cyclic RGD-modified doxorubicin-loaded polymers in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Li, Yuan; Chen, Binbin; Zou, Meijuan

    2016-10-01

    In our previous study, we successfully produced and characterized a multifunctional drug delivery system with doxorubicin (RC/GO/DOX), which was based on graphene oxide (GO) and cyclic RGD-modified chitosan (RC). Its characteristics include: pH-responsiveness, active targeting of hepatocarcinoma cells, and efficient loading with controlled drug release. Here, we report the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and anti-tumor efficacy of RC/GO/DOX polymers in tumor-bearing nude mice. The objective of this study is to assess its targeting potential for tumors. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution profiles demonstrated that tumor accumulation of RC/GO/DOX polymers was almost three times higher than the others, highlighting the efficacy of the active targeting strategy. Furthermore, the tumor inhibition rate of RC/GO/DOX polymers was 56.64%, 2.09 and 2.93 times higher than that of CS/GO/DOX polymers (without modification) and the DOX solution, respectively. Anti-tumor efficacy results indicated that the tumor growth was better controlled by RC/GO/DOX polymers than the others. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining showed remarkable changes in tumor histology. Compared with the saline group, the tumor section from the RC/GO/DOX group revealed a marked increase in the quantity of apoptotic and necrotic cells, and a reduction in the quantity of the blood vessels. Together, these studies show that this new system could be regarded as a suitable form of DOX-based treatment of the hepatocellular carcinoma.

  10. Stress-strain time-dependent behavior of A356.0 aluminum alloy subjected to cyclic thermal and mechanical loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrahi, G. H.; Ghodrati, M.; Azadi, M.; Rezvani Rad, M.

    2014-08-01

    This article presents the cyclic behavior of the A356.0 aluminum alloy under low-cycle fatigue (or isothermal) and thermo-mechanical fatigue loadings. Since the thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) test is time consuming and has high costs in comparison to low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests, the purpose of this research is to use LCF test results to predict the TMF behavior of the material. A time-independent model, considering the combined nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening law, was used to predict the TMF behavior of the material. Material constants of this model were calibrated based on room-temperature and high-temperature low-cycle fatigue tests. The nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening law could accurately estimate the stress-strain hysteresis loop for the LCF condition; however, for the out-of-phase TMF, the condition could not predict properly the stress value due to the strain rate effect. Therefore, a two-layer visco-plastic model and also the Johnson-Cook law were applied to improve the estimation of the stress-strain hysteresis loop. Related finite element results based on the two-layer visco-plastic model demonstrated a good agreement with experimental TMF data of the A356.0 alloy.

  11. Lumbar spine disc height and curvature responses to an axial load generated by a compression device compatible with magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, S.; Steinbach, G. C.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    2001-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Axial load-dependent changes in the lumbar spine of supine healthy volunteers were examined using a compression device compatible with magnetic resonance imaging. OBJECTIVE: To test two hypotheses: Axial loading of 50% body weight from shoulder to feet in supine posture 1) simulates the upright lumbar spine alignment and 2) decreases disc height significantly. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Axial compression on the lumbar spine has significantly narrowed the lumbar dural sac in patients with sciatica, neurogenic claudication or both. METHODS: Using a device compatible with magnetic resonance imaging, the lumbar spine of eight young volunteers, ages 22 to 36 years, was axially compressed with a force equivalent to 50% of body weight, approximating the normal load on the lumbar spine in upright posture. Sagittal lumbar magnetic resonance imaging was performed to measure intervertebral angle and disc height before and during compression. RESULTS: Each intervertebral angle before and during compression was as follows: T12-L1 (-0.8 degrees +/- 2.5 degrees and -1.5 degrees +/- 2.6 degrees ), L1-L2 (0.7 degrees +/- 1.4 degrees and 3.3 degrees +/- 2.9 degrees ), L2-L3 (4.7 degrees +/- 3.5 degrees and 7.3 degrees +/- 6 degrees ), L3-L4 (7.9 degrees +/- 2.4 degrees and 11.1 degrees +/- 4.6 degrees ), L4-L5 (14.3 degrees +/- 3.3 degrees and 14.9 degrees +/- 1.7 degrees ), L5-S1 (25.8 degrees +/- 5.2 degrees and 20.8 degrees +/- 6 degrees ), and L1-S1 (53.4 degrees +/- 11.9 degrees and 57.3 degrees +/- 16.7 degrees ). Negative values reflect kyphosis, and positive values reflect lordosis. A significant difference between values before and during compression was obtained at L3-L4 and L5-S1. There was a significant decrease in disc height only at L4-L5 during compression. CONCLUSIONS: The axial force of 50% body weight in supine posture simulates the upright lumbar spine morphologically. No change in intervertebral angle occurred at L4-L5. However, disc height at L4-L

  12. Buckling loads of stiffened panels subjected to combined longitudinal compression and shear: Results obtained with PASCO, EAL, and STAGS computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.; Greene, W. H.; Anderson, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    Buckling analyses used in PASCO are summarized with emphasis placed on the shear buckling analyses. The PASCO buckling analyses include the basic VIPASA analysis, which is essentially exact for longitudinal and transverse loads, and a smeared stiffener solution, which treats a stiffened panel as an orthotropic plate. Buckling results are then presented for seven stiffened panels loaded by combinations of longitudinal compression and shear. The buckling results were obtained with the PASCO, EAL, and STAGS computer programs. The EAL and STAGS solutions were obtained with a fine finite element mesh and are very accurate. These finite element solutions together with the PASCO results for pure longitudinal compression provide benchmark calculations to evaluate other analysis procedures.

  13. Study of compression-loaded and impact-damaged structurally efficient graphite-thermoplastic trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semisandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1992-01-01

    The structural efficiency of compression-loaded trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semisandwich composite panels is studied to determine their weight savings potential. Sandwich panels with two identical face sheets and a trapezoidal corrugated core between them and semisandwich panels with a corrugation attached to a single skin are considered. An optimization code is used to find the minimum weight designs for critical compressive load levels ranging from 3000 to 24,000 lb/in. Graphite-thermoplastic panels based on the optimal minimum weight designs were fabricated and tested. A finite element analysis of several test specimens was also conducted. The results of the optimization study, the finite element analysis, and the experiments are presented. The results of testing impact damage panels are also discussed.

  14. SYNERGISTIC DEGRADATION OF DENTIN BY CYCLIC STRESS AND BUFFER AGITATION

    PubMed Central

    Orrego, Santiago; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    Secondary caries and non-carious lesions develop in regions of stress concentrations and oral fluid movement. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of cyclic stress and fluid movement on material loss and subsurface degradation of dentin within an acidic environment. Rectangular specimens of radicular dentin were prepared from caries-free unrestored 3rd molars. Two groups were subjected to cyclic cantilever loading within a lactic acid solution (pH=5) to achieve compressive stresses on the inner (pulpal) or outer sides of the specimens. Two additional groups were evaluated in the same solution, one subjected to movement only (no stress) and the second held stagnant (control: no stress or movement). Exterior material loss profiles and subsurface degradation were quantified on the two sides of the specimens. Results showed that under cyclic stress material loss was significantly greater (p≤0.0005) on the pulpal side than on the outer side and significantly greater (p≤0.05) under compression than tension. However, movement only caused significantly greater material loss (p≤0.0005) than cyclic stress. Subsurface degradation was greatest at the location of highest stress, but was not influenced by stress state or movement. PMID:25637823

  15. Hysteresis model of shape memory alloy wire-based laminated rubber bearing under compression and unidirectional shear loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayati Dezfuli, F.; Shahria Alam, M.

    2015-06-01

    Smart lead rubber bearings (LRBs), in which a shape memory alloy (SMA) is used in the form of wires, are a new generation of elastomeric isolators with improved performance in terms of recentering capability and energy dissipation capacity. It is of great interest to implement SMA wire-based lead rubber bearings (SMA-LRBs) in bridges; however, currently there is no appropriate hysteresis model for accurately simulating the behavior of such isolators. A constitutive model for SMA-LRBs is proposed in this study. An LRB is equipped with a double cross configuration of SMA wires (DC-SMAW) and subjected to compression and unidirectional shear loadings. Due to the complexity of the shear behavior of the SMA-LRB, a hysteresis model is developed for the DC-SMAWs and then combined with the bilinear kinematic hardening model, which is assumed for the LRB. Comparing the hysteretic response of decoupled systems with that of the SMA-LRB shows that the high recentering capability of the DC-SMAW model with zero residual deformation could noticeably reduce the residual deformation of the LRB. The developed constitutive model for DC-SMAWs is characterized by three stiffnesses when the shear strain exceeds a starting limit at which the SMA wires are activated due to phase transformation. An important point is that the shear hysteresis of the DC-SMAW model looks different from the flag-shaped hysteresis of the SMA because of the specific arrangement of wires and its effect on the resultant forces transferred from the wires to the rubber bearing.

  16. Prediction of cyclic delamination lives of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on Ti-6Al-4V substrates with considering wear and dissolutions.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Kojima, Daisuke; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2016-12-01

    This study aims at developing the prediction model of cyclic delamination lives of plasma-sprayed HAp coating on Ti-6Al-4V substrate by considering wear by interface contacts and dissolution effect by Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). Delamination of HAp coating can lead to loosening of implants stem and final failure in vivo. In the fracture mechanism of interfaces between HAp coating with Ti substrates, only adhesive strength (interracial tensile strength) or fatigue behavior by longitudinal cracking have been observed. Cyclic delamination mechanism by considering various loading modes and corrosion effect has not been revealed yet. The interface delamination rates by cyclic loading were much higher than those by static loading tests. The result clearly demonstrated that the interface demalination behaviors are dominated not by maximum stress, but by stress range. Surface profile measurement and SEM observation also demonstrated damages by interface contact or third body wear at delamination tips of HAp coating only in the cases of compressions. The mechanisms of acceleration on the delaminations are third-body wear or wedge effect by worn particles which increased mean stress level during cyclic loading. Cyclic loading tests under SBF also revealed that cyclic delamination lives were shortened probably due to crevice corrosion at interfaces. Dissolutions at the tips of delaminations were observed by SEM images under tensile loading condition in SBF. Linearly adding the effects of wear and dissolutions into Paris law could successfully predict the delamination lives of HAp coating for various loading ratios in SBF. PMID:27498422

  17. Prediction of cyclic delamination lives of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on Ti-6Al-4V substrates with considering wear and dissolutions.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Kojima, Daisuke; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2016-12-01

    This study aims at developing the prediction model of cyclic delamination lives of plasma-sprayed HAp coating on Ti-6Al-4V substrate by considering wear by interface contacts and dissolution effect by Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). Delamination of HAp coating can lead to loosening of implants stem and final failure in vivo. In the fracture mechanism of interfaces between HAp coating with Ti substrates, only adhesive strength (interracial tensile strength) or fatigue behavior by longitudinal cracking have been observed. Cyclic delamination mechanism by considering various loading modes and corrosion effect has not been revealed yet. The interface delamination rates by cyclic loading were much higher than those by static loading tests. The result clearly demonstrated that the interface demalination behaviors are dominated not by maximum stress, but by stress range. Surface profile measurement and SEM observation also demonstrated damages by interface contact or third body wear at delamination tips of HAp coating only in the cases of compressions. The mechanisms of acceleration on the delaminations are third-body wear or wedge effect by worn particles which increased mean stress level during cyclic loading. Cyclic loading tests under SBF also revealed that cyclic delamination lives were shortened probably due to crevice corrosion at interfaces. Dissolutions at the tips of delaminations were observed by SEM images under tensile loading condition in SBF. Linearly adding the effects of wear and dissolutions into Paris law could successfully predict the delamination lives of HAp coating for various loading ratios in SBF.

  18. Combined effects of the in-plane orientation angle and the loading angle on the dynamic enhancement of honeycombs under mixed shear-compression loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tounsi, R.; Markiewicz, E.; Haugou, G.; Chaari, F.; Zouari, B.

    2016-05-01

    The combined effect of the loading angle (ψ) and the in-plane orientation angle (β) on the dynamic enhancement of aluminium alloy honeycombs is investigated. Experimental results are analysed on the crushing surfaces (initial peak and average crushing forces). A significant effect of the loading angle is reported. The dynamic enhancement rate depends on the loading angle until a critical loading angle (ψcritical). Beyond, a negative dynamic enhancement rate is observed. Concerning the in-plane orientation angle β effect, it depends on the loading angle ψ under quasi-static conditions. Under dynamic conditions, a significant effect is reported independently of the loading angle ψ. Therefore, the dynamic enhancement rate depends on the combined effects of ψ and β angles. A global analysis of the buckling mechanisms allowed us to explain the combined effect of ψ and β angles on the initial peak force. The collapse mechanisms analysis explain the negative dynamic enhancement rate for large loading angles.

  19. Unraveling cyclic deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy using in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-12-23

    In the current study, the deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy were investigated under cyclic loading using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. The relationship between the macroscopic cyclic deformation behavior and the microscopic response at the grain level was established. The neutron diffraction results indicate that more and more grains are involved in the twinning and detwinning deformation process with the increase of fatigue cycles. The residual twins appear in the early fatigue life, which is responsible for the cyclic hardening behavior. The asymmetric shape of the hysteresis loop is attributed to the early exhaustion of the detwinning process during compression, which leads to the activation of dislocation slips and rapid strain-hardening. The critical resolved shear stress for the activation of tensile twinning closely depends on the residual strain developed during cyclic loading. In the cycle before the sample fractured, the dislocation slips became active in tension, although the sample was not fully twinned. The increased dislocation density leads to the rise of the stress concentration at weak spots, which is believed to be the main reason for the fatigue failure. Furthermore, the deformation history greatly influences the deformation mechanisms of hexagonal-close-packed-structured magnesium alloy during cyclic loading.

  20. Unraveling cyclic deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy using in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-12-23

    In the current study, the deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy were investigated under cyclic loading using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. The relationship between the macroscopic cyclic deformation behavior and the microscopic response at the grain level was established. The neutron diffraction results indicate that more and more grains are involved in the twinning and detwinning deformation process with the increase of fatigue cycles. The residual twins appear in the early fatigue life, which is responsible for the cyclic hardening behavior. The asymmetric shape of the hysteresis loop is attributed to the early exhaustionmore » of the detwinning process during compression, which leads to the activation of dislocation slips and rapid strain-hardening. The critical resolved shear stress for the activation of tensile twinning closely depends on the residual strain developed during cyclic loading. In the cycle before the sample fractured, the dislocation slips became active in tension, although the sample was not fully twinned. The increased dislocation density leads to the rise of the stress concentration at weak spots, which is believed to be the main reason for the fatigue failure. Furthermore, the deformation history greatly influences the deformation mechanisms of hexagonal-close-packed-structured magnesium alloy during cyclic loading.« less

  1. Compression Ratio Adjuster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    New mechanism alters compression ratio of internal-combustion engine according to load so that engine operates at top fuel efficiency. Ordinary gasoline, diesel and gas engines with their fixed compression ratios are inefficient at partial load and at low-speed full load. Mechanism ensures engines operate as efficiently under these conditions as they do at highload and high speed.

  2. Survivability characteristics of composite compression structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, John G.; Allen, M. R.; Sawdy, D.; Avery, S.

    1990-01-01

    Test and evaluation was performed to determine the compression residual capability of graphite reinforced composite panels following perforation by high-velocity fragments representative of combat threats. Assessments were made of the size of the ballistic damage, the effect of applied compression load at impact, damage growth during cyclic loading and residual static strength. Several fiber/matrix systems were investigated including high-strain fibers, tough epoxies, and APC-2 thermoplastic. Additionally, several laminate configurations were evaluated including hard and soft laminates and the incorporation of buffer strips and stitching for improved damage resistance of tolerance. Both panels (12 x 20-inches) and full scale box-beam components were tested to assure scalability of results. The evaluation generally showed small differences in the responses of the material systems tested. The soft laminate configurations with concentrated reinforcement exhibited the highest residual strength. Ballistic damage did not grow or increase in severity as a result of cyclic loading, and the effects of applied load at impact were not significant under the conditions tested.

  3. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2013-09-01

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic

  4. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    SciTech Connect

    D'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2013-09-15

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic

  5. Shape Memory Alloy Tension/Compression Device for Seismic Retrofit of Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speicher, Matthew; Hodgson, Darel E.; Desroches, Reginald; Leon, Roberto T.

    2009-08-01

    A tension/compression device is developed for applications as bracing elements in buildings. The device is designed to allow Nitinol forms, such as helical springs or Belleville washers, to be used in compression. The device allows both overall extension (tension) and compression while subjecting the Nitinol to an optimum deformation mode. It is possible, due to the versatility of the design, to adjust the force and stroke of the device without changing the overall configuration. This new device is subjected to a cyclic loading protocol that tests the Nitinol element’s ability to recover large deformations. The effect of different Nitinol configurations and a cyclic loading history are evaluated in the study. The results show that Nitinol helical springs produce good recentering and damping behavior while Nitinol Belleville washers show good potential to form the basis for a Nitinol damping device.

  6. Response of Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panel with Minimum Gage GFRP Face-Sheets to Compression Loading After Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2011-01-01

    A compression after impact study has been conducted to determine the residual strength of three sandwich panel constructions with two types of thin glass fiber reinforced polymer face-sheets and two hexagonal honeycomb Nomex core densities. Impact testing is conducted to first determine the characteristics of damage resulting from various impact energy levels. Two modes of failure are found during compression after impact tests with the density of the core precipitating the failure mode present for a given specimen. A finite element analysis is presented for prediction of the residual compressive strength of the impacted specimens. The analysis includes progressive damage modeling in the face-sheets. Preliminary analysis results were similar to the experimental results; however, a higher fidelity core material model is expected to improve the correlation.

