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Sample records for cyclin g-associated kinase

  1. Selective inhibitors of Cyclin-G associated kinase (GAK) as anti-HCV agents

    PubMed Central

    Kovackova, Sona; Chang, Lei; Bekerman, Elena; Neveu, Gregory; Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Chaikuad, Apirat; Heroven, Christina; Šála, Michal; De Jonghe, Steven; Knapp, Stefan; Einav, Shirit; Herdewijn, Piet

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-G associated kinase (GAK) emerged as a promising drug target for the treatment of viral infections. However, no potent and selective GAK inhibitors have been reported in the literature to date. This paper describes the discovery of isothiazolo[5,4-b]pyridines as selective GAK inhibitors, with the most potent congeners displaying low nanomolar binding affinity for GAK. Co-crystallization experiments revealed that these compounds behaved as classic type I ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. In addition, we have demonstrated that these compounds exhibit a potent activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) by inhibiting two temporally distinct steps in the HCV lifecycle (i.e. viral entry and assembly). Hence, these GAK inhibitors represent chemical probes to study GAK function in different disease areas where GAK has been implicated (including viral infection, cancer and Parkinson's disease). PMID:25822739

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  3. Viral cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase 6 complexes initiate nuclear DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Laman, H; Coverley, D; Krude, T; Laskey, R; Jones, N

    2001-01-01

    The cyclins encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and herpesvirus saimiri are homologs of human D-type cyclins. However, when complexed to cdk6, they have several activities that distinguish them from D-type cyclin-cdk6 complexes, including resistance to cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and an enhanced substrate range. We find that viral cyclins interact with and phosphorylate proteins involved in replication initiation. Using mammalian in vitro replication systems, we show that viral cyclin-cdk6 complexes can directly trigger the initiation of DNA synthesis in isolated late-G(1)-phase nuclei. Viral cyclin-cdk6 complexes share this capacity with cyclin A-cdk2, demonstrating that in addition to functioning as G(1)-phase cyclin-cdk complexes, they function as S-phase cyclin-cdk complexes.

  4. Non-canonical functions of cell cycle cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    Hydbring, Per; Malumbres, Marcos; Sicinski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The role of cyclins and their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), as core components of the machinery that drives cell cycle progression is well established. Increasing evidence indicates that mammalian cyclins and CDKs also carry out important roles in other cellular processes such as transcription, DNA damage repair, the control of cell death, differentiation, the immune response and metabolism. Some of these non-canonical functions are performed by cyclins or by CDKs, independent of their respective cell cycle partners, suggesting a substantial divergence in the function of these proteins during evolution. PMID:27033256

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, a Positive Regulator of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyuwon; Brown, Raymond S.; Birrane, Gabriel; Ladias, John A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cyclin K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, collectively referred to as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 Å resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9–cyclin K and CDK9–cyclin T1 complexes. PMID:17169370

  6. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, A Positive Regulator of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9

    SciTech Connect

    Baek,K.; Brown, R.; Birrane, G.; Ladias, J.

    2007-01-01

    K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes.

  7. Selective killing of transformed cells by cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase 2 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Nan P.; Sharma, Sushil K.; Ramsey, Timothy M.; Jiang, Li; Martin, Mary S.; Baker, Kayla; Adams, Peter D.; Bair, Kenneth W.; Kaelin, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies identified a short peptide motif that serves as a docking site for cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 2 complexes. Peptides containing this motif block the phosphorylation of substrates by cyclin A/cdk2 or cyclin E/cdk2. Here we report that cell membrane-permeable forms of such peptides preferentially induced transformed cells to undergo apoptosis relative to nontransformed cells. Deregulation of E2F family transcription factors is a common event during transformation and was sufficient to sensitize cells to the cyclin/cdk2 inhibitory peptides. These results suggest that deregulation of E2F and inhibition of cdk2 are synthetically lethal and provide a rationale for the development of cdk2 antagonists as antineoplastic agents. PMID:10200261

  8. Design of a novel class of peptide inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin activation.

    PubMed

    Gondeau, Claire; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine; Bello, Paul; Aldrian-Herrada, Gudrun; Morris, May C; Divita, Gilles

    2005-04-08

    Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are key regulators of the cell cycle progression and therefore constitute excellent targets for the design of anticancer agents. Most of the inhibitors identified to date inhibit kinase activity by interfering with the ATP-binding site of CDKs. We recently proposed that the protein/protein interface and conformational changes required in the molecular mechanism of CDK2-cyclin A activation were potential targets for the design of specific inhibitors of cell cycle progression. To this aim, we have designed and characterized a small peptide, termed C4, derived from amino acids 285-306 in the alpha5 helix of cyclin A. We demonstrate that this peptide does not interfere with complex formation but forms stable complexes with CDK2-cyclin A. The C4 peptide significantly inhibits kinase activity of complexes harboring CDK2 in a competitive fashion with respect to substrates but does not behave as an ATP antagonist. Moreover, when coupled with the protein transduction domain of Tat, the C4 peptide blocks the proliferation of tumor cell lines, thereby constituting a potent lead for the development of specific CDK-cyclin inhibitors.

  9. Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors as anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Concepción; Gelbert, Lawrence M; Lallena, María José; de Dios, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Sustained proliferative capacity is a hallmark of cancer. In mammalian cells proliferation is controlled by the cell cycle, where cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate critical checkpoints. CDK4 and CDK6 are considered highly validated anticancer drug targets due to their essential role regulating cell cycle progression at the G1 restriction point. This review provides an overview of recent advances on cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors in general with special emphasis on CDK4 and CDK6 inhibitors and compounds under clinical evaluation. Chemical structures, structure activity relationships, and relevant preclinical properties will be described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases by p21.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, J W; Elledge, S J; Keyomarsi, K; Dynlacht, B; Tsai, L H; Zhang, P; Dobrowolski, S; Bai, C; Connell-Crowley, L; Swindell, E

    1995-01-01

    p21Cip1 is a cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor that is transcriptionally activated by p53 in response to DNA damage. We have explored the interaction of p21 with the currently known Cdks. p21 effectively inhibits Cdk2, Cdk3, Cdk4, and Cdk6 kinases (Ki 0.5-15 nM) but is much less effective toward Cdc2/cyclin B (Ki approximately 400 nM) and Cdk5/p35 (Ki > 2 microM), and does not associate with Cdk7/cyclin H. Overexpression of P21 arrests cells in G1. Thus, p21 is not a universal inhibitor of Cdks but displays selectivity for G1/S Cdk/cyclin complexes. Association of p21 with Cdks is greatly enhanced by cyclin binding. This property is shared by the structurally related inhibitor p27, suggesting a common biochemical mechanism for inhibition. With respect to Cdk2 and Cdk4 complexes, p27 shares the inhibitory potency of p21 but has slightly different kinase specificities. In normal diploid fibroblasts, the vast majority of active Cdk2 is associated with p21, but this active kinase can be fully inhibited by addition of exogenous p21. Reconstruction experiments using purified components indicate that multiple molecules of p21 can associate with Cdk/cyclin complexes and inactive complexes contain more than one molecule of p21. Together, these data suggest a model whereby p21 functions as an inhibitory buffer whose levels determine the threshold kinase activity required for cell cycle progression. Images PMID:7626805

  11. Phosphate-Activated Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Stabilizes G1 Cyclin To Trigger Cell Cycle Entry

    PubMed Central

    Menoyo, S.; Ricco, N.; Bru, S.; Hernández-Ortega, S.; Escoté, X.; Aldea, M.

    2013-01-01

    G1 cyclins, in association with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), are universal activators of the transcriptional G1-S machinery during entry into the cell cycle. Regulation of cyclin degradation is crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle, but the mechanisms that modulate cyclin stability to control cell cycle entry are still unknown. Here, we show that a lack of phosphate downregulates Cln3 cyclin and leads to G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stability of Cln3 protein is diminished in strains with low activity of Pho85, a phosphate-sensing CDK. Cln3 is an in vitro substrate of Pho85, and both proteins interact in vivo. More interestingly, cells that carry a CLN3 allele encoding aspartic acid substitutions at the sites of Pho85 phosphorylation maintain high levels of Cln3 independently of Pho85 activity. Moreover, these cells do not properly arrest in G1 in the absence of phosphate and they die prematurely. Finally, the activity of Pho85 is essential for accumulating Cln3 and for reentering the cell cycle after phosphate refeeding. Taken together, our data indicate that Cln3 is a molecular target of the Pho85 kinase that is required to modulate cell cycle entry in response to environmental changes in nutrient availability. PMID:23339867

  12. Phosphate-activated cyclin-dependent kinase stabilizes G1 cyclin to trigger cell cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Menoyo, S; Ricco, N; Bru, S; Hernández-Ortega, S; Escoté, X; Aldea, M; Clotet, J

    2013-04-01

    G1 cyclins, in association with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), are universal activators of the transcriptional G1-S machinery during entry into the cell cycle. Regulation of cyclin degradation is crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle, but the mechanisms that modulate cyclin stability to control cell cycle entry are still unknown. Here, we show that a lack of phosphate downregulates Cln3 cyclin and leads to G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stability of Cln3 protein is diminished in strains with low activity of Pho85, a phosphate-sensing CDK. Cln3 is an in vitro substrate of Pho85, and both proteins interact in vivo. More interestingly, cells that carry a CLN3 allele encoding aspartic acid substitutions at the sites of Pho85 phosphorylation maintain high levels of Cln3 independently of Pho85 activity. Moreover, these cells do not properly arrest in G1 in the absence of phosphate and they die prematurely. Finally, the activity of Pho85 is essential for accumulating Cln3 and for reentering the cell cycle after phosphate refeeding. Taken together, our data indicate that Cln3 is a molecular target of the Pho85 kinase that is required to modulate cell cycle entry in response to environmental changes in nutrient availability.

  13. Structure of a cyclin-dependent kinase from Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Leibly, David J; Newling, Paul A; Abendroth, Jan; Guo, Wenjin; Kelley, Angela; Stewart, Lance J; Van Voorhis, Wesley

    2011-09-01

    Giardia lamblia is the etiologic agent of giardiasis, a water-borne infection that is prevalent throughout the world. The need for new therapeutics for the treatment of giardiasis is of paramount importance. Owing to the ubiquitous nature of kinases and their vital importance in organisms, they are potential drug targets. In this paper, the first structure of a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) from G. lamblia (GlCDK; UniProt A8BZ95) is presented. CDKs are cell-cycle-associated kinases that are actively being pursued as targets for anticancer drugs as well as for antiparasitic chemotherapy. Generally, a CDK forms a complex with its associated cyclin. This CDK-cyclin complex is active and acts as a serine/threonine protein kinase. Typically, CDKs are responsible for the transition to the next phase of the cell cycle. Although the structure of GlCDK with its associated cyclin was not solved, the 1.85 Å resolution structure of apo GlCDK and a 2.0 Å resolution structure of GlCDK in complex with adenosine monophosphate are presented and the structural differences from the orthologous human CDK2 and CDK3 are discussed.

  14. Selectivity and potency of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; Akula, Nagaraju; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan

    2006-03-24

    Members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family play key roles in various cellular processes. There are 11 members of the CDK family known till now. CDKs are activated by forming noncovalent complexes with cyclins such as A-, B-, C-, D- (D1, D2, and D3), and E-type cyclins. Each isozyme of this family is responsible for particular aspects (cell signaling, transcription, etc) of the cell cycle, and some of the CDK isozymes are specific to certain kinds of tissues. Aberrant expression and overexpression of these kinases are evidenced in many disease conditions. Inhibition of isozymes of CDKs specifically can yield beneficiary treatment modalities with minimum side effects. More than 80 3-dimensional structures of CDK2, CDK5, and CDK6 complexed with inhibitors have been published. This review provides an understanding of the structural aspects of CDK isozymes and binding modes of various known CDK inhibitors so that these kinases can be better targeted for drug discovery and design. The amino acid residues that constitute the cyclin binding region, the substrate binding region, and the area around the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding site have been compared for CDK isozymes. Those amino acids at the ATP binding site that could be used to improve the potency and subtype specificity have been described.

  15. Activation of cyclin A-dependent protein kinases during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Meikrantz, W; Gisselbrecht, S; Tam, S W; Schlegel, R

    1994-01-01

    Apoptosis was induced in S-phase-arrested HeLa cells by staurosporine, caffeine, 6-dimethylaminopurine, and okadaic acid, agents that activate M-phase-promoting factor and induce premature mitosis in similarly treated hamster cell lines. Addition of these agents to asynchronously growing HeLa cells or to cells arrested in early G1 phase with lovastatin had little or no effect. S-phase arrest also promoted tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis, eliminating the normal requirement for simultaneous cycloheximide treatment. For all of the apoptosis-inducing agents tested, the appearance of condensed chromatin was accompanied by 2- to 7-fold increases in cyclin A-associated histone H1 kinase activity, levels approximating the mitotic value. Where examined, both Cdc2 and Cdk2, the catalytic subunits known to associate with cyclin A, were activated. Stable overexpression of bcl-2 suppressed the apoptosis-inducing activity of all agents tested and reduced the amount of Cdc2 and Cdk2 in the nucleus, suggesting a possible mechanism by which bcl-2 inhibits the chromatin condensation characteristic of apoptosis. These findings suggest that at least one of the biochemical steps required for mitosis, activation of cyclin A-dependent protein kinases, is also an important event during apoptosis. Images PMID:8170983

  16. Pharmacological cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors: Implications for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Archana; Vyas, Arpita; Deshpande, Kaivalya; Vyas, Dinesh

    2016-02-21

    Colorectal cancer accounts for a significant proportion of cancer deaths worldwide. The need to develop more chemotherapeutic agents to combat this disease is critical. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), along with its binding partner cyclins, serve to control the growth of cells through the cell cycle. A new class of drugs, termed CDK inhibitors, has been studied in preclinical and now clinical trials. These inhibitors are believed to act as an anti-cancer drug by blocking CDKs to block the uncontrolled cellular proliferation that is hallmark of cancers like colorectal cancer. CDK article provides overview of the emerging drug class of CDK inhibitors and provides a list of ones that are currently in clinical trials.

  17. Viral Cyclin–Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6 Complexes Initiate Nuclear DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Laman, Heike; Coverley, Dawn; Krude, Torsten; Laskey, Ronald; Jones, Nic

    2001-01-01

    The cyclins encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and herpesvirus saimiri are homologs of human D-type cyclins. However, when complexed to cdk6, they have several activities that distinguish them from D-type cyclin-cdk6 complexes, including resistance to cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and an enhanced substrate range. We find that viral cyclins interact with and phosphorylate proteins involved in replication initiation. Using mammalian in vitro replication systems, we show that viral cyclin-cdk6 complexes can directly trigger the initiation of DNA synthesis in isolated late-G1-phase nuclei. Viral cyclin-cdk6 complexes share this capacity with cyclin A-cdk2, demonstrating that in addition to functioning as G1-phase cyclin-cdk complexes, they function as S-phase cyclin-cdk complexes. PMID:11134348

  18. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors closer to market launch?

    PubMed

    Galons, Hervé; Oumata, Nassima; Gloulou, Olfa; Meijer, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Interest in cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors was stimulated by the demonstration that their pharmacological activities could lead to therapies for numerous diseases. Until now, despite the clinical introduction of a dozen compounds belonging to other classes of kinase inhibitors, no CDK inhibitor has reached the marketplace. This review covers CDK inhibitor patents published between 2009 and September 2012. It presents compounds currently undergoing clinical development, along with our earlier (2010) review of the same topic, as well as descriptions of recently published compounds not disclosed in the patent literature. It provides the reader with an update of all chemical structures of current interest in the CDK inhibitor field. Though cancer remains the most obvious application for CDK inhibition, other indications, such as HIV infection, could potentially be treated with CDK inhibitors.

  19. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 immunoreactivity for granulovacuolar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Nakamori, Masahiro; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Yamazaki, Yuu; Kurashige, Takashi; Yamawaki, Takemori; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2012-10-24

    In addition to senile plaque and neurofibrillary tangles, granulovacuolar degeneration is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. A number of tau kinases, such as c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), glycogen-synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), and casein kinase 1 (CK1), have been reported to be markers of granulovacuolar degeneration. In addition, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), which phosphorylates tau, has been shown to be abundantly expressed in neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus. CDK5 has a unique staining pattern, and therefore, has the potential to be a novel marker for granulovacuolar degeneration. In this study, we investigated the ability of CDK5 to be a marker for granulovacuolar degeneration using immunohistochemical analysis. Four Alzheimer's disease cases, three myotonic dystrophy (MyD) cases, and three control cases were subjected to immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescent techniques using anti-CDK5, anti-charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B), anti-pSmad2/3, anti-ubiquitin (Ub), anti-phospho-TDP-43 and AT8 antibodies. Some CDK5-positive granules were morphologically similar to granulovacuolar degeneration intraluminal granules, and these granules overlapped with those immunopositive for pSmad2/3, Ub and phospho-TDP-43 established granulovacuolar degeneration markers. Moreover, CDK5-positive granulovacuolar degeneration and phosphorylated tau colocalized in pyramidal neurons in Alzheimer's disease and MyD cases. The numbers of CDK5-positive granules showed an inverse relationship with the degree of mature neurofibrillary tangles in each cell, as was the case with CHMP2B-positive granulovacuolar degeneration granules and neurofibrillary tangles. The presence of tau kinases including CDK5 in granulovacuolar degeneration might implicate that granulovacuolar degeneration is structurally involved in tau modification.

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors inspired by roscovitine: purine bioisosteres.

    PubMed

    Jorda, Radek; Paruch, Kamil; Krystof, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    Roscovitine is a synthetic inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases that is currently undergoing clinical trials as a candidate drug for some oncological indications. Its discovery prompted many research teams to further optimize its structure or to initiate their own related but independent studies. This article reviews known roscovitine bioisosteres that have been prepared as CDK inhibitors using different core heterocycles. The individual bioisostere types have been described and explored to a different extent, which complicates direct comparisons of their biochemical activity - only six direct analogs containing different purine bioisosteres have been prepared and evaluated side by side with roscovitine. Only four types of bioisosteres have demonstrated improved biological properties, namely pyrazolo[ 1,5-a]-1,3,5-triazines, pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines, pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridines and pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidines.

  1. [Cytotoxicity of chimera peptides incorporating sequences of cyclin kinases inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, V P; Kulinich, V G; Lunin, V G; Filiasova, E I; Shishkin, A M; Sergeenko, O V; Riazanova, E M; Voronina, O L; Bozhenko, V K

    2007-01-01

    The study is concerned with proapoptotic properties of chimera peptides which incorporate sequences of inhibitors of cyclin kinases p161NK4a and p21CIP/WAF1 as well as internalized sequences (Antp and tat). Sequences of the p16 type appeared to be more cytotoxic than the p21 one. Cytotoxic effect proved dependent on orientation with respect to the C or N terminal point of a polypeptide chain rather than on chimera sequence extent. Although p16 endogenous synthesis did not influence chimera peptide levels, apoptosis did not take place in certain cellular lines. Due to the rather unsophisticated nature of such synthesis, it might be used in designing individually-tailored chemotherapeutic drugs.

  2. Cyclin Dependent Kinase 9 Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Yogesh A; Taylor, Margaret A; Napoleon, John Victor; Rana, Sandeep; Contreras, Jacob I; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2016-10-13

    Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors have been the topic of intense research for nearly 2 decades due to their widely varied and critical functions within the cell. Recently CDK9 has emerged as a druggable target for the development of cancer therapeutics. CDK9 plays a crucial role in transcription regulation; specifically, CDK9 mediated transcriptional regulation of short-lived antiapoptotic proteins is critical for the survival of transformed cells. Focused chemical libraries based on a plethora of scaffolds have resulted in mixed success with regard to the development of selective CDK9 inhibitors. Here we review the regulation of CDK9, its cellular functions, and common core structures used to target CDK9, along with their selectivity profile and efficacy in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF-α/CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

  4. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M.; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF- /CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:24242917

  5. Characterization of cyclin-dependent kinases and Cdc2/Cdc28 kinase subunits in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Amador, Erick; López-Pacheco, Karla; Morales, Nataly; Coria, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda

    2017-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have important roles in regulating key checkpoints between stages of the cell cycle. Their activity is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including through binding with cyclin proteins and the Cdc2/Cdc28 kinase subunit (CKS), and their phosphorylation at specific amino acids. Studies of the components involved in cell cycle control in parasitic protozoa are limited. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of trichomoniasis in humans and is therefore important in public health; however, some of the basic biological processes used by this organism have not been defined. Here, we characterized proteins potentially involved in cell cycle regulation in T. vaginalis. Three genes encoding protein kinases were identified in the T. vaginalis genome, and the corresponding recombinant proteins (TvCRK1, TvCRK2, TvCRK5) were studied. These proteins displayed similar sequence features to CDKs. Two genes encoding CKSs were also identified, and the corresponding recombinant proteins were found to interact with TvCRK1 and TvCRK2 by a yeast two-hybrid system. One putative cyclin B protein from T. vaginalis was found to bind to and activate the kinase activities of TvCRK1 and TvCRK5, but not TvCRK2. This work is the first characterization of proteins involved in cell cycle control in T. vaginalis.

  6. Intergenic complementation truncation mutants of cyclin-dependent kinase.

    PubMed

    Bitter, G A; Tsai, M M; Putzke, A P; Leong, K

    2000-03-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes PHO80 and PHO85 encode, respectively, a cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase, which negatively regulate PHO5 gene transcription by phosphorylating the transcription activator Pho4p. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are highly conserved proteins, both within and between species. It was previously demonstrated, using reporter genes activated in yeast by Pho4p, that hybrid proteins in which over two-thirds of Pho85p were replaced with the homologous region from human Cdk2 retained the function of native Pho85p with respect to promoter repression. In the present study, various truncated forms of the hybrid human-yeast CDKs were tested for function. Surprisingly, truncations in which significant portions of the C-terminal region of the 291-residue hybrid CDK were deleted retained activity. Genes encoding human Cdk2 proteins which terminated after amino acids 151, 140, 130, 120 and 90 each complement a chromosomal pho85 gene disruption in which the HIS3 gene is inserted at codon 49. Truncated Cdk2 proteins containing less than 60 amino acids failed to complement the pho85::HIS3 gene disruption. Although the functional C-terminal truncations disrupt the ATP-binding and active sites of Cdk2, reporter gene repression mediated by these truncated proteins is apparently due to phosphorylation of Pho4p, since a gene in which the essential lysine codon at position 33 was converted to an arginine codon does not complement the chromosomal gene disruption. The human Cdk2 truncations were demonstrated to function through intergenic complementation. The intact Cdk2-Pho85 hybrid CDK complemented the pho85 mutation in yeast strains in which the entire PHO85 coding region was deleted from chromosome XVI. The C-terminal Cdk2 truncations, however, were non-functional in these strains and thus dependent for activity on the pho85 coding region which remained in the mutant pho85::HIS3 chromosomal locus. These genetic results are consistent with a model

  7. The N-terminal domains of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory proteins block the phosphorylation of cdk2/Cyclin E by the CDK-activating kinase.

    PubMed

    Rank, K B; Evans, D B; Sharma, S K

    2000-05-10

    It has been suggested that binding of p27 and p21 kinase inhibitory proteins (KIPs) to cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) render them inaccessible to cdk-activating kinase (CAK), presumably by steric hindrance by the C-terminal residues. However, this common mechanism of inhibition is inconsistent with the known structural divergence in the p27 and p21 C-terminal domains. Therefore, we studied the direct binding of N-terminal minimal domain of p27 (amino acids 28-81) to cdk2/cyclin E. An unlabeled p27 minimal domain, mutated in the N-terminal LFG motif, was unable to compete with a labeled minimal domain for binding to cdk2/cyclin E. The p27 and its minimal domain inhibited CAK-mediated phosphorylation of cdk2/cyclin E. This inhibitory effect was significantly diminished with p27 minimal domain mutated in the LFG motif. A synthetic peptide, ACRRLFGPVDSE, from the N-terminal residues 17-28 of p21, was also a potent inhibitor of CAK-mediated cdk2/cyclin E phosphorylation. Taken together, these results show that anchoring of p27 or p21 KIPs to cyclin E via the N-terminal LFG-containing motif can block CAK access to its cdk2/cyclin E substrate.

  8. Understanding and modulating cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor specificity: molecular modeling and biochemical evaluation of pyrazolopyrimidinones as CDK2/cyclin A and CDK4/cyclin D1 inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Karen A.; Markwalder, Jay A.; Seitz, Steven P.; Chang, Chong-Hwan; Cox, Sarah; Boisclair, Michael D.; Brizuela, Leonardo; Brenner, Stephen L.; Stouten, Pieter F. W.

    2005-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in regulating the cell cycle. The cyclins, their activating agents, and endogenous CDK inhibitors are frequently mutated in human cancers, making CDKs interesting targets for cancer chemotherapy. Our aim is the discovery of selective CDK4/cyclin D1 inhibitors. An ATP-competitive pyrazolopyrimidinone CDK inhibitor was identified by HTS and docked into a CDK4 homology model. The resulting binding model was consistent with available SAR and was validated by a subsequent CDK2/inhibitor crystal structure. An iterative cycle of chemistry and modeling led to a 70-fold improvement in potency. Small substituent changes resulted in large CDK4/CDK2 selectivity changes. The modeling revealed that selectivity is largely due to hydrogen-bonded interactions with only two kinase residues. This demonstrates that small differences between enzymes can efficiently be exploited in the design of selective inhibitors.

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 protects podocytes from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Saurus, Pauliina; Kuusela, Sara; Dumont, Vincent; Lehtonen, Eero; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Lassenius, Mariann I.; Forsblom, Carol; Lehto, Markku; Saleem, Moin A.; Groop, Per-Henrik; Lehtonen, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Loss of podocytes is an early feature of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and predicts its progression. We found that treatment of podocytes with sera from normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetes patients with high lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activity, known to predict progression of DN, downregulated CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2). LPS-treatment of mice also reduced CDK2 expression. LPS-induced downregulation of CDK2 was prevented in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway using immunomodulatory agent GIT27. We also observed that CDK2 is downregulated in the glomeruli of obese Zucker rats before the onset of proteinuria. Knockdown of CDK2, or inhibiting its activity with roscovitine in podocytes increased apoptosis. CDK2 knockdown also reduced expression of PDK1, an activator of the cell survival kinase Akt, and reduced Akt phosphorylation. This suggests that CDK2 regulates the activity of the cell survival pathway via PDK1. Furthermore, PDK1 knockdown reduced the expression of CDK2 suggesting a regulatory loop between CDK2 and PDK1. Collectively, our data show that CDK2 protects podocytes from apoptosis and that reduced expression of CDK2 associates with the development of DN. Preventing downregulation of CDK2 by blocking the TLR pathway with GIT27 may provide a means to prevent podocyte apoptosis and progression of DN. PMID:26876672

  10. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianling; Wang, Gangduo; Ma, Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2010-01-01

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and cyclin E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic

  11. Constitutively active K-cyclin/cdk6 kinase in Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Van Dross, Rukiyah; Yao, Shan; Asad, Shaheena; Westlake, Grant; Mays, Deborah J; Barquero, Laura; Duell, Stephanie; Pietenpol, Jennifer A; Browning, Philip J

    2005-05-04

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated human herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes K-cyclin, a homologue of D-type cellular cyclins, which binds cyclin-dependent kinases to phosphorylate various substrates. K-cyclin/cdk phosphorylates a subset of substrates normally targeted by cyclins D, E, and A. We used cells naturally infected with KSHV to further characterize the biochemical features of K-cyclin. We used immunoprecipitation with K-cyclin antibodies to examine the association of K-cyclin with cdk2, cdk6, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1 proteins in BC3 cells. We separated populations of BC3 cells enriched in cells in G1, S, or G2/M phases by elutriation and measured K-cyclin protein and the kinase activity of K-cyclin/cdk6 complexes. The half-life of K-cyclin and cyclin D2 proteins was determined by blocking protein synthesis with cycloheximide and measuring proteins in cell lysates by western blot analysis. We fused the entire K-cyclin sequence to the carboxyl-terminal sequence of cellular cyclin D that contains the PEST degradation sequence to produce K-cyclin/D2 and transfected K-cyclin/D2 into K-cyclin-negative cells to investigate the effect of the PEST sequence on K-cyclin's stability. Viral K-cyclin interacted with cyclin-dependent kinases cdk2, cdk4, and cdk6 and with the cyclin/cdk inhibitory proteins p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 in BC3 cell lysates. Unlike D-type cyclins, whose expression is cell cycle dependent, the level of K-cyclin was stable throughout the cell cycle, and the kinase associated with the K-cyclin/cdk6 complex was constitutively active. The half-life of K-cyclin (6.9 hours) was much longer than that of cellular cyclin D2 (0.6 hour) and that of K-cyclin/D2 (0.5 hour), probably because K-cyclin lacks the PEST degradation sequence present in D-type cyclins. The constitutive activation of K-cyclin/cdk complexes in KSHV-infected cells appears to result from the extended half-life of K-cyclin and may explain its role in Kaposi sarcoma.

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulates degranulation in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Odemuyiwa, Solomon O; Ilarraza, Ramses; Davoine, Francis; Logan, Michael R; Shayeganpour, Anooshirvan; Wu, Yingqi; Majaesic, Carina; Adamko, Darryl J; Moqbel, Redwan; Lacy, Paige

    2015-04-01

    Degranulation from eosinophils in response to secretagogue stimulation is a regulated process that involves exocytosis of granule proteins through specific signalling pathways. One potential pathway is dependent on cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and its effector molecules, p35 and p39, which play a central role in neuronal cell exocytosis by phosphorylating Munc18, a regulator of SNARE binding. Emerging evidence suggests a role for Cdk5 in exocytosis in immune cells, although its role in eosinophils is not known. We sought to examine the expression of Cdk5 and its activators in human eosinophils, and to assess the role of Cdk5 in eosinophil degranulation. We used freshly isolated human eosinophils and analysed the expression of Cdk5, p35, p39 and Munc18c by Western blot, RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoprecipitation. Cdk5 kinase activity was determined following eosinophil activation. Cdk5 inhibitors were used (roscovitine, AT7519 and small interfering RNA) to determine its role in eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) secretion. Cdk5 was expressed in association with Munc18c, p35 and p39, and phosphorylated following human eosinophil activation with eotaxin/CCL11, platelet-activating factor, and secretory IgA-Sepharose. Cdk5 inhibitors (roscovitine, AT7519) reduced EPX release when cells were stimulated by PMA or secretory IgA. In assays using small interfering RNA knock-down of Cdk5 expression in human eosinophils, we observed inhibition of EPX release. Our findings suggest that in activated eosinophils, Cdk5 is phosphorylated and binds to Munc18c, resulting in Munc18c release from syntaxin-4, allowing SNARE binding and vesicle fusion, with subsequent eosinophil degranulation. Our work identifies a novel role for Cdk5 in eosinophil mediator release by agonist-induced degranulation.

  13. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary E; Corsino, Patrick E; Narayan, Satya; Law, Brian K

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been considered promising drug targets for a number of years, but most CDK inhibitors have failed rigorous clinical testing. Recent studies demonstrating clear anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity of CDK4/6 inhibitors such as palbociclib and multi-CDK inhibitors such as dinaciclib have rejuvenated the field. Favorable results with palbociclib and its recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval demonstrate that CDK inhibitors with narrow selectivity profiles can have clinical utility for therapy based on individual tumor genetics. A brief overview of results obtained with ATP-competitive inhibitors such as palbociclib and dinaciclib is presented, followed by a compilation of new avenues that have been pursued toward the development of novel, non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors. These creative ways to develop CDK inhibitors are presented along with crystal structures of these agents complexed with CDK2 to highlight differences in their binding sites and mechanisms of action. The recent successes of CDK inhibitors in the clinic, combined with the potential for structure-based routes to the development of non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors, and evidence that CDK inhibitors may have use in suppressing chromosomal instability and in synthetic lethal drug combinations inspire optimism that CDK inhibitors will become important weapons in the fight against cancer. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Corsino, Patrick E.; Narayan, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been considered promising drug targets for a number of years, but most CDK inhibitors have failed rigorous clinical testing. Recent studies demonstrating clear anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity of CDK4/6 inhibitors such as palbociclib and multi-CDK inhibitors such as dinaciclib have rejuvenated the field. Favorable results with palbociclib and its recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval demonstrate that CDK inhibitors with narrow selectivity profiles can have clinical utility for therapy based on individual tumor genetics. A brief overview of results obtained with ATP-competitive inhibitors such as palbociclib and dinaciclib is presented, followed by a compilation of new avenues that have been pursued toward the development of novel, non–ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors. These creative ways to develop CDK inhibitors are presented along with crystal structures of these agents complexed with CDK2 to highlight differences in their binding sites and mechanisms of action. The recent successes of CDK inhibitors in the clinic, combined with the potential for structure-based routes to the development of non–ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors, and evidence that CDK inhibitors may have use in suppressing chromosomal instability and in synthetic lethal drug combinations inspire optimism that CDK inhibitors will become important weapons in the fight against cancer. PMID:26018905

  15. Emerging Drug Profile: Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blachly, James S.; Byrd, John C.

    2013-01-01

    As the rational application of targeted therapies in cancer supplants traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, there is an ever-greater need for a thorough understanding of the complex machinery of the cell and an application of this knowledge to the development of novel therapeutics and combinations of agents. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of the class of targeted agents known as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, with a focus on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Flavopiridol (alvocidib) is the best studied of the CDK inhibitors, producing a dramatic cytotoxic effect in vitro and in vivo, with the principal limiting factor of acute tumor lysis. Unfortunately, flavopiridol has a narrow therapeutic window and is relatively non-selective with several off-target (i.e. non-CDK) effects, which prompted development of the second-generation CDK inhibitor dinaciclib. Dinaciclib appears to be both more potent and selective than flavopiridol, with at least an order of magnitude greater therapeutic index, and is currently in phase III clinical trials. In additional to flavopiridol and dinaciclib, we also review the current state of other members of this class, and provide commentary as to the future direction of combination therapy including CDK inhibitors. PMID:23488658

  16. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ma Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2011-01-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in

  17. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianling; Wang, Gangduo; Ma, Huaxian; Khan, M Firoze

    2011-01-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in

  18. Cyclin-dependent kinase complexes in developing maize endosperm: evidence for differential expression and functional specialization.

    PubMed

    Dante, Ricardo A; Sabelli, Paolo A; Nguyen, Hong N; Leiva-Neto, João T; Tao, Yumin; Lowe, Keith S; Hoerster, George J; Gordon-Kamm, William J; Jung, Rudolf; Larkins, Brian A

    2014-02-01

    Endosperm development in maize (Zea mays L.) and related cereals comprises a cell proliferation stage followed by a period of rapid growth coupled to endoreduplication. Regulation of the cell cycle in developing endosperm is poorly understood. We have characterized various subunits of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, master cell cycle regulators in all eukaryotes. A-, B-, and D-type cyclins as well as A- and B-type cyclin-dependent kinases were characterized with respect to their RNA and protein expression profiles. Two main patterns were identified: one showing expression throughout endosperm development, and another characterized by a sharp down-regulation with the onset of endoreduplication. Cyclin CYCB1;3 and CYCD2;1 proteins were distributed in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells throughout the endosperm, while cyclin CYCD5 protein was localized in the cytoplasm of peripheral cells. CDKB1;1 expression was strongly associated with cell proliferation. Expression and cyclin-binding patterns suggested that CDKA;1 and CDKA;3 are at least partially redundant. The kinase activity associated with the cyclin CYCA1 was highest during the mitotic stage of development, while that associated with CYCB1;3, CYCD2;1 and CYCD5 peaked at the mitosis-to-endoreduplication transition. A-, B- and D-type cyclins were more resistant to proteasome-dependent degradation in endoreduplicating than in mitotic endosperm extracts. These results indicated that endosperm development is characterized by differential expression and activity of specific cyclins and CDKs, and suggested that endoreduplication is associated with reduced cyclin proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

  19. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kappaB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chk1 and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  20. Greatwall kinase and cyclin B-Cdk1 are both critical constituents of M-phase-promoting factor

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Masatoshi; Abe, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Okumura, Eiichi; Kishimoto, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Maturation/M-phase-promoting factor is the universal inducer of M-phase in eukaryotic cells. It is currently accepted that M-phase-promoting factor is identical to the kinase cyclin B–Cdk1. Here we show that cyclin B–Cdk1 and M-phase-promoting factor are not in fact synonymous. Instead, M-phase-promoting factor contains at least two essential components: cyclin B–Cdk1 and another kinase, Greatwall kinase. In the absence of Greatwall kinase, the M-phase-promoting factor is undetectable in oocyte cytoplasm even though cyclin B–Cdk1 is fully active, whereas M-phase-promoting factor activity is restored when Greatwall kinase is added back. Although the excess amount of cyclin B–Cdk1 alone, but not Greatwall kinase alone, can induce nuclear envelope breakdown, spindle assembly is abortive. Addition of Greatwall kinase greatly reduces the amount of cyclin B–Cdk1 required for nuclear envelope breakdown, resulting in formation of the spindle with aligned chromosomes. M-phase-promoting factor is thus a system consisting of one kinase (cyclin B–Cdk1) that directs mitotic entry and a second kinase (Greatwall kinase) that suppresses the protein phosphatase 2A-B55 which opposes cyclin B–Cdk1. PMID:22968705

  1. Fluorescent peptide biosensor for probing the relative abundance of cyclin-dependent kinases in living cells.

    PubMed

    Kurzawa, Laetitia; Pellerano, Morgan; Coppolani, J B; Morris, May C

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependant kinases play a central role in coordinating cell growth and division, and in sustaining proliferation of cancer cells, thereby constituting attractive pharmacological targets. However, there are no direct means of assessing their relative abundance in living cells, current approaches being limited to antigenic and proteomic analysis of fixed cells. In order to probe the relative abundance of these kinases directly in living cells, we have developed a fluorescent peptide biosensor with biligand affinity for CDKs and cyclins in vitro, that retains endogenous CDK/cyclin complexes from cell extracts, and that bears an environmentally-sensitive probe, whose fluorescence increases in a sensitive fashion upon recognition of its targets. CDKSENS was introduced into living cells, through complexation with the cell-penetrating carrier CADY2 and applied to assess the relative abundance of CDK/Cyclins through fluorescence imaging and ratiometric quantification. This peptide biosensor technology affords direct and sensitive readout of CDK/cyclin complex levels, and reports on differences in complex formation when tampering with a single CDK or cyclin. CDKSENS further allows for detection of differences between different healthy and cancer cell lines, thereby enabling to distinguish cells that express high levels of these heterodimeric kinases, from cells that present decreased or defective assemblies. This fluorescent biosensor technology provides information on the overall status of CDK/Cyclin complexes which cannot be obtained through antigenic detection of individual subunits, in a non-invasive fashion which does not require cell fixation or extraction procedures. As such it provides promising perspectives for monitoring the response to therapeutics that affect CDK/Cyclin abundance, for cell-based drug discovery strategies and fluorescence-based cancer diagnostics.

  2. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β and cyclin D1 expression in cervical carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunsoo; Lee, Myunghwa; Kim, Dae Woon; Hong, Seo Yoo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a pluripotent protein kinase involved in the development of cancers through regulation of numerous oncogenic molecules. Cyclin D1, an important regulator of G1 to S phase transition in various cells, is one of target proteins that GSK3β regulate. Our objective was to assess the expression of GSK3β and cyclin D1 in cervical neoplasm of different histologic grades and to identify their correlation in cervical carcinogenesis. Methods Immunohistochemical analysis of GSK3β and cyclin D1 was performed in a total of 137 patients with 12 normal, 62 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) (31 CIN1 and 31 CIN3) and 63 invasive cancers including 56 squamous cell carcinomas and 7 adenocarcinomas. Results The expression of GSK3β increased in parallel with the lesion grade, while that of cyclin D1 decreased with severity of the lesion (P<0.001). There was a significant inverse correlation between GSK3β and cyclin D1 expression in overall cervical neoplasia (Φ=-0.413, P<0.001). GSK3β expression was higher in squamous cell carcinoma than in adenocarcinoma (P=0.049). Conclusion These results suggest that the expressional increase in GSK3β plays a role in cervical carcinogenesis and has inverse correlation with cyclin D1 expression in this process. In addition, GSK3β expression appears to be associated with the histologic type of cervical cancer, especially squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27896249

  3. Cycloheximide-induced activation of mouse eggs: effects on cdc2/cyclin B and MAP kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Moos, J; Kopf, G S; Schultz, R M

    1996-04-01

    Fertilization of metaphase II-arrested mouse eggs results in resumption of meiosis and a decrease in both cdc2/cyclin B kinase and MAP kinase activities; the decrease in cdc2/cyclin B kinase activity precedes the decrease in MAP kinase activity. Cycloheximide treatment of metaphase II-arrested mouse eggs also results in resumption of meiosis but bypasses the fertilization-induced Ca2+ transient. However, it is not known if cycloheximide treatment results in the same temporal changes in cdc2/cyclin B kinase and MAP kinase activities that are intimately associated with resumption of meiosis. We report that cycloheximide-treated mouse eggs manifest similar temporal changes in the decrease in both cdc2/cyclin B kinase and MAP kinase activities that occur following fertilization, although cortical granule exocytosis is not stimulated. The decrease in cdc2/cyclin B kinase activity, however, does not seem to be required for the decrease in MAP kinase activity, since the decrease in MAP kinase activity still occurs in cycloheximide-treated eggs that are also incubated in the presence of nocodazole, which inhibits cyclin B degradation and hence the decrease in cdc2/cyclin B kinase. Following removal of these drugs, cdc2/cyclin B kinase activity remains high, MAP kinase activity increases to levels similar to that in the metaphase II-arrested eggs, and a spindle(s) forms with the chromosomes aligned on a metaphase plate. Results of these experiments suggest that some other protein with a relatively short half-life, e.g. cmos, a known upstream activator of MAP kinase, may be responsible for events leading to the decrease in MAP kinase activity.

