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Sample records for cyclic deformation mechanisms

  1. Temperature Dependent Cyclic Deformation Mechanisms in Haynes 188 Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Castelli, Michael G.; Allen, Gorden P.; Ellis, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188, has been investigated over a range of temperatures between 25 and 1000 C under isothermal and in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. Constant mechanical strain rates (epsilon-dot) of 10(exp -3)/s and 10(exp -4)/s were examined with a fully reversed strain range of 0.8%. Particular attention was given to the effects of dynamic strain aging (DSA) on the stress-strain response and low cycle fatigue life. A correlation between cyclic deformation behavior and microstructural substructure was made through detailed transmission electron microscopy. Although DSA was found to occur over a wide temperature range between approximately 300 and 750 C the microstructural characteristics and the deformation mechanisms responsible for DSA varied considerably and were dependent upon temperature. In general, the operation of DSA processes led to a maximum of the cyclic stress amplitude at 650 C and was accompanied by pronounced planar slip, relatively high dislocation density, and the generation of stacking faults. DSA was evidenced through a combination of phenomena, including serrated yielding, an inverse dependence of the maximum cyclic hardening with epsilon-dot, and an instantaneous inverse epsilon-dot sensitivity verified by specialized epsilon-dot -change tests. The TMF cyclic hardening behavior of the alloy appeared to be dictated by the substructural changes occuring at the maximum temperature in the TMF cycle.

  2. Mechanical behavior of Al-Li/SiC composites. Part 2: Cyclic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Poza, P.; Llorca, J.

    1999-03-01

    The deformation and failure mechanisms under cyclic deformation in an 8090 Al-Li alloy reinforced with 15 vol pct SiC particles were studied and compared to those of the unreinforced alloy. The materials were tested under fully reversed cyclic deformation in the peak-aged and naturally aged conditions to obtain the cyclic response and the cyclic stress-strain curve. The peak-aged materials remained stable or showed slight cyclic softening, and the deformation mechanisms were not modified by the presence of the ceramic reinforcements: dislocations were trapped by the S{prime} precipitates and the stable response was produced by the mobile dislocations shuttling between the precipitates to accommodate the plastic strain without further hardening. The naturally aged materials exhibited cyclic hardening until failure, which was attributed to the interactions among dislocations. Strain localization and slip-band formation were observed in the naturally aged alloy at high cyclic strain amplitudes, whereas the corresponding composite presented homogeneous deformation. Fracture was initiated by grain-boundary delamination in the unreinforced materials, while progressive reinforcement fracture under cyclic deformation was the main damage mechanism in the composites. The influence of these deformation and damage processes in low-cycle fatigue life is discussed.

  3. Mechanical behavior of Al-Li/SiC composites: Part II. Cyclic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poza, P.; Llorca, J.

    1999-03-01

    The deformation and failure mechanisms under cyclic deformation in an 8090 Al-Li alloy reinforced with 15 vol pct SiC particles were studied and compared to those of the unreinforced alloy. The materials were tested under fully reversed cyclic deformation in the peak-aged and naturally aged conditions to obtain the cyclic response and the cyclic stress-strain curve. The peak-aged materials remained stable or showed slight cyclic softening, and the deformation mechanisms were not modified by the presence of the ceramic reinforcements: dislocations were trapped by the S' precipitates and the stable response was produced by the mobile dislocations shuttling between the precipitates to accommodate the plastic strain without further hardening. The naturally aged materials exhibited cyclic hardening until failure, which was attributed to the interactions among dislocations. Strain localization and slip-band formation were observed in the naturally aged alloy at high cyclic strain amplitudes, whereas the corresponding composite presented homogeneous deformation. Fracture was initiated by grain-boundary delamination in the unreinforced materials, while progressive reinforcement fracture under cyclic deformation was the main damage mechanism in the composites. The influence of these deformation and damage processes in low-cycle fatigue life is discussed.

  4. Hardening mechanisms in a dynamic strain aging alloy, Hastelloy X, during isothermal and thermomechanical cyclic deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V.; Castelli, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    The relative contributions of the hardening mechanisms in Hastelloy X during cyclic deformation were investigated by conducting isothermal cyclic deformation tests within a total strain range of +/-0.3 pct and at several temperatures and strain rates, and thermomechanical tests within several different temperature limits. The results of the TEM examinations and special constant structure tests showed that the precipitation on dislocations of Cr23C6 contributed to hardening, but only after sufficient time above 500 C. Solute drag alone produced very considerable cyclic hardening. Heat dislocation densities, peaking around 10 exp 11 per sq cm, were found to develop at temperatures producing the greatest cyclic hardening.

  5. Unraveling cyclic deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy using in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-12-23

    In the current study, the deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy were investigated under cyclic loading using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. The relationship between the macroscopic cyclic deformation behavior and the microscopic response at the grain level was established. The neutron diffraction results indicate that more and more grains are involved in the twinning and detwinning deformation process with the increase of fatigue cycles. The residual twins appear in the early fatigue life, which is responsible for the cyclic hardening behavior. The asymmetric shape of the hysteresis loop is attributed to the early exhaustion of the detwinning process during compression, which leads to the activation of dislocation slips and rapid strain-hardening. The critical resolved shear stress for the activation of tensile twinning closely depends on the residual strain developed during cyclic loading. In the cycle before the sample fractured, the dislocation slips became active in tension, although the sample was not fully twinned. The increased dislocation density leads to the rise of the stress concentration at weak spots, which is believed to be the main reason for the fatigue failure. Furthermore, the deformation history greatly influences the deformation mechanisms of hexagonal-close-packed-structured magnesium alloy during cyclic loading.

  6. Unraveling cyclic deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy using in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-12-23

    In the current study, the deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy were investigated under cyclic loading using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. The relationship between the macroscopic cyclic deformation behavior and the microscopic response at the grain level was established. The neutron diffraction results indicate that more and more grains are involved in the twinning and detwinning deformation process with the increase of fatigue cycles. The residual twins appear in the early fatigue life, which is responsible for the cyclic hardening behavior. The asymmetric shape of the hysteresis loop is attributed to the early exhaustionmore » of the detwinning process during compression, which leads to the activation of dislocation slips and rapid strain-hardening. The critical resolved shear stress for the activation of tensile twinning closely depends on the residual strain developed during cyclic loading. In the cycle before the sample fractured, the dislocation slips became active in tension, although the sample was not fully twinned. The increased dislocation density leads to the rise of the stress concentration at weak spots, which is believed to be the main reason for the fatigue failure. Furthermore, the deformation history greatly influences the deformation mechanisms of hexagonal-close-packed-structured magnesium alloy during cyclic loading.« less

  7. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transformation temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antolovich, Stephen D.; Saxena, Ashok; Cullers, Cheryl

    1992-01-01

    , probing the deformation mechanisms operating in fatigue will lead to a better understanding of NiAl's unique characteristics. Low cycle fatigue properties have been reported on binary NiAl in the past year, yet those studies were limited to two temperature ranges: room temperature and near 1000 K. Eventually, fatigue property data will be needed for a wide range of temperatures and compositions. The intermediate temperature range near the brittle-to-ductile transition was chosen for this study to ascertain whether the sharp change occurring in monotonic behavior also occurs under cyclic conditions. An effort was made to characterize the dislocation structures which evolved during fatigue testing and comment on their role in the deformation process.

  8. Cyclic mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast proliferation and autocrine growth factor activity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J E; Mitchell, J J; Absher, P M; Baldor, L; Geller, H A; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Hamblin, M J; Vacek, P; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    Cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia and increased extracellular matrix deposition are features of tissue hypertrophy resulting from increased work load. It is known, for example, that mechanical forces play a critical role in lung development, cardiovascular remodeling following pressure overload, and skeletal muscle growth. The mechanisms involved in these processes, however, remain unclear. Here we examined the effect of mechanical deformation on fibroblast function in vitro. IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts grown on collagen-coated silastic membranes were subjected to cyclical mechanical deformation (10% increase in culture surface area; 1 Hz) for up to 5 days. Cell number was increased by 39% after 2 days of deformation (1.43 +/- .01 x 10(5) cells/membrane compared with control, 1.03 +/- 0.02 x 10(5) cells; mean +/- SEM; P < 0.02) increasing to 163% above control by 4 days (2.16 +/- 0.16 x 10(5) cells compared with 0.82 +/- 0.03 x 10(5) cells; P < 0.001). The medium from mechanically deformed cells was mitogenic for IMR-90 cells, with maximal activity in the medium from cells mechanically deformed for 2 days (stimulating cell replication by 35% compared with media control; P < 0.002). These data suggest that mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast replication and that this effect is mediated by the release of autocrine growth factors.

  9. Cyclic Deformation of Advanced High-Strength Steels: Mechanical Behavior and Microstructural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilditch, Timothy B.; Timokhina, Ilana B.; Robertson, Leigh T.; Pereloma, Elena V.; Hodgson, Peter D.

    2009-02-01

    The fatigue properties of multiphase steels are an important consideration in the automotive industry. The different microstructural phases present in these steels can influence the strain life and cyclic stabilized strength of the material due to the way in which these phases accommodate the applied cyclic strain. Fully reversed strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests have been used to determine the mechanical fatigue performance of a dual-phase (DP) 590 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) 780 steel, with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) used to examine the deformed microstructures. It is shown that the higher strain life and cyclic stabilized strength of the TRIP steel can be attributed to an increased yield strength. Despite the presence of significant levels of retained austenite in the TRIP steel, both steels exhibited similar cyclic softening behavior at a range of strain amplitudes due to comparable ferrite volume fractions and yielding characteristics. Both steels formed low-energy dislocation structures in the ferrite during cyclic straining.

  10. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, Cheryl L.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1993-01-01

    The intermetallic compound NiAl is one of many advanced materials which is being scrutinized for possible use in high temperature, structural applications. Stoichiometric NiAl has a high melting temperature, excellent oxidation resistance, and good thermal conductivity. Past research has concentrated on improving monotonic properties. The encouraging results obtained on binary and micro-alloyed NiAl over the past ten years have led to the broadening of NiAl experimental programs. The purpose of this research project was to determine the low cycle fatigue properties and dislocation mechanisms of stoichiometric NiAl at temperatures near the monotonic brittle-to-ductile transition. The fatigue properties were found to change only slightly in the temperature range of 600 to 700 K; a temperature range over which monotonic ductility and fracture strength increase markedly. The shape of the cyclic hardening curves coincided with the changes observed in the dislocation structures. The evolution of dislocation structures did not appear to change with temperature.

  11. DEFORMATION CHARACTERISTICS OF CRUSHED-STONE LAYER UNDER CYCLIC IMPACT LOADING FROM MICRO-MECHANICAL VIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akiko; Matsushima, Takashi

    'Hanging sleepers', which have gaps between sleepers and ballast layer are often found in the neighborhood of rail joints or rugged surface rails. This suggests that differential settlement of the ballast layer is due to impact loading generated by the contact between running wheel and rugged surface rail. Then cyclic loading tests were performed on crushed-stone layer with two loading patterns, the one is a cyclic impact loading and the other one is cyclic 'standard' loading controlled at 1/10 loading velocity of the impact loading. It was shown that the crashed-stone layer deforms with volumetric expansion during every off-loading processes under the cyclic impact loading. This phenomena prevents crushed stone layer from forming stable grain columns, then the residual settlement under the cyclic impact loading is larger than that under the cyclic 'standard' loading. A simple mass-spring model simulates that two masses move in the opposite direction with increased frequency of harmonic excitation.

  12. Cyclic Plastic Deformation, Fatigue, and the Associated Micro-Mechanisms in Magnesium: From Single Crystal to Polycrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qin

    Magnesium and its alloys have received substantial interests as the government initiatives on energy saving and environment protection demand an increasing use of lightweight materials in structural parts, especially in transportation industries. A good understanding of fatigue behavior in magnesium is critical to ensure the reliability and durability of the magnesium components. Unlike the body centered cubic and face centered cubic metals, fundamental knowledge concerning the cyclic deformation and fatigue in hexagonal close packed magnesium is limited. The current research aims at a better understanding of the micro-mechanisms associated with the cyclic deformation and fatigue of magnesium. Magnesium single crystal was chosen to study the fundamental twinning/detwinning process while extruded polycrystalline pure magnesium was studied for the fatigue damage mechanisms. Cyclic deformation and the corresponding morphology evolution of {1 0 1¯ 2} twinning-detwinning-retwinning are, for the first time, characterized in magnesium single crystal under fully reserved strain-controlled tension-compression utilizing in situ optical microscopy. As loading cycles are increased, the activity of twinning-detwinning-retwinning gradually decreases. Microscopy after fatigue shows that the matrix region having experienced repeated twinning-detwinning cannot be completely detwinned to its original crystal orientation. Fragmented secondary tension twins are found to result from twin-twin interactions. Various twin-twin interaction structures exist in fatigued magnesium single crystal: quilted-looking twin structure, "apparent crossing" twin structure, and double tension twin structure. According to the crystallography of magnesium, twin-twin interactions are classified into Type I for two twin variants sharing the same zone axis and Type II for two twins with different zone axes. For Type I twin-twin interactions, one twin does not transmit across the twin boundary and into the

  13. Geodetic Measurements and Mechanical Models of Cyclic Deformation at Okmok Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigl, K.; Masterlark, T.; Lu, Z.; Ohlendorf, S. J.; Thurber, C. H.; Sigmundsson, F.

    2009-12-01

    The 1997 and 2008 eruptions of Okmok volcano, Alaska, provide a rare opportunity for conducting a rheological experiment to unravel the complex processes associated with magma migration, storage, and eruption in an active volcano. In this experiment, the magma flux during the eruption provides the “impulse” and the subsequent, transient deformation, the “response”. By simulating the impulse, measuring the response, and interpreting the constitutive relations between the two, one can infer the rheology. Okmok is an excellent natural laboratory for such an experiment because a complete cycle of deformation has been monitored using geodetic and seismic means, including: (a) geodetic time series from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and the Global Positioning System (GPS), (b) earthquake locations; and (c) seismic tomography. We are developing quantitative models using the Finite Element Method (FEM) to simulate the timing and location of the observed seismicity and deformation by accounting for: (a) the geometry and loading of the magma chamber and lava flow, (b) the spatial distribution of material properties; and (c) the constitutive (rheological) relations between stress and strain. Here, we test the hypothesis that the deformation following the 1997 eruption did not reach a steady state before the eruption in 2008. To do so, we iteratively confront the FEM models with the InSAR measurements using the General Inversion of Phase Technique (GIPhT). This approach models the InSAR phase data directly, without unwrapping, as developed, validated, and applied by Feigl and Thurber [Geophys. J. Int., 2009]. By minimizing a cost function that quantifies the misfit between observed and modeled values in terms of “wrapped” phase (with values ranging from -1/2 to +1/2 cycles), GIPhT can estimate parameters in a geophysical model. By avoiding the pitfalls of phase-unwrapping approaches, GIPhT allows the analysis, interpretation and modeling of more

  14. Strain rate change transients during cyclic deformation of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Kaschner, G.C.; Gibeling, J.C.

    1996-12-15

    In the present study, the authors have undertaken to apply the strain rate change method to mechanically probe the mechanisms of cyclic deformation in copper. The goals of this work were twofold: to carefully explore differences in results obtained under conventional displacement control with those recorded under plastic strain control and to apply the formalism for monotonic deformation described above to cyclic deformation. To achieve these goals, it has been necessary to utilize computed-variable servo-hydraulic control to develop a new test technique incorporating strain rate change tests performed during low cycle fatigue. Plastic strain is used as the control variable to ensure a constant plastic strain rate between pre-determined plastic strain limits.

  15. Superplastic deformation induced by cyclic hydrogen charging

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Heeman; Schuh, Christopher A.; Dunand, David C.

    2008-05-15

    Deformation under the combined action of external stress and cyclic hydrogen charging/discharging is studied in a model material, titanium. Cyclic charging with hydrogen is carried out at 860 deg. C, which repeatedly triggers the transformation between hydrogen-lean {alpha}-Ti and hydrogen-rich {beta}-Ti. Due to bias from the externally applied tensile stress, the internal mismatch strains produced by this isothermal {alpha}-{beta} transformation accumulate preferentially along the loading axis. These strain increments are linearly proportional to the applied stress, i.e., flow is ideally Newtonian, at small stress levels (below {approx}2 MPa). Therefore, after multiple chemical cycles, a tensile engineering strain of 100% is achieved without fracture, with an average strain rate of 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}, which demonstrates for the first time that superplastic elongations can be achieved by chemical cycling. The effect of hydrogen partial pressure, cycle time, and external stress on the value of the superplastic strain increments is experimentally measured and discussed in light of a diffusional phase transformation model. Special attention is paid to understanding the two contributions to the internal mismatch strains from the phase transformation and lattice swelling.

  16. Investigation of Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue of Polycrystalline Cu under Pure Compression Cyclic Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tzu-Yin Jean

    It is commonly accepted that fatigue crack is initiated under tensile fatigue stresses. However, practical examples demonstrate that cracks may also initiate under pure compressive fluctuating loads such as the failures observed in aircraft landing gear frames. However, the mechanism of such failures is rarely investigated. Furthermore, knowledge on cyclic deformation response under pure compressive fatigue condition is also very limited or non-existent. Our recent work already verified that fatigue cracks may nucleate from stress concentration sites under pure compression fatigue, but whether or not a form of stress concentration is always needed to initiate a crack under pure compression fatigue remains uncertain. In this study, compression fatigue tests under different peak stresses were carried out on smooth bars of fully annealed OFHC Copper. The purpose of these tests is to investigate not only the cyclic deformation response but also the possibility of crack nucleation without the stress concentrator. Results showed that overall the cyclic stress-strain response and microstructural evolution of OFHC Copper under pure compression fatigue exhibits rather dissimilar behaviour compared to those under symmetrical fatigue. The specimens hardened rapidly within 10 cycles under pure compression fatigue unlike the gradual cyclic hardening behaviour in symmetrical fatigue with the same peak stress amplitude. Compressive cyclic creep behaviour was also observed under the same testing conditions. Moreover, unlike conventional tension-compression fatigue, only moderate slip activity was detectable on the surface instead of typical PSB features detected from TEM observations. The surface observations has revealed that surface slip bands did not increase in number nor did they become more pronounced in height with increasing number of cycles. In addition, surface roughening by grain boundary extrusion was detected to become more severe as the cycling progressed. Therefore

  17. Investigation of Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue of Polycrystalline Cu under Pure Compression Cyclic Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tzu-Yin Jean

    It is commonly accepted that fatigue crack is initiated under tensile fatigue stresses. However, practical examples demonstrate that cracks may initiate under pure compressive fluctuating loads, e.g. the failures observed in aircraft landing gear frames. As the mechanism of such failures is rarely investigated, there is very limited or non-existent knowledge pool on cyclic deformation response under pure compressive fatigue condition. Our recent work verified that fatigue cracks may nucleate from stress concentration sites under pure compression fatigue, but whether or not a form of stress concentration is always needed to initiate a crack remains uncertain. In this study, compression fatigue tests under different peak stresses were carried out on smooth bars of fully annealed OFHC Copper. The purpose of these tests is to investigate not only the cyclic deformation response but also the possibility of crack nucleation without the stress concentrator. Results showed that overall the cyclic stress-strain response and microstructural evolution of OFHC Copper under pure compression fatigue exhibits rather dissimilar behaviour compared to those under symmetrical fatigue. The specimens hardened rapidly within 10 cycles under pure compression fatigue unlike the gradual cyclic hardening behaviour in symmetrical fatigue with the same peak stress amplitude. Compressive cyclic creep behaviour was also observed. Moreover, TEM observation showed that only moderate slip activity was detectable on the surface instead of typical PSB features. The surface observations revealed that surface slip bands did not increase in number nor height as cycling progressed. In addition, surface roughening by grain boundary extrusion was detected to become more severe with further cycling. Therefore, the plastic strain accommodated within the samples was not mainly related to dislocation activities. Instead, the mechanism of cyclic creep response for pure compression fatigue was correlated and

  18. Dynamic deformation capability of a red blood cell under a cyclically reciprocating shear stress.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, N; Yasuda, T; Kataoka, H; Takatani, S

    2004-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) in the cardiovascular devices are exposed to varying degree of the shear stress from all the directions. However the RBCs' deformability or the deformation capability under such a shear stress is not well understood. In this study, we designed and built a system that can induce a cyclically reciprocating shear stress to a RBC suspension. The arm of the cyclically reciprocating shear stress device was attached to the upper piece of the parallel glass plates between which a suspension of human RBCs (1% hematocrit whole blood diluted in a 32 weight% dextran phosphate buffer solution) was contained. The cyclic reciprocating motion of the upper glass plate of 3.0 mm stroke length was produced using a slider-crank shaft mechanism that was linked to an eccentric cam-motor system. Each rotation of the motor produced a 3.0 mm stroke each in the forward and backward direction of the slider block. The clearance between the two glass plates was adjusted to 30 micrometer. The cyclic reciprocating glass plate apparatus was attached to a light microscope stage (IX71 Olympus with x40 objective lens) for illumination with a 350 watt metal halide light source. A high speed camera (MEMREMCAM fx-K3 Nac, 5000 frames per second with shutter kept open) was attached to the microscope to capture the deformation process of the RBCs under cyclic shear stress. The preliminary result indicated that the correlation between the amplitude of the maximum shear stress and the RBCs' deformability. This indicates a potential application of the cyclic reciprocating device to evaluate the temporal response of the RBCs deformability prior to its destruction. The future study will focus on the study of the relative velocity of the erythrocytes with respect to the velocity of the reciprocating plate. PMID:17271457

  19. Cyclic deformations in the Opalinus clay: a laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Emanuel; Huggenberger, Peter; Möri, Andreas; Meier, Edi

    2015-04-01

    The influence of tunnel climate on deformation cycles of joint openings and closings is often observed immediately after excavation. At the EZ-B niche in the Mt. Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland), a cyclic deformation of the shaly Opalinus clay has been monitored for several years. The deformation cycles of the joints parallel to the clay bedding planes correlate with seasonal variations in relative humidity of the air in the niche. In winter, when the relative humidity is the lowest (down to 65%), the joints open as the clay volume decreases, whereas they tend to close in the summer when the relative humidity reaches up to 100%. Furthermore, in situ measurements have shown the trend of an increasingly smaller aperture of joints with time. A laboratory experiment was carried out to reproduce the observed cyclic deformation in a climate chamber using a core sample of Opalinus clay. The main goal of the experiment was to investigate the influence of the relative humidity on the deformation of the Opalinus clay while excluding the in situ effects (e.g. confining stress). The core sample of Opalinus clay was put into a closed ended PVC tube and the space between the sample and the tube was filled with resin. Then, the sample (size: 28 cm × 14 cm × 6.5 cm) was cut in half lengthways and the open end was cut, so that the half-core sample could move in one direction. The mounted sample was exposed to wetting and drying cycles in a climate chamber. Air temperature, air humidity and sample weight were continuously recorded. Photographs taken at regular time intervals by a webcam allowed the formation/deformation of cracks on the surface of the sample to be monitored. A crackmeter consisting of a double-plate capacitor attached to the core sample was developed to measure the dynamics of the crack opening and closing. Preliminary results show that: - Deformation movements during different climate cycles can be visualized with the webcam - The crackmeter signal gives a

  20. Cyclic deformation leads to defect healing and strengthening of small-volume metal crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhang-Jie; Li, Qing-Jie; Cui, Yi-Nan; Liu, Zhan-Li; Ma, Evan; Li, Ju; Sun, Jun; Zhuang, Zhuo; Dao, Ming; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Suresh, Subra

    2015-11-01

    When microscopic and macroscopic specimens of metals are subjected to cyclic loading, the creation, interaction, and accumulation of defects lead to damage, cracking, and failure. Here we demonstrate that when aluminum single crystals of submicrometer dimensions are subjected to low-amplitude cyclic deformation at room temperature, the density of preexisting dislocation lines and loops can be dramatically reduced with virtually no change of the overall sample geometry and essentially no permanent plastic strain. This "cyclic healing" of the metal crystal leads to significant strengthening through dramatic reductions in dislocation density, in distinct contrast to conventional cyclic strain hardening mechanisms arising from increases in dislocation density and interactions among defects in microcrystalline and macrocrystalline metals and alloys. Our real-time, in situ transmission electron microscopy observations of tensile tests reveal that pinned dislocation lines undergo shakedown during cyclic straining, with the extent of dislocation unpinning dependent on the amplitude, sequence, and number of strain cycles. Those unpinned mobile dislocations moving close enough to the free surface of the thin specimens as a result of such repeated straining are then further attracted to the surface by image forces that facilitate their egress from the crystal. These results point to a versatile pathway for controlled mechanical annealing and defect engineering in submicrometer-sized metal crystals, thereby obviating the need for thermal annealing or significant plastic deformation that could cause change in shape and/or dimensions of the specimen.

  1. Cyclic deformation leads to defect healing and strengthening of small-volume metal crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhang-Jie; Li, Qing-Jie; Cui, Yi-Nan; Liu, Zhan-Li; Ma, Evan; Li, Ju; Sun, Jun; Zhuang, Zhuo; Dao, Ming; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Suresh, Subra

    2015-11-01

    When microscopic and macroscopic specimens of metals are subjected to cyclic loading, the creation, interaction, and accumulation of defects lead to damage, cracking, and failure. Here we demonstrate that when aluminum single crystals of submicrometer dimensions are subjected to low-amplitude cyclic deformation at room temperature, the density of preexisting dislocation lines and loops can be dramatically reduced with virtually no change of the overall sample geometry and essentially no permanent plastic strain. This "cyclic healing" of the metal crystal leads to significant strengthening through dramatic reductions in dislocation density, in distinct contrast to conventional cyclic strain hardening mechanisms arising from increases in dislocation density and interactions among defects in microcrystalline and macrocrystalline metals and alloys. Our real-time, in situ transmission electron microscopy observations of tensile tests reveal that pinned dislocation lines undergo shakedown during cyclic straining, with the extent of dislocation unpinning dependent on the amplitude, sequence, and number of strain cycles. Those unpinned mobile dislocations moving close enough to the free surface of the thin specimens as a result of such repeated straining are then further attracted to the surface by image forces that facilitate their egress from the crystal. These results point to a versatile pathway for controlled mechanical annealing and defect engineering in submicrometer-sized metal crystals, thereby obviating the need for thermal annealing or significant plastic deformation that could cause change in shape and/or dimensions of the specimen. PMID:26483463

  2. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  3. Modeling Step-Strain Relaxation and Cyclic Deformations of Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A.R.; Mead, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Data for step-strain relaxation and cyclic compressive deformations of highly viscous short elastomer cylinders are modeled using a large strain rubber viscoelastic constitutive theory with a rate-independent friction stress term added. In the tests, both small and large amplitude cyclic compressive strains, in the range of 1% to 10%, were superimposed on steady state compressed strains, in the range of 5% to 20%, for frequencies of 1 and 10 Hz. The elastomer cylinders were conditioned prior to each test to soften them. The constants in the viscoclastic-friction constitutive theory are determined by employing a nonlinear least-squares method to fit the analytical stresses for a Maxwell model, which includes friction, to measured relaxation stresses obtained from a 20% step-strain compression test. The simulation of the relaxation data with the nonlinear model is successful at compressive strains of 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%. Simulations of hysteresis stresses for enforced cyclic compressive strains of 20% +/- 5% are made with the model calibrated by the relaxation data. The predicted hysteresis stresses are lower than the measured stresses.

  4. Mechanical annealing under low-amplitude cyclic loading in micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yi-nan; Liu, Zhan-li; Wang, Zhang-jie; Zhuang, Zhuo

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical annealing has been demonstrated to be an effective method for decreasing the overall dislocation density in submicron single crystal. However, simultaneously significant shape change always unexpectedly happens under extremely high monotonic loading to drive the pre-existing dislocations out of the free surfaces. In the present work, through in situ TEM experiments it is found that cyclic loading with low stress amplitude can drive most dislocations out of the submicron sample with virtually little change of the shape. The underlying dislocation mechanism is revealed by carrying out discrete dislocation dynamic (DDD) simulations. The simulation results indicate that the dislocation density decreases within cycles, while the accumulated plastic strain is small. By comparing the evolution of dislocation junction under monotonic, cyclic and relaxation deformation, the cumulative irreversible slip is found to be the key factor of promoting junction destruction and dislocation annihilation at free surface under low-amplitude cyclic loading condition. By introducing this mechanics into dislocation density evolution equations, the critical conditions for mechanical annealing under cyclic and monotonic loadings are discussed. Low-amplitude cyclic loading which strengthens the single crystal without seriously disturbing the structure has the potential applications in the manufacture of defect-free nano-devices.

  5. Fatigue and cyclic deformation behaviour of surface-modified titanium alloys in simulated physiological media.

    PubMed

    Leinenbach, Christian; Eifler, Dietmar

    2006-03-01

    In this investigation, the cyclic deformation behaviour of the binary titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb was characterized in axial stress-controlled constant amplitude and load increase tests as well as in rotating bending tests. The influence of different clinically relevant surface treatments (polishing, corundum grit blasting, thermal and anodic oxidizing) on the fatigue behaviour was investigated. All tests were realized in oxygen-saturated Ringer's solution. The cyclic deformation behaviour was characterized by mechanical hysteresis measurements. In addition, the change of the free corrosion potential and the corrosion current during testing in simulated physiological media indicated surface damages such as slip bands, intrusions and extrusions or finally microcracks. Microstructural changes on the specimen surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:16140373

  6. A model for cyclic mechanical reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhai; Kong, Fang; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical force regulates a broad range of molecular interactions in biology. Three types of counterintuitive mechanical regulation of receptor–ligand dissociation have been described. Catch bonds are strengthened by constant forces, as opposed to slip bonds that are weakened by constant forces. The phenomenon that bonds become stronger with prior application of cyclic forces is termed cyclic mechanical reinforcement (CMR). Slip and catch bonds have respectively been explained by two-state models. However, they assume fast equilibration between internal states and hence are inadequate for CMR. Here we propose a three-state model for CMR where both loading and unloading regulate the transition of bonds among the short-lived, intermediate, and long-lived state. Cyclic forces favor bonds in the long-lived state, hence greatly prolonging their lifetimes. The three-state model explains the force history effect and agrees with the experimental CMR effect of integrin α5β1–fibronectin interaction. This model helps decipher the distinctive ways by which molecular bonds are mechanically strengthened: catch bonds by constant forces and CMR by cyclic forces. The different types of mechanical regulation may enable the cell to fine tune its mechanotransduction via membrane receptors. PMID:27786286

  7. Detecting thermally driven cyclic deformation of an exfoliation sheet with lidar and radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Brian D.; Stock, Greg M.

    2014-01-01

    Rock falls from steep, exfoliating cliffs are common in many landscapes. Of the many mechanisms known to trigger rock falls, thermally driven deformation is among the least quantified, despite potentially being a prevalent trigger due to its occurrence at all times of year. Here we present the results of a field-based monitoring program using instrumentation, ground-based lidar, and ground-based radar to investigate the process of thermally driven deformation of an exfoliation sheet, and the ability of remote sensing tools to capture cyclic expansion and contraction patterns. Our results indicate that thermally driven exfoliation occurs on diurnal cycles and can be measured at the submillimeter to centimeter scale using high-resolution strain gauges, short-range (2 km) radar interfer-ometry.

  8. Supersymmetric q-deformed quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Traikia, M. H.; Mebarki, N.

    2012-06-27

    A supersymmetric q-deformed quantum mechanics is studied in the weak deformation approximation of the Weyl-Heisenberg algebra. The corresponding supersymmetric q-deformed hamiltonians and charges are constructed explicitly.

  9. Solute Transport in Cyclically Deformed Porous Tissue Scaffolds with Controlled Pore Cross-Sectional Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Op Den Buijs, Jorn; Lu, Lichun; Jorgensen, Steven M.; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of pore geometry on the transport rate and depth after repetitive mechanical deformation of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Flexible cubic imaging phantoms with pores in the shape of a circular cylinder, elliptic cylinder, and spheroid were fabricated from a biodegradable polymer blend using a combined 3D printing and injection molding technique. The specimens were immersed in fluid and loaded with a solution of a radiopaque solute. The solute distribution was quantified by recording 20 μm pixel-resolution images in an X-ray microimaging scanner at selected time points after intervals of dynamic straining with a mean strain of 8.6 ± 1.6% at 1.0 Hz. The results show that application of cyclic strain significantly increases the rate and depth of solute transport, as compared to diffusive transport alone, for all pore shapes. In addition, pore shape, pore size, and the orientation of the pore cross-sectional asymmetry with respect to the direction of strain greatly influence solute transport. Thus, pore geometry can be tailored to increase transport rates and depths in cyclically deformed scaffolds, which is of utmost importance when thick, metabolically functional tissues are to be engineered. PMID:19196145

  10. Deformation of noncommutative quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jian-Jian; Chowdhury, S. Hasibul Hassan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the Lie group GNC α , β , γ , of which the kinematical symmetry group GNC of noncommutative quantum mechanics (NCQM) is a special case due to fixed nonzero α, β, and γ, is three-parameter deformation quantized using the method suggested by Ballesteros and Musso [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 46, 195203 (2013)]. A certain family of QUE algebras, corresponding to GNC α , β , γ with two of the deformation parameters approaching zero, is found to be in agreement with the existing results of the literature on quantum Heisenberg group. Finally, we dualize the underlying QUE algebra to obtain an expression for the underlying star-product between smooth functions on GNC α , β , γ .

  11. Inhomogeneous deformation in INCONEL 718 during monotonic and cyclic loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthem, D. W.; Robertson, I. M.; Leckie, F. A.; Socie, D. F.; Altstetter, C. J.

    1990-12-01

    The deformation microstructures produced by room-temperature monotonie tensile and uniaxial low-cycle fatigue tests in aged (precipitate-hardened) INCONEL 718 were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Regularly spaced arrays of deformation bands on {111} slip planes were observed. Under monotonie loading, the dislocation structure within a deformation band formed an inverse pileup at a grain boundary, indicating that the boundary was the probable dislocation source. Under fatigue loading, the bands contained a high density of dislocations in a complex arrangement, which was attained after relatively few cycles. Samples of homogenized (precipitate-free) material were deformed monotonically in tension for comparison with the aged material. Early in the deformation, there was only one deformation band per grain and little evidence of work hardening; that is, there was a region of constant flow stress. With increased deformation, work hardening began, more bands nucleated, and their spacing became similar to that in the aged material. This result demonstrates that the degree of coarseness of inhomogeneous deformation in this material was not necessarily a result of a softening process within the bands because of precipitate shearing, but rather, it was primarily a function of the amount of work hardening within the bands. The regularity of the bands and the dislocation structure can be rationalized in terms of a periodic resistance to glide of the dislocations due to the presence of the precipitates and a distribution of dislocation sources along the grain boundaries.

  12. Time variations of geopotential, gravity and vertical crustul deformations: nature and unity of cyclicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2003-04-01

    TIME VARIATIONS OF GEOPOTENTIAL, GRAVITY AND VERTICAL CRUSTAL DEFORMATIONS: NATURE AND UNITY OF CYCLICITIES Yu.V.Barkin Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow, Russia, barkin@sai.msu.ru Gravitational action of the Moon and the Sun on the Earth generates very big additional mechanical forces and moments of the interaction of its neighboring shells (liquid core, mantle and another layers) and produces cyclic perturbations of the tensional state of the shells, their deformations, small relative translational displacements and small relative rotational oscillations of the shells, redistribution of the plastic and fluid masses and others. These additional forces and moments of the cyclic celestial-mechanical nature produce deformations of the all layers of the Earth and organize and control practically all natural processes. In given report we analyze these forces and moments caused by the Moon attraction. We have shown that they are conditionally periodic functions of time with definite basis of frequencies, which are some combinations of the frequencies of perturbations in the Moon orbital motion. Very important conclusion follows from our approach - natural processes are controlled and dictated by pointed mechanism and are subjected by cyclic variations with general for all processes base of frequencies. The fundamental basis of frequencies was established in result of theoretical study of the gravitational interaction of the Earth’s core and mantle with the Moon and the Sun and in result of analysis of observed variations of the many natural processes [1]. Predicted periods of variations of the natural processes were conformed by last results of the spectral analysis of gravity at Moscow fidicial station and by similar studies of the Earth rotation, vertical crustul deformations [2]. In particular periods, amplitudes (in a few microGal) and phases for about 20 harmonics of gravity variations were discovered in result of spectral analysis of the absolute

  13. Deformations and cyclic fatigue resistance of nickel-titanium instruments inside a sequence

    PubMed Central

    Gambarini, Gianluca; Plotino, Gianluca; Piasecki, Lucila; Al-Sudani, Dina; Testarelli, Luca; Sannino, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim To compare the effect of brushing motion on torsional and cyclic fatigue resistance of TF Adaptive instruments after clinical use. Methods 20 packs of TFA small sequence (SybronEndo, Orange, CA, USA) were used for this study and divided into two groups. Each instrument prepared one resin tooth, consisting in 4 canals with a complex anatomy. In group A, no brushing motion was performed. In group B, after the green instrument reached the working length, brushing motion with circumferential filing was performed for 15 seconds in each canal (overall 1 minute). All the instruments were then subjected to cyclic fatigue test and mean values and standard deviation for time to fracture were evaluated. Data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni t-test procedure with a significance set at P < 0.05. Results No instruments were broken during preparation of root canals. Two TF Adaptive green and 5 yellow showed unwinding after intracanal clinical use. No statistically significant differences were found between green instruments of both groups (P > 0.05), while a statistically significant difference was found between the yellow instruments (P < 0.05), with group B showing an higher resistance to cyclic fatigue. Conclusions A prolonged passive brushing motion did not adversely affected mechanical resistance of the instrument used for this purpose. Resistance to both deformations and cyclic fatigue of the second instrument within the TFA small sequence was enhanced by the coronal flaring provided by the brushing action of the first instrument used. PMID:26161246

  14. Twinning-detwinning behavior during cyclic deformation of magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Yeol; Wang, Huamiao; Gharghouri, Michael A.

    2015-05-26

    In situ neutron diffraction has been used to examine the deformation mechanisms of a precipitation-hardened and extruded Mg-8.5wt.%Al alloy subjected to (i) compression followed by reverse tension (texture T1) and (ii) tension followed by reverse compression (texture T2). Two starting textures are used: (1) as-extruded texture, T1, in which the basal pole of most grains is normal to the extrusion axis and a small portion of grains are oriented with the basal pole parallel to the extrusion axis; (2) a reoriented texture, T2, in which the basal pole of most grains is parallel to the extrusion axis. For texture T1, the onset of extension twinning corresponds well with the macroscopic elastic-plastic transition during the initial compression stage. The non-linear macroscopic stress/strain behavior during unloading after compression is more significant than during unloading after tension. For texture T2, little detwinning occurs after the initial tension stage, but almost all of the twinned volumes are detwinned during loading in reverse compression.

  15. Twinning-detwinning behavior during cyclic deformation of magnesium alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Soo Yeol; Wang, Huamiao; Gharghouri, Michael A.

    2015-05-26

    In situ neutron diffraction has been used to examine the deformation mechanisms of a precipitation-hardened and extruded Mg-8.5wt.%Al alloy subjected to (i) compression followed by reverse tension (texture T1) and (ii) tension followed by reverse compression (texture T2). Two starting textures are used: (1) as-extruded texture, T1, in which the basal pole of most grains is normal to the extrusion axis and a small portion of grains are oriented with the basal pole parallel to the extrusion axis; (2) a reoriented texture, T2, in which the basal pole of most grains is parallel to the extrusion axis. For texture T1,more » the onset of extension twinning corresponds well with the macroscopic elastic-plastic transition during the initial compression stage. The non-linear macroscopic stress/strain behavior during unloading after compression is more significant than during unloading after tension. For texture T2, little detwinning occurs after the initial tension stage, but almost all of the twinned volumes are detwinned during loading in reverse compression.« less

  16. Constitutive modeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene under large-deformation and cyclic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Bergström, J S; Kurtz, S M; Rimnac, C M; Edidin, A A

    2002-06-01

    When subjected to a monotonically increasing deformation state, the mechanical behavior of UHMWPE is characterized by a linear elastic response followed by distributed yielding and strain hardening at large deformations. During the unloading phases of an applied cyclic deformation process, the response is characterized by nonlinear recovery driven by the release of stored internal energy. A number of different constitutive theories can be used to model these experimentally observed events. We compare the ability of the J2-plasticity theory, the "Arruda-Boyce" model, the "Hasan-Boyce" model, and the "Bergström-Boyce" model to reproduce the observed mechanical behavior of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). In addition a new hybrid model is proposed, which incorporates many features of the previous theories. This hybrid model is shown to most effectively predict the experimentally observed mechanical behavior of UHMWPE. PMID:12013180

  17. Experimental investigation of cyclic thermomechanical deformation in torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, John R.; Castelli, Michael G.; Bakis, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of thermomechanical testing and deformation behavior of tubular specimens under torsional loading is described. Experimental issues concerning test accuracy and control specific to thermomechanical loadings under a torsional regime are discussed. A series of shear strain-controlled tests involving the nickel-base superalloy Hastelloy X were performed with various temperature excursions and compared to similar thermomechanical uniaxial tests. The concept and use of second invariants of the deviatoric stress and strain tensors as a means of comparing uniaxial and torsional specimens is also briefly presented and discussed in light of previous thermomechanical tests conducted under uniaxial conditions.

  18. Dynamic Deformation and Recovery Response of Red Blood Cells to a Cyclically Reversing Shear Flow: Effects of Frequency of Cyclically Reversing Shear Flow and Shear Stress Level

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Toshitaka; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic deformation and recovery responses of red blood cells (RBCs) to a cyclically reversing shear flow generated in a 30-μm clearance, with the peak shear stress of 53, 108, 161, and 274 Pa at the frequency of 1, 2, 3, and 5 Hz, respectively, were studied. The RBCs' time-varying velocity varied after the glass plate velocity without any time lag, whereas the L/W change, where L and W were the major and minor axes of RBCs' ellipsoidal shape, exhibited a rapid increase and gradual decay during the deformation and recovery phase. The time of minimum L/W occurrence lagged behind the zero-velocity time of the glass plate (zero stress), and the delay time normalized to the one-cycle duration remained constant at 8.0%. The elongation of RBCs at zero stress time became larger with the reversing frequency. A simple mechanical model consisting of an elastic linear element during a rapid elongation period and a parallel combination of elements such as a spring and dashpot during the nonlinear recovery phase was suggested. The dynamic response behavior of RBCs under a cyclically reversing shear flow was different from the conventional shape change where a steplike force was applied to and completely released from the RBCs. PMID:16766612

  19. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, P. M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, E.; Prakapenka, V.; Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Smith, J.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Wenk, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    The crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, yet little is known about its deformation mechanisms. Information about how stishovite deforms under stress is important for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. Particularly, stishovite is elastically anisotropic and thus development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation may contribute to seismic anomalies in the mantle. We converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. Diffraction patterns were collected in situ in radial geometry at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to examine development of CPO during deformation. We find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction and infer deformation mechanisms leading to the observed CPO with visco-plastic self consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity models. Our results show pyramidal and basal slip are most likely active at high pressure and ambient temperature, in agreement with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of rutile (TiO2) and paratellurite (TeO2), which are isostructural to stishovite. Conversely other TEM studies of stishovite done at higher temperature suggest dominant prismatic slip. This indicates that a variety of slip systems may be active in stishovite, depending on conditions. As a result, stishovite's contribution to the seismic signature in the mantle may vary as a function of pressure and temperature and thus depth.

  20. BASIC STUDY ON TENSION SOFTENING AND CYCLIC DEFORMATION BEHAVIOR OF SOLIDIFIED BODY FOR THE COHESIVE SOIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urano, Kazuhiko; Adachi, Yuji; Mihara, Masaya; Yamada, Atsuo; Kawamura, Makoto

    So far, authors have proposed a method to improve earthquake resistance of pile foundations by partially solidifying an underground part of the pile foundations, and the effect of reinforcement has been confirmed by shaking table tests and the lateral loading tests of a full scale model. Though the solidified body is usually designed as an elastic body, it is possible to design the body considering the damage by the tensile stress when a seismic ground motion is assumed to be level 2. Therefore, material tests of the solidified body for the cohesive soil were executed, and the characteristics of the tension softening and the cyclic deformation behavior of the solidified bod y were clarified. Moreover, loading tests that used wall models of the solidified body were executed, and the effects of the shape on the tension softening and the cyclic deformation behavior of the solidified body were clarified. In addition, a numerical simulation by elastoplastic FEM analysis that considers the damage of the solidified body was executed, and the tension softening and the cyclic deformation behavior of the solidified body were reproduced.

  1. Experimental investigation on mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Ranjith, P. G.; Huang, Yan-Hua; Yin, Peng-Fei; Jing, Hong-Wen; Gui, Yi-Lin; Yu, Qing-Lei

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone subjected to cyclic loading is very significant to evaluate the stability and safety of deep excavation damage zones. However to date, there are very few triaxial experimental studies of sandstone under cyclic loading. Moreover, few X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) observations have been adopted to reveal the damage mechanism of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading. Therefore, in this research, a series of triaxial cyclic loading tests and X-ray micro-CT observations were conducted to analyse the mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone with respect to different confining pressures. The results indicated that at lower confining pressures, the triaxial strength of sandstone specimens under cyclic loading is higher than that under monotonic loading; whereas at confining pressures above 20 MPa, the triaxial strength of sandstone under cyclic loading is approximately equal to that under monotonic loading. With the increase of cycle number, the crack damage threshold of sandstone first increases, and then significantly decreases and finally remains constant. Based on the damage evolution of irreversible deformation, it appears that the axial damage value of sandstone is all higher than the radial damage value before the peak strength; whereas the radial damage value is higher than the axial damage value after the peak strength. The evolution of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of sandstone can be characterized as having four stages: (i) Stage I: material strengthening; (ii) Stage II: material degradation; (iii) Stage III: material failure and (iv) Stage IV: structure slippage. X-ray micro-CT observations demonstrated that the CT scanning surface images of sandstone specimens are consistent with actual surface crack photographs. The analysis of the cross-sections of sandstone supports that the system of crack planes under triaxial cyclic loading is much more complicated than that under triaxial

  2. Dislocations: 75 years of Deformation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy

    2009-01-01

    The selection of papers presented in this section reflect on themes to be explored at the "Dislocations: 75 years of Deformation Mechanisms" Symposium to be held at the Annual 2009 TMS meeting. The symposium was sponsored by the Mechanical Behavior of Materials Committee to give tribute to the evolution of a concept that has formed the basis of our mechanistic understanding of how crystalline solids plastically deform and how they fail.

  3. Cyclic Axial-Torsional Deformation Behavior of a Cobalt-Base Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic, high-temperature deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base super-alloy, Haynes 188, is investigated under combined axial and torsional loads. This is accomplished through the examination of hysteresis loops generated from a biaxial fatigue test program. A high-temperature axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional fatigue database has been generated on Haynes 188 at 760 C. Cyclic loading tests have been conducted on uniform gage section tubular specimens in a servohydraulic axial-torsional test rig. Test control and data acquisition were accomplished with a minicomputer. The fatigue behavior of Haynes 188 at 760 C under axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional loads and the monotonic and cyclic deformation behaviors under axial and torsional loads have been previously reported. In this paper, the cyclic hardening characteristics and typical hysteresis loops in the axial stress versus axial strain, shear stress ,versus engineering shear strain, axial strain versus engineering shear strain. and axial stress versus shear stress spaces are presented for cyclic in-phase and out-of-phase axial-torsional tests. For in-phase tests, three different values of the proportionality constant lambda (the ratio of engineering shear strain amplitude to axial strain amplitude, are examined, viz. 0.86, 1.73, and 3.46. In the out-of-phase tests, three different values of the phase angle, phi (between the axial and engineering shear strain waveforms), are studied, viz., 30, 60, and 90 degrees with lambda equals 1.73. The cyclic hardening behaviors of all the tests conducted on Haynes 188 at 760 C are evaluated using the von Mises equivalent stress-strain and the maximum shear stress-maximum engineering shear strain (Tresca) curves. Comparisons are also made between the hardening behaviors of cyclic axial, torsional, and combined in-phase (lambda = 1.73 and phi = 0) and out-of-phase (lambda = 1.73 and phi = 90') axial-torsional fatigue tests. These comparisons

  4. Cyclic axial-torsional deformation behavior of a cobalt-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1992-01-01

    Multiaxial loading, especially at elevated temperature, can cause the inelastic response of a material to differ significantly from that predicted by simple flow rules, i.e., von Mises or Tresca. To quantify some of these differences, the cyclic high-temperature, deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-based superalloy, Haynes 188, is investigated under combined axial and torsional loads. Haynes 188 is currently used in many aerospace gas turbine and rocket engine applications, e.g., the combustor liner for the T800 turboshaft engine for the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and the liquid oxygen posts in the main injector of the space shuttle main engine. The deformation behavior of this material is assessed through the examination of hysteresis loops generated from a biaxial fatigue test program. A high-temperature axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional fatigue data base has been generated on Haynes 188 at 760 C. Cyclic loading tests have been conducted on uniform gauge section tubular specimens in a servohydraulic axial-torsional test rig. Test control and data acquisition were accomplished with a minicomputer. In this paper, the cyclic hardening characteristics and typical hysteresis loops in the axial stress versus axial strain, shear stress versus engineering shear strain, axial strain versus engineering shear strain, and axial stress versus shear stress spaces are presented for cyclic, in-phase and out-of-phase, axial torsional tests. For in-phase tests three different values of the proportionality constant, lambda (ratio of engineering shear strain amplitude to axial strain amplitude), are examined, viz., 0.86, 1.73, and 3.46. In the out-of-phase tests, three different values of the phase angle, phi (between the axial and engineering shear strain waveforms), are studied, viz., 30, 60, and 90 deg with lambda = 1.73. The cyclic hardening behaviors of all the tests conducted on Haynes 188 at 760 C are evaluated using the von Mises equivalent stress

  5. Highly deformable bones: unusual deformation mechanisms of seahorse armor.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael M; Novitskaya, Ekaterina; Castro-Ceseña, Ana Bertha; Meyers, Marc A; McKittrick, Joanna

    2013-06-01

    Multifunctional materials and devices found in nature serve as inspiration for advanced synthetic materials, structures and robotics. Here, we elucidate the architecture and unusual deformation mechanisms of seahorse tails that provide prehension as well as protection against predators. The seahorse tail is composed of subdermal bony plates arranged in articulating ring-like segments that overlap for controlled ventral bending and twisting. The bony plates are highly deformable materials designed to slide past one another and buckle when compressed. This complex plate and segment motion, along with the unique hardness distribution and structural hierarchy of each plate, provide seahorses with joint flexibility while shielding them against impact and crushing. Mimicking seahorse armor may lead to novel bio-inspired technologies, such as flexible armor, fracture-resistant structures or prehensile robotics.

  6. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Pamela M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, Eloisa; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    Although the crystal structure of the high-pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, little is known about the development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation in stishovite. Insight into CPO and associated deformation mechanics of stishovite would provide important information for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. To study CPO development, we converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. We collected diffraction patterns in radial geometry to examine in situ development of crystallographic preferred orientation and find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction. Viscoplastic self-consistent modeling suggests the most likely slip systems at high pressure and ambient temperature are pyramidal and basal slip.

  7. Bianchi type I cyclic cosmology from Lie-algebraically deformed phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Vakili, Babak; Khosravi, Nima

    2010-11-15

    We study the effects of noncommutativity, in the form of a Lie-algebraically deformed Poisson commutation relations, on the evolution of a Bianchi type I cosmological model with a positive cosmological constant. The phase space variables turn out to correspond to the scale factors of this model in x, y, and z directions. According to the conditions that the structure constants (deformation parameters) should satisfy, we argue that there are two types of noncommutative phase space with Lie-algebraic structure. The exact classical solutions in commutative and type I noncommutative cases are presented. In the framework of this type of deformed phase space, we investigate the possibility of building a Bianchi I model with cyclic scale factors in which the size of the Universe in each direction experiences an endless sequence of contractions and reexpansions. We also obtain some approximate solutions for the type II noncommutative structure by numerical methods and show that the cyclic behavior is repeated as well. These results are compared with the standard commutative case, and similarities and differences of these solutions are discussed.

  8. Microstructure, Cyclic Deformation and Corrosion Behavior of Laser Welded NiTi Shape Memory Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshekari, G. R.; Kermanpur, A.; Saatchi, A.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.; Soleymani, A. P.

    2015-09-01

    The present paper reports the effects of Nd:YAG laser welding on the microstructure, phase transformation, cyclic deformation behavior, and corrosion resistance of Ti-55 wt.% Ni wire. The results showed that the laser welding altered the microstructure of the weld metal which mainly composed of columnar dendrites grown epitaxially from the fusion line. DSC results indicated that the onset of the transformation temperatures of the weld metal differed from that of the base metal. Cyclic stress-strain behavior of laser-welded NiTi wire was comparable to the as-received material; while a little reduction in the pseudo-elastic property was noted. The weld metal exhibited higher corrosion potential, lower corrosion current density, higher breakdown potential and wider passive region than the base metal. The weld metal was therefore more resistant to corrosion than the base metal.

  9. Internal stresses and the cyclic deformation of an aluminium matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Johannesson, B.

    1992-01-01

    The development of internal stresses in planar random Saffil fibre reinforced aluminum with a range of fibre volume fraction has been studied theoretically and in monotonic and cyclic deformation (Bauschinger) experiments at room temperature and 77K. The Eshelby S tensor for a planar random array of fibres is calculated. Because the aluminum/Saffil composites are not isotropic in the transverse directions, the plastic strain used in the calculations has to be determined experimentally. A method for quantifying the anisotropic plastic flow of aluminium/Saffil composites is proposed and the results are used in calculations of the mean stress hardening rate. The measurements of the thermal stresses obtained in the Bauschinger experiments are in quantitative agreement with results obtained in monotomic tests. The magnitude of the thermal stress at room temperature or 77K is independent of fibre volume fraction and a comparison with predictions shows that relaxation of the thermal stress increase with fibre volume fraction. Cycling in the Bauschinger experiments reduces the thermal stress and hence the separation of the mean and thermal stresses is essential or a reliable measurement of the mean stress hardening rate. Matrix hardening contributes considerably to the overall hardening of the composite, both at room temperature and 77K. The modified Orowan-Wilson model, which enables the plastic friction coefficient to be measured in copper-tungsten composites, has been applied to the aluminium/Saffil composites. The model requires both the mean stress and the peak stress curve obtained in Bauschinger experiments to be linear in plastic strain. The temperature dependence of the mean stress hardening rate suggests that relaxation is thermally activated. A model for relaxation of the mean stress is proposed. An equation is derived for the number of Orowan loops per fibre and it is assumed that the rate controlling mechanism of relaxation is cross slip of screw dislocations.

  10. Cyclic mechanical stretch reduces myofibroblast differentiation of primary lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Blaauboer, Marjolein E; Smit, Theo H; Hanemaaijer, Roeland; Stoop, Reinout; Everts, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    In lung fibrosis tissue architecture and function is severely hampered by myofibroblasts due to excessive deposition of extracellular matrix and tissue contraction. Myofibroblasts differentiate from fibroblasts under the influence of transforming growth factor (TGF) β(1) but this process is also controlled mechanically by cytoskeletal tension. In healthy lungs, the cytoskeleton of fibroblasts is mechanically strained during breathing. In stiffer fibrotic lung tissue, this mechanical stimulus is reduced, which may influence fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of cyclic mechanical stretch on fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation. Primary normal human lung fibroblasts were grown on BioFlex culture plates and stimulated to undergo myofibroblast differentiation by 10 ng/ml TGFβ(1). Cells were either or not subjected to cyclic mechanical stretch (sinusoidal pattern, maximum elongation 10%, 0.2 Hz) for a period of 48 h on a Flexercell apparatus. mRNA expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. Cyclic mechanical loading reduced the mRNA expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin and the extracellular matrix proteins type-I, type-III, and type-V collagen, and tenascin C. These outcomes indicate that fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation is reduced. Cyclic mechanical loading did not change the expression of the fibronectin ED-A splice variant, but did decrease the paracrine expression of TGFβ(1), thereby suggesting a possible regulation mechanism for the observed effects. The data suggest that cyclic loading experienced by healthy lung cells during breathing may prevent fibroblasts from differentiating towards myofibroblasts. PMID:21094632

  11. Cyclic axial-torsional deformation behavior of a cobalt-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bonacuse, P.J.; Kalluri, S.

    1992-11-01

    Multiaxial loading, especially at elevated temperature, can cause the inelastic response of a material to differ significantly from that predicted by simple flow rules, i.e., von Mises or Tresca. To quantify some of these differences, the cyclic high-temperature, deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-based superalloy, Haynes 188, is investigated under combined axial and torsional loads. Haynes 188 is currently used in many aerospace gas turbine and rocket engine applications, e.g., the combustor liner for the T800 turboshaft engine for the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and the liquid oxygen posts in the main injector of the space shuttle main engine. The deformation behavior of this material is assessed through the examination of hysteresis loops generated from a biaxial fatigue test program. A high-temperature axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional fatigue data base has been generated on Haynes 188 at 760 C. Cyclic loading tests have been conducted on uniform gauge section tubular specimens in a servohydraulic axial-torsional test rig. Test control and data acquisition were accomplished with a minicomputer. In this paper, the cyclic hardening characteristics and typical hysteresis loops in the axial stress versus axial strain, shear stress versus engineering shear strain, axial strain versus engineering shear strain, and axial stress versus shear stress spaces are presented for cyclic, in-phase and out-of-phase, axial torsional tests. For in-phase tests three different values of the proportionality constant, lambda (ratio of engineering shear strain amplitude to axial strain amplitude), are examined, viz., 0.86, 1.73, and 3.46. In the out-of-phase tests, three different values of the phase angle, phi (between the axial and engineering shear strain waveforms), are studied, viz., 30, 60, and 90 deg with lambda = 1.73.

  12. Effects of Cyclic and Monotonic Deformations on Nonlinear Ultrasonic Response of Austenitic Stainless Steel: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Xiang, Yanxun; Zhao, Peng

    2016-05-01

    The effect of plastic deformations on the nonlinear ultrasonic response in austenite stainless steel was investigated under the tensile, asymmetric cyclic, and symmetric cyclic loadings. Nonlinear ultrasonic wave measurement was performed on the interrupted specimens. Results show that cyclic and monotonic plastic deformations lead to the significantly different acoustic nonlinear response. The increase of dislocation density and martensite transformation causes the increase of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrast, the well-developed cell structures decrease the acoustic nonlinear response. Under the asymmetric cyclic loading condition, the lightly decrease of acoustic nonlinearity is caused by the development of cell structures, while the slight increase of acoustic nonlinearity should be attributed to the increase of martensite transformation. Comparatively, the severe increase of acoustic nonlinearity during the first stage under symmetric cyclic loading is ascribed to the fast generation of dislocation structures and martensite transformation.

  13. Fatigueless response of spider draglines in cyclic torsion facilitated by reversible molecular deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, Kamal P.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate that spider draglines exhibit a fatigueless response in extreme cyclic torsion up to its breaking limit. The well defined Raman bands at 1095 and 1245 cm-1 shifted linearly towards lower wavenumbers versus increasing twist in both clockwise and counter-clockwise directions. Under thousands of continuous loading cycles of twist strain approaching its breaking limit, all the Raman bands were preserved and the characteristic Raman peak shifts were found to be reversible. Besides, nanoscale surface profile of the worked silk appeared as good as the pristine silk. This unique fatigueless twist response of draglines, facilitated by reversible deformation of protein molecules, could find applications in durable miniatured devices.

  14. Structure modulation driven by cyclic deformation in nanocrystalline NiFe

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Sheng; Wang, Xun-Li; Zhao, Yh; Wang, Yinmin; Liaw, Peter K; Lavernia, Ej

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical modeling suggests that the grain size remains unchanged during fatigue crack growth in nanocrystalline metals. Here we demonstrate that a modulated structure is generated in a nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy under cyclic deformation. Substantial grain coarsening and loss of growth twins are observed in the path of fatigue cracks, while the grains away from the cracks remain largely unaffected. Statistical analyses suggest that the grain coarsening is realized through the grain lattice rotation and coalescence and the loss of growth twins may be related to the detwinning process near crack tip.

  15. Cyclic deformation of NI/sub 3/(Al,Nb) single crystals at ambient and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bonda, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    Cyclic tests were performed on Ni/sub 3/(Al,Nb) (..gamma..' phase) single crystals by using a servo-hydraulic machine under fully reversed plastic strain control at a frequency of 0.1-0.2 Hz at room temperature, 400/sup 0/C and 700/sup 0/C. Since the monotonic behavior is orientation dependent, three orientations were studied. Asymmetry in tensile and compressive stresses was observed in the cyclic hardening curves of specimens tested at these temperatures and they were discussed with regard to the model suggested by Paider et al for monotonic behavior. The stress levels in the cyclic stress-strain curves (CSSC) at room temperature depended on orientation and cyclic history. No CSSCs were established at 400/sup 0/C and 700/sup 0/C. The deformation in cyclic tests at small plastic strain amplitudes was found to be different from that in monotonic tests in the microplastic regions in which the deformation is believed to be carried by a small density of edge dislocations. But in cyclic deformation, to and from motion of dislocations trap the edge dislocations into dipoles and therefore screw dislocations will be forced to participate in the deformation. Cracks on the surfaces of specimens tested at room temperature and 400/sup 0/C were found to be of stage I type, whereas at 700/sup 0/C, they were of stage II type.

  16. Cyclic Deformation Behavior of a Rare-Earth Containing Extruded Magnesium Alloy: Effect of Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, F. A.; Chen, D. L.; Li, D. J.; Zeng, X. Q.

    2015-03-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating strain-controlled cyclic deformation behavior of a rare-earth (RE) element containing Mg-10Gd-3Y-0.5Zr (GW103K) alloy in different states (as-extruded, peak-aged (T5), and solution-treated and peak-aged (T6)). The addition of RE elements led to an effective grain refinement and weak texture in the as-extruded alloy. While heat treatment resulted in a grain growth modestly in the T5 state and significantly in the T6 state, a high density of nano-sized and bamboo-leaf/plate-shaped β' (Mg7(Gd,Y)) precipitates was observed to distribute uniformly in the α-Mg matrix. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength, as well as the maximum and minimum peak stresses during cyclic deformation in the T5 and T6 states were significantly higher than those in the as-extruded state. Unlike RE-free extruded Mg alloys, symmetrical hysteresis loops in tension and compression and cyclic stabilization were present in the GW103K alloy in different states. The fatigue life of this alloy in the three conditions, which could be well described by the Coffin-Manson law and Basquin's equation, was equivalent within the experimental scatter and was longer than that of RE-free extruded Mg alloys. This was predominantly attributed to the presence of the relatively weak texture and the suppression of twinning activities stemming from the fine grain sizes and especially RE-containing β' precipitates. Fatigue crack was observed to initiate from the specimen surface in all the three alloy states and the initiation site contained some cleavage-like facets after T6 heat treatment. Crack propagation was characterized mainly by the characteristic fatigue striations.

  17. Deformed Conformal and Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, Vyacheslav

    Within the standard quantum mechanics a q-deformation of the simplest N=2 supersymmetry algebra is suggested. Resulting physical systems do not have conserved charges and degeneracies in the spectra. Instead, superpartner Hamiltonians are q-isospectral, i.e., the spectrum of one can be obtained from another (with possible exception of the lowest level) by the q2-factor scaling. A special class of the self-similar potentials is shown to obey the dynamical conformal symmetry algebra suq(1,1). These potentials exhibit exponential spectra and corresponding raising and lowering operators satisfy the q-deformed harmonic oscillator algebra of Biedenharn and Macfarlane.

  18. Dislocation Mechanics of High-Rate Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Ronald W.; Li, Qizhen

    2015-10-01

    Four topics associated with constitutive equation descriptions of rate-dependent metal plastic deformation behavior are reviewed in honor of previous research accomplished on the same issues by Professor Marc Meyers along with colleagues and students, as follow: (1) increasing strength levels attributed to thermally activated dislocation migration at higher loading rates; (2) inhomogeneous adiabatic shear banding; (3) controlling mechanisms of deformation in shock as compared with shock-less isentropic compression experiments and (4) Hall-Petch-based grain size-dependent strain rate sensitivities exhibited by nanopolycrystalline materials. Experimental results are reviewed on the topics for a wide range of metals.

  19. The cyclic deformation and fatigue behaviour of the low carbon steel SAE 1045 in the temperature regime of dynamic strain aging

    SciTech Connect

    Weisse, M.; Wamukwamba, C.K.; Christ, H.J.; Mughrabi, H. . Inst. fuer Werkstoffwissenschaften)

    1993-07-01

    The cyclic deformation behaviour of normalized SAE 1045 steel (german steel grade Ck 45) had been investigated over a range of temperatures between 20 and 375C. Special attention has been paid to the effects of dynamic strain aging, which are most pronounced around 300C. Different types of deformation tests (tension tests, incremental step tests, and constant amplitude cyclic deformation tests under stress control with a stress amplitude of 400 MPa as well as under plastic strain control with a plastic strain amplitude of 0.5%) were carried out to observe the influence of temperature on the macroscopic mechanical behaviour. These tests were followed by TEM studies on microstructural features. In the temperature range of maximum dynamic strain aging, the material was found to show maximum strength in unidirectional as well as in cyclic deformation tests. While the fatigue life is maximum at the temperature of maximum dynamic strain aging in stress-controlled tests, it is minimum in plastic strain controlled tests. At the temperature of maximum dynamic strain aging around 300C, the dislocations are arranged in dense dislocation tangles and parallel dislocation walls, whereas at room and at higher temperatures (375C) mainly dislocation cell structures are observed.

  20. Deformation and Phase Transformations During Cyclic Oxidation of Ni-Al and Ni-Pt-Al

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Speakman, Scott A; Rawn, Claudia J; Zhang, Ying

    2006-01-01

    The reversible high-temperature {gamma}' to {beta} phase transformation may be critical to explaining the unusual high-temperature oxidation behavior of (Ni,Pt)Al alloys and coatings. During high-temperature, high-frequency (1 h) cyclic oxidation in dry, flowing O{sub 2}, unprecedented macroscopic deformation was observed in two-phase ({gamma}'+{beta}) cast specimens of Hf-doped Ni-Al at 1,150 C and Hf-doped Ni-Pt-Al at 1,100 and 1,150 C, Outside of this two-phase field or when the cycle frequency was decreased to 100h, no deformation was observed. Using high-temperature x-ray diffraction in an inert environment, the {beta}-to-{gamma}' phase ratio was observed to increase above 1,000 C, causing a 2.5% volume change. The addition of platinum appeared to lower the transformation temperature consistent with the deformation observed in castalloys and rumpling of simple and platinum-modified aluminide coatings.