  7. Cyclic Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dennis H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a simple experiment that has become popular in chemical research because it can provide useful information about redox reactions in a form which is easily obtained and interpreted. Discusses principles of the method and illustrates its use in the study of four electrode reactions. (Author/JN)

  8. Cyclic fatigue in silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, G.; Kawabe, Y. . Tsukuba Lab.); Horibe, S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Static and cyclic fatigue behavior was investigated for two kinds of silicon nitride with different microstructures. These materials hardly show rising R-curve behavior. Nevertheless the considerable cyclic loading effect is obviously recognized in them. There has been observed an insignificant difference in the pure cyclic loading effect between coarse grained silicon nitride (SSN-1) and fine grained one (SSN-2). In addition, crack growth rate shows a transient acceleration or retardation when variable-amplitude cyclic loading is applied to SSN-1. Such a result implies the existence of a process zone near a crack tip which has a similar function to plastic zone in metals. Since the above cyclic crack behavior is inexplicable by the grain bridging degradation mechanisms, possible cyclic fatigue mechanisms are, thus, discussed.

  9. Loading simulation of lumbar spine vertebrae during a compression test using the finite elements method and trabecular bone strength properties, determined by means of nanoindentations.

    PubMed

    Bouzakis, K D; Mitsi, S; Michailidis, N; Mirisidis, I; Mesomeris, G; Maliaris, G; Korlos, A; Kapetanos, G; Antonarakos, P; Anagnostidis, K

    2004-06-01

    The mechanical strength properties of lumbar spine vertebrae are of great importance in a wide range of applications. Herein, through nanoindentations and appropriate evaluation of the corresponding results, trabecular bone struts stress-strain characteristics can be determined. In the frame of the present paper, an L2 fresh cadaveric vertebra, from which posterior elements were removed, was subjected to compression. With the aid of developed finite elements method based algorithms, the cortical shell and the cancellous core bulk elasticity moduli and stresses were determined, whereas the tested vertebra geometrical model used in these algorithms was considered as having a compound structure, consisting of the cancellous bone surrounded by the cortical shell. Moreover nanoindentations were conducted and an appropriate evaluation method of the obtained results was applied to extract stress-strain curves of individual lumbar spine vertebra trabecular bone struts. These data were used in the mathematical description of the vertebrae compression test. The vertebral cancellous bone structure was simulated by a beam elements network, possessing an equivalent porosity and different stiffnesses in vertical and horizontal direction. Thus, the measured course of the compression load versus the occurring specimen deformation was verified.

  10. Tension-Compression Fatigue of a Nextel™720/alumina Composite at 1200 °C in Air and in Steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanser, R. L.; Ruggles-Wrenn, M. B.

    2016-08-01

    Tension-compression fatigue behavior of an oxide-oxide ceramic-matrix composite was investigated at 1200 °C in air and in steam. The composite is comprised of an alumina matrix reinforced with Nextel™720 alumina-mullite fibers woven in an eight harness satin weave (8HSW). The composite has no interface between the fiber and matrix, and relies on the porous matrix for flaw tolerance. Tension-compression fatigue behavior was studied for cyclical stresses ranging from 60 to 120 MPa at a frequency of 1.0 Hz. The R ratio (minimum stress to maximum stress) was -1.0. Fatigue run-out was defined as 105 cycles and was achieved at 80 MPa in air and at 70 MPa in steam. Steam reduced cyclic lives by an order of magnitude. Specimens that achieved fatigue run-out were subjected to tensile tests to failure to characterize the retained tensile properties. Specimens subjected to prior cyclic loading in air retained 100 % of their tensile strength. The steam environment severely degraded tensile properties. Tension-compression cyclic loading was considerably more damaging than tension-tension cyclic loading. Composite microstructure, as well as damage and failure mechanisms were investigated.

  11. Development of structural and material clavicle response corridors under axial compression and three point bending loading for clavicle finite element model validation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Kindig, Matthew; Li, Zuoping; Crandall, Jeff R; Kerrigan, Jason R

    2014-08-22

    Clavicle injuries were frequently observed in automotive side and frontal crashes. Finite element (FE) models have been developed to understand the injury mechanism, although no clavicle loading response corridors yet exist in the literature to ensure the model response biofidelity. Moreover, the typically developed structural level (e.g., force-deflection) response corridors were shown to be insufficient for verifying the injury prediction capacity of FE model, which usually is based on strain related injury criteria. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop both the structural (force vs deflection) and material level (strain vs force) clavicle response corridors for validating FE models for injury risk modeling. 20 Clavicles were loaded to failure under loading conditions representative of side and frontal crashes respectively, half of which in axial compression, and the other half in three point bending. Both structural and material response corridors were developed for each loading condition. FE model that can accurately predict structural response and strain level provides a more useful tool in injury risk modeling and prediction. The corridor development method in this study could also be extended to develop corridors for other components of the human body. PMID:24975696

  12. In situ Compressive Loading and Correlative Noninvasive Imaging of the Bone-periodontal Ligament-tooth Fibrous Joint

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Andrew T.; Lin, Jeremy D.; Seo, Youngho; Etchin, Sergey; Merkle, Arno; Fahey, Kevin; Ho, Sunita P.

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel biomechanics testing protocol. The advantage of this protocol includes the use of an in situ loading device coupled to a high resolution X-ray microscope, thus enabling visualization of internal structural elements under simulated physiological loads and wet conditions. Experimental specimens will include intact bone-periodontal ligament (PDL)-tooth fibrous joints. Results will illustrate three important features of the protocol as they can be applied to organ level biomechanics: 1) reactionary force vs. displacement: tooth displacement within the alveolar socket and its reactionary response to loading, 2) three-dimensional (3D) spatial configuration and morphometrics: geometric relationship of the tooth with the alveolar socket, and 3) changes in readouts 1 and 2 due to a change in loading axis, i.e. from concentric to eccentric loads. Efficacy of the proposed protocol will be evaluated by coupling mechanical testing readouts to 3D morphometrics and overall biomechanics of the joint. In addition, this technique will emphasize on the need to equilibrate experimental conditions, specifically reactionary loads prior to acquiring tomograms of fibrous joints. It should be noted that the proposed protocol is limited to testing specimens under ex vivo conditions, and that use of contrast agents to visualize soft tissue mechanical response could lead to erroneous conclusions about tissue and organ-level biomechanics. PMID:24638035

  13. Observation on the transformation domains of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy and their evolutions during cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xi; Kan, Qianhua; Kang, Guozheng; Li, Jian; Qiu, Bo; Yu, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The strain field of a super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) and its variation during uniaxial cyclic tension-unloading were observed by a non-contact digital image correlation method, and then the transformation domains and their evolutions were indirectly investigated and discussed. It is seen that the super-elastic NiTi (SMA) exhibits a remarkable localized deformation and the transformation domains evolve periodically with the repeated cyclic tension-unloading within the first several cycles. However, the evolutions of transformation domains at the stage of stable cyclic transformation depend on applied peak stress: when the peak stress is low, no obvious transformation band is observed and the strain field is nearly uniform; when the peak stress is large enough, obvious transformation bands occur due to the residual martensite caused by the prevention of enriched dislocations to the reverse transformation from induced martensite to austenite. Temperature variations measured by an infrared thermal imaging method further verifies the formation and evolution of transformation domains.

  14. Full Field Measurement of The Dynamic Response of AA6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy under High Strain Rate Compression and Torsion Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odoh, Daniel Oghenekewhe Oluwatobi

    The dynamic response of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy under high strain rate loading in compression and torsion loading conditions was studied using the split Hopkinson pressure bar, the Kolsky torsion bar, and the high speed digital image correlation system. AA6061-T6 alloy, the most widely used in the AA6000 series, is a multi-purpose Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy containing about 0.4 % wt. of Cu and other alloying additives. The properties of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy including medium to high strength, good fracture toughness, and high corrosion resistance make it to find application in high performance structures such as the automotive parts, panels, and armored carriers. In this work, the effect of strain rate during dynamic test on formation of adiabatic shear bands in AA6061-T6 alloy was investigated. A post deformation analysis of the tested specimen was performed in order to determine the damage evolution and strain localization along the narrow adiabatic shear bands within the specimen. The formation of an adiabatic shear band in the aluminum alloy tested was found to depend on the strain rate at which the test was conducted. Stress, strain, and strain rate data obtained from the elastic waves in the compression and torsion bar tests were also compared with those obtained using the high speed digital cameras. Results show good agreement between both measurement techniques with the 3D digital image correlation technique giving a slightly lower result. Scanning and electron microscopy results show that both deformed and transformed bands can be formed in AA6061-T6 alloy during dynamic loading. The type of adiabatic shear band formed depends on the strain rate at which test was performed.

  15. Analytical method development for powder characterization: Visualization of the critical drug loading affecting the processability of a formulation for direct compression.

    PubMed

    Hirschberg, Cosima; Sun, Changquan Calvin; Rantanen, Jukka

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of particulate systems (powders) is one of the remaining scientific challenges. Evaluation of powder behaviour is often empirical and the decision-making processes are experience-based. There is a need for development of analytical instrumentation enabling more fundamental understanding of powder behaviour. Flowability and tabletability, two key factors in commercial scale manufacturing of tablets with direct compression (DC) approach, were analysed for formulations containing increasing amounts of several model active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). Flowability was investigated using a ring shear tester and tablets were prepared at four different compression pressures using a single punch tablet press. Thereby, a material sparing screening approach was developed to estimate the influence of APIs on behaviour of a given DC formulation. Additionally, this approach is useful for estimating the low threshold amount of API (wt%), at which the properties of an API start affecting the powder behaviour of a given formulation (API-excipient mixture). This threshold will be referred to as critical drug loading. The flowability of microcrystalline cellulose (reference grade pH 102) was used as a threshold for adequate flowability of model formulations. The threshold for tablet tensile strength was set to 2MPa. Simultaneous visual presentation of both- flowability and tabletability were used for a fast evaluation of manufacturability of a given formulation. The results confirmed that flowability is more sensitive to drug loading than tabletability, and that the critical drug loading for a DC formulation is strongly affected by particulate properties of API. For example, decreasing the particle size of paracetamol led to rapid decrease in flowability index, whereas the tabletability was not affected. PMID:27368089

  16. Numerical study of mechanical behavior of ceramic composites under compression loading in the framework of movable cellular automaton method

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalenko, Igor S. Smolin, Alexey Yu. Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Promakhov, Vladimir V.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2014-11-14

    Movable cellular automaton method was used for investigating the mechanical behavior of ceramic composites under uniaxial compression. A 2D numerical model of ceramic composites based on oxides of zirconium and aluminum with different structural parameters was developed using the SEM images of micro-sections of a real composite. The influence of such structural parameters as the geometrical dimensions of layers, inclusions, and their spatial distribution in the sample, the volume content of the composite components and their mechanical properties (as well as the amount of zirconium dioxide that underwent the phase transformation) on the fracture, strength, deformation and dissipative properties was investigated.

  17. Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Thick rubber components are employed by the Army to carry large loads. In tanks, rubber covers road wheels and track systems to protect roadways. It is difficult for design engineers to simulate the details of the hysteretic heating for large strain viscoelastic deformations. In this study, an approximation to the viscoelastic energy dissipated per unit time is investigated for use in estimating mechanically induced viscoelastic heating. Coupled thermo-mechanical simulations of large cyclic deformations of rubber cylinders are presented. The cylinders are first compressed axially and then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. Details of the algorithm and some computational issues are discussed. The coupled analyses are conducted for tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without imbedded metal disks.

  18. Cavity door effects on aerodynamic loadings of compressed-carriage store configurations separating from cavities at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.; Stallings, R. L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted at supersonic Mach numbers to determine the effects of cavity doors on the aerodynamic characteristics of compressed-carriage store configurations during separation from a shallow box cavity (closed cavity flow) located in a simulated generic parent aircraft. The tests were conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at free-stream Mach numbers of 1.70, 2.00, and 2.65 for a constant Reynolds number per foot of two million. Results are summarized to show the effects of cavity door opening angles, vertical door height, folded and unfolded tail fins, and Mach number on the near-field aerodynamic separation characteristics of a single missile-type store with in-line cruciform wings and tail fins.

  19. Cyclic multiverses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marosek, Konrad; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Balcerzak, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Using the idea of regularization of singularities due to the variability of the fundamental constants in cosmology we study the cyclic universe models. We find two models of oscillating and non-singular mass density and pressure (`non-singular' bounce) regularized by varying gravitational constant G despite the scale factor evolution is oscillating and having sharp turning points (`singular' bounce). Both violating (big-bang) and non-violating (phantom) null energy condition models appear. Then, we extend this idea on to the multiverse containing cyclic individual universes with either growing or decreasing entropy though leaving the net entropy constant. In order to get an insight into the key idea, we consider the doubleverse with the same geometrical evolution of the two `parallel' universes with their physical evolution [physical coupling constants c(t) and G(t)] being different. An interesting point is that there is a possibility to exchange the universes at the point of maximum expansion - the fact which was already noticed in quantum cosmology. Similar scenario is also possible within the framework of Brans-Dicke theory where varying G(t) is replaced by the dynamical Brans-Dicke field φ(t) though these theories are slightly different.

  20. Effects of heel height and shoe shape on the compressive load between foot and base: a graphic analysis of principle.

    PubMed

    Broch, Nana Lise; Wyller, Thomas; Steen, Harald

    2004-01-01

    Even in the ever-changing and increasingly technical realm of medicine, common sense approaches are needed. We can still learn from our predecessors by using their practical and simple methods. In this article a graphic approach in the sagittal plane is used to explain the relationship between the heel height of a shoe and load under the foot. By using an elementary theoretical model based on schematic sketches, an analysis of principle can be performed to calculate the change in the distribution of mechanical stress in the planta with change in foot orientation. The model shows that when standing posture remains unaltered, load under the forefoot increases and load under the heel decreases with elevated heel height and the corresponding changes in shoe shape. These results can be confirmed by pedobarographic and gait-analysis measurements, but the graphic method can be used without application of advanced instrumentation. The rationale behind the model is to use common terms and simple means to facilitate a more fundamental understanding of complex mechanical orthopedic problems. The method is meant to be a helpful supplement to clinical judgment in the many situations in which advanced instrumentation is not available.

  1. Dynamic behavior and constitutive modeling of magnesium alloys AZ91D and AZ31B under high strain rate compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jing; Ahmad, Iram Raza; Shu, D. W.

    2014-03-01

    The dynamic stress-strain characteristics of magnesium alloys have not been sufficiently studied experimentally. Thus, the present work investigated compressive dynamic stress-strain characteristics of two representative magnesium alloys: AZ91D and AZ31B at high strain rates and elevated temperatures. In order to use the stress-strain characteristics in numerical simulations to predict the impact response of components, the stress-strain characteristics must be modeled. The most common approach is to use accepted constitutive laws. The results from the experimental study of the response of magnesium alloys AZ91D and AZ31B under dynamic compressive loading, at different strain rates and elevated temperatures are presented here. Johnson-Cook model was used to best fit the experimental data. The material parameters required by the model were obtained and the resultant stress-strain curves of the two alloys for each testing condition were plotted. It is found that the dynamic stress-strain relationship of both magnesium alloys are strain rate and temperature dependent and can be described reasonably well at high strain rates and room temperature by Johnson-Cook model except at very low strains. This might be due to the fact that the strain rate is not strictly constant in the early stage of deformation.

  2. Microstructure studies of air-plasma-spray-deposited CoNiCrAlY coatings before and after thermal cyclic loading for high-temperature application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dipak; Pandey, K. N.; Das, Dipak Kumar

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, bond-coats for thermal barrier coatings were deposited via air plasma spraying (APS) techniques onto Inconel 800 and Hastelloy C-276 alloy substrates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to investigate the phases and microstructure of the as-sprayed, APS-deposited CoNiCrAlY bond-coatings. The aim of this work was to study the suitability of the bond-coat materials for high temperature applications. Confirmation of nanoscale grains of the γ/γ'-phase was obtained by TEM, high-resolution TEM, and AFM. We concluded that these changes result from the plastic deformation of the bond-coat during the deposition, resulting in CoNiCrAlY bond-coatings with excellent thermal cyclic resistance suitable for use in high-temperature applications. Cyclic oxidative stability was observed to also depend on the underlying metallic alloy substrate.

  3. Cardiac looping may be driven by compressive loads resulting from unequal growth of the heart and pericardial cavity. Observations on a physical simulation model

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Meriç; Männer, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The transformation of the straight embryonic heart tube into a helically wound loop is named cardiac looping. Such looping is regarded as an essential process in cardiac morphogenesis since it brings the building blocks of the developing heart into an approximation of their definitive topographical relationships. During the past two decades, a large number of genes have been identified which play important roles in cardiac looping. However, how genetic information is physically translated into the dynamic form changes of the looping heart is still poorly understood. The oldest hypothesis of cardiac looping mechanics attributes the form changes of the heart loop (ventral bending → simple helical coiling → complex helical coiling) to compressive loads resulting from growth differences between the heart and the pericardial cavity. In the present study, we have tested the physical plausibility of this hypothesis, which we call the growth-induced buckling hypothesis, for the first time. Using a physical simulation model, we show that growth-induced buckling of a straight elastic rod within the confined space of a hemispherical cavity can generate the same sequence of form changes as observed in the looping embryonic heart. Our simulation experiments have furthermore shown that, under bilaterally symmetric conditions, growth-induced buckling generates left- and right-handed helices (D-/L-loops) in a 1:1 ratio, while even subtle left- or rightward displacements of the caudal end of the elastic rod at the pre-buckling state are sufficient to direct the buckling process toward the generation of only D- or L-loops, respectively. Our data are discussed with respect to observations made in biological “models.” We conclude that compressive loads resulting from unequal growth of the heart and pericardial cavity play important roles in cardiac looping. Asymmetric positioning of the venous heart pole may direct these forces toward a biased generation of D- or L-loops. PMID

  4. Integrins mediate mechanical compression-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction lead to compression of intramuscular arterioles, which, in turn, leads to their vasodilation (a process that may enhance blood flow during muscle activity). Although endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in compression-induced vasodilation, the mechanism whereby arterial compression elicits NO production is unclear. We cannulated isolated swine (n = 39) myocardial (n = 69) and skeletal muscle (n = 60) arteriole segments and exposed them to cyclic transmural pressure generated by either intraluminal or extraluminal pressure pulses to simulate compression in contracting muscle. We found that the vasodilation elicited by internal or external pressure pulses was equivalent; moreover, vasodilation in response to pressure depended on changes in arteriole diameter. Agonist-induced endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was used to verify endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell viability. Vasodilation in response to cyclic changes in transmural pressure was smaller than that elicited by pharmacological activation of the NO signaling pathway. It was attenuated by inhibition of NO synthase and by mechanical removal of the endothelium. Stemming from previous observations that endothelial integrin is implicated in vasodilation in response to shear stress, we found that function-blocking integrin α5β1 or αvβ3 antibodies attenuated cyclic compression-induced vasodilation and NOx (NO(-)2 and NO(-)3) production, as did an RGD peptide that competitively inhibits ligand binding to some integrins. We therefore conclude that integrin plays a role in cyclic compression-induced endothelial NO production and thereby in the vasodilation of small arteries during cyclic transmural pressure loading.