  4. CyclinA2-Cyclin-dependent Kinase Regulates SAMHD1 Protein Phosphohydrolase Domain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junpeng; Hao, Caili; DeLucia, Maria; Swanson, Selene; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Ahn, Jinwoo; Skowronski, Jacek

    2015-05-22

    SAMHD1 is a nuclear deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that contributes to the control of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool sizes through dNTP hydrolysis and modulates the innate immune response to viruses. CyclinA2-CDK1/2 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at Thr-592, but how this modification controls SAMHD1 functions in proliferating cells is not known. Here, we show that SAMHD1 levels remain relatively unchanged during the cell division cycle in primary human T lymphocytes and in monocytic cell lines. Inactivation of the bipartite cyclinA2-CDK-binding site in the SAMHD1 C terminus described herein abolished SAMHD1 phosphorylation on Thr-592 during S and G2 phases thus interfering with DNA replication and progression of cells through S phase. The effects exerted by Thr-592 phosphorylation-defective SAMHD1 mutants were associated with activation of DNA damage checkpoint and depletion of dNTP concentrations to levels lower than those seen upon expression of wild type SAMHD1 protein. These disruptive effects were relieved by either mutation of the catalytic residues of the SAMHD1 phosphohydrolase domain or by a Thr-592 phosphomimetic mutation, thus linking the Thr-592 phosphorylation state to the control of SAMHD1 dNTPase activity. Our findings support a model in which phosphorylation of Thr-592 by cyclinA2-CDK down-modulates, but does not inactivate, SAMHD1 dNTPase in S phase, thereby fine-tuning SAMHD1 control of dNTP levels during DNA replication. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. CyclinA2-Cyclin-dependent Kinase Regulates SAMHD1 Protein Phosphohydrolase Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Junpeng; Hao, Caili; DeLucia, Maria; Swanson, Selene; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Skowronski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a nuclear deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that contributes to the control of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool sizes through dNTP hydrolysis and modulates the innate immune response to viruses. CyclinA2-CDK1/2 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at Thr-592, but how this modification controls SAMHD1 functions in proliferating cells is not known. Here, we show that SAMHD1 levels remain relatively unchanged during the cell division cycle in primary human T lymphocytes and in monocytic cell lines. Inactivation of the bipartite cyclinA2-CDK-binding site in the SAMHD1 C terminus described herein abolished SAMHD1 phosphorylation on Thr-592 during S and G2 phases thus interfering with DNA replication and progression of cells through S phase. The effects exerted by Thr-592 phosphorylation-defective SAMHD1 mutants were associated with activation of DNA damage checkpoint and depletion of dNTP concentrations to levels lower than those seen upon expression of wild type SAMHD1 protein. These disruptive effects were relieved by either mutation of the catalytic residues of the SAMHD1 phosphohydrolase domain or by a Thr-592 phosphomimetic mutation, thus linking the Thr-592 phosphorylation state to the control of SAMHD1 dNTPase activity. Our findings support a model in which phosphorylation of Thr-592 by cyclinA2-CDK down-modulates, but does not inactivate, SAMHD1 dNTPase in S phase, thereby fine-tuning SAMHD1 control of dNTP levels during DNA replication. PMID:25847232

  6. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peyressatre, Marion; Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins) form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported. PMID:25625291

  7. A cotton fiber associated cyclin-dependent kinase A gene: Characterization and chromosomal location

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A cotton fiber cell normally originates and elongates as a single ovular epidermal cell. The cessation of fiber cell division and ensuing elongation imply that the cell cycle is differentially regulated in fiber cells. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a central role in the regulation of cell cy...

  8. Both cyclin I and p35 are required for maximal survival benefit of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in kidney podocytes.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshinori; Pippin, Jeffrey W; Hagmann, Henning; Krofft, Ronald D; Chang, Alice M; Zhang, Jiong; Terada, Yoshio; Brinkkoetter, Paul; Shankland, Stuart J

    2012-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-5 is activated by both cyclin I and the noncyclin activator p35 in terminally differentiated cells such as kidney podocytes and neurons. Cyclin I and p35 are restricted to podocytes in the kidney, and each limit podocyte apoptosis by activating Cdk5. To determine whether both activators are necessary, or whether they serve backup roles, a double cyclin I-p35 null mouse was generated. Experimental glomerular disease characterized by podocyte apoptosis was then induced by administering an anti-podocyte antibody. The results showed that under nonstressed conditions double mutants had normal kidney structure and function and were indistinguishable from wild-type, cyclin I(-/-), or p35(-/-) mice. In contrast, when stressed with disease, podocyte apoptosis increased fourfold compared with diseased cyclin I(-/-) or p35(-/-) mice. This resulted in a more pronounced decrease in podocyte number, proteinuria, and glomerulosclerosis. Under normal states and nephritic states, levels for the prosurvival protein Bcl-2 were lower in double cyclin I(-/-) p35(-/-) mice than the other mice. Similarly, levels of Bcl-xL, another prosurvival member, were lower in normal and nephritic double cyclin I(-/-) p35(-/-) mice but similar to single-cyclin I(-/-) mice. Moreover, levels of ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 activation were lower in nephritic double cyclin I(-/-) p35(-/-) mice but similar to single-cyclin I(-/-) mice. The results demonstrate that the activators of Cdk5, p35, and cyclin I are not required for normal kidney function. However, they play pivotal coordinated roles in maintaining podocyte survival during stress states in disease.

  9. Novel complexes of cyclin-dependent kinases and a cyclin-like protein from Arabidopsis thaliana with a function unrelated to cell division.

    PubMed

    Barrôco, R M; De Veylder, L; Magyar, Z; Engler, G; Inzé, D; Mironov, V

    2003-02-01

    Although the majority of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in cell cycle progression, recent evidence has shown that CDKs are also implicated in transcription regulation. Here, we describe two Arabidopsis CDKs designated Arath;CDKC;1 and Arath; CDKC;2. These CDKs share a PITAIRE signature in the cyclin-binding domain and the structural characteristics of mammalian CDK9. Yeast two-hybrid screens and immunoprecipitation assays identified CDKC-interacting proteins with homology to the animal cyclin T/cyclin K group. We suggest that these Arabidopsis CDKCs may be part of a kinase complex similar to the animal positive transcription elongation factor b, whose activity is essential for transcription control. Expression studies showed that Arath; CDKC transcripts are mainly confined to epidermal tissues and are most abundant in flower tissues. No expression was detected in actively dividing Arabidopsis tissues, suggesting a role for the CDKC proteins in differentiated cells.

  10. A novel member of the cyclin-dependent kinase family in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Berger, J D

    1999-01-01

    Passage through the cell cycle in eukaryotes requires the successive activation of different cyclin-dependent protein kinases. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of a novel class of cyclin-dependent protein kinase, termed Cdk2, in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. It is 301 amino acids long, 7 amino acids shorter than Cdk1, the CDK that is associated with macronuclear DNA synthesis. All the catalytic domains typical of protein kinases can be located within the sequence and putative regulatory phosphorylation sites equivalent to Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr161 in human CDK1 are also conserved. The 'PSTAIRE' region characteristic of most CDKs is perfectly conserved. Cdk2 shares only 48% homology to Cdk1 at the amino acid level, suggesting that the evolutionary separation of Cdk1 and Cdk2 is ancient, and implying that they have different roles in cell cycle regulation. Like Cdk1, Cdk2 does not bind to yeast p13suc1, even though it has better conservation of p13suc1 binding sites than Cdk1 does. The Cdk2 protein level is relatively constant throughout the vegetative cell cycle. Cdk2 exhibits kinase activity towards bovine histone H1 in vitro with the maximal level late in the cell cycle, suggesting it may be involved in the regulation of cytokinesis. Our results further support the view that an analogue of the cyclin-dependent kinase cell cycle regulatory system like that of yeast and higher eukaryotic cells operates in Paramecium and that a family of cyclin-dependent kinases may control different aspects of the Paramecium cell cycle.

  11. [Involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase CDK1/CDC28 in regulation of cell cycle].

    PubMed

    Koltovaya, N A

    2013-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of enzymes essential for the progression of the cells through the cell cycle in eukaryotes. Moreover, genetic stability-maintaining processes, such as checkpoint control and DNA repair, require the phosphorylation of a wide variety of target substrates by CDK. In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the key role in the cell cycle progression is played by CDK1/CDC28 kinase. This enzyme is the most thoroughly investigated. In this review the involvement of CDC28 kinase in regulation of the cell cycle is discussed in the light of newly obtained data.

  12. Homology modeling of yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selwyne, R. A.; Kholmurodov, Kh. T.; Koltovaya, N. A.

    2007-07-01

    The important functions that CDKs perform in cell division and cell cycle regulation made central protein kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC28 a target model for structural and functional analysis. The 3D models of CDC28 protein kinase using molecular modeling techniques will enlarge our understanding of the phosphorylation mechanism and the structural changes of mutant kinases. The structural template for S. cerevisiae CDC28 was identified from PDB (Protein Databank) using BLASTP (basic local alignment search tool for proteins). Template-target alignments were generated for homology modeling and checked manually for errors. The models were then generated using MODELLER and validated using PROCHECK followed by energy minimization and molecular dynamics calculations in AMBER force field.

  13. Identification of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 as a new interaction partner of cyclin D3

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Maoyun; Wei Yuanyan; Yao Luyang; Xie Jianhui; Chen Xiaoning; Wang Hanzhou; Jiang Jianhai; Gu Jianxin . E-mail: jxgu@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-02-03

    Cyclin D3, like cyclin D1 and D2 isoforms, is a crucial component of the core cell cycle machinery in mammalian cells. It also exhibits its unique properties in many other physiological processes. In the present study, using yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified ERK3, an atypical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as a cyclin D3 binding partner. GST pull-down assays showed that cyclin D3 interacts directly and specifically with ERK3 in vitro. The binding of cyclin D3 and ERK3 was further confirmed in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation assay and confocal microscopic analysis. Moreover, carboxy-terminal extension of ERK3 was responsible for its association with intact cyclin D3. These findings further expand distinct roles of cyclin D3 and suggest the potential activity of ERK3 in cell proliferation.

  14. Structure-function relationships of the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase Pho85.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, R C; Waters, N C; Creasy, C L; Bergman, L W

    1995-01-01

    The PHO85 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a cyclin-dependent kinase involved in both transcriptional regulation and cell cycle progression. Although a great deal is known concerning the structure, function, and regulation of the highly homologous Cdc28 protein kinase, little is known concerning these relationships in regard to Pho85. In this study, we constructed a series of Pho85-Cdc28 chimeras to map the region(s) of the Pho85 molecule that is critical for function of Pho85 in repression of acid phosphatase (PHO5) expression. Using a combination of site-directed and ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutagenesis, we have identified numerous residues critical for either activation of the Pho85 kinase, interaction of Pho85 with the cyclin-like molecule Pho80, or substrate recognition. Finally, analysis of mutations analogous to those previously identified in either Cdc28 or cdc2 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe suggested that the inhibition of Pho85-Pho80 activity in mechanistically different from that seen in the other cyclin-dependent kinases. PMID:7565699

  15. Crystal structure of a human cyclin-dependent kinase 6 complexwith a flavonol inhibitor, Fisetin

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Heshu; Chang, Debbie J.; Baratte, Blandine; Meijer, Laurent; Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula

    2005-01-10

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a central role in cell cycle control, apoptosis, transcription and neuronal functions. They are important targets for the design of drugs with anti-mitotic and/or anti-neurodegenerative effects. CDK4 and CDK6 form a subfamily among the CDKs in mammalian cells, as defined by sequence similarities. Compared to CDK2 and CDK5, structural information on CDK4 and CDK6 is sparse. We describe here the crystal structure of human CDK6 in complex with a viral cyclin and a flavonol inhibitor, fisetin. Fisetin binds to the active form of CDK6, forming hydrogen bonds with the side chains of residues in the binding pocket that undergo large conformational changes during CDK activation by cyclin binding. The 4-keto group and the 3-hydroxyl group of fisetin are hydrogen bonded with the backbone in the hinge region between the N-terminal and C-terminal kinase domain, as has been observed for many CDK inhibitors. However, CDK2 and HCK kinase in complex with other flavone inhibitors such as quercetin and flavopiridol showed a different binding mode with the inhibitor rotated by about 180. The structural information of the CDK6-fisetin complex is correlated with the binding affinities of different flavone inhibitors for CDK6. This complex structure is the first description of an inhibitor complex with a kinase from the CDK4/6 subfamily and can provide a basis for selecting and designing inhibitor compounds with higher affinity and specificity.

  16. Pneumocystis carinii inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase activity in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Limper, A H; Edens, M; Anders, R A; Leof, E B

    1998-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii remains an important cause of pneumonia in patients with AIDS. Attachment of the organism to epithelial cells is a central event in establishing infection, impairing the growth potential of lung epithelial cells and thereby slowing repair. In light of investigations documenting a central role for cyclin-dependent kinases in controlling the cell cycle, we addressed the hypothesis that P. carinii inhibits epithelial cell growth by interfering with host epithelial cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) activity. We observed that P. carinii significantly impaired growth of cultured mink lung epithelial cells, with effects observed after 48-72 h of treatment. However, the kinase activity associated with p34cdc2 or p33cdk2 was maximally inhibited as early as 24 h after P. carinii exposure. The inhibitory effect on cyclin-dependent kinase activity was mediated by the trophozoite form of P. carinii, in that highly purified trophozoites exerted marked inhibition of p34cdc2 activity. Growth impairment was similarly preceded by P. carinii-induced alteration in the state of epithelial cell p34cdc2 phosphorylation, with no change in p34cdc2 or p33cdk2 protein levels. These data strongly suggest that the antiproliferative activity of P. carinii on respiratory epithelium is mediated in part through modulation of the host cell cycle machinery. PMID:9486986

  17. Correlation between Cyclin Dependent Kinases and Artemisinin-Induced Dormancy in Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Karen-Ann; Gresty, Karryn J.; Chen, Nanhua; Zhang, Veronica; Gutteridge, Clare E.; Peatey, Christopher L.; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C.; Cheng, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-induced dormancy provides a plausible explanation for recrudescence following artemisinin monotherapy. This phenomenon shares similarities with cell cycle arrest where cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins play an important role. Methods Transcription profiles of Plasmodium falciparum CDKs and cyclins before and after dihydroartemisinin (DHA) treatment in three parasite lines, and the effect of CDK inhibitors on parasite recovery from DHA-induced dormancy were investigated. Results After DHA treatment, parasites enter a dormancy phase followed by a recovery phase. During the dormancy phase parasites up-regulate pfcrk1, pfcrk4, pfcyc2 and pfcyc4, and down-regulate pfmrk, pfpk5, pfpk6, pfcrk3, pfcyc1 and pfcyc3. When entering the recovery phase parasites immediately up-regulate all CDK and cyclin genes. Three CDK inhibitors, olomoucine, WR636638 and roscovitine, produced distinct effects on different phases of DHA-induced dormancy, blocking parasites recovery. Conclusions The up-regulation of PfCRK1 and PfCRK4, and down regulation of other CDKs and cyclins correlate with parasite survival in the dormant state. Changes in CDK expression are likely to negatively regulate parasite progression from G1 to S phase. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism of artemisinin-induced dormancy and cell cycle regulation of P. falciparum, opening new opportunities for preventing recrudescence following artemisinin treatment. PMID:27326764

  18. Characterization of a new family of cyclin-dependent kinase activators

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Progression through the cell cycle is regulated by CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases), which associate with activating partners, named cyclins, to efficiently phosphorylate substrates. We previously reported the identification of RINGO, a Xenopus protein that can activate CDK1 and CDK2 despite lack of sequence similarity to cyclins, which plays a role in the regulation of the meiotic cell cycle in oocytes. In the present study we report the characterization of four mammalian RINGO proteins, which are 53–68% identical with Xenopus RINGO in a central core of about 75 residues. We show that all RINGO family members can bind to and activate CDK1 and CDK2, albeit with different efficiencies, but they do not bind to CDK4 or CDK6. The core RINGO sequences are critical for CDK activation. We also identified key residues in CDK2 that are required for RINGO binding. All RINGO proteins can also bind the CDK inhibitor p27Kip1, but with an inverse efficiency of their ability to bind to CDK1. Our results identify a new family of mammalian proteins that can activate CDKs and therefore potentially function as cell cycle regulators. The ability of RINGO proteins to activate CDK1 and CDK2 suggest also cyclin-independent roles for these kinases. PMID:15574121

  19. Direct activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 by human papillomavirus E7.

    PubMed

    He, Wanxia; Staples, Doug; Smith, Clark; Fisher, Chris

    2003-10-01

    Addition of human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 CDK2/cyclin A or CDK2/cyclin E, purified from either insect cells or bacteria, dramatically upregulates histone H1 kinase activity. Activation is substrate specific, with a smaller effect noted for retinoblastoma protein (Rb). The CDK2 stimulatory activity is equivalent in high-risk (HPV type 16 [HPV16] and HPV31) and low-risk (HPV6b) E7. Mutational analyses of HPV16 E7 indicate that the major activity resides in amino acids 9 to 38, spanning CR1 and CR2, and does not require casein kinase II or Rb-binding domain functions. Synthetic peptides spanning HPV16 amino acid residues 9 to 38 also activate CDK2. Peptides containing this sequence that carry biotin on the carboxy terminus, as well as a photoactivated cross-linking group (benzophenone), also activate the complex and covalently associate with the CDK2/cyclin A complex in a specific manner requiring UV. Cross-linking studies that use protein monomers detect association of the E7 peptides with cyclin A but not CDK2. Together, our results indicate a novel mechanism whereby E7 promotes HPV replication by directly altering CDK2 activity and substrate specificity.

  20. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4 Deficiency Results in Expedited Cellular Proliferation through E2F1-Mediated Increase of Cyclins.

    PubMed

    Choiniere, Jonathan; Wu, Jianguo; Wang, Li

    2017-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common form of cancer with prevalence worldwide. There are many factors that lead to the development and progression of HCC. This study aimed to identify potential new tumor suppressors, examine their function as cell cycle modulators, and investigate their impact on the cyclin family of proteins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). In this study, the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4 gene was shown to have potential tumor suppressor characteristics. PDK4 expression was significantly downregulated in human HCC. Pdk4(-/-) mouse liver exhibited a consistent increase in cell cycle regulator proteins, including cyclin D1, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, some associated CDKs, and transcription factor E2F1. PDK4-knockdown HCC cells also progressed faster through the cell cycle, which concurrently expressed high levels of cyclins and E2F1 as seen in the Pdk4(-/-) mice. Interestingly, the induced cyclin E1 and cyclin A2 caused by Pdk4 deficiency was repressed by arsenic treatment in mouse liver and in HCC cells. E2f1 deficiency in E2f1(-/-) mouse liver or knockdown E2F1 using small hairpin RNAs in HCC cells significantly decreased cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and E2F1 proteins. In contrast, inhibition of PDK4 activity in HCC cells increased cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and E2F1 proteins. These findings demonstrate that PDK4 is a critical regulator of hepatocyte proliferation via E2F1-mediated regulation of cyclins. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. Effects of BP-14, a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Allegri, Lorenzo; Baldan, Federica; Mio, Catia; Puppin, Cinzia; Russo, Diego; Kryštof, Vladimir; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is an extremely aggressive human malignancy characterized by a marked degree of invasiveness, absense of features of thyroid differentiation and resistance to current medical treatment. It is well known that ATCs are characterized by deregulation of genes related to cell cycle regulation, i.e., cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and endogenous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs). Therefore, in the present study, the effect of a novel exogenous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, BP-14, was investigated in three human ATC cell lines. The ATC-derived cell lines FRO, SW1736 and 8505C were treated with BP-14 alone or in combination with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. In all ATC cell lines, treatment with BP-14 decreased cell viability and, in two of them, BP-14 modified expression of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Thus, our data indicate that BP-14 is a potential new compound effective against ATC. Combined treatment with BP-14 and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus had a strong synergistic effect on cell viability in all three cell lines, suggesting that the combined used of CDK and mTOR inhibitors may be a useful strategy for ATC treatment.

  2. Cell cycle regulated D3-type cyclins form active complexes with plant-specific B-type cyclin-dependent kinase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kazue; Murray, James A H; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Sekine, Masami

    2006-05-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cv Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells are the most highly synchronizable plant cell culture, and previously we used them to analyze cell cycle regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) containing the cyclin binding motifs PSTAIRE (CDKA) and PPTA/TLRE (CDKB). Here we describe the analysis of tobacco CycD3 cyclins whose transcripts predominantly accumulate during G2 to M phase, which represents a unique feature of this type of cyclin D in plants. Although protein levels of CycD3s fluctuate with different patterns during the cell cycle, kinase assays revealed that the CycD3-associated kinases phosphorylate histone H1 and the tobacco retinoblastoma related protein (NtRBR1) with two peaks at the G1/S and G2/M boundaries. In vitro pull-down assays revealed that cell cycle-regulated CycD3s bind to CDKA, but more weakly than does CycD3;3, and that they also bind to CDKB and the CDK inhibitor NtKIS1a. Mutations in the cyclin box of the CycD3s showed that two amino acids are required for binding with CDKA and NtKIS1a, but no diminished interaction was observed with CDKB. A reconstituted kinase assay was adapted for use with bacterially produced GST-CycD3s, and kinase activity could be activated by incubation of extracts from exponentially growing BY-2 cells. Such activated complexes contained CDKA and CDKB, and the reconstituted GST-CycD3 mutants, retaining binding ability to CDKB, showed kinase activity, suggesting that these cell cycle-regulated CycD3s form active complexes with both A- and B-type CDKs in vitro.

  3. Structure-guided discovery of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fischmann, Thierry O.; Hruza, Alan; Duca, Jose S.; Ramanathan, Lata; Mayhood, Todd; Windsor, William T.; Le, Hung V.; Guzi, Timothy J.; Dwyer, Michael P.; Paruch, Kamil; Doll, Ronald J.; Lees, Emma; Parry, David; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Madison, Vincent

    2008-10-02

    CDK2 inhibitors containing the related bicyclic heterocycles pyrazolopyrimidines and imidazopyrazines were discovered through high-throughput screening. Crystal structures of inhibitors with these bicyclic cores and two more related ones show that all but one have a common binding mode featuring two hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) to the backbone of the kinase hinge region. Even though ab initio computations indicated that the imidazopyrazine core would bind more tightly to the hinge, pyrazolopyrimidines gain an advantage in potency through participation of N4 in an H-bond network involving two catalytic residues and bridging water molecules. Further insight into inhibitor/CDK2 interactions was gained from analysis of additional crystal structures. Significant gains in potency were obtained by optimizing the fit of hydrophobic substituents to the gatekeeper region of the ATP binding site. The most potent inhibitors have good selectivity.

  4. Cyclin I-like (CCNI2) is a cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activator and is involved in cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengcheng; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yanfei; Xu, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to conventional cyclin-dependent kinases that are important for mitotic cell division, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is predominantly activated in post-mitotic cells and is involved in various cellular events. The kinase activity of CDK5 is tightly regulated by specific activators including p35, p39, and cyclin I (CCNI). Here we show that cyclin I-like (CCNI2), a homolog of CCNI, interacts with CDK5 and activates the kinase activity of CDK5. Different from CCNI, which colocalizes with CDK5 in the nuclei in transfected cells, CCNI2 mainly retains CDK5 in the cytoplasm as well as on the cell membrane. Furthermore, although the expression level of CCNI2 mRNA and CCNI2 protein do not change significantly during cell cycle, depletion of CCNI2 with siRNA affects cell cycle progression as well as cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that CCNI2 is a novel CDK5 activator and is involved in cell cycle regulation. PMID:28112194

  5. CDK10/cyclin M is a protein kinase that controls ETS2 degradation and is deficient in STAR syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guen, Vincent J.; Gamble, Carly; Flajolet, Marc; Unger, Sheila; Thollet, Aurélie; Ferandin, Yoan; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Cohen, Pascale A.; Meijer, Laurent; Colas, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate a variety of fundamental cellular processes. CDK10 stands out as one of the last orphan CDKs for which no activating cyclin has been identified and no kinase activity revealed. Previous work has shown that CDK10 silencing increases ETS2 (v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2)-driven activation of the MAPK pathway, which confers tamoxifen resistance to breast cancer cells. The precise mechanisms by which CDK10 modulates ETS2 activity, and more generally the functions of CDK10, remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that CDK10 is a cyclin-dependent kinase by identifying cyclin M as an activating cyclin. Cyclin M, an orphan cyclin, is the product of FAM58A, whose mutations cause STAR syndrome, a human developmental anomaly whose features include toe syndactyly, telecanthus, and anogenital and renal malformations. We show that STAR syndrome-associated cyclin M mutants are unable to interact with CDK10. Cyclin M silencing phenocopies CDK10 silencing in increasing c-Raf and in conferring tamoxifen resistance to breast cancer cells. CDK10/cyclin M phosphorylates ETS2 in vitro, and in cells it positively controls ETS2 degradation by the proteasome. ETS2 protein levels are increased in cells derived from a STAR patient, and this increase is attributable to decreased cyclin M levels. Altogether, our results reveal an additional regulatory mechanism for ETS2, which plays key roles in cancer and development. They also shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying STAR syndrome. PMID:24218572

  6. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors in Maize Endosperm and Their Potential Role in Endoreduplication1

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Cintia M.; Dante, Ricardo A.; Sabelli, Paolo A.; Sun, Yuejin; Dilkes, Brian P.; Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Larkins, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    Two maize (Zea mays) cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2, were characterized and shown to be expressed in developing endosperm. Similar to the CDK inhibitors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), the maize proteins contain a carboxy-terminal region related to the inhibitory domain of the mammalian Cip/Kip inhibitors. Zeama;KRP;1 is present in the endosperm between 7 and 21 d after pollination, a period that encompasses the onset of endoreduplication, while the Zeama;KRP;2 protein declines during this time. Nevertheless, Zeama;KRP;1 accounts for only part of the CDK inhibitory activity that peaks coincident with the endoreduplication phase of endosperm development. In vitro assays showed that Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2 are able to inhibit endosperm Cdc2-related CKD activity that associates with p13Suc1. They were also shown to specifically inhibit cyclin A1;3- and cyclin D5;1-associated CDK activities, but not cyclin B1;3/CDK. Overexpression of Zeama;KRP;1 in maize embryonic calli that ectopically expressed the wheat dwarf virus RepA protein, which counteracts retinoblastoma-related protein function, led to an additional round of DNA replication without nuclear division. PMID:16055680

  7. Alteration of cell cycle in cervical tumor associated with human papillomavirus: cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Hoon; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Jae Wook

    2002-12-01

    The ability of viral oncoproteins to subvert cell cycle checkpoints may constitute a mechanism by which viral oncoproteins induce genetic instability. HPV 16 E6 and E7 disrupt cell cycle checkpoints, particularly affecting nearly all cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors linked to the G1- and G2- checkpoints, in each case by means of a different mechanism. HPV 16 E7 shows homology with the pRb binding sites of cyclin D1, which consequently releases E2F. In addition, E7 directly binds to p21, and releases PCNA and other S-phase promoting genes. In turn, released E2F activates cyclin E, and cyclin E accelerates p27 proteolysis as a function of the antagonistic reaction of its own inhibitor. The induction of p16 expression is assumed to be indirectly associated with E7, which is upregulated only after prolonged inactivation of Rb. HPV 16 E6 decreased the fidelity of multiple checkpoints controlling both entry into and exit from mitosis, with the mechanism of p53 inactivation. In addition, HPV 16 E6 increased the sensitivity to chemically induced S-phase premature mitosis and decreased mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint function. Alongside the impressive advances made in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms, which HPV disrupts, the validity of these conclusions should be evaluated in the diagnostic and prognostic fields.

  8. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in maize endosperm and their potential role in endoreduplication.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Cintia M; Dante, Ricardo A; Sabelli, Paolo A; Sun, Yuejin; Dilkes, Brian P; Gordon-Kamm, William J; Larkins, Brian A

    2005-08-01

    Two maize (Zea mays) cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2, were characterized and shown to be expressed in developing endosperm. Similar to the CDK inhibitors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), the maize proteins contain a carboxy-terminal region related to the inhibitory domain of the mammalian Cip/Kip inhibitors. Zeama;KRP;1 is present in the endosperm between 7 and 21 d after pollination, a period that encompasses the onset of endoreduplication, while the Zeama;KRP;2 protein declines during this time. Nevertheless, Zeama;KRP;1 accounts for only part of the CDK inhibitory activity that peaks coincident with the endoreduplication phase of endosperm development. In vitro assays showed that Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2 are able to inhibit endosperm Cdc2-related CKD activity that associates with p13(Suc1). They were also shown to specifically inhibit cyclin A1;3- and cyclin D5;1-associated CDK activities, but not cyclin B1;3/CDK. Overexpression of Zeama;KRP;1 in maize embryonic calli that ectopically expressed the wheat dwarf virus RepA protein, which counteracts retinoblastoma-related protein function, led to an additional round of DNA replication without nuclear division.

  9. Unexpected reduction of skin tumorigenesis on expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 in mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 are important regulators of the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, share 71% amino acid identity, and are expressed ubiquitously. As a result, it was assumed that each of these kinases plays a redundant role regulating normal and neoplastic proliferation. In previous reports, we have described the effects of CDK4 expression in transgenic mice, including the development of epidermal hyperplasia and increased malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma. To study the role of CDK6 in epithelial growth and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice carrying the CDK6 gene under the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK6). Similar to K5CDK4 mice, epidermal proliferation increased substantially in K5CDK6 mice; however, no hyperplasia was observed. CDK6 overexpression also triggered keratinocyte apoptosis in interfollicular and follicular epidermis as a compensatory mechanism to override aberrant proliferation. Unexpectedly, CDK6 overexpression results in decreased skin tumor development compared with wild-type siblings. The inhibition in skin tumorigenesis was similar to that previously reported in K5-cyclin D3 mice. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the K5CDK6 epidermis showed preferential complex formation between CDK6 and cyclin D3, suggesting that this particular complex plays an important role in tumor restraint. These studies provide in vivo evidence that CDK4 and CDK6 play a similar role as a mediator of keratinocyte proliferation but differ in apoptosis activation and skin tumor development.

  10. Selective anticancer activity of a hexapeptide with sequence homology to a non-kinase domain of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 (Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6) are closely structurally homologous proteins which are classically understood to control the transition from the G1 to the S-phases of the cell cycle by combining with their appropriate cyclin D or cyclin E partners to form kinase-active holoenzymes. Deregulation of Cdk4 is widespread in human cancer, CDK4 gene knockout is highly protective against chemical and oncogene-mediated epithelial carcinogenesis, despite the continued presence of CDK2 and CDK6; and overexpresssion of Cdk4 promotes skin carcinogenesis. Surprisingly, however, Cdk4 kinase inhibitors have not yet fulfilled their expectation as 'blockbuster' anticancer agents. Resistance to inhibition of Cdk4 kinase in some cases could potentially be due to a non-kinase activity, as recently reported with epidermal growth factor receptor. Results A search for a potential functional site of non-kinase activity present in Cdk4 but not Cdk2 or Cdk6 revealed a previously-unidentified loop on the outside of the C'-terminal non-kinase domain of Cdk4, containing a central amino-acid sequence, Pro-Arg-Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (PRGPRP). An isolated hexapeptide with this sequence and its cyclic amphiphilic congeners are selectively lethal at high doses to a wide range of human cancer cell lines whilst sparing normal diploid keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Treated cancer cells do not exhibit the wide variability of dose response typically seen with other anticancer agents. Cancer cell killing by PRGPRP, in a cyclic amphiphilic cassette, requires cells to be in cycle but does not perturb cell cycle distribution and is accompanied by altered relative Cdk4/Cdk1 expression and selective decrease in ATP levels. Morphological features of apoptosis are absent and cancer cell death does not appear to involve autophagy. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential new paradigm for the development of broad-spectrum cancer specific therapeutics with a companion diagnostic

  11. Structural basis for inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 by flavopiridol.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira; Canduri, Fernanda; da Silveira, Nelson José Freitas

    2002-04-26

    Flavopiridol has been shown to potently inhibit CDK1 and 2 (cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2) and most recently it has been found that it also inhibits CDK9. The complex CDK9-cyclin T1 controls the elongation phase of transcription by RNA polymerase II. The present work describes a molecular model for the binary complex CDK9-flavopiridol. This structural model indicates that the inhibitor strongly binds to the ATP-binding pocket of CDK9 and the structural comparison of the complex CDK2-flavopiridol correlates the structural differences with differences in inhibition of these CDKs by flavopiridol. This structure opens the possibility of testing new inhibitor families, in addition to new substituents for the already known leading structures such as flavones and adenine derivatives.

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors as potential anticancer, antineurodegenerative, antiviral and antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Laurent

    2000-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in the cell division cycle, in neuronal functions, in transcription and in apoptosis. Intensive screening with these kinases as targets has lead to the identification of highly selective and potent small - molecule inhibitors. Co-crystallization with CDK2 shows that these flat heterocyclic hydrophobic compounds bind through two or three hydrogen bonds with the side chains of two amino acids located in the ATP-binding pocket of the kinase. These inhibitors are anti-proliferative; they arrest cells in G1 and in G2/M phase. Furthermore they facilitate or even trigger apoptosis in proliferating cells while they protect neuronal cells and thymocytes from apoptosis. The potential use of these inhibitors is being extensively evaluated for cancer chemotherapy and also in other therapeutic areas: neurology (Alzheimer's disease), cardiovascular (restenosis, angiogenesis), nephrology (glomerulonephritis), parasitology (Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, Toxoplasma, etc.) and virology (cytomegalovirus, HIV, herpes virus). Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  13. A tumor suppressor C53 protein antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint (1). More recently, Wang et al (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor via inhibiting NF-κB signaling (2). We report here identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexrepsssion. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell cycle progression and DNA damage response. PMID:19223857

  14. Functional Analysis of the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Pho81 Identifies a Novel Inhibitory Domain

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sidong; Jeffery, Douglas A.; Anthony, Malcolm D.; O'Shea, Erin K.

    2001-01-01

    In response to phosphate limitation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae induces transcription of a set of genes important for survival. A phosphate-responsive signal transduction pathway mediates this response by controlling the activity of the transcription factor Pho4. Three components of this signal transduction pathway resemble those used to regulate the eukaryotic cell cycle: a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), Pho85; a cyclin, Pho80; and a CDK inhibitor (CKI), Pho81. Pho81 forms a stable complex with Pho80-Pho85 under both high- and low-phosphate conditions, but it only inhibits the kinase when cells are starved for phosphate. Pho81 contains six tandem repeats of the ankyrin consensus domain homologous to the INK4 family of mammalian CKIs. INK4 proteins inhibit kinase activity through an interaction of the ankyrin repeats and the CDK subunits. Surprisingly, we find that a region of Pho81 containing 80 amino acids C terminal to the ankyrin repeats is necessary and sufficient for Pho81's CKI function. The ankyrin repeats of Pho81 appear to have no significant role in Pho81 inhibition. Our results suggest that Pho81 inhibits Pho80-Pho85 with a novel motif. PMID:11533256

  15. A computational model of binding thermodynamics: the design of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sims, Peter A; Wong, Chung F; McCammon, J Andrew

    2003-07-17

    The cyclin-dependent protein kinases are important targets in drug discovery because of their role in cell cycle regulation. In this computational study, we have applied a continuum solvent model to study the interactions between cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and analogues of the clinically tested anticancer agent flavopiridol. The continuum solvent model uses Coulomb's law to account for direct electrostatic interactions, solves the Poisson equation to obtain the electrostatic contributions to solvation energy, and calculates scaled solvent-accessible surface area to account for hydrophobic interactions. The computed free energy of binding gauges the strength of protein-ligand interactions. Our model was first validated through a study on the binding of a number of flavopiridol derivatives to CDK2, and its ability to identify potent inhibitors was observed. The model was then used to aid in the design of novel CDK2 inhibitors with the aid of a computational sensitivity analysis. Some of these hypothetical structures could be significantly more potent than the lead compound flavopiridol. We applied two approaches to gain insights into designing selective inhibitors. One relied on the comparative analysis of the binding pocket for several hundred protein kinases to identify the parts of a lead compound whose modifications might lead to selective compounds. The other was based on building and using homology models for energy calculations. The homology models appear to be able to classify ligand potency into groups but cannot yet give reliable quantitative results.

  16. Novel plant-specific cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors induced by biotic and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Peres, Adrian; Churchman, Michelle L; Hariharan, Srivaidehirani; Himanen, Kristiina; Verkest, Aurine; Vandepoele, Klaas; Magyar, Zoltan; Hatzfeld, Yves; Van Der Schueren, Els; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Frankard, Valerie; Larkin, John C; Inzé, Dirk; De Veylder, Lieven

    2007-08-31

    The EL2 gene of rice (Oryza sativa), previously classified as early response gene against the potent biotic elicitor N-acetylchitoheptaose and encoding a short polypeptide with unknown function, was identified as a novel cell cycle regulatory gene related to the recently reported SIAMESE (SIM) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. Iterative two-hybrid screens, in vitro pull-down assays, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses showed that Orysa; EL2 binds the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) CDKA1;1 and D-type cyclins. No interaction was observed with the plant-specific B-type CDKs. The amino acid motif ELERFL was identified to be essential for cyclin, but not for CDK binding. Orysa;EL2 impaired the ability of Orysa; CYCD5;3 to complement a budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) triple CLN mutant, whereas recombinant protein inhibited CDK activity in vitro. Moreover, Orysa;EL2 was able to rescue the multicellular trichome phenotype of sim mutants of Arabidopsis, unequivocally demonstrating that Orysa;EL2 operates as a cell cycle inhibitor. Orysa;EL2 mRNA levels were induced by cold, drought, and propionic acid. Our data suggest that Orysa;EL2 encodes a new type of plant CDK inhibitor that links cell cycle progression with biotic and abiotic stress responses.

  17. A quantitative model for cyclin-dependent kinase control of the cell cycle: revisited.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Frank; Bouchoux, Céline; López-Avilés, Sandra

    2011-12-27

    The eukaryotic cell division cycle encompasses an ordered series of events. Chromosomal DNA is replicated during S phase of the cell cycle before being distributed to daughter cells in mitosis. Both S phase and mitosis in turn consist of an intricately ordered sequence of molecular events. How cell cycle ordering is achieved, to promote healthy cell proliferation and avert insults on genomic integrity, has been a theme of Paul Nurse's research. To explain a key aspect of cell cycle ordering, sequential S phase and mitosis, Stern & Nurse proposed 'A quantitative model for cdc2 control of S phase and mitosis in fission yeast'. In this model, S phase and mitosis are ordered by their dependence on increasing levels of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activity. Alternative mechanisms for ordering have been proposed that rely on checkpoint controls or on sequential waves of cyclins with distinct substrate specificities. Here, we review these ideas in the light of experimental evidence that has meanwhile accumulated. Quantitative Cdk control emerges as the basis for cell cycle ordering, fine-tuned by cyclin specificity and checkpoints. We propose a molecular explanation for quantitative Cdk control, based on thresholds imposed by Cdk-counteracting phosphatases, and discuss its implications.

