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Sample records for cyclic compressive loading

  1. Cyclic Compressive Loading Facilitates Recovery after Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    BUTTERFIELD, TIMOTHY A.; ZHAO, YI; AGARWAL, SUDHA; HAQ, FURQAN; BEST, THOMAS M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the biologic basis of massage therapies, we developed an experimental approach to mimic Swedish massage and evaluate this approach on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage using a well-controlled animal model. Methods Tibialis anterior muscles of six New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to one bout of damaging, eccentric contractions. One muscle was immediately subjected to cyclic compressive loads, and the contralateral served as the exercised control. Results We found that commencing 30 min of cyclic compressive loading to the muscle, immediately after a bout of eccentric exercise, facilitated recovery of function and attenuated leukocyte infiltration. In addition, fiber necrosis and wet weight of the tissue were also reduced by compressive loading. Conclusion We conclude that subjecting muscle to compressive loads immediately after exercise leads to an enhanced recovery of muscle function and attenuation of the damaging effects of inflammation in the rabbit model. Although these observations suggest that skeletal muscle responds to cyclic compressive forces similar to those generated by clinical approaches, such as therapeutic massage, further research is needed to assess the translational efficacy of these findings. PMID:18580410

  2. Investigation of Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue of Polycrystalline Cu under Pure Compression Cyclic Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tzu-Yin Jean

    It is commonly accepted that fatigue crack is initiated under tensile fatigue stresses. However, practical examples demonstrate that cracks may also initiate under pure compressive fluctuating loads such as the failures observed in aircraft landing gear frames. However, the mechanism of such failures is rarely investigated. Furthermore, knowledge on cyclic deformation response under pure compressive fatigue condition is also very limited or non-existent. Our recent work already verified that fatigue cracks may nucleate from stress concentration sites under pure compression fatigue, but whether or not a form of stress concentration is always needed to initiate a crack under pure compression fatigue remains uncertain. In this study, compression fatigue tests under different peak stresses were carried out on smooth bars of fully annealed OFHC Copper. The purpose of these tests is to investigate not only the cyclic deformation response but also the possibility of crack nucleation without the stress concentrator. Results showed that overall the cyclic stress-strain response and microstructural evolution of OFHC Copper under pure compression fatigue exhibits rather dissimilar behaviour compared to those under symmetrical fatigue. The specimens hardened rapidly within 10 cycles under pure compression fatigue unlike the gradual cyclic hardening behaviour in symmetrical fatigue with the same peak stress amplitude. Compressive cyclic creep behaviour was also observed under the same testing conditions. Moreover, unlike conventional tension-compression fatigue, only moderate slip activity was detectable on the surface instead of typical PSB features detected from TEM observations. The surface observations has revealed that surface slip bands did not increase in number nor did they become more pronounced in height with increasing number of cycles. In addition, surface roughening by grain boundary extrusion was detected to become more severe as the cycling progressed. Therefore

  3. Investigation of Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue of Polycrystalline Cu under Pure Compression Cyclic Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tzu-Yin Jean

    It is commonly accepted that fatigue crack is initiated under tensile fatigue stresses. However, practical examples demonstrate that cracks may initiate under pure compressive fluctuating loads, e.g. the failures observed in aircraft landing gear frames. As the mechanism of such failures is rarely investigated, there is very limited or non-existent knowledge pool on cyclic deformation response under pure compressive fatigue condition. Our recent work verified that fatigue cracks may nucleate from stress concentration sites under pure compression fatigue, but whether or not a form of stress concentration is always needed to initiate a crack remains uncertain. In this study, compression fatigue tests under different peak stresses were carried out on smooth bars of fully annealed OFHC Copper. The purpose of these tests is to investigate not only the cyclic deformation response but also the possibility of crack nucleation without the stress concentrator. Results showed that overall the cyclic stress-strain response and microstructural evolution of OFHC Copper under pure compression fatigue exhibits rather dissimilar behaviour compared to those under symmetrical fatigue. The specimens hardened rapidly within 10 cycles under pure compression fatigue unlike the gradual cyclic hardening behaviour in symmetrical fatigue with the same peak stress amplitude. Compressive cyclic creep behaviour was also observed. Moreover, TEM observation showed that only moderate slip activity was detectable on the surface instead of typical PSB features. The surface observations revealed that surface slip bands did not increase in number nor height as cycling progressed. In addition, surface roughening by grain boundary extrusion was detected to become more severe with further cycling. Therefore, the plastic strain accommodated within the samples was not mainly related to dislocation activities. Instead, the mechanism of cyclic creep response for pure compression fatigue was correlated and

  4. Analysis of the mechanical behavior of chondrocytes in unconfined compression tests for cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Wu, John Z; Herzog, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the biosynthetic activity of chondrocytes is associated with the mechanical environment. For example, excessive, repetitive loading has been found to induce cell death, morphological and cellular damage, as seen in degenerative joint disease, while cyclic, physiological-like loading has been found to trigger a partial recovery of morphological and ultrastructural aspects in osteoarthritic human articular chondrocytes. Mechanical stimuli are believed to influence the biosynthetic activity via the deformation of cells. However, the in situ deformation of chondrocytes for cyclic loading conditions has not been investigated experimentally or theoretically. The purpose of the present study was to simulate the mechanical response of chondrocytes to cyclic loading in unconfined compression tests using a finite element model. The material properties of chondrocytes and extracellular matrix were considered to be biphasic. The time-histories of the shape and volume variations of chondrocytes at three locations (i.e., surface, center, and bottom) within the cartilage were predicted for static and cyclic loading conditions at two frequencies (0.02 and 0.1 Hz) and two amplitudes (0.1 and 0.2 MPa). Our results show that cells at different depths within the cartilage deform differently during cyclic loading, and that the depth dependence of cell deformation is influenced by the amplitude of the cyclic loading. Cell deformations under cyclic loading of 0.02 Hz were found to be similar to those at 0.1 Hz. We conclude from the simulation results that, in homogeneous cartilage layers, cell deformations are location-dependent, and further are affected by load magnitude. In physiological conditions, the mechanical environment of cells are even more complex due to the anisotropy, depth-dependent inhomogeneity, and tension-compression non-linearity of the cartilage matrix. Therefore, it is feasible to speculate that biosynthetic responses of

  5. Fatigue response of notched laminates subjected to tension-compression cyclic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakis, C. E.; Stinchcomb, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The fatigue response of a ((0/45/90/-45)(sub s))(sub 4) T300-5208 graphite-epoxy laminate with a drilled center-hole subjected to various components of tensile and compressive cyclic loads was investigated. Damage evaluation techniques such as stiffness monitoring, penetrant-enhanced X-ray radiography, C-scan, laminate deply and residual strength measurement were used to establish the mechanisms of damage development as well as the effect of such damage on the laminate strength, stiffness and life. Damage modes consisted of transverse matrix cracks, initiating at the hole, in all plies, followed by delamination between plies of different orientation. A characteristic stiffness repsonse during cyclic loading at two load levels was identified and utilized a more reliable indicator of material and residual properties than accumulated cycles. For the load ratios of tension-compression loading, residual tensile strength increased significantly above the virgin strength early in the fatigue life and remained approximately constant to near the end of life. A technique developed for predicting delamination initiation sites along the hole boundary correlated well with experimental evidence.

  6. Retention Strength after Compressive Cyclic Loading of Five Luting Agents Used in Implant-Supported Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Arenal, Angel; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Ignacio; deLlanos-Lanchares, Hector; Pinés-Hueso, Javier; Ellakuria-Echebarria, Joseba

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the retention strength of five cement types commonly used in implant-retained fixed partial dentures, before and after compressive cyclic loading. In five solid abutments screwed to 5 implant analogs, 50 metal Cr-Ni alloy copings were cemented with five luting agents: resin-modified glass ionomer (RmGI), resin composite (RC), glass ionomer (GI), resin urethane-based (RUB), and compomer cement (CC). Two tensile tests were conducted with a universal testing machine, one after the first luting of the copings and the other after 100,000 cycles of 100 N loading at 0.72 Hz. The one way ANOVA test was applied for the statistical analysis using the post hoc Tukey test when required. Before and after applying the compressive load, RmGI and RC cement types showed the greatest retention strength. After compressive loading, RUB cement showed the highest percentage loss of retention (64.45%). GI cement recorded the lowest retention strength (50.35 N) and the resin composite cement recorded the highest (352.02 N). The type of cement influences the retention loss. The clinician should give preference to lower retention strength cement (RUB, CC, and GI) if he envisages any complications and a high retention strength one (RmGI, RC) for a specific clinical situation. PMID:27822468

  7. A mathematical model of tissue-engineered cartilage development under cyclic compressive loading.

    PubMed

    Bandeiras, Cátia; Completo, António

    2016-11-05

    In this work a coupled model of solute transport and uptake, cell proliferation, extracellular matrix synthesis and remodeling of mechanical properties accounting for the impact of mechanical loading is presented as an advancement of a previously validated coupled model for free-swelling tissue-engineered cartilage cultures. Tissue-engineering constructs were modeled as biphasic with a linear elastic solid, and relevant intrinsic mechanical stimuli in the constructs were determined by numerical simulation for use as inputs of the coupled model. The mechanical dependent formulations were derived from a calibration and parametrization dataset and validated by comparison of normalized ratios of cell counts, total glycosaminoglycans and collagen after 24-h continuous cyclic unconfined compression from another dataset. The model successfully fit the calibration dataset and predicted the results from the validation dataset with good agreement, with average relative errors up to 3.1 and 4.3 %, respectively. Temporal and spatial patterns determined for other model outputs were consistent with reported studies. The results suggest that the model describes the interaction between the simultaneous factors involved in in vitro tissue-engineered cartilage culture under dynamic loading. This approach could also be attractive for optimization of culture protocols, namely through the application to longer culture times and other types of mechanical stimuli.

  8. Time of flight measurements of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphite under cyclic compressive load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodel, W.; Atkin, C.; Marsden, B. J.

    2017-04-01

    The time-of-flight technique has been used to investigate the stiffness of nuclear graphite with respect to the grade and grain direction. A loading rig was developed to collect time-of-flight measurements during cycled compressive loading up to 80% of the material's compressive strength and subsequent unloading of specimens along the axis of the applied stress. The transmission velocity (related to Young's modulus), decreased with increasing applied stress; and depending on the graphite grade and orientation, the modulus then increased, decreased or remained constant upon unloading. These tests were repeated while observing the microstructure during the load/unload cycles. Initial decreases in transmission velocity with compressive load are attributed to microcrack formation within filler and binder phases. Three distinct types of behaviour occur on unloading, depending on the grade, irradiation, and loading direction. These different behaviours can be explained in terms of the material microstructure observed from the microscopy performed during loading.

  9. Effects of Acoustic Emission and Energy Evolution of Rock Specimens Under the Uniaxial Cyclic Loading and Unloading Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingbin; Zhang, Mingwei; Han, Lijun; Pu, Hai; Nie, Taoyi

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics of energy accumulation, evolution, and dissipation in uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading compression of 30 sandstone rock specimens under six different loading rates were explored. Stress-strain relations and acoustic emission characteristics of the deformation and failure of rock specimens were analyzed. The densities and rates of stored energy, elastic energy, and dissipated energy under different loading rates were confirmed, and an effective approach for the equivalent energy surface was presented. The energy evolution of rock deformation and failure were revealed. It turns out that the rock deformation behavior under uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading compression remained almost unchanged compared with that of uniaxial compression. The degree of match between reloading stress-strain curves and previous unloading curves was high, thereby demonstrating the memory function of rock masses. The intensity of acoustic emission fluctuated continually during the entire cyclic process. Emissions significantly increased as the stress exceeded the unloading level. The peak of acoustic emission increased with increasing loading stress level. Relationships between energy density and axial load indicate that the rock mass possesses a certain energy storage limitation. The energy evolution of rock masses is closely related to the axial loading stress, rather than to the axial loading rate. With increasing axial loading stress, stored energy varied most rapidly, followed by that of the elastic energy, then dissipated energy. Energy accumulation dominates prior to the axial load reaching peak strength; thereafter, energy dissipation becomes dominant. The input energy causes the irreversible initiation and extension of microcracks in the rock body. Elastic energy release leads to sudden instability of rock bodies and drives rock damage.

  10. Fatigue damage prognosis of internal delamination in composite plates under cyclic compression loadings using affine arithmetic as uncertainty propagation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey J.-M.

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has become indispensable for reducing maintenance costs and increasing the in-service capacity of a structure. The increased use of lightweight composite materials in aircraft structures drastically increased the effects of fatigue induced damage on their critical structural components and thus the necessity to predict the remaining life of those components. Damage prognosis, one of the least investigated fields in SHM, uses the current damage state of the system to forecast its future performance by estimating the expected loading environments. A successful damage prediction model requires the integration of technologies in areas like measurements, materials science, mechanics of materials, and probability theories, but most importantly the quantification of uncertainty in all these areas. In this study, Affine Arithmetic is used as a method for incorporating the uncertainties due to the material properties into the fatigue life prognosis of composite plates subjected to cyclic compressive loadings. When loadings are compressive in nature, the composite plates undergo repeated buckling-unloading of the delaminated layer which induces mixed modes I and II states of stress at the tip of the delamination in the plates. The Kardomateas model-based prediction law is used to predict the growth of the delamination, while the integration of the effects of the uncertainties for modes I and II coefficients in the fatigue life prediction model is handled using Affine arithmetic. The Mode I and Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue characterization of the composite plates are first experimentally studied to obtain the material coefficients and fracture toughness, respectively. Next, these obtained coefficients are used in the Kardomateas law to predict the delamination lengths in the composite plates while using Affine Arithmetic to handle their uncertainties. At last, the fatigue characterization of the composite plates during

  11. Delamination growth behavior in cross-ply composites under compressive cyclic (fatigue) loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelegri, Assimina A.

    A mode dependent fatigue delamination growth law for anisotropic composite plates is presented in this thesis. The novelty of the presented law lies in the mode dependency of the material and laminate constants m(Psi) and C(Psi). The model describing the mode dependent delamination growth law consists of an initial postbuckling solution accounting for general delaminated composites, i.e. with no restrictive assumptions on the delamination dimensions, and a fracture mechanics solution. A numerical code was developed for the implementation of the closed form solution which gives the loading and geometrical quantities as well as the energy release rates and the mode mixities. The computer code was especially designed for parametric studies. Parameters assigned in this particular investigation were: end conditions, delamination position (h/T), and applied strain. The effect of the end conditions, i.e. clamped-clamped versus simply-supported ends on the initial postbuckling and growth behavior of delaminated plates was also investigated. In conjunction with the previous analysis, a detailed experimental study was designed and carried out in order to validate the proposed model. The tests were designed so that the effect of certain parameters on the delamination growth behavior could be evaluated. The parameters included in the investigation were: initial delamination length, applied strain and delamination position (h/T). Compressive static, compressive fatigue (constant displacement amplitude), and double cantilever beam (DCB) tests were conducted. Data acquisition and analysis for these tests were performed. By comparing analytical and experimental results it is shown that a very good correlation exists, and the presented mode dependent fatigue delamination growth law can accurately predict fatigue lives of delaminated composite structures.

  12. Thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) and its thermal contact resistance with fuel cell gas diffusion layers: Effect of compression, PTFE, micro porous layer (MPL), BPP out-of-flatness and cyclic load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza; Djilali, Ned; Bahrami, Majid

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on measurements of thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) as a function of temperature and its thermal contact resistance (TCR) with treated and untreated gas diffusion layers (GDLs). The thermal conductivity of the BPP decreases with temperature and its thermal contact resistance with GDLs, which has been overlooked in the literature, is found to be dominant over a relatively wide range of compression. The effects of PTFE loading, micro porous layer (MPL), compression, and BPP out-of-flatness are also investigated experimentally. It is found that high PTFE loadings, MPL and even small BPP out-of-flatness increase the BPP-GDL thermal contact resistance dramatically. The paper also presents the effect of cyclic load on the total resistance of a GDL-BPP assembly, which sheds light on the behavior of these materials under operating conditions in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  13. Progressive cell-mediated changes in articular cartilage and bone in mice are initiated by a single session of controlled cyclic compressive loading.

    PubMed

    Ko, Frank C; Dragomir, Cecilia L; Plumb, Darren A; Hsia, Allison W; Adebayo, Olufunmilayo O; Goldring, Steven R; Wright, Timothy M; Goldring, Mary B; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2016-11-01

    We previously showed that repetitive cyclic loading of the mouse knee joint causes changes that recapitulate the features of osteoarthritis (OA) in humans. By applying a single loading session, we characterized the temporal progression of the structural and compositional changes in subchondral bone and articular cartilage. We applied loading during a single 5-minute session to the left tibia of adult (26-week-old) C57Bl/6 male mice at a peak load of 9.0N for 1,200 cycles. Knee joints were collected at times 0, 1, and 2 weeks after loading. The changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone were analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry (caspase-3 and cathepsin K), and microcomputed tomography. At time 0, no change was evident in chondrocyte viability or cartilage or subchondral bone integrity. However, cartilage pathology demonstrated by localized thinning and proteoglycan loss occurred at 1 and 2 weeks after the single session of loading. Transient cancellous bone loss was evident at 1 week, associated with increased osteoclast number. Bone loss was reversed to control levels at 2 weeks. We observed formation of fibrous and cartilaginous tissues at the joint margins at 1 and 2 weeks. Our findings demonstrate that a single session of noninvasive loading leads to the development of OA-like morphological and cellular alterations in articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The loss in subchondral trabecular bone mass and thickness returns to control levels at 2 weeks, whereas the cartilage thinning and proteoglycan loss persist. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1941-1949, 2016.

  14. Exploring interactions between force, repetition and posture on intervertebral disc height loss and bulging in isolated porcine cervical functional spinal units from sub-acute-failure magnitudes of cyclic compressive loading.

    PubMed

    Gooyers, Chad E; Callaghan, Jack P

    2015-10-15

    Most in vitro studies are limited in the ability to partition intervertebral disc (IVD) height loss from total specimen height loss since the net changes in the actuator position of the materials testing system simply reflect net changes to functional spinal units (FSUs) used for testing. Three levels of peak compressive force, three cycle rates and two dynamic postural conditions were examined using a full-factorial design. Cyclic compressive force was applied using a time-varying waveform with synchronous flexion/extension for 5000 cycles. Surface scans from the anterior aspect of the IVD were recorded in a neutral and flexed posture before and after the cyclic loading protocol using a 3D laser scanner to characterise changes in IVD height loss and bulging. A significant three-way interaction (p=0.0092) between the magnitude of peak compressive force, cycle rate and degree of postural deviation was observed in cycle-varying specimen height loss data. A significant main effect of peak compressive force (p=0.0003) was also observed in IVD height loss calculated from the surface profiles of the IVD. The relative contribution of IVD height loss (measured on the anterior surface) to total specimen height loss across experimental conditions varied considerably, ranging from 19% to 58%. Postural deviation was the only factor that significantly affected the magnitude of peak AF bulge (p=0.0016). This investigation provides evidence that total specimen height loss is not an accurate depiction of cycle-varying changes in the IVD across a range of in vivo scenarios that were replicated with in vitro testing.

  15. Dynamic cyclic compression modulates the chondrogenic phenotype in human chondrocytes from late stage osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Diao, Hua Jia; Fung, Hon Sing; Yeung, Pan; Lam, K L; Yan, Chun Hoi; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2017-02-16

    Human osteoarthritic chondrocytes (hOACs) are characterized by their "dedifferentiated" and catabolic phenotype and lack the ability for restoring their inherent functions by themselves. Here we investigated whether extrinsically supplemented mechanical signal via compression loading would affect the phenotype of hOACs. Specifically, we applied cyclic compression loading on cultured hOACs-collagen constructs and measured the expression of the major chondrogenic factors, cell-matrix interaction molecules and matrix degradation enzymes. Dynamic compression loading stimulates the expression and nuclear localization of sox9 in hOACs and reduces the catabolic events via downregulated expression of collagenases. These results contribute to better understanding towards mechanoregulation of hOACs.

  16. Cyclic Loading Effects on the Creep and Dilation of Salt Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Lance A.; Buchholz, Stuart A.; Mellegard, Kirby D.; Düsterloh, Uwe

    2015-11-01

    The Solution Mining Research Institute (SMRI) has embarked on inquiries into the effect cyclic loading might have on salt. This interest stems from the concept of using salt caverns as a storage medium for renewable energy projects such as compressed air energy storage where daily pressure cycles in the cavern are conceivable as opposed to the seasonal cycles that are typical for natural gas storage projects. RESPEC and the Institut für Aufbereitung und Deponietechnik at Clausthal University of Technology jointly executed a rock mechanics laboratory study using both facilities for performing triaxial cyclic loading creep tests on rock salt recovered from the Avery Island Mine in Louisiana, USA. The cyclic triaxial creep tests were performed under various load paths including compression, extension, and compression/extension. The tests were performed under both dilative and nondilative stress regimes. The cyclic compression creep data were compared to static creep tests performed under similar conditions to assess the effect of cycling of the applied stress. Furthermore, the cyclic compression tests were compared to a numerically simulated static creep test at the same stress and temperature conditions to determine if the creep behavior was similar under cyclic loading.

  17. Intervertebral disc response to cyclic loading--an animal model.

    PubMed

    Ekström, L; Kaigle, A; Hult, E; Holm, S; Rostedt, M; Hansson, T

    1996-01-01

    The viscoelastic response of a lumbar motion segment loaded in cyclic compression was studied in an in vivo porcine model (N = 7). Using surgical techniques, a miniaturized servohydraulic exciter was attached to the L2-L3 motion segment via pedicle fixation. A dynamic loading scheme was implemented, which consisted of one hour of sinusoidal vibration at 5 Hz, 50 N peak load, followed by one hour of restitution at zero load and one hour of sinusoidal vibration at 5 Hz, 100 N peak load. The force and displacement responses of the motion segment were sampled at 25 Hz. The experimental data were used for evaluating the parameters of two viscoelastic models: a standard linear solid model (three-parameter) and a linear Burger's fluid model (four-parameter). In this study, the creep behaviour under sinusoidal vibration at 5 Hz closely resembled the creep behaviour under static loading observed in previous studies. Expanding the three-parameter solid model into a four-parameter fluid model made it possible to separate out a progressive linear displacement term. This deformation was not fully recovered during restitution and is therefore an indication of a specific effect caused by the cyclic loading. High variability was observed in the parameters determined from the 50 N experimental data, particularly for the elastic modulus E1. However, at the 100 N load level, significant differences between the models were found. Both models accurately predicted the creep response under the first 800 s of 100 N loading, as displayed by mean absolute errors for the calculated deformation data from the experimental data of 1.26 and 0.97 percent for the solid and fluid models respectively. The linear Burger's fluid model, however, yielded superior predictions particularly for the initial elastic response.

  18. Collagen network strengthening following cyclic tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Monica E; Paten, Jeffrey A; Sander, Edward A; Nguyen, Thao D; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2016-02-06

    The bulk mechanical properties of tissues are highly tuned to the physiological loads they experience and reflect the hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of their constituent parts. A thorough understanding of the processes involved in tissue adaptation is required to develop multi-scale computational models of tissue remodelling. While extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is partly due to the changing cellular metabolic activity, there may also be mechanically directed changes in ECM nano/microscale organization which lead to mechanical tuning. The thermal and enzymatic stability of collagen, which is the principal load-bearing biopolymer in vertebrates, have been shown to be enhanced by force suggesting that collagen has an active role in ECM mechanical properties. Here, we ask how changes in the mechanical properties of a collagen-based material are reflected by alterations in the micro/nanoscale collagen network following cyclic loading. Surprisingly, we observed significantly higher tensile stiffness and ultimate tensile strength, roughly analogous to the effect of work hardening, in the absence of network realignment and alterations to the fibril area fraction. The data suggest that mechanical loading induces stabilizing changes internal to the fibrils themselves or in the fibril-fibril interactions. If such a cell-independent strengthening effect is operational in vivo, then it would be an important consideration in any multiscale computational approach to ECM growth and remodelling.

  19. Changes in nuclear composition following cyclic compression of the intervertebral disc in an in vivo rat-tail model.

    PubMed

    Ching, Congo T S; Chow, Daniel H K; Yao, Fiona Y D; Holmes, Andrew D

    2004-09-01

    While in vitro studies have shown that mechanical loading can result in changes in the composition of intervertebral disc matrix, the effects of cyclic loading in vivo have not been considered. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of static and cyclic compression of different frequencies on the nuclear composition of the intervertebral disc. Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control group (no pin insertion, no loading), a sham group (pins inserted in sixth and seventh caudal vertebrae, no loading), a static loading group (compression applied via pins) and cyclic loading groups (loading at 0.5, 1.5 or 2.5 Hz). Loading was applied for 1 h each day from the third to 17th day following pin insertion, and the caudal 5-6, 6-7 and 7-8 discs harvested to quantify proteoglycan content, collagen content and chondrocyte density in the nucleus pulposus. Static compression resulted in a significant reduction in total proteoglycan content as compared with the adjacent control disc, but this effect was not seen in any of the cyclic loading groups. However, comparison with the sham group appears to indicate an overall decrease in total proteoglycan content at the targeted and adjacent levels following cyclic loading. The 0.5 Hz loading group showed a significantly greater total proteoglycan content than all other compression groups, and also showed a lower total collagen content than the sham group. Results suggest that frequency dependent changes in composition occur in response to cyclic loading, but are not limited to the directly loaded disc alone. Further studies are required to verify this, but the choice of control appears to need careful consideration in all studies of this nature.

  20. Effect of Cyclic Thermo-Mechanical Loads on Fatigue Reliability in Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, A. R.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    A methodology to compute probabilistic fatigue life of polymer matrix laminated composites has been developed and demonstrated. Matrix degradation effects caused by long term environmental exposure and mechanical/thermal cyclic loads are accounted for in the simulation process. A unified time-temperature-stress dependent multi-factor interaction relationship developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used to model the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. The fast probability integration method is used to compute probabilistic distribution of response. Sensitivities of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables (e.g., constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness, etc.) computed and their significance in the reliability- based design for maximum life is discussed. The effect of variation in the thermal cyclic loads on the fatigue reliability for a (0/+/- 45/90)(sub s) graphite/epoxy laminate with a ply thickness of 0.127 mm, with respect to impending failure modes has been studied. The results show that, at low mechanical cyclic loads and low thermal cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life for 0.999 reliability is most sensitive to matrix compressive strength, matrix modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and ply thickness. Whereas at high mechanical cyclic loads and high thermal cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life at 0.999 reliability is more sensitive to the shear strength of matrix, longitudinal fiber modulus, matrix modulus, and ply thickness.

  1. Cyclic Load Effects on Long Term Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, A. R.; Chamis, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    A methodology to compute the fatigue life for different ratios, r, of applied stress to the laminate strength based on first ply failure criteria combined with thermal cyclic loads has been developed and demonstrated. Degradation effects resulting from long term environmental exposure and thermo-mechanical cyclic loads are considered in the simulation process. A unified time-stress dependent multi-factor interaction equation model developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used to account for the degradation of material properties caused by cyclic and aging loads. Effect of variation in the thermal cyclic load amplitude on a quasi-symmetric graphite/epoxy laminate has been studied with respect to the impending failure modes. The results show that, for the laminate under consideration, the fatigue life under combined mechanical and low thermal amplitude cyclic loads is higher than that due to mechanical loads only. However, as the thermal amplitude increases, the life also decreases. The failure mode changes from tensile under mechanical loads only to the compressive and shear at high mechanical and thermal loads. Also, implementation of the developed methodology in the design process has been discussed.

  2. Compressive strength of axially loaded composite cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollar, Laszlo P.; Springer, George C.; Spingarn, Jay; McColskey, J. D.

    1993-10-01

    Tests were performed to measure the failure loads of axially compressed glass-fiber-reinforced and graphite-fiber-reinforced composite cylinders. The data were compared with the results of a previous model, which was based on a three-dimensional stress analysis and the Tsai-Wu quadratic first-ply failure criterion. This model predicted the failure loads for glass-fiber-reinforced composites with good accuracy, but less accurately for failure loads of graphite-epoxy composites.

  3. Fatigue failure of dentin-composite disks subjected to cyclic diametral compression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuping; Carrera, Carola; Chen, Ruoqiong; Li, Jianying; Chen, Yungchung; Lenton, Patricia; Rudney, Joel. D.; Jones, Robert S.; Aparicio, Conrado; Fok, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to establish the relationship between cyclic loading and fatigue life of the dentin-composite interface using the newly developed disk in diametral compression tests. The results were then used to estimate the fatigue life of restored teeth under occlusal loading. Methods Disk specimens (5mm dia. × 2mm thick) were prepared using bovine incisors and restored with either a methacrylate-based composite Z100™ with Adper Single Bond Plus (Z100) or silorane-based composite Filtek ™ LS with LS System adhesive (LS). The dentin-composite disks were tested under cyclic diametral compression to determine the number of cycles to failure (Nf) at three load levels (n = 3 per group). Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to calculate the interfacial stresses (σ) within the specimen, to establish the σ vs. Nf curves, and those within a restored tooth under normal chewing forces (15N maximum). These were then used to estimate the lifetime of the restored tooth for the two restorative systems. Results The disks restored with LS had a higher fatigue resistance than those restored with Z100. The maximum interfacial stress in the restored tooth determined by FEA was ∼0.5MPa. Based on the estimate of 300,000 cycles of chewing per year, the predicted lifetime under occlusal loading for teeth restored with LS and Z100 was 33 and 10 years, respectively. Significance The disk in cyclic diametral compression has been used successfully to provide fatigue data which allows the lifetime of composite-restored teeth under occlusal loading to be predicted using numerical simulation. PMID:25958269

  4. Specific Features of the Nucleation and Growth of Fatigue Cracks in Steel under Cyclic Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelyukh, A. I.; Popelyukh, P. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Nikulina, A. A.; Smirnov, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    The processes of the fracture of 40Kh and U8 steels under cyclic dynamic compression are studied. It has been found that the main cause for the fracture of the cyclically compressed specimens is the propagation of cracks due to the effect of residual tensile stresses, which arise near the tips of the cracks at the stage of the unloading of the specimens. The growth rate of a crack has the maximum value at the initial stage of its propagation in the vicinity of the stress concentrator. As the crack propagates deep into the specimen, its growth rate decreases and depends only slightly on the real cross section of the specimen. The model of the process of the fatigue fracture of the steels under dynamic loading by a cyclically varied compressive force is proposed. It has been found that the high fatigue endurance is provided by tempering at 200°C for the 40Kh steel and at 300°C for the U8 steel.

  5. Effect of cyclic loading on the nanoscale deformation of hydroxyapatite and collagen fibrils in bovine bone.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Anjali; Stock, Stuart R; Almer, Jonathan D; Dunand, David C

    2014-06-01

    Cyclic compressive loading tests were carried out on bovine femoral bones at body temperature (37 °C), with varying mean stresses (-55 to -80 MPa) and loading frequencies (0.5-5 Hz). At various times, the cyclic loading was interrupted to carry out high-energy X-ray scattering measurements of the internal strains developing in the hydroxyapatite (HAP) platelets and the collagen fibrils. The residual strains upon unloading were always tensile in the HAP and compressive in the fibrils, and each increases in magnitude with loading cycles, which can be explained from damage at the HAP–collagen interface and accumulation of plastic deformation within the collagen phase. The samples tested at a higher mean stress and stress amplitude, and at lower loading frequencies exhibit greater plastic deformation and damage accumulation, which is attributed to greater contribution of creep. Synchrotron microcomputed tomography of some of the specimens showed that cracks are produced during cyclic loading and that they mostly occur concentric with Haversian canals.

  6. Compressive cyclic ratcheting and fatigue of synthetic, soft biomedical polymers in solution.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew T; Safranski, David L; Smith, Kathryn E; Guldberg, Robert E; Gall, Ken

    2016-02-01

    The use of soft, synthetic materials for the replacement of soft, load-bearing tissues has been largely unsuccessful due to a lack of materials with sufficient fatigue and wear properties, as well as a lack of fundamental understanding on the relationship between material structure and behavior under cyclic loads. In this study, we investigated the response of several soft, biomedical polymers to cyclic compressive stresses under aqueous conditions and utilized dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry to evaluate the role of thermo-mechanical transitions on such behavior. Studied materials include: polycarbonate urethane, polydimethylsiloxane, four acrylate copolymers with systematically varied thermo-mechanical transitions, as well as bovine meniscal tissue for comparison. Materials showed compressive moduli between 2.3 and 1900MPa, with polycarbonate urethane (27.3MPa) matching closest to meniscal tissue (37.0MPa), and also demonstrated a variety of thermo-mechanical transition behaviors. Cyclic testing resulted in distinct fatigue-life curves, with failure defined as either classic fatigue fracture or a defined increased in maximum strain due to ratcheting. Our study found that polymers with sufficient dissipation mechanisms at the testing temperature, as evidenced by tan delta values, were generally tougher than those with less dissipation and exhibited ratcheting rather than fatigue fracture much like meniscal tissue. Strain recovery tests indicated that, for some toughened polymers, the residual strain following our cyclic loading protocol could be fully recovered. The similarity in ratcheting behavior, and lack of fatigue fracture, between the meniscal tissue and toughened polymers indicates that such polymers may have potential as artificial soft tissue.

  7. Development of a viscoelastic continuum damage model for cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    A previously developed spectrum model for linear viscoelastic behavior of solids is used to describe the rate-dependent damage growth of a time dependent material under cyclic loading. Through the use of the iterative solution of a special Volterra integral equation, the cyclic strain history is described. The spectrum-based model is generalized for any strain rate and any uniaxial load history to formulate the damage function. Damage evolution in the body is described through the use of a rate-type evolution law which uses a pseudo strain to express the viscoelastic constitutive equation with damage. The resulting damage function is used to formulate a residual strength model. The methodology presented is demonstrated by comparing the peak values of the computed cyclic strain history as well as the residual strength model predictions to the experimental data of a polymer matrix composite.

  8. Design for cyclic loading endurance of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Liaw, Leslie D. G.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the computer code IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures) to aircraft wing type structures is described. The code performs a complete probabilistic analysis for composites taking into account the uncertainties in geometry, boundary conditions, material properties, laminate lay-ups, and loads. Results of the analysis are presented in terms of cumulative distribution functions (CDF) and probability density function (PDF) of the fatigue life of a wing type composite structure under different hygrothermal environments subjected to the random pressure. The sensitivity of the fatigue life to a number of critical structural/material variables is also computed from the analysis.

  9. Influences of cyclic loading on martensite transformation of TRIP steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, W. J.; Hu, Z. G.; Zhang, W. G.

    2013-03-01

    While austenite transformation into martensite induces increasing of the crack initiation life and restraining of the growth of fatigue cracks in cyclic-loading processes, TRIP-assisted steels have a better fatigue life than the AHSS (Advance High Strength Steels). As two key parameters in the cyclic loading process, strain amplitude and cyclic frequency are used in a kinetic transformation model to reasonably evaluate the phase transformation from austenite into martensite with the shear-band intersections theory, in which strain amplitude and cyclic frequency are related to the rate of shear-band intersection formation and the driving force of phase transformation. The results revealed that the martensite volume fraction increased and the rate of phase transformation decrease while the number of cycles increased, and the martensite volume fraction was almost constant after the number of cycles was more than 2000 times. Higher strain amplitude promotes martensite transformation and higher cyclic frequency impedes phase transformation, which are interpreted by temperature increment, the driving force of phase transformation and the rate of shearband intersection formation.

  10. Durability of Polymeric Coatings: Cyclic Loading and Free Volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongmin; Peng, Qinghua; Wu, Yichu; Li, Ying; Zhang, Junjie; Sandreczki, T. C.; Zhang, Renwu; Jean, Y. C.; Richardson, J. R.

    2002-03-01

    The mechanical durability of seven commercially polymeric coatings is investigated using slow positron beam techniques to monitor changes in sub nanometer defects during the cyclic loading process. Doppler broadened energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime measurements were performed as a function of the slow positron energy at different periods of cycling loading. The positron annihilation dada show that both S-defect parameter and ortho-positronium intensity decrease as the loading cycles increase. The results indicate a loss of free volumes due to mechanical loading and cycling. A direct correlation between the loss of free-volume parameter and of loading cycle is observed. This is interpreted as that durability of polymeric coatings is controlled by the atomic level defects. It is shown that the slow positron beam is very successful probe in detecting the very early stages of coating degradation due to mechanical processes. Supported by NSF-CMS-9812717

  11. Matrix cracking in laminated composites under monotonic and cyclic loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.; Lee, Jong-Won

    1991-01-01

    An analytical model based on the internal state variable (ISV) concept and the strain energy method is proposed for characterizing the monotonic and cyclic response of laminated composites containing matrix cracks. A modified constitution is formulated for angle-ply laminates under general in-plane mechanical loading and constant temperature change. A monotonic matrix cracking criterion is developed for predicting the crack density in cross-ply laminates as a function of the applied laminate axial stress. An initial formulation for a cyclic matrix cracking criterion for cross-ply laminates is also discussed. For the monotonic loading case, a number of experimental data and well-known models are compared with the present study for validating the practical applicability of the ISV approach.

  12. Compressed magnetic flux amplifier with capacitive load

    SciTech Connect

    Stuetzer, O.M.

    1980-03-01

    A first-order analysis is presented for a compressed magnetic flux (CMF) current amplifier working into a load with a capacitive component. Since the purpose of the investigation was to gain a general understanding of the arrangement, a number of approximations and limitations were accepted. The inductance of the transducer varies with time; the inductance/resistance/capacitance (LRC) circuit therefore is parametric and solutions are different for the stable regime (high C), the oscillation regime (low C), and the transition case. Solutions and performance depend strongly on circuit boundary conditions, i.e., energization of the circuit by either an injected current or by an applied capacitor charge. The behavior of current and energy amplification for the various cases are discussed in detail. A number of experiments with small CMF devices showed that the first-order theory presented predicts transducer performance well in the linear regime.

  13. Adjustable-Length Strut Withstands Large Cyclic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carner, Fred P.

    1995-01-01

    Adjustable-length strut designed for installation in structure subjected to large cyclic loads. Partly resembles large turnbuckle: includes oppositely threaded eyebolts engaging correspondingly threaded holes at opposite ends of shaft, and shaft turned to adjust length. However, unlike in turnbuckle, length setting not fixed by use of simple jam nuts: instead, length setting fixed by use of more complex threaded-end flanges partly resembling jam nuts but function somewhat differently.

  14. Plasticity model for metals under cyclic large-strain loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greshnov, V. M.; Puchkova, I. V.

    2010-03-01

    This paper deals with mathematical modeling of one of the effective technologies of plastic metal forming — multistep cold metal forging. Experimental results are given on the plastic behavior of metals under cyclic loading at large strains accumulated for one cycle. Based on the experimental data obtained, a plasticity model is developed and shown to be effective in testing and improving the technology of forging a nut blank by using a computer-aided engineering analysis system.

  15. Bladder tissue passive response to monotonic and cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Elisabetta M; Perrini, Michela; Bignardi, Cristina; Audenino, Alberto L

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental passive mechanical properties of the bladder need to be known in order to design the most appropriate long-term surgical repair procedures and develop materials for bladder reconstruction. This study has focused on the bladder tissue viscoelastic behavior, providing a comprehensive analysis of the effects of fibers orientation, strain rate and loading history. Whole bladders harvested from one year old fat pigs (160 kg approximate weight) were dissected along the apex-to-base direction and samples were isolated from the lateral region of the wall, as well as along apex-to-base and transverse directions. Uniaxial monotonic (stress relaxation) and cyclic tests at different frequencies have been performed with the Bose Electroforce(®) 3200. Normalized stress relaxation functions have been interpolated using a second-order exponential series and loading and unloading stress-strain curves have been interpolated with a non-linear elastic model. The passive mechanical behavior of bladder tissue was shown to be heavily influenced by frequency and loading history, both in monotonic and cyclic tests. The anisotropy of the tissue was evident in monotonic and in cyclic tests as well, especially in tests performed on an exercised tissue and at high frequencies. In contrast, transverse and apex-to-base samples demonstrated an analogous relaxation behavior.

  16. Dual-phase steel sheets under cyclic tension-compression to large strains: Experiments and crystal plasticity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecevic, Milovan; Korkolis, Yannis P.; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Knezevic, Marko

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop a physically-based crystal plasticity model for the prediction of cyclic tension-compression deformation of multi-phase materials, specifically dual-phase (DP) steels. The model is elasto-plastic in nature and integrates a hardening law based on statistically stored dislocation density, localized hardening due to geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs), slip-system-level kinematic backstresses, and annihilation of dislocations. The model further features a two level homogenization scheme where the first level is the overall response of a two-phase polycrystalline aggregate and the second level is the homogenized response of the martensite polycrystalline regions. The model is applied to simulate a cyclic tension-compression-tension deformation behavior of DP590 steel sheets. From experiments, we observe that the material exhibits a typical decreasing hardening rate during forward loading, followed by a linear and then a non-linear unloading upon the load reversal, the Bauschinger effect, and changes in hardening rate during strain reversals. To predict these effects, we identify the model parameters using a portion of the measured data and validate and verify them using the remaining data. The developed model is capable of predicting all the particular features of the cyclic deformation of DP590 steel, with great accuracy. From the predictions, we infer and discuss the effects of GNDs, the backstresses, dislocation annihilation, and the two-level homogenization scheme on capturing the cyclic deformation behavior of the material.

  17. DEFORMATION CHARACTERISTICS OF CRUSHED-STONE LAYER UNDER CYCLIC IMPACT LOADING FROM MICRO-MECHANICAL VIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akiko; Matsushima, Takashi

    'Hanging sleepers', which have gaps between sleepers and ballast layer are often found in the neighborhood of rail joints or rugged surface rails. This suggests that differential settlement of the ballast layer is due to impact loading generated by the contact between running wheel and rugged surface rail. Then cyclic loading tests were performed on crushed-stone layer with two loading patterns, the one is a cyclic impact loading and the other one is cyclic 'standard' loading controlled at 1/10 loading velocity of the impact loading. It was shown that the crashed-stone layer deforms with volumetric expansion during every off-loading processes under the cyclic impact loading. This phenomena prevents crushed stone layer from forming stable grain columns, then the residual settlement under the cyclic impact loading is larger than that under the cyclic 'standard' loading. A simple mass-spring model simulates that two masses move in the opposite direction with increased frequency of harmonic excitation.

  18. Infrared thermographic analysis of shape memory polymer during cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszczak, Maria; Pieczyska, Elżbieta A.; Maj, Michał; Kukla, Dominik; Tobushi, Hisaaki

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we present the effects of thermomechanical couplings occurring in polyurethane shape memory polymer subjected to cyclic tensile loadings conducted at various strain rates. Stress-strain characteristics were elaborated using a quasistatic testing machine, whereas the specimen temperature changes accompanying the deformation process were obtained with an infrared camera. We demonstrate a tight correlation between the mechanical and thermal results within the initial loading stage. The polymer thermomechanical behaviour in four subsequent loading-unloading cycles and the influence of the strain rate on the stress and the related temperature changes were also examined. In the range of elastic deformation the specimen temperature drops below the initial level due to thermoelastic effect whereas at the higher strains the temperature always increased, due to the dissipative deformation mechanisms. The difference in the characteristics of the specimen temperature has been applied to determine a limit of the polymer reversible deformation and analyzed for various strain rates. It was shown that at the higher strain rates higher values of the stress and temperature changes are obtained, which are related to higher values of the polymer yield points. During the cyclic loading a significant difference between the first and the second cycle was observed. The subsequent loading-unloading cycles demonstrated similar sharply shaped stress and temperature profiles and gradually decrease in values.

  19. Cyclic stretch and compression forces alter microRNA-29 expression of human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinghua; Mohammed, Arshad; Oubaidin, Maysaa; Evans, Carla A; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Atsawasuwan, Phimon

    2015-07-15

    MicroRNAs (miRs) play an important role in the development and remodeling of tissues through the regulation of large cohorts of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes. The purpose of the present study was to determine the response of miR-29 family expression to loading forces and their effects on ECM gene expression in periodontal ligament cells, the key effector cell population during orthodontic tooth movement. In a comparison between miRs from human periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) and alveolar bone cells (ABCs) from healthy human subjects, the ABC cohort of miRs was substantially greater than the corresponding PDLC cohort. Cyclic mechanical stretch forces at 12% deformation at 0.1Hz for 24h decreased expression of miR-29 family member miRs about 0.5 fold while 2g/cm(2) compression force for 24h increased miR-29 family member expression in PDLCs 1.8-4 folds. Cyclic stretch up-regulated major ECM genes in PDLCs, such as COL1A1, COL3A1 and COL5A1, while the compression force resulted in a down-regulation of these ECM genes. Direct interactions of miR-29 and Col1a1, Col3a1 and Col5a1 were confirmed using a dual luciferase reporter gene assay. In addition, transient transfection of a miR-29b mimic in mouse PDLCs down-regulated Col1a1, Col3a1 and Col5a1 while the transfection of miR-29b inhibitor up-regulated these genes compared to control transfection indicating that these target ECM genes directly responded to the altered level of miR-29b. These results provided a possible explanation for the effects of the miR-29 family on loaded PDLCS and their roles in extracellular matrix gene expression.

  20. Inverse Slip Accompanying Twinning and Detwinning during Cyclic Loading of Magnesium Single Crystal

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Qin; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Yanyao

    2013-01-01

    In situ , observation of twinning and detwinning in magnesium single crystals during tension-compression cyclic loading was made using optical microscopy. A quantitative analysis of plastic strain indicates that twinning and detwinning experience two stages, low and high work hardening de-twinning, and pure re-twinning and fresh twinning combined with retwinning. Slip is always activated. For the first time, inverse slip accompanying with pure retwinning and high work hardening detwinning was experimentally identified, which provides insights in better understanding of the activity of twining, detwinning, and slips.

  1. Dynamic performance of angle-steel concrete columns under low cyclic loading-I: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenzhong; Ji, Jing

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes low cyclic loading testing of nine angle-steel concrete column (ASCC) specimens. In the tests, the influence of the shear-span ratio, axial compression ratio and shear steel plate ratio on the hysteretic behavior, energy dissipation, strength degradation, stiffness degradation, skeleton curve and ductility of the ASCCs is studied. Based on the test results, some conclusions are presented. The P- Δ and sectional M — ϕ hysteretic models for the ASCCs are presented in a companion paper (Zheng and Ji, 2008).

  2. Behavior of nonplastic silty soils under cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Ural, Nazile; Gunduz, Zeki

    2014-01-01

    The engineering behavior of nonplastic silts is more difficult to characterize than is the behavior of clay or sand. Especially, behavior of silty soils is important in view of the seismicity of several regions of alluvial deposits in the world, such as the United States, China, and Turkey. In several hazards substantial ground deformation, reduced bearing capacity, and liquefaction of silty soils have been attributed to excess pore pressure generation during dynamic loading. In this paper, an experimental study of the pore water pressure generation of silty soils was conducted by cyclic triaxial tests on samples of reconstituted soils by the slurry deposition method. In all tests silty samples which have different clay percentages were studied under different cyclic stress ratios. The results have showed that in soils having clay content equal to and less than 10%, the excess pore pressure ratio buildup was quicker with an increase in different cyclic stress ratios. When fine and clay content increases, excess pore water pressure decreases constant cyclic stress ratio in nonplastic silty soils. In addition, the applicability of the used criteria for the assessment of liquefaction susceptibility of fine grained soils is examined using laboratory test results.

  3. Behavior of Nonplastic Silty Soils under Cyclic Loading

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Nazile; Gunduz, Zeki

    2014-01-01

    The engineering behavior of nonplastic silts is more difficult to characterize than is the behavior of clay or sand. Especially, behavior of silty soils is important in view of the seismicity of several regions of alluvial deposits in the world, such as the United States, China, and Turkey. In several hazards substantial ground deformation, reduced bearing capacity, and liquefaction of silty soils have been attributed to excess pore pressure generation during dynamic loading. In this paper, an experimental study of the pore water pressure generation of silty soils was conducted by cyclic triaxial tests on samples of reconstituted soils by the slurry deposition method. In all tests silty samples which have different clay percentages were studied under different cyclic stress ratios. The results have showed that in soils having clay content equal to and less than 10%, the excess pore pressure ratio buildup was quicker with an increase in different cyclic stress ratios. When fine and clay content increases, excess pore water pressure decreases constant cyclic stress ratio in nonplastic silty soils. In addition, the applicability of the used criteria for the assessment of liquefaction susceptibility of fine grained soils is examined using laboratory test results. PMID:24672343

  4. Micromechanics of intergranular creep failure under cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Giessen, E. van der; Tvergaard, V.

    1996-07-01

    This paper is concerned with a micromechanical investigation of intergranular creep failure caused by grain boundary cavitation under strain-controlled cyclic loading conditions. Numerical unit cell analyses are carried out for a planar polycrystal model in which the grain material and the grain boundaries are modeled individually. The model incorporates power-law creep of the grains, viscous grain boundary sliding between grains as well as the nucleation and growth of grain boundary cavities until they coalesce and form microcracks. Study of a limiting case with a facet-size microcrack reveals a relatively simple phenomenology under either balanced loading, slow-fast loading or balanced loading with a hold period at constant tensile stress. Next, a (non-dimensionalized) parametric study is carried out which focuses on the effect of the diffusive cavity growth rate relative to the overall creep rate, and the effects of cavity nucleation and grain boundary sliding. The model takes account of the build up of residual stresses during cycling, and it turns out that this, in general, gives rise to a rather complex phenomenology, but some cases are identified which approach the simple microcrack behavior. The analyses provide some new understanding that helps to explain the sometimes peculiar behavior under balanced cyclic creep.

  5. Cyclic Plasticity under Shock Loading in an HCP Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B.; Hunter, Abigail; Canfield, Thomas R.; Adams, Chris D.

    2012-06-08

    Plate impact experiments with pressures from 2 to 20 GPa, including one shock-partial release-reshock experiment, were performed on vacuum hot-pressed S-200F Beryllium. This hexagonal close-packed (HCP) metal shows significant plasticity effects in such conditions. The experiments were modeled in a Lagrangian hydrocode using an experimentally calibrated Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) constitutive model. By using the shock data to constrain a high rate portion of PTW, the model was able to generally match plasticity effects on the measured wave profile (surface velocity) during the shock loading, but not unloading. A backstress-based cyclic plasticity model to capture the quasi-elastic release (Bauschinger-type effect) was explored in order to match the unloading and reloading portions of the measured wave profiles. A comparison is made with other approaches in the literature to capture the cyclic plasticity in shock conditions.

  6. High load operation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    DOEpatents

    Duffy, Kevin P.; Kieser, Andrew J.; Liechty, Michael P.; Hardy, William L.; Rodman, Anthony; Hergart, Carl-Anders

    2008-12-23

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine is set up by first identifying combinations of compression ratio and exhaust gas percentages for each speed and load across the engines operating range. These identified ratios and exhaust gas percentages can then be converted into geometric compression ratio controller settings and exhaust gas recirculation rate controller settings that are mapped against speed and load, and made available to the electronic

  7. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  8. Compressive failure of fiber composites under multi-axial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shiladitya; Waas, Anthony M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the compressive strength of a fiber reinforced lamina under multi-axial stress states. An equilibrium analysis is carried out in which a kinked band of rotated fibers, described by two angles, is sandwiched between two regions in which the fibers are nominally straight. Proportional multi-axial stress states are examined. The analysis includes the possibility of bifurcation from the current equilibrium state. The compressive strength of the lamina is contingent upon either attaining a load maximum in the equilibrium response or satisfaction of a bifurcation condition, whichever occurs first. The results show that for uniaxial loading a non-zero kink band angle β produces the minimum limit load. For multi-axial loading, different proportional loading paths show regimes of bifurcation dominated and limit load dominated behavior. The present results are able to capture the beneficial effect of transverse compression in raising the composite compressive strength as observed in experiments.

  9. Compressive Failure of Fiber Composites under Multi-Axial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Shiladitya; Waas, Anthony M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the compressive strength of a fiber reinforced lamina under multi-axial stress states. An equilibrium analysis is carried out in which a kinked band of rotated fibers, described by two angles, is sandwiched between two regions in which the fibers are nominally straight. Proportional multi-axial stress states are examined. The analysis includes the possibility of bifurcation from the current equilibrium state. The compressive strength of the lamina is contingent upon either attaining a load maximum in the equilibrium response or satisfaction of a bifurcation condition, whichever occurs first. The results show that for uniaxial loading a non-zero kink band angle beta produces the minimum limit load. For multi-axial loading, different proportional loading paths show regimes of bifurcation dominated and limit load dominated behavior. The present results are able to capture the beneficial effect of transverse compression in raising the composite compressive strength as observed in experiments.

  10. Mercury embrittlement of Cu-Al alloys under cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, T. M.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of mercury on the room temperature, high cycle fatigue properties of three alloys: Cu-5.5 pct Al, Cu-7.3 pct Al, and Cu-6.3 pct Al-2.5 pct Fe has been determined. Severe embrittlement under cyclic loading in mercury is associated with rapid crack propagation in the presence of the liquid metal. A pronounced grain size effect is noted under mercury, while fatigue properties in air are insensitive to grain size. The fatigue results are discussed in relation to theories of adsorption-induced liquid metal embrittlement.

  11. Modeling of Anisotropic Rock Joints Under Cyclic Loading (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    This work describes a constitutive framework for modeling the behavior of rough joints under cyclic loading. Particular attention is paid to the intrinsic links between dilatancy, surface degradation, and mobilized shear strength. The framework also accounts for the important effect of shear-induced anisotropy. Both the governing formulation and an algorithm for implicit numerical integration are presented. While the proposed methods are general, we also postulate a specific model that is compared with experimental data. It employs relatively few free parameters, but shows good agreement with laboratory tests.

  12. Damage Evolution On Mechanical Parts Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestriez, P.; Bogard, F.; Shan, J. L.; Guo, Y. Q.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a fatigue damage model, based on the continuum damage mechanics and general thermodynamic theory, proposed by Lemaitre and Chaboche, for rolling bearings under very numerous loading cycles. A flow surface of fatigue using the Sines criterion is adopted. The coupling between the hardening plasticity and damage effects is considered in the constitutive equations. An explicit algorithm of weak coupling leads to a calculation very fast. This fatigue damage model is implemented into Abaqus/Explicit using a Vumat user's subroutine. Moreover, the damage variable in function of time is transformed into a function of number of cycles. An algorithm of cycle jump, with a criterion for choosing the number increment of cycles, is proposed, which allows to largely reduce the CPU time. The present damage simulation allows to determine the lifetime of mechanical parts under cyclic loading.

  13. BEHAVIOR OF POST-INSTALLED ANCHORS TESTED BY STEPWISE INCREASING CYCLIC LOAD PROTOCOLS

    PubMed Central

    Mahrenholtz, Philipp; Eligehausen, Rolf; Hutchinson, Tara C.; Hoehler, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic loads are a characteristic feature of actions acting on structures and anchorages during earthquakes. For this reason, seismic qualification of post-installed concrete anchors according to the internationally recognized American Concrete Institute (ACI) standard ACI 355 is based on cyclic load tests. The protocols for these tests, however, have limited scientific basis. Therefore, in the present paper newly-developed test protocols with stepwise-increasing load amplitudes are utilized to more realistically evaluate anchor seismic performance. The study focuses on the load-displacement behavior of common anchor types installed in cracked concrete and subjected to both cyclic tension and cyclic shear actions. The results confirmed robust behavior for anchors loaded in cyclic tension even in the presence of crack widths in the anchorage material larger than currently required by ACI 355. In addition, the critical influence of low cycle fatigue on the performance of anchors loaded in cyclic shear is demonstrated. PMID:27890969

  14. Cyclic-loading Induced Lattice-Strain Asymmetry in Loading and Transverse Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E-Wen; Barabash, Rozaliya; Clausen, Bjorn; Liaw, Peter K

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic-loading effects on a nickel-based superalloy are investigated with in-situ neutron-diffraction measurements. The thermoelastic-temperature evolution subjected to cyclic loading is estimated based on the lattice-strain evolution. The atomic thermoelastic responses are compared with the measured bulk temperature evolution. Two transitions in the temperature-evolution are observed. The first transition, observed with the neutron-measurement results, is associated with the cyclic hardening/softening-structural transformation. The second transition is observed at larger number of fatigue cycles. It has a distinct origin and is related to the start of irreversible structural transformations during fatigue. A lattice-strain asymmetry behavior is observed. The lattice-strain asymmetry is quantified as a grain-orientation-dependent transverse/loading parameter (P-ratio). The P-ratio parameter evolution reveals the irreversible plastic deformation subjected to the fatigue. The irreversible fatigue phenomena might relate to the formation of the microcracks. At elevated temperatures the cyclic hardening/softening transition starts at lower fatigue cycles as compared to room temperature. A comparison between the room-temperature and the elevated-temperature fatigue experiments is performed. The P-ratio parameters show the same irreversible trends at both the room and the elevated temperatures.

  15. 78. PIPING CHANNEL FOR FUEL LOADING, FUEL TOPPING, COMPRESSED AIR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. PIPING CHANNEL FOR FUEL LOADING, FUEL TOPPING, COMPRESSED AIR, GASEOUS NITROGEN, AND HELIUM - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. Assessment of Composite Delamination Self-Healing Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the promise of self-healing materials for enhanced autonomous durability has been introduced using a micro-encapsulation technique where a polymer based healing agent is encapsulated in thin walled spheres and embedded into a base polymer along with a catalyst phase. For this study, composite skin-stiffener flange debonding specimens were manufactured from composite prepreg containing interleaf layers with a polymer based healing agent encapsulated in thin-walled spheres. Constant amplitude fatigue tests in three-point bending showed the effect of self-healing on the fatigue response of the skin-stiffener flange coupons. After the cycling that created debonding, fatigue tests were held at the mean load for 24 hours. For roughly half the specimens tested, when the cyclic loading was resumed a decrease in compliance (increase in stiffness) was observed, indicating that some healing had occurred. However, with continued cycling, the specimen compliance eventually increased to the original level before the hold, indicating that the damage had returned to its original state. As was noted in a prevoius study conducted with specimens tested under monotonically increasing loads to failure, healing achieved via the micro-encapsulation technique may be limited to the volume of healing agent available relative to the crack volume.

  17. Characterization of ultrafine-grained aluminum tubes processed by Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression (TCEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Babaei, A. Mashhadi, M.M.

    2014-09-15

    Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression as a novel severe plastic deformation technique for tubes was utilized for processing ultrafine grained 1050 aluminum alloy for the first time. In this method, aluminum tube is fully constrained and deformed between mandrel and chamber with a small neck zone. The material deformation during Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression processing analyzed and the grain refinement mechanism were described. The capability of Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression in grain refinement of the aluminum alloy was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy observations and X-ray diffraction line profile analysis. The micrographs of the evolved microstructure show grain size of 850 nm and 550 nm after the first and second processing cycles of Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression, respectively. Mechanical properties of the initial and processed specimens were extracted from ring-hoop tensile tests. The documented results confirm grain refinement by showing remarkable increase in the yield and ultimate strengths. The main increase in strength and decrease in elongation take place after the first cycle. The microhardness assessments illustrate increase from the initial value of 29 Hv to 44 and 49 Hv respectively after the first and second cycles of Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression. There is a good homogeneity in peripheral microhardness and microhardness across the tube thickness. - Highlights: • Tubes of AA1050 for the first time were successfully SPD processed by TCEC. • The grain size was refined to 550 nm after two cycles of TCEC. • Notable increase in the strength and decrease in the elongation were documented. • The microhardness increased to 49 Hv from the initial value of 29 Hv. • Good homogeneity in the microhardness distribution was recorded.

  18. Internal loading of an inhomogeneous compressible Earth with phase boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defraigne, P.; Dehant, V.; Wahr, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The geoid and the boundary topography caused by mass loads inside the earth were estimated. It is shown that the estimates are affected by compressibility, by a radially varying density distribution, and by the presence of phase boundaries with density discontinuities. The geoid predicted in the chemical boundary case is 30 to 40 percent smaller than that predicted in the phase case. The effects of compressibility and radially varying density are likely to be small. The inner core-outer core topography for loading inside the mantle and for loading inside the inner core were computed.

  19. Behavior of tunnel form buildings under quasi-static cyclic lateral loading

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuksel, S.B.; Kalkan, E.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, experimental investigations on the inelastic seismic behavior of tunnel form buildings (i.e., box-type or panel systems) are presented. Two four-story scaled building specimens were tested under quasi-static cyclic lateral loading in longitudinal and transverse directions. The experimental results and supplemental finite element simulations collectively indicate that lightly reinforced structural walls of tunnel form buildings may exhibit brittle flexural failure under seismic action. The global tension/compression couple triggers this failure mechanism by creating pure axial tension in outermost shear-walls. This type of failure takes place due to rupturing of longitudinal reinforcement without crushing of concrete, therefore is of particular interest in emphasizing the mode of failure that is not routinely considered during seismic design of shear-wall dominant structural systems.

  20. Evaluation of an In Situ Gelable and Injectable Hydrogel Treatment to Preserve Human Disc Mechanical Function Undergoing Physiologic Cyclic Loading Followed by Hydrated Recovery.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Brent L; Elliott, Dawn M; Chen, Weiliam; Malhotra, Neil R

    2015-08-01

    Despite the prevalence of disc degeneration and its contributions to low back problems, many current treatments are palliative only and ultimately fail. To address this, nucleus pulposus replacements are under development. Previous work on an injectable hydrogel nucleus pulposus replacement composed of n-carboxyethyl chitosan, oxidized dextran, and teleostean has shown that it has properties similar to native nucleus pulposus, can restore compressive range of motion in ovine discs, is biocompatible, and promotes cell proliferation. The objective of this study was to determine if the hydrogel implant will be contained and if it will restore mechanics in human discs undergoing physiologic cyclic compressive loading. Fourteen human lumbar spine segments were tested using physiologic cyclic compressive loading while intact, following nucleotomy, and again following treatment of injecting either phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (sham, n = 7) or hydrogel (implant, n = 7). In each compressive test, mechanical parameters were measured immediately before and after 10,000 cycles of compressive loading and following a period of hydrated recovery. The hydrogel implant was not ejected from the disc during 10,000 cycles of physiological compression testing and appeared undamaged when discs were bisected following all mechanical tests. For sham samples, creep during cyclic loading increased (+15%) from creep during nucleotomy testing, while for implant samples creep strain decreased (-3%) toward normal. There was no difference in compressive modulus or compressive strains between implant and sham samples. These findings demonstrate that the implant interdigitates with the nucleus pulposus, preventing its expulsion during 10,000 cycles of compressive loading and preserves disc creep within human L5-S1 discs. This and previous studies provide a solid foundation for continuing to evaluate the efficacy of the hydrogel implant.