  1. Mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bumjoon; Yoon, Gwonchan; Lee, Sang Woo; Eom, Kilho

    2015-01-14

    Amyloid fibrils have recently received attention due to their remarkable mechanical properties, which are highly correlated with their biological functions. We have studied the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils as a function of their length scales by using atomistic simulations. It is shown that the length of amyloid fibrils plays a role in their deformation and fracture mechanisms in such a way that the competition between shear and bending deformations is highly dependent on the fibril length, and that as the fibril length increases, so does the bending strength of the fibril while its shear strength decreases. The dependence of rupture force for amyloid fibrils on their length is elucidated using the Bell model, which suggests that the rupture force of the fibril is determined from the hydrogen bond rupture mechanism that critically depends on the fibril length. We have measured the toughness of amyloid fibrils, which is shown to depend on the fibril length. In particular, the toughness of the fibril with its length of ∼3 nm is estimated to be ∼30 kcal mol(-1) nm(-3), comparable to that of a spider silk crystal with its length of ∼2 nm. Moreover, we have shown the important effect of the pulling rate on the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibril. It is found that as the pulling rate increases, so does the contribution of the shear effect to the elastic deformation of the amyloid fibril with its length of <10 nm. However, we found that the deformation mechanism of the amyloid fibril with its length of >15 nm is almost independent of the pulling rate. Our study sheds light on the role of the length scale of amyloid fibrils and the pulling rate in their mechanical behaviors and properties, which may provide insights into how the excellent mechanical properties of protein fibrils can be determined. PMID:25426573

  2. Deformation Mechanisms of Gum Metals Under Nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Rohini Priya

    Gum Metal is a set of multi-component beta-Ti alloys designed and developed by Toyota Central R&D Labs in 2003 to have a nearly zero shear modulus in the direction. After significant amounts of cold-work (>90%), these alloys were found to have yield strengths at a significant fraction of the predicted ideal strengths and exhibited very little work hardening. It has been speculated that this mechanical behavior may be realized through an ideal shear mechanism as opposed to conventional plastic deformation mechanisms, such as slip, and that such a mechanism may be realized through a defect structure termed "nanodisturbance". It is furthermore theorized that for near ideal strength to be attained, dislocations need to be pinned at sufficiently high stresses. It is the search for these defects and pinning points that motivates the present study. However, the mechanism of plastic deformation and the true origin of specific defect structures unique to gum metals is still controversial, mainly due to the complexity of the beta-Ti alloy system and the heavily distorted lattice exhibited in cold worked gum metals, rendering interpretation of images difficult. Accordingly, the first aim of this study is to clarify the starting as-received microstructures of gum metal alloys through conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and aberration-corrected high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy with high-angle annular dark field detector (HAADF-HRSTEM) imaging. To elucidate the effects of beta-stability and starting microstructure on the deformation behavior of gum metals and thus to provide adequate context for potentially novel deformation structures, we investigate three alloy conditions: gum metal that has undergone solution heat treatment (STGM), gum metal that has been heavily cold worked (CWGM), and a solution treated alloy of nominal gum metal composition, but leaner in beta-stabilizing content (ST Ref-1). In order to directly relate observed

  3. First Cycle Heterogeneous Deformation Behavior and Cyclic Shakedown Phenomena of Nitinol Near A(sub f) Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, H. N.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental observations on the cyclic behavior of a NiTi alloy (Nitinol) at temperatures in the neighborhood of the A(sub f) (austenite finish) temperature are presented. The strongly heterogeneous nature of the deformation behavior of this material at temperatures within this regime during the first cycle is examined with emphasis placed on the difficulties that the existence of such phenomena pose on the formulation of realistic constitutive relations. It is further demonstrated that this heterogeneity of deformation persists on subsequent cycles with the result that the hysteretic cyclic behavior of these alloys can exhibit a point to point variation in an otherwise uniform geometry. The experimental observations on the deformation behavior of this alloy show that it is strongly dependent on temperature and prior deformation history of the sample, thus resulting in an almost intractable problem with respect to capturing an adequate constitutive description from either experiment or modeling.

  4. Welding of pyroclastic conduit infill: A mechanism for cyclical explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Russell, J. K.

    2014-07-01

    Vulcanian-style eruptions are small- to moderate-sized, singular to cyclical events commonly having volcanic explosivity indices of 1-3. They produce pyroclastic flows, disperse tephra over considerable areas, and can occur as precursors to larger (e.g., Plinian) eruptions. The fallout deposits of the 2360 B.P. eruption of Mount Meager, BC, Canada, contain bread-crusted blocks of welded breccia as accessory lithics. They display a range of compaction/welding intensity and provide a remarkable opportunity to constrain the nature and timescales of mechanical processes operating within explosive volcanic conduits during repose periods between eruptive cycles. We address the deformation and porosity/permeability reduction within natural pyroclastic deposits infilling volcanic conduits. We measure the porosity, permeability, and ultrasonic wave velocities for a suite of samples and quantify the strain recorded by pumice clasts. We explore the correlations between the physical properties and deformation fabric. Based on these correlations, we reconstruct the deformation history within the conduit, model the permeability reduction timescales, and outline the implications for the repressurization of the volcanic conduit. Our results highlight a profound directionality in the measured physical properties of these samples related to the deformation-induced fabric. Gas permeability varies drastically with increasing strain and decreasing porosity along the compaction direction of the fabric but varies little along the elongation direction of the fabric. The deformation fabric records a combination of compaction within the conduit and postcompaction stretching associated with subsequent eruption. Model timescales of these processes are in good agreement with repose periods of cyclic vulcanian eruptions.

  5. Deformation behavior of reinforced ECC flexural members under reversed cyclic loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Gregor D.

    In this dissertation, the use of engineered cementitious composites (ECC) in reinforced members and model seismic resistant frames is investigated. The development from composite material to structural system behavior is presented, bridging the dimensional scales associated with microstructures, composite materials and composite structures. The fundamental cause of damage in reinforced concrete (R/C) structures is the brittle deformation behavior of concrete in tension. Engineered cementitious composites (ECC) are fiber reinforced cementitious composites designed to achieve a deformation behavior analogous to that of metals, specifically strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior. The combination of such a ductile ECC with ductile reinforcing steel in direct tension results in deformation compatibility of these R/ECC components, leading to a reduction of interfacial bond stresses and bond splitting cracks while maintaining composite integrity. Test results show that the performance of R/ECC structural composites in reversed cyclic flexure benefits from this deformation compatibility, resulting in a decrease of peak curvature at a given flexural deformation. It is further observed that beyond localization of cracking in ECC, enhanced confinement, shear strength and buckling resistance in R/ECC members make transverse steel reinforcement redundant and lead to stable energy dissipation by yielding of longitudinal steel reinforcement. Furthermore, R/ECC members with longitudinal FRP reinforcement show reduced residual displacements after unloading. On the structural system scale, the particular interaction of R/ECC members reinforced with steel and FRP reinforcement in a moment resisting frame is found to result in a structural system with considerable energy dissipation capacity and reduced residual displacement. This composite structural system shows a bi-linear elastic load-deformation behavior and intrinsic stiffness modification capabilities, which are

  6. Deformation mechanisms of irradiated metallic nanofoams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepeda-Ruiz, L. A.; Martinez, E.; Caro, M.; Fu, E. G.; Caro, A.

    2013-07-01

    It was recently proposed that within a particular window in the parameter space of temperature, ion energy, dose rate, and filament diameter, nanoscale metallic foams could show radiation tolerance [Bringa et al., Nano Lett. 12, 3351 (2012)]. Outside this window, damage appears in the form of vacancy-related stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT), with no effects due to interstitials [Fu et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 191607 (2012)]. These SFT could be natural sources of dislocations within the ligaments composing the foam and determine their mechanical response. We employ molecular dynamics simulations of cylindrical ligaments containing an SFT to obtain an atomic-level picture of their deformation behavior under compression. We find that plastic deformation originates at the edges of the SFT, at lower stress than needed to create dislocations at the surface. Our results predict that nanoscale foams soften under irradiation, a prediction not yet tested experimentally.

  7. Deformed Coherent State for Multiparticle Production Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. Y.; Leong, Q.; Ng, W. K.; Dewanto, A.; Chan, A. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2014-04-01

    The deformation structure function describing the Generalised Multiplicities Distribution (GMD), Negative Binomial Distribution (NBD), Furry-Yule Distribution (FYD), and their corresponding deformed coherent states and second order correlation function g(2) are derived. A superposition model of the GMD and NBD states is then proposed as a general description of the mechanism that gives rise to the double NBD model first proposed by Giovannini. The model is applied to LHC multiplicity data at |η| ≤ 2.4 and 0.9, 2.36 and 7 TeV, from the CMS collaboration at CERN, and the second order correlation g(2) of the model is then compared with the normalised second factorial moment {F_2}/F_1^2 of the multiplicity.

  8. Universal mechanism of thermo-mechanical deformation in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, W.; Tong, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Egami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Y.

    2015-02-11

    Here we investigated the atomistic structure of metallic glasses subjected to thermo-mechanical creep deformation using high energy x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulation. The experiments were performed in-situ, at high temperatures as a time dependent deformation in the elastic regime, and ex-situ on samples quenched under stress. We show that all the anisotropic structure functions of the samples undergone thermo-mechanical creep can be scaled into a single curve, regardless of the magnitude of anelastic strain, stress level and the sign of the stress, demonstrating universal behavior and pointing to unique atomistic unit of anelastic deformation. The structural changes due to creep are strongly localized within the second nearest neighbors, involving only a small group of atoms.

  9. Universal mechanism of thermo-mechanical deformation in metallic glasses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dmowski, W.; Tong, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Egami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Y.

    2015-02-11

    Here we investigated the atomistic structure of metallic glasses subjected to thermo-mechanical creep deformation using high energy x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulation. The experiments were performed in-situ, at high temperatures as a time dependent deformation in the elastic regime, and ex-situ on samples quenched under stress. We show that all the anisotropic structure functions of the samples undergone thermo-mechanical creep can be scaled into a single curve, regardless of the magnitude of anelastic strain, stress level and the sign of the stress, demonstrating universal behavior and pointing to unique atomistic unit of anelastic deformation. The structural changes due tomore » creep are strongly localized within the second nearest neighbors, involving only a small group of atoms.« less

  10. Deformation Mechanisms of Gum Metals Under Nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Rohini Priya

    Gum Metal is a set of multi-component beta-Ti alloys designed and developed by Toyota Central R&D Labs in 2003 to have a nearly zero shear modulus in the direction. After significant amounts of cold-work (>90%), these alloys were found to have yield strengths at a significant fraction of the predicted ideal strengths and exhibited very little work hardening. It has been speculated that this mechanical behavior may be realized through an ideal shear mechanism as opposed to conventional plastic deformation mechanisms, such as slip, and that such a mechanism may be realized through a defect structure termed "nanodisturbance". It is furthermore theorized that for near ideal strength to be attained, dislocations need to be pinned at sufficiently high stresses. It is the search for these defects and pinning points that motivates the present study. However, the mechanism of plastic deformation and the true origin of specific defect structures unique to gum metals is still controversial, mainly due to the complexity of the beta-Ti alloy system and the heavily distorted lattice exhibited in cold worked gum metals, rendering interpretation of images difficult. Accordingly, the first aim of this study is to clarify the starting as-received microstructures of gum metal alloys through conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and aberration-corrected high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy with high-angle annular dark field detector (HAADF-HRSTEM) imaging. To elucidate the effects of beta-stability and starting microstructure on the deformation behavior of gum metals and thus to provide adequate context for potentially novel deformation structures, we investigate three alloy conditions: gum metal that has undergone solution heat treatment (STGM), gum metal that has been heavily cold worked (CWGM), and a solution treated alloy of nominal gum metal composition, but leaner in beta-stabilizing content (ST Ref-1). In order to directly relate observed

  11. Deformation mechanisms in a Laves phase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yaping; Allen, S.M.; Livingston, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    The stress-induced phase transformation between C36 and C15 structures in Fe{sub 2}Zr is studied by electron microscopy. Nucleus of transformation is believed to be pre-existing C15 layers in C36 particles. Microstructural evidence for three mechanisms of growth of a new phase were found: Fault accumulation and rearrangement, moving of a individual partial dislocations between two phases, and the migration of microscopic ledges composed of a series of Shockley partials between C36 and C15. Plastic deformation by slip on non-basal planes of C36 caused by indentation is studied.

  12. Cyclic ductile and brittle deformation related to coseismic thrust fault propagation: Structural record at the base of a basement nappe (Preveli, Crete)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüchter, Jens-Alexander; Wassmann, Sara; Stöckhert, Bernhard

    2013-09-01

    structural record at the base of a basement nappe (Preveli nappe, Crete, Greece) thrust upon sedimentary rocks is investigated, aimed on understanding mechanisms which result in decoupling of the thrust sheet from its original substratum. We identify several superimposed deformation stages, each with characteristic structural style and indications of episodic deformation at initially high differential stress. The final stage involves formation of a matrix supported breccia transected by pseudotachylytes, comprising the lowermost 30 m of the nappe. Brecciation and pseudotachylyte formation occurred in a single event, and structures were not modified afterward. Complete induration of breccia and composition of phengite crystallized during devitrification of pseudotachylytes place the sequence of events into the middle crust. We propose a model relating episodic deformation and cyclic stress history to propagation of a thrust fault in a limited number of seismic events. Terminal brecciation and frictional fusion record passage of the fault front beneath the site of observation and decoupling of the thrust sheet. Absence of discernible further deformation is consistent with negligible basal friction during transport as a nappe. Brecciation and pseudotachylyte formation mark the switch from a history of repeated coseismic loading and postseismic stress relaxation in the plastosphere, driven by seismic events on the approaching thrust fault, to passive transport with deformation localized in a weak thrust plane. For a sequence of superimposed ductile to brittle structures, our model provides an alternative to progressive cooling and exhumation concomitant with deformation over millions of years.

  13. Ruthenium Aluminides: Deformation Mechanisms and Substructure Development

    SciTech Connect

    Tresa M. Pollock

    2005-05-11

    Structural and functional materials that can operate in severe, high temperature environments are key to the operation of a wide range of energy generation systems. Because continued improvements in the energy efficiency of these systems is critical, the need for new materials with higher temperature capabilities is inevitable. Intermetallic compounds, with strong bonding and generally high melting points offer this possibility for a broad array of components such as coatings, electrode materials, actuators and/or structural elements. RuAl is a very unusual intermetallic compound among the large number of B2compounds that have been identified and investigated to date. This material has a very high melting temperature of 2050?C, low thermal expansion, high thermal conductivity and good corrosion resistance. Unlike most other high temperature B2 intermetallics, RuAl possesses good intrinsic deformability at low temperatures. In this program fundamental aspects of low and high temperature mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms in binary and higher order RuAl-based systems have been investigated. Alloying additions of interest included platinum, boron and niobium. Additionally, preliminary studies on high temperature oxidation behavior of these materials have been conducted.

  14. Damage Evolution On Mechanical Parts Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestriez, P.; Bogard, F.; Shan, J. L.; Guo, Y. Q.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a fatigue damage model, based on the continuum damage mechanics and general thermodynamic theory, proposed by Lemaitre and Chaboche, for rolling bearings under very numerous loading cycles. A flow surface of fatigue using the Sines criterion is adopted. The coupling between the hardening plasticity and damage effects is considered in the constitutive equations. An explicit algorithm of weak coupling leads to a calculation very fast. This fatigue damage model is implemented into Abaqus/Explicit using a Vumat user's subroutine. Moreover, the damage variable in function of time is transformed into a function of number of cycles. An algorithm of cycle jump, with a criterion for choosing the number increment of cycles, is proposed, which allows to largely reduce the CPU time. The present damage simulation allows to determine the lifetime of mechanical parts under cyclic loading.

  15. Non-geometric fluxes, quasi-Hopf twist deformations, and nonassociative quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Mylonas, Dionysios Szabo, Richard J.; Schupp, Peter

    2014-12-15

    We analyse the symmetries underlying nonassociative deformations of geometry in non-geometric R-flux compactifications which arise via T-duality from closed strings with constant geometric fluxes. Starting from the non-abelian Lie algebra of translations and Bopp shifts in phase space, together with a suitable cochain twist, we construct the quasi-Hopf algebra of symmetries that deforms the algebra of functions and the exterior differential calculus in the phase space description of nonassociative R-space. In this setting, nonassociativity is characterised by the associator 3-cocycle which controls non-coassociativity of the quasi-Hopf algebra. We use abelian 2-cocycle twists to construct maps between the dynamical nonassociative star product and a family of associative star products parametrized by constant momentum surfaces in phase space. We define a suitable integration on these nonassociative spaces and find that the usual cyclicity of associative noncommutative deformations is replaced by weaker notions of 2-cyclicity and 3-cyclicity. Using this star product quantization on phase space together with 3-cyclicity, we formulate a consistent version of nonassociative quantum mechanics, in which we calculate the expectation values of area and volume operators, and find coarse-graining of the string background due to the R-flux.

  16. Non-geometric fluxes, quasi-Hopf twist deformations, and nonassociative quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylonas, Dionysios; Schupp, Peter; Szabo, Richard J.

    2014-12-01

    We analyse the symmetries underlying nonassociative deformations of geometry in non-geometric R-flux compactifications which arise via T-duality from closed strings with constant geometric fluxes. Starting from the non-abelian Lie algebra of translations and Bopp shifts in phase space, together with a suitable cochain twist, we construct the quasi-Hopf algebra of symmetries that deforms the algebra of functions and the exterior differential calculus in the phase space description of nonassociative R-space. In this setting, nonassociativity is characterised by the associator 3-cocycle which controls non-coassociativity of the quasi-Hopf algebra. We use abelian 2-cocycle twists to construct maps between the dynamical nonassociative star product and a family of associative star products parametrized by constant momentum surfaces in phase space. We define a suitable integration on these nonassociative spaces and find that the usual cyclicity of associative noncommutative deformations is replaced by weaker notions of 2-cyclicity and 3-cyclicity. Using this star product quantization on phase space together with 3-cyclicity, we formulate a consistent version of nonassociative quantum mechanics, in which we calculate the expectation values of area and volume operators, and find coarse-graining of the string background due to the R-flux.

  17. Characterization of Solder Joint Reliability Using Cyclic Mechanical Fatigue Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Choong-Un; Bang, Woong-Ho; Xu, Huili; Lee, Tae-Kyu

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the mechanics of two mechanical fatigue methods, cyclic bending fatigue and shear fatigue, in inducing failure in solder joints in package assemblies, and it presents the characteristics of fatigue failures resulting from these methods using example cases of Sn-Pb eutectic and Sn-rich Pb-free solder alloys. Numerical simulation suggests that both testing configurations induce fatigue failure by the crack-opening mode. In the case of bending fatigue, the strain induced by the bending displacement is found to be sensitive to chip geometry, and it induces fatigue cracks mainly at the solder matrix adjacent to the printed circuit board interface. In case of shear fatigue, the failure location is firmly fixed at the solder neck, created by solder mask, where an abrupt change in the solder geometry occurs. Both methods conclude that the Coffin-Manson model is the most appropriate model for the isothermal mechanical fatigue of solder alloys. An analysis of fatigue characteristics using the frame of the Coffin-Manson model produces several insightful results, such as the reason why Pb-free alloys show higher fatigue resistance than Sn-Pb alloys even if they are generally more brittle. Our analysis suggests that it is related to higher work hardening. All these results indicate that mechanical fatigue can be an extremely useful method for fast screening of defective package structures and also in gaining a better understanding of fatigue failure mechanism and prediction of reliability in solder joints.

  18. A mechanism for tectonic deformation on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.

    1986-01-01

    In the absence of identifiable physiographic features directly associated with plate tectonics, alternate mechanisms are sought for the intense tectonic deformation observed in radar images of Venus. One possible mechanism is direct coupling into an elastic lithosphere of the stresses associated with convective flow in the interior. Spectral Green's function solutions have been obtained for stresses in an elastic lithosphere overlying a Newtonian interior with an exponential depth dependence of viscosity, and a specified surface-density distribution driving the flow. At long wavelengths and for a rigid elastic/fluid boundary condition, horizontal normal stresses in the elastic lid are controlled by the vertical shear stress gradient and are directly proportional to the depth of the density disturbance in the underlying fluid. The depth and strength of density anomalies in the Venusian interior inferred by analyses of long wavelength gravity data suggest that stresses in excess of 100 MPa would be generated in a 10 km thick elastic lid unless a low viscosity channel occurring beneath the lid or a positive viscosity gradient uncouples the flow stresses. The great apparent depth of compensation of topographic features argues against this, however, thus supporting the importance of the coupling mechanism. If there is no elastic lid, stresses will also be very high near the surface, providing also that the viscosity gradient is negative.

  19. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  20. Plate-tectonic mechanism of Laramide deformation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.

    1981-01-01

    The Laramide compressive deformation of the craton was caused by a clockwise rotation of about 2-4o of the Colorado Plateau region relative to the continental interior, during late Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary time. Late Paleozoic and Neogene deformation of the craton also were produced by motion of a southwestern subplate relative to the continental interior. -from Author

  1. Deformation mechanisms of antigorite serpentinite at subduction zone conditions determined from experimentally and naturally deformed rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzende, Anne-Line; Escartin, Javier; Walte, Nicolas P.; Guillot, Stéphane; Hirth, Greg; Frost, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    We performed deformation-DIA experiments on antigorite serpentinite at pressures of 1-3.5 GPa and temperatures of between 400 and 650 °C, bracketing the stability of antigorite under subduction zone conditions. For each set of pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions, we conducted two runs at strain rates of 5 ×10-5 and 1 ×10-4 s-1. We complemented our study with a sample deformed in a Griggs-type apparatus at 1 GPa and 400 °C (Chernak and Hirth, 2010), and with natural samples from Cuba and the Alps deformed under blueschist/eclogitic conditions. Optical and transmission electron microscopies were used for microstructural characterization and determination of deformation mechanisms. Our observations on experimentally deformed antigorite prior to breakdown show that deformation is dominated by cataclastic flow with observable but minor contribution of plastic deformation (microkinking and (001) gliding mainly expressed by stacking disorder mainly). In contrast, in naturally deformed samples, plastic deformation structures are dominant (stacking disorder, kinking, pressure solution), with minor but also perceptible contribution of brittle deformation. When dehydration occurs in experiments, plasticity increases and is coupled to local embrittlement that we attribute to antigorite dehydration. In dehydrating samples collected in the Alps, embrittlement is also observed suggesting that dehydration may contribute to intermediate-depth seismicity. Our results thus show that semibrittle deformation operates within and above the stability field of antigorite. However, the plastic deformation recorded by naturally deformed samples was likely acquired at low strain rates. We also document that the corrugated structure of antigorite controls the strain accommodation mechanisms under subduction conditions, with preferred inter- and intra-grain cracking along (001) and gliding along both a and b. We also show that antigorite rheology in subduction zones is partly controlled

  2. Deformation Mechanisms of Antigorite Serpentinite at Subduction Zone Conditions Determined from Experimentally and Naturally Deformed Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzende, A. L.; Escartin, J.; Walte, N.; Guillot, S.; Hirth, G.; Frost, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The rheology of serpentinite, and particularly that of antigorite-bearing rocks, is of prime importance for understanding subduction zone proceses, including decoupling between the downwelling slab and the overriding plate, exhumation of high-pressure rocks, fluids pathways and, more generally, mantle wedge dynamics. We present results from deformation-DIA experiments on antigorite serpentinite performed under conditions relevant of subduction zones (1-3.5 GPa ; 400-650°C). We complemented our study with a sample deformed in a Griggs-type apparatus at 1 GPa and 400°C (Chernak and Hirth, EPSL, 2010), and with natural samples from Cuba and the Alps deformed under blueschist/eclogitic conditions. Our observations on experimental samples of antigorite deformed within its stability field show that deformation is dominated by cataclastic flow; we can only document a minor contribution of plastic deformation. In naturally deformed samples, deformation-related plastic structures largely dominate strain accommodation, but we also document a minor contribution of brittle deformation. When dehydration occurs in experiments, plasticity increases, and is coupled to local embrittlement attributed to hydraulic fracturating due to the migration of dehydration fluids. Our results thus show that semibrittle deformation operates within and above the stability field of antigorite. We also document that the corrugated structure of antigorite has a control on the strain accommodation mechanisms under subduction conditions, with preferred inter and intra-cracking along (001) and gliding along both a and b. Deformation dominated by brittle processes, as observed in experiments, may occur during deformation at elevated (seismic?) strain rates, while plastic deformation, as observed in naturally deformed rocks, may correspond instead to low strain rates instead (aseismic creep?). We also discuss the role of antigorite rheology and mode of deformation on fluid transport.

  3. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Galperin, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms.

  4. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms. PMID:26055114

  5. Mechanical Behavior of Two High Strength Alloy Steels Under Conditions of Cyclic Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Manigandan, K.; Sastry, S.; Quick, T.; Schmidt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    The results of a recent study aimed at understanding the conjoint influence of load ratio and microstructure on the high cycle fatigue properties and resultant fracture behavior of two high strength alloy steels is presented and discussed. Both the chosen alloy steels, i.e., 300M and Tenax™ 310 have much better strength and ductility properties to offer in comparison with the other competing high strength steels having near similar chemical composition. Test specimens were precision machined from the as-provided stock of each steel. The machined specimens were deformed in both uniaxial tension and cyclic fatigue under conditions of stress control. The test specimens of each alloy steel were cyclically deformed over a range of maximum stress at two different load ratios and the number of cycles to failure recorded. The specific influence of load ratio on cyclic fatigue life is presented and discussed keeping in mind the maximum stress used during cyclic deformation. The fatigue fracture surfaces were examined in a scanning electron microscope to establish the macroscopic mode and to concurrently characterize the intrinsic features on the fracture surface. The conjoint influence of nature of loading, maximum stress, and microstructure on cyclic fatigue life is discussed.

  6. Repetitive mechanical strain suppresses macrophage uptake of immunoglobulin G complexes and enhances cyclic adenosine monophosphate synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, J.; Sankaran, R. T.; Singhal, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Uptake of immunoglobulin G (IgG) complexes by macrophages (M phi) may play an important role in disease states characterized by increased levels of circulating immune complexes. In sites such as the glomerular mesangium M phi may be subjected to repetitive mechanical strain, although in vitro studies of M phi endocytosis are typically carried out with cells grown on rigid surfaces. We undertook the present study to determine whether repetitive mechanical strain could modulate M phi endocytosis of IgG complexes. IgG complex uptake was significantly diminished in M phi that were subjected to repetitive mechanical strain using parameters corresponding to peak and minimal intraglomerular pressures compared with control, and uptake varied according to the amount of mechanical strain applied. There was no significant difference in surface binding of IgG between M phi subjected to strain and those not. Mechanical strain did not significantly influence the rate of IgG complex degradation. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase and guanylate cyclase activity did not alter the effect of mechanical strain, although this effect was potentiated by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Angiotensin II, which has been shown to reduce adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production in M phi, significantly attenuated the suppressive effect of mechanical strain on IgG complex uptake as well as another inhibitor of cAMP generation, indomethacin. Enzyme immunoassay demonstrated significantly enhanced levels of cAMP in M phi that were subjected to mechanical strain compared with control, an effect that was potentiated by IBMX and attenuated by angiotensin II and indomethacin. These results demonstrate that repetitive mechanical strain significantly reduces IgG complex uptake by M phi, most likely by enhancing cAMP synthesis. Such an effect might play a significant role in macromolecule handling by M phi in sites in which they are subjected to repetitive mechanical deformation such as

  7. Deformation mechanisms of human amnion: Quantitative studies based on second harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Arabella; Ehret, Alexander E; Perrini, Michela; Maake, Caroline; Ochsenbein-Kölble, Nicole; Ehrbar, Martin; Oyen, Michelle L; Mazza, Edoardo

    2015-06-25

    Multiphoton microscopy has proven to be a versatile tool to analyze the three-dimensional microstructure of the fetal membrane and the mechanisms of deformation on the length scale of cells and the collagen network. In the present contribution, dedicated microscopic tools for in situ mechanical characterization of tissue under applied mechanical loads and the related methods for data interpretation are presented with emphasis on new stepwise monotonic uniaxial experiments. The resulting microscopic parameters are consistent with previous ones quantified for cyclic and relaxation tests, underlining the reliability of these techniques. The thickness reduction and the substantial alignment of collagen fiber bundles in the compact and fibroblast layer starting at very small loads are highlighted, which challenges the definition of a reference configuration in terms of a force threshold. The findings presented in this paper intend to inform the development of models towards a better understanding of fetal membrane deformation and failure, and thus of related problems in obstetrics and other clinical conditions.

  8. Integrated random-aligned carbon nanotube layers: deformation mechanism under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhiping; Gui, Xuchun; Gan, Qiming; Lin, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Yuan; Zhang, Wenhui; Xiang, Rong; Cao, Anyuan; Tang, Zikang

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to construct highly compressible and elastic macroscopic structures such as films, aerogels and sponges. The structure-related deformation mechanism determines the mechanical behavior of those structures and niche applications. Here, we show a novel strategy to integrate aligned and random nanotube layers and reveal their deformation mechanism under uniaxial compression with a large range of strain and cyclic testing. Integrated nanotube layers deform sequentially with different mechanisms due to the distinct morphology of each layer. While the aligned layer forms buckles under compression, nanotubes in the random layer tend to be parallel and form bundles, resulting in the integration of quite different properties (strength and stiffness) and correspondingly distinct plateau regions in the stress-strain curves. Our results indicate a great promise of constructing hierarchical carbon nanotube structures with tailored energy absorption properties, for applications such as cushioning and buffering layers in microelectromechanical systems.Carbon nanotubes have the potential to construct highly compressible and elastic macroscopic structures such as films, aerogels and sponges. The structure-related deformation mechanism determines the mechanical behavior of those structures and niche applications. Here, we show a novel strategy to integrate aligned and random nanotube layers and reveal their deformation mechanism under uniaxial compression with a large range of strain and cyclic testing. Integrated nanotube layers deform sequentially with different mechanisms due to the distinct morphology of each layer. While the aligned layer forms buckles under compression, nanotubes in the random layer tend to be parallel and form bundles, resulting in the integration of quite different properties (strength and stiffness) and correspondingly distinct plateau regions in the stress-strain curves. Our results indicate a great promise of

  9. Multiscale Graphene Topographies Programmed by Sequential Mechanical Deformation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yen; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Qiu, Yang; Valentin, Thomas M; Steinberg, Ruben Spitz; Wang, Zhongying; Hurt, Robert H; Wong, Ian Y

    2016-05-01

    Multigenerational graphene oxide architectures can be programmed by specific sequences of mechanical deformations. Each new deformation results in a progressively larger set of features decorated by smaller preexisting patterns, indicating a structural "memory." It is shown that these multiscale architectures are superhydrophobic and display excellent functionality as electrochemical electrodes. PMID:26996525

  10. The high temperature deformation in cyclic loading of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Welsch, G.

    1989-01-01

    The high temperature cyclic stress softening response of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy PWA 1480 was investigated. Specimens oriented near the 001- and 111-lines were tested at 1050 C in low-cycle fatigue and then microstructurally evaluated. The 001- and 111-line specimens had dissimilar flow behavior in monotonic tensile tests, but comparable softening in low-cycle fatigue. This softening was accompanied by rapid generation of dislocation networks at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces and by a slower time-dependent coarsening of gamma-prime precipitates. Due to the rapid formation of a dislocation substructure at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces, the cyclic stress softening could be modeled with an existing theory which related cyclic stress to the evolving microstructure and dislocation structure.

  11. Strain gage network distinguishes between thermal and mechanical deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, F. J.

    1966-01-01

    Strain gage network measures the thermal coefficient of linear expansion of composite metal structures. The network consists of a test gage and two dummy gages arranged to distinguish thermally induced deformation from mechanical strain.

  12. Creep deformation mechanism mapping in nickel base disk superalloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Timothy M.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Deutchman, Hallee; Mills, Michael J.

    2016-05-10

    We investigated the creep deformation mechanisms at intermediate temperature in ME3, a modern Ni-based disk superalloy, using diffraction contrast imaging. Both conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM were utilised. Distinctly different deformation mechanisms become operative during creep at temperatures between 677-815 °C and at stresses ranging from 274 to 724 MPa. Both polycrystalline and single-crystal creep tests were conducted. The single-crystal tests provide new insight into grain orientation effects on creep response and deformation mechanisms. Creep at lower temperatures (≤760 °C) resulted in the thermally activated shearing modes such as microtwinning, stacking fault ribbons and isolated superlattice extrinsicmore » stacking faults. In contrast, these faulting modes occurred much less frequently during creep at 815 °C under lower applied stresses. Instead, the principal deformation mode was dislocation climb bypass. In addition to the difference in creep behaviour and creep deformation mechanisms as a function of stress and temperature, it was also observed that microstructural evolution occurs during creep at 760 °C and above, where the secondary coarsened and the tertiary precipitates dissolved. Based on this work, a creep deformation mechanism map is proposed, emphasising the influence of stress and temperature on the underlying creep mechanisms.« less

  13. On the deformation mechanisms in single crystal Hadfield manganese steels

    SciTech Connect

    Karaman, I.; Sehitoglu, H.; Gall, K.; Chumlyakov, Y.I.

    1998-02-13

    Austenitic manganese steel, so called Hadfield manganese steel, is frequently used in mining and railroad frog applications requiring excessive deformation and wear resistance. Its work hardening ability is still not completely understood. Previous studies attributed the work-hardening characteristics of this material to dynamic strain aging or an imperfect deformation twin, a so-called pseudotwin. Unfortunately, these previous studies have all focused on polycrystalline Hadfield steels. To properly study the mechanisms of deformation in the absence of grain boundary or texture effects, single crystal specimens are required. The purpose of this work is the following: (1) observe the inelastic stress-strain behavior of Hadfield single crystals in orientations where twinning and slip are individually dominating or when they are competing deformation mechanisms; and (2) determine the microyield points of Hadfield single crystals and use micro-mechanical modeling to predict the stress-strain response of a single crystal undergoing micro-twinning.

  14. Probabilistic Simulation of Combined Thermo-Mechanical Cyclic Fatigue in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    A methodology to compute probabilistically-combined thermo-mechanical fatigue life of polymer matrix laminated composites has been developed and is demonstrated. Matrix degradation effects caused by long-term environmental exposure and mechanical/thermal cyclic loads are accounted for in the simulation process. A unified time-temperature-stress-dependent multifactor-interaction relationship developed at NASA Glenn Research Center has been used to model the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. The fast probability-integration method is used to compute probabilistic distribution of response. Sensitivities of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables (e.g., constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness, etc.) computed and their significance in the reliability-based design for maximum life is discussed. The effect of variation in the thermal cyclic loads on the fatigue reliability for a (0/+/-45/90)s graphite/epoxy laminate with a ply thickness of 0.127 mm, with respect to impending failure modes has been studied. The results show that, at low mechanical-cyclic loads and low thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life for 0.999 reliability is most sensitive to matrix compressive strength, matrix modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and ply thickness. Whereas at high mechanical-cyclic loads and high thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life at 0.999 reliability is more sensitive to the shear strength of matrix, longitudinal fiber modulus, matrix modulus, and ply thickness.

  15. Probabilistic Simulation of Combined Thermo-Mechanical Cyclic Fatigue in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2011-01-01

    A methodology to compute probabilistically-combined thermo-mechanical fatigue life of polymer matrix laminated composites has been developed and is demonstrated. Matrix degradation effects caused by long-term environmental exposure and mechanical/thermal cyclic loads are accounted for in the simulation process. A unified time-temperature-stress-dependent multifactor-interaction relationship developed at NASA Glenn Research Center has been used to model the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. The fast probability-integration method is used to compute probabilistic distribution of response. Sensitivities of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables (e.g., constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness, etc.) computed and their significance in the reliability-based design for maximum life is discussed. The effect of variation in the thermal cyclic loads on the fatigue reliability for a (0/+/-45/90)s graphite/epoxy laminate with a ply thickness of 0.127 mm, with respect to impending failure modes has been studied. The results show that, at low mechanical-cyclic loads and low thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life for 0.999 reliability is most sensitive to matrix compressive strength, matrix modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and ply thickness. Whereas at high mechanical-cyclic loads and high thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life at 0.999 reliability is more sensitive to the shear strength of matrix, longitudinal fiber modulus, matrix modulus, and ply thickness.

  16. Cyclic Deformation Response of β-Annealed Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr Alloy Under Compressive Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Wang, Zhirui; Zhou, Jie

    2011-09-01

    This article reports the cyclic deformation behavior of the β-annealed metastable Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (Ti-5553) alloy under the condition of pure compressive fatigue stress. The following three aspects, namely, the mechanical response, the surface morphology evolution, and the dislocation structures, were systematically investigated. Under all testing conditions, the material demonstrated cyclic softening in the initial cycles followed by saturation. The progressive observation of surface morphology at fixed locations, but after different numbers of cycles, elucidated typical planar slip behavior and the early appearance of fatigue microcracks, which were found often to be induced by the highly localized planar slip bands. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study revealed dislocation annihilation upon cycling, i.e., the reduction of dislocation density as well as the simplification of dislocation configurations. In addition, detwinning and changed twin boundary structures upon cycling were also detected. Such activities, together with the intersection of coherent ω precipitates by moving dislocations, are considered to be responsible for the initial softening, whereas the dislocation dipole flip-flop mechanism is presumably responsible for the cyclic saturation behavior. An attempt was made to explain the strain-localized planar slip behavior by considering the stacking fault energy (SFE) as well as the free-electron-to-atom ( e/ a) ratio. The nanoscaled ω and α precipitation in the β matrix may also contribute to the planar slip behavior. The effect of the microstructure in the as-received material was also analyzed for the strain localization and planar-slip mode.

  17. Interplay of stresses induced by phase transformation and plastic deformation during cyclic load of austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Yu. V.; Daymond, M. R.; Schreiber, J.

    2004-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 samples subjected to low-cycle fatigue (LCF) were analysed using in situ neutron diffraction stress rig experiments on the ENGIN instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron facility. The elastoplastic properties of the austenitic matrix and martensitic inclusions as well as the residual stresses of the both phases were studied. The martensite formation is connected with volume dilation. Since the specific volume of martensite is larger (about 2%) than that one of austenite, the martensite phase is generally expected to be in hydrostatic compression, whereas the austenite one is in tension. However, these phase transformation stresses can be superimposed on the deformation stresses caused by the plastic deformation during LCF. The resulting residual stresses have a nonhydrostatic nature. In this study, only deviatoric components of the residual stress tensor were obtained because of the lack of the strain free lattice parameters of both phases. We have established that in the axial direction (along cyclic load) the deviatoric phase stress and the microstress of the austenitic phase were compressive and tensile for the martensite phase, i.e. an overshot of the deformation stress is observed.

  18. Gauge Mechanics of Deformable Bodies: a Theory of Something.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapere, Alfred Dudley

    The treatment of the motion of deformable bodies requires a specification of axes for each shape. We present a natural kinematic formulation of this problem in terms of a gauge structure over the space of shapes that the body may assume. Our first and simplest application is to a freely -falling self-deforming body. We show how deformations of a body with angular momentum zero can result in a change in orientation, and we give a general expression for the gauge potential describing the net rotation due to an arbitrary change of shape. The problem of swimming at low Reynolds number may also be formulated in terms of a gauge potential. Effective methods for computing it, by solving a linear boundary value problem, are described. We employ conformal mapping techniques to calculate swimming motions for cylinders with a variety of cross-sections. We also determine the net translational motions due to arbitrary infinitesimal deformations of the sphere and the circular cylinder. The solution is compactly expressed in terms of the field strength tensor of the gauge potential. Having solved for all cyclic swimming motions of a nearly spherical body, it makes sense to ask which motions are the best. We define a notion of efficiency and use it to determine optimal swimming strokes. These strokes are composed of propagating waves, symmetric about the axis of propulsion. Qualitatively, they resemble the swimming strokes of ciliated micro-organisms, such as the Paramecium. The solution of Stokes' equations is not feasible analytically, except for the simplest shapes. Two approximation schemes may help in studying more general swimming strokes. We discuss and test a short-wavelength analytic approximation, valid when the scales associated with a deformation are small relative to the radius of curvature of the average shape. The complementary domain of large deformations is probably best dealt with on a computer. We sketch a general method for solving Stokes' equations numerically.

  19. Deformation twinning mechanisms in FCC and HCP metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Tome, Carlos N; Beyerlein, Irene J; Misra, Amit; Mara, N

    2011-01-31

    We report the recent work on twinning and detwinning in fcc and hcp metals based on the in situ and ex situ TEM observations and molecular dynamics simulations. Three aspects are discussed in this paper. (1) Detwinning in single-phase Cu with respect to growth twins, (2) deformation twinning in Ag-Cu composites, and (3) deformation twinning mechanisms in hcp metals. The main conclusion is that atomic structures of interfaces (twin boundaries, two-phases interface, and grain boundaries) play a crucial role in nucleating and propagating of deformation twins.

  20. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles.

    PubMed

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A; Wuite, Gijs J L; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams' deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young's moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams' survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications. PMID:26821264

  1. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles.

    PubMed

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A; Wuite, Gijs J L; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams' deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young's moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams' survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications.

  2. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams’ deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young’s moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams’ survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications. PMID:26821264

  3. Damage mechanisms in PBT-GF30 under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Schaaf, A. De Monte, M. Hoffmann, C.; Vormwald, M.; Quaresimin, M.

    2014-05-15

    The scope of this paper is the investigation of damage mechanisms at microscopic scale on a short glass fiber reinforced polybutylene terephthalate (PBT-GF30) under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. In addition the principal mechanisms are verified through micro mechanical FE models. In order to investigate the fatigue behavior of the material both isothermal strain controlled fatigue (ISCF) tests at three different temperatures and thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) tests were conducted on plain and notched specimens, manufactured by injection molding. The goal of the work is to determine the damage mechanisms occurring under TMF conditions and to compare them with the mechanisms occurring under ISCF. For this reason fracture surfaces of TMF and ISCF samples loaded at different temperature levels were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, specimens that failed under TMF were examined on microsections revealing insight into both crack initiation and crack propagation. The findings of this investigation give valuable information about the main damage mechanisms of PBT-GF30 under TMF loading and serve as basis for the development of a TMF life estimation methodology.

  4. Cyclic deformation, fatigue and fatigue crack propagation in Ni-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antolovich, Stephen D.; Lerch, Brad

    1989-01-01

    Ni-base superalloys' cumulative glide behavior, damage accumulation, low-cycle fatigue, and crack propagation characteristics are directly dependent on deformation behavior which is in turn a strong function of microstructural characteristics. Microstructural instabilities and environmental interactions become additional factors at elevated temperatures. An account is presently given of microstructural, chemical, and processing techniques that may be used to obtain the properties that appear most critical or desirable in specific applications.

  5. Mechanical properties of graphene on deformable patterned substrates: Experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfenberg, S.; Chialvo, C.; Rocklin, D. Z.; Weaver, R.; Goldbart, P. M.; Mason, N.

    2010-03-01

    The mechanical properties of graphene can strongly influence its electronic behavior, and are relevant for implementing novel nano-mechanical devices. In this talk we present results on the mechanical behavior of few-layered graphene (FLG) placed on a patterned rubbery surface. Samples of FLG, with thicknesses ranging from 1-7 atomic layers, were deposited on micro-scale grooved polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. AFM imaging techniques were then used to study the surface deformations, and to perform thickness measurements on the samples. AFM phase-imaging shows that the graphene strongly adheres to the substrate. The graphene also substantially deforms the substrate, with thicker pieces causing greater deformation. The results are discussed in the context of a linear elasticity theory (detailed in an accompanying paper) which can be used to explain the data and place bounds on the various interface strengths.

  6. Cyclic stretch promotes osteogenesis-related gene expression in osteoblast-like cells through a cofilin-associated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    GAO, JIE; FU, SHANMIN; ZENG, ZHAOBIN; LI, FEIFEI; NIU, QIANNAN; JING, DA; FENG, XUE

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts have the capacity to perceive and transduce mechanical signals, and thus, regulate the mRNA and protein expression of a variety of genes associated with osteogenesis. Cytoskeletal reconstruction, as one of the earliest perception events for external mechanical stimulation, has previously been demonstrated to be essential for mechanotransduction in bone cells. However, the mechanism by which mechanical signals induce cytoskeletal deformation remains poorly understood. The actin-binding protein, cofilin, promotes the depolymerization of actin and is understood to be important in the regulation of activities in various cell types, including endothelial, neuronal and muscle cells. However, to the best of our knowledge, the importance of cofilin in osteoblastic mechanotransduction has not been previously investigated. In the present study, osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were subjected to physiological cyclic stretch stimulation (12% elongation) for 1, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h, and the expression levels of cofilin and osteogenesis-associated genes were quantified with reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence staining and western blotting analyses. Additionally, knockdown of cofilin using RNA interference was conducted, and the mRNA levels of osteogenesis-associated genes were compared between osteoblast-like cells in the presence and absence of cofilin gene knockdown. The results of the present study demonstrated that cyclic stretch stimulates the expression of genes associated with osteoblastic activities in MG-63 cells, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OCN), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and collagen-1 (COL-1). Cyclic stretch also regulates the mRNA and protein expression of cofilin in MG-63 cells. Furthermore, stretch-induced increases in the levels of osteogenesis-associated genes, including ALP, OCN, Runx2 and COL-1, were reduced following cofilin gene knockdown. Together, these results

  7. Analysis of Deformation Mechanisms Associated with Biaxially Oriented Polypropylene Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Hsu, Shaw Ling

    1998-03-01

    Biaxially oriented samples can be prepared either by simultaneous or sequential deformation along two orthogonal directions. Generally speaking the orientation achieved in the plane of the film is independent of the method. In this study, we demonstrate that for sequential deformation, the degree of orientation achieved in the two orthogonal directions is dependent on initial sample morphology and deformation parameters. The achievable orientation is strongly dependent on the degree of crystallinity and initial crystallite dimensions. Samples containing small crystallites can achieve significantly higher orientation in the transverse direction (restretching step). The ultimate morphology is dictated by the temperature at which second drawing occurs. At lower deformation temperature, rotation of stacked crystalline lamellae can be accomplished to form biaxially oriented films. At higher temperatures, the dominant mechanism is unfolding of crystalline chain segments followed by recrystallization into units aligned with the restretching direction. X-ray diffraction, polarized infrared and Raman spectroscopy, and calorimetric techniques were employed to analyze these structural transformations.

  8. Plastic-Strain-Amplitude Dependence of Dislocation Structures in Cyclically Deformed <112>-Oriented Cu-7 at. pct Al Alloy Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. W.; Peng, N.; Wu, X. M.; Wang, Z. G.

    2014-08-01

    Dislocation structures in Cu-7 at. pct Al alloy single crystals cyclically deformed at different plastic strain amplitudes were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and compared with the results of Cu single crystals. It is found that the plastic strain amplitude γ pl has an obvious effect on the slip deformation mode, and consequently on the cyclic hardening behavior of Cu-7 at. pct Al alloy single crystals with an intermediate stacking fault energy. For instance, a high slip planarity ( i.e., only formation of planar-slip bands) contributes to the occurrence of a gentle cyclic hardening with a much lower saturation stress at a low γ pl of 4.5 × 10-4. A mixed planar/wavy-slip mode ( e.g., persistent Lüder's bands/wall-like microstructures) at an intermediate γ pl of 2.2 × 10-3 causes an obvious cyclic hardening up to a comparable saturation stress to that for the Cu single crystal. In contrast, the deformation mode is dominated by wavy slip ( e.g., ill-defined dislocation cells and walls) at the highest γ pl of 7.2 × 10-3, causing that its cyclic hardening curve is quite similar to that for the Cu single crystal; in this case, a slightly higher saturation stress level than that for the Cu single crystal is reached due to the additional solid solution strengthening.

  9. Validation of a Fluid–Structure Interaction Model of Solute Transport in Pores of Cyclically Deformed Tissue Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Op Den Buijs, Jorn; Ritman, Erik L.

    2010-01-01

    Convection induced by repetitive compression of porous tissue scaffolds enhances solute transport inside the scaffold. Our previous experiments have shown that pore size, shape, and orientation with respect to strain direction greatly influence loading-induced solute transport. The objective of this study was to develop a computational model of deformation-induced solute transport in porous tissue scaffolds, which included the pore geometry of the scaffold. This geometry consisted of a cubic scaffold with single channel in the middle of the scaffold, immersed in a fluid reservoir. Cylindrical pores with circular or elliptic cross section, and spheroid pores were modeled. The scaffold was cyclically compressed from one side, causing fluid motion and dispersion of solute inside the scaffold pore. Scaffold deformation was solved using the finite element method, and fluid flow and solute transport were solved using the finite volume method. The distortion of the scaffold–fluid interface was transferred as a boundary condition to the fluid flow solver. Both convection and diffusion were included in the computations. The solute transport rates in the different scaffold pore geometries agreed well with our previous experimental results obtained with X-ray microimaging. This model will be used to explore transport properties of a spectrum of novel scaffold designs. PMID:20136371

  10. Inference of postseismic deformation mechanisms of the 1923 Kanto earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Nyst, M.; Nishimura, T.; Thatcher, W.

    2006-01-01

    Coseismic slip associated with the M7.9, 1923 Kanto earthquake is fairly well understood, involving slip of up to 8 m along the Philippine Sea-Honshu interplate boundary under Sagami Bay and its onland extension. Postseismic deformation after the 1923 earthquake, however, is relatively poorly understood. We revisit the available deformation data in order to constrain possible mechanisms of postseismic deformation and to examine the consequences for associated stress changes in the surrounding crust. Data from two leveling lines and one tide gage station over the first 7-8 years postseismic period are of much greater amplitude than the corresponding expected interseismic deformation during the same period, making these data suitable for isolating the signal from postseismic deformation. We consider both viscoelastic models of asthenosphere relaxation and afterslip models. A distributed coseismic slip model presented by Pollitz et al. (2005), combined with prescribed parameters of a viscoelastic Earth model, yields predicted postseismic deformation that agrees with observed deformation on mainland Honshu from Tokyo to the Izu peninsula. Elsewhere (southern Miura peninsula; Boso peninsula), the considered viscoelastic models fail to predict observed deformation, and a model of ???1 in shallow afterslip in the offshore region south of the Boso peninsula, with equivalent moment magnitude Mw = 7.0, adequately accounts for the observed deformation. Using the distributed coseismic slip model, layered viscoelastic structure, and a model of interseismic strain accumulation, we evaluate the post-1923 stress evolution, including both the coseismic and accumulated postseismic stress changes and those stresses contributed by interseismic loading. We find that if account is made for the varying tectonic regime in the region, the occurrence of both immediate (first month) post-1923 crustal aftershocks as well as recent regional crustal seismicity is consistent with the predicted

  11. Mechanical threshold of dynamically deformed copper and Nitronic 40

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, P.S.; Kocks, U.F.; Regazzoni, G.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the mechanical threshold, or threshold stress, are reported on quasi-statically and dynamically deformed copper and Nitronic 40. Results for copper show that the increase of the threshold stress with strain rate is similar to that of the flow stress. In Nitronic 40 the results show that the ratio of the flow stress to the threshold stress is approx.0.6. Both results indicate that the increased rate sensitivity found in these materials at high strain rates is not due to the predominance of a viscous drag deformation mechanism, as has been previously suggested.

  12. High temperature monotonic and cyclic deformation in a directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huron, Eric S.

    1986-01-01

    Directionally solidified (DS) MAR-M246+Hf was tested in tension and fatigue, at temperatures from 20 C to 1093 C. Tests were performed on (001) oriented specimens at strain rates of 50 % and 0.5 % per minute. In tension, the yield strength was constant up to 704 C, above which the strength dropped off rapidly. A strong dependence of strength on strain rate was seen at the higher temperatures. The deformation mode was observed to change from heterogeneous to homogeneous with increasing temperature. Low Cycle Fatigue tests were done using a fully reversed waveform and total strain control. For a given plastic strain range, lives increased with increasing temperature. For a given temperature strain rate had a strong effect on life. At 704 C, decreasing strain rates decreased life, while at the higher temperatures, decreasing strain rates increased life, for a given plastic strain range. These results could be explained through considerations of the deformation modes and stress levels. At the higher temperatures, marked coarsening caused beneficial stress reductions, but oxidation limited the life. The longitudinal grain boundaries were found to influence slip behavior. The degree of secondary slip adjacent to the boundaries was found to be related to the degree of misorientation between the grains.

  13. Modeling AFM Induced Mechanical Deformation of Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M; Balhorn, R; Allen, M J; Belak, J

    2002-11-15

    Finite element modeling has been applied to study deformation of living cells in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and particularly Recognition Force Microscopy (RFM). The abstract mechanical problem of interest is the response to RFM point loads of an incompressible medium enclosed in a fluid membrane. Cells are soft systems, susceptible to large deformations in the course of an RFM measurement. Often the local properties such as receptor anchoring forces, the reason for the measurement, are obscured by the response of the cell as a whole. Modeling can deconvolute these effects. This facilitates experimental efforts to have reproducible measurements of mechanical and chemical properties at specific kinds of receptor sites on the membrane of a living cell. In this article we briefly review the RFM technique for cells and the problems it poses, and then report on recent progress in modeling the deformation of cells by a point load.

  14. Reliability of piezoceramic patch sensors under cyclic mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielicke, Bärbel; Gesang, Thomas; Wierach, Peter

    2003-12-01

    Piezoceramic patch sensors have to withstand the primary stresses and strains of a structure during operation. In the leading project 'Adaptronics' a lifespan of 106 cycles at 0.1% strain was required for sensors applied on components of steel and carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP). In order to test the reliability of the patches themselves and of their adhesion on the substrate, special four-point bending tests were carried out under quasistatic loading and under cyclic loading at different strain levels. The specimens consisted in sheets of steel and CFRP as substrates on which the newly developed patches with embedded piezoelectric foils and fibres were glued. In the quasistatic bending tests the performance of each sensor was characterized by measuring the sensor signal (charge) as a function of strain before and after cycling. Damage of the specimens would result in a decreasing slope of the charge-strain-curve after cycling. However, all the specimens tested survived 107 cycles up to 0.12% strain without marked loss of performance.

  15. Molecular deformation mechanisms of the wood cell wall material.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kai; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-02-01

    Wood is a biological material with outstanding mechanical properties resulting from its hierarchical structure across different scales. Although earlier work has shown that the cellular structure of wood is a key factor that renders it excellent mechanical properties at light weight, the mechanical properties of the wood cell wall material itself still needs to be understood comprehensively. The wood cell wall material features a fiber reinforced composite structure, where cellulose fibrils act as stiff fibers, and hemicellulose and lignin molecules act as soft matrix. The angle between the fiber direction and the loading direction has been found to be the key factor controlling the mechanical properties. However, how the interactions between theses constitutive molecules contribute to the overall properties is still unclear, although the shearing between fibers has been proposed as a primary deformation mechanism. Here we report a molecular model of the wood cell wall material with atomistic resolution, used to assess the mechanical behavior under shear loading in order to understand the deformation mechanisms at the molecular level. The model includes an explicit description of cellulose crystals, hemicellulose, as well as lignin molecules arranged in a layered nanocomposite. The results obtained using this model show that the wood cell wall material under shear loading deforms in an elastic and then plastic manner. The plastic regime can be divided into two parts according to the different deformation mechanisms: yielding of the matrix and sliding of matrix along the cellulose surface. Our molecular dynamics study provides insights of the mechanical behavior of wood cell wall material at the molecular level, and paves a way for the multi-scale understanding of the mechanical properties of wood.

  16. The effect of dynamic recrystallization and LPO formation on deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed plagioclase aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, C. D.; Hirth, G.; Cross, A. J.; Prior, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    We performed a series of deformation experiments on intermediate plagioclase aggregates (An60) that explored the role of dynamic recrystallization and LPO formation on the deformation mechanisms active and their effect on the mechanical strength of the aggregates. Our experiments were executed using a molten salt cell in a Tullis-modified Griggs Rig at 1 GPa, temperatures between 950-1100 C. These experiments were run in both axial compression and general shear geometries at both constant strain rates and with strain rate steps. The imposed strain rates ranged from 10^-4 to 5*10^-7 s^-1. The sample aggregates were prepared by sintering powders ranging from 20-45 micron at experimental P-T conditions prepared from pulverized single crystals of labradorite. We observed a strong dependence of strength on the strain-rate history of the experiment. Initially the samples weaken dramatically as the grain-size is reduced in the sample aggregate. During strain-rate stepping experiments, used to calculate the stress exponent, we observe variation in the strain-rate dependence of the strength related to whether there is an increasing or decreasing strain rate. Increasing the strain-rate tends to show stress exponent close to n=3, consistent with deformation by dislocation creep. Decreasing the strain-rate tends to decrease the stress exponent towards n=1, consistent with deformation by diffusion creep. Further, analysis using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) revealed distinctive LPOs that were different between larger relict porphryclast grains (>20 micron) and smaller recrystallized grains (1-4 micron). Larger relict grains have an LPO with {001} poles perpendicular to the shear plane, while smaller recrystallized grains have an LPO with {010} poles perpendicular to the shear plane. This is evidence that the processes that facilitate deformation are different between the relict and recrystallized grains. We also observe grain scale shear bands oriented roughly 30

  17. Room Temperature Cyclic Deformation Behavior of Cast and Extruded NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Lerch, B. A.

    1992-01-01

    The fully reversed, strain controlled fatigue behavior of cast and extruded NiAl was evaluated at room temperature for plastic strain ranges of 0.0006 to 0.0002 to provide baseline data on the fatigue life of NiAl and to investigate whether the low ductility of NiAl would result in poor low-cycle fatigue behavior. Except at the smallest plastic strain range investigated, NiAl work hardened continuously until failure with a final fracture stress under cyclic conditions which was at least 60 percent greater than the monotonic fracture strength of NiAl. Fatigue fracture initiation occurred at large internal tear-shaped pores, and fatigue life was controlled or limited by the presence of these processing-related defects. Even with the processing defects present in this material and the limited ductility of NiAl in general, cast and extruded NiAl exhibited much greater fatigue life at room temperature than comparable B2 ordered compounds when compared on a strain range basis.

  18. Mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes in crossed junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yadong; Chen, Xiaoming; Park, Cheol; Fay, Catharine C.; Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw; Ke, Changhong

    2014-04-01

    We present a study of the mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in crossed junctions. The structure and deformation of the crossed tubes in the junction are characterized by using atomic force microscopy. Our results show that the total tube heights are reduced by 20%-33% at the crossed junctions formed by double-walled BNNTs with outer diameters in the range of 2.21-4.67 nm. The measured tube height reduction is found to be in a nearly linear relationship with the summation of the outer diameters of the two tubes forming the junction. The contact force between the two tubes in the junction is estimated based on contact mechanics theories and found to be within the range of 4.2-7.6 nN. The Young's modulus of BNNTs and their binding strengths with the substrate are quantified, based on the deformation profile of the upper tube in the junction, and are found to be 1.07 ± 0.11 TPa and 0.18-0.29 nJ/m, respectively. Finally, we perform finite element simulations on the mechanical deformations of the crossed BNNT junctions. The numerical simulation results are consistent with both the experimental measurements and the analytical analysis. The results reported in this paper contribute to a better understanding of the structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and to the pursuit of their applications.

  19. Mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes in crossed junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yadong; Chen, Xiaoming; Ke, Changhong; Park, Cheol; Fay, Catharine C.; Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw

    2014-04-28

    We present a study of the mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in crossed junctions. The structure and deformation of the crossed tubes in the junction are characterized by using atomic force microscopy. Our results show that the total tube heights are reduced by 20%–33% at the crossed junctions formed by double-walled BNNTs with outer diameters in the range of 2.21–4.67 nm. The measured tube height reduction is found to be in a nearly linear relationship with the summation of the outer diameters of the two tubes forming the junction. The contact force between the two tubes in the junction is estimated based on contact mechanics theories and found to be within the range of 4.2–7.6 nN. The Young's modulus of BNNTs and their binding strengths with the substrate are quantified, based on the deformation profile of the upper tube in the junction, and are found to be 1.07 ± 0.11 TPa and 0.18–0.29 nJ/m, respectively. Finally, we perform finite element simulations on the mechanical deformations of the crossed BNNT junctions. The numerical simulation results are consistent with both the experimental measurements and the analytical analysis. The results reported in this paper contribute to a better understanding of the structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and to the pursuit of their applications.

  20. Material heterogeneity in cancellous bone promotes deformation recovery after mechanical failure

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ashley M.; Matheny, Jonathan B.; Keaveny, Tony M.; Taylor, David; Rimnac, Clare M.; Hernandez, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Many natural structures use a foam core and solid outer shell to achieve high strength and stiffness with relatively small amounts of mass. Biological foams, however, must also resist crack growth. The process of crack propagation within the struts of a foam is not well understood and is complicated by the foam microstructure. We demonstrate that in cancellous bone, the foam-like component of whole bones, damage propagation during cyclic loading is dictated not by local tissue stresses but by heterogeneity of material properties associated with increased ductility of strut surfaces. The increase in surface ductility is unexpected because it is the opposite pattern generated by surface treatments to increase fatigue life in man-made materials, which often result in reduced surface ductility. We show that the more ductile surfaces of cancellous bone are a result of reduced accumulation of advanced glycation end products compared with the strut interior. Damage is therefore likely to accumulate in strut centers making cancellous bone more tolerant of stress concentrations at strut surfaces. Hence, the structure is able to recover more deformation after failure and return to a closer approximation of its original shape. Increased recovery of deformation is a passive mechanism seen in biology for setting a broken bone that allows for a better approximation of initial shape during healing processes and is likely the most important mechanical function. Our findings suggest a previously unidentified biomimetic design strategy in which tissue level material heterogeneity in foams can be used to improve deformation recovery after failure. PMID:26929343

  1. Sine-square deformation and supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunishi, Kouichi; Katsura, Hosho

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the sine-square deformation (SSD) of free fermions in one-dimensional continuous space. On the basis of supersymmetric quantum mechanics, we prove the correspondence between the many-body ground state of the system with SSD and that of the uniform system with periodic boundary conditions. We also discuss the connection between the SSD in the continuous space and its lattice version, where the geometric correction due to the real-space deformation plays an important role in relating the eigenstates of the lattice SSD with those of the continuous SSD.

  2. Different mechanisms of adaptation to cyclic water stress in two South Australian bread wheat cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Izanloo, Ali; Condon, Anthony G.; Langridge, Peter; Tester, Mark; Schnurbusch, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    In the South Australian wheat belt, cyclic drought is a frequent event represented by intermittent periods of rainfall which can occur around anthesis and post-anthesis in wheat. Three South Australian bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars, Excalibur, Kukri, and RAC875, were evaluated in one greenhouse and two growth-room experiments. In the first growth-room experiment, where plants were subjected to severe cyclic water-limiting conditions, RAC875 and Excalibur (drought-tolerant) showed significantly higher grain yield under cyclic water availability compared to Kukri (drought-susceptible), producing 44% and 18% more grain compared to Kukri, respectively. In the second growth-room experiment, where plants were subjected to a milder drought stress, the differences between cultivars were less pronounced, with only RAC875 showing significantly higher grain yield under the cyclic water treatment. Grain number per spike and the percentage of aborted tillers were the major components that affected yield under cyclic water stress. Excalibur and RAC875 adopted different morpho-physiological traits and mechanisms to reduce water stress. Excalibur was most responsive to cyclic water availability and showed the highest level of osmotic adjustment (OA), high stomatal conductance, lowest ABA content, and rapid recovery from stress under cyclic water stress. RAC875 was more conservative and restrained, with moderate OA, high leaf waxiness, high chlorophyll content, and slower recovery from stress. Within this germplasm, the capacity for osmotic adjustment was the main physiological attribute associated with tolerance under cyclic water stress which enabled plants to recover from water deficit. PMID:18703496

  3. Different mechanisms of adaptation to cyclic water stress in two South Australian bread wheat cultivars.

    PubMed

    Izanloo, Ali; Condon, Anthony G; Langridge, Peter; Tester, Mark; Schnurbusch, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    In the South Australian wheat belt, cyclic drought is a frequent event represented by intermittent periods of rainfall which can occur around anthesis and post-anthesis in wheat. Three South Australian bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars, Excalibur, Kukri, and RAC875, were evaluated in one greenhouse and two growth-room experiments. In the first growth-room experiment, where plants were subjected to severe cyclic water-limiting conditions, RAC875 and Excalibur (drought-tolerant) showed significantly higher grain yield under cyclic water availability compared to Kukri (drought-susceptible), producing 44% and 18% more grain compared to Kukri, respectively. In the second growth-room experiment, where plants were subjected to a milder drought stress, the differences between cultivars were less pronounced, with only RAC875 showing significantly higher grain yield under the cyclic water treatment. Grain number per spike and the percentage of aborted tillers were the major components that affected yield under cyclic water stress. Excalibur and RAC875 adopted different morpho-physiological traits and mechanisms to reduce water stress. Excalibur was most responsive to cyclic water availability and showed the highest level of osmotic adjustment (OA), high stomatal conductance, lowest ABA content, and rapid recovery from stress under cyclic water stress. RAC875 was more conservative and restrained, with moderate OA, high leaf waxiness, high chlorophyll content, and slower recovery from stress. Within this germplasm, the capacity for osmotic adjustment was the main physiological attribute associated with tolerance under cyclic water stress which enabled plants to recover from water deficit.

  4. Deformation of supersymmetric and conformal quantum mechanics through affine transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, Vyacheslav

    Affine transformations (dilatations and translations) are used to define a deformation of one-dimensional N = 2 supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Resulting physical systems do not have conserved charges and degeneracies in the spectra. Instead, superpartner Hamiltonians are q-isospectral, i.e. the spectrum of one can be obtained from another (with possible exception of the lowest level) by q(sup 2)-factor scaling. This construction allows easily to rederive a special self-similar potential found by Shabat and to show that for the latter a q-deformed harmonic oscillator algebra of Biedenharn and Macfarlane serves as the spectrum generating algebra. A general class of potentials related to the quantum conformal algebra su(sub q)(1,1) is described. Further possibilities for q-deformation of known solvable potentials are outlined.