  18. A quantitative model for cyclin-dependent kinase control of the cell cycle: revisited

    PubMed Central

    Uhlmann, Frank; Bouchoux, Céline; López-Avilés, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell division cycle encompasses an ordered series of events. Chromosomal DNA is replicated during S phase of the cell cycle before being distributed to daughter cells in mitosis. Both S phase and mitosis in turn consist of an intricately ordered sequence of molecular events. How cell cycle ordering is achieved, to promote healthy cell proliferation and avert insults on genomic integrity, has been a theme of Paul Nurse's research. To explain a key aspect of cell cycle ordering, sequential S phase and mitosis, Stern & Nurse proposed ‘A quantitative model for cdc2 control of S phase and mitosis in fission yeast’. In this model, S phase and mitosis are ordered by their dependence on increasing levels of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activity. Alternative mechanisms for ordering have been proposed that rely on checkpoint controls or on sequential waves of cyclins with distinct substrate specificities. Here, we review these ideas in the light of experimental evidence that has meanwhile accumulated. Quantitative Cdk control emerges as the basis for cell cycle ordering, fine-tuned by cyclin specificity and checkpoints. We propose a molecular explanation for quantitative Cdk control, based on thresholds imposed by Cdk-counteracting phosphatases, and discuss its implications. PMID:22084384

  19. Cyclin-Dependent kinase 5 targeting prevents β-Amyloid aggregation involving glycogen synthase kinase 3β and phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alvarez, John Fredy; Uribe-Arias, Alejandro; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria Patricia

    2015-08-01

    Inappropriate activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) resulting from proteolytic release of the activator fragment p25 from the membrane contributes to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, β-amyloid (βA) aggregation, and chronic neurodegeneration. At 18 months of age, 3× Tg-AD mice were sacrificed after either 3 weeks (short term) or 1 year (long term) of CDK5 knockdown. In short-term-treated animals, CDK5 knockdown reversed βA aggregation in the hippocampi via inhibitory phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β Ser9 and activation of phosphatase PP2A. In long-term-treated animals, CDK5 knockdown induced a persistent reduction in CDK5 and prevented βA aggregation, but the effect on amyloid precursor protein processing was reduced, suggesting that yearly booster therapy would be required. These findings further validate CDK5 as a target for preventing or blocking amyloidosis in older transgenic mice.

  20. The SET protein regulates G2/M transition by modulating cyclin B-cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Canela, Núria; Rodriguez-Vilarrupla, Aina; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Diaz, Carmen; Pujol, María Jesús; Agell, Neus; Bachs, Oriol

    2003-01-10

    The SET protein and the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1) interact in vivo and in vitro. We identified here the domain (157)LIF(159) of p21(Cip1) as essential for the binding of SET. We also found that SET contains at least two domains of interaction with p21(Cip1), one located in the fragment amino acids 81-180 and the other one in the fragment including amino acids 181-277. SET and p21(Cip1) co-localize in the cell nucleus in a temporal manner. Overexpression of SET blocks the cell cycle at the G(2)/M transition in COS and HCT116 cells. Moreover, SET inhibits cyclin B-CDK1 activity both in vivo and in vitro in both cell types. This effect is specific for these complexes since SET did not inhibit either cyclin A-CDK2 or cyclin E-CDK2 complexes. SET and p21(Cip1) cooperate in the inhibition of cyclin B-CDK1 activity. The inhibitory effect of SET resides in its acidic C terminus, as demonstrated by the ability of this domain to inhibit cyclin B-CDK1 activity and by the lack of blocking G(2)/M transition when a mutated form of SET lacking this C terminus domain was overexpressed in COS cells. These results indicate that SET might regulate G(2)/M transition by modulating cyclin B-CDK1 activity.

  1. Vaccination with cyclin-dependent kinase tick antigen confers protection against Ixodes infestation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Helga; Moraes, Jorge; Githaka, Naftaly; Martins, Renato; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Logullo, Carlos; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-30

    Among arthropods, ticks lead as vectors of animal diseases and rank second to mosquitoes in transmitting human pathogens. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) participate in cell cycle control in eukaryotes. CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases and these catalytic subunits are activated or inactivated at specific stages of the cell cycle. To determine the potential of using CDKs as anti-tick vaccine antigens, hamsters were immunized with recombinant Ixodes persulcatus CDK10, followed by a homologous tick challenge. Though it was not exactly unexpected, IpCDK10 vaccination significantly impaired tick blood feeding and fecundity, which manifested as low engorgement weights, poor oviposition, and a reduction in 80% of hatching rates. These findings may underpin the development of more efficacious anti-tick vaccines based on the targeting of cell cycle control proteins.

  2. The Yeast Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Routes Carbon Fluxes to Fuel Cell Cycle Progression.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Jennifer C; Kuehne, Andreas; Zamboni, Nicola; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-05-19

    Cell division entails a sequence of processes whose specific demands for biosynthetic precursors and energy place dynamic requirements on metabolism. However, little is known about how metabolic fluxes are coordinated with the cell division cycle. Here, we examine budding yeast to show that more than half of all measured metabolites change significantly through the cell division cycle. Cell cycle-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism are controlled by the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1), a major cell cycle regulator, and the metabolic regulator protein kinase A. At the G1/S transition, Cdk1 phosphorylates and activates the enzyme Nth1, which funnels the storage carbohydrate trehalose into central carbon metabolism. Trehalose utilization fuels anabolic processes required to reliably complete cell division. Thus, the cell cycle entrains carbon metabolism to fuel biosynthesis. Because the oscillation of Cdk activity is a conserved feature of the eukaryotic cell cycle, we anticipate its frequent use in dynamically regulating metabolism for efficient proliferation.

  3. (R)-roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, enhances tonic GABA inhibition in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A; Tyzio, R; Zilberter, Y; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-10-02

    Pharmacological agents that mediate a persistent GABAergic conductance are of considerable interest for treatment of epilepsy. (R)-roscovitine is a membrane permeable cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, designed to block cell division. It is currently undergoing a phase II clinical trial as an anticancer drug. We show that (R)-roscovitine increases a tonic GABA-mediated current in rat hippocampal neurons. This enhanced tonic current appears independent of synaptic GABA release and requires functional transmembrane GABA transport. The effect of (R)-roscovitine is associated with neither modification of GABAA receptors nor protein kinase activity, but is associated with a significant increase in intracellular GABA concentration in hippocampal GABAergic neurons. (R)-roscovitine-induced tonic inhibition significantly suppresses spontaneous spiking activity of hippocampal pyramidal cells. Therefore, (R)-roscovitine is a potent modulator of neuronal activity in rat hippocampus and may provide a tool for preventing paroxysmal activity.

  4. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) by indirubin derivatives in human tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Marko, D; Schätzle, S; Friedel, A; Genzlinger, A; Zankl, H; Meijer, L; Eisenbrand, G

    2001-01-01

    The bisindole indirubin has been described, more than 30 years ago, as being clinically active in the treatment of human chronic myelocytic leukaemia. However, the underlying mechanism of action has remained unclear. We have reported previously that indirubin and its analogues are potent and selective inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). In this study, we investigated the influence of indirubin and derivatives on CDK1/cyclin B kinase in human tumour cells at concentrations known to induce growth inhibition. Cells of the mammary carcinoma cell line MCF-7, synchronized by serum deprivation, after serum repletion stay arrested in the G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle in the presence of 2 μM indirubin-3′-monoxime. At higher drug concentrations (≥ 5 μM) an increase of the cell population in the G2/M phase is additionally observed. Cells synchronized in G2/M phase by nocodazole remain arrested in the G2/M phase after release, in the presence of indirubin-3′-monoxime (≥5 μM). After 24 h treatment with 10 μM indirubin-3′-monoxime a sub-G2 peak appears, indicative for the onset of apoptotic cell death. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with growth inhibitory concentrations of indirubin-3′-monoxime induces dose-dependent inhibition of the CDK1 activity in the cell. After 24 h treatment, a strong decrease of the CDK1 protein level along with a reduction of cyclin B in complex with CDK1 is observed. Taken together, the results of this study strongly suggest that inhibition of CDK activity in human tumour cells is a major mechanism by which indirubin derivatives exert their potent antitumour efficacy. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11161389

  5. Embryonic Expression and Function of the Xenopus Ink4d Cyclin D-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joanne R.; Nilsson, Lisa M.; Kuliyev, Emin; Zhu, Haiqing; Matthew, Rose; Cleveland, John L.; Mead, Paul E.; Roussel, Martine F.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the cloning and functional characterization of the cyclin D-dependent kinase 4 and 6 (Cdk4/6) inhibitory protein Cdkn2d/p19Ink4d of Xenopuslaevis (Xl-Ink4d). Xl-Ink4d is the only Ink4 family gene highly expressed during Xenopus development and its transcripts were detected maternally and during neurulation. The Xl-Ink4d protein has 63% identity to mouse and human Cdkn2d/p19Ink4d and its function as a negative regulator of cell cycle traverse is evolutionary conserved. Indeed, Xl-lnk4d can functionally substitute for mouse Cdkn2d in binding to mouse Cdk4 and inhibiting cyclin-D1-dependent CDK4 kinase activity. Further, enforced expression of Xl-lnk4d arrests mouse fibroblasts in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. These findings indicate that CDKN2d/p19Ink4d is conserved through vertebrate evolution and suggest Xl-lnk4d may contribute to the development of Xenopuslaevis. PMID:25309971

  6. Cloning and characterization of rat p27Kip1, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nomura, H; Sawada, Y; Fujinaga, K; Ohtaki, S

    1997-06-03

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitors play significant roles in the cell cycle control of various biological phenomena. To characterize the role of Cdk inhibitors in rat cells, we isolated a cDNA encoding rat p27Kip1, a 27-kDa Cdk inhibitor. The 1.04-kb cDNA of rat p27 contained an open reading frame of 197 amino acids that shared high homology with mammalian p27 and significant homology with mammalian p21Cip1 and p57Kip2. p27 mRNA was detected in most rat tissues and cell lines. The levels of p27 protein expression were similar in rat cell lines transformed by E1A and in normal cells. Rat p27 was able to interact with Cdk 2/4 and cyclin A/D in rat cells, but the amounts of rat p27 in Cdk2 complexes were different between transformed cells and normal cells. Thus, the formation of stable complexes of rat p27 may be modulated by E1A. Rat p27 protein could inhibit the increased Cdk2-associated kinase activity in transformed rat cells.

  7. Arcyriaflavin a, a cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase4 inhibitor, induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation of human endometriotic stromal cells: a potential therapeutic agent in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Tomoko; Nasu, Kaei; Aoyagi, Yoko; Takebayashi, Kanetoshi; Narahara, Hisashi

    2017-07-18

    We previously showed that microRNA-503 (miR-503) transfection into endometriotic cyst stromal cells (ECSCs) induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing cyclin D1. This finding prompted us to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of cyclin D1 inhibitors in endometriotic cells. This study aimed to determine whether arcyriaflavin A, a representative inhibitor of cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), is beneficial in the treatment of endometriosis. ECSCs were isolated from the ovarian endometriotic tissues of 32 women. The effects of arcyriaflavin A on cell viability and proliferation, vascular endothelial growth factor A expression, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression were evaluated using a modified methylthiazoletetrazolium assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Caspase-Glo® 3/7 assay, and flow cytometry. Arcyriaflavin A significantly inhibited cell viability, proliferation, and angiogenesis of ECSCs as assessed using the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and methylthiazoletetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) ELISA. Arcyriaflavin A induced apoptosis as shown in the Caspase-Glo® 3/7 assay and cell death detection ELISA whilethe cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 phase. The findings indicate that cyclin D1-CDK4 inhibitors may be promising candidates for the treatment of endometriosis. This is the first study to demonstrate the potential usefulness of arcyriaflavin A as a therapeutic agent for endometriosis. Further studies of the effects of cyclin D1-CDK4 inhibitors on endometriosis may provide useful information on pathogenesis and treatment.

  8. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Suppression by WEE1 Kinase Protects the Genome through Control of Replication Initiation and Nucleotide Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Halfdan; Nähse-Kumpf, Viola; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Patzke, Sebastian; Holmberg, Christian; Mejlvang, Jakob; Groth, Anja; Nielsen, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Activation of oncogenes or inhibition of WEE1 kinase deregulates cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity and leads to replication stress; however, the underlying mechanism is not understood. We now show that elevation of CDK activity by inhibition of WEE1 kinase rapidly increases initiation of replication. This leads to nucleotide shortage and reduces replication fork speed, which is followed by SLX4/MUS81-mediated DNA double-strand breakage. Fork speed is normalized and DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation is suppressed when CDT1, a key factor for replication initiation, is depleted. Furthermore, addition of nucleosides counteracts the effects of unscheduled CDK activity on fork speed and DNA DSB formation. Finally, we show that WEE1 regulates the ionizing radiation (IR)-induced S-phase checkpoint, consistent with its role in control of replication initiation. In conclusion, these results suggest that deregulated CDK activity, such as that occurring following inhibition of WEE1 kinase or activation of oncogenes, induces replication stress and loss of genomic integrity through increased firing of replication origins and subsequent nucleotide shortage. PMID:22907750

  9. Enterolactone induces G1-phase cell cycle arrest in non-small cell lung cancer cells by down-regulating cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    Chikara, Shireen; Lindsey, Kaitlin; Dhillon, Harsharan; Mamidi, Sujan; Kittilson, Jeffrey; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Reindl, Katie M.

    2017-01-01

    Flaxseed is a rich source of the plant lignan secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) which is metabolized into mammalian lignans enterodiol (ED) and enterolactone (EL) in the digestive tract. The anti-cancer properties of these lignans have been demonstrated for various cancer types, but have not been studied for lung cancer. In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effects of EL for several non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines of various genetic backgrounds. EL inhibited the growth of A549, H441, and H520 lung cancer cells in concentration- and time-dependent manners. The anti-proliferative effects of EL for lung cancer cells were not due to enhanced cell death, but rather due to G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Molecular studies revealed that EL- decreased mRNA or protein expression levels of the G1-phase promoters cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)-2, -4, and -6, and p-cdc25A; decreased phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p-pRb) protein levels; and simultaneously increased levels of p21WAF1/CIP1, a negative regulator of the G1-phase. The results suggest that EL inhibits the growth of NSCLC cell lines by down-regulating G1-phase cyclins and CDKs, and up-regulating p21WAF1/CIP1, which leads to G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Therefore, EL may hold promise as an adjuvant treatment for lung cancer therapy. PMID:28323486

  10. Enterolactone Induces G1-phase Cell Cycle Arrest in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cells by Downregulating Cyclins and Cyclin-dependent Kinases.

    PubMed

    Chikara, Shireen; Lindsey, Kaitlin; Dhillon, Harsharan; Mamidi, Sujan; Kittilson, Jeffrey; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Reindl, Katie M

    2017-01-01

    Flaxseed is a rich source of the plant lignan secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), which is metabolized into mammalian lignans enterodiol (ED) and enterolactone (EL) in the digestive tract. The anticancer properties of these lignans have been demonstrated for various cancer types, but have not been studied for lung cancer. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of EL for several nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines of various genetic backgrounds. EL inhibited the growth of A549, H441, and H520 lung cancer cells in concentration- and time-dependent manners. The antiproliferative effects of EL for lung cancer cells were not due to enhanced cell death, but rather due to G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Molecular studies revealed that EL decreased mRNA or protein expression levels of the G1-phase promoters cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)-2, -4, and -6, and p-cdc25A; decreased phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p-pRb) protein levels; and simultaneously increased levels of p21(WAF1/CIP1), a negative regulator of the G1 phase. The results suggest that EL inhibits the growth of NSCLC cell lines by downregulating G1-phase cyclins and CDKs, and upregulating p21(WAF1/CIP1), which leads to G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Therefore, EL may hold promise as an adjuvant treatment for lung cancer therapy.

  11. Inhibition of DNA binding of MCM2-7 complex by phosphorylation with cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Moritani, Mariko; Ishimi, Yukio

    2013-10-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) that plays a central role in preventing re-replication of DNA phosphorylates several replication proteins to inactivate them. MCM4 in MCM2-7 and RPA2 in RPA are phosphorylated with CDK in vivo. There are inversed correlations between the phosphorylation of these proteins and their chromatin binding. Here, we examined in vitro phosphorylation of human replication proteins of MCM2-7, RPA, TRESLIN, CDC45 and RECQL4 with CDK2/cyclinE, CDK2/cyclinA, CDK1/cyclinB, CHK1, CHK2 and CDC7/DBF4 kinases. MCM4, RPA2, TRESLIN and RECQL4 were phosphorylated with CDKs. Effect of the phosphorylation by CDK2/cyclinA on DNA-binding abilities of MCM2-7 and RPA was examined by gel-shift analysis. The phosphorylation of RPA did not affect its DNA-binding ability but that of MCM4 inhibited the ability of MCM2-7. Change of six amino acids of serine and threonine to alanines in the amino-terminal region of MCM4 rendered the mutant MCM2-7 insensitive to the inhibition with CDK. These biochemical data suggest that phosphorylation of MCM4 at these sites by CDK plays a direct role in dislodging MCM2-7 from chromatin and/or preventing re-loading of the complex to chromatin.

  12. Novel alterations in CDK1/cyclin B1 kinase complex formation occur during the acquisition of a polyploid DNA content.

    PubMed Central

    Datta, N S; Williams, J L; Caldwell, J; Curry, A M; Ashcraft, E K; Long, M W

    1996-01-01

    The pathways that regulate the S-phase events associated with the control of DNA replication are poorly understood. The bone marrow megakaryocytes are unique in that they leave the diploid (2C) state to differentiate, synthesizing 4 to 64 times the normal DNA content within a single nucleus, a process known as endomitosis. Human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells model this process, becoming polyploid during phorbol diester-induced megakaryocyte differentiation. The mitotic arrest occurring in these polyploid cells involves novel alterations in the cdk1/cyclin B1 complex: a marked reduction in cdk1 protein levels, and an elevated and sustained expression of cyclin B1. Endomitotic cells thus lack cdk1/cyclin B1-associated H1-histone kinase activity. Constitutive over-expression of cdk1 in endomitotic cells failed to re-initiate normal mitotic events even though cdk1 was present in a 10-fold excess. This was due to an inability of cyclin-B1 to physically associate with cdk1. Nonetheless, endomitotic cyclin B1 possesses immunoprecipitable H1-histone kinase activity, and specifically translocates to the nucleus. We conclude that mitosis is abrogated during endomitosis due to the absence of cdk1 and the failure to form M-phase promoting factor, resulting in a disassociation of mitosis from the completion of S-phase. Further studies on cyclin and its interacting proteins should be informative in understanding endomitosis and cell cycle control. Images PMID:8688553

  13. Circadian variation in expression of G1 phase cyclins D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16 and p21 in human bowel mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Griniatsos, John; Michail, Othon P; Theocharis, Stamatios; Arvelakis, Antonios; Papaconstantinou, Ioannis; Felekouras, Evangelos; Pikoulis, Emmanouel; Karavokyros, Ioannis; Bakoyiannis, Chris; Marinos, George; Bramis, John; Michail, Panayiotis O

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether the cellular proliferation rate in the large bowel epithelial cells is characterized by circadian rhythm. METHODS: Between January 2003 and December 2004, twenty patients who were diagnosed as suffering from primary, resectable, non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lower rectum, infiltrating the sphincter mechanism, underwent abdominoperineal resection, total mesorectal excision and permanent left iliac colostomy. In formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens obtained from the colostomy mucosa every six hours (00:00, 06:00, 12:00, 18:00 and 24:00), we studied the expression of G1 phase cyclins (D1 and E) as well as the expression of the G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p16 and p21 as indicators of cell cycle progression in colonic epithelial cells using immunohistochemical methods. RESULTS: The expression of both cyclins showed a similar circadian fashion obtaining their lowest and highest values at 00:00 and 18:00, respectively (P< 0.001). A circadian rhythm in the expression of CDK inhibitor proteins p16 and p21 was also observed, with the lowest levels obtained at 12:00 and 18:00 (P< 0.001), respectively. When the complexes cyclins D1 - p21 and E - p21 were examined, the expression of the cyclins was adversely correlated to the p21 expression throughout the day. When the complexes the cyclins D1 - p16 and E - p16 were examined, high levels of p16 expression were correlated to low levels of cyclin expression at 00:00, 06:00 and 24:00. Meanwhile, the highest expression levels of both cyclins were correlated to high levels of p16 expression at 18:00. CONCLUSION: Colonic epithelial cells seem to enter the G1 phase of the cell cycle during afternoon (between 12:00 and 18:00) with the highest rates obtained at 18:00. From a clinical point of view, the present results suggest that G1-phase specific anticancer therapies in afternoon might maximize their anti-tumor effect while minimizing toxicity

  14. CR8, a potent and selective, roscovitine-derived inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Bettayeb, K; Oumata, N; Echalier, A; Ferandin, Y; Endicott, J A; Galons, H; Meijer, L

    2008-10-02

    Among the ten pharmacological inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) currently in clinical trials, the purine roscovitine (CYC202, Seliciclib) is undergoing phase 2 trials against non-small-cell lung and nasopharyngeal cancers. An extensive medicinal chemistry study, designed to generate more potent analogues of roscovitine, led to the identification of an optimal substitution at the N6 position (compound CR8). An extensive selectivity study (108 kinases) highlights the exquisite selectivity of CR8 for CDK1/2/3/5/7/9. CR8 was 2- to 4-fold more potent than (R)-roscovitine at inhibiting these kinases. Cocrystal structures of (R)-CR8 and (R)-roscovitine with pCDK2/cyclin A showed that both inhibitors adopt essentially identical positions. The cellular effects of CR8 and (R)-roscovitine were investigated in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. CR8 inhibited the phosphorylation of CDK1 and 9 substrates, with a 25-50 times higher potency compared to (R)-roscovitine. CR8 was consistently more potent than (R)-roscovitine at inducing apoptotic cell death parameters: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium reduction (40-fold), lactate dehydrogenase release (35-fold), caspases activation (68-fold) and poly-(ADP-ribose)polymerase cleavage (50-fold). This improved cell death-inducing activity of CR8 over (R)-roscovitine was observed in 25 different cell lines. Altogether these results show that second-generation analogues of (R)-roscovitine can be designed with improved antitumor potential.

  15. Spatial Reorganization of the Endoplasmic Reticulum during Mitosis Relies on Mitotic Kinase Cyclin A in the Early Drosophila Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Zane J.; Mclaurin, Justin D.; Eritano, Anthony S.; Johnson, Brittany M.; Sims, Amanda Q.; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope. PMID:25689737

  16. The checkpoint kinase ATM protects against stress-induced elevation of cyclin D1 and potential cell death in neurons.

    PubMed

    Hitomi, Masahiro; Stacey, Dennis W

    2010-06-01

    Quantitative cytometric studies show that cyclin D1 levels must decline during S phase for proper cell cycle progression, and that cyclin D1 decline follows phosphorylation induced by the checkpoint kinases ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). ATM is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia (AT), a disease characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. Importantly, neurodegeneration in many cases has been linked to the increased expression of cyclin D1 in neurons leading to inappropriate cell cycle entry. These facts prompted us to test the possibility that ATM normally protects against neural degeneration by suppressing cyclin D1 levels, particularly following genotoxic stress. For this purpose, neural stem cells were induced to differentiate into mature neural cells, including neurons. ATM activity in these cultures was inhibited with a specific chemical inhibitor in the presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide treatment, and the effect on cyclin D1 expression was determined by quantitative, single cell cytometric analyses. As predicted, inhibition of ATM did promote elevation of cyclin D1 in differentiated neurons, particularly under conditions of oxidative stress. The survival of differentiated neurons and of neural stem cells was reduced by such treatments. These data support our suggestion that ATM functions to maintain low levels of cyclin D1 expression in differentiated neurons; and may provide important clues in understanding neural degeneration in general. Copyright 2010 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  17. Growth arrest by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 is abrogated by c-Myc.

    PubMed Central

    Vlach, J; Hennecke, S; Alevizopoulos, K; Conti, D; Amati, B

    1996-01-01

    We show here that c-Myc antagonizes the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p27Kip1. p27 expressed from recombinant retroviruses in Rat1 cells associated with and inhibited cyclin E/CDK2 complexes, induced accumulation of the pRb and p130 proteins in their hypophosphorylated forms, and arrested cells in G1. Prior expression of c-Myc prevented inactivation of cyclin E/CDK2 as well as dephosphorylation of pRb and p130, and allowed continuous cell proliferation in the presence of p27. This effect did not require ubiquitin-mediated degradation of p27. Myc altered neither the susceptibility of cyclin E/CDK2 to inhibition by p27, nor the intrinsic CDK-inhibitory activity of p27, but induced sequestration of p27 in a form unable to bind cyclin E/CDK2. Neither Myc itself nor other G1-cyclin/CDK complexes were directly responsible for p27 sequestration. Retroviral expression of G1 cyclins (D1-3, E or A) or of the Cdc25A phosphatase did not overcome p27-induced arrest. Growth rescue by Myc required dimerization with Max, DNA binding and an intact transcriptional activation domain, as previously shown for cellular transformation. We propose that this activity is mediated by the product of an as yet unknown Myc-Max target gene(s) and represents an essential aspect of Myc's mitogenic and oncogenic functions. Images PMID:8978686

  18. Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinase 9 by dinaciclib suppresses cyclin B1 expression and tumor growth in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Sandeep; Khera, Nimmish; Guo, Zhanfang; Hoog, Jeremy; Li, Shunqiang; Ma, Cynthia X.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are potential cancer therapeutic targets because of their critical role in promoting cell growth. Dinaciclib is a novel CDK inhibitor currently under clinical evaluation for the treatment of advanced malignancies. In this study, we demonstrated the anti-tumor activity of dinaciclib in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patient derived xenograft (PDX) and cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with dinaciclib induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and marked apoptosis. These changes were accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of CDK1 and retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and decreased protein levels of cyclin B1, cMYC and survivin. We further demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of CDK9, the kinase subunit of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), instead of CDK1 or CDK2, reduced the levels of cyclin B1 and MYC in TNBC cell lines. These data support the importance of CDK9, in addition to CDK1, in mediating the growth inhibitory effect of dinaciclib in TNBC. Further investigation of CDK9 as a therapeutic target in TNBC is needed. PMID:27486754

  19. Regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 Thr-160 phosphorylation and activity by mitogen-activated protein kinase in late G1 phase.

    PubMed Central

    Chiariello, M; Gomez, E; Gutkind, J S

    2000-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, p42(MAPK) and p44(MAPK), are central components of growth-promoting signalling pathways. However, how stimulation of MAP kinases culminates in cell-cycle progression is still poorly understood. Here we show that mitogenic stimulation of NIH 3T3 cells causes a sustained activation of MAP kinases, which lasts until cells begin progressing through the G(1)/S boundary. Furthermore, we observed that disruption of the MAP-kinase pathway with a selective MEK (MAP kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinase) inhibitor, PD98059, prevents the activation of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 and DNA synthesis, even when added during late G(1) phase, once the known mechanisms by which MAP kinase controls G(1) progression, accumulation of G(1) cyclins and degradation of Cdk inhibitors have already taken place. Moreover, we provide evidence indicating that MAP kinases control Cdk2 Thr-160 activating phosphorylation and function, possibly by regulating the activity of a Cdk-activating kinase, thus promoting the re-initiation of DNA synthesis. These findings suggest the existence of a novel mechanism whereby signal-transducing pathways converging on MAP kinases can affect the cell-cycle machinery and, ultimately, participate in cell-growth control. PMID:10903150

  20. Platelet-rich plasma increases proliferation of tendon cells by modulating Stat3 and p27 to up-regulate expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Yu, T-Y; Pang, J-H S; Wu, K P-H; Lin, L-P; Tseng, W-C; Tsai, W-C

    2015-08-01

    To investigate effects of platelet-rich plasma on tendon cell proliferation and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Platelet-rich plasma was prepared manually by two-step centrifugation. Proliferation was evaluated in cultured rat tendon cells by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell cycle progression was assessed by flow cytometry. Messenger RNA expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cyclin E1, A2 and B1, and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) 1 and 2 was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Protein expression of the above cyclins and Cdks and of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 3 and p27 was evaluated by western blotting. Platelet-rich plasma used in the present study had concentrations of platelets, TGF-β1 and PDGF over 3-fold higher than normal whole blood. Platelet-rich plasma enhanced tendon cell proliferation (P = 0.008) by promoting G1 /S phase transition in the cell cycle, and increased expression of PCNA, cyclin E1, A2 and B1, Cdks1 and 2, and phosphorylated Stat3, while inhibiting p27 expression. Platelet-rich plasma contains high concentrations of TGF-β1 and PDGF that increase tendon cell proliferation by modulating Stat3/p27(Kip1), which enhances expression of cyclin-Cdk complexes that promote cell cycle progression. These results provide molecular evidence for positive effects of platelet-rich plasma on tendon cell proliferation, which can be useful in clinical applications of tendon injury. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Foxp3 Protein Stability Is Regulated by Cyclin-dependent Kinase 2*

    PubMed Central

    Morawski, Peter A.; Mehra, Parul; Chen, Chunxia; Bhatti, Tricia; Wells, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Foxp3 is a transcription factor required for the development of regulatory T cells (Treg). Mice and humans with a loss of Foxp3 function suffer from uncontrolled autoimmunity and inflammatory disease. Expression of Foxp3 is necessary for the anti-inflammatory capacity of Treg, but whether Foxp3 activity is further subject to regulation by extracellular signals is unclear. The primary structure of Foxp3 contains four cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) motifs (Ser/Thr-Pro) within the N-terminal repressor domain, and we show that CDK2 can partner with cyclin E to phosphorylate Foxp3 at these sites. Consistent with our previous demonstration that CDK2 negatively regulates Treg function, we find that mutation of the serine or threonine at each CDK motif to alanine (S/T→A) results in enhanced Foxp3 protein stability in CD4+ T cells. T cells expressing the S/T→A mutant of Foxp3 showed enhanced induction (e.g. CD25) and repression (e.g. IL2) of canonical Foxp3-responsive genes, exhibited an increased capacity to suppress conventional T cell proliferation in vitro, and were highly effective at ameliorating colitis in an in vivo model of inflammatory bowel disease. These results indicate that CDK2 negatively regulates the stability and activity of Foxp3 and implicate CDK-coupled receptor signal transduction in the control of regulatory T cell function and stability. PMID:23853094

  2. Dephosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinases by type 2C protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Aiyang; Ross, Karen E.; Kaldis, Philipp; Solomon, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Activating phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) is necessary for their kinase activity and cell cycle progression. This phosphorylation is carried out by the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK); in contrast, little is known about the corresponding protein phosphatase. We show that type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) are responsible for this dephosphorylation of Cdc28p, the major budding yeast CDK. Two yeast PP2Cs, Ptc2p and Ptc3p, display Cdc28p phosphatase activity in vitro and in vivo, and account for ∼90% of Cdc28p phosphatase activity in yeast extracts. Overexpression of PTC2 or PTC3 results in synthetic lethality in strains temperature-sensitive for yeast CAK1, and disruptions of PTC2 and PTC3 suppress the growth defect of a cak1 mutant. Furthermore, PP2C-like enzymes are the predominant phosphatases toward human Cdk2 in HeLa cell extracts, indicating that the substrate specificity of PP2Cs toward CDKs is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:10580002

  3. Cyclin-dependent kinase 8 regulates mitotic commitment in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, Zsolt; Banyai, Gabor; Lopez, Marcela Davila; McInerny, Christopher J; Gustafsson, Claes M

    2012-06-01

    Temporal changes in transcription programs are coupled to control of cell growth and division. We here report that Mediator, a conserved coregulator of eukaryotic transcription, is part of a regulatory pathway that controls mitotic entry in fission yeast. The Mediator subunit cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (Cdk8) phosphorylates the forkhead 2 (Fkh2) protein in a periodic manner that coincides with gene activation during mitosis. Phosphorylation prevents degradation of the Fkh2 transcription factor by the proteasome, thus ensuring cell cycle-dependent variations in Fkh2 levels. Interestingly, Cdk8-dependent phosphorylation of Fkh2 controls mitotic entry, and mitotic entry is delayed by inactivation of the Cdk8 kinase activity or mutations replacing the phosphorylated serine residues of Fkh2. In addition, mutations in Fkh2, which mimic protein phosphorylation, lead to premature mitotic entry. Therefore, Fkh2 regulates not only the onset of mitotic transcription but also the correct timing of mitotic entry via effects on the Wee1 kinase. Our findings thus establish a new pathway linking the Mediator complex to control of mitotic transcription and regulation of mitotic entry in fission yeast.

  4. Development of highly potent and selective diaminothiazole inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    Schonbrunn, Ernst; Betzi, Stephane; Alam, Riazul; Martin, Mathew P.; Becker, Andreas; Han, Huijong; Francis, Rawle; Chakrasali, Ramappa; Jakkaraj, Sudhakar; Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Sebti, Said M.; Cubitt, Christopher L.; Gebhard, Anthony W.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Tash, Joseph S.; Georg, Gunda I.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine protein kinases that act as key regulatory elements in cell cycle progression. We describe the development of highly potent diaminothiazole inhibitors of CDK2 (IC50 = 0.0009 – 0.0015 µM) from a single hit compound with weak inhibitory activity (IC50 = 15 µM), discovered by high-throughput screening. Structure-based design was performed using 35 co-crystal structures of CDK2 liganded with distinct analogues of the parent compound. The profiling of compound 51 against a panel of 339 kinases revealed high selectivity for CDKs, with preference for CDK2 and CDK5 over CDK9, CDK1, CDK4 and CDK6. Compound 51 inhibited the proliferation of 13 out of 15 cancer cell lines with IC50 values between 0.27 and 6.9 µM, which correlated with the complete suppression of retinoblastoma phosphorylation and the onset of apoptosis. Combined, the results demonstrate the potential of this new inhibitors series for further development into CDK-specific chemical probes or therapeutics. PMID:23600925

  5. Drug Design of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Inhibitor for Melanoma from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsin-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    One has found an important cell cycle controller. This guard can decide the cell cycle toward proliferation or quiescence. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) is a unique target among the CDK family in melanoma therapy. We attempted to find out TCM compounds from TCM Database@Taiwan that have the ability to inhibit the activity of CDK2 by systems biology. We selected Tetrahydropalmatine, Reserpiline, and (+)-Corydaline as the candidates by docking and screening results for further survey. We utilized support vector machine (SVM), multiple linear regression (MLR) models and Bayesian network for validation of predicted activity. By overall analysis of docking results, predicted activity, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we could conclude that Tetrahydropalmatine, Reserpiline, and (+)-Corydaline had better binding affinity than the control. All of them had the ability to inhibit the activity of CDK2 and might have the opportunity to be applied in melanoma therapy. PMID:25045703

  6. Suppression of hepatitis C virus replication by cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Tsubasa; Inada, Makoto; Tokunaga, Yuko; Wakita, Takaji; Kohara, Michinori; Nomoto, Akio

    2014-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a causative agent of chronic hepatitis. Although the standard therapy for HCV-infected patients consists of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, this treatment is associated with serious side effects and high costs, and fails in some patients infected with specific HCV genotypes. To address this problem, we are developing small-molecule inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) as novel anti-HCV drug candidates. Previous data showed that HCV replication is inhibited by retinoblastoma protein, which is itself inactivated by CDK-mediated phosphorylation. Here, we report that CDK inhibitors suppress HCV replication in vitro and in vivo, and that CDK4 is required for efficient HCV replication. These findings shed light on the development of novel anti-HCV drugs that target host factors.

  7. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in yeast, animals, and plants: a functional comparison.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Annelies; Inzé, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The cell cycle is remarkably conserved in yeast, animals, and plants and is controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). CDK activity can be inhibited by binding of CDK inhibitory proteins, designated CKIs. Numerous studies show that CKIs are essential in orchestrating eukaryotic cell proliferation and differentiation. In yeast, animals, and plants, CKIs act as regulators of the G1 checkpoint in response to environmental and developmental cues and assist during mitotic cell cycles by inhibiting CDK activity required to arrest mitosis. Furthermore, CKIs play an important role in regulating cell cycle exit that precedes differentiation and in promoting differentiation in cooperation with transcription factors. Moreover, CKIs are essential to control CDK activity in endocycling cells. So, in yeast, animals, and plants, CKIs share many functional similarities, but their functions are adapted toward the specific needs of the eukaryote.

  8. Processing of meiotic DNA double strand breaks requires cyclin-dependent kinase and multiple nucleases.

    PubMed

    Manfrini, Nicola; Guerini, Ilaria; Citterio, Andrea; Lucchini, Giovanna; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2010-04-09

    Meiotic recombination requires the formation of programmed Spo11-dependent DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Sae2 protein and the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex are necessary to remove the covalently attached Spo11 protein from the DNA ends, which are then resected by so far unknown nucleases. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of Sae2 Ser-267 by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is required to initiate meiotic DSB resection by allowing Spo11 removal from DSB ends. This finding suggests that Cdk1 activity is required for the processing of Spo11-induced DSBs, thus providing a mechanism for coordinating DSB resection with progression through meiotic prophase. Furthermore, the helicase Sgs1 and the nucleases Exo1 and Dna2 participate in lengthening the 5'-3' resection tracts during meiosis by controlling a step subsequent to Spo11 removal.

  9. A chrysin derivative suppresses skin cancer growth by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N R; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-09-06

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P(+) cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P(+) cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency.

  10. Roscovitine blocks leukocyte extravasation by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases 5 and 9.

    PubMed

    Berberich, Nina; Uhl, Bernd; Joore, Jos; Schmerwitz, Ulrike K; Mayer, Bettina A; Reichel, Christoph A; Krombach, Fritz; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Fürst, Robert

    2011-07-01

    Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor that induces tumour cell death, is under evaluation as an anti-cancer drug. By triggering leukocyte apoptosis, roscovitine can also enhance the resolution of inflammation. Beyond death-inducing properties, we tested whether roscovitine affects leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction, a vital step in the onset of inflammation. Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions were evaluated in venules of mouse cremaster muscle, using intravital microscopy. In primary human endothelial cells, we studied the influence of roscovitine on adhesion molecules and on the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. A cellular kinome array, in vitro CDK profiling and RNAi methods were used to identify targets of roscovitine. In vivo, roscovitine attenuated the tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced leukocyte adherence to and transmigration through, the endothelium. In vitro, roscovitine strongly inhibited TNF-α-evoked expression of endothelial adhesion molecules (E-selectin, intercellular cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule). Roscovitine blocked NF-κB-dependent gene transcription, but not the NF-κB activation cascade [inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase activity, IκB-α degradation, p65 translocation]. Using a cellular kinome array and an in vitro CDK panel, we found that roscovitine inhibited protein kinase A, ribosomal S6 kinase and CDKs 2, 5, 7 and 9. Experiments using kinase inhibitors and siRNA showed that the decreased endothelial activation was due solely to blockade of CDK5 and CDK9 by roscovitine. Our study highlights a novel mode of action for roscovitine, preventing endothelial activation and leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction by inhibition of CDK5 and 9. This might expand its usage as a promising anti-inflammatory compound. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Roscovitine blocks leukocyte extravasation by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases 5 and 9

    PubMed Central

    Berberich, Nina; Uhl, Bernd; Joore, Jos; Schmerwitz, Ulrike K; Mayer, Bettina A; Reichel, Christoph A; Krombach, Fritz; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Fürst, Robert

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor that induces tumour cell death, is under evaluation as an anti-cancer drug. By triggering leukocyte apoptosis, roscovitine can also enhance the resolution of inflammation. Beyond death-inducing properties, we tested whether roscovitine affects leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction, a vital step in the onset of inflammation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions were evaluated in venules of mouse cremaster muscle, using intravital microscopy. In primary human endothelial cells, we studied the influence of roscovitine on adhesion molecules and on the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. A cellular kinome array, in vitro CDK profiling and RNAi methods were used to identify targets of roscovitine. KEY RESULTS In vivo, roscovitine attenuated the tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced leukocyte adherence to and transmigration through, the endothelium. In vitro, roscovitine strongly inhibited TNF-α-evoked expression of endothelial adhesion molecules (E-selectin, intercellular cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule). Roscovitine blocked NF-κB-dependent gene transcription, but not the NF-κB activation cascade [inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase activity, IκB-α degradation, p65 translocation]. Using a cellular kinome array and an in vitro CDK panel, we found that roscovitine inhibited protein kinase A, ribosomal S6 kinase and CDKs 2, 5, 7 and 9. Experiments using kinase inhibitors and siRNA showed that the decreased endothelial activation was due solely to blockade of CDK5 and CDK9 by roscovitine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our study highlights a novel mode of action for roscovitine, preventing endothelial activation and leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction by inhibition of CDK5 and 9. This might expand its usage as a promising anti-inflammatory compound. PMID:21391976

  12. A Chrysin Derivative Suppresses Skin Cancer Growth by Inhibiting Cyclin-dependent Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N. R.; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M.; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L.; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P+ cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P+ cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency. PMID:23888052

  13. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21Waf1, regulates vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kenichi; Kato, Seiya; Arima, Nobuyuki; Fujii, Teruhiko; Morimatsu, Minoru; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2004-04-01

    In the process of vascular diseases, smooth muscle cells (SMC) undergo not only hyperplasia but also hypertrophy, resulting in vascular remodeling. A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI), p21Waf1, has been shown to play an important role in SMC hyperplasia. Here we investigated a potential role of p21Waf1 in SMC hypertrophy. An exposure of cultured rat SMC to serum drove the cell cycle progression with up-regulation of various cell cycle markers and increased activities of cyclin-dependent kinases, but did not cause SMC hypertrophy. In contrast, incubation of SMC for 48 h with angiotensin II (AII, 100 nmol/l) resulted in a significant increase in the cell size measured by flowcytometric forward-angle light scatter assay, in association with an increase in the ratio of [3H]leucine/[3H]thymidine uptake, indicating SMC hypertrophy. At 48 h, p21Waf1 expression was up-regulated in SMC exposed to AII but not in those exposed to serum. These results suggest that p21Waf1 may be involved in hypertrophy. To further investigate this issue, two manipulations of the p21Waf1 gene were performed. Adenovirus-mediated over-expression of p21Waf1 not only reduced S-phasic cells but also caused hypertrophy, despite the exposure to serum. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide for p21Waf1 inhibited the hypertrophy of SMC exposed to AII. Our data suggest that p21Waf1 may play a role in SMC hypertrophy as well.