  1. Numerical Investigation of the Dynamic Properties of Intermittent Jointed Rock Models Subjected to Cyclic Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Zhao, Tao; Xu, Nu-wen

    2017-01-01

    Intermittent jointed rocks, which exist in a myriad of engineering projects, are extraordinarily susceptible to cyclic loadings. Understanding the dynamic fatigue properties of jointed rocks is necessary for evaluating the stability of rock engineering structures. This study numerically investigated the influences of cyclic loading conditions (i.e., frequency, maximum stress and amplitude) and joint geometric configurations (i.e., dip angle, persistency and interspace) on the dynamic fatigue mechanisms of jointed rock models. A reduction model of stiffness and strength was first proposed, and then, sixteen cyclic uniaxial loading tests with distinct loading parameters and joint geometries were simulated. Our results indicate that the reduction model can effectively reproduce the hysteresis loops and the accumulative plastic deformation of jointed rocks in the cyclic process. Both the loading parameters and the joint geometries significantly affect the dynamic properties, including the irreversible strain, damage evolution, dynamic residual strength and fatigue life. Three failure modes of jointed rocks, which are principally controlled by joint geometries, occur in the simulations: splitting failure through the entire rock sample, sliding failure along joint planes and mixed failure, which are principally controlled by joint geometries. Furthermore, the progressive failure processes of the jointed rock samples are numerically observed, and the different loading stages can be distinguished by the relationship between the number of broken bonds and the axial stress.

  2. Structural strength of cancellous specimens from bovine femur under cyclic compression

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Kaori; Yamada, Satoshi; Todoh, Masahiro; Takahata, Masahiko; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic fractures was estimated as nine million worldwide in 2000, with particular occurrence at the proximity of joints rich in cancellous bone. Although most of these fractures spontaneously heal, some fractures progressively collapse during the early post-fracture period. Prediction of bone fragility during progressive collapse following initial fracture is clinically important. However, the mechanism of collapse, especially the gradual loss of the height in the cancellous bone region, is not clearly proved. The strength of cancellous bone after yield stress is difficult to predict since structural and mechanical strength cannot be determined a priori. The purpose of this study was to identify whether the baseline structure and volume of cancellous bone contributed to the change in cancellous bone strength under cyclic loading. A total of fifteen cubic cancellous bone specimens were obtained from two 2-year-old bovines and divided into three groups by collection regions: femoral head, neck, and proximal metaphysis. Structural indices of each 5-mm cubic specimen were determined using micro-computed tomography. Specimens were then subjected to five cycles of uniaxial compressive loading at 0.05 mm/min with initial 20 N loading, 0.3 mm displacement, and then unloading to 0.2 mm with 0.1 mm displacement for five successive cycles. Elastic modulus and yield stress of cancellous bone decreased exponentially during five loading cycles. The decrease ratio of yield stress from baseline to fifth cycle was strongly correlated with bone volume fraction (BV/TV, r = 0.96, p < 0.01) and structural model index (SMI, r = − 0.81, p < 0.01). The decrease ratio of elastic modulus from baseline to fifth cycle was also correlated with BV/TV (r = 0.80, p < 0.01) and SMI (r = − 0.78, p < 0.01). These data indicate that structural deterioration of cancellous bone is associated with bone strength after yield stress. This study suggests that baseline cancellous

  3. Elevated Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Silicon Nitride Under Dynamic, Static and Cyclic Flexural Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Nemeth, Noel; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1994-01-01

    The slow crack growth parameters of a hot-pressed silicon nitride were determined at 1200 and 1300 C in air by statically, dynamically and cyclicly loading bend specimens. The fatigue parameters were estimated using the recently developed CARES/Life computer code. Good agreement exists between the flexural results. However, fatigue susceptibility under static uniaxial tensile loading, reported elsewhere, was greater than in flexure. Cyclic flexural loading resulted in the lowest apparent flexural fatigue susceptibility.

  4. Mechanical instabilities of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes under cyclic axial compression.

    PubMed

    Yap, Hsao W; Lakes, Roderic S; Carpick, Robert W

    2007-05-01

    Individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes with a range of aspect ratios are subjected to cyclic axial compression to large strains using atomic force microscopy. Distinct elastic buckling and post-buckling phenomena are observed reproducibly and are ascribed to Euler, asymmetric shell buckling (i.e., kinking), and symmetric shell buckling. These show agreement with continuum theories that range from approximate to remarkable. Shell buckling yields reproducible incremental negative stiffness in the initial post-buckled regime.

  5. Composite lamina compressive properties using the Wyoming combined loading compression test method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Peter Mark

    The determination of lamina compressive strength and modulus using the Wyoming Combined Loading Compression (CLC) test method was investigated. In this test method an untabbed [90/0]ns cross-ply test coupon is tested in uniaxial compression using the CLC test fixture. The longitudinal modulus and strength of the 0°-plies are determined by applying a back-out factor, calculated using Classical Lamination Theory, to the measured longitudinal laminate modulus and strength. A parametric study revealed that specimen quality, load train alignment, and fixture dimensional tolerances have a large impact on the measured compressive properties. Thus, a significant amount of time was dedicated to developing specimen fabrication and testing procedures to minimize variations in the measured compressive properties. A comparative study of the CLC and IITRI test fixtures showed that the CLC test fixture is superior to the IITRI fixture in many ways. Although the compressive properties measured using these two fixtures are often statistically equivalent, the CLC test fixture is easier to use, less expensive to fabricate, and much less massive than the IITRI fixture. In a second portion of the comparative study, the 0°-ply compressive strength obtained using [90/0]ns cross-ply test specimens was compared to the 0°-ply compressive strength obtained using quasi-isotropic test specimens. This revealed that the 0°-ply compressive strength was independent of the laminate orientation. This "backed-out" 0°-ply compressive strength is then by definition the "design value" for the strength of the composite material in compression. The present study showed that valid "design values" for the compressive strength of laminated composite materials can be obtained using the CLC test method. This was verified by testing two classes of structural components in compression, filament-wound cylinders, and honeycomb sandwich beams. The compressive strength of the 0°-plies at failure in the

  6. Removal torque evaluation of three different abutment screws for single implant restorations after mechanical cyclic loading

    PubMed Central

    PAEPOEMSIN, T.; REICHART, P. A.; CHAIJAREENONT, P.; STRIETZEL, F. P.; KHONGKHUNTHIAN, P.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal torque of three different abutment screws and pull out strength of implant-abutment connection for single implant restorations after mechanical cyclic loading. Methods The study was performed in accordance with ISO 14801:2007. Three implant groups (n=15) were used: group A, PW Plus® with flat head screw; group B, PW Plus® with tapered screw; and group C, Conelog® with flat head screw. All groups had the same implant-abutment connection feature: cone with mandatory index. All screws were tightened with manufacturer’s recommended torque. Ten specimens in each group underwent cyclic loading (1×106 cycles, 10 Hz, and 250 N). Then, all specimens were un-tightened, measured for the removal torque, and underwent a tensile test. The force that dislodged abutment from implant fixture was recorded. The data were analysed using independent sample t-test, ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Results Before cyclic loading, removal torque in groups A, B and C were significantly different (B> A> C, P<.05). After cyclic loading, removal torque in all groups decreased significantly (P<.05). Group C revealed significantly less removal torque than groups A and B (P<.005). Tensile force in all groups significantly increased after cyclic loading (P<.05), group A had significantly less tensile force than groups B and C (P<.005). Conclusions Removal torque reduced significantly after cyclic loading. Before cyclic loading, tapered screws maintained more preload than did flat head screws. After cyclic loading, tapered and flat head screws maintained even amounts of preload. The tensile force that dislodged abutment from implant fixture increased immensely after cyclic loading. PMID:28042450

  7. Effect of cyclic loading and temper condition on the tensile behavior of boron-aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Kennedy, J. M.; Tenney, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results from monotonic and cyclic tension tests on six different 6061 boron-aluminum laminates show that the strength of fiber dominated laminates is decreased and the strength of matrix dominated laminates is increased by T6 heat treatment. Cyrogenic exposure and cyclic loading are shown to have little influence on strength. Cyclic loading is also shown to produce small reductions in modulus for some laminates and some temper conditions. The results are discussed in light of expected metallurgical and residual stress changes due to temperature excursions and loading cycles.

  8. Embedded trilayer graphene flakes under tensile and compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoukleri, G.; Parthenios, J.; Galiotis, C.; Papagelis, K.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical response of embedded ABA trilayer graphene flakes loaded in tension and compression on polymer beams is monitored by simultaneous Raman measurements through the strain sensitivity of the G or 2D peaks. A characteristic peculiarity of the investigated flake is that it contains a trilayer and bilayer part. The Bernal stacked bilayer was used as a strain sensor aiming to assess the efficiency of the load transfer from the polymer matrix through shear to the individual graphene layers. For the trilayer graphene in tension, both peaks are redshifted and splitting of the G peak is reported for the first time. In compression, the studied sample was an almost isolated trilayer, in which both peaks are blue-shifted up to a critical compressive strain. This critical strain is found to be one fourth of the value found in the case of single layer graphene despite the higher bending rigidity that trilayer exhibits over the much thinner monolayer.

  9. Frozen storage increases the ultimate compressive load of porcine vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, J P; McGill, S M

    1995-09-01

    The use of freezing as a method of storage is commonplace in mechanical testing of biological tissues. The effects of freezing on tissues that comprise spinal segments have been examined separately, but little work has been done on intact specimens. We examined the effect of freezing on the structural properties of porcine cervical spines. The intact cervical spines of seven pigs (a total of 14 specimens--seven of C2-C4 and seven of C5-C7) were stored frozen (-20 degrees C) for 1 month. The ultimate compressive load, displacement, stiffness, and energy absorbed were obtained using a monotonic compressive load applied at 3,000 N/sec. The structural properties were compared with those of another 14 porcine cervical specimens (control group, matched for age and weight) that were tested in a fresh state. The frozen storage of the vertebral specimens significantly increased the ultimate compressive load (24%) and energy absorbed to failure (33%). The stiffness and displacement at failure were not affected. We concluded that the use of freezing as a storage medium should be of concern when the resulting measures are used to quantify the ultimate compressive load of the spinal motion segments.

  10. Loading rate sensitivity of open hole composites in compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubowinski, Steve J.; Guynn, E. G.; Elber, Wolf; Whitcomb, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    The results are reported of an experimental study on the compressive, time-dependent behavior of graphite fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates with open holes. The effect of loading rate on compressive strength was determined for six material systems ranging from brittle epoxies to thermoplastics at both 75 F and 220 F. Specimens were loaded to failure using different loading rates. The slope of the strength versus elapsed time-to-failure curve was used to rank the materials' loading rate sensitivity. All of the materials had greater strength at 75 F than at 220 F. All the materials showed loading rate effects in the form of reduced failure strength for longer elapsed-time-to-failure. Loading rate sensitivity was less at 220 F than the same material at 70 F. However, C12000/ULTEM and IM7/8551-7 were more sensitive to loading rate than the other materials at 220 F. AS4/APC2 laminates with 24, 32, and 48 plies and 1/16 and 1/4 inch diameter holes were tested. The sensitivity to loading rate was less for either increasing number of plies or larger hole size. The failure of the specimens made from brittle resins was accompanied by extensive delaminations while the failure of the roughened systems was predominantly by shear crippling. Fewer delamination failures were observed at the higher temperature.

  11. Flexor tenorrhaphy tensile strength: reduction by cyclic loading: in vitro and ex vivo porcine study.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C E R; Thompson, D; Sandow, M J

    2009-06-01

    The integrity of the repair is critical to maintain coaptation of the severed flexor tendon end until healing has advanced sufficiently. In our hospital, we use a modified Savage repair (four-strand Adelaide technique) using 3-0 Ethibond (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA) for acute flexor tenorrhaphy and an active postrepair mobilization protocol. To explain the apparent differences between the theoretical and actual repair strength of a multistrand repair in a single tension test and the reduced strength of a repair subjected to cyclic loading, we compared single and cyclical tensile loading with different suture in vitro configurations of 3-0 Ethibond (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA; one, two, and four strands) and an ex vivo four-strand repair of freshly divided porcine tendon to calculate the ultimate tensile strength (UTS). Mechanical testing was repeated 15 times with both single tensile and cyclical loading for each suture configuration and porcine repair. In the in vitro model, the presence of a knot in a single strand reduced the UTS by 50%. The stiffness of a knotted strand was substantially less than the unknotted strand but became identical after cyclical loading. There was no statistical significance of the UTS between single and cyclical loading with different numbers of strands in this model. In the ex vivo four-strand porcine repair model, there was a significant reduction in UTS with cyclical loading, which equated to the number of strands times the strength of the knotted strand. This discrepancy can be explained by the change in stiffness of the knotted strand after cyclical loading and has important implications for previous studies of suture tendon repair using single tensile loading where the UTS may have been overestimated. We believe that cyclical loading is more representative of physiological loading after acute flexor tendon repair and should be the testing model of choice in suture tenorrhaphy studies.

  12. Monotonic and cyclic loading behavior of porous scaffolds made from poly(para-phenylene) for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Anthony J; Yakacki, Christopher M; Fertig, Ray S; Dana Carpenter, R; Frick, Carl P

    2015-01-01

    Porous poly(para-phenylene) (PPP) scaffolds have tremendous potential as an orthopedic biomaterial; however, the underlying mechanisms controlling the monotonic and cyclic behavior are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to integrate micro-computed tomography (μCT), finite-element analysis (FEA), and experimental results to uncover the relationships between the porous structure and mechanical behavior. The μCT images were taken from porous PPP scaffolds with a porosity of 75vol% and pore size distribution between 420 and 500µm. Representative sections of the image were segmented and converted into finite-element meshes. It was shown through FEA that localized stresses within the microstructure were approximately 100 times higher than the applied global stress during the linear loading regime. Experimental analysis revealed the S-N fatigue curves for fully dense and porous PPP samples were parallel on log-log plots, with the endurance limit for porous samples in tension being approximately 100 times lower than their solid PPP counterparts (0.3-35MPa) due to the extreme stress concentrations caused by the porous microarchitecture. The endurance limit for porous samples in compression was much higher than in tension (1.60MPa). Through optical, laser-scanning, and scanning-electron microscopy it was found that porous tensile samples failed under Mode I fracture in both monotonic and cyclic loading. By comparison, porous compressive samples failed via strut buckling/pore collapse monotonically and by shearing fracture during cyclic loading. Monotonic loading showed that deformation behavior was strongly correlated with pore volume fraction, matching foam theory well; however, fatigue behavior was much more sensitive to local stresses believed to cause crack nucleation.

  13. Behavior of a Large-Scale Pile Group Subjected to Cyclic Lateral Loading.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    difference techniques, and is a well-established procedure in geotechnical engineering . The key to successful use of the method is an accurate...CYCLIC LATERAL LOADING.. (U) TEXAS UNIV AT AUSTIN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING CENTER D A BROWJN ET AL. UNCLASSIFIED, FED 66 IdES/MP/GL-89-2 DACW39-83-C...TO CYCLIC LATERAL LOADING by AD-A 193 498 Dan A. Brown, Lymon C. Reese Geotechnical Engineering Center Bureau of Engineering Research The University

  14. Analysis of delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tratt, Matthew D.

    The present analytical and empirical study of composite structure delamination has attempted to predict the threshold stress for the initiation of delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates. The strain-energy release-rate distributions around circular delaminations are computed via MSC/NASTRAN analysis in conjunction with a virtual crack-opening technique. Static compression tests were conducted on specimens of graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy having circular delaminations of various sizes. Computed delamination growth threshold-stress prediction results were at substantial variance with the test data, but confirmed trends and gave qualitative insight into quasi-static delamination growth.

  15. Insentropic compression of solid using pulsed magnetic loading

    SciTech Connect

    HALL,CLINT A.; ASAY,JAMES R.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; ROSENTHAL,STEPHEN E.; KNUDSON,MARCUS D.; REISMAN,D.; TOOR,A.; CAUBLE,R.; HAYES,D.B.

    2000-04-18

    Shock loading techniques are often used to determine material response along a specific pressure loading curve referred to as the Hugoniot. However, many technological and scientific applications require accurate determination of dynamic material response that is off-Hugoniot, covering large regions of the equation-of-state surface. Unloading measurements from the shocked state provide off-Hugoniot information, but experimental techniques for measuring compressive off-Hugoniot response have been limited. A new pulsed magnetic loading technique is presented which provides previously unavailable information on isentropic loading of materials to pressures of several hundred kbar. This smoothly increasing pressure loading provides a good approximation to the high-pressure material isentrope centered at ambient conditions. The approach uses high current densities to create ramped magnetic loading to a few hundred kbar over time intervals of 100--200 ns. The method has successfully determined the isentropic mechanical response of copper to about 200 kbar and has been used to evaluate the kinetics of the alpha-epsilon phase transition occurring in iron at 130 kbar. With refinements in progress, the method shows promise for performing isentropic compression experiments to multi-Mbar pressures.

  16. Ultrasonic Measurement of Strain Distribution Inside Object Cyclically Compressed by Dual Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagiri, Yoshitaka; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2008-05-01

    One possible way to evaluate acupuncture therapy quantitatively is to measure the change in the elastic property of muscle after application of the therapy. Many studies have been conducted to measure mechanical properties of tissues using ultrasound-induced acoustic radiation force. To assess mechanical properties, strain must be generated in an object. However, a single radiation force is not effective because it mainly generates translational motion when the object is much harder than the surrounding medium. In this study, two cyclic radiation forces are simultaneously applied to a muscle phantom from two opposite horizontal directions so that the object is cyclically compressed in the horizontal direction. By the horizontal compression, the object is expanded vertically based on its incompressibility. The resultant vertical displacement is measured using another ultrasound pulse. Two ultrasonic transducers for actuation were both driven by the sum of two continuous sinusoidal signals at two slightly different frequencies [1 MHz and (1 M + 5) Hz]. The displacement of several micrometers in amplitude, which fluctuated at 5 Hz, was measured by the ultrasonic phased tracking method. Increase in thickness inside the object was observed just when acoustic radiation forces increased. Such changes in thickness correspond to vertical expansion due to horizontal compression.

  17. Physical properties and compression loading behaviour of corn seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić, Lj.; Radojèin, M.; Pavkov, I.; Babić, M.; Turan, J.; Zoranović, M.; Stanišić, S.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to acquire data on the physical properties and compression loading behaviour of seed of six corn hybrid varieties. The mean values of length, width, thickness, geometric diameter, surface area, porosity, single kernel mass, sphericity, bulk and true density, 1 000 kernelmass and coefficient of friction were studied at single level of corn seed moisture content. The calculated secant modulus of elasticity during compressive loading for dent corn was 0.995 times that of the semi-flint type; there were no significant differences in the value of this mechanical property between semi-flint and dent corn varieties. The linear model showed a decreasing tendency of secant modulus of elasticity for all hybrids as the moisture content of seeds increased.

  18. Compression loading behaviour of sunflower seeds and kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, Thasaiya A.; Manikantan, Musuvadi R.; Chand, Tarsem; Sharma, Rajiv; Seerangurayar, Thirupathi

    2014-10-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the compression loading behaviour of five Indian sunflower varieties (NIRMAL-196, NIRMAL-303, CO-2, KBSH-41, and PSH- 996) under four different moisture levels (6-18% d.b). The initial cracking force, mean rupture force, and rupture energy were measured as a function of moisture content. The observed results showed that the initial cracking force decreased linearly with an increase in moisture content for all varieties. The mean rupture force also decreased linearly with an increase in moisture content. However, the rupture energy was found to be increasing linearly for seed and kernel with moisture content. NIRMAL-196 and PSH-996 had maximum and minimum values of all the attributes studied for both seed and kernel, respectively. The values of all the studied attributes were higher for seed than kernel of all the varieties at all moisture levels. There was a significant effect of moisture and variety on compression loading behaviour.

  19. Evaluation of load transfer characteristics of a dynamic stabilization device on disc loading under compression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing Hang; Zhou, Yuan Li; Petit, Dominique; Teo, Ee Chon

    2009-06-01

    In the current study, finite element analyses were conducted to examine the biomechanical capability of a newly design dynamic stabilization system, FlexPLUS, to restore the load transmission of degenerated intervertebral L4-L5 lumbar motion segment spine under compression. Detailed three-dimensional FE models of L4-L5 motion segment and the FlexPLUS were developed. Compressive loading up to 1000N was applied to the intact L4-L5 model, the L4-L5 models with slight and moderate degenerated disc, and the implanted L4-L5 model. Further more, the load transmission characteristics of Dynesys and a rigid rod was also simulated for comparison. The resultant load-displacement curves and the load transferred through annulus under various conditions were compared. The predicted axial displacement of L4 top surface against applied compressive force of the intact L4-L5 model agreed well with experimental data. The predicted results showed that degenerated disc has significant effect on the lumbar segment load bearing capacity. Not only the stiffness of the segment was greatly increased, the uniform nature of the disc stress distribution was also altered. The FlexPLUS can effectively reduce the disc loading of degenerated model. Although the non-uniform load distribution pattern through annulus was not improved, the overall stress magnitude was greatly reduced to the level of intact model for grade II degeneration.

  20. Elastic-plastic analysis of a propagating crack under cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Armen, H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Development and application of a two-dimensional finite-element analysis to predict crack-closure and crack-opening stresses during specified histories of cyclic loading. An existing finite-element computer program which accounts for elastic-plastic material behavior under cyclic loading was modified to account for changing boundary conditions - crack growth and intermittent contact of crack surfaces. This program was subsequently used to study the crack-closure behavior under constant-amplitude and simple block-program loading.

  1. The Mechanism of Orientation Dependence of Cyclic Stability of Superelesticity in NiFeGaCo Single Crystals Under Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeeva, E. E.; Panchenko, E. Yu.; Vetoshkina, N. G.; Chumlyakov, Yu. I.; Tagiltsev, A. I.; Eftifeeva, A. S.; Maier, H.

    2016-12-01

    Using single crystals of the Ni49Fe18Ga27Co6 (at.%) alloy, oriented along [001]- and [123]-directions, cyclic stability of superelasticity is investigated in isothermal loading/unloading cycles at T = Af +(12-15) K (100 cycles) under compressive stress as a function of given strain per cycle, presence of disperse γ-phase particles measuring 5-10 μm, austenitic (B2 or L21) and stress-induced martensitic crystal structure (14M or L10). It is shown that single-phase L21-crystals demonstrate high cyclic stability during L21-14M-transitions with narrow hysteresises Δσ < 50 MPa in the absence of detwinning of the martensite. During the development of L21-14M stress-induced transformation, the reversible energy ΔGrev for these crystals exceeds the dissipated energy ΔGirr, and ΔGrev/ΔGirr = 1.7-1.8. A significant degradation of superelasticity is observed in [123]-oriented crystals during the development of L21-14M-L10-transformations followed by detwinning of the L10-martensite crystals and heterophase (B2+γ) single crystals, irrespective of their orientation during the B2-L10-transition. In the latter case, martensitic transformations are characterized by a wide stress hysteresis Δσ ≥ 80 MPa and the dissipated energy exceeds the reversible energy ΔGrev/ΔGirr = 0.5. The empirical criterion, relying on the analysis of the reversible-to-irreversible energy ratio, ΔGrev/ΔGirr, during stressinduced martensitic transformations, can be used to predict the cyclic stability of superelasticity in NiFeGaCo alloys subjected to different types of heat treatment.

  2. CYCLIC-LOADING TESTS OF TWO GLASSREINFORCED PLASTIC CYLINDERS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SUBMARINE HULLS, *LAMINATED PLASTICS , COMPOSITE MATERIALS, GLASS TEXTILES, PRESSURE VESSELS, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE, FATIGUE(MECHANICS), MODEL TESTS, LOADS(FORCES), RINGS, TAPES, CREEP, SHELLS(STRUCTURAL FORMS).

  3. The mechanical behaviour of NBR/FEF under compressive cyclic stress strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, W. E.; El-Eraki, M. H. I.; El-Lawindy, A. M. Y.; Hassan, H. H.

    2006-06-01

    Acrylonitrile butadiene rubber compounds filled with different concentrations of fast extrusion furnace (FEF) carbon black were experimentally investigated. The stress-strain curves of the composites were studied, which suggest good filler-matrix adhesion. The large reinforcement effect of the filler followed the Guth model for non-spherical particles. The effect of FEF carbon black on the cyclic fatigue and hysteresis was also examined. The loading and unloading stress-strain relationships for any cycle were described by applying Ogden's model for rubber samples. The dissipation energy that indicates the vibration damping capacity for all samples was determined. A simple model was proposed, to investigate the relation between maximum stress and the number of cyclic fatigue.

  4. Effects of shear stress component and loading path on fatigue strength under tension/torsion biaxial cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Y.; Fujii, T.

    1994-12-31

    The material degradation and its mechanism of a plain woven glass fabric under tension/torsion biaxial cyclic loading were investigated. Thin-walled tubular specimens were used. Different types of loading sequence were applied to the specimens in order to estimate the effect of shear stress component on fatigue degradation of the composite under biaxial cyclic loading. All biaxial loads were proportionally applied to the specimens, but the number of torsion loading cycles and its direction (pulsating or alternate) were changed. Various wave forms were also used to estimate the effect of loading path. Loading path was changed but the final stress state (tensile and shear stresses) was the same. Stress-strain relation and stiffness reduction were observed to evaluate the degree of fatigue damage. The experimental results show that the role of shear stress is important when the material degradation is dominated by the shear stress component although the effect of shear stress component on fatigue strength decreases with an increase of tensile stress component under tension/torsion biaxial loading. Loading sequence also affects more or less on the fatigue life. On the other hand, it is well estimated that the fatigue life is little dependent on loading path in the case of high cycle fatigue.

  5. Finite Element Analysis of Sacroiliac Joint Fixation under Compression Loads

    PubMed Central

    Bruna-Rosso, Claire; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Bianco, Rohan-Jean; Godio-Raboutet, Yves; Fradet, Léo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a known chronic pain-generator. The last resort of treatment is the arthrodesis. Different implants allow fixation of the joint, but to date there is no tool to analyze their influence on the SIJ biomechanics under physiological loads. The objective was to develop a computational model to biomechanically analyze different parameters of the stable SIJ fixation instrumentation. Methods A comprehensive finite element model (FEM) of the pelvis was built with detailed SIJ representation. Bone and sacroiliac joint ligament material properties were calibrated against experimentally acquired load-displacement data of the SIJ. Model evaluation was performed with experimental load-displacement measurements of instrumented cadaveric SIJ. Then six fixation scenarios with one or two implants on one side with two different trajectories (proximal, distal) were simulated and assessed with the FEM under vertical compression loads. Results The simulated S1 endplate displacement reduction achieved with the fixation devices was within 3% of the experimentally measured data. Under compression loads, the uninstrumented sacrum exhibited mainly a rotation motion (nutation) of 1.38° and 2.80° respectively at 600 N and 1000 N, with a combined relative translation (0.3 mm). The instrumentation with one screw reduced the local displacement within the SIJ by up to 62.5% for the proximal trajectory vs. 15.6% for the distal trajectory. Adding a second implant had no significant additional effect. Conclusion A comprehensive finite element model was developed to assess the biomechanics of SIJ fixation. SIJ devices enable to reduce the motion, mainly rotational, between the sacrum and ilium. Positioning the implant farther from the SIJ instantaneous rotation center was an important factor to reduce the intra-articular displacement. Clinical relevance Knowledge provided by this biomechanical study enables improvement of SIJ fixation through optimal implant

  6. Behavior of sandwich panels subjected to bending fatigue, axial compression loading and in-plane bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieson, Haley Aaron

    This thesis investigates experimentally and analytically the structural performance of sandwich panels composed of glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) skins and a soft polyurethane foam core, with or without thin GFRP ribs connecting skins. The study includes three main components: (a) out-of-plane bending fatigue, (b) axial compression loading, and (c) in-plane bending of sandwich beams. Fatigue studies included 28 specimens and looked into establishing service life (S-N) curves of sandwich panels without ribs, governed by soft core shear failure and also ribbed panels governed by failure at the rib-skin junction. Additionally, the study compared fatigue life curves of sandwich panels loaded under fully reversed bending conditions (R=-1) with panels cyclically loaded in one direction only (R=0) and established the stiffness degradation characteristics throughout their fatigue life. Mathematical models expressing fatigue life and stiffness degradation curves were calibrated and expanded forms for various loading ratios were developed. Approximate fatigue thresholds of 37% and 23% were determined for non-ribbed panels loaded at R=0 and -1, respectively. Digital imaging techniques showed significant shear contribution significantly (90%) to deflections if no ribs used. Axial loading work included 51 specimens and examined the behavior of panels of various lengths (slenderness ratios), skin thicknesses, and also panels of similar length with various rib configurations. Observed failure modes governing were global buckling, skin wrinkling or skin crushing. In-plane bending involved testing 18 sandwich beams of various shear span-to-depth ratios and skin thicknesses, which failed by skin wrinkling at the compression side. The analytical modeling components of axially loaded panels include; a simple design-oriented analytical failure model and a robust non-linear model capable of predicting the full load-displacement response of axially loaded slender sandwich panels

  7. Instantaneous angular speed monitoring of gearboxes under non-cyclic stationary load conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stander, C. J.; Heyns, P. S.

    2005-07-01

    Recent developments in the condition monitoring and asset management market have led to the commercialisation of online vibration-monitoring systems. These systems are primarily utilised to monitor large mineral mining equipment such as draglines, continuous miners and hydraulic shovels. Online monitoring systems make diagnostic information continuously available for asset management, production outsourcing and maintenance alliances with equipment manufacturers. However, most online vibration-monitoring systems are based on conventional vibration-monitoring technologies, which are prone to giving false equipment deterioration warnings on gears that operate under fluctuating load conditions. A simplified mathematical model of a gear system was developed to illustrate the feasibility of monitoring the instantaneous angular speed (IAS) as a means of monitoring the condition of gears that are subjected to fluctuating load conditions. A distinction is made between cyclic stationary load modulation and non-cyclic stationary load modulation. It is shown that rotation domain averaging will suppress the modulation caused by non-cyclic stationary load conditions but will not suppress the modulation caused by cyclic stationary load conditions. An experimental investigation on a test rig indicated that the IAS of a gear shaft could be monitored with a conventional shaft encoder to indicate a deteriorating gear fault condition.

  8. Cyclic mechanical loading promotes bacterial penetration along composite restoration marginal gaps

    PubMed Central

    Khvostenko, D.; Salehi, S.; Naleway, S. E.; Hilton, T. J.; Ferracane, J. L.; Mitchell, J. C.; Kruzic, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Secondary caries is the most common reason for composite restoration replacement and usually forms between dentin and the filling. The objective of this study was to investigate the combined effect of cyclic loading and bacterial exposure on bacterial penetration into gaps at the interface between dentin and resin composite restorative material using a novel bioreactor system and test specimen design. Methods Human molars were machined into 3 mm thick disks with 2 mm deep × 5 mm diameter cavity preparations into which composite restorations were placed. A ∼15-30 micrometer (small) or ∼300 micrometer wide (large) dentin-restoration gap was introduced along half of the interface between the dentin and restoration. Streptococcus mutans UA 159 biofilms were grown on each sample prior to testing in a bioreactor both with and without cyclic loading. Both groups of samples were tested for 2 weeks and post-test biofilm viability was confirmed with a live-dead assay. Samples were fixed, mounted and cross-sectioned to reveal the gaps and observe the depth of bacterial penetration. Results It was shown that for large gap samples the bacteria easily penetrated to the full depth of the gap independent of loading or non-loading conditions. The results for all cyclically loaded small gap samples show a consistently deep bacterial penetration down 100% of the gap while the average penetration depth was only 67% for the non-loaded samples with only two of six samples reaching 100%. Significance A new bioreactor was developed that allows combining cyclic mechanical loading and bacterial exposure of restored teeth for bacterial biofilm and demineralization studies. Cyclic loading was shown to aid bacterial penetration into narrow marginal gaps, which could ultimately promote secondary caries formation. PMID:25900624

  9. Dislocation substructures and nonproportional hardening. [TEM observations under tension-torsion cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Shiinghwa Doong; Socie, D.F.; Robertson, I.M. )

    1990-10-01

    The dislocation substructures created in 1100 aluminum, OFHC copper, and type 304 and 310 stainless steels by in-phase (proportional) and 90 deg out-of-phase (nonproportional) tension-torsion cyclic loading were examined with a transmission-electron microscope. Multislip structures (cells and subgrains) are observed in aluminum under both in-phase and 90 deg out-of-phase tension-torsion loading. For copper and stainless steel, single-slip structures (planar dislocations, matrix veins, and ladders) are observed after proportional loading, whereas multislip structures (cells and labyrinths) are observed after nonproportional loading. The increased cyclic hardening of copper and stainless steels under nonproportional loading is attributed to the change of dislocation substructures. Based on these observations, formulation of a nonproportionality parameter for constitutive modeling is discussed.

  10. Inhomogeneous deformation in INCONEL 718 during monotonic and cyclic loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worthem, D. W.; Robertson, I. M.; Socie, D. F.; Altstetter, C. J.; Leckie, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the relation between microstructural observations of the dislocation structures and the macroscopic deformation responses of both aged and homogenized precipitate-hardened alloys at room temperature. The deformation responses are compared to the cyclic deformation response of an aged precipitate-hardened alloy. Early in the deformation, one deformation band per grain and little evidence of work hardening are observed; with increased deformation, work hardening begins, more bands nucleate, and their spacing becomes similar to that in the aged material. It is pointed out that the degree of coarseness of inhomogeneous deformation is not a result of a softening process within the bands due to precipitate shearing, but it is a function of the amount of work hardening within the bands.

  11. Fatigue degradation in compressively loaded composite laminates. [graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramkumar, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of imbedded delaminations on the compression fatigue behavior of quasi-isotropic, T300/5208, graphite/epoxy laminates was investigated. Teflon imbedments were introduced during panel layup to create delaminations. Static and constant amplitude (R=10, omega = 10 Hz) fatigue tests were conducted. S-N data and half life residual strength data were obtained. During static compression loading, the maximum deflection of the buckled delaminated region was recorded. Under compression fatigue, growth of the imbedded delamination was identified as the predominant failure mode in most of the test cases. Specimens that exhibited others failures had a single low stiffness ply above the Teflon imbedment. Delamination growth during fatigue was monitored using DIB enhanced radiography. In specimens with buried delaminations, the dye penetrant (DIB) was introduced into the delaminated region through a minute laser drilled hole, using a hypodermic needle. A low kV, microfocus, X-ray unit was mounted near the test equipment to efficiently record the cyclic growth of buried delaminations on Polaroid film.

  12. Fatigue Damage in Notched Composite Laminates Under Tension-Tension Cyclic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinchcomb, W. W.; Henneke, E. G.; Reifsnider, K. L.; Kress, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    The results are given of an investigation to determine the damage states which develop in graphite epoxy laminates with center holes due to tension-tension cyclic loads, to determine the influence of stacking sequence on the initiation and interaction of damage modes and the process of damage development, and to establish the relationships between the damage states and the strength, stiffness, and life of the laminates. Two quasi-isotropic laminates were selected to give different distributions of interlaminar stresses around the hole. The laminates were tested under cyclic loads (R=0.1, 10 Hz) at maximum stresses ranging between 60 and 95 percent of the notched tensile strength.

  13. An in-situ neutron diffraction study of a multi-phase transformation and twinning-induced plasticity steel during cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Brown, Donald W.; Clausen, Bjørn; Tomé, Carlos N.; Pereloma, Elena V.; Davies, Christopher H. J.; Gazder, Azdiar A.

    2015-04-27

    In-situ neutron diffraction during cyclic tension-compression loading (∼+3.5% to −2.8%) of a 17Mn-3Al-2Si-1Ni-0.06C steel that exhibits concurrent transformation and twinning -induced plasticity effects indicated a significant contribution of intragranular back stresses to the observed Bauschinger effect. Rietveld analysis revealed a higher rate of martensitic transformation during tension compared to compression. Throughout cycling, α′-martensite exhibited the highest phase strains such that it bears an increasing portion of the macroscopic load as its weight fraction evolves. On the other hand, the ε-martensite strain remained compressive as it accommodated most of the internal strains caused by the shape misfit associated with the γ→ε and/or ε→α′ transformations.

  14. Active stabilization of thin-wall structures under compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welham, Jared; Calius, Emilio P.; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2003-08-01

    The active suppression of elastic buckling instability has the potential to significantly increase the effective strength of thin-wall structures. Despite all the interest in smart structures, the active suppression of buckling has received comparatively little attention. This paper addresses the effects of embedded actuation on the compression buckling strength of laminated composite plates through analysis and simulation. Numerical models are formulated that include the influence of essential features such as sensor uncertainty and noise, actuator saturation and control architecture on the buckling process. Silicon-based strain sensors and diffuse laser distance sensors are both considered for use in the detection of incipient buckling behavior due to their increased sensitivity. Actuation is provided by paired distributions of piezo-electric material incorporated into both sides of the laminate. Optimal controllers are designed to command the structure to deform in ways that interfere with the development of buckling mode shapes. Commercial software packages are used to solve the resulting non-linear equations, and some of the tradeoffs are enumerated. Overall, the results show that active buckling control can considerably enhance resistance to instability under compressive loads. These buckling load predictions demonstrate the viability of optimal control and piezo-electric actuation for implementing active buckling control. Due to the importance of early detection, the relative effectiveness of active buckling control is shown to be strongly dependent on the performance of the sensing scheme, as well as on the characteristics of the structure.

  15. FEM modelling of soil behaviour under compressive loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, N.; Vlăduţ, V.; Biriş, S. Şt

    2017-01-01

    Artificial compaction is one of the most dangerous forms of degradation of agricultural soil. Recognized as a phenomenon with multiple negative effects in terms of environment and agricultural production, soil compaction is strongly influenced by the size of external load, soil moisture, size and shape of footprint area, soil type and number of passes. Knowledge of soil behavior under compressive loads is important in order to prevent or minimize soil compaction. In this paper were developed, by means of the Finite Element Method, various models of soil behavior during the artificial compaction produced by the wheel of an agricultural trailer. Simulations were performed on two types of soil (cohesive and non-cohesive) with known characteristics. By applying two loads (4.5 kN and 21 kN) in footprints of different sizes, were obtained the models of the distributions of stresses occuring in the two types of soil. Simulation results showed that soil stresses increase with increasing wheel load and vary with soil type.

  16. Biomechanical properties under cyclic loading of seven meniscus repair techniques.

    PubMed

    Becker, Roland; Stärke, Christian; Heymann, Marlen; Nebelung, Wolfgang

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of the current study was to obtain additional information about the biomechanical behavior of different fixation techniques for meniscus repair using recently developed biodegradable implants and suture repair techniques. The posterior horns of human menisci were used to investigate the meniscus repair construct of the Arrow, Screw, Stinger, Fastener, T-fix, and horizontal and vertical mattress suture. A 20 mm-longitudinal incision was made in the meniscus, similar to a bucket handle lesion, 3 mm from the meniscosynovial rim and was repaired. One hundred cycles between 5 N and 15 N were done using a tension load machine with a loading rate of 10 N/second. The stiffness, displacement, and pullout strength were examined. The significantly highest stiffness was found for the vertical mattress suture (17.1 N/mm) and Stinger (15 N/mm) followed by the Arrow (13.7 N/mm), T-fix (10.5 N/mm), and horizontal mattress suture (10 N/mm). Superior load to failure was obtained for the suture repair in comparison with the biodegradable implants. Despite the lower pullout strength of biodegradable implants, similar stiffnesses were found for the Stinger and Arrow in comparison with the mattress suture technique. These techniques provide the most rigid fixation that is essential for tissue healing.

  17. Molecular dynamics investigation of the grain boundary migration hysteresis of nanocrystalline Ni under cyclic shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Xinhua; Peng, Di

    2017-02-01

    The deformation behavior and grain boundary (GB) response of nanocrystalline Ni under cyclic shear loading are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The GB migration hysteresis phenomenon, in which the GB migration displacement lags behind the change in nominal shear strain, is observed in the symmetric tilt GBs for the first time. The elementary structure transformation occurring at the two end segments of the observed GB during GB migration produces a disordered and irreversible state, while the transformation in the middle segment is reversible. Both dislocation retraction and nucleation occur during unloading. Relatively large cyclic strain amplitudes lead to disordered GB segments of greater length, such that the residual GB migration displacement increases with increasing cyclic amplitude. GB migration hysteresis vanishes after the GB becomes immobile owing to a cyclic shear induced transition to a disordered state along its entire length.

  18. Cyclic tension compression testing of AHSS flat specimens with digital image correlation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoerr, Lay; Sever, Nimet; McKune, Paul; Faath, Timo

    2013-12-01

    A cyclic tension-compression testing program was conducted on flat specimens of TPN-W®780 (Three Phase Nano) and DP980 (Dual Phase) Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS). This experimental method was enabled utilizing an anti-buckling clamping device performed in a test machine, and the surface strains along the thickness edge are measured with a three-dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system. The in-plane pre-strain and reversed strain values, at specified strain rates, are investigated to observe the potential plastic flow and the nonlinear strain hardening behavior of the materials. The validity of the test results is established with the monotonic tension tests, to substantiate the true stress-strain curves corrected for the frictional and biaxial stresses induced by the clamping device. A process method for analyzing the correction using a macro script is shown to simplify the output of the true stress-strain results for material model calibration. An in progress study to validate the forming and spring-back predictive capabilities of a calibrated TPN-W®780 complex material model to an actual stamping of an automotive component will demonstrate the usefulness of the experimental cyclic test method. Suggestions to improve the testing, strain analysis and calibration of the model parameters are proposed for augmented use of this test method.

  19. Quantitative tracking of grain structure evolution in a nanocrystalline metal during cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzarino, Jason F.; Ramos, Jesus J.; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2015-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to quantify mechanically induced structural evolution in nanocrystalline Al with an average grain size of 5 nm. A polycrystalline sample was cyclically strained at different temperatures, while a recently developed grain tracking algorithm was used to measure the relative contributions of novel deformation mechanisms such as grain rotation and grain sliding. Sample texture and grain size were also tracked during cycling, to show how nanocrystalline plasticity rearranges overall grain structure and alters the grain boundary network. While no obvious texture is developing during cycling, the processes responsible for plasticity act collectively to alter the interfacial network. Cyclic loading led to the formation of many twin boundaries throughout the sample as well as the occasional coalescence of neighboring grains, with higher temperatures causing more evolution. A temperature-dependent cyclic strengthening effect was observed, demonstrating that both the structure and properties of nanocrystalline metals can be dynamic during loading.

  20. Influence of cyclic loading on the fracture toughness and load bearing capacities of all-ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rao-Rao; Lu, Cheng-Lin; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Dong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how cyclic loading influenced the fracture toughness of hot-press lithium disilicate and zirconia core materials and whether there was an increase in the propensity for crown failure. Two types of all-ceramic crowns including the IPS e.max Press system (n=24) and the Lava zirconia system (n=24), were selected. Sectioned specimens were subjected to cyclic loading with the maximum magnitude of 200 N (R=0.1) until two million cycles. The material properties including Young's modulus (E) and hardness (H) and the fracture toughness (KIC) of the core materials were evaluated using indentation methods (n=12 each). The load-bearing capacities of the specimens were examined by means of monotonic load to fracture (n=12 each). It was found that the material properties, including E, H and KIC, of the two types of dental ceramics, were reduced. Statistical analysis indicated that there were no significant influences of fatigue loading on material properties E and H for both types of dental ceramics or KIC for zirconia, while for the IPS e.max Press core, KIC, which was parallel to the direction of the lithium disilicate crystals, was significantly reduced (P=0.001). A conclusion was drawn that zirconia possesses high mechanical reliability and sustainable capacity to resist fatigue loading, while fatigue loading remarkably degraded the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of hot-press lithium disilicate ceramics. PMID:24335786

  1. Inelastic Deformation of Metals and Structures under Dynamic and Quasi-Static Cyclic Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    SECTION 3 NUMERICAL PROCEDURE Cyclic thermo-elasto- plastic problems may be solved by means of the .. method of successive elastic solutions in which...process. The thermal load is now applied incrementally and the thermo-elasto- " plastic problem is solved with the initial values of plastic strains -P

  2. Life prediction of materials exposed to monotonic and cyclic loading: A technology survey and bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhrke, W. F.; Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.; Mandel, G.

    1975-01-01

    Announced survey directs attention toward low cycle fatigue and thermal fatigue experienced at elevated temperatures equivalent to those found in hot end of gas turbine engine. Majority of bibliographic references are on life prediction for materials exposed to monotonic and cyclic loading in high temperature environments.

  3. One-dimensional consolidation in unsaturated soils under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Sposito, Garrison; Lee, Jhe-Wei; Chu, Hsiuhua

    2016-05-01

    The one-dimensional consolidation model of poroelasticity of Lo et al. (2014) for an unsaturated soil under constant loading is generalized to include an arbitrary time-dependent loading. A closed-form solution for the pore water and air pressures along with the total settlement is derived by employing a Fourier series representation in the spatial domain and a Laplace transformation in the time domain. This solution is illustrated for the important example of a fully-permeable soil cylinder with an undrained initial condition acted upon by a periodic stress. Our results indicate that, in terms of a dimensionless time scale, the transient solution decays to zero most slowly in a water-saturated soil, whereas for an unsaturated soil, the time for the transient solution to die out is inversely proportional to the initial water saturation. The generalization presented here shows that the diffusion time scale for pore water in an unsaturated soil is orders of magnitude greater than that in a water-saturated soil, mainly because of the much smaller hydraulic conductivity of the former.

  4. Shear Performance of Horizontal Joints in Short Precast Concrete Columns with Sleeve Grouted Connections under Cyclic Loading

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bingyu; Chen, Jiang; Zhang, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    In this study, two short precast concrete columns and two cast-in-situ concrete columns were tested under cyclic loads. It was shown that the sleeve grouted connection was equivalent to the cast-in-situ connections for short columns when the axial compression ratio was 0.6. In order to determine the influence of the axial compression ratio and the shear-span ratio on the shear capacity of the horizontal joint, a FE model was established and verified. The analysis showed that the axial compression ratio is advantageous to the joint and the shear capacity of the horizontal joint increases with increase of the shear-span ratio. Based on the results, the methods used to estimate the shear capacity of horizontal joints in the Chinese Specification and the Japanese Guidelines are discussed and it was found that both overestimated the shear capacity of the horizontal joint. In addition, the Chinese Specification failed to consider the influence of the shear-span ratio. PMID:27861493

  5. Life Prediction for a Structural Material under Cyclic Loads with Hold Times Using a Viscoplastic Constitutive Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-31

    times. The six material parameters of the viscoplastic theory were S evaluated from a series of strain - controlled stabilized cyclic loading tests, and...fatigue. Two sets of low cycle :ati;ue life predictions were carried out and compared with experimental data. One in- Valved strain - controlled cyclic... strain for a strain -time 0e input that produces stress relaxation. Figures 2.22-2.30 illustrate the effects of strain controlled cyclic loading. For

  6. Characterization of focal muscle compression under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, B. J.; Sory, D. R.; Nguyen, T.-T. N.; Proud, W. G.; Williams, A.; Brown, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    In modern wars over 70% of combat wounds are to the extremities. These injuries are characterized by disruption and contamination of the limb soft tissue envelope. The extent of this tissue trauma and contamination determine the outcome of the extremity injury. In military injury, common post-traumatic complications at amputation sites include heterotopic ossification (formation of bone in soft tissue), and severe soft tissue and bone infections. We are currently developing a model of soft tissue injury that recreates pathologies observed in combat injuries. Here we present characterization of a controlled focal compression of the rabbit flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscle group. The FCU was previously identified as a suitable site for studying impact injury because its muscle belly can easily be mobilized from the underlying bone without disturbing anatomical alignment in the limb. We show how macroscopic changes in tissue organization, as visualized using optical microscopy, can be correlated with data from temporally resolved traces of loading conditions.

  7. Case study of preliminary cyclic load evaluation and triaxial soil testing in offshore wind farm planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Daniel; Ossig, Benjamin; Kreiter, Stefan; Kouery, Saed; Moerz, Tobias

    2010-05-01

    In 2020 Germany aims to produce 20% of its electrical power trough renewable energy sources. Assigned Offshore Wind farms in the German exclusive economic zone of the North- and the Baltic Sea are important step toward a fulfilment of this goal. However the save erecting of 5-6 MW wind power plants (total construction size: > 200m) in water depth of around 40 m is related to unprecedented technical, logistical and financial challenges. With an intended lifetime expectation of 50 years for the foundations, construction materials and the soils around the foundation are subject to high and continued stresses from self-weight, waves, wind and current. These stresses are not only static, but have also a significant cyclic component. An estimated 250 million cyclic load changes may lead to an accumulation of plastic deformation in the soil that potentially may affect operability or lifespan of the plant. During a preliminary geotechnical site survey of one of the largest (~150 km2) offshore wind project sites within the German Bight (~45 km North off the island Juist) a total of 16 drill cores with in situ cone penetration data and a total sample length of ~800 m where recovered. Preliminary foundation designs and static self weight and lateral load calculations were used to design a cycling triaxial lab testing program on discrete natural soil samples. Individual tests were performed by foundation type and at vertical and lateral load maxima to evaluate the long-term soil behaviour under cyclic load. Tests have been performed on granular, cohesive and intermediate natural soils. Following an introduction to the unique MARUM triaxial apparatus and testing conditions, the cyclic triaxial test results are shown and explained. Furthermore cyclic shear strength and stiffness are compared to their static counterparts. Unique soil behaviour like abrupt partial failure, pore pressure response and unexpected in part load independent cyclic deformation behaviour is discussed and

  8. Thermomechanical characterization of Hastelloy-X under uniaxial cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, J. R.; Bartolotta, P. A.; Allen, G. P.; Robinson, D. N.

    1986-01-01

    In most high-temperature engineering applications, components are subjected to complex combinations of thermal and mechanical loading during service. A number of viscoplastic constitutive models were proposed which potentially can provide mathematical descriptions of material response under such conditions. Implementation of these models into large finite element codes such as MARC has already resulted in much improved inelastic analysis capability for hot-section aircraft engine components. However, a number of questions remain regarding the validity of methods adopted in characterizing these constitutive models for particular high-temperature materials. One area of concern is that the majority of experimental data available for this purpose are determined under isothermal conditions. This is in contrast to service conditions which, as noted above, almost always involve some form of thermal cycling. The obvious question arises as to whether a constitutive model characterized using an isothermal data base can adequately predict material response under thermomechanical conditions. An experimental program was initiated within the HOST program to address this particular concern. The results of the most recent isothermal and thermomechanical experiments are described.

  9. Tensile and compressive failure modes of laminated composites loaded by fatigue with different mean stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotem, Assa

    1990-01-01

    Laminated composite materials tend to fail differently under tensile or compressive load. Under tension, the material accumulates cracks and fiber fractures, while under compression, the material delaminates and buckles. Tensile-compressive fatigue may cause either of these failure modes depending on the specific damage occurring in the laminate. This damage depends on the stress ratio of the fatigue loading. Analysis of the fatigue behavior of the composite laminate under tension-tension, compression-compression, and tension-compression had led to the development of a fatigue envelope presentation of the failure behavior. This envelope indicates the specific failure mode for any stress ratio and number of loading cycles. The construction of the fatigue envelope is based on the applied stress-cycles to failure (S-N) curves of both tensile-tensile and compressive-compressive fatigue. Test results are presented to verify the theoretical analysis.

  10. Behavior of pile group with elevated cap subjected to cyclic lateral loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun-min; Gu, Ming; Chen, Ren-peng; Kong, Ling-gang; Zhang, Zhe-hang; Bian, Xue-cheng

    2015-06-01

    The pile group with elevated cap is widely used as foundation of offshore structures such as turbines, power transmission towers and bridge piers, and understanding its behavior under cyclic lateral loads induced by waves, tide water and winds, is of great importance to designing. A large-scale model test on 3×3 pile group with elevated cap subjected to cyclic lateral loads was performed in saturated silts. The preparation and implementation of the test is presented. Steel pipes with the outer diameter of 114 mm, thickness of 4.5 mm, and length of 6 m were employed as model piles. The pile group was cyclic loaded in a multi-stage sequence with the lateral displacement controlled. In addition, a single pile test was also conducted at the same site for comparison. The displacement of the pile cap, the internal forces of individual piles, and the horizontal stiffness of the pile group are presented and discussed in detail. The results indicate that the lateral cyclic loads have a greater impact on pile group than that on a single pile, and give rise to the significant plastic strain in the soil around piles. The lateral loads carried by each row of piles within the group would be redistributed with loading cycles. The lateral stiffness of the pile group decreases gradually with cycles and broadly presents three different degradation patterns in the test. Significant axial forces were measured out in some piles within the group, owing to the strong restraint provided by the cap, and finally lead to a large settlement of the pile group. These findings can be referred for foundation designing of offshore structures.

  11. Multiple spatio-temporal scale modeling of composites subjected to cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, Robert; Oskay, Caglar; Clay, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript presents a multiscale modeling methodology for failure analysis of composites subjected to cyclic loading conditions. Computational homogenization theory with multiple spatial and temporal scales is employed to devise the proposed methodology. Multiple spatial scales address the disparity between the length scale of material heterogeneities and the overall structure, whereas multiple temporal scales with almost periodic fields address the disparity between the load period and overall life under cyclic loading. The computational complexity of the multiscale modeling approach is reduced by employing a meso-mechanical model based on eigendeformation based homogenization with symmetric coefficients in the space domain, and an adaptive time stepping strategy based on a quadratic multistep method with error control in the time domain. The proposed methodology is employed to simulate the response of graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy composites. Model parameters are calibrated using a suite of experiments conducted on unidirectionally reinforced specimens subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading. The calibrated model is employed to predict damage progression in quasi-isotropic specimens. The capabilities of the model are validated using acoustic emission testing.

  12. Fracture Modes in Curved Brittle Layers Subject to Concentrated Cyclic Loading in Liquid Environments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Won; Thompson, Van P; Rekow, E Dianne; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Zhang, Yu

    2009-03-01

    Damage response of brittle curved structures subject to cyclic Hertzian indentation was investigated. Specimens were fabricated by bisecting cylindrical quartz glass hollow tubes. The resulting hemi-cylindrical glass shells were bonded internally and at the edges to polymeric supporting structures and loaded axially in water on the outer circumference with a spherical tungsten carbide indenter. Critical loads and number of cycles to initiate and propagate near-contact cone cracks and far-field flexure radial cracks to failure were recorded. Flat quartz glass plates on polymer substrates were tested as a control group. Our findings showed that cone cracks form at lower loads, and can propagate through the quartz layer to the quartz/polymer interface at lower number of cycles, in the curved specimens relative to their flat counterparts. Flexural radial cracks require a higher load to initiate in the curved specimens relative to flat structures. These radial cracks can propagate rapidly to the margins, the flat edges of the bisecting plane, under cyclic loading at relatively low loads, owing to mechanical fatigue and a greater spatial range of tensile stresses in curved structures.

  13. Calcium regulates cyclic compression-induced early changes in chondrocytes during in vitro cartilage tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Raizman, Igal; De Croos, J N Amritha; Pilliar, Robert; Kandel, Rita A

    2010-10-01

    A single application of cyclic compression (1kPa, 1Hz, 30min) to bioengineered cartilage results in improved tissue formation through sequential catabolic and anabolic changes mediated via cell shape changes that are regulated by α5β1 integrin and membrane-type metalloprotease (MT1-MMP). To determine if calcium was involved in this process, the role of calcium in regulating cell shape changes, MT1-MMP expression and integrin activity in response to mechanical stimulation was examined. Stimulation-induced changes in cell shape and MT1-MMP expression were abolished by chelation of extracellular calcium, and this effect was reversed by re-introduction of calcium. Spreading was inhibited by blocking stretch-activated channels (with gadolinium), while retraction was prevented by blocking the L-Type voltage-gated channel (with nifedipine); both compounds inhibited MT1-MMP upregulation. Calcium A23187 ionophore restored cellular response further supporting a role for these channels. Calcium regulated the integrin-mediated signalling pathway, which was facilitated through Src kinase. Both calcium- and integrin-mediated pathways converged on ERK-MAPK in response to stimulation. While both integrins and calcium signalling mediate chondrocyte mechanotransduction, calcium appears to play the major regulatory role. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in chondrocyte mechanotransduction may lead to the development of improved bioengineered cartilage.

  14. Subcritical crack growth in glasses under cyclic loads: Effect of hydrodynamic pressure in aqueous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, K.S.; Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of hydrodynamic pressure developed in the wake of a crack growing in a brittle material under cyclic loads in an aqueous environment is considered. The pressure acts in opposition to the movement of the crack faces, thus shielding the crack up from the applied loads. A general hydrodynamic fluid pressure relation based on a one-dimensional Reynolds equation, which applicable to a crack with an arbitrary crack opening profile, is developed. The model is modified to account for side flow through the thickness of the sample and cavitation near the crack tip. Both effects significantly modify the hydrodynamic pressure distribution. Finally, the resulting hydrodynamic pressure relations are combined with a fracture mechanics model to account for the change in the near-tip stress intensity. Resulting predictions of the cyclic crack-growth rate are found to be in good agreement with measured values for a borosilicate glass tested at various frequencies in a water environment.

  15. Life prediction of materials exposed to monotonic and cyclic loading: Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    This bibliography is comprised of approximately 1200 reference citations related to the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures. Most of the references are for information on life prediction for materials exposed to monotonic and cyclic loading in elevated temperature environments such as that in the hot end of a gas turbine engine. Additional citations listed are for documents on the thermal and mechanical effects on solar cells in the cryogenic vacuum environment; radiation effects on high temperature mechanical properties; and high cycle fatigue technology as applicable to gas turbine engine bearings. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the period April 1962 through April 1974 and is largely limited to documents published in the United States. It is a companion volume to NASA CR-134750, Life Prediction of Materials Exposed to Monotonic and cyclic Loading - A Technology Survey.

  16. Biaxial ratcheting and cyclic plasticity for Bree-type loading. Part 1: Finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, H.W.; Nadarajah, C.

    1996-05-01

    The Bree diagram has been incorporated in the ASME B and PV Code in the elevated temperature Code Case N47 as a design approach for limiting strain accumulation in cylinders subjected to cyclic thermal loadings under sustained primary stress. Since the Bree diagram is based upon uniaxial-stress model, it is pertinent to examine the influence of biaxial stresses on strain growth and cyclic stress-strain hysteresis response. The results of inelastic analyses presented in this paper showed that ratcheting and hysteresis behavior may also occur in the axial direction in addition to the hoop direction. Results of almost 100 load cases were presented to clarify the influence of biaxial membrane and thermal bending stresses on the structural behavior. A design approach for the assessment of this type of problem was suggested which utilizes these results.

  17. Crack density and electrical resistance in indium-tin-oxide/polymer thin films under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Angel; Khan, Kamran A.; El Sayed, Tamer

    2014-11-01

    Here, we propose a damage model that describes the degradation of the material properties of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films deposited on polymer substrates under cyclic loading. We base this model on our earlier tensile test model and show that the new model is suitable for cyclic loading. After calibration with experimental data, we are able to capture the stress-strain behavior and changes in electrical resistance of ITO thin films. We are also able to predict the crack density using calibrations from our previous model. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of our model based on simulations using material properties reported in the literature. Our model is implemented in the commercially available finite element software ABAQUS using a user subroutine UMAT. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Life prediction of materials exposed to monotonic and cyclic loading: A new technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhrke, W. F.; Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Reviewed and evaluated technical abstracts for about 100 significant documents are reported relating primarily to life prediction for structural materials exposed to monotonic and cyclic loading, particularly in elevated temperature environments. The abstracts in the report are mostly for publications in the period April 1962 through April 1974. The purpose of this report is to provide, in quick reference form, a dependable source for current information

  19. A Unified Approach for Modeling Inelastic Behavior of Structural Metals under Complex Cyclic Loadings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    STRUCTURA——ETC (U) - UNCLASSIFIED MAY CERL—TR—M—214 NL construction engineering TECHNICAL REPORT M.214 research Respon~ to Cyclic Loading...this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citat ion of trade names does not constitute an off icial...indorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army

  20. The Characterization of Mechanical Properties of a Rabbit Femur-Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Tibia Complex During Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Hidetaka; Han, Jungsoo; Ryu, Jaiyoung; Han, Changsoo

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclic loading, which produced the condition of ACLs during sports activities, on tensile properties of femur-ACL-tibia complexes (FATCs). Paired FATCs of 40 New Zealand white rabbits were tested on a materials testing machine. One specimen of each pair was designated as a control and loaded until failure. The contralateral specimen was loaded cyclically (1.4 Hz, 1 hr.) with 20%, 30%, 40%, or 50% of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the control and then loaded until failure. The UTS and mode of failure were recorded after each test. Five specimens ruptured during cyclic loading in the 50% group. In the 40% group, the mean value of UTS of cycled specimens was significantly lower than that of controls. There was no statistically significant difference in UTS values between control and cycled specimens in the 20% and 30% groups. Cycled specimens had a significantly higher incidence of substance failure than controls. Our results demonstrated that FATCs have the strength to withstand cyclic loading within normal sports activity levels. However, FACTs can be damaged by cyclic loading under strenuous sports activity levels. We speculate that cyclic loading makes the ACL substance weaker than the insertion site.

  1. Modelling of Fiber/Matrix Debonding of Composites Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naghipour, Paria; Pineda, Evan J.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The micromechanics theory, generalized method of cells (GMC), was employed to simulate the debonding of fiber/matrix interfaces, within a repeating unit cell subjected to global, cyclic loading, utilizing a cyclic crack growth law. Cycle dependent, interfacial debonding was implemented as a new module to the available GMC formulation. The degradation of interfacial stresses, with applied load cycles, was achieved via progressive evolution of the interfacial compliance. A periodic repeating unit cell, representing the fiber/matrix architecture of a composite, was subjected to combined normal and shear loadings, and degradation of the global transverse stress in successive cycles was monitored. The obtained results were compared to values from a corresponding finite element model. Reasonable agreement was achieved for combined normal and shear loading conditions, with minimal variation for pure loading cases. The local effects of interfacial debonding, and fatigue damage will later be combined as sub-models to predict the experimentally obtained fatigue life of Ti-15-3/Sic composites at the laminate level.