  5. Deformation of supersymmetric and conformal quantum mechanics through affine transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiridonov, Vyacheslav

    1993-01-01

    Affine transformations (dilatations and translations) are used to define a deformation of one-dimensional N = 2 supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Resulting physical systems do not have conserved charges and degeneracies in the spectra. Instead, superpartner Hamiltonians are q-isospectral, i.e. the spectrum of one can be obtained from another (with possible exception of the lowest level) by q(sup 2)-factor scaling. This construction allows easily to rederive a special self-similar potential found by Shabat and to show that for the latter a q-deformed harmonic oscillator algebra of Biedenharn and Macfarlane serves as the spectrum generating algebra. A general class of potentials related to the quantum conformal algebra su(sub q)(1,1) is described. Further possibilities for q-deformation of known solvable potentials are outlined.

  6. Effect of material inhomogeneity on the cyclic plastic deformation behavior at the microstructural level: micromechanics-based modeling of dual-phase steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Surajit Kumar

    2013-07-01

    The microstructure of dual-phase (DP) steels typically consists of a soft ferrite matrix with dispersed islands of hard martensite phase. Due to the composite effect of ferrite and martensite, DP steels exhibit a unique combination of strain hardening, strength and ductility. A microstructure-based micromechanical modeling approach is adopted in this work to capture the tensile and cyclic plastic deformation behavior of DP steel. During tensile straining, strain incompatibility between the softer ferrite matrix and the harder martensite phase arises due to a difference in the flow characteristics of these two phases. Microstructural-level inhomogeneity serves as the initial imperfection, triggering strain incompatibility, strain partitioning and finally shear band localization during tensile straining. The local deformation in the ferrite phase is constrained by adjacent martensite islands, which locally results in stress triaxiality development in the ferrite phase. As the martensite distribution varies within the microstructure, the stress triaxiality also varies in a band within the microstructure. Inhomogeneous stress and strain distribution within the softer ferrite phase arises even during small tensile straining because of material inhomogeneity. The magnitude of cyclic plastic deformation within the softer ferrite phase also varies according to the stress distribution in the first-quarter cycle tensile loading. Accumulation of tensile/compressive plastic strain with number of cycles is noted in different locations within the ferrite phase during both symmetric stress and strain controlled cycling. The basic mode of cyclic plastic deformation in an inhomogeneous material is cyclic strain accumulation, i.e. ratcheting. Microstructural inhomogeneity results in cyclic strain accumulation in the aggregate DP material even in symmetric stress cycling.

  7. Temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in pure amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Haberl, B.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.

    2014-03-21

    High temperature nanoindentation has been performed on pure ion-implanted amorphous silicon (unrelaxed a-Si) and structurally relaxed a-Si to investigate the temperature dependence of mechanical deformation, including pressure-induced phase transformations. Along with the indentation load-depth curves, ex situ measurements such as Raman micro-spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis on the residual indents reveal the mode of deformation under the indenter. While unrelaxed a-Si deforms entirely via plastic flow up to 200 °C, a clear transition in the mode of deformation is observed in relaxed a-Si with increasing temperature. Up to 100 °C, pressure-induced phase transformation and the observation of either crystalline (r8/bc8) end phases or pressure-induced a-Si occurs in relaxed a-Si. However, with further increase of temperature, plastic flow rather than phase transformation is the dominant mode of deformation. It is believed that the elevated temperature and pressure together induce bond softening and “defect” formation in structurally relaxed a-Si, leading to the inhibition of phase transformation due to pressure-releasing plastic flow under the indenter.

  8. Data related to cyclic deformation and fatigue behavior of direct laser deposited Ti–6Al–4V with and without heat treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Amanda J.; Torries, Brian; Shamsaei, Nima; Thompson, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Data is presented describing the strain-controlled, fully-reversed uniaxial cyclic deformation and fatigue behavior of Ti–6Al–4V specimens additively manufactured via Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS) – a Direct Laser Deposition (DLD) process. The data was collected by performing multiple fatigue tests on specimens with various microstructural states/conditions, i.e. in their ‘as-built’, annealed (below the beta transus temperature), or heat treated (above the beta transus temperature) condition. Such data aids in characterizing the mechanical integrity and fatigue resistance of DLD parts. Data presented herein also allows for elucidating the strong microstructure coupling of the fatigue behavior of DLD Ti–6Al–4V, as the data trends were found to vary with material condition (i.e. as-built, annealed or heat treated) [1]. This data is of interest to the additive manufacturing and fatigue scientific communities, as well as the aerospace and biomedical industries, since additively-manufactured parts cannot be reliably deployed for public use, until their mechanical properties are understood with high certainty. PMID:26949728

  9. Analysis of internal crack healing mechanism under rolling deformation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haitao; Ai, Zhengrong; Yu, Hailiang; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Xianghua

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental method, called the 'hole filling method', is proposed to simulate the healing of internal cracks in rolled workpieces. Based on the experimental results, the evolution in the microstructure, in terms of diffusion, nucleation and recrystallisation were used to analyze the crack healing mechanism. We also validated the phenomenon of segmented healing. Internal crack healing involves plastic deformation, heat transfer and an increase in the free energy introduced by the cracks. It is proposed that internal cracks heal better under high plastic deformation followed by slow cooling after rolling. Crack healing is controlled by diffusion of atoms from the matrix to the crack surface, and also by the nucleation and growth of ferrite grain on the crack surface. The diffusion mechanism is used to explain the source of material needed for crack healing. The recrystallisation mechanism is used to explain grain nucleation and growth, accompanied by atomic migration to the crack surface.

  10. Nanoparticle mechanics: deformation detection via nanopore resistive pulse sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvish, Armin; Goyal, Gaurav; Aneja, Rachna; Sundaram, Ramalingam V. K.; Lee, Kidan; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Ki-Bum; Vlahovska, Petia M.; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various liposomes inside nanopores. We observed a significant difference in resistive pulse characteristics between soft liposomes and rigid polystyrene nanoparticles especially at higher applied voltages. We used theoretical simulations to demonstrate that the difference can be explained by shape deformation of liposomes as they translocate through the nanopores. Comparing our results with the findings from electrodeformation experiments, we demonstrated that the rigidity of liposomes can be qualitatively compared using resistive pulse characteristics. This application of nanopores can provide new opportunities to study the mechanics at the nanoscale, to investigate properties of great value in fundamental biophysics and cellular mechanobiology, such as virus deformability and fusogenicity, and in applied sciences for designing novel drug/gene delivery systems.Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various

  11. Cyclic mechanical loading enables solute transport and oxygen supply in bone healing: an in vitro investigation.

    PubMed

    Witt, Florian; Duda, Georg N; Bergmann, Camilla; Petersen, Ansgar

    2014-02-01

    Bone healing is a complex process with an increased metabolic activity and consequently high demand for oxygen. In the hematoma phase, inflammatory cells and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are initially cut off from direct nutritional supply via blood vessels. Cyclic mechanical loading that occurs, for example, during walking is expected to have an impact on the biophysical environment of the cells but meaningful quantitative experimental data are still missing. In this study, the hypothesis that cyclic mechanical loading within a physiological range significantly contributes to oxygen transport into the fracture hematoma was investigated by an in vitro approach. MSCs were embedded in a fibrin matrix to mimic the hematoma phase during bone healing. Construct geometry, culture conditions, and parameters of mechanical loading in a bioreactor system were chosen to resemble the in vivo situation based on data from human studies and a well-characterized large animal model. Oxygen tension was measured before and after mechanical loading intervals by a chemical optical microsensor. The increase in oxygen tension at the center of the constructs was significant and depended on loading time with maximal values of 9.9%±5.1%, 14.8%±4.9%, and 25.3%±7.2% of normal atmospheric oxygen tension for 5, 15, and 30 min of cyclic loading respectively. Histological staining of hypoxic cells after 48 h of incubation confirmed sensor measurements by showing an increased number of normoxic cells with intermittent cyclic compression compared with unloaded controls. The present study demonstrates that moderate cyclic mechanical loading leads to an increased oxygen transport and thus to substantially enhanced supply conditions for cells entrapped in the hematoma. This link between mechanical conditions and nutrition supply in the early regenerative phases could be employed to improve the environmental conditions for cell metabolism and consequently prevent necrosis.

  12. Mechanical behavior of adhesive joints subjected to cyclic thermal loading

    SciTech Connect

    Humfeld, G.R.; Dillard, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Stresses induced in bimaterial systems due to changing temperature has been the subject of much study since the publication of Timoshenko`s classic paper of 1925. An adhesive bond is one example of a bimaterial system in which thermal stress can play an important role. However, adhesives are viscoelastic in nature, and their mechanical behavior is dictated by the temperature- and time-dependence of their material properties; analytical solutions for elastic materials do not adequately describe their true behavior. The effect of the adhesive`s viscoelasticity on stress in an adhesive bond subjected to changing temperature is therefore of compelling interest and importance for the adhesives industry. The objective of this research is to develop an understanding of the viscoelastic effect in an adhesive bond subjected to cycling temperature, particularly when the temperature range spans a transition temperature of the adhesive. Numerical modeling of a simplified geometry was first undertaken to isolate the influence of viscoelasticity on the stress state from any particular specimen geometry effect. Finite element modeling was then undertaken to examine the mechanical behavior of the adhesive in a layered geometry. Both solution methods predicted development of residual tensile stresses in the adhesive. For the layered geometry this was found to correspond with residual tensile peel stresses, which are thought to be the cause of interfacial debonding.

  13. Final Report: Hardening and Strain Localization in Single and Polycrystalline Materials Under Cyclic and Monotonic Deformation, January 11, 1985 - July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Laird, Campbell; Bassani, John L.

    2000-03-03

    The subject program on substructure evolution initially focused on strain localization produced by fatigue cycling and especially how such localization affects the cyclic response of polycrystalline pure metal. The latter stages have dealt with strain localization in the heavy monotonic deformation of alloys, which eventually produces forms of localized deformation that include coarse slip bands (CSB's), which are aligned to slip planes and macroscopic shear bands (MSB's), which are not aligned to slip planes. These forms of strain localization are important in that they limit the usable ductility of the material in forming processes.

  14. Constitutive Law and Flow Mechanism in Diamond Deformation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Xiaohui; Raterron, Paul; Zhang, Jianzhong; Lin, Zhijun; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng

    2012-11-19

    Constitutive laws and crystal plasticity in diamond deformation have been the subjects of substantial interest since synthetic diamond was made in 1950's. To date, however, little is known quantitatively regarding its brittle-ductile properties and yield strength at high temperatures. In this paper, we report, for the first time, the strain-stress constitutive relations and experimental demonstration of deformation mechanisms under confined high pressure. The deformation at room temperature is essentially brittle, cataclastic, and mostly accommodated by fracturing on {111} plane with no plastic yielding at uniaxial strains up to 15%. At elevated temperatures of 1000°C and 1200°C diamond crystals exhibit significantmore » ductile flow with corresponding yield strength of 7.9 and 6.3 GPa, indicating that diamond starts to weaken when temperature is over 1000°C. Finally, at high temperature the plastic deformation and ductile flow is meditated by the <110>{111} dislocation glide and a very active {111} micro-twinning.« less

  15. Constitutive Law and Flow Mechanism in Diamond Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaohui; Raterron, Paul; Zhang, Jianzhong; Lin, Zhijun; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng

    2012-11-19

    Constitutive laws and crystal plasticity in diamond deformation have been the subjects of substantial interest since synthetic diamond was made in 1950's. To date, however, little is known quantitatively regarding its brittle-ductile properties and yield strength at high temperatures. In this paper, we report, for the first time, the strain-stress constitutive relations and experimental demonstration of deformation mechanisms under confined high pressure. The deformation at room temperature is essentially brittle, cataclastic, and mostly accommodated by fracturing on {111} plane with no plastic yielding at uniaxial strains up to 15%. At elevated temperatures of 1000°C and 1200°C diamond crystals exhibit significant ductile flow with corresponding yield strength of 7.9 and 6.3 GPa, indicating that diamond starts to weaken when temperature is over 1000°C. Finally, at high temperature the plastic deformation and ductile flow is meditated by the <110>{111} dislocation glide and a very active {111} micro-twinning.

  16. Computer modelling of cyclic deformation of high-temperature materials. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Duesbery, M.S.; Louat, N.P.

    1992-11-16

    Current methods of lifetime assessment leave much to be desired. Typically, the expected life of a full-scale component exposed to a complex environment is based upon empirical interpretations of measurements performed on microscopic samples in controlled laboratory conditions. Extrapolation to the service component is accomplished by scaling laws which, if used at all, are empirical; little or no attention is paid to synergistic interactions between the different components of the real environment. With the increasingly hostile conditions which must be faced in modern aerospace applications, improvement in lifetime estimation is mandated by both cost and safety considerations. This program aims at improving current methods of lifetime assessment by building in the characteristics of the micro-mechanisms known to be responsible for damage and failure. The broad approach entails the integration and, where necessary, augmentation of the micro-scale research results currently available in the literature into a macro-scale model with predictive capability. In more detail, the program will develop a set of hierarchically structured models at different length scales, from atomic to macroscopic, at each level taking as parametric input the results of the model at the next smaller scale. In this way the known microscopic properties can be transported by systematic procedures to the unknown macro-scale region. It may not be possible to eliminate empiricism completely, because some of the quantities involved cannot yet be estimated to the required degree of precision. In this case the aim will be at least to eliminate functional empiricism.

  17. Bertram Hopkinson's pioneering work and the dislocation mechanics of high rate deformations and mechanically induced detonations.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ronald W

    2014-05-13

    Bertram Hopkinson was prescient in writing of the importance of better measuring, albeit better understanding, the nature of high rate deformation of materials in general and, in particular, of the importance of heat in initiating detonation of explosives. This report deals with these subjects in terms of post-Hopkinson crystal dislocation mechanics applied to high rate deformations, including impact tests, Hopkinson pressure bar results, Zerilli-Armstrong-type constitutive relations, shock-induced deformations, isentropic compression experiments, mechanical initiation of explosive crystals and shear banding in metals.

  18. Generalized coherent states under deformed quantum mechanics with maximum momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Chee Leong; Ng, Wei Khim

    2013-10-01

    Following the Gazeau-Klauder approach, we construct generalized coherent states (GCS) as the quantum simulator to examine the deformed quantum mechanics, which exhibits an intrinsic maximum momentum. We study deformed harmonic oscillators and compute their probability distribution and entropy of states exactly. Also, a particle in an infinite potential box is studied perturbatively. In particular, unlike usual quantum mechanics, the present deformed case increases the entropy of the Planck scale quantum optical system. Furthermore, for simplicity, we obtain the modified uncertainty principle (MUP) with the perturbative treatment up to leading order. MUP turns out to increase generally. However, for certain values of γ (a parameter of GCS), it is possible that the MUP will vanish and hence will exhibit the classical characteristic. This is interpreted as the manifestation of the intrinsic high-momentum cutoff at lower momentum in a perturbative treatment. Although the GCS saturates the minimal uncertainty in a simultaneous measurement of physical position and momentum operators, thus constituting the squeezed states, complete coherency is impossible in quantum gravitational physics. The Mandel Q number is calculated, and it is shown that the statistics can be Poissonian and super-/sub-Poissonian depending on γ. The equation of motion is studied, and both Ehrenfest’s theorem and the correspondence principle are recovered. Fractional revival times are obtained through the autocorrelation, and they indicate that the superposition of a classical-like subwave packet is natural in GCS. We also contrast our results with the string-motivated (Snyder) type of deformed quantum mechanics, which incorporates a minimum position uncertainty rather than a maximum momentum. With the advances of quantum optics technology, it might be possible to realize some of these distinguishing quantum-gravitational features within the domain of future experiments.

  19. Mechanical behavior of aluminum deformed under hot-working conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Puchi, E.S.; Staia, M.H.

    1995-11-01

    The stress-strain behavior of aluminum 3-9 purity deformed at elevated temperatures has been analyzed on a rational basis. Emphasis has been given to the analysis of the curves corresponding to typical deformation conditions of interest for hot rolling of commercial aluminum alloys. The strain-hardening behavior has been modeled assuming the validity of the typical saturation exponential equation earlier proposed by Voce. The temperature and strain dependence of the flow stress parameters involved in such an equation has been introduced by means of a model based on the power law relationship, where the stress-sensitivity exponent of the strain rate is considered to be temperature dependent. The final constitutive equation derived provides a satisfactory reproduction of the experimental values of the flow stress and follow quite closely the strain-hardening behavior. The mean activation energy determined by the different models confirmed the predominance of both climb of edge dislocation segments and motion of jogged screw dislocations as the rate-controlling mechanisms during deformation of this material under hot-working conditions. The use of a constitutive equation which expresses the flow stress of the material in terms of the applied strain, rate of straining, and deformation temperature to calculate the power dissipation efficiency of the material ({eta}) deformed under hot-rolling conditions has shown that it could be strongly strain dependent, particularly toward the end of the rolling schedule. Hence, it has been concluded that the calculation of both the power co-content as defined in dynamic material modeling (DMM) and its maximum value, taking into consideration the constitutive equation previously developed, represents a more plausible and soundly based approach toward the determination of {eta}.

  20. Deformable liposomes and ethosomes: mechanism of enhanced skin delivery.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Mustafa M A; Abdallah, Ossama Y; Naggar, Viviane F; Khalafallah, Nawal M

    2006-09-28

    Despite intensive research, the mechanisms by which vesicular systems deliver drugs into intact skin are not yet fully understood. In the current study, possible mechanisms by which deformable liposomes and ethosomes improve skin delivery of ketotifen under non-occlusive conditions were investigated. In vitro permeation and skin deposition behavior of deformable liposomes and ethosomes, having ketotifen both inside and outside the vesicles (no separation of free ketotifen), having ketotifen only inside the vesicles (free ketotifen separated) and having ketotifen only outside the vesicles (ketotifen solution added to empty vesicles), was studied using rabbit pinna skin. Results suggested that both the penetration enhancing effect and the intact vesicle permeation into the stratum corneum might play a role in improving skin delivery of drugs by deformable liposomes, under non-occlusive conditions, and that the penetration enhancing effect was of greater importance in case of ketotifen. Regarding ethosomes, results indicated that ketotifen should be incorporated in ethosomal vesicles for optimum skin delivery. Ethosomes were not able to improve skin delivery of non-entrapped ketotifen.

  1. Thermal and mechanical controls on magma supply and volcanic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James; Gottsmann, Jo; Nakamichi, Haruhisa; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-04-01

    Ground deformation often precedes volcanic eruptions, and results from complex interactions between source processes and the thermomechanical behaviour of surrounding rock. Geodetic models aimed at constraining source processes consequently require the implementation of realistic mechanical and thermal rock properties. However, most generic models ignore this requirement and employ oversimplified mechanical assumptions without regard for thermal effects. Here we show how spatio-temporal deformation and magma reservoir evolution are fundamentally controlled by three-dimensional thermomechanical heterogeneity. Using the example of continued inflation at Aira caldera, Japan, we demonstrate that despite on-going eruptions magma is accumulating faster than it can be ejected, and the current uplift is approaching the level inferred prior to the 1914 Plinian eruption. Our results from inverse and forward numerical models are consistent with petrological constraints and highlight how the location, volume, and rate of magma supply, 0.014 km3/yr, are thermomechanically controlled. Magma storage conditions coincide with estimates for the caldera-forming reservoir ˜29,000 years ago, and the inferred magma supply rate indicates a ˜130-year timeframe to amass enough magma to feed a future 1914-sized eruption. These new inferences are important for eruption forecasting and risk mitigation, and have significant implications for the interpretations of volcanic deformation worldwide.

  2. Deformation behavior and mechanical properties of amyloid protein nanowires.

    PubMed

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils are most often associated with their pathological role in diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, but they are now increasingly being considered for uses in functional engineering materials. They are among the stiffest protein fibers known but they are also rather brittle, and it is unclear how this combination of properties affects the behavior of amyloid structures at larger length scales, such as in films, wires or plaques. Using a coarse-grained model for amyloid fibrils, we study the mechanical response of amyloid nanowires and examine fundamental mechanical properties, including mechanisms of deformation and failure under tensile loading. We also explore the effect of varying the breaking strain and adhesion strength of the constituent amyloid fibrils on the properties of the larger structure. We find that deformation in the nanowires is controlled by a combination of fibril sliding and fibril failure and that there exists a transition from brittle to ductile behavior by either increasing the fibril failure strain or decreasing the strength of adhesion between fibrils. Furthermore, our results reveal that the mechanical properties of the nanowires are quite sensitive to changes in the properties of the individual fibrils, and the larger scale structures are found to be more mechanically robust than the constituent fibrils, for all cases considered. More broadly, this work demonstrates the promise of utilizing self-assembled biological building blocks in the development of hierarchical nanomaterials. PMID:23290516

  3. Production, structure, texture, and mechanical properties of severely deformed magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. Yu.; Antonova, O. V.; Kamenetskii, B. I.; Klyukin, I. V.; Komkova, D. A.; Antonov, B. D.

    2016-05-01

    Methods of the severe plastic deformation (SPD) of pure magnesium at room temperature, namely, transverse extrusion and hydroextrusion in a self-destroyed shell, have been developed. The maximum true strain of the samples after the hydroextrusion was e ~ 3.2; in the course of transverse extrusion and subsequent cold rolling, a true strain of e ~ 6.0 was achieved. The structure and mechanical properties of the magnesium samples have been studied in different structural states. It has been shown that the SPD led to a decrease in the grain size d to ~2 μm; the relative elongation at fracture δ increased to ~20%. No active twinning has been revealed. The reasons for the high plasticity of magnesium after SPD according to the deformation modes suggested are discussed from the viewpoint of the hierarchy of the observed structural states.

  4. Creeping deformation mechanisms for mixed hydrate-sediment submarine landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, Joshu; Pecher, Ingo; Henrys, Stuart; Barnes, Philip; Plaza-Faverola, Andreia

    2013-04-01

    Globally widespread gas hydrates are proposed to stabilize the seafloor by increasing sediment peak shear strength; while seafloor failure localises at the base of the gas hydrate stability field (BGHS). The primary mechanism by which gas hydrates are proposed to induce slope failure is by temperature or pressure controlled dissociation of hydrate to free gas resulting in a significant pore pressure increase at the BGHS. Direct evidence for this process is lacking however, and the interaction between gas hydrate and seafloor stability remains poorly understood. We present evidence that, contrary to conventional views, gas hydrate can itself destabilize the seafloor. Morphological (Kongsberg-Simrad EM300 and EM302 multibeam) and high-resolution multichannel seismic refection data from a 100 km2 submarine landslide complex in ~450 m water depth, 20 km off the east coast of New Zealand indicate flow-like deformation within gas hydrate-bearing sediments. This "creeping" deformation occurs immediately downslope of where the BGHS reaches the seafloor, as indicated by a hydrate-indicating bottom simulating reflector (BSR) cutting through the landslide debris, suggesting involvement of gas hydrates. We propose two mechanisms to explain how the shallow gas hydrate system could control these landslides. 1) The Hydrate Valve: Overpressure and/or temperature fluctuations below low-permeability gas hydrate-bearing sediments causes hydrofracturing where the BGHS approaches the landslide base, both weakening sediments and creating a valve for transferring excess pore pressure into the upper landslide body. 2) Hydrate-sediment Glacier: Gas hydrate-bearing sediment exhibits time-dependent plastic deformation enabling glacial-style deformation. This second hypothesis is supported by recent laboratory observations of time-dependent behaviour of gas-hydrate-bearing sands. Given the ubiquitous occurrence of gas hydrates on continental slopes, our results may require a re-evaluation of

  5. Fatigue Behavior and Deformation Mechanisms in Inconel 718 Superalloy Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The nickel-base superalloy Inconel 718 (IN 718) is used as a structural material for a variety of components in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) and accounts for more than half of the total weight of this engine. IN 718 is the bill-of-material for the pressure vessels of nickel-hydrogen batteries for the space station. In the case of the space shuttle main engine, structural components are typically subjected to startup and shutdown load transients and occasional overloads in addition to high-frequency vibratory loads from routine operation. The nickel-hydrogen battery cells are prooftested before service and are subjected to fluctuating pressure loads during operation. In both of these applications, the structural material is subjected to a monotonic load initially, which is subsequently followed by fatigue. To assess the life of these structural components, it is necessary to determine the influence of a prior monotonic load on the subsequent fatigue life of the superalloy. An insight into the underlying deformation and damage mechanisms is also required to properly account for the interaction between the prior monotonic load and the subsequent fatigue loading. An experimental investigation was conducted to establish the effect of prior monotonic straining on the subsequent fatigue behavior of wrought, double-aged, IN 718 at room temperature. First, monotonic strain tests and fully-reversed, strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted on uniform-gage-section IN 718 specimens. Next, fully reversed fatigue tests were conducted under strain control on specimens that were monotonically strained in tension. Results from this investigation indicated that prior monotonic straining reduced the fatigue resistance of the superalloy particularly at the lowest strain range. Some of the tested specimens were sectioned and examined by transmission electron microscopy to reveal typical microstructures as well as the active deformation and damage mechanisms under each of

  6. Effect of Cyclic Aging on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Maraging Steel 250

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Fawad; Naz, Nausheen; Baloch, Rasheed Ahmed

    2010-10-01

    The effects of thermal cyclic aging on mechanical properties and microstructure of maraging steel 250 were studied using hardness tester, tensile testing machine, impact tester, optical, scanning electron, and stereo microscopy. Samples were solution annealed at 1093 K for 1 h followed by air cooling to form bcc martensite. Cyclic aging treatments were carried out at 753 and 773 K for varying time periods. Increase in hardness and strength with corresponding decrease in ductility and impact strength was observed with increasing aging cycles. Reverted austenite was detected by x-ray diffraction technique formed as a result of cyclic aging. The presence of reverted γ was also confirmed by EDX-SEM analysis and attributed to the formation of Mo- and Ni-rich regions which transformed to γ on cooling. Heterogeneity in composition and amount of reverted γ was found to increase with increase in aging cycles and aging time. Fractography reveals the change in fracture mode from ductile dimple-like to brittle cleavage with increase in hardness and strength due to cyclic aging.

  7. Deformation and Fracture Mechanisms of Polymer-Silicate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harcup, Jason; Yee, Albert

    1998-03-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of a series of nanocomposites comprising polyamide, silicate and in some cases rubber has been studied. Mechanical properties including Young modulus and fracture toughness were measured and it was found that compared to conventional composites, the nanocomposites exhibited far greater improvement in properties over the neat matrix for a given silicate fraction. It was also found that the addition of the rubber phase produced an increase in toughness. The arrested crack tip process zone was obtained using the Double Notch Four Point Bend test geometry and the process zone morphology was studied using TEM and TOM. Fracture surfaces were probed with XEDS and SEM. The use of these techniques enabled the mechanisms which occur during fracture to be studied and related to the mechanical properties and toughening of these materials.

  8. A deformation quantization theory for noncommutative quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Costa Dias, Nuno; Prata, Joao Nuno; Gosson, Maurice de; Luef, Franz

    2010-07-15

    We show that the deformation quantization of noncommutative quantum mechanics previously considered by Dias and Prata ['Weyl-Wigner formulation of noncommutative quantum mechanics', J. Math. Phys. 49, 072101 (2008)] and Bastos, Dias, and Prata ['Wigner measures in non-commutative quantum mechanics', e-print arXiv:math-ph/0907.4438v1; Commun. Math. Phys. (to appear)] can be expressed as a Weyl calculus on a double phase space. We study the properties of the star-product thus defined and prove a spectral theorem for the star-genvalue equation using an extension of the methods recently initiated by de Gosson and Luef ['A new approach to the *-genvalue equation', Lett. Math. Phys. 85, 173-183 (2008)].

  9. Mechanical control of cyclic AMP signalling and gene transcription through integrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C. J.; Alenghat, F. J.; Rim, P.; Fong, J. H.; Fabry, B.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This study was carried out to discriminate between two alternative hypotheses as to how cells sense mechanical forces and transduce them into changes in gene transcription. Do cells sense mechanical signals through generalized membrane distortion or through specific transmembrane receptors, such as integrins? Here we show that mechanical stresses applied to the cell surface alter the cyclic AMP signalling cascade and downstream gene transcription by modulating local release of signals generated by activated integrin receptors in a G-protein-dependent manner, whereas distortion of integrins in the absence of receptor occupancy has no effect.

  10. Structure of STING bound to cyclic di-GMP reveals the mechanism of cyclic dinucleotide recognition by the immune system.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chang; Yi, Guanghui; Watts, Tylan; Kao, C Cheng; Li, Pingwei

    2012-06-24

    STING (stimulator of interferon genes) is an innate immune sensor of cyclic dinucleotides that regulates the induction of type I interferons. STING's C-terminal domain forms a V-shaped dimer and binds a cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) at the dimer interface by both direct and solvent-mediated hydrogen bonds. Guanines of c-di-GMP stack against the phenolic rings of a conserved tyrosine, and mutations at the c-di-GMP binding surface reduce nucleotide binding and affect signaling.

  11. Significance of grain sliding mechanisms for ductile deformation of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, A.; Bourcier, M.; Gaye, A.; Héripré, E.; Bornert, M.; Raphanel, J.; Ludwig, W.

    2013-12-01

    Ductile shear zones at depth present polyphase and heterogeneous rocks and multi-scale strain localization patterns. Most strain concentrates in ultramylonitic layers, which exhibit microstructural signatures of several concomitant deformation mechanisms. The latter are either active in volume (dislocation creep), or in the vicinity and along interfaces (grain sliding and solution mass transfer). Because their chronology of appearance and interactions are unclear, inference of the overall rheology seems illusory. We have therefore characterized over a decade the rheology of synthetic lower crustal materials with different compositions and fluid contents, and for various microstructures. Non-Newtonian flow clearly related to dominant dislocation creep. Conversely, Newtonian behavior involved grain sliding mechanisms, but crystal plasticity could be identified as well. In order to clarify the respective roles of these mechanisms we underwent a multi-scale investigation of the ductile deformation of rock analog synthetic halite with controlled microstructures. The mechanical tests were combined with in-situ optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X ray computed tomography, allowing for digital image correlation (DIC) techniques and retrieval of full strain field. Crystal plasticity dominated, as evidenced by physical slip lines and DIC computed slip bands. Crystal orientation mapping allowed to identify strongly active easy glide {110} <110> systems. But, all other slip systems were observed as well, and especially near interfaces, where their activity is necessary to accommodate for the plastic strain incompatibilities between neighboring grains. We also evidenced grain boundary sliding (GBS), which clearly occurred as a secondary, but necessary, accommodation mechanism. The DIC technique allowed the quantification of the relative contribution of each mechanism. The amount of GBS clearly increased with decreasing grain size. Finite element (FE) modeling

  12. Welding of Pyroclastic Conduit Infill: A Mechanism for Cyclical Explosive Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, Stephan; Russell, James K.

    2014-05-01

    Vulcanian style eruptions are small to moderate sized singular to cyclical events commonly having volcanic explosivity indices (VEI) of 1-3. They produce pyroclastic flows, disperse tephra over considerable areas and can occur as precursors to larger (e.g. Plinian) eruptions. Here we present a study on the evolution of the physical properties (strain, porosity, permeability and ultrasonic wave velocities) of breadcrust bombs recovered from the deposits of the 2350 B.P. eruption of Mt Meager, BC, Canada. These accessory lithics are fragments of welded intra vent deposits formed during compaction and deformation processes operating in the shallow (less than 2 km) conduit. The deformation experienced by these samples is a combination of compaction within the conduit and post-compaction stretching associated with the subsequent eruption. Our results highlight a profound directionality in the measured physical properties of these samples related to the deformation-induced fabric. Gas permeability varies drastically with increasing strain and decreasing porosity along the compaction direction of the fabric. However, permeability varies little along the elongation direction of the fabric. Similarly, ultrasonic wave velocities increase along the compaction direction and remain unaffected along the direction of fabric stretching; Poisons ratio increases along the fabric stretching direction. We combine these physical property measurements with models describing the timescales of porosity loss and to explore the timescales of permeability reduction and re-pressurization of the edifice. Modelling results and reconstruction of the deformation history also suggest the potential for a low-cost technique for monitoring the pressure build-up within volcanic systems based on fumarolic activity.

  13. Thermo-mechanically coupled deformation with the finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, Thibault; Raess, Ludovic; Podladchikov, Yury; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Numerous geological observations are the result of thermo-mechanical processes. In particular, tectonic processes such as ductile shear localization can be induced by the intrinsic coupling that exists between deformation, energy and rheology. In order to study these processes, we have designed two-dimensional implicit and explicit finite difference models. These models take into account a temperature-dependent power-law rheology as well as diffusion, advection, and conversion of mechanical work into heat. For implicit models, different non-linear solving strategies were implemented (implicit/explicit thermo-mechanical coupling, Picard/Newton linearisations). We model thermo-mechanically activated shear localization in lower crustal conditions using these different numerical methods. We show that all methods capture the thermo-mechanical instability and exhibit similar temporal evolution. We perform quantitative comparisons with specifically designed tests (conservation of energy, analytical solution, scaling law). For implicit approaches, we discuss the treatment of thermo-mechanical coupling (implicit/explicit) and the impact of the imposed accuracy (tolerance) of the non-linear solvers. We compare the accuracy of the explicit method with the one of the implicit methods. Numerical algorithms based on explicit methods to study thermo-mechanical shear localisation are attractive because they are easy to program and very comprehensible.

  14. Cyclic mechanical loading promotes bacterial penetration along composite restoration marginal gaps

    PubMed Central

    Khvostenko, D.; Salehi, S.; Naleway, S. E.; Hilton, T. J.; Ferracane, J. L.; Mitchell, J. C.; Kruzic, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Secondary caries is the most common reason for composite restoration replacement and usually forms between dentin and the filling. The objective of this study was to investigate the combined effect of cyclic loading and bacterial exposure on bacterial penetration into gaps at the interface between dentin and resin composite restorative material using a novel bioreactor system and test specimen design. Methods Human molars were machined into 3 mm thick disks with 2 mm deep × 5 mm diameter cavity preparations into which composite restorations were placed. A ∼15-30 micrometer (small) or ∼300 micrometer wide (large) dentin-restoration gap was introduced along half of the interface between the dentin and restoration. Streptococcus mutans UA 159 biofilms were grown on each sample prior to testing in a bioreactor both with and without cyclic loading. Both groups of samples were tested for 2 weeks and post-test biofilm viability was confirmed with a live-dead assay. Samples were fixed, mounted and cross-sectioned to reveal the gaps and observe the depth of bacterial penetration. Results It was shown that for large gap samples the bacteria easily penetrated to the full depth of the gap independent of loading or non-loading conditions. The results for all cyclically loaded small gap samples show a consistently deep bacterial penetration down 100% of the gap while the average penetration depth was only 67% for the non-loaded samples with only two of six samples reaching 100%. Significance A new bioreactor was developed that allows combining cyclic mechanical loading and bacterial exposure of restored teeth for bacterial biofilm and demineralization studies. Cyclic loading was shown to aid bacterial penetration into narrow marginal gaps, which could ultimately promote secondary caries formation. PMID:25900624

  15. Creep deformation mechanisms in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Triratna; Basirat, Mehdi; Charit, Indrajit; Potirniche, Gabriel P.; Rink, Karl K.; Sahaym, Uttara

    2012-04-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo (Grade 91) steel is currently considered as a candidate material for reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) and reactor internals for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). The tensile creep behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (Grade 91) was studied in the temperature range of 873-1023 K and stresses between 35 MPa and 350 MPa. Analysis of creep results yielded stress exponents of ∼9-11 in the higher stress regime and ∼1 in the lower stress regime. The high stress exponent in the power-law creep regime was rationalized by invoking the concept of threshold stress, which represents the lattice diffusion controlled dislocation climb process. Without threshold stress compensation, the activation energy was 510 ± 51 kJ/mol, while after correcting for the threshold stress, the activation energy decreased to 225 ± 24 kJ/mol. This value is close to the activation energy for lattice self-diffusion in α-Fe. Threshold stress calculations were performed for the high stress regime at all test temperatures. The calculated threshold stress showed a strong dependence on temperature. The creep behavior of Grade 91 steel was described by the modified Bird-Mukherjee-Dorn relation. The rate controlling creep deformation mechanism in the high stress regime was identified as the edge dislocation climb with a stress exponent of n = 5. On the other hand, the deformation mechanism in the Newtonian viscous creep regime (n = 1) was identified as the Nabarro-Herring creep.

  16. Deformation mechanisms of Cu nanowires with planar defects

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xia Yang, Haixia; Wan, Rui; Cui, Junzhi; Yu, Xingang

    2015-01-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the mechanical behavior of Cu nanowires (NWs) with planar defects such as grain boundaries (GBs), twin boundaries (TBs), stacking faults (SFs), etc. To investigate how the planar defects affect the deformation and fracture mechanisms of naowires, three types of nanowires are considered in this paper: (1) polycrystalline Cu nanowire; (2) single-crystalline Cu nanowire with twin boundaries; and (3) single-crystalline Cu nanowire with stacking faults. Because of the large fraction of atoms at grain boundaries, the energy of grain boundaries is higher than that of the grains. Thus, grain boundaries are proved to be the preferred sites for dislocations to nucleate. Moreover, necking and fracture prefer to occur at the grain boundary interface owing to the weakness of grain boundaries. For Cu nanowires in the presence of twin boundaries, it is found that twin boundaries can strength nanowires due to the restriction of the movement of dislocations. The pile up of dislocations on twin boundaries makes them rough, inducing high energy in twin boundaries. Hence, twin boundaries can emit dislocations, and necking initiates at twin boundaries. In the case of Cu nanowires with stacking faults, all pre-existing stacking faults in the nanowires are observed to disappear during deformation, giving rise to a fracture process resembling the samples without stacking fault.

  17. Miniature non-mechanical zoom camera using deformable MOEMS mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaylor, Brant M.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Greenfield, Nathan J.; Roos, Peter A.; Seger, Eric M.; Moghimi, Mohammad J.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2012-03-01

    We present a miniature non-mechanical zoom camera using deformable MOEMS mirrors. Bridger Photonics, Inc. (Bridger) in collaboration with Montana State University (MSU), has developed electrostatically actuated deformable MEMS mirrors for use in compact focus control and zoom imaging systems. Applications including microscopy, endomicroscopy, robotic surgery and cell-phone cameras. In comparison to conventional systems, our MEMS-based designs require no mechanically moving parts. Both circular and elliptical membranes are now being manufactured at the wafer level and possess excellent optical surface quality (membrane flatness < λ/4). The mirror diameters range from 1 - 4 mm. For membranes with a 25 μm air gap, the membrane stroke is 10 μm. In terms of the optical design, the mirrors are considered variable power optical elements. A device with 2 mm diameter and 10 μm stroke can vary its optical power over 40 diopters or 0.04mm∧(-1). Equivalently, this corresponds to a focal length ranging from infinity to 25 mm. We have designed and demonstrated a zoom system using two MOEMS elements and exclusively commercial off-the-shelf optical components to achieve an optical zoom of 1.9x with a 15° full field of view. The total optical track length of the system is 36 mm. The design is approximately 30 mm x 30 mm x 20 mm including the optomechanical housing and image sensor. With custom optics, we anticipate achieving form factors that are compatible with incorporation into cell phones.

  18. Distributed deformation measurement of large space deployable mechanism based on FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yanfang; Zhou, Zude; Liu, Yi; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Ruiya; Li, Tianliang

    2015-10-01

    Space deployable mechanisms are widely used, important and multi-purpose components in aerospace fields. In order to ensure the mechanism in normal situation after unfolded, detecting the deformation caused by huge temperature difference in real-time is necessary. This paper designed a deployable mechanism setup, completed its distributed deformation measurement by means of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and BP neural network, proved the mechanism distributed strain takes place sequence and FBG sensor is capable for space deployable mechanisms deformation measuring.

  19. Effects of Crack Closure and Cyclic Deformation on Thermomechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of a Near α Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Kartik; Kumar, Vikas; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Sundararaman, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, closure corrected in-phase (IP) and out-of-phase (OP) thermomechanical fatigue crack growth rates at two temperature intervals viz. 573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C) and 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) of Timetal 834 near α titanium alloy are presented. It is found that closure mechanisms significantly influence the stage I crack growth behavior. Surface roughness-induced crack closure (RICC) predominantly modifies the crack growth rate of near-threshold region at 573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C) test conditions. However, oxide-induced crack closure further strengthens RICC at 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) TMF loading. In stage II crack growth behavior, the alloy shows higher crack growth rates at 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) OP-TMF loading which is attributed to the combined effect of cyclic hardening occurring at the crack tip and weakening of interlamellar regions due to oxidation.

  20. Influences of periodic mechanical deformation on pinned spiral waves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Peng, Liang; Zheng, Qiang; Zhao, Ye-Hua; Ying, He-Ping

    2014-09-01

    In a generic model of excitable media, we study the behavior of spiral waves interacting with obstacles and their dynamics under the influences of simple periodic mechanical deformation (PMD). Depending on the characteristics of the obstacles, i.e., size and excitability, the rotation of a pinned spiral wave shows different scenarios, e.g., embedding into or anchoring on an obstacle. Three different drift phenomena induced by PMD are observed: scattering on small partial-excitable obstacles, meander-induced unpinning on big partial-excitable obstacles, and drifting around small unexcitable obstacles. Their underlying mechanisms are discussed. The dependence of the threshold amplitude of PMD on the characteristics of the obstacles to successfully remove pinned spiral waves on big partial-excitable obstacles is studied. PMID:25273183

  1. Tensile deformation mechanisms of ABS/PMMA/EMA blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. H.; Gao, J.; Lin, S. X.; Zhang, P.; Huang, J.; Xu, L. L.

    2014-08-01

    The tensile deformation mechanisms of acrylonitrile - butadiene - styrene (ABS) / polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) blends toughened by ethylene methacrylate (EMA) copolymer was investigated by analysing the fracture morphology. ABS/PMMA was blended with EMA copolymer by melt mixing technique using co-rotating twin extruder. Tensile tests show that the elongation at break of ABS/PMMA blends can be efficiently improved with the increase in EMA content. Fracture morphology of ABS/PMMA/EMA blends reveals that the material yield induced by hollowing-out of EMA particles and its propagation into yield zone is the main toughening mechanism. Moreover, the appearance that EMA particles in the central area are given priority to hollowing-out may be related to the skin-core structure of the injection moulded parts caused by the different cooling rate between surface and inside in the process of injection moulding.

  2. Mechanics and deformation of the nucleus in micropipette aspiration experiment.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Ashkan; Mofrad, Mohammad R Kaazempur

    2007-01-01

    Robust biomechanical models are essential for the study of nuclear mechanics and deformation and can help shed light on the underlying mechanisms of stress transition in nuclear elements. Here, we develop a computational model for an isolated nucleus undergoing micropipette aspiration. Our model includes distinct components representing the nucleoplasm and nuclear envelope. The nuclear envelope itself comprises three layers: inner and outer nuclear membranes and one thicker layer representing the nuclear lamina. The nucleoplasm is modeled as a viscoelastic Maxwell material with a single time constant, while a modified Maxwell model, equivalent to a spring and a dashpot in series and both in parallel with a spring, is adopted for the inner and outer nuclear membranes. The nuclear envelope layer is taken as a linear elastic material. The proposed computational model, validated using experimental observations of Guilak et al. [2000. Viscoelastic properties of the cell nucleus. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 269, 781-786] and Deguchi et al. [2005, Flow-induced hardening of endothelial nucleus as an intracellular stress-bearing organelle. Journal of Biomechanics 38, 1751-1759], is employed to study nuclear mechanics and deformation in micropipette aspiration and to shed light on the contribution of individual nuclear components on the response. The results indicate that the overall response of an isolated nucleus in micropipette aspiration is highly sensitive to the apparent stiffness of the nuclear lamina. This observation suggests that micropipette aspiration is an effective technique for examining the influence of various kinds of alteration in the nuclear lamina, such as mutations in the gene encoding lamin A, and also structural remodeling due to mechanical perturbation.

  3. Mechanics and deformation of the nucleus in micropipette aspiration experiment.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Ashkan; Mofrad, Mohammad R Kaazempur

    2007-01-01

    Robust biomechanical models are essential for the study of nuclear mechanics and deformation and can help shed light on the underlying mechanisms of stress transition in nuclear elements. Here, we develop a computational model for an isolated nucleus undergoing micropipette aspiration. Our model includes distinct components representing the nucleoplasm and nuclear envelope. The nuclear envelope itself comprises three layers: inner and outer nuclear membranes and one thicker layer representing the nuclear lamina. The nucleoplasm is modeled as a viscoelastic Maxwell material with a single time constant, while a modified Maxwell model, equivalent to a spring and a dashpot in series and both in parallel with a spring, is adopted for the inner and outer nuclear membranes. The nuclear envelope layer is taken as a linear elastic material. The proposed computational model, validated using experimental observations of Guilak et al. [2000. Viscoelastic properties of the cell nucleus. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 269, 781-786] and Deguchi et al. [2005, Flow-induced hardening of endothelial nucleus as an intracellular stress-bearing organelle. Journal of Biomechanics 38, 1751-1759], is employed to study nuclear mechanics and deformation in micropipette aspiration and to shed light on the contribution of individual nuclear components on the response. The results indicate that the overall response of an isolated nucleus in micropipette aspiration is highly sensitive to the apparent stiffness of the nuclear lamina. This observation suggests that micropipette aspiration is an effective technique for examining the influence of various kinds of alteration in the nuclear lamina, such as mutations in the gene encoding lamin A, and also structural remodeling due to mechanical perturbation. PMID:17112531

  4. Effect of pre-strain on mechanical properties and deformation induced transformation of 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulfi, Fahri R.; Korda, Akhmad A.

    2016-08-01

    Effect of pre-strain on mechanical properties and deformation induced phase transformation of 304 stainless steel under tensile deformation has been studied. Pre-strain with the variation percentage of deformation was applied to the tensile test specimens. Tensile and hardness testing were carried out after pre-strain to study the mechanical properties change. Deformation induced phase transformation was investigated by using X-ray diffraction and optical microscope. XRD study indicates that metastable austenite transforms to martensite due to deformation. The martensite volume fraction increases with the increase in percentage of deformation. The increase in strength and hardness were associated with an increase in the volume fraction of martensite.

  5. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science. PMID:27694937

  6. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-10-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science.

  7. Investigating Deformation and Failure Mechanisms in Nanoscale Multilayer Metallic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zbib, Hussein M; Bahr, David F

    2014-10-22

    Over the history of materials science there are many examples of materials discoveries that have made superlative materials; the strongest, lightest, or toughest material is almost always a goal when we invent new materials. However, often these have been a result of enormous trial and error approaches. A new methodology, one in which researchers design, from the atoms up, new ultra-strong materials for use in energy applications, is taking hold within the science and engineering community. This project focused on one particular new classification of materials; nanolaminate metallic composites. These materials, where two metallic materials are intimately bonded and layered over and over to form sheets or coatings, have been shown over the past decade to reach strengths over 10 times that of their constituents. However, they are not yet widely used in part because while extremely strong (they don’t permanently bend), they are also not particularly tough (they break relatively easily when notched). Our program took a coupled approach to investigating new materials systems within the laminate field. We used computational materials science to explore ways to institute new deformation mechanisms that occurred when a tri-layer, rather than the more common bi-layer system was created. Our predictions suggested that copper-nickel or copper-niobium composites (two very common bi-layer systems) with layer thicknesses on the order of 20 nm and then layered 100’s of times, would be less tough than a copper-nickel-niobium metallic composite of similar thicknesses. In particular, a particular mode of permanent deformation, cross-slip, could be activated only in the tri-layer system; the crystal structure of the other bi-layers would prohibit this particular mode of deformation. We then experimentally validated this predication using a wide range of tools. We utilized a DOE user facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnology (CINT), to fabricate, for the first time, these

  8. STATISTICAL MECHANICS MODELING OF MESOSCALE DEFORMATION IN METALS

    SciTech Connect

    Anter El-Azab

    2013-04-08

    The research under this project focused on a theoretical and computational modeling of dislocation dynamics of mesoscale deformation of metal single crystals. Specifically, the work aimed to implement a continuum statistical theory of dislocations to understand strain hardening and cell structure formation under monotonic loading. These aspects of crystal deformation are manifestations of the evolution of the underlying dislocation system under mechanical loading. The project had three research tasks: 1) Investigating the statistical characteristics of dislocation systems in deformed crystals. 2) Formulating kinetic equations of dislocations and coupling these kinetics equations and crystal mechanics. 3) Computational solution of coupled crystal mechanics and dislocation kinetics. Comparison of dislocation dynamics predictions with experimental results in the area of statistical properties of dislocations and their field was also a part of the proposed effort. In the first research task, the dislocation dynamics simulation method was used to investigate the spatial, orientation, velocity, and temporal statistics of dynamical dislocation systems, and on the use of the results from this investigation to complete the kinetic description of dislocations. The second task focused on completing the formulation of a kinetic theory of dislocations that respects the discrete nature of crystallographic slip and the physics of dislocation motion and dislocation interaction in the crystal. Part of this effort also targeted the theoretical basis for establishing the connection between discrete and continuum representation of dislocations and the analysis of discrete dislocation simulation results within the continuum framework. This part of the research enables the enrichment of the kinetic description with information representing the discrete dislocation systems behavior. The third task focused on the development of physics-inspired numerical methods of solution of the coupled

  9. Mechanical Failure Mode of Metal Nanowires: Global Deformation versus Local Deformation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Duc Tam; Im, Youngtae; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Earmme, Youn Young; Kim, Sung Youb

    2015-06-18

    It is believed that the failure mode of metal nanowires under tensile loading is the result of the nucleation and propagation of dislocations. Such failure modes can be slip, partial slip or twinning and therefore they are regarded as local deformation. Here we provide numerical and theoretical evidences to show that global deformation is another predominant failure mode of nanowires under tensile loading. At the global deformation mode, nanowires fail with a large contraction along a lateral direction and a large expansion along the other lateral direction. In addition, there is a competition between global and local deformations. Nanowires loaded at low temperature exhibit global failure mode first and then local deformation follows later. We show that the global deformation originates from the intrinsic instability of the nanowires and that temperature is a main parameter that decides the global or local deformation as the failure mode of nanowires.

  10. Mechanical Failure Mode of Metal Nanowires: Global Deformation versus Local Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Duc Tam; Im, Youngtae; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Earmme, Youn Young; Kim, Sung Youb

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that the failure mode of metal nanowires under tensile loading is the result of the nucleation and propagation of dislocations. Such failure modes can be slip, partial slip or twinning and therefore they are regarded as local deformation. Here we provide numerical and theoretical evidences to show that global deformation is another predominant failure mode of nanowires under tensile loading. At the global deformation mode, nanowires fail with a large contraction along a lateral direction and a large expansion along the other lateral direction. In addition, there is a competition between global and local deformations. Nanowires loaded at low temperature exhibit global failure mode first and then local deformation follows later. We show that the global deformation originates from the intrinsic instability of the nanowires and that temperature is a main parameter that decides the global or local deformation as the failure mode of nanowires. PMID:26087445

  11. Structural integrity and failure mechanisms of a smart piezoelectric actuator under a cyclic bending mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sung-Choong; Goo, Nam Seo

    2008-08-01

    Information on the onset and evolution of damage within materials is essential for guaranteeing the integrity of actuator systems. The authors have evaluated the structural integrity and the failure mechanisms of smart composite actuators with a PZT ceramic plate under electric cyclic loading. For this, two kinds of actuators, actuator 1 and actuator 2, were manufactured. Prior to the main testing, performance testing was performed on the actuators to determine their resonant frequencies. Electric cyclic tests were conducted up to twenty million cycles. An acoustic emission technique was used for monitoring the damage evolution in real time. We observed the extent of the damage after testing using scanning electron microscopy and reflected optical microscopy to support characteristics in the acoustic emission behavior that corresponded to specific types of damage mechanisms. It was shown that the initial damage mechanism of the smart composite actuator under electric cyclic loading originated from the transgranular micro-fatigue damage in the PZT ceramic layer. With increasing cycles, a local intergranular crack initiated and developed onto the surface of the PZT ceramic layer or propagated into the internal layer. Finally, short-circuiting led to the electric breakdown of the actuator. These results were different depending on the drive frequencies and the configuration of the actuators. Moreover, we differentiated between the aforementioned damage mechanisms via AE signal pattern analyses based on the primary frequency and the waveform. From our results, we conclude that the drive frequency and the existence of a protecting layer are dominant factors in the structural integrity of the smart composite actuator.

  12. Cyclic Failure Mechanisms of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coating Systems Under Thermal Gradient Test Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 and mullite+BSAS/Si multilayer thermal and environmental barrier coating (TBC-EBC) systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) substrates were thermally cyclic tested under high thermal gradients using a laser high-heat-flux rig in conjunction with furnace exposure in water-vapor environments. Coating sintering and interface damage were assessed by monitoring the real-time thermal conductivity changes during the laser heat-flux tests and by examining the microstructural changes after exposure. Sintering kinetics of the coating systems were also independently characterized using a dilatometer. It was found that the coating failure involved both the time-temperature dependent sintering and the cycle frequency dependent cyclic fatigue processes. The water vapor environments not only facilitated the initial coating conductivity increases due to enhanced sintering and interface reaction, but also promoted later conductivity reductions due to the accelerated coating cracking and delamination. The failure mechanisms of the coating systems are also discussed based on the cyclic test results and are correlated to the sintering and thermal stress behavior under the thermal gradient test conditions.

  13. Deformation and Tensile Cyclic Fatigue of Plasma-Sprayed ZrO2-8wt% Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Deformation (constitutive relations) of free-standing, thick thermal barrier coatings of sprayed ZrO2-8Wt% Y2O3 was determined at ambient temperature in both pure tension and pure compression using cylindrical bar test specimens. The material exhibited both significant nonlinearity and hysteresis in its load-strain curves, The load-strain relations in four-point uniaxial flexure were determined from tension and compression sides and were compared with individual pure tension and compression constitutive data. Effect of sintering on deformation behavior was significant, resulting in a dramatic change in constitutive relation. Cyclic fatigue testing of the coating material in tension-tension at room temperature showed an insignificant susceptibility to fatigue, similar to the slow crack growth behavior of the material in flexure in 800 C air.

  14. Deformation mechanisms in tungsten single crystals in ballistic impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchey, W. J., Jr.; Herring, R. N.; Kingman, P. W.; Horwath, E. J.

    1993-05-01

    The performance of tungsten single crystals in ballistic impact varies strongly as a function of crystallographic orientation. The deformation structure of recovered single crystal rods fired in ballistic environments has been characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and TEM, and x-ray diffraction. The observed microstructures are varied and provide substantial insights into the factors governing the penetration and flow behavior under ballistic conditions. Crystallographic orientation influences the potential for developing shear which enhances material flow, and this enhancement ultimately maximizes the energy available for target penetration. Microstructural analysis elucidates the various mechanisms occuring during the flow process for single crystals of high-symmetry orientations, and suggests possible analogies between the penetration behavior of the tungsten single crystals and other materials.

  15. Evidence for a Novel Mechanism of Antimicrobial Action of a Cyclic R-,W-Rich Hexapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Scheinpflug, Kathi; Krylova, Oxana; Nikolenko, Heike; Thurm, Charley; Dathe, Margitta

    2015-01-01

    The development of antimicrobial peptides as new class of antibiotic agents requires structural characterisation and understanding of their diverse mechanisms of action. As the cyclic hexapeptide cWFW (cyclo(RRRWFW)) does not exert its rapid cell killing activity by membrane permeabilisation, in this study we investigated alternative mechanisms of action, such as peptide translocation into the cytoplasm and peptide interaction with components of the phospholipid matrix of the bacterial membrane. Using fluorescence microscopy and an HPLC-based strategy to analyse peptide uptake into the cells we could confirm the cytoplasmic membrane as the major peptide target. However, unexpectedly we observed accumulation of cWFW at distinct sites of the membrane. Further characterisation of peptide-membrane interaction involved live cell imaging to visualise the distribution of the lipid cardiolipin (CL) and isothermal titration calorimetry to determine the binding affinity to model membranes with different bacterial lipid compositions. Our results demonstrate a distribution of the cyclic peptide similar to that of cardiolipin within the membrane and highly preferred affinity of cWFW for CL-rich phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) matrices. These observations point to a novel mechanism of antimicrobial killing for the cyclic hexapeptide cWFW which is neither based on membrane permeabilisation nor translocation into the cytoplasm but rather on preferred partitioning into particular lipid domains. As the phospholipids POPE/CL play a key role in the dynamic organisation of bacterial membranes we discuss the consequences of this peptide-lipid-interaction and outline the impact on antimicrobial peptide research. PMID:25875357

  16. Investigation of static and cyclic bearing failure mechanisms for GR/EP laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. W.; Tuttle, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Static, cyclic load (fatigue), and residual strength testing of graphite-epoxy (GR/EP) and aluminum pin bearing joints was completed to study bearing failure mechanisms. Parameters investigated included static strength, failure mode, fatigue life, hole growth, joint stiffness, and residual strength. Comparative evaluation of these results show that the MIL-HDBK-5 convention for the definition of bearing strength can be used for GR/EP materials while maintaining the same, or improved, level of structural integrity shown for metal joints.

  17. Deformation mechanisms of antigorite and strain localization during dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, B.; Hirth, G.

    2012-12-01

    Antigorite, the high temperature and pressure serpentine polytype, is thought to exist along subduction zones between the mantle wedge and the subducting oceanic crust (e.g., Wada et al., 2008). Understanding how the rheology of antigorite changes with depth along the slab may be key to understanding seismicity along the upper plate boundary (e.g., Hacker et al., 2003). To explore this phenomenon we are conducting constant strain rate general shear experiments on antigorite-rich serpentinite at shear strain rates of 5*10^-7/s to 10^-5/s, confining pressures from 1-2 GPa and temperatures from 400-700°C. We are using microstructural observations to constrain deformation mechanisms and investigate conditions where strain localization occurs. In some experiments we employ either strain rate stepping or temperature ramping to examine the stress dependence of viscosity (i.e., determine stress exponent) and syntectonic reaction during heating. The results of our general shear experiments suggest the rheologic behavior of antigorite varies significantly with changes in temperature and pressure, similar to previous work in axial compression (e.g., Chernak and Hirth, 2010). At 400°C and 1GPa confining pressure antigorite deforms initially via steady-state ductile flow with strengths as high as 1.4 GPa at a strain rate of 10^-5/s. With increasing strain we observe weakening events that correlate with the development of shear fractures within the sample. At 2GPa pressure, the flow strength of antigorite increases to ~1.8 GPa at 10^-6/s and deformation is distributed at low strain. Strain rate stepping at these conditions suggests a very weak strain rate dependence on strength with a 5-10% change in stress for an order of magnitude strain rate step. At 700C and 1 GPa, above the thermal stability of antigorite, the steady-state strength is ~120 MPa at 10^-5/s. In these samples olivine becomes the dominant phase as antigorite progressively reacts to olivine and pyroxene. At the

  18. Mechanism for the uncatalyzed cyclic acetone-peroxide formation reaction: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Fuentes, Eduardo A; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C; Hidalgo-Santiago, Migdalia; Moreno, Martha; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P

    2013-10-17

    In this study, a mechanism for the uncatalyzed reaction between acetone and hydrogen peroxide is postulated. The reaction leads to the formation of the important homemade explosives collectively known as cyclic acetone peroxides (CAP). The proposed mechanistic scheme is based on Raman, GC-MS, and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, and it is supported by ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results demonstrate that the proposed mechanism for the uncatalyzed formation reaction of CAP occurs in three steps: monomer formation, polymerization of the 2-hydroperoxipropan-2-ol monomer, and cyclization. The temporal decay of the intensities of important assigned-bands is in excellent agreement with the proposed mechanism. Previous reports also confirm that the polymerization step is favored in comparison to other possible pathways.

  19. Experimental deformation of a synthetic dunite at high temperature and pressure. I. Mechanical behavior, optical microstructure and deformation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeuch, David H.; Green, H. W.

    1984-12-01

    We have performed a series of 27 deformation experiments on a very dry synthetic dunite, using the Griggs solid medium apparatus. Strain rates ranged from 1 × 10 4 to 1 × 10 7 sec 1, temperatures varied from 1100° to 1300 °C, and the confining pressure was maintained at 10 or (more usually) 15 kbar. MACOR IM, a commercially available, anhydrous, machinable glass ceramic with a low melting point, was used in many of the experiments. We find that strength measurements performed using macor as a confining medium are similar to results obtained using sodium chloride as the confining solid. Tests performed in undried sample assemblies using air-dried dunite specimens resulted in creep strengths greater than those found in any earlier studies except those of Post (1973. 1977). A single test on a sample for which both sample and assembly were dried at a temperature sufficiently high to drive off any adsorbed water resulted in a creep strength comparable to that determined by Post (1973, 1977) for very dry Mt. Burnett dunite. Despite our experimental difficulties, we are led to believe that our synthetic dunite exhibits mechanical behavior consistent with that determined in other experimental studies in which natural dunites and peridotites were used. Furthermore, we conclude that dry dunite is very probably as strong as the oft-disputed results of Post earlier indicated. Finally, we show that the optical textures of our highly recrystallized experimental specimens are essentially identical to naturally produced porphyroclastic textures and that the deformation mechanism in both the experimental and natural specimens is probably dislocation creep with recovery by dynamic recrystallization.

  20. GABAB receptors modulate catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells by a mechanism involving cyclic AMP formation.

    PubMed Central

    Oset-Gasque, M. J.; Parramón, M.; González, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The function of gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors in modulation of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells and the possible mechanism involved in this action have been examined. 2. The GABAB agonists (-)-baclofen and 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid (3-APPA) were found to induce a dose-dependent increase of basal catecholamine secretion. The EC50s were 151 +/- 35 microM and 225 +/- 58 microM for baclofen and 3-APPA, respectively. This stimulatory effect was specific since it could be blocked by 0.5 mM of the specific GABAB antagonist CGP-35348. 3. In contrast, preincubation of chromaffin cells with the GABAB agonists was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the catecholamine secretion evoked by 10 microM nicotine and 200 microM muscimol. 4. The effects of GABAB agonists on both basal and evoked catecholamine secretion were found to be accompanied by parallel changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). GABAB agonists produced a dose-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i which was partially blocked by CGP 35348, but they produced a strong inhibition of the [Ca2+]i increase induced by nicotine and muscimol. 5. The GABAB agonists also produced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular cyclic AMP levels, there being a direct correlation between both increase in catecholamine secretion and in intracellular cyclic AMP levels. 6. The pretreatment of chromaffin cells with pertussis toxin doubled the catecholamine secretion and increased by four times the intracellular cyclic AMP levels evoked by GABAB agonists. 7. The possible involvement of adenylate cyclase in the mechanism of GABAA receptor modulation of catecholamine secretion is discussed. PMID:8306105

  1. Mechanisms of deformation-induced grain growth of a two-dimensional nanocrystal at different deformation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korznikova, E. A.; Dmitriev, S. V.

    2014-06-01

    This work discloses the evolution of a two-dimensional nanocrystalline aggregate in the process of shear deformation under the conditions of hydrostatic compression of the material in the deformation-temperature range T = 0.5-0.7 T m. It has been shown that grain growth by the mechanism of mutual rotation with subsequent coalescence is characteristic of deformation temperatures T = 0.6 T m and below, whereas at T = 0.65 and 0.7 T m one of grains with predominant orientation grows at the expense of other grains. In all instances, the growth of the degree of shear deformation leads to the disappearance of all grain boundaries in the calculated cell under consideration.

  2. Cyclic mechanical strain maintains Nanog expression through PI3K/Akt signaling in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Rie; Akimoto, Takayuki; Hong, Zhang; Ushida, Takashi

    2012-08-15

    Mechanical strain has been reported to affect the proliferation/differentiation of many cell types; however, the effects of mechanotransduction on self-renewal as well as pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells remains unknown. To investigate the effects of mechanical strain on mouse ES cell fate, we examined the expression of Nanog, which is an essential regulator of self-renewal and pluripotency as well as Nanog-associated intracellular signaling during uniaxial cyclic mechanical strain. The mouse ES cell line, CCE was plated onto elastic membranes, and we applied 10% strain at 0.17 Hz. The expression of Nanog was reduced during ES cell differentiation in response to the withdrawal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF); however, two days of cyclic mechanical strain attenuated this reduction of Nanog expression. On the other hand, the cyclic mechanical strain promoted PI3K-Akt signaling, which is reported as an upstream of Nanog transcription. The cyclic mechanical strain-induced Akt phosphorylation was blunted by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Furthermore, cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, also inhibited the mechanical strain-induced increase in phospho-Akt. These findings imply that mechanical force plays a role in regulating Nanog expression in ES cells through the actin cytoskeleton-PI3K-Akt signaling. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of Nanog, which is an essential regulator of 'stemness' was reduced during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclic mechanical strain attenuated the reduction of Nanog expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclic mechanical strain promoted PI3K-Akt signaling and mechanical strain-induced Akt phosphorylation was blunted by the PI3K inhibitor and an inhibitor of actin polymerization.