  5. Buckling and vibration of any prismatic assembly of shear and compression loaded anisotropic plates with an arbitrary supporting structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.; Williams, F. W.; Wright, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    The computer program designated 'VIPASA', which accurately treats buckling and vibration in prismatic plate assemblies with a response that varies sinusoidally in the longitudinal direction, has been found to be limited by the production of an in-plane shear loading of component plates that produces skewed mode shapes. These do not conform to desired support conditions. This problem is presently overcome through a coupling of the VIPASA stiffness matrices for different wavelength responses by means of the Lagrangian Multipliers method. The theory extends to supports at arbitrary locations, and even to the support provided by any elastic structure. The generality and capabilities of VIPASA have been retained in the computer program designated 'VICON', which permits constraints and a supporting structure consisting of any number of transverse beam columns.

  6. Mechanical Loading of Cartilage Explants with Compression and Sliding Motion Modulates Gene Expression of Lubricin and Catabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Marková, Michala; Torzilli, Peter A.; Gallo, Luigi M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Translation of the contact zone in articulating joints is an important component of joint kinematics, yet rarely investigated in a biological context. This study was designed to investigate how sliding contact areas affect cartilage mechanobiology. We hypothesized that higher sliding speeds would lead to increased extracellular matrix mechanical stress and the expression of catabolic genes. Design A cylindrical Teflon indenter was used to apply 50 or 100 N normal forces at 10, 40, or 70 mm/s sliding speed. Mechanical parameters were correlated with gene expressions using a multiple linear regression model. Results In both loading groups there was no significant effect of sliding speed on any of the mechanical parameters (strain, stress, modulus, tangential force). However, an increase in vertical force (from 50 to 100 N) led to a significant increase in extracellular matrix strain and stress. For 100 N, significant correlations between gene expression and mechanical parameters were found for TIMP-3 (r2 = 0.89), ADAMTS-5 (r2 = 0.73), and lubricin (r2 = 0.73). Conclusions The sliding speeds applied do not have an effect on the mechanical response of the cartilage, this could be explained by a partial attainment of the “elastic limit” at and above a sliding speed of 10 mm/s. Nevertheless, we still found a relationship between sliding speed and gene expression when the tissue was loaded with 100 N normal force. Thus despite the absence of speed-dependent mechanical changes (strain, stress, modulus, tangential force), the sliding speed had an influence on gene expression. PMID:26175864

  7. Multiaxial cyclic plasticity of ultrafine grain nickel produced by pulsed electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batane, Ntirelang Robert

    The desirable properties of ultrafine grain (UFG) materials have prompted significant research efforts over the past decade. These materials have proven to be suitable for many industrial applications where conventional grain sized materials have limitations. Some properties of UFG materials which make them preferred over their conventional grain sized counterparts include high strength, corrosion resistance, and high shock resistance. The understanding of mechanical behavior of UFG materials under cyclic loading still remains a challenge. Available data in the literature about UFG material subjected to cyclic loading is limited. As most engineering components experience complex stress-strain states, an understanding of multiaxial fatigue is critical in applications where reliability and optimum performance are required. The objective of this research, therefore, was to study the mechanical behavior of UFG nickel under multiaxial loading conditions. In the first part of this research, the uniaxial fatigue behavior of UFG nickel synthesized by pulsed electrodeposition in a nickel sulfamate bath was studied. Bulk nickel cylinders, 10mm in diameter and 60mm long, were electroformed. The cylinders were machined into test specimens and cycled in fully reversed tension-compression at room temperature at different plastic strain amplitudes. The second part involved multiaxial deformation of thin-walled nickel tubes. The thin-walled UFG nickel tubes were produced by the same technique as that used in electroforming the UFG nickel solid cylinders. Thin-walled tubes were subjected to axial-torsional cyclic loading. For comparison purposes, conventional grain size (CG) nickel specimens were also tested under the same loading conditions as the UFG nickel specimens. The UFG nickel shows high cyclic strength as compared to CG nickel under both uniaxial and multiaxial loading conditions. CG nickel shows higher effective saturation stress under nonproportional loading than

  8. In vitro evaluation of compression-coated glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu(II) (GHK-Cu2+)-loaded microparticles for colonic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Uğurlu, Timuçin; Türkoğlu, Murat; Özaydın, Tuğçe

    2011-11-01

    Glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu(II) (GHK-Cu(2+))-loaded Zn-pectinate microparticles in the form of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) compression-coated tablets were prepared and their in vitro behavior tested. GHK-Cu(2+) delivery to colon can be useful for the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase, with the increasing secretion of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPS),which are the major factors contributing in mucosal ulceration and inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. The concentration of peptide was determined spectrophotometrically. The results obtained implied that surfactant ratio had a significant effect on percent production yield (1.25 to 1.75 w/w; 72.22% to 80.84%), but cross-linking agent concentration had not. The entrapment efficiency (EE) was found to be in the range of 58.25-78.37%. The drug-loading factor significantly increased the EE; however, enhancement of cross-linking agent concentration decreased it. The release of GHK-Cu(2+) from Zn-pectinate microparticles (F1-F8) in simulated intestinal fluid was strongly affected by cross-linking agent concentration and drug amount (50 mg for F1-F6; 250 mg for F7-F8), but not particularly affected by surfactant amount. Release profiles represented that the microparticles released 50-80% their drug load within 4 h. Therefore, the optimum microparticle formulation (F8) coated with a relatively hydrophobic polymer HPC to get a suitable colonic delivery system. The optimum colonic delivery tablets prepared with 700 mg HPC-SL provided the expected delayed release with a lag time of 6 h. The effects of polymer viscosity and coat weight on GHK-Cu(2+) release were found to be crucial for the optimum delay of lag time. The invention was found to be promising for colonic delivery. PMID:21457130

  9. Mouse tail vertebrae adapt to cyclic mechanical loading by increasing bone formation rate and decreasing bone resorption rate as shown by time-lapsed in vivo imaging of dynamic bone morphometry.

    PubMed

    Lambers, Floor M; Schulte, Friederike A; Kuhn, Gisela; Webster, Duncan J; Müller, Ralph

    2011-12-01

    It is known that mechanical loading leads to an increase in bone mass through a positive shift in the balance between bone formation and bone resorption. How the remodeling sites change over time as an effect of loading remains, however, to be clarified. The purpose of this paper was to investigate how bone formation and resorption sites are modulated by mechanical loading over time by using a new imaging technique that extracts three dimensional formation and resorption parameters from time-lapsed in vivo micro-computed tomography images. To induce load adaptation, the sixth caudal vertebra of C57BL/6 mice was cyclically loaded through pins in the adjacent vertebrae at either 8 N or 0 N (control) three times a week for 5 min (3000 cycles) over a total of 4 weeks. The results showed that mechanical loading significantly increased trabecular bone volume fraction by 20% (p<0.001) and cortical area fraction by 6% (p<0.001). The bone formation rate was on average 23% greater (p<0.001) and the bone resorption rate was on average 25% smaller (p<0.001) for the 8 N group than for the 0 N group. The increase in bone formation rate for the 8 N group was mostly an effect of a significantly increased surface of bone formation sites (on average 16%, p<0.001), while the thickness of bone formation packages was less affected (on average 5% greater, p<0.05). At the same time the surface of bone resorption sites was significantly reduced (on average 15%, p<0.001), while the depth of resorption pits remained the same. For the 8 N group, the strength of the whole bone increased significantly by 24% (p<0.001) over the loading period, while the strain energy density in the trabecular bone decreased significantly by 24% (p<0.001). In conclusion, mouse tail vertebrae adapt to mechanical loading by increasing the surface of formation sites and decreasing the surface of resorption sites, leading to an overall increase in bone strength. This new imaging technique will provide opportunities

  10. Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2000-01-01

    A procedure that models coupled thermo-mechanical deformations of viscoelastic rubber cylinders by employing the ABAQUS finite element code is described. Computational simulations of hysteretic heating are presented for several tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without a steel disk at their centers. The cylinders are compressed axially and are then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. The non-uniform hysteretic heating of the rubber cylinders containing a steel disk is presented. The analyses performed suggest that the coupling procedure should be considered for further development as a design tool for rubber degradation studies.

  11. In Vivo Axial Loading of the Mouse Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Melville, Katherine M.; Robling, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Non-invasive methods to apply controlled, cyclic loads to the living skeleton are used as an anabolic agent to stimulate new bone formation in adults and enhance bone mass accrual in growing animals. These methods are also invaluable for understanding bone signaling pathways. Our focus here is on a particular loading model: in vivo axial compression of the mouse tibia. An advantage of loading the tibia is that changes are present in both the cancellous envelope of the proximal tibia and the cortical bone of the tibial diaphysis. To load the tibia of the mouse axially in vivo, a cyclic compressive load is applied up to five times a week to a single tibia per mouse for a duration lasting from 1 day to 6 weeks. With the contralateral limb as an internal control, the anabolic response of the skeleton to mechanical stimuli can be studied in a pairwise experimental design. Here, we describe the key parameters that must be considered before beginning an in vivo mouse tibial loading experiment, including methods for in vivo strain gauging of the tibial midshaft, and then we describe general methods for loading the mouse tibia for an experiment lasting multiple days. PMID:25331046

  12. In vivo axial loading of the mouse tibia.

    PubMed

    Melville, Katherine M; Robling, Alexander G; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive methods to apply controlled, cyclic loads to the living skeleton are used as anabolic procedures to stimulate new bone formation in adults and enhance bone mass accrual in growing animals. These methods are also invaluable for understanding bone signaling pathways. Our focus here is on a particular loading model: in vivo axial compression of the mouse tibia. An advantage of loading the tibia is that changes are present in both the cancellous envelope of the proximal tibia and the cortical bone of the tibial diaphysis. To load the tibia of the mouse axially in vivo, a cyclic compressive load is applied up to five times a week to a single tibia per mouse for a duration lasting from 1 day to 6 weeks. With the contralateral limb as an internal control, the anabolic response of the skeleton to mechanical stimuli can be studied in a pairwise experimental design. Here, we describe the key parameters that must be considered before beginning an in vivo mouse tibial loading experiment, including methods for in vivo strain gauging of the tibial midshaft, and then we describe general methods for loading the mouse tibia for an experiment lasting multiple days. PMID:25331046

  13. Effects of dividing the transverse carpal ligament on the mechanical behavior of the carpal bones under axial compressive load: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zong-Ming

    2009-03-01

    Transecting the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) is a routine procedure to surgically treat carpal tunnel syndrome; yet, its mechanical consequences on carpal bones are unclear. In this study, our intent was to perform a computational analysis of carpal biomechanics resulting from TCL release. A three-dimensional finite element model of the wrist was constructed, which included all the carpal bones, the distal ulna and radius, the proximal metacarpals and the interosseous ligaments. Cartilage layers of each bone were modeled manually according to anatomic visualization software. The TCL was also modeled in three dimensions and added to the bone model. A 100-Newton axial load was applied to the upper section of the second and third metacarpals. The effects of dividing the TCL on the displacements of the carpal bones and the contact stress distribution in the midcarpal joints were studied using a finite element analysis method. When the TCL was divided, the axial compressive load resulted in the carpal bones deviating more radially. More specifically, the carpal bones on the radial side of the capitate and lunate (i.e. the trapezium, trapezoid, and scaphoid) moved further toward the radius, and the carpal bones on the ulnar side of the capitate and lunate (i.e. hamate, triquetrum, and pisiform) moved further toward the metacarpals. The contact stresses and contact locations in the midcarpal joints changed as a result of dividing the TCL. The changes in displacements of carpal bones and the contact stress distributions in the midcarpal joints due to TCL release may be implicated for some of the postoperative complications associated with carpal tunnel release.

  14. Cyclic delamination behavior of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on Ti-6Al-4V substrates in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Hayato; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to clarify the effect of a simulated body fluid (SBF) on the cyclic delamination behavior of a plasma-sprayed hydroxapatite (HAp) coating. A HAp coating is deposited on the surfaces of surgical metallic materials in order to enhance the bond between human bone and such surfaces. However, the HAp coating is susceptible to delamination by cyclic loading from the patient's gait. Although hip joints are subjected to both positive and negative moments, only the effects of tensile bending stresses on vertical crack propagation behavior have been investigated. Thus, the cyclic delamination behavior of a HAp coating was observed at the stress ratio R=-1 in order to determine the effects of tensile/compressive loading on the delamination behavior. The delamination growth rate increased with SBF immersion, which decreased the delamination life. Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the selective phase dissolution in the HAp coating was promoted at interfaces. Finite element analysis revealed that the energy release rate Gmax showed a positive value even in cases with compressive loading, which is a driving force for the delamination of a HAp coating. A prediction model for the delamination growth life was developed that combines a fracture mechanics parameter with the assumed stress-dependent dissolution rate. The predicted delamination life matched the experimental data well in cases of lower stress amplitudes with SBF. PMID:27287152

  15. Cyclic delamination behavior of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on Ti-6Al-4V substrates in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Hayato; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to clarify the effect of a simulated body fluid (SBF) on the cyclic delamination behavior of a plasma-sprayed hydroxapatite (HAp) coating. A HAp coating is deposited on the surfaces of surgical metallic materials in order to enhance the bond between human bone and such surfaces. However, the HAp coating is susceptible to delamination by cyclic loading from the patient's gait. Although hip joints are subjected to both positive and negative moments, only the effects of tensile bending stresses on vertical crack propagation behavior have been investigated. Thus, the cyclic delamination behavior of a HAp coating was observed at the stress ratio R=-1 in order to determine the effects of tensile/compressive loading on the delamination behavior. The delamination growth rate increased with SBF immersion, which decreased the delamination life. Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the selective phase dissolution in the HAp coating was promoted at interfaces. Finite element analysis revealed that the energy release rate Gmax showed a positive value even in cases with compressive loading, which is a driving force for the delamination of a HAp coating. A prediction model for the delamination growth life was developed that combines a fracture mechanics parameter with the assumed stress-dependent dissolution rate. The predicted delamination life matched the experimental data well in cases of lower stress amplitudes with SBF.

  16. The use of the percentile method for searching empirical relationships between compression strength (UCS), Point Load (Is50) and Schmidt Hammer (RL) Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Giovanni; Bobbo, Luigi; Vessia, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    Is50 and RL indices are commonly used to indirectly estimate the compression strength of a rocky deposit by in situ and in laboratory devices. The widespread use of Point load and Schmidt hammer tests is due to the simplicity and the speediness of the execution of these tests. Their indices can be related to the UCS by means of the ordinary least square regression analyses. Several researchers suggest to take into account the lithology to build high correlated empirical expressions (R2 >0.8) to draw UCS from Is50 or RL values. Nevertheless, the lower and upper bounds of the UCS ranges of values that can be estimated by means of the two indirect indices are not clearly defined yet. Aydin (2009) stated that the Schmidt hammer test shall be used to assess the compression resistance of rocks characterized by UCS>12-20 MPa. On the other hand, the Point load measures can be performed on weak rocks but upper bound values for UCS are not suggested. In this paper, the empirical relationships between UCS, RL and Is50 are searched by means of the percentile method (Bruno et al. 2013). This method is based on looking for the best regression function, between measured data of UCS and one of the indirect indices, drawn from a subset sample of the couples of measures that are the percentile values. These values are taken from the original dataset of both measures by calculating the cumulative function. No hypothesis on the probability distribution of the sample is needed and the procedure shows to be robust with respect to odd values or outliers. In this study, the carbonate sedimentary rocks are investigated. According to the rock mass classification of Dobereiner and De Freitas (1986), the UCS values for the studied rocks range between 'extremely weak' to 'strong'. For the analyzed data, UCS varies between 1,18-270,70 MPa. Thus, through the percentile method the best empirical relationships UCS-Is50 and UCS-RL are plotted. Relationships between Is50 and RL are drawn, too

  17. Tensile and compressive stress-strain behavior of heat treated boron-aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.; Tenney, D. R.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess the effects of heat treatment and cyclic mechanical loading on the tensile and compressive stress-strain behavior of six boron-aluminum composites having different laminate orientations and being subjected to different heat treatments. The heat treatments were as-fabricated, T6, and T6N consisting of T6 treatment followed by cryogenic quench in liquid nitrogen prior to testing. All laminates were tested in monotonic and cyclic compression, while the tensile-test data are taken from the literature for comparison purposes. It is shown that the linear elastic range of the T6- and T6N-condition specimens is larger than that of the as-fabricated specimens, and that cyclic loading in tension or compression strain hardens the specimens and extends the linear elastic range. For laminates containing 0-deg plies, the stress-strain behavior upon unloading is found to be nonlinear, whereas the other laminates exhibit a linear behavior upon unloading. Specimens in the T6 and T6N conditions show higher strain hardening than the as-fabricated specimens.