  14. Computer Molecular Dynamics Studies on Protein Structures (Visual Pigment Rhodopsin and Cyclin-Dependent Kinases)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo T.

    2007-05-01

    Based on the computer molecular dynamics (MD) calculations we have simulated for the visual pigment rhodopsin and cyclin-dependent kinase proteins the dynamical and structural properties at reliable physiological temperatures and conditions. MD simulations are carried out on the rhodopsin protein to investigate the conformational changes of the protein in relation to the inclusion of the 11-cis chromophore retinal into consideration. It was demonstrated that the adaptation of the chromophore retinal in the opsin site causes a considerable influence on its protein binding pocket, as well as on conformations of the cytoplasmic part, but the extracelluar part of the protein shows a comparably small changes. On the basis of the simulaton results we discuss some molecular mechanisms for the rhodopsin protein function as a G-protein-coupled receptor in the dark state, i.e. for the chromophore retinal as a ligand-agonist stabilizaing the inactive conformation. The central role that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) play in the timing of cell division and repair and the high incidence of genetic alteration of CDKs or deregulation of CDK inhibitors in a number of cancers make CDC28 of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae very attractive model for studies of mechanisms of CDK regulation. The crystal structure of the human CDK2 has served as a model for the catalytic core of other CDKs, including CDC28. Nanoseconds long molecular dynamics trajectories of the CDK2/ATP complex were analyzed. The MD simulations of substitution CDK2-G16S in conserved G-loop shows an important of this amino acid and a conformational change of CDK2 structure resulting in the moving of the G-loop away from ATP and a new rearrangement of amino acids in the T-loop.

  15. G{sub 1} arrest and down-regulation of cyclin E/cyclin-dependent kinase 2 by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine are dependent on the retinoblastoma protein in the bladder carcinoma cell line 5637

    SciTech Connect

    Schnier, J.B.; Nishi, K.; Goodrich, D.W.

    1996-06-11

    The protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine has been shown to induce G{sub 1} phase arrest in normal cells but not in most transformed cells. Staurosporine did not induce G{sub 1} phase arrest in the bladder carcinoma cell line 5637 that lacks a functional retinoblastoma protein (pRB{sup {minus}}). However, when infected with a pRB-expressing retrovirus, these cells, now pRB{sup +} and pRB{sup {minus}} cells, cyclin D1-associated kinase activities were reduced on staurosporine treatment. In contrast, cylin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 and cyclin E/CDK2 activities were inhibited only in pRB{sup +} cells. Staurosporine treatment did not cause reductions in the protein levels of CDK4, cyclin D1, CDK2, or cyclin E. The CDK inhibitor proteins p21{sup (Wafl/Cipl)} and p27{sup (Kipl}) levels increased in staurosporine-treated cells. Immunoprecipitation of CDK2, cyclin E, and p21 form staurosporine-treated pRB{sup +} cells revealed a 2.5- to 3-fold higher ratio of p21 bound to CDK2 compared with staurosporine-treated pRB cells. In pRB{sup +} cells, p21 was preferentially associated with Thr160 phosphorylated active CDK2. In pRB{sup {minus}} cells, however, p21 was bound preferentially to the unphosphorylated, inactive form of CDK2 even though the phosphorylated form was abundant. This is the first evidence suggesting that G{sub 1} arrest by 4 nM staurosporine is dependent on a functional pRB protein. Cell cycle arrest at the pRB-dependent checkpoint may prevent activation of cyclin E/CDK2 by stabilizing its interaction with inhibitor proteins p21 and p27. 47 refs.

  16. Transgenic expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 results in epidermal hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and severe dermal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Miliani de Marval, P L; Gimenez-Conti, I B; LaCava, M; Martinez, L A; Conti, C J; Rodriguez-Puebla, M L

    2001-07-01

    In a previous report we have described the effects of expression of D-type cyclins in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice. To study the involvement of the D-type cyclin partner cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in epithelial growth and differentiation, transgenic mice were generated carrying the CDK4 gene under the control of a keratin 5 promoter. As expected, transgenic mice showed expression of CDK4 in the epidermal basal-cell layer. Epidermal proliferation increased dramatically and basal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy were observed. The hyperproliferative phenotype of these transgenic mice was independent of D-type cyclin expression because no overexpression of these proteins was detected. CDK4 and CDK2 kinase activities increased in transgenic animals and were associated with elevated binding of p27(Kip1) to CDK4. Expression of CDK4 in the epidermis results in an increased spinous layer compared with normal epidermis, and a mild hyperkeratosis in the cornified layer. In addition to epidermal changes, severe dermal fibrosis was observed and part of the subcutaneous adipose tissue was replaced by connective tissue. Also, abnormal expression of keratin 6 associated with the hyperproliferative phenotype was observed in transgenic epidermis. This model provides in vivo evidence for the role of CDK4 as a mediator of proliferation in epithelial cells independent of D-type cyclin expression.

  17. Cyclin is a component of the sea urchin egg M-phase specific histone H1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Meijer, L; Arion, D; Golsteyn, R; Pines, J; Brizuela, L; Hunt, T; Beach, D

    1989-08-01

    A so-called 'growth-associated' or 'M-phase specific' histone H1 kinase (H1K) has been described in a wide variety of eukaryotic cell types; p34cdc2 has previously been shown to be a catalytic subunit of this protein kinase. In fertilized sea urchin eggs the activity of H1K oscillates during the cell division cycle and there is a striking temporal correlation between H1K activation and the accumulation of a phosphorylated form of cyclin. H1K activity declines in parallel with proteolytic cyclin destruction of the end of the first cell cycle. By virtue of the high affinity of the fission yeast p13suc1 for the p34cdc2 protein, H1K strongly binds to p13-Sepharose beads. Cyclin, p34cdc2 and H1K co-purify on this affinity reagent as well as through several conventional chromatographic procedures. Anticyclin antibodies immunoprecipitate the M-phase specific H1K in crude extracts or in purified fractions. Sea urchin eggs appear to contain much less cyclin than p34cdc2, suggesting that p34cdc2 may interact with other proteins. These results demonstrate that cyclin and p34cdc2 are major components of the M-phase specific H1K.

  18. Regulation of nuclear transport and degradation of the Xenopus cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p27Xic1.

    PubMed

    Chuang, L C; Yew, P R

    2001-01-12

    The regulation of the vertebrate cell cycle is controlled by the function of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), cyclins, and CDK inhibitors. The Xenopus laevis kinase inhibitor, p27(Xic1) (Xic1) is a member of the p21(Cip1)/p27(Kip1)/p57(Kip2) CDK inhibitor family and inhibits CDK2-cyclin E in vitro as well as DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts. Xic1 is targeted for degradation in interphase extracts in a manner dependent on both the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, Cdc34, and nuclei. Here we show that ubiquitination of Xic1 occurs exclusively in the nucleus and that nuclear localization of Xic1 is necessary for its degradation. We find that Xic1 nuclear localization is independently mediated by binding to CDK2-cyclin E and by nuclear localization sequences within the C terminus of Xic1. Our results also indicate that binding of Xic1 to CDK2-cyclin E is dispensable for Xic1 ubiquitination and degradation. Moreover, we show that amino acids 180-183 of Xic1 are critical determinants of Xic1 degradation. This region of Xic1 may define a motif of Xic1 essential for recognition by the ubiquitin conjugation machinery or for binding an alternate protein required for degradation.

  19. Insulin-like growth factor-1 promotes G(1)/S cell cycle progression through bidirectional regulation of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway in developing rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mairet-Coello, Georges; Tury, Anna; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2009-01-21

    Although survival-promoting effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) during neurogenesis are well characterized, mitogenic effects remain less well substantiated. Here, we characterize cell cycle regulators and signaling pathways underlying IGF-1 effects on embryonic cortical precursor proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, IGF-1 stimulated cell cycle progression and increased cell number without promoting cell survival. IGF-1 induced rapid increases in cyclin D1 and D3 protein levels at 4 h and cyclin E at 8 h. Moreover, p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) expression were reduced, suggesting downregulation of negative regulators contributes to mitogenesis. Furthermore, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway specifically underlies IGF-1 activity, because blocking this pathway, but not MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase)/ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase), prevented mitogenesis. To determine whether mechanisms defined in culture relate to corticogenesis in vivo, we performed transuterine intracerebroventricular injections. Whereas blockade of endogenous factor with anti-IGF-1 antibody decreased DNA synthesis, IGF-1 injection stimulated DNA synthesis and increased the number of S-phase cells in the ventricular zone. IGF-1 treatment increased phospho-Akt fourfold at 30 min, cyclins D1 and E by 6 h, and decreased p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) expression. Moreover, blockade of the PI3K/Akt pathway in vivo decreased DNA synthesis and cyclin E, increased p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) expression, and prevented IGF-1-induced cyclin E mRNA upregulation. Finally, IGF-1 injection in embryos increased postnatal day 10 brain DNA content by 28%, suggesting a role for IGF-1 in brain growth control. These results demonstrate a mitogenic role for IGF-1 that tightly controls both positive and negative cell cycle regulators, and indicate that the PI3K/Akt pathway mediates IGF-1 mitogenic signaling during corticogenesis.

  20. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor flavopiridol inhibits glycogen phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A; Nishi, K; Gorin, F A; Walsh, D A; Bradbury, E M; Schnier, J B

    2001-02-15

    Flavopiridol has been shown to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in various tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Using immobilized flavopiridol, we identified glycogen phosphorylases (GP) from liver and brain as flavopiridol binding proteins from HeLa cell extract. Purified rabbit muscle GP also bound to the flavopiridol affinity column. GP is the rate-limiting enzyme in intracellular glycogen breakdown. Flavopiridol significantly inhibited the AMP-activated GP-b form of the purified rabbit muscle isoenzyme (IC50 of 1 microM at 0.8 mM AMP), but was less inhibitory to the active phosphorylated form of GP, GP-a (IC50 of 2.5 microM). The AMP-bound GP-a form was poorly inhibited by flavopiridol (40% at 10 microM). Increasing concentrations of the allosteric effector AMP resulted in a linear decrease in the GP-inhibitory activity of flavopiridol suggesting interference between flavopiridol and AMP. In contrast the GP inhibitor caffeine had no effect on the relative GP inhibition by flavopiridol, suggesting an additive effect of caffeine. Flavopiridol also inhibited the phosphorylase kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation of GP-b by inhibiting the kinase in vitro. Flavopiridol thus is able to interfere with both activating modifications of GP-b, AMP activation and phosphorylation. In A549 NSCLC cells flavopiridol treatment caused glycogen accumulation despite of an increase in GP activity, suggesting direct GP inhibition in vivo rather than inhibition of GP activation by phosphorylase kinase. These results suggest that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol interferes with glycogen degradation, which may be responsible for flavopiridol's cytotoxicity and explain its resistance in some cell lines.

  1. Co-amplification of phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer A and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 triggers glioblastoma progression.

    PubMed

    Qi, Q; Kang, S S; Zhang, S; Pham, C; Fu, H; Brat, D J; Ye, K

    2017-08-10

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor and has a dismal prognosis. Amplification of chromosome 12q13-q15 (Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) amplicon) is frequently observed in numerous human cancers including GBM. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer (PIKE) is a group of GTP-binding proteins that belong to the subgroup of centaurin GTPase family, encoded by CENTG1 located in CDK4 amplicon. However, the pathological significance of CDK4 amplicon in GBM formation remains incompletely understood. In the current study, we show that co-expression of PIKE-A and CDK4 in TP53/PTEN double knockout GBM mouse model additively shortens the latency of glioma onset and survival compared to overexpression of these genes alone. Consequently, p-mTOR, p-Akt and p-ERK pathways are highly upregulated in the brain tumors, in alignment with their oncogenic activities by CDK4 and PIKE-A stably transfected in GBM cell lines. Hence, our findings support that PIKE amplification or overexpression coordinately acts with CDK4 to drive GBM tumorigenesis.

  2. The roles and therapeutic potential of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yunfei; Feng, Yong; Shen, Jacson; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-06-01

    Uncontrolled proliferation and cell growth is the hallmark of many different malignant diseases, including sarcomas. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are members of the serine/threonine protein kinase family and play crucial roles in tumor cell proliferation and growth by controlling cell cycle, transcription, and RNA splicing. In addition, several CDKs influence multiple targets and phosphorylate transcription factors involved in tumorigenesis. There are many examples linking dysregulated activation and expression of CDKs to tumors, and targeting CDKs in tumor cells has become a promising therapeutic strategy. More recently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib for treating metastatic breast cancer. In sarcomas, high levels of CDK mRNA and protein expression have been found in most human sarcoma cells and patient tissues. Many studies have demonstrated consistent results in which inhibition of different CDKs decrease sarcoma cell growth and induce apoptosis. Therefore, CDKs comprise an attractive set of targets for novel anti-sarcoma drug development. In this review, we discuss the roles of different members of CDKs in various sarcomas and provide a pre-clinical overview of promising therapeutic potentials of targeting CDKs with a special emphasis on sarcoma.

  3. Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 (Cdk5) Regulates the Function of CLOCK Protein by Direct Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yongdo; Jeong, Jaehoon; Lee, Saebom; Park, Young-Un; Lee, Seol-Ae; Han, Dong-Hee; Kim, Joung-Hun; Ohshima, Toshio; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Cho, Sehyung; Park, Sang Ki

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythm is a biological rhythm governing physiology and behavior with a period of ∼24 h. At the molecular level, circadian output is controlled by a molecular clock composed of positive and negative feedback loops in transcriptional and post-translational processes. CLOCK is a transcription factor known as a central component of the molecular clock feedback loops generating circadian oscillation. Although CLOCK is known to undergo multiple post-translational modifications, the knowledge of their entities remains limited. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine-threonine kinase that is involved in various neuronal processes. Here, we report that Cdk5 is a novel regulator of CLOCK protein. Cdk5 phosphorylates CLOCK at the Thr-451 and Thr-461 residues in association with transcriptional activation of CLOCK. The Cdk5-dependent regulation of CLOCK function is mediated by alterations of its stability and subcellular distribution. These results suggest that Cdk5 is a novel regulatory component of the core molecular clock machinery. PMID:24235147

  4. The cyclin-dependent kinase family in the social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that regulate eukaryotic cell cycle progression. Their ability to modulate the cell cycle has made them an attractive target for anti-cancer therapies. Cdk protein function has been studied in a variety of Eukaryotes ranging from yeast to humans. In the social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum, several homologues of mammalian Cdks have been identified and characterized. The life cycle of this model organism is comprised of a feeding stage where single cells grow and divide mitotically as they feed on their bacterial food source and a multicellular developmental stage that is induced by starvation. Thus it is a valuable system for studying a variety of cellular and developmental processes. In this review I summarize the current knowledge of the Cdk protein family in Dictyostelium by highlighting the research efforts focused on the characterization of Cdk1, Cdk5, and Cdk8 in this model Eukaryote. Accumulated evidence indicates that each protein performs distinct functions during the Dictyostelium life cycle with Cdk1 being required for growth and Cdk5 and Cdk8 being required for processes that occur during development. Recent studies have shown that Dictyostelium Cdk5 shares attributes with mammalian Cdk5 and that the mammalian Cdk inhibitor roscovitine can be used to inhibit Cdk5 activity in Dictyostelium. Together, these results show that Dictyostelium can be used as a model system for studying Cdk protein function.

  5. Protein-Protein Interaction for the De Novo Design of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Peptide Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Arumugasamy, Karthiga; Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Poonam; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The homology of the inhibitor binding site regions on the surface of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) makes actual CDK inhibitors unable to bind specifically to their molecular targets. Most of them are ATP competitive inhibitors with low specificity that also affect the phosphorylation mechanisms of other nontarget kinases giving rise to harmful side effects. So, the search of specific and potent inhibitors able to bind to the desired CDK target is still a pending issue. Structure based drug design minimized the erroneous binding and increased the affinity of the inhibitor interaction. In the case of CDKs their activation and regulation mechanisms mainly depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The design of drugs targeting these PPIs makes feasible and promising towards the discovery of new and specific CDK inhibitors. Development of peptide inhibitors for a target protein is an emerging approach in computer aided drug designing. This chapter describes in detail methodology for use of the VitAL-Viterbi algorithm for de novo peptide design of CDK2 inhibitors.

  6. A role for cyclin-dependent kinase(s) in the modulation of fast anterograde axonal transport: effects defined by olomoucine and the APC tumor suppressor protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, N.; Bloom, G. S.; Brady, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    Proteins that interact with both cytoskeletal and membrane components are candidates to modulate membrane trafficking. The tumor suppressor proteins neurofibromin (NF1) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) both bind to microtubules and interact with membrane-associated proteins. The effects of recombinant NF1 and APC fragments on vesicle motility were evaluated by measuring fast axonal transport along microtubules in axoplasm from squid giant axons. APC4 (amino acids 1034-2844) reduced only anterograde movements, whereas APC2 (aa 1034-2130) or APC3 (aa 2130-2844) reduced both anterograde and retrograde transport. NF1 had no effect on organelle movement in either direction. Because APC contains multiple cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus phosphorylation motifs, the kinase inhibitor olomoucine was examined. At concentrations in which olomoucine is specific for cyclin-dependent kinases (5 microM), it reduced only anterograde transport, whereas anterograde and retrograde movement were both affected at concentrations at which other kinases are inhibited as well (50 microM). Both anterograde and retrograde transport also were inhibited by histone H1 and KSPXK peptides, substrates for proline-directed kinases, including CDKs. Our data suggest that CDK-like axonal kinases modulate fast anterograde transport and that other axonal kinases may be involved in modulating retrograde transport. The specific effect of APC4 on anterograde transport suggests a model in which the binding of APC to microtubules may limit the activity of axonal CDK kinase or kinases in restricted domains, thereby affecting organelle transport.

  7. A role for cyclin-dependent kinase(s) in the modulation of fast anterograde axonal transport: effects defined by olomoucine and the APC tumor suppressor protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, N.; Bloom, G. S.; Brady, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    Proteins that interact with both cytoskeletal and membrane components are candidates to modulate membrane trafficking. The tumor suppressor proteins neurofibromin (NF1) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) both bind to microtubules and interact with membrane-associated proteins. The effects of recombinant NF1 and APC fragments on vesicle motility were evaluated by measuring fast axonal transport along microtubules in axoplasm from squid giant axons. APC4 (amino acids 1034-2844) reduced only anterograde movements, whereas APC2 (aa 1034-2130) or APC3 (aa 2130-2844) reduced both anterograde and retrograde transport. NF1 had no effect on organelle movement in either direction. Because APC contains multiple cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus phosphorylation motifs, the kinase inhibitor olomoucine was examined. At concentrations in which olomoucine is specific for cyclin-dependent kinases (5 microM), it reduced only anterograde transport, whereas anterograde and retrograde movement were both affected at concentrations at which other kinases are inhibited as well (50 microM). Both anterograde and retrograde transport also were inhibited by histone H1 and KSPXK peptides, substrates for proline-directed kinases, including CDKs. Our data suggest that CDK-like axonal kinases modulate fast anterograde transport and that other axonal kinases may be involved in modulating retrograde transport. The specific effect of APC4 on anterograde transport suggests a model in which the binding of APC to microtubules may limit the activity of axonal CDK kinase or kinases in restricted domains, thereby affecting organelle transport.

  8. Adapalene inhibits the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SHI, XI-NAN; LI, HONGJIAN; YAO, HONG; LIU, XU; LI, LING; LEUNG, KWONG-SAK; KUNG, HSIANG-FU; LIN, MARIE CHIA-MI

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) has been reported to be overexpressed in human colorectal cancer; it is responsible for the G1-to-S-phase transition in the cell cycle and its deregulation is a hallmark of cancer. The present study was the first to use idock, a free and open-source protein-ligand docking software developed by our group, to identify potential CDK2 inhibitors from 4,311 US Food and Drug Administration-approved small molecular drugs with a re-purposing strategy. Among the top compounds identified by idock score, nine were selected for further study. Among them, adapalene (ADA; CD271,6-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-naphtoic acid) exhibited the highest anti-proliferative effects in LoVo and DLD1 human colon cancer cell lines. Consistent with the expected properties of CDK2 inhibitors, the present study demonstrated that ADA significantly increased the G1-phase population and decreased the expression of CDK2, cyclin E and retinoblastoma protein (Rb), as well as the phosphorylation of CDK2 (on Thr-160) and Rb (on Ser-795). Furthermore, the anti-cancer effects of ADA were examined in vivo on xenograft tumors derived from DLD1 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously inoculated in BALB/C nude mice. ADA (20 mg/kg orally) exhibited marked anti-tumor activity, comparable to that of oxaliplatin (40 mg/kg), and dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth (P<0.05), while combined administration of ADA and oxaliplatin produced the highest therapeutic effect. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to indicate that ADA inhibits CDK2 and is a potential candidate drug for the treatment of human colorectal cancer. PMID:26398439

  9. Adapalene inhibits the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xi-Nan; Li, Hongjian; Yao, Hong; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie Chia-Mi

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) has been reported to be overexpressed in human colorectal cancer; it is responsible for the G1‑to‑S‑phase transition in the cell cycle and its deregulation is a hallmark of cancer. The present study was the first to use idock, a free and open‑source protein‑ligand docking software developed by our group, to identify potential CDK2 inhibitors from 4,311 US Food and Drug Administration‑approved small molecular drugs with a re‑purposing strategy. Among the top compounds identified by idock score, nine were selected for further study. Among them, adapalene (ADA; CD271,6‑[3‑(1‑adamantyl)‑4‑methoxyphenyl]‑2‑naphtoic acid) exhibited the highest anti‑proliferative effects in LOVO and DLD1 human colon cancer cell lines. Consistent with the expected properties of CDK2 inhibitors, the present study demonstrated that ADA significantly increased the G1‑phase population and decreased the expression of CDK2, cyclin E and retinoblastoma protein (Rb), as well as the phosphorylation of CDK2 (on Thr‑160) and Rb (on Ser‑795). Furthermore, the anti‑cancer effects of ADA were examined in vivo on xenograft tumors derived from DLD1 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously inoculated in BALB/C nude mice. ADA (20 mg/kg orally) exhibited marked anti‑tumor activity, comparable to that of oxaliplatin (40 mg/kg), and dose‑dependently inhibited tumor growth (P<0.05), while combined administration of ADA and oxaliplatin produced the highest therapeutic effect. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to indicate that ADA inhibits CDK2 and is a potential candidate drug for the treatment of human colorectal cancer.

  10. A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, dinaciclib in preclinical treatment models of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Fu; Lin, Jen-Der; Hsueh, Chuen; Chou, Ting-Chao; Wong, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Background We explored the therapeutic effects of dinaciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, in the treatment of thyroid cancer. Materials and methods Seven cell lines originating from three pathologic types of thyroid cancer (papillary, follicular and anaplastic) were studied. The cytotoxicity of dinaciclib was measured using a lactate dehydrogenase assay. The expression of proteins associated with cell cycle and apoptosis was assessed using Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Cell cycle distribution was measured by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Apoptosis and caspase-3 activity were measured by flow cytometry and fluorometric assay. Mice bearing flank anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) were treated with intraperitoneal injections of dinaciclib. Results Dinaciclib inhibited thyroid cancer cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Dinaciclib had a low median-effect dose (≤ 16.0 nM) to inhibit cell proliferation in seven thyroid cancer cell lines. Dinaciclib decreased CDK1, cyclin B1, and Aurora A expression, induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, and induced accumulation of prophase mitotic cells. Dinaciclib decreased Mcl-1, Bcl-xL and survivin expression, activated caspase-3 and induced apoptosis. In vivo, the growth of ATC xenograft tumors was retarded in a dose-dependent fashion with daily dinaciclib treatment. Higher-dose dinaciclib (50 mg/kg) caused slight, but significant weight loss, which was absent with lower-dose dinaciclib (40 mg/kg) treatment. Conclusions Dinaciclib inhibited thyroid cancer proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. These findings support dinaciclib as a potential drug for further studies in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with refractory thyroid cancer. PMID:28207834

  11. Regulation of a Myb Transcription Factor by Cyclin-dependent Kinase 2 in Giardia lamblia*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chao-Cheng; Su, Li-Hsin; Huang, Yu-Chang; Pan, Yu-Jiao; Sun, Chin-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia parasitizes the human small intestine to cause diseases. It undergoes differentiation into infectious cysts by responding to intestinal stimulation. How the activated signal transduction pathways relate to encystation stimulation remain largely unknown. During encystation, genes encoding cyst wall proteins (CWPs) are coordinately up-regulated by a Myb2 transcription factor. Because cell differentiation is linked to cell cycle regulation, we tried to understand the role of cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), in encystation. We found that the recombinant Myb2 was phosphorylated by Cdk-associated complexes and the levels of phosphorylation increased significantly during encystation. We have identified a putative cdk gene (cdk2) by searching the Giardia genome database. Cdk2 was found to localize in the cytoplasm with higher expression during encystation. Interestingly, overexpression of Cdk2 resulted in a significant increase of the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. In addition, the Cdk2-associated complexes can phosphorylate Myb2 and the levels of phosphorylation increased significantly during encystation. Mutations of important catalytic residues of Cdk2 resulted in a significant decrease of kinase activity and ability of inducing cyst formation. Addition of a Cdk inhibitor, purvalanol A, significantly decreased the Cdk2 kinase activity and the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. Our results suggest that the Cdk2 pathway may be involved in phosphorylation of Myb2, leading to activation of the Myb2 function and up-regulation of cwp genes during encystation. The results provide insights into the use of Cdk inhibitory drugs in disruption of Giardia differentiation into cysts. PMID:22167200

  12. Identification of Candidate Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) Substrates in Mitosis by Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Adam; Adamo, Mark E; Cheng, Chao; Kettenbach, Arminja N

    2016-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is an essential regulator of many mitotic processes including the reorganization of the cytoskeleton, chromosome segregation, and formation and separation of daughter cells. Deregulation of Cdk1 activity results in severe defects in these processes. Although the role of Cdk1 in mitosis is well established, only a limited number of Cdk1 substrates have been identified in mammalian cells. To increase our understanding of Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation pathways in mitosis, we conducted a quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis in mitotic HeLa cells using two small molecule inhibitors of Cdk1, Flavopiridol and RO-3306. In these analyses, we identified a total of 24,840 phosphopeptides on 4,273 proteins, of which 1,215 phosphopeptides on 551 proteins were significantly reduced by 2.5-fold or more upon Cdk1 inhibitor addition. Comparison of phosphopeptide quantification upon either inhibitor treatment revealed a high degree of correlation (R(2) value of 0.87) between the different datasets. Motif enrichment analysis of significantly regulated phosphopeptides revealed enrichment of canonical Cdk1 kinase motifs. Interestingly, the majority of proteins identified in this analysis contained two or more Cdk1 inhibitor-sensitive phosphorylation sites, were highly connected with other candidate Cdk1 substrates, were enriched at specific subcellular structures, or were part of protein complexes as identified by the CORUM database. Furthermore, candidate Cdk1 substrates were enriched in G2 and M phase-specific genes. Finally, we validated a subset of candidate Cdk1 substrates by in vitro kinase assays. Our findings provide a valuable resource for the cell signaling and mitosis research communities and greatly increase our knowledge of Cdk1 substrates and Cdk1-dependent signaling pathways. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Regulation of a Myb transcription factor by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chao-Cheng; Su, Li-Hsin; Huang, Yu-Chang; Pan, Yu-Jiao; Sun, Chin-Hung

    2012-02-03

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia parasitizes the human small intestine to cause diseases. It undergoes differentiation into infectious cysts by responding to intestinal stimulation. How the activated signal transduction pathways relate to encystation stimulation remain largely unknown. During encystation, genes encoding cyst wall proteins (CWPs) are coordinately up-regulated by a Myb2 transcription factor. Because cell differentiation is linked to cell cycle regulation, we tried to understand the role of cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), in encystation. We found that the recombinant Myb2 was phosphorylated by Cdk-associated complexes and the levels of phosphorylation increased significantly during encystation. We have identified a putative cdk gene (cdk2) by searching the Giardia genome database. Cdk2 was found to localize in the cytoplasm with higher expression during encystation. Interestingly, overexpression of Cdk2 resulted in a significant increase of the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. In addition, the Cdk2-associated complexes can phosphorylate Myb2 and the levels of phosphorylation increased significantly during encystation. Mutations of important catalytic residues of Cdk2 resulted in a significant decrease of kinase activity and ability of inducing cyst formation. Addition of a Cdk inhibitor, purvalanol A, significantly decreased the Cdk2 kinase activity and the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. Our results suggest that the Cdk2 pathway may be involved in phosphorylation of Myb2, leading to activation of the Myb2 function and up-regulation of cwp genes during encystation. The results provide insights into the use of Cdk inhibitory drugs in disruption of Giardia differentiation into cysts.

  14. Activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 mediates orofacial mechanical hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a unique member of the serine/threonine kinase family. This kinase plays an important role in neuronal development, and deregulation of its activity leads to neurodegenerative disorders. Cdk5 also serves an important function in the regulation of nociceptive signaling. Our previous studies revealed that the expression of Cdk5 and its activator, p35, is upregulated in nociceptive neurons during peripheral inflammation. The aim of the present study was to characterize the involvement of Cdk5 in orofacial pain. Since mechanical hyperalgesia is the distinctive sign of many orofacial pain conditions, we adapted an existing orofacial stimulation test to assess the behavioral responses to mechanical stimulation in the trigeminal region of the transgenic mice with either reduced or increased Cdk5 activity. Results Mice overexpressing or lacking p35, an activator of Cdk5, showed altered phenotype in response to noxious mechanical stimulation in the trigeminal area. Mice with increased Cdk5 activity displayed aversive behavior to mechanical stimulation as indicated by a significant decrease in reward licking events and licking time. The number of reward licking/facial contact events was significantly decreased in these mice as the mechanical intensity increased. By contrast, mice deficient in Cdk5 activity displayed mechanical hypoalgesia. Conclusions Collectively, our findings demonstrate for the first time the important role of Cdk5 in orofacial mechanical nociception. Modulation of Cdk5 activity in primary sensory neurons makes it an attractive potential target for the development of novel analgesics that could be used to treat multiple orofacial pain conditions. PMID:24359609

  15. The cell cycle, cyclin-dependent kinases, and viral infections: new horizons and unexpected connections.

    PubMed

    Schang, Luis M

    2003-01-01

    The genomes of small DNA viruses such as papilloma and polyomaviruses code for few or no DNA replication proteins. Consequently, these viruses depend on cellular DNA replication proteins to replicate their genomes and replicate only when the infected cell progresses into S-phase, when these proteins are active. As a consequence of this strict dependence, the relationship between replication of the small DNA viruses and the cell cycle was obvious from the very early studies. The genomes of larger DNA viruses such as adeno- and herpes-viruses, in contrast, encode many of the proteins required for DNA replication. Some of the larger DNA viruses such as adenoviruses, however, also replicate only in S-phase because expression of viral DNA replication proteins is regulated by cellular factors that are activated in S-phase. Other large DNA viruses such as herpes simplex viruses (HSV) can replicate in arrested cells such as neurons, without inducing progression into S-phase. The relationships between cell cycle and replication of these last viruses are, thus, so subtle that their replication was long thought to be independent from cellular proteins whose activities are regulated in a cell cycle dependent manner. In contrast to this hypothesis, recent studies have shown that replication of HSV and other large DNA viruses requires cellular proteins whose activities are normally regulated in a cell cycle dependent manner, such as the cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks). Many excellent reviews on the interactions between cellular proteins involved in cell cycle regulation and smaller DNA viruses (parvo, papilloma, polyoma and adenoviruses) have been published (for example, see (1, 2)). Many reviews on cell cycle regulation also discuss the interactions between the cell cycle and the smaller DNA viruses (for example, see (3-5)). Herein, we will review these relationships only briefly, while focusing on the interactions between cell cycle proteins such as cdks and herpes-, retro

  16. Elevated cyclin A associated kinase activity promotes sensitivity of metastatic human cancer cells to DNA antimetabolite drug.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Yin, Hailin; Panandikar, Ashwini; Gandhi, Varsha; Sen, Subrata

    2015-08-01

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle in successful systemic therapy of metastatic cancer. We analyzed the involvement of cell cycle regulatory proteins in eliciting response to N (phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA), an inhibitor of de novo pyrimidine synthesis, in two metastatic variants of human cancer cell line MDA-MB-435 isolated from lung (L-2) and brain (Br-1) in nude mouse, respectively. L-2 and Br-l cells markedly differed in their sensitivity to PALA. While both cell types displayed an initial S phase delay/arrest, Br-l cells proliferated but most L-2 cells underwent apoptosis. There was distinct elevation in cyclin A, and phosphorylated Rb proteins concomitant with decreased expression of bcl-2 protein in the PALA treated L-2 cells undergoing apoptosis. Markedly elevated cyclin A associated and cdk2 kinase activities together with increased E2F1-DNA binding were detected in these L-2 cells. Induced ectopic cyclin A expression sensitized Br-l cells to PALA by activating an apoptotic pathway. Our findings demonstrate that elevated expression of cyclin A and associated kinase can activate an apoptotic pathway in cells exposed to DNA antimetabolites. Abrogation of this pathway can lead to resistance against these drugs in metastatic variants of human carcinoma cells.

  17. CK2 regulates in vitro the activity of the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1.

    PubMed

    Barberis, Matteo; Pagano, Mario A; Gioia, Luca De; Marin, Oriano; Vanoni, Marco; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Alberghina, Lilia

    2005-11-04

    We have previously demonstrated that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (Cki) Sic1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is phosphorylated in vitro by the CK2 kinase on Ser(201) residue. Moreover, we have collected evidence showing that Sic1 is functionally and structurally related to mammalian Cki p27(Kip1) and binds to the mammalian Cdk2/cyclin A complex with a similar mode of inhibition. In this paper, we use SPR analysis to investigate the binding of Sic1 to the catatytic and regulatory subunits of CK2. Evidence is presented showing that phosphorylation of Sic1 at the CK2 consensus site QES(201)EDEED increases the binding of a Sic1-derived peptide to the Cdk2/cyclin A complex, a functional homologue of the yeast Cdk1/Clb5,6. Moreover, Sic1 fully phosphorylated in vitro on Ser(201) by CK2 is shown to be a stronger inhibitor of the Cdk/cyclin complexes than the unphosphorylated protein. Taken together, these data disclose the possibility that CK2 plays a role in the regulation of Sic1 activity.

  18. Interferon-induces expression of cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitors p21WAF1 and p27Kip1 that prevent activation of cyclin-dependent kinase by CDK-activating kinase (CAK).

    PubMed

    Mandal, M; Bandyopadhyay, D; Goepfert, T M; Kumar, R

    1998-01-15

    To understand the mechanism of interferon (IFN)-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression, we have earlier shown that IFN-alpha enhances the expression of underphosphorylated retinoblastoma protein by inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK-2) activity (Kumar and Atlas, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 89, 6599-6603, 1992; Zhang and Kumar, Biochem. Biophysi. Res. Comm., 200, 522-528, 1994). In the studies presented here, we investigated the mechanism of inhibition of CDKs in IFN-treated cells by delineating the potential role(s) of CDK-inhibitors (CKIs) and CDK-activating kinase (CAK). We report that IFN-alpha inhibits the H-1 kinase activity associated with CDK-4 or CDK-2 due to induction of expression of CDK-inhibitor p21WAF1 (but not p27Kip1) as its immunodepletion from IFN-treated extracts restored the CDK-associated H-1 kinase activity. In addition, we also show that IFN-gamma induces expression of CDK-inhibitors p21WAF1 and p27Kip1 and inhibited the H-1 kinase activity associated with CDK-2 or CDK-4. The observed IFN-gamma-mediated inhibition of CDK-2 and CDK-4 kinase activity was due to enhanced interactions with p21WAF1 and p27Kip1, respectively. We also demonstrated that IFN-induced CKIs prevent CAK from activating the CDK-2 as immunodepletion of induced CKIs from the inhibitory extracts resulted in the restoration of CAK-mediated activation of CDK-2.

  19. AP-1 blockade in breast cancer cells causes cell cycle arrest by suppressing G1 cyclin expression and reducing cyclin-dependent kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Lu, Chunhua; Shen, Qiang; Munoz-Medellin, Debbie; Kim, Heetae; Brown, Powel H

    2004-10-28

    The AP-1 transcription factor is a central component of signal transduction pathways in many cells, although the exact role of AP-1 in controlling cell growth and malignant transformation is unknown. We have previously shown that AP-1 complexes are activated by peptide and steroid growth factors in both normal and malignant breast cells, and that blocking AP-1 by overexpressing a dominant-negative form of cJun (cJun-DN, TAM67) inhibits breast cancer cell growth both in vivo and in vitro. We hypothesized that TAM67 inhibits cell growth by altering the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, thus causing a cell cycle block. In the present study, we used clones of MCF7 breast cancer cells that express TAM67 under the control of an inducible promoter. First, we determined the effect of AP-1 blockade on cell growth, then we performed 3H-thymidine incorporation and flow cytometry assays to investigate whether TAM67 inhibits the cell cycle. We observed that in the presence of serum TAM67 inhibited cell growth and caused a block in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Next, we performed Western-blotting and CDK kinase assays to determine the effects of TAM67 on retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation, the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, and CDK activity. We discovered that TAM67 inhibited Rb phosphorylation and reduced E2F activity. We also found that TAM67 decreased the expression of D and E cyclins, reduced CDK2 and CDK4 activity, and increased the CDK inhibitor p27. The studies of gene expression at the RNA level showed that TAM67 decreased cyclin Ds mRNA expression. Our study suggests that in the presence of serum, TAM67 inhibits breast cancer growth predominantly by inducing inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (such as p27) and by reducing the expression of the cyclins involved in transitioning from G1 into S phase of the cell cycle. These studies lay the foundation for future attempt to develop new agents for the treatment and prevention of breast

  20. Cyclin G2 Is Degraded through the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Mediates the Antiproliferative Effect of Activin Receptor-like Kinase 7

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guoxiong; Bernaudo, Stefanie; Fu, Guodong; Lee, Daniel Y.; Yang, Burton B.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously reported that Nodal, a member of the TGF-β superfamily, acts through activin receptor-like kinase 7 (ALK7) to inhibit ovarian cancer cell proliferation. To determine the mechanism underlying their effects, a cell cycle gene array was performed and cyclin G2 mRNA was found to be strongly up-regulated by Nodal and ALK7. To study the function and regulation of cyclin G2 in ovarian cancer cells, expression constructs were generated. We found that cyclin G2 protein level decreased rapidly after transfection, and this decrease was prevented by 26S proteasome inhibitors. Immunoprecipitation and pull-down studies showed that ubiquitin, Skp1, and Skp2 formed complexes with cyclin G2. Knockdown of Skp2 by siRNA increased, whereas overexpression of Skp2 decreased cyclin G2 levels. Nodal and ALK7 decreased the expression of Skp1 and Skp2 and increased cyclin G2 levels. Overexpression of cyclin G2 inhibited cell proliferation whereas cyclin G2-siRNA reduced the antiproliferative effect of Nodal and ALK7. Taken together, these findings provide strong evidence that cyclin G2 is degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway and that Skp2 plays a role in regulating cyclin G2 levels. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that the antiproliferative effect of Nodal/ALK7 on ovarian cancer cells is in part mediated by cyclin G2. PMID:18784254

  1. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AT7519 accelerates neutrophil apoptosis in sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dorward, David A; Felton, Jennifer M; Robb, Calum T; Craven, Thomas; Kipari, Tiina; Walsh, Timothy S; Haslett, Christopher; Kefala, Kallirroi; Rossi, Adriano G; Lucas, Christopher D

    2017-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a neutrophil-dominant disorder with no effective pharmacological therapies. While the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AT7519 induces neutrophil apoptosis to promote inflammation resolution in preclinical models of lung inflammation, its potential efficacy in ARDS has not been examined. Untreated peripheral blood sepsis-related ARDS neutrophils demonstrated prolonged survival after 20 hours in vitro culture. AT7519 was able to override this phenotype to induce apoptosis in ARDS neutrophils with reduced expression of the pro-survival protein Mcl-1. We demonstrate the first pharmacological compound to induce neutrophil apoptosis in sepsis-related ARDS, highlighting cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors as potential novel therapeutic agents. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AT7519 accelerates neutrophil apoptosis in sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Felton, Jennifer M; Robb, Calum T; Craven, Thomas; Kipari, Tiina; Walsh, Timothy S; Haslett, Christopher; Kefala, Kallirroi; Rossi, Adriano G; Lucas, Christopher D

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a neutrophil-dominant disorder with no effective pharmacological therapies. While the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AT7519 induces neutrophil apoptosis to promote inflammation resolution in preclinical models of lung inflammation, its potential efficacy in ARDS has not been examined. Untreated peripheral blood sepsis-related ARDS neutrophils demonstrated prolonged survival after 20 hours in vitro culture. AT7519 was able to override this phenotype to induce apoptosis in ARDS neutrophils with reduced expression of the pro-survival protein Mcl-1. We demonstrate the first pharmacological compound to induce neutrophil apoptosis in sepsis-related ARDS, highlighting cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors as potential novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27965411

  3. Preclinical biomarkers for a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor translate to candidate pharmacodynamic biomarkers in phase I patients.