  2. Characterization of Focal Muscle Compression Under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Ben; Sory, David; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien; Curry, Richard; Clasper, Jon; Proud, William; Williams, Alun; Brown, Kate

    2015-06-01

    The pattern of battle injuries sustained in modern wars shows that over 70% of combat wounds are to the extremities. These injuries are characterized by disruption and contamination of the limb soft tissue envelope. The extent of this tissue trauma and contamination determine the outcome in extremity injury. In military injury, common post-traumatic complications at amputation sites include heterotopic ossification (formation of bone in soft tissue), and severe soft tissue and bone infections. We are currently developing a model of soft tissue injury that recreates pathologies observed in combat injuries. Here we present characterization of a controlled focal compression of the rabbit flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscle group. The FCU was previously identified as a suitable site for studying impact injury because its muscle belly can easily be mobilized from the underlying bone without disturbing anatomical alignment in the limb. We show how macroscopic changes in tissue organization, as visualized using optical microscopy, can be correlated with data from temporally resolved traces of loading conditions. Funding provided by the Royal British Legion.

  3. Load/Strain Distribution between Ulna and Radius in the Mouse Forearm Compression Loading Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yunkai; Thiagarajan, Ganesh; Nicolella, Daniel P.; Johnson, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) of the mouse forearm compression loading model is used to relate strain distributions with downstream changes in bone formation and responses of bone cells. The objective of this study was to develop two FEA models – the first one with the traditional ulna only and the second one in which both the ulna and radius are included, in order to examine the effect of the inclusion of the radius on the strain distributions in the ulna. The entire mouse forearm was scanned using microCT and images were converted into FEA tetrahedral meshes using a suite of software programs. The performance of both linear and quadratic tetrahedral elements and coarse and fine meshes were studied. A load of 2 N was applied to the ulna/radius model and a 1.3 N load (based on previous investigations of load sharing between the ulna and radius in rats) was applied to the ulna only model for subsequent simulations. The results showed differences in the cross sectional strain distributions and magnitude within the ulna for the combined ulna/radius model versus the ulna only model. The maximal strain in the combined model occurred about 4 mm towards the distal end from the ulna mid-shaft in both models. Results from the FEA model simulations were also compared to experimentally determined strain values. We conclude that inclusion of the radius in FE models to predict strains during in vivo forearm loading increases the magnitude of the estimated ulna strains compared to those predicted from a model of the ulna alone but the distribution was similar. This has important ramifications for future studies to understand strain thresholds needed to activate bone cell responses to mechanical loading. PMID:21903442

  4. Strain Amplification Analysis of an Osteocyte under Static and Cyclic Loading: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    Osteocytes, the major type of bone cells which reside in their lacunar and canalicular system within the bone matrix, function as biomechanosensors and biomechanotransducers of the bone. Although biomechanical behaviour of the osteocyte-lacunar-canalicular system has been investigated in previous studies mostly using computational 2-dimensional (2D) geometric models, only a few studies have used the 3-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model. In the current study, a 3D FE model was used to predict the responses of strain distributions of osteocyte-lacunar-canalicular system analyzed under static and cyclic loads. The strain amplification factor was calculated for all simulations. Effects on the strain of the osteocyte system were investigated under 500, 1500, 2000, and 3000 microstrain loading magnitudes and 1, 5, 10, 40, and 100 Hz loading frequencies. The maximum strain was found to change with loading magnitude and frequency. It was observed that maximum strain under 3000-microstrain loading was higher than those under 500, 1500, and 2000 microstrains. When the loading strain reached the maximum magnitude, the strain amplification factor of 100 Hz was higher than those of the other frequencies. Data from this 3D FE model study suggests that the strain amplification factor of the osteocyte-lacunar-canalicular system increases with loading frequency and loading strain increasing. PMID:25664319

  5. Effect of dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading on fracture behavior for Japanese carbon steel pipe STS410

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Kanji; Murayama, Kouichi; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    1997-04-01

    The fracture behavior for Japanese carbon steel pipe STS410 was examined under dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading through a research program of International Piping Integrity Research Group (EPIRG-2), in order to evaluate the strength of pipe during the seismic event The tensile test and the fracture toughness test were conducted for base metal and TIG weld metal. Three base metal pipe specimens, 1,500mm in length and 6-inch diameter sch.120, were employed for a quasi-static monotonic, a dynamic monotonic and a dynamic cyclic loading pipe fracture tests. One weld joint pipe specimen was also employed for a dynamic cyclic loading test In the dynamic cyclic loading test, the displacement was controlled as applying the fully reversed load (R=-1). The pipe specimens with a circumferential through-wall crack were subjected four point bending load at 300C in air. Japanese STS410 carbon steel pipe material was found to have high toughness under dynamic loading condition through the CT fracture toughness test. As the results of pipe fracture tests, the maximum moment to pipe fracture under dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading condition, could be estimated by plastic collapse criterion and the effect of dynamic monotonic loading and cyclic loading was a little on the maximum moment to pipe fracture of the STS410 carbon steel pipe. The STS410 carbon steel pipe seemed to be less sensitive to dynamic and cyclic loading effects than the A106Gr.B carbon steel pipe evaluated in IPIRG-1 program.

  6. Cyclic compressive stress-induced scinderin regulates progress of developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Long; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chuan-Dong; Hu, Guo-Li; Zhu, Jun-Feng; Shen, Chao; Zuo, Bin; Cui, Yi-Min; Li, De; Yuan-Gao; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2017-02-14

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a common musculoskeletal disorder characterized by a mismatch between acetabulum and femoral head. Mechanical force plays an important role during the occurrence and development of abnormities in acetabulum and femoral head. In this study, we established a mechanical force model named cyclic compressive stress (Ccs). To analyze the effect of Ccs on DDH, we detected special genes in chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Results showed that Ccs downregulated chondrogenesis of ADTC5 in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the mRNA level of Scinderin (Scin) considerably increased. We established lentivirus-SCIN(GV144-SCIN) to transfect hBMSCs, which were treated with different Ccs levels (0.25 Hz*5 cm, 0.5 Hz*5 cm, and 1 Hz*10 cm); the result showed that overexpression of Scin upregulated osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. By contrast, expression of chondrocyte-specific genes, including ACAN, COL-2A, and Sox9, decreased. Further molecular investigation demonstrated that Scin promoted osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis through activation of the p-Smad1/5/8, NF-κB, and MAPK P38 signaling pathways, as well as stimulated the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Moreover, Scin-induced osteogenesis outweighed osteoclastogenesis in defective femur in vivo. The results of the analysis of Micro-CT confirmed these findings. Overall, Ccs influenced the development of DDH by promoting osteogenesis and cartilage degradation. In addition, Scin played a vital role in the development of DDH.

  7. Analytical basis for the determination of the lacunar-canalicular permeability of bone using cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Benalla, M; Cardoso, L; Cowin, S C

    2012-07-01

    An analytical model for the determination of the permeability in the lacunar-canalicular porosity of bone using cyclic loading is described in this contribution. The objective of the analysis presented is to relate the lacunar-canalicular permeability to a particular phase angle that is measurable when the bone is subjected to infinitesimal cyclic strain. The phase angle of interest is the lag angle between the applied strain and the resultant stress. Cyclic strain causes the interstitial fluid to move. This movement is essential for the viability of osteocytes and is believed to play a major role in the bone mechanotransduction mechanism. However, certain bone fluid flow properties, notably the permeability of the lacunar-canalicular porosity, are still not accurately determined. In this paper, formulas for the phase angle as a function of permeability for infinitesimal cyclic strain are presented and mathematical expressions for the storage modulus, loss modulus, and loss tangent are obtained. An accurate determination of the PLC permeability will improve our ability to understand mechanotransduction and mechanosensory mechanisms, which are fundamental to the understanding of how to treat osteoporosis, how to cope with microgravity in long-term manned space flights, and how to increase the longevity of prostheses that are implanted in bone tissue.

  8. In vivo dynamic stiffness of the porcine lumbar spine exposed to cyclic loading: influence of load and degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kaigle, A; Ekström, L; Holm, S; Rostedt, M; Hansson, T

    1998-02-01

    The dynamic axial stiffness of the L2-3 motion segment subjected to vibratory loading under intact and injured states of the intervertebral disc was studied using an in vivo porcine model. Three groups of animals with the following states of the intervertebral discs were studied: intact disc, acutely injured disc, and degenerated disc. A miniaturized servo-hydraulic exciter was used to sinusoidally vibrate the motion segment from 0.05 to 25 Hz under a compressive load with a peak value of either 100 or 200 N. The dynamic axial stiffness of the intervertebral disc was calculated at 1-Hz intervals over the frequency range. The results showed that the dynamic axial stiffness was frequency dependent. A positive relationship was found between an increase in mean dynamic stiffness and load magnitude. An increase in mean stiffness with successive exposures at the same load magnitude was observed, despite the allowance of a recovery period between loading. The greatest difference was noted between the first and second load sets. No significant change in stiffness was found due to an acute disc injury, whereas a significant increase in mean stiffness was found for the degenerated disc group as compared with the intact group. The form of the frequency response curve, however, remained relatively unaltered regardless of the degenerated state of the disc. With heavier loads, repeated loading, and/or disc degeneration, the stiffness of the intervertebral disc increases. An increase in stiffness can mean a reduction in the amount of allowable motion within the motion segment or a potentially harmful increase in force to obtain the desired motion. This may locally result in greater stresses due to an altered ability of the disc to distribute loads.

  9. The tolerance of the femoral shaft in combined axial compression and bending loading.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, B Johan; Genovese, Daniel; Crandall, Jeff R; Bolton, James R; Untaroiu, Costin D; Bose, Dipan

    2009-11-01

    The likelihood of a front seat occupant sustaining a femoral shaft fracture in a frontal crash has traditionally been assessed by an injury criterion relying solely on the axial force in the femur. However, recently published analyses of real world data indicate that femoral shaft fracture occurs at axial loads levels below those found experimentally. One hypothesis attempting to explain this discrepancy suggests that femoral shaft fracture tends to occur as a result of combined axial compression and applied bending. The current study aims to evaluate this hypothesis by investigating how these two loading components interact. Femoral shafts harvested from human cadavers were loaded to failure in axial compression, sagittal plane bending, and combined axial compression and sagittal plane bending. All specimens subjected to bending and combined loading fractured midshaft, whereas the specimens loaded in axial compression demonstrated a variety of failure locations including midshaft and distal end. The interaction between the recorded levels of applied moment and axial compression force at fracture were evaluated using two different analysis methods: fitting of an analytical model to the experimental data and multiple regression analysis. The two analysis methods yielded very similar relationships between applied moment and axial compression force at midshaft fracture. The results indicate that posteroanterior bending reduces the tolerance of the femoral shaft to axial compression and that that this type of combined loading therefore may contribute to the high prevalence of femoral shaft fracture in frontal crashes.

  10. Field testing of stiffened deep cement mixing piles under lateral cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raongjant, Werasak; Jing, Meng

    2013-06-01

    Construction of seaside and underground wall bracing often uses stiffened deep cement mixed columns (SDCM). This research investigates methods used to improve the level of bearing capacity of these SDCM when subjected to cyclic lateral loading via various types of stiffer cores. Eight piles, two deep cement mixed piles and six stiffened deep cement mixing piles with three different types of cores, H shape cross section prestressed concrete, steel pipe, and H-beam steel, were embedded though soft clay into medium-hard clay on site in Thailand. Cyclic horizontal loading was gradually applied until pile failure and the hysteresis loops of lateral load vs. lateral deformation were recorded. The lateral carrying capacities of the SDCM piles with an H-beam steel core increased by 3-4 times that of the DCM piles. This field research clearly shows that using H-beam steel as a stiffer core for SDCM piles is the best method to improve its lateral carrying capacity, ductility and energy dissipation capacity.

  11. Damage & fracture of high-explosive mock subject to cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng; Rae, Philip J; Cady, Carl M; Lovato, Manuel L

    2011-01-11

    We use four-point bend specimen with a single shallow edge notch to study the fracture process in Mock 900-21, a PBX 9501 high explosive simulant mock. Subject to monotonic loading we determine quantitatively the threshold load for macroscopic crack initiation from the notch tip. The four-point bend specimen is then subject to cyclic loading in such a way that during the first cycle, the applied force approaches but does not exceed the threshold load determined from the monotonic loading test and in the subsequent cycles, the overall maximum deformation is maintained to be equal to that of the first cycle. It is expected and is also confirmed that no macroscopic damage and cracking occur during the first cycle. However, we observe that sizable macroscopic crack is generated and enlarged during the subsequent cycles, even though the applied force never exceeds the threshold load. Details of the process of damage fonnation, accumulation, and crack extension are presented and the mechanical mechanism responsible for such failure process is postulated and discussed.

  12. Fabric Evolution in Granular Materials Subject to Drained, Strain Controlled Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, C.; Cui, L.

    2009-06-01

    While there have been many discrete element method (DEM) publications considering the micromechanics of granular materials subject to monotonic loading, studies of the particle-scale material response to cyclic or repeated loading have been comparatively rare. From a geotechnical perspective soil is subjected to repeated loading in a variety of situations. Examples include foundations to railways and roads, foundations to wind turbines, soil adjacent to integral bridges, etc. The work described in this paper extends an earlier study by O'Sullivan et al.. [1]. In this earlier study, DEM simulations of strain controlled cyclic triaxial tests were coupled with laboratory experiments to validate a DEM model. The simulations were performed using the axi-symmetric DEM formulation proposed by [2] and a stress controlled membrane algorithm was used to apply forces to balls along the outer vertical boundaries to model the latex membrane used in the laboratory tests. Specimens of uniform spheres and mixtures of sphere sizes were considered in the validation stage of this research. The earlier study considered strain amplitudes of 1%, 0.5% and 0.1%. In the current study the response is extended to consider the smaller strain amplitude of 0.01%. All of the simulations were carried out in a quasi-static mode and in all cases the maximum stress level mobilized was significantly lower than the peak stress measured in equivalent monotonic physical tests and DEM simulations [2]. In examining the response of the material to the smaller strain amplitude, the macro scale analyses considered the stress strain response and specimen stiffness. At the particle scale, the variation in coordination number and deviator fabric are considered as well as the distribution of the contact forces orientations. The findings may provide insight to the development of continuum constitutive models for cyclic soil response that include fabric parameters [3].

  13. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, D. G.; Dassios, K. G.; Kordatos, E. Z.; Matikas, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    Barium osumilite (BMAS) ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE) sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism. PMID:24381524

  14. High Temperature Environmental Test Facility for Uniaxial Testing under Cyclic Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY ( Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED March 23, 1998 Final Report (1 Aug 95 to 31 Jul 97) 4 . TITLE...AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS High Temperature Environmental Test Facility For Uniaxial F49620-95- 1-04 70 Testing Under Cyclic Loading 6 . AUTHOR(S...extensometer is rated for 1200 ’C. The system is capable of fatigue testing conventional aluminum and titanium materials and high temperature or single crystal

  15. Damage accumulation in cyclically-loaded glass-ceramic matrix composites monitored by acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Aggelis, D G; Dassios, K G; Kordatos, E Z; Matikas, T E

    2013-01-01

    Barium osumilite (BMAS) ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE) sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism.

  16. Self-Sensing of Damage Progression in Unidirectional Multiscale Hierarchical Composites Subjected to Cyclic Tensile Loading

    PubMed Central

    Ku-Herrera, J. J.; Pacheco-Salazar, O. F.; Ríos-Soberanis, C. R.; Domínguez-Rodríguez, G.; Avilés, F.

    2016-01-01

    The electrical sensitivity of glass fiber/multiwall carbon nanotube/vinyl ester hierarchical composites containing a tailored electrically-percolated network to self-sense accumulation of structural damage when subjected to cyclic tensile loading-unloading is investigated. The hierarchical composites were designed to contain two architectures differentiated by the location of the multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), viz. MWCNTs deposited on the fibers and MWCNTs dispersed within the matrix. The changes in electrical resistance of the hierarchical composites are associated to their structural damage and correlated to acoustic emissions. The results show that such tailored hierarchical composites are able to self-sense damage onset and accumulation upon tensile loading-unloading cycles by means of their electrical response, and that the electrical response depends on the MWCNT location. PMID:26999158

  17. FEA Based Tool Life Quantity Estimation of Hot Forging Dies Under Cyclic Thermo-Mechanical Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bouguecha, A.; Schäfer, F.; Hadifi, T.

    2011-01-01

    Hot forging dies are exposed during service to a combination of cyclic thermo-mechanical, tribological and chemical loads. Besides abrasive and adhesive wear on the die surface, fatigue crack initiation with subsequent fracture is one of the most frequent causes of failure. In order to extend the tool life, the finite element analysis (FEA) may serve as a means for process design and process optimisation. So far the FEA based estimation of the production cycles until initial cracking is limited as tool material behaviour due to repeated loading is not captured with the required accuracy. Material models which are able to account for cyclic effects are not verified for the fatigue life predictions of forging dies. Furthermore fatigue properties from strain controlled fatigue tests of relevant hot work steels are to date not available to allow for a close-to-reality fatigue life prediction. Two industrial forging processes, where clear fatigue crack initiation has been observed are considered for a fatigue analysis. For this purpose the relevant tool components are modelled with elasto-plastic material behaviour. The predicted sites, where crack initiation occurs, agree with the ones observed on the real die component.

  18. Automatic Modulation Classification of Common Communication and Pulse Compression Radar Waveforms using Cyclic Features

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    from estimated duty cycle, cyclic spectral correlation, and cyclic cumulants. The modulations considered in this research are BPSK, QPSK, 16- QAM , 64- QAM ...spectral density PSK phase shift keying QAM quadrature amplitude modulation QPSK quadrature phase shift keying RADAR radio detection and ranging RF radio...spectrum sensing research, automatic modulation recognition has emerged as an important process in cognitive spectrum management and EW applications

  19. Damage development under compression-compression fatigue loading in a stitched uniwoven graphite/epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandermey, Nancy E.; Morris, Don H.; Masters, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Damage initiation and growth under compression-compression fatigue loading were investigated for a stitched uniweave material system with an underlying AS4/3501-6 quasi-isotropic layup. Performance of unnotched specimens having stitch rows at either 0 degree or 90 degrees to the loading direction was compared. Special attention was given to the effects of stitching related manufacturing defects. Damage evaluation techniques included edge replication, stiffness monitoring, x-ray radiography, residual compressive strength, and laminate sectioning. It was found that the manufacturing defect of inclined stitches had the greatest adverse effect on material performance. Zero degree and 90 degree specimen performances were generally the same. While the stitches were the source of damage initiation, they also slowed damage propagation both along the length and across the width and affected through-the-thickness damage growth. A pinched layer zone formed by the stitches particularly affected damage initiation and growth. The compressive failure mode was transverse shear for all specimens, both in static compression and fatigue cycling effects.

  20. Dynamic Behavior of Single-Stage Bellows of Titanium-Nickel Shape Memory Alloy Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semba, Hiromasa; Okabe, Nagatoshi; Yamaji, Toru; Okita, Keisuke; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    The dynamic behavior of TiNi shape memory alloy (SMA) bellows is examined in light of its potential use as elements in seismic protection devices. Dynamic property results obtained from cyclic tests under tension-compression loading of TiNi SMA single-stage bellows, with different shapes and with different heat treatments, are reported as a function of displacement amplitude and frequency. It was found that the displacement-force loops were almost symmetric with respect to the central point for almost all specimens. The normalized secant stiffness diminishes significantly with increasing bulge height as well as displacement amplitude. From hysteretic cycles, an equivalent damping of about 15% was recognized for longtime-aged bellows with relatively high bulge height. Frequencies, in the range of interest for seismic applications, had a small influence on damping values. Under the conditions studied in this research, the bellows had better damping performance in a martensite phase than in a rhombohedral phase. SMA bellows in martensite phase subjected to the longtime-ageing have great potential as an element in seismic devices.

  1. The Critical Compression Load for a Universal Testing Machine When the Specimen Is Loaded Through Knife Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E; Schwartz, Edward B

    1942-01-01

    The results of a theoretical and experimental investigation to determine the critical compression load for a universal testing machine are presented for specimens loaded through knife edges. The critical load for the testing machine is the load at which one of the loading heads becomes laterally instable in relation to the other. For very short specimens the critical load was found to be less than the rated capacity given by the manufacturer for the machine. A load-length diagram is proposed for defining the safe limits of the test region for the machine. Although this report is particularly concerned with a universal testing machine of a certain type, the basic theory which led to the derivation of the general equation for the critical load, P (sub cr) = alpha L can be applied to any testing machine operated in compression where the specimen is loaded through knife edges. In this equation, L is the length of the specimen between knife edges and alpha is the force necessary to displace the upper end of the specimen unit horizontal distance relative to the lower end of the specimen in a direction normal to the knife edges through which the specimen is loaded.

  2. Compressive Loading and Modeling of Stitched Composite Stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Linton, Kim A.

    2016-01-01

    A series of single-frame and single-stringer compression tests were conducted at NASA Langley Research Center on specimens harvested from a large panel built using the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. Different frame and stringer designs were used in fabrication of the PRSEUS panel. In this paper, the details of the experimental testing of single-frame and single-stringer compression specimens are presented, as well as discussions on the performance of the various structural configurations included in the panel. Nonlinear finite element models were developed to further understand the failure processes observed during the experimental campaign.

  3. Acoustics and temperature based NDT for damage assessment of concrete masonry system subjected to cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Fuad; Bartoli, Ivan; Rajaram, Satish; Vanniamparambil, Prashanth A.; Kontsos, Antonios; Bolhassani, Mohammad; Hamid, Ahmad

    2014-04-01

    This paper represents a hybrid non-destructive testing (HNDT) approach based on infrared thermography (IRT), acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic (UT) techniques for effective damage quantification of partially grouted concrete masonry walls (CMW). This integrated approach has the potential to be implemented for the health monitoring of concrete masonry systems. The implementation of this hybrid approach assists the cross validation of in situ recorded information for structural damage assessment. In this context, NDT was performed on a set of partially grouted CMW subjected to cyclic loading. Acoustic emission (AE) signals and Infrared thermography (IRT) images were recorded during each cycle of loading while the ultrasonic (UT) tests were performed in between each loading cycle. Four accelerometers, bonded at the toe of the wall, were used for recording waveforms for both passive (AE) and active (UT) acoustics. For the active approach, high frequency stress waves were generated by an instrumented hammer and the corresponding waveforms were recorded by the accelerometers. The obtained AE, IRT, and UT results were correlated to visually confirm accumulated progressive damage throughout the loading history. Detailed post-processing of these results was performed to characterize the defects at the region of interest. The obtained experimental results demonstrated the potential of the methods to detect flaws on monitored specimens; further experimental investigations are planned towards the quantitative use of these NDT methods.

  4. High temperature fatigue behaviour of TZM molybdenum alloy under mechanical and thermomechanical cyclic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, H. J.; Niu, L. S.; Korn, C.; Pluvinage, G.

    2000-02-01

    High temperature isothermal mechanical fatigue and in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) tests in load control were carried out on a molybdenum-based alloy, one of the best known of the refractory alloys, TZM. The stress-strain response and the cyclic life of the material were measured during the tests. The fatigue lives obtained in the in-phase TMF tests are lower than those obtained in the isothermal mechanical tests at the same load amplitude. It appears that an additional damage is produced by the reaction of mechanical stress cycles and temperature cycles in TMF situation. Ratcheting phenomenon occurred during the tests with an increasing creep rate and it was dependent on temperature and load amplitude. A model of lifetime prediction, based on the Woehler-Miner law, was discussed. Damage coefficients that are functions of the maximum temperature and the variation of temperature are introduced in the model so as to evaluate TMF lives in load control. With this method the lifetime prediction gives results corresponding well to experimental data.

  5. Fixture for environmental exposure of structural materials under compression load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. K.; Lisagor, W. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A device for stressing a deformable material specimen consists of top plate and a bottom plate sandwiching a guide cylinder. The specimen is positioned on the bottom plate and attached to a load piston. Force is applied through the top plate into the guide cylinder. Once the specimen is loaded, the stress is maintained by tightening tie bolt nuts.

  6. Development of a new connection for precast concrete walls subjected to cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaghei, Ramin; Hejazi, Farzad; Taheri, Hafez; Jaafar, Mohd Saleh; Aziz, Farah Nora Aznieta Abdul

    2017-01-01

    The Industrialized Building System (IBS) was recently introduced to minimize the time and cost of project construction. Accordingly, ensuring the integration of the connection of precast components in IBS structures is an important factor that ensures stability of buildings subjected to dynamic loads from earthquakes, vehicles, and machineries. However, structural engineers still lack knowledge on the proper connection and detailed joints of IBS structure construction. Therefore, this study proposes a special precast concrete wall-to-wall connection system for dynamic loads that resists multidirectional imposed loads and reduces vibration effects (PI2014701723). This system is designed to connect two adjacent precast wall panels by using two steel U-shaped channels (i.e., male and female joints). During casting, each joint is adapted for incorporation into a respective wall panel after considering the following conditions: one side of the steel channel opens into the thickness face of the panel; a U-shaped rubber is implemented between the two channels to dissipate the vibration effect; and bolts and nuts are used to create an extension between the two U-shaped male and female steel channels. The developed finite element model of the precast wall is subjected to cyclic loads to evaluate the performance of the proposed connection during an imposed dynamic load. Connection performance is then compared with conventional connections based on the energy dissipation, stress, deformation, and concrete damage in the plastic range. The proposed precast connection is capable of exceeding the energy absorption of precast walls subjected to dynamic load, thereby improving its resistance behavior in all principal directions.

  7. Buckling Behavior of Compression-Loaded Quasi-Isotropic Curved Panels with a Circular Cutout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Britt, Vicki O.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    Results from a numerical and experimental study of the response of compression-loaded quasi-isotropic curved panels with a centrally located circular cutout are presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code. The effects of cutout size, panel curvature and initial geo- metric imperfections on the overall response of compression-loaded panels are described. In addition, results are presented from a numerical parametric study that indicate the effects of elastic circumferential edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling response of a selected panel and these numerical results are compared to experimentally measured results. These restraints are used to identify the effects of circumferential edge restraints that are introduced by the test fixture that was used in the present study. It is shown that circumferential edge restraints can introduce substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations into shallow compression-loaded curved panels that can results in a significant increase in buckling load.

  8. Buckling and Failure of Compression-loaded Composite Cylindrical Shells with Reinforced Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Results from a numerical and experimental study that illustrate the effects of selected cutout reinforcement configurations on the buckling and failure response of compression-loaded composite cylindrical shells with a cutout are presented. The effects of reinforcement size, thickness, and orthotropy on the overall response of compression-loaded shells are described. In general, reinforcement around a cutout in a compression-loaded shell can retard or eliminate the local buckling response and material failure near the cutout and increase the buckling load of the shell. However, some results show that certain reinforcement configurations can cause a significant increase in the local interlaminar failures that can accumulate near the free edges of a cutout during a local buckling event.

  9. Validation of Lower-Bound Estimates for Compression-Loaded Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynie, Waddy T.; Hilburger, Mark W.; Bogge, Massimiliano; Kriegesmann, Benedikt

    2012-01-01

    The traditional approach used in the design of stability critical thin-walled circular cylin- ders, is to reduce unconservative buckling load predictions with an empirical knockdown factor. An alternative analysis-based approach to determine a lower bound buckling load for cylinders under axial compression is to use a lateral perturbation load to create an initial imperfection and determine the buckling load while that load is applied. This paper describes a preliminary e ort to develop a test capability to verify this approach. Results from tests of three aluminum alloy cylinders are described and compared to nite element predictions.

  10. Mechanical durability of polymeric coatings studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy: correlation between cyclic loading and free volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Peng, Q.; Huang, Y. Y.; Zhang, R.; Mallon, P. E.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.; Wu, Y.; Richardson, J. R.; Sandreczki, T. C.; Jean, Y. C.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.

    2002-06-01

    The mechanical durability of seven commercially polymeric coatings is investigated using slow positron beam techniques to monitor changes in sub-nanometer defects during the process of cyclic loading. Doppler broadened energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) measurements were performed as a function of the slow positron energy at different periods of cycling loading. The positron annihilation dada show that both S-defect parameter and o-positronium (Ps) lifetime decrease as the loading cycle increases. The results indicate a loss of free volumes due to the loss of mechanical durability by cyclic loading. A direct correlation between the loss of S-defect parameter and the period of loading cycle is observed. This is interpreted as that durability of polymeric coatings is controlled by the atomic level free volumes. It is shown that the slow positron beam is a very successful probe in detecting the very early stages of coating degradation due to mechanical processes.

  11. Effect of Cyclic Loading on Bond Strength of Fiber Posts to Root Canal Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Khamverdi, Zahra; Damavandi, Leila Yazdani; Kasraei, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cyclic loading on the bond strength of quartz fiber posts to root canal dentin after different surface treatments of different regions of root canal dentin. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight single-rooted human teeth were selected. Post spaces were prepared and then the teeth were divided into four groups: G1: no treatment (control); G2: irrigation with a chemical solvent; G3: etching with 37% phosphoric acid; G4: treatment with ultrasonic file. The fiber posts were cemented using dual-cured resin cement. Half of the specimens were load-cycled (10000 cycles, 3 cycles/s) and the others did not undergo any load cycling. From each root, two slides measuring 1 mm in thickness were obtained from the apical and cervical regions. The push-out bond strength test was performed for each slice. Data were analyzed by using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. The fracture modes were evaluated under a stereomicroscope at ×20. Results: The effect of load cycling and surface treatment as the main factors and the interaction of main factors were not significant (P=0.734, P=0.180, and P=0.539, respectively). The most frequent failure mode under the stereomicroscope was adhesive. Conclusion: It appears that load cycling and surface treatment methods had no effect on the bond strength of fiber posts to root canal dentin, but it depended on the region of the root canal dentin. PMID:24910680

  12. Damage mechanisms in PBT-GF30 under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Schaaf, A. De Monte, M. Hoffmann, C.; Vormwald, M.; Quaresimin, M.

    2014-05-15

    The scope of this paper is the investigation of damage mechanisms at microscopic scale on a short glass fiber reinforced polybutylene terephthalate (PBT-GF30) under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. In addition the principal mechanisms are verified through micro mechanical FE models. In order to investigate the fatigue behavior of the material both isothermal strain controlled fatigue (ISCF) tests at three different temperatures and thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) tests were conducted on plain and notched specimens, manufactured by injection molding. The goal of the work is to determine the damage mechanisms occurring under TMF conditions and to compare them with the mechanisms occurring under ISCF. For this reason fracture surfaces of TMF and ISCF samples loaded at different temperature levels were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, specimens that failed under TMF were examined on microsections revealing insight into both crack initiation and crack propagation. The findings of this investigation give valuable information about the main damage mechanisms of PBT-GF30 under TMF loading and serve as basis for the development of a TMF life estimation methodology.

  13. Cyclic fatigue damage characteristics observed for simple loadings extended to multiaxial life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, David J.; Kurath, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Fully reversed uniaxial strain controlled fatigue tests were performed on smooth cylindrical specimens made of 304 stainless steel. Fatigue life data and cracking observations for uniaxial tests were compared with life data and cracking behavior observed in fully reversed torsional tests. It was determined that the product of maximum principle strain amplitude and maximum principle stress provided the best correlation of fatigue lives for these two loading conditions. Implementation of this parameter is in agreement with observed physical damage and it accounts for the variation of stress-strain response, which is unique to specific loading conditions. Biaxial fatigue tests were conducted on tubular specimens employing both in-phase and out-of-phase tension torsion cyclic strain paths. Cracking observations indicated that the physical damage which occurred in the biaxial tests was similar to the damage observed in uniaxial and torsional tests. The Smith, Watson, and Topper parameter was then extended to predict the fatigue lives resulting from the more complex loading conditions.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Multimaterial Thermoelectric Devices Under Static and Cyclic Thermal Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergus, Jeffrey W.; Yerkes, Kirk; Yost, Kevin

    2014-02-01

    Selection of materials for thermoelectric devices is generally based on a figure of merit that is a function of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity. While this figure of merit is a useful metric for comparing materials, the relative importance of the constituent properties depends on the particular application and conditions. In addition, multiple materials can be used together to improve the performance or extend the operating range, and determining the performance of such multimaterial combinations requires analysis beyond simply averaging the properties of the constituent materials. In this paper, finite-element numerical simulations under static and cyclic thermal loadings are used to investigate how device performance can be improved by judicious location of the different materials within the device. The results show that the performance of a device with two different materials can be better than that of either of the individual materials. The greatest improvement in performance occurs with cyclic heating, where the overall performance is strongly influenced by the behavior under transient conditions during heating and cooling.

  15. Electrochemical Behavior of Novel Superelastic Biomedical Alloys in Simulated Physiological Media Under Cyclic Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukova, Yu. S.; Pustov, Yu. A.; Konopatsky, A. S.; Filonov, M. R.; Prokoshkin, S. D.

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to study corrosion and electrochemical behavior of Ti-22Nb-6Ta and Ti-22Nb-6Zr (at.%) superelastic alloys under conditions which imitate the performance mode of target devices (bone implants), i.e., under cyclic load in simulated physiological solutions. Open circuit potential (OCP) measurements were carried out on wire specimens in Hank's solution and artificial saliva at 37 °C with various strain values up to 1.5%. It is shown that at clinically relevant strain values (about 0.2%) the alloys exhibit OCP growth indicating their high stability and resistance to corrosion fatigue under these cycling conditions. At much higher strains (about 1%), fatigue crack initiation and propagation take place, however, the corresponding OCP variation indicates that the fracture process is significantly restrained by reversible martensitic transformation during cycling.

  16. Results of a Cyclic Load Test of an RB-47E Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, Wilber B.

    1959-01-01

    Results of a cyclic load test made by NASA on an EB-47E airplane are given. The test reported on is for one of three B-47 airplanes in a test program set up by the U. S. Air Force to evaluate the effect of wing structural reinforcements on fatigue life. As a result of crack development in the upper fuselage longerons of the other two airplanes in the program, a longeron and fuselage skin modification was incorporated early in the test. Fuselage strain-gage measurements made before and after the longeron modification and wing strain-gage measurements made only after wing reinforcement are summarized. The history of crack development and repair is given in detail. Testing was terminated one sequence short of the planned end of the program with the occurrence of a major crack in the lower right wing skin.

  17. Models for predicting damage evolution in metal matrix composites subjected to cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.H.; Hurtado, L.D.; Helms, K.L.E.

    1995-03-01

    A thermomechanical analysis of a continuous fiber metal matrix composite (MMC) subjected to cyclic loading is performed herein. The analysis includes the effects of processing induced residual thermal stresses, matrix inelasticity, and interface cracking. Due to these complexities, the analysis is performed computationally using the finite element method. Matrix inelasticity is modelled with a rate dependent viscoplasticity model. Interface fracture is modelled by the use of a nonlinear interface constitutive model. The problem formulation is summarized, and results are given for a four-ply unidirectional SCS-6/{beta}21S titanium composite under high temperature isothermal mechanical fatigue. Results indicate rate dependent viscoplasticity can be a significant mechanism for dissipating the energy available for damage propagation, thus contributing to improved ductility of the composite. Results also indicate that the model may be useful for inclusion in life prediction methodologies for MMC`s.

  18. Cortical and trabecular bone adaptation to incremental load magnitudes using the mouse tibial axial compression loading model.

    PubMed

    Weatherholt, Alyssa M; Fuchs, Robyn K; Warden, Stuart J

    2013-01-01

    The mouse tibial axial compression loading model has recently been described to allow simultaneous exploration of cortical and trabecular bone adaptation within the same loaded element. However, the model frequently induces cortical woven bone formation and has produced inconsistent results with regards to trabecular bone adaptation. The aim of this study was to investigate bone adaptation to incremental load magnitudes using the mouse tibial axial compression loading model, with the ultimate goal of revealing a load that simultaneously induced lamellar cortical and trabecular bone adaptation. Adult (16 weeks old) female C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three load magnitude groups (5, 7 and 9N), and had their right tibia axially loaded using a continuous 2-Hz haversine waveform for 360 cycles/day, 3 days/week for 4 consecutive weeks. In vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to longitudinally assess midshaft tibia cortical bone adaptation, while ex vivo micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry were used to assess both midshaft tibia cortical and proximal tibia trabecular bone adaptation. A dose response to loading magnitude was observed within cortical bone, with increasing load magnitude inducing increasing levels of lamellar cortical bone adaptation within the upper two thirds of the tibial diaphysis. Greatest cortical bone adaptation was observed at the midshaft where there was a 42% increase in estimated mechanical properties (polar moment of inertia) in the highest (9N) load group. A dose response to load magnitude was not clearly evident within trabecular bone, with only the highest load (9N) being able to induce measureable adaptation (31% increase in trabecular bone volume fraction at the proximal tibia). The ultimate finding was that a load of 9N (engendering a tensile strain of 1833 με on medial surface of the midshaft tibia) was able to simultaneously induce measurable lamellar cortical and trabecular bone adaptation

  19. The dynamic conductance response and mechanics-modulated memristive behavior of the Azurin monolayer under cyclic loads.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyue; Shao, Jian; Chen, Yun; Chen, Weijin; Yu, Jing; Wang, Biao; Zheng, Yue

    2017-03-01

    Azurin (Az) has been considered as the research hotspot in molecular electronics, as well as a promising material for building functional devices on the molecular scale because of its special electrical properties and force-dependent conductance effects. Here we carry out an in-depth investigation combined with molecular scale experiments, molecular dynamics simulations, first-principles calculations and theoretical models to reveal the dynamic conductance response of the Az monolayer under cyclic mechanical loading. Experimentally, the conductance of the Az monolayer under continuous cyclic loads was recorded using a conductive atomic force microscope. Our results demonstrate the strong nonlinear force-dependence and significant time-delayed characteristics, which distinctly differ from the results obtained under stepwise loading. It is also found that the period and amplitude of cyclic loads have a great impact on the magnitude, peak value and change rate of the current. The regular dynamic response of the Az conductance under mechanical force looks like a type of memristive behavior, which is defined as mechanics-modulated memristive behavior in this work. In order to verify these peculiar experimental results, we employed both molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles calculations to analyze the structural deformation and molecular orbitals of Az under cyclic loads. A phenomenological model is also established to explain experimental findings and further illustrate mechanics-modulated memristive behavior.

  20. Dynamic Crush Behaviors Of Aluminum Honeycomb Specimens Under Compression Dominant Inclined Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Pan, Jwo; Tyan, Tau; Prasad, Priya

    2008-01-01

    The quasi-static and dynamic crush behaviors of aluminum 5052-H38 honeycomb specimens under out-of-plane inclined loads are investigated by experiments. Different types of honeycomb specimens were designed for crush tests under pure compressive and inclined loads with respect to the out-of-plane direction. A test fixture was designed for both quasi-static and dynamic crush tests under inclined loads. The results of the quasi-static crush tests indicate that the normal crush and shear strengths under inclined loads are consistent with the corresponding results under combined loads. The results of the dynamic crush tests indicate that as the impact velocity increases, the normal crush strength increases and the shear strength remains nearly the same. The trends of the normalized normal crush strengths under inclined loads for specimens with different in-plane orientation angles as functions of the impact velocity are very similar to each other. Based on the experimental results, a macroscopic yield criterion as a function of the impact velocity is proposed. The experimental results suggest that as the impact velocity increases, the shape of the macroscopic yield surface changes, or more specifically, the curvature of the yield surface increases near the pure compression state. The experimental results also show similar microscopic progressive folding mechanisms in honeycomb specimens under pure compressive and inclined loads. However, honeycomb specimens under inclined loads show inclined stacking patterns of folds due to the asymmetric location of horizontal plastic hinge lines.

  1. Influence of compressive load on microstructure of micro-scaled DLC structures produced by FIB-CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, N.; Kogo, Y.; Yasuno, T.

    2008-03-01

    Influence of compressive load on microstructure of micro-scaled diamond-like carbon (DLC) structures was investigated by high-resolution electron transmission microscopy (HRTEM) analyses. The micro-scaled structures were produced by the focused ion-beam chemical vapor deposition method. The compressive loads were applied by a dynamic ultra micro hardness tester equipped with a flat-tip diamond indenter. Microgrid images in HRTEM observation and selected area diffraction patterns were varied by the compressive loads. The variations revealed that constituent atoms arranged disorderly in DLC were clustered by compressive loads. Electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements indicated that sp3 fraction in DLC was decreased by the compressive load. Consequently, it was suggested that graphitic clusters were formed in the microstructure of DLC by the compressive loads.

  2. Laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE) for dynamically loading materials at high strain rates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Eggert, J; Celliers, P; Jankowski, A; Lorenz, T; Moon, S; Edwards, M J; Collins, G

    2006-03-30

    We demonstrate the recently developed technique of laser driven isentropic compression (ICE) for dynamically compressing Al samples at high loading rates close to the room temperature isentrope and up to peak stresses above 100GPa. Upon analysis of the unloading profiles from a multi-stepped Al/LiF target a continuous path through Stress-Density space may be calculated. For materials with phase transformations ramp compression techniques reveals the location of equilibrium phase boundaries and provide information on the kinetics of the lattice re-ordering.

  3. Subcritical crack-growth behavior of borosilicate glass under cyclic loads: Evidence of a mechanical fatigue effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Bennison, S.J.

    1997-03-01

    Amorphous glasses are generally considered immune to mechanical fatigue effects associated with cyclic loading. In this study surprising new evidence is presented for a mechanical fatigue effect in borosilicate glass, in both moist air and dry nitrogen environments. The fatigue effect occurs at near threshold subcritical crack-growth rates (da/dt < 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s) as the crack extension per cycle approaches the dimensions of the borosilicate glass network. While subcritical crack growth under cyclic loads at higher load levels is entirely consistent with environmentally assisted crack growth, lower growth rates actually exceed those measured under monotonic loads. This suggests a mechanical fatigue effect which accelerates subcritical crack-growth rates. Likely mechanisms for the mechanical fatigue effect are presented.

  4. A coupled damage-plasticity model for the cyclic behavior of shear-loaded interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, P.; De Lorenzis, L.

    2015-12-01

    The present work proposes a novel thermodynamically consistent model for the behavior of interfaces under shear (i.e. mode-II) cyclic loading conditions. The interface behavior is defined coupling damage and plasticity. The admissible states' domain is formulated restricting the tangential interface stress to non-negative values, which makes the model suitable e.g. for interfaces with thin adherends. Linear softening is assumed so as to reproduce, under monotonic conditions, a bilinear mode-II interface law. Two damage variables govern respectively the loss of strength and of stiffness of the interface. The proposed model needs the evaluation of only four independent parameters, i.e. three defining the monotonic mode-II interface law, and one ruling the fatigue behavior. This limited number of parameters and their clear physical meaning facilitate experimental calibration. Model predictions are compared with experimental results on fiber reinforced polymer sheets externally bonded to concrete involving different load histories, and an excellent agreement is obtained.

  5. Portevin-Le Chatelier effect under cyclic loading: experimental and numerical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazière, M.; Pujol d'Andrebo, Q.

    2015-10-01

    The Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) effect is generally evidenced by the apparition of serrated yielding under monotonic tensile loading conditions. It appears at room temperature in some aluminium alloys, around ? in some steels and in many other metallic materials. This effect is associated with the propagation of bands of plastic deformation in tensile specimens and can in some cases lead to unexpected failures. The PLC effect has been widely simulated under monotonic conditions using finite elements and an appropriate mechanical model able to reproduce serrations and strain localization. The occurrence of serrations can be predicted using an analytical stability analysis. Recently, this serrated yielding has also been observed in specimens made of Cobalt-based superalloy under cyclic loading, after a large number of cycles. The mechanical model has been identified in this case to accurately reproduce this critical number of cycle where serrations appear. The associated apparition of localized bands of deformation in specimens and their influence on its failure has also been investigated using finite element simulations.

  6. Inelastic behavior of cold-formed braced walls under monotonic and cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerami, Mohsen; Lotfi, Mohsen; Nejat, Roya

    2015-06-01

    The ever-increasing need for housing generated the search for new and innovative building methods to increase speed and efficiency and enhance quality. One method is the use of light thin steel profiles as load-bearing elements having different solutions for interior and exterior cladding. Due to the increase in CFS construction in low-rise residential structures in the modern construction industry, there is an increased demand for performance inelastic analysis of CFS walls. In this study, the nonlinear behavior of cold-formed steel frames with various bracing arrangements including cross, chevron and k-shape straps was evaluated under cyclic and monotonic loading and using nonlinear finite element analysis methods. In total, 68 frames with different bracing arrangements and different ratios of dimensions were studied. Also, seismic parameters including resistance reduction factor, ductility and force reduction factor due to ductility were evaluated for all samples. On the other hand, the seismic response modification factor was calculated for these systems. It was concluded that the highest response modification factor would be obtained for walls with bilateral cross bracing systems with a value of 3.14. In all samples, on increasing the distance of straps from each other, shear strength increased and shear strength of the wall with bilateral bracing system was 60 % greater than that with lateral bracing system.

  7. Calibration of hyperelastic material properties of the human lumbar intervertebral disc under fast dynamic compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Wagnac, Eric; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Garo, Anaïs; El-Rich, Marwan; Aubin, Carl-Eric

    2011-10-01

    Under fast dynamic loading conditions (e.g. high-energy impact), the load rate dependency of the intervertebral disc (IVD) material properties may play a crucial role in the biomechanics of spinal trauma. However, most finite element models (FEM) of dynamic spinal trauma uses material properties derived from quasi-static experiments, thus neglecting this load rate dependency. The aim of this study was to identify hyperelastic material properties that ensure a more biofidelic simulation of the IVD under a fast dynamic compressive load. A hyperelastic material law based on a first-order Mooney-Rivlin formulation was implemented in a detailed FEM of a L2-L3 functional spinal unit (FSU) to represent the mechanical behavior of the IVD. Bony structures were modeled using an elasto-plastic Johnson-Cook material law that simulates bone fracture while ligaments were governed by a viscoelastic material law. To mimic experimental studies performed in fast dynamic compression, a compressive loading velocity of 1 m/s was applied to the superior half of L2, while the inferior half of L3 was fixed. An exploratory technique was used to simulate dynamic compression of the FSU using 34 sets of hyperelastic material constants randomly selected using an optimal Latin hypercube algorithm and a set of material constants derived from quasi-static experiments. Selection or rejection of the sets of material constants was based on compressive stiffness and failure parameters criteria measured experimentally. The two simulations performed with calibrated hyperelastic constants resulted in nonlinear load-displacement curves with compressive stiffness (7335 and 7079 N/mm), load (12,488 and 12,473 N), displacement (1.95 and 2.09 mm) and energy at failure (13.5 and 14.7 J) in agreement with experimental results (6551 ± 2017 N/mm, 12,411 ± 829 N, 2.1 ± 0.2 mm and 13.0 ± 1.5 J respectively). The fracture pattern and location also agreed with experimental results. The simulation performed with

  8. Longitudinal Weld Land Buckling in Compression-Loaded Orthogrid Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Large stiffened cylinders used in launch vehicles (LV), such as the Space Shuttle External Tank, are manufactured by welding multiple curved panel sections into complete cylinders. The effects of the axial weld lands between the panel sections on the buckling load were studied, along with the interaction between the acreage stiffener arrangement and the weld land geometry. This document contains the results of the studies.

  9. Reversible-strain criteria of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys under cyclic 3D magneto-mechanical loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y. J.; Chen, X.; Moumni, Z.

    2012-08-01

    Recent researches revealed that ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMA) in 2D/3D configurations (with multi-axial stresses) had much more advantages (e.g., higher working stress and more application flexibility) than that in 1D configuration (with uniaxial stress). In literature, however, there is no simple criterion to judge whether a cyclic 3D magneto-mechanical loading can induce a large reversible strain (via martensite reorientation in FSMA). In this paper, a 3D magneto-mechanical energy analysis is proposed and incorporated into a phase diagram in terms of deviatoric stresses (including mechanical and magneto-stresses) to study the path-dependent (hysteretic) martensite reorientation in FSMA under 3D cyclic loadings. Based on the phase diagram (a plane graph), general criteria for obtaining reversible strain under cyclic magneto-mechanical loadings are derived, which provide basic guidelines for FSMA's applications under multi-axial loadings. Particularly for FSMA actuators driven by cyclic magnetic fields, the criteria of setting the 3D mechanical stresses to allow field-induced reversible strain are formulated. The 3D criteria can be reduced to 1D and 2D criteria which agree with the existing 1D/2D theoretical and experimental studies.

  10. Buckling Behavior of Compression-Loaded Composite Cylindrical Shells with Reinforced Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the response of thin-wall compression-loaded quasi-isotropic laminated composite cylindrical shells with reinforced and unreinforced square cutouts are presented. The effects of cutout reinforcement orthotropy, size, and thickness on the nonlinear response of the shells are described. A high-fidelity nonlinear analysis procedure has been used to predict the nonlinear response of the shells. The analysis procedure includes a nonlinear static analysis that predicts stable response characteristics of the shells and a nonlinear transient analysis that predicts unstable dynamic buckling response characteristics. The results illustrate how a compression-loaded shell with an unreinforced cutout can exhibit a complex nonlinear response. In particular, a local buckling response occurs in the shell near the cutout and is caused by a complex nonlinear coupling between local shell-wall deformations and in-plane destabilizing compression stresses near the cutout. In general, the addition of reinforcement around a cutout in a compression-loaded shell can retard or eliminate the local buckling response near the cutout and increase the buckling load of the shell, as expected. However, results are presented that show how certain reinforcement configurations can actually cause an unexpected increase in the magnitude of local deformations and stresses in the shell and cause a reduction in the buckling load. Specific cases are presented that suggest that the orthotropy, thickness, and size of a cutout reinforcement in a shell can be tailored to achieve improved response characteristics.

  11. Load-bearing capacity of screw-retained CAD/CAM-produced titanium implant frameworks (I-Bridge®2) before and after cyclic mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    DITTMER, Marc Philipp; NENSA, Moritz; STIESCH, Meike; KOHORST, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Implant-supported screw-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) produced by CAD/ CAM have been introduced in recent years for the rehabilitation of partial or total endentulous jaws. However, there is a lack of data about the long-term mechanical characteristics. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the failure mode and the influence of extended cyclic mechanical loading on the load-bearing capacity of these frameworks. Material and Methods Ten five-unit FDP frameworks simulating a free-end situation in the mandibular jaw were manufactured according to the I-Bridge®2-concept (I-Bridge®2, Biomain AB, Helsingborg, Sweden) and each was screw-retained on three differently angulated Astra Tech implants (30º buccal angulation/0º angulation/30º lingual angulation). One half of the specimens was tested for static load-bearing capacity without any further treatment (control), whereas the other half underwent five million cycles of mechanical loading with 100 N as the upper load limit (test). All specimens were loaded until failure in a universal testing machine with an occlusal force applied at the pontics. Load-displacement curves were recorded and the failure mode was macro- and microscopically analyzed. The statistical analysis was performed using a t-test (p=0.05). Results All the specimens survived cyclic mechanical loading and no obvious failure could be observed. Due to the cyclic mechanical loading, the load-bearing capacity decreased from 8,496 N±196 N (control) to 7,592 N±901 N (test). The cyclic mechanical loading did not significantly influence the load-bearing capacity (p=0.060). The failure mode was almost identical in all specimens: large deformations of the framework at the implant connection area were obvious. Conclusion The load-bearing capacity of the I-Bridge®2 frameworks is much higher than the clinically relevant occlusal forces, even with considerably angulated implants. However, the performance under functional loading in vivo

  12. Monotonic and fatigue properties of kenaf /glass hybrid composites under fully reversed cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharba, M. J.; Leman, Z.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Ishak, M. R.; Hanim, M. A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of hybridization of kenaf-glass fibers reinforced unsaturated polyester on fatigue life. Three types of composites were fabricated using hands lay-up method, namely, kenaf, glass, and hybrid composites with 30% of weight fraction, the hybrid was mixed with a ratio of kenaf: glass 10:20. Monotonic tests were achieved (Tensile and compression) to determine the fatigue stress levels. Fully reversed fatigue loading was conducted with a stress ratio of -1 and stress levels 55-85% of the ultimate static stresses, all tests were conducted at 10 Hz of frequency. The results proof a positive hybrid composite; also agree with the rule of mixture that can predict the final composite properties. Moreover, it's been observed an improvement in overall mechanical properties of hybrid compared to individual ones.

  13. Crack propagation in SiC f/SiC ceramic matrix composite under static and cyclic loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuraman, S.; Stubbins, J. F.; Ferber, M. K.; Wereszczak, A. A.

    1994-09-01

    {SiC f}/{SiC} ceramic matrix composite material is of high interest for potential application as a structural and barrier material in fusion systems. It possesses reasonable fracture toughness over a range of temperatures and, due to the low atomic number of its constituents, is appealing for low activation reasons. This study examines the mechanical durability of a Nicalon fiber-SiC composite which has been tested at temperatures up to 1400°C to determine its resistance to crack propagation under static and cyclic loading conditions. The crack growth characteristics are governed by the fiber and interface failure modes. These, in turn are affected by loading parameters, temperature and environmental effects. The material shows R-curve behavior, due to fiber bridging of the crack wake. The material also shows time dependent crack growth at elevated temperature, but not at room temperature. However, cyclic loading does induce crack extension at room temperature.

  14. Recent developments in reassessment of jacket structures under extreme storm cyclic loading. Part 2: Cyclic capacity of tubular members

    SciTech Connect

    Amdahl, J.; Skallerud, B.H.; Eide, O.I.; Johansen, A.

    1995-12-31

    Tubular members with D/t ratio 35, 45, 60 and 80 were tested under controlled axial displacement described by an amplitude and a mean level. The material was structural steel to St. 52-3N, with minimum yield stress 345 MPa. The slenderness ratio of the specimens were in the range 50--70. During testing, the specimens were instrumented for measurements of longitudinal and transversal deflections, ovalization, and extreme fiber strains. Number of cycles to local buckling and through thickness cracking was recorded. Selected tests were simulated by use of the nonlinear beam-column FE program USFOS and the shell FE program ABAQUS. Comparisons were made to the corresponding test results. Monotonic and cyclic capacity criteria of tubular members are discussed on the basis of the results obtained.

  15. Effects of Nesting on Compression-Loaded 2-D Woven Textile Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Daniel OHare; Breiling, Kurtis B.; Verhulst, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Layer nesting was investigated in five harness satin weave textile composite laminates under static compression loading. Two carbon/epoxy material systems, AS4/3501-6 and IM7/8551-7A were considered. Laminates were fabricated with three idealized nesting cases: stacked, split-span and diagonal. Similar compression strength reductions due to the effects of idealized nesting were identified for each material. The diagonal nesting geometry produced the largest reduction in static strength when compared to the compression strength of a conventional textile composite. All three nesting cases produced reductions in strength and ultimate strain due to the effects of idealized nesting. Finite element results showed consistent strength reduction trends for the idealized nesting cases, however the magnitudes of compressive strengths were overpredicted.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Studies on Development of Fracture Process Zone (FPZ) in Rocks under Cyclic and Static Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamgosar, M.; Erarslan, N.

    2016-03-01

    The development of fracture process zones (FPZ) in the Cracked Chevron Notched Brazilian Disc (CCNBD) monsonite and Brisbane tuff specimens was investigated to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of brittle rocks under static and various cyclic loadings. An FPZ is a region that involves different types of damage around the pre-existing and/or stress-induced crack tips in engineering materials. This highly damaged area includes micro- and meso-cracks, which emerge prior to the main fracture growth or extension and ultimately coalescence to macrofractures, leading to the failure. The experiments and numerical simulations were designed for this study to investigate the following features of FPZ in rocks: (1) ligament connections and (2) microcracking and its coalescence in FPZ. A Computed Tomography (CT) scan technique was also used to investigate the FPZ behaviour in selected rock specimens. The CT scan results showed that the fracturing velocity is entirely dependent on the appropriate amount of fracture energy absorbed in rock specimens due to the change of frequency and amplitudes of the dynamic loading. Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM) was used to compute the displacements, tensile stress distribution and plastic energy dissipation around the propagating crack tip in FPZ. One of the most important observations, the shape of FPZ and its extension around the crack tip, was made using numerical and experimental results, which supported the CT scan results. When the static rupture and the cyclic rupture were compared, the main differences are twofold: (1) the number of fragments produced is much greater under cyclic loading than under static loading, and (2) intergranular cracks are formed due to particle breakage under cyclic loading compared with smooth and bright cracks along cleavage planes under static loading.

  17. Effect of cyclic loading on microleakage of silorane based composite compared with low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites

    PubMed Central

    Kermanshah, Hamid; Yasini, Esmail; Hoseinifar, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are many concerns regarding the marginal seal of composite restorations, especially when composite restorations are subjected to cyclic loading. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cyclic loading on the microleakage of silorane based composite compared with low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites in class V cavities. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, class V cavities were prepared on the facial and lingual surfaces of 48 human premolars (96 cavities). The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 12 teeth (24 cavities) each and restored as follows: Group 1 (Siloran System Adhesive + Filtek P90), Group 2 (All Bond SE + Aelite LS Posterior), Group 3 (Futurabond NR + Grandio), and Group 4 (G-Bond + Kalore-GC). All the specimens were thermocycled for 2000 cycles (5-55°C) and then half of the specimens from each group, were Load cycled. All teeth were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye, sectioned, and observed under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon test, Kruskal–Wallis, and Mann–Whitney U-tests. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: In both unloaded and loaded groups, no statistically significant differences were observed among four composites at the occlusal margin, but a significant difference in gingival microleakage was found between Aelite and silorane. Occlusal and gingival microleakage was not affected by cyclic loading in none of the four restorative materials. Conclusion: Silorane did not provide better marginal seal than the low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites (except Aelite). In addition, cyclic loading did not affect the marginal microleakage of evaluated composite restorations. PMID:27274348

  18. Water diffusion pathway, swelling pressure, and biomechanical properties of the intervertebral disc during compression load

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, H.; Tsuji, H.; Hirano, N.; Ishihara, H.; Katoh, Y.; Yamada, H. )

    1989-11-01

    The behavior of water in the intervertebral disc of pig tail and its physiologic and biomechanical properties were investigated in relation to compression load. The water content, chemical composition, and swelling pressure in the intervertebral disc were measured, and the mechanism of the generation of the swelling pressure in relation to compression load stress was studied. The swelling pressure, through regulation of the water content of the disc and the resistance of the external load, differs with the region of the intervertebral disc. In the nucleus pulposus and the inner layer of the anulus fibrosus, the swelling pressure rises in proportion to the load, but few changes occur in the outer layer of the anulus fibrosus, and the constant pressure environment is thus maintained. The tritiated water (3H2O) uptake of the disc under various loads was measured. The molar partition coefficient of tritiated water is almost equal to 1 even under a compression load, which suggests that water is freely exchangeable. The diffusion of 3H2O in the intervertebral disc was traced using two pathway models: the perianular route and the end-plate route. The diffusion of water in the unloaded disc for both uptake and washout was about 2 to 3 times larger in the perianular route than in the end-plate route. Under load, the water diffusion was inhibited in both pathways. The relation between the load and displacement revealed viscoelastic properties indicating creep and stress relaxation. Young's modulus and the stiffness increased with a rise in load speed.

  19. Contact mechanics of the human finger pad under compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Dzidek, Brygida M; Adams, Michael J; Andrews, James W; Zhang, Zhibing; Johnson, Simon A

    2017-02-01

    The coefficient of friction of most solid objects is independent of the applied normal force because of surface roughness. This behaviour is observed for a finger pad except at long contact times (greater than 10 s) against smooth impermeable surfaces such as glass when the coefficient increases with decreasing normal force by about a factor of five for the load range investigated here. This is clearly an advantage for some precision manipulation and grip tasks. Such normal force dependence is characteristic of smooth curved elastic bodies. It has been argued that the occlusion of moisture in the form of sweat plasticises the surface topographical features and their increased compliance allows flattening under an applied normal force, so that the surfaces of the fingerprint ridges are effectively smooth. While the normal force dependence of the friction is consistent with the theory of elastic frictional contacts, the gross deformation behaviour is not and, for commonly reported values of the Young's modulus of stratum corneum, the deformation of the ridges should be negligible compared with the gross deformation of the finger pad even when fully occluded. This paper describes the development of a contact mechanics model that resolves these inconsistencies and is validated against experimental data.

  20. Optimization of composite sandwich cover panels subjected to compressive loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis and design method is presented for the design of composite sandwich cover panels that include the transverse shear effects and damage tolerance considerations. This method is incorporated into a sandwich optimization computer program entitled SANDOP. As a demonstration of its capabilities, SANDOP is used in the present study to design optimized composite sandwich cover panels for for transport aircraft wing applications. The results of this design study indicate that optimized composite sandwich cover panels have approximately the same structural efficiency as stiffened composite cover panels designed to satisfy individual constraints. The results also indicate that inplane stiffness requirements have a large effect on the weight of these composite sandwich cover panels at higher load levels. Increasing the maximum allowable strain and the upper percentage limit of the 0 degree and +/- 45 degree plies can yield significant weight savings. The results show that the structural efficiency of these optimized composite sandwich cover panels is relatively insensitive to changes in core density. Thus, core density should be chosen by criteria other than minimum weight (e.g., damage tolerance, ease of manufacture, etc.).