  18. Compression-bending of multi-component semi-rigid columns in response to axial loads and conjugate reciprocal extension-prediction of mechanical behaviours and implications for structural design.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ernest W

    2013-01-01

    The mathematical modelling of column buckling or beam bending under an axial or transverse load is well established. However, the existent models generally assume a high degree of symmetry in the structure of the column and minor longitudinal and transverse displacements. The situation when the column is made of several components with different mechanical properties asymmetrically distributed in the transverse section, semi-rigid, and subjected to multiple axial loads with significant longitudinal and transverse displacements through compression and bending has not been well characterised. A more comprehensive theoretical model allowing for these possibilities and assuming a circular arc contour for the bend is developed, and used to establish the bending axes, balance between compression and bending, and equivalent stiffness of the column. In certain situations, such as with pull cable catheters commonly used for minimally invasive surgical procedures, the compression loads are applied via cables running through channels inside a semi-rigid column. The model predicts the mathematical relationships between the radius of curvature of the bend and the tension in and normal force exerted by such cables. Conjugate extension with reciprocal compression-bending is a special structural arrangement for a semi-rigid column such that extension of one segment is linked to compression-bending of another by inextensible cables running between them. Leads are cords containing insulated electrical conductor coil and cables between the heart muscle and cardiac implantable electronic devices. Leads can behave like pull cable catheters through differential component pulling, providing a possible mechanism for inside-out abrasion and conductor cable externalisation. Certain design features may predispose to this mode of structural failure. PMID:23127643

  19. Effects of surface treatments, thermocycling, and cyclic loading on the bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Guarda, G B; Correr, A B; Gonçalves, L S; Costa, A R; Borges, G A; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives : The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of two surface treatments, fatigue and thermocycling, on the microtensile bond strength of a newly introduced lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and a dual-cured resin cement. Methods : A total of 18 ceramic blocks (10 mm long × 7 mm wide × 3.0 mm thick) were fabricated and divided into six groups (n=3): groups 1, 2, and 3-air particle abraded for five seconds with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles; groups 4, 5, and 6-acid etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds. A silane coupling agent was applied onto all specimens and allowed to dry for five seconds, and the ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) with RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) resin cement and placed under a 500-g static load for two minutes. The cement excess was removed with a disposable microbrush, and four periods of light activation for 40 seconds each were performed at right angles using an LED curing unit (UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent) with a final 40 second light exposure from the top surface. All of the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Groups 2 and 5 were submitted to 3,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, and groups 3 and 6 were submitted to a fatigue test of 100,000 cycles at 2 Hz. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding area to obtain beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) (30 beams per group) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test in a testing machine (EZ Test) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p≤0.05). Results : The microtensile bond strength values (MPa) were 26.9 ± 6.9, 22.2 ± 7.8, and 21.2 ± 9.1 for groups 1-3 and 35.0 ± 9.6, 24.3 ± 8.9, and 23.9 ± 6.3 for groups 4-6. For the control group, fatigue testing and thermocycling produced a predominance of adhesive failures. Fatigue and

  20. Effects of surface treatments, thermocycling, and cyclic loading on the bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Guarda, G B; Correr, A B; Gonçalves, L S; Costa, A R; Borges, G A; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives : The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of two surface treatments, fatigue and thermocycling, on the microtensile bond strength of a newly introduced lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and a dual-cured resin cement. Methods : A total of 18 ceramic blocks (10 mm long × 7 mm wide × 3.0 mm thick) were fabricated and divided into six groups (n=3): groups 1, 2, and 3-air particle abraded for five seconds with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles; groups 4, 5, and 6-acid etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds. A silane coupling agent was applied onto all specimens and allowed to dry for five seconds, and the ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) with RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) resin cement and placed under a 500-g static load for two minutes. The cement excess was removed with a disposable microbrush, and four periods of light activation for 40 seconds each were performed at right angles using an LED curing unit (UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent) with a final 40 second light exposure from the top surface. All of the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Groups 2 and 5 were submitted to 3,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, and groups 3 and 6 were submitted to a fatigue test of 100,000 cycles at 2 Hz. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding area to obtain beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) (30 beams per group) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test in a testing machine (EZ Test) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p≤0.05). Results : The microtensile bond strength values (MPa) were 26.9 ± 6.9, 22.2 ± 7.8, and 21.2 ± 9.1 for groups 1-3 and 35.0 ± 9.6, 24.3 ± 8.9, and 23.9 ± 6.3 for groups 4-6. For the control group, fatigue testing and thermocycling produced a predominance of adhesive failures. Fatigue and

  1. Deformation and Tensile Cyclic Fatigue of Plasma-Sprayed ZrO2-8wt% Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Deformation (constitutive relations) of free-standing, thick thermal barrier coatings of sprayed ZrO2-8Wt% Y2O3 was determined at ambient temperature in both pure tension and pure compression using cylindrical bar test specimens. The material exhibited both significant nonlinearity and hysteresis in its load-strain curves, The load-strain relations in four-point uniaxial flexure were determined from tension and compression sides and were compared with individual pure tension and compression constitutive data. Effect of sintering on deformation behavior was significant, resulting in a dramatic change in constitutive relation. Cyclic fatigue testing of the coating material in tension-tension at room temperature showed an insignificant susceptibility to fatigue, similar to the slow crack growth behavior of the material in flexure in 800 C air.

  2. Damage Monitoring of Unidirectional C/SiC Ceramic-Matrix Composite under Cyclic Fatigue Loading using A Hysteresis Loss Energy-Based Damage Parameter at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-06-01

    The damage evolution of unidirectional C/SiC ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) under cyclic fatigue loading has been investigated using a hysteresis loss energy-based damage parameter at room and elevated temperatures. The experimental fatigue hysteresis modulus and fatigue hysteresis loss energy versus cycle number have been analyzed. By comparing the experimental fatigue hysteresis loss energy with theoretical computational values, the interface shear stress corresponding to different cycle number and peak stress has been estimated. The experimental evolution of fatigue hysteresis loss energy and fatigue hysteresis loss energy-based damage parameter versus cycle number has been predicted for unidirectional C/SiC composite at room and elevated temperatures. The predicted results of interface shear stress degradation, stress-strain hysteresis loops corresponding to different number of applied cycles, fatigue hysteresis loss energy and fatigue hysteresis loss energy-based damage parameter as a functions of cycle number agreed with experimental data. It was found that the fatigue hysteresis energy-based parameter can be used to monitor the fatigue damage evolution and predict the fatigue life of fiber-reinforced CMCs.

  3. The role of peel stresses in cyclic debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    When an adhesively bonded joint is undergoing cyclic loading, one of the possible damage modes that occurs is called cyclic debonding - progressive separation of the adherends by failure of the adhesive bond under cyclic loading. In most practical structures, both peel and shear stresses exist in the adhesive bonding during cyclic loading. The results of an experimental and analytical study to determine the role of peel stresses on cyclic debonding in a mixed mode specimen are presented. Experimentally, this was done by controlling the forces that create the peel stresses by applying a clamping force to oppose the peel stresses. Cracked lap shear joints were chosen for this study. A finite element analysis was developed to assess the effect of the clamping force on the strain energy release rates due to shear and peel stresses. The results imply that the peel stress is the principal stress causing cyclic debonding.

  4. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  5. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon.

  6. Anterior cervical interbody constructs: effect of a repetitive compressive force on the endplate.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Nathaniel R; Rim, Byeong Cheol; Tan, Rong; Hickman, Rebecca; Fayyazi, Amir H

    2012-04-01

    Graft subsidence following anterior cervical reconstruction can result in the loss of sagittal balance and recurring foraminal stenosis. This study examined the implant-endplate interface using a cyclic fatigue loading protocol in an attempt to model the subsidence seen in vivo. The superior endplate from 30 cervical vertebrae (C3 to T1) were harvested and biomechanically tested in axial compression with one of three implants: Fibular allograft; titanium mesh cage packed with cancellous chips; and trabecular metal. Each construct was cyclically loaded from 50 to 250 N for 10,000 cycles. Nondestructive cyclic loading of the cervical endplate-implant construct resulted in a stiffer construct independent of the type of the interbody implant tested. The trabecular metal construct demonstrated significantly more axial stability and significantly less subsidence in comparison to the titanium mesh construct. Although the allograft construct resulted in more subsidence than the trabecular metal construct, the difference was not significant and no difference was found when comparing axial stability. For all constructs, the majority of the subsidence during the cyclic testing occurred during the first 500 cycles and was followed by a more gradual settling in the remaining 9,500 cycles.

  7. Micromechanical evaluation of bone microstructures under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Ralph; Boesch, Tobias; Jarak, Drazen; Stauber, Martin; Nazarian, Ara; Tantillo, Michelle; Boyd, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Many bones within the axial and appendicular skeleton are subjected to repetitive, cyclic loading during the course of ordinary daily activities. If this repetitive loading is of sufficient magnitude or duration, fatigue failure of the bone tissue may result. In clinical orthopedics, trabecular fatigue fractures are observed as compressive stress fractures in the proximal femur, vertebrae, calcaneus and tibia, and are often preceded by buckling and bending of microstructural elements. However, the relative importance of bone density and architecture in the aetiology of these fractures is poorly understood. The aim of the study was to investigate failure mechanisms of 3D trabecular bone using micro-computed tomography (mCT). Because of its nondestructive nature, mCT represents an ideal approach for performing not only static measurements of bone architecture but also dynamic measurements of failure initiation and propagation as well as damage accumulation. For the purpose of the study, a novel micro-compression device was devised to measure loaded trabecular bone specimens directly in a micro-tomographic system. A 3D snapshot of the structure under load was taken for each load step in the mCT providing 34 mm nominal resolution. An integrated mini-button load cell in the compression device combined with the displacement computed directly from the mCT scout view was used to record the load-displacement curve. From the series of 3D images, failure of the trabecular architecture could be observed, and in a rod-like type of architecture it could be described by an initial buckling and bending of structural elements followed by a collapse of the overloaded trabeculae. A computational method was developed to quantify individual trabecular strains during failure. The four main steps of the algorithm were (i) sequential image alignment, (ii) identification of landmarks (trabecular nodes), (iii) determine nodal connectivity, and (iv) to compute the nodal displacements and

  8. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time. PMID:26924339

  9. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time.

  10. Static and dynamic mechanics of the temporomandibular joint: plowing forces, joint load and tissue stress.

    PubMed

    Nickel, J; Spilker, R; Iwasaki, L; Gonzalez, Y; McCall, W D; Ohrbach, R; Beatty, M W; Marx, D

    2009-08-01

    OBJECTIVES - To determine the combined effects 1) of stress-field aspect ratio and velocity and compressive strain and 2) joint load, on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc mechanics. SETTING AND SAMPLE POPULATION - Fifty-two subjects (30 female; 22 male) participated in the TMJ load experiments. MATERIAL AND METHODS - In the absence of human tissue, pig TMJ discs were used to determine the effects of variables 1) on surface plowing forces, and to build a biphasic finite element model (bFEM) to test the effect of human joint loads and 2) on tissue stresses. In the laboratory, discs received a 7.6 N static load via an acrylic indenter before cyclic movement. Data were recorded and analysed using anova. To determine human joint loads, Research Diagnostic Criteria calibrated investigators classified subjects based on signs of disc displacement (DD) and pain (+DD/+pain, n = 18; +DD/-pain, n = 17; -DD/-pain, n = 17). Three-dimensional geometries were produced for each subject and used in a computer model to calculate joint loads. RESULTS - The combined effects of compressive strain, and aspect ratio and velocity of stress-field translation correlated with plowing forces (R(2) = 0.85). +DD/-pain subjects produced 60% higher joint loads (ANOVA, p < 0.05), which increased bFEM-calculated compressive strain and peak total normal stress. CONCLUSIONS - Static and dynamic variables of the stress-field and subject-dependent joint load significantly affect disc mechanics.

  11. Cyclic phosphonium ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Mukhlall, Joshua A; Romeo, Alicia R; Gohdo, Masao; Ramati, Sharon; Berman, Marc; Suarez, Sophia N

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ionic liquids (ILs) incorporating cyclic phosphonium cations are a novel category of materials. We report here on the synthesis and characterization of four new cyclic phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ILs with aliphatic and aromatic pendant groups. In addition to the syntheses of these novel materials, we report on a comparison of their properties with their ammonium congeners. These exemplars are slightly less conductive and have slightly smaller self-diffusion coefficients than their cyclic ammonium congeners. PMID:24605146

  12. Effects of cyclic flexural fatigue on porcine bioprosthetic heart valve heterograft biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mirnajafi, Ali; Zubiate, Brett; Sacks, Michael S

    2010-07-01

    Although bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV) remain the primary treatment modality for adult heart valve replacement, continued problems with durability remain. Several studies have implicated flexure as a major damage mode in porcine-derived heterograft biomaterials used in BHV fabrication. Although conventional accelerated wear testing can provide valuable insights into BHV damage phenomena, the constituent tissues are subjected to complex, time-varying deformation modes (i.e., tension and flexure) that do not allow for the control of the amount, direction, and location of flexure. Thus, in this study, customized fatigue testing devices were developed to subject circumferentially oriented porcine BHV tissue strips to controlled cyclic flexural loading. By using this approach, we were able to study layer-specific structural damage induced by cyclic flexural tensile and compressive stresses alone. Cycle levels of 10 x 10(6), 25 x 10(6), and 50 x 10(6) were used, with resulting changes in flexural stiffness and collagen structure assessed. Results indicated that flexural rigidity was markedly reduced after only 10 x 10(6) cycles, and progressively decayed at a lower rate with cycle number thereafter. Moreover, the against-curvature fatigue direction induced the most damage, suggesting that the ventricularis and fibrosa layers have low resistance to cyclic flexural compressive and tensile loads, respectively. The histological analyses indicated progressive collagen fiber delamination as early as 10 x 10(6) cycles but otherwise no change in gross collagen orientation. Our results underscore that porcine-derived heterograft biomaterials are very sensitive to flexural fatigue, with delamination of the tissue layers the primary underlying mechanism. This appears to be in contrast to pericardial BHV, wherein high tensile stresses are considered to be the major cause of structural failure. These findings point toward the need for the development of chemical fixation

  13. Vehicle Integrated Photovoltaics for Compression Ignition Vehicles: An Experimental Investigation of Solar Alkaline Water Electrolysis for Improving Diesel Combustion and a Solar Charging System for Reducing Auxiliary Engine Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negroni, Garry Inocentes

    Vehicle-integrated photovoltaic electricity can be applied towards aspiration of hydrogen-oxygen-steam gas produced through alkaline electrolysis and reductions in auxiliary alternator load for reducing hydrocarbon emissions in low nitrogen oxide indirect-injection compression-ignition engines. Aspiration of 0.516 ± 0.007 liters-per-minute of gas produced through alkaline electrolysis of potassium-hydroxide 2wt.% improves full-load performance; however, part-load performance decreases due to auto-ignition of aspirated gas prior to top-dead center. Alternator load reductions offer improved part-load and full-load performance with practical limitations resulting from accessory electrical loads. In an additive approach, solar electrolysis can electrochemically convert solar photovoltaic electricity into a gas comprised of stoichiometric hydrogen and oxygen gas. Aspiration of this hydrogen-oxygen gas enhances combustion properties decreasing emissions and increased combustion efficiency in light-duty diesel vehicles. The 316L stainless steel (SS) electrolyser plates are arranged with two anodes and three cathodes space with four bipolar plates delineating four stacks in parallel with five cells per stack. The electrolyser was tested using potassium hydroxide 2 wt.% and hydronium 3wt.% at measured voltage and current inputs. The flow rate output from the reservoir cell was measured in parallel with the V and I inputs producing a regression model correlating current input to flow rate. KOH 2 wt.% produced 0.005 LPM/W, while H9O44 3 wt.% produced less at 0.00126 LPM/W. In a subtractive approach, solar energy can be used to charge a larger energy storage device, as is with plug-in electric vehicles, in order to alleviate the engine of the mechanical load placed upon it by the vehicles electrical accessories through the alternator. Solar electrolysis can improve part-load emissions and full-load performance. The average solar-to-battery efficiency based on the OEM rated

  14. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  15. Are Math Grades Cyclical?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gerald J.; Dial, Micah

    1998-01-01

    The cyclical nature of mathematics grades was studied for a cohort of elementary school students from a large metropolitan school district in Texas over six years (average cohort size of 8495). The study used an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model. Results indicate that grades do exhibit a significant cyclical pattern. (SLD)

  16. Affordable Cyclic Voltammetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Greg; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Amend, John R.; Collins, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is an important component of the undergraduate chemical curriculum. Unfortunately, undergraduate students rarely have the opportunity to conduct experiments in cyclic voltammetry owing to the high cost of potentiostats, which are required to control these experiments. By using MicroLab data acquisition interfaces in conjunction…

  17. Genetics Home Reference: cyclic neutropenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cyclic neutropenia cyclic neutropenia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Cyclic neutropenia is a disorder that causes frequent infections and ...

  18. A criterion for high-cycle fatigue life and fatigue limit prediction in biaxial loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejkowski, Łukasz; Skibicki, Dariusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a criterion for high-cycle fatigue life and fatigue strength estimation under periodic proportional and non-proportional cyclic loading. The criterion is based on the mean and maximum values of the second invariant of the stress deviator. Important elements of the criterion are: function of the non-proportionality of fatigue loading and the materials parameter that expresses the materials sensitivity to non-proportional loading. The methods for the materials parameters determination uses three S-N curves: tension-compression, torsion, and any non-proportional loading proposed. The criterion has been verified using experimental data, and the results are included in the paper. These results should be considered as promising. The paper also includes a proposal for multiaxial fatigue models classification due to the approach for the non-proportionality of loading.