    PubMed

    Berkofsky-Fessler, Windy; Nguyen, Tri Q; Delmar, Paul; Molnos, Juliette; Kanwal, Charu; DePinto, Wanda; Rosinski, James; McLoughlin, Patricia; Ritland, Steve; DeMario, Mark; Tobon, Krishna; Reidhaar-Olson, John F; Rueger, Ruediger; Hilton, Holly

    2009-09-01

    A genomics-based approach to identify pharmacodynamic biomarkers was used for a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory drug. R547 is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with a potent antiproliferative effect at pharmacologically relevant doses and is currently in phase I clinical trials. Using preclinical data derived from microarray experiments, we identified pharmacodynamic biomarkers to test in blood samples from patients in clinical trials. These candidate biomarkers were chosen based on several criteria: relevance to the mechanism of action of R547, dose responsiveness in preclinical models, and measurable expression in blood samples. We identified 26 potential biomarkers of R547 action and tested their clinical validity in patient blood samples by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Based on the results, eight genes (FLJ44342, CD86, EGR1, MKI67, CCNB1, JUN, HEXIM1, and PFAAP5) were selected as dose-responsive pharmacodynamic biomarkers for phase II clinical trials.

  4. Molecular cloning and identification of two types of hamster cyclin-dependent kinases: cdk2 and cdk2L.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, E; Sekiguchi, T; Yamashita, K; Nishimoto, T

    1993-12-30

    We isolated two types of hamster cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) cDNAs from BHK21 cells derived from Golden hamsters. One type of cdk2 (cdk2hm) encodes the 32 kDa protein consisting of 298 predicted amino acids and shows strong homology to the cdk2 cDNAs of humans and Xenopus. The other cdk2 (cdk2Lhm) encodes the 38 kDa protein containing the insertion of 48 amino acids in the cdk2hm protein. Immunoblotting analysis suggested that these two types of cdk2 protein exist in mammalian cells. The cdk2hm has the activity of protein kinase, while the cdk2Lhm does not, however, both bind with cyclin E.

  5. S-nitrosylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) regulates its kinase activity and dendrite growth during neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Yu, Pei-Chun; Tsang, Anthony H K; Chen, Yu; Fu, Amy K Y; Fu, Wing-Yu; Chung, Kenny K; Ip, Nancy Y

    2010-10-27

    Precise regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase family, is critical for proper neuronal development and functions. Cdk5 is activated through its association with the neuron-specific activator p35 or p39. Nonetheless, how its kinase activity is regulated in neurons is not well understood. In this study, we found that Cdk5 activity is regulated by S-nitrosylation, a post-translational modification of protein that affects a plethora of neuronal functions. S-nitrosylation of Cdk5 occurs at Cys83, which is one of the critical amino acids within the ATP-binding pocket of the kinase. Upon S-nitrosylation, Cdk5 exhibits reduced kinase activity, whereas mutation of Cys83 to Ala on Cdk5 renders the kinase refractory to such inhibition. Importantly, S-nitrosylated Cdk5 can be detected in the mouse brain, and blocking the S-nitrosylation of Cdk5 in cultured hippocampal neurons enhances dendritic growth and branching. Together, our findings reveal an important role of S-nitrosylation in regulating Cdk5 kinase activity and dendrite growth in neurons during development.

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines as selective cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Kirk L.; Reno, Michael J.; Alberti, Jennifer B.; Price, Daniel J.; Kane-Carson, Laurie S.; Knick, Victoria B.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Hassell, Anne M.; Veal, James M.; Davis, Stephen T.; Griffin, Robert J.; Peel, Michael R.

    2010-10-01

    A novel series of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines have been synthesized and identified as cyclin dependant kinase inhibitors potentially useful for the treatment of solid tumors. Modification of the hinge-binding amine or the C(2)- and C(6)-substitutions on the pyrazolopyridazine core provided potent inhibitors of CDK4 and demonstrated enzyme selectivity against VEGFR-2 and GSK3{beta}.

  7. Lack of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 inhibits c-myc tumorigenic activities in epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Macias, Everardo; Rounbehler, Robert; Sicinski, Piotr; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Johnson, David G; Conti, Claudio J; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2004-09-01

    The proto-oncogene c-myc encodes a transcription factor that is implicated in the regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and that has also been found to be deregulated in several forms of human and experimental tumors. We have shown that forced expression of c-myc in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice (K5-Myc) resulted in keratinocyte hyperproliferation and the development of spontaneous tumors in the skin and oral cavity. Although a number of genes involved in cancer development are regulated by c-myc, the actual mechanisms leading to Myc-induced neoplasia are not known. Among the genes regulated by Myc is the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) gene. Interestingly, previous studies from our laboratory showed that the overexpression of CDK4 led to keratinocyte hyperproliferation, although no spontaneous tumor development was observed. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that CDK4 may be one of the critical downstream genes involved in Myc carcinogenesis. Our results showed that CDK4 inhibition in K5-Myc transgenic mice resulted in the complete inhibition of tumor development, suggesting that CDK4 is a critical mediator of tumor formation induced by deregulated Myc. Furthermore, a lack of CDK4 expression resulted in marked decreases in epidermal thickness and keratinocyte proliferation compared to the results obtained for K5-Myc littermates. Biochemical analysis of the K5-Myc epidermis showed that CDK4 mediates the proliferative activities of Myc by sequestering p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 and thereby indirectly activating CDK2 kinase activity. These results show that CDK4 mediates the proliferative and oncogenic activities of Myc in vivo through a mechanism that involves the sequestration of specific CDK inhibitors.

  8. Bioinformatic survey for new physiological substrates of Cyclin-dependent kinase 5.

    PubMed

    Bórquez, Daniel A; Olmos, Cristina; Álvarez, Sebastián; Di Genova, Alex; Maass, Alejandro; González-Billault, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase predominantly active in the nervous system where it regulates several processes such as neuronal migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal guidance, and neurotransmission. We constructed a position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) based on a dataset of sites shown to be phosphorylated both in vivo and in vitro by Cdk5. This dataset was curated manually through an exhaustive search of published experimental data. We then used this PSSM to perform a search in the mouse proteome through Scansite, a web-based tool for matching sequence patterns in large databases. Considering a stringent cut-off score of 0.5, we identified 354 new putative sites present in 291 proteins. In order to assess the robustness of our results, ten random subsets (of 80 sites each) of the original dataset were used to construct new PSSMs, which were then used as input for a new Scansite search, leading to the recovery of 81% of the 354 sites by at least 5 PSSMs. In order to reduce the number of false positives in our sequence-based approach, we evaluated which of these predicted sites were phosphorylated in vivo as determined by multiple phosphoproteomics studies carried out through mass spectrometry and available in the PhosphoSitePlus database. This step resulted in a very promising list of 132 putative phosphorylation sites for Cdk5, of which, 51 are specifically phosphorylated in brain tissue, and some are involved in functions regulated by Cdk5 such as axonal growth, synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission. Other phosphorylation sites in our list suggest that Cdk5 might regulate processes through mechanisms not previously recognized such as the control of mRNA splicing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Locomotor conditioning by amphetamine requires cyclin-dependent kinase 5 signaling in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Singer, Bryan F; Neugebauer, Nichole M; Forneris, Justin; Rodvelt, Kelli R; Li, Dongdong; Bubula, Nancy; Vezina, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Intermittent systemic exposure to psychostimulants leads to several forms of long-lasting behavioral plasticity including nonassociative sensitization and associative conditioning. In the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), the protein serine/threonine kinase cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and its phosphorylation target, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor kalirin-7 (Kal7), may contribute to the neuroadaptations underlying the formation of conditioned associations. Pharmacological inhibition of Cdk5 in the NAcc prevents the increases in dendritic spine density normally observed in this site following repeated cocaine. Mice lacking the Kal7 gene display similar effects. As increases in spine density may relate to the formation of associative memories and both Cdk5 and Kal7 regulate the generation of spines following repeated drug exposure, we hypothesized that either inhibiting Cdk5 or preventing its phosphorylation of Kal7 in the NAcc may prevent the induction of drug conditioning. In the present experiments, blockade in rats of NAcc Cdk5 activity with roscovitine (40 nmol/0.5 μl/side) prior to each of 4 injections of amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg; i.p.) prevented the accrual of contextual locomotor conditioning but spared the induction of locomotor sensitization as revealed on tests conducted one week later. Similarly, transient viral expression in the NAcc exclusively during amphetamine exposure of a threonine-alanine mutant form of Kal7 [mKal7(T1590A)] that is not phosphorylated by Cdk5 also prevented the accrual of contextual conditioning and spared the induction of sensitization. These results indicate that signaling via Cdk5 and Kal7 in the NAcc is necessary for the formation of context-drug associations, potentially through the modulation of dendritic spine dynamics in this site.

  10. Actin interaction and regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p35 complex activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiqing; Tsutsumi, Koji; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Estes, Katherine A; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) plays a critical role during neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity, and neurodegeneration. Cdk5 activity depends on association with neuronal proteins p35 and p25, a proteolytic product of p35. Cdk5 regulates the actin cytoskeletal dynamics that are essential for neuronal migration, neuritic growth, and synaptogenesis. However, little is known about the interaction of actin and Cdk5 and its effect on neuronal Cdk5 activity. In a previous study, we observed that Cdk5/p35 activity is negatively correlated with co-immunoprecipitated F-actin (filamentous actin) amounts in the mouse brain, and suggested that F-actin inhibits the formation of the Cdk5/p35 complex [Journal of Neuroscience (2008) vol. 28, p. 14511]. The experiments reported here were undertaken to elucidate the relationship between actin and the formation of the Cdk5/p35 complex and its activity. Instead of an F-actin-mediated inhibition, we propose that G-actin (globular actin) in the F-actin preparations is responsible for inhibiting Cdk5/p35 and Cdk5/p25 kinase activity. We found that F-actin binds to p35 but not p25 or Cdk5. We have shown that G-actin binds directly to Cdk5 without disrupting the formation of the Cdk5/p35 or Cdk5/p25 complexes. G-actin potently suppressed Cdk5/p35 and Cdk5/p25 activity when either histone H1 or purified human tau protein were used as substrates, indicating a substrate-independent inhibitory effect of G-actin on Cdk5 activity. Finally, G-actin suppressed the activity of Cdk5 immunoprecipitated from wild type and p35-deficient mouse brain, suggesting that G-actin suppresses endogenous Cdk5 activity in a p35-independent manner. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of actin cytoskeletal regulation of Cdk5/p35 activity.

  11. p35 and p39 are essential for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 function during neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Ko, J; Humbert, S; Bronson, R T; Takahashi, S; Kulkarni, A B; Li, E; Tsai, L H

    2001-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) plays a pivotal role in brain development and neuronal migration. Cdk5 is abundant in postmitotic, terminally differentiated neurons. The ability of Cdk5 to phosphorylate substrates is dependent on activation by its neuronal-specific activators p35 and p39. There exist striking differences in the phenotypic severity of Cdk5-deficient mice and p35-deficient mice. Cdk5-null mutants show a more severe disruption of lamination in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. In addition, Cdk5-null mice display perinatal lethality, whereas p35-null mice are viable. These discrepancies have been attributed to the function of other Cdk5 activators, such as p39. To understand the roles of p39 and p35, we created p39-null mice and p35/p39 compound-mutant mice. Interestingly, p39-null mice show no obvious detectable abnormalities, whereas p35(-/-)p39(-/-) double-null mutants are perinatal lethal. We show here that the p35(-/-)p39(-/-) mutants exhibit phenotypes identical to those of the Cdk5-null mutant mice. Other compound-mutant mice with intermediate phenotypes allow us to determine the distinct and redundant functions between p35 and p39. Our data strongly suggest that p35 and p39 are essential for Cdk5 activity during the development of the nervous system. Thus, p35 and p39 are likely to be the principal, if not the only, activators of Cdk5.

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B regulates efferocytosis and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Yoko; Downing, Kelly; Kundu, Ramendra; Miller, Clint; Dewey, Frederick; Lancero, Hope; Raaz, Uwe; Perisic, Ljubica; Hedin, Ulf; Schadt, Eric; Maegdefessel, Lars; Quertermous, Tom; Leeper, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation at the chromosome 9p21 risk locus promotes cardiovascular disease; however, it is unclear how or which proteins encoded at this locus contribute to disease. We have previously demonstrated that loss of one candidate gene at this locus, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B (Cdkn2b), in mice promotes vascular SMC apoptosis and aneurysm progression. Here, we investigated the role of Cdnk2b in atherogenesis and found that in a mouse model of atherosclerosis, deletion of Cdnk2b promoted advanced development of atherosclerotic plaques composed of large necrotic cores. Furthermore, human carriers of the 9p21 risk allele had reduced expression of CDKN2B in atherosclerotic plaques, which was associated with impaired expression of calreticulin, a ligand required for activation of engulfment receptors on phagocytic cells. As a result of decreased calreticulin, CDKN2B-deficient apoptotic bodies were resistant to efferocytosis and not efficiently cleared by neighboring macrophages. These uncleared SMCs elicited a series of proatherogenic juxtacrine responses associated with increased foam cell formation and inflammatory cytokine elaboration. The addition of exogenous calreticulin reversed defects associated with loss of Cdkn2b and normalized engulfment of Cdkn2b-deficient cells. Together, these data suggest that loss of CDKN2B promotes atherosclerosis by increasing the size and complexity of the lipid-laden necrotic core through impaired efferocytosis. PMID:24531546

  13. Cdc14 phosphatases preferentially dephosphorylate a subset of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) sites containing phosphoserine.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, Steven C; Hall, Hana; Martinez, Juan S; Eissler, Christie L; Hinrichsen, Thomas H; Rossie, Sandra; Parker, Laurie L; Hall, Mark C; Charbonneau, Harry

    2012-01-13

    Mitotic cell division is controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), which phosphorylate hundreds of protein substrates responsible for executing the division program. Cdk inactivation and reversal of Cdk-catalyzed phosphorylation are universal requirements for completing and exiting mitosis and resetting the cell cycle machinery. Mechanisms that define the timing and order of Cdk substrate dephosphorylation remain poorly understood. Cdc14 phosphatases have been implicated in Cdk inactivation and are thought to be generally specific for Cdk-type phosphorylation sites. We show that budding yeast Cdc14 possesses a strong and unusual preference for phosphoserine over phosphothreonine at Pro-directed sites in vitro. Using serine to threonine substitutions in the Cdk consensus sites of the Cdc14 substrate Acm1, we demonstrate that phosphoserine specificity exists in vivo. Furthermore, it appears to be a conserved property of all Cdc14 family phosphatases. An invariant active site residue was identified that sterically restricts phosphothreonine binding and is largely responsible for phosphoserine selectivity. Optimal Cdc14 substrates also possessed a basic residue at the +3 position relative to the phosphoserine, whereas substrates lacking this basic residue were not effectively hydrolyzed. The intrinsic selectivity of Cdc14 may help establish the order of Cdk substrate dephosphorylation during mitotic exit and contribute to roles in other cellular processes.

  14. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1a (p21) Modulates Response to Cocaine and Motivated Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Scholpa, Natalie E.; Briggs, Sherri B.; Wagner, John J.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the functional role of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a (Cdkn1a or p21) in cocaine-induced responses using a knockout mouse model. Acute locomotor activity after cocaine administration (15 mg/kg, i.p.) was decreased in p21−/− mice, whereas cocaine-induced place preference was enhanced. Interestingly, κ-opioid–induced place aversion was also significantly enhanced. Concentration-dependent analysis of locomotor activity in response to cocaine demonstrated a rightward shift in the p21−/− mice. Pretreatment with a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist did not alter the enhancement of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in p21−/− mice, indicating a lack of involvement of serotonergic signaling in this response. Cocaine exposure increased p21 expression exclusively in the ventral sector of the hippocampus of rodents after either contingent or noncontingent drug administration. Increased p21 expression was accompanied by increased histone acetylation of the p21 promoter region in rats. Finally, increased neurogenesis in the dorsal hippocampus of p21−/− mice was also observed. These results show that functional loss of p21 altered the acute locomotor response to cocaine and the conditioned responses to either rewarding or aversive stimuli. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a previously unreported involvement of p21 in modulating responses to cocaine and in motivated behaviors. PMID:26791604

  15. A novel mechanism for regulating hepatic glycogen synthesis involving serotonin and cyclin-dependent kinase-5.

    PubMed

    Tudhope, Susan J; Wang, Chung-Chi; Petrie, John L; Potts, Lloyd; Malcomson, Fiona; Kieswich, Julius; Yaqoob, Muhammad M; Arden, Catherine; Hampson, Laura J; Agius, Loranne

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic autonomic nerves regulate postprandial hepatic glucose uptake, but the signaling pathways remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) exerts stimulatory and inhibitory effects on hepatic glucose disposal. Ligands of diverse 5-HT receptors were used to identify signaling pathway(s) regulating glucose metabolism in hepatocytes. 5-HT had stimulatory and inhibitory effects on glycogen synthesis in hepatocytes mediated by 5-HT1/2A and 5-HT2B receptors, respectively. Agonists of 5-HT1/2A receptors lowered blood glucose and increased hepatic glycogen after oral glucose loading and also stimulated glycogen synthesis in freshly isolated hepatocytes with greater efficacy than 5-HT. This effect was blocked by olanzapine, an antagonist of 5-HT1/2A receptors. It was mediated by activation of phosphorylase phosphatase, inactivation of glycogen phosphorylase, and activation of glycogen synthase. Unlike insulin action, it was not associated with stimulation of glycolysis and was counteracted by cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors. A role for cdk5 was supported by adaptive changes in the coactivator protein p35 and by elevated glycogen synthesis during overexpression of p35/cdk5. These results support a novel mechanism for serotonin stimulation of hepatic glycogenesis involving cdk5. The opposing effects of serotonin, mediated by distinct 5-HT receptors, could explain why drugs targeting serotonin function can cause either diabetes or hypoglycemia in humans.

  16. Identification of a novel subgroup of melanomas with KIT/cyclin-dependent kinase-4 overexpression.

    PubMed

    Smalley, Keiran S M; Contractor, Rooha; Nguyen, Thiennga K; Xiao, Min; Edwards, Robin; Muthusamy, Viswanathan; King, Alastair J; Flaherty, Keith T; Bosenberg, Marcus; Herlyn, Meenhard; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2008-07-15

    Although many melanomas harbor either activating mutations in BRAF or NRAS, there remains a substantial, yet little known, group of tumors without either mutation. Here, we used a genomic strategy to define a novel group of melanoma cell lines with co-overexpression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and KIT. Although this subgroup lacked any known KIT mutations, they had high phospho-KIT receptor expression, indicating receptor activity. Quantitative PCR confirmed the existence of a similar KIT/CDK4 subgroup in human melanoma samples. Pharmacologic studies showed the KIT/CDK4-overexpressing subgroup to be resistant to BRAF inhibitors but sensitive to imatinib in both in vitro and in vivo melanoma models. Mechanistically, imatinib treatment led to increased apoptosis and G(1) phase cell cycle arrest associated with the inhibition of phospho-ERK and increased expression of p27(KIP). Other melanoma cell lines, which retained some KIT expression but lacked phospho-KIT, were not sensitive to imatinib, suggesting that KIT expression alone is not predictive of response. We suggest that co-overexpression of KIT/CDK4 is a potential mechanism of oncogenic transformation in some BRAF/NRAS wild-type melanomas. This group of melanomas may be a subpopulation for which imatinib or other KIT inhibitors may constitute optimal therapy.

  17. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1a (p21) Modulates Response to Cocaine and Motivated Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Scholpa, Natalie E; Briggs, Sherri B; Wagner, John J; Cummings, Brian S

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the functional role of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a (Cdkn1a or p21) in cocaine-induced responses using a knockout mouse model. Acute locomotor activity after cocaine administration (15 mg/kg, i.p.) was decreased in p21(-/-) mice, whereas cocaine-induced place preference was enhanced. Interestingly, κ-opioid-induced place aversion was also significantly enhanced. Concentration-dependent analysis of locomotor activity in response to cocaine demonstrated a rightward shift in the p21(-/-) mice. Pretreatment with a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist did not alter the enhancement of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in p21(-/-) mice, indicating a lack of involvement of serotonergic signaling in this response. Cocaine exposure increased p21 expression exclusively in the ventral sector of the hippocampus of rodents after either contingent or noncontingent drug administration. Increased p21 expression was accompanied by increased histone acetylation of the p21 promoter region in rats. Finally, increased neurogenesis in the dorsal hippocampus of p21(-/-) mice was also observed. These results show that functional loss of p21 altered the acute locomotor response to cocaine and the conditioned responses to either rewarding or aversive stimuli. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a previously unreported involvement of p21 in modulating responses to cocaine and in motivated behaviors.

  18. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulates PSD-95 ubiquitination in neurons.

    PubMed

    Bianchetta, Michael J; Lam, TuKiet T; Jones, Stephen N; Morabito, Maria A

    2011-08-17

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and its activator p35 have been implicated in drug addiction, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, learning and memory, and synapse maturation and plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Cdk5 regulates synaptic plasticity are still unclear. PSD-95 is a major postsynaptic scaffolding protein of glutamatergic synapses that regulates synaptic strength and plasticity. PSD-95 is ubiquitinated by the ubiquitin E3 ligase Mdm2, and rapid and transient PSD-95 ubiquitination has been implicated in NMDA receptor-induced AMPA receptor endocytosis. Here we demonstrate that genetic or pharmacological reduction of Cdk5 activity increases the interaction of Mdm2 with PSD-95 and enhances PSD-95 ubiquitination without affecting PSD-95 protein levels in vivo in mice, suggesting a nonproteolytic function of ubiquitinated PSD-95 at synapses. We show that PSD-95 ubiquitination correlates with increased interaction with β-adaptin, a subunit of the clathrin adaptor protein complex AP-2. This interaction is increased by genetic reduction of Cdk5 activity or NMDA receptor stimulation and is dependent on Mdm2. Together these results support a function for Cdk5 in regulating PSD-95 ubiquitination and its interaction with AP-2 and suggest a mechanism by which PSD-95 may regulate NMDA receptor-induced AMPA receptor endocytosis.

  19. Sp1 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 represses its DNA-binding activity during mitosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, J-Y; Wang, S-A; Yang, W-B; Yang, H-C; Hung, C-Y; Su, T-P; Chang, W-C; Hung, J-J

    2012-11-22

    Sp1 is important for the transcription of many genes. Our previous studies have shown that Sp1 is degraded in normal cell, but it is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis and exists a priori in the daughter cells, ready to engage in gene transcription and thereby contributes to the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. The mechanism by which Sp1 is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis remains unknown. In this study, we observed that Sp1 strongly colocalized with cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)/cyclin B1 during mitosis. Moreover, we showed that Sp1 is a novel mitotic substrate of CDK1/cyclin B1 and is phosphorylated by it at Thr 739 before the onset of mitosis. Phospho-Sp1 reduced its DNA-binding ability and facilitated the chromatin condensation process during mitosis. Mutation of Thr739 to alanine resulted in Sp1 remaining in the chromosomes, delayed cell-cycle progression, and eventually led to apoptosis. Screening of Sp1-associated proteins during mitosis by using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry indicated the tethering of Sp1 to myosin/F-actin. Furthermore, phospho-Sp1 and myosin/F-actin appeared to exist as a congregated ring at the periphery of the chromosome. However, at the end of mitosis and the beginning of interphase, Sp1 was dephosphorylated by PP2A and returned to the chromatin. These results indicate that cancer cells use CDK1 and PP2A to regulate the movement of Sp1 in and out of the chromosomes during cell-cycle progression, which may benefit cancer-cell proliferation.

  20. Sp1 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 represses its DNA-binding activity during mitosis in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, J-Y; Wang, S-A; Yang, W-B; Yang, H-C; Hung, C-Y; Su, T-P; Chang, W-C; Hung, J-J

    2013-01-01

    Sp1 is important for the transcription of many genes. Our previous studies have shown that Sp1 is degraded in normal cell, but it is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis and exists a priori in the daughter cells, ready to engage in gene transcription and thereby contributes to the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. The mechanism by which Sp1 is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis remains unknown. In this study, we observed that Sp1 strongly colocalized with cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)/cyclin B1 during mitosis. Moreover, we showed that Sp1 is a novel mitotic substrate of CDK1/cyclin B1 and is phosphorylated by it at Thr 739 before the onset of mitosis. Phospho-Sp1 reduced its DNA-binding ability and facilitated the chromatin condensation process during mitosis. Mutation of Thr739 to alanine resulted in Sp1 remaining in the chromosomes, delayed cell-cycle progression, and eventually led to apoptosis. Screening of Sp1-associated proteins during mitosis by using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry indicated the tethering of Sp1 to myosin/F-actin. Furthermore, phospho-Sp1 and myosin/F-actin appeared to exist as a congregated ring at the periphery of the chromosome. However, at the end of mitosis and the beginning of interphase, Sp1 was dephosphorylated by PP2A and returned to the chromatin. These results indicate that cancer cells use CDK1 and PP2A to regulate the movement of Sp1 in and out of the chromosomes during cell-cycle progression, which may benefit cancer-cell proliferation. PMID:22266860

  1. Identification of novel inhibitors against Cyclin Dependent Kinase 9/Cyclin T1 complex as: Anti cancer agent.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Afzal; Verma, Chandan Kumar; Chouhan, Usha

    2017-09-01

    Cell cycle consists of different types of phases, transition from G1, S, G2, M. Inhibition of associated CDKs like CDK9/Cyclin T1 complex, which are indirectly involved in the Cell cycle progression in the form of transcription elongation, reduces diverse diseases such as Cardiac Hypertrophy, Alzheimer's, Cancer, AIDS and Inflammation. Glide tool of the Schrodinger software has been used for performing Structure Based Virtual Screening and Docking against Drug Bank and MDPI database. The best hits were identified which go and bind in the active site of the target where ATP binds for the activity. The ADMET, MM-GBSA and DFT analysis is also done for the same. Compound 4-{4-[4-(3-aminopropoxy)phenyl]-1H-pyrazol-5-yl}-6-chlorobenzene-1,3-diol (DB08045) was found to be more potent, novel and selective as an inhibitor. Hopefully compound (DB08045) could be used as an anti-cancer agent for the treatment of life-threatening diseases.

  2. Kinase Inhibitor Screening Identifies Cyclin-Dependent Kinases and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 as Potential Modulators of TDP-43 Cytosolic Accumulation during Cell Stress.

    PubMed

    Moujalled, Diane; James, Janine L; Parker, Sarah J; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Duncan, Clare; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Nonaka, Takashi; Hasegawa, Masato; Kanninen, Katja M; Grubman, Alexandra; Liddell, Jeffrey R; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal processing of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) has been identified as a major factor in neuronal degeneration during amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). It is unclear how changes to TDP-43, including nuclear to cytosolic translocation and subsequent accumulation, are controlled in these diseases. TDP-43 is a member of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) RNA binding protein family and is known to associate with cytosolic RNA stress granule proteins in ALS and FTLD. hnRNP trafficking and accumulation is controlled by the action of specific kinases including members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. However, little is known about how kinase pathways control TDP-43 movement and accumulation. In this study, we used an in vitro model of TDP-43-positve stress granule formation to screen for the effect of kinase inhibitors on TDP-43 accumulation. We found that while a number of kinase inhibitors, particularly of the MAPK pathways modulated both TDP-43 and the global stress granule marker, human antigen R (HuR), multiple inhibitors were more specific to TDP-43 accumulation, including inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Close correlation was observed between effects of these inhibitors on TDP-43, hnRNP K and TIAR, but often with different effects on HuR accumulation. This may indicate a potential interaction between TDP-43, hnRNP K and TIAR. CDK inhibitors were also found to reverse pre-formed TDP-43-positive stress granules and both CDK and GSK3 inhibitors abrogated the accumulation of C-terminal TDP-43 (219-414) in transfected cells. Further studies are required to confirm the specific kinases involved and whether their action is through phosphorylation of the TDP-43 binding partner hnRNP K. This knowledge provides a valuable insight into the mechanisms controlling abnormal cytoplasmic TDP-43 accumulation and may herald new opportunities

  3. Pho85p, a cyclin-dependent protein kinase, and the Snf1p protein kinase act antagonistically to control glycogen accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, D; Farkas, I; Roach, P J

    1996-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient levels control multiple cellular processes. Cells lacking the SNF1 gene cannot express glucose-repressible genes and do not accumulate the storage polysaccharide glycogen. The impaired glycogen synthesis is due to maintenance of glycogen synthase in a hyperphosphorylated, inactive state. In a screen for second site suppressors of the glycogen storage defect of snf1 cells, we identified a mutant gene that restored glycogen accumulation and which was allelic with PHO85, which encodes a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase family. In cells with disrupted PHO85 genes, we observed hyperaccumulation of glycogen, activation of glycogen synthase, and impaired glycogen synthase kinase activity. In snf1 cells, glycogen synthase kinase activity was elevated. Partial purification of glycogen synthase kinase activity from yeast extracts resulted in the separation of two fractions by phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, both of which phosphorylated and inactivated glycogen synthase. The activity of one of these, GPK2, was inhibited by olomoucine, which potently inhibits cyclin-dependent protein kinases, and contained an approximately 36-kDa species that reacted with antibodies to Pho85p. Analysis of Ser-to-Ala mutations at the three potential Gsy2p phosphorylation sites in pho85 cells implicated Ser-654 and/or Thr-667 in PHO85 control of glycogen synthase. We propose that Pho85p is a physiological glycogen synthase kinase, possibly acting downstream of Snf1p. PMID:8754836

  4. Involvement of aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p25 activity in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Mohammad A; Tan, Chunfeng; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I; Lu, Fang-Min; Plautz, Erik; Zhang, Shanrong; Takahashi, Masaya; Hernandez, Adan; Kernie, Steven G; Plattner, Florian; Bibb, James A

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with adverse effects on brain functions, including sensation, language, emotions and/or cognition. Therapies for improving outcomes following TBI are limited. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI may suggest novel treatment strategies to facilitate recovery and improve treatment outcome. Aberrant activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been implicated in neuronal injury and neurodegeneration. Cdk5 is a neuronal protein kinase activated via interaction with its cofactor p35 that regulates numerous neuronal functions, including synaptic remodeling and cognition. However, conversion of p35 to p25 via Ca(2+) -dependent activation of calpain results in an aberrantly active Cdk5/p25 complex that is associated with neuronal damage and cell death. Here, we show that mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model, exhibit increased p25 levels and consistently elevated Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau and retinoblastoma (Rb) protein in hippocampal lysates. Moreover, CCI-induced neuroinflammation as indicated by increased astrocytic activation and number of reactive microglia. Brain-wide conditional Cdk5 knockout mice (Cdk5 cKO) subjected to CCI exhibited significantly reduced edema, ventricular dilation, and injury area. Finally, neurophysiological recordings revealed that CCI attenuated excitatory post-synaptic potential field responses in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway 24 h after injury. This neurophysiological deficit was attenuated in Cdk5 cKO mice. Thus, TBI induces increased levels of p25 generation and aberrant Cdk5 activity, which contributes to pathophysiological processes underlying TBI progression. Hence, selectively preventing aberrant Cdk5 activity may be an effective acute strategy to improve recovery from TBI. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases astrogliosis and microglial activation

  5. Co-amplification of phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer A and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 triggers glioblastoma progression | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor and has a dismal prognosis. Amplification of chromosome 12q13-q15 (Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) amplicon) is frequently observed in numerous human cancers including GBM. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer (PIKE) is a group of GTP-binding proteins that belong to the subgroup of centaurin GTPase family, encoded by CENTG1 located in CDK4 amplicon. However, the pathological significance of CDK4 amplicon in GBM formation remains incompletely understood.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations on the inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases 2 and 5 in the presence of activators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Tan, Vincent B C; Lim, Kian Meng; Tay, Tong Earn

    2006-06-01

    Interests in CDK2 and CDK5 have stemmed mainly from their association with cancer and neuronal migration or differentiation related diseases and the need to design selective inhibitors for these kinases. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have not only become a viable approach to drug design because of advances in computer technology but are increasingly an integral part of drug discovery processes. It is common in MD simulations of inhibitor/CDK complexes to exclude the activator of the CDKs in the structural models to keep computational time tractable. In this paper, we present simulation results of CDK2 and CDK5 with roscovitine using models with and without their activators (cyclinA and p25). While p25 was found to induce slight changes in CDK5, the calculations support that cyclinA leads to significant conformational changes near the active site of CDK2. This suggests that detailed and structure-based inhibitor design targeted at these CDKs should employ activator-included models of the kinases. Comparisons between P/CDK2/cyclinA/roscovitine and CDK5/p25/roscovitine complexes reveal differences in the conformations of the glutamine around the active sites, which may be exploited to find highly selective inhibitors with respect to CDK2 and CDK5.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations on the inhibition of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases 2 and 5 in the presence of activators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing; Tan, Vincent B. C.; Lim, Kian Meng; Tay, Tong Earn

    2006-06-01

    Interests in CDK2 and CDK5 have stemmed mainly from their association with cancer and neuronal migration or differentiation related diseases and the need to design selective inhibitors for these kinases. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have not only become a viable approach to drug design because of advances in computer technology but are increasingly an integral part of drug discovery processes. It is common in MD simulations of inhibitor/CDK complexes to exclude the activator of the CDKs in the structural models to keep computational time tractable. In this paper, we present simulation results of CDK2 and CDK5 with roscovitine using models with and without their activators (cyclinA and p25). While p25 was found to induce slight changes in CDK5, the calculations support that cyclinA leads to significant conformational changes near the active site of CDK2. This suggests that detailed and structure-based inhibitor design targeted at these CDKs should employ activator-included models of the kinases. Comparisons between P/CDK2/cyclinA/roscovitine and CDK5/p25/roscovitine complexes reveal differences in the conformations of the glutamine around the active sites, which may be exploited to find highly selective inhibitors with respect to CDK2 and CDK5.

  8. Regulation of μ and δ opioid receptor functions: involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, H; Mercier-Blais, A-A; Delaygue, C; Lavoie, C; Parent, J-L; Neugebauer, W; Gendron, L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Phosphorylation of δ opioid receptors (DOP receptors) by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) was shown to regulate the trafficking of this receptor. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of CDK5 in regulating DOP receptors in rats treated with morphine or with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). As μ (MOP) and DOP receptors are known to be co-regulated, we also sought to determine if CDK5-mediated regulation of DOP receptors also affects MOP receptor functions. Experimental Approach The role of CDK5 in regulating opioid receptors in CFA- and morphine-treated rats was studied using roscovitine as a CDK inhibitor and a cell-penetrant peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of DOP receptors (C11-DOPri2). Opioid receptor functions were assessed in vivo in a series of behavioural experiments and correlated by measuring ERK1/2 activity in dorsal root ganglia homogenates. Key Results Chronic roscovitine treatment reduced the antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects of deltorphin II (Dlt II) in morphine- and CFA-treated rats respectively. Repeated administrations of C11-DOPri2 also robustly decreased Dlt II-induced analgesia. Interestingly, DAMGO-induced analgesia was significantly increased by roscovitine and C11-DOPri2. Concomitantly, in roscovitine-treated rats the Dlt II-induced ERK1/2 activation was decreased, whereas the DAMGO-induced ERK1/2 activation was increased. An acute roscovitine treatment had no effect on Dlt II- or DAMGO-induced analgesia. Conclusions and Implications Together, our results demonstrate that CDK5 is a key player in the regulation of DOP receptors in morphine- and CFA-treated rats and that the regulation of DOP receptors by CDK5 is sufficient to modulate MOP receptor functions through an indirect process. PMID:25598508

  9. Differential regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Lan; Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora; Qiao, Jingbo; Wang, Yongsheng; Chung, Dai H.

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •GRP-R signaling differentially regulated the expression of p21 and p27. •Silencing GRP/GRP-R downregulated p21, while p27 expression was upregulated. •Inhibition of GRP/GRP-R signaling enhanced PTEN expression, correlative to the increased expression of p27. •PTEN and p27 co-localized in cytoplasm and silencing PTEN decreased p27 expression. -- Abstract: Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and its receptor (GRP-R) are highly expressed in undifferentiated neuroblastoma, and they play critical roles in oncogenesis. We previously reported that GRP activates the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway to promote DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression in neuroblastoma cells. Conversely, GRP-R silencing induces cell cycle arrest. Here, we speculated that GRP/GRP-R signaling induces neuroblastoma cell proliferation via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. Surprisingly, we found that GRP/GRP-R differentially induced expressions of p21 and p27. Silencing GRP/GRP-R decreased p21, but it increased p27 expressions in neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, we found that the intracellular localization of p21 and p27 in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, respectively. In addition, we found that GRP/GRP-R silencing increased the expression and accumulation of PTEN in the cytoplasm of neuroblastoma cells where it co-localized with p27, thus suggesting that p27 promotes the function of PTEN as a tumor suppressor by stabilizing PTEN in the cytoplasm. GRP/GRP-R regulation of CDK inhibitors and tumor suppressor PTEN may be critical for tumoriogenesis of neuroblastoma.

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and promotes tumor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Chunyang; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Zhou, Wuhua; Zhang, Wu; Ding, Songming; Wei, Bajin; Yu, Xiaobo; Su, Rong; Zheng, Shusen

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDKN3 is commonly overexpressed in HCC and is associated with poor clinical outcome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of CDKN3 could stimulate the proliferation of HCC cells by promoting G1/S transition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDKN3 could inhibit the expression of p21 in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of CDKN3 has no effect on apoptosis and invasion of HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified 61 genes co-expressed with CDKN3, and BIRC5 was located at the center of the co-expression network. -- Abstract: Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3) belongs to the protein phosphatases family and has a dual function in cell cycling. The function of this gene has been studied in several kinds of cancers, but its role in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that CDKN3 was frequently overexpressed in both HCC cell lines and clinical samples, and this overexpression was correlated with poor tumor differentiation and advanced tumor stage. Functional studies showed that overexpression of CDKN3 could promote cell proliferation by stimulating G1-S transition but has no impact on cell apoptosis and invasion. Microarray-based co-expression analysis identified a total of 61 genes co-expressed with CDKN3, with most of them involved in cell proliferation, and BIRC5 was located at the center of CDKN3 co-expression network. These results suggest that CDKN3 acts as an oncogene in human hepatocellular carcinoma and antagonism of CDKN3 may be of interest for the treatment of HCC.