  3. Gene Expression Changes under Cyclic Mechanical Stretching in Rat Retinal Glial (Müller) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Fan, Jiawen; Zhang, Meng; Sun, Zhongcui; Xu, Gezhi

    2013-01-01

    Objective The retina is subjected to tractional forces in various conditions. As the predominant glial element in the retina, Müller cells are active players in all forms of retinal injury and disease. In this study, we aim to identify patterns of gene expression changes induced by cyclic mechanical stretching in Müller cells. Methods Rat Müller cells were seeded onto flexible bottom culture plates and subjected to a cyclic stretching regimen of 15% equibiaxial stretching for 1 and 24 h. RNA was extracted and amplified, labeled, and hybridized to rat genome microarrays. The expression profiles were analyzed using GeneSpring software, and gene ontology analysis and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) were used to select, annotate, and visualize genes by function and pathway. The selected genes of interest were further validated by Quantitative Real-time PCR (qPCR). Results Microarray data analysis showed that at 1 and 24 h, the expression of 532 and 991 genes in the Müller cells significantly (t-test, p<0.05) differed between the mechanically stretched and unstretched groups. Of these genes, 56 genes at 1 h and 62 genes at 24 h showed more than a twofold change in expression. Several genes related to response to stimulus (e.g., Egr2, IL6), cell proliferation (e.g., Areg, Atf3), tissue remodeling (e.g., PVR, Loxl2), and vasculogenesis (e.g., Epha2, Nrn1) were selected and validated by qPCR. KEGG pathway analysis showed significant changes in MAPK signaling at both time points. Conclusions Cyclic mechanical strain induces extensive changes in the gene expression in Müller cells through multiple molecular pathways. These results indicate the complex mechanoresponsive nature of Müller cells, and they provide novel insights into possible molecular mechanisms that would account for many retinal diseases in which the retina is often subjected to mechanical forces, such as pathological myopia and proliferative vitreoretinopathy. PMID:23723984

  4. Deformation and Failure Mechanisms of Shape Memory Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Samantha Hayes

    2015-04-15

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental mechanics that drive the deformation and failure of shape memory alloys (SMAs). SMAs are difficult materials to characterize because of the complex phase transformations that give rise to their unique properties, including shape memory and superelasticity. These phase transformations occur across multiple length scales (one example being the martensite-austenite twinning that underlies macroscopic strain localization) and result in a large hysteresis. In order to optimize the use of this hysteretic behavior in energy storage and damping applications, we must first have a quantitative understanding of this transformation behavior. Prior results on shape memory alloys have been largely qualitative (i.e., mapping phase transformations through cracked oxide coatings or surface morphology). The PI developed and utilized new approaches to provide a quantitative, full-field characterization of phase transformation, conducting a comprehensive suite of experiments across multiple length scales and tying these results to theoretical and computational analysis. The research funded by this award utilized new combinations of scanning electron microscopy, diffraction, digital image correlation, and custom testing equipment and procedures to study phase transformation processes at a wide range of length scales, with a focus at small length scales with spatial resolution on the order of 1 nanometer. These experiments probe the basic connections between length scales during phase transformation. In addition to the insights gained on the fundamental mechanisms driving transformations in shape memory alloys, the unique experimental methodologies developed under this award are applicable to a wide range of solid-to-solid phase transformations and other strain localization mechanisms.

  5. Precipitation under cyclic strain in solution-treated Al4wt%Cu I: mechanical behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Farrow, Adam M; Laird, Campbell

    2008-01-01

    Solution-treated AL-4wt%Cu was strain-cycled at ambient temperature and above, and the precipitation and deformation behaviors investigated by TEM. Anomalously rapid growth of precipitates appears to have been facilitated by a vacancy super-saturation generated by cyclic strain and the presence of a continually refreshed dislocation density to provide heterogeneous nucleation sites. Texture effects as characterized by Orientation Imaging Microscopy appear to be responsible for latent hardening in specimens tested at room temperature, with increasing temperatures leading to a gradual hardening throughout life due to precipitation. Specimens exhibiting rapid precipitation hardening appear to show a greater effect of texture due to the increased stress required to cut precipitates in specimens machined from rolled plate at an angle corresponding to a lower average Schmid factor. The accelerated formation of grain boundary precipitates appears to be partially responsible for rapid inter-granular fatigue failure at elevated temperatures, producing fatigue striations and ductile dimples coexistent on the fracture surface.

  6. Study of the deformation mechanism of the Gaoliying ground fissure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, G.; Wang, H.; Luo, Y.; Guo, H.

    2015-11-01

    The Gaoliying ground fissure in Beijing has caused building cracking and road damage, and has seriously influenced city construction. Based on investigations and trenching, the influences of the fault and the variation of groundwater levels on the formation mechanism of the Gaoliying ground fissure were investigated by using FLAC3D. The results indicated that (1) the surface location of Gaoliying fissure is controlled by the underlying normal fault activity, and over pumping further exacerbates development of the ground fissure; (2) when the groundwater level declines, obvious differential settlement occurs at both sides of the ground fissure, in which greater settlement occurs in the vicinity of the hanging wall, the greater the distance from the hanging wall, the smaller the ground subsidence, however smaller ground subsidence occurs in the vicinity of the footwall, the greater the distance from the footwall, the greater the ground subsidence; (3) the vertical velocity of the ground fissure triggered by the fault activity and groundwater decline ranges from 15.5 to 18.3 mm a-1, which is basically in line with the monitoring data. The fault activity contributes about 28-39 %, and the groundwater contributes about 61-72 % to the deformation of the ground fissure, respectively.

  7. Mechanical behaviors of multi-filament twist superconducting strand under tensile and cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Li, Yingxu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2016-01-01

    The superconducting strand, serving as the basic unit cell of the cable-in-conduit-conductors (CICCs), is a typical multi-filament twist composite which is always subjected to a cyclic loading under the operating condition. Meanwhile, the superconducting material Nb3Sn in the strand is sensitive to strain frequently relating to the performance degradation of the superconductivity. Therefore, a comprehensive study on the mechanical behavior of the strand helps understanding the superconducting performance of the strained Nb3Sn strands. To address this issue, taking the LMI (internal tin) strand as an example, a three-dimensional structural finite element model, named as the Multi-filament twist model, of the strand with the real configuration of the LMI strand is built to study the influences of the plasticity of the component materials, the twist of the filament bundle, the initial thermal residual stress and the breakage and its evolution of the filaments on the mechanical behaviors of the strand. The effective properties of superconducting filament bundle with random filament breakage and its evolution versus strain are obtained based on the damage theory of fiber-reinforced composite materials proposed by Curtin and Zhou. From the calculation results of this model, we find that the occurrence of the hysteresis loop in the cyclic loading curve is determined by the reverse yielding of the elastic-plastic materials in the strand. Both the initial thermal residual stress in the strand and the pitch length of the filaments have significant impacts on the axial and hysteretic behaviors of the strand. The damage of the filaments also affects the axial mechanical behavior of the strand remarkably at large axial strain. The critical current of the strand is calculated by the scaling law with the results of the Multi-filament twist model. The predicted results of the Multi-filament twist model show an acceptable agreement with the experiment.

  8. Cyclic mechanical stimulation rescues achilles tendon from degeneration in a bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Lin, Zhen; Ni, Ming; Thien, Christine; Day, Robert E; Gardiner, Bruce; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B; Smith, David W; Wang, Allan; Lloyd, David G; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Qiujian; Zheng, Ming H

    2015-12-01

    Physiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for tendinopathy, whereby symptoms are relieved by changing the biomechanical environment of the pathological tendon. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we first established a model of progressive tendinopathy-like degeneration in the rabbit Achilles. Following ex vivo loading deprivation culture in a bioreactor system for 6 and 12 days, tendons exhibited progressive degenerative changes, abnormal collagen type III production, increased cell apoptosis, and weakened mechanical properties. When intervention was applied at day 7 for another 6 days by using cyclic tensile mechanical stimulation (6% strain, 0.25 Hz, 8 h/day) in a bioreactor, the pathological changes and mechanical properties were almost restored to levels seen in healthy tendon. Our results indicated that a proper biomechanical environment was able to rescue early-stage pathological changes by increased collagen type I production, decreased collagen degradation and cell apoptosis. The ex vivo model developed in this study allows systematic study on the effect of mechanical stimulation on tendon biology.

  9. Disordered long-range internal stresses in deformed copper and the mechanisms underlying plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Lyle E.; Larson, Ben C; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Geantil, P.; Kassner, Michael E.; Liu, W.; Stoudt, M. R.; Tavazza, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    The strength of wavy glide metals increases dramatically during deformation as dislocations multiply and entangle, forming dense dislocation wall structures. Numerous competing models have been proposed for this process but experimental validation and guidance for further model development require new experimental approaches capable of resolving local stresses within the dislocation microstructure. We use three-dimensional X-ray microscopy combining submicrometer spatial resolution with diffracted-beam masking to make direct measurements of axial elastic strain (and thus stress) in individual dislocation cell walls and their adjacent cell interiors in heavily deformed copper. These spatially resolved measurements show broad, asymmetric distributions of dipolar stresses that directly discriminate between long-standing deformation models and demonstrate that the distribution of local stresses is statistically connected to the global behavior through simple rules.

  10. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  11. Catalytic Mechanism of Nitrile Hydratase Subsequent to Cyclic Intermediate Formation: A QM/MM Study.

    PubMed

    Kayanuma, Megumi; Shoji, Mitsuo; Yohda, Masafumi; Odaka, Masafumi; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2016-04-01

    The catalytic mechanism of an Fe-containing nitrile hydratase (NHase) subsequent to the formation of a cyclic intermediate was investigated using a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method. We identified the following mechanism: (i) proton transfer from βTyr72 to the substrate via αSer113, and cleavage of the S-O bond of αCys114-SO(-) and formation of a disulfide bond between αCys109 and αCys114; (ii) direct attack of a water molecule on the sulfur atom of αCys114, which resulted in the generation of both an imidic acid and a renewed sulfenic cysteine; and (iii) isomerization of the imidic acid to the amide. In addition, to clarify the role of βArg56K, which is one of the essential amino residues in the enzyme, we analyzed a βR56K mutant in which βArg56 was replaced by Lys. The results suggest that βArg56 is necessary for the formation of disulfide intermediate by stabilizing the cleavage of the S-O bond via a hydrogen bond with the oxygen atom of αCys114-SO(-). PMID:27007978

  12. Cyclic stretch reveals a mechanical role for intermediate filaments in a desminopathic cell model.

    PubMed

    Leccia, E; Batonnet-Pichon, S; Tarze, A; Bailleux, V; Doucet, J; Pelloux, M; Delort, F; Pizon, V; Vicart, P; Briki, F

    2013-02-01

    Mechanics is now recognized as crucial in cell function. To date, the mechanical properties of cells have been inferred from experiments which investigate the roles of actin and microtubules ignoring the intermediate filaments (IFs) contribution. Here, we analyse myoblasts behaviour in the context of myofibrillar myopathy resulting from p.D399Y desmin mutation which disorganizes the desmin IF network in muscle cells. We compare the response of myoblasts expressing either mutated or wild-type desmin to cyclic stretch. Cells are cultivated on supports submitted to periodic uniaxial stretch of 20% elongation amplitude and 0.3 Hz frequency. We show that during stretching cycles, cells expressing mutated desmin reduce their mean amplitude both for the elongation and spreading area compared to those expressing wild-type desmin. Even more unexpected, the reorientation angles are altered in the presence of p.D399Y desmin. Yet, at rest, the whole set of those parameters are similar for the two cell populations. Thus, we demonstrate that IFs affect the mechanical properties and the dynamics of cell reorientation. Since these processes are known due to actin cytoskeleton, these results suggest the IFs implication in mechanics signal transduction. Further studies may lead to better understanding of their contribution to this process.

  13. NMR study on mechanisms of ionic polymer-metal composites deformation with water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zicai; Chen, Hualing; Wang, Yongquan; Luo, Bin; Chang, Longfei; Li, Bo; Chen, Luping

    2011-10-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) exhibit a large dynamic bending deformation under exterior electric field. The states and proportions of water within the IPMCs have great effect on the IPMCs deformation properties. This letter investigates the influence of the proportion changes of different types of water on the deformation, which may disclose the working mechanisms of the IPMCs. We give a deformation trend of IPMCs with the reduction of water content firstly. Then by the method of nuclear magnetic resonance, various water types (water bonded to sulfonates, loosely bound water and free water) of IPMCs and their proportions are investigated in the drying process which corresponds to their different deformation states. It is obtained that the deformation properties of IPMCs depend strongly on their water content and the excess free water is responsible for the relaxation deformation.

  14. Load-bearing capacity of screw-retained CAD/CAM-produced titanium implant frameworks (I-Bridge®2) before and after cyclic mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    DITTMER, Marc Philipp; NENSA, Moritz; STIESCH, Meike; KOHORST, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Implant-supported screw-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) produced by CAD/ CAM have been introduced in recent years for the rehabilitation of partial or total endentulous jaws. However, there is a lack of data about the long-term mechanical characteristics. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the failure mode and the influence of extended cyclic mechanical loading on the load-bearing capacity of these frameworks. Material and Methods Ten five-unit FDP frameworks simulating a free-end situation in the mandibular jaw were manufactured according to the I-Bridge®2-concept (I-Bridge®2, Biomain AB, Helsingborg, Sweden) and each was screw-retained on three differently angulated Astra Tech implants (30º buccal angulation/0º angulation/30º lingual angulation). One half of the specimens was tested for static load-bearing capacity without any further treatment (control), whereas the other half underwent five million cycles of mechanical loading with 100 N as the upper load limit (test). All specimens were loaded until failure in a universal testing machine with an occlusal force applied at the pontics. Load-displacement curves were recorded and the failure mode was macro- and microscopically analyzed. The statistical analysis was performed using a t-test (p=0.05). Results All the specimens survived cyclic mechanical loading and no obvious failure could be observed. Due to the cyclic mechanical loading, the load-bearing capacity decreased from 8,496 N±196 N (control) to 7,592 N±901 N (test). The cyclic mechanical loading did not significantly influence the load-bearing capacity (p=0.060). The failure mode was almost identical in all specimens: large deformations of the framework at the implant connection area were obvious. Conclusion The load-bearing capacity of the I-Bridge®2 frameworks is much higher than the clinically relevant occlusal forces, even with considerably angulated implants. However, the performance under functional loading in vivo

  15. Acoustic Emission as a Tool for Exploring Deformation Mechanisms in Magnesium and Its Alloys In Situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Alexei; Máthis, Kristian

    2016-06-01

    Structural performance of magnesium alloys depends strongly on specific deformation mechanisms operating during mechanical loading. Therefore, in situ monitoring of the acting mechanisms is a key to performance tailoring. We review the capacity of the advanced acoustic emission (AE) technique to understand the interplay between two primary deformation mechanisms—dislocation slip and twinning—in real time scale. Details of relative contributions of dislocation slip and deformation twinning to the mechanical response of pure Mg and Mg-Al alloy are discussed in view of AE results obtained with the aid of recently proposed spectral and signal categorization algorithms in conjunction with with neutron diffraction data.

  16. Influence of deformation behavior, oxydation, and temperature on the long time cyclic stress behavior of high temperature steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maile, K.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of different parameters on the creep-fatigue behavior of several steel alloys was investigated. The higher the temperature the lower the crack initiation value. Pauses during the cycle reduce the damage. Oxidation reduces and protective gas increases the lifetime. Prior loading and prior deformation reduce the lifetime. Short annealing slightly affects the cycle stress behavior. The test results do not satisfactorily agree with methods of extrapolation and damage accumulation.

  17. Cyclic deformation and nano-contact adhesion of MEMS nano-bridges by in-situ TEM nanomechanical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, A. J.; Bobji, M. S.; Bunyan, R. J. T.; Inkson, B. J.

    2010-07-01

    MEMS nano-bridges fabricated by FIB have been deformed in-situ in the TEM. The polysilicon bridges show high levels of flexibility but also, at increased indentation depths, residual plastic deformation after fully unloading the bridges. Here, a significant number of cycles were applied to the centre of a bridge by a W-probe. This resulted in the formation of an adhesive contact with the W-probe. On unloading the nano-bridge regained its original shape and then deformed upwards, adhered to the W-probe. A significant high tensile force of -17μN was required to sever the nano-contact. Analysis of the W-probe and polysilicon nano-bridge indicate that carbon migration along the W-probe and local contact heating due to the associated fatigue cycles were responsible for the adhesive bond, with initial carbon contamination layer on the W-probe of 2nm, thickening during the loading cycles to 25nm.

  18. Dynamic fluctuations provide the basis of a conformational switch mechanism in apo cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Aykaç Fas, Burcu; Tutar, Yusuf; Haliloğlu, Türkan

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP) undergoes conformational changes with cAMP binding and allosterically promotes CRP to bind specifically to the DNA. In that, the structural and dynamic properties of apo CRP prior to cAMP binding are of interest for the comprehension of the activation mechanism. Here, the dynamics of apo CRP monomer/dimer and holo CRP dimer were studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Gaussian Network Model (GNM). The interplay of the inter-domain hinge with the cAMP and DNA binding domains are pre-disposed in the apo state as a conformational switch in the CRP's allosteric communication mechanism. The hinge at L134-D138 displaying intra- and inter-subunit coupled fluctuations with the cAMP and DNA binding domains leads to the emergence of stronger coupled fluctuations between the two domains and describes an on state. The flexible regions at K52-E58, P154/D155 and I175 maintain the dynamic coupling of the two domains. With a shift in the inter-domain hinge position towards the N terminus, nevertheless, the latter correlations between the domains loosen and become disordered; L134-D138 dynamically interacts only with the cAMP and DNA binding domains of its own subunit, and an off state is assumed. We present a mechanistic view on how the structural dynamic units are hierarchically built for the allosteric functional mechanism; from apo CRP monomer to apo-to-holo CRP dimers.

  19. Influence of Cyclic Mechanical Stretch and Tissue Constraints on Cellular and Collagen Alignment in Fibroblast-Derived Cell Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Weidenhamer, Nathan K.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical forces play an important role in shaping the organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in developing and mature tissues. The resulting organization gives the tissue its unique functional properties. Understanding how mechanical forces influence the alignment of the ECM is important in tissue engineering, where recapitulating the alignment of the native tissue is essential for appropriate mechanical anisotropy. In this work, a novel method was developed to create and stretch tubular cell sheets by seeding neonatal dermal fibroblasts onto a rotating silicone tube. We show the fibroblasts proliferated to create a confluent monolayer around the tube and a collagenous, isotropic tubular tissue over 4 weeks of static culture. These silicone tubes with overlying tubular tissue constructs were mounted into a cyclic distension bioreactor and subjected to cyclic circumferential stretch at 5% strain, 0.5 Hz for 3 weeks. We found that the tissue subjected to cyclic stretch compacted axially over the silicone tube in comparison to static controls, leading to a circumferentially aligned tissue with higher membrane stiffness and maximum tension. In a subsequent study, the tissue constructs were constrained against axial compaction during cyclic stretching. The resulting alignment of fibroblasts and collagen was perpendicular (axial) to the stretch direction (circumferential). When the cells were devitalized with sodium azide before stretching, similarly constrained tissue did not develop strong axial alignment. This work suggests that both mechanical stretching and mechanical constraints are important in determining tissue organization, and that this organization is dependent on an intact cytoskeleton. PMID:23126441

  20. Mechanics of dielectric elastomer-activated deformable transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Zhou, Jinxiong; Sun, Wenjie; Wu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ling

    2014-09-01

    Laminating a thin layer of elastomeric grating on the surface of a prestretched dielectric elastomer (DE) membrane forms a basic design of electrically tunable transmission grating. We analyze the inhomogeneous deformation of a circular multiple-region configuration. Variation of the geometric and material parameters, as well as of the critical condition determined by loss of tension instability, is probed to aid the design of a DE-based deformable grating. The predicted changes in the grating period agree substantially with the experimental results reported by Aschwanden et al (Aschwanden et al 2007 IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 19 1090).

  1. Experimental Deformation of Diopside Single Crystals at Mantle P and T: Mechanical Data and Deformation Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiguet, E.; Raterron, P.; Cordier, P.; Couvy, H.; Chen, J.

    2009-04-01

    Clinopyroxenes (cpx) are major constituents of eclogites and are present in excess of 10 vol.% at most depths in the pyrolitic upper mantle. Among mantle minerals, they exhibit the strongest anisotropy for seismic wave propagation. Cpx plastic properties may thus significantly affect both mantle rheology and seismic anisotropy. Yet, no study of cpx rheology at high-pressure (typically P > 3 GPa) has been reported so far, while recent developments in high-pressure deformation devices coupled with synchrotron radiation allow now investigating the rheology of mantle minerals and aggregates at the extreme pressure and temperature (T) of their natural occurrence in the Earth. In order to investigate the effect of P on cpx rheology, steady state deformation experiments were carried out on gem quality oriented diopside crystals in the Deformation-DIA apparatus (D-DIA, see Wang et al., 2003, Rev. Scientific Instr., 74, 3002) that equipped the X17B2 beamline of the NSLS (Upton, NY, USA), at P ranging from 3.8 to 8.8 GPa, T in the range 1100˚ -1400˚ C, and with differential stress () ranging between 0.2 and 1.7 GPa. Three compression directions were chosen in order to activate either 1 •2 {1¯10} dislocation slip (duplex) systems together, or [100](010) and [010](100) systems together, or again [001] dislocation slip in (100), (010) and {110} planes. Constant and specimen strain rates (ɛ˙) were monitored in situ using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction and radiography, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of the run products revealed that dislocation creep was responsible for sample deformation. Comparison of the present high-P deformation data with data obtained at room-P - on similar diopside crystals deformed at comparable T- conditions (Raterron and Jaoul, 1991, JGR, 96, 14277) - allows quantifying the effect of P on the activity of 1 •2 {1¯10} duplex systems. This translates into an activation volume V * = 17 ± 6 cm

  2. Models for rupture mechanics of plate boundaries and crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, A.

    1983-01-01

    The role of pull aparts and pushups in transcurrent systems, the rotation of faults and blocks within transcurrent fault systems, the role of accretion tectonics in plate boundary deformation, and power law creep behavior and the yielding at plate boundaries were investigated.

  3. On the mechanism of cell lysis by deformation.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Takeya, Ryu; Naito, Seiji; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we identify the extent of deformation that causes cell lysis using a simple technique where a drop of cell suspension is compressed by two flat plates. The viability of human prostatic adenocarcinoma PC-3 cells in solutions of various concentrations of NaCl is determined as a function of the gap size between the plates. The viability declines with decreasing gap size in the following order: 700 mM >150 mM >75 mM NaCl. This is considered to be due to the difference in cell size, which is caused by the osmotic volume change before deformation; cell diameter becomes smaller in a solution of higher NaCl concentration, which appears to increase the survival ratio in a given gap size. The deformation-induced decrease in cell viability is correlated with the cell surface strain, which is dependent on the increase in surface area, irrespective of NaCl concentration. In addition, the treatment of cells with cytochalasin D results in the disappearance of cortical actin filaments and a marked drop in the viability, indicating that cell lysis is closely related to the deformation of the cytoskeleton. PMID:15519346

  4. Mechanisms for high-frequency cyclicity in the Upper Jurassic limestone of northeastern Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.R.; Ward, W.C. ); Goldhammer, R.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The 520 m of Upper Jurassic Zuloaga Limestone exposed in the Sierra de Bunuelos in southern Coahuila comprise 118 cycles of peritidal carbonate rock deposited on a gently dipping ramp. Field studies with Fischer plots and time-series analysis suggest that a Milankovitchian glacioeustasy mechanism is inadequate to describe the Zuloaga cycles. Autocyclic progradation may have been the major influence on depositional cyclicity. Depositional cycles in the Zuloaga Formation typically are a few meters thick and asymmetric with subtidal wackestone and packstone grading upward into subtidal grainstone or into intertidal stromatolites. Width of the carbonate ramp is estimated to have been about 150 km. Sedimentation rates for these peritidal carbonate environments apparently exceeded subsidence rates inasmuch as most of the carbonate platform remained near sea level during Zuloaga deposition. The area was tectonically quiescent during the late Jurassic. Autocyclic shoreline progradation is a feasible mechanism for producing the high-frequency cycles, as suggested by (1) poor correlation with predicted Milankovitch periodicity shown by time-series analysis, (2) little evidence of subaerial exposure, (3) development of complete peritidal cycles, (4) general progradational sequences within each third-order unit, and (5) absence of polar glaciation during Late Jurassic.

  5. Molecular mechanism for 3:1 subunit stoichiometry of rod cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Shuart, Noah G.; Haitin, Yoni; Camp, Stacey S.; Black, Kevin D.; Zagotta, William N.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular determinants of ion channel tetramerization are well characterized, but those involved in heteromeric channel assembly are less clearly understood. The heteromeric composition of native channels is often precisely controlled. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels from rod photoreceptors exhibit a 3:1 stoichiometry of CNGA1 and CNGB1 subunits that tunes the channels for their specialized role in phototransduction. Here we show, using electrophysiology, fluorescence, biochemistry, and X-ray crystallography, that the mechanism for this controlled assembly is the formation of a parallel 3-helix coiled-coil domain of the carboxy-terminal leucine zipper region of CNGA1 subunits, constraining the channel to contain three CNGA1 subunits, followed by preferential incorporation of a single CNGB1 subunit. Deletion of the carboxy-terminal leucine zipper domain relaxed the constraint and permitted multiple CNGB1 subunits in the channel. The X-ray crystal structures of the parallel 3-helix coiled-coil domains of CNGA1 and CNGA3 subunits were similar, suggesting that a similar mechanism controls the stoichiometry of cone CNG channels. PMID:21878911

  6. Cyclic Cryogenic Thermal-Mechanical Testing of an X-33/RLV Liquid Oxygen Tank Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin

    1999-01-01

    An important step in developing a cost-effective, reusable, launch vehicle is the development of durable, lightweight, insulated, cryogenic propellant tanks. Current cryogenic tanks are expendable so most of the existing technology is not directly applicable to future launch vehicles. As part of the X-33/Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program, an experimental apparatus developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for evaluating the effects of combined, cyclic, thermal and mechanical loading on cryogenic tank concepts was used to evaluate cryogenic propellant tank concepts for Lockheed-Martin Michoud Space Systems. An aluminum-lithium (Al 2195) liquid oxygen tank concept, insulated with SS-1171 and PDL-1034 cryogenic insulation, is tested under simulated mission conditions, and the results of those tests are reported. The tests consists of twenty-five simulated Launch/Abort missions and twenty-five simulated flight missions with temperatures ranging from -320 F to 350 F and a maximum mechanical load of 71,300 lb. in tension.

  7. Thermo-mechanical modelling of cyclic gas storage applications in salt caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Norbert; Watanabe, Norihiro; Görke, Uwe-Jens; Kolditz, Olaf; Nagel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the growing importance of renewable energy sources it becomes more and more necessary to investigate energy storage potentials. One major way to store energy is the power-to-gas concept. Excessive electrical energy can be used either to produce hydrogen or methane by electrolysis or methanation or to compress air, respectively. Those produced gases can then be stored in artificial salt caverns, which are constructed in large salt formations by solution mining. In combination with renewable energy sources, the power-to-gas concept is subjected to fluctuations. Compression and expansion of the storage gases lead to temperature differences within the salt rock. The variations can advance several metres into the host rock, influencing its material behaviour, inducing thermal stresses and altering the creep response. To investigate the temperature influence on the cavern capacity, we have developed a numerical model to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviour of salt caverns during cyclic gas storage. The model considers the thermodynamic behaviour of the stored gases as well as the heat transport and the temperature dependent material properties of the host rock. Therefore, we utilized well-known constitutive thermo-visco-plastic material models, implemented into the open source-scientific software OpenGeoSys. Both thermal and mechanical processes are solved using a finite element approach, connected via a staggered coupling scheme. The model allows the assessment of the structural safety as well as the convergence of the salt caverns.

  8. Subcritical crack-growth behavior of borosilicate glass under cyclic loads: Evidence of a mechanical fatigue effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Bennison, S.J.

    1997-03-01

    Amorphous glasses are generally considered immune to mechanical fatigue effects associated with cyclic loading. In this study surprising new evidence is presented for a mechanical fatigue effect in borosilicate glass, in both moist air and dry nitrogen environments. The fatigue effect occurs at near threshold subcritical crack-growth rates (da/dt < 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s) as the crack extension per cycle approaches the dimensions of the borosilicate glass network. While subcritical crack growth under cyclic loads at higher load levels is entirely consistent with environmentally assisted crack growth, lower growth rates actually exceed those measured under monotonic loads. This suggests a mechanical fatigue effect which accelerates subcritical crack-growth rates. Likely mechanisms for the mechanical fatigue effect are presented.

  9. Evidence for Cyclic Brittle-Ductile Deformation from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) Phase 3 Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. C.; Kennedy, L.

    2010-12-01

    Microstructural development in core retrieved from SAFOD Phase 3 drilling has been examined in three locations utilizing light, scanning electron (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM): (1) within the Salinian Terrane near its contact with the presumed Great Valley sequence (Hole E-Run 1-Section 4 & 6); (2) proximal to the Southwest Deformation Zone (SDZ) with which are associated casing deformation and seismic aftershocks indicative of active faulting (Hole G-Run-1-Section 2 & Hole G-Run 2-Section 3); and (3) within the Central Deformation Zone (CDZ) in the centre of the damage zone identified in Phase 2 drilling (Hole G-Run 4-Section 2). The sampling locations translate to an across-strike distance from outside the damage zone to its centre of approximately 125 meters, and a change in current measured depth from 2610 m to 2685m. Common to all cores are: (1) a significant fractional volume (<1μm) of very fine-grained material, both primary grains and tectonized particles; (2) evidence of extensive fluid flux in the form of stress-induced dissolution seams (pressure solution), grain precipitation and veining; and (3) complex, non-systematically varying phyllosilicate intergrowths (illite, muscovite, phengite, chlorite). The Salinian terrane material (E14, E16) comprises coarse-grained quartz and perthitic feldspar clasts that locally form slightly foliated cataclasite. The matrix is commonly chloritic with very fine-grained aggregates and zones of quartz and/or feldspar. Microbrecciation is ubiquitous. There are both fluid-corroded clasts, particularly of quartz, and globular infillings of calcite with sutured contacts. Quartz and feldspar grains are coated by chlorite. Amorphous silica and secondary Ti-Fe oxides occur within cataclasite. Foliated siltstone-shale cataclasites (G12, G23) at the edge of the damage zone close to the SDZ exhibit brecciation and cataclasis at different scales; deformation is episodic as there are distinct overprinting

  10. Chronic high-magnitude cyclic stretch stimulates EC inflammatory response via VEGF receptor 2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gawlak, Grzegorz; Son, Sophia; Tian, Yufeng; O'Donnell, James J; Birukov, Konstantin G; Birukova, Anna A

    2016-06-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is associated with activated inflammatory signaling, such as cytokine production by endothelial and epithelial cells and macrophages, although the precise mechanisms of inflammatory activation induced by VILI-relevant cyclic stretch (CS) amplitude remain poorly understood. We show that exposure of human pulmonary endothelial cells (EC) to chronic CS at 18% linear distension (18% CS), but not at physiologically relevant 5% CS, induces "EC-activated phenotype," which is characterized by time-dependent increase in ICAM1 and VCAM1 expression. A preconditioning of 18% CS also increased in a time-dependent fashion the release of soluble ICAM1 (sICAM1) and IL-8. Investigation of potential signaling mechanisms of CS-induced EC inflammatory activation showed that 18% CS, but not 5% CS, induced time-dependent upregulation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), as monitored by increased protein expression and VEGFR2 tyrosine phosphorylation. Both CS-induced VEGFR2 expression and tyrosine phosphorylation were abrogated by cotreatment with reactive oxygen species inhibitor, N-acetyl cysteine. Molecular inhibition of VEGFR2 expression by gene-specific siRNA or treatment with VEGFR2 pharmacological inhibitor SU-1498 attenuated CS-induced activation of ICAM1 and VCAM1 expression and sICAM1 release. Chronic EC preconditioning at 18% CS augmented EC inflammation and barrier-disruptive response induced by proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α. This effect of chronic 18% CS preconditioning was attenuated by siRNA-induced VEGFR2 knockdown. This study demonstrates for the first time a VEGFR2-dependent mechanism of EC inflammatory activation induced by pathological CS. We conclude that, despite the recognized role of VEGF as a prosurvival and angiogenic factor, excessive activation of VEGFR2 signaling by high-tidal-volume lung mechanical ventilation may contribute to ventilator-induced (biotrauma) lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction by augmenting cell response

  11. Autophagy protects end plate chondrocytes from intermittent cyclic mechanical tension induced calcification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-guang; Yu, Yun-fei; Zheng, Quan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Chuang-dong; Zhao, Xiao-yn; Tong, Wen-xue; Wang, Hong; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Xiao-ling

    2014-09-01

    Calcification of end plate chondrocytes is a major cause of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of end plate chondrocyte calcification is still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify whether autophagy in end plate chondrocytes could protect the calcification of end plate chondrocytes. Previous studies showed that intermittent cyclic mechanical tension (ICMT) contributes to the calcification of end plate chondrocytes in vitro. While autophagy serves as a cell survival mechanism, the relationship of autophagy and induced end plate chondrocyte calcification by mechanical tension in vitro is unknown. Thus, we investigated autophagy, the expression of the autophagy genes, Beclin-1 and LC3, and rat end plate chondrocyte calcification by ICMT. The viability of end plate chondrocytes was examined using the LIVE/DEAD viability/cytotoxicity kit. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the expression of Beclin-1; LC3; type I, II and X collagen; aggrecan; and Sox-9 genes. Immunofluorescent and fluorescent microscopy showed decreased autophagy in the 10- and 20-day groups loaded with ICMT. Additionally, Alizarin red and alkaline phosphatase staining detected the palpable calcification of end plate chondrocytes after ICMT treatment. We found that increased autophagy induced by short-term ICMT treatment was accompanied by an insignificant calcification of end plate chondrocytes. To the contrary, the suppressive autophagy inhibited by long-term ICMT was accompanied by a more significant calcification. The process of calcification induced by ICMT was partially resisted by increased autophagy activity induced by rapamycin, implicating that autophagy may prevent end plate chondrocyte calcification.

  12. Neurochemical mechanisms and pharmacologic strategies in managing nausea and vomiting related to cyclic vomiting syndrome and other gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Bashashati, Mohammad; McCallum, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common gastrointestinal complaints which could be triggered by stimuli in both the peripheral and central nervous systems. They may be considered as defense mechanisms when threatening toxins/agents enter the gastrointestinal tract or there is excessive retention of gastrointestinal contents due to obstruction. The pathophysiology of nausea and vomiting is complex and much still remains unknown. Therefore, treatments are restricted or ineffective in many cases. Nausea and vomiting with functional etiologies including cyclic vomiting syndrome are challenging in gastroenterology. In this article, we review potential pathways, neurochemical transmitters, and their receptors which are possibly involved in the pathophysiology of nausea and vomiting including the entity cyclic vomiting syndrome.

  13. Study on mechanism of lubricating oil consumption caused by cylinder bore deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Hitosugi, Hideshi; Nagoshi, Katsuyuki; Komada, Masaharu; Furuhama, Shoichi

    1996-09-01

    It is a well-known fact that cylinder bore deformations in engine operation involves a number of problems in terms of lubrication, and the deterioration of piston ring conformability to the bore, in particular, increases the lubricating oil consumption (LOC). It is also verified through the cylinder bore deformation measurements carried out by the research laboratory that bore deformations occur in engine operation which can not be ignored. Although some studies on the mechanism and the reduction of such deformations have been conducted, only few analyses have been conducted on the mechanism of the increase in LOC, whereas it is vital to clarify the mechanism under the current situation where the reduction of LOC is urged in terms of purification of exhaust emissions also. This study has been conducted for the clarification of the mechanism of LOC increased by cylinder bore deformation, with emphasis of analysis placed mainly on the following two points: (1) the development of a theoretical calculation method for the behavior of the oil film between a piston ring and the cylinder bore taking into account of the deformed bore profile and the ring elastic deformation, based on the piston ring dynamic lubrication theory developed by Furuhama, analysis of the relationship between the oil film behavior and lubricating oil flow-out rate against the deformed bore profile; (2) measurements of LOC and ring conformability to the bore deformation, using cylinder liners having various types of bore profiles and rings with local clearances on their sliding surfaces. Based on the analyses stated above, qualitatively and quantitatively evaluations of the LOC attributable to the bore deformations have been conducted. The details of the mechanism of LOC determined by the above is reported.

  14. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of 6061 aluminum alloy strips severely deformed by Dissimilar Channel Angular Pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Evren; Kibar, Alp Aykut; Guer, C. Hakan

    2011-04-15

    Dissimilar Channel Angular Pressing (DCAP) is a severe plastic deformation technique to improve the mechanical properties of flat products by producing ultrafine grains. In this study, the changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties of 6061 Al-alloy strips deformed by various numbers of DCAP passes were investigated. Some DCAPed samples were also held at 200 deg. C and 350 deg. C to investigate the effect of post-annealing. Mechanical properties were determined by hardness and tension tests; and microstructural changes were investigated by TEM analysis. Up to a critical level of plastic strain, remarkable improvements have been observed in the strength and hardness of the severely deformed strips; and the improvements have been explained by variations in grain size, dislocation structure, and formation of subgrains. - Research Highlights: {yields}Dissimilar Channel Angular Pressing (DCAP). {yields}Severe plastic deformation (SPD). {yields}Transmission Electron Microscopy of the 6061 Al alloy. {yields}Mechanical Properties of 6061 Al alloy.

  15. Cyclic stretch induces upregulation of endothelin-1 with keratinocytes in vitro: Possible role in mechanical stress-induced hyperpigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Masakazu; Okazaki, Mutsumi; Fujino, Takashi; Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} Influence of cyclic stretch on melanogenetic paracrine cytokines was investigated. {yields} Keratinocyte-derived endothelin-1 was upregulated with cyclic stretch. {yields} Degree of upregulation increases dose-dependently. {yields} This upregulation possibly plays a role in the pathogenesis of pigmented disorders. -- Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the possible pathological relation between mechanical stress and hyperpigmentation. We did this by investigating the influence of cyclic stretch on the expression of keratinocyte- and fibroblast-derived melanogenetic paracrine cytokines in vitro. Using primary human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, alterations of mRNA expression of melanogenetic paracrine cytokines due to cyclic stretch were investigated using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cytokines included basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-1{alpha}, and endothelin-1 (ET-1) for keratinocytes and bFGF, SCF, and hepatocyte growth factor for fibroblasts. The dose dependence of keratinocyte-derived ET-1 upregulation was further investigated using real-time PCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We also investigated the effects of cyclic stretch on the proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. Among the melanogenetic paracrine cytokines investigated, keratinocyte-derived ET-1 was consistently upregulated in all four cell lines. The degree of upregulation increased with the degree of the length and frequency of the stretch; in contrast, cell number and differentiation markers showed no obvious alterations with cyclic stretch. Keratinocyte-derived ET-1 upregulation possibly plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of pigmented disorders, such as friction melanosis, caused by mechanical stress.

  16. Graphene Topographies: Multiscale Graphene Topographies Programmed by Sequential Mechanical Deformation (Adv. Mater. 18/2016).

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yen; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Qiu, Yang; Valentin, Thomas M; Steinberg, Ruben Spitz; Wang, Zhongying; Hurt, Robert H; Wong, Ian Y

    2016-05-01

    P.-Y. Chen, R. H. Hurt, I. Y. Wong and co-workers demonstrate a hierarchical graphene surface architecture generated by using various sequences and combinations of extreme mechanical deformation, as shown in the false-colored SEM image. As described on page 3564, the sequential patterning approach enables the design of feature sizes and orientations across multiple length scales which are retained during mechanical deformations of similar extent. This results in sequence-dependent surface topographies with structural memory. PMID:27151628

  17. Multiple mechanisms underlying rectification in retinal cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNGA1) channels.

    PubMed

    Arcangeletti, Manuel; Marchesi, Arin; Mazzolini, Monica; Torre, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    In cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNGA1) channels, in the presence of symmetrical ionic conditions, current-voltage (I-V) relationship depends, in a complex way, on the radius of permeating ion. It has been suggested that both the pore and S4 helix contribute to the observed rectification. In the present manuscript, using tail and gating current measurements from homotetrameric CNGA1 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, we clarify and quantify the role of the pore and of the S4 helix. We show that in symmetrical Rb(+) and Cs(+) single-channel current rectification dominates macroscopic currents while voltage-dependent gating becomes larger in symmetrical ethylammonium and dimethylammonium, where the open probability strongly depends on voltage. Isochronal tail currents analysis in dimethylammonium shows that at least two voltage-dependent transitions underlie the observed rectification. Only the first voltage-dependent transition is sensible to mutation of charge residues in the S4 helix. Moreover, analysis of tail and gating currents indicates that the number of elementary charges per channel moving across the membrane is less than 2, when they are about 12 in K(+) channels. These results indicate the existence of distinct mechanisms underlying rectification in CNG channels. A restricted motion of the S4 helix together with an inefficient coupling to the channel gate render CNGA1 channels poorly sensitive to voltage in the presence of physiological Na(+) and K(+).

  18. Characterization of a 3D multi-mechanism SMA material model for the prediction of the cyclic "evolutionary" response of NiTi for use in actuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Binod

    The intermetallic NiTi-based alloys are known as Shape Memory material. They exhibit unique ability to remember a shape after large deformation. They are desirable in various engineering applications, such as actuators, biomedical devices, vibration damping, etc, as they can absorb and dissipate mechanical/thermal energies by undergoing a reversible hysteretic shape change under the applied mechanical/thermal cyclic loadings. This reflects the effect of micro-structural changes occurring during phase transformation between Austenite(A) and Martensite(M), as well as differently-oriented M-variants. As typically utilized in applications, a particular shape memory alloy (SMA) device or component operates under a large number of thermo-mechanical cycles, hence, the importance of accounting for the cyclic behavior characteristics in modeling and characterization of these systems. A detailed study of the multi-mechanism-based, comprehensive, thus complex modeling framework (by Saleeb et al) and the determination of its material parameters responsible for the physical significance of the shape memory effect are made. This formulation utilizes multiple, inelastic mechanisms to regulate the partitioning of energy dissipation and storage governing the evolutionary thermo-mechanical behavior. Equipped with the understanding of the physical significance of the model parameters and utilizing the SMA modeling strategy effectively, a comprehensive characterization of the evolutionary, cyclic response of the complex real SMA, known as 55NiTi (Ni49.9Ti50.1) is carried out. The detailed comparisons between the SMA model and experimental results provided the necessary validation of the modeling capabilities of the framework to calibrate the complex alloys like 55NiTi. In addition, the details of interplays between the internal mechanisms to describe the material behavior within all the important response characteristic regions provides a convenient means to compliment the theoretical

  19. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time. PMID:26924339

  20. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time.

  1. Cyclic stretch induces upregulation of endothelin-1 with keratinocytes in vitro: possible role in mechanical stress-induced hyperpigmentation.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Masakazu; Okazaki, Mutsumi; Fujino, Takashi; Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori

    2011-05-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible pathological relation between mechanical stress and hyperpigmentation. We did this by investigating the influence of cyclic stretch on the expression of keratinocyte- and fibroblast-derived melanogenetic paracrine cytokines in vitro. Using primary human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, alterations of mRNA expression of melanogenetic paracrine cytokines due to cyclic stretch were investigated using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cytokines included basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-1α, and endothelin-1 (ET-1) for keratinocytes and bFGF, SCF, and hepatocyte growth factor for fibroblasts. The dose dependence of keratinocyte-derived ET-1 upregulation was further investigated using real-time PCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We also investigated the effects of cyclic stretch on the proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. Among the melanogenetic paracrine cytokines investigated, keratinocyte-derived ET-1 was consistently upregulated in all four cell lines. The degree of upregulation increased with the degree of the length and frequency of the stretch; in contrast, cell number and differentiation markers showed no obvious alterations with cyclic stretch. Keratinocyte-derived ET-1 upregulation possibly plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of pigmented disorders, such as friction melanosis, caused by mechanical stress.

  2. Deformation Mechanisms is a-Phase Silicon Nitride Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Schneider; A. K. Mukherjee

    1998-08-12

    Changes of phase composition and morphology were investigated in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} both before and after compressive deformation testing. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens, with 5 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 5 wt% MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} additives, were rapidly consolidated to preserve the initial, metastable {alpha}-phase present in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} starting powders. Constant strain rate compression tests were used to evaluate the strain rate dependency of the flow stress. At 1723 K, a flow stress dependency value of n = 2 was observed.

  3. Revealing cyclic hardening mechanism of a TRIP steel by real-time in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dunji; An, Ke; Chen, Yan; Chen, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Real-time in situ neutron diffraction was performed on a transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel under cyclic loading at room temperature. By Rietveld refinement and single peak analysis, the volume fraction and average stress estimates as well as dislocation density of individual phases (austenite and martensite phase) were derived. The results reveal that the volume fraction of martensite phase, instead of individual phase strengthening, should be accounted for the remarkable secondary cyclic hardening.

  4. Mechanical durability of polymeric coatings studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy: correlation between cyclic loading and free volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Peng, Q.; Huang, Y. Y.; Zhang, R.; Mallon, P. E.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.; Wu, Y.; Richardson, J. R.; Sandreczki, T. C.; Jean, Y. C.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.

    2002-06-01

    The mechanical durability of seven commercially polymeric coatings is investigated using slow positron beam techniques to monitor changes in sub-nanometer defects during the process of cyclic loading. Doppler broadened energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) measurements were performed as a function of the slow positron energy at different periods of cycling loading. The positron annihilation dada show that both S-defect parameter and o-positronium (Ps) lifetime decrease as the loading cycle increases. The results indicate a loss of free volumes due to the loss of mechanical durability by cyclic loading. A direct correlation between the loss of S-defect parameter and the period of loading cycle is observed. This is interpreted as that durability of polymeric coatings is controlled by the atomic level free volumes. It is shown that the slow positron beam is a very successful probe in detecting the very early stages of coating degradation due to mechanical processes.

  5. Deformation mechanisms of bent Si nanowires governed by the sign and magnitude of strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihua; Kong, Deli; Xin, Tianjiao; Shu, Xinyu; Zheng, Kun; Xiao, Lirong; Sha, Xuechao; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Ze; Han, Xiaodong; Zou, Jin

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the deformation mechanisms of bent Si nanowires are investigated at the atomic scale with bending strain up to 12.8%. The sign and magnitude of the applied strain are found to govern their deformation mechanisms, in which the dislocation types (full or partial dislocations) can be affected by the sign (tensile or compressive) and magnitude of the applied strain. In the early stages of bending, plastic deformation is controlled by 60° full dislocations. As the bending increases, Lomer dislocations can be frequently observed. When the strain increases to a significant level, 90° partial dislocations induced from the tensile surfaces of the bent nanowires are observed. This study provides a deeper understanding of the effect of the sign and magnitude of the bending strain on the deformation mechanisms in bent Si nanowires.

  6. The influence of large deformations on mechanical properties of sinusoidal ligament structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Tomasz; Jopek, Hubert; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof W.

    2016-05-01

    Studies of mechanical properties of materials, both theoretical and experimental, usually deal with linear characteristics assuming a small range of deformations. In particular, not much research has been published devoted to large deformations of auxetic structures - i.e. structures exhibiting negative Poisson’s ratio. This paper is focused on mechanical properties of selected structures that are subject to large deformations. Four examples of structure built of sinusoidal ligaments are studied and for each geometry the impact of deformation size and geometrical parameters on the effective mechanical properties of these structures are investigated. It is shown that some of them are auxetic when compressed and non-auxetic when stretched. Geometrical parameters describing sinusoidal shape of ligaments strongly affect effective mechanical properties of the structure. In some cases of deformation, the increase of the value of amplitude of the sinusoidal shape decreases the effective Poisson’s ratio by 0.7. Therefore the influence of geometry, as well as the arrangement of ligaments allows for smart control of mechanical properties of the sinusoidal ligament structure being considered. Given the large deformation of the structure, both a linear elastic material model, and a hyperelastic Neo-Hookean material model are used.

  7. Cumulative mechanical moments and microstructure deformation induced by growth shape in columnar solidification.

    PubMed

    Billia, Bernard; Bergeon, Nathalie; Thi, Henri Nguyen; Jamgotchian, Haïk; Gastaldi, Joseph; Grange, Gérard

    2004-09-17

    The dynamical interaction between columnar interface microstructure and self-stress, resulting in unforeseen mechanical deformation phenomena, is brought to light by means of in situ and real-time synchrotron x-ray topography during directional solidification of dilute aluminum alloys. Beyond long-known local mechanical stresses, global mechanical constraints are found to be active. In particular, column rotation results from deformation caused by the mechanical moments associated with the very growth shape, namely, the cumulative torque acting together with the cumulative bending moment under gravity. A basic model allowing for a qualitative explanation of the observed distinctive features of the self-stress effects on microstructure dynamics is proposed.

  8. Effect of deformation temperature on the mechanical behavior and deformation mechanisms of Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mazen, A.A. . Dept. of Engineering)

    1999-08-01

    Aluminum-alumina (Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) metal matrix composite (MMC) materials were fabricated using the powder metallurgy (PM) techniques of hot pressing followed by hot extrusion. Different reinforcement weight fractions were used, that is, 0, 2.5, 5, and 10 wt% Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. The effect of deformation temperature was investigated through hot tensile deformation conducted at different temperatures. The microstructures of the tested specimens were also investigated to characterize the operative softening mechanisms. The yield and tensile strength of the Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] were found to improve as a function of reinforcement weight fraction. With the exception of Al-10wt%Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], the MMC showed better strength and behavior at high temperatures than the unreinforced matrix. The uniform deformation range was found to decrease for the same reinforcement weight fraction, as a function of temperature. For the same deformation temperature, it increases as a function of reinforcement weight fraction. Both dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization were found to be operative in Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] MMC as a function of deformation temperature. Dynamic recovery is dominant in the lower temperature range, while dynamic recrystallization is more dominant at the higher range. The increase in reinforcement weight fraction was found to lead to early nucleation of recrystallization. No direct relationship was established as far as the number of grains nucleated due to each reinforcement particle.

  9. Computer modelling of cyclic deformation of high-temperature materials. Technical progress report, 1 June-30 August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Duesbery, M.S.; Louat, N.P.

    1994-08-30

    This program aims at improving current methods of lifetime assessment by building in the characteristics of the micro-mechanisms known to be responsible for damage and failure. The broad approach entails the integration and, where necessary, augmentation of the micro-scale research results currently available in the literature into a macro-scale model with predictive capability.

  10. Molecular structure and mechanisms of action of cyclic and linear ion transport antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Duax, W L; Griffin, J F; Langs, D A; Smith, G D; Grochulski, P; Pletnev, V; Ivanov, V

    1996-01-01

    Ionophores are antibiotics that induce ion transport across natural and artificial membranes. The specific function of a given ionophore depends upon its selectivity and the kinetics of ion capture, transport, and release. Systematic studies of complexed and uncomplexed forms of linear and cyclic ionophores provide insight into molecular mechanisms of ion capture and release and the basis for ion selectivity. The cyclic dodecadepsipeptide valinomycin, cyclo[(-L-Val-D-Hyi-D-Val-L-Lac)3-], transports potassium ions across cellular membrane bilayers selectively. The x-ray crystallographic and nmr spectroscopic data concerning the structures of Na+, K+, and Ba+2 complexes are consistent and provide a rationale for the K+ selectivity of valinomycin. Three significantly different conformations of valinomycin are observed in anhydrous crystals, in hydrated crystals grown from dimethylsulfoxide, and in crystals grown from dioxane. Each of these conformations suggests a different mechanism of ion capture. One of the observed conformations has an elliptical structure stabilized by four 4<--1 intramolecular hydrogen bonds and two 5<--1 hydrogen bonds. Ion capture could be readily achieved by disruption of the 5<--1 hydrogen bonds to permit coordination to a potassium ion entering the cavity. The conformation found in crystals obtained from dimethyl sulfoxide is an open flower shape having three petals and three 4<--1 hydrogen bonds. Complexation could proceed by a closing up of the three petals of the flower around the desolvating ion. In the third form, water molecules reside in the central cavity of a bracelet structure having six 4<--1 hydrogen bonds. Two of these bracelets stack over one another with their valine-rich faces surrounding a dioxane molecule. The stacked molecules form a channel approximately 20 A in length, suggesting that under certain circumstances valinomycin might function as a channel. A series of analogues of valinomycin differing in ring composition

  11. Deformation mechanisms of a 20Mn TWIP steel investigated by in situ neutron diffraction and TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Wang, Y. D.; Liu, Xiaopeng; Sun, Xin; Peng, R. Lin; Zhang, S. Y.; Zuo, Liang; Liaw, Peter K.

    2013-07-25

    The deformation mechanisms and associated microstructure changes during tensile loading of an annealed twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel with the chemical composition of Fe–20Mn–3Si–3Al–0.045C (wt.%) were systematically investigated using in situ time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction in combination with postmortem transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The initial microstructure of the investigated alloy consists of equiaxed austenitic grains with the initial α´-phase of ~7% in volume. In addition to dislocation slip, twinning and two kinds of martensitic transformations from the austenite to α´- and epsilon martensites were observed as the main deformation modes during the tensile deformation. In situ neutron diffraction provides a powerful tool to establish the deformation mode map for elucidating the role of different deformation modes in different strain regions. The critical stress is 520 MPa for the martensitic transformation from the austenite to α´-martensite, whereas a higher stress (>600 MPa) is required for actuating the deformation twin and/or the martensitic transformation from -martensite. Both epsilon- and α´-martensites act as the hard phases whereas mechanical twinning contributes to both strength and ductility of the studied steel. TEM observations confirmed that the twinning process was facilitated by the parent grains orientated with <111> or <110> parallel to the loading direction. The nucleation and growth of twins are attributed to the pole and self-generation formation mechanisms, as well as the stair-rod cross-slip mechanism.

  12. Evidence for a cyclic GMP-independent mechanism in the anti-platelet action of S-nitrosoglutathione

    PubMed Central

    Gordge, M P; Hothersall, J S; Noronha-Dutra, A A

    1998-01-01

    We have measured the ability of a range of NO donor compounds to stimulate cyclic GMP accumulation and inhibit collagen-induced aggregation of human washed platelets. In addition, the rate of spontaneous release of NO from each donor has been measured spectrophotometrically by the oxidation of oxyhaemoglobin to methaemoglobin. The NO donors used were five s-nitrosothiol compounds: S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), S-nitrosocysteine (cysNO), S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP), S-nitroso-N-acetyl-cysteine (SNAC), S-nitrosohomocysteine (homocysNO), and two non-nitrosothiol compounds: diethylamine NONOate (DEANO) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP).Using 10 μM of each donor compound, mean±s.e.mean rate of NO release ranged from 0.04±0.001 nmol min−1 (for SNP) to 3.15±0.29 nmol min−1 (for cysNO); cyclic GMP accumulation ranged from 0.43±0.05 pmol per 108 platelets (for SNP) to 2.67±0.31 pmol per 108 platelets (for cysNO), and inhibition of platelet aggregation ranged from 40±6.4% (for SNP) to 90±3.8% (for SNAC).There was a significant positive correlation between the rate of NO release and the ability of the different NO donors to stimulate intra-platelet cyclic GMP accumulation (r=0.83; P=0.02). However, no significant correlation was observed between the rate of NO release and the inhibition of platelet aggregation by the different NO donors (r=−0.17), nor was there a significant correlation between cyclic GMP accumulation and inhibition of aggregation by the different NO donor compounds (r=0.34).Comparison of the dose-response curves obtained with GSNO, DEANO and 8-bromo cyclic GMP showed DEANO to be the most potent stimulator of intraplatelet cyclic GMP accumulation (P<0.001 vs both GSNO and 8-bromo cyclic GMP), but GSNO to be the most potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation (P<0.01 vs DEANO, and P<0.001 vs 8-bromo cyclic GMP).The rate of NO release from GSNO, and its ability both to stimulate intra-platelet cyclic GMP accumulation and to

  13. Deformation mechanisms in Be{sub 12}X compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Brimhall, J.L.; Charlot, L.A.; Sondhi, S.; Hoagland, R.G.; Hirth, J.P.

    1992-12-01

    Dislocation structures have been examined, and active slip systems identified, in Be{sub l2}Nb after compressive deformation at 20, 800, 900 1000 and 1200C. A large number of slip systems are active at 1200C, but these decrease significantly at temperatures below 1000C. Dislocation structures at low temperatures are limited to 1/2<101(101) partial dislocations either paired or creating isolated planar faults. Significant ductility is not observed until 1200C when a second type of partial dislocation, 1/2<100(011) is present. Dislocations observed in the body-centered tetragonal Be{sup 12}X compounds (where X can be Nb, Ta, Mo, V, Fe etc.) have been modelled atomistically using molecular dynamics. Simulations corroborate the stability of these dislocation systems and indicate that the stacking faults associated with these partial dislocations have very low fault energy.

  14. Earthquake mechanism and seafloor deformation for tsunami generation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.; Oglesby, David D.; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Tsunamis are generated in the ocean by rapidly displacing the entire water column over a significant area. The potential energy resulting from this disturbance is balanced with the kinetic energy of the waves during propagation. Only a handful of submarine geologic phenomena can generate tsunamis: large-magnitude earthquakes, large landslides, and volcanic processes. Asteroid and subaerial landslide impacts can generate tsunami waves from above the water. Earthquakes are by far the most common generator of tsunamis. Generally, earthquakes greater than magnitude (M) 6.5–7 can generate tsunamis if they occur beneath an ocean and if they result in predominantly vertical displacement. One of the greatest uncertainties in both deterministic and probabilistic hazard assessments of tsunamis is computing seafloor deformation for earthquakes of a given magnitude.

  15. Representing Matrix Cracks Through Decomposition of the Deformation Gradient Tensor in Continuum Damage Mechanics Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented to represent the large-deformation kinematics of intraply matrix cracks and delaminations in continuum damage mechanics (CDM) constitutive material models. The method involves the additive decomposition of the deformation gradient tensor into 'crack' and 'bulk material' components. The response of the intact bulk material is represented by a reduced deformation gradient tensor, and the opening of an embedded cohesive interface is represented by a normalized cohesive displacement-jump vector. The rotation of the embedded interface is tracked as the material deforms and as the crack opens. The distribution of the total local deformation between the bulk material and the cohesive interface components is determined by minimizing the difference between the cohesive stress and the bulk material stress projected onto the cohesive interface. The improvements to the accuracy of CDM models that incorporate the presented method over existing approaches are demonstrated for a single element subjected to simple shear deformation and for a finite element model of a unidirectional open-hole tension specimen. The material model is implemented as a VUMAT user subroutine for the Abaqus/Explicit finite element software. The presented deformation gradient decomposition method reduces the artificial load transfer across matrix cracks subjected to large shearing deformations, and avoids the spurious secondary failure modes that often occur in analyses based on conventional progressive damage models.

  16. Deformation mechanisms adjacent to a thrust fault, Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.C.; McConnell, D.A.; Friberg, V.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the character of grain-scale deformation adjacent to a Laramide thrust fault in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. This site represents a window through the hanging wall of a thrust sheet which juxtaposes Precambrian rocks over Pennsylvanian rocks. It provides a rare opportunity to examine deformation mechanisms in the footwall of a basement-involved thrust. Brittle deformation is evident at both outcrop and grain-scale. Filled fractures and slickensides composed of quartz and epidote are present throughout the area, and increase in abundance adjacent to the fault zone, as does the frequency of mesoscopic faulting. Variations in deformation mechanisms can be seen between the Precambrian rocks of the thrust sheet and the Pennsylvanian metasedimentary rocks, and between the metamorphosed arkoses and metapelites within the Pennsylvanian section. Cataclastic textures are present in deformed Precambrian rocks, and the degree of cataclasis is greatest immediately adjacent to the fault zone. Deformation in the Pennsylvanian rocks is largely dependent upon the abundance of fine-grained matrix within each sample. The degree of brittle deformation is negatively correlated to the percentage of matrix. Coarser-grained sections show microscopic faults which offset quartz and feldspar grains. Offsets decrease on the faults as they pass from coarse grains into the matrix.

  17. Detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in diffusion bonding of steel hollow structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Li, H.; Li, M. Q.

    2016-05-01

    This study focused on the detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in similar diffusion bonding as well as on the fabrication of high quality martensitic stainless steel hollow structural components. A special surface with regular patterns was processed to be joined so as to observe the extent of surface asperity deformation under different bonding pressures. Results showed that an undamaged hollow structural component has been obtained with full interfacial contact and the same shear strength to that of base material. Fracture surface characteristic combined with surface roughness profiles distinctly revealed the enhanced surface asperity deformation as the applied pressure increases. The influence of surface asperity deformation mechanism on joint formation was analyzed: (a) surface asperity deformation not only directly expanded the interfacial contact areas, but also released deformation heat and caused defects, indirectly accelerating atomic diffusion, then benefits to void shrinkage; (b) surface asperity deformation readily introduced stored energy difference between two opposite sides of interface grain boundary, resulting in strain induced interface grain boundary migration. In addition, the influence of void on interface grain boundary migration was analyzed in detail.

  18. Large Deformation Mechanisms, Plasticity, and Failure of an Individual Collagen Fibril With Different Mineral Content.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils are composed of tropocollagen molecules and mineral crystals derived from hydroxyapatite to form a composite material that combines optimal properties of both constituents and exhibits incredible strength and toughness. Their complex hierarchical structure allows collagen fibrils to sustain large deformation without breaking. In this study, we report a mesoscale model of a single mineralized collagen fibril using a bottom-up approach. By conserving the three-dimensional structure and the entanglement of the molecules, we were able to construct finite-size fibril models that allowed us to explore the deformation mechanisms which govern their mechanical behavior under large deformation. We investigated the tensile behavior of a single collagen fibril with various intrafibrillar mineral content and found that a mineralized collagen fibril can present up to five different deformation mechanisms to dissipate energy. These mechanisms include molecular uncoiling, molecular stretching, mineral/collagen sliding, molecular slippage, and crystal dissociation. By multiplying its sources of energy dissipation and deformation mechanisms, a collagen fibril can reach impressive strength and toughness. Adding mineral into the collagen fibril can increase its strength up to 10 times and its toughness up to 35 times. Combining crosslinks with mineral makes the fibril stiffer but more brittle. We also found that a mineralized fibril reaches its maximum toughness to density and strength to density ratios for a mineral density of around 30%. This result, in good agreement with experimental observations, attests that bone tissue is optimized mechanically to remain lightweight but maintain strength and toughness. PMID:26866939

  19. Large Deformation Mechanisms, Plasticity, and Failure of an Individual Collagen Fibril With Different Mineral Content.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils are composed of tropocollagen molecules and mineral crystals derived from hydroxyapatite to form a composite material that combines optimal properties of both constituents and exhibits incredible strength and toughness. Their complex hierarchical structure allows collagen fibrils to sustain large deformation without breaking. In this study, we report a mesoscale model of a single mineralized collagen fibril using a bottom-up approach. By conserving the three-dimensional structure and the entanglement of the molecules, we were able to construct finite-size fibril models that allowed us to explore the deformation mechanisms which govern their mechanical behavior under large deformation. We investigated the tensile behavior of a single collagen fibril with various intrafibrillar mineral content and found that a mineralized collagen fibril can present up to five different deformation mechanisms to dissipate energy. These mechanisms include molecular uncoiling, molecular stretching, mineral/collagen sliding, molecular slippage, and crystal dissociation. By multiplying its sources of energy dissipation and deformation mechanisms, a collagen fibril can reach impressive strength and toughness. Adding mineral into the collagen fibril can increase its strength up to 10 times and its toughness up to 35 times. Combining crosslinks with mineral makes the fibril stiffer but more brittle. We also found that a mineralized fibril reaches its maximum toughness to density and strength to density ratios for a mineral density of around 30%. This result, in good agreement with experimental observations, attests that bone tissue is optimized mechanically to remain lightweight but maintain strength and toughness.

  20. On Green-Cusson Ansätze and deformed supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, J.; Debergh, N.

    1996-11-01

    Supersymmetric quantum mechanics cannot be deformed when the superposition of only a pair of usual bosons and fermions is considered, but it can if nontrivial parabosons and parafermions of the same order p of paraquantization are superposed. We take the simplest case p=2 and exhibit reducibility problems in that context by using Green-Cusson Ansätze following Macfarlane methods. Specific representations of the Lie superalgebra osp (2|2, R) play an interesting role in connection with possible deformations.

  1. Predictive Model for Temperature-Induced Deformation of Robot Mechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonyapak, Pranchalee

    The positioning accuracy and repeatability of a robot are critical for many industrial applications. Drift in repeatability can occur with changes in environmental and internal conditions, such as those seen with temperature-induced deformation. Thermal instability causes dimensional deformation, and a warm-up cycle is typically required to bring the robot to a thermally stable working condition. The elimination of warm-up cycles will ultimately enhance the positioning accuracy of the robots, their productivity, and reduce unnecessary energy consumption. The main objective of this research was to develop a robot controller algorithm that would provide, a priori, compensation for temperature-induced deformation associated with warm-up in robot mechanical systems. The research started at the fundamental stage of gaining insight into the thermal behaviour and corresponding temperature-induced deformation of simplified, i.e., one-dimensional, robot mechanical systems consisting of slender links and heat sources. The systems were studied using concomitant experimental, numerical and analytical models to provide cross-checking of the results. For the experimental model, the deformation was measured by tracking the drift of a laser diode spot across a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera chip. A non-contact measurement system consisting of an infrared camera, a CCD camera and a laser diode was developed to provide high accuracy measurement for the deformation. The numerical model was generated with a coupled thermal-mechanical finite element analysis incorporating thermal effects due to conduction and convection. The models were tested with the analytical model that was further extended using a finite difference technique. Once the three models showed excellent agreement, it was possible to develop a controller algorithm. Deformations predicted by the finite difference model were used as input for a validation experiment of the compensation algorithm. Results of the

  2. Identification of fundamental deformation and failure mechanisms in armor ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Andrea Marie

    Indentation of a surface with a hard sphere can be used to examine micromechanical response of a wide range of materials and has been shown to generate loading conditions resembling early stages of ballistic impact events. Cracking morphologies also show similarities, particularly with formation of cone cracks at the contact site. The approach in this thesis is to use this indentation technique to characterize contact damage and deformation processes in armor ceramics, as well as identify the role of cone cracking and inelastic behavior. To accomplish these objectives, an instrumented indentation system was designed and fabricated, extending depth-sensing capabilities originally developed for nano-indentation to higher forces. This system is also equipped with an acoustic emission system to detect onset of cone cracking and subsequent failure. Once calibrated and verified the system was used to evaluate elastic modulus and cone crack initiation forces of two commercial float glasses. As-received air and tin surfaces of soda-lime-silica and borosilicate float glass were tested to determine differences in elastic and fracture behavior. Information obtained from load--displacement curves and visual inspection of indentation sites were used to determine elastic modulus, and conditions for onset of cone cracking as a function of surface roughness. No difference in reduced modulus or cone cracking loads on as-received air and tin surfaces were observed. Abraded surfaces showed the tin surface to be slightly more resistant to cone cracking. A study focusing on the transition from elastic to inelastic deformation in two transparent fine-grained polycrystalline spinels with different grain sizes was then conducted. Congruent experiments included observations on evolution of damage, examinations of sub-surface damage and inspection of remnant surface profiles. Indentation stress--strain behavior obtained from load--displacement curves revealed a small difference in yielding

  3. Mechanical Response of DNA–Nanoparticle Crystals to Controlled Deformation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of DNA-conjugated nanoparticles represents a promising avenue toward the design of engineered hierarchical materials. By using DNA to encode nanoscale interactions, macroscale crystals can be formed with mechanical properties that can, at least in principle, be tuned. Here we present in silico evidence that the mechanical response of these assemblies can indeed be controlled, and that subtle modifications of the linking DNA sequences can change the Young’s modulus from 97 kPa to 2.1 MPa. We rely on a detailed molecular model to quantify the energetics of DNA–nanoparticle assembly and demonstrate that the mechanical response is governed by entropic, rather than enthalpic, contributions and that the response of the entire network can be estimated from the elastic properties of an individual nanoparticle. The results here provide a first step toward the mechanical characterization of DNA–nanoparticle assemblies, and suggest the possibility of mechanical metamaterials constructed using DNA. PMID:27725959

  4. Redox instability, mechanical deformation, and heterogeneous damage accumulation in solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, F.; Nelson, G. J.; Chiu, W. K. S.; Haataja, M.