  1. Engineering the periodontal ligament in hyaluronan-gelatin-type I collagen constructs: upregulation of apoptosis and alterations in gene expression by cyclic compressive strain.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, Aarthi; Sriram, Gopu; Vinoth, Jayasaleen Kumar; Cao, Tong; Meikle, Murray C

    2015-02-01

    To engineer constructs of the periodontal ligament (PDL), human PDL cells were incorporated into a matrix of hyaluronan, gelatin, and type I collagen (COLI) in sample holders (13×1 mm) of six-well Biopress culture plates. The loading dynamics of the PDL were mimicked by applying a cyclic compressive strain of 33.4 kPa (340.6 gm/cm(2)) to the constructs for 1.0 s every 60 s, for 6, 12, and 24 h in a Flexercell FX-4000C Strain Unit. Compression significantly increased the number of nonviable cells and increased the expression of several apoptosis-related genes, including initiator and executioner caspases. Of the 15 extracellular matrix genes screened, most were upregulated at some point after 6-12 h deformation, but all were downregulated at 24 h, except for MMPs1-3 and CTGF. In culture supernatants, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) protein levels were upregulated at 24 h; receptor activator of nuclear kappa factor B (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) were unchanged; and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) not detected. The low modulus of elasticity of the constructs was a disadvantage-future mechanobiology studies and tissue engineering applications will require constructs with much higher stiffness. Since the major structural protein of the PDL is COLI, a more rational approach would be to permeabilize preformed COLI scaffolds with PDL-populated matrices.

  2. Creep-fatigue of High Temperature Materials for VHTR: Effect of Cyclic Loading and Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Celine Cabet; L. Carroll; R. Wright; R. Madland

    2011-05-01

    Alloy 617 is the one of the leading candidate materials for Intermediate Heat eXchangers (IHX) of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). System start-ups and shut-downs as well as power transients will produce low cycle fatigue (LCF) loadings of components. Furthermore, the anticipated IHX operating temperature, up to 950°C, is in the range of creep so that creep-fatigue interaction, which can significantly increase the fatigue crack growth, may be one of the primary IHX damage modes. To address the needs for Alloy 617 codification and licensing, a significant creep-fatigue testing program is underway at Idaho National Laboratory. Strain controlled LCF tests including hold times up to 1800s at maximum tensile strain were conducted at total strain range of 0.3% and 0.6% in air at 950°C. Creep-fatigue testing was also performed in a simulated VHTR impure helium coolant for selected experimental conditions. The creep-fatigue tests resulted in failure times up to 1000 hrs. Fatigue resistance was significantly decreased when a hold time was added at peak stress and when the total strain was increased. The fracture mode also changed from transgranular to intergranular with introduction of a tensile hold. Changes in the microstructure were methodically characterized. A combined effect of temperature, cyclic and static loading and environment was evidenced in the targeted operating conditions of the IHX. This paper This paper reviews the data previously published by Carroll and co-workers in references 10 and 11 focusing on the role of inelastic strain accumulation and of oxidation in the initiation and propagation of surface fatigue cracks.

  3. Experimental study of hollow rectangular bridge column performance under vertical and cyclically bilateral loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qiang; Du, Xiuli; Zhou, Yihui; Lee, George C.

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the seismic performance of hollow reinforced concrete (RC) bridge columns of rectangular cross section under constant axial load and cyclically biaxial bending, five specimens were tested. A parametric study is carried out for different axial load ratios, longitudinal reinforcement ratios and lateral reinforcement ratios. The experimental results showed that all tested specimens failed in the flexural failure mode and their ultimate performance was dominated by flexural capacity, which is represented by the rupture/buckling of tensile longitudinal rebars at the bottom of the bridge columns. Biaxial force and displacement hysteresis loops showed significant stiffness and strength degradations, and the pinching effect and coupling interaction effect of both directions severely decrease the structural seismic resistance. However, the measured ductility coefficient varying from 3.5 to 5.7 and the equivalent viscous damping ratio varying from 0.19 and 0.26 can meet the requirements of the seismic design. The hollow RC rectangular bridge columns with configurations of lateral reinforcement in this study have excellent performance under bidirectional earthquake excitations, and may be considered as a substitute for current hollow RC rectangular section configurations described in the Guideline for Seismic Design of Highway Bridges (JTG/T B02-01-2008). The length of the plastic hinge region was found to approach one sixth of the hollow RC rectangular bridge column height for all specimen columns, and it was much less than those specified in the current JTG/T. Thus, the length of the plastic hinge region is more concentrated for RC rectangular hollow bridge columns.

  4. Importance of anisotropy on design of compression-loaded composite corrugated panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurdal, Zafer; Young, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the importance of anisotropic terms in the design of composite corrugated panels, for a range of axial compressive load intensities. The two panel configurations treated were panels with tailored laminates and panels with a continuous laminate; both are of interest to aircraft designers and prone to anisotropic effects which are of as-yet undetermined extent. The importance of the anisotropic terms is measured by the difference between the design load and the buckling load obtained from the ultimate structural analysis.

  5. Design maps for failure of all-ceramic layer structures in concentrated cyclic loading

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Sanjit; Meléndez-Martínez, Juan José; Zhang, Yu; Lawn, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    A study is made of the competition between failure modes in ceramic-based bilayer structures joined to polymer-based substrates, in simulation of dental crown-like structures with a functional but weak “veneer” layer bonded onto a strong “core” layer. Cyclic contact fatigue tests are conducted in water on model flat systems consisting of glass plates joined to glass, sapphire, alumina or zirconia support layers glued onto polycarbonate bases. Critical numbers of cycles to take each crack mode to failure are plotted as a function of peak contact load on failure maps showing regions in which each fracture mode dominates. In low-cycle conditions, radial and outer cone cracks are competitive in specimens with alumina cores, and outer cone cracks prevail in specimens with zirconia cores; in high-cycle conditions, inner cone cracks prevail in all cases. The roles of other factors, e.g. substrate modulus, layer thickness, indenter radius and residual stresses from specimen preparation, are briefly considered. PMID:19562095

  6. Investigation of changes in the electrical properties of novel knitted conductive textiles during cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Isaia, Cristina; McNally, Donal; McMaster, Simon A; Branson, David T

    2016-08-01

    Combining stainless steel with polyester fibres adds an attractive conductive behaviour to the yarn. Once knitted in such a manner, fabrics develop sensing properties that make the textiles, also known as e-textiles, suitable for smart/wearable applications. Structural deformations of the fibres (e.g. stretching) will cause changes in the conductivity of the fabric. This work investigates changes in the electrical properties exhibited by four knitted conductive textiles made of 20% stainless steel and 80% polyester fibres during cyclic loading. The samples were preconditioned first with 500 hundred cycles of unidirectional elongation and, after a rest interval, tested again for repeatability at the same conditions. In both cases the electrical behaviour stabilises after a few tens of cycles. In particular the repeatability test exhibited a considerably smaller settling time and a larger resistance due to the mechanical stabilisation and the loosening of the fabrics, respectively. It was found that the current provided to the fabrics affects the resistance measurements by decreasing the resistance value at which the samples become electrically stable. The reported findings present a valid method for the electrical characterisation of conductive textiles for use in further studies as a wearable technology.

  7. Poroelastic analysis of interstitial fluid flow in a single lamellar trabecula subjected to cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Kameo, Yoshitaka; Ootao, Yoshihiro; Ishihara, Masayuki

    2016-04-01

    Trabecula, an anatomical unit of the cancellous bone, is a porous material that consists of a lamellar bone matrix and interstitial fluid in a lacuno-canalicular porosity. The flow of interstitial fluid caused by deformation of the bone matrix is believed to initiate a mechanical response in osteocytes for bone remodeling. In order to clarify the effect of the lamellar structure of the bone matrix--i.e., variations in material properties--on the fluid flow stimuli to osteocytes embedded in trabeculae, we investigated the mechanical behavior of an individual trabecula subjected to cyclic loading based on poroelasticity. We focused on variations in the trabecular permeability and developed an analytical solution containing both transient and steady-state responses for interstitial fluid pressure in a single trabecular model represented by a multilayered two-dimensional poroelastic slab. Based on the obtained solution, we calculated the pressure and seepage velocity of the interstitial fluid in lacuno-canalicular porosity, within the single trabecula, under various permeability distributions. Poroelastic analysis showed that a heterogeneous distribution of permeability produces remarkable variations in the fluid pressure and seepage velocity in the cross section of the individual trabecula, and suggests that fluid flow stimuli to osteocytes are mostly governed by the value of permeability in the neighborhood of the trabecular surfaces if there is no difference in the average permeability in a single trabecula.

  8. Numerical analyses of caisson breakwaters on soft foundations under wave cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-zhan; Yan, Zhen; Wang, Yu-chi

    2016-03-01

    A caisson breakwater is built on soft foundations after replacing the upper soft layer with sand. This paper presents a dynamic finite element method to investigate the strength degradation and associated pore pressure development of the intercalated soft layer under wave cyclic loading. By combining the undrained shear strength with the empirical formula of overconsolidation clay produced by unloading and the development model of pore pressure, the dynamic degradation law that describes the undrained shear strength as a function of cycle number and stress level is derived. Based on the proposed dynamic degradation law and M-C yield criterion, a dynamic finite element method is numerically implemented to predict changes in undrained shear strength of the intercalated soft layer by using the general-purpose FEM software ABAQUS, and the accuracy of the method is verified. The effects of cycle number and amplitude of the wave force on the degradation of the undrained shear strength of the intercalated soft layer and the associated excess pore pressure response are investigated by analyzing an overall distribution and three typical sections underneath the breakwater. By comparing the undrained shear strength distributions obtained by the static method and the quasi-static method with the undrained shear strength distributions obtained by the dynamic finite element method in the three typical sections, the superiority of the dynamic finite element method in predicting changes in undrained shear strength is demonstrated.

  9. Performance of extrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber strain sensors in the presence of cyclic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyprykevich, Peter; Fogg, Brian R.; Murphy, Kent A.; Claus, Richard O.

    1993-07-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the utility of in-line optical fiber-based extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometers (EFPIs), in a fatigue environment typical of aircraft structures. Metallic and composite coupons with EFPIs attached to and embedded within were tested in constant amplitude cyclic fatigue at room temperature. An additional composite coupon was tested similarly at an elevated temperature. For the consideration of composite material applications the objectives were to determine the durability of the sensor and its ability to measure strains accurately, even when the EFPI sensor was embedded at an angle with respect to the principal adjacent reinforcing fibers of the composite. For metals, in addition to durability considerations, research was conducted as to how the EFPI sensor may be used to detect crack initiation and growth. The results of the test program have established the excellent durability of the EFPI sensor element for fatigue loading up to 50,000 cycles at R equals 0.1 (tension-tension fatigue) with a maximum strain level of 3,500 microinch/inch, for both attached and embedded sensors, once the optical fiber and sensor survived the composite laminate panel curing process.

  10. Cartilage interstitial fluid load support in unconfined compression following enzymatic digestion.

    PubMed

    Basalo, Ines M; Mauck, Robert L; Kelly, Terri-Ann N; Nicoll, Steven B; Chen, Faye H; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2004-12-01

    Interstitial fluid pressurization plays an important role in cartilage biomechanics and is believed to be a primary mechanism of load support in synovial joints. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of enzymatic degradation on the interstitial fluid load support mechanism of articular cartilage in unconfined compression. Thirty-seven immature bovine cartilage plugs were tested in unconfined compression before and after enzymatic digestion. The peak fluid load support decreased significantly (p < 0.0001) from 84 +/- 10% to 53 +/- 19% and from 80 +/- 10% to 46 +/- 21% after 18-hours digestion with 1.0 u/mg-wet-weight and 0.7 u/mg-wet-weight of collagenase, respectively. Treatment with 0.1 u/ml of chondroitinase ABC for 24 hours also significantly reduced the peak fluid load support from 83 +/- 12% to 48 +/- 16% (p < 0.0001). The drop in interstitial fluid load support following enzymatic treatment is believed to result from a decrease in the ratio of tensile to compressive moduli of the solid matrix.

  11. Buckling Behavior of Compression-Loaded Composite Cylindrical Shells With Reinforced Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Sarnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the response of thin-walled compression-loaded quasi-isotropic laminated composite cylindrical shells with unreinforced and reinforced square cutouts are presented. The effects of cutout reinforcement orthotropy, size, and thickness on the nonlinear response of the shells are described. A nonlinear analysis procedure has been used to predict the nonlinear response of the shells. The results indicate that a local buckling response occurs in the shell near the cutout when subjected to load and is caused by a nonlinear coupling between local shell-wall deformations and in-plane destabilizing compression stresses near the cutout. In general, reinforcement around a cutout in a compression-loaded shell is shown to retard or eliminate the local buckling response near the cutout and increase the buckling load of the shell. However, some results show that certain reinforcement configurations can cause an unexpected increase in the magnitude of local deformations and stresses in the shell and cause a reduction in the buckling load. Specific cases are presented that suggest that the orthotropy, thickness, and size of a cutout reinforcement in a shell can be tailored to achieve improved buckling response characteristics.

  12. Tooth-PDL-bone complex: response to compressive loads encountered during mastication - a review.

    PubMed

    Naveh, Gili R S; Lev-Tov Chattah, Netta; Zaslansky, Paul; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2012-12-01

    The components of the tooth-periodontal ligament (PDL)-alveolar bone complex act in a synergistic manner to dissipate the loads incurred during mastication. The complex incorporates a diverse array of structural features for this purpose. These include the non-mineralized and hence soft PDL that absorbs much of the initial loads. The internal structure of the tooth also includes soft interphases that essentially surround the dentine core. These interphases, although stiffer than the PDL, still are more compliant than the dentine core, and are thus key components that allow the tooth itself to deform and hence help dissipate the compressive loads. There is also direct evidence that even under moderate compressive loads, when the tooth moves in the alveolar bone socket, this movement is guided by specific locations where the tooth comes into contact with the bone surface. The combination of all these responses to load is that each tooth type appears to move and deform in a specific manner when loaded. Much, however, still remains to be learned about these three-dimensional responses to load and the factors that control them. Such an understanding will have major implications for dentistry, that include a better understanding of phenomena such as abfraction, the manner in which tooth implants function even in the absence of a PDL-like tissue and the implications to bone remodelling of the movements imposed during orthodontic interventions.

  13. Cyclic-loading-induced accumulation of geometrically necessary dislocations near grain boundaries in a an ni-based superalloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E. W.; Barabash, R. I.; Ice, G. I.; Liu, W.; Liu, Y. L.; Kai, J. J.; Liaw, P. K.; Univ.of Tennessee; ORNL; Tsing-Hua Univ.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the fatigue-induced microstructure produced in a nickel-based polycrystalline superalloy that was subjected to cyclic loading was characterized by polychromatic x-ray microdiffraction (PXM) together with in-situ neutron diffraction and transmission-electron microscopy (TEM). In-situ neutron-diffraction measurements reveal two distinct stages of the fatigue damage: cyclic hardening followed by cyclic softening. Three-dimensional spatially resolved PXM micro-Laue measurements find an increase in the density of geometrically necessary dislocations near the grain boundaries, which is accompanied by lattice rotations and grain subdivisions. The PXM results are in agreement with the in-situ neutron-diffraction and TEM results.

  14. Analysis of the complex stress state during early loading in cylindrical compression-shear specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, S.; Frint, P.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2017-03-01

    In most engineering applications, materials are subjected to complex load cases rather than the simple uniaxial ones typically used for material characterization. To experimentally study the material behavior under a combination of compression and shear, an inclined compression specimen can be used. This specimen has been applied in various earlier experimental studies, typically to investigate shear localization under quasi-static or impact loading. In this contribution, we analyze the stress state in a compression-shear specimen in detail using an elastic-ideal plastic finite element simulation. The effects of specimen aspect ratio (height/diameter), inclination angle, and friction conditions between specimen and tool plates are investigated using the material parameters of different conventional steels as input. Shear stress distributions in characteristic shear directions on specific planes in the specimen that control the subsequent plastic deformation behavior are evaluated. Our results show that, even in the absence of friction, shear stresses are distributed heterogeneously in the inclined specimen, which differs from the stress distribution in a conventional compression specimen. Moreover, the highest shear and equivalent stresses always occur at the edges of the short diagonal plane of the specimen, independent of the investigated parameters. This study contributes to a more detailed understanding of the elasto-plastic mechanics in compression-shear specimens, and it specifically provides information for the analysis of the onset of early plastic deformation.

  15. Effectiveness of a Load-Imposing Device for Cyclic Stretching of Isolated Human Bronchi: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Le Guen, Morgan; Naline, Emmanuel; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas; Devillier, Philippe; Faisy, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation may induce harmful effects in the airways of critically ill patients. Nevertheless, the effects of cyclic stretching caused by repetitive inflation-deflation of the bronchial compartment have not been well characterized in humans. The objective of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of a load-imposing device for the cyclic stretching of human bronchi. Methods Intact bronchial segments were removed from 128 thoracic surgery patients. After preparation and equilibration in an organ bath, bronchi were stretched repetitively and cyclically with a motorized transducer. The peak force imposed on the bronchi was set to 80% of each individual maximum contraction in response to acetylcholine and the minimal force corresponded to the initial basal tone before stretching. A 1-min cycle (stretching for 15 sec, relaxing for 15 sec and resting for 30 sec) was applied over a time period ranging from 5 to 60 min. The device's performance level was assessed and the properties of the stretched bronchi were compared with those of paired, non-stretched bronchi. Results Despite the intrinsic capacities of the device, the targets of the tension adjustments remained variable for minimal tension (156–178%) while the peak force set point was unchanged (87–115%). In the stretched bronchi, a time-dependent rise in basal tone (P <.05 vs. non-stretched) was apparent after as little as 5 min of cyclic stretching. The stretch-induced rise in basal tone continued to increase (P <.01) after the stretching had ended. Only 60 min of cyclic stretching was associated with a significant (P <.05) increase in responsiveness to acetylcholine, relative to non-stretched bronchi. Conclusions Low-frequency, low-force, cyclic loading of human bronchi is associated with elevated basal tone and acetylcholine responsiveness. The present experimental model is likely to be a useful tool for future investigations of the bronchial response to repetitive stress

  16. Design of a miniature hydraulic compression load frame for microdiffraction tests at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Varma, R.; Krasnicki, S.; Sinha, S.

    1999-10-11

    In support of the x-ray synchrotrons radiation multidiffraction project of Los Alamos National Laboratory at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), we have designed and fabricated a miniature hydraulic compression load frame with 20000 N load capacity for metal specimen tests at the APS. The compact design allows the load frame to sit on the center of a 6-circle goniometer with six degrees of freedom and maximum solid angle accessibility for the incoming x-ray beam and diffraction beam detectors. A set of compact precision stages with submicron resolution has been designed for the load frame positioning to compensate the sample internal elastic and/or plastic deformation during the loading process. The system design, specifications, and test results are presented.

  17. THE EFFECT OF REPEATED COMPRESSIVE DYNAMIC LOADING ON THE STRESS-INDUCED MARTENSITIC TRANSFORMATION IN NiTi SHAPE MEMORY ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    D. MILLER; W. THISSELL; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    It has been shown that quasi-static, cyclic, isothermal mechanical loading influences the mechanical response of the stress-induced martensitic transformation in fully annealed NiTi Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs). As the cycle number increases, hardening of the stress-strain response during the martensitic phase transformation is seen along with a decrease in the threshold stress for initiation of stress-induced martensite. Also, the amount of plastic strain and detwinned martensitic strain decreases as the cycle number increases. However, NiTi SMAs have not been experimentally explored under high compressive strain rates. This research explores the cyclic near-adiabatic stress-induced martensitic loading using a Split Hopkinskin Pressure Bar (SHPB). The results of the dynamic loading tests are presented with emphasis on the loading rate, stress-strain response, specimen temperature and post-test microstructural evaluation. The results from the high strain rate tests show similarities with the quasi-static results in the hardening of the stress-strain response and shifting of the threshold stress for initiation of stress-induced martensite.

  18. The influence of low-temperature degradation and cyclic loading on the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia molar crowns.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Harada, A; Kanno, T; Inagaki, R; Niwano, Y; Milleding, P; Örtengren, U

    2015-07-01

    The present study analyzed the kinetics of low-temperature degradation (LTD) in zirconia, and evaluated the influence of LTD and cyclic loading on the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia molar crowns. Bar-shaped zirconia specimens were divided into nine groups and autoclaved at 134°C for 0-200h to induce LTD. The surface fraction and penetration depth of the monoclinic phase were examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Monolithic zirconia molar crowns were prepared for crown fracture testing. The crowns were autoclaved for 0-100h (n=6) and cemented to dies. Six crown-die samples that were not autoclaved and six samples that were autoclaved for 100h were subjected to cyclic loading with a load of 300N for 240,000 cycles. All samples were tested in a load-to-failure test. The monoclinic fraction on the surface increased with autoclaving time and reached a plateau after 50h. The depth of the monoclinic phase increased without reaching a plateau. The fracture load of the crowns significantly decreased from 5683N (SD: 342) to 3975N (SD: 194) after 100h of autoclaving. Cyclic loading did not significantly affect the fracture resistance of the crowns in all cases. Kinetic analysis showed no linear correlation between the surface fraction and depth of the monoclinic phase after 50h of autoclaving. Even though LTD increased the monoclinic phase, resulting in lower strength, the fracture resistance of the monolithic zirconia crowns was still sufficient to withstand the loading conditions in the molar regions.

  19. Investigation of the failure behaviour of vertebral trabecular architectures under uni-axial compression and wedge action loading conditions.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, P; Harrison, N; McHugh, P E

    2010-07-01

    Vertebral wedge fractures are associated with combined compression and flexure loading and are the most common fracture type for human vertebrae. In this study, rapid prototype (RP) biomodels of human vertebral trabecular bone were mechanically tested under uni-axial compression loading and also under wedge action loading (combination of compression and flexure loading) to investigate the mode of failure and the ultimate loads that could be sustained under these different loading conditions. Two types of trabecular bone models were manufactured and tested: baseline models which were directly derived from microCT scans of human thoracic vertebrae, and osteoporotic models which were generated from the baseline models using a custom-developed bone loss algorithm. The ultimate load for each model under compression and wedge action loading was determined and a video was recorded of each test so that failure mechanisms could be evaluated. The results of the RP model mechanical tests showed that the ultimate loads that could be supported by vertebral trabecular architectures under wedge action loading were less than those that could be supported under uni-axial compression loading by up to 26%. Also, the percentage reduction in strength from the baseline value due to osteoporotic bone loss was slightly less for the wedge action loading compared to uni-axial compression loading. Analysis of the videos for each test revealed that failure occurred in localised regions of the trabecular structure due to bending and buckling of thin vertical struts. These results suggest that vertebral trabecular bone is more susceptible to failure from wedge action loading compared to uni-axial compression loading, although this effect is not exacerbated by osteoporotic bone loss.

  20. Experimental research on behavior of 460 MPa high strength steel I-section columns under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiaojiao; Shi, Gang; Shi, Yongjiu

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the seismic behavior of I-section columns made of 460 MPa high strength steel (HSS), six specimens were tested under constant axial load and cyclic horizontal load. The specimens were designed with different width-to-thickness ratios and loaded under different axial load ratios. For each specimen, the failure mode was observed and hysteretic curve was measured. Comparison of different specimens on hysteretic characteristic, energy dissipation capacity and deformation capacity were further investigated. Test results showed that the degradation of bearing capacity was due to local buckling of flange and web. Under the same axial load ratio, as width-to-thickness ratio increased, the deformation area of local buckling became smaller. And also, displacement level at both peak load and failure load became smaller. In addition, the full extent of hysteretic curve, energy dissipation capacity, ultimate story drift angle decreased, and capacity degradation occurred more rapidly with the increase of width-to-thickness ratio or axial load ratio. Based on the capacity of story drift angle, limiting values which shall not be exceeded are suggested respectively for flange and web plate of 460 MPa HSS I-section columns when used in SMFs and in IMFs in the case of axial load ratio no more than 0.2. Such values should be smaller when the axial load ratio increases.

  1. Effects of saline loading during head down tilt on ANP and cyclic GMP levels and on urinary fluid excretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, C.; Lang, R. E.; Baisch, F.; Blomqvist, G.; Heer, M.; Gerzer, R.

    In the present study the renal and humoral effects of acute saline infusions were investigated in six healthy male volunteers before, during and after a ten day period of -6° head-down-tilt (HDT). During the whole 23-day study period the subjects received a standardized diet including 40 ml water and 125 mg NaCl per kg body weight per day. After the infusion of 0.9% saline (22 ml/kg within 20 minutes) plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels were only slightly increased (not significant) at the end of the infusion, while plasma cyclic GMP levels were significantly increased by about 40% (p<0.05) one hour later. No difference was observed in the plasma ANP and cyclic GMP changes between the pre-HDT, the HDT and the post-HDT infusion experiment. Urine flow, sodium excretion and urinary cyclic GMP excretion were significantly increased (p<0.05 and below) by 100 to 300% during the second and third hour after each saline infusion. However, during these short-term periods only 20% of the infused water and less than 20% of the infused sodium were excreted. Furthermore, a significantly increased volume, sodium and cyclic GMP excretion was observed for over 48 hours after each fluid load experiment. These data suggest that HDT does not induce major alterations in the regulation of an acute saline infusion and plasma ANP does not play a major role in the diuretic/natriuretic effects of volume loading.

  2. Evaluation of a Compression-Loaded-Stitched-Multi-Bay Fuselage Panel With Barely Visible Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Li, Ji-An

    2005-01-01

    The experimental results from a stitched VaRTM carbon-epoxy composite panel tested under uni-axial compression loading are presented along with nonlinear finite element analysis prediction of the response. The curved panel is divided by frames and stringers into six bays with a column of three bays along the compressive loading direction. The frames are supported at the frame ends to resist out-of-plane translation. Back-to-back strain gages are used to record the strain and displacement transducers were used to record the out-of-plane displacements. In addition a full-field-displacement measurement technique that utilizes a camera-based-stereo-vision system was used to record the displacements. The panel was loaded to 1.5 times the predicted initial buckling load (1st bay buckling load, P(sub er) from the nonlinear finite element analysis and then was removed from the test machine for impact testing. After impacting with 20 ft-lbs of energy using a spherical impactor to produce barely visible damage the panel was loaded in compression until failure. The buckling load of the first bay to buckle was 97% of the buckling load before impact. The stitching constrained the impact damage from growing during the loading to failure. Impact damage had very little overall effect on panel stiffness. Panel stiffness measured by the full-field-displacement technique indicated a 13% loss in stiffness after impact. The panel failed at 1.64 times the first panel buckling load. The barely visible impact damage did not grow noticeably as the panel failed by global instability due to stringer-web terminations at the frame locations. The predictions from the nonlinear analysis of the finite element modeling of the entire specimen were very effective in the capture of the initial buckling and global behavior of the panel. In addition, the prediction highlighted the weakness of the panel under compression due to stringer web terminations. Both the test results and the nonlinear

  3. Intervertebral disc responses during spinal loading with MRI-compatible spinal compression apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Iwane; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2004-07-01

    This study addresses the development of an MRI-compatible spinal compression harness for use as a research and diagnostic tool. This apparatus adds valuable information to MRI imaging regarding the physiology/biomechanics of intervertebral discs and pathophysiology of back pain in patients and astronauts in space. All materials of the spinal compression apparatus are non-metallic for MRI compatibility. The compact design fits into standard MRI or CT scanners and loading is adjusted to specific percentages of BW with elastic cords. Previously this capability has not been available. Three healthy male subjects were fitted with a spinal compression harness and placed supine in a MRI scanner. Longitudinal distance between T7/8 and L5/S1 discs decreased 5.6 mm with 50% BW compression. Lumbosacral angle increased 17.2 degrees. T2 values of nucleus pulposus from L1/2 to L5/S1 discs increased 18.2+/-6.1% (+/-SD) during 50% BW compression and 25.3+/-7.4% (+/-SD) during 75% BW compression.

  4. Failure of woven carbon-polyimide laminates under off-axis compression loading

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, V.; Anand, K.; Grape, J.

    1998-01-05

    This paper reports the failure mechanisms in a woven 0/90 carbon-polyimide laminate under 45{degree} off-axis compression loading. The stress carried by the composite increased linearly with increasing levels of applied displacements and, at about 188 MPa, the load dropped suddenly to 172 MPa and remained constant thereafter till about 8.9% strain, at which point the load reduced drastically and resulted in the ultimate failure of the sample. The damage started with the nucleation of several in-plane cracks which split both the wrap and fill yarns completely, and ran diagonally across the sample`s entire width. Upon further loading, the cracking progressed in bundles towards the sample`s interior, and eventually, at a strain of about 5%, a saturation cracking state was reached with each bundle split by at least three-to-four longitudinal cracks. The sample was able to accommodate further strain via nucleation of additional cracks formed at the edges of the longitudinal cracks with their planes parallel to the loading axis and orthogonal to those occupied by the longitudinal cracks. Essentially, these new cracks separated the longitudinally-split bundles in the sample`s thickness direction and resulted in the creation of three-to-four independent bundles from the original well-bonded warp or fill bundle. At this stage, the compressive load carrying capacity of the original bundle was largely compromised and the sample failed through gross delaminations, resulting in the bulging of the sample normal to its largest faces. The above deformation was remarkably different from that observed under bundle-aligned compression loading where the samples failed at an average stress of 588 MPa in more or less brittle catastrophic manner after undergoing only 1.5% strain.

  5. a Study of the Shock Sensitivity of PBX 9501 Damaged by Compressive Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. G.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Hooks, D. E.; Peterson, P. D.; DeLuca, R.; Stahl, D. B.; Hagelberg, S. I.; Alcon, R. R.

    2007-12-01

    We have studied the effects of damage caused by compressive loading on the shock sensitivity of the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9501. PBX 9501 consists of 95 wt. % HMX and 5 wt. % nitroplasticized Estane binder. The binder is a mixture of 49 wt. % Estane® 5703 (BF Goodrich), 49 wt. % Nitroplasticizer (a eutectic mixture of bis(2,2-dinitropropyl)formal and bis(2,2 dinitropropyl)acetal), and 2 wt. % Irganox® 1010 stabilizer. PBX 9501 cubes, 25.4 mm on a side, were compressed to various uniaxial loads in an Instron machine. After loading, 10×10 mm cross-sections, 3.5 mm thick, were taken from the center of each cube. These slices were then subjected to nearly identical 35 kbar shocks. Transmitted shock wave profiles were measured using interface velocimetry (VISAR). Comparison of shock wave growth is a measure of shock sensitivity. Results on four samples indicate little change in sensitivity caused by compressive loading.

  6. Polycrystal plasticity modeling of nickel-based superalloy IN 617 subjected to cyclic loading at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Oskay, Caglar

    2016-06-01

    A crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model considering isothermal, large deformation and cyclic loading conditions has been formulated and employed to investigate the mechanical response of a nickel-based alloy at high temperature. The investigations focus on fatigue and creep-fatigue hysteresis response of IN 617 subjected to fatigue and creep-fatigue cycles. A new slip resistance evolution equation is proposed to account for cyclic transient features induced by solute drag creep that occur in IN 617 at 950 °C. The crystal plasticity model parameters are calibrated against the experimental fatigue and creep-fatigue data based on an optimization procedure that relies on a surrogate modeling (i.e. Gaussian process) technique to accelerate multi-parameter optimizations. The model predictions are validated against experimental data, which demonstrates the capability of the proposed model in capturing the hysteresis behavior for various hold times and strain ranges in the context of fatigue and creep-fatigue loading.

  7. The Effects of Geometric and Loading Imperfections on the Response and Lower-Bound Buckling Load of a Compression-Loaded Cylindrical Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriegesmann, Benedikt; Hilburger, Mark W.; Rolfes, Raimund

    2012-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the buckling response of a thin-walled compressionloaded isotropic circular cylindrical shell with initial geometric and loading imperfections are used to determine a lower bound buckling load estimate suitable for preliminary design. The lower bound prediction techniques presented herein include an imperfection caused by a lateral perturbation load, an imperfection in the shape of a single stress-free dimple (similar to the lateral pertubation imperfection), and a distributed load imperfection that induces a nonuniform load in the shell. The ABAQUS finite element code is used for the analyses. Responses of the cylinders for selected imperfection amplitudes and imperfection types are considered, and the effect of each imperfection is compared to the response of a geometrically perfect cylinder. The results indicate that compression-loaded shells subjected to a lateral perturbation load or a single dimple imperfection, and a nonuniform load imperfection, exhibit similar buckling behavior and lower bound trends and the predicted lower bounds are much less conservative than the corresponding design recommendation NASA SP-8007 for the design of buckling-critical shells. In addition, the lateral perturbation technique and the distributed load imperfection produce response characteristics that are physically meaningful and can be validated via laboratory testing.

  8. Bonding of flowable resin composite restorations to class 1 occlusal cavities with and without cyclic load stress.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takatoshi; Maseki, Toshio; Nara, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    To examine the bonding of flowable resin composite restorations (F-restoration) to class 1 occlusal cavities with and without cyclic load stress, compared with that of a universal resin composite restoration (U-restoration). Two flowable composites and one universal composite (control) were applied with an adhesive system to 42 standardized class 1 occlusal cavities. The restored specimens were subjected to cyclic load stress and no stress modes. The microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) of the dentin floor was measured. The U-restoration did not show pretesting failure. The F-restorations exhibited pretesting failure, regardless of the stress mode. The μ-TBS was not significantly different among the three restorations, regardless of the stress mode. The cyclic load stress did not influence the μ-TBS of the F-restorations; however, it significantly reduced μ-TBS in the U-restoration. The bonding reliability of the F-restorations was inferior to that of the U-restoration, for both stress modes.

  9. Damage Characteristics and Residual Strength of Composite Sandwich Panels Impacted with and Without Compression Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the impact damage characteristics and residual strength of composite sandwich panels impacted with and without a compression loading are presented. Results of impact damage screening tests conducted to identify the impact-energy levels at which damage initiates and at which barely visible impact damage occurs in the impacted facesheet are discussed. Parametric effects studied in these tests include the impactor diameter, dropped-weight versus airgun-launched impactors, and the effect of the location of the impact site with respect to the panel boundaries. Residual strength results of panels tested in compression after impact are presented and compared with results of panels that are subjected to a compressive preload prior to being impacted.

  10. Force response of the fingertip pulp to repeated compression--effects of loading rate, loading angle and anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Serina, E R; Mote, C D; Rempel, D

    1997-10-01

    Repeated loading of the fingertips has been postulated to contribute to tendon and nerve disorders at the wrist during activities associated with prolonged fingertip loading such as typing. To fully understand the pathomechanics of these soft tissue disorders, the role of the fingertip pulp in attenuating the applied dynamic forces must be known. An experiment was conducted to characterize the response of the in vivo fingertip pulp under repeated, dynamic, compressive loadings, to identify factors that influence pulp dynamics, and to better understand the force modulation by the pulp. Twenty subjects tapped repeatedly on a flat plate with their left index finger, while the contact force and pulp displacement were measured simultaneously. Tapping trials were conducted at three fingertip contact angles from the horizontal plane (0 degree, 45 degrees, and 90 degrees) and five tapping rates (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 Hz). The fingertip pulp responds as a viscoelastic material, exhibiting rate-dependence, hysteresis, and a nonlinear force-displacement relationship. The pulp was relatively compliant at forces less than 1 N, but stiffened rapidly with displacement at higher forces for all loading conditions. This suggests that high-frequency forces of a small magnitude (< 1 N) are attenuated by the nonlinearly stiffening pulp while these forces of larger magnitude are transmitted to the bone. Pulp response was significantly influenced by the angle of loading. Fingertip dimensions, gender, and subject age had little to no influence on pulp parameters.

  11. Uniaxial and triaxial compression tests of silicon carbide ceramics under quasi-static loading condition.

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, Rebecca Moss; Lee, Moo Yul; Bronowski, David R.

    2005-02-01

    To establish mechanical properties and failure criteria of silicon carbide (SiC-N) ceramics, a series of quasi-static compression tests has been completed using a high-pressure vessel and a unique sample alignment jig. This report summarizes the test methods, set-up, relevant observations, and results from the constitutive experimental efforts. Results from the uniaxial and triaxial compression tests established the failure threshold for the SiC-N ceramics in terms of stress invariants (I{sub 1} and J{sub 2}) over the range 1246 < I{sub 1} < 2405. In this range, results are fitted to the following limit function (Fossum and Brannon, 2004) {radical}J{sub 2}(MPa) = a{sub 1} - a{sub 3}e -a{sub 2}(I{sub 1}/3) + a{sub 4} I{sub 1}/3, where a{sub 1} = 10181 MPa, a{sub 2} = 4.2 x 10{sup -4}, a{sub 3} = 11372 MPa, and a{sub 4} = 1.046. Combining these quasistatic triaxial compression strength measurements with existing data at higher pressures naturally results in different values for the least-squares fit to this function, appropriate over a broader pressure range. These triaxial compression tests are significant because they constitute the first successful measurements of SiC-N compressive strength under quasistatic conditions. Having an unconfined compressive strength of {approx}3800 MPa, SiC-N has been heretofore tested only under dynamic conditions to achieve a sufficiently large load to induce failure. Obtaining reliable quasi-static strength measurements has required design of a special alignment jig and load-spreader assembly, as well as redundant gages to ensure alignment. When considered in combination with existing dynamic strength measurements, these data significantly advance the characterization of pressure-dependence of strength, which is important for penetration simulations where failed regions are often at lower pressures than intact regions.

  12. Damage Progression in Buckle-Resistant Notched Composite Plates Loaded in Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David M.; Davila, Carlos G.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2001-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical evaluation of damage progression in three stitched composite plates containing an angled central notch and subjected to compression loading are presented. Parametric studies were conducted systematically to identify the relative effects of the material strength parameters on damage initiation and growth. Comparisons with experiments were conducted to determine the appropriate in situ values of strengths for progressive failure analysis. These parametric studies indicated that the in situ value of the fiber buckling strength is the most important parameter in the prediction of damage initiation and growth in these notched composite plates. Analyses of the damage progression in the notched, compression-loaded plates were conducted using in situ material strengths. Comparisons of results obtained from these analyses with experimental results for displacements and axial strains show good agreement.

  13. Origin of compression-induced failure in brittle solids under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. Y.; Li, Y.; Liu, Q. C.; Zhou, X. M.; Liu, L. W.; Liu, C. L.; Zhu, M. H.; Luo, S. N.

    2015-10-01

    The origin of compression-induced failure in brittle solids has been a subject of debate. Using in situ, high-speed, strain field mapping of a representative material, polymethylmethacrylate, we reveal that shock loading leads to heterogeneity in a compressive strain field, which in turn gives rise to localized lateral tension and shear through Poisson's effects, and, subsequently, localized microdamage. A failure wave nucleates from the impact surface and its propagation into the microdamage zone is self-sustained, triggering interior failure. Its velocity increases with increasing shock strength and eventually approaches the shock velocity. The seemingly puzzling phenomena observed in previous experiments, including incubation time, failure wave velocity variations, and surface roughness effects, can all be explained consistently with the nucleation and growth of the microdamage, and the effects of loading strength and preexisting defects.

  14. Buckling and Failure of Compression-Loaded Composite Laminated Shells With Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.

    2007-01-01

    Results from a numerical and experimental study that illustrate the effects of laminate orthotropy on the buckling and failure response of compression-loaded composite cylindrical shells with a cutout are presented. The effects of orthotropy on the overall response of compression-loaded shells is described. In general, preliminary numerical results appear to accurately predict the buckling and failure characteristics of the shell considered herein. In particular, some of the shells exhibit stable post-local-buckling behavior accompanied by interlaminar material failures near the free edges of the cutout. In contrast another shell with a different laminate stacking sequence appears to exhibit catastrophic interlaminar material failure at the onset of local buckling near the cutout and this behavior correlates well with corresponding experimental results.

  15. Cyclical compressive stress induces differentiation of rat primary mandibular condylar chondrocytes through phosphorylated myosin light chain II.

    PubMed

    Liu, Limin; Chen, Lin; Mai, Zhihui; Peng, Zhuli; Yu, Kafung; Liu, Guanqi; Ai, Hong

    2016-11-01

    The role of myosin light chain II (MLC‑II) in cellular differentiation of rat mandibular condylar chondrocytes (MCCs) induced by cyclical uniaxial compressive stress (CUCS) remains unclear. In the current study, a four‑point bending system was used to apply CUCS to primary cultured MCCs from rats. It was identified that CUCS stimulated features of cellular differentiation including morphological alterations, cytoskeleton rearrangement and overproduction of proteoglycans. Furthermore, CUCS promoted runt‑related transcription factor‑2 (RUNX2) expression at mRNA (P<0.01) and protein levels (P<0.05) and elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (P<0.01), which are both markers of osteogenic differentiation. Under conditions of stress, western blotting indicated that the ratio of phosphorylated MLC‑II to total MLC‑II was increased significantly (P<0.05). Silencing MLC‑II by RNA interference reduced ALP activity (P<0.01), and eliminated RUNX2 mRNA expression (P<0.01). Addition of the MLC kinase inhibitor, ML‑7, reduced the CUCS‑associated upregulation of RUNX2 expression (P<0.01) and ALP activity (P<0.01). The data indicated that CUCS promoted cellular differentiation of rat primary MCCs, and this was suggested to be via the phosphorylation of MLC‑II.

  16. Cyclic Compressive Stress Regulates Apoptosis in Rat Osteoblasts: Involvement of PI3K/Akt and JNK MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dawei; Wang, Tianchen; Zhang, Yinquan; Ma, Hui

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that physiological mechanical stimulation suppresses apoptosis and induces synthesis of extracellular matrix by osteoblasts; however, the effect of stress overloading on osteoblasts has not been fully illustrated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of cyclic compressive stress on rat osteoblasts apoptosis, using a novel liquid drop method to generate mechanical stress on osteoblast monolayers. After treatment with different levels of mechanical stress, apoptosis of osteoblasts and activations of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and PI3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathways were investigated. Osteoblasts apoptosis was observed after treated with specific inhibitors prior to mechanical stimulation. Protein levels of Bax/Bcl-2/caspase-3 signaling were determined using western blot with or without inhibitors of PI3K/Akt and phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) MAPK. Results showed that mechanical stimulation led to osteoblasts apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner and a remarkable activation of MAPKs and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Activation of PI3K/Akt protected against apoptosis, whereas JNK MAPK increased apoptosis via regulation of Bax/Bcl-2/caspase-3 activation. In summary, the PI3K/Akt and JNK MAPK signaling pathways played opposing roles in osteoblasts apoptosis, resulting in inhibition of apoptosis upon small-magnitude stress and increased apoptosis upon large-magnitude stress. PMID:27806136

  17. Prediction of the critical buckling load of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timesli, Abdelaziz; Braikat, Bouazza; Jamal, Mohammad; Damil, Noureddine

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new explicit analytical formula of the critical buckling load of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNT) under axial compression. This formula takes into account van der Waals interactions between adjacent tubes and the effect of terms involving tube radii differences generally neglected in the derived expressions of the critical buckling load published in the literature. The elastic multiple Donnell shells continuum approach is employed for modelling the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The validation of the proposed formula is made by comparison with a numerical solution. The influence of the neglected terms is also studied.

  18. Evaluation of Composite Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Under Compressive Loads at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.

    1998-01-01

    Fourteen composite honeycomb sandwich panels were tested to failure under compressive loading. The test specimens included panels with both 8 and 24-ply graphite-bismaleimide composite facesheets and both titanium and graphite-polyimide core materials. The panels were designed to have the load introduced through fasteners attached to pairs of steel angles on the ends of the panels to simulate double shear splice joints. The unloaded edges were unconstrained. Test temperatures included room temperature, 250F, and 300F. For the room and 250F temperature tests, the 24-ply specimen failure strains were close to the unnotched allowable strain values and failure loads were well above the design loads. However, failure strains much lower than the unnotched allowable strain values, and failure loads below the design loads were observed with several of the 8-ply specimens. For each individual test temperature, large variations in the failure strains and loads were observed for the 8-ply specimens. Dramatic decreases in the failure strains and loads were observed for the 24-ply specimens as the test temperature was increased from 250F to 300F. All 8-ply specimens appeared to have failed in a facesheet strength failure mode for all test temperatures. The 24-ply specimens displayed appreciably greater amounts of bending prior to failure than the 8-ply specimens, and panel buckling occurred prior to facesheet strength failure for the 24-ply room and 250F temperature tests.

  19. Effects of specimen size on limiting compressive loading for silicate, ceramic, and other materials

    SciTech Connect

    Okhrimenko, G.M.

    1995-06-01

    Published data are examined on the ultimate strength in uniaxial compression for glass, glass ceramics, porcelain, crystalline silicon, periclase - spinel - chromite material PSCM, and ferrite in relation to the specimen dimensions. Two methods are proposed for combined experimental and computational estimation of the effects from the volume on the limiting load, which are based only on the data obtained from testing specimens with one or two standard dimensions.

  20. Dry plant extracts loaded on fumed silica for direct compression: preparation and preformulation.

    PubMed

    Palma, S D; Manzo, R H; Allemandi, D A

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a method to load fumed silica with vegetal material (solid residue) from a liquid extract to obtain a solid loaded silica product (LSP) with satisfactory flow properties and compressibility to be processed by direct-compression technology. Extracts of Melissa officinalis L. (M.o.), Cardus marianus L. (C.m.), and Peumus boldus L. (P.b.) were used to load silica support. The release of boldine from LSP (P.b.) reached 100% in HCl 0.1 N solution and only approximately 70% in water. Some physical-mechanical properties of LSP (M.o. and C.m.) alone and LSP-excipient mixtures were determined. The densities (bulk and tap) of LSP were higher than those of fumed silica alone. Consequently, good flow properties of LSP products were observed. On the other hand, flowability, densities, and compactibility of directly compressible excipients (lactose, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, and microcrystalline cellulose) were not adversely affected when mixed with LSP.

  1. Life prediction for a structural material under cyclic loads with hold times using a viscoplastic constitutive model. Final report, 1 February 1983-31 January 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Eftis, J.; Jones, D.L.

    1984-12-31

    This investigation demonstrates the ability of the Chaboche viscoplastic constitutive theory to model the behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy at non-elevated temperature. The range of material behavior considered includes uniaxial monotonic stress-strain primary creep, stress relaxation, kinematic and isotropic hardening (and softening) under cyclic loading with and without hold times. The six materials parameters of the viscoplastic theory were evaluated from a series of strain-controlled stabilized cyclic loading tests, and room temperature primary creep tests. The viscoplastic strain calculations were integrated into a fatigue life prediction methodology for low cycle fatigue. Two sets of low cycle fatigue life predictions were carried out and compared with experimental data. One involved strain-controlled cyclic loading without hold times, and the other stress-controlled cyclic loading with hold times. Good agreement was found between predicted and actual results.

  2. Effect of abutment screw length and cyclic loading on removal torque in external and internal hex implants

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Hnd Hadi; Lee, Jin-Han; Bae, Ji-Myung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment screw length and cyclic loading on the removal torque (RTV) in external hex (EH) and internal hex (IH) implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty screw-retained single crowns were connected to external and internal hex implants. The prepared titanium abutment screws were classified into 8 groups based on the number of threads (n = 5 per group): EH 12.5, 6.5, 3.5, 2.5 and IH 6.5, 5, 3.5, 2.5 threads. The abutment screws were tightened with 20 Ncm torque twice with 10-minute intervals. After 5 minutes, the initial RTVs of the abutment screws were measured with a digital torque gauge (MGT12). A customized jig was constructed to apply a load along the implant long axis at the central fossa of the maxillary first molar. The post-loading RTVs were measured after 16,000 cycles of mechanical loading with 50 N at a 1-Hz frequency. Statistical analysis included one-way analysis of variance and paired t-tests. RESULTS The post-loading RTVs were significantly lower than the initial RTVs in the EH 2.5 thread and IH 2.5 thread groups (P<.05). The initial RTVs exhibited no significant differences among the 8 groups, whereas the post-loading RTVs of the EH 6.5 and EH 3.5 thread groups were higher than those of the IH 3.5 thread group (P<.05). CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this study, the external hex implants with short screw lengths were more advantageous than internal hex implants with short screw lengths in torque maintenance after cyclic loading. PMID:26949489

  3. MRI Evaluation of Spinal Length and Vertebral Body Angle During Loading with a Spinal Compression Harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James A.; Hargens, Alan R.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan, R.; Sanchez, E.; Yang, C.; Mitsui, I.; Schwandt, D.; Fechner, K. P.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Weight bearing by the spinal column during upright posture often plays a role in the common problem of low back pain. Therefore, we developed a non-ferromagnetic spinal compression harness to enable MRI investigations of the spinal column during axial loading. Human subjects were fitted with a Nest and a footplate which were connected by adjustable straps to an analog load cell. MRI scans of human subjects (5 males and 1 female with age range of 27-53 yrs) during loaded and unloaded conditions were accomplished with a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa scanner. Studies of two subjects undergoing sequentially increasing spinal loads revealed significant decreases (r(sup 2) = 0.852) in spinal length between T4 and L5 culminating in a 1.5 to 2% length decrease during loading with 75% body weight. Sagittal vertebral body angles of four subjects placed under a constant 50% body weight load for one hour demonstrated increased lordotic and kyphotic curvatures. In the lumbar spine, the L2 vertebral body experienced the greatest angular change (-3 deg. to -5 deg.) in most subjects while in the thoracic spine, T4 angles increased from the unloaded state by +2 deg. to +9 deg. Overall, our studies demonstrate: 1) a progressive, although surprisingly small, decrease in spinal length with increasing load and 2) relatively large changes in spinal column angulation with 50% body weight.

  4. Investigation of Anomalous Behavior in Metallic-Based Materials Under Compressive Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gil, Christopher M.; Lissenden, Cliff J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1998-01-01

    An anomalous material response has been observed under the action of applied compressive loads in fibrous SiC/Ti (both Ti-6242 and Ti-15-3 alloys) and the monolithic nickel-base alloy IN-718 in the aged condition. The observed behavior is an increase, rather than a decrease, in the instantaneous Young's modulus with increasing load. This increase is small, but can be significant in yield surface determination tests, where an equivalent offset strain on the order of 10 micron(1 x 10(exp -6) m/m) is being used. Stiffening has been quantified by calculating offset strains from the linear elastic loading line. The offset strains associated with stiffening during compressive loading are positive and of the same order as the target offset strains in yield surface determination tests. At this time we do not have a reasonable explanation for this response nor can we identify a deformation mechanism that might cause it. On the other hand, we are not convinced that it is an artifact of the experimental procedure because a number of issues have been identified and seemingly ruled out. In fact, stiffening appears to be temperature dependent, since it decreases as the temperature increases.

  5. Parametric Study on the Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Shells With Geometric and Material Imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The results of a parametric study of the effects of initial imperfections on the buckling and postbuckling response of three unstiffened thinwalled compression-loaded graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells with different orthotropic and quasi-isotropic shell-wall laminates are presented. The imperfections considered include initial geometric shell-wall midsurface imperfections, shell-wall thickness variations, local shell-wall ply-gaps associated with the fabrication process, shell-end geometric imperfections, nonuniform applied end loads, and variations in the boundary conditions including the effects of elastic boundary conditions. A high-fidelity nonlinear shell analysis procedure that accurately accounts for the effects of these imperfections on the nonlinear responses and buckling loads of the shells is described. The analysis procedure includes a nonlinear static analysis that predicts stable response characteristics of the shells and a nonlinear transient analysis that predicts unstable response characteristics.

  6. Effect of a circular hole on the buckling of cylindrical shells loaded by axial compression.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, J. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation of the effect of a circular hole on the buckling of thin cylindrical shells under axial compression was carried out. The experimental results were obtained from tests performed on seamless electroformed copper shells and Mylar shells with a lap joint seam. These results indicated that the character of the shell buckling was dependent on a parameter which is proportional to the hole radius divided by the square root of the product of the shell radius and thickness. For small values of this parameter, there was no apparent effect of the hole on the buckling load. For slightly larger values of the parameter, the shells still buckled into a general collapse configuration, but the buckling loads were sharply reduced as the parameter increased. For still larger values of the parameter, the buckling loads were further reduced, and the shells buckled into a stable local buckling configuration.

  7. Buckling and Failure of Compression-Loaded Composite Cylindrical Shells With Geometric and Material Imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The results of an experimental and numerical study of the effects of initial imperfections on the buckling response and failure of unstiffened thin-walled compression-loaded graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells are presented. The shells considered in the study have six different orthotropic or quasi-isotropic shell-wall laminates and two different shell-radius-to-thickness ratios. The numerical results include the effects of geometric shell-wall mid-surface imperfections, shell-wall thickness variations, local shell-wall ply-gaps associated with the fabrication process, shell-end geometric imperfections, nonuniform end loads, and the effects of elastic boundary conditions. Selected cylinder parameter uncertainties were also considered. Results that illustrate the effects of imperfections and uncertainties on the nonlinear response characteristics, buckling loads and failure the shells are presented. In addition, a common failure analysis is used to predict material failures in the shells.

  8. Design, fabrication and test of lightweight shell structure. [axial compression loads and torsion stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lager, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A cylindrical shell structure 3.66 m (144 in.) high by 4.57 m (180 in.) diameter was designed using a wide variety of materials and structural concepts to withstand design ultimate combined loading 1225.8 N/cm (700 lb/in.) axial compression and 245.2 N/cm (140 lb/in.) torsion. The overall cylinder geometry and design loading are representative of that expected on a high performance space tug vehicle. The relatively low design load level results in designs that use thin gage metals and fibrous-composite laminates. Fabrication and structural tests of small panels and components representative of many of the candidate designs served to demonstrate proposed fabrication techniques and to verify design and analysis methods. Three of the designs evaluated, honeycomb sandwich with aluminum faceskins, honeycomb sandwich with graphite/epoxy faceskins, and aluminum truss with fiber-glass meteoroid protection layers, were selected for further evaluation.

  9. Characterization of light emission from mechanoluminescent composites subjected to high-rate compressive loading (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Donghyeon; Castaño, Nicolas; Bhakta, Raj; Romero, Michael; Kimberley, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to devise multifunctional composites using fracto-mechanoluminescent (FML) materials and photoactive sensing thin films for autonomous and self-powered impact damage detection. In previous studies, multifunctional photoactive thin films were suggested as a strain sensor that does not require any external electrical source. Instead, the photoactive thin films generated direct current (DC) (or photocurrent) under ambient light, whose magnitude varied linearly with applied strain. In this study, multifunctional FML materials-photoactive thin film composites will be devised for autonomously sensing high-speed compressive strains without supplying any external photonic or electrical energy. FML materials exhibit transformative properties that emit light when its crystalline structures are fractured. The developed photoactive strain sensing thin film will be integrated with the FML materials. Thus, it is envisioned that the FML materials will emit light, which will be supplied to the photoactive sensing thin films when the high-speed compressive loadings break FML materials' crystalline structures. First, synthesized europium tetrakit(dibenzoylmethide) triethylammonium (EuD4TEA) crystals will be embedded in the elastomeric and transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix to prepare test specimens. Second, the FML properties of the EuD4TEA-PDMS composites will be characterized at various compressive strains, which will be applied by Kolsky bar testing setup. Light emission from the EuD4TEA-PDMS test specimens will be recorded using a high-speed camera. Intensity of the light emissions will be quantified via image processing techniques by taking into account pixel profiles of the high-speed camera captured images (e.g., pixel values, counts of pixels, and RGB values) at various levels of compressive strains. Lastly, the autonomous high-speed compressive sensor modules will be fabricated by integrating the EuD4TEA-PDMS composites with the photoactive thin

  10. The Instructional Effects of Diagrams and Time-Compressed Instruction on Student Achievement and Learners' Perceptions of Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastore, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of visual representations and time-compressed instruction on learning and learners' perceptions of cognitive load. Time-compressed instruction refers to instruction that has been increased in speed without sacrificing quality. It was anticipated that learners would be able to gain a conceptual…

  11. A nonlinear CDM model for ductile failure analysis of steel bridge columns under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Van Do, Vuong; Lee, Chin-Hyung; Chang, Kyong-Ho

    2014-06-01

    A nonlinear cyclic plasticity damage model for ductile metals, which is able to take large deformation effects into consideration, has been developed using a new damage dissipation potential formulation in order to predict the cyclic inelastic behavior of steel bridge piers. The cyclic constitutive equations that employ the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening rule for plastic deformation is incorporated into the damage mechanics in conjunction with the large strain formulation. The damage growth law is based on the experimental observations that the evolution of microvoids results in nonlinear damage accumulation with plastic deformation. The damage model parameters and the procedure for their identification are presented. The proposed model has been validated and successfully applied to thin-walled steel bridge tubular columns subjected to alternating lateral displacements to evaluate the seismic performance.

  12. Compression-Loaded Composite Panels With Elastic Edge Restraints and Initial Prestress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Riddick, Jaret C.; Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2005-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of test-fixture-induced initial prestress and elastic edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling responses of a compression-loaded, quasi-isotropic curved panel is presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code with high-fidelity models. The results presented show that a wide range of prebuckling and buckling behavior can be obtained by varying parameters that represent circumferential loaded-edge restraint and rotational unloaded-edge restraint provided by a test fixture and that represent the mismatch in specimen and test-fixture radii of curvature. For a certain range of parameters, the panels exhibit substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations that yield buckling loads nearly twice the corresponding buckling load predicted by a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis for shallow curved panels. In contrast, the results show another range of parameters exist for which the nonlinear prebuckling deformations either do not exist or are relatively benign, and the panels exhibit buckling loads that are nearly equal to the corresponding linear bifurcation buckling load. Overall, the results should be of particular interest to scientists, engineers, and designers involved in simulating flight-hardware boundary conditions in structural verification and certification tests, involved in validating structural analysis tools, and interested in tailoring buckling performance.

  13. A potential means of using acoustic emission for crack detection under cyclic-load conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Klima, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary investigation was conducted to assess the feasibility of monitoring acoustic emission signals from fatigue cracks during cyclic bend tests. Plate specimens of 6Al-4V titanium, 2219-T87 aluminum, and 18-Ni maraging steel were tested with and without crack starter notches. It was found that significant acoustic emission signals could be detected in the frequency range from 100 to 400 kHz. Cracks emanating from starter notches were monitored by the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique and periodically measured by micro-optical examination. The investigation indicated that it was possible to extract meaningful acoustic emission signals in a cyclic bend machine environment.

  14. Study on the Aging Behaviors of Rubber Materials in Tension and Compression Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Can; Wang, Hongyu; Ma, Xiaobing

    Rubber materials are widely used in aviation, aerospace, shipbuilding, automobile and other military field. However, rubber materials are easy to aging, which largely restricts its using life. In working environment, due to the combined effect of heat and oxygen, vulcanized rubber will undergo degradation and crosslinking reaction which will cause elasticity decease and permanent deformation, so mostly rubber products are used under stress state. Due to the asymmetric structure and asymmetric stress distribution, mechanical stress may cause serious damage to molecular structure; therefore, this paper is aimed to analyze the aging behavior of rubber materials under tensile and compressive loadings, through analyzing experiment data, and adopting Gauss function to describe stress relaxation coefficient, to build an aging equation containing compression ratio parameter and aging time.

  15. Effect of cyclic loading on the creep performance of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Kirkland, T.P.; Lin, C.K.J.

    1995-04-01

    Tension-tension cyclic fatigue tests (triangular waveform, {sigma}{sub max} = 100 MPa, R = 0.1) were conducted on hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitride at frequencies spanning several orders of magnitude (5.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 0.1 Hz or 10{sup {minus}3} MPa/s to 18 MPa/s) at 1,370 C in air. The amount of cyclic creep strain was found to be a function of the frequency or stressing rate with greater strains to failure observed as the frequency or stressing rate decreased. The total strain was viewed as the sum of elastic, anelastic (or transient recoverable), and plastic (viscous or non-recoverable) strain contributions, after the empirical Pao and Marin model. The plastic strain was found to be the dominant component of the total creep and was unsatisfactorily represented by the Pao and Marin model. To circumvent this, a time exponent was introduced in the plastic strain term in the Pao and Marin model. This modification resulted in good correlation between model and experiment at the slower frequencies examined but over-predicted the cyclic creep strain at the faster frequencies. The utility of using the modified Pao and Marin model to predict cyclic creep response from static creep and strain relaxation tests is described.

  16. Closed-form solution of the Ogden-Hill's compressible hyperelastic model for ramp loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezvai, Szabolcs; Kossa, Attila

    2016-09-01

    This article deals with the visco-hyperelastic modelling approach for compressible polymer foam materials. Polymer foams can exhibit large elastic strains and displacements in case of volumetric compression. In addition, they often show significant rate-dependent properties. This material behaviour can be accurately modelled using the visco-hyperelastic approach, in which the large strain viscoelastic description is combined with the rate-independent hyperelastic material model. In case of polymer foams, the most widely used compressible hyperelastic material model, the so-called Ogden-Hill's model, was applied, which is implemented in the commercial finite element (FE) software uc(Abaqus). The visco-hyperelastic model is defined in hereditary integral form, therefore, obtaining a closed-form solution for the stress is not a trivial task. However, the parameter-fitting procedure could be much faster and accurate if closed-form solution exists. In this contribution, exact stress solutions are derived in case of uniaxial, biaxial and volumetric compression loading cases using ramp-loading history. The analytical stress solutions are compared with the stress results in uc(Abaqus) using FE analysis. In order to highlight the benefits of the analytical closed-form solution during the parameter-fitting process experimental work has been carried out on a particular open-cell memory foam material. The results of the material identification process shows significant accuracy improvement in the fitting procedure by applying the derived analytical solutions compared to the so-called separated approach applied in the engineering practice.