  11. Involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in 2,5-hexanedione-induced neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Shan; Zhang, Cui-Li; Hou, Li-Yan; Zhao, Xiu-Lan; Yang, Xi-Wei; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2008-06-03

    Occupational exposure to n-hexane produces a neuropathy characterized as a central-peripheral distal axonopathy, which is mediated by 2,5-hexanedione (HD). To investigate the mechanisms of the neuropathy induced by HD, the contents and activities of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and activators (p35 precursor, p35 and p25) in rats' cerebrum cortex (CC), spinal cord (SC) and sciatic nerve (SN) were determined. The results showed that the levels and activities of CDK5 in CC of 200 or 400mg/kg HD-treated rats were significantly decreased in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions and negatively correlated with gait abnormality in the cytosolic fraction. However, CDK5 contents and activities in SN of rats treated with 200 or 400mg/kg HD were significantly increased and positively correlated with gait abnormality in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions. Although increases of CDK5 contents in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions of SC in 200 and 400mg/kg HD-treated rats were also observed, CDK5 activities were significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction and negatively correlated with gait abnormality. The changes of p35 precursor, p35 and p25 contents in CC, SC and SN showed the same pattern with that of CDK5 activities. Thus, HD intoxication was associated with deregulation of CDK5 and its activator p35 or p25 in nerve tissues. The inconsistent changes of CDK5 activities in CNS and PNS might delegate the different mechanisms of HD-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  12. Binding of cyclin-dependent kinases to ORC and Cdc6p regulates the chromosome replication cycle.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, M; Liang, C; Chen, H H; Stillman, B

    2001-09-25

    Cdc6p and the origin recognition complex (ORC) are essential for assembly of a pre-replicative complex (preRC) at origins of replication, before the initiation of DNA synthesis. In the absence of Cdc6p, cells fail to initiate DNA replication and undergo a "reductional" mitosis, in which the unreplicated chromosomes are randomly segregated to the spindle poles. We show here that the cells harboring a mutation in the essential Cdc6p Walker A-box arrest in late mitosis, probably at anaphase. This cell cycle block requires either the three Cdc28p phosphorylation sites within the N terminus of Cdc6p or a short region (aa 8-17) that contains a Cy (Cyclin) interaction sequence. These same two Cdc6p mutants that allow a reductional mitosis are defective in binding Cdc28p kinase. In addition to Cdc6p, ORC also binds to cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Interestingly, Sic1p, a CDK inhibitor protein, blocked the S phase-specific Cdc28p-Clb5p kinase from interacting with ORC, but did not prevent the G(1)-specific Cdc28p-Cln2p kinase-ORC interaction. We suggest that ORC, Cdc6p, and Sic1p bind to different CDKs in a cell cycle-dependent manner to temporally regulate events that (i) allow preRC formation after mitosis, (ii) prevent mitosis before DNA replication can occur, and (iii) promote initiation of DNA replication.

  13. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 phosphorylation of familial prion protein mutants exacerbates conversion into amyloid structure.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Raphaël; Sharma, Gyanesh; LeBlanc, Andréa C

    2015-02-27

    Familial prion protein (PrP) mutants undergo conversion from soluble and protease-sensitive to insoluble and partially protease-resistant proteins. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylation of wild type PrP (pPrP) at serine 43 induces a conversion of PrP into aggregates and fibrils. Here, we investigated whether familial PrP mutants are predisposed to Cdk5 phosphorylation and whether phosphorylation of familial PrP mutants increases conversion. PrP mutants representing three major familial PrP diseases and different PrP structural domains were studied. We developed a novel in vitro kinase reaction coupled with Thioflavin T binding to amyloid structure assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent amyloid conversion. Although non-phosphorylated full-length wild type or PrP mutants did not convert into amyloid, Cdk5 phosphorylation rapidly converted these into Thioflavin T-positive structures following first order kinetics. Dephosphorylation partially reversed conversion. Phosphorylation-dependent conversion of PrP from α-helical structures into β-sheet structures was confirmed by circular dichroism. Relative to wild type pPrP, most PrP mutants showed increased rate constants of conversion. In contrast, non-phosphorylated truncated PrP Y145X (where X represents a stop codon) and Q160X mutants converted spontaneously into Thioflavin T-positive fibrils after a lag phase of over 20 h, indicating nucleation-dependent polymerization. Phosphorylation reduced the lag phase by over 50% and thus accelerated the formation of the nucleating event. Consistently, phosphorylated Y145X and phosphorylated Q160X exacerbated conversion in a homologous seeding reaction, whereas WT pPrP could not seed WT PrP. These results demonstrate an influence of both the N terminus and the C terminus of PrP on conversion. We conclude that post-translational modifications of the flexible N terminus of PrP can cause or exacerbate PrP mutant conversion.

  14. Regulation of Sox6 by cyclin dependent kinase 5 in brain.

    PubMed

    Rudrabhatla, Parvathi; Utreras, Elias; Jaffe, Howard; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase involved in various biological functions during normal brain development and neurodegeneration. In brain, Cdk5 activity is specific to post-mitotic neurons, due to neuronal specific expression of its activator p35. The biological functions of Cdk5 have been ascribed to its cytoplasmic substrates, however not much is known in nucleus. Here, we show that nuclear transcription factor Sox6 is a direct nuclear target of Cdk5. Sox6 is expressed in Tuj1 positive neurons, suggesting that Sox6 is expressed in differentiating neurons. The expression of Sox6 is high in mitotic nuclei during embryonic day 12 (E12) and gradually decreases during development into adult. On the other hand, Cdk5 expression gradually increases during its development. We show that Sox6 is expressed in mitotic nuclei in embryonic day 12 (E12) and in migrating neurons of E16. Sox6 is phosphorylated in vivo. Sox6 was detected by phospho-Ser/Thr and phospho-Ser/Thr-Pro and MPM-2 (Mitotic protein #2) antibodies in brain. Furthermore, calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIAP) digestion resulted in faster migration of Sox6 band. The GST-Sox6 was phosphorylated by Cdk5/p35. The mass spectrometry analysis revealed that Sox6 is phosphorylated at T119PER motif. We show that Sox6 steady state levels are regulated by Cdk5. Cdk5 knockout mice die in utero and Sox6 protein expression is remarkably high in Cdk5-/- brain, however, there is no change in mRNA expression, suggesting a post-translational regulation of Sox6 by Cdk5. Transfection of primary cortical neurons with WT Cdk5 reduced Sox6 levels, while dominant negative (DN) Cdk5 and p35 increased Sox6 levels. Thus, our results indicate that Cdk5 regulates Sox6 steady state protein level that has an important role in brain development and function.

  15. Fluorescent peptide biosensor for monitoring CDK4/cyclin D kinase activity in melanoma cell extracts, mouse xenografts and skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; González-Vera, Juan A; Henri, Pauline; Meunier, Laurent; Vollaire, Julien; Josserand, Véronique; Morris, May C

    2016-11-15

    Melanoma constitutes the most aggressive form of skin cancer, which further metastasizes into a deadly form of cancer. The p16(INK4a)-Cyclin D-CDK4/6-pRb pathway is dysregulated in 90% of melanomas. CDK4/Cyclin D kinase hyperactivation, associated with mutation of CDK4, amplification of Cyclin D or loss of p16(INK4a) leads to increased risk of developing melanoma. This kinase therefore constitutes a key biomarker in melanoma and an emerging pharmacological target, however there are no tools enabling direct detection or quantification of its activity. Here we report on the design and application of a fluorescent peptide biosensor to quantify CDK4 activity in melanoma cell extracts, skin biopsies and melanoma xenografts. This biosensor provides sensitive means of comparing CDK4 activity between different melanoma cell lines and further responds to CDK4 downregulation by siRNA or small-molecule inhibitors. By affording means of monitoring CDK4 hyperactivity consequent to cancer-associated molecular alterations in upstream signaling pathways that converge upon this kinase, this biosensor offers an alternative to immunological identification of melanoma-specific biomarkers, thereby constituting an attractive tool for diagnostic purposes, providing complementary functional information to histological analysis, of particular utility for detection of melanoma onset in precancerous lesions. This is indeed the first fluorescent peptide biosensor which has been successfully implemented to monitor kinase activity in skin samples and melanoma tumour xenografts. Moreover by enabling to monitor response to CDK4 inhibitors, this biosensor constitutes an attractive companion assay to identify compounds of therapeutic relevance for melanoma.

  16. A plant-specific cyclin-dependent kinase is involved in the control of G2/M progression in plants.

    PubMed

    Porceddu, A; Stals, H; Reichheld, J P; Segers, G; De Veylder, L; Barroco, R P; Casteels, P; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Mironov, V

    2001-09-28

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) control the key transitions in the eukaryotic cell cycle. All the CDKs known to control G(2)/M progression in yeast and animals are distinguished by the characteristic PSTAIRE motif in their cyclin-binding domain and are closely related. Higher plants contain in addition a number of more divergent non-PSTAIRE CDKs with still obscure functions. We show that a plant-specific type of non-PSTAIRE CDKs is involved in the control of the G(2)/M progression. In synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells, the corresponding protein, accumulated in a cell cycle-regulated fashion, peaking at the G(2)/M transition. The associated histone H1 kinase activity reached a maximum in mitosis and required a yet unidentified subunit to be fully active. Down-regulation of the associated kinase activity in transgenic tobacco plants using a dominant-negative mutation delayed G(2)/M transition. These results provide the first evidence that non-PSTAIRE CDKs are involved in the control of the G(2)/M progression in plants.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor -CR8- in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CR8 is a second generation inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases derived from roscovitine. CR8 was shown to be 50–100 fold more potent than roscovitine in inducing apoptosis in different tumor cell lines. In the present investigation, we have established an analytical method for the quantification of CR8 in biological samples and evaluated its bioavailability, biodistribution and pharmacokinetics in mice. Methods A liquid chromatography method utilizing UV-detection was used for the determination of CR8. CR8 was administered either orally (100 mg/kg) or i.v. (50 mg/kg) and the animals were sacrificed at different time points. Blood samples and organs were collected, after which the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated for plasma and organs. Results CR8 was eluted at 5 minutes in the high performance liquid chromatography system used. The LLOQ detection was 0.10 μg/ml and linearity was observed within the 0.10-10 μg/ml range (r2 > 0.998). The accuracy and precision were >86%, while the recovery from plasma was >95%. CR8 was stable for 2 months at room temperature in both solution and plasma. CR8 pharmacokinetics was fitted to a two-compartment open model after oral administration and to a one compartment model after i.v. injection. The elimination half-life was about 3 hours. Organ exposure to CR8 (expressed as % AUC organ vs. AUC plasma) was highest in liver (205%), adipose tissue (188%) and kidney (150%) and low in bone marrow (30%) and brain (15%) as compared to plasma. The oral bioavailability of CR8 was found to be essentially 100%. Conclusions We have developed a rapid and simple method for the analysis of CR8. CR8 pharmacokinetics pattern showed 100% bioavailability, long half-life and limited distribution to brain and bone marrow, which may allow systemic exposure higher than the IC50 reported for cell death in tumor cell lines. CR8 displays favorable pharmacological properties and is therefore a good candidate for future

  18. Effects of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor R-roscovitine on eosinophil survival and clearance.

    PubMed

    Farahi, N; Uller, L; Juss, J K; Langton, A J; Cowburn, A S; Gibson, A; Foster, M R; Farrow, S N; Marco-Casanova, P; Sobolewski, A; Condliffe, A M; Chilvers, E R

    2011-05-01

    Eosinophils are pro-inflammatory cells implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma and atopy. Apoptosis has been proposed as a potential mechanism underlying the resolution of eosinophilic inflammation and studies have indicated the ability of interventions that induce human eosinophil apoptosis to promote the resolution of eosinophilic inflammation. Recently, the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor R-roscovitine was shown to enhance neutrophil apoptosis and promote the resolution of neutrophilic inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of CDKs in human blood eosinophils, the effects of R-roscovitine on eosinophil survival in vitro and whether R-roscovitine could influence eosinophilic lung inflammation in vivo. Eosinophils were isolated from human peripheral blood and the effects of R-roscovitine on apoptosis, degranulation and phagocytic uptake examined in vitro. The effects of R-roscovitine on eosinophilic lung inflammation in vivo were also assessed using an ovalbumin mouse model. Our data demonstrate that human eosinophils express five known targets for R-roscovitine: CDK1, -2, -5, -7 and -9. R-roscovitine induced eosinophil apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner but also accelerated transition to secondary necrosis as assessed by microscopy, flow cytometry and caspase activation. In addition, we show that R-roscovitine can override the anti-apoptotic signals of GM-CSF and IL-5. We report that the pro-apoptotic effect of R-roscovitine is associated with suppression of Mcl-1L expression and that this compound enhanced phagocytic clearance of eosinophils by macrophages. Finally, we show that R-roscovitine induces apoptosis in murine peripheral blood and spleen-derived eosinophils; despite this, R-roscovitine did not modulate the tissue and lumen eosinophilia characteristic of the ovalbumin mouse model of airway eosinophilia. These data demonstrate that R-roscovitine is capable of inducing rapid apoptosis and

  19. Antitumor effects of cyclin dependent kinase 9 inhibition in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhimin; Chatterjee, Devkumar; Deng, Defeng; Veeranki, Omkara; Mejia, Alicia; Ajani, Jaffer A; Hofstetter, Wayne; Lin, Steven; Guha, Sushovan; Kopetz, Scott; Krishnan, Sunil; Maru, Dipen

    2017-01-01

    Role of cyclin dependent kinase 9(CDK9) as a potential target in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is unknown. We investigated CDK9 protein expression in EAC and Barrett's esophagus and role of CDK9 in oncogenic processes of EAC in vitro and in murine xenografts. The CDK9 expression was significantly higher in EAC as compared to Barrett's esophagus in patient samples. Stable shCDK9 in SKGT4 reduced proliferation by 37% at day 4, increased apoptosis at 48 hours and induced G1 cell cycle arrest at 48 hours (58.4% vs. 45.8%) compared to controls SKGT4 cells. SKGT4-shCDK9 cell-derived tumors were significantly smaller than control SKGT4-derived tumors in xenografts (72.89mm3 vs. 270mm3). Pharmaceutical inhibition of CDK9 by Flavopiridol (0.1μm for 48 hours) and CAN508 (20 and 40μm for 72 hours) induced significant reduction in proliferation and 2-fold increase in apoptosis in SKGT4, FLO1 and OE33 cells. In xenograft models, CAN508 (60 mg/kg/dayx10 days) and Flavopiridol (4mg/kg/dayx10 days) caused 50.8% and 63.1% reduction in xenograft tumors as compared to control on post-treatment day 21. Reduction of MCL-1 and phosphorylated RNA polymerase II was observed with transient shCDK9 in SKGT4 cells but not with stable shCDK9. CAN508 (20 and 40 μm) and Flavopiridol (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 μm) for 4 hours showed reduction in MCL-1 mRNA (84% and 96%) and protein. Mcl-1 overexpression conferred resistance to Flavopiridol (0.2 μm or 0.4 μm for 48 hours) and CAN 508 (20 or 40μm for 72 hours). Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated significant reduction of binding of transcriptional factor HIF-1α to MCL-1 promoter in FLO-1 cells by CDK9 inhibitors. PMID:28404924

  20. Antitumor effects of cyclin dependent kinase 9 inhibition in esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhimin; Chatterjee, Devkumar; Deng, Defeng; Veeranki, Omkara; Mejia, Alicia; Ajani, Jaffer A; Hofstetter, Wayne; Lin, Steven; Guha, Sushovan; Kopetz, Scott; Krishnan, Sunil; Maru, Dipen

    2017-04-25

    Role of cyclin dependent kinase 9(CDK9) as a potential target in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is unknown. We investigated CDK9 protein expression in EAC and Barrett's esophagus and role of CDK9 in oncogenic processes of EAC in vitro and in murine xenografts. The CDK9 expression was significantly higher in EAC as compared to Barrett's esophagus in patient samples. Stable shCDK9 in SKGT4 reduced proliferation by 37% at day 4, increased apoptosis at 48 hours and induced G1 cell cycle arrest at 48 hours (58.4% vs. 45.8%) compared to controls SKGT4 cells. SKGT4-shCDK9 cell-derived tumors were significantly smaller than control SKGT4-derived tumors in xenografts (72.89mm3 vs. 270mm3). Pharmaceutical inhibition of CDK9 by Flavopiridol (0.1µm for 48 hours) and CAN508 (20 and 40µm for 72 hours) induced significant reduction in proliferation and 2-fold increase in apoptosis in SKGT4, FLO1 and OE33 cells. In xenograft models, CAN508 (60 mg/kg/dayx10 days) and Flavopiridol (4mg/kg/dayx10 days) caused 50.8% and 63.1% reduction in xenograft tumors as compared to control on post-treatment day 21. Reduction of MCL-1 and phosphorylated RNA polymerase II was observed with transient shCDK9 in SKGT4 cells but not with stable shCDK9. CAN508 (20 and 40 µm) and Flavopiridol (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 µm) for 4 hours showed reduction in MCL-1 mRNA (84% and 96%) and protein. Mcl-1 overexpression conferred resistance to Flavopiridol (0.2 µm or 0.4 µm for 48 hours) and CAN 508 (20 or 40µm for 72 hours). Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated significant reduction of binding of transcriptional factor HIF-1α to MCL-1 promoter in FLO-1 cells by CDK9 inhibitors.

  1. Mitotic p21Cip1/CDKN1A is regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kreis, Nina-Naomi; Friemel, Alexandra; Zimmer, Brigitte; Roth, Susanne; Rieger, Michael A.; Rolle, Udo; Louwen, Frank; Yuan, Juping

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional protein p21Cip1/CDKN1A (p21) is an important and universal Cdk-interacting protein. Recently, we have reported that p21 is involved in the regulation of the mitotic kinase Cdk1/cyclin B1 and critical for successful mitosis and cytokinesis. In the present work we show that S130 of p21 is phosphorylated by Cdk1/cyclin B1 during mitosis, which reduces p21′s stability and binding affinity to Cdk1/cyclin B1. Interfering with this phosphorylation results in extended mitotic duration and defective chromosome segregation, indicating that this regulation ensures proper mitotic progression. Given that p53, the major transcriptional activator of p21, is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer and that deregulated Cdk1 associates with the development of different types of cancer, this work provides new insight into the understanding of how deregulated p21 contributes to chromosomal instability and oncogenesis. PMID:27384476

  2. Intrinsic and cyclin-dependent kinase-dependent control of spindle pole body duplication in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Simmons Kovacs, Laura A; Nelson, Christine L; Haase, Steven B

    2008-08-01

    Centrosome duplication must be tightly controlled so that duplication occurs only once each cell cycle. Accumulation of multiple centrosomes can result in the assembly of a multipolar spindle and lead to chromosome mis-segregation and genomic instability. In metazoans, a centrosome-intrinsic mechanism prevents reduplication until centriole disengagement. Mitotic cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) prevent reduplication of the budding yeast centrosome, called a spindle pole body (SPB), in late S-phase and G2/M, but the mechanism remains unclear. How SPB reduplication is prevented early in the cell cycle is also not understood. Here we show that, similar to metazoans, an SPB-intrinsic mechanism prevents reduplication early in the cell cycle. We also show that mitotic cyclins can inhibit SPB duplication when expressed before satellite assembly in early G1, but not later in G1, after the satellite had assembled. Moreover, electron microscopy revealed that SPBs do not assemble a satellite in cells expressing Clb2 in early G1. Finally, we demonstrate that Clb2 must localize to the cytoplasm in order to inhibit SPB duplication, suggesting the possibility for direct CDK inhibition of satellite components. These two mechanisms, intrinsic and extrinsic control by CDK, evoke two-step system that prevents SPB reduplication throughout the cell cycle.

  3. A novel quantitative model of cell cycle progression based on cyclin-dependent kinases activity and population balances.

    PubMed

    Pisu, Massimo; Concas, Alessandro; Cao, Giacomo

    2015-04-01

    Cell cycle regulates proliferative cell capacity under normal or pathologic conditions, and in general it governs all in vivo/in vitro cell growth and proliferation processes. Mathematical simulation by means of reliable and predictive models represents an important tool to interpret experiment results, to facilitate the definition of the optimal operating conditions for in vitro cultivation, or to predict the effect of a specific drug in normal/pathologic mammalian cells. Along these lines, a novel model of cell cycle progression is proposed in this work. Specifically, it is based on a population balance (PB) approach that allows one to quantitatively describe cell cycle progression through the different phases experienced by each cell of the entire population during its own life. The transition between two consecutive cell cycle phases is simulated by taking advantage of the biochemical kinetic model developed by Gérard and Goldbeter (2009) which involves cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) whose regulation is achieved through a variety of mechanisms that include association with cyclins and protein inhibitors, phosphorylation-dephosphorylation, and cyclin synthesis or degradation. This biochemical model properly describes the entire cell cycle of mammalian cells by maintaining a sufficient level of detail useful to identify check point for transition and to estimate phase duration required by PB. Specific examples are discussed to illustrate the ability of the proposed model to simulate the effect of drugs for in vitro trials of interest in oncology, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  4. Fibroblast growth factor-10 prevents H2O2-induced cell cycle arrest by regulation of G1 cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, D; Chang, W; Wei, K; Gao, M; Rosen, G D

    2007-01-23

    We studied the effects of fibroblast growth factor (FGF-10) on H2O2-induced alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) G1 arrest and the role of G1 cyclins. FGF-10 prevented H2O2-induced AEC G1 arrest. FGF-10 induced 2-4-fold increase in cyclin E, cyclin A and CDKs (2,4) alone and in AEC treated with H2O2. H2O2 downregulated cyclin D1; FGF-10 blocked these effects. FGF-10 prevented H2O2-induced upregulation of CDK inhibitor, p21. SiRNAp21 blocked H2O2-induced downregulation of cyclins, CDKs and AEC G1 arrest. Accordingly, we provide first evidence that FGF-10 regulates G1 cyclins and CDKs, and prevents H2O2-induced AEC G1 arrest.

  5. FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR-10 PREVENTS H2O2-INDUCED CELL CYCLE ARREST BY REGULATION OF G1 CYCLINS AND CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASES

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, D; Chang, W; Wei, K; Gao, M; Rosen, GD

    2007-01-01

    We studied the effects of fibroblast growth factor (FGF-10) on H2O2-induced alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) G1 arrest and the role of G1 cyclins. FGF-10 prevented H2O2–induced AEC G1 arrest. FGF-10 induced 2 to 4-fold increase in cyclin E, cyclin A and CDKs (2, 4) alone and in AEC treated with H2O2. H2O2 downregulated cyclin D1; FGF-10 blocked these effects. FGF-10 prevented H2O2–induced upregulation of CDK inhibitor, p21. SiRNAp21 blocked H2O2–induced downregulation of cyclins, CDKs and AEC G1 arrest. Accordingly, we provide first evidence that FGF-10 regulates G1 cyclins and CDKs, and prevents H2O2-induced AEC G1 arrest. PMID:17188682

  6. PfPK6, a novel cyclin-dependent kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase-related protein kinase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Bracchi-Ricard, V; Barik, S; Delvecchio, C; Doerig, C; Chakrabarti, R; Chakrabarti, D

    2000-01-01

    We have isolated a novel protein kinase cDNA, PfPK6, by differential display RT-PCR (DDRT-PCR) of mRNA obtained from different asexual erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum, which shows sequence similarity to both cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members. The 915 bp open reading frame (ORF) is interrupted by seven introns and encodes a 305-residue polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 35848 Da. Several cDNA clones with some of the intron sequences were isolated, indicating alternate or defective splicing of PfPK6 transcripts because the gene seems to be a single copy located on chromosome 13. The similarity of the catalytic domain of PfPK6 to those of CDK2 and MAPK is 57.3% and 49.6%, respectively. The signature PSTAIRE (single-letter amino acid codes) CDK motif is changed to SKCILRE in PfPK6. The TXY residues that are phosphorylated in MAPKs for their activation are T(173)PT in PfPK6. Three size classes of PfPK6 transcripts of 6.5, 2.0 and 1.1 kb are up-regulated during the transition of P. falciparum from ring to trophozoite. Western blot analysis suggested the expression of a 35 kDa polypeptide in trophozoites and schizonts. Immunofluorescence studies indicated both nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of PfPK6 in trophozoite, schizont and segmenter stages. In vitro, recombinant PfPK6 phosphorylated itself and also exogenous substrates, histone and the small subunit of the malarial ribonucleotide reductase (R2). The kinase activity of PfPK6 is sensitive to CDK inhibitors such as olomoucine and roscovitine. PfPK6 showed a preference for Mn(2+) over Mg(2+) ions as a cofactor. The Lys(38)-->Arg mutant is severely defective in its interaction with ATP and bivalent cations and somewhat defective in catalytic rate for R2 phosphorylation. PMID:10727426

  7. Preclinical evaluation of cyclin dependent kinase 11 and casein kinase 2 survival kinases as RNA interference targets for triple negative breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kren, Betsy T; Unger, Gretchen M; Abedin, Md J; Vogel, Rachel I; Henzler, Christine M; Ahmed, Khalil; Trembley, Janeen H

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapies for aggressive breast cancers like triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) are needed. The use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to disable expression of survival genes provides a tool for killing these cancer cells. Cyclin dependent kinase 11 (CDK11) is a survival protein kinase that regulates RNA transcription, splicing and mitosis. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a survival protein kinase that suppresses cancer cell death. Eliminating the expression of these genes has potential therapeutic utility for breast cancer. Expression levels of CDK11 and CK2 mRNAs and associated proteins were examined in breast cancer cell lines and tissue arrays. RNA expression levels of CDC2L1, CDC2L2, CCNL1, CCNL2, CSNK2A1, CSNK2A2, and CSNK2B genes in breast cancer subtypes were analyzed. Effects following transfection of siRNAs against CDK11 and CK2 in cultured cells were examined by viability and clonal survival assays and by RNA and protein measures. Uptake of tenfibgen (TBG) nanocapsules by TNBC cells was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. TBG nanocapsules delivered siRNAs targeting CDK11 or CK2 in mice carrying TNBC xenograft tumors. Transcript cleavage and response parameters were evaluated. We found strong CDK11 and CK2 mRNA and protein expression in most human breast cancer cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of TNBC patient tissues showed 100% of tumors stained positive for CDK11 with high nuclear intensity compared to normal tissue. The Cancer Genome Atlas analysis comparing basal to other breast cancer subtypes and to normal breast revealed statistically significant differences. Down-regulation of CDK11 and/or CK2 in breast cancer cells caused significant loss of cell viability and clonal survival, reduced relevant mRNA and protein expression, and induced cell death changes. TBG nanocapsules were taken up by TNBC cells both in culture and in xenograft tumors. Treatment with TBG- siRNA to CDK11 or TBG- siRNA to CK2αα' nanocapsules induced

  8. Functional Conservation in the SIAMESE-RELATED Family of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors in Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Bertrand, Laura L.; Johnson, Matthew C.; Dale, Renee; Simmons, L. Alice; Sugimoto, Keiko; Kato, Naohiro; Dassanayake, Maheshi; Schnittger, Arp

    2015-01-01

    The best-characterized members of the plant-specific SIAMESE-RELATED (SMR) family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors regulate the transition from the mitotic cell cycle to endoreplication, also known as endoreduplication, an altered version of the cell cycle in which DNA is replicated without cell division. Some other family members are implicated in cell cycle responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the functions of most SMRs remain unknown, and the specific cyclin-dependent kinase complexes inhibited by SMRs are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a diverse group of SMRs, including an SMR from the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens, can complement an Arabidopsis thaliana siamese (sim) mutant and that both Arabidopsis SIM and P. patens SMR can inhibit CDK activity in vitro. Furthermore, we show that Arabidopsis SIM can bind to and inhibit both CDKA;1 and CDKB1;1. Finally, we show that SMR2 acts to restrict cell proliferation during leaf growth in Arabidopsis and that SIM, SMR1/LGO, and SMR2 play overlapping roles in controlling the transition from cell division to endoreplication during leaf development. These results indicate that differences in SMR function in plant growth and development are primarily due to differences in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation, rather than to differences in fundamental biochemical function. PMID:26546445

  9. Several human cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, structurally related to roscovitine, are new anti-malarial agents.

    PubMed

    Houzé, Sandrine; Hoang, Nha-Thu; Lozach, Olivier; Le Bras, Jacques; Meijer, Laurent; Galons, Hervé; Demange, Luc

    2014-09-23

    In Africa, malaria kills one child each minute. It is also responsible for about one million deaths worldwide each year. Plasmodium falciparum, is the protozoan responsible for the most lethal form of the disease, with resistance developing against the available anti-malarial drugs. Among newly proposed anti-malaria targets, are the P. falciparum cyclin-dependent kinases (PfCDKs). There are involved in different stages of the protozoan growth and development but share high sequence homology with human cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). We previously reported the synthesis of CDKs inhibitors that are structurally-related to (R)-roscovitine, a 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine, and they showed activity against neuronal diseases and cancers. In this report, we describe the synthesis and the characterization of new CDK inhibitors, active in reducing the in vitro growth of P. falciparum (3D7 and 7G8 strains). Six compounds are more potent inhibitors than roscovitine, and three exhibited IC50 values close to 1 µM for both 3D7 and 7G8 strains. Although, such molecules do inhibit P. falciparum growth, they require further studies to improve their selectivity for PfCDKs.

  10. Functional Conservation in the SIAMESE-RELATED Family of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors in Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narender; Harashima, Hirofumi; Kalve, Shweta; Bramsiepe, Jonathan; Wang, Kai; Sizani, Bulelani L; Bertrand, Laura L; Johnson, Matthew C; Faulk, Christopher; Dale, Renee; Simmons, L Alice; Churchman, Michelle L; Sugimoto, Keiko; Kato, Naohiro; Dasanayake, Maheshi; Beemster, Gerrit; Schnittger, Arp; Larkin, John C

    2015-11-01

    The best-characterized members of the plant-specific SIAMESE-RELATED (SMR) family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors regulate the transition from the mitotic cell cycle to endoreplication, also known as endoreduplication, an altered version of the cell cycle in which DNA is replicated without cell division. Some other family members are implicated in cell cycle responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the functions of most SMRs remain unknown, and the specific cyclin-dependent kinase complexes inhibited by SMRs are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a diverse group of SMRs, including an SMR from the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens, can complement an Arabidopsis thaliana siamese (sim) mutant and that both Arabidopsis SIM and P. patens SMR can inhibit CDK activity in vitro. Furthermore, we show that Arabidopsis SIM can bind to and inhibit both CDKA;1 and CDKB1;1. Finally, we show that SMR2 acts to restrict cell proliferation during leaf growth in Arabidopsis and that SIM, SMR1/LGO, and SMR2 play overlapping roles in controlling the transition from cell division to endoreplication during leaf development. These results indicate that differences in SMR function in plant growth and development are primarily due to differences in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation, rather than to differences in fundamental biochemical function.

  11. Accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27/Kip1 and the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Durand, B; Gao, F B; Raff, M

    1997-01-01

    Many types of vertebrate precursor cells divide a limited number of times before they stop and terminally differentiate. In no case is it known what causes them to stop dividing. We have been studying this problem in the proliferating precursor cells that give rise to postmitotic oligodendrocytes, the cells that make myelin in the central nervous system. We show here that two components of the cell cycle control system, cyclin D1 and the Cdc2 kinase, are present in the proliferating precursor cells but not in differentiated oligodendrocytes, suggesting that the control system is dismantled in the oligodendrocytes. More importantly, we show that the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27 progressively accumulates in the precursor cells as they proliferate and is present at high levels in oligodendrocytes. Our findings are consistent with the possibility that the accumulation of p27 is part of both the intrinsic counting mechanism that determines when precursor cell proliferation stops and differentiation begins and the effector mechanism that arrests the cell cycle when the counting mechanism indicates it is time. The recent findings of others that p27-deficient mice have an increased number of cells in all of the organs examined suggest that this function of p27 is not restricted to the oligodendrocyte cell lineage. PMID:9029151

  12. Identification of New Substrates for Breast Tumor Specific LMW Cyclin E/CDK2 Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Cyclin E/CDK2 phosphorylation of Hbo1 does not affect the HAT activity of Hbo1 CDK1 phosphorylates Hbo1 at T85/T88 to create a docking site for polo ...values first subtracted from a water control and then normalized to the positive control, which used HeLa nuclear extract as a source of HAT

  13. Differential expression of cyclin G2, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2C and peripheral myelin protein 22 genes during adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Suh, Y; Choi, Y M; Ahn, J; Davis, M E; Lee, K

    2014-05-01

    Increase of fat cells (FCs) in adipose tissue is attributed to proliferation of preadipocytes or immature adipocytes in the early stage, as well as adipogenic differentiation in the later stage of adipose development. Although both events are involved in the FC increase, they are contrary to each other, because the former requires cell cycle activity, whereas the latter requires cell cycle withdrawal. Therefore, appropriate regulation of cell cycle inhibition is critical to adipogenesis. In order to explore the important cell cycle inhibitors and study their expression in adipogenesis, we adopted a strategy combining the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database available on the NCBI website and the results of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) data in porcine adipose tissue. Three cell cycle inhibitors - cyclin G2 (CCNG2), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2C (CDKN2C) and peripheral myelin protein (PMP22) - were selected for study because they are relatively highly expressed in adipose tissue compared with muscle, heart, lung, liver and kidney in humans and mice based on two GEO DataSets (GDS596 and GDS3142). In the latter analysis, they were found to be more highly expressed in differentiating/ed preadipocytes than in undifferentiated preadipocytes in human and mice as shown respectively by GDS2366 and GDS2743. In addition, GDS2659 also suggested increasing expression of the three cell cycle inhibitors during differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. Further study with qPCR in Landrace pigs did not confirm the high expression of these genes in adipose tissue compared with other tissues in market-age pigs, but confirmed higher expression of these genes in FCs than in the stromal vascular fraction, as well as increasing expression of these genes during in vitro adipogenic differentiation and in vivo development of adipose tissue. Moreover, the relatively high expression of CCNG2 in adipose tissue of market-age pigs and increasing expression during development of adipose tissue

  14. Prediction of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 inhibitor potency using the fragment molecular orbital method

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The reliable and robust estimation of ligand binding affinity continues to be a challenge in drug design. Many current methods rely on molecular mechanics (MM) calculations which do not fully explain complex molecular interactions. Full quantum mechanical (QM) computation of the electronic state of protein-ligand complexes has recently become possible by the latest advances in the development of linear-scaling QM methods such as the ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. This approximate molecular orbital method is sufficiently fast that it can be incorporated into the development cycle during structure-based drug design for the reliable estimation of ligand binding affinity. Additionally, the FMO method can be combined with approximations for entropy and solvation to make it applicable for binding affinity prediction for a broad range of target and chemotypes. Results We applied this method to examine the binding affinity for a series of published cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) inhibitors. We calculated the binding affinity for 28 CDK2 inhibitors using the ab initio FMO method based on a number of X-ray crystal structures. The sum of the pair interaction energies (PIE) was calculated and used to explain the gas-phase enthalpic contribution to binding. The correlation of the ligand potencies to the protein-ligand interaction energies gained from FMO was examined and was seen to give a good correlation which outperformed three MM force field based scoring functions used to appoximate the free energy of binding. Although the FMO calculation allows for the enthalpic component of binding interactions to be understood at the quantum level, as it is an in vacuo single point calculation, the entropic component and solvation terms are neglected. For this reason a more accurate and predictive estimate for binding free energy was desired. Therefore, additional terms used to describe the protein-ligand interactions were then calculated to improve the

  15. Multiple Roles of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitors in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Patrick J.; Bisi, John E.; Strum, Jay C.; Combest, Austin J.; Darr, David B.; Usary, Jerry E.; Zamboni, William C.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Perou, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate cell proliferation and coordinate the cell cycle checkpoint response to DNA damage. Although inhibitors with varying selectivity to specific CDK family members have been developed, selective CDK4/6 inhibitors have emerged as the most attractive antineoplastic agents because of the importance of CDK4/6 activity in regulating cell proliferation and the toxic effects associated with inhibition of other CDKs (eg, CDK1 and CDK2). Methods FVB/N wild-type mice (n = 13) were used to evaluate carboplatin-induced myelosuppression in bone marrow by complete blood cell counts after treatment with the CDK4/6 inhibitor PD0332991. Genetically engineered murine models of retinoblastoma (Rb)-competent (MMTV-c-neu) and Rb-incompetent (C3-TAg) breast cancer (n = 16 MMTV-c-neu mice in the carboplatin plus vehicle control group, n = 17 MMTV-c-neu mice in the carboplatin plus PD0332991 group, n = 17 C3-TAg mice in the carboplatin plus vehicle control group, and n = 14 C3-TAg mice in the carboplatin plus PD0332991 group) were used to investigate the antitumor activity of PD0332991 alone or in combination with chemotherapy. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Coadministration of PD0332991 with carboplatin compared with carboplatin alone in FVB/N wild-type mice increased hematocrit (51.2% vs 33.5%, difference = 17.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = −26.7% to −8.6%, P < .001), platelet counts (1321 vs 758.5 thousand cells per μL, difference = 562.5 thousand cells per μL, 95% CI = −902.8 to −222.6, P = .002), myeloid cells (granulocytes and monocytes; 3.1 vs 1.6 thousand cells per μL, difference = 1.5 thousand cells per μL, 95% CI = −2.23 to −0.67, P < .001), and lymphocytes (7.9 vs 5.4 thousand cells per μL, difference = 2.5 thousand cells per μL, 95% CI = −4.75 to −0.18, P = .02). Daily administration of PD0332991 exhibited antitumor activity in MMTV-c-neu mice as a single agent. However, the combination of

  16. Targeting zebrafish and murine pituitary corticotroph tumors with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning-Ai; Jiang, Hong; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Fan, Xue-Mo; Lin, Shuo; Melmed, Shlomo

    2011-01-01

    Cushing disease caused by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas leads to hypercortisolemia predisposing to diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, central obesity, cardiovascular morbidity, and increased mortality. There is no effective pituitary targeted pharmacotherapy for Cushing disease. Here, we generated germline transgenic zebrafish with overexpression of pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG/securin) targeted to the adenohypophyseal proopiomelanocortin (POMC) lineage, which recapitulated early features pathognomonic of corticotroph adenomas, including corticotroph expansion and partial glucocorticoid resistance. Adult Tg:Pomc-Pttg fish develop neoplastic coticotrophs and pituitary cyclin E up-regulation, as well as metabolic disturbances mimicking hypercortisolism caused by Cushing disease. Early development of corticotroph pathologies in Tg:Pomc-Pttg embryos facilitated drug testing in vivo. We identified a pharmacologic CDK2/cyclin E inhibitor, R-roscovitine (seliciclib; CYC202), which specifically reversed corticotroph expansion in live Tg:Pomc-Pttg embryos. We further validated that orally administered R-roscovitine suppresses ACTH and corticosterone levels, and also restrained tumor growth in a mouse model of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Molecular analyses in vitro and in vivo showed that R-roscovitine suppresses ACTH expression, induces corticotroph tumor cell senescence and cell cycle exit by up-regulating p27, p21 and p57, and downregulates cyclin E expression. The results suggest that use of selective CDK inhibitors could effectively target corticotroph tumor growth and hormone secretion. PMID:21536883

  17. Establishment of an immortalized cell line derived from the prairie vole via lentivirus-mediated transduction of mutant cyclin-dependent kinase 4, cyclin D, and telomerase reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Masafumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Horie, Kengo; Hirayama, Takashi; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Kuroda, Kengo; Donai, Kenichiro; Hidema, Shizu; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    The prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) shows social behaviors such as monogamy and parenting of infants with pair bonding. These social behaviors are specific to the prairie vole and have not been observed in other types of voles, such as mountain voles. Although the prairie vole has several unique characteristics, an in vitro cell culture system has not been established for this species. Furthermore, establishment of cultured cells derived from the prairie vole may be beneficial based on the three Rs (i.e., Replacement, Reduction, and Refinement) concept. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to establish an immortalized cell line derived from the prairie vole. Our previous research has shown that transduction with mutant forms of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), cyclin D, and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) could efficiently immortalize cells from multiple species, including humans, cattle, pigs, and monkeys. Here, we introduced these three genes into prairie vole-derived muscle fibroblasts. The expression of mutant CDK4 and cyclin D proteins was confirmed by western blotting, and telomerase activity was detected in immortalized vole muscle-derived fibroblasts (VMF-K4DT cells or VMFs) by stretch PCR. Population doubling analysis showed that the introduction of mutant CDK4, cyclin D, and TERT extended the lifespan of VMFs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the establishment of an immortalized cell line derived from the prairie vole through the expression of mutant CDK4, cyclin D, and human TERT. PMID:26496927

  18. The ω-3 epoxide of eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits endothelial cell proliferation by p38 MAP kinase activation and cyclin D1/CDK4 down-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Pei H; Petrovic, Nenad; Murray, Michael

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Dietary intake of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) like eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreases cancer risk, while arachidonic acid and other ω-6 PUFAs increase risk, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-derived epoxides contribute to enhanced tumourigenesis due to ω-6 PUFA intake. Thus, ω-6 arachidonic acid epoxides (EETs) inhibit apoptosis and stimulate proliferation by up-regulating cyclin D1 expression in cells. The present study evaluated the corresponding ω-3 PUFA epoxides and assessed their role in the regulation of cell proliferation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Four chemically stable EPA epoxides (formed at the 8,9-, 11,12-, 14,15- and 17,18-olefinic bonds) were synthesized and tested against growth-related signalling pathways in brain microvascular endothelial bEND.3 cells. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry and cyclin gene expression by immunoblotting and real-time PCR. The role of the p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in cyclin D1 dysregulation was assessed using specific inhibitors and dominant-negative expression plasmids. KEY RESULTS The ω-3 17,18-epoxide of EPA decreased cell proliferation, interrupted the cell cycle in S-phase and down-regulated the cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-4 complex, whereas the 8,9-, 11,12- and 14,15-epoxides were either inactive or enhanced proliferation. Cyclin D1 down-regulation by 17,18-epoxy-EPA was mediated by activation of the growth-suppressing p38 MAP kinase, but the alternate EPA-epoxides were inactive. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present findings suggest that the epoxide formed by CYP enzymes at the ω-3 olefinic bond may contribute to the beneficial effects of ω-3 PUFA by down-regulating cyclin D1 and suppressing cell proliferation. PMID:21077851

  19. Dephosphorylation of human cyclin-dependent kinases by protein phosphatase type 2C alpha and beta 2 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, A; Kaldis, P; Solomon, M J

    2000-11-03

    We previously reported that the activating phosphorylation on cyclin-dependent kinases in yeast (Cdc28p) and in humans (Cdk2) is removed by type 2C protein phosphatases. In this study, we characterize this PP2C-like activity in HeLa cell extract and determine that it is due to PP2C beta 2, a novel PP2C beta isoform, and to PP2C alpha. PP2C alpha and PP2C beta 2 co-purified with Mg(2+)-dependent Cdk2/Cdk6 phosphatase activity in DEAE-Sepharose, Superdex-200, and Mono Q chromatographies. Moreover, purified recombinant PP2C alpha and PP2C beta 2 proteins efficiently dephosphorylated monomeric Cdk2/Cdk6 in vitro. The dephosphorylation of Cdk2 and Cdk6 by PP2C isoforms was inhibited by the binding of cyclins. We found that the PP2C-like activity in HeLa cell extract, partially purified HeLa PP2C alpha and PP2C beta 2 isoforms, and the recombinant PP2Cs exhibited a comparable substrate preference for a phosphothreonine containing substrate, consistent with the conservation of threonine residues at the site of activating phosphorylation in CDKs.