    2012-08-01

    Mechanical integrity and damage tolerance represent two key challenges in the design of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). In particular, reduction and oxidation (redox) cycles, and the associated large transformation strains have a notable impact on the mechanical stability and failure mode of SOFC anodes. In this study, the deformation behavior under redox cycling is investigated computationally with an approach that provides a detailed, microstructurally based view of heterogeneous damage accumulation behavior within an experimentally obtained nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia SOFC anode microstructure. Simulation results underscore the critical role that the microstructure plays in the mechanical deformation behavior of and failure within such materials.

  5. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites: Plasticity and damage mechanisms, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The inelastic deformation mechanisms for the SiC (SCS-6)/Ti-15-3 system were studied at 538 C (1000 F) using a combination of mechanical measurements and detailed microstructural examinations. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall MMC response, and to compare the room temperature and elevated temperature deformation behaviors. Four different laminates were studied: (0)8, (90)8,(+ or -45)2s, and (0/90)2s, with the primary emphasis on the unidirectional (0)8, and (90)8 systems. The elevated temperature responses were similar to those at room temperature, involving a two-stage elastic-plastic type of response for the (0)8 system, and a characteristic three-stage deformation response for the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s systems. The primary effects of elevated temperatures included: (1) reduction in the 'yield' and failure strengths; (2) plasticity through diffused slip rather than concentrated planar slip (which occurred at room temperature); and (3) time-dependent deformation. The inelastic deformation mechanism for the (0)8 MMC was dominated by plasticity at both temperatures. For the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s MMCs, a combination of damage and plasticity contributed to the deformation at both temperatures.

  6. μCT based assessment of mechanical deformation of designed PTMC scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Narra, Nathaniel; Blanquer, Sébastien B.G.; Haimi, Suvi P.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Hyttinen, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Advances in rapid-prototyping and 3D printing technologies have enhanced the possibilities in preparing designed architectures for tissue engineering applications. A major advantage in custom designing is the ability to create structures with desired mechanical properties. While the behaviour of a designed scaffold can be simulated using bulk material properties, it is important to verify the behaviour of a printed scaffold at the microstructure level. OBJECTIVE: In this study we present an effective method in validating the mechanical behaviour of designed scaffolds using a μCT with an in-situ mechanical deformation device. METHODS: The scaffolds were prepared from biodegradable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) by stereolithography and images obtained using a high-resolution μCT with 12.25μm isometric voxels. The data was processed (filtering, segmentation) and analysed (surface generation, registration) to extract relevant deformation features. RESULTS: The computed local deformation fields, calculated at sub-pore resolutions, displayed expected linear behaviour within the scaffold along the compressions axis. On planes perpendicular to this axis, the deformations varied by 150– 200μm. CONCLUSIONS: μCT based imaging with in-situ deformation provides a vital tool in validating the design parameters of printed scaffolds. Deformation fields obtained from micro-tomographic image volumes can serve to corroborate the simulated ideal design with the realized product. PMID:25818150

  7. Cell Deformation by Single-beam Acoustic Trapping: A Promising Tool for Measurements of Cell Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Jihun; Park, Jin Man; Lee, Changyang; Jung, Hayong; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact single-beam acoustic trapping method for the quantification of the mechanical properties of a single suspended cell with label-free. Experimentally results show that the single-beam acoustic trapping force results in morphological deformation of a trapped cell. While a cancer cell was trapped in an acoustic beam focus, the morphological changes of the immobilized cell were monitored using bright-field imaging. The cell deformability was then compared with that of a trapped polystyrene microbead as a function of the applied acoustic pressure for a better understanding of the relationship between the pressure and degree of cell deformation. Cell deformation was found to become more pronounced as higher pressure levels were applied. Furthermore, to determine if this acoustic trapping method can be exploited in quantifying the cell mechanics in a suspension and in a non-contact manner, the deformability levels of breast cancer cells with different degrees of invasiveness due to acoustic trapping were compared. It was found that highly-invasive breast cancer cells exhibited greater deformability than weakly-invasive breast cancer cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the single-beam acoustic trapping technique is a promising tool for non-contact quantitative assessments of the mechanical properties of single cells in suspensions with label-free. PMID:27273365

  8. Cell Deformation by Single-beam Acoustic Trapping: A Promising Tool for Measurements of Cell Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Jihun; Park, Jin Man; Lee, Changyang; Jung, Hayong; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact single-beam acoustic trapping method for the quantification of the mechanical properties of a single suspended cell with label-free. Experimentally results show that the single-beam acoustic trapping force results in morphological deformation of a trapped cell. While a cancer cell was trapped in an acoustic beam focus, the morphological changes of the immobilized cell were monitored using bright-field imaging. The cell deformability was then compared with that of a trapped polystyrene microbead as a function of the applied acoustic pressure for a better understanding of the relationship between the pressure and degree of cell deformation. Cell deformation was found to become more pronounced as higher pressure levels were applied. Furthermore, to determine if this acoustic trapping method can be exploited in quantifying the cell mechanics in a suspension and in a non-contact manner, the deformability levels of breast cancer cells with different degrees of invasiveness due to acoustic trapping were compared. It was found that highly-invasive breast cancer cells exhibited greater deformability than weakly-invasive breast cancer cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the single-beam acoustic trapping technique is a promising tool for non-contact quantitative assessments of the mechanical properties of single cells in suspensions with label-free.

  9. Transition in Failure Mechanism Under Cyclic Creep in 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Aritra; Nagesha, A.; Parameswaran, P.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M. D.

    2014-06-01

    Cyclic creep behavior of a type 316LN austenitic stainless steel was investigated in the temperature range from 823 K to 923 K (550 °C to 650 °C). A transition from fatigue-dominated to creep-dominated failure mode was observed with an increase in the mean stress. The threshold value of mean stress for the transition was seen to be a strong function of the test temperature. Occurrence of dynamic strain aging proved beneficial owing to a substantial reduction in the strain accumulation during cyclic loading.

  10. Computer modelling of cyclic deformation of high-temperature materials. Technical progress report, 16 November 1992-15 February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Duesbery, M.S.

    1993-02-26

    This program aims at improving current methods of lifetime assessment by building in the characteristics of the micro-mechanisms known to be responsible for damage and failure. The broad approach entails the integration and, where necessary, augmentation of the micro-scale research results currently available in the literature into a macro-scale model with predictive capability. In more detail, the program will develop a set of hierarchically structured models at different length scales, from atomic to macroscopic, at each level taking as parametric input the results of the model at the next smaller scale. In this way the known microscopic properties can be transported by systematic procedures to the unknown macro-scale region. It may not be possible to eliminate empiricism completely, because some of the quantities involved cannot yet be estimated to the required degree of precision. In this case the aim will be at least to eliminate functional empiricism.

  11. Inelastic Deformation of Metal Matrix Composites. Part 1; Plasticity and Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a Ti 15-3/SCS6 (SiC fiber) metal matrix composite (MMC) were investigated using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall inelastic response, and to confirm the mechanisms by rigorous microstructural evaluations. The results of room temperature experiments performed on 0 degree and 90 degree systems primarily are reported in this report. Results of experiments performed on other laminate systems and at high temperatures will be provided in a forthcoming report. Inelastic deformation of the 0 degree MMC (fibers parallel to load direction) was dominated by the plasticity of the matrix. In contrast, inelastic deformations of the 90 degree composite (fibers perpendicular to loading direction) occurred by both damage and plasticity. The predictions of a continuum elastic plastic model were compared with experimental data. The model was adequate for predicting the 0 degree response; however, it was inadequate for predicting the 90 degree response largely because it neglected damage. The importance of validating constitutive models using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis is pointed out. The deformation mechanisms, and the likely sequence of events associated with the inelastic deformation of MMCs, are indicated in this paper.

  12. Investigation of deformation mechanisms of staggered nanocomposites using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiazhagan, S.; Anup, S.

    2016-08-01

    Biological materials with nanostructure of regularly or stair-wise staggered arrangements of hard platelets reinforced in a soft protein matrix have superior mechanical properties. Applications of these nanostructures to ceramic matrix composites could enhance their toughness. Using molecular dynamics simulations, mechanical behaviour of the bio-inspired nanocomposites is studied. Regularly staggered model shows better flow behaviour compared to stair-wise staggered model due to the symmetrical crack propagation along the interface. Though higher stiffness and strength are obtained for stair-wise staggered models, rapid crack propagation reduces the toughness. Arresting this crack propagation could lead to superior mechanical properties in stair-wise staggered models.

  13. The effect of aluminium on mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms of hadfield steel single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, E. G.; Kireeva, I. V.; Chumlyakov, Y. I.; Shul'Mina, A. A.; Sehitoglu, H.; Karaman, I.

    2004-06-01

    On single crystals of Hadfield steel (Fe-13Mn-1.3C, Fe-13Mn-2.7Al-1.3C, wt.%) the systematical investigations of deformation mechanisms - slip and twinning, stages of plastic flow, strain hardening coefficient depending on orientation of tensile axis have been carried out by methods of optical and electron microscopy, x-ray analysis. Is has been shown that the combination of low stacking fault energy (γ{SF}=0.03J/m^2) with high concentration of carbon atoms in aluminium-free steel results in development of the mechanical twinning at room temperature in all crystal orientations. The new type of twinning with formation of extrinsic stacking fault has been found out in [001] single crystals. Experimentally it has been established that alloying with aluminium leads to increase of stacking fault energy of Hadfield steel and suppresses twinning in all orientations of crystals at preservation of high values of strain-hardening coefficients θ.

  14. Computer modelling of cyclic deformation of high-temperature materials. Technical progress report, 1 September-30 November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Duesbery, M.S.

    1993-11-30

    This program aims at improving current methods of lifetime assessment by building in the characteristics of the micro-mechanisms known to be responsible for damage and failure. The broad approach entails the integration and, where necessary, augmentation of the micro-scale research results currently available in the literature into a macro-sale model with predictive capability. In more detail, the program will develop a set of hierarchically structured models at different length scales, from atomic to macroscopic, at each level taking as parametric input the results of the model at the next smaller scale. In this way the known microscopic properties can be transported by systematic procedures to the unknown macro-scale region. It may mot be possible to eliminate empiricism completely, because some of the quantities involved cannot yet be estimated to the required degree of precision. In this case the aim will be at least to eliminate functional empiricism. Restriction of empiricism to the choice of parameters to be input to known functional forms permits some confidence in extrapolation procedures and has the advantage that the models can readily be updated as better estimates of the parameters become available.

  15. Mechanisms of Photo-Induced Deformations of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Nathan; Kuzyk, Mark; Neal, Jeremy; Luchette, Paul; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Over a century ago, Alexander Graham Bell invented the photophone, which he used to transmit mechanical information on a beam of light. We report on the use of an active Fabry-Perot interferometer to encode and detect mechanical information using the photomechanical effect of a liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) that is placed at a critical point between the reflectors. These are the first steps in the creation of ultra smart materials which require a large photomechanical response. Thus, understanding the underlying mechanisms is critical. Only limited studies of the mechanisms of the photomechanical effect, such as photo-isomerization, photo-reorientation and thermal effects have been studied in azo-dye-doped LCEs and in azo-dye-doped polymer fibers have been reported. The focus of our present work is to use the Fabry-Perot transducer geometry to study the underlying mechanisms and to determine the relevant material parameters that are used to develop theoretical models of the response. We use various intensity-modulated optical wave forms to determine the frequency response of the material, which are used to predict the material response.

  16. Elucidating the Molecular Deformation Mechanism of Entangled Polymers in Fast Flow by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yangyang; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis; Cheng, Shiwang; Hong, Kunlun; Chen, Wei-Ren; Liu, Jianning; Lin, Panpan; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Understanding the viscoelastic properties of polymers is of fundamental and practical importance because of the vast and ever expanding demand of polymeric materials in daily life. Our current theoretical framework for describing the nonlinear flow behavior of entangled polymers is built upon the tube model pioneered by de Gennes, Doi, and Edwards. In this work, we critically examine the central hypothesis of the tube model for nonlinear rheology using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). While the tube model envisions a unique non-affine elastic deformation mechanism for entangled polymers, our SANS measurements show that the evolution of chain conformation of a well-entangled polystyrene melt closely follows the affine deformation mechanism in uniaxial extension, even when the Rouse Weissenberg number is much smaller than unity. This result provides a key clue for understanding the molecular deformation mechanism of entangled polymers in fast flow. Several implications from our analysis will be discussed in this talk.

  17. Thermo-mechanical modeling of dendrite deformation in continuous casting of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domitner, J.; Drezet, J.-M.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2012-07-01

    In the field of modern steelmaking, continuous casting has become the major manufacturing process to handle a wide range of steel grades. An important criterion characterizing the quality of semi-finished cast products is the macrosegregation forming at the centre of these products during solidification. The deformation induced interdendritic melt flow has been identified as the key mechanism for the formation of centreline segregation. Bulging of the solidified strand shell causes deformation of the solidifying dendrites at the casting's centre. Hence, a fundamental knowledge about the solid phase motion during casting processes is crucial to examine segregation phenomena in detail. To investigate dendritic deformation particularly at the strand centre, a thermo-mechanical Finite Element (FE) simulation model is built in the commercial software package ABAQUS. The complex dendritic shape is approximated with a conical model geometry. Varying this geometry allows considering the influence of different centreline solid fractions on the dendrite deformation. A sinusoidal load profile is used to describe bulging of the solid which deforms the dendrites. Based on the strain rates obtained in the FE simulations the dendrite deformation velocity perpendicular to the casting direction is calculated. The velocity presented for different conditions is used as input parameter for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to investigate macrosegregation formation inside of a continuous casting strand using the commercial software package FLUENT.

  18. A Mechanism-based Model for Deformation Twinning in Polycrystalline FCC Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Sun, Xin; Wang, Y. D.; Hu, Xiaohua; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2014-06-01

    Deformation twinning, a common and important plastic deformation mechanism, is the key contributor to the excellent combination of strength and ductility in twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel. In the open literature, a significant amount of research has been reported on the microstructural characteristics of deformation twinning and its influence on the overall deformation behavior of TWIP steel. In this study, we examine the feasibility of a mechanism-based crystal plasticity model in simulating the microstructural level deformation characteristics of TWIP steel. To this end, a model considering both double-slip and double-twin is developed to investigate the stress-strain behavior and local microstructural features related to the formation and growth of micro-twins in low stacking fault energy (SFE) TWIP steel. The twin systems are described as pseudo-slips that can be activated when their resolved shear stress reaches the corresponding critical value. A hardening law that accounts for the interaction among the slip and twin systems is also developed. Numerical simulations for dDifferent mesh sizes and single crystal patch tests under different loading modes are carried out to verify the modeling procedure. Our simulation results reveal that, despite its simple nature, the double-slip/double-twin model can capture the key deformation features of TWIP steel, including twin volume fraction evolution, continuous strain hardening, and the final fracture in the form of strain localization.

  19. Tuning of a deformable image registration procedure for skin component mechanical properties assessment.

    PubMed

    Montin, E; Cutri, E; Spadola, G; Testori, A; Pennati, G; Mainardi, L

    2015-01-01

    Several studies report the mechanical properties of skin tissues but their values largely depend on the measurement method. Therefore, we investigated the feasibility of recognizing the cellular constituents mechanical properties of pigmented skin by Confocal Laser Scanner Microscopy (CLSM). With this purpose, an healthy volunteer was examined in three areas nearby a pigmented skin lesion in two configurations: deforming and non deforming the nevus. The tissue displacement of the nevus was then assessed by means of deformable registration of the images in these two configurations. There are several registration strategy able to overcome this task, among them, we proposed two methods with different deformation models: a Free Form Deformation (FFD) model based on b-spline and a second one based on Demons Registration Algorithm (DRA). These two strategies need the definition of several parameters in order to obtain optimal registration performances. Thus, we tuned these parameters by means of simulated data and evaluated their registration abilities on the real in vivo CLSM acquisitions in the two configurations. The results showed that the registration using DRA had a better performance in comparison to the FFD one, in particular in two out of the three areas the DRA performance was significantly better than the FFD one. The registration procedure highlighted deformation differences among the chosen areas. PMID:26737734

  20. A TEM Study of Creep Deformation Mechanisms in Allvac 718Plus

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R; Unocic, Kinga A; Hayes, Robert; Daehn, Glenn; Mills, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary study on the evolution of creep deformation substructure in Ni-base superalloy Allvac 718Plus has been performed. Specimens crept at 620 MPa and at temperatures ranging from 690-732 C were examined utilizing diffraction contrast TEM characterization techniques. Creep was interrupted at 1-2.5% strain in order to study the deformation substructure following a limited amount of deformation. The dominant deformation modes at each of the test temperatures were highly planar in nature and involved shearing of the matrix and precipitates on {111} glide planes. In addition, paired a/2<110> dislocations were evident which suggest an antiphase boundary shearing mechanism. Creep induced microtwinning was also observed at the highest creep temperature which was created by identical a/6<112> Shockley partial dislocations that shear the matrix and precipitates on consecutive close packed {111} glide planes.

  1. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-40 mass % Nb alloy after megaplastic deformation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkeev, Yurii P.; Eroshenko, Anna Yu.; Glukhov, Ivan A.; Sun, Zeming; Zhu, Qifang; Danilov, Vladimir I.; Tolmachev, Alexei I.

    2015-10-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti alloy contained 40 mass % Nb at megaplastic deformation effect is described. It was proved that the deformation effect including the multiple abc-pressing and multi-pass rolling and further pre-recrystallizing annealing enhances the formation of ultra-fine grained structures with mean element size of 0.3 μm or less, involving stable (β + α)-phase composition and metastable nanosized ω-phase in the alloy. This, in its turn, significantly improves the mechanical properties and simultaneously preserves low elastic modulus level.

  2. Communications: Mechanical Deformation of Dendrites by Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilling, J.; Hellawell, A.

    1996-01-01

    It is generally accepted that liquid agitation during alloy solidification assists in crystal multiplication, as in dendrite fragmentation and the detachment of side arms in the mushy region of a casting. Even without deliberate stirring by electromagnetic or mechanical means, there is often vigorous interdendritic fluid flow promoted by natural thermosolutal convection. In this analysis, we shall estimate the stress at the root of a secondary dendrite arm of aluminum arising from the action of a flow of molten metal past the dendrite arm.

  3. Structure and mechanism of E. coli RNA 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Remus, Barbara S; Jacewicz, Agata; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-11-01

    2H (two-histidine) phosphoesterase enzymes are distributed widely in all domains of life and are implicated in diverse RNA and nucleotide transactions, including the transesterification and hydrolysis of cyclic phosphates. Here we report a biochemical and structural characterization of the Escherichia coli 2H protein YapD YadP [corrected], which was identified originally as a reversible transesterifying "nuclease/ligase" at RNA 2',5'-phosphodiesters. We find that YapD YadP [corrected] is an "end healing" cyclic phosphodiesterase (CPDase) enzyme that hydrolyzes an HORNA>p substrate with a 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiester to a HORNAp product with a 2'-phosphomonoester terminus, without concomitant end joining. Thus we rename this enzyme ThpR (two-histidine 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase acting on RNA). The 2.0 Å crystal structure of ThpR in a product complex with 2'-AMP highlights the roles of extended histidine-containing motifs (43)HxTxxF(48) and (125)HxTxxR(130) in the CPDase reaction. His43-Nε makes a hydrogen bond with the ribose O3' leaving group, thereby implicating His43 as a general acid catalyst. His125-Nε coordinates the O1P oxygen of the AMP 2'-phosphate (inferred from geometry to derive from the attacking water nucleophile), pointing to His125 as a general base catalyst. Arg130 makes bidentate contact with the AMP 2'-phosphate, suggesting a role in transition-state stabilization. Consistent with these inferences, changing His43, His125, or Arg130 to alanine effaced the CPDase activity of ThpR. Phe48 makes a π-π stack on the adenine nucleobase. Mutating Phe28 to alanine slowed the CPDase by an order of magnitude. The tertiary structure and extended active site motifs of ThpR are conserved in a subfamily of bacterial and archaeal 2H enzymes. PMID:25239919

  4. Time-dependent Deformation in Porous Rocks Driven by Chemo-mechanical Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Brantut, N.; Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.

    2015-12-01

    We report results from triaxial deformation of porous sandstone and limestone conducted to determine the time-dependency of deformation. Experiments were run on water-saturated samples under constant differential stress (creep) conditions. In sandstone, the deformation is entirely brittle for all levels of stress and for all resulting strain rates. The strain rate during creep is very stress sensitive, with a change of only 20 MPa in differential stress producing three orders of magnitude change in strain rate. Failure occurs by localized shear faulting after an extended period of dilatant microcracking, as evidenced by the output of acoustic emissions. By contrast, the behaviour of limestone is more complex. At low effective pressure, the creep behavior is brittle and characterised by the same features as observed for sandstone; a decelerating phase of creep, followed by an inflection and then an accelerating creep phase leading to macroscopic failure. Similarly, only a small amount of inelastic strain is accommodated before failure, and P wave speeds measured throughout deformation decrease continuously, indicating a continuous increase in dilatant crack damage. At higher effective pressure, brittle creep still occurs, but the details of the time-dependent deformation behavior are quite different. First, the total amount of accumulated creep strain increases dramatically with decreasing strain rate, and no localized failure occurs even at these higher strains. Second, the rate of decrease in P wave speeds during deformation decreases with decreasing strain rate; indicating that less damage is accumulated per unit strain when the strain rate is lower. Third, complementary strain rate stepping experiments indicate that the deformation becomes more compactant at lower strain rates. Taken together, these observations suggest that rate-dependent compactive deformation mechanisms compete with dilatant subcritical crack growth during creep in limestone under low

  5. Morphogenetic Mechanisms in the Cyclic Regeneration of Hair Follicles and Deer Antlers from Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyi; McMahon, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We have made comparisons between hair follicles (HFs) and antler units (AUs)—two seemingly unrelated mammalian organs. HFs are tiny and concealed within skin, whereas AUs are gigantic and grown externally for visual display. However, these two organs share some striking similarities. Both consist of permanent and cyclic/temporary components and undergo stem-cell-based organogenesis and cyclic regeneration. Stem cells of both organs reside in the permanent part and the growth centres are located in the temporary part of each respective organ. Organogenesis and regeneration of both organs depend on epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Establishment of these interactions requires stem cells and reactive/niche cells (dermal papilla cells for HFs and epidermal cells for AUs) to be juxtaposed, which is achieved through destruction of the cyclic part to bring the reactive cells into close proximity to the respective stem cell niche. Developments of HFs and AUs are regulated by similar endocrine (particularly testosterone) and paracrine (particularly IGF1) factors. Interestingly, these two organs come to interplay during antlerogenesis. In conclusion, we believe that investigators from the fields of both HF and AU biology could greatly benefit from a comprehensive comparison between these two organs. PMID:24383056

  6. Emergent morphogenesis: elastic mechanics of a self-deforming tissue.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lance A; Joshi, Sagar D; Kim, Hye Young; von Dassow, Michelangelo; Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Multicellular organisms are generated by coordinated cell movements during morphogenesis. Convergent extension is a key tissue movement that organizes mesoderm, ectoderm, and endoderm in vertebrate embryos. The goals of researchers studying convergent extension, and morphogenesis in general, include understanding the molecular pathways that control cell identity, establish fields of cell types, and regulate cell behaviors. Cell identity, the size and boundaries of tissues, and the behaviors exhibited by those cells shape the developing embryo; however, there is a fundamental gap between understanding the molecular pathways that control processes within single cells and understanding how cells work together to assemble multicellular structures. Theoretical and experimental biomechanics of embryonic tissues are increasingly being used to bridge that gap. The efforts to map molecular pathways and the mechanical processes underlying morphogenesis are crucial to understanding: (1) the source of birth defects, (2) the formation of tumors and progression of cancer, and (3) basic principles of tissue engineering. In this paper, we first review the process of tissue convergent extension of the vertebrate axis and then review models used to study the self-organizing movements from a mechanical perspective. We conclude by presenting a relatively simple "wedge-model" that exhibits key emergent properties of convergent extension such as the coupling between tissue stiffness, cell intercalation forces, and tissue elongation forces. PMID:19815213

  7. Temporal Effects of Mechanical Loading on Deformation-Induced Damage in Skeletal Muscle Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Stekelenburg, A.; Strijkers, G. J.; Rijpkema, J. J. M.; Baaijens, F. P. T.; Bader, D. L.; Nicolay, K.; Oomens, C. W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical loading of soft tissues covering bony prominences can cause skeletal muscle damage, ultimately resulting in a severe pressure ulcer termed deep tissue injury. Recently, by means of an experimental-numerical approach, it was shown that local tissue deformations cause tissue damage once a deformation threshold is exceeded. In the present study, the effects of load exposure time and intermittent load relief on the development of deformation-induced muscle damage were investigated. The data showed that a 2 h loading period caused more damage than 10 min loading. Intermittent load reliefs of 2 min during a 2 h loading period had minimal effect on the evolution of skeletal muscle damage. In addition, a local deformation threshold for damage was found, which was similar for each of the loading regimes applied in this study. For short loading periods, these results imply that local tissue deformations determine whether muscle damage will develop and the exposure time influences the amount of tissue damage. Temporary load reliefs were inefficient in reducing deformation-induced damage, but may still influence the development of ischemia-induced damage during longer loading periods. PMID:20232152

  8. Prostaglandins and muscarinic agonists induce cyclic AMP attenuation by two distinct mechanisms in the pregnant-rat myometrium. Interaction between cyclic AMP and Ca2+ signals.

    PubMed Central

    Goureau, O; Tanfin, Z; Harbon, S

    1990-01-01

    In pregnant-rat myometrium (day 21 of gestation), isoprenaline-induced cyclic AMP accumulation, resulting from receptor-mediated activation of adenylate cyclase, was negatively regulated by prostaglandins [PGE2, PGF2 alpha; EC50 (concn. giving 50% of maximal response) = 2 nM] and by the muscarinic agonist carbachol (EC50 = 2 microM). PG-induced inhibition was prevented by pertussis-toxin treatment, supporting the idea that it was mediated by the inhibitory G-protein Gi through the inhibitory pathway of the adenylate cyclase. Both isoprenaline-induced stimulation and PG-evoked inhibition of cyclic AMP were insensitive to Ca2+ depletion. By contrast, carbachol-evoked attenuation of cyclic AMP accumulation was dependent on Ca2+ and was insensitive to pertussis toxin. The inhibitory effect of carbachol was mimicked by ionomycin. Indirect evidence was thus provided for the enhancement of cyclic AMP degradation by a Ca2(+)-dependent phosphodiesterase activity in the muscarinic-mediated effect. The attenuation of cyclic AMP elicited by carbachol coincided with carbachol-stimulated inositol phosphate (InsP3, InsP2 and InsP) generation, which displayed an almost identical EC50 (3 microM) and was similarly unaffected by pertussis toxin. Both carbachol effects were reproduced by oxotremorine, whereas pilocarpine (a partial muscarinic agonist) failed to induce any decrease in cyclic AMP accumulation and concurrently was unable to stimulate the generation of inositol phosphates. These data support our proposal for a carbachol-mediated enhancement of a Ca2(+)-dependent phosphodiesterase activity, compatible with the rises in Ca2+ associated with muscarinic-induced increased generation of inositol phosphates. They further illustrate that a cross-talk between the two major transmembrane signalling systems contributed to an ultimate decrease in cyclic AMP in the pregnant-rat myometrium near term. PMID:1700899

  9. On the creep deformation mechanisms of an advanced disk nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unocic, Raymond R.

    The main objective of this research was aimed at investigating the fundamental relationship between microstructure and creep deformation mechanisms using a variety of electron microscopy characterization techniques. The alloy used in this research, Rene 104, is a newer generation powder metallurgy Ni-base superalloy that was developed specifically for aircraft gas turbine disk applications with extended service durability at temperatures exceeding 650°C. The influence of stress and temperature was studied first and it was found that during creep deformation at temperatures between 677--815°C and stresses between 345--724MPa a variety of distinctly different creep deformation mechanisms were operative. In addition to identifying the creep deformation mechanisms an attempt was made to determine the creep rate limiting process so that an improved understanding of the fundamental processes that control deformation can be better understood. Microtwinning was found to the dominant deformation mechanism following creep at 677°C/690MPa and 704°C/724MPa. Microtwins form by the motion of paired a/6<112> Shockley partial dislocations that shear both the gamma matrix and gamma' precipitates. The rate limiting process in this mechanism is diffusion mediated atomic reordering that occurs in the wake of the shearing, twinning partial dislocations in order to maintain the ordered L12 structure of the gamma' precipitates. This reordering process helps to fundamentally explain the temperature and rate dependence of microtwinning under creep conditions within this temperature and stress regime. At a slightly higher temperature but lower stress (760°C and 345MPa), a stacking fault related shearing mechanism, which typically spanned only a few micrometers in length, was the principle deformation mode. The faults left behind in the gamma' precipitates determined to be extrinsic in nature. During creep at the highest temperature and lowest stress (815°C and 345MPa) a thermally

  10. Large Deformation Mechanisms, Plasticity, and Failure of an Individual Collagen Fibril With Different Mineral Content

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mineralized collagen fibrils are composed of tropocollagen molecules and mineral crystals derived from hydroxyapatite to form a composite material that combines optimal properties of both constituents and exhibits incredible strength and toughness. Their complex hierarchical structure allows collagen fibrils to sustain large deformation without breaking. In this study, we report a mesoscale model of a single mineralized collagen fibril using a bottom‐up approach. By conserving the three‐dimensional structure and the entanglement of the molecules, we were able to construct finite‐size fibril models that allowed us to explore the deformation mechanisms which govern their mechanical behavior under large deformation. We investigated the tensile behavior of a single collagen fibril with various intrafibrillar mineral content and found that a mineralized collagen fibril can present up to five different deformation mechanisms to dissipate energy. These mechanisms include molecular uncoiling, molecular stretching, mineral/collagen sliding, molecular slippage, and crystal dissociation. By multiplying its sources of energy dissipation and deformation mechanisms, a collagen fibril can reach impressive strength and toughness. Adding mineral into the collagen fibril can increase its strength up to 10 times and its toughness up to 35 times. Combining crosslinks with mineral makes the fibril stiffer but more brittle. We also found that a mineralized fibril reaches its maximum toughness to density and strength to density ratios for a mineral density of around 30%. This result, in good agreement with experimental observations, attests that bone tissue is optimized mechanically to remain lightweight but maintain strength and toughness. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR). PMID:26866939

  11. Deformation mechanisms in a coal mine roadway in extremely swelling soft rock.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghai; Shi, Weiping; Yang, Renshu

    2016-01-01

    The problem of roadway support in swelling soft rock was one of the challenging problems during mining. For most geological conditions, combinations of two or more supporting approaches could meet the requirements of most roadways; however, in extremely swelling soft rock, combined approaches even could not control large deformations. The purpose of this work was to probe the roadway deformation mechanisms in extremely swelling soft rock. Based on the main return air-way in a coal mine, deformation monitoring and geomechanical analysis were conducted, as well as plastic zone mechanical model was analysed. Results indicated that this soft rock was potentially very swelling. When the ground stress acted alone, the support strength needed in situ was not too large and combined supporting approaches could meet this requirement; however, when this potential released, the roadway would undergo permanent deformation. When the loose zone reached 3 m within surrounding rock, remote stress p ∞ and supporting stress P presented a linear relationship. Namely, the greater the swelling stress, the more difficult it would be in roadway supporting. So in this extremely swelling soft rock, a better way to control roadway deformation was to control the releasing of surrounding rock's swelling potential.

  12. Deformation mechanisms in a coal mine roadway in extremely swelling soft rock.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghai; Shi, Weiping; Yang, Renshu

    2016-01-01

    The problem of roadway support in swelling soft rock was one of the challenging problems during mining. For most geological conditions, combinations of two or more supporting approaches could meet the requirements of most roadways; however, in extremely swelling soft rock, combined approaches even could not control large deformations. The purpose of this work was to probe the roadway deformation mechanisms in extremely swelling soft rock. Based on the main return air-way in a coal mine, deformation monitoring and geomechanical analysis were conducted, as well as plastic zone mechanical model was analysed. Results indicated that this soft rock was potentially very swelling. When the ground stress acted alone, the support strength needed in situ was not too large and combined supporting approaches could meet this requirement; however, when this potential released, the roadway would undergo permanent deformation. When the loose zone reached 3 m within surrounding rock, remote stress p ∞ and supporting stress P presented a linear relationship. Namely, the greater the swelling stress, the more difficult it would be in roadway supporting. So in this extremely swelling soft rock, a better way to control roadway deformation was to control the releasing of surrounding rock's swelling potential. PMID:27547684

  13. Deformation Microstructures and Creep Mechanisms in Advanced ZR-Based Cladding Under Biazal Loading

    SciTech Connect

    K. Linga Murty

    2008-08-11

    Investigate creep behavior of Zr-based cladding tubes with attention to basic creep mechanisms and transitions in them at low stresses and/or temperatures and study the dislocation microstructures of deformed samples for correlation with the underlying micromechanism of creep

  14. Hot deformation mechanisms of a solution-treated Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Avramovic-Cingara, G.; Perovic, D.D.; McQueen, H.J.

    1996-11-01

    Solution-treated 8090 and 8091 Al-based alloys were subjected to hot torsion testing in the temperature range of 300 C through 500 C at strain rates of 0.1 to 5 s{sup {minus}1}, up to an equivalent strain of 4. The flow stresses for alloys 8090 (8091) were found to depend on strain rate through a sinh function with exponent 3.98 (2.37) and on temperature through an Arrhenius behavior with activation energy of about 287 (282) kJ/mol. Studies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been performed with the aim of understanding the difference in deformation mechanisms at 500 C, 400 C, and 300 C. During hot processing, the mechanism of dynamic recovery is operative. The change in average subgrain size (d) with the conditions of deformation, i.e., Zener-Hollomon parameter and steady-state flow stress ({sigma}), was quantitatively characterized. Heat treatment at 550 C induced the precipitation of Al{sub 3}Zr particles which are resistant to dislocation shear. Furthermore, electron microscopic analyses have revealed a large number of helical dislocations, prismatic loops, and some Orowan loop formation after deformation at 500 C and 400 C. The density of these defects depends on the temperature of deformation and strain rate. At 300 C, dynamic precipitation of T{sub 2} (Al{sub 6}CuLi{sub 3}) and T{sub 1} (Al{sub 2}CuLi) phases strongly affected hot deformation behavior. In all cases, the microstructural analyses were consistent with a dual-slope description of the mechanical behavior during hot deformation.

  15. Hot deformation mechanisms of a solution-treated Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramovic-Cingara, G.; Perovic, D. D.; McQueen, H. J.

    1996-11-01

    Solution-treated 8090 and 8091 Al-based alloys were subjected to hot torsion testing in the temperature range of 300 °C through 500 °C at strain rates of 0.1 to 5 s-1, up to an equivalent strain of 4. The flow stresses for alloys 8090 (8091) were found to depend on strain rate through a sinh function with exponent 3.98 (2.37) and on temperature through an Arrhenius behavior with activation energy of about 287 (282) kJ/mol. Studies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been performed with the aim of understanding the difference in deformation mechanisms at 500 °C, 400 °C, and 300 °C. During hot processing, the mechanism of dynamic recovery is operative. The change in average subgrain size ( d) with the conditions of deformation, i.e., Zener-Hollomon parameter and steady-state flow stress ( σ s ), was quantitatively characterized. Heat treatment at 550 °C induced the precipitation of Al3Zr particles which are resistant to dislocation shear. Furthermore, electron microscopic analyses have revealed a large number of helical dislocations, prismatic loops, and some Orowan loop formation after deformation at 500 °C and 400 °C. The density of these defects depends on the temperature of deformation and strain rate. At 300 °C, dynamic precipitation of T2 (Al6CuLi3) and T1 (Al2CuLI) phases strongly affected hot deformation behavior. In all cases, the microstructural analyses were consistent with a dual-slope description of the mechanical behavior during hot deformation.

  16. Microstructural Analysis of Coupled Mechanical and Chemical Diagenetic Processes in Deformation Bands in Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, C. M.; Eichhubl, P.; Elliott, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Deformation bands in sandstone and other porous rock have been shown to act as barriers or baffles to fluid flow. Changes in flow properties are related to microscale textural changes that occur within the deformation bands through coupled mechanical and chemical diagenetic processes. Microscale textures relating to flow properties, such as brittle grain deformation, preferred cementation, and the entrainment of fines within bands can be studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging techniques. Conventional techniques for imaging deformation bands by SEM involve using mechanically polished thin sections. However, mechanical polishing can cause induced sample damage that limits microstructural observations. To mitigate sample damage, we use large-area and cross-sectional Ar ion beam milling to prepare deformation band samples for SEM imaging. These techniques preserve sample integrity allowing the imaging of cement and pore textures at submicron resolution. In an ion milled deformation band from the Entrada sandstone, we observe delicate euhedral quartz crystals that precipitated after band formation. In the same band, broken grain fragments that occupy space between larger framework grains are angular in shape, suggesting that they still bear freshly broken surfaces, not dulled and rounded by grain dissolution and cement overgrowth. The lack of widespread isopachous cement on grain fragments, and the observation, instead, of isolated slender quartz cement prisms indicates that cementation in these bands is highly localized. These localized cement growths increase roughness in the pore walls, increasing surface area and tortuosity in the flow pathway through the band. This may reduce permeability in the band without completely occluding flow pathways and pore connections within the bands.

  17. Identifying deformation mechanisms in the NEEM ice core using EBSD measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, Ernst-Jan; Weikusat, Ilka; Drury, Martyn R.; Pennock, Gill M.; de Winter, Matthijs D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Deformation of ice in continental sized ice sheets determines the flow behavior of ice towards the sea. Basal dislocation glide is assumed to be the dominant deformation mechanism in the creep deformation of natural ice, but non-basal glide is active as well. Knowledge of what types of deformation mechanisms are active in polar ice is critical in predicting the response of ice sheets in future warmer climates and its contribution to sea level rise, because the activity of deformation mechanisms depends critically on deformation conditions (such as temperature) as well as on the material properties (such as grain size). One of the methods to study the deformation mechanisms in natural materials is Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD). We obtained ca. 50 EBSD maps of five different depths from a Greenlandic ice core (NEEM). The step size varied between 8 and 25 micron depending on the size of the deformation features. The size of the maps varied from 2000 to 10000 grid point. Indexing rates were up to 95%, partially by saving and reanalyzing the EBSP patterns. With this method we can characterize subgrain boundaries and determine the lattice rotation configurations of each individual subgrain. Combining these observations with arrangement/geometry of subgrain boundaries the dislocation types can be determined, which form these boundaries. Three main types of subgrain boundaries have been recognized in Antarctic (EDML) ice core¹². Here, we present the first results obtained from EBSD measurements performed on the NEEM ice core samples from the last glacial period, focusing on the relevance of dislocation activity of the possible slip systems. Preliminary results show that all three subgrain types, recognized in the EDML core, occur in the NEEM samples. In addition to the classical boundaries made up of basal dislocations, subgrain boundaries made of non-basal dislocations are also common. ¹Weikusat, I.; de Winter, D. A. M.; Pennock, G. M.; Hayles, M

  18. Mechanism of grain growth during severe plastic deformation of a nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongqi; Wang, Y B; Ho, J C; Liao, X Z; Zhu, Y T; Ringer, S P

    2009-01-01

    Deformation induced grain growth has been widely reported in nanocrystalline materials. However, the grain growth mechanism remains an open question. This study applies high-pressure torsion to severely deform bulk nanocrystalline Ni-20 wt % Fe disks and uses transmission electron microscopy to characterize the grain growth process. Our results provide solid evidence suggesting that high pressure torsion induced grain growth is achieved primarily via grain rotation for grains much smaller than 100 nm. Dislocations are mainly seen at small-angle subgrain boundaries during the grain growth process but are seen everywhere in grains after the grains have grown large.

  19. Mechanical properties evaluations of an age hardenable martensitic steel deformed by equal channel angular pressing.

    PubMed

    Nili-Ahmadabadi, M; Shirazi, H; Iranpour Mobarake, M; Poorganji, B; Hossein Nedjad, S; Furuhara, T

    2010-09-01

    Effect of severe plastic deformation by equal channel angular pressing on the mechanical properties of an age hardenable low carbon martensitic steel was investigated. Equal Channel angular pressing was carried out on the solution-annealed steel up to four passes at room temperature through the route Bc. Aging was carried out at 753 K for 2.4 ks. It was found that after four passes deformation, the microstructure is consist of fine grained high angle grain boundaries and lamellar dislocation cell block. The strength of steel is increased considerably while a increasing in elongation is revealed. PMID:21133170

  20. Effects of mechanical deformation on energy conversion efficiency of piezoelectric nanogenerators.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jinho; Cho, Seunghyeon; Kim, Wook; Kwon, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hojoong; Kim, Seunghyun; Chang, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Chang-Wan; Choi, Dukhyun

    2015-07-10

    Piezoelectric nanogenerators (PNGs) are capable of converting energy from various mechanical sources into electric energy and have many attractive features such as continuous operation, replenishment and low cost. However, many researchers still have studied novel material synthesis and interfacial controls to improve the power production from PNGs. In this study, we report the energy conversion efficiency (ECE) of PNGs dependent on mechanical deformations such as bending and twisting. Since the output power of PNGs is caused by the mechanical strain of the piezoelectric material, the power production and their ECE is critically dependent on the types of external mechanical deformations. Thus, we examine the output power from PNGs according to bending and twisting. In order to clearly understand the ECE of PNGs in the presence of those external mechanical deformations, we determine the ECE of PNGs by the ratio of output electrical energy and input mechanical energy, where we suggest that the input energy is based only on the strain energy of the piezoelectric layer. We calculate the strain energy of the piezoelectric layer using numerical simulation of bending and twisting of the PNG. Finally, we demonstrate that the ECE of the PNG caused by twisting is much higher than that caused by bending due to the multiple effects of normal and lateral piezoelectric coefficients. Our results thus provide a design direction for PNG systems as high-performance power generators.

  1. Scaling laws and deformation mechanisms of nanoporous copper under adiabatic uniaxial strain compression

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Fuping Wu, Xiaolei

    2014-12-15

    A series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the scaling laws and the related atomistic deformation mechanisms of Cu monocrystal samples containing randomly placed nanovoids under adiabatic uniaxial strain compression. At onset of yielding, plastic deformation is accommodated by dislocations emitted from void surfaces as shear loops. The collapse of voids are observed by continuous emissions of dislocations from void surfaces and their interactions with further plastic deformation. The simulation results also suggest that the effect modulus, the yield stress and the energy aborption density of samples under uniaxial strain are linearly proportional to the relative density ρ. Moreover, the yield stress, the average flow stress and the energy aborption density of samples with the same relative density show a strong dependence on the void diameter d, expressed by exponential relations with decay coefficients much higher than -1/2. The corresponding atomistic mechanisms for scaling laws of the relative density and the void diameter were also presented. The present results should provide insights for understanding deformation mechanisms of nanoporous metals under extreme conditions.

  2. A deformation mechanism of hard metal surrounded by soft metal during roll forming

    PubMed Central

    YU, Hailiang; TIEU, A. Kiet; LU, Cheng; LIU, Xiong; GODBOLE, Ajit; LI, Huijun; KONG, Charlie; QIN, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    It is interesting to imagine what would happen when a mixture of soft-boiled eggs and stones is deformed together. A foil made of pure Ti is stronger than that made of Cu. When a composite Cu/Ti foil deforms, the harder Ti will penetrate into the softer Cu in the convex shapes according to previously reported results. In this paper, we describe the fabrication of multilayer Cu/Ti foils by the roll bonding technique and report our observations. The experimental results lead us to propose a new deformation mechanism for a hard metal surrounded by a soft metal during rolling of a laminated foil, particularly when the thickness of hard metal foil (Ti, 25 μm) is much less than that of the soft metal foil (Cu, 300 μm). Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) imaging results show that the hard metal penetrates into the soft metal in the form of concave protrusions. Finite element simulations of the rolling process of a Cu/Ti/Cu composite foil are described. Finally, we focus on an analysis of the deformation mechanism of Ti foils and its effects on grain refinement, and propose a grain refinement mechanism from the inside to the outside of the laminates during rolling. PMID:24853192

  3. Inelastic deformation mechanisms in SCS-6/Ti 15-3 MMC lamina under compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newaz, Golam M.; Majumdar, Bhaskar S.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to study the inelastic deformation mechanisms in (0)(sub 8) and (90)(sub 8) Ti 15-3/SCS-6 lamina subjected to pure compression. Monotonic tests were conducted at room temperature (RT), 538 C and 650 C. Results indicate that mechanical response and deformation characteristics were different in monotonic tension and compression loading whereas some of those differences could be attributed to residual stress effects. There were other differences because of changes in damage and failure modes. The inelastic deformation in the (0)(sub 8) lamina under compression was controlled primarily by matrix plasticity, although some evidence of fiber-matrix debonding was observed. Failure of the specimen in compression was due to fiber buckling in a macroscopic shear zone (the failure plane). The inelastic deformation mechanisms under compression in (90)(sub 8) lamina were controlled by radial fiber fracture, matrix plasticity, and fiber-matrix debonding. The radial fiber fracture was a new damage mode observed for MMC's. Constitutive response was predicted for both the (0)(sub 8) and (90)(sub 8) laminae, using AGLPLY, METCAN, and Battelle's Unit Cell FEA model. Results from the analyses were encouraging.

  4. Description of tantalum deformation behavior by dislocation mechanics based constitutive relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerilli, Frank J.; Armstrong, Ronald W.

    1990-08-01

    Dislocation mechanics based constitutive equation constants are determined for temperature, strain rate, work hardening, and polycrystal grain size influences on the deformation behavior of various tantalum materials. An analysis of the maximum load point strain provides a useful method of determining the work hardening constants. Different athermal stress constants and thermal activation related constants are obtained for certain groupings of the different tantalum materials. The variation are correlated with the annealing history of the materials and related to dislocation model parameters involved in the thermal activation strain rate analysis. Computed tantalum deformation results based on these constants are shown to agree with Gourdin's reported expanding ring test measurements and with the deformed shape of a Taylor cylinder impact test specimen.

  5. Atomistic simulations of deformation mechanisms in ultralight weight Mg-Li alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karewar, Shivraj

    Mg alloys have spurred a renewed academic and industrial interest because of their ultra-light-weight and high specific strength properties. Hexagonal close packed Mg has low deformability and a high plastic anisotropy between basal and non-basal slip systems at room temperature. Alloying with Li and other elements is believed to counter this deficiency by activating non-basal slip by reducing their nucleation stress. In this work I study how Li addition affects deformation mechanisms in Mg using atomistic simulations. In the first part, I create a reliable and transferable concentration dependent embedded atom method (CD-EAM) potential for my molecular dynamics study of deformation. This potential describes the Mg-Li phase diagram, which accurately describes the phase stability as a function of Li concentration and temperature. Also, it reproduces the heat of mixing, lattice parameters, and bulk moduli of the alloy as a function of Li concentration. Most importantly, our CD-EAM potential reproduces the variation of stacking fault energy for basal, prismatic, and pyramidal slip systems that in uences the deformation mechanisms as a function of Li concentration. This success of CD-EAM Mg-Li potential in reproducing different properties, as compared to literature data, shows its reliability and transferability. Next, I use this newly created potential to study the effect of Li addition on deformation mechanisms in Mg-Li nanocrystalline (NC) alloys. Mg-Li NC alloys show basal slip, pyramidal type-I slip, tension twinning, and two-compression twinning deformation modes. Li addition reduces the plastic anisotropy between basal and non-basal slip systems by modifying the energetics of Mg-Li alloys. This causes the solid solution softening. The inverse relationship between strength and ductility therefore suggests a concomitant increase in alloy ductility. A comparison of the NC results with single crystal deformation results helps to understand the qualitative and

  6. Impact of mechanical deformation on guest diffusion in zeolitic imidazolate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bin; Wang, Lian Li; Hui, Jia Chen; Du, Lifei; Du, Huiling; Zhu, Ming

    2016-03-14

    The effect of the mechanical deformation of metal-organic frameworks on guest diffusion was investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations. Two basic deformation modes, uniaxial tensile and shear deformation, were considered. The computed shear modulus of the zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) model system was much lower than the Young's modulus, which is in agreement with the experimental results. The diffusion rate in ZIF-8 was calculated for two types of guest molecules: the nonpolar H2 and the quadrupolar CO2. Under tensile strain, the diffusion of both H2 and CO2 was found to be enhanced, whereas the diffusion rates did not change significantly under shear loading. The evolution of the internal structure of ZIF-8 was studied to determine its effect on guest diffusion. The organic-inorganic connection was identified as the source of the framework's flexibility, and therefore we focused on the N-Zn bond and the N-Zn-N angle. Under stretching deformation, the N-Zn bond is elongated and the N-Zn-N angle remains constant. Thus, the length of the C2-C2 long bond, determining the size of the 6-membered ring (6MR) gate, increases and the gate is opened, allowing for faster guest diffusion. Under shear deformation, the N-Zn bond length changes very little and the N-Zn-N angle is distorted. This results in the occurrence of three peaks in the C2-C2 bond length distribution. Although the 6MR gate is distorted, the variation of its average size is small, resulting in a very small effect on the guest diffusivity. In addition, we found that the fluctuation of the ZIF-8 cell can enhance the impact of the mechanical deformation of the host on guest diffusion.

  7. Influence of cross-link structure, density and mechanical properties in the mesoscale deformation mechanisms of collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-12-01

    Collagen is a ubiquitous protein with remarkable mechanical properties. It is highly elastic, shows large fracture strength and enables substantial energy dissipation during deformation. Most of the connective tissue in humans consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of tropocollagen molecules, which are connected by intermolecular cross-links. In this study, we report a three-dimensional coarse-grained model of collagen and analyze the influence of enzymatic cross-links on the mechanics of collagen fibrils. Two representatives immature and mature cross-links are implemented in the mesoscale model using a bottom-up approach. By varying the number, type and mechanical properties of cross-links in the fibrils and performing tensile test on the models, we systematically investigate the deformation mechanisms of cross-linked collagen fibrils. We find that cross-linked fibrils exhibit a three phase behavior, which agrees closer with experimental results than what was obtained using previous models. The fibril mechanical response is characterized by: (i) an initial elastic deformation corresponding to the collagen molecule uncoiling, (ii) a linear regime dominated by molecule sliding and (iii) the second stiffer elastic regime related to the stretching of the backbone of the tropocollagen molecules until the fibril ruptures. Our results suggest that both cross-link density and type dictate the stiffness of large deformation regime by increasing the number of interconnected molecules while cross-links mechanical properties determine the failure strain and strength of the fibril. These findings reveal that cross-links play an essential role in creating an interconnected fibrillar material of tunable toughness and strength.

  8. Influence of cross-link structure, density and mechanical properties in the mesoscale deformation mechanisms of collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is a ubiquitous protein with remarkable mechanical properties. It is highly elastic, shows large fracture strength and enables substantial energy dissipation during deformation. Most of the connective tissue in humans consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of tropocollagen molecules, which are connected by intermolecular cross-links. In this study, we report a three-dimensional coarse-grained model of collagen and analyze the influence of enzymatic cross-links on the mechanics of collagen fibrils. Two representatives immature and mature cross-links are implemented in the mesoscale model using a bottom-up approach. By varying the number, type and mechanical properties of cross-links in the fibrils and performing tensile test on the models, we systematically investigate the deformation mechanisms of cross-linked collagen fibrils. We find that cross-linked fibrils exhibit a three phase behavior, which agrees closer with experimental results than what was obtained using previous models. The fibril mechanical response is characterized by: (i) an initial elastic deformation corresponding to the collagen molecule uncoiling, (ii) a linear regime dominated by molecule sliding and (iii) the second stiffer elastic regime related to the stretching of the backbone of the tropocollagen molecules until the fibril ruptures. Our results suggest that both cross-link density and type dictate the stiffness of large deformation regime by increasing the number of interconnected molecules while cross-links mechanical properties determine the failure strain and strength of the fibril. These findings reveal that cross-links play an essential role in creating an interconnected fibrillar material of tunable toughness and strength. PMID:25153614

  9. Role of plastic deformation mechanisms in the formation of nanostructured silicon and its photoluminescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulinich, O. A.

    2012-06-01

    The role of plastic deformation mechanisms in the process of obtaining nanostructured silicon layers is demonstrated. The process of obtaining nanostructured silicon consists in growing of silicon oxide layers of various thicknesses on the silicon wafer surface, their subsequent removal, and treatment by selective chemical etchants (SE) before the formation of defectless silicon islands possessing the photoluminescent properties typical of nanostructured silicon. Based on analysis of the photoluminescence intensity spectra of nanostructured silicon islands, the conclusion is drawn on different plastic deformation mechanisms at different thicknesses of thermally grown silicon oxide. Possible mechanisms of displacement of the intensity maximum in the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum toward shorter wavelengths with decreasing nanostructured silicon island sizes are discussed.

  10. Mechanical behavior of polymer-grafted iron oxide nano particles under large shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yang; Senses, Erkan; Akcora, Pinar; Stevens Institute of Technology Team

    2014-03-01

    Grafting particles with polymers is an effective strategy to control the dispersion and assembly of fillers that will enhance the structural and mechanical stability of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). Viscoelastic properties of polymer-grafted nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed in homopolymer melts at nonlinear regimes are particularly important as nonlinearities are sensitive to any microstructural change. Her, we report on the nonlinear mechanical behavior of poly(styrene) (PS)-grafted iron oxide NPs in PS homopolymers to reveal the importance of brush-matrix interface and dynamic entanglement under large shear deformations. With oscillatory shear flow, wetting is enabled and long-range ordering of particles is achieved in the system where free chains are longer than the grafted one. We show that large oscillatory deformations can strengthen the interfaces that result in the enhanced mechanical properties. These shear-induced ordered particles can perform as reinforced polymer networks for energy absorbing application. We acknowledge financial support by NSF-CAREER-DMR (#1048865).

  11. Plastic deformation mechanisms in polyimide resins and their semi-interpenetrating networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Bor Z.

    1990-01-01

    High-performance thermoset resins and composites are critical to the future growth of space, aircraft, and defense industries in the USA. However, the processing-structure-property relationships in these materials remain poorly understood. In the present ASEE/NASA Summer Research Program, the plastic deformation modes and toughening mechanisms in single-phase and multiphase thermoset resins were investigated. Both thermoplastic and thermoset polyimide resins and their interpenetrating networks (IPNs and semi-IPNs) were included. The fundamental tendency to undergo strain localization (crazing and shear banding) as opposed to a more diffuse (or homogeneous) deformation in these polymers were evaluated. Other possible toughening mechanisms in multiphase thermoset resins were also examined. The topological features of network chain configuration/conformation and the multiplicity of phase morphology in INPs and semi-IPNs provide unprecedented opportunities for studying the toughening mechanisms in multiphase thermoset polymers and their fiber composites.

  12. A mechanical model for deformable and mesh pattern wheel of lunar roving vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhongchao; Wang, Yongfu; Chen, Gang (Sheng); Gao, Haibo

    2015-12-01

    As an indispensable tool for astronauts on lunar surface, the lunar roving vehicle (LRV) is of great significance for manned lunar exploration. An LRV moves on loose and soft lunar soil, so the mechanical property of its wheels directly affects the mobility performance. The wheels used for LRV have deformable and mesh pattern, therefore, the existing mechanical theory of vehicle wheel cannot be used directly for analyzing the property of LRV wheels. In this paper, a new mechanical model for LRV wheel is proposed. At first, a mechanical model for a rigid normal wheel is presented, which involves in multiple conventional parameters such as vertical load, tangential traction force, lateral force, and slip ratio. Secondly, six equivalent coefficients are introduced to amend the rigid normal wheel model to fit for the wheels with deformable and mesh-pattern in LRV application. Thirdly, the values of the six equivalent coefficients are identified by using experimental data obtained in an LRV's single wheel testing. Finally, the identified mechanical model for LRV's wheel with deformable and mesh pattern are further verified and validated by using additional experimental results.

  13. Comparison of deformation mechanics for two different carbonates: oolitic limestone and laminites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zihms, Stephanie; Lewis, Helen; Couples, Gary; Hall, Stephen; Somerville, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate rocks form under a range of conditions which leads to a diverse rock group. Even though carbonates are overall mineralogically simple, the solid-space distribution ranges from simple compositions such as oolitic limestones to highly complex networks of pores and solids as seen in coquinas. Their fundamental mechanical behaviour has been identified to be like clastic rocks (Vajdova 2004, Brantut, Heap et al. 2014). However it is very likely that this observation is not true for more complex carbonates. Triaxial tests were performed on cylindrical samples of two different carbonates; a) oolitic limestone (Bicqueley quarry, France) and b) laminite (Ariripe basin, Brazil). The samples were deformed under confining pressures of 8, 12 and 20MPa, and 20, 30 and 40MPa, respectively. All tests were stopped as soon as peak load was observed to preserve as many deformation characteristics as possible. Photographs of the samples were taken before and after deformation to allow surface analysis of deformation features. Additionally, samples were analysed post-deformation with X-ray tomography (XRT) (using the Zeiss XRadia XRM 520 at the 4D Imaging Lab at Lund University). The 3D tomography images represent the post-deformation samples' density distribution, allowing detailed, non-destructive, 3D analysis of the deformation features that developed in the triaxial testing, including the complex geometries and interactions of fractures, deformation bands and sedimentary layering. They also provide an insight into the complexity of deformation features produced due to the carbonate response. Initial results show that the oolitic limestone forms single shear bands almost the length of the sample, exhibiting similar characteristics to sandstones deformed under similar conditions. These features are observed for all three applied loads. The laminate sample deformed at the lowest confining pressure exhibits compactive features. However, the laminite samples deformed at the

  14. Mechanical Deformation of a Lithium-Metal Anode Due to a Very Stiff Separator

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrese, A; Newman, J

    2014-05-21

    This work builds on the two-dimensional model presented by Ferrese et al. [J. Electrochem. Soc., 159, A1615 (2012)1, which captures the movement of lithium metal at the negative electrode during cycling in a Li-metal/LiCoO2 cell. In this paper, the separator is modeled as a dendrite-inhibiting polymer separator with an elastic modulus of 16 GPa. The separator resists the movement of lithium through the generation of stresses in the cell. These stresses affect the negative electrode through two mechanisms altering the thermodynamics of the negative electrode and deforming the negative electrode mechanically. From this analysis, we find that the dendrite-inhibiting separator causes plastic and elastic deformation of the lithium at the negative electrode which flattens the electrode considerably when compared to the liquid-electrolyte case. This flattening of the negative electrode causes only very slight differences in the local state of charge in the positive electrode. When comparing the magnitude of the effects flattening the negative electrode, we find that the plastic deformation plays a much larger role than either the pressure-modified reaction kinetics or elastic deformation. This is due to the low yield strength of the lithium metal, which limits the stresses such that they have only a small effect on the reaction kinetics. (C) 2014 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanical behavior of Al-Li-SiC composites. Part 1: Microstructure and tensile deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Poza, P.; Llorca, J.

    1999-03-01

    The microstructure and tensile properties of an 8090 Al-Li alloy reinforced with 15 vol pct SiC particles were investigated, together with those of the unreinforced alloy processed following the same route. Two different heat treatments (naturally aged at ambient temperature and artificially aged at elevated temperature to the peak strength) were chosen because they lead to very different behaviors. Special emphasis was given to the analysis of the differences and similarities in the microstructure and in the deformation and failure mechanisms between the composite and the unreinforced alloy. It was found that the dispersion of the SiC particles restrained the formation of elongated grains during extrusion and inhibited the precipitation of Al{sub 3}Li at ambient temperature. The deformation processes in the peak-aged materials were controlled by the S{prime} precipitates, which acted as barriers for dislocation motion and homogenized the slip. Homogeneous slip was also observed in the naturally aged composite, but not in the unreinforced alloy, where plastic deformation was concentrated in slip bands. The most notorious differences between the alloy and the composite were found in the fracture mechanisms. The naturally aged unreinforced alloy failed by transgranular shear, while the failure of the peak-aged alloy was induced by grain-boundary fracture. The fracture of the composite in both tempers was, however, precipitated by the progressive fracture of the SiC reinforcements during deformation, which led to the early failure at the onset of plastic instability.

  16. Mechanical behavior of Al-Li-SiC composites: Part I. Microstructure and tensile deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poza, P.; Llorca, J.

    1999-03-01

    The microstructure and tensile properties of an 8090 Al-Li alloy reinforced with 15 vol pet SiC particles were investigated, together with those of the unreinforced alloy processed following the same route. Two different heat treatments (naturally aged at ambient temperature and artificially aged at elevated temperature to the peak strength) were chosen because they lead to very different behaviors. Special emphasis was given to the analysis of the differences and similarities in the microstructure and in the deformation and failure mechanisms between the composite and the unreinforced alloy. It was found that the dispersion of the SiC particles restrained the formation of elongated grains during extrusion and inhibited the precipitation of Al3Li at ambient temperature. The deformation processes in the peak-aged materials were controlled by the S' precipitates, which acted as barriers for dislocation motion and homogenized the slip. Homogeneous slip was also observed in the naturally aged composite, but not in the unreinforced alloy, where plastic deformation was concentrated in slip bands. The most notorious differences between the alloy and the composite were found in the fracture mechanisms. The naturally aged unreinforced alloy failed by transgranular shear, while the failure of the peak-aged alloy was induced by grain-boundary fracture. The fracture of the composite in both tempers was, however, precipitated by the progressive fracture of the SiC reinforcements during deformation, which led to the early failure at the onset of plastic instability.

  17. Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Tran, T. T.; Smillie, L. A.; Subianto, D.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.; Haberl, B.

    2015-05-28

    This study uses high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with in situ electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25–200 °C) of the phase transformation behavior of diamond cubic (dc) silicon at the nanoscale. Along with in situ indentation and electrical data, ex situ characterizations, such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, have been used to reveal the indentation-induced deformation mechanisms. We find that phase transformation and defect propagation within the crystal lattice are not mutually exclusive deformation processes at elevated temperature. Both can occur at temperatures up to 150 °C but to different extents, depending on the temperature and loading conditions. For nanoindentation, we observe that phase transformation is dominant below 100 °C but that deformation by twinning along (111) planes dominates at 150 °C and 200 °C. This work, therefore, provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale and helps to clarify previous inconsistencies in the literature.

  18. Perturbatively deformed defects in Pöschl-Teller-driven scenarios for quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Alex E.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2016-07-01

    Pöschl-Teller-driven solutions for quantum mechanical fluctuations are triggered off by single scalar field theories obtained through a systematic perturbative procedure for generating deformed defects. The analytical properties concerning the quantum fluctuations in one-dimension, zero-mode states, first- and second-excited states, and energy density profiles are all obtained from deformed topological and non-topological structures supported by real scalar fields. Results are firstly derived from an integrated λϕ4 theory, with corresponding generalizations applied to starting λχ4 and sine-Gordon theories. By focusing our calculations on structures supported by the λϕ4 theory, the outcome of our study suggests an exact quantitative correspondence to Pöschl-Teller-driven systems. Embedded into the perturbative quantum mechanics framework, such a correspondence turns into a helpful tool for computing excited states and continuous mode solutions, as well as their associated energy spectrum, for quantum fluctuations of perturbatively deformed structures. Perturbative deformations create distinct physical scenarios in the context of exactly solvable quantum systems and may also work as an analytical support for describing novel braneworld universes embedded into a 5-dimensional gravity bulk.

  19. Humidity and multiscale structure govern mechanical properties and deformation modes in films of native cellulose nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Benítez, Alejandro J; Torres-Rendon, Jose; Poutanen, Mikko; Walther, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    Nanopapers formed by stiff and strong native cellulose nanofibrils are emerging as mechanically robust and sustainable materials to replace high-performance plastics or as flexible, transparent and "green" substrates for organic electronics. The mechanical properties endowed by nanofibrils crucially depend on mastering structure formation processes and on understanding interfibrillar interactions as well as deformation mechanisms in bulk. Herein, we show how different dispersion states of cellulose nanofibrils, that is, unlike tendencies to interfibrillar aggregation, and different relative humidities influence the mechanical properties of nanopapers. The materials undergo a humidity-induced transition from a predominantly linear elastic behavior in dry state to films displaying plastic deformation due to disengagement of the hydrogen-bonded network and lower nanofibrillar friction at high humidity. A concurrent loss of stiffness and tensile strength of 1 order of magnitude is observed, while maximum elongation stays near constant. Scanning electron microscopy imaging in plastic failure demonstrates pull-out of individual nanofibrils and bundles of nanofibrils, as well as larger mesoscopic layers, stemming from structures organized on different length scales. Moreover, multiple yielding phenomena and substantially increased elongation in strongly disengaged networks, swollen in water, show that strain at break in such nanofibril-based materials is coupled to relaxation of structural entities, such as cooperative entanglements and aggregates, which depend on the pathway of material preparation. The results demonstrate the importance of controlling the state of dispersion and aggregation of nanofibrils by mediating their interactions, and highlight the complexity associated with understanding hierarchically structured nanofibrillar networks under deformation.

  20. In situ TEM straining of nanograined free-standing thin films reveals various unexpected deformation mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, David Martin; Knapp, James Arthur; Clark, Blythe G.; Hattar, Khalid M.; Robertson, Ian M.