  17. Can human mesenchymal stem cells survive on a NiTi implant material subjected to cyclic loading?

    PubMed

    Habijan, T; Glogowski, T; Kühn, S; Pohl, M; Wittsiepe, J; Greulich, C; Eggeler, G; Schildhauer, T A; Köller, M

    2011-06-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi-SMAs) exhibit mechanical and chemical properties which make them attractive candidate materials for various types of biomedical applications. However, the high nickel content of NiTi-SMAs may result in adverse tissue reactions, especially when they are considered for load-bearing implants. It is generally assumed that a protective titanium oxide layer separates the metallic alloy from its environment and that this explains the good biocompatibility of NiTi. Cyclic loading may result in failure of the protective oxide layer. The scientific objective of this work was to find out whether cyclic dynamic strain, in a range relevant for orthopedic implants, diminishes the biocompatibility of NiTi-SMAs. In order to analyze the biocompatibility of NiTi-SMA surfaces subjected to cyclic loading, NiTi-SMA tensile specimens were preloaded with mesenchymal stem cells, transferred to a sterile cell culture system and fixed to the pull rods of a tensile testing machine. Eighty-six thousand and four hundred strain cycles at 2% pseudoelastic strain were performed for a period of 24 h or 7 days. Cytokines (IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF) and nickel ion release were determined within the cell culture medium. Adherent cells on the tensile specimens were stained with calcein-AM and propidium iodide to determine cell viability. Dynamic loading of the tensile specimens did not influence the viability of adherent human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) after 24 h or 7 days compared with the non-strained control. Dynamic cycles of loading and unloading did not affect nickel ion release from the tensile specimens. The release of IL-6 from hMSCs cultured under dynamic conditions was significantly higher after mechanical load (873 pg ml(-1)) compared with static conditions (323 pg ml(-1)). The present work demonstrates that a new type of mechanical in vitro cell culture experiment can provide information which previously could only be obtained in large animal

  18. Buckling Of Long Compression-Loaded Anisotropic Plates Restrained Against Inplane Lateral and Shear Deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2003-01-01

    An approach for synthesizing buckling results and behavior for thin balanced and unbalanced symmetric laminates that are subjected to uniform axial compression loads and elastically restrained against inplane expansion, contraction, and shear deformation is presented. This approach uses a nondimensional analysis for infinitely long, flexurally anisotropic plates (coupling between bending and twisting) that are subjected to combined mechanical loads and is based on nondimensional parameters. In addition, nondimensional loading parameters are derived that account for the effects of the elastic inplane deformation restraints, membrane orthotropy, and membrane anisotropy on the induced prebuckling stress state. The loading parameters are used to determine buckling coefficients that include the effects of flexural orthotropy and flexural anisotropy. Many results are presented, for some selected laminates, that are intended to facilitate a structural designer's transition to the use of the generic buckling design curves that are presented and discussed in the paper. Several buckling response curves are presented that provide physical insight into the behavior for combined loads, in addition to providing useful design data. An example is presented that demonstrates the use of the generic design curves, which are applicable to a wide range of laminate constructions. The analysis approach and generic results indicate the effects and characteristics of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy in a very general and unifying manner.

  19. Compressive sampling based approach for identification of moving loads distribution on cable-stayed bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yuequan; Li, Hui; Zhang, Fujian; Ou, Jinping

    2013-04-01

    A moving loads distribution identification method for cable-stayed bridges based on compressive sampling (CS) technique is proposed. CS is a technique for obtaining sparse signal representations to underdetermined linear measurement equations. In this paper, CS is employed to localize moving loads of cable-stayed bridges by limit cable force measurements. First, a vehicle-bridge model for cable-stayed bridges is presented. Then the relationship between the cable force and moving loads is constructed based on the influence lines. With the hypothesis of sparsity distribution of vehicles on bridge deck (which is practical for long-span bridges), the moving loads are identified by minimizing the `l2-norm of the difference between the observed and simulated cable forces caused by moving vehicles penalized by the `l1-norm' of the moving load vector. The resultant minimization problem is convex and can be solved efficiently. A numerical example of a real cable-stayed bridge is carried out to verify the proposed method. The robustness and accuracy of the identification approach with limit cable force measurement for multi-vehicle spatial localization are validated.

  20. Effects of method of loading and specimen configuration on compressive strength of graphite/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. K.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    Three test schemes were examined for testing graphite/epoxy (Narmco T300/5208) composite material specimens to failure in compression, including an adaptation of the IITRI "wedge grip" compression fixture, a face-supported-compression fixture, and an end-loaded-coupon fixture. The effects of specimen size, specimen support arrangement and method of load transfer on compressive behavior of graphite/epoxy were investigated. Compressive stress strain, strength, and modulus data obtained with the three fixtures are presented with evaluations showing the effects of all test parameters, including fiber orientation. The IITRI fixture has the potential to provide good stress/strain data to failure for unidirectional and quasi-isotropic laminates. The face supported fixture was found to be the most desirable for testing + or - 45 s laminates.

  1. Evaluation of flawed composite structural components under static and cyclic loading. [fatigue life of graphite-epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of initial defects on the fatigue and fracture response of graphite-epoxy composite laminates are presented. The structural laminates investigated were a typical angle ply laminate, a polar/hoop wound pressure vessel laminate, and a typical engine fan blade laminate. Defects investigated were full and half penetration circular holes, full and half penetration slits, and countersink holes. The effects of the defect size and type on the static fracture strength, fatigue performance, and residual static strength are shown as well as the results of loadings on damage propagation in composite laminates. The data obtained were used to define proof test levels as a qualification procedure in composite structure subjected to cyclic loading.

  2. REVERSAL CYCLIC LOADING TEST OF REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMN WITH HIGH DENSITY LONGITUDINAL REINFORCEMENT CONFINED BY SPIRAL REINFORCEMENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohba, Mitsuaki; Sato, Akiko; Ishibashi, Tadayoshi

    In case of that column diameter is restricted by the narrow construction space, Concrete filled steel tube column is used. Authors developed new arrangement of bars that the range of longitudinal reinforcement ratio is from 14.8% to 24.7% and the longitudinal reinforcements are reinforced by spiral reinforcement. For the confirmation of the damage form and the deformation performance of the column with new bar arrangement at the earthquake, static reversal cyclic loading test was carried out. The parameters are longitudinal reinforcement ratio, shear span ratio and strength ratio. As the result, the damage form showed different trends due to longitudinal reinforcement ratio, shear span ratio and flexural strength and shear strength ratio. And specimens with the new bar arrangement had a good ductility with rotation angle of the column more than 1/10 and no rapid decline of strength. And, it is possible to evaluate ultimate bending capacity by considering the damage situation at maximum load.

  3. Identifying and Characterizing Discrepancies Between Test and Analysis Results of Compression-Loaded Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2005-01-01

    Results from a study to identify and characterize discrepancies between validation tests and high-fidelity analyses of compression-loaded panels are presented. First, potential sources of the discrepancies in both the experimental method and corresponding high-fidelity analysis models were identified. Then, a series of laboratory tests and numerical simulations were conducted to quantify the discrepancies and develop test and analysis methods to account for the discrepancies. The results indicate that the discrepancies between the validation tests and high-fidelity analyses can be attributed to imperfections in the test fixture and specimen geometry; test-fixture-induced changes in specimen geometry; and test-fixture-induced friction on the loaded edges of the test specimen. The results also show that accurate predictions of the panel response can be obtained when these specimen imperfections and edge conditions are accounted for in the analysis. The errors in the tests and analyses, and the methods used to characterize these errors are presented.

  4. A potential means of using acoustic emission for crack detection under cyclic-load conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Klima, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary investigation was conducted to assess the feasibility of monitoring acoustic emission signals from fatigue cracks during cyclic bend tests. Plate specimens of 6A1-4V titanium, 2219-T87 aluminum, and 18-Ni maraging steel were tested with and without crack starter notches. It was found that significant acoustic emission signals could be detected in the frequency range from 100 kHz to 400 kHz. Cracks emanating from starter notches were monitored by the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique and periodically measured by micro-optical examination. Methods used to reduce the effects of extraneous noises (i.e., machine noises, fretting) are described. A frequency spectrum analyzer was used to characterize the emissions and to evaluate methods used to acquire the signals (i.e., transducer location, bandwidth selection). The investigation indicated that it was possible to extract meaningful acoustic emission signals in a cyclic bend machine environment.

  5. Constitutive modeling of the rate, temperature, and hydration dependent deformation response of Nafion to monotonic and cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberstein, Meredith N.; Boyce, Mary C.

    The elastic-plastic behavior of the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) Nafion is characterized via monotonic and cyclic uniaxial tension testing as a function of strain rate, temperature, and hydration. Dynamic mechanical analysis shows that, under dry (30%RH) conditions, the material begins to transition from the glassy to the rubbery state at 75 ° C, with a glass transition of 105 ° C. DMA reveals the fully hydrated state to be significantly more compliant than the dry state, with a glass transition beginning at 40 ° C. Large strain monotonic tensile tests find the rate-dependent stress-strain behavior to be highly dependent on temperature and hydration. The dry state transitions from an elastic-plastic behavior at 25 ° C to an increasingly more compliant behavior and lower yield stress as temperature is increased through the glass transition, until exhibiting a rubbery-like behavior at 100 ° C. At 25 ° C, the stress-strain behavior remains elastic-plastic for all hydrated states with the stiffness and yield stress decreasing with increasing hydration. Increasing hydration at all temperatures acts to decrease the initial elastic stiffness and yield stress. Unloading from different strains reveals the elastic-plastic nature of the behavior even for the elevated temperature and hydrated states. Cyclic loading-unloading-reloading excursions to different strains show significant nonlinear recovery at all strains past yield with a highly nonlinear reloading behavior which rejoins the initial loading path. A micromechanically motivated constitutive model consisting of an intermolecular resistance in parallel with an elastic network resistance is shown to be capable of capturing the rate, temperature, and hydration dependence of the monotonic stress-strain behavior. The intermolecular resistance captures the local intermolecular barriers to initial elastic deformation and also captures the thermally activated nature of yield; these intermolecular barriers are

  6. Crack Initiation Life of Materials Under Combined Pitting Corrosion and Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriraman, M. R.; Pidaparti, R. M.

    2010-02-01

    Pitting corrosion triggered damage is responsible for the degradation of many metallic materials affecting structural integrity. As pitting and crack initiation processes govern the overall life of such structures and components, particularly at nominal cyclic stresses, there is a need to develop simple models to estimate crack initiation life of materials. This paper presents a simple deterministic model that considers the effect of cyclic stressing under pitting corrosion conditions. The developed model is validated on an aluminum alloy 2024-T3, and 12% Cr stainless steel used in aircraft and steam turbines, respectively. The predicted critical pit depth values are in fair agreement with the limited experimental data available in the literature. The model indicates that at high stresses, the crack initiation can occur very rapidly even from relatively small pits. The crack initiation life predictions when compared with the available experimental data, suggest a probable stress-level dependency with regard to the form and extent of the influence of cyclic stresses on pit growth and subsequent crack formation.

  7. The influence of surface topography on wear debris generation at the cement/bone interface under cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Kirk A; Yang, Dongliang T; Arola, Dwayne

    2008-05-01

    The long-term success of a total joint replacement can be undermined by loosening of the implant, generation of wear debris or a combination of both factors. In the present study the influence of the surface morphologies of the bone and cement mantle on loosening of cemented total joint replacements (THJRs) and development of wear debris were studied. Model cemented THJR specimens were prepared in which the femoral canal was textured using specific cutting tools. The specimens were subjected to cyclic loads inducing pure shear fatigue of the cement/bone interface. Changes in both the femoral canal and cement mantle resulting from fatigue were quantified in terms of the surface topography and the volume of wear debris. Loosening occurred with cyclic loading due to degradation of the cement and bone and resulted in the development of cement and bone particles. There was no correlation between the fatigue strength of the interfaces and the volume of wear debris. In general, the change in surface topography of the cement mantle with fatigue decreased with increasing volume of cement interdigitation. Femoral canal surfaces with symmetric profile height distribution (i.e., Gaussian surfaces) resulted in the lowest volume of generated debris.

  8. Short-period cyclic loading system for in situ X-ray observation of anelastic properties at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Takashi; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Tange, Yoshinori; Higo, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    To determine the anelastic properties of materials of the Earth's interior, a short-period cyclic loading system was installed for in situ X-ray radiographic observation under high pressure to the multi-anvil deformation DIA press at the bending magnet beam line BL04B1 at SPring-8. The hydraulic system equipped with a piston controlled by a solenoid was designed so as to enable producing smooth sinusoidal stress in a wide range of oscillation period from 0.2 to 100 s and generating variable amplitudes. Time resolved X-ray radiography imaging of the sample and reference material provides their strain as a function of time during cyclic loading. A synchrotron X-ray radiation source allows us to resolve their strain variation with time even at the short period (<1 s). The minimum resolved strain is as small as 10-4, and the shortest oscillation period to detect small strain is 0.5 s. Preliminary experimental results exhibited that the new system can resolve attenuation factor Q-1 at upper mantle conditions. These results are in quantitative agreement with previously reported data obtained at lower pressures.

  9. Cyclic hardening in copper described in terms of combined monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, H.D. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    Hardening of polycrystalline copper subjected to tension-compression loading cycles in the plastic region is discussed with reference to changes in flow stress determined from equations describing dislocation glide. It is suggested that hardening is as a result of the accumulation of strain on a monotonic stress-strain curve. On initial loading, the behavior is monotonic. On stress reversal, a characteristic cyclic stress-strain curve is followed until the stress reaches a value in reverse loading corresponding to the maximum attained during the preceding half cycle. Thereafter, the monotonic path is followed until strain reversal occurs at completion of the half cycle. Repetition of the process results in cyclic hardening. Steady state cyclic behavior is reached when a stress associated with the monotonic stress-strain curve is reached which is equal to the stress associated with the cyclic stress-strain curve corresponding to the imposed strain amplitude.

  10. Effects of Imperfections on the Buckling Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical study of the effects of initial imperfections on the buckling and postbuckling response of three unstiffened thin-walled compression-loaded graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells with different orthotropic and quasi-isotropic shell-wall laminates are presented. The results identify the effects of traditional and non-traditional initial imperfections on the non-linear response and buckling loads of the shells. The traditional imperfections include the geometric shell-wall mid-surface imperfect ions that are commonly discussed in the literature on thin shell buckling. The non-traditional imperfections include shell-wall thickness variations local shell-wall ply-gaps associated with the fabrication process, sheltered geometric imperfections, non-uniform applied end loads, and variations in the boundary conditions including the effects of elastic boundary conditions. A high-fidelity non-linear shell analysis procedure that accurately accounts for the effects of these traditional and non-traditional imperfections on the nonlinear response, and buckling loads of the shells is described. The analysis procedure includes a non-linear static analysis that predicts stable response characteristics of the shells and a non-linear transient analysis that predicts unstable response characteristics.

  11. Structural Response of Compression-Loaded, Tow-Placed, Variable Stiffness Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Guerdal, Zafer; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Results of an analytical and experimental study to characterize the structural response of two compression-loaded variable stiffness composite panels are presented and discussed. These variable stiffness panels are advanced composite structures, in which tows are laid down along precise curvilinear paths within each ply and the fiber orientation angle varies continuously throughout each ply. The panels are manufactured from AS4/977-3 graphite-epoxy pre-preg material using an advanced tow placement system. Both variable stiffness panels have the same layup, but one panel has overlapping tow bands and the other panel has a constant-thickness laminate. A baseline cross-ply panel is also analyzed and tested for comparative purposes. Tests performed on the variable stiffness panels show a linear prebuckling load-deflection response, followed by a nonlinear response to failure at loads between 4 and 53 percent greater than the baseline panel failure load. The structural response of the variable stiffness panels is also evaluated using finite element analyses. Nonlinear analyses of the variable stiffness panels are performed which include mechanical and thermal prestresses. Results from analyses that include thermal prestress conditions correlate well with measured variable stiffness panel results. The predicted response of the baseline panel also correlates well with measured results.

  12. Study the Cyclic Plasticity Behavior of 508 LAS under Constant, Variable and Grid-Load-Following Loading Cycles for Fatigue Evaluation of PWR Components

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Barua, Bipul; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2016-09-01

    This report provides an update of an earlier assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for components in light water reactors. This report is a deliverable in September 2016 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In an April 2016 report, we presented a detailed thermal-mechanical stress analysis model for simulating the stress-strain state of a reactor pressure vessel and its nozzles under grid-load-following conditions. In this report, we provide stress-controlled fatigue test data for 508 LAS base metal alloy under different loading amplitudes (constant, variable, and random grid-load-following) and environmental conditions (in air or pressurized water reactor coolant water at 300°C). Also presented is a cyclic plasticity-based analytical model that can simultaneously capture the amplitude and time dependency of the component behavior under fatigue loading. Results related to both amplitude-dependent and amplitude-independent parameters are presented. The validation results for the analytical/mechanistic model are discussed. This report provides guidance for estimating time-dependent, amplitude-independent parameters related to material behavior under different service conditions. The developed mechanistic models and the reported material parameters can be used to conduct more accurate fatigue and ratcheting evaluation of reactor components.

  13. In situ AE records in cyclically loaded rock salt - The stress memory effect and spatio-temporal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, D.; Cailleau, B.; Dahm, T.; Shapiro, S.; Kaiser, D.

    2009-04-01

    We study acoustic emission (AE) activity caused by cyclic thermal loading due to the backfilling of a cavity in an abandoned salt mine to answer questions regarding the stress memory effect of rock (Kaiser effect), the dependence of AE rates and b-value on the stress state as well as the stress rate and the spatio-temporal evolution of the AE activity. Event rates and b-values of the frequency magnitude relation are calculated for a region well covered by a network of piezo-electric receivers from an event catalog corrected for incomplete recording times. Results are compared and correlated with the output of a 2D thermo-elastic stress modelling performed with an FE program. The high quality of the AE dataset as well as the good control of the input parameters of the FE program allows us to study the in situ activity in the mining environment with exceptionally high precision and temporal resolution. The backfilling period can be subdivided into two AE activity regimes. The first one exhibits a clear and pronounced Kaiser effect as well as an upward migration of the AE event front away from the ceiling of the cavity which correlates with the calculated stress field. This observation of the Kaiser effect implies that no healing effect is observed for these first few loading cycles. The maximum event rate observed during a loading cycle scales with the absolute stress increase of this cycle with respect to the former maximum. This behavior is also observed for later loading cycles which show a deteriorated Kaiser effect with an onset of AE activity well before the former maximum stress and a smaller slope of the relation between maximum event rate and absolute stress increase. During later loading cycles also time periods showing a pronounced anti-correlation between event rate and Coulomb stress with event rate maxima during minima of the Coulomb stress are observed. These time periods are generally characterized by a b-value of the frequency magnitude relation much

  14. Permeability Evolution in Natural Fractures Subject to Cyclic Loading and Gouge Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Daniel; Amann, Florian; Bayer, Peter; Elsworth, Derek

    2016-09-01

    Increasing fracture aperture by lowering effective normal stress and by inducing dilatant shearing and thermo-elastic effects is essential for transmissivity increase in enhanced geothermal systems. This study investigates transmissivity evolution for fluid flow through natural fractures in granodiorite at the laboratory scale. Processes that influence transmissivity are changing normal loads, surface deformation, the formation of gouge and fracture offset. Normal loads were varied in cycles between 1 and 68 MPa and cause transmissivity changes of up to three orders of magnitude. Similarly, small offsets of fracture surfaces of the order of millimeters induced changes in transmissivity of up to three orders of magnitude. During normal load cycling, the fractures experienced significant surface deformation, which did not lead to increased matedness for most experiments, especially for offset fractures. The resulting gouge material production may have caused clogging of the main fluid flow channels with progressing loading cycles, resulting in reductions of transmissivity by up to one order of magnitude. During one load cycle, from low to high normal loads, the majority of tests show hysteretic behavior of the transmissivity. This effect is stronger for early load cycles, most likely when surface deformation occurs, and becomes less pronounced in later cycles when asperities with low asperity strength failed. The influence of repeated load cycling on surface deformation is investigated by scanning the specimen surfaces before and after testing. This allows one to study asperity height distribution and surface deformation by evaluating the changes of the standard deviation of the height, distribution of asperities and matedness of the fractures. Surface roughness, as expressed by the standard deviation of the asperity height distribution, increased during testing. Specimen surfaces that were tested in a mated configuration were better mated after testing, than

  15. Effects of applied stress ratio on the fatigue behavior of additively manufactured porous biomaterials under compressive loading.

    PubMed

    de Krijger, Joep; Rans, Calvin; Van Hooreweder, Brecht; Lietaert, Karel; Pouran, Behdad; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-12-07

    Additively manufactured (AM) porous metallic biomaterials are considered promising candidates for bone substitution. In particular, AM porous titanium can be designed to exhibit mechanical properties similar to bone. There is some experimental data available in the literature regarding the fatigue behavior of AM porous titanium, but the effect of stress ratio on the fatigue behavior of those materials has not been studied before. In this paper, we study the effect of applied stress ratio on the compression-compression fatigue behavior of selective laser melted porous titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) based on the diamond unit cell. The porous titanium biomaterial is treated as a meta-material in the context of this work, meaning that R-ratios are calculated based on the applied stresses acting on a homogenized volume. After morphological characterization using micro computed tomography and quasi-static mechanical testing, the porous structures were tested under cyclic loading using five different stress ratios, i.e. R = 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.8, to determine their S-N curves. Feature tracking algorithms were used for full-field deformation measurements during the fatigue tests. It was observed that the S-N curves of the porous structures shift upwards as the stress ratio increases. The stress amplitude was the most important factor determining the fatigue life. Constant fatigue life diagrams were constructed and compared with similar diagrams for bulk Ti-6Al-4V. Contrary to the bulk material, there was limited dependency of the constant life diagrams to mean stress. The notches present in the AM biomaterials were the sites of crack initiation. This observation and other evidence suggest that the notches created by the AM process cause the insensitivity of the fatigue life diagrams to mean stress. Feature tracking algorithms visualized the deformation during fatigue tests and demonstrated the root cause of inclined (45°) planes of specimen failure. In conclusion, the R

  16. Dose-Dependent Response of Tissue-Engineered Intervertebral Discs to Dynamic Unconfined Compressive Loading

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Katherine D.; Mozia, Robert I.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the limitations of current surgical methods in the treatment of degenerative disc disease, tissue-engineered intervertebral discs (TE-IVDs) have become an important target. This study investigated the biochemical and mechanical responses of composite TE-IVDs to dynamic unconfined compression. TE-IVDs were manufactured by floating an injection molded alginate nucleus pulposus (NP) in a type I collagen annulus fibrosus (AF) that was allowed to contract for 2 weeks before loading. The discs were mechanically stimulated at a range of strain amplitude (1–10%) for 2 weeks with a duty cycle of 1 h on–1 h off–1 h on before being evaluated for their biochemical and mechanical properties. Mechanical loading increased all properties in a dose-dependent manner. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) increased between 2.8 and 2.2 fold in the AF and NP regions, respectively, whereas the hydroxyproline content increased between 1.2 and 1.8 fold. The discs also experienced a 2-fold increase in the equilibrium modulus and a 4.3-fold increase in the instantaneous modulus. Full effects for all properties were seen by 5% strain amplitude. These data suggest that dynamic loading increases the functionality of our TE-IVDs with region-dependent responses using a method that may be scaled up to larger disc models to expedite maturation for implantation. PMID:25277703

  17. Dynamic mechanical response of magnesium single crystal under compression loading: Experiments, model, and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qizhen

    2011-05-01

    Magnesium single crystal samples are compressed at room temperature under quasistatic (˜0.001 s-1) loading in a universal testing machine and dynamic (430, 1000, and 1200 s-1) loading in a split Hopkinson pressure bar system. Stress-strain curves show that (a) the fracture strain slightly increases with the strain rate; and (b) the maximum strength and strain hardening rate increase significantly when the testing changes from quasistatic to dynamic, although they do not vary much when the strain rate for dynamic testing varies in the range of 430-1200 s-1. The operation of the secondary pyramidal slip system is the dominating deformation mechanism, which leads to a fracture surface with an angle of ˜42° with respect to the loading axial direction. A theoretical material model based on Johnson-Cook law is also derived. The model includes the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms, and provides the stress-strain relations matching with the experimental results. Finite element simulations for the strain rates used in the experiments predict the mechanical responses of the material that agree well with the experimental data.

  18. Comparison of Methods to Predict Lower Bound Buckling Loads of Cylinders Under Axial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynie, Waddy T.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the buckling response of two different orthogrid stiffened circular cylindrical shells with initial imperfections and subjected to axial compression are used to compare three different lower bound buckling load prediction techniques. These lower bound prediction techniques assume different imperfection types and include an imperfection based on a mode shape from an eigenvalue analysis, an imperfection caused by a lateral perturbation load, and an imperfection in the shape of a single stress-free dimple. The STAGS finite element code is used for the analyses. Responses of the cylinders for ranges of imperfection amplitudes are considered, and the effect of each imperfection is compared to the response of a geometrically perfect cylinder. Similar behavior was observed for shells that include a lateral perturbation load and a single dimple imperfection, and the results indicate that the predicted lower bounds are much less conservative than the corresponding results for the cylinders with the mode shape imperfection considered herein. In addition, the lateral perturbation technique and the single dimple imperfection produce response characteristics that are physically meaningful and can be validated via testing.

  19. Effects of Imperfections on the Buckling Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The results of an experimental and numerical study of the effects of imperfections on the buckling response of unstiffened thin-walled composite cylindrical shells are presented. Results that identify the individual and combined effects of traditional initial geometric shell-wall imperfections and non-traditional shell-wall thickness variations, shell-end geometric imperfections and variations in loads applied to the ends of the shells on the shell buckling response are included. In addition, results illustrating the effects of manufacturing flaws in the form of gaps between adjacent pieces of graphite-epoxy tape in some of the laminate plies are presented in detail. The shells have been analyzed with a nonlinear finite-element analysis code that accurately accounts for these effects on the buckling and nonlinear responses of the shells. The numerical results indicate that traditional and nontraditional initial imperfections can cause a significant reduction in the buckling load of a compression-loaded composite shell. Furthermore, the results indicate that the imperfections couple in a nonlinear manner. The numerical results correlate well with the experimental results. The nonlinear analysis results are also compared to the results from a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis. The results suggest that the nonlinear analysis procedure can be used for determining accurate, high-fidelity design knockdown factors for shell buckling and collapse. The results can also be used to determine the effects of manufacturing tolerances on the buckling response of composite shells.

  20. Axially compressed buckling of an embedded boron nitride nanotube subjected to thermo-electro-mechanical loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Jalili, Nader

    2007-04-01

    Unlike widely-used carbon nanotubes, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have shown to possess stable semiconducting behavior and strong piezoelectricity. Such properties along with their outstanding mechanical properties and thermal conductivity, make BNNTs promising candidate reinforcement materials for a verity of applications especially nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Motivated by these abilities, we aim to study the buckling behavior of BNNT-reinforced piezoelectric polymeric composites when subjected to combined electro-thermo-mechanical loadings. For this, the multi-walled structure of BNNT is considered as elastic media and a set of concentric cylindrical shell with van der Waals interaction between them. Using three-dimensional equilibrium equations, Donnell shell theory is utilized to show that the axially compressive resistance of BNNT varies with applying thermal and electrical loads. The effect of BNNT piezoelectric property on the buckling behavior of the composites is demonstrated. More specifically, it is shown that applying direct and reverse voltages to BNNT changes the buckling loads for any axial and circumferential wavenumbers. Such capability could be uniquely utilized when designing BNNT-reinforced composites.

  1. Tow-Steered Panels With Holes Subjected to Compression or Shear Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Tatting, Brian F.; Guerdal, Zafer

    2005-01-01

    Tailoring composite laminates to vary the fiber orientations within a fiber layer of a laminate to address non-uniform stress states and provide structural advantages such as the alteration of principal load paths has potential application to future low-cost, light-weight structures for commercial transport aircraft. Evaluation of this approach requires the determination of the effectiveness of stiffness tailoring through the use of curvilinear fiber paths in flat panels including the reduction of stress concentrations around the holes and the increase in load carrying capability. Panels were designed through the use of an optimization code using a genetic algorithm and fabricated using a tow-steering approach. Manufacturing limitations, such as the radius of curvature of tows the machine could support, avoidance of wrinkling of fibers and minimization of gaps between fibers were considered in the design process. Variable stiffness tow-steered panels constructed with curvilinear fiber paths were fabricated so that the design methodology could be verified through experimentation. Finite element analysis where each element s stacking sequence was accurately defined is used to verify the behavior predicted based on the design code. Experiments on variable stiffness flat panels with central circular holes were conducted with the panels loaded in axial compression or shear. Tape and tow-steered panels are used to demonstrate the buckling, post-buckling and failure behavior of elastically tailored panels. The experimental results presented establish the buckling performance improvements attainable by elastic tailoring of composite laminates.

  2. Compression and compression fatigue testing of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, T. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of moisture and temperature on the fatigue and fracture response of composite laminates under compression loads were investigated. The structural laminates studied were an intermediate stiffness graphite-epoxy composite (a typical angle ply laimna liminate had a typical fan blade laminate). Full and half penetration slits and impact delaminations were the defects examined. Results are presented which show the effects of moisture on the fracture and fatigue strength at room temperature, 394 K (250 F), and 422 K (300 F). Static tests results show the effects of defect size and type on the compression-fracture strength under moisture and thermal environments. The cyclic tests results compare the fatigue lives and residual compression strength under compression only and under tension-compression fatigue loading.

  3. Static and Cyclic Load-Deflection Characteristics of NiTi Orthodontic Archwires Using Modified Bending Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nili Ahmadabadi, Mahmoud; Shahhoseini, Tahereh; Habibi-Parsa, Mohamad; Haj-Fathalian, Maryam; Hoseinzadeh-Nik, Tahereh; Ghadirian, Hananeh

    2009-08-01

    Near-equiatomic nickel-titanium (nitinol) has the ability to return to a former shape when subjected to an appropriate thermomechanical procedure. One of the most successful applications of nitinol is orthodontic archwire. One of the suitable characteristics of these wires is superelasticity, a phenomenon that allows better-tolerated loading conditions during clinical therapy. Superelastic nitinol wires deliver clinically desired light continuous force enabling effective tooth movement with minimal damage for periodontal tissues. In this research, a special three-point bending fixture was invented and designed to determine the superelastic property in simulated clinical conditions, where the wire samples were held in the fixture similar to an oral cavity. In this experimental study, the load-deflection characteristics of superelastic NiTi commercial wires were studied through three-point bending test. The superelastic behavior was investigated by focusing on bending time, temperature, and number of cycles which affects the energy dissipating capacity. Experimental results show that the NiTi archwires are well suited for cyclic load-unload dental applications. Results show reduction in superelastic property for used archwires after long-time static bending.

  4. An investigation of the self-heating phenomenon in viscoelastic materials subjected to cyclic loadings accounting for prestress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, A. M. G.; Rade, D. A.; Lacerda, H. B.; Araújo, C. A.

    2015-06-01

    It has been demonstrated by many authors that the internal damping mechanism of the viscoelastic materials offers many possibilities for practical engineering applications. However, in traditional procedures of analysis and design of viscoelastic dampers subjected to cyclic loadings, uniform, constant temperature is generally assumed and do not take into account the self-heating phenomenon. Moreover, for viscoelastic materials subjected to dynamic loadings superimposed on static preloads, such as engine mounts, these procedures can lead to poor designs or even severe failures since the energy dissipated within the volume of the material leads to temperature rises. In this paper, a hybrid numerical-experimental investigation of effects of the static preloads on the self-heating phenomenon in viscoelastic dampers subjected to harmonic loadings is reported. After presenting the theoretical foundations, the numerical and experimental results obtained in terms of the temperature evolutions at different points within the volume of the viscoelastic material for various static preloads are compared, and the main features of the methodology are discussed.

  5. Sulfur loaded in micropore-rich carbon aerogel as cathode of lithium-sulfur battery with improved cyclic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zihao; Li, Xiaogang; Liao, Youhao; Li, Xiaoping; Li, Weishan

    2016-12-01

    We report a novel composite of sulfur loaded in micropore-rich carbon aerogel (CA-S), as cathode of lithium-sulfur battery. Carbon aerogel (CA) is synthesized through phenol-formaldehyde reaction with a low catalyst concentration and carbonization under high temperature, and loaded with sulfur via chemical deposition and heat treatment. The physical properties of the resulting CA and the electrochemical performances of the resulting CA-S are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller characterization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic discharge/charge test, with a comparison of a common carbon material, acetylene black (AB), and sulfur loaded in AB (AB-S). It is found that the CA is micropore-rich with micropore volume over 66% of total pore volume, and the CA-S exhibits significantly improved cyclic stability compared with AB-S. The improved performance of CA-S is attributed to the confinement of the micropores in CA to small sulfur allotropes and corresponding lithium sulfides.

  6. Crack growth of 10M Ni-Mn-Ga material in cyclic mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltio, I.; Ge, Y.; Pulkkinen, H.; Sjöberg, A.; Söderberg, O.; Liu, X. W.; Hannula, S.-P.

    The 10M martensitic Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal materials are usually applied in the magneto-mechanical actuators. Therefore, it is important to know the possible effect of the long-term cyclic shape changes on their structure and behavior. This can be evaluated with the mechanical fatigue testing. In the present study, the single crystal 10M Ni-Mn-Ga samples of different compositions were applied to strain-controlled uniaxial mechanical cycling in the multivariant state at ambient temperature. The experiments revealed distinctive changes of the twin variant structure, especially in the mobile twin area, density of twin boundaries, and in the tendency for fatigue crack growth. Characterization of the crack surface showed that the cracks in the microscale grow in a step-wise manner on specific crystallographic planes, i.e, twin boundary planes, but that the macroscopic crack does not occur only along crystallographic directions.

  7. Mechanical strength of the silicon carbide-bearing materials under cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Babaev, E.I.; Berdichevskii, I.M.; Kozlovskii, L.V.; Mei, E.P.; Rozhkova, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    The authors seek to optimize the firing process for porcelain both for the resulting properties of the porcelain and for the thermal efficiency of the furnace by finding a structural furnace material which will withstand the designated optimal firing regime. To this end they select and test a silicon carbide refractory for its ultimate flexural and compression strength and its resistance to fracture under thermal cycling and stress conditions.In actual service the refractory is found to increase the service life and reduce the frequency of maintenance of the furnace.

  8. The transition from stress softening to stress hardening under cyclic loading induced by magnetic field for magneto-sensitive polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yangguang; Liao, Guojiang; Zhang, Canyang; Wan, Qiang; Liu, Taixiang

    2016-04-01

    Magneto-sensitive polymer gel (MSPG) is a kind of ferromagnetic particle filled smart polymer composite, whose magneto-mechanical coupling mechanism has attracted increasing attention in recent years. In this work, the magneto-induced rheological response of MSPG under cyclic shear loading was investigated. It was found that magnetic field is the critical reason for the transition from stress softening to stress hardening under cyclic loading. Besides, the particle concentration and temperature are the controlling factors in the structure optimization of MSPG in the presence of magnetic field. The magneto-induced hardening mechanism was further proposed based on the related experimental results.

  9. Mixed-mode hydrogen-assisted cracking of high-strength steel: The role of cyclic load history

    SciTech Connect

    Toribio, J.; Ovejero, E.; Kharin, V.

    1999-07-01

    Prestressing steel wires are manufactured from a hot-rolled bar, which is heavily cold drawn to produce a highly resistant material. This manufacturing process generates very intense plastic deformations in the material and causes severe changes in its pearlitic microstructure, thus leading to anisotropic stress corrosion behavior in the form of environmentally assisted longitudinal splitting and, thus, mixed-mode stress corrosion cracking. This work describes experimental evidence of mixed-mode hydrogen-assisted cracking of high-strength steel and discusses the role of cyclic load history, because fatigue precracking is a fundamental technique of crack generation for posterior stress corrosion testing, and it has been reported that fatigue preloading may substantially alter the results from stress corrosion cracking tests, especially in the case of hydrogen-assisted cracking.

  10. Analytical Prediction of Damage Growth in Notched Composite Panels Loaded in Axial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; McGowan, David M.; Davila, Carlos G.

    1999-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis method based on shell elements is developed for the computation of damage initiation and growth in stiffened thick-skin stitched graphite-epoxy panels loaded in axial compression. The analysis method involves a step-by-step simulation of material degradation based on ply-level failure mechanisms. High computational efficiency is derived from the use of superposed layers of shell elements to model each ply orientation in the laminate. Multiple integration points through the thickness are used to obtain the correct bending effects through the thickness without the need for ply-by-ply evaluations of the state of the material. The analysis results are compared with experimental results for three stiffened panels with notches oriented at 0, 15 and 30 degrees to the panel width dimension. A parametric study is performed to investigate the damage growth retardation characteristics of the Kevlar stitch lines in the pan

  11. Loading and compressing cesium atoms in a very far-off- resonant light trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depue, Marshall Thomas

    An experiment is described in which 3 × 107 Cs atoms are loaded into a 400 μm crossed beam far-off-resonant trap (FORT) that is only 2.5 μK deep. A high density sample is prepared in a magneto-optic trap (MOT), cooled in a 3D far-off-resonant lattice (FORL), optically pumped into the lowest energy state, adiabatically released from the FORL, magnetically levitated, and transferred to the final FORT trap with a phase space density of 10-3. Spontaneous emission in the FORT is negligible, and the atoms can be compressed in the FORT to a spatial density of higher than 1014 cm-3. Evaporative cooling under these conditions can proceed rapidly. The atoms are monitored with a high intensity fluorescent imaging technique that is well suited to providing accurate number and density measurements for optically thick samples.

  12. Buckling and postbuckling behavior of compression-loaded isotropic plates with cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study of the buckling and postbuckling behavior of square and rectangular compression loaded aluminum plates with centrally located circular, square, and elliptical cutouts is presented. Experimental results indicate that the plates exhibit overall trends of increasing buckling strain and decreasing initial postbuckling stiffness with increasing cutout width. Corresponding plates with circular and square cutouts of the same width buckle at approximately the same strain level, and exhibit approximately the same initial postbuckling stiffness. Results show that the reduction in initial postbuckling stiffness due to a cutout generally decreases as the plate aspect ratio increases. Other results presented indicate that square plates with elliptical cutouts having a large cutout-width-to-plate-width ratio generally lose prebuckling and initial postbuckling stiffness as the cutout height increases. However, the plates buckle at essentially the same strain level. Results also indicate that postbuckling stiffness is more sensitive to changes in elliptical cutout height than are prebuckling stiffness and buckling strain.

  13. Innovative design of composite structures: Axisymmetric deformations of unsymmetrically laminated cylinders loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Paraska, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The study focuses on the axisymmetric deformation response of unsymmetrically laminate cylinders loaded in axial compression by known loads. A geometrically nonlinear analysis is used. Though buckling is not studied, the deformations can be considered to be the prebuckling response. Attention is directed at three 16 layer laminates: a (90 sub 8/0 sub 8) sub T; a (0 sub 8/90 sub 8) sub T and a (0/90) sub 4s. The symmetric laminate is used as a basis for comparison, while the two unsymmetric laminates were chosen because they have equal but opposite bending-stretching effects. Particular attention is given to the influence of the thermally-induced preloading deformations that accompany the cool-down of any unsymmetric laminate from the consolidation temperature. Simple support and clamped boundary conditions are considered. It is concluded that: (1) The radial deformations of an unsymmetric laminate are significantly larger than the radial deformations of a symmetric laminate, although for both symmetric and unsymmetric laminates the large deformations are confined to a boundary layer near the ends of the cylinder; (2) For this nonlinear problem the length of the boundary layer is a function of the applied load; (3) The sign of the radial deformations near the supported end of the cylinder depends strongly on the sense (sign) of the laminate asymmetry; (4) For unsymmetric laminates, ignoring the thermally-induced preloading deformations that accompany cool-down results in load-induced deformations that are under predicted; and (5) The support conditions strongly influence the response but the influence of the sense of asymmetry and the influence of the thermally-induced preloading deformations are independent of the support conditions.

  14. Loading-path dependent deformation of nanocrystalline Ta under single- and double-shock, and quasi-isentropic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M. X.; E, J. C.; Wang, L.; Luo, S. N.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate dynamic deformation of nanocrystalline Ta under single- and double-shock, and quasi-isentropic compression, with large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Orientation mapping, selected area electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction are implemented for microstructure analysis. Different deformation modes are found for different loading paths, and are attributed to the differences in temperature rise induced by dynamic compression. For sufficiently strong shocks, catastrophic activation of slip systems and their growth in single-shock loading with the largest temperature rise lead to amorphization and recrystallization, while stacking faults and dislocation slip dominate deformation in double-shock loading with intermediate temperature rise, and deformation twinning is the principal mode in quasi-isentropic loading with the least temperature rise.

  15. Effects of Carbon Nanomaterial Reinforcement on Composite Joints Under Cyclic and Impact Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Molding ( VARTM ) technique with 7.5g/m2 of MWCNTs or CNFs dispersed at the joint interface ahead of the crack tip. The test coupons were loaded in 3...fabricated via Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) technique with 7.5g/m 2 of MWCNTs or CNFs dispersed at the joint interface ahead of... VARTM setup in the laboratory ........................................................................9 Figure 7. Arrangement of the various layers

  16. Capacity fade modelling of lithium-ion battery under cyclic loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwin, T. R.; Chung, Yongmann M.; Wang, Jihong

    2016-10-01

    A pseudo two-dimensional (P2D) electro-chemical lithium-ion battery model is presented in this paper to study the capacity fade under cyclic charge-discharge conditions. The Newman model [1,2] has been modified to include a continuous solvent reduction reaction responsible for the capacity fade and power fade. The temperature variation inside the cell is accurately predicted using a distributed thermal model coupled with the internal chemical heat generation. The model is further improved by linking the porosity variation with the electrolyte partial molar concentration, thereby proving a stronger coupling between the battery performance and the chemical properties of electrolyte. The solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer growth is estimated for different cut-off voltages and charging current rates. The results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient as well as the porosity variation influences the SEI layer growth and the battery life significantly. The choice of an electrolyte decides the conductivity and partial molar concentration, which is found to have a strong influence on the capacity fade of the battery. The present battery model integrates all essential electro-chemical processes inside a lithium-ion battery under a strong implicit algorithm, proving a useful tool for computationally fast battery monitoring system.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Jointed Rock Under Compressive Loading Using X-ray Computerized Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qinglei; Yang, Shengqi; Ranjith, P. G.; Zhu, Wancheng; Yang, Tianhong

    2016-03-01

    As jointed rocks consist of joints embedded within intact rock blocks, the presence and geometrical fabric of joints have a great influence on the mechanical behavior of rock. With consideration of the actual spatial shape of joints, a numerical model is proposed to investigate the fracture evolution mechanism of jointed rocks. In the proposed model, computerized tomography (CT) scanning is first used to capture the microstructure of a jointed sandstone specimen, which is artificially fabricated by loading the intact sample until the residual strength, and then digital image processing (DIP) techniques are applied to characterize the geometrical fabric of joints from the CT images. A simple vectorization method is used to convert the microstructure based on a cross-sectional image into a layer of 3-D vectorized microstructure and the overall 3-D model of the jointed sandstone including the real spatial shape of the joints is established by stacking the layers in a specific sequence. The 3-D model is then integrated into a well-established code [three-dimensional Rock Failure Process Analysis, (RFPA3D)]. Using the proposed model, a uniaxial compression test of the jointed sandstone is simulated. The results show that the presence of joints can produce tensile stress zones surrounding them, which result in the fracture of jointed rocks under a relatively small external load. In addition, the spatial shape of the joints has a great influence on the fracture process of jointed rocks.

  18. Effect of Initial Geometrical Imperfection on the Buckling Load of Cylindrical Sandwich Shells Under Axial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, Victor M.; Hinsch, Svend; Garcia, Jesus Gomez; Castro, Saullo G. P.

    2014-06-01

    The impact of geometrical imperfections on the general instability of laminated cylindrical sandwich shells was assessed by means of a numerical investigation. Five forms of 'ideal' initial geometrical imperfection patterns were studied: eigen-mode shaped, axisymmetric dimple, geometric dimple, single perturbation load and single stress-free dimple. Implementation of such imperfections, despite their simplicity, can provide a method for predicting lower-bound buckling loads during the preliminary design phase, when the structural defects of the real hardware are unknown. Numerical prediction of the non- linear instability of the cylinders under axial compression was performed using the finite element method. A typical launcher Inter Stage Skirt (ISS) structure is used as the basis for the chosen geometry and materials. In order to make design and qualification tests more affordable, it is common to use representative sub-scaled hardware. This paper verifies the validity of the chosen sub-scaling method of an ISS cylindrical shell. Buckling mechanisms are described and the different lower-bound methods are discussed.

  19. Buckling and postbuckling behavior of square compression-loaded graphite-epoxy plates with circular cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study of the postbuckling behavior of square compression-loaded graphite-epoxy plates and isotropic plates with a central circular cutout is presented. Results are presented for unidirectional (0 sub 10)s and (90 sub 10)s plates, (0/90 sub 5)s plates, and for aluminum plates. Results are also presented for (+ or - O sub 6)s angle-ply plates for values of O = 30, 46, and 60 degrees. The experimental results indicate that the change in axial stiffness of a plate at buckling is strongly dependent upon cutout size and plate orthotropy. The presence of a cutout gives rise to an internal load distribution that changes, sometimes dramtically, as a function of cutout size coupled with the plate orthotropy. In the buckled state, the role of orthotropy becomes more significant since bending in addition to membrane orthotropy is present. Most of the plates with cutouts exhibited less postbuckling stiffness than the corresponding plate without a cutout, and the postbuckling stiffness decreased with increasing cutout size. However, some of the highly orthotropic plates with cutouts exhibited more postbuckling stiffness than the corresponding plate without a cutout.

  20. Distinct cyclosporin a doses are required to enhance bone formation induced by cyclic and rest-inserted loading in the senescent skeleton.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sundar; Threet, Dewayne; Worton, Leah E; Ausk, Brandon J; Bain, Steven D; Gardiner, Edith M; Kwon, Ronald Y; Gross, Ted S

    2014-01-01

    Age-related decline in periosteal adaptation negatively impacts the ability to utilize exercise to enhance bone mass and strength in the elderly. We recently observed that in senescent animals subject to cyclically applied loading, supplementation with Cyclosporin A (CsA) substantially enhanced the periosteal bone formation rates to levels observed in young animals. We therefore speculated that if the CsA supplement could enhance bone response to a variety of types of mechanical stimuli, this approach could readily provide the means to expand the range of mild stimuli that are robustly osteogenic at senescence. Here, we specifically hypothesized that a given CsA supplement would enhance bone formation induced in the senescent skeleton by both cyclic (1-Hz) and rest-inserted loading (wherein a 10-s unloaded rest interval is inserted between each load cycle). To examine this hypothesis, the right tibiae of senescent female C57BL/6 mice (22 Mo) were subjected to cyclic or rest-inserted loading supplemented with CsA at 3.0 mg/kg. As previously, we initially found that while the periosteal bone formation rate (p.BFR) induced by cyclic loading was enhanced when supplemented with 3.0 mg/kg CsA (by 140%), the response to rest-inserted loading was not augmented at this CsA dosage. In follow-up experiments, we observed that while a 30-fold lower CsA dosage (0.1 mg/kg) significantly enhanced p.BFR induced by rest-inserted loading (by 102%), it was ineffective as a supplement with cyclic loading. Additional experiments and statistical analysis confirmed that the dose-response relations were significantly different for cyclic versus rest-inserted loading, only because the two stimuli required distinct CsA dosages for efficacy. While not anticipated a priori, clarifying the complexity underlying the observed interaction between CsA dosage and loading type holds potential for insight into how bone response to a broad range of mechanical stimuli may be substantially enhanced in

  1. Effect of Air Abrasion Preconditioning on Microleakage in Class V Restorations Under Cyclic Loading: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Dharmani, Charan Kamal Kaur; Singh, Shamsher; Logani, Ajay; Shah, Naseem

    2014-01-01

    Background: Microleakage in class V Glass Ionomer Cement(GIC) or composite restorations at enamel or cementum margins has been cited as a reason for their failure. Air abrasion has been used to precondition tooth surface for increasing retention of such restorations. This study is done to evaluate the effect of preconditioning with air abrasion on microleakage in class V GIC and composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in 40 freshly extracted teeth. They were categorised into following four groups (n=10) depending on cavity preconditioning and restoration. Group I: 10% polyacrylic acid and GI (Ketac molar TM 3M ESPE); Group II: AA and GI; Group III: 35% Phosphoric acid and micro filled composite (MC) (Heliomolar, Ivoclar Vivadent); Group IV: AA and MC. Each group was further divided into subgroups A (no loading) & B (cyclic loading). Microleakage at occlusal and gingival margins was evaluated using methylene blue dye penetration method. Statistical analysis was done using Kruskal-wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Microleakage at cementum margins was higher than at enamel margins in all the groups. Preconditioning with AA resulted in increased micro leakage. Conclusion: AA as a preconditioning agent was ineffective in producing superior tooth-restoration bonding. PMID:24995240

  2. A Splitting Scheme for Solving Reaction-Diffusion Equations Modeling Dislocation Dynamics in Materials Subjected to Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, J.; Walgraef, D.; Christov, C. I.

    2010-11-01

    Strain localization and dislocation pattern formation are typical features of plastic deformation in metals and alloys. Glide and climb dislocation motion along with accompanying production/annihilation processes of dislocations lead to the occurrence of instabilities of initially uniform dislocation distributions. These instabilities result into the development of various types of dislocation micro-structures, such as dislocation cells, slip and kink bands, persistent slip bands, labyrinth structures, etc., depending on the externally applied loading and the intrinsic lattice constraints. The Walgraef-Aifantis (WA) (Walgraef and Aifanits, J. Appl. Phys., 58, 668, 1985) model is an example of a reaction-diffusion model of coupled nonlinear equations which describe 0 formation of forest (immobile) and gliding (mobile) dislocation densities in the presence of cyclic loading. This paper discuss two versions of the WA model and focus on a finite difference, second order in time 1-Nicolson semi-implicit scheme, with internal iterations at each time step and a spatial splitting using the Stabilizing, Correction (Christov and Pontes, Mathematical and Computer Modelling, 35, 87, 2002) for solving the model evolution equations in two dimensions. The results of two simulations are presented. More complete results will appear in a forthcoming paper.

  3. Index of Unconfined Compressive Strength of SAFOD Core by Means of Point-Load Penetrometer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlin, M. B.; Weymer, B.; D'Onfro, P. S.; Ramos, R.; Morgan, K.

    2010-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) project is motivated by the need to answer fundamental questions on the physical and chemical processes controlling faulting and earthquake generation within major plate-boundaries. In 2007, approximately 135 ft (41.1 m) of 4 inch (10.61 cm) diameter rock cores was recovered from two actively deforming traces of the San Andreas Fault. 97 evenly (more or less) distributed index tests for Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) where performed on the cores using a modified point-load penetrometer. The point-load penetrometer used was a handheld micro-conical point indenter referred to as the Dimpler, in reference to the small conical depression that it creates. The core surface was first covered with compliant tape that is about a square inch in size. The conical tip of the indenter is coated with a (red) dye and then forced, at a constant axial load, through the tape and into the sample creating a conical red depression (dimple) on the tape. The combination of red dye and tape preserves a record of the dimple geometrical attributes. The geometrical attributes (e.g. diameter and depth) depend on the rock UCS. The diameter of a dimple is measured with a surface measuring magnifier. Correlation between dimple diameter and UCS has been previously established with triaxial testing. The SAFOD core gave Dimpler UCS values in the range of 10 psi (68.9 KPa) to 15,000 psi (103.4 MPa). The UCS index also allows correlations between geomechanical properties and well log-derived petrophysical properties.

  4. Thermally Stratified Compression Ignition: A new advanced low temperature combustion mode with load flexibility

    DOE PAGES

    Lawler, Benjamin; Splitter, Derek; Szybist, James; ...

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a new advanced combustion mode, called Thermally Stratified Compression Ignition (TSCI), which uses direct water injection to control both the average temperature and the temperature distribution prior to ignition, thereby providing cycle-to-cycle control over the start and rate of heat release in Low Temperature Combustion (LTC). Experiments were conducted to fundamentally understand the effects of water injection on heat release in LTC. Our results show that water injection retards the start of combustion due to the latent heat of vaporization of the injected water. Furthermore, for start of water injection timings between 20 and 70 degrees before topmore » dead center, combustion is significantly elongated compared to without water injection. The 10–90% burn duration with 6.6 and 9.0 mg of water per cycle was 77% and 146% longer than without water injection, respectively. Forced thermal stratification result from a direct water injection which reduces the heat release rate by local evaporative cooling. Finally, the load limits with and without water injection were determined experimentally. Without water injection, the load range was 2.3–3.6 bar gross IMEP. By using water injection to control heat release, the load range in TSCI was 2.3–8.4 bar gross IMEP, which is a range expansion of over 350%. These results demonstrate that direct water injection can provide significant improvements to both controllability and the range of operability of LTC, thereby resolving the major challenges associated with HCCI.« less

  5. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cyclic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R.; Figert, J.; Beek, J.; Ventura, J.; Martinez, J.; Samonski, F.

    2011-01-01

    The present studies show that fanning in the threshold regime is likely caused by other factors than a plastic wake developed during load shedding. The cause of fanning at low R-values is a result of localized roughness, mainly formation of a faceted crack surface morphology , plus crack bifurcations which alters the crack closure at low R-values. The crack growth behavior in the threshold regime involves both crack closure theory and the dislocation theory of metals. Research will continue in studying numerous other metal alloys and performing more extensive analysis, such as the variation in dislocation properties (e.g., stacking fault energy) and its effects in different materials.

  6. The Effects of Time-Compressed Instruction and Redundancy on Learning and Learners' Perceptions of Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastore, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Can increasing the speed of audio narration in multimedia instruction decrease training time and still maintain learning? The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of time-compressed instruction and redundancy on learning and learners' perceptions of cognitive load. 154 university students were placed into conditions that consisted of…

  7. Effect of cyclic high loading rates on the fatigue strength of aluminum-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon Arteaga, Hermes Eskander

    The study of fatigue under high loading rates is of great interest in the complete characterization of a new series of composites with Al-Cu-Mg matrix reinforced with AlB2 dispersoids. Homogeneous and functionally graded composites were prepared via gravity and centrifugal casting, respectively. Through centrifugal casting a gradual variation of the volume fraction of reinforcing particles along the cross section was obtained. In specific fabrication conditions, even complete segregation of the reinforcement particles was achieved. Charpy impact tests as well as hardness tests were conducted to assess the composite strength as a function of the weight percent of boron. The tensile properties of gravity cast samples were obtained. Then for both casting conditions, simple edge-notched bend SE(B) specimens were tested under fatigue conditions (three-point bending). The results from impact and hardness tests allowed identifying an interaction between the Mg dissolved in the matrix and the diborides. This interaction, which has never been reported before, was responsible for the strength reduction observed. It was assumed that a substitutional diffusion of Al by Mg atoms in the hp3 structure of diboride was causing the strength reduction, and three approaches were developed to estimate the amount of Mg depleted from the matrix by the diborides during the composite processing. Gravity cast samples were more sensitive to monotonic damage due to fatigue loads where compared with functionally-graded composites. Contrary to the centrifugal cast samples, gravity samples were also affected by the loading rate. The Mg-AlB2 interaction was also responsible for the reduction in the fatigue resistance as the weight percent of boron increased in both types of composites; regression models were obtained to predict the crack growth curve slope change as function of the boron level. The particle distribution showed to affect the crack growth behavior of the FGMs, decreasing the

  8. Relation of cyclic loading pattern to microstructural fracture in creep fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Halford, G. R.; Oldrieve, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Creep-fatigue-environment interaction is discussed using the 'strainrange partitioning' (SRP) framework as a basis. The four generic SRP strainrange types are studied with a view of revealing differences in micromechanisms of deformation and fatigue degradation. Each combines in a different manner the degradation associated with slip-plane sliding, grain-boundary sliding, migration, cavitation, void development and environmental interaction; hence the approch is useful in delineating the relative importance of these mechanisms in the different loadings. Micromechanistic results are shown for a number of materials, including 316 SS, wrought heat resistant alloys, several nickel-base superalloys, and a tantalum base alloy, T-111. Although there is a commonality of basic behavior, the differences are useful in delineation several important principles of interpretation. Some quantitative results are presented for 316 SS, involving crack initiation and early crack growth, as well as the interaction of low-cycle fatigue with high-cycle fatigue.

  9. Effect of various endodontic solutions on punch out strength of Resilon under cyclic loading

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narender; Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Gupta, Ridhima

    2011-01-01

    Background: Before obturation, various endodontic solutions are used as a final rinse. These solutions might affect the bond strength of Resilon-Epiphany system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of NaOCl (5.25%), chlorhexidine CHX (2%), EDTA solution (17%), and BioPure MTAD on push out bond strength of Resilon-Epiphany system. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five human premolar roots were prepared and divided on the basis of final endodontic solution rinse. The canals were obturated with Resilon-Epiphany system. All samples were restored using a fiber post system and indirect composite crown. The samples received 150 000 cycles of mechanical loading. Push out bond strength was performed in the apical third of root having Resilon obturation. Results and Conclusions: Different endodontic solutions tested, did not affected the push out bond strength of Resilon-Epiphany obturation system. PMID:22144804

  10. Compressive neuropathy of long thoracic nerve and accessory nerve secondary to heavy load bearing. A case report.

    PubMed

    Sahin, F; Yilmaz, F; Esit, N; Aysal, F; Kuran, B

    2007-03-01

    Carrying heavy loads that compress the shoulders is a possible etiological factor for both accessory and long thoracic nerve entrapment. In our patient, shouldering heavy loads damaged both nerves. A 27-year-old right-hand-dominant man was referred because of difficulty in raising his arms after a brief period of painful episodes due to heavy load bearing on both shoulders. Atrophic muscles around the shoulders, depressed and winged scapula were noted. An EMG confirmed entrapment of long thoracic and accessory nerves. An exercise program was instituted; 16 months after initial referral, though winged scapula was still noted, manual muscular strength had returned without functional limitation.

  11. Cyclic Deformation in Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Sha, Z D; Qu, S X; Liu, Z S; Wang, T J; Gao, H

    2015-10-14

    Despite the utmost importance and decades of experimental studies on fatigue in metallic glasses (MGs), there has been so far little or no atomic-level understanding of the mechanisms involved. Here we perform molecular dynamics simulations of tension-compression fatigue in Cu50Zr50 MGs under strain-controlled cyclic loading. It is shown that the shear band (SB) initiation under cyclic loading is distinctly different from that under monotonic loading. Under cyclic loading, SB initiation takes place when aggregates of shear transformation zones (STZs) accumulating at the MG surface reach a critical size comparable to the SB width, and the accumulation of STZs follows a power law with rate depending on the applied strain. It is further shown that almost the entire fatigue life of nanoscale MGs under low cycle fatigue is spent in the SB-initiation stage, similar to that of crystalline materials. Furthermore, a qualitative investigation of the effect of cycling frequency on the fatigue behavior of MGs suggests that higher cycling frequency leads to more cycles to failure. The present study sheds light on the fundamental fatigue mechanisms of MGs that could be useful in developing strategies for their engineering applications.

  12. Evaluating the capability of time-of-flight cameras for accurately imaging a cyclically loaded beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahamy, Hervé; Lichti, Derek; El-Badry, Mamdouh; Qi, Xiaojuan; Detchev, Ivan; Steward, Jeremy; Moravvej, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Time-of-flight cameras are used for diverse applications ranging from human-machine interfaces and gaming to robotics and earth topography. This paper aims at evaluating the capability of the Mesa Imaging SR4000 and the Microsoft Kinect 2.0 time-of-flight cameras for accurately imaging the top surface of a concrete beam subjected to fatigue loading in laboratory conditions. Whereas previous work has demonstrated the success of such sensors for measuring the response at point locations, the aim here is to measure the entire beam surface in support of the overall objective of evaluating the effectiveness of concrete beam reinforcement with steel fibre reinforced polymer sheets. After applying corrections for lens distortions to the data and differencing images over time to remove systematic errors due to internal scattering, the periodic deflections experienced by the beam have been estimated for the entire top surface of the beam and at witness plates attached. The results have been assessed by comparison with measurements from highly-accurate laser displacement transducers. This study concludes that both the Microsoft Kinect 2.0 and the Mesa Imaging SR4000s are capable of sensing a moving surface with sub-millimeter accuracy once the image distortions have been modeled and removed.

  13. A method for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of compressively loaded prismatic composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, Frederick; Gurdal, Zafer; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A method was developed for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of the static response of thin-walled stiffened composite structures loaded in uniaxial or biaxial compression. The method is applicable to arbitrary prismatic configurations composed of linked plate strips, such as stiffened panels and thin-walled columns. The longitudinal ends of the structure are assumed to be simply supported, and geometric shape imperfections can be modeled. The method can predict the nonlinear phenomena of postbuckling strength and imperfection sensitivity which are exhibited by some buckling-dominated structures. The method is computer-based and is semi-analytic in nature, making it computationally economical in comparison to finite element methods. The method uses a perturbation approach based on the use of a series of buckling mode shapes to represent displacement contributions associated with nonlinear response. Displacement contributions which are of second order in the model amplitudes are incorported in addition to the buckling mode shapes. The principle of virtual work is applied using a finite basis of buckling modes, and terms through the third order in the model amplitudes are retained. A set of cubic nonlinear algebraic equations are obtained, from which approximate equilibrium solutions are determined. Buckling mode shapes for the general class of structure are obtained using the VIPASA analysis code within the PASCO stiffened-panel design code. Thus, subject to some additional restrictions in loading and plate anisotropy, structures which can be modeled with respect to buckling behavior by VIPASA can be analyzed with respect to nonlinear response using the new method. Results obtained using the method are compared with both experimental and analytical results in the literature. The configurations investigated include several different unstiffened and blade-stiffening panel configurations, featuring both homogeneous, isotropic materials, and laminated composite

  14. Effect of Degeneration on Fluid–Solid Interaction within Intervertebral Disk Under Cyclic Loading – A Meta-Model Analysis of Finite Element Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhoo, Mohammad; Khalaf, Kinda; Kuo, Ya-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Chun; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Parnianpour, Mohamad; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The risk of low back pain resulted from cyclic loadings is greater than that resulted from prolonged static postures. Disk degeneration results in degradation of disk solid structures and decrease of water contents, which is caused by activation of matrix digestive enzymes. The mechanical responses resulted from internal solid–fluid interactions of degenerative disks to cyclic loadings are not well studied yet. The fluid–solid interactions in disks can be evaluated by mathematical models, especially the poroelastic finite element (FE) models. We developed a robust disk poroelastic FE model to analyze the effect of degeneration on solid–fluid interactions within disk subjected to cyclic loadings at different loading frequencies. A backward analysis combined with in vitro experiments was used to find the elastic modulus and hydraulic permeability of intact and enzyme-induced degenerated porcine disks. The results showed that the averaged peak-to-peak disk deformations during the in vitro cyclic tests were well fitted with limited FE simulations and a quadratic response surface regression for both disk groups. The results showed that higher loading frequency increased the intradiscal pressure, decreased the total fluid loss, and slightly increased the maximum axial stress within solid matrix. Enzyme-induced degeneration decreased the intradiscal pressure and total fluid loss, and barely changed the maximum axial stress within solid matrix. The increase of intradiscal pressure and total fluid loss with loading frequency was less sensitive after the frequency elevated to 0.1 Hz for the enzyme-induced degenerated disk. Based on this study, it is found that enzyme-induced degeneration decreases energy attenuation capability of disk, but less change the strength of disk. PMID:25674562

  15. Anelastic Response of Ice-I/Magnesium Sulfate Hydrate Eutectic Aggregates Obtained from Creep and Cyclic-Loading Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, C.; Goldsby, D. L.; Cooper, R. F.