  20. Regulation of Cdc28 Cyclin-Dependent Protein Kinase Activity during the Cell Cycle of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Michael D.; Hodge, Amy E.

    1998-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK) encoded by CDC28 is the master regulator of cell division in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By mechanisms that, for the most part, remain to be delineated, Cdc28 activity controls the timing of mitotic commitment, bud initiation, DNA replication, spindle formation, and chromosome separation. Environmental stimuli and progress through the cell cycle are monitored through checkpoint mechanisms that influence Cdc28 activity at key cell cycle stages. A vast body of information concerning how Cdc28 activity is timed and coordinated with various mitotic events has accrued. This article reviews that literature. Following an introduction to the properties of CDKs common to many eukaryotic species, the key influences on Cdc28 activity—cyclin-CKI binding and phosphorylation-dephosphorylation events—are examined. The processes controlling the abundance and activity of key Cdc28 regulators, especially transcriptional and proteolytic mechanisms, are then discussed in detail. Finally, the mechanisms by which environmental stimuli influence Cdc28 activity are summarized. PMID:9841670

  1. Binding of Drosophila ORC proteins to anaphase chromosomes requires cessation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Baldinger, Tina; Gossen, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    The initial step in the acquisition of replication competence by eukaryotic chromosomes is the binding of the multisubunit origin recognition complex, ORC. We describe a transgenic Drosophila model which enables dynamic imaging of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Drosophila melanogaster ORC subunit, DmOrc2-GFP. It is functional in genetic complementation, expressed at physiological levels, and participates quantitatively in complex formation. This fusion protein is therefore able to depict both the holocomplex DmOrc1-6 and the core complex DmOrc2-6 formed by the Drosophila initiator proteins. Its localization can be monitored in vivo along the cell cycle and development. DmOrc2-GFP is not detected on metaphase chromosomes but binds rapidly to anaphase chromatin in Drosophila embryos. Expression of either stable cyclin A, B, or B3 prevents this reassociation, suggesting that cessation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase activity is essential for binding of the DmOrc proteins to chromosomes.

  2. Identification of cdk2 binding sites on the p27Kip1 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kwon, T K; Nordin, A A

    1998-02-12

    A cdk2 binding domain on p27Kip1 located within the sequence of amino acids 53-85 was further characterized by generating a series of point mutations within amino acid residues 62-75. Two regions, FDF (residues 62-64) and GXY (residues 72 and 74), were identified within the beta hairpin region of p27Kip1. Mutations within these regions essentially completely inhibited the binding to in vitro translated cdk2 and cdk2/cyclin E complexes formed in vitro or in vivo. The p27Kip1 GST-fusion protein of the point mutation that replaces phenylalanine at residue 64 to alanine (F64A) showed approximately twofold less inhibition of cdk2 kinase activity. The cellular response to the introduction of the F64A mutant form of p27Kip1 was compared to that of p27Kip1 wild type by transfecting HeLa cells with constructs of full length sense and antisense coding sequences. Overexpression of the F64A mutant form of p27Kip1 bound significantly lower levels of cdk2 as compared to wild type and did not affect the cdk2 related kinase activity of the transfected HeLa cells. Overexpression of wild type p27Kip1 resulted in a reduction of the level of cdk2 kinase activity and effectively suppressed the growth of the transfected HeLa cells.

  3. B1-type cyclin-dependent kinases are essential for the formation of stomatal complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Boudolf, Véronique; Barrôco, Rosa; Engler, Janice de Almeida; Verkest, Aurine; Beeckman, Tom; Naudts, Mirande; Inzé, Dirk; De Veylder, Lieven

    2004-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are key regulators of the cell cycle. In yeasts, only one CDK is sufficient to drive cells through the cell cycle, whereas higher eukaryotes developed a family of related CDKs. Curiously, plants contain a unique class of CDKs (B-type CDKs), whose function is still unclear. We show that the CDKB1;1 gene of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is highly expressed in guard cells and stomatal precursor cells of cotyledons, suggesting a prominent role for B-type CDKs in stomatal development. In accordance, transgenic Arabidopsis plants with reduced B-type CDK activity had a decreased stomatal index because of an early block of meristemoid division and inhibition of satellite meristemoid formation. Many aberrant stomatal cells were observed, all of them blocked in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Although division of stomatal precursors was inhibited, cells still acquired stomatal identity, illustrating that stomatal cell differentiation is independent of cellular and nuclear division.

  4. Loss of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 from parvalbumin interneurons leads to hyperinhibition, decreased anxiety, and memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, Andrii; Seo, Jinsoo; Hu, Ji; Su, Susan C; de Anda, Froylan Calderon; Durak, Omer; Ericsson, Maria; Carlén, Marie; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2015-02-11

    Perturbations in fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV) interneurons are hypothesized to be a major component of various neuropsychiatric disorders; however, the mechanisms regulating PV interneurons remain mostly unknown. Recently, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been shown to function as a major regulator of synaptic plasticity. Here, we demonstrate that genetic ablation of Cdk5 in PV interneurons in mouse brain leads to an increase in GABAergic neurotransmission and impaired synaptic plasticity. PVCre;fCdk5 mice display a range of behavioral abnormalities, including decreased anxiety and memory impairment. Our results reveal a central role of Cdk5 expressed in PV interneurons in gating inhibitory neurotransmission and underscore the importance of such regulation during behavioral tasks. Our findings suggest that Cdk5 can be considered a promising therapeutic target in a variety of conditions attributed to inhibitory interneuronal dysfunction, such as epilepsy, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia.

  5. Neurobehavioral phenotype in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 syndrome: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Posar, Annio; Faggioli, Raffaella; Visconti, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The phenotype of cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) syndrome includes Rett syndrome variant with early onset seizures, early onset epileptic encephalopathy; and severe developmental delay. Autistic features have often been reported in literature, but detailed reports of the behavior of these individuals are lacking. We describe the clinical picture of a girl aged 15 years 9 months affected by CDKL5 syndrome, with special attention to the neurobehavioral phenotype. The evaluation showed, apart from a profound intellectual disability, the presence of atypical features of behavior, mainly in relating to people, in imitation, and in verbal and nonverbal communication, thus justifying the diagnosis of comorbid autism spectrum disorder. A formal assessment of the behavior, through appropriate tools, is necessary to choose the most appropriate rehabilitative intervention and to characterize in more detail the CDKL5 syndrome phenotype. We propose a testing protocol for the neurobehavioral assessment of these patients.

  6. Neurobehavioral phenotype in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 syndrome: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Posar, Annio; Faggioli, Raffaella; Visconti, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The phenotype of cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) syndrome includes Rett syndrome variant with early onset seizures, early onset epileptic encephalopathy; and severe developmental delay. Autistic features have often been reported in literature, but detailed reports of the behavior of these individuals are lacking. We describe the clinical picture of a girl aged 15 years 9 months affected by CDKL5 syndrome, with special attention to the neurobehavioral phenotype. The evaluation showed, apart from a profound intellectual disability, the presence of atypical features of behavior, mainly in relating to people, in imitation, and in verbal and nonverbal communication, thus justifying the diagnosis of comorbid autism spectrum disorder. A formal assessment of the behavior, through appropriate tools, is necessary to choose the most appropriate rehabilitative intervention and to characterize in more detail the CDKL5 syndrome phenotype. We propose a testing protocol for the neurobehavioral assessment of these patients. PMID:26557170

  7. A new class of cyclin dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas is required for coupling cell size to cell division.

    PubMed

    Li, Yubing; Liu, Dianyi; López-Paz, Cristina; Olson, Bradley Jsc; Umen, James G

    2016-03-25

    Proliferating cells actively control their size by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii divides by multiple fission, wherein a 'counting' mechanism couples mother cell-size to cell division number allowing production of uniform-sized daughters. We identified a sizer protein, CDKG1, that acts through the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway as a D-cyclin-dependent RB kinase to regulate mitotic counting. Loss of CDKG1 leads to fewer mitotic divisions and large daughters, while mis-expression of CDKG1 causes supernumerous mitotic divisions and small daughters. The concentration of nuclear-localized CDKG1 in pre-mitotic cells is set by mother cell size, and its progressive dilution and degradation with each round of cell division may provide a link between mother cell-size and mitotic division number. Cell-size-dependent accumulation of limiting cell cycle regulators such as CDKG1 is a potentially general mechanism for size control.

  8. Extracellular alpha-synuclein induces calpain-dependent overactivation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Czapski, Grzegorz A; Gąssowska, Magdalena; Wilkaniec, Anna; Cieślik, Magdalena; Adamczyk, Agata

    2013-09-17

    Extracellular alpha-synuclein (ASN) could be involved in the pathomechanism of Parkinson's disease (PD) via disturbances of calcium homeostasis, activation of nitric oxide synthase and oxidative/nitrosative stress. In this study we analyzed the role of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in the molecular mechanism(s) of ASN toxicity. We found that exposure of PC12 cells to ASN increases Cdk5 activity via calpain-dependent p25 formation and by enhancement of Cdk5 phosphorylation at Tyr15. Cdk5 and calpain inhibitors prevented ASN-evoked cell death. Our findings, indicating the participation of Cdk5 in ASN toxicity, provide new insight into how extracellular ASN may trigger dopaminergic cell dysfunction in PD.

  9. Identification and Structural-Functional Analysis of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases of the Cattle Tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Helga; Romeiro, Nelilma C.; Braz, Gloria R. C.; de Oliveira, Eduardo Alves Gamosa; Rodrigues, Camilla; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Githaka, Naftaly; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; Moraes, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases essential for cell cycle progression. Herein, we describe the participation of CDKs in the physiology of Rhipicephalus microplus, the southern cattle tick and an important disease vector. Firstly, amino acid sequences homologous with CDKs of other organisms were identified from a R. microplus transcriptome database in silico. The analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of CDK1 and CDK10 from R. microplus showed that both have caspase-3/7 cleavage motifs despite their differences in motif position and length of encoded proteins. CDK1 has two motifs (DKRGD and SAKDA) located opposite to the ATP binding site while CDK10 has only one motif (SLLDN) for caspase 3–7 near the ATP binding site. Roscovitine (Rosco), a purine derivative that inhibits CDK/cyclin complexes by binding to the catalytic domain of the CDK molecule at the ATP binding site, which prevents the transfer of ATP's γphosphoryl group to the substrate. To determine the effect of Rosco on tick CDKs, BME26 cells derived from R. microplus embryo cells were utilized in vitro inhibition assays. Cell viability decreased in the Rosco-treated groups after 24 hours of incubation in a concentration-dependent manner and this was observed up to 48 hours following incubation. To our knowledge, this is the first report on characterization of a cell cycle protein in arachnids, and the sensitivity of BME26 tick cell line to Rosco treatment suggests that CDKs are potential targets for novel drug design to control tick infestation. PMID:24146826

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Dinaciclib (SCH727965) inhibits pancreatic cancer growth and progression in murine xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Savita; Karikari, Collins; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Rasheed, Zeshaan; Ottenhof, Niki A; Dadon, Tikva; Alvarez, Hector; Fendrich, Volker; Rajeshkumar, NV; Matsui, William; Brossart, Peter; Hidalgo, Manuel; Bannerji, Rajat

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies, and potent therapeutic options are lacking. Inhibition of cell cycle progression through pharmacological blockade of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) has been suggested as a potential treatment option for human cancers with deregulated cell cycle control. Dinaciclib (SCH727965) is a novel small molecule multi-CDK inhibitor with low nanomolar potency against CDK1, CDK2, CDK5 and CDK9 that has shown favorable toxicity and efficacy in preliminary mouse experiments, and has been well tolerated in Phase I clinical trials. In the current study, the therapeutic efficacy of SCH727965 on human pancreatic cancer cells was tested using in vitro and in vivo model systems. Treatment with SCH727965 significantly reduced in vitro cell growth, motility and colony formation in soft agar of MIAPaCa-2 and Pa20C cells. These phenotypic changes were accompanied by marked reduction of phosphorylation of Retinoblastoma (Rb) and reduced activation of RalA. Single agent therapy with SCH727965 (40 mg/kg i.p. twice weekly) for 4 weeks significantly reduced subcutaneous tumor growth in 10/10 (100%) of tested low-passage human pancreatic cancer xenografts. Treatment of low passage pancreatic cancer xenografts with a combination of SCH727965 and gemcitabine was significantly more effective than either agent alone. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis identified overrepresentation of the Notch and Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGFβ) signaling pathways in the xenografts least responsive to SCH727965 treatment. Treatment with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor SCH727965 alone or in combination is a highly promising novel experimental therapeutic strategy against pancreatic cancer. PMID:21768779

  11. Differential Roles of Two Homologous Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Genes in Regulating Cell Cycle and Innate Immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hamdoun, Safae; Zhang, Chong; Gill, Manroop; Kumar, Narender; Churchman, Michelle; Larkin, John C; Kwon, Ashley; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Precise cell-cycle control is critical for plant development and responses to pathogen invasion. Two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes, SIAMESE (SIM) and SIM-RELATED 1 (SMR1), were recently shown to regulate Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) defense based on phenotypes conferred by a sim smr1 double mutant. However, whether these two genes play differential roles in cell-cycle and defense control is unknown. In this report, we show that while acting synergistically to promote endoreplication, SIM and SMR1 play different roles in affecting the ploidy of trichome and leaf cells, respectively. In addition, we found that the smr1-1 mutant, but not sim-1, was more susceptible to a virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain, and this susceptibility could be rescued by activating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense. Consistent with these results, smr1-1 partially suppressed the dwarfism, high SA levels, and cell death phenotypes in acd6-1, a mutant used to gauge the change of defense levels. Thus, SMR1 functions partly through SA in defense control. The differential roles of SIM and SMR1 are due to differences in temporal and spatial expression of these two genes in Arabidopsis tissues and in response to P. syringae infection. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis of plants with altered SA signaling revealed that SA is necessary, but not sufficient, to change cell-cycle progression. We further found that a mutant with three CYCD3 genes disrupted also compromised disease resistance to P. syringae. Together, this study reveals differential roles of two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in regulating cell-cycle progression and innate immunity in Arabidopsis and provides insights into the importance of cell-cycle control during host-pathogen interactions. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Identification and structural-functional analysis of cyclin-dependent kinases of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Helga; Romeiro, Nelilma C; Braz, Gloria R C; de Oliveira, Eduardo Alves Gamosa; Rodrigues, Camilla; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Githaka, Naftaly; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; Moraes, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases essential for cell cycle progression. Herein, we describe the participation of CDKs in the physiology of Rhipicephalus microplus, the southern cattle tick and an important disease vector. Firstly, amino acid sequences homologous with CDKs of other organisms were identified from a R. microplus transcriptome database in silico. The analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of CDK1 and CDK10 from R. microplus showed that both have caspase-3/7 cleavage motifs despite their differences in motif position and length of encoded proteins. CDK1 has two motifs (DKRGD and SAKDA) located opposite to the ATP binding site while CDK10 has only one motif (SLLDN) for caspase 3-7 near the ATP binding site. Roscovitine (Rosco), a purine derivative that inhibits CDK/cyclin complexes by binding to the catalytic domain of the CDK molecule at the ATP binding site, which prevents the transfer of ATP's γphosphoryl group to the substrate. To determine the effect of Rosco on tick CDKs, BME26 cells derived from R. microplus embryo cells were utilized in vitro inhibition assays. Cell viability decreased in the Rosco-treated groups after 24 hours of incubation in a concentration-dependent manner and this was observed up to 48 hours following incubation. To our knowledge, this is the first report on characterization of a cell cycle protein in arachnids, and the sensitivity of BME26 tick cell line to Rosco treatment suggests that CDKs are potential targets for novel drug design to control tick infestation.

  13. Do truncated cyclins contribute to aberrant cyclin expression in cancer?

    PubMed

    Van Dross, Rukiyah; Browning, Philip J; Pelling, Jill C

    2006-03-01

    Cyclin overexpression is found in several types of cancer. Genetic events that place cyclin genes under the control of active promoters or that increase cyclin gene copy number account for most instances of cyclin overexpression. New paradigms for aberrant cyclin expression have been suggested by studies showing that truncated cyclins are expressed in specific subsets of cancer. The altered cyclins lack regulatory sequences (compared to the wild-type protein) that modulate their stability, subcellular localization or cdk-associated kinase activity. In this communication, we review the current literature and assess the role of truncated cyclins D, E, A, B, C and virus encoded-cyclin D (K-cyclin) in the development of cancer. We also report the molecular characteristics, expression patterns and if available, prognostic significance of these proteins.

  14. Apoptosis in 7-hydroxystaurosporine-treated T lymphoblasts correlates with activation of cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Worland, P J; Clark, J L; Carlson, B A; Sausville, E A

    1995-08-01

    7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01) is a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes alpha, beta, and gamma [Seynaeve et al., Mol. Pharmacol, 45: 1207-1214, 1994] that also has antitumor effects in vivo. To determine whether inhibition of PKC can be related to inhibition of cell growth with induction of apoptosis, we compared the effects of UCN-01 to those of the highly selective bisindolylmaleimide PKC antagonist GF 109203X in leukemic T-cell lines. Both compounds potently inhibited PKC activity when added to T-cell membrane preparations and reversed phorbol ester-induced c-fos gene expression in intact cells. However, whereas UCN-01 potently inhibited growth of Jurkat, Molt-3, Molt-4, and Hut-78 cells (IC50 = 20-65 nM, irreversible after 24 h of exposure), GF 109203X had IC50s for cell growth of 3.6-5.0 muM. Less than 3 h after addition, UCN-01 but not GF 109203X-treated cells displayed loss of cells with G2-M DNA content, appearance of a hypodiploid DNA fraction, and evidence of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Six h after treatment, cells appeared to accumulate with S-phase DNA content. These effects correlated with selective UCN-01 but not GF 109203X-induced decrease in total and tyrosine phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) 1 and 2, and with increases in the histone H1 kinase activities of cdk1 and cdk2. UCN-01 was relatively less potent in inhibition of properly activated cdk1 and cdk2 when added in vitro to H1 kinase assays (IC50 = 1000 and 600 nM, respectively). We conclude that inhibition of PKC alone is not sufficient to account for the actions of UCN-01 and are led to the hypothesis that inappropriate cdk activation either correlates with or actually mediates cell growth inhibition with apoptosis in T lymphoblasts exposed to UCN-01.

  15. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine inhibits kinase activity, cell proliferation, multicellular development, and Cdk5 nuclear translocation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert J; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-03-01

    Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor, inhibited kinase activity and the axenic growth of Dictyostelium discoideum at micromolar concentrations. Growth was almost fully rescued in 50 µM and ≈ 50% rescued in 100 µM roscovitine-treated cultures by the over-expression of Cdk5-GFP. This supports the importance of Cdk5 function during cell proliferation in Dictyostelium and indicates that Cdk5 is a primary target of the drug. Roscovitine did not affect the expression of Cdk5 protein during axenic growth but did inhibit its nuclear translocation. This novel result suggests that the effects of roscovitine could be due in part to altering Cdk5 translocation in other systems as well. Kinase activity was inhibited by roscovitine in assays using AX3 whole cell lysates, but not in assays using lysates from Cdk5-GFP over-expressing cells. At higher concentrations, roscovitine impaired slug and fruiting body formation. Fruiting bodies that did form were small and produced relatively fewer spores many of which were round. However, roscovitine did not affect stalk cell differentiation. Together with previous findings, these data reveal that roscovitine inhibits Cdk5 during growth and as yet undefined Cdks during mid-late development. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Hierarchy of S-Phase-Promoting Factors: Yeast Dbf4-Cdc7 Kinase Requires Prior S-Phase Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nougarède, Romain; Della Seta, Flavio; Zarzov, Patrick; Schwob, Etienne

    2000-01-01

    In all eukaryotes, the initiation of DNA synthesis requires the formation of prereplicative complexes (pre-RCs) on replication origins, followed by their activation by two S-T protein kinases, an S-phase cyclin-dependent kinase (S-CDK) and a homologue of yeast Dbf4-Cdc7 kinase (Dbf4p-dependent kinase [DDK]). Here, we show that yeast DDK activity is cell cycle regulated, though less tightly than that of the S-CDK Clb5-Cdk1, and peaks during S phase in correlation with Dbf4p levels. Dbf4p is short-lived throughout the cell cycle, but its instability is accentuated during G1 by the anaphase-promoting complex. Downregulating DDK activity is physiologically important, as joint Cdc7p and Dbf4p overexpression is lethal. Because pre-RC formation is a highly ordered process, we asked whether S-CDK and DDK need also to function in a specific order for the firing of origins. We found that both kinases are activated independently, but we show that DDK can perform its function for DNA replication only after S-CDKs have been activated. Cdc45p, a protein needed for initiation, binds tightly to chromatin only after S-CDK activation (L. Zou and B. Stillman, Science 280:593–596, 1998). We show that Cdc45p is phosphorylated by DDK in vitro, suggesting that it might be one of DDK's critical substrates after S-CDK activation. Linking the origin-bound DDK to the tightly regulated S-CDK in a dependent sequence of events may ensure that DNA replication initiates only at the right time and place. PMID:10805723

  17. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2/cyclin E complex is involved in p120 catenin (p120ctn)-dependent cell growth control: a new role for p120ctn in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Nicolas T.; Oddou, Christiane I.; Lainé, Michèle G.; Ducarouge, Benjamin; Marie, Christiane A.; Block, Marc R.; Jacquier-Sarlin, Muriel R.

    2007-01-01

    Depending on its cellular localization, p120 catenin (p120ctn) can participate in various processes, such as cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion, actin cytoskeleton remodeling, and intracellular trafficking. Recent studies also indicate that p120ctn could regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition. This report describes a new function of p120ctn in the regulation of cell cycle progression. Overexpression of the p120ctn isoform 3A in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29) results in cytoplasmic accumulation of the protein, as observed in many tumors. This cytoplasmic increase is correlated with a reduction in proliferation and inhibition of DNA synthesis. Under these conditions, experiments on synchronized cells revealed a prolonged S phase associated with cyclin E stabilization. Both confocal microscopy and biochemical analysis showed that cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 colocalized with p120ctn in centrosomes during mitosis. These proteins are associated in a functional complex evidenced by coimmunoprecipitation experiments and the emergence of Thr199-phosphorylated nucleophosmin/B23. Such post-translational modification of this centrosomal target has been shown to trigger the initiation of centrosome duplication. Therefore, p120ctn-mediated accumulation of cyclin E in centrosomes may participate in abnormal amplification of centrosomes and the inhibition of DNA replication, thus leading to aberrant mitosis and polyploidy. Because these modifications are often observed in cancer, p120ctn may represent a new therapeutic target for future therapy. PMID:17942908

  18. Phosphorylation of TRPV1 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 promotes TRPV1 surface localization, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Du, Junxie; Yang, Yanrui; Wang, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is an important serine/threonine kinase that plays critical roles in many physiological processes. Recently, Cdk5 has been reported to phosphorylate TRPV1 at threonine 407 (Thr-407) in humans (Thr-406 in rats), which enhances the function of TRPV1 channel and promotes thermal hyperalgesia in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain rats. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates TRPV1 at Threonine 406 and promotes the surface localization of TRPV1, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia. The mutation of Thr-406 of TRPV1 to alanine reduced the interaction of TRPV1 with the cytoskeletal elements and decreased the binding of TRPV1 with the motor protein KIF13B, which led to reduced surface distribution of TRPV1. Disrupting the phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 dramatically reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in HEK 293 cells after transient expression and the channel function in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Notably, intrathecal administration of the interfering peptide against the phosphorylation of Thr-406 alleviated heat hyperalgesia and reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in inflammatory pain rats. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 increases the surface level and the function of TRPV1, while the TAT-T406 peptide can effectively attenuate thermal hyperalgesia. Our studies provide a potential therapy for inflammatory pain.

  19. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase CDK1 by oxindolimine ligands and corresponding copper and zinc complexes.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Rodrigo Bernardi; Petersen, Philippe Alexandre Divina; Gonzales-Zubiate, Fernando A; Oliveira, Carla Columbano; Kumar, Naresh; do Nascimento, Rafael Rodrigues; Petrilli, Helena Maria; da Costa Ferreira, Ana Maria

    2015-10-01

    Oxindolimine-copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes that previously have shown to induce apoptosis, with DNA and mitochondria as main targets, exhibit here significant inhibition of kinase CDK1/cyclin B protein. Copper species are more active than the corresponding zinc, and the free ligand shows to be less active, indicating a major influence of coordination in the process, and a further modulation by the coordinated ligand. Molecular docking and classical molecular dynamics provide a better understanding of the effectiveness and kinase inhibition mechanism by these compounds, showing that the metal complex provides a stronger interaction than the free ligand with the ATP-binding site. The metal ion introduces charge in the oxindole species, giving it a more rigid conformation that then becomes more effective in its interactions with the protein active site. Analogous experiments resulted in no significant effect regarding phosphatase inhibition. These results can explain the cytotoxicity of these metal complexes towards different tumor cells, in addition to its capability of binding to DNA, and decreasing membrane potential of mitochondria.

  20. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 Regulates Adult Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation in Response to Insulin.

    PubMed

    Chirivella, Laura; Kirstein, Martina; Ferrón, Sacri R; Domingo-Muelas, Ana; Durupt, Fabrice C; Acosta-Umanzor, Carlos; Cano-Jaimez, Marifé; Pérez-Sánchez, Francisco; Barbacid, Mariano; Ortega, Sagrario; Burks, Deborah J; Fariñas, Isabel

    2017-08-20

    Insulin is one of the standard components used to culture primary neurospheres. Although it stimulates growth of different types of cells, the effects of insulin on adult neural stem cells (NSCs) have not been well characterized. Here, we reveal that insulin stimulates proliferation, but not survival or self-renewal, of adult NSCs. This effect is mediated by insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and subsequent activation of the protein kinase B (or Akt), leading to increased activity of the G1-phase cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) and cell cycle progression. Neurospheres isolated from Irs2-deficient mice are reduced in size and fail to expand in culture and this impaired proliferation is rescued by introduction of a constitutively active Cdk4 (Cdk4(R24C/R24C) ). More interestingly, activation of the IRS2/Akt/Cdk4 signaling pathway by insulin is also necessary for the generation in vitro of neurons and oligodendrocytes from NSCs. Furthermore, the IRS2/Cdk4 pathway is also required for neuritogenesis, an aspect of neuronal maturation that has not been previously linked to regulation of the cell cycle. Differentiation of NSCs usually follows exit from the cell cycle due to increased levels of CDK-inhibitors which prevent activation of CDKs. In contrast, our data indicate that IRS2-mediated Cdk4 activity in response to a mitogen such as insulin promotes terminal differentiation of adult NSCs. Stem Cells 2017. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  1. Palbociclib can overcome mutations in cyclin dependent kinase 6 that break hydrogen bonds between the drug and the protein

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez Maganhi, Stella; Jensen, Patrizia; Caracelli, Ignez; Zukerman Schpector, Julio; Fröhling, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 prevent cells from entering the synthesis phase of the cell cycle. CDK4 and 6 are therefore important drug targets in various cancers. The selective CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib is approved for the treatment of breast cancer and has shown activity in a cellular model of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL)‐rearranged acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We studied the interactions of palbociclib and CDK6 using molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of the simulations suggested several interactions that stabilized the drug in its binding site and that were not observed in the crystal structure of the protein‐drug complex. These included a hydrogen bond to His 100 that was hitherto not reported and several hydrophobic contacts. Evolutionary‐based bioinformatic analysis was used to suggest two mutants, D163G and H100L that would potentially yield drug resistance, as they lead to loss of important protein–drug interactions without hindering the viability of the protein. One of the mutants involved a change in the glycine of the well‐conserved DFG motif of the kinase. Interestingly, CDK6‐dependent human AML cells stably expressing either mutant retained sensitivity to palbociclib, indicating that the protein‐drug interactions are not affected by these. Furthermore, the cells were proliferative in the absence of palbociclib, indicating that the Asp to Gly mutation in the DFG motif did not interfere with the catalytic activity of the protein. PMID:28168755

  2. Regulation of N-type voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic function by cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Su, Susan C.; Seo, Jinsoo; Pan, Jen Q.; Samuels, Benjamin Adam; Rudenko, Andrii; Ericsson, Maria; Neve, Rachael L.; Yue, David T.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV2.2) localize to presynaptic nerve terminals and mediate key events including synaptogenesis and neurotransmission. While several kinases have been implicated in the modulation of calcium channels, their impact on presynaptic functions remains unclear. Here we report that the N-type calcium channel is a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). The pore-forming α1 subunit of the N-type calcium channel is phosphorylated in the C-terminal domain, and phosphorylation results in enhanced calcium influx due to increased channel open probability. Phosphorylation of the N-type calcium channel by Cdk5 facilitates neurotransmitter release and alters presynaptic plasticity by increasing the number of docked vesicles at the synaptic cleft. These effects are mediated by an altered interaction between N-type calcium channels and RIM1, which tethers presynaptic calcium channels to the active zone. Collectively, our results highlight a molecular mechanism by which N-type calcium channels are regulated by Cdk5 to affect presynaptic functions. PMID:22920258

  3. Cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation of RUNX1/AML1 on 3 sites increases transactivation potency and stimulates cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linsheng; Fried, Florence B.; Guo, Hong

    2008-01-01

    RUNX1/AML1 regulates lineage-specific genes during hematopoiesis and stimulates G1 cell-cycle progression. Within RUNX1, S48, S303, and S424 fit the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) phosphorylation consensus, (S/T)PX(R/K). Phosphorylation of RUNX1 by cdks on serine 303 was shown to mediate destabilization of RUNX1 in G2/M. We now use an in vitro kinase assay, phosphopeptide-specific antiserum, and the cdk inhibitor roscovitine to demonstrate that S48 and S424 are also phosphorylated by cdk1 or cdk6 in hematopoietic cells. S48 phosphorylation of RUNX1 paralleled total RUNX1 levels during cell-cycle progression, S303 was more effectively phosphorylated in G2/M, and S424 in G1. Single, double, and triple mutation of the cdk sites to the partially phosphomimetic aspartic acid mildly reduced DNA affinity while progressively increasing transactivation of a model reporter. Mutation to alanine increased DNA affinity, suggesting that in other gene or cellular contexts phosphorylation of RUNX1 by cdks may reduce transactivation. The tripleD RUNX1 mutant rescued Ba/F3 cells from inhibition of proliferation by CBFβ-SMMHC more effectively than the tripleA mutant. Together these findings indicate that cdk phosphorylation of RUNX1 potentially couples stem/progenitor proliferation and lineage progression. PMID:18003885

  4. The emerging roles and therapeutic potential of cyclin-dependent kinase 11 (CDK11) in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yubing; Shen, Jacson K.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Kan, Quancheng; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression and/or hyperactivation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are common features of most cancer types. CDKs have been shown to play important roles in tumor cell proliferation and growth by controlling cell cycle, transcription, and RNA splicing. CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib has been recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of breast cancer. CDK11 is a serine/threonine protein kinase in the CDK family and recent studies have shown that CDK11 also plays critical roles in cancer cell growth and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic events may cause universal overexpression of CDK11 in human cancers. Inhibition of CDK11 has been shown to lead to cancer cell death and apoptosis. Significant evidence has suggested that CDK11 may be a novel and promising therapeutic target for the treatment of cancers. This review will focus on the emerging roles of CDK11 in human cancers, and provide a proof-of-principle for continued efforts toward targeting CDK11 for effective cancer treatment. PMID:27049727

  5. Expression of a TGF-{beta} regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor in normal and immortalized airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, L.A.; Bloomfield, C.; Johnson, N.F.

    1995-12-01

    Tumors arising from epithelial cells, including lung cancers are frequently resistant to factors that regulate growth and differentiation in normal in normal cells. Once such factor is transforming growth factor-{Beta} (TGF-{Beta}). Escape from the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF-{Beta} is thought to be a key step in the transformation of airway epithelial cells. most lung cancer cell lines require serum for growth. In contrast, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells are exquisitely sensitive to growth-inhibitory and differentiating effects of TGF-{Beta}. The recent identification of a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15{sup INK4B}, which is regulated by TGF-{Beta}, suggests a mechanism by which TGF-{Beta} mediates growth arrest in NHBE cells. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to determine if p15{sup INK4B} is induced by TGF-{Beta} in NHBE cells or immortalized bronchial epithelial (R.1) cells and if that induction corresponds to a G1/S cell-cycle arrest; (2) to determine the temporal relationship between p15{sup INK4B} induction, cell-cycle arrest, and the phosphorylation state of the pRB because it is thought that p15{sup INK4B} acts indirectly by preventing phosphorylation of the RB gene product. In this study, expression of p15{sup INK4B} was examined in NHBE cells and R.1 cells at different time intervals following TGF-{Beta} treatment. The expression of this kinase inhibitor and its relationship to the cell and the pRb phosphorylation state were examined in cells that were both sensitive (NHBE) and resistant (R.1) to the effects of TGF-{Beta}. These results suggest that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15{sup INK4B}, is involved in airway epithelial cell differentiation and that loss or reduction of expression plays a role in the resistance of transformed or neoplastic cells to the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF-{Beta}.

  6. Phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) at Tyr-15 is inhibited by Cdk5 activators and does not contribute to the activation of Cdk5.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Saito, Taro; Sato, Ko; Furusawa, Kotaro; Hosokawa, Tomohisa; Tsutsumi, Koji; Asada, Akiko; Kamada, Shinji; Ohshima, Toshio; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2014-07-11

    Cdk5 is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) family. In contrast to other Cdks that promote cell proliferation, Cdk5 plays a role in regulating various neuronal functions, including neuronal migration, synaptic activity, and neuron death. Cdks responsible for cell proliferation need phosphorylation in the activation loop for activation in addition to binding a regulatory subunit cyclin. Cdk5, however, is activated only by binding to its activator, p35 or p39. Furthermore, in contrast to Cdk1 and Cdk2, which are inhibited by phosphorylation at Tyr-15, the kinase activity of Cdk5 is reported to be stimulated when phosphorylated at Tyr-15 by Src family kinases or receptor-type tyrosine kinases. We investigated the activation mechanism of Cdk5 by phosphorylation at Tyr-15. Unexpectedly, however, it was found that Tyr-15 phosphorylation occurred only on monomeric Cdk5, and the coexpression of activators, p35/p25, p39, or Cyclin I, inhibited the phosphorylation. In neuron cultures, too, the activation of Fyn tyrosine kinase did not increase Tyr-15 phosphorylation of Cdk5. Further, phospho-Cdk5 at Tyr-15 was not detected in the p35-bound Cdk5. In contrast, expression of active Fyn increased p35 in neurons. These results indicate that phosphorylation at Tyr-15 is not an activation mechanism of Cdk5 but, rather, indicate that tyrosine kinases could activate Cdk5 by increasing the protein amount of p35. These results call for reinvestigation of how Cdk5 is regulated downstream of Src family kinases or receptor tyrosine kinases in neurons, which is an important signaling cascade in a variety of neuronal activities.

  7. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity is required for T cell activation and induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Tej K.; Lam, Eric; Zheng, Xiaojing; Askew, David; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Chance, Mark R.; Huang, Alex Y.; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine kinase. However, a requirement for Cdk5 has been demonstrated only in postmitotic neurons where there is abundant expression of its activating partners p35 and/or p39. Although hyperactivation of the Cdk5–p35 complex has been found in a variety of inflammatory neurodegenerative disorders, the potential contribution of nonneuronal Cdk5–p35 activity has not been explored in this context. We describe a previously unknown function of the Cdk5–p35 complex in T cells that is required for induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation leads to a rapid induction of Cdk5–p35 expression that is required for T lymphocyte activation. Chimeric mice lacking Cdk5 gene expression in hematopoietic tissues (Cdk5−/−C) are resistant to induction of EAE, and adoptive transfer of either Cdk5−/−C or p35−/− encephalitogenic lymphocytes fails to transfer disease. Moreover, our data reveal a novel mechanism involving Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of the actin modulator coronin 1a on threonine 418. Cdk5-deficient lymphocytes lack this posttranslational modification of coronin 1a and exhibit defective TCR-induced actin polarization and reduced migration toward CCL-19. These data define a distinct role for Cdk5 in lymphocyte biology and suggest that inhibition of this kinase may be beneficial in the treatment of T cell–mediated inflammatory disorders. PMID:20937706

  8. The extracellular-regulated protein kinase 5 (ERK5) promotes cell proliferation through the down-regulation of inhibitors of cyclin dependent protein kinases (CDKs).