    2010-04-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) straining experiments provide direct detailed observation of the deformation and failure mechanisms active at a length scale relevant to nanomaterials. This presentation will detail continued investigations into the active mechanisms governing high purity nanograined pulsed-laser deposited (PLD) nickel, as well as recent work into dislocation-particle interactions in nanostructured PLD aluminum-alumina alloys. Straining experiments performed on nanograined PLD free-standing nanograined Ni films with an engineered grain size distribution revealed that the addition of ductility with limited decrease in strength, reported in such metals, can be attributed to the simultaneous activity of three deformation mechanisms in front of the crack tip. At the crack tip, a grain agglomeration mechanism occurs where several nanograins appear to rotate, resulting in a very thin, larger grain immediately prior to failure. In the classical plastic zone in front of the crack tip, a multitude of mechanisms were found to operate in the larger grains including: dislocation pile-up, twinning, and stress-assisted grain growth. The region outside of the plastic zone showed signs of elasticity with limited indications of dislocation activity. The insight gained from in-situ TEM straining experiments of nanograined PLD Ni provides feedback for models of the deformation and failure in nanograined FCC metals, and suggests a greater complexity in the active mechanisms. The investigation into the deformation and failure mechanisms of FCC metals via in-situ TEM straining experiments has been expanded to the effect of hard particles on the active mechanisms in nanograined aluminum with alumina particles. The microstructures investigated were developed with varying composition, grain size, and particle distribution via tailoring of the PLD conditions and subsequent annealing. In order to develop microstructures suitable for in-situ deformation testing

  1. Cyclic mechanical stretch down-regulates cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide expression and activates a pro-inflammatory response in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Karadottir, Harpa; Kulkarni, Nikhil Nitin; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Karason, Sigurbergur; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur Hrafn

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) of patients can cause damage to bronchoalveolar epithelium, leading to a sterile inflammatory response, infection and in severe cases sepsis. Limited knowledge is available on the effects of MV on the innate immune defense system in the human lung. In this study, we demonstrate that cyclic stretch of the human bronchial epithelial cell lines VA10 and BCi NS 1.1 leads to down-regulation of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene expression. We show that treatment of VA10 cells with vitamin D3 and/or 4-phenyl butyric acid counteracted cyclic stretch mediated down-regulation of CAMP mRNA and protein expression (LL-37). Further, we observed an increase in pro-inflammatory responses in the VA10 cell line subjected to cyclic stretch. The mRNA expression of the genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-1β was increased after cyclic stretching, where as a decrease in gene expression of chemokines IP-10 and RANTES was observed. Cyclic stretch enhanced oxidative stress in the VA10 cells. The mRNA expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 3, TLR5 and TLR8 was reduced, while the gene expression of TLR2 was increased in VA10 cells after cyclic stretch. In conclusion, our in vitro results indicate that cyclic stretch may differentially modulate innate immunity by down-regulation of antimicrobial peptide expression and increase in pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:26664810

  2. Characterization of dislocation structures and deformation mechanisms in as-grown and deformed directionally solidified NiAl–Mo composites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kwon, J.; Bowers, M. L.; Brandes, M. C.; McCreary, V.; Robertson, Ian M.; Phani, P. Sudaharshan; Bei, H.; Gao, Y. F.; Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.; et al

    2015-02-26

    In this paper, directionally solidified (DS) NiAl–Mo eutectic composites were strained to plastic strain values ranging from 0% to 12% to investigate the origin of the previously observed stochastic versus deterministic mechanical behaviors of Mo-alloy micropillars in terms of the development of dislocation structures at different pre-strain levels. The DS composites consist of long, [1 0 0] single-crystal Mo-alloy fibers with approximately square cross-sections embedded in a [1 0 0] single-crystal NiAl matrix. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and computational stress state analysis were conducted for the current study. STEM of the as-grown samples (without pre-straining) reveal no dislocations inmore » the investigated Mo-alloy fibers. In the NiAl matrix, on the other hand, a(1 0 0)-type dislocations exist in two orthogonal orientations: along the [1 0 0] Mo fiber axis, and wrapped around the fiber axis. They presumably form to accommodate the different thermal contractions of the two phases during cool down after eutectic solidification. At intermediate pre-strain levels (4–8%), a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are present in the Mo-alloy fibers and the pre-existing dislocations in the NiAl matrix seem to be swept toward the interphase boundary. Some of the dislocations in the Mo-alloy fibers appear to be transformed from a(1 0 0)-type dislocations present in the NiAl matrix. Subsequently, the transformed dislocations in the fibers propagate through the NiAl matrix as a(1 1 1) dislocations and aid in initiating additional slip bands in adjacent fibers. Thereafter, co-deformation presumably occurs by (1 1 1) slip in both phases. With a further increase in the pre-strain level (>10%), multiple a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are observed in many locations in the Mo-alloy fibers. Interactions between these systems upon subsequent deformation could lead to stable junctions and persistent dislocation sources. Finally, the transition from stochastic to

  3. Characterization of dislocation structures and deformation mechanisms in as-grown and deformed directionally solidified NiAl–Mo composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J.; Bowers, M. L.; Brandes, M. C.; McCreary, V.; Robertson, Ian M.; Phani, P. Sudaharshan; Bei, H.; Gao, Y. F.; Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-02-26

    In this paper, directionally solidified (DS) NiAl–Mo eutectic composites were strained to plastic strain values ranging from 0% to 12% to investigate the origin of the previously observed stochastic versus deterministic mechanical behaviors of Mo-alloy micropillars in terms of the development of dislocation structures at different pre-strain levels. The DS composites consist of long, [1 0 0] single-crystal Mo-alloy fibers with approximately square cross-sections embedded in a [1 0 0] single-crystal NiAl matrix. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and computational stress state analysis were conducted for the current study. STEM of the as-grown samples (without pre-straining) reveal no dislocations in the investigated Mo-alloy fibers. In the NiAl matrix, on the other hand, a(1 0 0)-type dislocations exist in two orthogonal orientations: along the [1 0 0] Mo fiber axis, and wrapped around the fiber axis. They presumably form to accommodate the different thermal contractions of the two phases during cool down after eutectic solidification. At intermediate pre-strain levels (4–8%), a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are present in the Mo-alloy fibers and the pre-existing dislocations in the NiAl matrix seem to be swept toward the interphase boundary. Some of the dislocations in the Mo-alloy fibers appear to be transformed from a(1 0 0)-type dislocations present in the NiAl matrix. Subsequently, the transformed dislocations in the fibers propagate through the NiAl matrix as a(1 1 1) dislocations and aid in initiating additional slip bands in adjacent fibers. Thereafter, co-deformation presumably occurs by (1 1 1) slip in both phases. With a further increase in the pre-strain level (>10%), multiple a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are observed in many locations in the Mo-alloy fibers. Interactions between these systems upon subsequent deformation could lead to stable junctions and persistent dislocation sources. Finally, the transition from stochastic to

  4. Atomic force microscopic study of the structure of high-density polyethylene deformed in liquid medium by crazing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bagrov, D V; Yarysheva, A Y; Rukhlya, E G; Yarysheva, L M; Volynskii, A L; Bakeev, N F

    2014-02-01

    A procedure has been developed for the direct atomic force microscopic (AFM) examination of the native structure of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) deformed in an adsorption-active liquid medium (AALM) by the crazing mechanism. The AFM investigation has been carried out in the presence of a liquid medium under conditions preventing deformed films from shrinkage. Deformation of HDPE in AALM has been shown to proceed through the delocalized crazing mechanism and result in the development of a fibrillar-porous structure. The structural parameters of the crazed polymer have been determined. The obtained AFM images demonstrate a nanosized nonuniformity of the deformation and enable one to observe the structural rearrangements that take place in the deformed polymer after removal of the liquid medium and stress relaxation. A structural similarity has been revealed between HDPE deformed in the AALM and hard elastic polymers. PMID:24283329

  5. Atomic force microscopic study of the structure of high-density polyethylene deformed in liquid medium by crazing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bagrov, D V; Yarysheva, A Y; Rukhlya, E G; Yarysheva, L M; Volynskii, A L; Bakeev, N F

    2014-02-01

    A procedure has been developed for the direct atomic force microscopic (AFM) examination of the native structure of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) deformed in an adsorption-active liquid medium (AALM) by the crazing mechanism. The AFM investigation has been carried out in the presence of a liquid medium under conditions preventing deformed films from shrinkage. Deformation of HDPE in AALM has been shown to proceed through the delocalized crazing mechanism and result in the development of a fibrillar-porous structure. The structural parameters of the crazed polymer have been determined. The obtained AFM images demonstrate a nanosized nonuniformity of the deformation and enable one to observe the structural rearrangements that take place in the deformed polymer after removal of the liquid medium and stress relaxation. A structural similarity has been revealed between HDPE deformed in the AALM and hard elastic polymers.

  6. Structural evolution of fault zones in sandstone by multiple deformation mechanisms: Moab fault, southeast Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davatzes, N.C.; Eichhubl, P.; Aydin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Faults in sandstone are frequently composed of two classes of structures: (1) deformation bands and (2) joints and sheared joints. Whereas the former structures are associated with cataclastic deformation, the latter ones represent brittle fracturing, fragmentation, and brecciation. We investigated the distribution of these structures, their formation, and the underlying mechanical controls for their occurrence along the Moab normal fault in southeastern Utah through the use of structural mapping and numerical elastic boundary element modeling. We found that deformation bands occur everywhere along the fault, but with increased density in contractional relays. Joints and sheared joints only occur at intersections and extensional relays. In all locations , joints consistently overprint deformation bands. Localization of joints and sheared joints in extensional relays suggests that their distribution is controlled by local variations in stress state that are due to mechanical interaction between the fault segments. This interpretation is consistent with elastic boundary element models that predict a local reduction in mean stress and least compressive principal stress at intersections and extensional relays. The transition from deformation band to joint formation along these sections of the fault system likely resulted from the combined effects of changes in remote tectonic loading, burial depth, fluid pressure, and rock properties. In the case of the Moab fault, we conclude that the structural heterogeneity in the fault zone is systematically related to the geometric evolution of the fault, the local state of stress associated with fault slip , and the remote loading history. Because the type and distribution of structures affect fault permeability and strength, our results predict systematic variations in these parameters with fault evolution. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  7. In Situ Mechanical Testing Techniques for Real-Time Materials Deformation Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Chris; Boesl, Benjamin; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    In situ mechanical property testing has the ability to enhance quantitative characterization of materials by revealing the occurring deformation behavior in real time. This article will summarize select recent testing performed inside a scanning electron microscope on various materials including metals, ceramics, composites, coatings, and 3-Dimensional graphene foam. Tensile and indentation testing methods are outlined with case studies and preliminary data. The benefits of performing a novel double-torsion testing technique in situ are also proposed.

  8. Quantifying and observing viscoplasticity at the nanoscale: highly localized deformation mechanisms in ultrathin nanocrystalline gold films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinian, Ehsan; Legros, Marc; Pierron, Olivier N.

    2016-04-01

    This study unveils the stress relaxation transient deformation mechanisms in 100 nm-thick, nanocrystalline Au films thanks to a robust quantitative in situ TEM MEMS nanomechanical testing approach to quantify stress relaxation and to perform in situ observations of time-dependent deformation in ultrathin nanocrystalline films. The relaxation is characterized by a decrease in plastic strain rate of more than one order of magnitude over the first ~30 minutes (from 10-4 to less than 10-5 s-1). For longer relaxation experiments, the plastic strain rate decreases down to 10-7 s-1 after several hours. The power-law exponent n, relating plastic strain rate and stress, continuously decreases from initial large values (n from 6 to 14 at t = 0) down to low values (n ~ 1-2) after several hours. In situ TEM observations reveal that the relaxation behavior is initially accommodated by highly localized, sustained, intergranular and transgranular dislocation motion. Over time, the dislocation sources become less operative or exhausted, leading to a transition to grain-boundary-diffusion based mechanisms. The results also highlight a promising technique for nanoscale characterization of time-dependent deformation.This study unveils the stress relaxation transient deformation mechanisms in 100 nm-thick, nanocrystalline Au films thanks to a robust quantitative in situ TEM MEMS nanomechanical testing approach to quantify stress relaxation and to perform in situ observations of time-dependent deformation in ultrathin nanocrystalline films. The relaxation is characterized by a decrease in plastic strain rate of more than one order of magnitude over the first ~30 minutes (from 10-4 to less than 10-5 s-1). For longer relaxation experiments, the plastic strain rate decreases down to 10-7 s-1 after several hours. The power-law exponent n, relating plastic strain rate and stress, continuously decreases from initial large values (n from 6 to 14 at t = 0) down to low values (n ~ 1-2) after

  9. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks.

  10. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks. PMID:25408295

  11. A plant toxin mediated mechanism for the lag in snowshoe hare population recovery following cyclic declines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeAngelis, Donald L.; Bryant, John P.; Liu, Rongsong; Gourley, Stephen A.; Krebs, Charles J; Reichardt, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    A necessary condition for a snowshoe hare population to cycle is reduced reproduction after the population declines. But the cause of a cyclic snowshoe hare population's reduced reproduction during the low phase of the cycle, when predator density collapses, is not completely understood. We propose that moderate-severe browsing by snowshoe hares upon preferred winter-foods could increase the toxicity of some of the hare's best winter-foods during the following hare low, with the result being a decline in hare nutrition that could reduce hare reproduction. We used a combination of modeling and experiments to explore this hypothesis. Using the shrub birch Betula glandulosa as the plant of interest, the model predicted that browsing by hares during a hare cycle peak, by increasing the toxicity B. glandulosa twigs during the following hare low, could cause a hare population to cycle. The model's assumptions were verified with assays of dammarane triterpenes in segments of B. glandulosa twigs and captive hare feeding experiments conducted in Alaska during February and March 1986. The model's predictions were tested with estimates of hare density and measurements of B. glandulosa twig growth made at Kluane, Yukon from 1988–2008. The empirical tests supported the model's predictions. Thus, we have concluded that a browsing-caused increase in twig toxicity that occurs during the hare cycle's low phase could reduce hare reproduction during the low phase of the hare cycle.

  12. Microscopic deformation mechanisms in model thermoplastic elastomers by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Amanda; Rottler, Jörg

    Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) can be formed by exploiting the nanostructured morphology of triblock copolymers. Glassy end-blocks phase separate to form spherical regions which act as physical cross-links for the soft rubbery phase. Molecular dynamics simulations of TPEs allow us to relate the microscopic mechanisms active during plastic deformation to the macroscopic stress response. A coarse-grained bead-spring model of linear ABA triblock copolymers which forms the desired spherical morphology is used for pure stress and pure strain uniaxial deformations. The systems are first equilibrated using a soft pair potential. We observe increased strain hardening in triblocks when compared to homopolymers of the same chain length in accordance with experiments. We connect variations in the stress response for systems of different chain lengths to the non-affine deformation of chains and to the scale of phase separated regions. The stress response is also compared to rubbery elasticity models, taking into account the evolution of chain entanglements during deformation. We observe void formation at the interfaces of glassy regions or where these regions have broken up at large strain.

  13. The role of dislocations in varied olivine deformation mechanisms investigated using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars; Britton, Ben; Wilkinson, Angus

    2016-04-01

    Experimentally-derived flow laws can be used to predict the rheology of rocks deformed under natural conditions only if the same microphysical processes can be demonstrated to control the rate-limiting deformation mechanism in both cases. Olivine rheology may exert a principle control on the strength of the lithosphere, and therefore considerable research effort has been applied to assessing its rheology through experimental, geological, and geophysical approaches. Nonetheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the dominant deformation mechanisms in the upper mantle. This uncertainty arises in large part due to our limited understanding of the fundamental deformation processes associated with each mechanism. Future improvements to microphysical models of distinct deformation mechanisms require new insight into the contributions those fundamental processes to the macroscopic behaviour. The dynamics of dislocations is central to modelling viscous deformation of olivine, but characterisation techniques capable of constraining dislocation types, densities, and distributions over the critical grain to polycrystal length-scales have been lacking. High angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), developed and increasingly applied in the material sciences, offers an approach capable of such analyses. HR-EBSD utilises diffraction pattern image cross-correlation to achieve dramatically improved angular resolution (~0.01°) of lattice orientation gradients compared to conventional Hough-based EBSD (~0.5°). This angular resolution allows very low densities (≥ 10^11 m^-2) of geometrically necessary dislocations (GND) to be resolved, facilitating analysis of a wide range of dislocation microstructures. We have developed the application of HR-EBSD to olivine and applied it to samples deformed both experimentally and naturally in grain-size sensitive and grain-size insensitive regimes. The results quantitatively highlight variations in the types and

  14. The effect of hydrogenation on strain hardening and deformation mechanisms in <113> single crystals of Hadfield steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurova, Elena; Maier, Galina; Melnikov, Eugene; Koshovkina, Vera; Moskvina, Valentina; Smirnov, Alexander; Bataev, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    The effect of hydrogenation on the strain-hardening behavior and the deformation mechanisms of <113>-oriented single crystals of Hadfield steel was investigated under tension at room temperature. The stages of plastic flow and deformation mechanisms for hydrogen-charged specimens are similar to one in hydrogen-free state: slip → slip + single twinning → slip + multiple twinning. Hydrogen alloying favors to mechanical twinning, micro- and macrolocalization of plastic flow.

  15. Initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the intervertebral disc under cyclic loading using continuum damage mechanics methodology: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Muhammad; Natarajan, Raghu N.; An, Howard S.; Andersson, Gunnar B.J.

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to study the breakdown of disc tissue over several years of exposure to bending and lifting by experimental methods. There is also no finite element model that elucidates the failure mechanism due to repetitive loading of the lumbar motion segment. The aim of this study was to refine an already validated poro-elastic finite element model of lumbar motion segment to investigate the initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the disc under simple and complex cyclic loading conditions. Continuum damage mechanics methodology was incorporated into the finite element model to track the damage accumulation in the annulus in response to the repetitive loading. The analyses showed that the damage initiated at the posterior inner annulus adjacent to the endplates and propagated outwards towards its periphery under all loading conditions simulated. The damage accumulated preferentially in the posterior region of the annulus. The analyses also showed that the disc failure is unlikely to happen with repetitive bending in the absence of compressive load. Compressive cyclic loading with low peak load magnitude also did not create the failure of the disc. The finite element model results were consistent with the experimental and clinical observations in terms of the region of failure, magnitude of applied loads and the number of load cycles survived. PMID:22682891

  16. Deformation mechanisms of low-temperature superplasticity in 8090 Al-Li alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, H.P.; Huang, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The 8090 Al-Li alloys, after special thermomechanical processes, exhibited low-temperature superplasticity (LTSP) from 350 to 450 C, behaving differently from the conventional high-temperature superplasticity (HTSP). The LTSP sheets after {approximately} 700% elongation at 350 C and 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} still possessed fine (sub)grains 3.7 {micro}m in size and narrow surface Li-depletion zones 11 {micro}m in width. It results in a post-SP T6 strength of {approximately} 500 MPa, which is higher than that of the conventional superplastic 8090 alloys tested at 525 C or above. The tensile behavior and deformation mechanisms of the LTSP and HTSP sheets were investigated over the strain-rate range 10{sup {minus}5}--10{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} and strain range 0.5--1.0. At {var_epsilon} 0.5, the strain rate sensitivity (m-value) for the LTSP and HTSP materials was found to be {approximately} 0.33 and 0.50, respectively. The activation energy was extracted to be 92 kJ/mole for the LTSP sheets and to be 141 kJ/mole for the HTSP sheets. As straining to {var_epsilon} = 1.0 the m-value of the LTSP materials increased to 0.37 and the activation energy decreased slightly to 82 kJ/mole. By SEM examinations, the movement of surface grains in LTSP samples confirmed the role of grain boundary sliding (GBS). TEM observations revealed that the deformation mechanism consists of a large amount of dislocation motion resulting in the subgrain formation and rotation; and TEM observations from the transverse section might explain the anisotropic deformation behavior during the initial superplastic strain. The primary and rate-controlling deformation mechanisms for the HTSP and LTSP sheets are considered to be GBS and dislocation creep, respectively.

  17. Atomistic tensile deformation mechanisms of Fe with gradient nano-grained structure

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenbin E-mail: xlwu@imech.ac.cn; Yuan, Fuping Wu, Xiaolei E-mail: xlwu@imech.ac.cn

    2015-08-15

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate the tensile properties and the related atomistic deformation mechanisms of the gradient nano-grained (GNG) structure of bcc Fe (gradient grains with d from 25 nm to 105 nm), and comparisons were made with the uniform nano-grained (NG) structure of bcc Fe (grains with d = 25 nm). The grain size gradient in the nano-scale converts the applied uniaxial stress to multi-axial stresses and promotes the dislocation behaviors in the GNG structure, which results in extra hardening and flow strength. Thus, the GNG structure shows slightly higher flow stress at the early plastic deformation stage when compared to the uniform NG structure (even with smaller grain size). In the GNG structure, the dominant deformation mechanisms are closely related to the grain sizes. For grains with d = 25 nm, the deformation mechanisms are dominated by GB migration, grain rotation and grain coalescence although a few dislocations are observed. For grains with d = 54 nm, dislocation nucleation, propagation and formation of dislocation wall near GBs are observed. Moreover, formation of dislocation wall and dislocation pile-up near GBs are observed for grains with d = 105 nm, which is the first observation by MD simulations to our best knowledge. The strain compatibility among different layers with various grain sizes in the GNG structure should promote the dislocation behaviors and the flow stress of the whole structure, and the present results should provide insights to design the microstructures for developing strong-and-ductile metals.

  18. The effect of aluminum alloying on strength properties and deformation mechanisms of the <123> Hadfield steel single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurova, E. G.; Tukeev, M. S.; Chumlyakov, Yu. I.

    2007-10-01

    The role of aluminum alloying on strength properties and deformation mechanisms (slip, twinning) of <123> single crystals of Hadfield steel under tensile loading at T = 300 K is demonstrated. It is found out that aluminum alloying suppresses twinning deformation in the <123> single crystals and, during slip, results in a dislocation structure change from a uniform dislocation distribution to a planar dislocation structure.

  19. Application of random walk concept to the cyclic diffusion mechanisms for self-diffusion in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, G. P.; Mehrotra, R. S.; Iijima, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Huntington-Elcock-McCombie (HEM) mechanism involving six consecutive and correlated jumps, a triple-defect mechanism (TDM) involving three correlated jumps and an anti-structure bridge (ASB) mechanism invoking the migration of an anti-structure atom are the three mechanisms currently in vogue to explain the self- and solute diffusion in intermetallic compounds. Among them, HEM and TDM are cyclic in nature. The HEM and TDM constitute the theme of the present article. The concept of random walk is applied to them and appropriate expressions for the diffusion coefficient are derived. These equations are then employed to estimate activation energies for self-diffusion via HEM and TDM processes and compared with the available experimental data on activation energy for self-diffusion in intermetallic compounds. The resulting activation energies do not favour HEM and TDM for the self-diffusion in intermetallic compounds. A comparison of the sum of experimentally determined activation energies for vacancy formation and migration with the activation energies for self-diffusion determined from radioactive tracer method favours the conventional monovacancy-mediated process for self-diffusion in intermetallic compounds.

  20. Chromium vaporization from mechanically deformed pre-coated interconnects in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Sattari, Mohammad; Svensson, Jan-Erik; Froitzheim, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Cathode poisoning, associated with Cr evaporation from interconnect material, is one of the most important degradation mechanisms in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells when Cr2O3-forming steels are used as the interconnect material. Coating these steels with a thin Co layer has proven to decrease Cr vaporization. To reduce production costs, it is suggested that thin metallic PVD coatings be applied to each steel strip before pressing the material into interconnect shape. This process would enable high volume production without the need for an extra post-coating step. However, when the pre-coated material is mechanically deformed, cracks may form and lower the quality of the coating. In the present study, Chromium volatilization is measured in an air-3% H2O environment at 850 °C for 336 h. Three materials coated with 600 nm Co are investigated and compared to an uncoated material. The effect of deformation is investigated on real interconnects. Microscopy observations reveal the presence of cracks in the order of several μm on the deformed pre-coated steel. However, upon exposure, the cracks can heal and form a continuous surface oxide rich in Co and Mn. As an effect of the rapid healing, no increase in Cr vaporization is measured for the pre-coated material.

  1. The role of deformation mechanisms in flow localization of 316L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianglin; Pan, Xiao; Mabon, James C.; Li, Meimei; Stubbins, James F.

    2006-09-01

    Type 316 SS is widely used as a structural material in a variety of current accelerator driven systems and designs as well as in a number of current and advanced fission and fusion reactor concepts. The material is found to be very sensitive to irradiation damage in the temperature range of 150-400 °C, where low levels of irradiation exposure, as little as 0.1 dpa, can substantially reduce the uniform elongation in tensile tests. This process, where the plastic flow becomes highly localized resulting in very low overall ductility, is referred to as flow localization. The process controlling this restriction of flow is related to the difference between the yield and ultimate strengths such that dramatic irradiation-induced increases in the yield strength results in very limited plastic flow until necking. In this study, the temperature dependence of this process is examined in light of the operating deformation mechanisms. It is found that twinning is an important deformation mechanism at lower temperatures but is not available in the temperature range of concern since the stress to activate twinning becomes excessively high. This limits the deformation and leads to the flow localization process.

  2. Hydro-mechanical regimes of deforming subduction interface: modeling versus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Gerya, T.; May, D.

    2015-12-01

    A lot of evidence indicates that fluid flows exist in the subduction interface, including seismic observation, magnetotelluric imaging, heat flow modeling, etc. Fluid percolation should strongly modify rock deformation affected by fluid-induced weakening within the subduction interface. Hence, we study the fluid-rock interaction along the subduction interface using a visco-plastic hydro-mechanical model, in which rock deformation and fluid percolation are self-consistently coupled. Based on a series of 2D numerical experiments, we found two typical hydro-mechanical regimes of deforming subduction interface: (1) coupled and (2) decoupled. In the case of the coupled regime, the tectonic movement of the subduction interface is divided into blocks; newly generated faults are distributed uniformly , say fault band; fluid activity concentrates inside the faults. In the case of the decoupled regime, the upper layer of the subduction interface stops moving while the lower layer continues moving along with the subduction slab; a primary fault is generated at the centre of the subduction interface, or namely decoupled interface. Available observations suggests that both coupled and decoupled regimes can be observed in the nature at different scales. Systematic parameter study suggests that it is mainly the magnitude of the yield strength of subducted rocks depending on their cohesion and friction coefficient, which control the transition between the coupled and decoupled subduction interface regimes.

  3. Image-based mechanical analysis of stent deformation: concept and exemplary implementation for aortic valve stents.

    PubMed

    Gessat, Michael; Hopf, Raoul; Pollok, Thomas; Russ, Christoph; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Sündermann, Simon Harald; Hirsch, Sven; Mazza, Edoardo; Székely, Gábor; Falk, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    An approach for extracting the radial force load on an implanted stent from medical images is proposed. To exemplify the approach, a system is presented which computes a radial force estimation from computer tomography images acquired from patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The deformed shape of the implanted valve prosthesis' Nitinol frame is extracted from the images. A set of displacement vectors is computed that parameterizes the observed deformation. An iterative relaxation algorithm is employed to adapt the information extracted from the images to a finite-element model of the stent, and the radial components of the interaction forces between the stent and the tissue are extracted. For the evaluation of the method, tests were run using the clinical data from 21 patients. Stent modeling and extraction of the radial forces were successful in 18 cases. Synthetic test cases were generated, in addition, for assessing the sensitivity to the measurement errors. In a sensitivity analysis, the geometric error of the stent reconstruction was below 0.3 mm, which is below the image resolution. The distribution of the radial forces was qualitatively and quantitatively reasonable. An uncertainty remains in the quantitative evaluation of the radial forces due to the uncertainty in defining a radial direction on the deformed stent. With our approach, the mechanical situation of TAVI stents after the implantation can be studied in vivo, which may help to understand the mechanisms that lead to the complications and improve stent design. PMID:24626769

  4. Failure and deformation mechanisms at macro- and nano-scales of alkali activated clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar Das, Pradip; Bhattacharya, Manjima; Chanda, Dipak Kr; Dalui, Srikanta; Acharya, Saikat; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Here we report two qualitative models on failure and deformation mechanisms at macro- and nano-scales of alkali activated clay (AACL), a material of extraordinary importance as a low cost building material. The models were based on experimental data of compressive failure and nanoindentation response of the AACL materials. A 420% improvement in compressive strength (σ c) of the AACL was achieved after 28 days (d) of curing at room temperature and it correlated well with the decrements in the residual alkali and pH concentrations with the increase in curing time. Based on extensive post-mortem FE-SEM examinations, a schematic model for the compressive failure mechanism of AACL was proposed. In addition, the nanoindentation results of AACL provided the first ever experimental evidence of the presence of nano-scale plasticity and a nano-scale contact deformation resistance that increased with the applied load. These results meant the development of a unique strain tolerant microstructure in the AACL of Indian origin. The implications of these new observations were discussed in terms of a qualitative model based on the deformation of layered clay structure.

  5. Characteristics of aluminum alloy microplastic deformation in different structural states

    SciTech Connect

    Seregin, G.V.; Efimenko, L.L.; Leonov, M.V.

    1995-07-01

    The solution to the problem of improving the mechanical properties (including cyclic strength) of structural materials is largely dependent on our knowledge of the laws governing the development of microplastic deformations in them. The effect of heat and mechanical treatment on the elastoplastic properties and fatigue resistance of the commercial aluminum alloys AK4-1 and D16 is analyzed.

  6. Effect of severe plastic deformation on microstructure and mechanical properties of magnesium and aluminium alloys in wide range of strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir; Skripnyak, Evgeniya; Skripnyak, Vladimir; Vaganova, Irina; Skripnyak, Nataliya

    2013-06-01

    Results of researches testify that a grain size have a strong influence on the mechanical behavior of metals and alloys. Ultrafine grained HCP and FCC metal alloys present higher values of the spall strength than a corresponding coarse grained counterparts. In the present study we investigate the effect of grain size distribution on the flow stress and strength under dynamic compression and tension of aluminium and magnesium alloys. Microstructure and grain size distribution in alloys were varied by carrying out severe plastic deformation during the multiple-pass equal channel angular pressing, cyclic constrained groove pressing, and surface mechanical attrition treatment. Tests were performed using a VHS-Instron servo-hydraulic machine. Ultra high speed camera Phantom V710 was used for photo registration of deformation and fracture of specimens in range of strain rates from 0,01 to 1000 1/s. In dynamic regime UFG alloys exhibit a stronger decrease in ductility compared to the coarse grained material. The plastic flow of UFG alloys with a bimodal grain size distribution was highly localized. Shear bands and shear crack nucleation and growth were recorded using high speed photography.

  7. Intraplate deformation, stress in the lithosphere and the driving mechanism for plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    1988-01-01

    During this period work was carried out on three fronts relevant to the understanding of intraplate deformation, stress in the lithosphere, and the driving mechanisms for plate motions: (1) observational constraints, using GPS geodesy on the deformation in the region of the boundry between the Pacific and North American plates in central and southern California; (2) numerical modeling of the effects of temperature dependent lithospheric viscosity on the stress and strain history of extensional regimes; and (3) improvement of estimates of mantle viscosity variation, the long-wave-length density variations in the mantle, and the topography of the core-mantel boundary from modeling of geoid anomalies, nutation, and changes in length of day. These projects are described in more detail, followed by a discussion of meetings attended and a list of abstracts and papers submitted and/or published.

  8. Study of the mechanisms of current-induced suppression of serrated deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibkov, A. A.; Zolotov, A. E.; Zheltov, M. A.; Denisov, A. A.; Gasanov, M. F.

    2015-11-01

    The main results of studying the influence of electric current on the Portevin‒Le Chatelier serrated deformation in some commercial aluminum alloys of the Al‒Mg, Al‒Li-Mg, Al‒Zn‒Mg‒Cu, and Al‒Cu systems are reported. It is found that the passage of a low-density (~10-60 A/mm2) dc current leads to the suppression of serrated deformation and band formation in all alloys under study, except for the Al‒Cu alloy. Possible mechanisms of this phenomenon are discussed, basically in terms of possible influence of current on the processes of precipitation and dynamic strain aging, which are used to explain the Portevin‒Le Chatelier effect.

  9. Deformation mechanisms and grain size evolution in the Bohemian granulites - a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierova, Petra; Lexa, Ondrej; Jeřábek, Petr; Franěk, Jan; Schulmann, Karel

    2015-04-01

    A dominant deformation mechanism in crustal rocks (e.g., dislocation and diffusion creep, grain boundary sliding, solution-precipitation) depends on many parameters such as temperature, major minerals, differential stress, strain rate and grain size. An exemplary sequence of deformation mechanisms was identified in the largest felsic granulite massifs in the southern Moldanubian domain (Bohemian Massif, central European Variscides). These massifs were interpreted to result from collision-related forced diapiric ascent of lower crust and its subsequent lateral spreading at mid-crustal levels. Three types of microstructures were distinguished. The oldest relict microstructure (S1) with large grains (>1000 μm) of feldspar deformed probably by dislocation creep at peak HT eclogite facies conditions. Subsequently at HP granulite-facies conditions, chemically- and deformation- induced recrystallization of feldspar porphyroclasts led to development of a fine-grained microstructure (S2, ~50 μm grain size) indicating deformation via diffusion creep, probably assisted by melt-enhanced grain-boundary sliding. This microstructure was associated with flow in the lower crust and/or its diapiric ascent. The latest microstructure (S3, ~100 μm grain size) is related to the final lateral spreading of retrograde granulites, and shows deformation by dislocation creep at amphibolite-facies conditions. The S2-S3 switch and coarsening was interpreted to be related with a significant decrease in strain rate. From this microstructural sequence it appears that it is the grain size that is critically linked with specific mechanical behavior of these rocks. Thus in this study, we focused on the interplay between grain size and deformation with the aim to numerically simulate and reinterpret the observed microstructural sequence. We tested several different mathematical descriptions of the grain size evolution, each of which gave qualitatively different results. We selected the two most

  10. Creep mechanisms and interface-enhanced deformation twinning in a two-phase lamellar TiAl alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L.M., LLNL

    1997-03-01

    Deformation mechanisms and the role of interfaces in deformation twinning of a two-phase [TiAl({gamma})/Ti{sub 3}Al({alpha}{sub 2})] lamellar alloy creep deformed at elevated temperatures have been investigated. Since the multiplication of lattice dislocations within both {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} lamellae is very limited at a low stress level due to a refined lamellar microstructure, the glide of interfacial dislocations on both {gamma}/{alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma}/{gamma} interfaces (i.e interface sliding) becomes an important deformation mode. Obstacles such as impinged lattice dislocations can impede the movement of interfacial dislocations, which glide in a cooperative fashion along the lamellar interfaces. The impediment of dislocation motion subsequently causes a dislocation pile-up in front of obstacles as creep strain accumulates. When the crystals deform at high stress level, deformation twinning becomes a predominant deformation mode. Deformation twins are found to nucleate from the interfaces as a result of a local stress concentration generated from dislocation pile-ups. It is suggested that the deformation twinning in lamellar TiAl/Ti{sub 3}Al crystals can be vieived as a stress relaxation process for the concentration of stress at the head of each dislocation pile-up. An interface-assisted twinning mechanism is accordingly proposed and discussed.

  11. Simultaneous Application of Interstitial Flow and Cyclic Mechanical Strain to a Three-Dimensional Cell-Seeded Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Galie, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study describes the design and validation of a simple apparatus to apply simultaneous mechanical and fluidic stress to three-dimensional (3D) cell-seeded collagen hydrogels. Constructs were formed in wells in a silicone substrate that could be stretched cyclically, and were also fitted with inlet ports to apply fluid flow. Acid etching was used to retain adhesion of the gels to the walls of the well, and an acellular layer of collagen hydrogel was used to distribute flow evenly. Finite element modeling showed that 5% uniaxial strain applied to the entire silicone substrate resulted in ∼6.5% strain in each of the gel constructs. Permeability testing and flow observation showed that acellular hydrogels were fourfold more permeable than cardiac fibroblast-seeded gels, and that the fluid distributed evenly in the acellular layer before entering the cell-seeded gel. Viability testing and imaging demonstrated that cells remained viable with expected fibroblast morphology for the 120 h duration of the experiments. These results demonstrate that this simple bioreactor can be used to study the effects of mechanical strain and interstitial flow in 3D protein hydrogels. Such 3D tissue models have utility in studying cell and tissue responses to their mechanical environment. PMID:21174633

  12. Evidence that additional mechanisms to cyclic GMP mediate the decrease in intracellular calcium and relaxation of rabbit aortic smooth muscle to nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Robert M; Griswold, Mark C; Yaghoubi, Mohammad; Komalavilas, Padmini; Lincoln, Thomas M; Cohen, Richard A

    1998-01-01

    The role of cyclic GMP in the ability of nitric oxide (NO) to decrease intracellular free calcium concentration [Ca2+]i and divalent cation influx was studied in rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells in primary culture. In cells stimulated with angiotensin II (AII, 10−7 M), NO (10−10–10−6 M) increased cyclic GMP levels measured by radioimmunoassay and decreased [Ca2+]i and cation influx as indicated by fura-2 fluorimetry.Zaprinast (10−4 M), increased NO-stimulated levels of cyclic GMP by 3–20 fold. Although the phosphodiesterase inhibitor lowered the level of [Ca2+]i reached after administration of NO, the initial decreases in [Ca2+]i initiated by NO were not significantly different in magnitude or duration from those that occurred in the absence of zaprinast.The guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, H-(1,2,4) oxadiazolo(4,3-a) quinoxallin-1-one (ODQ, 10−5 M), blocked cyclic GMP accumulation and activation of protein kinase G, as measured by back phosphorylation of the inositol trisphosphate receptor. ODQ and Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS, a protein kinase G inhibitor, decreased the effects of NO, 10−10–10−8 M, but the decrease in [Ca2+]i or cation influx caused by higher concentrations of NO (10−7–10−6 M) were unaffected. Relaxation of intact rabbit aorta rings to NO (10−7–10−5 M) also persisted in the presence of ODQ without a significant increase in cyclic GMP. Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS blocked the decreases in cation influx caused by a cell permeable cyclic GMP analog, but ODQ and/or the protein kinase G inhibitor had no significant effect on the decrease caused by NO.Although inhibitors of cyclic GMP, protein kinase G and phosphodiesterase can be shown to affect the decrease in [Ca2+]i and cation influx via protein kinase G, these studies indicate that when these mechanisms are blocked, cyclic GMP-independent mechanisms also contribute significantly to the decrease in [Ca2+]i and smooth muscle relaxation to NO. PMID:9886761

  13. Cyclic Polyynes as Examples of the Quantum Mechanical Particle on a Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Many quantum mechanical models are discussed as part of the undergraduate physical chemistry course to help students understand the connection between eigenvalue expressions and spectroscopy. Typical examples covered include the particle in a box, the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotor, and the hydrogen atom. This article demonstrates that…

  14. Fluid Controlled Deformation Mechanisms and Recrystallization Regimes in a High Temperature Deformed Contact Aureole: Implications for the Rheology of the Lower Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, S. S.; Law, R. D.

    2004-05-01

    Deformation in the aureole of the Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek (EJB) composite pluton (California, USA) illustrates the role fluid content plays in lower crustal deformation. Microstructures and quartz c-axis fabrics were analyzed in five quartzite samples collected across the aureole. Temperatures of deformation are estimated to be approximately 740° C based on a modified c-axis opening angle thermometer of Kruhl (1998). There is a spatial inversion in microstructures and slip systems; apparent "high temperature" deformation and complete recrystallization (grain boundary migration and prism [c] slip) further from the pluton-contact and apparent "low temperature" deformation and partial recrystallization (subgrain rotation and slip) closer to the pluton-contact. Strain is also lower in the inner aureole based on relict grain shape ratios. We believe this spatial inversion in strain, deformation mechanisms and recrystallization mechanisms is a result of anhydrous conditions in the inner aureole. We suggest that a thick marble unit located between the pluton and the quartzite layers acted as a barrier to fluids emanating from the pluton. Decarbonation reactions in marble layers interbedded with the inner aureole quartzites and calc-silicate assemblages (quartz + calcite (and not wollastonite) + diopside ± K-feldspar) in the inner aureole quartzites produced high XCO2 (water absent) fluids during deformation. We suggest that it was these "dry" conditions that suppressed prism [c] slip and regime 3 recrystallization in the inner aureole and resulted in slip and regime 2 recrystallization. In contrast, the prograde assemblage in the pelite-dominated outer part of the aureole is biotite p K-feldspar. These "wet" pelitic assemblages indicate fluids dominated by water in the outer part of the aureole and promoted prism [c] slip and regime 3 recrystallization and resulted in higher strains. Strain rates for [c] slip are an order of magnitude higher than

  15. Size-dependent transition of deformation mechanism, and nonlinear elasticity in Ni{sub 3}Al nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yun-Jiang; Ogata, Shigenobu; Gao, Guo-Jie J.

    2013-01-28

    A size-dependent transition of deformation mechanism is revealed in Ni{sub 3}Al nanowire under atomistic uniaxial tension. Deformation twinning is replaced by phase transformation when the diameter of Ni{sub 3}Al nanowire reduces to a critical value near 4 nm. Enhanced size-dependent nonlinear elasticity is observed in the nanowires, in comparison to their bulk counterpart which is benchmarked by combined density functional and atomistic study. This study provide fundamental understanding on the size-dependent deformation mechanisms of nanostructured alloys.

  16. Effect of reversible torsion on the structure and mechanical properties of iron under severe plastic deformations in a Bridgman camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glezer, A. M.; Tomchuk, A. A.; Rassadina, T. V.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the reversible direction of rotation of the movable anvil of the Bridgman camera (torsion under high quasi-hydrostatic pressure at room temperature) on the structure and mechanical properties of commercially pure iron (steel 08kp) is investigated. It is established that a change in the direction of rotation of the movable anvil under torsion substantially effects the structural characteristics of deformation fragments and dynamically recrystallized grains formed under severe plastic deformations. The effect of the method of deformation on the internal distortions of structure and on the mechanical properties is analyzed.

  17. Crumpling deformation regimes of monolayer graphene on substrate: a molecular mechanics study.

    PubMed

    Al-Mulla, Talal; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-09-01

    Experiments and simulations demonstrating reversible and repeatable crumpling of graphene warrant a detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms of graphene crumple formation, especially for design of tailored nanostructures. To systematically study the formation of crumples in graphene, we use a simple molecular dynamics model, and perform a series of simulations to characterize the finite number of deformation regimes of graphene on substrate after compression. We formulate a quantitative measure of predicting these deformations based on observed results of the simulations and distinguish graphene crumpling considered in this study from others. In our study, graphene is placed on a model substrate while controlling and varying the interfacial energy between graphene and substrate and the substrate roughness through a set of particles embedded in the substrate. We find that a critical value of interfacial adhesion energy marks a transition point that separates two deformation regimes of graphene on substrate under uniaxial compression. The interface between graphene and substrate plays a major role in the formation of crumples, and we show that the choice of substrate can help in designing desired topologies in graphene. PMID:26252422

  18. Amorphous silicon under mechanical shear deformations: Shear velocity and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrache, Ali; Mousseau, Normand; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical shear deformations lead, in some cases, to effects similar to those resulting from ion irradiation. Here we characterize the effects of shear velocity and temperature on amorphous silicon (a-Si) modeled using classical molecular-dynamics simulations based on the empirical environment-dependent interatomic potential (EDIP). With increasing shear velocity at low temperature, we find a systematic increase in the internal strain leading to the rapid appearance of structural defects (fivefold-coordinated atoms). The impacts of externally applied strain can be almost fully compensated by increasing the temperature, allowing the system to respond more rapidly to the deformation. In particular, we find opposite power-law relations between the temperature and the shear velocity and the deformation energy. The spatial distribution of defects is also found to depend strongly on temperature and strain velocity. For low temperature or high shear velocity, defects are concentrated in a few atomic layers near the center of the cell, while with increasing temperature or decreasing shear velocity, they spread slowly throughout the full simulation cell. This complex behavior can be related to the structure of the energy landscape and the existence of a continuous energy-barrier distribution.

  19. A Micro Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based Cryogenic Deformable Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; Kataza, H.; Bierden, P.

    2009-03-01

    We present our first results on the development and evaluation of a cryogenic deformable mirror (DM) based on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. A MEMS silicon-based DM chip with 32 channels, in which each channel is 300 μm × 300 μm in size, was mounted on a silicon substrate in order to minimize distortion and prevent it from being permanently damaged by thermal stresses introduced by cooling. The silicon substrate was oxidized to obtain electric insulation and had a metal fan-out pattern on the surface. For cryogenic tests, we constructed a measurement system consisting of a Fizeau interferometer, a cryostat cooled by liquid N2, zooming optics, electric drivers. The surface of the mirror at 95 K deformed in response to the application of a voltage, and no significant difference was found between the deformation at 95 K and that at room temperature. The power dissipation by the cryogenic DM was also measured, and we suggest that this is small enough for it to be used in a space cryogenic telescope. The properties of the DM remained unchanged after five cycles of vacuum pumping, cooling, warming, and venting. We conclude that fabricating cryogenic DMs employing MEMS technology is a promising approach. Therefore, we intend to develop a more sophisticated device for actual use, and to look for potential applications including the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology & Astrophysics (SPICA), and other missions.

  20. Deformation Mechanisms in the Near-β Titanium Alloy Ti-55531

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikovits, Martina; Poletti, Cecilia; Warchomicka, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    The hot formability of a near-β titanium alloy is studied near the β transus temperature to determine the mechanisms of deformation. Compression tests of Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr-1Zr are carried out using a Gleeble®1500 device between 1036 K and 1116 K (763 °C and 843 °C) and strain rates between 0.001 and 10 s-1. The achieved flow data are used to calculate the efficiency of power dissipation, the strain rate sensitivity, and instability parameters derived from different models. Constitutive equations are built using the stress values at the strain of 0.4. Light optical microscopy and EBSD measurements are used to correlate the parameters that describe formability with the microstructure. It is found that hot deformation is achieved by dynamic recovery in the β phase by subgrain formation. Geometric dynamic recrystallization along the β grain boundaries takes place at large deformations, high temperatures, and low strain rates. On the other hand, for high strain rates, continuous dynamic recrystallization by lattice rotation already starts at a local strain of 1. Different phenomenological models are used to predict the flow instabilities, where the flow-softening parameter α i provides the best correlation with microstructure as well as the physical understanding. The instabilities observed in this alloy are strongly related to flow localization by adiabatic heat.

  1. Timing matters: tuning the mechanics of a muscle-tendon unit by adjusting stimulation phase during cyclic contractions.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Robertson, Benjamin D; Azizi, Emanuel; Roberts, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    A growing body of research on the mechanics and energetics of terrestrial locomotion has demonstrated that elastic elements acting in series with contracting muscle are critical components of sustained, stable and efficient gait. Far fewer studies have examined how the nervous system modulates muscle-tendon interaction dynamics to optimize 'tuning' or meet varying locomotor demands. To explore the fundamental neuromechanical rules that govern the interactions between series elastic elements (SEEs) and contractile elements (CEs) within a compliant muscle-tendon unit (MTU), we used a novel work loop approach that included implanted sonomicrometry crystals along muscle fascicles. This enabled us to decouple CE and SEE length trajectories when cyclic strain patterns were applied to an isolated plantaris MTU from the bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus). Using this approach, we demonstrate that the onset timing of muscle stimulation (i.e. stimulation phase) that involves a symmetrical MTU stretch-shorten cycle during active force production results in net zero mechanical power output, and maximal decoupling of CE and MTU length trajectories. We found it difficult to 'tune' the muscle-tendon system for strut-like isometric force production by adjusting stimulation phase only, as the zero power output condition involved significant positive and negative mechanical work by the CE. A simple neural mechanism - adjusting muscle stimulation phase - could shift an MTU from performing net zero to net positive (energy producing) or net negative (energy absorbing) mechanical work under conditions of changing locomotor demand. Finally, we show that modifications to the classical work loop paradigm better represent in vivo muscle-tendon function during locomotion.

  2. Timing matters: tuning the mechanics of a muscle–tendon unit by adjusting stimulation phase during cyclic contractions

    PubMed Central

    Sawicki, Gregory S.; Robertson, Benjamin D.; Azizi, Emanuel; Roberts, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A growing body of research on the mechanics and energetics of terrestrial locomotion has demonstrated that elastic elements acting in series with contracting muscle are critical components of sustained, stable and efficient gait. Far fewer studies have examined how the nervous system modulates muscle–tendon interaction dynamics to optimize ‘tuning’ or meet varying locomotor demands. To explore the fundamental neuromechanical rules that govern the interactions between series elastic elements (SEEs) and contractile elements (CEs) within a compliant muscle–tendon unit (MTU), we used a novel work loop approach that included implanted sonomicrometry crystals along muscle fascicles. This enabled us to decouple CE and SEE length trajectories when cyclic strain patterns were applied to an isolated plantaris MTU from the bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus). Using this approach, we demonstrate that the onset timing of muscle stimulation (i.e. stimulation phase) that involves a symmetrical MTU stretch–shorten cycle during active force production results in net zero mechanical power output, and maximal decoupling of CE and MTU length trajectories. We found it difficult to ‘tune’ the muscle–tendon system for strut-like isometric force production by adjusting stimulation phase only, as the zero power output condition involved significant positive and negative mechanical work by the CE. A simple neural mechanism – adjusting muscle stimulation phase – could shift an MTU from performing net zero to net positive (energy producing) or net negative (energy absorbing) mechanical work under conditions of changing locomotor demand. Finally, we show that modifications to the classical work loop paradigm better represent in vivo muscle–tendon function during locomotion. PMID:26232413

  3. Mechanisms of submicron inclusion re-equilibration during host mineral deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Thomas; Habler, Gerlinde; Abart, Rainer; Rhede, Dieter; Wirth, Richard

    2014-05-01

    data, and no subgrain boundaries. Secondly, garnet lattice rotation of up to 10° around rational garnet crystal axes is observed in connection with some already coarsened inclusions. Strain concentrations are widespread in some trails, but rare in others. A TEM foil transecting a garnet domain with concentrated lattice rotation in association with inclusions reveals well developed polygonal subgrain walls with few free dislocations. Where dislocation density is greatest, almost no <100nm inclusions are observed, whereas these are more abundant in unstrained garnet domains despite the foil being located entirely within the optically visible bleaching zone. Chlorite inclusions and formation of etch pits at dislocations at the garnet-chlorite interface demonstrate the presence of fluid along subgrain boundaries during this second bleaching process. In summary, brittle deformation in these garnets led to enhanced transport and inclusion re-equilibration by coarsening, forming inclusion trails. The precise mechanism allowing enhanced transport is still to be determined and may have involved fluid supply with or without pipe diffusion along introduced dislocations. Later ductile deformation via dislocations, concentrated at already coarsened inclusions and enhanced by fluid availability, further affected the nanoinclusion population. The inclusion trail microstructure records complex small-scale interaction between deformation and reaction, shedding light on the mechanisms by which re-equilibration and strain localisation can influence each other in deforming host-inclusion systems. Bestmann et al. (2008) Journal of Structural Geology 30: 777-790

  4. Focal Mechanisms for Local Earthquakes within a Rapidly Deforming Rhyolitic Magma System, Laguna del Maule, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. E.; Keranen, K. M.; Cardona, C.; Thurber, C. H.; Singer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Large shallow rhyolitic magma systems like the one underlying the Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field (LdM) atop the Southern Andes, Chile, that comprises the largest concentration of rhyolitic lava and tephra younger than 20 ka at earth's surface, are capable of producing modest to very large explosive eruptions. Moreover, LdM is currently exhibiting magma migration, reservoir growth, and crustal deformation at rates higher than any volcano that is not actively erupting. The long-term build-up of a large silicic magmatic system toward an eruption has yet to be monitored, therefore, precursory phenomena are poorly understood. In January of 2015, 12 broadband, 3-component seismometers were installed at LdM to detect local microearthquakes and tele-seismic events with the goals of determining the migration paths of fluids as well as the boundaries of the magma chamber beneath LdM. These stations complement the 6 permanent stations installed by the Southern Andes Volcano Observatory in 2011. Focal mechanisms were calculated using FOCMEC (Snoke et al., 1984) and P-wave first motions for local events occurring between January and March of 2015 using these 18 broadband stations. Results from six of the largest local events indicate a mixture of normal and reverse faulting at shallow (<10 km) depths surrounding the lake. This may be associated with the opening of fractures to accommodate rising magma in the subsurface and/or stresses induced by the rapid deformation. Two of these events occurred near the center of maximum deformation where seismic swarms have previously been identified. Focal mechanisms from smaller magnitude events will be calculated to better delineate subsurface structure. Source mechanisms will be refined using P-S amplitude ratios and full waveform inversion.

  5. Direct assessment of living cell mechanical responses during deformation inside microchannel restrictions.

    PubMed

    Walter, Nadine; Micoulet, Alexandre; Seufferlein, Thomas; Spatz, Joachim P

    2011-09-01

    The deformation of suspended cells inside microchannel restrictions mimics passive cell transportation in the blood circulation system of the body. The cells traverse or get stuck in narrow vessels, as, e.g., during the metastasis of tumor cells. In this work, the mechanical responses of suspended pancreatic cancer cells as they move through and deform inside microchannel restrictions are assessed with a cantilever-based polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) force sensor. Incorporated into a flow cell chip, the PDMS cantilever is integrated into the boundary wall of a narrow microrestriction. Upon being forced to enter the restriction by an applied flow, the cell exerts pressure on the cantilever, which then bends. By assuming a uniformly loaded cantilever, the total force and pressure on the cantilever can be calculated using elastic beam theory. This technique has the advantage of presenting an absolute and direct measure, which is independent of the applied flow and frictional processes at the channel-cell interface; in contrast to, e.g., measuring cell mechanics indirectly via cell sliding velocities. Furthermore, a high number of cells can be examined in a short time compared to other single cell mechanical testing devices. PMID:21974682

  6. Effect of mechanical deformation on the electrical properties of organic single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Martinez, Marcos; Crosby, Alfred; Briseno, Alejandro

    2014-03-01

    Despite efforts in the flexible electronics field, relatively little research quantified the effects of mechanical strain on the electrical properties of organic single crystals (OSCs) and their device performance in deformed geometries. Single crystals of organic semiconductors are ideal systems for the elucidation of these effects without having to account for imperfections, grain boundaries and other defects. The aim of this presentation is to bring new understanding of the effects of mechanical strain in charge transport phenomena on OSCs. First, the existence of a piezoresistive effect in rubrene crystals is demonstrated and experimentally quantified by the application of in-plane strain along its [010] axis. A piezoresistive coefficient approximately 50 is determined. Second, the effect of local mechanical deformation on the conductive channel is investigated in rubrene single-crystal field-effect transistors. A wrinkling instability is used as a technique to apply local strains of different magnitudes to the conducting channel of field-effect transistors. All devices maintain excellent transistor behavior, and small, reversible changes in performance are observed during wrinkling. This work provides useful knowledge for the effective application of organic semiconductors in strain intensive applications such as pressure sensors, electronic skins and strained-channel organic transistors.

  7. Intraplate deformation, stress in the lithosphere and the driving mechanism for plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden L.

    1993-01-01

    The initial research proposed was to use the predictions of geodynamical models of mantle flow, combined with geodetic observations of intraplate strain and stress, to better constrain mantle convection and the driving mechanism for plate motions and deformation. It is only now that geodetic observations of intraplate strain are becoming sufficiently well resolved to make them useful for substantial geodynamical inference to be made. A model of flow in the mantle that explains almost 90 percent of the variance in the observed longwavelength nonhydrostatic geoid was developed.

  8. Mechanical Deformability of Biological Membranes and the Sphering of the Erythrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Adams, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Equations of mechanical equilibrium are applied to the erythrocyte membrane in the normal, hypotonically swollen, and sphered configurations. The hydrostatic pressure drop across the normal cell membrane is shown to be zero for all biconcave shapes if the membrane thickness is uniform. This result leads to the conclusion that the membrane tension is uniform and is a function of membrane potential. A two-dimensional fluid film model for the membrane is introduced to describe the unusual deformability of the erythrocyte during sphering in hypotonic solutions. The model predicts a smooth transition from the biconcave shape to a perfect sphere. PMID:4697234

  9. The Impact of Posture on the Mechanical Properties of a Functional Spinal Unit During Cyclic Compressive Loading.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jeff M; Gooyers, Chad E; Karakolis, Thomas; Callaghan, Jack P

    2016-08-01

    To assess how posture affects the transmission of mechanical energy up the spinal column during vibration, 18 porcine functional spinal units (FSUs) were exposed to a sinusoidal force (1500 ± 1200 N) at 5 Hz for 120 min in either a flexed, extended, or neutral posture. Force and FSU height were measured continuously throughout the collection. From these data, specimen height loss, dynamic stiffness, hysteresis, and parameters from a standard linear solid (SLS) model were determined and analyzed for differences between postures. Posture had an influence on all of these parameters. In extension, the FSU had higher dynamic stiffness values than when neutral or flexed (p < 0.0001). In flexion, the FSU had higher hysteresis than both an extended or neutral posture (p < 0.0001). Height loss was greatest in a flexed posture and smallest in an extended posture (p < 0.0001). In extension, the series spring element in the SLS model had a stiffness value higher than both flexed and neutral posture conditions, whereas the stiffness in the parallel spring was the same between extension and neutral (p < 0.01), both higher than in flexion. Viscosity coefficients were highest in extension compared to both flexed and neutral (p < 0.01). Based on these results, it was determined that posture had a significant influence in determining the mechanical properties of the spine when exposed to cyclic compressive loading. PMID:27322199

  10. Combined effects of proinflammatory cytokines and intermittent cyclic mechanical strain in inhibiting osteogenicity in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chaofan; Chen, Lijiao; Shi, Xinlian; Cao, Zhensheng; Hu, Bibo; Yu, Wenbin; Ren, Manman; Hu, Rongdang; Deng, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical strain plays an important role in bone formation and resorption during orthodontic tooth movement. The mechanism has not been fully studied, and the process becomes complex with increased amounts of periodontal patients seeking orthodontic care. Our aims were to elucidate the combined effects of proinflammatory cytokines and intermittent cyclic strain (ICS) on the osteogenic capacity of human periodontal ligament cells. Cultured human periodontal ligament cells were exposed to proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β 5 ng/mL and tumor necrosis factor-α 10 ng/mL) for 1 and 5 days, and ICS (0.5 Hz, 12% elongation) was applied for 4 h per day. The autocrine of inflammatory cytokines was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of osteoblast markers runt-related transcription factor 2 and rabbit collagen type I was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The osteogenic capacity was also detected by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining, ALP activity, and alizarin red staining. We demonstrated that ICS impaired the osteogenic capacity of human periodontal ligament cells when incubated with proinflammatory cytokines, as evidenced by the low expression of ALP staining, low ALP activity, reduced alizarin red staining, and reduced osteoblast markers. These data, for the first time, suggest that ICS has a negative effect on the inductive inhibition of osteogenicity in human PDL cells mediated by proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:27357508

  11. Multiple deformation mechanisms operating at seismogenic depths: Tectonic pseudotachylyte and associated deformation from the central Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prante, M. R.; Evans, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Description and identification of fault-related deformation products that are diagnostic of seismic slip have implications for the energy budget of earthquakes, fault strength, and fault-rock assemblages. We describe tectonic pseduotachylyte, cataclastic rocks, crystal-plastic deformation, and hydrothermal alteration form faults exhumed from seismogenic depths in the Volcanic Lakes area, in northern Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park, CA, USA. Fault rock protoliths include Mesozoic granite and granodiorite plutonic and limited metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. These plutonic and metamorphic rocks are cross-cut by the E-W striking, steeply dipping, left-lateral strike-slip Granite Pass (GPF) and Glacier Lakes faults (GLF). Cross-cutting relationships and microstructural data suggest that the GPF is the oldest fault in the area and preserves evidence for coeval brittle and plastic crystal deformation, and hydrothermal fluid-flow. Tectonic pseudotachylyte from the area has been dated using the 40Ar/39Ar method at 76.6 ± 0.3 Ma; when placed into a thermochronologic framework for the plutonic host rock it can be inferred that the pseudotachylyte formed at depths between 2.4-6.0 km with ambient temperatures between 110-160°C. Exceptionally well preserved tectonic pseudotachylyte from the GLF and GPF contain evidence for a frictional melt origin including: 1) plagioclase spherulites and microlites, 2) injection vein morphology, 3) amygdules, 4) viscous flow banding and folds, and 5) embayed and corroded clasts. Pseudotachylyte from the GPF and GLF is associated with brittle and plastic deformation in the damage zone of the faults. Evidence for plastic deformation includes undulose extinction, deformation lamellae, subgrain development, and grain boundary bulging in quartz; and limited undulose extinction in feldspar. Additionally, abundant hydrothermal alteration and mineralization has been documented in the GPF and GLF fault zones, including, chlorite

  12. Controls of Lithospheric Mechanical Strength on the Deformation Pattern of Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Xiong, X.; Zheng, Y.; Hu, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Tien Shan is an outstanding example of intracontinental mountain belt, which was built rapidly and formed far away from plate boundaries. It exhibits 300~500 km in width and extends ~2000 km EW, located in central Asia. The Tien Shan is a key area for solution of the problems relating to intracontinental geodynamics. During last decades, despite a large amount of results based on various geological, geophysical and geodetic data about the Tien Shan, however, deformation mechanism remains controversial and other several principal problems related to its structure and evolution also have not been completely resolved. As for patterns of continental deformation, they are always controlled by both the forces applied to the lithosphere and by lithospheric resistance to the forces. The latter is often measured by the mechanical strength of lithosphere. The lateral variation of strength of lithosphere has been recognized to be an important factor controlling the spatial construction and temporal evolution of continent. In this study, we investigate the mechanical strength (Te) of lithosphere in the Tien Shan using wavelet coherency between Bouguer anomaly and topography. The patterns of Te variations are closely related to major tectonic boundaries and blocks. Mechanical strength exhibits a weak zone (Te~5-20km) beneath the Tien Shan while its surrounding blocks including Tarim Basin, Junggar Basin and Kazakh platform are characterized by a strong lithosphere (Te>40km). The lateral variations in mechanical strength and velocity field of horizontal movement with GPS demonstrate that strain localization appears at the margins of Tarim Basin, which is also the strong lithospheric domain. It is suggested that the weak lithosphere allows the crustal stress accumulation and the strong lithosphere helps to stress transfer. There is also a good agreement between mechanical strength and shear wave velocity structure in upper mantle. It indicates a strong domain located in the

  13. The structure and molecular mechanics calculations of the cyclic (1 → 2)-β- D-glucan secreted by Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil Serrano, Antonio M.; Franco-Rodríguez, Guillermo; González-Jiménez, Isabel; Tejero-Mateo, Pilar; Molina, José Molina; Dobado, J. A.; Megías, Manuel; Romero, Maria Jesús

    1993-12-01

    The structure of the extracellular cyclic (1 → 2)-β- D-glucan secreted by Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 has been studied by methylation analysis, 1D and 2D NMR experiments, HPLC and FAB-MS. Molecular mechanics (MM2) and theoretical 3JHH coupling constants calculations were performed.

  14. Deformation mechanisms of pyroxenes in a sheared mafic granulite from the Seiland Igneous Province (northern Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    degli Alessandrini, Giulia; Menegon, Luca; Malaspina, Nadia; Dijkstra, Arjan; Anderson, Mark

    2015-04-01

    A detailed microstructural and EBSD study was performed on a sheared mafic granulite from the Seiland Igneous Province (northern Norway) to investigate the deformation mechanisms of clino- and orthopyroxenes in a continental lower-crust mafic shear zone. Shearing occurred at T ≈750-820 degC, P ≈0.75-0.95 GPa, following magmatic emplacement and granulite facies riequilibration under dry conditions. The sample consists of clinopyroxene [Ca0.47,Mg0.35,Fe0.18]Si2O3 + orthopyroxene [Ca0.1,Mg0.5,Fe0.4]Si2O3 + plagioclase porphyroclasts (ranging in size from 25 to 650 μm) embedded in a fine-grained matrix (7 μm average grainsize) of cpx + opx + plag and qtz. The cpx and opx porphyroclasts show varying degrees of elongation, with the opx reaching aspect ratios up to 16 and the cpx reaching rare maxima of 7. Elongated opx grains display activity of the {100}<001> and {100}<010> slip systems. Many porphyroclasts have low aspect ratio (≈80% < 3) and show intracrystalline bands of recrystallized grains, as well as micro-boudinage with recrystallized grains in the boudin necks. All porphyroclasts have strong internal misorientations (undulatory and sweeping extinction) and a general lack of recovery features (subgrains). The new grains, with the same composition of the porphyroclasts, shows no host-control. The poly-phase matrix lacks of a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). These results suggest that crystal plasticity was not the main deformation mechanism in opx and cpx, and that recovery leading to dynamic recrystallization was not efficient despite the high P-T conditions of deformation. The absence of a CPO in the poly-phase matrix and the well mixed phase distribution are consistent with grains-size-sensitive creep (GSS). We speculate that GSS creep in the matrix has imposed a bulk high strain rate, which hampered crystal plasticity and recovery. High strain rates produced work hardening, causing microcracking and microboudinage in many pyroxene

  15. Exhumed analogues of seismically active carbonate-bearing thrusts: fault architecture and deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.; Viti, C.; Barchi, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    In May 2012 a M = 5.9 earthquake followed by a long aftershock sequence struck the Northern Italy. The sequence occurred at 4-10 km depth within the active front of Northern Apennines Prism and the major events nucleate within, or propagate through, a thick sequence of carbonates. In an inner sector of the Northern Apennines, ancient carbonate-bearing thrusts exposed at the surface, represent exhumed analogues of structures generating seismicity in the active front. Here we document fault architecture and deformation mechanisms of three regional carbonate bearing thrusts with displacement of several kilometers and exhumation in the range of 1-4 km. Fault zone structure and deformation mechanisms are controlled by the lithology of the faulted rocks. In layered limestones and marly-limestones the fault zone is up to 200 m thick and is characterized by intense pressure solution. In massive limestones the deformation generally occurs along thin and sharp slip planes that are in contact with fault portions affected by either cataclasis or pressure solution. SEM and TEM observations show that pressure solution surfaces, made of smectite lamellae, with time tend to form an interconnected network affected by frictional sliding. Sharp slipping planes along massive limestones show localization along Y shear planes that separate an extremely comminuted cataclasites from an almost undeformed protolith. The comparison of the three shear zones depicts a fault zone structure extremely heterogeneous as the result of protolith lithology, geometrical complexities and the presence of inherited structures. We observe the competition between brittle (cataclasis, distributed frictional sliding along phyllosilicates and extremely localized slip within carbonates) and pressure solution processes, that suggest a multi-mode of slip behaviour. Extreme localization along carbonate-bearing Y shear planes is our favorite fault zone feature representing past seismic ruptures along the studied

  16. Deformation mechanism study of a hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb alloy by transmission electron microscopy. II. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of deformation mechanism change of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy upon heavy ion irradiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Fei; Daymond, Mark R.; Yao, Zhongwen; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2015-03-14

    The effect of heavy-ion irradiation on deformation mechanisms of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy was investigated by using the in situ transmission electron microscopy deformation technique. The gliding behavior of prismatic < a > dislocations has been dynamically observed before and after irradiation at room temperature and 300 degrees C. Irradiation induced loops were shown to strongly pin the gliding dislocations. Unpinning occurred while loops were incorporated into or eliminated by < a > dislocations. In the irradiated sample, loop depleted areas with a boundary parallel to the basal plane trace were found by post-mortem observation after room temperature deformation, supporting the possibility of basal channel formation in bulk neutron irradiated samples. Strong activity of pyramidal slip was also observed at both temperatures, which might be another important mechanism to induce plastic instability in irradiated zirconium alloys. Finally, {01 (1) over bar1}< 0 (1) over bar 12 > twinning was identified in the irradiated sample deformed at 300 degrees C.