    2007-12-01

    The large icy satellites of the giant planets are subjected to periodic stress due to their resonance-effected orbital eccentricity. The dissipation of this tidal elastic energy represents a potentially significant internal energy source, the magnitude of which depends on the anelastic properties of the various material layers (ice, rock, etc.). In an icy satellite incorporating an internal ocean, as is suggested for Europa, most of the tidal dissipation (attenuation) occurs in the outer ice layer. Current models for attenuation in the icy shell rely on the inversion of a Maxwell model of steady-state rheology because, to date, no direct dynamic measurements of energy absorption in polycrystalline ice at low-stress/low-frequency planetary conditions have been reported. We are pursuing transient and steady-state creep as well as direct attenuation measurements on polycrystalline ice-I and on eutectic aggregates of ice-I and salt hydrates, such as those suggested to be present on the surface of Europa by the near-infrared spectral data. We focus primarily on system H2O-MgSO4 because it represents the best (binary-system) fit to the spectral data. Samples are fabricated using a misting/sifting technique in order to obtain fine grain-size, or, more accurately, eutectic colony-size (< 25 μm). Transformation of the time- domain data suggest the Maxwell model of steady state is inappropriate for understanding attenuation in pure ice, and wildly inappropriate for a ice-I/magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic material, which demonstrates far higher attenuation (e.g., a factor of 102 at 1 Hz) than that predicted from the model. The absorption behavior of solid-state heterophase boundaries are argued as crucial in this behavior. Attenuation (cyclic compression- compression) experiments have commenced; we will report initial results, comparing these to earlier studies of the static response. Information gleaned from these experiment can help constrain models of crustal thickness

  16. Two-way Shape Memory Effect of NiTi under Compressive Loading Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Young Ik; Lee, Jung Ju

    In this study, the two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) of a Ni-54.5 at.% Ti alloy was investigated experimentally to develop a NiTi linear actuator. The two-way shape memory effect was induced through a compressive shape memory cycle composed of four steps: (1) loading to maximum deformation; (2) unloading; (3) heating; (4) and cooling. Six types of specimens (one solid cylindrical and five tubular) were used to obtain the twoway shape memory strain and two-way recovery stress and to evaluate the actuating capacity. The two-way actuating strain showed a convergent tendency after several training cycles for the same maximum deformation. A maximum value of the two-way strain was obtained for 7% of maximum deformation, independently of the geometry of the tubular specimens. The two-way strains obtained by the shape memory cycles and two-way recovery stress linearly increase as a function of the maximum deformation and the two-way strain, respectively, and the geometry of specimen affects the two-way recovery stress. Although the results show that sufficient recovery stress can be generated by either the two-way shape memory process or by the one-way shape memory process, the two-way shape memory process can be applied more conveniently to actuating applications.

  17. A scanning electron-microscopic study of in vitro abrasion of mammalian tooth enamel under compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Maas, M C

    1994-01-01

    Microscopic tooth-wear (microwear) patterns can be an important tool for assessing modes and rates of abrasive tooth wear, but their analysis and interpretation is complicated by the fact that microwear is influenced by many factors. Three of these factors were here tested under conditions of compressive loading: (1) species differences in enamel structure, (2) abrasive particle size and (3) magnitude of force. Teeth of four species (Homo sapiens, Lemur fulvus, Ovis aries and Crocodylus rhombifer) were abraded in vitro using three sizes of abrasive silicon-carbide grit (average diameters 73, 23 and 14 microns), at two loads (50 and 100 kg). Microwear features were assessed by scanning electron microscopy of lightly etched enamel surfaces and epoxy replicas. Microwear pits (length:width < 4:1) were the predominant feature type. Factorial analysis of variance of rank-transformed, feature-area measurements demonstrated that, under conditions of compressive loading, the size of abrasive particles was the primary determinant of microwear size. These results contrast with previous experimental tests of abrasion by predominantly shearing loads, where feature size was influenced by interaction among experimental factors, including the microscopic orientation of enamel crystallites. Although magnitude of compressive force was not a factor in microwear size variation, it may be a critical factor in explaining the presence or absence of microwear on tooth surfaces. The relatively small compressive bite force generated during typical chewing may not consistently produce abrasive pitting. These experiments demonstrate that, as the same abrasive regime can produce both large and small pits, the mechanism by which wear features are formed (i.e. compression or adhesion) cannot be determined from the size of features alone. Nevertheless, the dependence of pit size on abrasive particle size demonstrates that metrical variation in wear features can elucidate important attributes of

  18. Cyclic loading experiments to measure material response over a broad frequency range: from tickling of rocks to squeezing of moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, C.; Takei, Y.; Cooper, R. F.; Savage, H. M.

    2014-12-01

    Seismology provides powerful methods for imaging the interior of the Earth, not only through differences in seismic velocities, but also through attenuation contrasts. As seismic waves travel through the Earth they are attenuated in accordance with the viscoelastic properties of the material through which they pass. With proper constraints, we will someday be able to use seismic attenuation data as a prospecting tool to determine the grain size, temperature, pressure, melt content, and water content of the material along the ray path. Furthermore, it should be possible to determine active deformation structure, such as crystallographic preferred orientations that form in response to far-field natural tectonic loading. Laboratory studies are striving to provide these needed constraints. Using analogues to mantle rock, we isolate and scrutinize the physics of how microstructural elements affect macroscopic properties of attenuation and steady-state viscosity. An organic analogue, borneol, was used to measure the effects of grain size, temperature, and melt content over a broad frequency range. In these experiments, grain boundary processes were found to play a major role. Polycrystalline ice, which can be considered a rock analogue, has been used to explore the effect of accumulated strain on attenuation, particularly in material that is actively deforming via dislocation creep. Here, defect concentration and substructure are important. I will discuss the use of cyclic loading experiments on borneol and on polycrystalline ice to probe material response from seismic to tidal frequencies, from 10 Hz to 10-4 Hz respectively. These experiments, then, inform our knowledge of viscoelastic behavior of geologic materials at not only seismic frequencies, but also the tidal forcing frequencies experienced by tidewater glaciers and icy satellites.

  19. Analysis of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings With Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Bond Coats Under Spatially Uniform Cyclic Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a numerical investigation into the spallation mechanism in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings observed under spatially-uniform cyclic thermal loading. The analysis focuses on the evolution of local stress and inelastic strain fields in the vicinity of the rough top/bond coat interface during thermal cycling, and how these fields are influenced by the presence of an oxide film and spatially uniform and graded distributions of alumina particles in the metallic bond coat aimed at reducing the top/bond coat thermal expansion mismatch. The impact of these factors on the potential growth of a local horizontal delamination at the rough interface's crest is included. The analysis is conducted using the Higher-Order Theory for Functionally Graded Materials with creep/relaxation constituent modeling capabilities. For two-phase bond coat microstructures, both the actual and homogenized properties are employed in the analysis. The results reveal the important contributions of both the normal and shear stress components to the delamination growth potential in the presence of an oxide film, and suggest mixed-mode crack propagation. The use of bond coats with uniform or graded microstructures is shown to increase the potential for delamination growth by increasing the magnitude of the crack-tip shear stress component.

  20. Relationship Between Hysteresis Dissipated Energy and Temperature Rising in Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the relationship between hysteresis dissipated energy and temperature rising of the external surface in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) during the application of cyclic loading has been analyzed. The temperature rise, which is caused by frictional slip of fibers within the composite, is related to the hysteresis dissipated energy. Based on the fatigue hysteresis theories considering fibers failure, the hysteresis dissipated energy and a hysteresis dissipated energy-based damage parameter changing with the increase of cycle number have been investigated. The relationship between the hysteresis dissipated energy, a hysteresis dissipated energy-based damage parameter and a temperature rise-based damage parameter have been established. The experimental temperature rise-based damage parameter of unidirectional, cross-ply and 2D woven CMCs corresponding to different fatigue peak stresses and cycle numbers have been predicted. It was found that the temperature rise-based parameter can be used to monitor the fatigue damage evolution and predict the fatigue life of fiber-reinforced CMCs.

  1. Liposomes loaded with a STING pathway ligand, cyclic di-GMP, enhance cancer immunotherapy against metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Miyabe, Hiroko; Hyodo, Mamoru; Sato, Yusuke; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-10-28

    Malignant melanomas escape immunosurveillance via the loss/down-regulation of MHC-I expression. Natural killer (NK) cells have the potential to function as essential effector cells for eliminating melanomas. Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a ligand of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signal pathway, can be thought of as a new class of adjuvant against cancer. However, it is yet to be tested, because technologies for delivering c-di-GMP to the cytosol are required. Herein, we report that c-di-GMP efficiently activates NK cells and induces antitumor effects against malignant melanomas when loaded in YSK05 lipid containing liposomes, by assisting in the efficient delivery of c-di-GMP to the cytosol. The intravenous administration of c-di-GMP encapsulated within YSK05-liposomes (c-di-GMP/YSK05-Lip) into mice efficiently induced the production of type I interferon (IFN) as well as the activation of NK cells, resulting in a significant antitumor effect in a lung metastasis mouse model using B16-F10. This antitumor effect was dominated by NK cells. The infiltration of NK cells was observed in the lungs with B16-F10 melanomas. These findings indicate that the c-di-GMP/YSK05-Lip induces MHC-I non-restricted antitumor immunity mediated by NK cells. Consequently, c-di-GMP/YSK05-Lip represents a potentially new adjuvant system for use in immunotherapy against malignant melanomas.

  2. Constitutive law describing the strength degradation kinetics of fibre-reinforced composites subjected to constant amplitude cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amore, Alberto; Grassia, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    A two-parameter model based on strength degradation was developed and its predictive reliability was checked on a series of fatigue life and residual strength data available in the literature. The modelling approach explicitly accounts for the maximum cyclic stress, σ_{max}, and the stress ratio, R= σ_{min} /σ_{max}, and requires a limited number of experimental fatigue life data to predict the cycle-by-cycle strength degradation kinetics until the "sudden drop" of strength before catastrophic failure. Different loading conditions were analysed for a large variety of composites, including short-glass-fibre-reinforced polycarbonate, [±45]S glass/epoxy laminates, [±35]_{2S} graphite/epoxy laminates, AS4 carbon/epoxy 3k/E7K8 plain weave fabric with [45/-45/90/45/-45/45/-45/0/45/-45]S layup, and [CSM/fabric/(CSM/UD)2]S glass/polyester laminate. The modelling approach indicates that the fatigue life and the residual strength are related to the statistical distribution of the static strength.

  3. Comparison of Fracture Characteristics of Openhole-Notch Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites Subjected to Tensile and Compressive Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, M.-U.; Chen, Z. F.; Chen, Z. H.; Li, B. B.

    2017-01-01

    Open-hole tension (OHT) and open-hole compression (OHC) tests were carried out on hot-pressed carbon-fiberreinforced composite samples with a singular open hole. The fracture surfaces of the OHT- and OHC-tested specimens were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM micrographs showed significant features on the surface of carbon fiber, matrix, and especially in the fiber/matrix interface. Interpretation of these micrographs revealed the possible failure mechanism of composite samples with an open hole under tensile and compressive loadings. Furthermore, a comparative study of these micrographs also pointed to certain specific differences between the fracture characteristics of open-hole composite samples failed under tension and compression. This information is useful in the post-failure analysis of a composite structure.

  4. Comparison of Fracture Characteristics of Open-Hole-Notch Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites Subjected to Tensile and Compressive Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, M.-U.; Chen, Z. F.; Chen, Z. H.; Li, B. B.

    2017-01-01

    Open-hole tension (OHT) and open-hole compression (OHC) tests were carried out on hot-pressed carbon-fiberreinforced composite samples with a singular open hole. The fracture surfaces of the OHT- and OHC-tested specimens were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM micrographs showed significant features on the surface of carbon fiber, matrix, and especially in the fiber/matrix interface. Interpretation of these micrographs revealed the possible failure mechanism of composite samples with an open hole under tensile and compressive loadings. Furthermore, a comparative study of these micrographs also pointed to certain specific differences between the fracture characteristics of open-hole composite samples failed under tension and compression. This information is useful in the post-failure analysis of a composite structure.

  5. Effect of compressibility on the nonlinear prediction of the aerodynamic loads on lifting surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, O. A.; Mook, D. T.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The vortex-lattice technique for incompressible flow which accounts for separation at sharp edges is modified to account for compressibility. This is accomplished by extending the Prandtl-Glauert transformation to moderate angles of attack. Thus, the aerodynamic characteristics for the compressible case are obtained from the solution of an equivalent incompressible problem. Numerical results are presented for parallelogram and delta wings to assess the effects of compressibility. The results are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  6. Short-wavelength buckling and shear failures for compression-loaded composite laminates. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The short-wavelength buckling (or the microbuckling) and the interlaminar and inplane shear failures of multi-directional composite laminates loaded in uniaxial compression are investigated. A laminate model is presented that idealizes each lamina. The fibers in the lamina are modeled as a plate, and the matrix in the lamina is modeled as an elastic foundation. The out-of-plane w displacement for each plate is expressed as a trigonometric series in the half-wavelength of the mode shape for laminate short-wavelength buckling. Nonlinear strain-displacement relations are used. The model is applied to symmetric laminates having linear material behavior. The laminates are loaded in uniform end shortening and are simply supported. A linear analysis is used to determine the laminate stress, strain, and mode shape when short-wavelength buckling occurs. The equations for the laminate compressive stress at short-wavelength buckling are dominated by matrix contributions.

  7. Superplastic deformation in carbonate apatite ceramics under constant compressive loading for near-net-shape production of bioresorbable bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Masanori; Wakamatsu, Nobukazu; Doi, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    To produce carbonate apatite (CAP) ceramics with the desired complex shapes using superplastic deformation, deformation behavior of CAP ceramics under constant loading as well as physical properties after deformation were evaluated. Sintered CAP ceramics were plastically deformed in an electric furnace attached to a universal hydraulic testing machine under a constant load. CAP ceramics subjected to an initial compressive pressure of 10 MPa showed an appreciable amount of plastic deformation at temperatures ranging from 720 to 800 degrees C. Plastic deformation increased with increasing temperature from about 10% to 70% after two hours of loading. X-ray diffraction analysis and SEM observation further revealed that some CAP crystals were elongated and aligned with the c-axis normal to the loading direction during superplastic deformation. It was thus concluded that a marked plastic deformation of about 70% at 800 degrees C would be sufficient for near-net-shape production of bioresorbable CAP bone substitutes with complex shapes.

  8. The effects of cyclic and dynamic loading on the fracture resistance of nuclear piping steels. Technical report, October 1992--April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; Brust, F.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the results of the material property evaluation efforts performed within Task 3 of the IPIRG-2 Program. Several related investigations were conducted. (1) Quasi-static, cyclic-load compact tension specimen experiments were conducted using parameters similar to those used in IPIRG-1 experiments on 6-inch nominal diameter through-wall-cracked pipes. These experiments were conducted on a TP304 base metal, an A106 Grade B base metal, and their respective submerged-arc welds. The results showed that when using a constant cyclic displacement increment, the compact tension experiments could predict the through-wall-cracked pipe crack initiation toughness, but a different control procedure is needed to reproduce the pipe cyclic crack growth in the compact tension tests. (2) Analyses conducted showed that for 6-inch diameter pipe, the quasi-static, monotonic J-R curve can be used in making cyclic pipe moment predictions; however, sensitivity analyses suggest that the maximum moments decrease slightly from cyclic toughness degradation as the pipe diameter increases. (3) Dynamic stress-strain and compact tension tests were conducted to expand on the existing dynamic database. Results from dynamic moment predictions suggest that the dynamic compact tension J-R and the quasi-static stress-strain curves are the appropriate material properties to use in making dynamic pipe moment predictions.

  9. Determination of critical loads for cylindrical sandwich panels of composite materials under two-sided compression and shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubina, A. L.; Krashakov, Yu. F.

    The problem of determining the critical buckling stress of symmetric and nonsymmetric sandwich panels loaded in two-sided compression and shear is investigated analytically. The governing equation is obtained by solving equations of balance of forces and moments for an element of a sandwich structure in the case of buckling. The solution is based on the general assumptions of the theory of thin shallow shells. The results of the study can be used to optimize the structure of sandwich panels.

  10. The Microstructure and Thermoelectric Properties of Yb-Filled Skutterudite Yb0.1Co4Sb12 Under Cyclic Thermal Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Pengfei; Zhu, Yan; Chen, Jihu; Yang, Houjiang; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2016-11-01

    This paper is devoted to investigating the microstructure and thermoelectric properties of Yb-filled skutterudite Yb0.1Co4Sb12 under a cyclic thermal loading from room temperature to 773 K. The results indicate after 1000 cycles, the surface morphology changes dramatically, and clear grain boundaries appear on the surface of the sample. The grain sizes of the sample change little after 1000 cycles, and the main phase is still skutterudite; however, a trace amount of YbSb also exists. In addition, the electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity decrease distinctly after 1000 cycles, but the absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient increases a little. Consequently, the ZT value decreases slightly from 0.75 at 800 K before cycling to 0.69 after 1000 cycles. It indicates that the effect of the cyclic thermal loading on the ZT of the Yb0.1Co4Sb12 material is not distinct.

  11. Experimental study on thermal effect on infiltration mechanisms of glycerol into ZSM-5 zeolite under cyclic loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yafei; Li, Na; Luo, Rui; Zhang, Yifeng; Zhou, Qulan; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental infiltration mechanisms under thermal response is of crucial importance to design and develop nanoporous energy systems. In this work, a glycerol/ZSM-5 zeolite-based pressure-driven energy absorption system was built, while the temperature-dependent intrusion of glycerol molecules into lyophobic nanopores of ZSM-5 zeolite and the underlying mechanisms were experimentally studied. By changing the system temperature, the correlations of infiltration pressure with the infiltration and defiltration percentages of the liquid phase under thermal response were explored. It turns out that lifting the system temperature will reduce the critical infiltration pressure barriers and change the system’s wettability. The equivalent surface tension and contact angle are calculated to elucidate the thermal dependence of the system’s wettability. Elevating system temperature can also help enlarge the entry area of the nanochannels and trigger more glycerol molecules to flow out of the nanochannels, which means an increase of the infiltration and defiltration percentages. Weakened hydrogen bonding interaction, temperature sensitivity of glycerol viscosity, and the inherent gas phase in the nanoporous channels may contribute to the infiltration and outflow process at a higher temperature level. Cyclic loadings were applied under each working condition to test the recoverability of the built system. Results showed that the system’s throughput shrank in the first three/four cycles and became stable afterwards. Lifting the system temperature could enhance both intrusion and extrusion processes, thus helping the system reach a faster throughput balance, which is beneficial in establishing a recoverable and reusable energy absorption/storage/conversion system.

  12. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    DOE PAGES

    Alexander, C. Scott; Ding, Jow -Lian; Asay, James Russell

    2016-03-09

    Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPSmore » experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. Additionally, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material

  13. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C. Scott; Ding, Jow -Lian; Asay, James Russell

    2016-03-09

    Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPS experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. Additionally, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material model for

  14. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. S.; Ding, J. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPS experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. In addition, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material model for

  15. Grain size dependence of dynamic mechanical behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under compressive shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Odeshi, A.G.; Szpunar, J.A.; Zeng, L.J.; Olsson, E.

    2015-08-15

    The effects of grain size on the dynamic deformation behavior of rolled AZ31B alloy at high strain rates were investigated. Rolled AZ31B alloy samples with grain sizes of 6, 18 and 37 μm, were subjected to shock loading tests using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar at room temperature and at a strain rate of 1100 s{sup −} {sup 1}. It was found that a double-peak basal texture formed in the shock loaded samples. The strength and ductility of the alloy under the high strain-rate compressive loading increased with decreasing grain size. However, twinning fraction and strain hardening rate were found to decrease with decreasing grain size. In addition, orientation imaging microscopy showed a higher contribution of double and contraction twins in the deformation process of the coarse-grained samples. Using transmission electron microscopy, pyramidal dislocations were detected in the shock loaded sample, proving the activation of pyramidal slip system under dynamic impact loading. - Highlights: • A double-peak basal texture developed in all shock loaded samples. • Both strength and ductility increased with decreasing grain size. • Twinning fraction and strain hardening rate decreased with decreasing grain size. • ‘g.b’ analysis confirmed the presence of dislocations in shock loaded alloy.

  16. Study for the Effect of Continuously Applied Load on a Compressed Ag Nanoparticle at Room Temperature by Atomic Scale Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin

    2016-05-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations are reported for structural transition of a compressed Ag nanoparticle containing 2123 atoms with a crystal structure during the processes of continuously applied load at room temperature. Analytical tools are used to demonstrate the effect of the load on the packing patterns in this deformed particle including internal energy per atom, pair distribution functions, coordination number, pair number as well as the cross-sectional images, and mean square displacements. The simulation results show that the deformation processes of this particle include different stages. Owing to the atom sliding in the (111) plane in different regions of this particle, some interfaces are formed between these regions, and they are barriers of atom movements. With increasing the load, the interfaces in the middle of this particle are disappeared, and the deformation is able to carry out. At larger load, new interfaces are formed in the different regions of this heavily compressed particle with several atom layers, and these interfaces again become obstacles for the further deformation.

  17. A stack-based flex-compressive piezoelectric energy harvesting cell for large quasi-static loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianfeng; Shi, Zhifei; Wang, Jianjun; Xiang, Hongjun

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a flex-compressive piezoelectric energy harvesting cell (F-C PEHC) is proposed. This cell has a large load capacity and adjustable force transmission coefficient assembled from replaceable individual components. A statically indeterminate mechanical model for the cell is established and the theoretical force transmission coefficient is derived based on structural mechanics. An inverse correlation between the force transmission coefficient and the relative stiffness of Element 1’s limbs is found. An experimental study is also conducted to verify the theoretical results. Both weakened and enhanced modes are achieved for this experiment. The maximum power output approaches 4.5 mW at 120 kΩ resistive load under a 4 Hz harmonic excitation with 600 N amplitude for the weakened mode, whereas the maximum power output approaches 17.8 mW at 120 kΩ under corresponding load for the enhanced mode. The experimental measurements of output voltages are compared with the theoretical ones in both weakened and enhanced modes. The experimental measurements of open-circuit voltages are slightly smaller for harmonic excitations with amplitudes that vary from 400 N to 800 N and the errors are within 14%. During the experiment, the maximum load approaches 2.8 kN which is quite large but not the ultimate bearing capacity of the present device. The mechanical model and theoretical transmission coefficient can be used in other flex-compressive mode energy transducers.

  18. Stress-strain state and durability of mechanically inhomogeneous welds under low-cycle loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazenas, A.; Daunis, M.

    2008-02-01

    Relations are proposed for the determination of the stress-strain state, strength, and life of butt welds with mild and hard interlayers under cyclic elastoplastic tension-compression. The accumulation of cyclic and quasistatic damages is determined with allowance for the redistribution of the cyclic elastoplastic strains and hardness of the stress state due to changes in the cyclic properties of separate regions of welds. The theoretical distribution of cyclic strains and the durability of welds under cyclic elastoplastic loading are supported by experimental data

  19. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  20. Constitutive Relations of Randomly Oriented Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete under Multiaxial Compressive Loadings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Plastic Hardening Material [Mould (89)] ....................... 381 5.40 Post-Failure Strain Rate Vectors of Mortar from Steel Plate Series [ Andenes (8...A good review of that was done by Andenes (8) and Starovisky (119). Another good review describing different multiaxial test apparatuses in detail up...contraction of the specimen during hydrostatic compression. Andenes (8) measured these plastic strain increment vectors from biaxial compression

  1. Effects of Elastic Edge Restraints and Initial Prestress on the Buckling Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Riddick, Jaret C.; Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2004-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of test-fixture-induced initial prestress and elastic edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling responses of a compression-loaded, quasi-isotropic curved panel is presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code with high-fidelity models. The results presented show that a wide range of prebuckling and buckling behavior can be obtained by varying parameters that represent circumferential loaded-edge restraint and rotational unloaded-edge restraint provided by a test fixture and that represent the mismatch in specimen and test-fixture radii of curvature. For a certain range of parameters, the panels exhibit substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations that yield buckling loads nearly twice the corresponding buckling load predicted by a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis for shallow curved panels. In contrast, the results show another range of parameters exist for which the nonlinear prebuckling deformations either do not exist or are relatively benign, and the panels exhibit buckling loads that are nearly equal to the corresponding linear bifurcation buckling load. Overall, the results should also be of particular interest to scientists, engineers, and designers involved in simulating flight-hardware boundary conditions in structural verification and certification tests, involved in validating structural analysis tools, and interested in tailoring buckling performance.

  2. Impact of Different Screw Designs on Durability of Fracture Fixation: In Vitro Study with Cyclic Loading of Scaphoid Bones

    PubMed Central

    Gruszka, Dominik; Herr, Robert; Hely, Hans; Hofmann, Peer; Klitscher, Daniela; Hofmann, Alexander; Rommens, Pol Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The use of new headless compression screws (HCSs) for scaphoid fixation is growing, but the nonunion rate has remained constant. The aim of this study was to compare the stability of fixation resulting from four modern HCSs using a simulated fracture model to determine the optimal screw design(s). Methods We tested 40 fresh-frozen cadaver scaphoids treated with the Acumed Acutrak 2 mini (AA), the KLS Martin HBS2 midi (MH), the Stryker TwinFix (ST) and the Synthes HCS 3.0 with a long thread (SH). The bones with simulated fractures and implanted screws were loaded uniaxially into flexion for 2000 cycles with a constant bending moment of 800 Nmm. The angulation of the fracture fragments was measured continuously. Data were assessed statistically using the univariate ANOVA test and linear regression analysis, and the significance level was set at p < 0.05. Results The median angulation of bone fragments φ allowed by each screw was 0.89° for AA, 1.12° for ST, 1.44° for SH and 2.36° for MH. With regards to linear regression, the most reliable curve was achieved by MH, with a coefficient of determination of R2 = 0.827. This was followed by AA (R2 = 0.354), SH (R2 = 0.247) and ST (R2 = 0.019). Data assessed using an adapted ANOVA model showed no statistically significant difference (p = 0.291) between the screws. Conclusions The continuous development of HCSs has resulted in very comparable implants, and thus, at this time, other factors, such as surgeons’ experience, ease of handling and price, should be taken into consideration. PMID:26741807

  3. Damage evaluation of fiber reinforced plastic-confined circular concrete-filled steel tubular columns under cyclic loading using the acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Du, Fangzhu; Ou, Jinping

    2017-03-01

    Glass-fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP)-confined circular concrete-filled steel tubular (CCFT) columns comprise of concrete, steel, and GFRP and show complex failure mechanics under cyclic loading. This paper investigated the failure mechanism and damage evolution of GFRP–CCFT columns by performing uniaxial cyclic loading tests that were monitored using the acoustic emission (AE) technique. Characteristic AE parameters were obtained during the damage evolution of GFRP–CCFT columns. Based on the relationship between the loading curve and these parameters, the damage evolution of GFRP–CCFT columns was classified into three stages that represented different damage degrees. Damage evolution and failure mode were investigated by analyzing the b-value and the ratio of rise time to waveform amplitude and average frequency. The damage severity of GFRP–CCFT columns were quantitatively estimated according to the modified index of damage and NDIS-2421 damage assessment criteria corresponding to each loading step. The proposed method can explain the damage evolution and failure mechanism for GFRP–CCFT columns and provide critical warning information for composite structures.

  4. Age-related effect of static and cyclic loadings on the strain-force curve of the vastus lateralis tendon and aponeurosis.

    PubMed

    Mademli, Lida; Arampatzis, Adamantios; Walsh, Mark

    2008-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the age-related effects of submaximal static and cyclic loading on the mechanical properties of the vastus lateralis (VL) tendon and aponeurosis in vivo. Fourteen old and 12 young male subjects performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions (MVC) on a dynamometer before and after (a) a sustained isometric contraction at 25% MVC and (b) isokinetic contractions at 50% isokinetic MVC, both until task failure. The elongation of the VL tendon and aponeurosis was examined using ultrasonography. To calculate the resultant knee joint moment, the kinematics of the leg were recorded with eight cameras (120 Hz). The old adults displayed significantly lower maximal moments but higher strain values at any given tendon force from 400 N and up in all tested conditions. Neither of the loading protocols influenced the strain-force relationship of the VL tendon and aponeurosis in either the old or young adults. Consequently, the capacity of the tendon and aponeurosis to resist force remained unaffected in both groups. It can be concluded that in vivo tendons are capable of resisting long-lasting static (~4.6 min) or cyclic (~18.5 min) mechanical loading at the attained strain levels (4-5%) without significantly altering their mechanical properties regardless of age. This implies that as the muscle becomes unable to generate the required force due to fatigue, the loading of the tendon is terminated prior to provoking any significant changes in tendon mechanical properties.

  5. Strain distribution in the intervertebral disc under unconfined compression and tension load by the optimized digital image correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Tai-Yong; Yang, Xiu-Ping; Li, Kun; Gao, Li-Lan; Zhang, Chun-Qiu; Guo, Yue-Hong

    2014-05-01

    The unconfined compression and tension experiments of the intervertebral disc were conducted by applying an optimized digital image correlation technique, and the internal strain distribution was analysed for the disc. It was found that the axial strain values of different positions increased obviously with the increase in loads, while inner annulus fibrosus and posterior annulus fibrosus experienced higher axial strains than the outer annulus fibrosus and anterior annulus fibrosus. Deep annulus fibrosus exhibited higher compressive and tensile axial strains than superficial annulus fibrosus for the anterior region, while there was an opposite result for the posterior region. It was noted that all samples demonstrated a nonlinear stress-strain profile in the process of deforming, and an elastic region was shown once the sample was deformed beyond its toe region.

  6. Dislocation model of nucleation and development of slip bands and their effect on service life of structural materials subject to cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetulov, D. I.; Andreev, V. V.; Myasnikov, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Most of the destructions of machine parts are of fatigue character. Under cyclic loading, the surface layer, in which hardening-softening processes rapidly occur, is formed almost at once after its beginning. The interaction of plastic-deformation traces with each other and with other structural elements, such as grains, results in the formation of a characteristic microstructure of the machine-part surface subject to cyclic loadings. The character of accumulation of slip bands and their shape (narrow, wide, twisting, and broken) depends on the conditions under which (under what factors) the cyclic loading occurs. The fatigue-resistance index expressed in terms of the slope of left portion of the fatigue curve linearized in logarithmic coordinates also depends on the set of relevant factors. The dependence of the surface damageability on the fatigue resistance index makes it possible to implement the method of predicting the fatigue curve by the description of the factors acting on a detail or construction. The position of the inflection point on the curve in the highcycle fatigue region (the endurance limit and the number of loading cycles, the ordinate and abscissa of the inflection point on the fatigue curve, respectively) also depends on the set of relevant factors. In combination with the previously obtained value of the slope of the left portion of the curve in the high-cycle fatigue region, this makes it possible to construct an a priori fatigue curve, thus reducing the scope of required fatigue tests and, hence, high expenses because of their long duration and high cost. The scope of tests upon using the developed method of prediction may be reduced to a minimum of one or two samples at the predicted level of the endurance limit.

  7. Dislocation model of nucleation and development of slip bands and their effect on service life of structural materials subject to cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Shetulov, D. I.; Andreev, V. V. Myasnikov, A. M.

    2015-12-15

    Most of the destructions of machine parts are of fatigue character. Under cyclic loading, the surface layer, in which hardening–softening processes rapidly occur, is formed almost at once after its beginning. The interaction of plastic-deformation traces with each other and with other structural elements, such as grains, results in the formation of a characteristic microstructure of the machine-part surface subject to cyclic loadings. The character of accumulation of slip bands and their shape (narrow, wide, twisting, and broken) depends on the conditions under which (under what factors) the cyclic loading occurs. The fatigue-resistance index expressed in terms of the slope of left portion of the fatigue curve linearized in logarithmic coordinates also depends on the set of relevant factors. The dependence of the surface damageability on the fatigue resistance index makes it possible to implement the method of predicting the fatigue curve by the description of the factors acting on a detail or construction. The position of the inflection point on the curve in the highcycle fatigue region (the endurance limit and the number of loading cycles, the ordinate and abscissa of the inflection point on the fatigue curve, respectively) also depends on the set of relevant factors. In combination with the previously obtained value of the slope of the left portion of the curve in the high-cycle fatigue region, this makes it possible to construct an a priori fatigue curve, thus reducing the scope of required fatigue tests and, hence, high expenses because of their long duration and high cost. The scope of tests upon using the developed method of prediction may be reduced to a minimum of one or two samples at the predicted level of the endurance limit.

  8. Effect of loading path on fatigue degradation and stress-strain response of glass fabric composites under tension/torsion biaxial cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Tamiaki, Minoru; Fujii, Toru; Kawakami, Hiroshi

    1998-12-31

    It has been well recognized that the fatigue failure characteristics of fiber reinforced composites under tension/torsion biaxial loading are different from those under uniaxial loading. In many cases, biaxial loads are proportionally applied to specimens and their loading path is shown as a straight line on the normal and shear stresses map. However, innumerable loading paths exist which give the same final stress state under non-proportional biaxial loading. It was revealed in the previous research of the authors that the difference in loading mode and sequence of shear stress under tension/torsion biaxial loading apparently affects the fatigue characteristics such as stress-strain relation and fatigue life. Therefore, it is also anticipated that the fatigue failure characteristics of fiber reinforced composites are strongly influenced not only by loading mode and sequence but also by loading path under multi-axial loading. However, there are few studies on the effect of loading path on the fatigue characteristics including stress-strain response and microscopic internal damage accumulation for fiber reinforced composites. The objective of the present work is to show the effect of loading path on the fatigue of a plain-woven glass fabric polymer composite under tension/torsion biaxial loading. Three different loading paths are applied to the material including proportional loading.

  9. Quasi-three-dimensional analysis for composite cylinder under lateral compressive loading

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiwaki, Tsuyoshi |; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Maekawa, Zenichiro; Hamada, Hiroyuki; Mori, Sadaki

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a lateral compressive analytical method for CFRP cylinders using a quasi-three-dimensional model. This numerical model was constructed by shell and beam elements which represent fiber and resin respectively. The lateral compressive behaviors of CFRP cylinders with [{theta}/{minus}{theta}]sym ({theta} = 15{degree}, 30{degree}, 45{degree}, 60{degree}) were experimentally evaluated. The damage propagation was simulated using the quasi-three-dimensional model. The transverse cracking and interlaminar delamination were simulated independently. Furthermore comparing the analytical and experimental results, it is confirmed that the proposed analytical method is precise.

  10. Shock Compression and Recovery of Microorganism-Loaded Broths and AN Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazell, P. J.; Beveridge, C.; Groves, K.; Stennett, C.

    2009-12-01

    The microorganisms Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Zygosaccharomyces bailii and an oil-based emulsion, have been subjected to shock compression using the flyer-plate technique to initial pressures of 0.8 GPa (in the suspension). In each experiment, a stainless steel capsule was used to contain the broths and allow for recovery without contamination. Where cavitation was mostly suppressed by virtue of simultaneous shock and dynamic compression, no kill was observed. By introducing an air gap behind the suspension, limited kill was measured in the yeast. Results also suggest that stable emulsification occurs in coarse oil-based emulsions that are subjected to shock.

  11. Shock compression and recovery of microorganism-loaded broths and an emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazell, Paul; Beveridge, Cliff; Groves, Kathy

    2009-06-01

    The microorganisms Escherichia coli, Enterococcus feacalis and Zygosaccharomyces bailii and an oil-based emulsion, have been subjected to shock compression using the flyer-plate technique to initial pressures of 0.8 GPa (in the suspension). In each experiment, a stainless steel capsule was used to contain the broths and allow for recovery without contamination. Where cavitation was suppressed by virtue of simultaneous shock and quasi-static compression, no kill was observed. By introducing an air gap behind the suspension, limited kill was measured in the yeast. Results also suggest that emulsification occurs in oil-based emulsions that are subjected to shock.

  12. Analysis of behavior of simply supported flat plates compressed beyond the buckling load into the plastic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayers, J; Budiansky, Bernard

    1955-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the postbuckling behavior of a simply supported square flat plate with straight edges compressed beyond the buckling load into the plastic range. The method of analysis involves the application of a variational principle of the deformation theory of plasticity in conjunction with computations carried out on a high-speed calculating machine. Numerical results are obtained for several plate proportions and for one material. The results indicate plate strengths greater than those that have been found experimentally on plates that do not satisfy straight-edge conditions. (author)

  13. Compression creep rupture of an E-glass/vinyl ester composite subjected to combined mechanical and fire loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Steven Earl

    Polymer matrix composites are seeing increasing use in structural systems (e.g. ships, bridges) and require a quantitative basis for describing their performance under combined mechanical load and fire. Although much work has been performed to characterize the flammability, fire resistance and toxicity of these composite systems, an understanding of the structural response of sandwich type structures and laminate panels under combined mechanical and thermal loads (simulating fire conditions) is still largely unavailable. Therefore a research effort to develop a model to describe the structural response of these glass/vinyl esters systems under fire loading conditions is relevant to the continuing and future application of polymer matrix composites aboard naval ships. The main goal of the effort presented here is to develop analytical models and finite element analysis methods and tools to predict limit states such as local compression failures due to micro-buckling, residual strength and times to failure for composite laminates at temperatures in the vicinity of the glass transition where failure is controlled by viscoelastic effects. Given the importance of compression loading to a structure subject to fire exposure, the goals of this work are succinctly stated as the: (a) Characterization of the non-linear viscoelastic and viscoplastic response of the E-glass/vinyl ester composite above Tg. (b) Description of the laminate compression mechanics as a function of stress and temperature including viscoelasticity. (c) Viscoelastic stress analysis of a laminated panel ([0/+45/90/-45/0] S) using classical lamination theory (CLT). Three manuscripts constitute this dissertation which is representative of the three steps listed above. First, a detailed characterization of the nonlinear thermoviscoelastic response of Vetrotex 324/Derakane 510A--40 through Tg was conducted using the Time--Temperature--Stress--Superposition Principle (TTSSP) and Zapas--Crissman model. Second

  14. The Study of Stability of Compression-loaded Multispan Composite Panel Upon Failure of elements Binding it to Panel Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamula, G. N.; Ierusalimsky, K. M.; Fomin, V. P.; Grishin, V. I.; Kalmykova, G. S.

    1999-01-01

    The present document is a final technical report under the NCC-1-233 research program (dated September 15, 1998; see Appendix 5) carried out within co-operation between United States'NASA Langley RC and Russia's Goskomoboronprom in aeronautics, and continues similar programs, NCCW-73, NCC-1-233 and NCCW 1-233 accomplished in 1996, 1997, and 1998, respectively. The report provides results of "The study of stability of compression-loaded multispan composite panels upon failure of elements binding it to panel supports"; these comply with requirements established at TsAGI on 24 March 1998 and at NASA on 15 September 1998.

  15. Design and fabrication of Rene 41 advanced structural panels. [their performance under axial compression, shear, and bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, B. E.; Northrup, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    The efficiency was investigated of curved elements in the design of lightweight structural panels under combined loads of axial compression, inplane shear, and bending. The application is described of technology generated in the initial aluminum program to the design and fabrication of Rene 41 panels for subsequent performance tests at elevated temperature. Optimum designs for two panel configurations are presented. The designs are applicable to hypersonic airplane wing structure, and are designed specifically for testing at elevated temperature in the hypersonic wing test structure located at the NASA Flight Research Center. Fabrication methods developed to produce the Rene panels are described, and test results of smaller structural element specimens are presented to verify the design and fabrication methods used. Predicted strengths of the panels under several proposed elevated temperature test load conditions are presented.

  16. Degradation of Ti-6Al-4V alloy under cyclic loading in a simulated body environment with cell culturing.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kotaro; Miyabe, Sayaka; Tsuchiya, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Shinji

    2016-03-01

    The present study reports the corrosion fatigue of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy using cyclic deformation test in a simulated body fluid under cell culturing for the first time. Cyclic deformation tests were carried out using three types of specimens to reveal the effects of proteins and cells on the corrosion fatigue of the alloy. For the 1-day-immersed and 1-week-immersed specimens, tensile specimens were soaked in a simulated body fluid for 1 day and 1 week, respectively, before cyclic deformation test, whereas for the cell-cultured specimen, MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells were seeded and then cultured on tensile specimens for 1 week. The incubation period for crack initiation was longer for the cell-cultured and 1-week-immersed specimens compared to that for the 1-day-immersed specimen. On the other hand, crack propagation period for the cell-cultured and 1-week-immersed specimens was shorter than that for the 1-day-immersed specimen. These results indicate that proteins and cells adhered on the alloy surface inhibit metal dissolution at newly created surface emerged by cyclic deformation to suppress crack initiation, whereas they accelerate crack propagation because dissolution at crack tip is accelerated in the occluded space formed under proteins and cells.

  17. Effect of ion-beam treatment on structure and fracture resistance of 12Cr1MoV steel under static, cyclic and dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, S. V. Vlasov, I. V. Sergeev, V. P.; Maruschak, P. O.

    2015-10-27

    Features of the structure and properties modification of 12Cr1MoV steel subjected to irradiation by zirconium ion beam have been investigated with the use of optical and electron microscopy as well as microhardness measurement. It has been shown that upon treatment the structure modification occurred across the entire cross-section of specimens with the thickness of 1 mm. Changes in the mechanical properties of these specimens under static, cyclic and impact loading are interpreted in terms of identified structure changes.

  18. Study of the strength of molybdenum under high pressure using electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jow; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James

    2015-06-01

    MAPS (Magnetically Applied Pressure Shear) is a new technique that has the potential to study material strength under mega-bar pressures. By applying a mixed-mode pressure-shear loading and measuring the resultant material responses, the technique provides explicit and direct information on material strength under high pressure. In order to apply sufficient shear traction to the test sample, the driver must have substantial strength. Molybdenum was selected for this reason along with its good electrical conductivity. In this work, the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under MAPS loading was studied. To understand the experimental data, a viscoplasticity model with tension-compression asymmetry was also developed. Through a combination of experimental characterization, model development, and numerical simulation, many unique insights were gained on the inelastic behavior of molybdenum such as the effects of strength on the interplay between longitudinal and shear stresses, potential interaction between the magnetic field and molybdenum strength, and the possible tension-compression asymmetry of the inelastic material response. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Modal parameter identification of a compression-loaded CFRP stiffened plate and correlation with its buckling behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves-Vargas, M.; Dafnis, A.; Reimerdes, H.-G.; Schröder, K.-U.

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the dynamic response and the buckling behaviour of several load-carrying structural components of civil aircraft when subjected to transient load scenarios such as gusts or a landing impact, a generic mid-size aircraft is defined within the European research project DAEDALOS. From this aircraft, several sections or panels in different regions such as wing, vertical tailplane and fuselage are defined. The stiffened carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) plate investigated within the present work represents a simplified version of the wing panel selected from the generic aircraft. As part of the current work, the buckling behaviour and the modal properties of the stiffened plate under the effect of a static in-plane compression load are studied. This is accomplished by means of a test series including quasi-static buckling tests and an experimental modal analysis (EMA). One of the key objectives pursued is the correlation of the modal properties to the buckling behaviour by studying the relationship between the natural frequencies of the stiffened plate and its corresponding buckling load. The experimental work is verified by a finite element analysis.

  20. Embedding of human vertebral bodies leads to higher ultimate load and altered damage localisation under axial compression.

    PubMed

    Maquer, Ghislain; Schwiedrzik, Jakob; Zysset, Philippe K

    2014-01-01

    Computer tomography (CT)-based finite element (FE) models of vertebral bodies assess fracture load in vitro better than dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, but boundary conditions affect stress distribution under the endplates that may influence ultimate load and damage localisation under post-yield strains. Therefore, HRpQCT-based homogenised FE models of 12 vertebral bodies were subjected to axial compression with two distinct boundary conditions: embedding in polymethylmethalcrylate (PMMA) and bonding to a healthy intervertebral disc (IVD) with distinct hyperelastic properties for nucleus and annulus. Bone volume fraction and fabric assessed from HRpQCT data were used to determine the elastic, plastic and damage behaviour of bone. Ultimate forces obtained with PMMA were 22% higher than with IVD but correlated highly (R² = 0.99). At ultimate force, distinct fractions of damage were computed in the endplates (PMMA: 6%, IVD: 70%), cortex and trabecular sub-regions, which confirms previous observations that in contrast to PMMA embedding, failure initiated underneath the nuclei in healthy IVDs. In conclusion, axial loading of vertebral bodies via PMMA embedding versus healthy IVD overestimates ultimate load and leads to distinct damage localisation and failure pattern.

  1. High Temperature Expansion Due to Compression Test for the Determination of a Cladding Material Failure Criterion under RIA Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Le Saux, M.; Poussard, C.; Averty, X.; Sainte Catherine, C.; Carassou, S.

    2007-07-01

    This paper is mainly dedicated to the development of an out-of-pile test reproducing the thermo-mechanical loading conditions encountered during the first stage of a Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA) transient, dominated by Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction (PCMI). In particular, the strain-controlled clad loading under high strain rate associated with temperatures up to 600 deg. C expected during the PCMI phase is simulated by an Expansion Due to Compression (EDC) test achievable at high temperature. The use of appropriate materials for the inner pellet made it possible to achieve the tests from 20 deg. C up to 900 deg. C. The interpretation of the test data is supported by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) including parameters tuned using an inverse method coupling FEA and tests results. A deformation model, identified upon the PROMETRA (Transient Mechanical Properties) experimental database and describing the anisotropic viscoplastic behavior of Cold-Worked Stress Relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding alloys under typical RIA loading conditions, is exploited. The combined analysis of experimental results and finite element simulations provides a deeper understanding of the deformation mode (near pure hoop tension) that arises during the tests. The failure mode appears to be representative of that obtained on tubes during the PCMI stage of RIA experiments. An appropriate device is currently developed in order to reach a bi-axiality of the loading path closer to that expected during the PCMI stage (between plane-strain and equal-biaxial tension). (authors)

  2. Analytical and experimental study of structurally efficient composite hat-stiffened panels loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Mikulus, M. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Structural efficiency studies were made to determine the weight saving potential of graphite/epoxy composite structures for compression panel applications. Minimum weight hat-stiffened and open corrugation configurations were synthesized using a nonlinear mathematical programming technique. Selected configurations were built and tested to study local and Euler buckling characteristics. Test results for 23 panels critical in local buckling and six panels critical in Euler buckling are compared with analytical results obtained using the BUCLASP-2 branched plate buckling program. A weight efficiency comparison is made between composite and aluminum compression panels using metal test data generated by the NACA. Theoretical studies indicate that potential weight savings of up to 50% are possible for composite hat-stiffened panels when compared with similar aluminum designs. Weight savings of 32% to 42% were experimentally achieved. Experience suggests that most of the theoretical weight saving potential is available if design deficiencies are eliminated and strict fabrication control is exercised.

  3. Cyclic tensile stretch load and oxidized low density lipoprotein synergistically induce lectin-like oxidized ldl receptor-1 in cultured bovine chondrocytes, resulting in decreased cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Masao; Nishimura, Shunji; Yoshida, Kohji; Kakinuma, Takumi; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Munakata, Hiroshi; Hamanishi, Chiaki

    2006-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation is known to be an essential factor in the regulation of cartilage metabolism. We tested the hypothesis that expression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) can be modulated by cyclic tensile stretch load in chondrocytes. Cyclic loading of repeated stretch stress at 10 cycles per minute with 10 kPa of stress for 6 h induced expression of LOX-1 to 2.6 times control in cultured bovine articular chondrocytes, equivalent to the addition of 10 microg/mL oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) (2.4 times control). Application of the cyclic load to the chondrocytes along with 10 microg/mL ox-LDL resulted in synergistically increased LOX-1 expression to 6.3 times control. Individual application of cyclic loading and 10 microg/mL ox-LDL significantly suppressed chondrocytes viability (84.6% +/- 3.4% and 80.9% +/- 3.2% of control at 24 h, respectively; n = 3; p < 0.05) and proteoglycan synthesis [81.0% +/- 7.1% and 85.7% +/- 5.2% of control at 24 h, respectively; p < 0.05 when compared with 94.6% +/- 4.6% for native-LDL (n = 3)]. Cyclic loading and 10 microg/mL ox-LDL synergistically affected cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis, which were significantly suppressed to 45.6% +/- 4.9% and 48.7% +/- 6.7% of control at 24 h, respectively (n = 3; p < 0.01 when compared with individual application of cyclic loading or 10 microg/mL ox-LDL). In this study, we demonstrated synergistic effects of cyclic tensile stretch load and ox-LDL on cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes, which may be mediated through enhanced expression of LOX-1 and which has important implications in the progression of cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis.

  4. The Behaviour of Reinforced Concrete Subjected to Reversed Cyclic Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, David Michael Volpe

    Reversed cyclic loading, as may occur during seismic events, can cause sudden and brittle shear failures in reinforced concrete structural members. This thesis presents both experimental and analytical investigations into the behaviour of members subjected to reversed cyclic shear loading, and culminates in the development of a new, rational model to describe this behaviour. In the experimental phase of the research, ten reinforced concrete shell elements were tested under reversed cyclic in-plane shear loads. Data collected by means of several acquisition systems allowed extensive analysis of the experiments, and provided insight into the behaviour of the crack interfaces. In comparison with existing models, such as the Modified Compression Field Theory, it was found that the shear strengths of these reversed cyclically loaded specimens were as much as 25% lower than monotonic predictions. The results of the experimental program informed the development of a new analytical model, the General Crack Component Model (GCCM). The central concept of the GCCM is that the reversed cyclic behaviour of a shear panel depends on the behaviour of multiple crack systems, each with its own constitutive properties. A rigorous framework based on the principles of compatibility and equilibrium was formulated in order to allow for the appropriate combination of the stiffnesses of the three components of the model: concrete, steel, and cracks. The GCCM was validated for reversed cyclic and monotonic loading by comparison with the experimental results as well as data from other researchers. It was shown that the model provides good estimates of the behaviour of reinforced concrete subjected to reversed cyclic loads, and that it can be used as part of a larger structural analysis, ultimately helping engineers to design safer structures and more accurately assess the safety of existing construction.

  5. Biaxial ratcheting and cyclic plasticity for Bree-type loading. Part 2: Comparison between finite element analysis and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nadarajah, C.; Ng, H.W.

    1996-05-01

    In Part 1 of this two part (Ng and Nadarajah, 1996), the results of an extensive program of finite element analyses were described. The problem being considered is the phenomenon of ratcheting and cyclic stress-strain hysteresis loop behavior in a thin-walled cylinder subject to cyclic thermal stress and sustained internal pressure. The purpose of Part 2 is to compare the finite element results with two analytical solutions and review the applicability of the latter as a design procedure for assessment of these types of structures. The comparison shows that the ratcheting to shake-down boundaries based on F.E. and analytical models are in close agreement. The hoop ratcheting rates predicted by the uniaxial model enveloped the F.E. and biaxial models, while for the axial ratcheting rates, the F.E. results are upper bound.

  6. Strain localization in <111> single crystals of Hadfield steel under compressive load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurova, E. G.; Zakharova, G. G.; Melnikov, E. V.

    2010-07-01

    A study of strain localization under compression of <111> Hadfield steel single crystals at room temperature was done by light and transmission electron microscopy. At epsilon<1%, macro shear bands (MSB) form that have non-crystallographic and complex non-linear habit planes and are the results of the interaction of dislocation slip on conjugate slip planes. Mechanical twinning was experimentally found inside the MSB. After the stage of MSBs formation, deformation develops with high strain hardening coefficient and corresponds to interaction of slip and twinning inside as well as outside the MSBs.

  7. Probabilistic Simulation of Combined Thermo-Mechanical Cyclic Fatigue in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2011-01-01

    A methodology to compute probabilistically-combined thermo-mechanical fatigue life of polymer matrix laminated composites has been developed and is demonstrated. Matrix degradation effects caused by long-term environmental exposure and mechanical/thermal cyclic loads are accounted for in the simulation process. A unified time-temperature-stress-dependent multifactor-interaction relationship developed at NASA Glenn Research Center has been used to model the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. The fast probability-integration method is used to compute probabilistic distribution of response. Sensitivities of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables (e.g., constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness, etc.) computed and their significance in the reliability-based design for maximum life is discussed. The effect of variation in the thermal cyclic loads on the fatigue reliability for a (0/+/-45/90)s graphite/epoxy laminate with a ply thickness of 0.127 mm, with respect to impending failure modes has been studied. The results show that, at low mechanical-cyclic loads and low thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life for 0.999 reliability is most sensitive to matrix compressive strength, matrix modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and ply thickness. Whereas at high mechanical-cyclic loads and high thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life at 0.999 reliability is more sensitive to the shear strength of matrix, longitudinal fiber modulus, matrix modulus, and ply thickness.

  8. Probabilistic Simulation of Combined Thermo-Mechanical Cyclic Fatigue in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    A methodology to compute probabilistically-combined thermo-mechanical fatigue life of polymer matrix laminated composites has been developed and is demonstrated. Matrix degradation effects caused by long-term environmental exposure and mechanical/thermal cyclic loads are accounted for in the simulation process. A unified time-temperature-stress-dependent multifactor-interaction relationship developed at NASA Glenn Research Center has been used to model the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. The fast probability-integration method is used to compute probabilistic distribution of response. Sensitivities of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables (e.g., constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness, etc.) computed and their significance in the reliability-based design for maximum life is discussed. The effect of variation in the thermal cyclic loads on the fatigue reliability for a (0/+/-45/90)s graphite/epoxy laminate with a ply thickness of 0.127 mm, with respect to impending failure modes has been studied. The results show that, at low mechanical-cyclic loads and low thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life for 0.999 reliability is most sensitive to matrix compressive strength, matrix modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and ply thickness. Whereas at high mechanical-cyclic loads and high thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life at 0.999 reliability is more sensitive to the shear strength of matrix, longitudinal fiber modulus, matrix modulus, and ply thickness.

  9. Analytical and experimental study of structurally efficient composite hat-stiffened panels loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Structural efficiency studies were made to determine the weight-saving potential of graphite/epoxy composite structures for compression panel applications. Minimum-weight hat-stiffened and open-corrugation configurations were synthesized using a nonlinear mathematical programing technique. Selected configurations were built and tested to study local and Euler buckling characteristics. Test results for 23 panels critical in local buckling and six panels critical in Euler buckling are compared with analytical results obtained using the BUCLASP-2 branched plate buckling program. A weight efficiency comparison is made between composite and aluminum compression panels using metal test data generated by the NACA. Theoretical studies indicate that potential weight savings of up to 50% are possible for composite hat-stiffened panels when compared with similar aluminum designs. Weight savings of 32% to 42% were experimentally achieved. Experience to date suggests that most of the theoretical weight-saving potential is available if design deficiencies are eliminated and strict fabrication control is exercised.

  10. Improvements to a method for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of compressively loaded stiffened composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, Frederick

    1993-01-01

    The NLPAN computer code uses a finite-strip approach to the analysis of thin-walled prismatic composite structures such as stiffened panels. The code can model in-plane axial loading, transverse pressure loading, and constant through-the-thickness thermal loading, and can account for shape imperfections. The NLPAN code represents an attempt to extend the buckling analysis of the VIPASA computer code into the geometrically nonlinear regime. Buckling mode shapes generated using VIPASA are used in NLPAN as global functions for representing displacements in the nonlinear regime. While the NLPAN analysis is approximate in nature, it is computationally economical in comparison with finite-element analysis, and is thus suitable for use in preliminary design and design optimization. A comprehensive description of the theoretical approach of NLPAN is provided. A discussion of some operational considerations for the NLPAN code is included. NLPAN is applied to several test problems in order to demonstrate new program capabilities, and to assess the accuracy of the code in modeling various types of loading and response. User instructions for the NLPAN computer program are provided, including a detailed description of the input requirements and example input files for two stiffened-panel configurations.

  11. Effect of cyclic strain on the mechanical behavior of virgin ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Avanzini, A

    2011-10-01

    Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a polymeric material employed in critical biomedical applications. Knowledge of its mechanical behavior is essential in order to obtain accurate prediction of stresses and deformations in real components, in particular when cyclic loading is considered. In the present research the effects of alternating and pulsating cyclic strain on the mechanical response of UHMWPE were studied by means of an experimental procedure based on tests carried out in strain control at different mean cyclic strain levels. During the tests the temperature increase due to hysteretic heating was controlled by means of a compressed air cooling apparatus specifically devised. By taking advantage of the possibility to control and stabilize temperature, cyclic steady-state mechanical response was investigated at room temperature and at 37 and 50 °C, comparing the effects of alternating and pulsating loading cycles. A transient thermal analysis using the finite element method (FEM) was also carried out to analyze temperature distribution within the specimen. UHMWPE exhibited cyclic softening as a result of a thermal contribution due to temperature increase and of a mechanical contribution related to the effects of applied load on the microstructure. The material exhibited different peak stress percent reductions for pulsating and alternating loading and during tensile and compressive loading phases. For pulsating tests significant cyclic mean stress relaxation was also observed. Based on the experimental procedure described the cyclic curve was determined as a function of temperature and fitted with a Ramberg-Osgood type constitutive equation, in which material parameters are temperature dependent. In this way the combined effects of temperature rises, such as those that might occur in biological environments or due to frictional heating, and mechanical loads could effectively be taken into account for constitutive modeling purposes of

  12. Finite Element Analysis of Warp-Reinforced 2.5D Woven Composites Based on a Meso-Scale Voxel Model under Compression Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Diantang; Chen, Li; Wang, Yanjie; Sun, Ying; Jia, Na; Qian, Kun

    2016-11-01

    A study is conducted with the aim of developing meso-scale voxel-based model for evaluating the compressive behaviors of warp-reinforced 2.5D woven composites. The real microstructure of warp-reinforced 2.5D woven composites is established. For the validation of this model, a series of axial (warp direction) and transverse (weft direction) compressive tests are conducted. The results show that under axial and transverse compressive loading, the calculated max stress and the final damage morphology agree well with the experimental results. Moreover, it is found that the axial compressive strength is mainly dependent on the high-crimp blinder warp, while the transverse compressive strength is significantly influenced by the warp/weft interlaced regions. It is expected that such a numerical investigation will provide useful information for understanding the strength and failure characteristic of 2.5D woven composites.

  13. Investigation into Fretting Fatigue Under Cyclic Contact Load and in Conjunction with Plain Fatigue of Titanium Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    to predict fatigue life, crack initiation location, and crack initiation orientation. 2.4.2. Plain Fatigue In the low cycle regime Coffin [20...and Manson [21] expressed the relationship of life in the plastic area as: ’’ )2( 2 c ff p Nεε =⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜ ⎝ ⎛ Δ...Wright-Patterson AFB OH, December 2002. 20. L. Coffin , Jr. “A Study of the Effects of Cyclic Thermal Stresses on a Ductile Metal,” Trans

  14. Acoustic emission signals can discriminate between compressive bone fractures and tensile ligament injuries in the spine during dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Van Toen, C; Street, J; Oxland, T R; Cripton, P A

    2012-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) sensors are a reliable tool in detecting fracture; however they have not been used to differentiate between compressive osseous and tensile ligamentous failures in the spine. This study evaluated the effectiveness of AE data in detecting the time of injury of ligamentum flavum (LF) and vertebral body (VB) specimens tested in tension and compression, respectively, and in differentiating between these failures. AE signals were collected while LF (n=7) and VB (n=7) specimens from human cadavers were tested in tension and compression (0.4m/s), respectively. Times of injury (time of peak AE amplitude) were compared to those using traditional methods (VB: time of peak force, LF: visual evidence in high speed video). Peak AE signal amplitudes and frequencies (using Fourier and wavelet transformations) for the LF and VB specimens were compared. In each group, six specimens failed (VB, fracture; LF, periosteal stripping or attenuation) and one did not. Time of injury using AE signals for VB and LF specimens produced average absolute differences to traditional methods of 0.7 (SD=0.2) ms and 2.4 (SD=1.5) ms (representing 14% and 20% of the average loading time), respectively. AE signals from VB fractures had higher amplitudes and frequencies than those from LF failures (average peak amplitude 87.7 (SD=6.9) dB vs. 71.8 (SD=9.8)dB for the inferior sensor, p<0.05; median characteristic frequency from the inferior sensor 97 (interquartile range, IQR, 41) kHz vs. 31 (IQR 2) kHz, p<0.05). These findings demonstrate that AE signals could be used to delineate complex failures of the spine.

  15. Post-buckling of geometrically imperfect shear-deformable flat panels under combined thermal and compressive edge loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Souza, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The static post-buckling of simply-supported flat panels exposed to a stationary nonuniform temperature field and subjected to a system of subcritical in-plane compressive edge loads is investigated. The study is performed within a refined theory of composite laminated plates incorporating the effect of transverse shear and the geometric nonlinearities. The influence played by a number of effects, among them transverse shear deformation, initial geometric imperfections, the character of the in-plane boundary conditions and thickness ratio are studied and a series of conclusions are outlined. The influence played by the complete temperature field (i.e., the uniform through thickness and thickness-wise gradient) as compared to the one induced by only the uniform one, is discussed and the peculiarities of the resulting post-buckling behaviors are enlightened.

  16. Two-dimensional descent through a compressible atmosphere: Sequential deceleration of an unpowered load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, M. P.

    2010-02-01

    Equations, based on Rayleigh's drag law valid for high Reynolds number, are derived for two-dimensional motion through a compressible atmosphere in isentropic equilibrium, such as characterizes the Earth's troposphere. Solutions yield horizontal and vertical displacement, velocity, and acceleration as a function of altitude and ground-level temperature. An exact analytical solution to the equations linearized in the aero-thermodynamic parameter is given; in general the equations must be solved numerically. The theory, applied to the unpowered fall of a large aircraft stabilized to flat descent by symmetrical, sequential deployment of horizontal and vertical decelerators, shows that such an aircraft can be brought down with mean peak deployment and impact decelerations below 10g.