  19. The Effect of Sustained Compression on Oxygen Metabolic Transport in the Intervertebral Disc Decreases with Degenerative Changes

    PubMed Central

    Malandrino, Andrea; Noailly, Jérôme; Lacroix, Damien

    2011-01-01

    Intervertebral disc metabolic transport is essential to the functional spine and provides the cells with the nutrients necessary to tissue maintenance. Disc degenerative changes alter the tissue mechanics, but interactions between mechanical loading and disc transport are still an open issue. A poromechanical finite element model of the human disc was coupled with oxygen and lactate transport models. Deformations and fluid flow were linked to transport predictions by including strain-dependent diffusion and advection. The two solute transport models were also coupled to account for cell metabolism. With this approach, the relevance of metabolic and mechano-transport couplings were assessed in the healthy disc under loading-recovery daily compression. Disc height, cell density and material degenerative changes were parametrically simulated to study their influence on the calculated solute concentrations. The effects of load frequency and amplitude were also studied in the healthy disc by considering short periods of cyclic compression. Results indicate that external loads influence the oxygen and lactate regional distributions within the disc when large volume changes modify diffusion distances and diffusivities, especially when healthy disc properties are simulated. Advection was negligible under both sustained and cyclic compression. Simulating degeneration, mechanical changes inhibited the mechanical effect on transport while disc height, fluid content, nucleus pressure and overall cell density reductions affected significantly transport predictions. For the healthy disc, nutrient concentration patterns depended mostly on the time of sustained compression and recovery. The relevant effect of cell density on the metabolic transport indicates the disturbance of cell number as a possible onset for disc degeneration via alteration of the metabolic balance. Results also suggest that healthy disc properties have a positive effect of loading on metabolic transport. Such

  20. The effect of sustained compression on oxygen metabolic transport in the intervertebral disc decreases with degenerative changes.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Andrea; Noailly, Jérôme; Lacroix, Damien

    2011-08-01

    Intervertebral disc metabolic transport is essential to the functional spine and provides the cells with the nutrients necessary to tissue maintenance. Disc degenerative changes alter the tissue mechanics, but interactions between mechanical loading and disc transport are still an open issue. A poromechanical finite element model of the human disc was coupled with oxygen and lactate transport models. Deformations and fluid flow were linked to transport predictions by including strain-dependent diffusion and advection. The two solute transport models were also coupled to account for cell metabolism. With this approach, the relevance of metabolic and mechano-transport couplings were assessed in the healthy disc under loading-recovery daily compression. Disc height, cell density and material degenerative changes were parametrically simulated to study their influence on the calculated solute concentrations. The effects of load frequency and amplitude were also studied in the healthy disc by considering short periods of cyclic compression. Results indicate that external loads influence the oxygen and lactate regional distributions within the disc when large volume changes modify diffusion distances and diffusivities, especially when healthy disc properties are simulated. Advection was negligible under both sustained and cyclic compression. Simulating degeneration, mechanical changes inhibited the mechanical effect on transport while disc height, fluid content, nucleus pressure and overall cell density reductions affected significantly transport predictions. For the healthy disc, nutrient concentration patterns depended mostly on the time of sustained compression and recovery. The relevant effect of cell density on the metabolic transport indicates the disturbance of cell number as a possible onset for disc degeneration via alteration of the metabolic balance. Results also suggest that healthy disc properties have a positive effect of loading on metabolic transport. Such

  1. Self-compression of ultrashort pulses in a quartz-fiber/amplifier system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimov, B. S.; Isaev, S. K.; Luzgin, S. N.; Trukhov, D. V.

    1986-11-01

    A fiber-optic compressor-amplifier (FOCA) which conserves a smooth monopulse shape of the compressed pulse has been developed. Continuous compression in the FOCA scheme with cyclic amplification makes it possible to vary the output pulse duration in a wide range. Several FOCA variants are proposed including pulse compression in a cyclic scheme with a wideband color-center laser-amplifier and compression with stimulated Raman scattering.

  2. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  3. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  4. Biomechanical Evaluation of Human Allograft Compression in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Breck; Yasen, Sam; Amis, Andrew; Wilson, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A common problem encountered during ACL reconstruction is asymmetry of proximal-distal graft diameter leading to tunnel upsizing and potential graft-tunnel mismatch. Human allografts are often oedematous, compounding this issue in the context of multi-ligament reconstructions. Tunnel upsizing reduces bone stock, increases the complexity of multi-bundle surgery and may compromise graft-osseous integration if cortical suspensory fixation is used. Graft compression provides uniform size, allowing easy passage into a smaller tunnel, potentially improving the ‘press-fit’ graft-osseous interaction whilst preserving bone stock. To our knowledge, no biomechanical evaluation of this increasing popular technique has been reported. Hypotheses: Graft compression would not cause any significant changes in the biomechanical properties of human allograft tendon that would be detrimental to the function of an ACL reconstruction. Compressed Bioclense® allograft will increase in size when soaked in Ringer’s solution at 36° improving the ‘press-fit’ within the bone socket, decreasing micro-motion at the graft-osseous interface following ACL reconstruction. Method: In-vitro laboratory study. Sixteen samples of Bioclense® treated peroneus longus allograft were quadrupled into GraftLink constructs randomly divided into control and compressed groups. Cross-sectional area (CSA) was determined using alginate moulds and specimens immersed, under tension, in Ringer’s solution at 36.5°. CSA was measured at 8 hours. A further 32 samples were randomised and evaluated under cyclic loading of 70N-220N (1020 cycles) followed by test to failure. A further 30 samples were quadrupled into GraftLink constructs and mounted within porcine femurs using suspensory fixation. High resolution videometer recorded motion at the graft-osseous interface under the same cyclic loading protocol. An independent samples t-test was used to compare changes in CSA whilst a one-way ANOVA was

  5. Cyclic control stick

    DOEpatents

    Whitaker, Charles N.; Zimmermann, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclic control stick of the type used in helicopters for reducing the safety hazards associated with such a mechanism in the event of a crewman being thrown violently into contact with the cyclic control stick resulting from a crash or the like. The cyclic control stick is configured to break away upon the exertion of an impact force which exceeds a predetermined value and/or is exerted for more than a momentary time duration. The cyclic control stick is also configured to be adjustable so as to locate the grip thereof as far away from the crewman as possible for safety reasons without comprising the comfort of the crewman or the use of the control stick, and a crushable pad is provided on the top of the grip for impact energy absorbing purposes.

  6. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  7. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  8. Cyclic steps on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokawa, M.; Izumi, N.; Naito, K.; Parker, G.; Yamada, T.; Greve, R.

    2016-05-01

    Boundary waves often form at the interface between ice and fluid flowing adjacent to it, such as ripples under river ice covers, and steps on the bed of supraglacial meltwater channels. They may also be formed by wind, such as the megadunes on the Antarctic ice sheet. Spiral troughs on the polar ice caps of Mars have been interpreted to be cyclic steps formed by katabatic wind blowing over ice. Cyclic steps are relatives of upstream-migrating antidunes. Cyclic step formation on ice is not only a mechanical but also a thermodynamic process. There have been very few studies on the formation of either cyclic steps or upstream-migrating antidunes on ice. In this study, we performed flume experiments to reproduce cyclic steps on ice by flowing water, and found that trains of steps form when the Froude number is larger than unity. The features of those steps allow them to be identified as ice-bed analogs of cyclic steps in alluvial and bedrock rivers. We performed a linear stability analysis and obtained a physical explanation of the formation of upstream-migrating antidunes, i.e., precursors of cyclic steps. We compared the results of experiments with the predictions of the analysis and found the observed steps fall in the range where the analysis predicts interfacial instability. We also found that short antidune-like undulations formed as a precursor to the appearance of well-defined steps. This fact suggests that such antidune-like undulations correspond to the instability predicted by the analysis and are precursors of cyclic steps.

  9. Cyclic polymers from alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christopher D.; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Veige, Adam S.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer.

  10. Cyclic polymers from alkynes.

    PubMed

    Roland, Christopher D; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A; Wagener, Kenneth B; Veige, Adam S

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer. PMID:27442285

  11. Survey of Header Compression Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishac, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    This report provides a summary of several different header compression techniques. The different techniques included are: (1) Van Jacobson's header compression (RFC 1144); (2) SCPS (Space Communications Protocol Standards) header compression (SCPS-TP, SCPS-NP); (3) Robust header compression (ROHC); and (4) The header compression techniques in RFC2507 and RFC2508. The methodology for compression and error correction for these schemes are described in the remainder of this document. All of the header compression schemes support compression over simplex links, provided that the end receiver has some means of sending data back to the sender. However, if that return path does not exist, then neither Van Jacobson's nor SCPS can be used, since both rely on TCP (Transmission Control Protocol). In addition, under link conditions of low delay and low error, all of the schemes perform as expected. However, based on the methodology of the schemes, each scheme is likely to behave differently as conditions degrade. Van Jacobson's header compression relies heavily on the TCP retransmission timer and would suffer an increase in loss propagation should the link possess a high delay and/or bit error rate (BER). The SCPS header compression scheme protects against high delay environments by avoiding delta encoding between packets. Thus, loss propagation is avoided. However, SCPS is still affected by an increased BER (bit-error-rate) since the lack of delta encoding results in larger header sizes. Next, the schemes found in RFC2507 and RFC2508 perform well for non-TCP connections in poor conditions. RFC2507 performance with TCP connections is improved by various techniques over Van Jacobson's, but still suffers a performance hit with poor link properties. Also, RFC2507 offers the ability to send TCP data without delta encoding, similar to what SCPS offers. ROHC is similar to the previous two schemes, but adds additional CRCs (cyclic redundancy check) into headers and improves

  12. Modeling Step-Strain Relaxation and Cyclic Deformations of Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A.R.; Mead, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Data for step-strain relaxation and cyclic compressive deformations of highly viscous short elastomer cylinders are modeled using a large strain rubber viscoelastic constitutive theory with a rate-independent friction stress term added. In the tests, both small and large amplitude cyclic compressive strains, in the range of 1% to 10%, were superimposed on steady state compressed strains, in the range of 5% to 20%, for frequencies of 1 and 10 Hz. The elastomer cylinders were conditioned prior to each test to soften them. The constants in the viscoclastic-friction constitutive theory are determined by employing a nonlinear least-squares method to fit the analytical stresses for a Maxwell model, which includes friction, to measured relaxation stresses obtained from a 20% step-strain compression test. The simulation of the relaxation data with the nonlinear model is successful at compressive strains of 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%. Simulations of hysteresis stresses for enforced cyclic compressive strains of 20% +/- 5% are made with the model calibrated by the relaxation data. The predicted hysteresis stresses are lower than the measured stresses.

  13. On the cyclic stress-strain behaviour of a Ni-base superalloy at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Vakil; Wahi, R. P.; Chen, W.; Yun, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    The cyclic stress-strain behavior of Nimonic alloy PE16 was studied at room temperature and at different aging conditions to determine whether the plateau in the cyclic stress-strain curve (CSSC) reported by Arbuthnot (1982) is typical of the room temperature behavior and/or some specific initial microstructural states. Specimen blanks were heat-treated in batches in Ar/H2 (98/2) atmosphere to produce gamma-prime precipitates of different average sizes, but with the volume fraction of gamma-prime precipitates kept constant at about 7 percent at all the heat-treatment conditions. Total axial strain controlled LCF tests were conducted under fully reversed loading (R = -1) at a constant strain rate of 0.004/s, using a servohydraulic machine. The load response in tension and compression was recorded continually, and stress-strain hysteresis loops were recorded at frequent intervals. In the present investigation, the CSSCs of the P16 alloy at room temperature did not display the plateaus reported by Arbuthnot.

  14. Cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in ceramics: Long and small crack behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, A.A.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    Stress/life (S/N) and cyclic fatigue-crack growth properties are studied in a Mg-PSZ, with particular reference to the role of crack size. S/N data from unnotched specimens show markedly lower lives under tension-compression compared to tension-tension loading; fatigue limits'' (at 10{sup 8} cycles) for the former case approach 50% of the tensile strength. Under tension-tension loading, cyclic crack-growth rates of long'' (> 3 mm) cracks are found to be power-law dependent on the stress-intensity range {Delta}K with a fatigue threshold, {Delta}K{sub TH}, of order 50% K{sub c}. Conversely, naturally-occurring small'' (1 to 100 {mu}m) surface cracks were observed to grow at {Delta}K levels some 2 to 3 times smaller than {Delta}K{sub TH}. The implications of such data for structural design with ceramics is briefly discussed. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Exploring the influence of loading geometry on the plastic flow properties of geological materials: Results from combined torsion + axial compression tests on calcite rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey-Crump, S. J.; Xiao, W. F.; Mecklenburgh, J.; Rutter, E. H.; May, S. E.

    2016-07-01

    For technical reasons, virtually all plastic deformation experiments on geological materials have been performed in either pure shear or simple shear. These special case loading geometries are rather restrictive for those seeking insight into how microstructure evolves under the more general loading geometries that occur during natural deformation. Moreover, they are insufficient to establish how plastic flow properties might vary with the 3rd invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor (J3) which describes the stress configuration, and so applications that use those flow properties (e.g. glaciological and geodynamical modelling) may be correspondingly compromised. We describe an inexpensive and relatively straightforward modification to the widely used Paterson rock deformation apparatus that allows torsion experiments to be performed under simultaneously applied axial loads. We illustrate the performance of this modification with the results of combined stress experiments performed on Carrara marble and Solnhofen limestone at 500°-600 °C and confining pressures of 300 MPa. The flow stresses are best described by the Drucker yield function which includes J3-dependence. However, that J3-dependence is small. Hence for these initially approximately isotropic calcite rocks, flow stresses are adequately described by the J3-independent von Mises yield criterion that is widely used in deformation modelling. Loading geometry does, however, have a profound influence on the type and rate of development of crystallographic preferred orientation, and hence of mechanical anisotropy. The apparatus modification extends the range of loading geometries that can be used to investigate microstructural evolution, as well as providing greater scope for determining the shape of the yield surface in plastically anisotropic materials.

  16. Mechanical response of unidirectional boron/aluminum under combined loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    Three test methods were employed to characterize the response of unidirectional Boron/Aluminum metal matrix composite material under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions, namely, losipescu shear, off-axis tension and compression. The characterization of the elastic and plastic response includes the elastic material properties, yielding and subsequent hardening of the unidirectional composite under different stress ratios in the material principal coordinate system. Yield loci generated for different stress ratios are compared for the three different test methods, taking into account residual stresses and specimen geometry. Subsequently, the yield locus for in-plane shear is compared with the prediction of an analytical, micromechanical model. The influence of the scatter in the experimental data on the predicted yield surface is also analyzed. Lastly, the experimental material strengths in tension and compression are correlated with the maximum stress and the Tsai-Wu failure criterion.

  17. Thermodynamic rigid cushion loading indenter: a buttock-shaped temperature and humidity measurement system for cushioning surfaces under anatomical compression conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Pell, Martin; Hirose, Hideyuki; Nicholson, Graham; Call, Evan

    2009-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the heat and water vapor dissipation characteristics of wheelchair cushions and seating systems while under simulated loading conditions. Thermal interaction between the body and seating surfaces can result in elevated tissue temperature and moisture build-up, which may increase the risk of pressure ulcers associated with prolonged ischemia or due to macerative damage. Both the materials and geometry of commercial seating systems are thought to influence the body-support surface microclimate. A thermodynamic rigid cushion loading indenter (TRCLI) has been developed to simulate the thermal and loading conditions of the body on seating surfaces. Results are reported for 32 commercially available wheelchair cushions. The results differentiate the cushions into clusters of comparable properties that offer the potential for classification of support surfaces based on their heat and water vapor dissipation performance. This study has shown that deducing the heat and water vapor dissipation characteristics of a seating system from material physical properties is of limited value because of the influences of particular design features of combinations of materials. Testing of individual products with the use of the TRCLI can, however, reliably differentiate wheelchair cushions by their ability to dissipate heat and water vapor. PMID:20104417

  18. Best compression: Reciprocating or rotary?

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, C.

    1997-07-01

    A compressor is a device used to increase the pressure of a compressible fluid. The inlet pressure can vary from a deep vacuum to a high positive pressure. The discharge pressure can range from subatmospheric levels to tens of thousands of pounds per square inch. Compressors come in numerous forms, but for oilfield applications there are two primary types, reciprocating and rotary. Both reciprocating and rotary compressors are grouped in the intermittent mode of compression. Intermittent is cyclic in nature, in that a specific quantity of gas is ingested by the compressor, acted upon and discharged before the cycle is repeated. Reciprocating compression is the most common form of compression used for oilfield applications. Rotary screw compressors have a long history but are relative newcomers to oilfield applications. The rotary screw compressor-technically a helical rotor compressor-dates back to 1878. That was when the first rotary screw was manufactured for the purpose of compressing air. Today thousands of rotary screw compression packages are being used throughout the world to compress natural gas.

  19. Comparison of the Mechanical Characteristics of a Universal Small Biplane Plating Technique Without Compression Screw and Single Anatomic Plate With Compression Screw.

    PubMed

    Dayton, Paul; Ferguson, Joe; Hatch, Daniel; Santrock, Robert; Scanlan, Sean; Smith, Bret

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the mechanical characteristics of biplane locked plating in small bone fixation, the present study compared the stability under cyclic cantilever loading of a 2-plate locked biplane (BPP) construct without interfragmentary compression with that of a single-plate locked construct with an additional interfragmentary screw (SPS) using surrogate bone models simulating Lapidus arthrodesis. In static ultimate plantar bending, the BPP construct failed at significantly greater load than did the SPS construct (556.2 ± 37.1 N versus 241.6 ± 6.3 N, p = .007). For cyclic failure testing in plantar bending at a 180-N starting load, the BPP construct failed at a significantly greater number of cycles (158,322 ± 50,609 versus 13,718 ± 10,471 cycles) and failure load (242.5 ± 25.0 N versus 180.0 ± 0.0 N) than the SPS construct (p = .002). For cyclic failure testing in plantar bending at a 120-N starting load, the results were not significantly different between the BPP and SPS constructs for the number of cycles (207,646 ± 45,253 versus 159,334 ± 69,430) or failure load (205.0 ± 22.4 N versus 185.0 ± 33.5 N; p = .300). For cyclic testing with 90° offset loading (i.e., medial to lateral bending) at a 120-N starting load, all 5 BPP constructs (tension side) and 2 of the 5 SPS constructs reached 250,000 cycles without failure. Overall, the present study found the BPP construct to have superior or equivalent stability in multiplanar orientations of force application in both static and fatigue testing. Thus, the concept of biplane locked plating, using 2 low profile plates and unicortical screw insertion, shows promise in small bone fixation, because it provides consistent stability in multiplanar orientations, making it universally adaptable to many clinical situations.

  20. Stress ratio effect on cyclic debonding in adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Ramamurthy, G.; Rezaizdeh, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the stress ratio effect on cyclic debond growth behavior in adhesively bonded composite joints. The system studied consisted of graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with a toughened epoxy adhesive. This study showed that the strain energy release rate range was the driving factor for cyclic debonding of the tested bonded system when subjected to cyclic loads with different stress ratios for both mode I and mixed mode I-II loadings.

  1. Cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of a simple composite to composite bonded joint was analyzed. The cracked lap shear specimen subjected to constant amplitude cyclic loading was studied. Two specimen geometries were tested for each bonded system: (1) a strap adherend of 16 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 8 plies; and (2) a strap adherend of 8 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 16 plies. In all specimens the fatigue failure was in the form of cyclic debonding with some 0 deg fiber pull off from the strap adherend. The debond always grew in the region of adhesive that had the highest mode (peel) loading and that region was close to the adhesive strap interface.