  17. Multiscale Plastic Deformation Near a Fatigue Crack from Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yinan; Barabash, Rozaliya; Choo, H.; Liaw, Peter K; Lu, Yulin; Brown, Donald; Ice, Gene E

    2007-01-01

    The plastic behavior of an annealed HASTELLOY C-22HS alloy, a face-centered cubic (FCC), nickel-based superalloy, was examined by in-situ neutron-diffraction measurements at room temperature. Both monotonic-tension and low-cycle-fatigue experiments were conducted. Monotonic-tension straining and cyclic-loading deformation were studied as a function of stress. The plastic behavior during deformation is discussed in light of the relationship between the stress and dislocation-density evolution. The calculated dislocation-density evolution within the alloy reflects the strain hardening and cyclic hardening/softening. Experimentally determined lattice strains are compared to verify the hardening mechanism at selected stress levels for tension and cyclic loadings. Combined with calculations of the dislocation densities, the neutron-diffraction experiments provide direct information about the strain and cyclic hardening of the alloy.

  18. A nonlinear CDM model for ductile failure analysis of steel bridge columns under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Van Do, Vuong; Lee, Chin-Hyung; Chang, Kyong-Ho

    2014-06-01

    A nonlinear cyclic plasticity damage model for ductile metals, which is able to take large deformation effects into consideration, has been developed using a new damage dissipation potential formulation in order to predict the cyclic inelastic behavior of steel bridge piers. The cyclic constitutive equations that employ the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening rule for plastic deformation is incorporated into the damage mechanics in conjunction with the large strain formulation. The damage growth law is based on the experimental observations that the evolution of microvoids results in nonlinear damage accumulation with plastic deformation. The damage model parameters and the procedure for their identification are presented. The proposed model has been validated and successfully applied to thin-walled steel bridge tubular columns subjected to alternating lateral displacements to evaluate the seismic performance.

  19. Mechanism of plastic deformation of a Ni-based superalloy for VHTR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Kun; Lovicu, Gianfranco; Chen, Xiang; Tung, Hsiao-Ming; Hansen, Jon B.; Stubbins, James F.

    2013-10-01

    Alloy 617 is considered a leading structural material for next generation nuclear power plants due to its good corrosion resistance and exceptional strength at high-temperatures. In the present work, a complementary study of deformation mechanisms in Alloy 617 was performed via tensile testing at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Dynamic strain aging characterized by serrated flow leading to temperature independent yield strength was observed at intermediate temperatures. At temperatures higher than 700 °C, the material's strength reduced dramatically as a result of the predominance of dislocation creep and dynamic recrystallization. The changes in deformation mechanisms were established by direct observations of Electron Backscatter Diffraction mappings and by the analysis of texture development based on the pole figure mappings. Recrystallized grains were found to preferentially grow in particle-rich areas and on high-angle grain boundaries. Finally, fracture was initiated from particle cracks at temperatures up to 700 °C and by triple junction cracks from 800 to 1000 °C.

  20. Automatic Segmentation of Mechanically Inhomogeneous Tissues Based on Deformation Gradient Jump.

    PubMed

    Witzenburg, Colleen M; Dhume, Rohit Y; Lake, Spencer P; Barocas, Victor H

    2016-01-01

    Variations in properties, active behavior, injury, scarring, and/or disease can all cause a tissue's mechanical behavior to be heterogeneous. Advances in imaging technology allow for accurate full-field displacement tracking of both in vitro and in vivo deformation from an applied load. While detailed strain fields provide some insight into tissue behavior, material properties are usually determined by fitting stress-strain behavior with a constitutive equation. However, the determination of the mechanical behavior of heterogeneous soft tissue requires a spatially varying constitutive equation (i.e., one in which the material parameters vary with position). We present an approach that computationally dissects the sample domain into many homogeneous subdomains, wherein subdomain boundaries are formed by applying a betweenness based graphical analysis to the deformation gradient field to identify locations with large discontinuities. This novel partitioning technique successfully determined the shape, size and location of regions with locally similar material properties for: (1) a series of simulated soft tissue samples prescribed with both abrupt and gradual changes in anisotropy strength, prescribed fiber alignment, stiffness, and nonlinearity, (2) tissue analogs (PDMS and collagen gels) which were tested biaxially and speckle tracked (3) and soft tissues which exhibited a natural variation in properties (cadaveric supraspinatus tendon), a pathologic variation in properties (thoracic aorta containing transmural plaque), and active behavior (contracting cardiac sheet). The routine enables the dissection of samples computationally rather than physically, allowing for the study of small tissues specimens with unknown and irregular inhomogeneity. PMID:26168433

  1. Mechanical dyssynchrony and deformation imaging in patients with functional mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Isabella; Marini, Claudia; Stella, Stefano; Ancona, Francesco; Spartera, Marco; Margonato, Alberto; Agricola, Eustachio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is a frequent finding of ischemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), associated with unfavourable prognosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms are involved in FMR, such as annular dilatation and dysfunction, left ventricle (LV) remodeling, dysfunction and dyssynchrony, papillary muscles displacement and dyssynchrony. The best therapeutic choice for FMR is still debated. When optimal medical treatment has already been set, a further option for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and/or surgical correction should be considered. CRT is able to contrast most of the pathophysiologic determinants of FMR by minimizing LV dyssynchrony through different mechanisms: Increasing closing forces, reducing tethering forces, reshaping annular geometry and function, correcting diastolic MR. Deformation imaging in terms of two-dimensional speckle tracking has been validated for LV dyssynchrony assessment. Radial speckle tracking and three-dimensional strain analysis appear to be the best methods to quantify intraventricular delay and to predict CRT-responders. Speckle-tracking echocardiography in patients with mitral valve regurgitation has been usually proposed for the assessment of LV and left atrial function. However it has also revealed a fundamental role of intraventricular dyssynchrony in determining FMR especially in DCM, rather than in ischemic cardiomyopathy in which MR severity seems to be more related to mitral valve deformation indexes. Furthermore speckle tracking allows the assessment of papillary muscle dyssynchrony. Therefore this technique can help to identify optimal candidates to CRT that will probably demonstrate a reduction in FMR degree and thus will experience a better outcome. PMID:26981211

  2. Mechanical dyssynchrony and deformation imaging in patients with functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Isabella; Marini, Claudia; Stella, Stefano; Ancona, Francesco; Spartera, Marco; Margonato, Alberto; Agricola, Eustachio

    2016-02-26

    Chronic functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is a frequent finding of ischemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), associated with unfavourable prognosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms are involved in FMR, such as annular dilatation and dysfunction, left ventricle (LV) remodeling, dysfunction and dyssynchrony, papillary muscles displacement and dyssynchrony. The best therapeutic choice for FMR is still debated. When optimal medical treatment has already been set, a further option for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and/or surgical correction should be considered. CRT is able to contrast most of the pathophysiologic determinants of FMR by minimizing LV dyssynchrony through different mechanisms: Increasing closing forces, reducing tethering forces, reshaping annular geometry and function, correcting diastolic MR. Deformation imaging in terms of two-dimensional speckle tracking has been validated for LV dyssynchrony assessment. Radial speckle tracking and three-dimensional strain analysis appear to be the best methods to quantify intraventricular delay and to predict CRT-responders. Speckle-tracking echocardiography in patients with mitral valve regurgitation has been usually proposed for the assessment of LV and left atrial function. However it has also revealed a fundamental role of intraventricular dyssynchrony in determining FMR especially in DCM, rather than in ischemic cardiomyopathy in which MR severity seems to be more related to mitral valve deformation indexes. Furthermore speckle tracking allows the assessment of papillary muscle dyssynchrony. Therefore this technique can help to identify optimal candidates to CRT that will probably demonstrate a reduction in FMR degree and thus will experience a better outcome.

  3. Phase transformation as the single-mode mechanical deformation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sherman; Haberl, Bianca; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2015-06-25

    The mixture of the metastable body-centered cubic (bc8) and rhombohedral (r8) phases of silicon that is formed via nanoindentation of diamond cubic (dc) silicon exhibits properties that are of scientifc and technological interest. This letter demonstrates that large regions of this mixed phase can be formed in crystalline Si via nanoindentation without signifcant damage to the surrounding crystal. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to show that volumes 6 μm wide and up to 650 nm deep can be generated in this way using a spherical tip of ~21.5 μm diameter. The phase transformed region is characterised using both Raman microspectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that uniform loading using large spherical indenters can favor phase transformation as the sole deformation mechanism as long as the maximum load is below a critical level. We suggest that the sluggish nature of the transformation from the dc-Si phase to the metallic (b-Sn) phase normally results in competing deformation mechanisms such as slip and cracking but these can be suppressed by controlled loading conditions.

  4. Deformation mechanisms during nanoindentation of sodium borosilicate glasses of nuclear interest

    SciTech Connect

    Kilymis, D. A.; Delaye, J.-M.

    2014-07-07

    In this paper we analyze results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of Vickers nanoindentation, performed for sodium borosilicate glasses of interest in the nuclear industry. Three glasses have been studied in their pristine form, as well as a disordered one that is analogous to the real irradiated glass. We focused in the behavior of the glass during the nanoindentation in order to reveal the mechanisms of deformation and how they are affected by microstructural characteristics. Results have shown a strong dependence on the SiO{sub 2} content of the glass, which promotes densification due to the open structure of SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra and also due to the strength of Si-O bonds. Densification for the glasses is primarily expressed by the relative decrease of the Si-O-Si and Si-O-B angles, indicating rotation of the structural units and decrease of free volume. The increase of alkali content on the other hand results to higher plasticity of the matrix and increased shear flow. The most important effect on the deformation mechanism of the disordered glasses is that of the highly depolymerized network that will also induce shear flow and, in combination with the increased free volume, will result in the decreased hardness of these glasses, as has been previously observed.

  5. Phase transformation as the single-mode mechanical deformation of silicon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wong, Sherman; Haberl, Bianca; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2015-06-25

    The mixture of the metastable body-centered cubic (bc8) and rhombohedral (r8) phases of silicon that is formed via nanoindentation of diamond cubic (dc) silicon exhibits properties that are of scientifc and technological interest. This letter demonstrates that large regions of this mixed phase can be formed in crystalline Si via nanoindentation without signifcant damage to the surrounding crystal. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to show that volumes 6 μm wide and up to 650 nm deep can be generated in this way using a spherical tip of ~21.5 μm diameter. The phase transformed region is characterised using both Ramanmore » microspectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that uniform loading using large spherical indenters can favor phase transformation as the sole deformation mechanism as long as the maximum load is below a critical level. We suggest that the sluggish nature of the transformation from the dc-Si phase to the metallic (b-Sn) phase normally results in competing deformation mechanisms such as slip and cracking but these can be suppressed by controlled loading conditions.« less

  6. Strong equivalence principle in polymer quantum mechanics and deformed Heisenberg algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajuri, Nirmalya

    2016-10-01

    The strong equivalence principle (SEP) states that the description of a physical system in a gravitational field is indistinguishable from the description of the same system at rest in an accelerating frame. While this statement holds true in both general relativity and ordinary quantum mechanics, one expects it to fail when quantum gravity corrections are taken into account. In this paper we investigate the possible failure of the SEP in two quantum gravity inspired modifications of quantum mechanics—polymer quantum mechanics and deformed Heisenberg algebra. We find that the SEP fails to hold in both these theories. We estimate the deviation from SEP and find in both cases that it is too small to be measured in present day experiments.

  7. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-01-01

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675-1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m(0.5). Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications. PMID:26503706

  8. Mechanical stress altered electron gate tunneling current and extraction of conduction band deformation potentials for germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Youn Sung; Lim, Ji-Song; Numata, Toshinori; Nishida, Toshikazu; Thompson, Scott E.

    2007-11-01

    Strain altered electron gate tunneling current is measured for germanium (Ge) metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with HfO2 gate dielectric. Uniaxial mechanical stress is applied using four-point wafer bending along [100] and [110] directions to extract both dilation and shear deformation potential constants of Ge. Least-squares fit to the experimental data results in Ξd and Ξu of -4.3±0.3 and 16.5±0.5 eV, respectively, which agree with theoretical calculations. The dominant mechanism for the strain altered electron gate tunneling current is a strain-induced change in the conduction band offset between Ge and HfO2. Tensile stress reduces the offset and increases the gate tunneling current for Ge while the opposite occurs for Si.

  9. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-10-01

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675-1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m0.5. Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications.

  10. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-10-27

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675-1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m(0.5). Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications.

  11. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-01-01

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675–1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m0.5. Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications. PMID:26503706

  12. Plasticity of human Achilles tendon mechanical and morphological properties in response to cyclic strain.

    PubMed

    Arampatzis, Adamantios; Peper, Andreas; Bierbaum, Stefanie; Albracht, Kirsten

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the current study in combination with our previous published data (Arampatzis et al., 2007) was to examine the effects of a controlled modulation of strain magnitude and strain frequency applied to the Achilles tendon on the plasticity of tendon mechanical and morphological properties. Eleven male adults (23.9 ± 2.2 yr) participated in the study. The participants exercised one leg at low magnitude tendon strain (2.97 ± 0.47%), and the other leg at high tendon strain magnitude (4.72 ± 1.08%) of similar frequency (0.5 Hz, 1s loading, 1s relaxation) and exercise volume (integral of the plantar flexion moment over time) for 14 weeks, 4 days per week, 5 sets per session. The exercise volume was similar to the intervention of our earlier study (0.17 Hz frequency; 3s loading, 3s relaxation) allowing a direct comparison of the results. Before and after the intervention ankle joint moment has been measured by a dynamometer, tendon-aponeurosis elongation by ultrasound and cross-sectional area of the Achilles tendon by magnet resonance images (MRI). We found a decrease in strain at a given tendon force, an increase in tendon-aponeurosis stiffness and tendon elastic modulus of the Achilles tendon only in the leg exercised at high strain magnitude. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the Achilles tendon did not show any statistically significant (P > 0.05) differences to the pre-exercise values in both legs. The results indicate a superior improvement in tendon properties (stiffness, elastic modulus and CSA) at the low frequency (0.17 Hz) compared to the high strain frequency (0.5 Hz) protocol. These findings provide evidence that the strain magnitude applied to the Achilles tendon should exceed the value, which occurs during habitual activities to trigger adaptational effects and that higher tendon strain duration per contraction leads to superior tendon adaptational responses.

  13. Finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of bilayer enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yunfei; Xuan, Fu-zhen; Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Fuqian

    2014-04-01

    Tooth enamel is often subjected to repeated contact and often experiences contact deformation in daily life. The mechanical strength of the enamel determines the biofunctionality of the tooth. Considering the variation of the rod arrangement in outer and inner enamel, we approximate enamel as a bilayer structure and perform finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of the bilayer structure, to mimic the repeated contact of enamel during mastication. The dynamic deformation behaviour of both the inner enamel and the bilayer enamel is examined. The material parameters of the inner and outer enamel used in the analysis are obtained by fitting the finite element results with the experimental nanoindentation results. The penetration depth per cycle at the quasi-steady state is used to describe the depth propagation speed, which exhibits a two-stage power-law dependence on the maximum indentation load and the amplitude of the cyclic load, respectively. The continuous penetration of the indenter reflects the propagation of the plastic zone during cyclic indentation, which is related to the energy dissipation. The outer enamel serves as a protective layer due to its great resistance to contact deformation in comparison to the inner enamel. The larger equivalent plastic strain and lower stresses in the inner enamel during cyclic indentation, as calculated from the finite element analysis, indicate better crack/fracture resistance of the inner enamel.

  14. Mechanical properties and constitutive relations for tantalum and tantalum alloys under high-rate deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III; Bingert, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    Tantalum and its alloys have received increased interest as a model bcc metal and for defense-related applications. The stress-strain behavior of several tantalums, possessing varied compositions and manufacturing histories, and tantalum alloyed with tungsten, was investigated as a function of temperature from {minus}196 C to 1,000 C, and strain rate from 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} to 8,000 s{sup {minus}1}. The yield stress for all the Ta-materials was found to be sensitive to the test temperature, the impurity and solute contents; however, the strain hardening remained very similar for various ``pure`` tantalums but increased with alloying. Powder-metallurgy (P/M) tantalum with various levels of oxygen content produced via different processing paths was also investigated. Similar mechanical properties compared to conventionally processed tantalums were achieved in the P/M Ta. This data suggests that the frequently observed inhomogeneities in the mechanical behavior of tantalum inherited from conventional processes can be overcome. Constitutive relations based upon the Johnson-Cook, the Zerilli-Armstrong, and the Mechanical Threshold Stress models were evaluated for all the Ta-based materials. Parameters were also fit for these models to a tantalum-bar material. Flow stresses of a Ta bar stock subjected to a large-strain deformation of {var_epsilon} = 1.85 via multiple upset forging were obtained. The capabilities and limitations of each model for large-strain applications are examined. The deformation mechanisms controlling high-rate plasticity in tantalum are revisited.

  15. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of a copper-zirconium alloy processed by severe plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsa-Ngam, Jittraporn

    A copper alloy, Cu-0.1% Zr, has been processed at room temperature by different techniques of severe plastic deformation (SPD), namely equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP), high-pressure torsion (HPT) and a combination of both processing (ECAP + HPT). The experiments were conducted to evaluate the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties for each of the processed and their combination. A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and an electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques were employed to measure the microstructural features, grain size distributions and the distribution of the misorientation angles. The mechanical properties of the processed samples were examined and compared both at a room temperature using microhardness measurements and at an elevated temperature using tensile testing. Using TEM and EBSD techniques, it is demonstrated that these three SPD procedures have a potential for producing an ultrafine-grain structure containing reasonably equiaxed grains with high-angle boundary misorientations. However, microstructures are refined in different level depending on the processing operation. The grain refinement mechanisms are primarily governed by dislocation activities. Microhardness distribution of the strained samples shows that there is a non-uniform of this distribution in the early stages of deformation where the lower hardness values were measured near the bottom of samples for ECAP and at the central region for HPT. This inhomogeneity is gradual decreased with increasing imposed strain and ultimately the microhardness distribution is reasonably homogeneous when the sufficient strain is subjected to the sample. The tensile results demonstrate that the samples after SPD processing exhibit superior mechanical properties with the combination of high strength and ductility compared to the as-received materials where the maximum elongation to failure of ˜240% at 723 K using a strain rate of 1.0 x 10 -4 s-1 is achieved in a sample

  16. Three-dimensional morphology of pores and cracks in intact and mechanically deformed sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez, B.; David, C.; Wong, T.-F.; Martinez-Nistal, A.

    2003-04-01

    We have studied four different sandstones under confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In order to discriminate the void space from the grains, the samples were impregnated with a fluorescent dyed (Rhodamine B) resin and thin-sections with a thickness larger than usual were prepared and studied with CSLM. Two different kinds of samples have been studied: mechanically deformed samples of Darley Dale and Berea sandstones and intact samples of Rothbach and Bentheim sandstones. On each sample several three dimensional blocks have been investigated with size 228 by 152 microns and depths ranging from 35 to 100 microns. From each block a series of tens of parallel "virtual sections" has been recorded, separated by 1 or 2 microns in depth. First we show some examples on Darley Dale and Berea sandstone samples deformed in triaxial experiments. Rotating animations are built from series of 3D views of reconstructed crack networks taken step by step for different block orientations. When put together these 3D views nicely simulate a rotation of the 3D block. To create and run the animations we used the Confocal Assistant free software on a PC. Spectacular 3D animations representing crack networks in mechanically deformed samples are obtained this way in a very short time: some examples will be shown on the screen. Secondly we show on a poster some static 3D reconstructions of the pore and/or crack networks obtained using the Slicer Dicer software. For the intact samples we observe that pore (or grain) walls are smoother in Bentheim sandstone whereas in Rothbach sandstone the presence of a significant amount of coating clay minerals results in a visible surface roughness. Some differences in pore size and pore shape were also observed, with a more homogeneous distribution in Bentheim sandstone than in Rothbach sandstone. In both sandstones we observe the classical pore-to-throats junctions. Complex contact geometry between adjacent grains are sometimes observed. In the

  17. Excited-state ring-opening mechanism of cyclic ketones: a MS-CASPT2//CASSCF study.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shu-Hua; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Fang, Qiu; Cui, Ganglong

    2015-04-16

    We have employed complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and its second-order perturbation (MS-CASPT2) methods to study the S1 and T1 excited-state ring-opening mechanisms and S1 excited-state deactivation channels of cyclopropanone, cyclobutanone, cyclopentanone, and cyclohexanone. On the basis of optimized minima, transition states, conical intersections, refined energies, and relaxed two-dimensional S1 and T1 potential energy surfaces, we find that, with the ring-strain decrease from cyclopropanone to cyclohexanone, (1) the ring-opening S1 and T1 barrier increases from 0.0 and 0.0 to 19.7 and 10.4 kcal/mol, respectively; (2) the electronic state responsible for the dominant ring-opening reaction varies from the S1 state of cyclopropanone to the T1 state of cyclopentanone and cyclohexanone; and (3) the S1 ring opening gradually becomes inefficient even blocked in cyclopentanone and cyclohexanone. This work shows that these dissimilar excited-state dynamics could originate from different ring strain of small cyclic ketones.

  18. The Phosphorylation Status of a Cyclic AMP-Responsive Activator Is Modulated via a Chromatin-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Laura F.; Asahara, Hiroshi; Shulman, Andrew I.; Kraus, W. Lee; Montminy, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) stimulates the expression of numerous genes via the protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133. Ser133 phosphorylation, in turn, promotes recruitment of the coactivator CREB binding protein and its paralog p300, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that have been proposed to mediate target gene activation, in part, by destabilizing promoter bound nucleosomes and thereby allowing assembly of the transcriptional apparatus. Here we show that although histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors potentiate target gene activation via cAMP, they do not stimulate transcription over the early burst phase, during which CREB phosphorylation and CBP/p300 recruitment are maximal. Rather, HDAC inhibitors augment CREB activity during the late attenuation phase by prolonging CREB phosphorylation on chromosomal but, remarkably, not on extrachromosomal templates. In reconstitution studies, assembly of periodic nucleosomal arrays on a cAMP-responsive promoter template potently inhibited CREB phosphorylation by PKA, and acetylation of these template-bound nucleosomes by p300 partially rescued CREB phosphorylation by PKA. Our results suggest a novel regulatory mechanism by which cellular HATs and HDACs modulate the phosphorylation status of nuclear activators in response to cellular signals. PMID:10669737

  19. Hypoxia induces phosphorylation of the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein by a novel signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1998-07-31

    To investigate signaling mechanisms by which hypoxia regulates gene expression, we examined the effect of hypoxia on the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in PC12 cells. Exposure to physiological levels of hypoxia (5% O2, approximately 50 mm Hg) rapidly induced a persistent phosphorylation of CREB on Ser133, an event that is required for CREB-mediated transcriptional activation. Hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of CREB was more robust than that induced by any other stimulus tested, including forskolin, depolarization, and osmotic stress. Furthermore, this effect was not mediated by any of the previously known signaling pathways that lead to phosphorylation of CREB, including protein kinase A, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, ribosomal S6 kinase-2, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase-2. Hypoxic activation of a CRE-containing reporter (derived from the 5'-flanking region of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene) was attenuated markedly by mutation of the CRE. Thus, a physiological reduction in O2 levels induces a functional phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133 via a novel signaling pathway. PMID:9677418

  20. Cyclic AMP and the mechanism of leucocyte lysosomal enzyme release during an immediate hypersensitivity reaction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Deporter, D A

    1977-11-01

    The pleural cavity of rats was used to study the effect of altering leucocyte cyclic AMP content on the release of B-glucuronidase activity during an immediate hypersensitivity reaction. The effect on intravenous colchicine was also studied. Despite an increase of 135 to 235% in leucocyte cyclic AMP content no decrease in B-glucuronidase release was observed. Similarly, colchicine had no effect on enzyme release. It was concluded that the cyclic nucleotides and leucocyte microtubules may have no significant role to play in the release of lysosomal enzymes during acute inflammation in vivo. PMID:201738

  1. Correlation between the microstructures and the deformation mechanisms of CuZr-based bulk metallic glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, K. K.; Pauly, S.; Sun, B. A.; Tan, J.; Stoica, M.; Kühn, U.; Eckert, J.

    2013-01-01

    The variation of the transformation-mediated deformation behavior with microstructural changes in CuZr-based bulk metallic glass composites is investigated. With increasing crystalline volume fraction, the deformation mechanism gradually changes from a shear-banding dominated process as evidenced by a chaotic serrated flow behavior, to being governed by a martensitic transformation with a pronounced elastic-plastic stage, resulting in different plastic deformations evolving into a self-organized critical state characterized by the power-law distribution of shear avalanches. This is reflected in the stress-strain curves by a single-to-"double"-to-"triple"-double yielding transition and by different mechanical properties with different serrated flow characteristics, which are interpreted based on the microstructural evolutions and a fundamental energy theorem. Our results can assist in understanding deformation behaviors for high-performance metastable alloys.

  2. Measurement of the ground-state distributions in bistable mechanically interlocked molecules using slow scan rate cyclic voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Barnes, Jonathan C.; Li, Hao; Benítez, Diego; Basuray, Ashish N.; Fang, Lei; Sue, Chi-Hau; Barin, Gokhan; Dey, Sanjeev K.; Goddard, William A.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2011-01-01

    In donor–acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules that exhibit bistability, the relative populations of the translational isomers—present, for example, in a bistable [2]rotaxane, as well as in a couple of bistable [2]catenanes of the donor–acceptor vintage—can be elucidated by slow scan rate cyclic voltammetry. The practice of transitioning from a fast scan rate regime to a slow one permits the measurement of an intermediate redox couple that is a function of the equilibrium that exists between the two translational isomers in the case of all three mechanically interlocked molecules investigated. These intermediate redox potentials can be used to calculate the ground-state distribution constants, K. Whereas, (i) in the case of the bistable [2]rotaxane, composed of a dumbbell component containing π-electron-rich tetrathiafulvalene and dioxynaphthalene recognition sites for the ring component (namely, a tetracationic cyclophane, containing two π-electron-deficient bipyridinium units), a value for K of 10 ± 2 is calculated, (ii) in the case of the two bistable [2]catenanes—one containing a crown ether with tetrathiafulvalene and dioxynaphthalene recognition sites for the tetracationic cyclophane, and the other, tetrathiafulvalene and butadiyne recognition sites—the values for K are orders (one and three, respectively) of magnitude greater. This observation, which has also been probed by theoretical calculations, supports the hypothesis that the extra stability of one translational isomer over the other is because of the influence of the enforced side-on donor–acceptor interactions brought about by both π-electron-rich recognition sites being part of a macrocyclic polyether. PMID:22135467

  3. State-variable theories for nonelastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.Y.

    1981-01-01

    The various concepts of mechanical equation of state for nonelastic deformation in crystalline solids, originally proposed for plastic deformation, have been recently extended to describe additional phenomena such as anelastic and microplastic deformation including the Bauschinger effect. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to predict, based on current state variables in a unified way, the mechanical response of a material under an arbitrary loading. Thus, if the evolution laws of the state variables are known, one can describe the behavior of a material for a thermal-mechanical path of interest, for example, during constant load (or stress) creep without relying on specialized theories. Some of the existing theories of mechanical equation of state for nonelastic deformation are reviewed. The establishment of useful forms of mechanical equation of state has to depend on extensive experimentation in the same way as that involved in the development, for example, the ideal gas law. Recent experimental efforts are also reviewed. It has been possible to develop state-variable deformation models based on experimental findings and apply them to creep, cyclic deformation, and other time-dependent deformation. Attempts are being made to correlate the material parameters of the state-variable models with the microstructure of a material. 24 figures.

  4. Investigation of fiber/matrix interfacial mechanical behavior in ceramic matrix composites by cyclic fiber push-in testing

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, J.I.; Bhatt, R.T.; Bansal, N.P.; Olmstead, F.A.

    1996-12-31

    Cyclic fiber push-in testing is used to examine the stability of interfacial frictional sliding stresses and fiber debond lengths with continued push-in load/unload cycles. The measured response to applying load cycling to a single fiber reveals the susceptibility of the fiber/matrix interface to degrade under cyclic loading conditions, and thus, helps evaluate the contribution of the interface to the cyclic fatigue behavior of the composite after the occurrence of matrix cracks. From cyclic push-in testing in room temperature air, decreasing interfacial sliding stresses and increasing debond lengths are observed with continued load cycling for SCS-6 SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SCS-6/RBSN), whereas stable interfacial sliding stresses and no increase in debond lengths are observed with continued load cycling for SCS-6 SiC fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate (SCS-6/SAS). These results indicate that fiber-bridged matrix cracks should be stable under cyclic fatigue loading conditions in SCS-6/SAS, but should exhibit increasing crack opening displacements and fiber pull-out with continued cycling in SCS-6/RBSN. In addition, changing the test environment from room air to nitrogen significantly affects the cyclic push-in test results for SCS-6/RBSN, but not for SCS-6/SAS. The different responses to this change in test environment are attributed to different locations of interfacial failure.

  5. The Characterization of Mechanical Properties of a Rabbit Femur-Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Tibia Complex During Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Hidetaka; Han, Jungsoo; Ryu, Jaiyoung; Han, Changsoo

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclic loading, which produced the condition of ACLs during sports activities, on tensile properties of femur-ACL-tibia complexes (FATCs). Paired FATCs of 40 New Zealand white rabbits were tested on a materials testing machine. One specimen of each pair was designated as a control and loaded until failure. The contralateral specimen was loaded cyclically (1.4 Hz, 1 hr.) with 20%, 30%, 40%, or 50% of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the control and then loaded until failure. The UTS and mode of failure were recorded after each test. Five specimens ruptured during cyclic loading in the 50% group. In the 40% group, the mean value of UTS of cycled specimens was significantly lower than that of controls. There was no statistically significant difference in UTS values between control and cycled specimens in the 20% and 30% groups. Cycled specimens had a significantly higher incidence of substance failure than controls. Our results demonstrated that FATCs have the strength to withstand cyclic loading within normal sports activity levels. However, FACTs can be damaged by cyclic loading under strenuous sports activity levels. We speculate that cyclic loading makes the ACL substance weaker than the insertion site.

  6. Structure of the SthK Carboxy-Terminal Region Reveals a Gating Mechanism for Cyclic Nucleotide-Modulated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kesters, Divya; Brams, Marijke; Nys, Mieke; Wijckmans, Eveline; Spurny, Radovan; Voets, Thomas; Tytgat, Jan; Kusch, Jana; Ulens, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-sensitive ion channels are molecular pores that open in response to cAMP or cGMP, which are universal second messengers. Binding of a cyclic nucleotide to the carboxyterminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) of these channels is thought to cause a conformational change that promotes channel opening. The C-linker domain, which connects the channel pore to this CNBD, plays an important role in coupling ligand binding to channel opening. Current structural insight into this mechanism mainly derives from X-ray crystal structures of the C-linker/CNBD from hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN) channels. However, these structures reveal little to no conformational changes upon comparison of the ligand-bound and unbound form. In this study, we take advantage of a recently identified prokaryote ion channel, SthK, which has functional properties that strongly resemble cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and is activated by cAMP, but not by cGMP. We determined X-ray crystal structures of the C-linker/CNBD of SthK in the presence of cAMP or cGMP. We observe that the structure in complex with cGMP, which is an antagonist, is similar to previously determined HCN channel structures. In contrast, the structure in complex with cAMP, which is an agonist, is in a more open conformation. We observe that the CNBD makes an outward swinging movement, which is accompanied by an opening of the C-linker. This conformation mirrors the open gate structures of the Kv1.2 channel or MthK channel, which suggests that the cAMP-bound C-linker/CNBD from SthK represents an activated conformation. These results provide a structural framework for better understanding cyclic nucleotide modulation of ion channels, including HCN and CNG channels. PMID:25625648

  7. Insights from the Lattice-Strain Evolution on Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic-Glass-Matrix Composites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jia, Haoling; Zheng, Lili; Li, Weidong; Li, Nan; Qiao, Junwei; Wang, Gongyao; Ren, Yang; Liaw, Peter K.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-02-18

    In this paper, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and micromechanics-based finite element simulations have been conducted to examine the lattice-strain evolution in metallic-glass-matrix composites (MGMCs) with dendritic crystalline phases dispersed in the metallic-glass matrix. Significant plastic deformation can be observed prior to failure from the macroscopic stress–strain curves in these MGMCs. The entire lattice-strain evolution curves can be divided into elastic–elastic (denoting deformation behavior of matrix and inclusion, respectively), elastic–plastic, and plastic–plastic stages. Characteristics of these three stages are governed by the constitutive laws of the two phases (modeled by free-volume theory and crystal plasticity) and geometric informationmore » (crystalline phase morphology and distribution). The load-partitioning mechanisms have been revealed among various crystalline orientations and between the two phases, as determined by slip strain fields in crystalline phase and by strain localizations in matrix. Finally, implications on ductility enhancement of MGMCs are also discussed.« less

  8. Insights from the Lattice-Strain Evolution on Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic-Glass-Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Haoling; Zheng, Lili; Li, Weidong; Li, Nan; Qiao, Junwei; Wang, Gongyao; Ren, Yang; Liaw, Peter K.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-02-18

    In this paper, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and micromechanics-based finite element simulations have been conducted to examine the lattice-strain evolution in metallic-glass-matrix composites (MGMCs) with dendritic crystalline phases dispersed in the metallic-glass matrix. Significant plastic deformation can be observed prior to failure from the macroscopic stress–strain curves in these MGMCs. The entire lattice-strain evolution curves can be divided into elastic–elastic (denoting deformation behavior of matrix and inclusion, respectively), elastic–plastic, and plastic–plastic stages. Characteristics of these three stages are governed by the constitutive laws of the two phases (modeled by free-volume theory and crystal plasticity) and geometric information (crystalline phase morphology and distribution). The load-partitioning mechanisms have been revealed among various crystalline orientations and between the two phases, as determined by slip strain fields in crystalline phase and by strain localizations in matrix. Finally, implications on ductility enhancement of MGMCs are also discussed.

  9. Deformation mechanisms in granodiorite at effective pressures to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Bauer, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Deformation mechanisms in room-dry and water-saturated specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, shortened at 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective pressures (Pe) to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting (less than or equal to 1050/sup 0/C) are documented with a view toward providing criteria to recognize and characterize the deformation for geological and engienering applications. Above 800/sup 0/C strength decreases dramatically at effective pressures greater than or equal to 50 MPa and water-weakening reduces strength an additional 30 to 40% at Pe = 100 MPa. Strains at failure are only 0.1 to 2.2% with macroscopic ductility (within this range) increasing as the effective pressures are increased and in wet versus dry tests. Shattering (multiple faulting) gives way to faulting along a single zone to failure without macroscopic faulting as ductility increases. Microscopically, cataclasis (extension microfracturing and thermal cracking with rigid-body motions) predominates at all conditions. Dislocation gliding contributes little to the strain. Precursive extension microfractures coalesce to produce the throughgoing faults with gouge zones exhibiting possible Riedel shears. Incipient melting, particularly in wet tests, produces a distinctive texture along feldspar grain boundaries that suggests a grain-boundary-softening effect contributes to the weakening. In addition, it is demonstrated that the presence of water does not lead to more microfractures, but to a reduction in the stresses required to initiate and propagate them.

  10. Effect of Intensive Plastic Deformation on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhadilov, Bauyrzhan; Uazyrkhanova, Gulzhaz; Myakinin, Alexandr; Uazyrkhanova, Zhuldyz

    2016-08-01

    In work it was studied the influence of intensive plastic deformation on structure and mechanical properties of aluminum alloys. Intensive plastic deformation was carried out by using equal-channel angular extrusion. It is shown that the most efficient angle of intersection of the channels is the angle of Φ=120°, which ensures defect-free parts at the highest possible level of accumulated strain (e=8). It is established that the intensive milling grain structures in aluminum alloys AMG6 and AMC occurs at ECAE-12 passes, while the intersection angle of the channels of 120°. After ECAE-12 in aluminum alloys the grain refinement reaches to the size of ∼⃒1.0-1.5 gm. It is determined that as a result of equal channel angular pressing, the microhardness of alloy AMG6 increases almost 4 times in comparison with the initial state, the microhardness of alloy AMC increases by almost 4.5 times in comparison with the initial state. It is shown that ECAE-12 mass loss is reduced to 5.4 and 5.6 mg, which shows an increase in wear-resistance of aluminum alloys AMG6 and AMC 13-14 %.

  11. Effect of the mechanical deformation on the electrical properties of the polymer/CNT fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Sung, Bong June; Nano-Bio Computational Chemistry Laboratory Team

    2014-03-01

    We elucidate the effect of the mechanical deformation on the electrical properties of the polymer/CNT fiber. The conductive polymer fiber has drawn a great attention for its potential application to a stretchable electronics such as wearable devices and artificial muscles, etc. However, the electrical conductivity of the polymer-based stretchable electronics decreases significantly during the deformation, which may limit the applicability of the polymer/CNT fiber for the stretchable electronics. Moreover, its physical origin for the decrease in electrical conductivity has not been explained clearly. In this work, we employ a coarse-grained model for the polymer/CNT fiber, and we calculate the electric conductivity using global tunneling network (GTN) model. We show that the electric conductivity decreases during the elongation of the polymer/CNT fiber. We also find using critical path approximation (CPA) that the structure of the electrical network of the CNTs changes collectively during the elongation of the fiber, which is strongly responsible for the reduction of the electrical conductivity of the polymer/CNT fiber.

  12. On the Bonding Mechanism in Cold Spray of Deformable hex-BN-Ni Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshastehriz, M.; Smid, I.; Segall, A. E.; Eden, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    Bond strength and the lubrication potential of coatings made of 7 µm Hexagonal Boron Nitride particles encapsulated with nickel (hBN-Ni), and deposited onto aluminum 6061 substrates via cold spray were examined; for all tests, N2 was used as the carrier gas at a temperature of 480 °C and pressure of 2.4 MPa. Results showed significant improvement in both wear resistance and reduced surface friction. Coated samples also demonstrated unexpected high bond strength, which was much greater than pure nickel cold sprayed onto aluminum. However, while the results were truly promising, the primary reason for the observed high bond strength could not be explained using existing cold spray theories which were primarily developed for pure metal particles. Based on the present findings compared to cold-sprayed layers of composite nickel-nickel (nickel particles encapsulated with nickel), a mechanism for bonding of hBN-Ni particles to aluminum based on the level of plastic deformation and hardenability is proposed. Indeed, the high bond strength between the coating and substrate is related to the relatively high initial ductility of the nickel encapsulation, compliance of the hBN, as well as the ensuing significant plastic deformation of the composite particles during cold spray deposition.

  13. Understanding creep in sandstone reservoirs - theoretical deformation mechanism maps for pressure solution in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface exploitation of the Earth's natural resources removes the natural system from its chemical and physical equilibrium. As such, groundwater extraction and hydrocarbon production from subsurface reservoirs frequently causes surface subsidence and induces (micro)seismicity. These effects are not only a problem in onshore (e.g. Groningen, the Netherlands) and offshore hydrocarbon fields (e.g. Ekofisk, Norway), but also in urban areas with extensive groundwater pumping (e.g. Venice, Italy). It is known that fluid extraction inevitably leads to (poro)elastic compaction of reservoirs, hence subsidence and occasional fault reactivation, and causes significant technical, economic and ecological impact. However, such effects often exceed what is expected from purely elastic reservoir behaviour and may continue long after exploitation has ceased. This is most likely due to time-dependent compaction, or 'creep deformation', of such reservoirs, driven by the reduction in pore fluid pressure compared with the rock overburden. Given the societal and ecological impact of surface subsidence, as well as the current interest in developing geothermal energy and unconventional gas resources in densely populated areas, there is much need for obtaining better quantitative understanding of creep in sediments to improve the predictability of the impact of geo-energy and groundwater production. The key problem in developing a reliable, quantitative description of the creep behaviour of sediments, such as sands and sandstones, is that the operative deformation mechanisms are poorly known and poorly quantified. While grain-scale brittle fracturing plus intergranular sliding play an important role in the early stages of compaction, these time-independent, brittle-frictional processes give way to compaction creep on longer time-scales. Thermally-activated mass transfer processes, like pressure solution, can cause creep via dissolution of material at stressed grain contacts, grain

  14. Deformation and failure of single- and multi-phase silicate liquids: seismic precursors and mechanical work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Wassermann, Joachim; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2013-04-01

    Along with many others, volcanic unrest is regarded as a catastrophic material failure phenomenon and is often preceded by diverse precursory signals. Although a volcanic system intrinsically behave in a non-linear and stochastic way, these precursors display systematic evolutionary trends to upcoming eruptions. Seismic signals in particular are in general dramatically increasing prior to an eruption and have been extensively reported to show accelerating rates through time, as well as in the laboratory before failure of rock samples. At the lab-scale, acoustic emissions (AE) are high frequency transient stress waves used to track fracture initiation and propagation inside a rock sample. Synthesized glass samples featuring a range of porosities (0 - 30%) and natural rock samples from volcán de Colima, Mexico, have been failed under high temperature uniaxial compression experiments at constant stresses and strain rates. Using the monitored AEs and the generated mechanical work during deformation, we investigated the evolutionary trends of energy patterns associated to different degrees of heterogeneity. We observed that the failure of dense, poorly porous glasses is achieved by exceeding elevated strength and thus requires a significant accumulation of strain, meaning only pervasive small-scale cracking is occurring. More porous glasses as well as volcanic samples need much lower applied stress and deformation to fail, as fractures are nucleating, propagating and coalescing into localized large-scale cracks, taking the advantage of the existence of numerous defects (voids for glasses, voids and crystals for volcanic rocks). These observations demonstrate that the mechanical work generated through cracking is efficiently distributed inside denser and more homogeneous samples, as underlined by the overall lower AE energy released during experiments. In contrast, the quicker and larger AE energy released during the loading of heterogeneous samples shows that the

  15. Sumatra-Andaman Megathrust Earthquake Slip: Insights From Mechanical Modeling of ICESat Surface Deformation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, D. J.; Miuller, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    boundary condition on the Sumatra-Andaman subduction interface fault. The direction of slip on the fault surface is derived from the slip directions computed by Tsai et al. (in review) for centroid moment tensor focal mechanisms spatially distributed along the rupture. The slip model will be refined to better correspond to the observed surface deformation as additional results from the ICESat profiles become available.

  16. Mechanical and statistical aspects of brittle faulting: From coseismic rupture to cumulative deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Scott Jay

    This dissertation is focused on answering fundamental problems in extensional tectonics at Valles Marineris and Tempe Terra, two regions of Mars that have characteristics similar to continental rifts on Earth. Three-dimensional displacement-length scaling relations for terrestrial earthquakes are also investigated because they provide the underlying physical basis for the analyses of extensional tectonics on Mars. Motivated by conflicting interpretations of the origin of blunt terminations of troughs at Valles Marineris, I investigate the reactivation of pre-existing cross faults in response to stress changes associated with slippage along a major, basin bounding normal fault (i.e., border fault). Observations from the Valles Marineris are consistent with model predictions, and are suggestive of a new sequence of deformation that accounts for the formation of blunt-trough terminations during the major phase of extension: coeval and locally bi-directional extension, that results from local stress field changes associated with border fault growth in a dominantly unidirectional remote strain field. These results indicate that irregular closed troughs at Valles Marineris are better interpreted as grabens rather than collapse depressions. Rates of deformation at Tempe Terra are estimated through an analysis of fault population statistics, which incorporates fault segment linkage and utilizes displacement-length relationships from exposed normal faults in this region. Deformation remained localized within the Tempe Rift throughout much of Martian history, with moment rates, strain rates, and rifting velocities comparable to stable plate interiors of Earth. This indicates that either the timing of deformation on Mars is poorly constrained or, less likely, rates are significantly slower than on Earth. Strike-slip earthquake source parameters, including slip distribution characteristics, are compared with predictions of a three-dimensional fracture mechanics model of

  17. Effects of microstructure and temperature on the plastic deformation mechanisms of synthetic halite : a micromechanical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourcier, M.; Dimanov, A.; Héripré, E.; Bornert, M.; Raphanel, J.

    2012-04-01

    Halite is a rock forming mineral with geotechnical applications for storage in underground caverns (hydrocarbons, compressed air, wastes...). Halite is also a convenient analog polycristalline material, used to study deformation mechanisms (crystal plasticity, recrystallization, pressure solution ...). In this work we present an investigation of intragranular plastic deformation and grain boundary sliding in pure synthetic NaCl polycrystals produced by hot isostatic pressing. Uniaxial compression tests are performed in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at two temperatures, 20°C and 400 °C, on cm - sized samples. The displacement rate is kept constant at 1µm/s and the maximum axial strain is between 5 and 10 %. The surface of the samples is marked by gold micro-spheres and analyzed by 2D digital image correlation (DIC) using the CorrelManuV software, which provides full field measures of surface displacements and strains. The dominant mechanism is intracrystalline plasticity, as revealed by the direct observation of slip lines and by DIC results showing intragranular deformation bands. Using crystal orientation mapping, the latter are related to the traces of crystallographic slip planes. However, limited grain boundary sliding (GBS) also occurs, as a secondary but necessary mechanism for accommodation of local strain incompatibilities. The relative contribution of each mechanism clearly depends on the microstructure, i.e. grain size and grain size distribution. At room temperature the strain is more heterogeneous than at high temperature, at both the aggregate scale and within individual grains, where the local activity of slip systems strongly depends on the relative crystalline and interfacial orientations. In particular, the easy glide planes ({110} planes) are not the only active ones. In some instance, wavy slip bands clearly indicate cross slip. The above kinematic analysis should be complemented by the knowledge of the local stress states in order to

  18. Ductile deformation mechanisms of synthetic halite: a full field measurement approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, Alexandre; Bourcier, Mathieu; Héripré, Eva; Bornert, Michel; Raphanel, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Halite is a commonly used analog polycristalline material. Compared to most rock forming minerals, halite exhibits extensively ductile behavior at even low temperatures and fast deformation rates. Therefore, it allows an easier study of the fundamental mechanisms of crystal plasticity, recrystallization, grain growth and texture development than any other mineral. Its high solubility also makes it an ideal candidate for investigating pressure solution creep. Most importantly, halite is very convenient to study the interactions of simultaneously occurring deformation mechanisms. We investigated uniaxial deformation of pure synthetic NaCl polycrystals with controlled grain sizes and grain size distributions at room and moderate temperatures (400°C). The mechanical tests were combined with "in-situ" optical and scanning electron microscopy, in order to perform 2D digital image correlation (2D-DIC) and to obtain the full surface strain fields at the sample scale and at the scales of the microstructure. We observed dominantly intracrystalline plasticity, as revealed by the occurrence of physical slip lines on the surface of individual grains and of deformation bands at the microstructure (aggregate) scale, as revealed by DIC. Crystal orientation mapping (performed by EBSD) allowed relating the latter to the traces of crystallographic slip planes and inferring the active slip systems considering the macroscopic stress state and computing Schmid factors. The strain heterogeneities are more pronounced at low temperature, at both the aggregate scale and within individual grains. The local activity of slip systems strongly depends on the relative crystallographic and interfacial orientations of the adjacent grains with respect to the loading direction. The easy glide {110} <110> systems are not the only active ones. We could identify the activity of all slip systems, especially near grain boundaries, which indicates local variations of the stress state. But, we also clearly

  19. Influence of interfacial interactions on deformation mechanism and interface viscosity in α-chitin-calcite interfaces.

    PubMed

    Qu, Tao; Verma, Devendra; Alucozai, Milad; Tomar, Vikas

    2015-10-01

    The interfaces between organic and inorganic phases in natural materials have a significant effect on their mechanical properties. This work presents a quantification of the interface stress as a function of interface chemical changes (water, organic molecules) in chitin-calcite (CHI-CAL) interfaces using classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations. NEMD is used to investigate interface stress as a function of applied strain based on the virial stress formulation. SMD is used to understand interface separation mechanism and to calculate interfacial shear stress based on a viscoplastic interfacial sliding model. Analyses indicate that interfacial shear stress combined with shear viscosity can result in variations to the mechanical properties of the examined interfacial material systems. It is further verified with Kelvin-Voigt and Maxwell viscoelastic analytical models representing viscous interfaces and outer matrix. Further analyses show that overall mechanical deformation depends on maximization of interface shear strength in such materials. This work establishes lower and upper bounds of interface strength in the interfaces examined. PMID:26143601

  20. Materials and noncoplanar mesh designs for integrated circuits with linear elastic responses to extreme mechanical deformations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Song, Jizhou; Choi, Won Mook; Kim, Hoon-Sik; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Liu, Zhuangjian; Huang, Yonggang Y.; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Zhang, Yong-wei; Rogers, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic systems that offer elastic mechanical responses to high-strain deformations are of growing interest because of their ability to enable new biomedical devices and other applications whose requirements are impossible to satisfy with conventional wafer-based technologies or even with those that offer simple bendability. This article introduces materials and mechanical design strategies for classes of electronic circuits that offer extremely high stretchability, enabling them to accommodate even demanding configurations such as corkscrew twists with tight pitch (e.g., 90° in ≈1 cm) and linear stretching to “rubber-band” levels of strain (e.g., up to ≈140%). The use of single crystalline silicon nanomaterials for the semiconductor provides performance in stretchable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits approaching that of conventional devices with comparable feature sizes formed on silicon wafers. Comprehensive theoretical studies of the mechanics reveal the way in which the structural designs enable these extreme mechanical properties without fracturing the intrinsically brittle active materials or even inducing significant changes in their electrical properties. The results, as demonstrated through electrical measurements of arrays of transistors, CMOS inverters, ring oscillators, and differential amplifiers, suggest a valuable route to high-performance stretchable electronics. PMID:19015528

  1. Influence of interfacial interactions on deformation mechanism and interface viscosity in α-chitin-calcite interfaces.

    PubMed

    Qu, Tao; Verma, Devendra; Alucozai, Milad; Tomar, Vikas

    2015-10-01

    The interfaces between organic and inorganic phases in natural materials have a significant effect on their mechanical properties. This work presents a quantification of the interface stress as a function of interface chemical changes (water, organic molecules) in chitin-calcite (CHI-CAL) interfaces using classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations. NEMD is used to investigate interface stress as a function of applied strain based on the virial stress formulation. SMD is used to understand interface separation mechanism and to calculate interfacial shear stress based on a viscoplastic interfacial sliding model. Analyses indicate that interfacial shear stress combined with shear viscosity can result in variations to the mechanical properties of the examined interfacial material systems. It is further verified with Kelvin-Voigt and Maxwell viscoelastic analytical models representing viscous interfaces and outer matrix. Further analyses show that overall mechanical deformation depends on maximization of interface shear strength in such materials. This work establishes lower and upper bounds of interface strength in the interfaces examined.

  2. Mechanical plasticity of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, Navid; Gerum, Richard; Kuhn, Michael; Spörrer, Marina; Lippert, Anna; Schneider, Werner; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Fabry, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Under mechanical loading, most living cells show a viscoelastic deformation that follows a power law in time. After removal of the mechanical load, the cell shape recovers only incompletely to its original undeformed configuration. Here, we show that incomplete shape recovery is due to an additive plastic deformation that displays the same power-law dynamics as the fully reversible viscoelastic deformation response. Moreover, the plastic deformation is a constant fraction of the total cell deformation and originates from bond ruptures within the cytoskeleton. A simple extension of the prevailing viscoelastic power-law response theory with a plastic element correctly predicts the cell behaviour under cyclic loading. Our findings show that plastic energy dissipation during cell deformation is tightly linked to elastic cytoskeletal stresses, which suggests the existence of an adaptive mechanism that protects the cell against mechanical damage.

  3. Cyclic control stick

    DOEpatents

    Whitaker, Charles N.; Zimmermann, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclic control stick of the type used in helicopters for reducing the safety hazards associated with such a mechanism in the event of a crewman being thrown violently into contact with the cyclic control stick resulting from a crash or the like. The cyclic control stick is configured to break away upon the exertion of an impact force which exceeds a predetermined value and/or is exerted for more than a momentary time duration. The cyclic control stick is also configured to be adjustable so as to locate the grip thereof as far away from the crewman as possible for safety reasons without comprising the comfort of the crewman or the use of the control stick, and a crushable pad is provided on the top of the grip for impact energy absorbing purposes.

  4. Deformation mechanisms, defects, heat treatment, and thermal conductivity in large grain niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, Thomas R.; Kang, Di; Baars, Derek C.; Chandrasekaran, Saravan; Mapar, Aboozar; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Wright, Neil T.; Pourboghrat, Farhang; Murphy, James E.; Compton, Chris C.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-12-01

    The physical and mechanical metallurgy underlying fabrication of large grain cavities for superconducting radio frequency accelerators is summarized, based on research of 1) grain orientations in ingots, 2) a metallurgical assessment of processing a large grain single cell cavity and a tube, 3) assessment of slip behavior of single crystal tensile samples extracted from a high purity ingot slice before and after annealing at 800 °C / 2 h, 4) development of crystal plasticity models based upon the single crystal experiments, and 5) assessment of how thermal conductivity is affected by strain, heat treatment, and exposure to hydrogen. Because of the large grains, the plastic anisotropy of deformation is exaggerated, and heterogeneous strains and localized defects are present to a much greater degree than expected in polycrystalline material, making it highly desirable to computationally anticipate potential forming problems before manufacturing cavities.

  5. Mechanical Deformation of Single- and Few- Layer Graphene on Micro-Scale-Grooved PDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocklin, David; Scharfenberg, Scott; Chialvo, Cesar; Weaver, Richard; Goldbart, Paul; Mason, Nadya

    2009-11-01

    The physical properties of the material graphene are currently of wide interest. To explore their mechanical aspects, we placed graphene flakes, of thicknesses ranging from one to seven layers, on a rubbery PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) substrate containing microgrooves. We used Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging techniques to study the resulting deformations of the surface, and found that the graphene adhered to the sample and substantially flattened the profile of the grooves. We have examined this flattening effect within a model based on linear elasticity theory. Thus, we have been able to identify, at least tentatively, the point at which shear stress breaks the interlayer coupling and causes the graphene layers to slide against each other.

  6. Directionally tunable and mechanically deformable ferroelectric crystals from rotating polar globular ionic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Jun; Shimojo, Takafumi; Oyamaguchi, Hideaki; Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Satomi, Koichiro; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Kawamata, Jun; Inabe, Tamotsu

    2016-10-01

    Ferroelectrics are used in a wide range of applications, including memory elements, capacitors and sensors. Recently, molecular ferroelectric crystals have attracted interest as viable alternatives to conventional ceramic ferroelectrics because of their solution processability and lack of toxicity. Here we show that a class of molecular compounds—known as plastic crystals—can exhibit ferroelectricity if the constituents are judiciously chosen from polar ionic molecules. The intrinsic features of plastic crystals, for example, the rotational motion of molecules and phase transitions with lattice-symmetry changes, provide the crystals with unique ferroelectric properties relative to those of conventional molecular crystals. This allows a flexible alteration of the polarization axis direction in a grown crystal by applying an electric field. Owing to the tunable nature of the crystal orientation, together with mechanical deformability, this type of molecular crystal represents an attractive functional material that could find use in a diverse range of applications.

  7. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model to Predict Kink-Band Propagation Using Deformation Gradient Tensor Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    A new model is proposed that represents the kinematics of kink-band formation and propagation within the framework of a mesoscale continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model. The model uses the recently proposed deformation gradient decomposition approach to represent a kink band as a displacement jump via a cohesive interface that is embedded in an elastic bulk material. The model is capable of representing the combination of matrix failure in the frame of a misaligned fiber and instability due to shear nonlinearity. In contrast to conventional linear or bilinear strain softening laws used in most mesoscale CDM models for longitudinal compression, the constitutive response of the proposed model includes features predicted by detailed micromechanical models. These features include: 1) the rotational kinematics of the kink band, 2) an instability when the peak load is reached, and 3) a nonzero plateau stress under large strains.

  8. Metastable alloy materials produced by solid state reaction of compacted, mechanically deformed mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Atzmon, M.; Johnson, W.L.; Verhoeven, J.D.

    1987-02-03

    Bulk metastable, amorphous or fine crystalline alloy materials are produced by reacting cold-worked, mechanically deformed filamentary precursors such as metal powder mixtures or intercalated metal foils. Cold-working consolidates the metals, increases the interfacial area, lowers the free energy for reaction, and reduces at least one characteristic dimension of the metals. For example, the grains of powder or the sheets of foil are clad in a container to form a disc. The disc is cold-rolled between the nip of rollers to form a flattened disc. The grains are further elongated by further rolling to form a very thin sheet of a lamellar filamentary structure containing filaments having a thickness of less than 0.01 microns. Thus, diffusion distance and time for reaction are substantially reduced when the flattened foil is thermally treated in oven to form a composite sheet containing metastable material dispersed in unreacted polycrystalline material. 4 figs.

  9. Deformation mechanisms, defects, heat treatment, and thermal conductivity in large grain niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, Thomas R. Kang, Di Baars, Derek C.; Chandrasekaran, Saravan; Mapar, Aboozar Wright, Neil T.; Ciovati, Gianluigi Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Pourboghrat, Farhang; Murphy, James E.; Compton, Chris C.

    2015-12-04

    The physical and mechanical metallurgy underlying fabrication of large grain cavities for superconducting radio frequency accelerators is summarized, based on research of 1) grain orientations in ingots, 2) a metallurgical assessment of processing a large grain single cell cavity and a tube, 3) assessment of slip behavior of single crystal tensile samples extracted from a high purity ingot slice before and after annealing at 800 °C / 2 h, 4) development of crystal plasticity models based upon the single crystal experiments, and 5) assessment of how thermal conductivity is affected by strain, heat treatment, and exposure to hydrogen. Because of the large grains, the plastic anisotropy of deformation is exaggerated, and heterogeneous strains and localized defects are present to a much greater degree than expected in polycrystalline material, making it highly desirable to computationally anticipate potential forming problems before manufacturing cavities.

  10. Directionally tunable and mechanically deformable ferroelectric crystals from rotating polar globular ionic molecules.

    PubMed

    Harada, Jun; Shimojo, Takafumi; Oyamaguchi, Hideaki; Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Satomi, Koichiro; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Kawamata, Jun; Inabe, Tamotsu

    2016-10-01

    Ferroelectrics are used in a wide range of applications, including memory elements, capacitors and sensors. Recently, molecular ferroelectric crystals have attracted interest as viable alternatives to conventional ceramic ferroelectrics because of their solution processability and lack of toxicity. Here we show that a class of molecular compounds-known as plastic crystals-can exhibit ferroelectricity if the constituents are judiciously chosen from polar ionic molecules. The intrinsic features of plastic crystals, for example, the rotational motion of molecules and phase transitions with lattice-symmetry changes, provide the crystals with unique ferroelectric properties relative to those of conventional molecular crystals. This allows a flexible alteration of the polarization axis direction in a grown crystal by applying an electric field. Owing to the tunable nature of the crystal orientation, together with mechanical deformability, this type of molecular crystal represents an attractive functional material that could find use in a diverse range of applications. PMID:27657871

  11. How stress and temperature conditions affect rock-fluid chemistry and mechanical deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nermoen, Anders; Korsnes, Reidar; Aursjø, Olav; Madland, Merete; Kjørslevik, Trygve Alexander; Østensen, Geir

    2016-02-01

    We report the results from a series of chalk flow-through-compaction experiments performed at three effective stresses (0.5 MPa, 3.5 MPa and 12.3 MPa) and two temperatures (92° and and 130°). The results show that both stress and temperature are important to both chemical alteration and mechanical deformation. The experiments were conducted on cores drilled from the same block of outcrop chalks from the Obourg quarry within the Saint Vast formation (Mons, Belgium). The pore pressure was kept at 0.7 MPa for all experiments with a continuous flow of 0.219 M MgCl2 brine at a constant flow rate; 1 original pore volume (PV) per day. The experiments have been performed in tri-axial cells with independent control of the external stress (hydraulic pressure in the confining oil), pore pressure, temperature, and the injected flow rate. Each experiment consists of two phases; a loading phase where stress-strain dependencies are investigated (approx. 2 days), and a creep phase that lasts for more than 150-160 days. During creep, the axial deformation was logged, and the effluent samples were collected for ion chromatography analyses. Any difference between the injected and produced water chemistry gives insight into the rock-fluid interactions that occur during flow through of the core. The observed effluent concentration shows a reduction in Mg2+, while the Ca2+ concentration is increased. This, together with SEM-EDS analysis, indicates that magnesium-bearing mineral phases are precipitated leading to dissolution of calcite, an observation . This is in-line with other flow-through experiments reported earlier. The observed dissolution and precipitation are sensitive to the effective stress and test temperature. Typically. H, higher stress and temperature lead to increased concentration differences of Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentration changes.. The observed strain can be partitioned additively into a mechanical and chemical driven component.

  12. Room Temperature Deformation Mechanisms of Alumina Particles Observed from In Situ Micro-compression and Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel C.; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron C.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containing numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. The identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.

  13. Room temperature deformation mechanisms of alumina particles observed from in situ micro-compression and atomistic simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2015-09-22

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containing numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. As a result, the identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.

  14. Room temperature deformation mechanisms of alumina particles observed from in situ micro-compression and atomistic simulations.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2015-09-22

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containingmore » numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. As a result, the identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.« less

  15. The Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone: A causal mechanism for Pb isotope cyclicity in Tropical Atlantic sediment cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouchami, W.; Zabel, M.

    2003-04-01

    Lead isotopic compositions of bulk sediment cores from the Tropical Atlantic can be used to infer variations in the provenance of terrigenous input to the Tropical Atlantic during Pleistocene climate cycles. Pb isotope data were obtained using the triple spike method (Galer, 1999) on bulk sediments cores and cover the last six Marine Isotope Stages. The 200-ka high precision (2σ ˜100 ppm) Pb isotope records of the Ceará Rise (Western Atlantic, core GeoB1523-1, 3^o49'N, 41^o37'W, 3292 m) and Sierra Leone Rise (Eastern Atlantic, core GeoB2910-1, 4^o50'N, 21^o03'W, 2703 m) cores show a clear glacial-interglacial cyclicity, reflected by alternating unradiogenic Pb and radiogenic Pb. Changes in the relative proportions of the glacial (unradiogenic) and interglacial (radiogenic) Pb source(s) can be explained by changes in the erosional regime (chemical vs. physical) as a function of prevailing climate, combined with different mechanisms of Pb transport to the oceans (predominantly eolian in the Eastern Atlantic vs. riverine in the Western Atlantic). We interpret these regional changes as reflecting shifts in the mean latitude of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone that affects the hydrological cycle over South America and the wind systems over Africa. Our results strongly favor an increase in winter wind transport (rather than glacial hyper aridity) as the cause of enhanced glacial terrigenous fluxes observed in the Tropical Atlantic (Ruddiman, 1997). The two Atlantic Pb isotopic records exhibit strong correlations with Pleistocene sea level fluctuations, providing evidence for global teleconnection between tropical records and high latitude climate. Galer, S.J.G. (1999). Optimal double and triple spiking for high precision lead isotopic measurements. Chem. Geol. 154, 255-274. Ruddiman, W. F. (1997). Tropical Atlantic terrigenous fluxes since 25,000 yrs B.P., Mar. Geol., 136, 189-207.

  16. Microarray Analysis of Siberian Ginseng Cyclic Somatic Embryogenesis Culture Systems Provides Insight into Molecular Mechanisms of Embryogenic Cell Cluster Generation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chenguang; Liu, Likun; Li, Chenghao

    2014-01-01

    Four systems of cyclic somatic embryogenesis of Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus Maxim) were used to study the mechanism of embryonic cell cluster generation. The first, direct somatic embryo induction (DSEI), generates secondary embryos directly from the primary somatic embryos; the second, direct embryogenic cell cluster induction (DEC)), induces embryogenic cell clusters directly from somatic embryos in agar medium. Subsequently, we found that when DEC-derived somatic embryos are transferred to suspension culture or a bioreactor culture, only somatic embryos are induced, and embryogenic cell clusters cannot form. Therefore, these new lines were named DEC cultured by liquid medium (ECS) and DEC cultured by bioreactor (ECB), respectively. Transmission electron microscopy showed that DEC epidermal cells contained a variety of inclusions, distinct from other lines. A cDNA library of DEC was constructed, and 1,948 gene clusters were obtained and used as probes. RNA was prepared from somatic embryos from each of the four lines and hybridized to a microarray. In DEC, 7 genes were specifically upregulated compared with the other three lines, and 4 genes were downregulated. EsXTH1 and EsPLT1, which were among the genes upregulated in DEC, were cloned using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Real-time quantitative PCR showed EsXTH1 was more highly expressed in DEC than in other lines throughout the culture cycle, and EsPLT1 expression in DEC increased as culture duration increased, but remained at a low expression level in other lines. These results suggest that EsXTH1 and EsPLT1 may be the essential genes that play important roles during the induction of embryogenic cell clusters. PMID:24743225

  17. Compensatory Cell Movements Confer Robustness to Mechanical Deformation during Embryonic Development.

    PubMed

    Jelier, Rob; Kruger, Angela; Swoger, Jim; Zimmermann, Timo; Lehner, Ben

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic development must proceed despite both internal molecular fluctuations and external perturbations. However, mechanisms that provide robustness to mechanical perturbation remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we use light-sheet microscopy, comprehensive single-cell tracking, and targeted cell ablation to study the response of Caenorhabditis elegans embryos to external compression. Compression changes the relative positions of many cells and causes severe distortions of the embryonic axes. A large-scale movement of cells then corrects this distortion. Only a few specific cells are required for these compensatory movements, and one cell, ABarppap, appears to generate force, dramatically changing as it moves to its correct local cellular environment. During these movements, we also observed "egressions", cells moving out onto the surface, and lineages that undergo both ingression and egression. In total, our work describes how the embryo responds to a major mechanical deformation that can occur during the early development in situ and puts forward a model to explain how the response is coordinated. PMID:27524104

  18. Effects of deformation mechanisms on reservoir potential in central Appalachian overthrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.