  17. Experimental study on energy absorption of foam filled kraft paper honeycomb subjected to quasi-static uniform compression loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Kadir, N.; Aminanda, Y.; Ibrahim, M. S.; Mokhtar, H.

    2016-10-01

    A statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of factor and to obtain the optimum configuration of Kraft paper honeycomb. The factors considered in this study include density of paper, thickness of paper and cell size of honeycomb. Based on three level factorial design, two-factor interaction model (2FI) was developed to correlate the factors with specific energy absorption and specific compression strength. From the analysis of variance (ANOVA), the most influential factor on responses and the optimum configuration was identified. After that, Kraft paper honeycomb with optimum configuration is used to fabricate foam-filled paper honeycomb with five different densities of polyurethane foam as filler (31.8, 32.7, 44.5, 45.7, 52 kg/m3). The foam-filled paper honeycomb is subjected to quasi-static compression loading. Failure mechanism of the foam-filled honeycomb was identified, analyzed and compared with the unfilled paper honeycomb. The peak force and energy absorption capability of foam-filled paper honeycomb are increased up to 32% and 30%, respectively, compared to the summation of individual components.

  18. EFFECTS OF HIGH-RATE COMPRESSION LOADING ON SHORT REINFORCED PLASTIC MEMBERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    thin-walled tubular aluminum columns, solid columns of cellular cellulose acetate , and tubular epoxy columns. Permanent deformations of both the...tubular aluminum columns and the solid cellular cellulose acetate columns appeared to occur intermittently as the columns resisted series of maximum...varied for the cellular cellulose acetate test pieces. the epoxy columns gave the least reproducibility, shattering severely under load. It was concluded

  19. Engineered particles demonstrate improved flow properties at elevated drug loadings for direct compression manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Trementozzi, Andrea N; Leung, Cheuk-Yui; Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Irdam, Erwin; Lin, Yiqing; MacPhee, J Michael; Boulas, Pierre; Karki, Shyam B; Zawaneh, Peter N

    2017-03-08

    Optimizing powder flow and compaction properties are critical for ensuring a robust tablet manufacturing process. The impact of flow and compaction properties of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) becomes progressively significant for higher drug load formulations, and for scaling up manufacturing processes. This study demonstrated that flow properties of a powder blend can be improved through API particle engineering, without critically impacting blend tabletability at elevated drug loadings. In studying a jet milled API (D50=24μm) and particle engineered wet milled API (D50=70μm and 90μm), flow functions of all API lots were similarly poor despite the vast difference in average particle size (ffc<4). This finding strays from the common notion that powder flow properties are directly correlated to particle size distribution. Upon adding excipients, however, clear trends in flow functions based on API particle size were observed. Wet milled API blends had a much improved flow function (ffc>10) compared with the jet milled API blends. Investigation of the compaction properties of both wet and jet milled powder blends also revealed that both jet and wet milled material produced robust tablets at the drug loadings used. The ability to practically demonstrate this uncommon observation that similarly poor flowing APIs can lead to a marked difference upon blending is important for pharmaceutical development. It is especially important in early phase development during API selection, and is advantageous particularly when material-sparing techniques are utilized.

  20. Particle and gaseous emissions from compressed natural gas and ultralow sulphur diesel-fuelled buses at four steady engine loads.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, E R; Ristovski, Z D; Meyer, N; Morawska, L

    2009-04-01

    Exhaust emissions from thirteen compressed natural gas (CNG) and nine ultralow sulphur diesel in-service transport buses were monitored on a chassis dynamometer. Measurements were carried out at idle and at three steady engine loads of 25%, 50% and 100% of maximum power at a fixed speed of 60 km h(-1). Emission factors were estimated for particle mass and number, carbon dioxide and oxides of nitrogen for two types of CNG buses (Scania and MAN, compatible with Euro 2 and 3 emission standards, respectively) and two types of diesel buses (Volvo Pre-Euro/Euro1 and Mercedez OC500 Euro3). All emission factors increased with load. The median particle mass emission factor for the CNG buses was less than 1% of that from the diesel buses at all loads. However, the particle number emission factors did not show a statistically significant difference between buses operating on the two types of fuel. In this paper, for the very first time, particle number emission factors are presented at four steady state engine loads for CNG buses. Median values ranged from the order of 10(12) particles min(-)(1) at idle to 10(15) particles km(-)(1) at full power. Most of the particles observed in the CNG emissions were in the nanoparticle size range and likely to be composed of volatile organic compounds The CO2 emission factors were about 20% to 30% greater for the diesel buses over the CNG buses, while the oxides of nitrogen emission factors did not show any difference due to the large variation between buses.

  1. A non-linear homogeneous model for bone-like materials under compressive load.

    PubMed

    Mengoni, M; Voide, R; de Bien, C; Freichels, H; Jérôme, C; Léonard, A; Toye, D; Müller, R; van Lenthe, G H; Ponthot, J P

    2012-02-01

    Finite element (FE) models accurately compute the mechanical response of bone and bone-like materials when the models include their detailed microstructure. In order to simulate non-linear behavior, which currently is only feasible at the expense of extremely high computational costs, coarser models can be used if the local morphology has been linked to the apparent mechanical behavior. The aim of this paper is to implement and validate such a constitutive law. This law is able to capture the non-linear structural behavior of bone-like materials through the use of fabric tensors. It also allows for irreversible strains using an elastoplastic material model incorporating hardening. These features are expressed in a constitutive law based on the anisotropic continuum damage theory coupled with isotropic elastoplasticity in a finite strain framework. This material model was implemented into metafor (LTAS-MNNL, University of Liège, Belgium), a non-linear FE software. The implementation was validated against experimental data of cylindrical samples subjected to compression. Three materials with bone-like microstructure were tested: aluminum foams of variable density (ERG, Oakland, CA, USA), polylactic acid foam (CERM, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium), and cancellous bone tissue of a deer antler (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium).

  2. Structural Performance of a Compressively Loaded Foam-Core Hat-Stiffened Textile Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Dexter, Benson H.

    1996-01-01

    A structurally efficient hat-stiffened panel concept that utilizes a structural foam as a stiffener core material has been designed and developed for aircraft primary structural applications. This stiffener concept is fabricated from textile composite material forms with a resin transfer molding process. This foam-filled hat-stiffener concept is structurally more efficient than most other prismatically stiffened panel configurations in a load range that is typical for both fuselage and wing structures. The panel design is based on woven/stitched and braided graphite-fiber textile preforms, an epoxy resin system, and Rohacell foam core. The structural response of this panel design was evaluated for its buckling and postbuckling behavior with and without low-speed impact damage. The results from single-stiffener and multi-stiffener specimen tests suggest that this structural concept responds to loading as anticipated and has excellent damage tolerance characteristics compared to a similar panel design made from preimpregnated graphite-epoxy tape material.

  3. Nonlinear analysis for the response and failure of compression-loaded angle-ply laminates with a hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathison, Steven R.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Shuart, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to determine the effect of nonlinear material behavior on the response and failure of unnotched and notched angle-ply laminates under uniaxial compressive loading. The endochronic theory was chosen as the constitutive theory to model the AS4/3502 graphite-epoxy material system. Three-dimensional finite element analysis incorporating the endochronic theory was used to determine the stresses and strains in the laminates. An incremental/iterative initial strain algorithm was used in the finite element program. To increase computational efficiency, a 180 deg rotational symmetry relationship was utilized and the finite element program was vectorized to run on a supercomputer. Laminate response was compared to experimentation revealing excellent agreement for both the unnotched and notched angle-ply laminates. Predicted stresses in the region of the hole were examined and are presented, comparing linear elastic analysis to the inelastic endochronic theory analysis. A failure analysis of the unnotched and notched laminates was performed using the quadratic tensor polynomial. Predicted fracture loads compared well with experimentation for the unnotched laminates, but were very conservative in comparison with experiments for the notched laminates.

  4. Buckling of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Laminated Composite Materials Subjected to Axial Compression and Shear Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, J. C.; Gates, T. S.; Frankland, S.-J. V.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-scale method to predict the stiffness and stability properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced laminates has been developed. This method is used in the prediction of the buckling behavior of laminated carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites formed by stacking layers of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer with the nanotube alignment axes of each layer oriented in different directions. Linking of intrinsic, nanoscale-material definitions to finite scale-structural properties is achieved via a hierarchical approach in which the elastic properties of the reinforced layers are predicted by an equivalent continuum modeling technique. Solutions for infinitely long symmetrically laminated nanotube-reinforced laminates with simply-supported or clamped edges subjected to axial compression and shear loadings are presented. The study focuses on the influence of nanotube volume fraction, length, orientation, and functionalization on finite-scale laminate response. Results indicate that for the selected laminate configurations considered in this study, angle-ply laminates composed of aligned, non-functionalized carbon nanotube-reinforced lamina exhibit the greatest buckling resistance with 1% nanotube volume fraction of 450 nm uniformly-distributed carbon nanotubes. In addition, hybrid laminates were considered by varying either the volume fraction or nanotube length through-the-thickness of a quasi-isotropic laminate. The ratio of buckling load-to-nanotube weight percent for the hybrid laminates considered indicate the potential for increasing the buckling efficiency of nanotube-reinforced laminates by optimizing nanotube size and proportion with respect to laminate configuration.

  5. In vitro evaluation of the fracture resistance and microleakage of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to teeth with composite fillings after cyclic loading

    PubMed Central

    Sadighpour, Leyla; Fallahi Sichani, Babak; Kharazi Fard, Mohamd Javad

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE There is insufficient data regarding the durability of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to existing composite fillings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fracture resistance and microleakage of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to teeth with existing composite fillings. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty maxillary central incisors were divided into three groups (for each group, n=10): intact teeth (NP), teeth with class III composite fillings (C3) and teeth with class IV cavities (C4). Porcelain laminate veneers were made using IPS-Empress ceramic and bonded with Panavia F2 resin cement. The microleakage of all of the specimens was tested before and after cyclic loading (1 × 106 cycles, 1.2 Hz). The fracture resistance values (N) were measured using a universal testing machine, and the mode of failure was also examined. The statistical analyses were performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests (α=.05). RESULTS There was a significant difference in the mean microleakage of group C4 compared with group NT (P=.013). There was no significant difference in the fracture loads among the groups. CONCLUSION The microleakage and failure loads of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to intact teeth and teeth with standard class III composite fillings were not significantly different. PMID:25177471

  6. A multi-surface model for ferroelectric ceramics - application to cyclic electric loading with changing maximum amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniprakash, S.; Arockiarajan, A.; Menzel, A.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the maximum amplitude of externally applied cyclic electric fields, ferroelectric ceramics show minor or major hysteresis. The materials also show asymmetric butterfly hysteresis in a prepoled material. Aiming at capturing these behaviour in a phenomenological constitutive model, a multi-surface modelling approach for ferroelectrics is introduced. In this paper, with the note on the motivation for a multi-surface model related to the results of new experimental investigations and also to experimental data reported in the literature, the constitutive relation for a rate dependent multi-surface ferroelectric model is developed. Following this, a brief graphical illustration shows how this model captures the objective phenomena. Consequently, the numerical implementation of the model to capture experimental results is demonstrated. Finally, the performance of this model to represent behaviour of decaying polarisation offset of electrically fatigued specimen is shown.

  7. Cyclic Fatigue Testing for Application for paraglacial rock slope stability modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grämiger, Lorenz; Perras, Matthew A.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Loew, Simon

    2015-04-01

    In glacial environments, rock mass damage is influenced by stress redistribution caused by glaciation and deglaciation cycles. The intact rock strength, discontinuities, stress regime and environmental factors all contribute to the mechanical behavior of the rock slope. Critically-stressed rock walls are exposed to changing boundary conditions. The effect of stress changes during deglaciation of a major glacial period is not well constrained, neither the influence of smaller stress magnitudes of repeat glacier cycles during an interglacial. In an effort to constrain numerical rock slope model input values, a laboratory testing program has been conducted to address the role of fatigue on the intact rock strength. Baseline unconfined compression and Brazilian tensile testing has been conducted on gneissic rocks from the Aletsch valley in Switzerland. The baseline testing results are used to determine load levels for cyclic fatigue compression and tension testing. In the cyclic tests the intact rock samples are taken to the load levels determined from the baseline tests and cyclic loading and unloading is conducted around the nominal load level. The stress fluctuation chosen is between 2-10 MPa, which is equivalent to a glacial loading and unloading of 200-1000m of ice. Such ice thickness change are typical for the Grosser Aletsch glacier during the Lateglacial and Holocene. During cyclic loading and unloading the amount of damage is estimated by recording the number of acoustic emission events with time. Once the acoustic emission events per cycle decrease well below initial cycling levels the load level is increased and cyclic loading is continued at the new load level. This was done for both cyclic compression and cyclic Brazilian tensile tests. The aim of the cyclic tests is to understand what degree of pre-existing damage is required such that 2-10 MPa stress fluctuations could cause crack propagation and failure of laboratory samples in long-term cyclic fatigue

  8. Influence of cyclic loading at room temperature on the critical current at 4.2 K of Nb3Sn superconducting composite wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, S.; Osamura, K.

    The influence of cyclic loading at room temperature on the critical current at 4.2 K of bronze-processed multifilamentary Nb3Sn superconducting composite wire was studied. After the first cycle, the critical current and upper critical magnetic field increased, reaching a maximum and then decreased with increasing applied stress. After the second and following cycles, the changes were small when the applied stress was not high enough to cause damage to the Nb3Sn. These results can be described well quantitatively by substituting the strain values of Nb3Sn calculated in this work into Ekin's scaling law for the strain effect. When the applied stress was high enough to cause damage to the Nb3Sn in the first cycle, the critical current decreased with increasing numbers of cycles.

  9. Study over thermal state of gas turbine engine metal-ceramic rotor blades and nozzle guide vanes under thermal shock and thermal-cyclic loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soudarev, A. V.; Souryaninov, A. A.; Podgorets, V. Ya.; Grishaev, V. V.; Tikhoplav, V. Yu; Molchanov, A. S.; Soudarev, B. V.

    2004-05-01

    To ensure a reliable operation of the 2.5 MW gas turbine engine (GTE- 2.5)[1] with the inlet gas temperature TIT=1623 K, studies were performed over the thermal state of the nozzle guide vanes and rotor blades with the temperatures, rates and flows of the working media and cooling air simulating all the potential turbine stage operating duties. The steady state and thermal-cyclic tests having been accomplished, there was no visible defect on the rotor blades and the nozzle vanes. Afterwards, they survived the endurance tests at the rated cooling. Therefore, the functionality of the shell thin-wall hybrid nozzle vanes and rotor blades under the variable operating duties of the gas turbine at the “shock” and “cyclic” loads of the working media temperature variations has been demonstrated.

  10. Buckling and postbuckling behavior of square compression-loaded graphite-epoxy plates with circular cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented for unidirectional (0, 10)(sub s) and (90,10)(sub s) plates, ((0/90)(sub 5)(sub s)) plates, and for aluminum plates. Results are also presented for ((+/- theta)(sub 6)(sub s)) angle-ply plates for values of theta = 30, 45, and 60 degrees. The results indicate that the change in axial stiffness of a plate at buckling is strongly dependent upon cutout size and plate orthotropy. The presence of a cutout gives rise to an internal load distribution that changes, sometimes dramatically, as a function of cutout size coupled with the plate orthotropy. In the buckled state, the role of orthotropy becomes more significant since bending in addition to membrane orthotropy is present. Most of the plates with cutouts exhibited less postbuckling stiffness than the corresponding plate without a cutout, and the postbuckling stiffness decreased with increasing cutout size. However, some of the highly orthotropic plates with cutouts exhibited more postbuckling stiffness than the corresponding plate without a cutout. These results suggest the possibility of tailoring the cutout size and the stacking sequence of a composite plate to optimize postbuckling stiffness. It was found that plates with large radius cutouts do exhibit some postbuckling strength. The results also indicate that a cutout can influence modal interaction in a plate. Specifically, results are presented that show a plate with a relatively small cutout buckling at a higher load than the corresponding plate without a cutout, due to modal interaction. Other results are presented that indicate the presence of nonlinear prebuckling deformations, due to material nonlinearity, in the angle-ply plates with theta = 45 and 60 degrees. The nonlinear prebuckling deformations are more pronounced in the plates with theta = 45 degrees and become even more pronounced as the cutout size increases. Results are also presented that show how load-path eccentricity due to improper machining of the test specimens

  11. Loading and compression of a single two-dimensional Bose gas in an optical accordion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ville, J. L.; Bienaimé, T.; Saint-Jalm, R.; Corman, L.; Aidelsburger, M.; Chomaz, L.; Kleinlein, K.; Perconte, D.; Nascimbène, S.; Dalibard, J.; Beugnon, J.

    2017-01-01

    The experimental realization of two-dimensional (2D) Bose gases with a tunable interaction strength is an important challenge for the study of ultracold quantum matter. Here we report on the realization of an optical accordion creating a lattice potential with a spacing that can be dynamically tuned between 11 and 2 μ m . We show that we can load ultracold 87Rb atoms into a single node of this optical lattice in the large spacing configuration and then decrease nearly adiabatically the spacing to reach a strong harmonic confinement with frequencies larger than ωz/2 π =10 kHz. Atoms are trapped in an additional flat-bottom in-plane potential that is shaped with a high resolution. By combining these tools we create custom-shaped uniform 2D Bose gases with tunable confinement along the transverse direction and hence with a tunable interaction strength.

  12. Changes in the Structure and Properties of Welded Joints of Low-Alloy Steels, Subjected to Cyclic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskov, V. N.; Kovenskiy, I. M.; Kuskov, K. V.

    2016-04-01

    Time-varying loads negatively affect the properties and structure of materials. Structural failures typically occur at loads below the yield point. In this work, fatigue tests of welded joints of low-alloy steels were carried out in an asymmetric cycle at loads of 60 and 80% of the yield strength. The stress ratio was 0.8-0.9. On the basis of the results of the tests, equations linking the number of cycles to failure with test parameters were obtained. Such equations can be used for estimating the residual life of elements both under construction and in operation. It has been found that the failure is not instantaneous. Specimens of steels continue to resist variable loads for 4000 - 26000 cycles to failure, depending on steel grade and the parameters of the test. Under operating conditions, it gives an opportunity to discover the onset of failure and dispose of the defective part or to replace the entire structure. A standard technique was used to measure the microhardness on the fractured specimens. The distance between the nearest indentations was 0.2 mm. The results of the measurements were plotted in graphs of ahardness change characteristic for all steels under study. A microhardness “step” has been discovered in areas with high dislocation density, as evidenced by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. An intermediate stage of the investigation is the development of recommendations for determining the moment of failure of welded constructions with a probability of 95%.

  13. Opening of an interface flaw in a layered elastic half-plane under compressive loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.; Fichter, W. B.; Goree, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    A static analysis is given of the problem of an elastic layer perfectly bonded, except for a frictionless interface crack, to a dissimilar elastic half-plane. The free surface of the layer is loaded by a finite pressure distribution directly over the crack. The problem is formulated using the two dimensional linear elasticity equations. Using Fourier transforms, the governing equations are converted to a pair of coupled singular integral equations. The integral equations are reduced to a set of simultaneous algebraic equations by expanding the unknown functions in a series of Jacobi polynomials and then evaluating the singular Cauchy-type integrals. The resulting equations are found to be ill-conditioned and, consequently, are solved in the least-squares sense. Results from the analysis show that, under a normal pressure distribution on the free surface of the layer and depending on the combination of geometric and material parameters, the ends of the crack can open. The resulting stresses at the crack-tips are singular, implying that crack growth is possible. The extent of the opening and the crack-top stress intensity factors depend on the width of the pressure distribution zone, the layer thickness, and the relative material properties of the layer and half-plane.

  14. Enhanced antitumor efficacy by cyclic RGDyK-conjugated and paclitaxel-loaded pH-responsive polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yajie; Zhou, Yanxia; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Chao; Li, Yushu; Li, Jinwen; Li, Xinru; Liu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Cyclic RGDyK (cRGDyK)-conjugated pH-sensitive polymeric micelles were fabricated for targeted delivery of paclitaxel to prostate cancer cells based on pH-sensitive copolymer poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline)-poly(D,L-lactide) (PEOz-PLA) and cRGDyK-PEOz-PLA to enhance antitumor efficacy. The prepared micelles with an average diameter of about 28nm exhibited rapid release behavior at endo/lysosome pH, effectively enhanced the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel to PC-3 cells by increasing the cellular uptake, which was correlated with integrin αvβ3 expression in tumor cells. The active targeting activity of the micelles was further confirmed by in vivo real time near-infrared fluorescence imaging in PC-3 tumor-bearing nude mice. Moreover, the active targeting and pH-sensitivity endowed cRGDyK-conjugated micelles with a higher antitumor effect in PC-3 xenograft-bearing nude mice compared with unmodified micelles and Taxol with negligible systemic toxicity. Therefore, these results suggested that cRGDyK-conjugated pH-sensitive polymeric micelles may be a promising delivery system for efficient delivery of anticancer drugs to treat integrin αvβ3-rich prostate cancers.

  15. Influence of cyclic fatigue in water on the load-bearing capacity of dental bridges made of zirconia.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Dittmer, Marc Philipp; Borchers, Lothar; Stiesch-Scholz, Meike

    2008-09-01

    The humid atmosphere and permanent occurrence of chewing forces in the oral environment lead to degradation of ceramics used for prosthetic restorations. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of artificial aging on the load-bearing capacity of four-unit bridges, with both undamaged and predamaged zirconia frameworks. Additionally, different parameters for chewing simulation have been investigated and a finite element analysis was made to predict the location of highest tensile stresses within the bridges. A total of 60 frameworks were milled from presintered zirconia and divided into six homogeneous groups. Prior to veneering, frameworks of two groups were "damaged" by a defined saw cut similar to an accidental flaw generated during shape cutting. After veneering, FPDs were subjected to thermal and mechanical cycling - with the exception of control groups. The load-bearing capacity of tested FPDs was significantly reduced by artificial aging. In comparison to unaged specimens, fracture resistance decreased by about 40%, whereas preliminary damage did not have a significant effect. Increasing number of cycles and increasing upper load limit failed to show any additional effect on fracture force. To predict the progression of degradation under the terms of in vitro simulation for even longer periods, further aging experiments are required.

  16. Finite-element analysis of transverse compressive and thermal loads on Nb3Sn wires with voids

    DOE PAGES

    Zhai, Y.; D'Hauthuille, L.; Barth, C.; ...

    2016-02-29

    High-field superconducting magnets play a very important role in many large-scale physics experiments, particularly particle colliders and fusion confinement devices such as Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The two most common superconductors used in these applications are NbTi and Nb3Sn. Nb3Sn wires are favored because of their significantly higher Jc (critical current density) for higher field applications. The main disadvantage of Nb3Sn is that the superconducting performance of the wire is highly strain sensitive and it is very brittle. This strain sensitivity is strongly influenced by two factors: plasticity and cracked filaments. Cracks are inducedmore » by large stress concentrators that can be traced to the presence of voids in the wire. We develop detailed 2-D and 3-D finite-element models containing wire filaments and different possible distributions of voids in a bronze-route Nb3Sn wire. We apply compressive transverse loads for various cases of void distributions to simulate the stress and strain response of a Nb3Sn wire under the Lorentz force. Furthermore, this paper improves our understanding of the effect voids have on the Nb3Sn wire's mechanical properties, and in so, the connection between the distribution of voids and performance degradation such as the correlation between irreversible strain limit and the void-induced local stress concentrations.« less

  17. Strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with various types of non-metallic fiber and rods reinforcement under static loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevskii, A. V.; Baldin, I. V.; Kudyakov, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Adoption of modern building materials based on non-metallic fibers and their application in concrete structures represent one of the important issues in construction industry. This paper presents results of investigation of several types of raw materials selected: basalt fiber, carbon fiber and composite fiber rods based on glass and carbon. Preliminary testing has shown the possibility of raw materials to be effectively used in compressed concrete elements. Experimental program to define strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with non-metallic fiber reinforcement and rod composite reinforcement included design, manufacture and testing of several types of concrete samples with different types of fiber and longitudinal rod reinforcement. The samples were tested under compressive static load. The results demonstrated that fiber reinforcement of concrete allows increasing carrying capacity of compressed concrete elements and reducing their deformability. Using composite longitudinal reinforcement instead of steel longitudinal reinforcement in compressed concrete elements insignificantly influences bearing capacity. Combined use of composite rod reinforcement and fiber reinforcement in compressed concrete elements enables to achieve maximum strength and minimum deformability.

  18. Air-particle abrasion on zirconia ceramic using different protocols: effects on biaxial flexural strength after cyclic loading, phase transformation and surface topography.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rodrigo O A; Valandro, Luiz F; Melo, Renata M; Machado, João P B; Bottino, Marco A; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different air-particle abrasion protocols on the biaxial flexural strength and structural stability of zirconia ceramics. Zirconia ceramic specimens (ISO 6872) (Lava, 3M ESPE) were obtained (N=336). The specimens (N=118, n=20 per group) were randomly assigned to one of the air-abrasion protocols: Gr1: Control (as-sintered); Gr2: 50 µm Al2O3 (2.5 bar); Gr3: 50 µm Al2O3 (3.5 bar); Gr4: 110 µm Al2O3(2.5 bar); Gr5: 110 µm Al2O3 (3.5 bar); Gr6: 30 µm SiO2 (2.5 bar) (CoJet); Gr7: 30 µm SiO2(3.5 bar); Gr8: 110 µm SiO2 (2.5 bar) (Rocatec Plus); and Gr9: 110 µm SiO2 (3.5 bar) (duration: 20 s, distance: 10 mm). While half of the specimens were tested immediately, the other half was subjected to cyclic loading in water (100,000 cycles; 50 N, 4 Hz, 37 °°C) prior to biaxial flexural strength test (ISO 6872). Phase transformation (t→m), relative amount of transformed monoclinic zirconia (FM), transformed zone depth (TZD) and surface roughness were measured. Particle type (p=0.2746), pressure (p=0.5084) and cyclic loading (p=0.1610) did not influence the flexural strength. Except for the air-abraded group with 110 µm Al2O3 at 3.5 bar, all air-abrasion protocols increased the biaxial flexural strength (MPa) (Controlnon-aged: 1,030 ± 153, Controlaged: 1,138 ± 138; Experimentalnon-aged: 1,307 ± 184-1,554 ± 124; Experimentalaged: 1,308 ± 118-1,451 ± 135) in both non-aged and aged conditions, respectively. Surface roughness (Ra) was the highest with 110 µm Al2O3(0.84 µm. FM values ranged from 0% to 27.21%, higher value for the Rocatec Plus (110 µm SiO2) and 110 µm Al2O3 groups at 3.5 bar pressure. TZD ranged between 0 and 1.43 µm, with the highest values for Rocatec Plus and 110 µm Al2O3 groups at 3.5 bar pressure.

  19. Cyclic heat load testing of improved CFC/Cu bonding for the W 7-X divertor targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Boscary, J.; Chaudhuri, P.; Schlosser, J.; Friedrich, T.; Plankensteiner, A.; Tivey, R.

    2009-04-01

    Extensive high heat flux cycling testing of pre-series targets was performed in the neutral beam facility GLADIS to establish the industrial process for the manufacturing of 890 targets, which will be needed for the installation of the WENDELSTEIN 7-X divertor. The targets are manufactured of flat tiles of CFC NB31 as plasma facing material bonded by an Active Metal Casting copper interlayer onto a water-cooled CuCrZr structure. Based on the results of the 3D thermo-mechanical FEM analysis of the CFC/Cu interface, an additional set of 17 full-scale pre-series elements including three design variations was manufactured by PLANSEE SE. The insertion of an additional plastically compliant copper interlayer between the cooling structure and the Active Metal Casting interlayer showed the best results. No critical tile detachment was observed during >5000 cycles at 10 MW/m 2. These results demonstrated the sufficient life time of the component for the expected heat load in operation.

  20. Lumbar spine disc height and curvature responses to an axial load generated by a compression device compatible with magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, S.; Steinbach, G. C.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    2001-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Axial load-dependent changes in the lumbar spine of supine healthy volunteers were examined using a compression device compatible with magnetic resonance imaging. OBJECTIVE: To test two hypotheses: Axial loading of 50% body weight from shoulder to feet in supine posture 1) simulates the upright lumbar spine alignment and 2) decreases disc height significantly. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Axial compression on the lumbar spine has significantly narrowed the lumbar dural sac in patients with sciatica, neurogenic claudication or both. METHODS: Using a device compatible with magnetic resonance imaging, the lumbar spine of eight young volunteers, ages 22 to 36 years, was axially compressed with a force equivalent to 50% of body weight, approximating the normal load on the lumbar spine in upright posture. Sagittal lumbar magnetic resonance imaging was performed to measure intervertebral angle and disc height before and during compression. RESULTS: Each intervertebral angle before and during compression was as follows: T12-L1 (-0.8 degrees +/- 2.5 degrees and -1.5 degrees +/- 2.6 degrees ), L1-L2 (0.7 degrees +/- 1.4 degrees and 3.3 degrees +/- 2.9 degrees ), L2-L3 (4.7 degrees +/- 3.5 degrees and 7.3 degrees +/- 6 degrees ), L3-L4 (7.9 degrees +/- 2.4 degrees and 11.1 degrees +/- 4.6 degrees ), L4-L5 (14.3 degrees +/- 3.3 degrees and 14.9 degrees +/- 1.7 degrees ), L5-S1 (25.8 degrees +/- 5.2 degrees and 20.8 degrees +/- 6 degrees ), and L1-S1 (53.4 degrees +/- 11.9 degrees and 57.3 degrees +/- 16.7 degrees ). Negative values reflect kyphosis, and positive values reflect lordosis. A significant difference between values before and during compression was obtained at L3-L4 and L5-S1. There was a significant decrease in disc height only at L4-L5 during compression. CONCLUSIONS: The axial force of 50% body weight in supine posture simulates the upright lumbar spine morphologically. No change in intervertebral angle occurred at L4-L5. However, disc height at L4-L

  1. Moment measurements in dynamic and quasi-static spine segment testing using eccentric compression are susceptible to artifacts based on loading configuration.

    PubMed

    Van Toen, Carolyn; Carter, Jarrod W; Oxland, Thomas R; Cripton, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    The tolerance of the spine to bending moments, used for evaluation of injury prevention devices, is often determined through eccentric axial compression experiments using segments of the cadaver spine. Preliminary experiments in our laboratory demonstrated that eccentric axial compression resulted in "unexpected" (artifact) moments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the static and dynamic effects of test configuration on bending moments during eccentric axial compression typical in cadaver spine segment testing. Specific objectives were to create dynamic equilibrium equations for the loads measured inferior to the specimen, experimentally verify these equations, and compare moment responses from various test configurations using synthetic (rubber) and human cadaver specimens. The equilibrium equations were verified by performing quasi-static (5 mm/s) and dynamic experiments (0.4 m/s) on a rubber specimen and comparing calculated shear forces and bending moments to those measured using a six-axis load cell. Moment responses were compared for hinge joint, linear slider and hinge joint, and roller joint configurations tested at quasi-static and dynamic rates. Calculated shear force and bending moment curves had similar shapes to those measured. Calculated values in the first local minima differed from those measured by 3% and 15%, respectively, in the dynamic test, and these occurred within 1.5 ms of those measured. In the rubber specimen experiments, for the hinge joint (translation constrained), quasi-static and dynamic posterior eccentric compression resulted in flexion (unexpected) moments. For the slider and hinge joints and the roller joints (translation unconstrained), extension ("expected") moments were measured quasi-statically and initial flexion (unexpected) moments were measured dynamically. In the cadaver experiments with roller joints, anterior and posterior eccentricities resulted in extension moments, which were unexpected and expected, for those

  2. Buckling loads of stiffened panels subjected to combined longitudinal compression and shear: Results obtained with PASCO, EAL, and STAGS computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.; Greene, W. H.; Anderson, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    Buckling analyses used in PASCO are summarized with emphasis placed on the shear buckling analyses. The PASCO buckling analyses include the basic VIPASA analysis, which is essentially exact for longitudinal and transverse loads, and a smeared stiffener solution, which treats a stiffened panel as an orthotropic plate. Buckling results are then presented for seven stiffened panels loaded by combinations of longitudinal compression and shear. The buckling results were obtained with the PASCO, EAL, and STAGS computer programs. The EAL and STAGS solutions were obtained with a fine finite element mesh and are very accurate. These finite element solutions together with the PASCO results for pure longitudinal compression provide benchmark calculations to evaluate other analysis procedures.

  3. Damage evolution analysis in mortar, during compressive loading using acoustic emission and X-ray tomography: Effects of the sand/cement ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Elaqra, H.; Godin, N.; Peix, G.; R'Mili, M. . E-mail: Mohamed.Rmili@insa-lyon.fr; Fantozzi, G.

    2007-05-15

    This paper explores the use of acoustic emission (AE) and X-ray tomography to identify the mechanisms of damage and the fracture process during compressive loading on concrete specimens. Three-dimensional (3D) X-ray tomography image analysis was used to observe defects of virgin mortar specimen under different compressive loads. Cumulative AE events were used to evaluate damage process in real time according to the sand/cement ratio. This work shows that AE and X-ray tomography are complementary nondestructive methods to measure, characterise and locate damage sites in mortar. The effect of the sand proportion on damage and fracture behaviour is studied, in relation with the microstructure of the material.

  4. Stress-strain time-dependent behavior of A356.0 aluminum alloy subjected to cyclic thermal and mechanical loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrahi, G. H.; Ghodrati, M.; Azadi, M.; Rezvani Rad, M.

    2014-08-01

    This article presents the cyclic behavior of the A356.0 aluminum alloy under low-cycle fatigue (or isothermal) and thermo-mechanical fatigue loadings. Since the thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) test is time consuming and has high costs in comparison to low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests, the purpose of this research is to use LCF test results to predict the TMF behavior of the material. A time-independent model, considering the combined nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening law, was used to predict the TMF behavior of the material. Material constants of this model were calibrated based on room-temperature and high-temperature low-cycle fatigue tests. The nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening law could accurately estimate the stress-strain hysteresis loop for the LCF condition; however, for the out-of-phase TMF, the condition could not predict properly the stress value due to the strain rate effect. Therefore, a two-layer visco-plastic model and also the Johnson-Cook law were applied to improve the estimation of the stress-strain hysteresis loop. Related finite element results based on the two-layer visco-plastic model demonstrated a good agreement with experimental TMF data of the A356.0 alloy.

  5. In vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and the anti-tumor effect of cyclic RGD-modified doxorubicin-loaded polymers in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Li, Yuan; Chen, Binbin; Zou, Meijuan

    2016-10-01

    In our previous study, we successfully produced and characterized a multifunctional drug delivery system with doxorubicin (RC/GO/DOX), which was based on graphene oxide (GO) and cyclic RGD-modified chitosan (RC). Its characteristics include: pH-responsiveness, active targeting of hepatocarcinoma cells, and efficient loading with controlled drug release. Here, we report the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and anti-tumor efficacy of RC/GO/DOX polymers in tumor-bearing nude mice. The objective of this study is to assess its targeting potential for tumors. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution profiles demonstrated that tumor accumulation of RC/GO/DOX polymers was almost three times higher than the others, highlighting the efficacy of the active targeting strategy. Furthermore, the tumor inhibition rate of RC/GO/DOX polymers was 56.64%, 2.09 and 2.93 times higher than that of CS/GO/DOX polymers (without modification) and the DOX solution, respectively. Anti-tumor efficacy results indicated that the tumor growth was better controlled by RC/GO/DOX polymers than the others. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining showed remarkable changes in tumor histology. Compared with the saline group, the tumor section from the RC/GO/DOX group revealed a marked increase in the quantity of apoptotic and necrotic cells, and a reduction in the quantity of the blood vessels. Together, these studies show that this new system could be regarded as a suitable form of DOX-based treatment of the hepatocellular carcinoma.

  6. Fracture tolerance of the small female elbow joint in compression: the effect of load angle relative to the long axis of the forearm.

    PubMed

    Duma, Stefan M; Boggess, Brian M; Crandall, Jeff R; Mac Mahon, Conor B

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a fracture tolerance for the elbow joint, or proximal ends of the ulna and radius, relative to the fracture risk under side-impact airbag loading. Forty experiments were performed on the elbow joints of small female cadavers. The energy source, a pneumatic impactor, was configured to apply compressive loads that match the onset rate, peak force, and momentum transfer of previously conducted side-impact airbag tests with small female subjects. Three initial orientations of the impact load angle relative to the longitudinal axis of the forearm were selected based on analysis of side-impact airbag tests with the instrumented dummy upper extremity. These included loading directions that are 0 degrees , 20 degrees , and 30 degrees superior of the longitudinal axis of the forearm. Post-test necropsy revealed that 11 of the 40 tests resulted in chondral, osteochondral, or comminuted fractures of the proximal radial head or the distal trochlear notch. Using the fracture outcome as the binary variable, a generalized estimating equations statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between elbow load angle (p < 0.01) and risk of fracture, as well as peak elbow force (p = 0.04) and risk of fracture. Using data that were mass scaled to the 5(th) percentile female, the analysis produced a multivariate fracture risk function that predicts a 50% risk of elbow fracture at a compressive elbow load of 1780 N and load angle of 30 degrees superior to the longitudinal axis of the forearm (p < 0.01). It is anticipated that this tolerance will be used to reduce the risk of elbow fractures from side airbag deployment.

  7. SYNERGISTIC DEGRADATION OF DENTIN BY CYCLIC STRESS AND BUFFER AGITATION

    PubMed Central

    Orrego, Santiago; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    Secondary caries and non-carious lesions develop in regions of stress concentrations and oral fluid movement. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of cyclic stress and fluid movement on material loss and subsurface degradation of dentin within an acidic environment. Rectangular specimens of radicular dentin were prepared from caries-free unrestored 3rd molars. Two groups were subjected to cyclic cantilever loading within a lactic acid solution (pH=5) to achieve compressive stresses on the inner (pulpal) or outer sides of the specimens. Two additional groups were evaluated in the same solution, one subjected to movement only (no stress) and the second held stagnant (control: no stress or movement). Exterior material loss profiles and subsurface degradation were quantified on the two sides of the specimens. Results showed that under cyclic stress material loss was significantly greater (p≤0.0005) on the pulpal side than on the outer side and significantly greater (p≤0.05) under compression than tension. However, movement only caused significantly greater material loss (p≤0.0005) than cyclic stress. Subsurface degradation was greatest at the location of highest stress, but was not influenced by stress state or movement. PMID:25637823

  8. Unraveling cyclic deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy using in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-12-23

    In the current study, the deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy were investigated under cyclic loading using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. The relationship between the macroscopic cyclic deformation behavior and the microscopic response at the grain level was established. The neutron diffraction results indicate that more and more grains are involved in the twinning and detwinning deformation process with the increase of fatigue cycles. The residual twins appear in the early fatigue life, which is responsible for the cyclic hardening behavior. The asymmetric shape of the hysteresis loop is attributed to the early exhaustionmore » of the detwinning process during compression, which leads to the activation of dislocation slips and rapid strain-hardening. The critical resolved shear stress for the activation of tensile twinning closely depends on the residual strain developed during cyclic loading. In the cycle before the sample fractured, the dislocation slips became active in tension, although the sample was not fully twinned. The increased dislocation density leads to the rise of the stress concentration at weak spots, which is believed to be the main reason for the fatigue failure. Furthermore, the deformation history greatly influences the deformation mechanisms of hexagonal-close-packed-structured magnesium alloy during cyclic loading.« less

  9. Unraveling cyclic deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy using in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-12-23

    In the current study, the deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy were investigated under cyclic loading using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. The relationship between the macroscopic cyclic deformation behavior and the microscopic response at the grain level was established. The neutron diffraction results indicate that more and more grains are involved in the twinning and detwinning deformation process with the increase of fatigue cycles. The residual twins appear in the early fatigue life, which is responsible for the cyclic hardening behavior. The asymmetric shape of the hysteresis loop is attributed to the early exhaustion of the detwinning process during compression, which leads to the activation of dislocation slips and rapid strain-hardening. The critical resolved shear stress for the activation of tensile twinning closely depends on the residual strain developed during cyclic loading. In the cycle before the sample fractured, the dislocation slips became active in tension, although the sample was not fully twinned. The increased dislocation density leads to the rise of the stress concentration at weak spots, which is believed to be the main reason for the fatigue failure. Furthermore, the deformation history greatly influences the deformation mechanisms of hexagonal-close-packed-structured magnesium alloy during cyclic loading.

  10. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    SciTech Connect

    D'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2013-09-15

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic

  11. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2013-09-01

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic

  12. Response of Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panel with Minimum Gage GFRP Face-Sheets to Compression Loading After Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2011-01-01

    A compression after impact study has been conducted to determine the residual strength of three sandwich panel constructions with two types of thin glass fiber reinforced polymer face-sheets and two hexagonal honeycomb Nomex core densities. Impact testing is conducted to first determine the characteristics of damage resulting from various impact energy levels. Two modes of failure are found during compression after impact tests with the density of the core precipitating the failure mode present for a given specimen. A finite element analysis is presented for prediction of the residual compressive strength of the impacted specimens. The analysis includes progressive damage modeling in the face-sheets. Preliminary analysis results were similar to the experimental results; however, a higher fidelity core material model is expected to improve the correlation.

  13. Tension-Compression Fatigue of a Nextel™720/alumina Composite at 1200 °C in Air and in Steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanser, R. L.; Ruggles-Wrenn, M. B.

    2016-08-01

    Tension-compression fatigue behavior of an oxide-oxide ceramic-matrix composite was investigated at 1200 °C in air and in steam. The composite is comprised of an alumina matrix reinforced with Nextel™720 alumina-mullite fibers woven in an eight harness satin weave (8HSW). The composite has no interface between the fiber and matrix, and relies on the porous matrix for flaw tolerance. Tension-compression fatigue behavior was studied for cyclical stresses ranging from 60 to 120 MPa at a frequency of 1.0 Hz. The R ratio (minimum stress to maximum stress) was -1.0. Fatigue run-out was defined as 105 cycles and was achieved at 80 MPa in air and at 70 MPa in steam. Steam reduced cyclic lives by an order of magnitude. Specimens that achieved fatigue run-out were subjected to tensile tests to failure to characterize the retained tensile properties. Specimens subjected to prior cyclic loading in air retained 100 % of their tensile strength. The steam environment severely degraded tensile properties. Tension-compression cyclic loading was considerably more damaging than tension-tension cyclic loading. Composite microstructure, as well as damage and failure mechanisms were investigated.

  14. Loading simulation of lumbar spine vertebrae during a compression test using the finite elements method and trabecular bone strength properties, determined by means of nanoindentations.

    PubMed

    Bouzakis, K D; Mitsi, S; Michailidis, N; Mirisidis, I; Mesomeris, G; Maliaris, G; Korlos, A; Kapetanos, G; Antonarakos, P; Anagnostidis, K

    2004-06-01

    The mechanical strength properties of lumbar spine vertebrae are of great importance in a wide range of applications. Herein, through nanoindentations and appropriate evaluation of the corresponding results, trabecular bone struts stress-strain characteristics can be determined. In the frame of the present paper, an L2 fresh cadaveric vertebra, from which posterior elements were removed, was subjected to compression. With the aid of developed finite elements method based algorithms, the cortical shell and the cancellous core bulk elasticity moduli and stresses were determined, whereas the tested vertebra geometrical model used in these algorithms was considered as having a compound structure, consisting of the cancellous bone surrounded by the cortical shell. Moreover nanoindentations were conducted and an appropriate evaluation method of the obtained results was applied to extract stress-strain curves of individual lumbar spine vertebra trabecular bone struts. These data were used in the mathematical description of the vertebrae compression test. The vertebral cancellous bone structure was simulated by a beam elements network, possessing an equivalent porosity and different stiffnesses in vertical and horizontal direction. Thus, the measured course of the compression load versus the occurring specimen deformation was verified.

  15. In situ Compressive Loading and Correlative Noninvasive Imaging of the Bone-periodontal Ligament-tooth Fibrous Joint

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Andrew T.; Lin, Jeremy D.; Seo, Youngho; Etchin, Sergey; Merkle, Arno; Fahey, Kevin; Ho, Sunita P.

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel biomechanics testing protocol. The advantage of this protocol includes the use of an in situ loading device coupled to a high resolution X-ray microscope, thus enabling visualization of internal structural elements under simulated physiological loads and wet conditions. Experimental specimens will include intact bone-periodontal ligament (PDL)-tooth fibrous joints. Results will illustrate three important features of the protocol as they can be applied to organ level biomechanics: 1) reactionary force vs. displacement: tooth displacement within the alveolar socket and its reactionary response to loading, 2) three-dimensional (3D) spatial configuration and morphometrics: geometric relationship of the tooth with the alveolar socket, and 3) changes in readouts 1 and 2 due to a change in loading axis, i.e. from concentric to eccentric loads. Efficacy of the proposed protocol will be evaluated by coupling mechanical testing readouts to 3D morphometrics and overall biomechanics of the joint. In addition, this technique will emphasize on the need to equilibrate experimental conditions, specifically reactionary loads prior to acquiring tomograms of fibrous joints. It should be noted that the proposed protocol is limited to testing specimens under ex vivo conditions, and that use of contrast agents to visualize soft tissue mechanical response could lead to erroneous conclusions about tissue and organ-level biomechanics. PMID:24638035

  16. Full Field Measurement of The Dynamic Response of AA6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy under High Strain Rate Compression and Torsion Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odoh, Daniel Oghenekewhe Oluwatobi

    The dynamic response of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy under high strain rate loading in compression and torsion loading conditions was studied using the split Hopkinson pressure bar, the Kolsky torsion bar, and the high speed digital image correlation system. AA6061-T6 alloy, the most widely used in the AA6000 series, is a multi-purpose Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy containing about 0.4 % wt. of Cu and other alloying additives. The properties of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy including medium to high strength, good fracture toughness, and high corrosion resistance make it to find application in high performance structures such as the automotive parts, panels, and armored carriers. In this work, the effect of strain rate during dynamic test on formation of adiabatic shear bands in AA6061-T6 alloy was investigated. A post deformation analysis of the tested specimen was performed in order to determine the damage evolution and strain localization along the narrow adiabatic shear bands within the specimen. The formation of an adiabatic shear band in the aluminum alloy tested was found to depend on the strain rate at which the test was conducted. Stress, strain, and strain rate data obtained from the elastic waves in the compression and torsion bar tests were also compared with those obtained using the high speed digital cameras. Results show good agreement between both measurement techniques with the 3D digital image correlation technique giving a slightly lower result. Scanning and electron microscopy results show that both deformed and transformed bands can be formed in AA6061-T6 alloy during dynamic loading. The type of adiabatic shear band formed depends on the strain rate at which test was performed.

  17. Numerical study of mechanical behavior of ceramic composites under compression loading in the framework of movable cellular automaton method

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalenko, Igor S. Smolin, Alexey Yu. Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Promakhov, Vladimir V.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2014-11-14

    Movable cellular automaton method was used for investigating the mechanical behavior of ceramic composites under uniaxial compression. A 2D numerical model of ceramic composites based on oxides of zirconium and aluminum with different structural parameters was developed using the SEM images of micro-sections of a real composite. The influence of such structural parameters as the geometrical dimensions of layers, inclusions, and their spatial distribution in the sample, the volume content of the composite components and their mechanical properties (as well as the amount of zirconium dioxide that underwent the phase transformation) on the fracture, strength, deformation and dissipative properties was investigated.

  18. Predictions for the drive capabilities of the RancheroS Flux Compression Generator into various load inductances using the Eulerian AMR Code Roxane

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, Robert Gregory

    2016-06-06

    The Ranchero Magnetic Flux Compression Generator (FCG) has been used to create current pulses in the 10-­100 MA range for driving both “static” low inductance (0.5 nH) loads1 for generator demonstration purposes and high inductance (10-­20 nH) imploding liner loads2 for ultimate use in physics experiments at very high energy density. Simulations of the standard Ranchero generator have recently shown that it had a design issue that could lead to flux trapping in the generator, and a non-­ robust predictability in its use in high energy density experiments. A re-­examination of the design concept for the standard Ranchero generator, prompted by the possible appearance of an aneurism at the output glide plane, has led to a new generation of Ranchero generators designated the RancheroS (for swooped). This generator has removed the problematic output glide plane and replaced it with a region of constantly increasing diameter in the output end of the FCG cavity in which the armature is driven outward under the influence of an additional HE load not present in the original Ranchero. The resultant RancheroS generator, to be tested in LA43S-­L13, probably in early FY17, has a significantly increased initial inductance and may be able to drive a somewhat higher load inductance than the standard Ranchero. This report will use the Eulerian AMR code Roxane to study the ability of the new design to drive static loads, with a goal of providing a database corresponding to the load inductances for which the generator might be used and the anticipated peak currents such loads might produce in physics experiments. Such a database, combined with a simple analytic model of an ideal generator, where d(LI)/dt = 0, and supplemented by earlier estimates of losses in actual use of the standard Ranchero, scaled to estimate the increase in losses due to the longer current carrying perimeter in the RancheroS, can then be used to bound the expectations for the current drive one may

  19. Cyclic Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dennis H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a simple experiment that has become popular in chemical research because it can provide useful information about redox reactions in a form which is easily obtained and interpreted. Discusses principles of the method and illustrates its use in the study of four electrode reactions. (Author/JN)

  20. Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Thick rubber components are employed by the Army to carry large loads. In tanks, rubber covers road wheels and track systems to protect roadways. It is difficult for design engineers to simulate the details of the hysteretic heating for large strain viscoelastic deformations. In this study, an approximation to the viscoelastic energy dissipated per unit time is investigated for use in estimating mechanically induced viscoelastic heating. Coupled thermo-mechanical simulations of large cyclic deformations of rubber cylinders are presented. The cylinders are first compressed axially and then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. Details of the algorithm and some computational issues are discussed. The coupled analyses are conducted for tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without imbedded metal disks.

  1. Dynamic behavior and constitutive modeling of magnesium alloys AZ91D and AZ31B under high strain rate compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jing; Ahmad, Iram Raza; Shu, D. W.

    2014-03-01

    The dynamic stress-strain characteristics of magnesium alloys have not been sufficiently studied experimentally. Thus, the present work investigated compressive dynamic stress-strain characteristics of two representative magnesium alloys: AZ91D and AZ31B at high strain rates and elevated temperatures. In order to use the stress-strain characteristics in numerical simulations to predict the impact response of components, the stress-strain characteristics must be modeled. The most common approach is to use accepted constitutive laws. The results from the experimental study of the response of magnesium alloys AZ91D and AZ31B under dynamic compressive loading, at different strain rates and elevated temperatures are presented here. Johnson-Cook model was used to best fit the experimental data. The material parameters required by the model were obtained and the resultant stress-strain curves of the two alloys for each testing condition were plotted. It is found that the dynamic stress-strain relationship of both magnesium alloys are strain rate and temperature dependent and can be described reasonably well at high strain rates and room temperature by Johnson-Cook model except at very low strains. This might be due to the fact that the strain rate is not strictly constant in the early stage of deformation.

  2. Observation on the transformation domains of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy and their evolutions during cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xi; Kan, Qianhua; Kang, Guozheng; Li, Jian; Qiu, Bo; Yu, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The strain field of a super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) and its variation during uniaxial cyclic tension-unloading were observed by a non-contact digital image correlation method, and then the transformation domains and their evolutions were indirectly investigated and discussed. It is seen that the super-elastic NiTi (SMA) exhibits a remarkable localized deformation and the transformation domains evolve periodically with the repeated cyclic tension-unloading within the first several cycles. However, the evolutions of transformation domains at the stage of stable cyclic transformation depend on applied peak stress: when the peak stress is low, no obvious transformation band is observed and the strain field is nearly uniform; when the peak stress is large enough, obvious transformation bands occur due to the residual martensite caused by the prevention of enriched dislocations to the reverse transformation from induced martensite to austenite. Temperature variations measured by an infrared thermal imaging method further verifies the formation and evolution of transformation domains.

  3. Effects of heel height and shoe shape on the compressive load between foot and base: a graphic analysis of principle.

    PubMed

    Broch, Nana Lise; Wyller, Thomas; Steen, Harald

    2004-01-01

    Even in the ever-changing and increasingly technical realm of medicine, common sense approaches are needed. We can still learn from our predecessors by using their practical and simple methods. In this article a graphic approach in the sagittal plane is used to explain the relationship between the heel height of a shoe and load under the foot. By using an elementary theoretical model based on schematic sketches, an analysis of principle can be performed to calculate the change in the distribution of mechanical stress in the planta with change in foot orientation. The model shows that when standing posture remains unaltered, load under the forefoot increases and load under the heel decreases with elevated heel height and the corresponding changes in shoe shape. These results can be confirmed by pedobarographic and gait-analysis measurements, but the graphic method can be used without application of advanced instrumentation. The rationale behind the model is to use common terms and simple means to facilitate a more fundamental understanding of complex mechanical orthopedic problems. The method is meant to be a helpful supplement to clinical judgment in the many situations in which advanced instrumentation is not available.

  4. Cardiac looping may be driven by compressive loads resulting from unequal growth of the heart and pericardial cavity. Observations on a physical simulation model

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Meriç; Männer, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The transformation of the straight embryonic heart tube into a helically wound loop is named cardiac looping. Such looping is regarded as an essential process in cardiac morphogenesis since it brings the building blocks of the developing heart into an approximation of their definitive topographical relationships. During the past two decades, a large number of genes have been identified which play important roles in cardiac looping. However, how genetic information is physically translated into the dynamic form changes of the looping heart is still poorly understood. The oldest hypothesis of cardiac looping mechanics attributes the form changes of the heart loop (ventral bending → simple helical coiling → complex helical coiling) to compressive loads resulting from growth differences between the heart and the pericardial cavity. In the present study, we have tested the physical plausibility of this hypothesis, which we call the growth-induced buckling hypothesis, for the first time. Using a physical simulation model, we show that growth-induced buckling of a straight elastic rod within the confined space of a hemispherical cavity can generate the same sequence of form changes as observed in the looping embryonic heart. Our simulation experiments have furthermore shown that, under bilaterally symmetric conditions, growth-induced buckling generates left- and right-handed helices (D-/L-loops) in a 1:1 ratio, while even subtle left- or rightward displacements of the caudal end of the elastic rod at the pre-buckling state are sufficient to direct the buckling process toward the generation of only D- or L-loops, respectively. Our data are discussed with respect to observations made in biological “models.” We conclude that compressive loads resulting from unequal growth of the heart and pericardial cavity play important roles in cardiac looping. Asymmetric positioning of the venous heart pole may direct these forces toward a biased generation of D- or L-loops. PMID

  5. Bauschinger effect on API 5L B and X56 steel plates under repeating bending load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Icho Y.; Korda, Akhmad A.

    2017-01-01

    During steel pipe fabrication, hot rolled coil steel will undergo coiling and uncoiling process, where the steel plate is bent repeatedly. When cyclic loading is imposed on steel, tensile and compressive stress will occur in it resulting in softening caused by Bauschinger effect. This research is focused on Bauschinger effect and cyclic loading during coiling and uncoiling process on API 5L B and API 5L X56 steel. Both types of steel were given repeated bend loading with variation in loading cycle and the curvature radius. The steel's response was then observed by using tensile testing, microhardness testing, and microstructure observation. A decrease in yield strength is observed during lower cycles and on smaller radii. After higher loading cycle, the yield strength of the steel was increased. Microhardness testing also reported similar results on the subsurface part of the steel where loading is at its highest.

  6. Integrins mediate mechanical compression-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction lead to compression of intramuscular arterioles, which, in turn, leads to their vasodilation (a process that may enhance blood flow during muscle activity). Although endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in compression-induced vasodilation, the mechanism whereby arterial compression elicits NO production is unclear. We cannulated isolated swine (n = 39) myocardial (n = 69) and skeletal muscle (n = 60) arteriole segments and exposed them to cyclic transmural pressure generated by either intraluminal or extraluminal pressure pulses to simulate compression in contracting muscle. We found that the vasodilation elicited by internal or external pressure pulses was equivalent; moreover, vasodilation in response to pressure depended on changes in arteriole diameter. Agonist-induced endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was used to verify endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell viability. Vasodilation in response to cyclic changes in transmural pressure was smaller than that elicited by pharmacological activation of the NO signaling pathway. It was attenuated by inhibition of NO synthase and by mechanical removal of the endothelium. Stemming from previous observations that endothelial integrin is implicated in vasodilation in response to shear stress, we found that function-blocking integrin α5β1 or αvβ3 antibodies attenuated cyclic compression-induced vasodilation and NOx (NO(-)2 and NO(-)3) production, as did an RGD peptide that competitively inhibits ligand binding to some integrins. We therefore conclude that integrin plays a role in cyclic compression-induced endothelial NO production and thereby in the vasodilation of small arteries during cyclic transmural pressure loading.

  7. Microstructure studies of air-plasma-spray-deposited CoNiCrAlY coatings before and after thermal cyclic loading for high-temperature application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dipak; Pandey, K. N.; Das, Dipak Kumar

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, bond-coats for thermal barrier coatings were deposited via air plasma spraying (APS) techniques onto Inconel 800 and Hastelloy C-276 alloy substrates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to investigate the phases and microstructure of the as-sprayed, APS-deposited CoNiCrAlY bond-coatings. The aim of this work was to study the suitability of the bond-coat materials for high temperature applications. Confirmation of nanoscale grains of the γ/γ'-phase was obtained by TEM, high-resolution TEM, and AFM. We concluded that these changes result from the plastic deformation of the bond-coat during the deposition, resulting in CoNiCrAlY bond-coatings with excellent thermal cyclic resistance suitable for use in high-temperature applications. Cyclic oxidative stability was observed to also depend on the underlying metallic alloy substrate.

  8. Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2000-01-01

    A procedure that models coupled thermo-mechanical deformations of viscoelastic rubber cylinders by employing the ABAQUS finite element code is described. Computational simulations of hysteretic heating are presented for several tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without a steel disk at their centers. The cylinders are compressed axially and are then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. The non-uniform hysteretic heating of the rubber cylinders containing a steel disk is presented. The analyses performed suggest that the coupling procedure should be considered for further development as a design tool for rubber degradation studies.

  9. In vivo axial loading of the mouse tibia.

    PubMed

    Melville, Katherine M; Robling, Alexander G; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive methods to apply controlled, cyclic loads to the living skeleton are used as anabolic procedures to stimulate new bone formation in adults and enhance bone mass accrual in growing animals. These methods are also invaluable for understanding bone signaling pathways. Our focus here is on a particular loading model: in vivo axial compression of the mouse tibia. An advantage of loading the tibia is that changes are present in both the cancellous envelope of the proximal tibia and the cortical bone of the tibial diaphysis. To load the tibia of the mouse axially in vivo, a cyclic compressive load is applied up to five times a week to a single tibia per mouse for a duration lasting from 1 day to 6 weeks. With the contralateral limb as an internal control, the anabolic response of the skeleton to mechanical stimuli can be studied in a pairwise experimental design. Here, we describe the key parameters that must be considered before beginning an in vivo mouse tibial loading experiment, including methods for in vivo strain gauging of the tibial midshaft, and then we describe general methods for loading the mouse tibia for an experiment lasting multiple days.

  10. Cyclic multiverses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marosek, Konrad; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Balcerzak, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Using the idea of regularization of singularities due to the variability of the fundamental constants in cosmology we study the cyclic universe models. We find two models of oscillating and non-singular mass density and pressure (`non-singular' bounce) regularized by varying gravitational constant G despite the scale factor evolution is oscillating and having sharp turning points (`singular' bounce). Both violating (big-bang) and non-violating (phantom) null energy condition models appear. Then, we extend this idea on to the multiverse containing cyclic individual universes with either growing or decreasing entropy though leaving the net entropy constant. In order to get an insight into the key idea, we consider the doubleverse with the same geometrical evolution of the two `parallel' universes with their physical evolution [physical coupling constants c(t) and G(t)] being different. An interesting point is that there is a possibility to exchange the universes at the point of maximum expansion - the fact which was already noticed in quantum cosmology. Similar scenario is also possible within the framework of Brans-Dicke theory where varying G(t) is replaced by the dynamical Brans-Dicke field φ(t) though these theories are slightly different.

  11. Röthlisberger Channel Model with Anti-­Plane Shear Loading Superposed on In-Plane Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, M. C.; Meyer, C. R.; Rice, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Röthlisberger channel (R­-channel) is a commonly adopted model that balances creep closure by Nye 2D in-plane straining, driven by the ice overburden pressure, against the melt rate from viscous energy dissipation in turbulent flow within the channel. Perol and Rice (AGU abstr. C11B-0677, 2011; JGR 2014 in review) and Suckale et al. (JGR F003008, 2014) have conjectured that these R-Channels may exist at the beds of rapidly straining West Antarctic Ice Stream shear margins. That is expected as a result of melt generation and drainage from forming temperate ice, and the channels may interact through the bed hydrology to partially stabilize the shear margin against lateral expansion. However, at those locations the overburden stresses, driving in-plane flow, are supplemented by substantial anti­-plane shear stresses. Similarly, R-channels in mountain glaciers are also subject to both in-plane and anti-plane stresses. These channels usually form in the downstream direction, where anti-plane shear effects arise horizontally from drag at lateral moraines and vertically from the downslope gravity component. Here we examine how superposed anti-plane loading can alter results of the Nye solution for a 2D R-­channel. We use a combination of perturbation analyses and finite element methods, varying the amount of applied anti-plane stress. A closed-form solution is derived for imposing a small anti-plane perturbation, which has no effect at linear order on the Nye closure rate. Such effects become strong at more substantial perturbations, and the in­plane stress and strain fields are then significantly altered from the Nye solution. We further extend our model to compute channel size in terms of the external stressing and flow rate. Understanding the effect of the ice flow on channel size and formation is important to subglacial hydrology, as well as a potentially vital component for our understanding of the formation and motion of ice streams found in West Antarctica.