  2. Cyclic tensile strain upregulates collagen synthesis in isolated tendon fascicles

    SciTech Connect

    Screen, Hazel R.C. . E-mail: H.R.C.Screen@qmul.ac.uk; Shelton, Julia C.; Bader, Dan L.; Lee, David A.

    2005-10-21

    Mechanical stimulation has been implicated as an important regulatory factor in tendon homeostasis. In this study, a custom-designed tensile loading system was used to apply controlled mechanical stimulation to isolated tendon fascicles, in order to examine the effects of 5% cyclic tensile strain at 1 Hz on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. Sample viability and gross structural composition were maintained over a 24 h loading period. Data demonstrated no statistically significant differences in cell proliferation or glycosaminoglycan production, however, collagen synthesis was upregulated with the application of cyclic tensile strain over the 24 h period. Moreover, a greater proportion of the newly synthesised matrix was retained within the sample after loading. These data provide evidence of altered anabolic activity within tendon in response to mechanical stimuli, and suggest the importance of cyclic tensile loading for the maintenance of the collagen hierarchy within tendon.

  3. Random cyclic matrices.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sudhir R; Srivastava, Shashi C L

    2008-09-01

    We present a Gaussian ensemble of random cyclic matrices on the real field and study their spectral fluctuations. These cyclic matrices are shown to be pseudosymmetric with respect to generalized parity. We calculate the joint probability distribution function of eigenvalues and the spacing distributions analytically and numerically. For small spacings, the level spacing distribution exhibits either a Gaussian or a linear form. Furthermore, for the general case of two arbitrary complex eigenvalues, leaving out the spacings among real eigenvalues, and, among complex conjugate pairs, we find that the spacing distribution agrees completely with the Wigner distribution for a Poisson process on a plane. The cyclic matrices occur in a wide variety of physical situations, including disordered linear atomic chains and the Ising model in two dimensions. These exact results are also relevant to two-dimensional statistical mechanics and nu -parametrized quantum chromodynamics. PMID:18851127

  4. Effects of Compressibility on the Maximum Lift Characteristics and Spanwise Load Distribution of a 12-Foot-Span Fighter-Type Wing of NACA 230-Series Airfoil Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, F E

    1945-01-01

    Lift characteristics and pressure distribution for a NACA 230 wing were investigated for an angle of attack range of from -10 to +24 degrees and Mach range of from 0.2 to 0.7. Maximum lift coefficient increased up to a Mach number of 0.3, decreased rapidly to a Mach number of 0.55, and then decreased moderately. At high speeds, maximum lift coefficient was reached at from 10 to 12 degrees beyond the stalling angle. In high-speed stalls, resultant load underwent a moderate shift outward.

  5. Flow in cyclic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, William H.; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, we use a known duality between expanding and contracting cosmologies to construct a dual of the inflationary flow hierarchy applicable to contracting cosmologies such as ekpyrotic and cyclic models. We show that the inflationary flow equations are invariant under the duality and therefore apply equally well to inflation or to cyclic cosmology. We construct a self-consistent small-parameter approximation dual to the slow-roll approximation in inflation, and calculate the power spectrum of perturbations in this limit. We also recover the matter-dominated contracting solution of Wands, and the recently proposed adiabatic ekpyrosis solution.

  6. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOEpatents

    Nemser, Stuart M.

    2005-05-03

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In the first part of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the second part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. In one aspect of this invention, a vacuum is drawn in the membrane separation unit thus reducing overall VOC emissions.

  7. Realistic Cyclic Magnetic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, L. G.

    2012-09-01

    This work presents a complete cyclic cosmological scenario based on nonlinear magnetic field. It is constructed from a model composed of five fluids, namely baryonic matter, dark matter, radiation, neutrinos and a cosmological magnetic field. The first four fluids are treated in the standard way and the fifth fluid, the magnetic field, is described by a nonlinear electrodynamics. The free parameters are fitted by observational data (SNIa, CMB, extragalactic magnetic fields, etc.) and by simple theoretical considerations. As a result arises a cyclic cosmological model that preserves the main successes of the standard Big Bang model and solves some other problems such as the initial singularity, the present acceleration and the Big Rip.

  8. Influence of compressive load conditions and thickness on the two-way shape memory behavior in tube-shaped NiTi alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Young Ik; Shin, Dong Kil; Lee, Chang Ho; Lee, Jung Ju

    2012-10-01

    The two-way shape memory behavior of Ni55Ti45 was investigated to develop a tube-shaped NiTi actuator which could generate a large amount of force. The two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) was induced by thermal cycling under various amounts of constant compressive stress. Six specimens with the same outer diameter and different thickness were used to apply the TWSME to an actuator. A fast saturation tendency of the recovery strain was shown through training at each level of constant stress, after which the two-way shape memory strain was quantitatively measured during thermal cycling for each level of applied stress. From the results, the maximum two-way strain value was obtained after training at a constant level of stress and then decreased thereafter. In addition, the two-way strain was found to depend on the thickness of the tube-shaped specimen. All specimens could be divided into two groups depending on the rate of increase in the two-way strain. After two-way strain was obtained, the two-way recovery stress was measured to verify the performance of the sample as an actuator. The results showed that the two-way recovery stress behavior was similar to the two-way strain; if the optimal thickness of the specimen and the stress applied for training are used for the development of the TWSME, tube-shaped NiTi using the TWSME can replace one-way shape memory alloys.

  9. Cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To analyze the fatigue behavior of a simple composite-to-composite bonded joint, a combined experimental and analytical study of the cracked-lap-shear specimen subjected to constant-amplitude cyclic loading was undertaken. Two bonded systems were studied: T300/5208 graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with adhesives EC 3445 and with FM-300. For each bonded system, two specimen geometries were tested: (1) a strap adherend of 16 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 8 plies, and (2) a strap adherend of 8 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 16 plies. In all specimens tested, the fatigue failure was in the form of cyclic debonding with some 0 deg fiber pull-off from the strap adherend. The debond always grew in the region of adhesive that had the highest mode I (peel) loading and that region was close to the adhesive-strap interface. Furthermore, the measured cyclic debond growth rates correlated well with total strain energy release rates G(T) as well as with its components G(I) (peel) and G(II) (shear) for the mixed-mode loading in the present study.

  10. Cyclic creep and anelastic relaxation analysis of an ODS superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardone, Vincent C.; Kimmerle, William L.; Tien, John K.

    1986-09-01

    This paper documents the effect of stress and temperature on the cyclic minimum strain rate at two different loading frequencies for the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) superalloy, INCONEL* MA 6000. The apparent stress exponent and activation energy for cyclic creep at both frequencies studied are shown to be greater than values observed for static creep. The large values of the stress exponent and activation energy for cyclic creep are proposed to result from anelastic strain storage delaying nonrecoverable creep during the on-load portion of the cyclic creep loading, such that the “effective stress” driving nonrecoverable creep is only a small fraction of the applied stress. In addition, the temperature dependence of the anelastic relaxation that occurs during the off-load portion of the cyclic creep loading is determined. The activation energy found for the relaxation process is equal to about one-half that for self-diffusion in nickel. A mechanism of localized climb of dislocations over the oxide dispersoids present in INCONEL MA 6000 is postulated to account for the observed activation energy of the relaxation process.

  11. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Benschoten, James J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-part experiment designed to introduce cyclic voltammetry to graduate/undergraduate students. Part 1 demonstrates formal reduction potential, redox electron transfer, diffusion coefficient, and electrochemical reversibility. Part 2 investigates electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen. Part 3 examines such experimental variables…

  12. Radioimmunoassay for cyclic nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.S.

    1984-02-21

    An improved radioimmunoassay for the determination of cyclic nucleotides in body fluids which comprises adding a source of divalent cation prior to assay minimizes the effects of both endogenous calcium ion and EDTA used as an anticoagulant in blood plasma samples.

  13. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bradley E.; Kabir, Md. E.; Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  14. Analytical model for ramp compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Quanxi; Jiang, Shaoen; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Feng; Hu, Yun; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-08-01

    An analytical ramp compression model for condensed matter, which can provide explicit solutions for isentropic compression flow fields, is reported. A ramp compression experiment can be easily designed according to the capability of the loading source using this model. Specifically, important parameters, such as the maximum isentropic region width, material properties, profile of the pressure pulse, and the pressure pulse duration can be reasonably allocated or chosen. To demonstrate and study this model, laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments and code simulation are performed successively, and the factors influencing the accuracy of the model are studied. The application and simulation show that this model can be used as guidance in the design of a ramp compression experiment. However, it is verified that further optimization work is required for a precise experimental design.

  15. Compressive strength of carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Prandy, J.M. ); Hahn, H.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Most composites are weaker in compression than in tension, which is due to the poor compressive strength of the load bearing fibers. The present paper discusses the compressive strengths and failure modes of 11 different carbon fibers: PAN-AS1, AS4, IM6, IM7, T700, T300, GY-30, pitch-75, ultra high modulus (UHM), high modulus (HM), and high strength (HS). The compressive strength was determined by embedding a fiber bundle in a transparent epoxy matrix and testing in compression. The resin allows for the containment and observation of failure during and after testing while also providing lateral support to the fibers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the global failure modes of the fibers.

  16. Combined Load Test Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    2010-01-01

    A test fixture has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center that has the capability of applying compression load and shear load simultaneously to a test specimen. The test specimen size is 24-inches by 28-inches. This report describes the test specimen design, test specimen preparation, fixture assembly in the test machine, and a test operation plan.

  17. A model for cyclic mechanical reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhai; Kong, Fang; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical force regulates a broad range of molecular interactions in biology. Three types of counterintuitive mechanical regulation of receptor–ligand dissociation have been described. Catch bonds are strengthened by constant forces, as opposed to slip bonds that are weakened by constant forces. The phenomenon that bonds become stronger with prior application of cyclic forces is termed cyclic mechanical reinforcement (CMR). Slip and catch bonds have respectively been explained by two-state models. However, they assume fast equilibration between internal states and hence are inadequate for CMR. Here we propose a three-state model for CMR where both loading and unloading regulate the transition of bonds among the short-lived, intermediate, and long-lived state. Cyclic forces favor bonds in the long-lived state, hence greatly prolonging their lifetimes. The three-state model explains the force history effect and agrees with the experimental CMR effect of integrin α5β1–fibronectin interaction. This model helps decipher the distinctive ways by which molecular bonds are mechanically strengthened: catch bonds by constant forces and CMR by cyclic forces. The different types of mechanical regulation may enable the cell to fine tune its mechanotransduction via membrane receptors. PMID:27786286

  18. Engineering cyclic peptide toxins.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard J; Craik, David J

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-based toxins have attracted much attention in recent years for their exciting potential applications in drug design and development. This interest has arisen because toxins are highly potent and selectively target a range of physiologically important receptors. However, peptides suffer from a number of disadvantages, including poor in vivo stability and poor bioavailability. A number of naturally occurring cyclic peptides have been discovered in plants, animals, and bacteria that have exceptional stability and potentially ameliorate these disadvantages. The lessons learned from studies of the structures, stabilities, and biological activities of these cyclic peptides can be applied to the reengineering of toxins that are not naturally cyclic but are amenable to cyclization. In this chapter, we describe solid-phase chemical synthetic methods for the reengineering of peptide toxins to improve their suitability as therapeutic, diagnostic, or imaging agents. The focus is on small disulfide-rich peptides from the venoms of cone snails and scorpions, but the technology is potentially widely applicable to a number of other peptide-based toxins. PMID:22230565

  19. Video Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Optivision developed two PC-compatible boards and associated software under a Goddard Space Flight Center Small Business Innovation Research grant for NASA applications in areas such as telerobotics, telesciences and spaceborne experimentation. From this technology, the company used its own funds to develop commercial products, the OPTIVideo MPEG Encoder and Decoder, which are used for realtime video compression and decompression. They are used in commercial applications including interactive video databases and video transmission. The encoder converts video source material to a compressed digital form that can be stored or transmitted, and the decoder decompresses bit streams to provide high quality playback.

  20. Functional Fatigue and Tension-Compression Asymmetry in [001]-Oriented Co49Ni21Ga30 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krooß, P.; Niendorf, T.; Kadletz, P. M.; Somsen, C.; Gutmann, M. J.; Chumlyakov, Y. I.; Schmahl, W. W.; Eggeler, G.; Maier, H. J.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional shape memory alloys cannot be employed for applications in the elevated temperature regime due to rapid functional degradation. Co-Ni-Ga has shown the potential to be used up to temperatures of about 400 °C due to a fully reversible superelastic stress-strain response. However, available results only highlight the superelastic response for single cycle tests. So far, no data addressing cyclic loading and functional fatigue are available. In order to close this gap, the current study reports on the cyclic degradation behavior and tension-compression asymmetry in [001]-oriented Co49Ni21Ga30 single crystals at elevated temperatures. The cyclic stress-strain response of the material under displacement controlled superelastic loading conditions was found to be dictated by the number of active martensite variants and different resulting stabilization effects. Co-Ni-Ga shows a large superelastic temperature window of about 400 °C under tension and compression, but a linear Clausius-Clapeyron relationship could only be observed up to a temperature of 200 °C. In the present experiments, the samples were subjected to 1000 cycles at different temperatures. Degradation mechanisms were characterized by neutron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results in this study confirm the potential of these alloys for damping applications at elevated temperatures.

  1. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V.

    2014-01-29

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

  2. Streaming Compression of Hexahedral Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Isenburg, M; Courbet, C

    2010-02-03

    We describe a method for streaming compression of hexahedral meshes. Given an interleaved stream of vertices and hexahedral our coder incrementally compresses the mesh in the presented order. Our coder is extremely memory efficient when the input stream documents when vertices are referenced for the last time (i.e. when it contains topological finalization tags). Our coder then continuously releases and reuses data structures that no longer contribute to compressing the remainder of the stream. This means in practice that our coder has only a small fraction of the whole mesh in memory at any time. We can therefore compress very large meshes - even meshes that do not file in memory. Compared to traditional, non-streaming approaches that load the entire mesh and globally reorder it during compression, our algorithm trades a less compact compressed representation for significant gains in speed, memory, and I/O efficiency. For example, on the 456k hexahedra 'blade' mesh, our coder is twice as fast and uses 88 times less memory (only 3.1 MB) with the compressed file increasing about 3% in size. We also present the first scheme for predictive compression of properties associated with hexahedral cells.

  3. Evolution of cyclic plasticity during rolling contact fatigue of a case-hardened bearing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Abir

    A combined experimental and numerical methodology is developed for the investigation of progressive evolution of subsurface plasticity during prolonged rolling contact fatigue (RCF) loading of a M50 NiL case hardened steel. Three balls-on-rod RCF tests have been performed on a M50 NiL steel rod a using silicon nitride balls over several hundred million cycles at 5.5 GPa contact stress level. A systematic investigation of the evolution of surface contact area between the ball and the rod reveals that the contact pressure evolves continuously during several hundred million cycles of RCF due to substantial surface and subsurface plasticity. Various stages of plastic deformation has been identified based on the nature of the evolution of contact patch during the first phase of study. In the second phase of research, systematic investigation on the nucleation and the growth of the plastically deformed subsurface regions in a case hardened M-50 NiL steel rod has been done. The microhardness measurements within the RCF affected subsurface regions revealed existence of hardened and softened regions, which grow in size and severity with stress cycles. A mechanistic explanation behind the formation of the hardened and softened regions inside the plastic zone and its growth in size and severity has been proposed in the second phase of the work. In the final phase of the study, we propose a generalized methodology to determine the cyclic constitutive response of the various case layers of M-50 NiL steel. A 3-dimenstional finite element (FE) model of the ball-on-rod test was simulated in ABAQUS and the obtained von Mises stresses were used along with measured microhardness values and Neuber's rule to obtain the cyclic strain amplitudes at various points inside the RCF affected region. The S-N diagram of M-50 NiL steel is constructed and the fatigue limit of the material under RCF loading is determined after considering the effect of compressive mean stress. It has been shown

  4. Total parenteral nutrition-induced cyclic hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Jannace, P W; Lerman, R H; Dennis, R C; Aalyson, M; Yeston, N S

    1988-07-01

    Excessive rates of carbohydrate infusion during total parenteral nutrition (TPN) have been reported to cause hypercapnia leading to respiratory failure or inability to wean from a ventilator. This case history illustrates the hitherto unreported syndrome of cyclic hypercapnia resulting from high rates of carbohydrate infusion during peak TPN flow rates when TPN was provided in a cyclic fashion. The patient was given TPN daily over an 18 1/2-h period followed by 5 1/2 h without nutritional support. Elevated CO2 production, increased respiratory quotient, hypercapnia, and inability to wean from a ventilator occurred during peak cycle TPN flow rates. When the same carbohydrate load was infused continuously over a 24-h period, CO2 production, respiratory quotient and PaCO2 were reduced. The patient was then able to tolerate periods of unassisted ventilation.