    1988-05-01

    Finite strain associated with various deformation mechanisms can significantly alter the porosity and permeability of reservoir rocks in overthrust belts. Mechanisms such as pressure solution and cataclasis reduce porosity and permeability, whereas extension fracturing and brecciation increase them. A theoretical derivation of the relationship between finite strain and original and final porosity indicates that little porosity is preserved in rocks whose strain (R) exceeds 1.5. Studies of variations in the relative importance of these mechanisms are used to define regional and local variations in reservoir properties in the central Appalachian overthrust belt. Regional limits of hydrocarbon potential are defined by combining finite-strain data with thermal-maturation (conodont color alteration index or CAI) data. On the basis of these studies, the author concludes that the potential for oil production is primarily restricted to the Appalachian Plateau province. The potential for gas production decreases from west to east in the Valley and Ridge and Plateau provinces, with its approximate eastern limit defined by the North Mountain thrust. 20 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Corrosion sensitization behavior and mechanical properties of liquid-nitrogen-deformed austenitic 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Julio Gerardo

    Plastic deformation of 304 stainless steel at liquid nitrogen temperature ({-}196sp°C) produces an almost complete transformation to strain-induced alphasp'/-martensite which provides the necessary conditions for a pseudo-recrystallization of the microstructure. This "so-called" pseudo-recrystallization results directly from the martensitic reversion (i.e. martensite to austenite reverse transformation) upon the application of heat treatment within the sensitization temperature range. The very fine duplex (alpha/gamma) microstructure which results (after heat treatment-0.1h-670sp°C) is also accompanied by a very extensive and homogeneous precipitation of chromium-rich carbides. The concomitant pseudo-recrystallization and precipitation processes not only have a profound positive effect on the sensitization behavior, but also affect the mechanical properties of the material. This suggests that 304 stainless steel could be thermo-mechanically treated, to in essence, heal itself and simultaneously produce an extremely fine (≈0.1mum) duplex grain structure with intermixed carbides to form a very high strength product. This might have important practical implications since 304 stainless steel is the material of choice in many engineering applications. Electrochemical testing, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, neutron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and mechanical testing were some of the techniques employed in this work.

  20. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    PubMed Central

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71–4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain. PMID:26898475

  1. Elasticity of MoS2 Sheets by Mechanical Deformation Observed by in Situ Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    MoS2 has been the focus of extensive research due to its potential applications. More recently, the mechanical properties of MoS2 layers have raised interest due to applications in flexible electronics. In this article, we show in situ transmission electron microcsopy (TEM) observation of the mechanical response of a few layers of MoS2 to an external load. We used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip mounted on a TEM stage to induce deformation on nanosheets of MoS2 containing few layers. The results confirm the outstanding mechanical properties on the MoS2. The layers can be bent close to 180°. However, when the tip is retrieved the initial structure is recovered. Evidence indicates that there is a significant bond reconstruction during the bending with an outstanding capability to recover the initial bond structure. The results show that flexibility of three layers of MoS2 remains the same as a single layer while increasing the bending modulus by 3 orders of magnitude. Our findings are consistent with theoretical calculations and confirm the great potential of MoS2 for applications. PMID:25598860

  2. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-02-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71–4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain.

  3. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-02-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71-4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain.

  4. The mechanisms of driving lithospheric deformation in India-Asia collision zone: a perspective from 3-D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianfeng; Kaus, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of intraplate deformation remains incompletely understood by plate tectonics theory. The India-Asia collision zone is the largest present-day example of continental collision, which makes it an ideal location to study the processes of continental deformation. Existing models of lithospheric deformation are typically quasi two-dimensional and often assume that the lithosphere is a thin viscous sheet, which deforms homogeneously as a result of the collision, or flows above a partially molten lower crust, which explains the exhumation of Himalayan units and lateral spreading of Tibetan plateau. An opposing view is that most deformation localize in shear zones separating less deformed blocks, requiring the lithosphere to have an elasto-plastic rather than a viscous rheology. In order to distinguish which model best fits the observations we develop a 3-D visco-elasto-plastic model, which can model both distributed and highly localized deformation. In our preliminary result, most of the large-scale strike-slips faults including Altyn-Tagh fault, Xianshuihe fault, Red-River fault, Sagaing fault and Jiali fault can be simulated. The topography is consistent with observations that flat plateau in central Tibet and steep, abrupt margins adjacent to Sichuan basin, and gradual topography in southeast Tibet. These models suggest that the localized large-scale strike-slip faults accommodate the continental deformation. These results show the importance of a weak lower crust and topographic effects, as well as the effect of rheology and temperature structure of the lithosphere on the deformation patterns.

  5. Plate deformation at the transition between collision and subduction: insights from 3D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, D. A.; Cruden, A. R.; Oncken, O.

    2012-04-01

    3-D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments of arc-continent collision investigate plate deformation at the transition between collision and subduction. Deformation in the collision area propagates into the subduction-collision transition zone via along-strike coupling of the neighboring segments of the plate boundary. The largest along-strike gradient of trench-perpendicular compression produced by a passive margin turning by 90 degrees does not generate sufficiently localized shear strain in the transition zone to cause a strike-slip system. This is because of the fast propagation of lithosphere failure in the arc area. Deformation is thus continuous along-strike, but the deformation mechanism is three-dimensional and progressive structural variations arise because the coupling between neighboring segments induces either advanced or delayed failure of the arc lithosphere and passive margin. During the initial stage of collision, the accretionary wedge is partially subducted, the interplate zone is lubricated, and shear traction drops. Thus large convergence obliquity does not produce a migrating fore-arc sliver. Instead, the fore-arc motion is due to the pressure force generated by subduction of the buoyant continental crust. It follows that convergence obliquity does not yield trench-parallel deformation of the fore-arc and its influence on the collision process is limited. However, convergence obliquity may have shaped the active margin during the stage of oceanic subduction stage, prior to collision, and inherited structures may impact the propagation mechanism.

  6. Catalytic mechanism of cyclic di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase: a study of the EAL domain-containing RocR from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rao, Feng; Yang, Ye; Qi, Yaning; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2008-05-01

    EAL domain proteins are the major phosphodiesterases for maintaining the cellular concentration of second-messenger cyclic di-GMP in bacteria. Given the pivotal roles of EAL domains in the regulation of many bacterial behaviors, the elucidation of their catalytic and regulatory mechanisms would contribute to the effort of deciphering the cyclic di-GMP signaling network. Here, we present data to show that RocR, an EAL domain protein that regulates the expression of virulence genes and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO-1, catalyzes the hydrolysis of cyclic di-GMP by using a general base-catalyzed mechanism with the assistance of Mg(2+) ion. In addition to the five essential residues involved in Mg(2+) binding, we propose that the essential residue E(352) functions as a general base catalyst assisting the deprotonation of Mg(2+)-coordinated water to generate the nucleophilic hydroxide ion. The mutation of other conserved residues caused various degree of changes in the k(cat) or K(m), leading us to propose their roles in residue positioning and substrate binding. With functions assigned to the conserved groups in the active site, we discuss the molecular basis for the lack of activity of some characterized EAL domain proteins and the possibility of predicting the phosphodiesterase activities for the vast number of EAL domains in bacterial genomes in light of the catalytic mechanism.

  7. Hot deformation mechanisms in Ti-5.5Al-1Fe alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubrahmanyam, V. V.; Prasad, Y. V. R. K.

    2001-12-01

    The mechanisms of hot deformation in the alloy Ti-5.5Al-1Fe have been studied in the temperature range 750 to 1150 °C and with the true strain rate varying from 0.001 to 100 s-1 by means of isothermal compression tests. At temperatures below β transus and low strain rates, the alloy exhibited steady-state flow behavior, while, at high strain rates, either continuous flow softening or work hardening followed by flow softening was observed. In the β region, the deformation behavior is characterized by steady-state behavior at low strain rates, yield drops at intermediate strain rates, and oscillations at high strain rates. The processing maps revealed two domains. (1) In the temperature range 750 to 1050 °C and at strain rates lower than 0.01 s-1, the material exhibits fine-grained superplasticity. The apparent activation energy for superplastic deformation is estimated to be about 328 kJ/mole. The optimum conditions for superplasticity are 825 °C and 0.001 s-1. (2) In the β region, a domain occurs at temperatures above 1100 °C and at strain rates from 0.001 to 0.1 s-1 with its peak efficiency of 47% occurring at 1150 °C and 0.01 s1. On the basis of kinetic analysis, tensile ductility, and grain size variation, this domain is interpreted to represent dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of β phase. The apparent activation energy for DRX is estimated to be 238 kJ/mole. The grain size ( d) is linearly dependent on the Zener-Hollomon parameter ( Z) per the equation log (d) = 2.86 - 0.023 log (Z) In the regimes in the temperature range 750 to 825 °C and at strain rates from 0.01 to 1.2 s-1 and at temperatures above 1050 °C and strain rates above 10 s-1, the material exhibits flow instabilities manifested in the form of adiabatic shear bands.

  8. Statistical model for the mechanical behavior of the tissue engineering non-woven fibrous matrices under large deformation.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Mohd Suhail; Pal, Anupam

    2014-09-01

    The fibrous matrices are widely used as scaffolds for the regeneration of load-bearing tissues due to their structural and mechanical similarities with the fibrous components of the extracellular matrix. These scaffolds not only provide the appropriate microenvironment for the residing cells but also act as medium for the transmission of the mechanical stimuli, essential for the tissue regeneration, from macroscopic scale of the scaffolds to the microscopic scale of cells. The requirement of the mechanical loading for the tissue regeneration requires the fibrous scaffolds to be able to sustain the complex three-dimensional mechanical loading conditions. In order to gain insight into the mechanical behavior of the fibrous matrices under large amount of elongation as well as shear, a statistical model has been formulated to study the macroscopic mechanical behavior of the electrospun fibrous matrix and the transmission of the mechanical stimuli from scaffolds to the cells via the constituting fibers. The study establishes the load-deformation relationships for the fibrous matrices for different structural parameters. It also quantifies the changes in the fiber arrangement and tension generated in the fibers with the deformation of the matrix. The model reveals that the tension generated in the fibers on matrix deformation is not homogeneous and hence the cells located in different regions of the fibrous scaffold might experience different mechanical stimuli. The mechanical response of fibrous matrices was also found to be dependent on the aspect ratio of the matrix. Therefore, the model establishes a structure-mechanics interdependence of the fibrous matrices under large deformation, which can be utilized in identifying the appropriate structure and external mechanical loading conditions for the regeneration of load-bearing tissues.

  9. Cyclic steps on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokawa, M.; Izumi, N.; Naito, K.; Parker, G.; Yamada, T.; Greve, R.

    2016-05-01

    Boundary waves often form at the interface between ice and fluid flowing adjacent to it, such as ripples under river ice covers, and steps on the bed of supraglacial meltwater channels. They may also be formed by wind, such as the megadunes on the Antarctic ice sheet. Spiral troughs on the polar ice caps of Mars have been interpreted to be cyclic steps formed by katabatic wind blowing over ice. Cyclic steps are relatives of upstream-migrating antidunes. Cyclic step formation on ice is not only a mechanical but also a thermodynamic process. There have been very few studies on the formation of either cyclic steps or upstream-migrating antidunes on ice. In this study, we performed flume experiments to reproduce cyclic steps on ice by flowing water, and found that trains of steps form when the Froude number is larger than unity. The features of those steps allow them to be identified as ice-bed analogs of cyclic steps in alluvial and bedrock rivers. We performed a linear stability analysis and obtained a physical explanation of the formation of upstream-migrating antidunes, i.e., precursors of cyclic steps. We compared the results of experiments with the predictions of the analysis and found the observed steps fall in the range where the analysis predicts interfacial instability. We also found that short antidune-like undulations formed as a precursor to the appearance of well-defined steps. This fact suggests that such antidune-like undulations correspond to the instability predicted by the analysis and are precursors of cyclic steps.

  10. Experimental and computational simulation studies on creep deformation mechanisms of a novel nanostructured Cu and Cu-10%Sn Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo-Elsoud, Mohamed A.

    2015-04-01

    This work presents experimental and computational simulation studies on creep deformation mechanisms of a novel nanostructured Cu and Cu-10%Sn alloy that prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) copper with elemental Tin. Mechanical Newtonian creep model is employed for computational simulation of creep deformation mechanism under low stress-high temperature and to justify the experimental findings. The observed behaviors are discussed and compared with the predications of the Nabarro-Herring (N-H) theory of directional diffusion. A simple theory based on the climb controlled generation of dislocations from a fixed density of sources is developed to explain the observed behavior. TEM and SEM investigations are convenient and powerful techniques for characterization of phases and a novel nano-grain structured of the resulting materials. The reduction of grain size to the nanometer scale improves their mechanical properties.

  11. Microstructures, deformation mechanisms and seismic properties of a Palaeoproterozoic shear zone: The Mertz shear zone, East-Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarque, Gaëlle; Bascou, Jérôme; Maurice, Claire; Cottin, Jean-Yves; Riel, Nicolas; Ménot, René-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    The Mertz shear zone (MSZ) is a lithospheric scale structure that recorded mid-crustal deformation during the 1.7 Ga orogeny. We performed a microstructural and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) study of samples from both mylonites and tectonic boudins that constitute relics of the Terre Adélie Craton (TAC). The deformation is highly accommodated in the MSZ by anastomosed shear bands, which become more scattered elsewhere in the TAC. Most of the MSZ amphibolite-facies mylonites display similar CPO, thermal conditions, intensity of deformation and dominant shear strain. Preserved granulite-facies boudins show both coaxial and non-coaxial strains related to the previous 2.45 Ga event. This former deformation is more penetrative and less localized and shows a deformation gradient, later affected by a major phase of recrystallization during retrogression at 2.42 Ga. Both MSZ samples and granulite-facies tectonic boudins present microstructures that reflect a variety of deformation mechanisms associated with the rock creep that induce contrasted CPO of minerals (quartz, feldspar, biotite, amphibole and orthopyroxene). In particular, we highlight the development of an "uncommon" CPO in orthopyroxene from weakly deformed samples characterized by (010)-planes oriented parallel to the foliation plane, [001]-axes parallel to the stretching lineation and clustering of [100]-axes near the Y structural direction. Lastly, we computed the seismic properties of the amphibolite and granulite facies rocks in the MSZ area in order to evaluate the contribution of the deformed intermediate and lower continental crust to the seismic anisotropy recorded above the MSZ. Our results reveal that (i) the low content of amphibole and biotite in the rock formations of the TAC, and (ii) the interactions between the CPO of the different mineralogical phases, generate a seismically isotropic crust. Thus, the seismic anisotropy recorded by the seismic stations of the TAC, including the

  12. The deformation and acoustic emission of aluminum-magnesium alloy under non-isothermal thermo-mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, S. V.; Plotnikov, V. A. Lysikov, M. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-27

    The following study investigates the deformation behavior and acoustic emission in aluminum-magnesium alloy under conditions of non-isothermal thermo-mechanical loading. The accumulation of deformation in the alloy, in conditions of change from room temperature to 500°C, occurs in two temperature intervals (I, II), characterized by different rates of deformation. The rate of deformation accumulation is correlated with acoustic emission. With load increasing in cycles from 40 to 200 MPa, the value of the boundary temperature (T{sub b}) between intervals I and II changes non-monotonically. In cycles with load up to 90 MPa, the T{sub b} value increases, while an increase up to 200 MPa makes T{sub b} shift toward lower temperatures. This suggests that the shift of boundaries in the region of low temperatures and the appearance of high-amplitude pulses of acoustic emission characterize the decrease of the magnitude of thermal fluctuations with increasing mechanical load, leading to the rupture of interatomic bonds in an elementary deformation act.

  13. Deformation mechanisms in advanced structural ceramics due to indentation and scratch processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipankar

    Plasma pressure compaction technique was used to develop boron carbide (B4C) and zirconium diboride-silicon carbide (ZrB2-SiC) composite. B4C ceramics are extensively used as body armor in military and civilian applications, and ZrB2-SiC composite has been recognized as a potential candidate for high-temperature aerospace applications. In this dissertation, processing parameters, quasistatic and high-strain rate mechanical response, and fundamental deformation mechanisms of these materials have been investigated. In the case of B4C, the rate sensitivity of indentation hardness was determined using a dynamic indentation hardness tester that can deliver loads in 100 micros. By comparing dynamic hardness with the static hardness, it was found that B4C exhibits a lower hardness at high-strain rate, contrary to known behavior in many structural ceramics. However, these results are consistent with the ballistic testing of B4C armors as reported in recent literature. This behavior was further investigated using a series of spectroscopic techniques such as visible and UV micro-Raman, photoluminescence and infrared. These studies not only confirmed that structural transformation occurred during indentation experiments similar to that in ballistic testing of B4C but also suggested a greater degree of structural changes under dynamic loading compared to static loading. Due to the potential application as external heat shields in supersonic vehicles, scratch studies were conducted on the ZrB2-SiC composite. These studies revealed metal-like slip-line patterns which are indeed an unusual in brittle solids at room-temperature. Utilizing classical stress field solutions under combined normal and tangential loads, a rationale was developed for understanding the formation of scratch-induced deformation features. Also, an analytical framework was developed, combining the concept of 'blister field' and the 'secular equation' relating Raman peaks to strain, to measure scratch

  14. Cyclic Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dennis H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a simple experiment that has become popular in chemical research because it can provide useful information about redox reactions in a form which is easily obtained and interpreted. Discusses principles of the method and illustrates its use in the study of four electrode reactions. (Author/JN)

  15. Soft Tissue Deformations Contribute to the Mechanics of Walking in Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiao-Yu; Zelik, Karl E.; Board, Wayne J.; Browning, Raymond C.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity not only adds to the mass that must be carried during walking, but also changes body composition. Although extra mass causes roughly proportional increases in musculoskeletal loading, less well understood is the effect of relatively soft and mechanically compliant adipose tissue. Purpose To estimate the work performed by soft tissue deformations during walking. The soft tissue would be expected to experience damped oscillations, particularly from high force transients following heel strike, and could potentially change the mechanical work demands for walking. Method We analyzed treadmill walking data at 1.25 m/s for 11 obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) and 9 non-obese (BMI < 30 kg/m2) adults. The soft tissue work was quantified with a method that compares the work performed by lower extremity joints as derived using assumptions of rigid body segments, with that estimated without rigid body assumptions. Results Relative to body mass, obese and non-obese individuals perform similar amounts of mechanical work. But negative work performed by soft tissues was significantly greater in obese individuals (p= 0.0102), equivalent to about 0.36 J/kg vs. 0.27 J/kg in non-obese individuals. The negative (dissipative) work by soft tissues occurred mainly after heel strike, and for obese individuals was comparable in magnitude to the total negative work from all of the joints combined (0.34 J/kg vs. 0.33 J/kg for obese and non-obese adults, respectively). Although the joints performed a relatively similar amount of work overall, obese individuals performed less negative work actively at the knee. Conclusion The greater proportion of soft tissues in obese individuals results in substantial changes in the amount, location, and timing of work, and may also impact metabolic energy expenditure during walking. PMID:25380475

  16. Analysis of the thermo-mechanical deformations in a hot forging tool by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L-Cancelos, R.; Varas, F.; Martín, E.; Viéitez, I.

    2016-03-01

    Although programs have been developed for the design of tools for hot forging, its design is still largely based on the experience of the tool maker. This obliges to build some test matrices and correct their errors to minimize distortions in the forged piece. This phase prior to mass production consumes time and material resources, which makes the final product more expensive. The forging tools are usually constituted by various parts made of different grades of steel, which in turn have different mechanical properties and therefore suffer different degrees of strain. Furthermore, the tools used in the hot forging are exposed to a thermal field that also induces strain or stress based on the degree of confinement of the piece. Therefore, the mechanical behaviour of the assembly is determined by the contact between the different pieces. The numerical simulation allows to analyse different configurations and anticipate possible defects before tool making, thus, reducing the costs of this preliminary phase. In order to improve the dimensional quality of the manufactured parts, the work presented here focuses on the application of a numerical model to a hot forging manufacturing process in order to predict the areas of the forging die subjected to large deformations. The thermo-mechanical model developed and implemented with free software (Code-Aster) includes the strains of thermal origin, strains during forge impact and contact effects. The numerical results are validated with experimental measurements in a tooling set that produces forged crankshafts for the automotive industry. The numerical results show good agreement with the experimental tests. Thereby, a very useful tool for the design of tooling sets for hot forging is achieved.

  17. Microstructure, strengthening mechanisms and hot deformation behavior of an oxide-dispersion strengthened UFG Al6063 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Asgharzadeh, H.; Kim, H.S.; Simchi, A.

    2013-01-15

    An ultrafine-grained Al6063/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0.8 vol.%, 25 nm) nanocomposite was prepared via powder metallurgy route through reactive mechanical alloying and hot powder extrusion. Scanning electron microcopy, transmission electron microscopy, and back scattered electron diffraction analysis showed that the grain structure of the nanocomposite is trimodal and composed of nano-size grains (< 0.1 {mu}m), ultrafine grains (0.1-1 {mu}m), and micron-size grains (> 1 {mu}m) with random orientations. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of the nanocomposite based on the strengthening-mechanism models revealed that the yield strength of the ultrafine-grained nanocomposite is mainly controlled by the high-angle grain boundaries rather than nanometric alumina particles. Hot deformation behavior of the material at different temperatures and strain rates was studied by compression test and compared to coarse-grained Al6063 alloy. The activation energy of the hot deformation process for the nanocomposite was determined to be 291 kJ mol{sup -1}, which is about 64% higher than that of the coarse-grained alloy. Detailed microstructural analysis revealed that dynamic recrystallization is responsible for the observed deformation softening in the ultrafine-grained nanocomposite. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strengthening mechanisms of Al6063/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite were evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hot deformation behavior of the nanocomposite was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hot deformation activation energy was determined using consecutive models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The restoration mechanisms and microstructural changes are presented.

  18. Effects of deformation on microstructure and mechanical properties of a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sari, U. Kirindi, T.

    2008-07-15

    In Cu-11.92 wt.%Al-3.78 wt.%Ni shape memory alloy, the influence of deformation and thermal treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties under the compression test were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Experiments show that the mechanical properties of the alloy can be enhanced by convenient heat treatments. The alloy exhibits good mechanical properties with high ultimate compression strength and ductility after annealing at high temperature. However, it exhibits brittle fracture and dramatic strain hardening, with linear stress-strain behavior after annealing at low temperature. The changes in the mechanical properties have been linked to the evolution of the degree of order, occurrence of precipitation, and variation of the grain size. From microstructural observations, it is seen that the {beta}{sub 1}' (18R) and {gamma}{sub 1}' (2H) martensite phases coexist at different fractions in the undeformed and deformed states. Deformation induces the changes between the {beta}{sub 1}' and {gamma}{sub 1}' martensites and deformation-induced martensites form at preferred orientations as mechanical twins. The {beta}{sub 1}' martensite variants are twin-related with respect to the (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub 18R} mirror plane and a new orientation relationship for these twin variants is derived as (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub A}-parallel (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub C}: [4-bar 61] {sub A}-parallel [4-bar 61]{sub C}. Additionally, an increase in the amount of deformation causes martensite reorientation, de-twinning, and dislocation generation; also, the martensite plates are seen to have rearranged in the same orientation to be parallel with each other.

  19. Deformation Mechanism and Microstructure Evolution of T92/S30432 Dissimilar Welded Joint During Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lianyong; Wang, Yongfa; Jing, Hongyang; Zhao, Lei; Han, Yongdian

    2016-09-01

    The cross dissimilar welds between T92 martensitic steel and S30432 austenitic steel were crept at 625 °C with different applied stresses, and the creep deformation and microstructure behaviors were characterized. The results revealed that the creep deformation behavior of dissimilar weld joint was controlled by its martensitic T92 part due to the Ni-based filler metal employed. The fracture positions of crept dissimilar welded joints were located in base metal of T92 steel as the applied stress over than 140 MPa. The fracture type was mainly caused by plastic deformation and characterized by dimples and surface necking. In contrast, as applied stress was <140 MPa, fractured location was transferred into the fine-grained heat-affected zone of T92 part identified to be the intergranular brittle fracture. This phenomenon was controlled by creep deformation and related to undissolved carbides, fine grain size and constraint effect induced by creep deformation inconsistent in this zone.

  20. Deformation of clinopyroxenite: evidence for a transition in flow mechanisms and semibrittle behavior.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.; Kronenberg, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    A systematic suite of constant strain rate experiments was performed on a vacuum-dried, high-purity, fine-grained clinopyroxenite using NaCl and NaF as confining media in a Griggs-type piston-cylinder apparatus. The experiments were carried out over a range of temperatures from 400o to 1100oC, strain rates from 10-3 to 10-7 s-1, and confining pressures from 170 to 1990 MPa. At T = 600oC and 8e = 1.1 X 10-5 s-1, 3 modes of deformation occur with increasing confining pressure. In experiments at P = 1500 MPa, 2 regimes of flow are clearly defined. The flow data within each regime can be satisfactorily fitted to thermally activated power laws. We believe that the parameters reflect flow dominated by the kinetics of dislocation glide associated with mechanical twinning and (100) slip in the low temperature regime and creep by multiple slip accompanied by increased rates of diffusion and recovery in the high temperature regime. -after Authors

  1. Deformation at Stromboli volcano (Italy) revealed by rock mechanics and structural geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, A.; Corazzato, C.; Apuani, T.; Cancelli, A.

    2003-01-01

    We approach the reconstruction of the recent structural evolution of Stromboli volcano (Italy) and the analysis of the interplay between tectonics, gravity and volcanic deformation. By tying together structural, lithostratigraphic and rock mechanics data, we establish that since 100 ka BP, the edifice has faulted and jointed mainly along NE-striking planes. Faults mostly dip to the NW with normal displacement. Taking also into account the presence of a NW-trending regional least principal stress and of tectonic earthquake hypocenters inside the cone, we suggest that this fracturing can be related to the transmission of tectonic forces from the basement to the cone. Dyking concentrated along a main NE-trending weakness zone (NEZ) across the volcano summit, resembling a volcanic rift, whose geometry is governed by the tectonic field. In the past 13 ka, Stromboli experienced a reorganisation of the strain field, which was linked with the development of four sector collapses affecting the NW flank, alternating with growth phases. The tectonic strain field interplayed with dyking and fracturing related to unbuttressing along the collapse shoulders. We propose that tectonics control the geometry of dykes inside the cone and that these, in turn, contribute to destabilise the cone flanks.

  2. Metastable alloy materials produced by solid state reaction of compacted, mechanically deformed mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Atzmon, Michael; Johnson, William L.; Verhoeven, John D.

    1987-01-01

    Bulk metastable, amorphous or fine crystalline alloy materials are produced by reacting cold-worked, mechanically deformed filamentary precursors such as metal powder mixtures or intercalated metal foils. Cold-working consolidates the metals, increases the interfacial area, lowers the free energy for reaction, and reduces at least one characteristic dimension of the metals. For example, the grains (13) of powder or the sheets of foil are clad in a container (14) to form a disc (10). The disc (10) is cold-rolled between the nip (16) of rollers (18,20) to form a flattened disc (22). The grains (13) are further elongated by further rolling to form a very thin sheet (26) of a lamellar filamentary structure (FIG. 4) containing filaments having a thickness of less than 0.01 microns. Thus, diffusion distance and time for reaction are substantially reduced when the flattened foil (28) is thermally treated in oven (32) to form a composite sheet (33) containing metastable material (34) dispersed in unreacted polycrystalline material (36).

  3. How Mechanical Deformation of Polymers during Vitrification Alters the Subsequent Stability of the Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Laura A. G.; Roth, Connie B.

    2015-03-01

    How stress and mechanical deformation impart mobility to polymer glasses have been studied primarily for materials where the glassy state was formed stress free. Here, we investigate the stability of polymer glasses where a constant stress is applied during the formation of the glassy state (thermal quench). Previously we found that physical aging is strongly dependent on the conditions during glass formation, including cooling rate and (often unintended) stress [Macromolecules 2012, 45, 1701]. We constructed a unique jig to apply a known stress to free-standing films during the thermal quench. We used ellipsometry to measure the physical aging rate of polystyrene films by quantifying the time-dependent decrease in film thickness that results from an increase in average film density during aging. As the magnitude of stress during vitrification increases, the physical aging rate quickly transitions over a small range of stresses to a faster aging rate, indicating the resulting glass is less stable [Soft Matter 2014, 10, 1572]. To explore this unique finding, we have constructed a computer-controlled apparatus to measure and apply stress and strain to polymer films during vitrification in order to characterize the temperature-dependent stress build up.

  4. Dolomite microstructures between 390° and 700 °C: Indications for deformation mechanisms and grain size evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Alfons; Ebert, Andreas; Ramseyer, Karl; Gnos, Edwin; Decrouez, Danielle

    2016-08-01

    Dolomitic marble on the island of Naxos was deformed at variable temperatures ranging from 390 °C to >700 °C. Microstructural investigations indicate two end-member of deformation mechanisms: (1) Diffusion creep processes associated with small grain sizes and weak or no CPO (crystallographic preferred orientation), whereas (2) dislocation creep processes are related with larger grain sizes and strong CPO. The change between these mechanisms depends on grain size and temperature. Therefore, sample with dislocation and diffusion creep microstructures and CPO occur at intermediate temperatures in relative pure dolomite samples. The measured dolomite grain size ranges from 3 to 940 μm. Grain sizes at Tmax >450 °C show an Arrhenius type evolution reflecting the stabilized grain size in deformed and relative pure dolomite. The stabilized grain size is five times smaller than that of calcite at the same temperature and shows the same Arrhenius-type evolution. In addition, the effect of second phase particle influences the grain size evolution, comparable with calcite. Calcite/dolomite mixtures are also characterized by the same difference in grain size, but recrystallization mechanism including chemical recrystallization induced by deformation may contribute to apparent non-temperature equilibrated Mg-content in calcite.

  5. Mechanotransduction Mechanisms for Intraventricular Diastolic Vortex Forces and Myocardial Deformations: Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are fundamental in cardiac adaptations, remodeling, reverse remodeling, and disease. This 2-article series proposes that variable forces associated with diastolic RV/LV rotatory intraventricular flows can exert physiologically and clinically important, albeit still unappreciated, epigenetic actions influencing functional and morphological cardiac adaptations and/or maladaptations. Taken in-toto, the 2-part survey formulates a new paradigm in which intraventricular diastolic filling vortex-associated forces play a fundamental epigenetic role, and examines how heart cells react to these forces. The objective is to provide a perspective on vortical epigenetic effects, to introduce emerging ideas and suggest directions of multidisciplinary translational research. The main goal is to make pertinent biophysics and cytomechanical dynamic systems concepts accessible to interested translational and clinical cardiologists. I recognize that the diversity of the epigenetic problems can give rise to a diversity of approaches and multifaceted specialized research undertakings. Specificity may dominate the picture. However, I take a contrasting approach. Are there concepts that are central enough that they should be developed in some detail? Broadness competes with specificity. Would however this viewpoint allow for a more encompassing view that may otherwise be lost by generation of fragmented results? Part 1 serves as a general introduction, focusing on background concepts, on intracardiac vortex imaging methods, and on diastolic filling vortex-associated forces acting epigenetically on RV/LV endocardium and myocardium. Part 2 will describe pertinent available pluridisciplinary knowledge/research relating to mechanotransduction mechanisms for intraventricular diastolic vortex forces and myocardial deformations and to their epigenetic actions on myocardial and ventricular function and adaptations. PMID:25624114

  6. Effects of Fault Segmentation, Mechanical Interaction, and Structural Complexity on Earthquake-Generated Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, David Elias

    Earth's topographic surface forms an interface across which the geodynamic and geomorphic engines interact. This interaction is best observed along crustal margins where topography is created by active faulting and sculpted by geomorphic processes. Crustal deformation manifests as earthquakes at centennial to millennial timescales. Given that nearly half of Earth's human population lives along active fault zones, a quantitative understanding of the mechanics of earthquakes and faulting is necessary to build accurate earthquake forecasts. My research relies on the quantitative documentation of the geomorphic expression of large earthquakes and the physical processes that control their spatiotemporal distributions. The first part of my research uses high-resolution topographic lidar data to quantitatively document the geomorphic expression of historic and prehistoric large earthquakes. Lidar data allow for enhanced visualization and reconstruction of structures and stratigraphy exposed by paleoseismic trenches. Lidar surveys of fault scarps formed by the 1992 Landers earthquake document the centimeter-scale erosional landforms developed by repeated winter storm-driven erosion. The second part of my research employs a quasi-static numerical earthquake simulator to explore the effects of fault roughness, friction, and structural complexities on earthquake-generated deformation. My experiments show that fault roughness plays a critical role in determining fault-to-fault rupture jumping probabilities. These results corroborate the accepted 3-5 km rupture jumping distance for smooth faults. However, my simulations show that the rupture jumping threshold distance is highly variable for rough faults due to heterogeneous elastic strain energies. Furthermore, fault roughness controls spatiotemporal variations in slip rates such that rough faults exhibit lower slip rates relative to their smooth counterparts. The central implication of these results lies in guiding the

  7. Deformation mechanism study of a hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb alloy by transmission electron microscopy. II. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of deformation mechanism change of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy upon heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Fei; Daymond, Mark R. Yao, Zhongwen; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2015-03-14

    The effect of heavy-ion irradiation on deformation mechanisms of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy was investigated by using the in situ transmission electron microscopy deformation technique. The gliding behavior of prismatic 〈a〉 dislocations has been dynamically observed before and after irradiation at room temperature and 300 °C. Irradiation induced loops were shown to strongly pin the gliding dislocations. Unpinning occurred while loops were incorporated into or eliminated by 〈a〉 dislocations. In the irradiated sample, loop depleted areas with a boundary parallel to the basal plane trace were found by post-mortem observation after room temperature deformation, supporting the possibility of basal channel formation in bulk neutron irradiated samples. Strong activity of pyramidal slip was also observed at both temperatures, which might be another important mechanism to induce plastic instability in irradiated zirconium alloys. Finally, (011{sup ¯}1)〈01{sup ¯}12〉 twinning was identified in the irradiated sample deformed at 300 °C.

  8. Deformation mechanism study of a hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb alloy by transmission electron microscopy. II. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of deformation mechanism change of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy upon heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Fei; Daymond, Mark R.; Yao, Zhongwen; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of heavy-ion irradiation on deformation mechanisms of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy was investigated by using the in situ transmission electron microscopy deformation technique. The gliding behavior of prismatic dislocations has been dynamically observed before and after irradiation at room temperature and 300 °C. Irradiation induced loops were shown to strongly pin the gliding dislocations. Unpinning occurred while loops were incorporated into or eliminated by dislocations. In the irradiated sample, loop depleted areas with a boundary parallel to the basal plane trace were found by post-mortem observation after room temperature deformation, supporting the possibility of basal channel formation in bulk neutron irradiated samples. Strong activity of pyramidal slip was also observed at both temperatures, which might be another important mechanism to induce plastic instability in irradiated zirconium alloys. Finally, {01 1 ¯ 1 }⟨0 1 ¯ 12 ⟩ twinning was identified in the irradiated sample deformed at 300 °C.

  9. Girdin/GIV is upregulated by cyclic tension, propagates mechanical signal transduction, and is required for the cellular proliferation and migration of MG-63 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiang-Tian; Li, Yan; Yu, Bing; Gao, Guo-Jie; Zhou, Ting; Li, Song

    2015-08-21

    To explore how Girdin/GIV is regulated by cyclic tension and propagates downstream signals to affect cell proliferation and migration. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were exposed to cyclic tension force at 4000 μstrain and 0.5 Hz for 6 h, produced by a four-point bending system. Cyclic tension force upregulated Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation in cultured MG-63 cells. Girdin and Akt each promoted the phosphorylation of the other under stimulated tension. In vitro MTT and transwell assays showed that Girdin and Akt are required for cell proliferation and migration during cellular quiescence. Moreover, STAT3 was determined to be essential for Girdin expression under stimulated tension force in the physiological condition, as well as for osteoblast proliferation and migration during quiescence. These findings suggest that the STAT3/Girdin/Akt pathway activates in osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and may play a significant role in triggering osteoblast proliferation and migration during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Tension force upregulates Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation. • Girdin and Akt promotes the phosphorylation of each other under tension stimulation. • Girdin and Akt are required for MG-63 cell proliferation and migration. • STAT3 is essential for Girdin expression after application of the tension forces.

  10. Random cyclic matrices.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sudhir R; Srivastava, Shashi C L

    2008-09-01

    We present a Gaussian ensemble of random cyclic matrices on the real field and study their spectral fluctuations. These cyclic matrices are shown to be pseudosymmetric with respect to generalized parity. We calculate the joint probability distribution function of eigenvalues and the spacing distributions analytically and numerically. For small spacings, the level spacing distribution exhibits either a Gaussian or a linear form. Furthermore, for the general case of two arbitrary complex eigenvalues, leaving out the spacings among real eigenvalues, and, among complex conjugate pairs, we find that the spacing distribution agrees completely with the Wigner distribution for a Poisson process on a plane. The cyclic matrices occur in a wide variety of physical situations, including disordered linear atomic chains and the Ising model in two dimensions. These exact results are also relevant to two-dimensional statistical mechanics and nu -parametrized quantum chromodynamics. PMID:18851127

  11. On the mechanism of action of lead in the testis: in vitro suppression of FSH receptors, cyclic AMP and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, J P; Salhanick, A I; Myers, K I

    1983-04-25

    Previous evidence has shown that prenatal and neonatal exposure to low levels of Pb result in decreased FSH binding and steroidogenesis in the testes at the onset of puberty. The purpose of the present study was to determine by in vitro methods, if Pb acts by interfering directly with hormone binding, cyclic AMP production and steroidogenic enzyme activity. Sertoli cells were isolated from testes of prepubertal rats and cultured in the presence of 2.64 x 10(-4)M of either NaAc (control) or PbAc for 1, 4, 24, 48, 96 or 144 hr. There was no reduction in FSH binding and in FSH-induced cyclic AMP after a 1-4 hr exposure to Pb. After a 24-hr exposure to Pb, the cells exhibited a 10-20% decrease in FSH binding and cyclic AMP production and after 96 hr there was a 75% decrease in these 2 parameters. The inhibition was greater in cells from 16 day old than from 20 day old rats, so that in the former, after a 144 hr exposure the FSH-induced cyclic AMP of the Pb exposed cells was only 3% of the amount produced by the NaAc exposed cells (i.e. a 97% inhibition). After in vitro exposure to Pb for 48 hr, the steroidogenic activity (progesterone conversion to steroid metabolites) of Sertoli cells was significantly reduced and their steroidogenesis was no longer stimulated by FSH. A crude testicular enzyme preparation containing 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD) exhibited approximately 25% reduction in activity if the assay buffer contained PbCl2 instead of the equivalent in NaCl. Prolonged in vivo exposure to Pb resulted in approximately 50% reduction in 3 beta-HSD activity. This is the first indication that in the testis Pb may act directly (immediate effect) by suppressing enzyme activities, and indirectly (long term effect) by reducing gonadotropin-receptor binding and the resultant cyclic AMP production.

  12. The role of mechanical heterogeneities in evaporite sequence during deformation initiated by basement fault activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Burliga, Stanisław

    2016-04-01

    Kłodawa Salt Structure (KSS) situated in the centre of the Polish Zechstein Basin started to rise above a basement fault in the Early Triassic. Geological studies of the KSS revealed significant differences in the deformation patterns between the PZ1-PZ2 (intensely deformed) and PZ3-PZ4 (less deformed) cycle evaporites. These two older and two younger cycle evaporite complexes are separated by the thick Main Anhydrite (A3) bed. We use numerical simulations to assess the impact of a thick anhydrite bed on intrasalt deformation. In our models, the overburden consists of clastic sediments. A normal fault located in the rigid basement beneath the salt is activated due to model extension. At the same time, the sedimentation process takes place. The evaporites consist of a salt bed intercalated with a thick anhydrite layer of varying position and geometry. To understand the role of anhydrite layer, we run comparative simulations, in which no anhydrite layer is present. In the study, we use our own numerical codes implemented in MATLAB combined with the MILAMIN and MUTILS numerical packages. Our investigations revealed a significant influence of the anhydrite on deformation style in the evaporate series. The supra-anhydrite domain is characterized by weaker deformation and lower rates of salt flow in comparison to the sub-anhydrite domain. The highest contrast in the rate of salt flow between the two domains is observed in the case of the anhydrite layer situated close to the bottom of the salt complex. The thick anhydrite layer additionally diminishes the deformation rate in the supra-anhydrite domain and can lead to detachment of the basement deformation from its overlay. Our numerical simulations showed that the presence of the A3 Main Anhydrite bed could be the dominant factor responsible for the decoupling of deformation in the KSS salt complex.

  13. Effects of Structural Deformations of the Crank-Slider Mechanism on the Estimation of the Instantaneous Engine Friction Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHALHOUB, N. G.; NEHME, H.; HENEIN, N. A.; BRYZIK, W.

    1999-07-01

    The focus on the current study is to assess the effects of structural deformations of the crankshaft/connecting-rod/piston mechanism on the computation of the instantaneous engine friction torque. This study is performed in a fully controlled environment in order to isolate the effects of structural deformations from those of measurement errors or noise interference. Therefore, a detailed model, accounting for the rigid and flexible motions of the crank-slider mechanism and including engine component friction formulations, is considered in this study. The model is used as a test bed to generate the engine friction torque,Tfa, and to predict the rigid and flexible motions of the system in response to the cylinder gas pressure. The torsional vibrations and the rigid body angular velocity of the crankshaft, as predicted by the detailed model of the crank-slider mechanism, are used along with the engine load torque and the cylinder gas pressure in the (P-ω) method to estimate the engine friction torque,Tfe. This method is well suited for the purpose of this study because its formulation is based on the rigid body model of the crank-slider mechanism. The digital simulation results demonstrate that the exclusion of the structural deformations of the crank-slider mechanism from the formulation of the (P-ω) method leads to an overestimation of the engine friction torque near the top-dead-center (TDC) position of the piston under firing conditions. Moreover, for the remainder of the engine cycle, the estimated friction torque exhibits large oscillations and takes on positive numerical values as if it is inducing energy into the system. Thus, the adverse effects of structural deformations of the crank-slider mechanism on the estimation of the engine friction torque greatly differ in their nature from one phase of the engine cycle to another.

  14. On the Stacking Fault Energy Evaluation and Deformation Mechanism of Sanicro-28 Super-Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moallemi, Mohammad; Zarei-Hanzaki, Abbas; Mirzaei, Ahmad

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, the reliance of deformation mechanism of a super-austenitic steel (Sanicro-28) on the external stress and stacking fault energy (SFE) was quantitatively investigated by analyzing the stacking fault separation. The stacking fault energy of the experimental alloy was determined using line profile analysis through x-ray diffraction measurements. Considering the calculated SFE and external stress, the predominant deformation mechanism was predicted by a quantitative model. A set of experimental examinations were carried out validating the applied model. The experimental findings reveal that the plasticity mechanism of steel can be divided into two stages. In the first stage (at lower strain), no mechanical twin was observed in the microstructure and the dislocation glide would control the plasticity. In the second stage (at higher strain), the mechanical twinning was considered as the predominant plasticity mechanism. Furthermore, regarding the stress threshold of mechanical twin formation, as the SFE increases, the critical stress for mechanical twinning initiation intensifies. However, in the present super-austenitic stainless steel, the mechanical twinning was observed at the stresses lower than those predicted by the applied model. This was related to the various interactions between dislocation and different barriers in the solid solution matrix.

  15. Cyclic creep and fatigue of TD-NiCr (thoria-dispersion-strengthened nickel-chromium), TD-Ni, and NiCr sheet at 1200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschberg, M. H.; Spera, D. A.; Klima, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    The resistance of thin TD-NiCr sheet to cyclic deformation was compared with that of TD-Ni and a conventional nickel-chromium alloy. Strains were determined by a calibration technique which combines room-temperature strain gage and deflection measurements with high-temperature deflection measurements. Analyses of the cyclic tests using measured tensile and creep-rupture data indicated that the TD-NiCr and NiCr alloy specimens failed by a cyclic creep mechanism. The TD-Ni specimens, on the other hand, failed by a fatigue mechanism.

  16. Effect of forging strain rate and deformation temperature on the mechanical properties of warm-worked 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, N. T.; Van Tyne, C. J.; Mataya, M. C.

    2010-01-25

    Stainless steel 304L forgings were produced with four different types of production forging equipment – hydraulic press, mechanical press, screw press, and high-energy rate forging (HERF). Each machine imparted a different nominal strain rate during the deformation. The final forgings were done at the warm working (low hot working) temperatures of 816 °C, 843°C, and 871°C. The objectives of the study were to characterize and understand the effect of industrial strain rates (i.e. processing equipment), and deformation temperature on the mechanical properties for the final component. Some of the components were produced with an anneal prior to the final forging while others were deformed without the anneal. The results indicate that lower strain rates produced lower strength and higher ductility components, but the lower strain rate processes were more sensitive to deformation temperature variation and resulted in more within-part property variation. The highest strain rate process, HERF, resulted in slightly lower yield strength due to internal heating. Lower processing temperatures increased strength, decreased ductility but decreased within-part property variation. The anneal prior to the final forging produced a decrease in strength, a small increase in ductility, and a small decrease of within-part property variation.

  17. Evaluation of an In Situ Gelable and Injectable Hydrogel Treatment to Preserve Human Disc Mechanical Function Undergoing Physiologic Cyclic Loading Followed by Hydrated Recovery.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Brent L; Elliott, Dawn M; Chen, Weiliam; Malhotra, Neil R

    2015-08-01

    Despite the prevalence of disc degeneration and its contributions to low back problems, many current treatments are palliative only and ultimately fail. To address this, nucleus pulposus replacements are under development. Previous work on an injectable hydrogel nucleus pulposus replacement composed of n-carboxyethyl chitosan, oxidized dextran, and teleostean has shown that it has properties similar to native nucleus pulposus, can restore compressive range of motion in ovine discs, is biocompatible, and promotes cell proliferation. The objective of this study was to determine if the hydrogel implant will be contained and if it will restore mechanics in human discs undergoing physiologic cyclic compressive loading. Fourteen human lumbar spine segments were tested using physiologic cyclic compressive loading while intact, following nucleotomy, and again following treatment of injecting either phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (sham, n = 7) or hydrogel (implant, n = 7). In each compressive test, mechanical parameters were measured immediately before and after 10,000 cycles of compressive loading and following a period of hydrated recovery. The hydrogel implant was not ejected from the disc during 10,000 cycles of physiological compression testing and appeared undamaged when discs were bisected following all mechanical tests. For sham samples, creep during cyclic loading increased (+15%) from creep during nucleotomy testing, while for implant samples creep strain decreased (-3%) toward normal. There was no difference in compressive modulus or compressive strains between implant and sham samples. These findings demonstrate that the implant interdigitates with the nucleus pulposus, preventing its expulsion during 10,000 cycles of compressive loading and preserves disc creep within human L5-S1 discs. This and previous studies provide a solid foundation for continuing to evaluate the efficacy of the hydrogel implant.

  18. The influence of metallic shell deformation on the contact mechanics of a ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Changdong; Wang, Ling; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty of ceramic-on-ceramic bearing combinations is increasingly used clinically. The majority of these implants are used with cementless fixation that a metal-backing shell is press-fitted into the pelvic bone. This usually results in the deformation of the metallic shell, which may also influence the ceramic liner deformation and consequently the contact mechanics between the liner and the femoral head under loading. The explicit dynamic finite element method was applied to model the implantation of a cementless ceramic-on-ceramic with a titanium shell and subsequently to investigate the effect of the metallic shell deformation on the contact mechanics. A total of three impacts were found to be necessary to seat the titanium alloy shell into the pelvic bone cavity with a 1 mm diameter interference and a 1.3 kg impactor at 4500 mm s(-1) velocity. The maximum deformation of the metallic shell was found to be 160 µm in the antero-superior and postero-inferior direction and 97 µm in the antero-inferior and postero-superior direction after the press-fit. The corresponding values were slightly reduced to 67 and 45 µm after the ceramic liner was inserted and then modified to 74 and 43 µm under loading, respectively. The maximum deformation and the maximum principal stress of the ceramic liner were 31 µm and 144 MPa (tensile stress), respectively, after it was inserted into the shell and further increased to 52 µm and 245 MPa under loading. This research highlights the importance of the press-fit of the metallic shell on the contact mechanics of the ceramic liner for ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasties and potential clinical performances.

  19. The influence of metallic shell deformation on the contact mechanics of a ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Changdong; Wang, Ling; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty of ceramic-on-ceramic bearing combinations is increasingly used clinically. The majority of these implants are used with cementless fixation that a metal-backing shell is press-fitted into the pelvic bone. This usually results in the deformation of the metallic shell, which may also influence the ceramic liner deformation and consequently the contact mechanics between the liner and the femoral head under loading. The explicit dynamic finite element method was applied to model the implantation of a cementless ceramic-on-ceramic with a titanium shell and subsequently to investigate the effect of the metallic shell deformation on the contact mechanics. A total of three impacts were found to be necessary to seat the titanium alloy shell into the pelvic bone cavity with a 1 mm diameter interference and a 1.3 kg impactor at 4500 mm s(-1) velocity. The maximum deformation of the metallic shell was found to be 160 µm in the antero-superior and postero-inferior direction and 97 µm in the antero-inferior and postero-superior direction after the press-fit. The corresponding values were slightly reduced to 67 and 45 µm after the ceramic liner was inserted and then modified to 74 and 43 µm under loading, respectively. The maximum deformation and the maximum principal stress of the ceramic liner were 31 µm and 144 MPa (tensile stress), respectively, after it was inserted into the shell and further increased to 52 µm and 245 MPa under loading. This research highlights the importance of the press-fit of the metallic shell on the contact mechanics of the ceramic liner for ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasties and potential clinical performances. PMID:26511269

  20. Structural ensembles of the north belt of Venus deformations and possible mechanisms of their formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markov, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    The author discusses structural formations in the northern deformation belt of Venus, studied according to the data of the radar pictures obtained with the Venera 15 and 16 probes. He shows that it consists of regions of compression with submeridional orientation, regions of displacement, extending in the sublatitudinal direction and individual slightly deformed blocks. He puts forward the hypothesis that the formation of these structures is related with horizontal movements in the mantle in the sublatitudinal direction.

  1. High-Strain-Induced Deformation Mechanisms in Block-Graft and Multigraft Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, Ralf; Duan, Y. X.; Weidisch, Roland; Holzer, Suzette R; Schneider, Ken R; Stamm, M.; Uhrig, David; Mays, Jimmy; Heinrich, G.; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    The molecular orientation behavior and structural changes of morphology at high strains for multigraft and block graft copolymers based on polystyrene (PS) and polyisoprene (PI) were investigated during uniaxial monotonic loading via FT-IR and synchrotron SAXS. Results from FT-IR revealed specific orientations of PS and PI segments depending on molecular architecture and on the morphology, while structural investigations revealed a typical decrease in long-range order with increasing strain. This decrease was interpreted as strain-induced dissolution of the glassy blocks in the soft matrix, which is assumed to affect an additional enthalpic contribution (strain-induced mixing of polymer chains) and stronger retracting forces of the network chains during elongation. Our interpretation is supported by FT-IR measurements showing similar orientation of rubbery and glassy segments up to high strains. It also points to highly deformable PS domains. By synchrotron SAXS, we observed in the neo-Hookean region an approach of glassy domains, while at higher elongations the intensity of the primary reflection peak was significantly decreasing. The latter clearly verifies the assumption that the glassy chains are pulled out from the domains and are partly mixed in the PI matrix. Results obtained by applying models of rubber elasticity to stressstrain and hysteresis data revealed similar correlations between the softening behavior and molecular and morphological parameters. Further, an influence of the network modality was observed (randomgrafted branches). For sphere formingmultigraft copolymers the domain functionality was found to be less important to achieve improved mechanical properties but rather size and distribution of the domains.

  2. Arterial mechanical motion estimation based on a semi-rigid body deformation approach.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Pablo; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Ros, Rafael; Ros, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Arterial motion estimation in ultrasound (US) sequences is a hard task due to noise and discontinuities in the signal derived from US artifacts. Characterizing the mechanical properties of the artery is a promising novel imaging technique to diagnose various cardiovascular pathologies and a new way of obtaining relevant clinical information, such as determining the absence of dicrotic peak, estimating the Augmentation Index (AIx), the arterial pressure or the arterial stiffness. One of the advantages of using US imaging is the non-invasive nature of the technique unlike Intra Vascular Ultra Sound (IVUS) or angiography invasive techniques, plus the relative low cost of the US units. In this paper, we propose a semi rigid deformable method based on Soft Bodies dynamics realized by a hybrid motion approach based on cross-correlation and optical flow methods to quantify the elasticity of the artery. We evaluate and compare different techniques (for instance optical flow methods) on which our approach is based. The goal of this comparative study is to identify the best model to be used and the impact of the accuracy of these different stages in the proposed method. To this end, an exhaustive assessment has been conducted in order to decide which model is the most appropriate for registering the variation of the arterial diameter over time. Our experiments involved a total of 1620 evaluations within nine simulated sequences of 84 frames each and the estimation of four error metrics. We conclude that our proposed approach obtains approximately 2.5 times higher accuracy than conventional state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:24871987

  3. Data Resolution and Scale-dependent Fracture Clustering: Implications for Deformation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A.; Aydin, A.; Mukerji, T.; Cilona, A.

    2015-12-01

    zones that have relatively uniform spacing while higher resolution data capture both thin and short splay joints and shear joints that form fracture clusters. Therefore, it may be concluded that data resolution is critical for identifying deformation mechanisms and their products.

  4. Distribution of contemporary crustal deformation and mechanisms for extension in the Woodlark Rift: insights from GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, L. M.; Ellis, S. M.; Tregoning, P.; Little, T. A.; Palmer, N.

    2012-12-01

    The Woodlark Rift, southeastern Papua New Guinea, is a classic example of a rift transitioning from continental rifting to seafloor spreading, and is also the site of exhumation of the world's youngest Ultra-High Pressure (UHP) terranes. Prior to now, very little GPS data existed to constrain the kinematics of contemporary rifting, and the relationship of modern-day rifting to exhumation of the young UHP terranes. We present results from GPS campaign measurements at ~45 sites throughout the southeastern Papua New Guinea region, from GPS campaigns conducted in 2009, 2010, and 2012. Our results suggest that most of the modern-day extensional deformation has shifted southward towards the north coast of the PNG mainland, away from the locus of UHP exhumation in the D'Entrecasteaux Islands, although a few mm/yr of active extension remains in the region of UHP rock exhumation. This is consistent with modelling studies that predict a shift in the locus of extension away from the locus of UHP exhumation during the final, waning stages of UHP exhumation. Rates of total extension in the Woodlark Rift increase from west to east from several mm/yr (in the far western Woodlark Rift) to >20 mm/yr further east, due to clockwise rotation of microplates in the region about nearby poles of rotation. We will discuss the implications that our kinematic modelling of the GPS data, earthquake slip vector data, and geological data have for the large-scale driving mechanisms behind rifting in southeast PNG. Our results favour a model where rapid microplate rotation (at 2-3 degrees/Myr) and rifting in the Woodlark Basin is a consequence of strong slab pull forces from extremely rapid subduction (6-13 cm/yr) at the New Britain and San Cristobal trenches further to the north.

  5. On the deformation mechanisms and electrical behavior of highly stretchable metallic interconnects on elastomer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafat, Yeasir; Dutta, Indranath; Panat, Rahul

    2016-09-01

    Flexible metallic interconnects are highly important in the emerging field of deformable/wearable electronics. In our previous work [Arafat et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 081906 (2015)], interconnect films of Indium metal, periodically bonded to an elastomer substrate using a thin discontinuous/cracked adhesion interlayer of Cr, were shown to sustain a linear strain of 80%-100% without failure during repeated cycling. In this paper, we investigate the mechanisms that allow such films to be stretched to a large strain without rupture along with strategies to prevent a deterioration in their electrical performance under high linear strain. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Digital Image Correlation are used to map the strain field of the Cr adhesion interlayer and the In interconnect film when the elastomer substrate is stretched. It is shown that the Cr interlayer morphology, consisting of islands separated by bi-axial cracks, accommodates the strain primarily by widening of the cracks between the islands along the tensile direction. This behavior is shown to cause the strain in the In interconnect film to be discontinuous and concentrated in bands perpendicular to the loading direction. This localization of strain at numerous periodically spaced locations preempts strain-localization at one location and makes the In film highly stretchable by delaying rupture. Finally, the elastic-plastic mismatch-driven wrinkling of the In interconnect upon release from first loading cycle is utilized to delay the onset of plasticity and allow the interconnect to be stretched repeatedly up to 25% linear strain in subsequent cycles without a deterioration of its electrical performance.

  6. The use of a novel injectable hydrogel nucleus pulposus replacement in restoring the mechanical properties of cyclically fatigued porcine intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Balkovec, Christian; Vernengo, Jennifer; McGill, Stuart M

    2013-06-01

    Repeated flexion and extension of an intervertebral disc has been shown to affect the angular stiffness of spinal motion segments and is a barometer of the mechanical integrity of the disc. A degenerated disc that loses height causes higher levels of stress on the annulus and facet joints which may increase its level of degeneration; restoring disc height may therefore help to slow this degenerative cascade. Previous research has indicated that nucleus implants have the potential to improve the mechanical characteristics of a disc and an implant that is custom-fit to the intervertebral disc yields the best results with respect to decreasing annular degeneration. Two groups of porcine spinal motion segments were exposed to repeated flexion and extension. One group was then injected with a novel hydrogel while the other group was used as a control. Both groups were then exposed to another round of cyclic flexion and extension to examine the effect that the hydrogel had on restoring the original mechanics to the motion segments. Angular stiffness was restored to the group which received the hydrogel injection in addition to a significant improvement in specimen height. No significant changes were seen in the group which did not receive an injection. It would appear that use of the novel injectable hydrogel is able to restore angular stiffness to cyclically fatigued spinal motion segments. It is also important to note that continued repetition of the event causing specimen fatigue after performing hydrogel injection will result in an eventual return to the same fatigued state.

  7. Effect of bimodal harmonic structure design on the deformation behaviour and mechanical properties of Co-Cr-Mo alloy.

    PubMed

    Vajpai, Sanjay Kumar; Sawangrat, Choncharoen; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Ciuca, Octav Paul; Ameyama, Kei

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, Co-Cr-Mo alloy compacts with a unique bimodal microstructural design, harmonic structure design, were successfully prepared via a powder metallurgy route consisting of controlled mechanical milling of pre-alloyed powders followed by spark plasma sintering. The harmonic structured Co-Cr-Mo alloy with bimodal grain size distribution exhibited relatively higher strength together with higher ductility as compared to the coarse-grained specimens. The harmonic Co-Cr-Mo alloy exhibited a very complex deformation behavior wherein it was found that the higher strength and the high retained ductility are derived from fine-grained shell and coarse-grained core regions, respectively. Finally, it was observed that the peculiar spatial/topological arrangement of stronger fine-grained and ductile coarse-grained regions in the harmonic structure promotes uniformity of strain distribution, leading to improved mechanical properties by suppressing the localized plastic deformation during straining. PMID:26478398

  8. Structure and fracture mechanism of a two-phase chromium-nickel alloy during high-temperature deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironenko, V. N.; Aronin, A. S.; Vasenev, V. V.; Aristova, I. M.; Shmyt'ko, I. M.; Trushnikova, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of a two-phase Kh65N33V2FT alloy has been studied after tests at room and high temperatures. The morphology of the main phases, namely, solid solutions of nickel in chromium (α) and chromium in nickel (γ), is changed depending on temperature. The lattice parameters of the main phases have been determined. The main mechanism of deformation for this alloy is shown to be grain-boundary sliding. Bulk and grain-boundary diffusion creep and self-regulating diffusion-viscous flow is possible in the γ phase during high-temperature deformation. The heat resistance of this alloy is restricted to 1000°C because of the formation of a γ-phase percolation cluster.

  9. Deformation and softening mechanism in naturally deformed rocks at the brittle-ductile transition zone in upper crust: pervasive micro-faulting accommodated by pressure solution of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, T.; El-Fakharani, A.

    2011-12-01

    Although the conventional two-mechanism strength profile of upper crustal rheology has been applied for a long time to geodynamical problems, the high differential stresses as much as a few hundreds of MPa have never been reported from geophysical observations such as those inferred from heat flow along active faults and stress drop during earthquakes. These facts suggest that there must be some softening mechanisms around the brittle-ductile transition zone in upper crust, where inland earthquakes most frequently occur. In order to unravel softening mechanisms in these regions, we have been examining natural microstructures in exhumed metamorphic rocks, which experienced pervasive deformation at brittle-ductile conditions (T=c. 300 oC). The Sambagawa metamorphic rocks experienced localized deformation under brittle-ductile transition conditions at D2 phase during exhumation. At outcrop scales, low-angle normal faults were pervasively developed with a dominant top-to-the-NNW movement recorded in quartz slickenfibre. In quartz schist deformed at D2 phase, shear bands coated by phengite were pervasively developed. We have extensively studied quartz c-axis fabrics and microstructures in the micro-faulted quartz schist. In quartz lenses surrounded by D2 shear bands, quartz microstructures and c-axis fabrics formed at D1 phase indicative of dislocation creep were well preserved. However, in the matrix (i.e. domains outside the lenses), quartz c-axis fabrics became weakened, and in some cases, became completely random. We have analyzed the degree of undulation of recrystallized quartz grain boundaries using the index called normalized perimeter of grains to that of the equivalent ellipse obtained with the NIH image, and compared the degree among different quartz schist samples and domains in the same sample. As a result, it has been found out that there is a nice positive correlation between the degree of grain boundary undulation and c-axis fabric intensity in quartz

  10. A Poroelastic Model Describing Nutrient Transport and Cell Stresses Within a Cyclically Strained Collagen Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Benjamin L.; Galie, Peter A.; Stegemann, Jan P.; Grotberg, James B.

    2013-01-01

    In the creation of engineered tissue constructs, the successful transport of nutrients and oxygen to the contained cells is a significant challenge. In highly porous scaffolds subject to cyclic strain, the mechanical deformations can induce substantial fluid pressure gradients, which affect the transport of solutes. In this article, we describe a poroelastic model to predict the solid and fluid mechanics of a highly porous hydrogel subject to cyclic strain. The model was validated by matching the predicted penetration of a bead into the hydrogel from the model with experimental observations and provides insight into nutrient transport. Additionally, the model provides estimates of the wall-shear stresses experienced by the cells embedded within the scaffold. These results provide insight into the mechanics of and convective nutrient transport within a cyclically strained hydrogel, which could lead to the improved design of engineered tissues. PMID:24209865

  11. Multiplexed fluidic plunger mechanism for the measurement of red blood cell deformability.

    PubMed

    Myrand-Lapierre, Marie-Eve; Deng, Xiaoyan; Ang, Richard R; Matthews, Kerryn; Santoso, Aline T; Ma, Hongshen

    2015-01-01

    The extraordinary deformability of red blood cells gives them the ability to repeatedly transit through the microvasculature of the human body. The loss of this capability is part of the pathology of a wide range of diseases including malaria, hemoglobinopathies, and micronutrient deficiencies. We report on a technique for multiplexed measurements of the pressure required to deform individual red blood cell through micrometer-scale constrictions. This measurement is performed by first infusing single red blood cells into a parallel array of ~1.7 μm funnel-shaped constrictions. Next, a saw-tooth pressure waveform is applied across the constrictions to squeeze each cell through its constriction. The threshold deformation pressure is then determined by relating the pressure-time data with the video of the deformation process. Our key innovation is a self-compensating fluidic network that ensures identical pressures are applied to each cell regardless of its position, as well as the presence of cells in neighboring constrictions. These characteristics ensure the consistency of the measurement process and robustness against blockages of the constrictions by rigid cells and debris. We evaluate this technique using in vitro cultures of RBCs infected with P. falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria, to demonstrate the ability to profile the deformability signature of a heterogeneous sample. PMID:25325848

  12. Deformation of Filamentous Escherichia coli Cells in a Microfluidic Device: A New Technique to Study Cell Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Yaron

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of bacterial cells are determined by their stress-bearing elements. The size of typical bacterial cells, and the fact that different time and length scales govern their behavior, necessitate special experimental techniques in order to probe their mechanical properties under various spatiotemporal conditions. Here, we present such an experimental technique to study cell mechanics using hydrodynamic forces in a microfluidic device. We demonstrate the application of this technique by calculating the flexural rigidity of non-growing Escherichia coli cells. In addition, we compare the deformation of filamentous cells under growing and non-growing conditions during the deformation process. We show that, at low forces, the force needed to deform growing cells to the same extent as non-growing cells is approximately two times smaller. Following previous works, we interpret these results as the outcome of the difference between the elastic response of non-growing cells and the plastic-elastic response of growing cells. Finally, we observe some heterogeneity in the response of individual cells to the applied force. We suggest that this results from the individuality of different bacterial cells. PMID:24392095

  13. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic super alloy revealed by in situ neutron dffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Teng, Zhenke; Wu, Wei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    The ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)AlB2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticity theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.