  12. Effects of dividing the transverse carpal ligament on the mechanical behavior of the carpal bones under axial compressive load: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zong-Ming

    2009-03-01

    Transecting the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) is a routine procedure to surgically treat carpal tunnel syndrome; yet, its mechanical consequences on carpal bones are unclear. In this study, our intent was to perform a computational analysis of carpal biomechanics resulting from TCL release. A three-dimensional finite element model of the wrist was constructed, which included all the carpal bones, the distal ulna and radius, the proximal metacarpals and the interosseous ligaments. Cartilage layers of each bone were modeled manually according to anatomic visualization software. The TCL was also modeled in three dimensions and added to the bone model. A 100-Newton axial load was applied to the upper section of the second and third metacarpals. The effects of dividing the TCL on the displacements of the carpal bones and the contact stress distribution in the midcarpal joints were studied using a finite element analysis method. When the TCL was divided, the axial compressive load resulted in the carpal bones deviating more radially. More specifically, the carpal bones on the radial side of the capitate and lunate (i.e. the trapezium, trapezoid, and scaphoid) moved further toward the radius, and the carpal bones on the ulnar side of the capitate and lunate (i.e. hamate, triquetrum, and pisiform) moved further toward the metacarpals. The contact stresses and contact locations in the midcarpal joints changed as a result of dividing the TCL. The changes in displacements of carpal bones and the contact stress distributions in the midcarpal joints due to TCL release may be implicated for some of the postoperative complications associated with carpal tunnel release.

  13. A biomechanical comparison of conventional versus an anatomic plate and compression bolts for fixation of intra-articular calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haili; Yang, Zhaoxu; Wu, Zhanpo; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Li, Ming; Li, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yingze

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability obtained by using our technique featured an anatomical plate and compression bolts versus that of the conventional anatomic plate and cancellous screws in the fixation of intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Eighteen fresh frozen lower limbs of cadavers were used to create a reproductive Sanders type-III calcaneal fracture model by using osteotomy. The calcaneus fractures were randomly selected to be fixed either using our anatomical plate and compression bolts or conventional anatomic plate and cancellous screws. Reduction of fracture was evaluated through X radiographs. Each calcaneus was successively loaded at a frequency of 1 Hz for 1000 cycles through the talus using an increasing axial force 20 N to 200 N and 20 N to 700 N, representing the partial weight bearing and full weight bearing, respectively, and then the specimens were loaded to failure. Data extracted from the mechanical testing machine were recorded and used to test for difference in the results with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. No significant difference was found between our fixation technique and conventional technique in displacement during 20-200 N cyclic loading (P=0.06), while the anatomical plate and compression bolts showed a great lower irreversible deformation during 20-700 N cyclic loading (P=0.008). The load achieved at loss of fixation of the constructs for the two groups had significant difference: anatomic plate and compression bolts at 3839.6±152.4 N and anatomic plate and cancellous screws at 3087.3±58.9 N (P=0.008). There was no significant difference between the ultimate displacements. Our technique featured anatomical plate and compression bolts for calcaneus fracture fixation was demonstrated to provide biomechanical stability as good as or better than the conventional anatomic plate and cancellous screws under the axial loading. The study supports the mechanical viability of using our plate and

  14. Cyclic delamination behavior of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on Ti-6Al-4V substrates in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Hayato; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to clarify the effect of a simulated body fluid (SBF) on the cyclic delamination behavior of a plasma-sprayed hydroxapatite (HAp) coating. A HAp coating is deposited on the surfaces of surgical metallic materials in order to enhance the bond between human bone and such surfaces. However, the HAp coating is susceptible to delamination by cyclic loading from the patient's gait. Although hip joints are subjected to both positive and negative moments, only the effects of tensile bending stresses on vertical crack propagation behavior have been investigated. Thus, the cyclic delamination behavior of a HAp coating was observed at the stress ratio R=-1 in order to determine the effects of tensile/compressive loading on the delamination behavior. The delamination growth rate increased with SBF immersion, which decreased the delamination life. Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the selective phase dissolution in the HAp coating was promoted at interfaces. Finite element analysis revealed that the energy release rate Gmax showed a positive value even in cases with compressive loading, which is a driving force for the delamination of a HAp coating. A prediction model for the delamination growth life was developed that combines a fracture mechanics parameter with the assumed stress-dependent dissolution rate. The predicted delamination life matched the experimental data well in cases of lower stress amplitudes with SBF.

  15. In-situ neutron diffraction study of martensitic variant redistribution in polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga alloy under cyclic thermo-mechanical treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zongbin; Zou, Naifu; Zhao, Xiang; Zuo, Liang E-mail: yudong.zhang@univ-lorraine.fr; Zhang, Yudong E-mail: yudong.zhang@univ-lorraine.fr; Esling, Claude; Gan, Weimin

    2014-07-14

    The influences of uniaxial compressive stress on martensitic transformation were studied on a polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga bulk alloy prepared by directional solidification. Based upon the integrated in-situ neutron diffraction measurements, direct experimental evidence was obtained on the variant redistribution of seven-layered modulated (7M) martensite, triggered by external uniaxial compression during martensitic transformation. Large anisotropic lattice strain, induced by the cyclic thermo-mechanical treatment, has led to the microstructure modification by forming martensitic variants with a strong 〈0 1 0〉{sub 7M} preferential orientation along the loading axis. As a result, the saturation of magnetization became easier to be reached.

  16. Compression-bending of multi-component semi-rigid columns in response to axial loads and conjugate reciprocal extension-prediction of mechanical behaviours and implications for structural design.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ernest W

    2013-01-01

    The mathematical modelling of column buckling or beam bending under an axial or transverse load is well established. However, the existent models generally assume a high degree of symmetry in the structure of the column and minor longitudinal and transverse displacements. The situation when the column is made of several components with different mechanical properties asymmetrically distributed in the transverse section, semi-rigid, and subjected to multiple axial loads with significant longitudinal and transverse displacements through compression and bending has not been well characterised. A more comprehensive theoretical model allowing for these possibilities and assuming a circular arc contour for the bend is developed, and used to establish the bending axes, balance between compression and bending, and equivalent stiffness of the column. In certain situations, such as with pull cable catheters commonly used for minimally invasive surgical procedures, the compression loads are applied via cables running through channels inside a semi-rigid column. The model predicts the mathematical relationships between the radius of curvature of the bend and the tension in and normal force exerted by such cables. Conjugate extension with reciprocal compression-bending is a special structural arrangement for a semi-rigid column such that extension of one segment is linked to compression-bending of another by inextensible cables running between them. Leads are cords containing insulated electrical conductor coil and cables between the heart muscle and cardiac implantable electronic devices. Leads can behave like pull cable catheters through differential component pulling, providing a possible mechanism for inside-out abrasion and conductor cable externalisation. Certain design features may predispose to this mode of structural failure.

  17. Data Compression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookstein, Abraham; Storer, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Introduces this issue, which contains papers from the 1991 Data Compression Conference, and defines data compression. The two primary functions of data compression are described, i.e., storage and communications; types of data using compression technology are discussed; compression methods are explained; and current areas of research are…

  18. Finite-element analysis of transverse compressive and thermal loads on Nb3Sn wires with voids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Y.; D'Hauthuille, L.; Barth, C.; Senatore, C.

    2016-02-29

    High-field superconducting magnets play a very important role in many large-scale physics experiments, particularly particle colliders and fusion confinement devices such as Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The two most common superconductors used in these applications are NbTi and Nb3Sn. Nb3Sn wires are favored because of their significantly higher Jc (critical current density) for higher field applications. The main disadvantage of Nb3Sn is that the superconducting performance of the wire is highly strain sensitive and it is very brittle. This strain sensitivity is strongly influenced by two factors: plasticity and cracked filaments. Cracks are induced by large stress concentrators that can be traced to the presence of voids in the wire. We develop detailed 2-D and 3-D finite-element models containing wire filaments and different possible distributions of voids in a bronze-route Nb3Sn wire. We apply compressive transverse loads for various cases of void distributions to simulate the stress and strain response of a Nb3Sn wire under the Lorentz force. Furthermore, this paper improves our understanding of the effect voids have on the Nb3Sn wire's mechanical properties, and in so, the connection between the distribution of voids and performance degradation such as the correlation between irreversible strain limit and the void-induced local stress concentrations.

  19. Deformation and Tensile Cyclic Fatigue of Plasma-Sprayed ZrO2-8wt% Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Deformation (constitutive relations) of free-standing, thick thermal barrier coatings of sprayed ZrO2-8Wt% Y2O3 was determined at ambient temperature in both pure tension and pure compression using cylindrical bar test specimens. The material exhibited both significant nonlinearity and hysteresis in its load-strain curves, The load-strain relations in four-point uniaxial flexure were determined from tension and compression sides and were compared with individual pure tension and compression constitutive data. Effect of sintering on deformation behavior was significant, resulting in a dramatic change in constitutive relation. Cyclic fatigue testing of the coating material in tension-tension at room temperature showed an insignificant susceptibility to fatigue, similar to the slow crack growth behavior of the material in flexure in 800 C air.

  20. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon.

  1. Mechanical loading, damping, and load-driven bone formation in mouse tibiae.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Todd; Wanis, Mina; Ayoub, Ramez; Zhao, Liming; Watts, Nelson B; Bhattacharya, Amit; Akkus, Ozan; Robling, Alexander; Yokota, Hiroki

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical loads play a pivotal role in the growth and maintenance of bone and joints. Although loading can activate anabolic genes and induce bone remodeling, damping is essential for preventing traumatic bone injury and fracture. In this study we investigated the damping capacity of bone, joint tissue, muscle, and skin using a mouse hindlimb model of enhanced loading in conjunction with finite element modeling to model bone curvature. Our hypothesis was that loads were primarily absorbed by the joints and muscle tissue, but that bone also contributed to damping through its compression and natural bending. To test this hypothesis, fresh mouse distal lower limb segments were cyclically loaded in axial compression in sequential bouts, with each subsequent bout having less surrounding tissue. A finite element model was generated to model effects of bone curvature in silico. Two damping-related parameters (phase shift angle and energy loss) were determined from the output of the loading experiments. Interestingly, the experimental results revealed that the knee joint contributed to the largest portion of the damping capacity of the limb, and bone itself accounted for approximately 38% of the total phase shift angle. Computational results showed that normal bone curvature enhanced the damping capacity of the bone by approximately 40%, and the damping effect grew at an accelerated pace as curvature was increased. Although structural curvature reduces critical loads for buckling in beam theory, evolution apparently favors maintaining curvature in the tibia. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia revealed that in response to axial loading, bone formation was significantly enhanced in the regions that were predicted to receive a curvature-induced bending moment. These results suggest that in addition to bone's compressive damping capacity, surrounding tissues, as well as naturally-occurring bone curvature, also contribute to mechanical damping, which may ultimately affect

  2. Effects of surface treatments, thermocycling, and cyclic loading on the bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Guarda, G B; Correr, A B; Gonçalves, L S; Costa, A R; Borges, G A; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives : The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of two surface treatments, fatigue and thermocycling, on the microtensile bond strength of a newly introduced lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and a dual-cured resin cement. Methods : A total of 18 ceramic blocks (10 mm long × 7 mm wide × 3.0 mm thick) were fabricated and divided into six groups (n=3): groups 1, 2, and 3-air particle abraded for five seconds with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles; groups 4, 5, and 6-acid etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds. A silane coupling agent was applied onto all specimens and allowed to dry for five seconds, and the ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) with RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) resin cement and placed under a 500-g static load for two minutes. The cement excess was removed with a disposable microbrush, and four periods of light activation for 40 seconds each were performed at right angles using an LED curing unit (UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent) with a final 40 second light exposure from the top surface. All of the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Groups 2 and 5 were submitted to 3,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, and groups 3 and 6 were submitted to a fatigue test of 100,000 cycles at 2 Hz. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding area to obtain beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) (30 beams per group) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test in a testing machine (EZ Test) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p≤0.05). Results : The microtensile bond strength values (MPa) were 26.9 ± 6.9, 22.2 ± 7.8, and 21.2 ± 9.1 for groups 1-3 and 35.0 ± 9.6, 24.3 ± 8.9, and 23.9 ± 6.3 for groups 4-6. For the control group, fatigue testing and thermocycling produced a predominance of adhesive failures. Fatigue and

  3. Damage Monitoring of Unidirectional C/SiC Ceramic-Matrix Composite under Cyclic Fatigue Loading using A Hysteresis Loss Energy-Based Damage Parameter at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-06-01

    The damage evolution of unidirectional C/SiC ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) under cyclic fatigue loading has been investigated using a hysteresis loss energy-based damage parameter at room and elevated temperatures. The experimental fatigue hysteresis modulus and fatigue hysteresis loss energy versus cycle number have been analyzed. By comparing the experimental fatigue hysteresis loss energy with theoretical computational values, the interface shear stress corresponding to different cycle number and peak stress has been estimated. The experimental evolution of fatigue hysteresis loss energy and fatigue hysteresis loss energy-based damage parameter versus cycle number has been predicted for unidirectional C/SiC composite at room and elevated temperatures. The predicted results of interface shear stress degradation, stress-strain hysteresis loops corresponding to different number of applied cycles, fatigue hysteresis loss energy and fatigue hysteresis loss energy-based damage parameter as a functions of cycle number agreed with experimental data. It was found that the fatigue hysteresis energy-based parameter can be used to monitor the fatigue damage evolution and predict the fatigue life of fiber-reinforced CMCs.

  4. Influence of the mechanical stress and the filler content on the hydrostatic compression behaviour of natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Jan; Stommel, Markus

    2013-12-01

    The behaviour of natural rubber (NR) compounds under mechanical stress is often reported in literature. An important and widely discussed effect that occurs is the Mullins effect. During the first loading cycles in a tensile test for example, a stress-softening effect is observed. This and other effects on the mechanical behaviour are investigated for different rubber materials with and without different types of fillers and filler contents. Besides, the hydrostatic compression behaviour is affected by the type and content of filler as well, which is shown for an NR with and without waxes and different contents of carbon black (CB) in this contribution. In contrast to the Mullins effect, there is no dependence of the number of loading cycles on the volumetric behaviour determined in hydrostatic compression tests. Furthermore, the influence of the previous stress-softening due to mechanical stress on the compression behaviour is elaborated. Cyclic uniaxial tensile tests are performed to realize the stress-softening in the rubber materials. The subsequent compression tests are compared to compression tests without any pre-stretching to determine the influence of previous mechanical loading on the compression behaviour of natural rubber with different filler contents.

  5. Structural Modeling of an Osteoblast Subjected to Hypergravity Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth K.; Steele, Charles R.; Searby, Nancy D.

    2001-01-01

    Osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, are sensitive to altered mechanical loads such as those induced by fluid shear forces and cyclic uniaxial tension and compression. The cytoskeleton is thought to play an important role in a cell's response to mechanical loading and to coordinate cell shape changes. While some theoretical calculations indicate that a cell should not be able to respond to relatively small changes in gravity given the magnitude of forces exerted by intracellular components, osteoblasts have been shown to respond to microgravity. In this study, we investigated whether an osteoblast can sense a constant hypergravity acceleration of 10G. We asked if this load changes the shape of an osteoblast, and if engineering modeling accurately predicts the shape change. We modeled a cell by representing it as a series of axisymmetric shell structures. To test this model empirically, we performed experiments with cultured osteoblasts to measure changes in cell shape resulting from hypergravity loading.

  6. Micromechanical evaluation of bone microstructures under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Ralph; Boesch, Tobias; Jarak, Drazen; Stauber, Martin; Nazarian, Ara; Tantillo, Michelle; Boyd, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Many bones within the axial and appendicular skeleton are subjected to repetitive, cyclic loading during the course of ordinary daily activities. If this repetitive loading is of sufficient magnitude or duration, fatigue failure of the bone tissue may result. In clinical orthopedics, trabecular fatigue fractures are observed as compressive stress fractures in the proximal femur, vertebrae, calcaneus and tibia, and are often preceded by buckling and bending of microstructural elements. However, the relative importance of bone density and architecture in the aetiology of these fractures is poorly understood. The aim of the study was to investigate failure mechanisms of 3D trabecular bone using micro-computed tomography (mCT). Because of its nondestructive nature, mCT represents an ideal approach for performing not only static measurements of bone architecture but also dynamic measurements of failure initiation and propagation as well as damage accumulation. For the purpose of the study, a novel micro-compression device was devised to measure loaded trabecular bone specimens directly in a micro-tomographic system. A 3D snapshot of the structure under load was taken for each load step in the mCT providing 34 mm nominal resolution. An integrated mini-button load cell in the compression device combined with the displacement computed directly from the mCT scout view was used to record the load-displacement curve. From the series of 3D images, failure of the trabecular architecture could be observed, and in a rod-like type of architecture it could be described by an initial buckling and bending of structural elements followed by a collapse of the overloaded trabeculae. A computational method was developed to quantify individual trabecular strains during failure. The four main steps of the algorithm were (i) sequential image alignment, (ii) identification of landmarks (trabecular nodes), (iii) determine nodal connectivity, and (iv) to compute the nodal displacements and

  7. Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed. PMID:19704553

  8. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-22

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  9. Vehicle Integrated Photovoltaics for Compression Ignition Vehicles: An Experimental Investigation of Solar Alkaline Water Electrolysis for Improving Diesel Combustion and a Solar Charging System for Reducing Auxiliary Engine Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negroni, Garry Inocentes

    Vehicle-integrated photovoltaic electricity can be applied towards aspiration of hydrogen-oxygen-steam gas produced through alkaline electrolysis and reductions in auxiliary alternator load for reducing hydrocarbon emissions in low nitrogen oxide indirect-injection compression-ignition engines. Aspiration of 0.516 ± 0.007 liters-per-minute of gas produced through alkaline electrolysis of potassium-hydroxide 2wt.% improves full-load performance; however, part-load performance decreases due to auto-ignition of aspirated gas prior to top-dead center. Alternator load reductions offer improved part-load and full-load performance with practical limitations resulting from accessory electrical loads. In an additive approach, solar electrolysis can electrochemically convert solar photovoltaic electricity into a gas comprised of stoichiometric hydrogen and oxygen gas. Aspiration of this hydrogen-oxygen gas enhances combustion properties decreasing emissions and increased combustion efficiency in light-duty diesel vehicles. The 316L stainless steel (SS) electrolyser plates are arranged with two anodes and three cathodes space with four bipolar plates delineating four stacks in parallel with five cells per stack. The electrolyser was tested using potassium hydroxide 2 wt.% and hydronium 3wt.% at measured voltage and current inputs. The flow rate output from the reservoir cell was measured in parallel with the V and I inputs producing a regression model correlating current input to flow rate. KOH 2 wt.% produced 0.005 LPM/W, while H9O44 3 wt.% produced less at 0.00126 LPM/W. In a subtractive approach, solar energy can be used to charge a larger energy storage device, as is with plug-in electric vehicles, in order to alleviate the engine of the mechanical load placed upon it by the vehicles electrical accessories through the alternator. Solar electrolysis can improve part-load emissions and full-load performance. The average solar-to-battery efficiency based on the OEM rated

  10. Rock fall triggering from cyclic thermal forcing of exfoliation fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, B. D.; Stock, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Exfoliation of rocks cause cliffs to deteriorate through the formation and subsequent opening of fractures. Where human activities are exposed to this process, rock fall hazard is potentially high. A number of mechanisms (e.g., freeze-thaw, precipitation-induced seepage) are capable of triggering rock fall in steep rock masses, however, some rock falls occur in the absence of any identified trigger. Among the suggested causes for these unexplained rock falls is thermal heating which can lead to outward expansion of rock surfaces. Here we use data from three years of displacement transducer field monitoring and corroborated by lidar measurements to test this hypothesis by assessing the magnitude and temporal pattern of thermally-induced rock deformation in an exfoliating granitic landscape. We show that daily, seasonal, and annual temperature effects are sufficient to cause cyclic and cumulative deformation of fractures, and that fracture tip propagation with consequent detachment of rock masses likely results. We use thermodynamic and structural engineering principals to show that thermally-forced exfoliation surfaces (i.e., partially detached 'flakes' of rock) follow Carnot-cycle-type hysteresis loops (i.e., the cyclical conversion of thermal energy to work that occurs in a heat engine) and can be modeled by Euler-type buckling criteria (i.e., the resultant lateral deformation that occurs upon an increase in axial compressive loading, here, caused by thermal expansion along the axis of partially detached exfoliation flakes). Our data from a 19-m-tall, 4-m-wide, 10-cm-thick, instrumented granodiorite exfoliation flake indicate that cumulative annual outward deformation of up to 1 mm/yr occurs under fatigue crack growth conditions. These conditions are related to both cyclic thermal and mechanical forcing and gravitational loads acting along the surfaces that attach the flake to the rock mass. Based on these observations and our analyses, we suggest that the warmest

  11. Reversible cyclic deformation mechanism of gold nanowires by twinning-detwinning transition evidenced from in situ TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Subin; Im, Jiseong; Yoo, Youngdong; Bitzek, Erik; Kiener, Daniel; Richter, Gunther; Kim, Bongsoo; Oh, Sang Ho

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical response of metal nanowires has recently attracted a lot of interest due to their ultra-high strengths and unique deformation behaviours. Atomistic simulations have predicted that face-centered cubic metal nanowires deform in different modes depending on the orientation between wire axis and loading direction. Here we report, by combination of in situ transmission electron microscopy and molecular dynamic simulation, the conditions under which particular deformation mechanisms take place during the uniaxial loading of [110]-oriented Au nanowires. Furthermore, by performing cyclic uniaxial loading, we show reversible plastic deformation by twinning and consecutive detwinning in tension and compression, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulations rationalize the observed behaviours in terms of the orientation-dependent resolved shear stress on the leading and trailing partial dislocations, their potential nucleation sites and energy barriers. This reversible twinning-detwinning process accommodates large strains that can be beneficially utilized in applications requiring high ductility in addition to ultra-high strength.

  12. Computational simulation of static/cyclic cell stimulations to investigate mechanical modulation of an individual mesenchymal stem cell using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Alihemmati, Zakieh; Vahidi, Bahman; Haghighipour, Nooshin; Salehi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    It has been found that cells react to mechanical stimuli, while the type and magnitude of these cells are different in various physiological and pathological conditions. These stimuli may affect cell behaviors via mechanotransduction mechanisms. The aim of this study is to evaluate mechanical responses of a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) to a pressure loading using finite elements method (FEM) to clarify procedures of MSC mechanotransduction. The model is constructed based on an experimental set up in which statics and cyclic compressive loads are implemented on a model constructed from a confocal microscopy 3D image of a stem cell. Both of the applied compressive loads are considered in the physiological loading regimes. Moreover, a viscohyperelastic material model was assumed for the cell through which the finite elements simulation anticipates cell behavior based on strain and stress distributions in its components. As a result, high strain and stress values were captured from the viscohyperelastic model because of fluidic behavior of cytosol when compared with the obtained results through the hyperelastic models. It can be concluded that the generated strain produced by cyclic pressure is almost 8% higher than that caused by the static load and the von Mises stress distribution is significantly increased to about 150kPa through the cyclic loading. In total, the results does not only trace the efficacy of an individual 3D model of MSC using biomechanical experiments of cell modulation, but these results provide knowledge in interpretations from cell geometry. The current study was performed to determine a realistic aspect of cell behavior.

  13. The effect of sustained compression on oxygen metabolic transport in the intervertebral disc decreases with degenerative changes.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Andrea; Noailly, Jérôme; Lacroix, Damien

    2011-08-01

    Intervertebral disc metabolic transport is essential to the functional spine and provides the cells with the nutrients necessary to tissue maintenance. Disc degenerative changes alter the tissue mechanics, but interactions between mechanical loading and disc transport are still an open issue. A poromechanical finite element model of the human disc was coupled with oxygen and lactate transport models. Deformations and fluid flow were linked to transport predictions by including strain-dependent diffusion and advection. The two solute transport models were also coupled to account for cell metabolism. With this approach, the relevance of metabolic and mechano-transport couplings were assessed in the healthy disc under loading-recovery daily compression. Disc height, cell density and material degenerative changes were parametrically simulated to study their influence on the calculated solute concentrations. The effects of load frequency and amplitude were also studied in the healthy disc by considering short periods of cyclic compression. Results indicate that external loads influence the oxygen and lactate regional distributions within the disc when large volume changes modify diffusion distances and diffusivities, especially when healthy disc properties are simulated. Advection was negligible under both sustained and cyclic compression. Simulating degeneration, mechanical changes inhibited the mechanical effect on transport while disc height, fluid content, nucleus pressure and overall cell density reductions affected significantly transport predictions. For the healthy disc, nutrient concentration patterns depended mostly on the time of sustained compression and recovery. The relevant effect of cell density on the metabolic transport indicates the disturbance of cell number as a possible onset for disc degeneration via alteration of the metabolic balance. Results also suggest that healthy disc properties have a positive effect of loading on metabolic transport. Such

  14. Relationship between streaming potential and compressive stress in bovine intervertebral tissue.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Kazuhiro; Tadano, Shigeru; Asano, Nozomu

    2011-09-02

    The intervertebral disc is formed by the nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF), and intervertebral tissue contains a large amount of negatively charged proteoglycan. When this tissue becomes deformed, a streaming potential is induced by liquid flow with positive ions. The anisotropic property of the AF tissue is caused by the structural anisotropy of the solid phase and the liquid phase flowing into the tissue with the streaming potential. This study investigated the relationship between the streaming potential and applied stress in bovine intervertebral tissue while focusing on the anisotropy and loading location. Column-shaped specimens, 5.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were prepared from the tissue of the AF, NP and the annulus-nucleus transition region (AN). The loading direction of each specimen was oriented in the spinal axial direction, as well as in the circumferential and radial directions of the spine considering the anisotropic properties of the AF tissue. The streaming potential changed linearly with stress in all specimens. The linear coefficients k(e) of the relationship between stress and streaming potential depended on the extracted positions. These coefficients were not affected by the anisotropy of the AF tissue. In addition, these coefficients were lower in AF than in NP specimens. Except in the NP specimen, the k(e) values were higher under faster compression rate conditions. In cyclic compression loading the streaming potential changed linearly with compressive stress, regardless of differences in the tissue and load frequency.

  15. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  16. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  17. Effects of Loading Duration and Short Rest Insertion on Cancellous and Cortical Bone Adaptation in the Mouse Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haisheng; Embry, Rachel E.; Main, Russell P.

    2017-01-01

    The skeleton’s osteogenic response to mechanical loading can be affected by loading duration and rest insertion during a series of loading events. Prior animal loading studies have shown that the cortical bone response saturates quickly and short rest insertions between load cycles can enhance cortical bone formation. However, it remains unknown how loading duration and short rest insertion affect load-induced osteogenesis in the mouse tibial compressive loading model, and particularly in cancellous bone. To address this issue, we applied cyclic loading (-9 N peak load; 4 Hz) to the tibiae of three groups of 16 week-old female C57BL/6 mice for two weeks, with a different number of continuous load cycles applied daily to each group (36, 216 and 1200). A fourth group was loaded under 216 daily load cycles with a 10 s rest insertion after every fourth cycle. We found that as few as 36 load cycles per day were able to induce osteogenic responses in both cancellous and cortical bone. Furthermore, while cortical bone area and thickness continued to increase through 1200 cycles, the incremental increase in the osteogenic response decreased as load number increased, indicating a reduced benefit of the increasing number of load cycles. In the proximal metaphyseal cancellous bone, trabecular thickness increased with load up to 216 cycles. We also found that insertion of a 10 s rest between load cycles did not improve the osteogenic response of the cortical or cancellous tissues compared to continuous loading in this model given the age and sex of the mice and the loading parameters used here. These results suggest that relatively few load cycles (e.g. 36) are sufficient to induce osteogenic responses in both cortical and cancellous bone in the mouse tibial loading model. Mechanistic studies using the mouse tibial loading model to examine bone formation and skeletal mechanobiology could be accomplished with relatively few load cycles. PMID:28076363

  18. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  19. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  20. Survey of Header Compression Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishac, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    This report provides a summary of several different header compression techniques. The different techniques included are: (1) Van Jacobson's header compression (RFC 1144); (2) SCPS (Space Communications Protocol Standards) header compression (SCPS-TP, SCPS-NP); (3) Robust header compression (ROHC); and (4) The header compression techniques in RFC2507 and RFC2508. The methodology for compression and error correction for these schemes are described in the remainder of this document. All of the header compression schemes support compression over simplex links, provided that the end receiver has some means of sending data back to the sender. However, if that return path does not exist, then neither Van Jacobson's nor SCPS can be used, since both rely on TCP (Transmission Control Protocol). In addition, under link conditions of low delay and low error, all of the schemes perform as expected. However, based on the methodology of the schemes, each scheme is likely to behave differently as conditions degrade. Van Jacobson's header compression relies heavily on the TCP retransmission timer and would suffer an increase in loss propagation should the link possess a high delay and/or bit error rate (BER). The SCPS header compression scheme protects against high delay environments by avoiding delta encoding between packets. Thus, loss propagation is avoided. However, SCPS is still affected by an increased BER (bit-error-rate) since the lack of delta encoding results in larger header sizes. Next, the schemes found in RFC2507 and RFC2508 perform well for non-TCP connections in poor conditions. RFC2507 performance with TCP connections is improved by various techniques over Van Jacobson's, but still suffers a performance hit with poor link properties. Also, RFC2507 offers the ability to send TCP data without delta encoding, similar to what SCPS offers. ROHC is similar to the previous two schemes, but adds additional CRCs (cyclic redundancy check) into headers and improves

  1. Designing cyclic universe models.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Justin; Steinhardt, Paul J; Turok, Neil

    2004-01-23

    The phenomenological constraints on the scalar field potential in cyclic models of the Universe are presented. We show that cyclic models require a comparable degree of tuning to that needed for inflationary models. The constraints are reduced to a set of simple design rules including "fast-roll" parameters analogous to the "slow-roll" parameters in inflation.

  2. Cyclic Hematopoiesis: animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.B.; Lange, R.D.

    1983-08-01

    The four existing animal models of cyclic hematopoiesis are briefly described. The unusual erythropoietin (Ep) responses of the W/Wv mouse, the Sl/Sld mouse, and cyclic hematopoietic dog are reviewed. The facts reviewed indicate that the bone marrow itself is capable of influencing regulatory events of hematopoiesis.

  3. Affordable Cyclic Voltammetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Greg; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Amend, John R.; Collins, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is an important component of the undergraduate chemical curriculum. Unfortunately, undergraduate students rarely have the opportunity to conduct experiments in cyclic voltammetry owing to the high cost of potentiostats, which are required to control these experiments. By using MicroLab data acquisition interfaces in conjunction…

  4. Compressive Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Se Hoon

    Compressive holography estimates images from incomplete data by using sparsity priors. Compressive holography combines digital holography and compressive sensing. Digital holography consists of computational image estimation from data captured by an electronic focal plane array. Compressive sensing enables accurate data reconstruction by prior knowledge on desired signal. Computational and optical co-design optimally supports compressive holography in the joint computational and optical domain. This dissertation explores two examples of compressive holography: estimation of 3D tomographic images from 2D data and estimation of images from under sampled apertures. Compressive holography achieves single shot holographic tomography using decompressive inference. In general, 3D image reconstruction suffers from underdetermined measurements with a 2D detector. Specifically, single shot holographic tomography shows the uniqueness problem in the axial direction because the inversion is ill-posed. Compressive sensing alleviates the ill-posed problem by enforcing some sparsity constraints. Holographic tomography is applied for video-rate microscopic imaging and diffuse object imaging. In diffuse object imaging, sparsity priors are not valid in coherent image basis due to speckle. So incoherent image estimation is designed to hold the sparsity in incoherent image basis by support of multiple speckle realizations. High pixel count holography achieves high resolution and wide field-of-view imaging. Coherent aperture synthesis can be one method to increase the aperture size of a detector. Scanning-based synthetic aperture confronts a multivariable global optimization problem due to time-space measurement errors. A hierarchical estimation strategy divides the global problem into multiple local problems with support of computational and optical co-design. Compressive sparse aperture holography can be another method. Compressive sparse sampling collects most of significant field

  5. In-situ TOF neutron diffraction studies of cyclic softening in superelasticity of a NiFeGaCo shape memory alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Hui; Yu, Dunji; Chen, Yan; ...

    2016-10-24

    Real-time in-situ neutron diffraction was conducted during uniaxial cycling compression of a Ni49.3Fe18Ga27Co5.7 shape memory alloy to explore the mechanism on its superelasticity at room temperature, which was manifested by the almost recoverable large strains and the apparent cyclic softening. Based on the Rietveld refinements, the real-time evolution of volume fraction of martensite was in-situ monitored, indicating the incremental amount of residual martensite with increasing load cycles. Real-time changes in intensities and lattice strains of {hkl} reflections for individual phase were obtained through fitting individual peaks, which reveal the quantitative information on phase transformation kinetics as a function ofmore » grain orientation and stress/strain partitioning. Moreover, a large compressive residual stress was evidenced in the parent phase, which should be balanced by the residual martensite after the second unloading cycle. As a result, the large compressive residual stress found in the parent austenite phase may account for the cyclic effect on critical stress required for triggering the martensitic transformation in the subsequent loading.« less

  6. In-situ TOF neutron diffraction studies of cyclic softening in superelasticity of a NiFeGaCo shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hui; Yu, Dunji; Chen, Yan; Mu, Juan; Wang, Y. D.; An, Ke

    2016-10-24

    Real-time in-situ neutron diffraction was conducted during uniaxial cycling compression of a Ni49.3Fe18Ga27Co5.7 shape memory alloy to explore the mechanism on its superelasticity at room temperature, which was manifested by the almost recoverable large strains and the apparent cyclic softening. Based on the Rietveld refinements, the real-time evolution of volume fraction of martensite was in-situ monitored, indicating the incremental amount of residual martensite with increasing load cycles. Real-time changes in intensities and lattice strains of {hkl} reflections for individual phase were obtained through fitting individual peaks, which reveal the quantitative information on phase transformation kinetics as a function of grain orientation and stress/strain partitioning. Moreover, a large compressive residual stress was evidenced in the parent phase, which should be balanced by the residual martensite after the second unloading cycle. As a result, the large compressive residual stress found in the parent austenite phase may account for the cyclic effect on critical stress required for triggering the martensitic transformation in the subsequent loading.

  7. Exploring the influence of loading geometry on the plastic flow properties of geological materials: Results from combined torsion + axial compression tests on calcite rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey-Crump, S. J.; Xiao, W. F.; Mecklenburgh, J.; Rutter, E. H.; May, S. E.

    2016-07-01

    For technical reasons, virtually all plastic deformation experiments on geological materials have been performed in either pure shear or simple shear. These special case loading geometries are rather restrictive for those seeking insight into how microstructure evolves under the more general loading geometries that occur during natural deformation. Moreover, they are insufficient to establish how plastic flow properties might vary with the 3rd invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor (J3) which describes the stress configuration, and so applications that use those flow properties (e.g. glaciological and geodynamical modelling) may be correspondingly compromised. We describe an inexpensive and relatively straightforward modification to the widely used Paterson rock deformation apparatus that allows torsion experiments to be performed under simultaneously applied axial loads. We illustrate the performance of this modification with the results of combined stress experiments performed on Carrara marble and Solnhofen limestone at 500°-600 °C and confining pressures of 300 MPa. The flow stresses are best described by the Drucker yield function which includes J3-dependence. However, that J3-dependence is small. Hence for these initially approximately isotropic calcite rocks, flow stresses are adequately described by the J3-independent von Mises yield criterion that is widely used in deformation modelling. Loading geometry does, however, have a profound influence on the type and rate of development of crystallographic preferred orientation, and hence of mechanical anisotropy. The apparatus modification extends the range of loading geometries that can be used to investigate microstructural evolution, as well as providing greater scope for determining the shape of the yield surface in plastically anisotropic materials.

  8. Mechanical response of unidirectional boron/aluminum under combined loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    Three test methods were employed to characterize the response of unidirectional Boron/Aluminum metal matrix composite material under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions, namely, losipescu shear, off-axis tension and compression. The characterization of the elastic and plastic response includes the elastic material properties, yielding and subsequent hardening of the unidirectional composite under different stress ratios in the material principal coordinate system. Yield loci generated for different stress ratios are compared for the three different test methods, taking into account residual stresses and specimen geometry. Subsequently, the yield locus for in-plane shear is compared with the prediction of an analytical, micromechanical model. The influence of the scatter in the experimental data on the predicted yield surface is also analyzed. Lastly, the experimental material strengths in tension and compression are correlated with the maximum stress and the Tsai-Wu failure criterion.

  9. Effect of Strain Rates on the Compressive Response of Neck Rubber From Humanetics HIII 50th Percentile Male Dummy Under Different Loading Sequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    Sequences by Brett Sanborn, Paul Moy, Randy Mrozek, and Tusit Weerasooriya ARL-TR-6336 February 2013...Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) Paul Moy, Randy Mrozek, and Tusit Weerasooriya Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...Different Loading Sequences 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 1120-1120-99 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Brett Sanborn, * Paul Moy

  10. On the cyclic stress-strain behaviour of a Ni-base superalloy at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Vakil; Wahi, R. P.; Chen, W.; Yun, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    The cyclic stress-strain behavior of Nimonic alloy PE16 was studied at room temperature and at different aging conditions to determine whether the plateau in the cyclic stress-strain curve (CSSC) reported by Arbuthnot (1982) is typical of the room temperature behavior and/or some specific initial microstructural states. Specimen blanks were heat-treated in batches in Ar/H2 (98/2) atmosphere to produce gamma-prime precipitates of different average sizes, but with the volume fraction of gamma-prime precipitates kept constant at about 7 percent at all the heat-treatment conditions. Total axial strain controlled LCF tests were conducted under fully reversed loading (R = -1) at a constant strain rate of 0.004/s, using a servohydraulic machine. The load response in tension and compression was recorded continually, and stress-strain hysteresis loops were recorded at frequent intervals. In the present investigation, the CSSCs of the P16 alloy at room temperature did not display the plateaus reported by Arbuthnot.

  11. Loading of Articular Cartilage Compromises Chondrocyte Respiratory Function

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Mitchell C.; Ramakrishnan, Prem S.; Brouillette, Marc J.; Martin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Determine whether repeatedly overloading healthy cartilage disrupts mitochondrial function in a manner similar to that associated with osteoarthritis pathogenesis. Methods We exposed normal articular cartilage on bovine osteochondral explants to 1 day or 7 consecutive days of cyclic axial compression (0.25 or 1.0 MPa, 0.5 Hz, 3 hours) and evaluated effects on chondrocyte viability, ATP concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, indicators of oxidative stress, respiration, and mitochondrial membrane potential. Results Neither 0.25 nor 1.0 MPa cyclic compression caused extensive chondrocyte death, macroscopic tissue damage, or overt changes in stress-strain behavior. After one day of loading, differences in respiratory activities between the 0.25 and 1.0 MPa groups were minimal; after 7 loading days, however, respiratory activity and ATP levels were suppressed in the 1.0 MPa group relative to the 0.25 MPa group, an effect prevented with pretreatment with 10 mM N-acetylcysteine. These changes were accompanied by increased proton leakage and decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential as well as by increased ROS formation indicated by dihydroethidium staining and glutathione oxidation. Conclusion Repeated overloading leads to chondrocyte oxidant-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction. This mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to destabilization of cartilage during various stages of OA in distinct ways by disrupting chondrocyte anabolic responses to mechanical stimuli. PMID:26473613

  12. Modeling Step-Strain Relaxation and Cyclic Deformations of Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A.R.; Mead, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Data for step-strain relaxation and cyclic compressive deformations of highly viscous short elastomer cylinders are modeled using a large strain rubber viscoelastic constitutive theory with a rate-independent friction stress term added. In the tests, both small and large amplitude cyclic compressive strains, in the range of 1% to 10%, were superimposed on steady state compressed strains, in the range of 5% to 20%, for frequencies of 1 and 10 Hz. The elastomer cylinders were conditioned prior to each test to soften them. The constants in the viscoclastic-friction constitutive theory are determined by employing a nonlinear least-squares method to fit the analytical stresses for a Maxwell model, which includes friction, to measured relaxation stresses obtained from a 20% step-strain compression test. The simulation of the relaxation data with the nonlinear model is successful at compressive strains of 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%. Simulations of hysteresis stresses for enforced cyclic compressive strains of 20% +/- 5% are made with the model calibrated by the relaxation data. The predicted hysteresis stresses are lower than the measured stresses.

  13. Mechanical compression release device in steel bracing system for retrofitting RC frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffarzadeh, H.; Maheri, M. R.

    2006-06-01

    The development of an innovative structural system with satisfactory seismic performance of braced systems is an important and challenging area of interest in structural engineering. In this paper, a device that can release the compressive force in the bracing members is developed, and its performance is evaluated. For comparison, four steel braced RC frames were constructed and tested under reverse cyclic loads. Two of them had different amounts of bracing and the other two had the same amount of bracing but incorporated different type of device, called compression release device, which is developed and described in this paper. It can be concluded from the test results that the newly developed device can effectively be used in steel braced systems to prevent buckling failure of the bracing members. Therefore, the device enhances the ductility of brace-framed systems by allowing an adequate capacity for energy dissipation.

  14. Microdamage caused by fatigue loading in human cancellous bone: relationship to reductions in bone biomechanical performance.

    PubMed

    Lambers, Floor M; Bouman, Amanda R; Rimnac, Clare M; Hernandez, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Vertebral fractures associated with osteoporosis are often the result of tissue damage accumulated over time. Microscopic tissue damage (microdamage) generated in vivo is believed to be a mechanically relevant aspect of bone quality that may contribute to fracture risk. Although the presence of microdamage in bone tissue has been documented, the relationship between loading, microdamage accumulation and mechanical failure is not well understood. The aim of the current study was to determine how microdamage accumulates in human vertebral cancellous bone subjected to cyclic fatigue loading. Cancellous bone cores (n = 32) from the third lumbar vertebra of 16 donors (10 male, 6 female, age 76 ± 8.8, mean ± SD) were subjected to compressive cyclic loading at σ/E0 = 0.0035 (where σ is stress and E0 is the initial Young's modulus). Cyclic loading was suspended before failure at one of seven different amounts of loading and specimens were stained for microdamage using lead uranyl acetate. Damage volume fraction (DV/BV) varied from 0.8 ± 0.5% (no loading) to 3.4 ± 2.1% (fatigue-loaded to complete failure) and was linearly related to the reductions in Young's modulus caused by fatigue loading (r(2) = 0.60, p<0.01). The relationship between reductions in Young's modulus and proportion of fatigue life was nonlinear and suggests that most microdamage generation occurs late in fatigue loading, during the tertiary phase. Our results indicate that human vertebral cancellous bone tissue with a DV/BV of 1.5% is expected to have, on average, a Young's modulus 31% lower than the same tissue without microdamage and is able to withstand 92% fewer cycles before failure than the same tissue without microdamage. Hence, even small amounts of microscopic tissue damage in human vertebral cancellous bone may have large effects on subsequent biomechanical performance.

  15. Effects of enzymatic digestion on compressive properties of rat intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Barbir, Ana; Michalek, Arthur J; Abbott, Rosalyn D; Iatridis, James C

    2010-04-19

    Enzymatic treatments were applied to rat motion segments to establish structure-function relationships and determine mechanical parameters most sensitive to simulated remodeling and degeneration. Rat caudal and lumbar disc biomechanical behaviors were evaluated to improve knowledge of their similarities and differences due to their frequent use during in vivo models. Caudal motion segments were assigned to four groups: soaked (control), genipin treated, elastase treated, and collagenase treated. Fresh lumbar and caudal discs were also compared. The mechanical protocol involved five force-controlled loading stages: equilibration, cyclic compression-tension, quasi-static compression, frequency sweep, and creep. Crosslinking was found to have the greatest effect on IVD properties at resting stress. Elastin's role was greatest in tension and at higher force conditions, where GAG content was also a contributing factor. Collagenase treatment caused tissue compaction, which impacted mechanical properties at both high and low force conditions. Equilibration creep and cyclic compression-tension tests were the mechanical tests most sensitive to alterations in specific matrix constituents. Caudal and lumbar motion segments had many similarities but biomechanical differences suggested some distinctions in collagenous structure and water transport characteristics in addition to the geometric differences. Results provide a basis for interpreting biomechanical changes observed in animal model studies of degeneration and remodeling, and underscore the need to maintain and/or repair collagen integrity in IVD health and disease.

  16. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013. Slutsker B, et al. Breaking the cycle: Cognitive behavioral therapy and biofeedback training in a case of cyclic vomiting syndrome. Psychology, Health & Medicine. 2010;15:625. Boles RG. High ...

  17. Cyclic control stick

    DOEpatents

    Whitaker, Charles N.; Zimmermann, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclic control stick of the type used in helicopters for reducing the safety hazards associated with such a mechanism in the event of a crewman being thrown violently into contact with the cyclic control stick resulting from a crash or the like. The cyclic control stick is configured to break away upon the exertion of an impact force which exceeds a predetermined value and/or is exerted for more than a momentary time duration. The cyclic control stick is also configured to be adjustable so as to locate the grip thereof as far away from the crewman as possible for safety reasons without comprising the comfort of the crewman or the use of the control stick, and a crushable pad is provided on the top of the grip for impact energy absorbing purposes.

  18. Prediction of unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by leading edge and trailing edge control surface motions in subsonic compressible flow: Computer program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redman, M. C.; Rowe, W. S.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program has been developed to calculate unsteady loadings caused by motions of lifting surfaces with leading edge or trailing edge controls based on the subsonic kernel function approach. The pressure singularities at hinge line and side edges have been extracted analytically as a preliminary step to solving the integral equation by collocation. The program calculates generalized aerodynamic forces for user supplied deflection modes. Optional intermediate output includes pressure at an array of points, and sectional generalized forces. From one to six controls on the half span can be accommodated.

  19. Effects of Compressibility on the Maximum Lift Characteristics and Spanwise Load Distribution of a 12-Foot-Span Fighter-Type Wing of NACA 230-Series Airfoil Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, F E

    1945-01-01

    Lift characteristics and pressure distribution for a NACA 230 wing were investigated for an angle of attack range of from -10 to +24 degrees and Mach range of from 0.2 to 0.7. Maximum lift coefficient increased up to a Mach number of 0.3, decreased rapidly to a Mach number of 0.55, and then decreased moderately. At high speeds, maximum lift coefficient was reached at from 10 to 12 degrees beyond the stalling angle. In high-speed stalls, resultant load underwent a moderate shift outward.

  20. Cyclic polymers from alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christopher D.; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Veige, Adam S.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer.

  1. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  2. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bradley E.; Kabir, Md. E.; Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  3. Cyclic plasticity and failure of structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalev, I.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical approach for low-cycle fatigue prediction is presented. The approach combines a cyclic plasticity model with the finite element method and a damage accumulation criterion for ductile metals. The cyclic plasticity model is based on the concept of the combination of several yield surfaces. The surfaces are related to the material uniaxial stress-strain curve idealized by piecewise linear segments. The damage criterion is based on the Coffin-Manson formulae modified for the mean stress variation effect. It is extended to the multiaxial varying stress-strain field and applied for both the crack initiation and the crack growth processes. The stable slow crack growth rate is approximated by the damage accumulation gradient computed from the cracked finite element models. This procedure requires fatigue testing data of only smooth specimens under constant strain amplitudes. The present approach is illustrated by numerical examples of an aircraft wing stiffened panel subjected to compression, which causes material yielding and residual tension.

  4. Cyclic tensile strain upregulates collagen synthesis in isolated tendon fascicles

    SciTech Connect

    Screen, Hazel R.C. . E-mail: H.R.C.Screen@qmul.ac.uk; Shelton, Julia C.; Bader, Dan L.; Lee, David A.

    2005-10-21

    Mechanical stimulation has been implicated as an important regulatory factor in tendon homeostasis. In this study, a custom-designed tensile loading system was used to apply controlled mechanical stimulation to isolated tendon fascicles, in order to examine the effects of 5% cyclic tensile strain at 1 Hz on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. Sample viability and gross structural composition were maintained over a 24 h loading period. Data demonstrated no statistically significant differences in cell proliferation or glycosaminoglycan production, however, collagen synthesis was upregulated with the application of cyclic tensile strain over the 24 h period. Moreover, a greater proportion of the newly synthesised matrix was retained within the sample after loading. These data provide evidence of altered anabolic activity within tendon in response to mechanical stimuli, and suggest the importance of cyclic tensile loading for the maintenance of the collagen hierarchy within tendon.

  5. In situ deformation of growth plate chondrocytes in stress-controlled static vs dynamic compression.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Bouguerra, Séréna; Londoño, Irene; Moldovan, Florina; Aubin, Carl-Éric; Villemure, Isabelle

    2017-03-11

    Longitudinal bone growth in children/adolescents occurs through endochondral ossification at growth plates and is influenced by mechanical loading, where increased compression decreases growth (i.e., Hueter-Volkmann Law). Past in vivo studies on static vs dynamic compression of growth plates indicate that factors modulating growth rate might lie at the cellular level. Here, in situ viscoelastic deformation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth plate explants undergoing stress-controlled static vs dynamic loading conditions was investigated. Growth plate explants from the proximal tibia of pre-pubertal rats were subjected to static vs dynamic stress-controlled mechanical tests. Stained hypertrophic chondrocytes were tracked before and after mechanical testing with a confocal microscope to derive volumetric, axial and lateral cellular strains. Axial strain in hypertrophic chondrocytes was similar for all groups, supporting the mean applied compressive stress's correlation with bone growth rate and hypertrophic chondrocyte height in past studies. However, static conditions resulted in significantly higher lateral (p<0.001) and volumetric cellular strains (p≤0.015) than dynamic conditions, presumably due to the growth plate's viscoelastic nature. Sustained compression in stress-controlled static loading results in continued time-dependent cellular deformation; conversely, dynamic groups have less volumetric strain because the cyclically varying stress limits time-dependent deformation. Furthermore, high frequency dynamic tests showed significantly lower volumetric strain (p=0.002) than low frequency conditions. Mechanical loading protocols could be translated into treatments to correct or halt progression of bone deformities in children/adolescents. Mimicking physiological stress-controlled dynamic conditions may have beneficial effects at the cellular level as dynamic tests are associated with limited lateral and volumetric cellular deformation.

  6. Streaming Compression of Hexahedral Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Isenburg, M; Courbet, C

    2010-02-03

    We describe a method for streaming compression of hexahedral meshes. Given an interleaved stream of vertices and hexahedral our coder incrementally compresses the mesh in the presented order. Our coder is extremely memory efficient when the input stream documents when vertices are referenced for the last time (i.e. when it contains topological finalization tags). Our coder then continuously releases and reuses data structures that no longer contribute to compressing the remainder of the stream. This means in practice that our coder has only a small fraction of the whole mesh in memory at any time. We can therefore compress very large meshes - even meshes that do not file in memory. Compared to traditional, non-streaming approaches that load the entire mesh and globally reorder it during compression, our algorithm trades a less compact compressed representation for significant gains in speed, memory, and I/O efficiency. For example, on the 456k hexahedra 'blade' mesh, our coder is twice as fast and uses 88 times less memory (only 3.1 MB) with the compressed file increasing about 3% in size. We also present the first scheme for predictive compression of properties associated with hexahedral cells.

  7. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOEpatents

    Bowser, John

    2004-04-13

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In one of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the other part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. Ambient air is charged to the membrane separation unit during the latter part of the cycle.

  8. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOEpatents

    Nemser, Stuart M.

    2005-05-03

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In the first part of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the second part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. In one aspect of this invention, a vacuum is drawn in the membrane separation unit thus reducing overall VOC emissions.

  9. Compression stockings

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee bend. Compression Stockings Can Be Hard to Put on If it's hard for you to put on the stockings, try these tips: Apply lotion ... your legs, but let it dry before you put on the stockings. Use a little baby powder ...

  10. Cyclic Deformation-Induced Solute Transport in Tissue Scaffolds with Computer Designed, Interconnected, Pore Networks: Experiments and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Op Den Buijs, Jorn; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Ritman, Erik L.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient supply and waste removal in porous tissue engineering scaffolds decrease from the periphery to the center, leading to limited depth of ingrowth of new tissue into the scaffold. However, as many tissues experience cyclic physiological strains, this may provide a mechanism to enhance solute transport in vivo before vascularization of the scaffold. The hypothesis of this study was that pore cross-sectional geometry and interconnectivity are of major importance for the effectiveness of cyclic deformation-induced solute transport. Transparent elastic polyurethane scaffolds, with computer-programmed design of pore networks in the form of interconnected channels, were fabricated using a 3D printing and injection molding technique. The scaffold pores were loaded with a colored tracer for optical contrast, cyclically compressed with deformations of 10 and 15% of the original undeformed height at 1.0 Hz. Digital imaging was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the tracer concentration within the pores. Numerical simulations of a fluid–structure interaction model of deformation-induced solute transport were compared to the experimental data. The results of experiments and modeling agreed well and showed that pore interconnectivity heavily influences deformation-induced solute transport. Pore cross-sectional geometry appears to be of less relative importance in interconnected pore networks. Validated computer models of solute transport can be used to design optimal scaffold pore geometries that will enhance the convective transport of nutrients inside the scaffold and the removal of waste, thus improving the cell survivability deep inside the scaffold. PMID:19466547

  11. Cyclic plasticity models and application in fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalev, I.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical procedure for prediction of the cyclic plasticity effects on both the structural fatigue life to crack initiation and the rate of crack growth is presented. The crack initiation criterion is based on the Coffin-Manson formulae extended for multiaxial stress state and for inclusion of the mean stress effect. This criterion is also applied for the accumulated damage ahead of the existing crack tip which is assumed to be related to the crack growth rate. Three cyclic plasticity models, based on the concept of combination of several yield surfaces, are employed for computing the crack growth rate of a crack plane stress panel under several cyclic loading conditions.

  12. Cyclic Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Remesic, Michael; Lee, Yeon Sun; Hruby, Victor J

    2016-01-01

    For decades the opioid receptors have been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Since the first discovery of enkephalin, approximately a dozen endogenous opioid peptides have been known to produce opioid activity and analgesia, but their therapeutics have been limited mainly due to low blood brain barrier penetration and poor resistance to proteolytic degradation. One versatile approach to overcome these drawbacks is the cyclization of linear peptides to cyclic peptides with constrained topographical structure. Compared to their linear parents, cyclic analogs exhibit better metabolic stability, lower offtarget toxicity, and improved bioavailability. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies have uncovered promising compounds for the treatment of pain as well as further elucidate structural elements required for selective opioid receptor activity. The benefits that come with employing cyclization can be further enhanced through the generation of polycyclic derivatives. Opioid ligands generally have a short peptide chain and thus the realm of polycyclic peptides has yet to be explored. In this review, a brief history of designing ligands for the opioid receptors, including classic linear and cyclic ligands, is discussed along with recent approaches and successes of cyclic peptide ligands for the receptors. Various scaffolds and approaches to improve bioavailability are elaborated and concluded with a discourse towards polycyclic peptides.

  13. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Benschoten, James J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-part experiment designed to introduce cyclic voltammetry to graduate/undergraduate students. Part 1 demonstrates formal reduction potential, redox electron transfer, diffusion coefficient, and electrochemical reversibility. Part 2 investigates electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen. Part 3 examines such experimental variables…

  14. A Material Model for the Cyclic Behavior of Nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebelo, Nuno; Zipse, Achim; Schlun, Martin; Dreher, Gael

    2011-07-01

    The uniaxial behavior of Nitinol in different forms and at different temperatures has been well documented in the literature. Mathematical models for the three-dimensional behavior of this class of materials, covering superelasticity, plasticity, and shape memory effects have been previously developed. Phenomenological models embedded in FEA analysis are part of common practice today in the development of devices made out of Nitinol. In vivo loading of medical devices has cyclic characteristics. There have been some indications in the literature that cyclic loading of Nitinol modifies substantially its behavior. A consortium of several stent manufacturers, Safe Technology and Dassault Systèmes Simulia Corp., dedicated to the development of fatigue laws suitable for life prediction of Nitinol devices, has conducted an extensive experimental study of the modifications in uniaxial behavior of both Nitinol wire and tubing due to cyclic loading. The Abaqus Nitinol material model has been extended to capture some of the phenomena observed and is described in this article. Namely, a preload beyond 6% strain alters the transformation plateaus; if the cyclic load amplitude is large enough, permanent deformations (residual martensite) are observed; the lower plateau increases; and the upper plateau changes. The modifications to the upper plateau are very interesting in the sense that it appears broken: its start stress gets lowered creating a new plateau up to the highest level of cyclic strain, followed by resuming the original plateau until full transformation. Since quite often the geometry of a device at the point at which it is subjected to cyclic loading is very much dependent on the manufacturing, deployment, and preloading sequence, it is important that analyses be conducted with the original material behavior up to that point, and then with the cyclic behavior thereafter.

  15. Cyclic networks of quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabauy, Peter

    In this thesis we first give an introduction to the basic aspects of quantum computation followed by an analysis of networks of quantum logic gates where the qubit lines are loops (cyclic). Thus far, investigations into cyclic networks of quantum logic gates have not been examined (as far as we know) by the quantum information community. In our investigations of cyclic quantum networks we have studied simple, one and two qubit systems. The analysis includes: classifying networks into groups, the dynamics of the qubits in a cyclic quantum network, and the perturbation effects of an external qubit acting on a cyclic quantum network. The analysis will be followed by a discussion on quantum algorithms and quantum information processing with cyclic quantum networks, a novel implementation of a cyclic network quantum memory and a discussion of quantum sensors via cyclic quantum networks.

  16. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V.

    2014-01-29

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

  17. A model for cyclic mechanical reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhai; Kong, Fang; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical force regulates a broad range of molecular interactions in biology. Three types of counterintuitive mechanical regulation of receptor–ligand dissociation have been described. Catch bonds are strengthened by constant forces, as opposed to slip bonds that are weakened by constant forces. The phenomenon that bonds become stronger with prior application of cyclic forces is termed cyclic mechanical reinforcement (CMR). Slip and catch bonds have respectively been explained by two-state models. However, they assume fast equilibration between internal states and hence are inadequate for CMR. Here we propose a three-state model for CMR where both loading and unloading regulate the transition of bonds among the short-lived, intermediate, and long-lived state. Cyclic forces favor bonds in the long-lived state, hence greatly prolonging their lifetimes. The three-state model explains the force history effect and agrees with the experimental CMR effect of integrin α5β1–fibronectin interaction. This model helps decipher the distinctive ways by which molecular bonds are mechanically strengthened: catch bonds by constant forces and CMR by cyclic forces. The different types of mechanical regulation may enable the cell to fine tune its mechanotransduction via membrane receptors. PMID:27786286

  18. Dynamic compression promotes proliferation and neovascular networks of endothelial progenitor cells in demineralized bone matrix scaffold seed.

    PubMed

    Kong, Zhan; Li, Jianjun; Zhao, Qun; Zhou, Zhendong; Yuan, Xiangnan; Yang, Dongxiang; Chen, Xu

    2012-08-15

    Neovascularization is required for bone formation and successful fracture healing. In the process of neovascularization, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role and finish vascular repair through reendothelialization to promote successful fracture healing. In this study, we found that dynamic compression can promote the proliferation and capillary-like tube formation of EPCs in the demineralized bone matrix (DBM) scaffold seed. EPCs isolated from the bone marrow of rats have been cultured in DBM scaffolds before dynamic compression and then seeded in the DBM scaffolds under dynamic conditions. The cells/scaffold constructs were subjected to cyclic compression with 5% strain and at 1 Hz for 4 h/day for 7 consecutive days. By using MTT and real-time PCR, we found that dynamic compression can significantly induce the proliferation of EPCs in three-dimensional culture with an even distribution of cells onto DBM scaffolds. Both in vitro and in vivo, the tube formation assays in the scaffolds showed that the loaded EPCs formed significant tube-like structures. These findings suggest that dynamic compression promoted the vasculogenic activities of EPCs seeded in the scaffolds, which would benefit large bone defect tissue engineering.

  19. An electromagnetic compressive force by cell exciter stimulates chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyug; Sim, Woo Young; Park, Sin Wook; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Byung Hyune; Park, So Ra; Park, Kwideok; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we present a biological micro-electromechanical system and its application to the chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Actuated by an electromagnetic force, the micro cell exciter was designed to deliver a cyclic compressive load (CCL) with various magnitudes. Two major parts in the system are an actuator and a cartridge-type chamber. The former has a permanent magnet and coil, and the latter is equipped with 7 sample dishes and 7 metal caps. Mixed with a 2.4% alginate solution, the alginate/MSC layers were positioned in the sample dishes; the caps contained chondrogenic defined medium without transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Once powered, the actuator coil-derived electromagnetic force pulled the metal caps down, compressing the samples. The cyclic load was given at 1-Hz frequency for 10 min twice a day. Samples in the dishes without a cap served as a control. The samples were analyzed at 3, 5, and 7 days after stimulation for cell viability, biochemical assays, histologic features, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression of the chondrogenic markers. Applied to the alginate/MSC layer, the CCL system enhanced the synthesis of cartilage-specific matrix proteins and the chondrogenic markers, such as aggrecan, type II collagen, and Sox9. We found that the micromechanically exerted CCL by the cell exciter was very effective in enhancing the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, even without using exogenous TGF-beta.

  20. Compressive fatigue of a plasma-sprayed ZrO{sub 2}-8wt%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}-10wt%NiCrAlCoY TTBC

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, B.P.; Cruse, T.A.; Miller, R.A.; Brindley, W.J.

    1995-07-01

    Design of TTBC`s for use in diesel engines requires definition of the compressive fatigue strength of TTBC`s for high numbers of applied load cycles. Here, high cycle (> 10{sup 6} cycles) fatigue (HCF) behavior of thick thermal barrier coatings (TTBC`s) was examined for applied stresses near the compressive strength of the material. Test data were obtained on four coating systems: two base materials in the unsealed and CrO{sub 2} dip sealed conditions. Free standing tubular specimens were evaluated. The data show that compressive fatigue limits exist for the four coating systems at room temperature (RT) and sealing with CrO{sub 2} improves RT fatigue life. Test results also show the ratio of the peak cyclic stress, at 10{sup 5} cycles, to ultimate compressive strength (UCS) of the Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) tubular specimens approaches 0.90 at R = 0.6 (R = minimum/maximum compressive stress). Residual UCS increases were observed after fatigue run-outs at elevated temperatures (5 at 700 C and 1 at 400 C) for both YSZ and the cermet. Ratchetting with cyclic hardening was observed during fatigue with deformation occurring primarily in the initial portion of the high cycle fatigue life of the specimens.