  5. Design of a cyclic pressure bioreactor for the ex vivo study of aortic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Schipke, Kimberly J; To, S D Filip; Warnock, James N

    2011-01-01

    The aortic valve, located between the left ventricle and the aorta, allows for unidirectional blood flow, preventing backflow into the ventricle. Aortic valve leaflets are composed of interstitial cells suspended within an extracellular matrix (ECM) and are lined with an endothelial cell monolayer. The valve withstands a harsh, dynamic environment and is constantly exposed to shear, flexion, tension, and compression. Research has shown calcific lesions in diseased valves occur in areas of high mechanical stress as a result of endothelial disruption or interstitial matrix damage(1-3). Hence, it is not surprising that epidemiological studies have shown high blood pressure to be a leading risk factor in the onset of aortic valve disease(4). The only treatment option currently available for valve disease is surgical replacement of the diseased valve with a bioprosthetic or mechanical valve(5). Improved understanding of valve biology in response to physical stresses would help elucidate the mechanisms of valve pathogenesis. In turn, this could help in the development of non-invasive therapies such as pharmaceutical intervention or prevention. Several bioreactors have been previously developed to study the mechanobiology of native or engineered heart valves(6-9). Pulsatile bioreactors have also been developed to study a range of tissues including cartilage(10), bone(11) and bladder(12). The aim of this work was to develop a cyclic pressure system that could be used to elucidate the biological response of aortic valve leaflets to increased pressure loads. The system consisted of an acrylic chamber in which to place samples and produce cyclic pressure, viton diaphragm solenoid valves to control the timing of the pressure cycle, and a computer to control electrical devices. The pressure was monitored using a pressure transducer, and the signal was conditioned using a load cell conditioner. A LabVIEW program regulated the pressure using an analog device to pump compressed

  6. Compressed Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv; Gordon, Assaf; Brand, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades we have steadily increased our knowledge on the genetic basis of many severe disorders. Nevertheless, there are still great challenges in applying this knowledge routinely in the clinic, mainly due to the relatively tedious and expensive process of genotyping. Since the genetic variations that underlie the disorders are relatively rare in the population, they can be thought of as a sparse signal. Using methods and ideas from compressed sensing and group testing, we have developed a cost-effective genotyping protocol to detect carriers for severe genetic disorders. In particular, we have adapted our scheme to a recently developed class of high throughput DNA sequencing technologies. The mathematical framework presented here has some important distinctions from the ’traditional’ compressed sensing and group testing frameworks in order to address biological and technical constraints of our setting. PMID:21451737

  7. Application of cyclic J-integral to low cycle fatigue crack growth of Japanese carbon steel pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, N.; Fujioka, T.; Kashima, K.

    1997-04-01

    Piping for LWR power plants is required to satisfy the LBB concept for postulated (not actual) defects. With this in mind, research has so far been conducted on the fatigue crack growth under cyclic loading, and on the ductile crack growth under excessive loading. It is important, however, for the evaluation of the piping structural integrity under seismic loading condition, to understand the fracture behavior under dynamic and cyclic loading conditions, that accompanies large-scale yielding. CRIEPI together with Hitachi have started a collaborative research program on dynamic and/or cyclic fracture of Japanese carbon steel (STS410) pipes in 1991. Fundamental tensile property tests were conducted to examine the effect of strain rate on tensile properties. Cracked pipe fracture tests under some loading conditions were also performed to investigate the effect of dynamic and/or cyclic loading on fracture behavior. Based on the analytical considerations for the above tests, the method to evaluate the failure life for a cracked pipe under cyclic loading was developed and verified. Cyclic J-integral was introduced to predict cyclic crack growth up to failure. This report presents the results of tensile property tests, cracked pipe fracture tests, and failure life analysis. The proposed method was applied to the cracked pipe fracture tests. The effect of dynamic and/or cyclic loading on pipe fracture was also investigated.

  8. Cyclic Plastic Deformation, Fatigue, and the Associated Micro-Mechanisms in Magnesium: From Single Crystal to Polycrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qin

    Magnesium and its alloys have received substantial interests as the government initiatives on energy saving and environment protection demand an increasing use of lightweight materials in structural parts, especially in transportation industries. A good understanding of fatigue behavior in magnesium is critical to ensure the reliability and durability of the magnesium components. Unlike the body centered cubic and face centered cubic metals, fundamental knowledge concerning the cyclic deformation and fatigue in hexagonal close packed magnesium is limited. The current research aims at a better understanding of the micro-mechanisms associated with the cyclic deformation and fatigue of magnesium. Magnesium single crystal was chosen to study the fundamental twinning/detwinning process while extruded polycrystalline pure magnesium was studied for the fatigue damage mechanisms. Cyclic deformation and the corresponding morphology evolution of {1 0 1¯ 2} twinning-detwinning-retwinning are, for the first time, characterized in magnesium single crystal under fully reserved strain-controlled tension-compression utilizing in situ optical microscopy. As loading cycles are increased, the activity of twinning-detwinning-retwinning gradually decreases. Microscopy after fatigue shows that the matrix region having experienced repeated twinning-detwinning cannot be completely detwinned to its original crystal orientation. Fragmented secondary tension twins are found to result from twin-twin interactions. Various twin-twin interaction structures exist in fatigued magnesium single crystal: quilted-looking twin structure, "apparent crossing" twin structure, and double tension twin structure. According to the crystallography of magnesium, twin-twin interactions are classified into Type I for two twin variants sharing the same zone axis and Type II for two twins with different zone axes. For Type I twin-twin interactions, one twin does not transmit across the twin boundary and into the

  9. Compressive fatigue and fracture toughness behavior of injectable, settable bone cements.

    PubMed

    Harmata, Andrew J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Granke, Mathilde; Guelcher, Scott A; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2015-11-01

    Bone grafts used to repair weight-bearing tibial plateau fractures often experience cyclic loading, and there is a need for bone graft substitutes that prevent failure of fixation and subsequent morbidity. However, the specific mechanical properties required for resorbable grafts to optimize structural compatibility with native bone have yet to be established. While quasi-static tests are utilized to assess weight-bearing ability, compressive strength alone is a poor indicator of in vivo performance. In the present study, we investigated the effects of interfacial bonding on material properties under conditions that re-capitulate the cyclic loading associated with weight-bearing fractures. Dynamic compressive fatigue properties of polyurethane (PUR) composites made with either unmodified (U-) or polycaprolactone surface-modified (PCL-) 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) particles were compared to a commercially available calcium sulfate and phosphate-based (CaS/P) bone cement at physiologically relevant stresses (5-30 MPa). Fatigue resistance of PCL-BG/polymer composite was superior to that of the U-BG/polymer composite and the CaS/P cement at higher stress levels for each of the fatigue failure criteria, related to modulus, creep, and maximum displacement, and was comparable to human trabecular bone. Steady state creep and damage accumulation occurred during the fatigue life of the PCL-BG/polymer and CaS/P cement, whereas creep of U-BG/polymer primarily occurred at a low number of loading cycles. From crack propagation testing, fracture toughness or resistance to crack growth was significantly higher for the PCL-BG composite than for the other materials. Finally, the fatigue and fracture toughness properties were intermediate between those of trabecular and cortical bone. These findings highlight the potential of PCL-BG/polyurethane composites as weight-bearing bone grafts. PMID:26282077

  10. Cyclic viscoelastoplasticity of polypropylene/nanoclay composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A. D.; deC. Christiansen, J.

    2012-11-01

    Observations are reported on isotactic polypropylene/organically modified nanoclay hybrids with concentrations of filler ranging from 0 to 5 wt.% in cyclic tensile tests with a stress-controlled program (oscillations between various maximum stresses and the zero minimum stress). A pronounced effect of nanofiller is demonstrated: reinforcement with 2 wt.% of clay results in strong reduction of maximum and minimum strains per cycle and growth of number of cycles to failure compared with neat polypropylene. To rationalize these findings, a constitutive model is developed in cyclic viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity of polymer nanocomposites. Adjustable parameters in the stress-strain relations are found by fitting experimental data. The model correctly describes the growth of the ratcheting strain and shows that fatigue failure is driven by a pronounced increase in plastic strain in the crystalline phase. To assess the influence of loading conditions on the changes in the material parameters, experimental data on polypropylene are studied in cyclic tests with a strain-controlled program (oscillations between fixed maximum and minimum strains) and a mixed program (oscillations between various maximum strains and the zero minimum stress). Numerical simulation confirms the ability of the model to predict the evolution of stress-strain diagrams with the number of cycles.

  11. Effect of material inhomogeneity on the cyclic plastic deformation behavior at the microstructural level: micromechanics-based modeling of dual-phase steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Surajit Kumar

    2013-07-01

    The microstructure of dual-phase (DP) steels typically consists of a soft ferrite matrix with dispersed islands of hard martensite phase. Due to the composite effect of ferrite and martensite, DP steels exhibit a unique combination of strain hardening, strength and ductility. A microstructure-based micromechanical modeling approach is adopted in this work to capture the tensile and cyclic plastic deformation behavior of DP steel. During tensile straining, strain incompatibility between the softer ferrite matrix and the harder martensite phase arises due to a difference in the flow characteristics of these two phases. Microstructural-level inhomogeneity serves as the initial imperfection, triggering strain incompatibility, strain partitioning and finally shear band localization during tensile straining. The local deformation in the ferrite phase is constrained by adjacent martensite islands, which locally results in stress triaxiality development in the ferrite phase. As the martensite distribution varies within the microstructure, the stress triaxiality also varies in a band within the microstructure. Inhomogeneous stress and strain distribution within the softer ferrite phase arises even during small tensile straining because of material inhomogeneity. The magnitude of cyclic plastic deformation within the softer ferrite phase also varies according to the stress distribution in the first-quarter cycle tensile loading. Accumulation of tensile/compressive plastic strain with number of cycles is noted in different locations within the ferrite phase during both symmetric stress and strain controlled cycling. The basic mode of cyclic plastic deformation in an inhomogeneous material is cyclic strain accumulation, i.e. ratcheting. Microstructural inhomogeneity results in cyclic strain accumulation in the aggregate DP material even in symmetric stress cycling.

  12. Three-Dimensional Mechanical Loading Modulates the Osteogenic Response of Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Tumor-Derived Soluble Signals.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Maureen E; Chiou, Aaron E; Lee, Min Joon; Marcott, Stephen C; Polamraju, Praveen V; Lee, Yeonkyung; Fischbach, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic mechanical loading is a strong anabolic signal in the skeleton, increasing osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and increasing the bone-forming activity of osteoblasts, but its role in bone metastatic cancer is relatively unknown. In this study, we integrated a hydroxyapatite-containing three-dimensional (3D) scaffold platform with controlled mechanical stimulation to investigate the effects of cyclic compression on the interplay between breast cancer cells and BM-MSCs as it pertains to bone metastasis. BM-MSCs cultured within mineral-containing 3D poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) scaffolds differentiated into mature osteoblasts, and exposure to tumor-derived soluble factors promoted this process. When BM-MSCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation were exposed to conditioned media collected from mechanically loaded breast cancer cells, their gene expression of osteopontin was increased. This was further enhanced when mechanical compression was simultaneously applied to BM-MSCs, leading to more uniformly deposited osteopontin within scaffold pores. These results suggest that mechanical loading of 3D scaffold-based culture models may be utilized to evaluate the role of physiologically relevant physical cues on bone metastatic breast cancer. Furthermore, our data imply that cyclic mechanical stimuli within the bone microenvironment modulate interactions between tumor cells and BM-MSCs that are relevant to bone metastasis. PMID:27401765

  13. Power Loss Characteristics of a Sensing Element Based on a Polymer Optical Fiber under Cyclic Tensile Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Chuan; Chen, Li-Wen; Lu, Wei-Hua

    2011-01-01

    In this study, power losses in polymer optical fiber (POF) subjected to cyclic tensile loadings are studied experimentally. The parameters discussed are the cyclic load level and the number of cycles. The results indicate that the power loss in POF specimens increases with increasing load level or number of cycles. The power loss can reach as high as 18.3% after 100 cyclic loadings. Based on the experimental results, a linear equation is proposed to estimate the relationship between the power loss and the number of cycles. The difference between the estimated results and the experimental results is found to be less than 3%. PMID:22164103

  14. Cyclic AMP in prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Botsford, J L; Harman, J G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is found in a variety of prokaryotes including both eubacteria and archaebacteria. cAMP plays a role in regulating gene expression, not only for the classic inducible catabolic operons, but also for other categories. In the enteric coliforms, the effects of cAMP on gene expression are mediated through its interaction with and allosteric modification of a cAMP-binding protein (CRP). The CRP-cAMP complex subsequently binds specific DNA sequences and either activates or inhibits transcription depending upon the positioning of the complex relative to the promoter. Enteric coliforms have provided a model to explore the mechanisms involved in controlling adenylate cyclase activity, in regulating adenylate cyclase synthesis, and in performing detailed examinations of CRP-cAMP complex-regulated gene expression. This review summarizes recent work focused on elucidating the molecular mechanisms of CRP-cAMP complex-mediated processes. For other bacteria, less detail is known. cAMP has been implicated in regulating antibiotic production, phototrophic growth, and pathogenesis. A role for cAMP has been suggested in nitrogen fixation. Often the only data that support cAMP involvement in these processes includes cAMP measurement, detection of the enzymes involved in cAMP metabolism, or observed effects of high concentrations of the nucleotide on cell growth. PMID:1315922

  15. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Initially described in children, cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is an idiopathic disorder that affects patients of all ages and is characterized by recurrent episodes of vomiting separated by symptom-free intervals or baseline health. Frequent misdiagnoses and delays in diagnosis often lead to years of recurrent vomiting. Similarities in the clinical features and symptoms of children and adults with CVS are often linked to migraines. Association with mitochondrial disorders and neuroendocrine dysfunction have been described in the pediatric CVS literature, whereas migraines, anxiety, and panic are common in adults with CVS. Various psychological, infectious, and physical stressors commonly precipitate episodes of CVS. Treatment is mostly empiric, with few controlled therapeutic studies conducted thus far. Associations with migraines have aided in developing pharmacologic treatment strategies for prophylaxis as well as abortive therapy during episodes, including the use of trip-tans. Most children outgrow CVS with time, though some children transition to migraine headaches or continue to have CVS as adults. Improved recognition of CVS in adults, along with the emergence of data in the use of anticonvulsants and antiemetics, may help further delineate pathophysiologic connections and therapeutic options for this debilitating disorder.

  16. On Cyclically Symmetrical Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, A.

    2001-07-01

    In a recent paper Carot et al. considered the definition of cylindrical symmetry as a specialisation of the case of axial symmetry. One of their propositions states that if there is a second Killing vector, which together with the one generating the axial symmetry, forms the basis of a two-dimensional Lie algebra, then the two Killing vectors must commute, thus generating an Abelian group. In this paper a similar result, valid under considerably weaker assumptions, is derived: any two-dimensional Lie transformation group which contains a one-dimensional subgroup whose orbits are circles, must be Abelian. The method used to prove this result is extended to apply to three-dimensional Lie transformation groups. It is shown that the existence of a one-dimensional subgroup with closed orbits restricts the Bianchi type of the associated Lie algebra to be I, II, III, VIIq = 0, VIII or IX. Some results on n-dimensional Lie groups are also derived and applied to show there are severe restrictions on the structure of the allowed four-dimensional Lie transformation groups compatible with cyclic symmetry.

  17. Ada and cyclic runtime scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Philip E.

    1986-01-01

    An important issue that must be faced while introducing Ada into the real time world is efficient and prodictable runtime behavior. One of the most effective methods employed during the traditional design of a real time system is the cyclic executive. The role cyclic scheduling might play in an Ada application in terms of currently available implementations and in terms of implementations that might be developed especially to support real time system development is examined. The cyclic executive solves many of the problems faced by real time designers, resulting in a system for which it is relatively easy to achieve approporiate timing behavior. Unfortunately a cyclic executive carries with it a very high maintenance penalty over the lifetime of the software that is schedules. Additionally, these cyclic systems tend to be quite fragil when any aspect of the system changes. The findings are presented of an ongoing SofTech investigation into Ada methods for real time system development. The topics covered include a description of the costs involved in using cyclic schedulers, the sources of these costs, and measures for future systems to avoid these costs without giving up the runtime performance of a cyclic system.

  18. Coke cake behavior under compressive forces

    SciTech Connect

    Watakabe, S.; Takeda, T.; Itaya, H.; Suginobe, H.

    1997-12-31

    The deformation of the coke cake and load on the side wall during pushing were studied using an electric furnace equipped with a movable wall. Coke cake was found to deform in three stages under compressive forces. The coke cake was shortened in the pushing direction in the cake deformation stage, and load was generated on the side walls in the high wall load stage. Secondary cracks in the coke cake were found to prevent load transmission on the wall. The maximum load transmission rate was controlled by adjusting the maximum fluidity and mean reflectance of the blended coal.

  19. Cyclic-stress analysis of notches for supersonic transport conditions. [using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of using the finite element method to account for the effects of cyclic load and temperature on local stresses and strains at a notch was demonstrated. The behavior of a notched titanium panel was studied under variable loads and temperatures representative of flight conditions for the lower wing surface of a Supersonic Transport (SST). The analysis was performed with the use of the BOPACE finite-element computer program which provides capability to determine high temperature and large viscoplastic effects caused by cyclic thermal and mechanical loads. The analysis involves the development of the finite-element model as well as determination of the structural behavior of the notched panel. Results are presented for twelve SST flights comprised of five different load-temperature cycles. The results show the approach is feasible, but material response to cyclic loads, temperatures, and hold times requires improved understanding to allow proper modeling of the material.

  20. Algebraic curves of maximal cyclicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caubergh, Magdalena; Dumortier, Freddy

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with analytic families of planar vector fields, studying methods to detect the cyclicity of a non-isolated closed orbit, i.e. the maximum number of limit cycles that can locally bifurcate from it. It is known that this multi-parameter problem can be reduced to a single-parameter one, in the sense that there exist analytic curves in parameter space along which the maximal cyclicity can be attained. In that case one speaks about a maximal cyclicity curve (mcc) in case only the number is considered and of a maximal multiplicity curve (mmc) in case the multiplicity is also taken into account. In view of obtaining efficient algorithms for detecting the cyclicity, we investigate whether such mcc or mmc can be algebraic or even linear depending on certain general properties of the families or of their associated Bautin ideal. In any case by well chosen examples we show that prudence is appropriate.

  1. Nonsurgical treatment of cyclic esotropia.

    PubMed

    Voide, Nathalie; Presset, Claudine; Klainguti, Georges; Kaeser, Pierre-François

    2015-04-01

    Cyclic esotropia is characterized by a 24-hour period of straight eye position followed by 24 hours of large-angle esotropia. Possible mechanisms include notably progressive loss of compensation of a latent strabismus. The classic treatment is surgical correction of the angle measured on the days with manifest deviation. We report the first case of cyclic esotropia successfully treated by prismatic correction of the latent strabismus present on "straight" days. PMID:25828819

  2. Antagonizing the αv β3 integrin inhibits angiogenesis and impairs woven but not lamellar bone formation induced by mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Ryan E; Schmieder, Anne H; Quirk, James D; Lanza, Gregory M; Silva, Matthew J

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis and osteogenesis are critically linked, although the role of angiogenesis is not well understood in osteogenic mechanical loading. In this study, either damaging or non-damaging cyclic axial compression was used to generate woven bone formation (WBF) or lamellar bone formation (LBF), respectively, at the mid-diaphysis of the adult rat forelimb. αv β3 integrin-targeted nanoparticles or vehicle was injected intravenously after mechanical loading. β3 integrin subunit expression on vasculature was maximal 7 days after damaging mechanical loading, but was still robustly expressed 14 days after loading. Accordingly, targeted nanoparticle delivery in WBF-loaded limbs was increased compared with non-loaded limbs. Vascularity was dramatically increased after WBF loading (+700% on day 14) and modestly increased after LBF loading (+50% on day 14). This increase in vascularity was inhibited by nanoparticle treatment in both WBF- and LBF-loaded limbs at days 7 and 14 after loading. Decreased vascularity led to diminished woven, but not lamellar, bone formation. Decreased woven bone formation resulted in impaired structural properties of the skeletal repair, particularly in post-yield behavior. These results demonstrate that αv β3 integrin-mediated angiogenesis is critical for recovering fracture resistance after bone injury but is not required for bone modeling after modest mechanical strain. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:24644077

  3. Ex Vivo bone formation in bovine trabecular bone cultured in a dynamic 3D bioreactor is enhanced by compressive mechanical strain.

    PubMed

    David, Valentin; Guignandon, Alain; Martin, Aline; Malaval, Luc; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène; Rattner, Aline; Mann, Val; Noble, Brendon; Jones, David B; Vico, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to test cell and trabecular responses to mechanical loading in vitro in a tissue bone explant culture model. We used a new three-dimensional culture model, the ZetOS system, which provides the ability to exert cyclic compression on cancellous bone cylinders (bovine sternum) cultured in forced flow circumfusion chambers, and allows to assess mechanical parameters of the cultivated samples. We evaluated bone cellular parameters through osteocyte viability test, gene and protein expression, and histomorphometric bone formation rate, in nonloaded versus loaded samples. The microarchitecture of bone cores was appraised by in vivo micro-CT imaging. After 3 weeks, the samples receiving daily cyclic compression exhibited increased osteoblast differentiation and activity associated with thicker, more plate-like-shaped trabeculae and higher Young's modulus and ultimate force as compared to unloaded samples. Osteoclast activity was not affected by mechanical strain, although it was responsive to drug treatments (retinoic acid and bisphosphonate) during the first 2 weeks of culture. Thus, in the ZetOS apparatus, we reproduce in vitro the osteogenic effects of mechanical strain known in vivo, making this system a unique and an essential laboratory aid for ex vivo testing of lamellar bone remodeling.

  4. Design and implementation of a multiaxial loading capability during heating on an engineering neutron diffractometer

    SciTech Connect

    Benafan, O.; Padula, S. A.; Skorpenske, H. D.; An, K.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2014-10-01

    A gripping capability was designed, implemented, and tested for in situ neutron diffraction measurements during multiaxial loading and heating on the VULCAN engineering materials diffractometer at the spallation neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The proposed capability allowed for the acquisition of neutron spectra during tension, compression, torsion, and/or complex loading paths at elevated temperatures. The design consisted of age-hardened, Inconel{sup ®} 718 grips with direct attachment to the existing MTS load frame having axial and torsional capacities of 100 kN and 400 N·m, respectively. Internal cooling passages were incorporated into the gripping system for fast cooling rates during high temperature experiments up to ~1000 K. The specimen mounting couplers combined a threaded and hexed end-connection for ease of sample installation/removal without introducing any unwanted loads. Instrumentation of this capability is documented in this work along with various performance parameters. The gripping system was utilized to investigate deformation in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes (e.g., isothermal, isobaric, and cyclic), and preliminary results are presented. The measurements facilitated the quantification of the texture, internal strain, and phase fraction evolution in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes.

  5. Design and implementation of a multiaxial loading capability during heating on an engineering neutron diffractometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benafan, O.; Padula, S. A.; Skorpenske, H. D.; An, K.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2014-10-01

    A gripping capability was designed, implemented, and tested for in situ neutron diffraction measurements during multiaxial loading and heating on the VULCAN engineering materials diffractometer at the spallation neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The proposed capability allowed for the acquisition of neutron spectra during tension, compression, torsion, and/or complex loading paths at elevated temperatures. The design consisted of age-hardened, Inconel® 718 grips with direct attachment to the existing MTS load frame having axial and torsional capacities of 100 kN and 400 N.m, respectively. Internal cooling passages were incorporated into the gripping system for fast cooling rates during high temperature experiments up to ˜1000 K. The specimen mounting couplers combined a threaded and hexed end-connection for ease of sample installation/removal without introducing any unwanted loads. Instrumentation of this capability is documented in this work along with various performance parameters. The gripping system was utilized to investigate deformation in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes (e.g., isothermal, isobaric, and cyclic), and preliminary results are presented. The measurements facilitated the quantification of the texture, internal strain, and phase fraction evolution in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes.

  6. Design and implementation of a multiaxial loading capability during heating on an engineering neutron diffractometer.

    PubMed

    Benafan, O; Padula, S A; Skorpenske, H D; An, K; Vaidyanathan, R

    2014-10-01

    A gripping capability was designed, implemented, and tested for in situ neutron diffraction measurements during multiaxial loading and heating on the VULCAN engineering materials diffractometer at the spallation neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The proposed capability allowed for the acquisition of neutron spectra during tension, compression, torsion, and/or complex loading paths at elevated temperatures. The design consisted of age-hardened, Inconel(®) 718 grips with direct attachment to the existing MTS load frame having axial and torsional capacities of 100 kN and 400 N·m, respectively. Internal cooling passages were incorporated into the gripping system for fast cooling rates during high temperature experiments up to ∼1000 K. The specimen mounting couplers combined a threaded and hexed end-connection for ease of sample installation/removal without introducing any unwanted loads. Instrumentation of this capability is documented in this work along with various performance parameters. The gripping system was utilized to investigate deformation in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes (e.g., isothermal, isobaric, and cyclic), and preliminary results are presented. The measurements facilitated the quantification of the texture, internal strain, and phase fraction evolution in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes.

  7. Cyclic mechanical stretch reduces myofibroblast differentiation of primary lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Blaauboer, Marjolein E; Smit, Theo H; Hanemaaijer, Roeland; Stoop, Reinout; Everts, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    In lung fibrosis tissue architecture and function is severely hampered by myofibroblasts due to excessive deposition of extracellular matrix and tissue contraction. Myofibroblasts differentiate from fibroblasts under the influence of transforming growth factor (TGF) β(1) but this process is also controlled mechanically by cytoskeletal tension. In healthy lungs, the cytoskeleton of fibroblasts is mechanically strained during breathing. In stiffer fibrotic lung tissue, this mechanical stimulus is reduced, which may influence fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of cyclic mechanical stretch on fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation. Primary normal human lung fibroblasts were grown on BioFlex culture plates and stimulated to undergo myofibroblast differentiation by 10 ng/ml TGFβ(1). Cells were either or not subjected to cyclic mechanical stretch (sinusoidal pattern, maximum elongation 10%, 0.2 Hz) for a period of 48 h on a Flexercell apparatus. mRNA expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. Cyclic mechanical loading reduced the mRNA expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin and the extracellular matrix proteins type-I, type-III, and type-V collagen, and tenascin C. These outcomes indicate that fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation is reduced. Cyclic mechanical loading did not change the expression of the fibronectin ED-A splice variant, but did decrease the paracrine expression of TGFβ(1), thereby suggesting a possible regulation mechanism for the observed effects. The data suggest that cyclic loading experienced by healthy lung cells during breathing may prevent fibroblasts from differentiating towards myofibroblasts. PMID:21094632

  8. Superplastic deformation induced by cyclic hydrogen charging

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Heeman; Schuh, Christopher A.; Dunand, David C.

    2008-05-15

    Deformation under the combined action of external stress and cyclic hydrogen charging/discharging is studied in a model material, titanium. Cyclic charging with hydrogen is carried out at 860 deg. C, which repeatedly triggers the transformation between hydrogen-lean {alpha}-Ti and hydrogen-rich {beta}-Ti. Due to bias from the externally applied tensile stress, the internal mismatch strains produced by this isothermal {alpha}-{beta} transformation accumulate preferentially along the loading axis. These strain increments are linearly proportional to the applied stress, i.e., flow is ideally Newtonian, at small stress levels (below {approx}2 MPa). Therefore, after multiple chemical cycles, a tensile engineering strain of 100% is achieved without fracture, with an average strain rate of 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}, which demonstrates for the first time that superplastic elongations can be achieved by chemical cycling. The effect of hydrogen partial pressure, cycle time, and external stress on the value of the superplastic strain increments is experimentally measured and discussed in light of a diffusional phase transformation model. Special attention is paid to understanding the two contributions to the internal mismatch strains from the phase transformation and lattice swelling.

  9. Validation of a Fluid–Structure Interaction Model of Solute Transport in Pores of Cyclically Deformed Tissue Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Op Den Buijs, Jorn; Ritman, Erik L.

    2010-01-01

    Convection induced by repetitive compression of porous tissue scaffolds enhances solute transport inside the scaffold. Our previous experiments have shown that pore size, shape, and orientation with respect to strain direction greatly influence loading-induced solute transport. The objective of this study was to develop a computational model of deformation-induced solute transport in porous tissue scaffolds, which included the pore geometry of the scaffold. This geometry consisted of a cubic scaffold with single channel in the middle of the scaffold, immersed in a fluid reservoir. Cylindrical pores with circular or elliptic cross section, and spheroid pores were modeled. The scaffold was cyclically compressed from one side, causing fluid motion and dispersion of solute inside the scaffold pore. Scaffold deformation was solved using the finite element method, and fluid flow and solute transport were solved using the finite volume method. The distortion of the scaffold–fluid interface was transferred as a boundary condition to the fluid flow solver. Both convection and diffusion were included in the computations. The solute transport rates in the different scaffold pore geometries agreed well with our previous experimental results obtained with X-ray microimaging. This model will be used to explore transport properties of a spectrum of novel scaffold designs. PMID:20136371

  10. Finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of bilayer enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yunfei; Xuan, Fu-zhen; Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Fuqian

    2014-04-01

    Tooth enamel is often subjected to repeated contact and often experiences contact deformation in daily life. The mechanical strength of the enamel determines the biofunctionality of the tooth. Considering the variation of the rod arrangement in outer and inner enamel, we approximate enamel as a bilayer structure and perform finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of the bilayer structure, to mimic the repeated contact of enamel during mastication. The dynamic deformation behaviour of both the inner enamel and the bilayer enamel is examined. The material parameters of the inner and outer enamel used in the analysis are obtained by fitting the finite element results with the experimental nanoindentation results. The penetration depth per cycle at the quasi-steady state is used to describe the depth propagation speed, which exhibits a two-stage power-law dependence on the maximum indentation load and the amplitude of the cyclic load, respectively. The continuous penetration of the indenter reflects the propagation of the plastic zone during cyclic indentation, which is related to the energy dissipation. The outer enamel serves as a protective layer due to its great resistance to contact deformation in comparison to the inner enamel. The larger equivalent plastic strain and lower stresses in the inner enamel during cyclic indentation, as calculated from the finite element analysis, indicate better crack/fracture resistance of the inner enamel.

  11. Effects of Cyclic and Monotonic Deformations on Nonlinear Ultrasonic Response of Austenitic Stainless Steel: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Xiang, Yanxun; Zhao, Peng

    2016-05-01

    The effect of plastic deformations on the nonlinear ultrasonic response in austenite stainless steel was investigated under the tensile, asymmetric cyclic, and symmetric cyclic loadings. Nonlinear ultrasonic wave measurement was performed on the interrupted specimens. Results show that cyclic and monotonic plastic deformations lead to the significantly different acoustic nonlinear response. The increase of dislocation density and martensite transformation causes the increase of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrast, the well-developed cell structures decrease the acoustic nonlinear response. Under the asymmetric cyclic loading condition, the lightly decrease of acoustic nonlinearity is caused by the development of cell structures, while the slight increase of acoustic nonlinearity should be attributed to the increase of martensite transformation. Comparatively, the severe increase of acoustic nonlinearity during the first stage under symmetric cyclic loading is ascribed to the fast generation of dislocation structures and martensite transformation.

  12. Real-Time Measurement of Solute Transport Within the Lacunar-Canalicular System of Mechanically Loaded Bone: Direct Evidence for Load-Induced Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Price, Christopher; Zhou, Xiaozhou; Li, Wen; Wang, Liyun

    2011-01-01

    Since proposed by Piekarski and Munro in 1977, load-induced fluid flow through the bone lacunar-canalicular system (LCS) has been accepted as critical for bone metabolism, mechanotransduction, and adaptation. However, direct unequivocal observation and quantification of load-induced fluid and solute convection through the LCS have been lacking due to technical difficulties. Using a novel experimental approach based on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and synchronized mechanical loading and imaging, we successfully quantified the diffusive and convective transport of a small fluorescent tracer (sodium fluorescein, 376 Da) in the bone LCS of adult male C57BL/6J mice. We demonstrated that cyclic end-compression of the mouse tibia with a moderate loading magnitude (–3 N peak load or 400 µɛ surface strain at 0.5 Hz) and a 4-second rest/imaging window inserted between adjacent load cycles significantly enhanced (+31%) the transport of sodium fluorescein through the LCS compared with diffusion alone. Using an anatomically based three-compartment transport model, the peak canalicular fluid velocity in the loaded bone was predicted (60 µm/s), and the resulting peak shear stress at the osteocyte process membrane was estimated (∼5 Pa). This study convincingly demonstrated the presence of load-induced convection in mechanically loaded bone. The combined experimental and mathematical approach presented herein represents an important advance in quantifying the microfluidic environment experienced by osteocytes in situ and provides a foundation for further studying the mechanisms by which mechanical stimulation modulates osteocytic cellular responses, which will inform basic bone biology, clinical understanding of osteoporosis and bone loss, and the rational engineering of their treatments. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20715178

  13. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  14. Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2005-05-15

    Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard associated with compressed gas cylinders and methods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

  15. Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01

    Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air, and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard assoicated with compressed gas cylinders and mthods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

  16. Tendon Differentiation on Decellularized Extracellular Matrix Under Cyclic Loading.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendon bioreactors combine cells, scaffold, and mechanical stimulation to drive tissue neogenesis ex vivo. Faithful recapitulation of the native tendon microenvironment is essential for stimulating graft maturation or modeling tendon biology. As the mediator between cells and mechanical stimulation, the properties of a scaffold constitute perhaps the most essential elements in a bioreactor system. One method of achieving native scaffold properties is to process tendon allograft in a manner that removes cells without modifying structure and function: "decellularization." This chapter describes (1) production of tendon scaffolds derived from native extracellular matrix, (2) preparation of cell-laden scaffolds prior to bioreactor culture, and (3) tissue processing post-harvest for gene expression analysis. These methods may be applied for a variety of applications including graft production, cell priming prior to transplantation and basic investigations of tendon cell biology. PMID:27062597

  17. Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides under cyclic loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1995-08-01

    The tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior in air in hydrogen and in oxygen of an Fe-Al-Cr-Zr alloy is described. The results are compared to data for FA-129. A detailed analysis of frequency effects on fatigue crack growth rates of FA-129, tested in the B2 condition, shows that dislocation transport of hydrogen from the surface is the rate limiting step in fatigue crack growth.

  18. Mechanical behavior of adhesive joints subjected to cyclic thermal loading

    SciTech Connect

    Humfeld, G.R.; Dillard, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Stresses induced in bimaterial systems due to changing temperature has been the subject of much study since the publication of Timoshenko`s classic paper of 1925. An adhesive bond is one example of a bimaterial system in which thermal stress can play an important role. However, adhesives are viscoelastic in nature, and their mechanical behavior is dictated by the temperature- and time-dependence of their material properties; analytical solutions for elastic materials do not adequately describe their true behavior. The effect of the adhesive`s viscoelasticity on stress in an adhesive bond subjected to changing temperature is therefore of compelling interest and importance for the adhesives industry. The objective of this research is to develop an understanding of the viscoelastic effect in an adhesive bond subjected to cycling temperature, particularly when the temperature range spans a transition temperature of the adhesive. Numerical modeling of a simplified geometry was first undertaken to isolate the influence of viscoelasticity on the stress state from any particular specimen geometry effect. Finite element modeling was then undertaken to examine the mechanical behavior of the adhesive in a layered geometry. Both solution methods predicted development of residual tensile stresses in the adhesive. For the layered geometry this was found to correspond with residual tensile peel stresses, which are thought to be the cause of interfacial debonding.

  19. Tendon Differentiation on Decellularized Extracellular Matrix Under Cyclic Loading.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendon bioreactors combine cells, scaffold, and mechanical stimulation to drive tissue neogenesis ex vivo. Faithful recapitulation of the native tendon microenvironment is essential for stimulating graft maturation or modeling tendon biology. As the mediator between cells and mechanical stimulation, the properties of a scaffold constitute perhaps the most essential elements in a bioreactor system. One method of achieving native scaffold properties is to process tendon allograft in a manner that removes cells without modifying structure and function: "decellularization." This chapter describes (1) production of tendon scaffolds derived from native extracellular matrix, (2) preparation of cell-laden scaffolds prior to bioreactor culture, and (3) tissue processing post-harvest for gene expression analysis. These methods may be applied for a variety of applications including graft production, cell priming prior to transplantation and basic investigations of tendon cell biology.

  20. Compressive strain rate sensitivity of ballistic gelatin.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jiwoon; Subhash, Ghatu

    2010-02-10

    Gelatin is a popular tissue simulant used in biomedical applications. The uniaxial compressive stress-strain response of gelatin was determined at a range of strain rates. In the quasistatic regime, gelatin strength remained relatively constant. With increase in loading rate, the compressive strength increased from 3kPa at a strain rate of around 0.0013/s to 6MPa at a strain rate of around 3200/s. This dramatic increase in strength of gelatin at high rates is attributed to its shear-thickening behavior and is argued on the basis of hydrocluster formation mechanism and differences in internal energy dissipation mechanism under static and dynamic loading. PMID:19863960