    PubMed

    Perez-Madrigal, Diana; Finegan, Katherine G; Paramo, Blanca; Tournier, Cathy

    2012-12-01

    Activation of the extracellular-regulated protein kinase 5 (ERK5) has been associated with mitogenic signal transduction. However, conflicting findings have challenged the idea that ERK5 is a critical regulator of cell proliferation. We have addressed this issue by testing the effect of the conditional loss of ERK5 in primary fibroblasts. We have discovered that ERK5 suppressed the expression of the cyclin dependent protein kinase (CDKs) inhibitors, p21 and p27, by decreasing mRNA and protein stability, respectively. As a result, low level CDK2 activity detected in ERK5-deficient cells correlated with a defect in G1 to S phase transition of the cell cycle. Similarly, we found that the malignant MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line was dependent on ERK5 to proliferate. We propose that ERK5 blocks p21 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells via a mechanism that implicates c-Myc-dependent transcriptional regulation of the miR-17-92 cluster. Together with evidence that cancer patients with poor prognosis display a high level of expression of components of the ERK5 signaling pathway, these findings support the hypothesis that ERK5 can be a potential target for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 and cyclin D1 compose a positive feedback loop contributing to tumor growth in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Hayato; Sakamoto, Kei; Hikiba, Yohko; Kinoshita, Hiroto; Nakata, Wachiko; Takahashi, Ryota; Tateishi, Keisuke; Tada, Motohisa; Akanuma, Masao; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori; Omata, Masao; Maeda, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate multiple cellular functions and are highly active in many types of human cancers. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is an upstream MAPK involved in apoptosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. This study investigated the role of ASK1 in the development of gastric cancer. In human gastric cancer specimens, we observed increased ASK1 expression, compared to nontumor epithelium. Using a chemically induced murine gastric tumorigenesis model, we observed increased tumor ASK1 expression, and ASK1 knockout mice had both fewer and smaller tumors than wild-type (WT) mice. ASK1 siRNA inhibited cell proliferation through the accumulation of cells in G1 phase of the cell cycle, and reduced cyclin D1 expression in gastric cancer cells, whereas these effects were uncommon in other cancer cells. ASK1 overexpression induced the transcription of cyclin D1, through AP-1 activation, and ASK1 levels were regulated by cyclin D1, via the Rb–E2F pathway. Exogenous ASK1 induced cyclin D1 expression, followed by elevated expression of endogenous ASK1. These results indicate an autoregulatory mechanism of ASK1 in the development of gastric cancer. Targeting this positive feedback loop, ASK1 may present a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer. PMID:21187402

  10. A p21(Waf1/Cip1)carboxyl-terminal peptide exhibited cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitory activity and cytotoxicity when introduced into human cells.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, M; Lung, F D; Long, Y Q; Roller, P P; Sikorski, R S; O'Connor, P M

    1999-07-15

    In the present study, we report the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-inhibitory activity of a series of p21waf1/cip1 (p21) peptide fragments spanning the whole protein against the cyclin D1/Cdk4 and cyclin E/Cdk2 enzymes. The most potent p21 peptide tested in our initial peptide series, designated W10, spanned amino acids 139 to 164, a region of p21 that has been found independently to bind to proliferating cell nuclear antigen and also to inhibit Cdk activity. We go on to report the importance of putative beta-strand and 3(10)-helix motifs in the W10 peptide for cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitory activity. We also describe the cellular activity of W10 and derivatives that were chemically linked to an antennapedia peptide, the latter segment acting as a cell membrane carrier. We found that the W10AP peptide exhibited growth inhibition that resulted from necrosis in human lymphoma CA46 cells. Furthermore, regions in the W10 peptide responsible for Cdk-inhibition were also important for the degree of this cellular activity. These studies provide insights that may eventually, through further design, yield agents for the therapy of cancer.

  11. Development and Use of Novel Tools to Directly Screen for Substrates of Cyclin Dependent Kinases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cold Spring Harbor , New York 11724 REPORT DATE...Kinases 5. FUNDING NUMBERS DAMD17-97-1-7316 6. AUTHOR(S) Gavin J. Sherlock, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory... Cold Spring Harbor , New York 11724 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND

  12. Bacterial cyclomodulin Cif blocks the host cell cycle by stabilizing the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27.

    PubMed

    Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Watrin, Claude; Jubelin, Grégory; Oswald, Eric; Taieb, Frédéric

    2008-12-01

    The cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is a cyclomodulin produced by enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Upon injection into the host cell by the bacterial type III secretion system, Cif inhibits the G2/M transition via sustained inhibition of the mitosis inducer CDK1 independently of the DNA damage response. In this study, we show that Cif induces not only G2, but also G1 cell cycle arrest depending on the stage of cells in the cell cycle during the infection. In various cell lines including differentiated and untransformed enterocytes, the cell cycle arrests are correlated with the accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(waf1/cip1) and p27(kip1). Cif-induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor accumulation is independent of the p53 pathway but occurs through inhibition of their proteasome-mediated degradation. Our results provide a direct link between the mode of action of Cif and the host cell cycle control.

  13. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor KRP2 controls the onset of the endoreduplication cycle during Arabidopsis leaf development through inhibition of mitotic CDKA;1 kinase complexes.

    PubMed

    Verkest, Aurine; Manes, Carmem-Lara de O; Vercruysse, Steven; Maes, Sara; Van Der Schueren, Els; Beeckman, Tom; Genschik, Pascal; Kuiper, Martin; Inzé, Dirk; De Veylder, Lieven

    2005-06-01

    Exit from the mitotic cell cycle and initiation of cell differentiation frequently coincides with the onset of endoreduplication, a modified cell cycle during which DNA continues to be duplicated in the absence of mitosis. Although the mitotic cell cycle and the endoreduplication cycle share much of the same machinery, the regulatory mechanisms controlling the transition between both cycles remain poorly understood. We show that the A-type cyclin-dependent kinase CDKA;1 and its specific inhibitor, the Kip-related protein, KRP2 regulate the mitosis-to-endocycle transition during Arabidopsis thaliana leaf development. Constitutive overexpression of KRP2 slightly above its endogenous level only inhibited the mitotic cell cycle-specific CDKA;1 kinase complexes, whereas the endoreduplication cycle-specific CDKA;1 complexes were unaffected, resulting in an increase in the DNA ploidy level. An identical effect on the endoreduplication cycle could be observed by overexpressing KRP2 exclusively in mitotically dividing cells. In agreement with a role for KRP2 as activator of the mitosis-to-endocycle transition, KRP2 protein levels were more abundant in endoreduplicating than in mitotically dividing tissues. We illustrate that KRP2 protein abundance is regulated posttranscriptionally through CDK phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation. KRP2 phosphorylation by the mitotic cell cycle-specific CDKB1;1 kinase suggests a mechanism in which CDKB1;1 controls the level of CDKA;1 activity through regulating KRP2 protein abundance. In accordance with this model, KRP2 protein levels increased in plants with reduced CDKB1;1 activity. Moreover, the proposed model allowed a dynamical simulation of the in vivo observations, validating the sufficiency of the regulatory interactions between CDKA;1, KRP2, and CDKB1;1 in fine-tuning the mitosis-to-endocycle transition.

  14. Characterization of molecular and cellular functions of the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK9 using a novel specific inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Albert, T K; Rigault, C; Eickhoff, J; Baumgart, K; Antrecht, C; Klebl, B; Mittler, G; Meisterernst, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The cyclin-dependent kinase CDK9 is an important therapeutic target but currently available inhibitors exhibit low specificity and/or narrow therapeutic windows. Here we have used a new highly specific CDK9 inhibitor, LDC000067 to interrogate gene control mechanisms mediated by CDK9. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The selectivity of LDC000067 was established in functional kinase assays. Functions of CDK9 in gene expression were assessed with in vitro transcription experiments, single gene analyses and genome-wide expression profiling. Cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells, HeLa cells, several cancer cell lines, along with cells from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia were also used to investigate cellular responses to LDC000067. KEY RESULTS The selectivity of LDC000067 for CDK9 over other CDKs exceeded that of the known inhibitors flavopiridol and DRB. LDC000067 inhibited in vitro transcription in an ATP-competitive and dose-dependent manner. Gene expression profiling of cells treated with LDC000067 demonstrated a selective reduction of short-lived mRNAs, including important regulators of proliferation and apoptosis. Analysis of de novo RNA synthesis suggested a wide ranging positive role of CDK9. At the molecular and cellular level, LDC000067 reproduced effects characteristic of CDK9 inhibition such as enhanced pausing of RNA polymerase II on genes and, most importantly, induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our study provides a framework for the mechanistic understanding of cellular responses to CDK9 inhibition. LDC000067 represents a promising lead for the development of clinically useful, highly specific CDK9 inhibitors. PMID:24102143

  15. Palbociclib can overcome mutations in cyclin dependent kinase 6 that break hydrogen bonds between the drug and the protein.

    PubMed

    Hernandez Maganhi, Stella; Jensen, Patrizia; Caracelli, Ignez; Zukerman Schpector, Julio; Fröhling, Stefan; Friedman, Ran

    2017-04-01

    Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 prevent cells from entering the synthesis phase of the cell cycle. CDK4 and 6 are therefore important drug targets in various cancers. The selective CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib is approved for the treatment of breast cancer and has shown activity in a cellular model of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL)-rearranged acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We studied the interactions of palbociclib and CDK6 using molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of the simulations suggested several interactions that stabilized the drug in its binding site and that were not observed in the crystal structure of the protein-drug complex. These included a hydrogen bond to His 100 that was hitherto not reported and several hydrophobic contacts. Evolutionary-based bioinformatic analysis was used to suggest two mutants, D163G and H100L that would potentially yield drug resistance, as they lead to loss of important protein-drug interactions without hindering the viability of the protein. One of the mutants involved a change in the glycine of the well-conserved DFG motif of the kinase. Interestingly, CDK6-dependent human AML cells stably expressing either mutant retained sensitivity to palbociclib, indicating that the protein-drug interactions are not affected by these. Furthermore, the cells were proliferative in the absence of palbociclib, indicating that the Asp to Gly mutation in the DFG motif did not interfere with the catalytic activity of the protein. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  16. Impact of meriolins, a new class of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, on malignant glioma proliferation and neo-angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jarry, Marie; Lecointre, Céline; Malleval, Céline; Desrues, Laurence; Schouft, Marie-Thérèse; Lejoncour, Vadim; Liger, François; Lyvinec, Gildas; Joseph, Benoît; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Honnorat, Jérôme; Gandolfo, Pierrick; Castel, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas are the most frequent and most aggressive primary brain tumors in adults. The median overall survival is limited to a few months despite surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. It is now clearly established that hyperactivity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) is one of the processes underlying hyperproliferation and tumoral growth. The marine natural products meridianins and variolins, characterized as CDK inhibitors, display a kinase-inhibitory activity associated with cytotoxic effects. In order to improve selectivity and efficiency of these CDK inhibitors, a series of hybrid compounds called meriolins have been synthesized. Methods The potential antitumoral activity of meriolins was investigated in vitro on glioma cell lines (SW1088 and U87), native neural cells, and a human endothelial cell line (HUV-EC-C). The impact of intraperitoneal or intratumoral administrations of meriolin 15 was evaluated in vivo on 2 different nude mice-xenografted glioma models. Results Meriolins 3, 5, and 15 exhibited antiproliferative properties with nanomolar IC50 and induced cell-cycle arrest and CDK inhibition associated with apoptotic events in human glioma cell lines. These meriolins blocked the proliferation rate of HUV-EC-C through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In vivo, meriolin 15 provoked a robust reduction in tumor volume in spite of toxicity for highest doses, associated with inhibition of cell division, activation of caspase 3, reduction of CD133 cells, and modifications of the vascular architecture. Conclusion Meriolins, and meriolin 15 in particular, exhibit antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities on both glioma and intratumoral endothelial cells, constituting key promising therapeutic lead compounds for the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:24891448

  17. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate splice-specific targeting of dynamin-related protein 1 to microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Theodore J.; Cribbs, J. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fission and fusion reactions determine mitochondrial morphology and function. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) is a guanosine triphosphate–hydrolyzing mechanoenzyme important for mitochondrial fission and programmed cell death. Drp1 is subject to alternative splicing of three exons with previously unknown functional significance. Here, we report that splice variants including the third but excluding the second alternative exon (x01) localized to and copurified with microtubule bundles as dynamic polymers that resemble fission complexes on mitochondria. A major isoform in immune cells, Drp1-x01 required oligomeric assembly and Arg residues in alternative exon 3 for microtubule targeting. Drp1-x01 stabilized and bundled microtubules and attenuated staurosporine-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis. Phosphorylation of a conserved Ser residue adjacent to the microtubule-binding exon released Drp1-x01 from microtubules and promoted mitochondrial fragmentation in a splice form–specific manner. Phosphorylation by Cdk1 contributed to dissociation of Drp1-x01 from mitotic microtubules, whereas Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation modulated Drp1-x01 targeting to interphase microtubules. Thus, alternative splicing generates a latent, cytoskeletal pool of Drp1 that is selectively mobilized by cyclin-dependent kinase signaling. PMID:23798729

  18. B1-Type Cyclin-Dependent Kinases Are Essential for the Formation of Stomatal Complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Boudolf, Véronique; Barrôco, Rosa; Engler, Janice de Almeida; Verkest, Aurine; Beeckman, Tom; Naudts, Mirande; Inzé, Dirk; De Veylder, Lieven

    2004-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are key regulators of the cell cycle. In yeasts, only one CDK is sufficient to drive cells through the cell cycle, whereas higher eukaryotes developed a family of related CDKs. Curiously, plants contain a unique class of CDKs (B-type CDKs), whose function is still unclear. We show that the CDKB1;1 gene of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is highly expressed in guard cells and stomatal precursor cells of cotyledons, suggesting a prominent role for B-type CDKs in stomatal development. In accordance, transgenic Arabidopsis plants with reduced B-type CDK activity had a decreased stomatal index because of an early block of meristemoid division and inhibition of satellite meristemoid formation. Many aberrant stomatal cells were observed, all of them blocked in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Although division of stomatal precursors was inhibited, cells still acquired stomatal identity, illustrating that stomatal cell differentiation is independent of cellular and nuclear division. PMID:15031414

  19. Membrane association facilitates degradation and cleavage of the cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activators p35 and p39.

    PubMed

    Minegishi, Seiji; Asada, Akiko; Miyauchi, Shinya; Fuchigami, Takahiro; Saito, Taro; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi

    2010-07-06

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is activated by binding to its activators, p35 and p39. The level of Cdk5 activity is determined by the amount of p35 and p39, which is regulated not only by transcription but also via proteasomal degradation. Alternatively, calpain-induced cleavage of p35 to p25 can induce aberrant Cdk5 activation. As the regulation of p35 and p39 proteolysis is not well understood, we have studied here the mechanisms governing their degradation and cleavage. We find that p35 and p39 undergo proteasomal degradation in neurons, with p39 showing a slower degradation rate than p35. Degradation of the activators is dependent on their respective N-terminal p10 region, as indicated by experiments in which cognate p10 regions were swapped between p35 and p39. The effect of the p10 region on degradation and cleavage could be assigned to its membrane binding properties, mediated predominantly by myristoylation. Together, these results indicate that both proteasomal degradation and calpain cleavage of p35 and p39 are stimulated by membrane association, which is in turn mediated via myristoylation of their p10 regions. However, p35 and p39 show differences in degradation and cleavage rates, which may in fact underlie the distinct physiological and pathological functions of these two Cdk5 activators.

  20. Oncogenic signals of HER-2/neu in regulating the stability of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27.

    PubMed

    Yang, H Y; Zhou, B P; Hung, M C; Lee, M H

    2000-08-11

    Overexpression and activation of HER-2/neu, a proto-oncogene, play a pivotal role in cancer formation. Strong expression of HER-2/neu in cancers has been associated with poor prognosis. Reduced expression of p27(Kip1), a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, correlates with poor clinical outcome in many types of carcinomas. Because many cancers with the overexpression of HER-2/neu overlap with those affected by reduced p27 expression, we studied the link between HER-2/neu oncogenic signals and p27 regulation. We found that down-regulation of p27 correlates with HER-2/neu overexpression. To address the molecular mechanism of this inverse correlation, we found that reduction of p27 is caused by enhanced ubiquitin-mediated degradation, and the HER-2/Grb2/MAPK pathway is involved in the decrease of p27 stability. Also, HER-2/neu activity causes mislocation of p27 and Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1), an exporter of p27, into the cytoplasm, thereby facilitating p27 degradation. These results reveal that HER-2/neu signals reduce p27 stability and thus present potential points for therapeutic intervention in HER-2/neu-associated cancers.

  1. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in rabbit retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Chang; Tai, Ming-Hong; Hu, Dan-Ning; Lai, Chien-Hsiung; Chen, Yi-Hao; Wu, Yi-Chen; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Kuo, Hsi-Kung

    2008-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play essential roles in the intracellular control of the cell cycle. It has been postulated that roscovitine, a potent CDK2, CDK5, and CDC2 inhibitor, might inhibit cellular proliferation by arresting the cell cycle. This in vitro study investigated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of roscovitine in cultured rabbit retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Experiments using rabbit RPE from young pigmented rabbits were carried out using roscovitine dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 micromol. Cell proliferation was measured by an MTT assay. The cell cycle response of RPE cells to roscovitine was analyzed by flow cytometry of propidium iodide-stained nuclei. Proteins related to DNA damage in the RPE cells were then assayed by Western blot. Roscovitine inhibited proliferation of RPE cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis after treatment demonstrated an accumulation of cells arrested in the S- and G2/M phases. Flow cytometry showed that 40 microM of roscovitine increased the cell population in the sub-G1 peak, which is considered a marker of cell death by apoptosis. Western blot analysis revealed Bcl-2 decreased and Bax increased after treatment of RPE cells with roscovitine. This study of the response of RPE cells to roscovitine demonstrated a bidirectional relationship between cell cycle control and apoptosis.

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(INK4a) and telomerase may co-modulate endothelial progenitor cells senescence.

    PubMed

    Yang, De-Guang; Liu, Ling; Zheng, Xiao-Yan

    2008-04-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) damage is an initial and pivotal step in the formation of atherosclerosis. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which have been considered as the precursor of ECs, can migrate and home to the site of injured ECs to divide into mature ECs and keep the integrity of the endothelial monolayer. It has been shown that the number and function of EPCs are negatively correlated with various atherosclerotic risk factors. This finding may be explained partly by accelerated senescence of EPCs induced by telomere attrition or shortening owning to oxidative stress and accumulative ROS. However, elevated telomerase activity which extends the telomere cannot lead to cellular immortal in the presence of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(INK4a). Researchers have the opinion that senescence is the balance between the regeneration and cancer. High expression of phosphorylated p16(INK4a), which is caused by oxidative stress and accumulative ROS, can prevent tumor cells from unlimited division and becoming malignant ones by accelerating premalignant cells premature senescence. It has been demonstrated that the expression of p16(INK4a) increases remarkably with age due to oxidative stress and accumulative ROS in some stem and progenitor cells, and regulates these cells age-dependent senescence. It is observed that telomeres shortening exists in these cells. Therefore, it can be hypothesized that p16(INK4a), together with telomerase, may co-modulate EPCs senescence.

  3. A Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor, Dinaciclib, Impairs Homologous Recombination and Sensitizes Multiple Myeloma Cells to PARP Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Alagpulinsa, David A; Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Shmookler Reis, Robert J

    2016-02-01

    PARP1/2 are required for single-strand break repair, and their inhibition causes DNA replication fork collapse and double-strand break (DSB) formation. These DSBs are primarily repaired via homologous recombination (HR), a high-fidelity repair pathway. Should HR be deficient, DSBs may be repaired via error-prone nonhomologous end-joining mechanisms, or may persist, ultimately resulting in cell death. The combined disruption of PARP and HR activities thus produces synthetic lethality. Multiple myeloma cells are characterized by chromosomal instability and pervasive DNA damage, implicating aberrant DNA repair. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), upstream modulators of HR, are dysregulated in multiple myeloma. Here, we show that a CDK inhibitor, dinaciclib, impairs HR repair and sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to the PARP1/2 inhibitor ABT-888. Dinaciclib abolishes ABT-888-induced BRCA1 and RAD51 foci and potentiates DNA damage, indicated by increased γH2AX foci. Dinaciclib treatment reduces expression of HR repair genes, including Rad51, and blocks BRCA1 phosphorylation, a modification required for HR repair, thus inhibiting HR repair of chromosome DSBs. Cotreatment with dinaciclib and ABT-888 in vitro resulted in synthetic lethality of multiple myeloma cells, but not normal CD19(+) B cells, and slowed growth of multiple myeloma xenografts in SCID mice almost two-fold. These findings support combining dinaciclib with PARP inhibitors for multiple myeloma therapy. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(2); 241-50. ©2015 AACR. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. The specific overexpression of a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor in tomato fruit mesocarp cells uncouples endoreduplication and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Nafati, Mehdi; Cheniclet, Catherine; Hernould, Michel; Do, Phuc T; Fernie, Alisdair R; Chevalier, Christian; Gévaudant, Frédéric

    2011-02-01

    The size of tomato fruit results from the combination of cell number and cell size, which are respectively determined by the cell division and cell expansion processes. As fruit growth is mainly sustained by cell expansion, the development of fleshy pericarp tissue is characterized by numerous rounds of endoreduplication inducing a spectacular increase in DNA ploidy and mean cell size. Although a clear relationship exists between endoreduplication and cell growth in plants, the exact role of endoreduplication has not been clearly elucidated. To decipher the molecular basis of endoreduplication-associated cell growth in fruit, we investigated the putative involvement of the tomato cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor SlKRP1. We studied the kinetics of pericarp development in tomato fruit at the morphological and cytological levels, and demonstrated that endoreduplication is directly proportional to cell and fruit diameter. We established a mathematical model for tissue growth according to the number of divisions and endocycles. This model was tested in fruits where we managed to decrease the extent of endoreduplication by over-expressing SlKRP1 under the control of a fruit-specific promoter expressed during early development. Despite the fact that endoreduplication was affected, we could not observe any morphological, cytological or metabolic phenotypes, indicating that determination of cell and fruit size can be, at least conditionally, uncoupled from endoreduplication. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Dependence of Cisplatin-Induced Cell Death In Vitro and In Vivo on Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Price, Peter M.; Yu, Fang; Kaldis, Philipp; Aleem, Eiman; Nowak, Grażyna; Safirstein, Robert L.; Megyesi, Judit

    2006-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutics, but its usefulness is limited by its toxicity to normal tissues, including cells of the kidney proximal tubule. The purpose of these studies was to determine the mechanism of cisplatin cytotoxicity. It was shown in vivo that cisplatin administration induces upregulation of the gene for the p21 cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor in kidney cells. This protein is a positive effector on the fate of cisplatin-exposed renal tubule cells in vivo and in vitro; adenoviral transduction of p21 completely protected proximal tubule cells from cisplatin toxicity. Herein is reported that cdk2 inhibitory drugs protect kidney cells in vivo and in vitro, that transduction of kidney cells in vitro with dominant-negative cdk2 also protected, and that cdk2 knockout cells were resistant to cisplatin. The cdk2 knockout cells regained cisplatin sensitivity after transduction with wild-type cdk2. It is concluded that cisplatin cytotoxicity depends on cdk2 activation and that the mechanism of p21 protection is by direct inhibition of cdk2. This demonstrated the involvement of a protein that previously was associated with cell-cycle progression with pathways of apoptosis. It also was demonstrated that this pathway of cisplatin-induced cell death can be interceded in vivo to prevent nephrotoxicity. PMID:16914540

  6. Mammalian cells cycle without the D-type cyclin-dependent kinases Cdk4 and Cdk6.

    PubMed

    Malumbres, Marcos; Sotillo, Rocío; Santamaría, David; Galán, Javier; Cerezo, Ana; Ortega, Sagrario; Dubus, Pierre; Barbacid, Mariano

    2004-08-20

    Cdk4 and Cdk6 are thought to be essential for initiation of the cell cycle in response to mitogenic stimuli. Previous studies have shown that Cdk4 is dispensable for proliferation in most cell types, an observation attributed to a putative compensatory role by Cdk6. Cdk6-null mice are viable and develop normally although hematopoiesis is slightly impaired. Embryos defective for Cdk4 and Cdk6 die during the late stages of embryonic development due to severe anemia. However, these embryos display normal organogenesis and most cell types proliferate normally. In vitro, embryonic fibroblasts lacking Cdk4 and Cdk6 proliferate and become immortal upon serial passage. Moreover, quiescent Cdk4/Cdk6-null cells respond to serum stimulation and enter S phase with normal kinetics although with lower efficiency. These results indicate that D-type cyclin-dependent kinases are not essential for cell cycle entry and suggest the existence of alternative mechanisms to initiate cell proliferation upon mitogenic stimulation.

  7. A new class of cyclin dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas is required for coupling cell size to cell division

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yubing; Liu, Dianyi; López-Paz, Cristina; Olson, Bradley JSC; Umen, James G

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cells actively control their size by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii divides by multiple fission, wherein a ‘counting’ mechanism couples mother cell-size to cell division number allowing production of uniform-sized daughters. We identified a sizer protein, CDKG1, that acts through the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway as a D-cyclin-dependent RB kinase to regulate mitotic counting. Loss of CDKG1 leads to fewer mitotic divisions and large daughters, while mis-expression of CDKG1 causes supernumerous mitotic divisions and small daughters. The concentration of nuclear-localized CDKG1 in pre-mitotic cells is set by mother cell size, and its progressive dilution and degradation with each round of cell division may provide a link between mother cell-size and mitotic division number. Cell-size-dependent accumulation of limiting cell cycle regulators such as CDKG1 is a potentially general mechanism for size control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10767.001 PMID:27015111

  8. Regulators of cyclin-dependent kinases are crucial for maintaining genome integrity in S phase

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Halfdan; Nähse, Viola; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Groth, Petra; Clancy, Trevor; Lees, Michael; Jørgensen, Mette; Helleday, Thomas; Syljuåsen, Randi G.

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is of critical importance to cells. To identify key regulators of genomic integrity, we screened a human cell line with a kinome small interfering RNA library. WEE1, a major regulator of mitotic entry, and CHK1 were among the genes identified. Both kinases are important negative regulators of CDK1 and -2. Strikingly, WEE1 depletion rapidly induced DNA damage in S phase in newly replicated DNA, which was accompanied by a marked increase in single-stranded DNA. This DNA damage is dependent on CDK1 and -2 as well as the replication proteins MCM2 and CDT1 but not CDC25A. Conversely, DNA damage after CHK1 inhibition is highly dependent on CDC25A. Furthermore, the inferior proliferation of CHK1-depleted cells is improved substantially by codepletion of CDC25A. We conclude that the mitotic kinase WEE1 and CHK1 jointly maintain balanced cellular control of Cdk activity during normal DNA replication, which is crucial to prevent the generation of harmful DNA lesions during replication. PMID:20194642

  9. Activation of cyclin D1 by estradiol and spermine in MCF-7 breast cancer cells: a mechanism involving the p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylation of ATF-2.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Joan S; Vijayanathan, Veena; Thomas, T J; Pestell, Richard G; Albanese, Chris; Gallo, Michael A; Thomas, Thresia

    2005-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) and the naturally occurring polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) play important roles in breast cancer cell growth and differentiation. We examined the effects of E2 and spermine on the phosphorylation and DNA binding of activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATF-2 is a transcription factor involved in estrogenic regulation of cyclin D1 gene, and thereby cell cycle progression. DNA affinity immunoblot assays showed a six- to eightfold increase in the binding of ATF-2 to a 74-mer ATF/CRE oligonucleotide (ODN1) from cyclin D1 promoter in the presence of 4 nM E2 and 0.5 mM spermine, compared to untreated control. Individual treatments with E2 or spermine caused a twofold or lower increase in ATF-2 binding to ODN1. Immunoblotting with phospho-ATF-2 antibody showed that increased DNA binding of ATF-2 was associated with its phosphorylation. A p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, PD169316, inhibited ATF-2 phosphorylation. In contrast, the MEK-ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, or the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, had no significant effect on DNA binding of ATF-2. Cyclin D1 promoter (-1745CD1) activity increased by approximately 12-fold (above control) in the presence of E2 and spermine, compared to a sixfold increase in the presence of E2 alone and a twofold increase with spermine. Cells transfected with a dominant negative mutant of ATF-2 showed decreased transactivation of cyclin D1 promoter in response to E2 and spermine. These results indicate that spermine can enhance E2-induced cell signaling and cyclin D1 transcription by activation of the p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylation of ATF-2, contributing to breast cancer cell proliferation.

  10. Aurora kinase A is not involved in CPEB1 phosphorylation and cyclin B1 mRNA polyadenylation during meiotic maturation of porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Komrskova, Pavla; Susor, Andrej; Malik, Radek; Prochazkova, Barbora; Liskova, Lucie; Supolikova, Jaroslava; Hladky, Stepan; Kubelka, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA translation by cytoplasmic polyadenylation is known to be important for oocyte maturation and further development. This process is generally controlled by phosphorylation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 1 (CPEB1). The aim of this study is to determine the role of Aurora kinase A in CPEB1 phosphorylation and the consequent CPEB1-dependent polyadenylation of maternal mRNAs during mammalian oocyte meiosis. For this purpose, we specifically inhibited Aurora kinase A with MLN8237 during meiotic maturation of porcine oocytes. Using poly(A)-test PCR method, we monitored the effect of Aurora kinase A inhibition on poly(A)-tail extension of long and short cyclin B1 encoding mRNAs as markers of CPEB1-dependent cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Our results show that inhibition of Aurora kinase A activity impairs neither cyclin B1 mRNA polyadenylation nor its translation and that Aurora kinase A is unlikely to be involved in CPEB1 activating phosphorylation.

  11. Cyclin A2-cyclin-dependent kinase 2 cooperates with the PLK1-SCFbeta-TrCP1-EMI1-anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome axis to promote genome reduplication in the absence of mitosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hoi Tang; Tsang, Yiu Huen; Marxer, Miriam; Poon, Randy Y C

    2009-12-01

    Limiting genome replication to once per cell cycle is vital for maintaining genome stability. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) with the specific inhibitor RO3306 is sufficient to trigger multiple rounds of genome reduplication. We demonstrated that although anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) remained inactive during the initial G(2) arrest, it was activated upon prolonged inhibition of CDK1. Using cellular biosensors and live-cell imaging, we provide direct evidence that genome reduplication was associated with oscillation of APC/C activity and nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of CDC6 even in the absence of mitosis at the single-cell level. Genome reduplication was abolished by ectopic expression of EMI1 or depletion of CDC20 or CDH1, suggesting the critical role of the EMI1-APC/C axis. In support of this, degradation of EMI1 itself and genome reduplication were delayed after downregulation of PLK1 and beta-TrCP1. In the absence of CDK1 activity, activation of APC/C and genome reduplication was dependent on cyclin A2 and CDK2. Genome reduplication was then promoted by a combination of APC/C-dependent destruction of geminin (thus releasing CDT1), accumulation of cyclin E2-CDK2, and CDC6. Collectively, these results underscore the crucial role of cyclin A2-CDK2 in regulating the PLK1-SCF(beta-TrCP1)-EMI1-APC/C axis and CDC6 to trigger genome reduplication after the activity of CDK1 is suppressed.

  12. Novel mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene in Indian cases of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Mehta, Bhakti; Menon, Shyla R; Raha, Sarbani; Udani, Vrajesh

    2013-03-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder, almost exclusively affecting females and characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Both the classic and atypical forms of Rett syndrome are primarily due to mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Mutations in the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been identified in patients with atypical Rett syndrome, X-linked infantile spasms sharing common features of generally early-onset seizures and mental retardation. CDKL5 is known as serine/threonine protein kinase 9 (STK9) and is mapped to the Xp22 region. It has a conserved serine/threonine kinase domain within its amino terminus and a large C-terminal region. Disease-causing mutations are distributed in both the amino terminal domain and in the large C-terminal domain. We have screened the CDKL5 gene in 44 patients with atypical Rett syndrome who had tested negative for MECP2 gene mutations and have identified 6 sequence variants, out of which three were novel and three known mutations. Two of these novel mutations p.V966I and p.A1011V were missense and p.H589H a silent mutation. Other known mutations identified were p.V999M, p.Q791P and p.T734A. Sequence homology for all the mutations revealed that the two mutations (p.Q791P and p.T734A) were conserved across species. This indicated the importance of these residues in structure and function of the protein. The damaging effects of these mutations were analysed in silico using PolyPhen-2 online software. The PolyPhen-2 scores of p.Q791P and p.T734A were 0.998 and 0.48, revealing that these mutations could be deleterious and might have potential functional effect. All other mutations had a low score suggesting that they might not alter the activity of CDKL5. We have also analysed the position of the mutations in the CDKL5 protein and found that all the mutations were present in the C-terminal domain of the protein. The C-terminal domain is required for

  13. Cyclin Partners Determine Pho85 Protein Kinase Substrate Specificity In Vitro and In Vivo: Control of Glycogen Biosynthesis by Pcl8 and Pcl10

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dongqing; Moffat, Jason; Wilson, Wayne A.; Moore, Lynda; Cheng, Christine; Roach, Peter J.; Andrews, Brenda

    1998-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PHO85 encodes a cyclin-dependent protein kinase (Cdk) with multiple roles in cell cycle and metabolic controls. In association with the cyclin Pho80, Pho85 controls acid phosphatase gene expression through phosphorylation of the transcription factor Pho4. Pho85 has also been implicated as a kinase that phosphorylates and negatively regulates glycogen synthase (Gsy2), and deletion of PHO85 causes glycogen overaccumulation. We report that the Pcl8/Pcl10 subgroup of cyclins directs Pho85 to phosphorylate glycogen synthase both in vivo and in vitro. Disruption of PCL8 and PCL10 caused hyperaccumulation of glycogen, activation of glycogen synthase, and a reduction in glycogen synthase kinase activity in vivo. However, unlike pho85 mutants, pcl8 pcl10 cells had normal morphologies, grew on glycerol, and showed proper regulation of acid phosphatase gene expression. In vitro, Pho80-Pho85 complexes effectively phosphorylated Pho4 but had much lower activity toward Gsy2. In contrast, Pcl10-Pho85 complexes phosphorylated Gsy2 at Ser-654 and Thr-667, two physiologically relevant sites, but only poorly phosphorylated Pho4. Thus, both the in vitro and in vivo substrate specificity of Pho85 is determined by the cyclin partner. Mutation of PHO85 suppressed the glycogen storage deficiency of snf1 or glc7-1 mutants in which glycogen synthase is locked in an inactive state. Deletion of PCL8 and PCL10 corrected the deficit in glycogen synthase activity in both the snf1 and glc7-1 mutants, but glycogen synthesis was restored only in the glc7-1 mutant strain. This genetic result suggests an additional role for Pho85 in the negative regulation of glycogen accumulation that is independent of Pcl8 and Pcl10. PMID:9584169

  14. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase CRK9, Required for Spliced Leader trans Splicing of Pre-mRNA in Trypanosomes, Functions in a Complex with a New L-Type Cyclin and a Kinetoplastid-Specific Protein.

    PubMed

    Badjatia, Nitika; Park, Sung Hee; Ambrósio, Daniela L; Kirkham, Justin K; Günzl, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    In eukaryotes, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) control the cell cycle and critical steps in gene expression. The lethal parasite Trypanosoma brucei, member of the phylogenetic order Kinetoplastida, possesses eleven CDKs which, due to high sequence divergence, were generically termed CDC2-related kinases (CRKs). While several CRKs have been implied in the cell cycle, CRK9 was the first trypanosome CDK shown to control the unusual mode of gene expression found in kinetoplastids. In these organisms, protein-coding genes are arranged in tandem arrays which are transcribed polycistronically. Individual mRNAs are processed from precursor RNA by spliced leader (SL) trans splicing and polyadenylation. CRK9 ablation was lethal in cultured trypanosomes, causing a block of trans splicing before the first transesterification step. Additionally, CRK9 silencing led to dephosphorylation of RNA polymerase II and to hypomethylation of the SL cap structure. Here, we tandem affinity-purified CRK9 and, among potential CRK9 substrates and modifying enzymes, discovered an unusual tripartite complex comprising CRK9, a new L-type cyclin (CYC12) and a protein, termed CRK9-associated protein (CRK9AP), that is only conserved among kinetoplastids. Silencing of either CYC12 or CRK9AP reproduced the effects of depleting CRK9, identifying these proteins as functional partners of CRK9 in vivo. While mammalian cyclin L binds to CDK11, the CRK9 complex deviates substantially from that of CDK11, requiring CRK9AP for efficient CRK9 complex formation and autophosphorylation in vitro. Interference with this unusual CDK rescued mice from lethal trypanosome infections, validating CRK9 as a potential chemotherapeutic target.

  15. Retinoic acid increases glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation via cyclin-dependent kinase 5.

    PubMed

    Brossaud, Julie; Roumes, Hélène; Helbling, Jean-Christophe; Moisan, Marie-Pierre; Pallet, Véronique; Ferreira, Guillaume; Biyong, Essi-Fanny; Redonnet, Anabelle; Corcuff, Jean-Benoît

    2017-07-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) function is modulated by phosphorylation. As retinoic acid (RA) can activate some cytoplasmic kinases able to phosphorylate GR, we investigated whether RA could modulate GR phosphorylation in neuronal cells in a context of long-term glucocorticoid exposure. A 4-day treatment of dexamethasone (Dex) plus RA, showed that RA potentiated the (Dex)-induced phosphorylation on GR Serine 220 (pSer220GR) in the nucleus of a hippocampal HT22 cell line. This treatment increased the cytoplasmic ratio of p35/p25 proteins, which are major CDK5 cofactors. Roscovitine, a pharmacological CDK5 inhibitor, or a siRNA against CDK5 prevented RA potentiation of GR phosphorylation. Furthermore, roscovitine counter-acted the effect of RA on GR sensitive target proteins such as BDNF or tissue-transglutaminase. These data help understanding the interaction between RA- and glucocorticoid-signalling pathways, both of which have strong influences on the adult brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure-based discovery of the first allosteric inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Giulio; Anighoro, Andrew; Chripkova, Martina; Carrassa, Laura; Broggini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric targeting of protein kinases via displacement of the structural αC helix with type III allosteric inhibitors is currently gaining a foothold in drug discovery. Recently, the first crystal structure of CDK2 with an open allosteric pocket adjacent to the αC helix has been described, prospecting new opportunities to design more selective inhibitors, but the structure has not yet been exploited for the structure-based design of type III allosteric inhibitors. In this work we report the results of a virtual screening campaign that resulted in the discovery of the first-in-class type III allosteric ligands of CDK2. Using a combination of docking and post-docking analyses made with our tool BEAR, 7 allosteric ligands (hit rate of 20%) with micromolar affinity for CDK2 were identified, some of them inhibiting the growth of breast cancer cell lines in the micromolar range. Competition experiments performed in the presence of the ATP-competitive inhibitor staurosporine confirmed that the 7 ligands are truly allosteric, in agreement with their design. Of these, compound 2 bound CDK2 with an EC50 value of 3 μM and inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB231 and ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells with IC50 values of approximately 20 μM, while compound 4 had an EC50 value of 71 μM and IC50 values around 4 μM. Remarkably, the most potent compound 4 was able to selectively inhibit CDK2-mediated Retinoblastoma phosphorylation, confirming that its mechanism of action is fully compatible with a selective inhibition of CDK2 phosphorylation in cells. Finally, hit expansion through analog search of the most potent inhibitor 4 revealed an additional ligand 4g with similar in vitro potency on breast cancer cells.

  17. Regulation of the histone deacetylase Hst3 by cyclin-dependent kinases and the ubiquitin ligase SCFCdc4.

    PubMed

    Delgoshaie, Neda; Tang, Xiaojing; Kanshin, Evgeny D; Williams, Elizabeth C; Rudner, Adam D; Thibault, Pierre; Tyers, Mike; Verreault, Alain

    2014-05-09

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is a modification of new H3 molecules deposited throughout the genome during S-phase. H3K56ac is removed by the sirtuins Hst3 and Hst4 at later stages of the cell cycle. Previous studies indicated that regulated degradation of Hst3 plays an important role in the genome-wide waves of H3K56 acetylation and deacetylation that occur during each cell cycle. However, little is known regarding the mechanism of cell cycle-regulated Hst3 degradation. Here, we demonstrate that Hst3 instability in vivo is dependent upon the ubiquitin ligase SCF(Cdc4) and that Hst3 is phosphorylated at two Cdk1 sites, threonine 380 and threonine 384. This creates a diphosphorylated degron that is necessary for Hst3 polyubiquitylation by SCF(Cdc4). Mutation of the Hst3 diphospho-degron does not completely stabilize Hst3 in vivo, but it nonetheless results in a significant fitness defect that is particularly severe in mutant cells treated with the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. Unexpectedly, we show that Hst3 can be degraded between G2 and anaphase, a window of the cell cycle where Hst3 normally mediates genome-wide deacetylation of H3K56. Our results suggest an intricate coordination between Hst3 synthesis, genome-wide H3K56 deacetylation by Hst3, and cell cycle-regulated degradation of Hst3 by cyclin-dependent kinases and SCF(Cdc4).

  18. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity is required for allogeneic T-cell responses after hematopoietic cell transplantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Tej K.; Eid, Saada; Ganguly, Sudipto; Tyler, Megan; Huang, Alex Y.; Letterio, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular intermediates in T-cell activation pathways are crucial targets for the therapy and prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). We recently identified an essential role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in T-cell activation and effector function, but the contribution of Cdk5 activity to the development of GVHD has not been explored. Using an established, preclinical, murine, GVHD model, we reveal that Cdk5 activity is increased in key target organs early after allo-HCT. We then generated chimeric mice (Cdk5+/+C or Cdk5−/−C) using hematopoietic progenitors from either embryonic day 16.5 Cdk5+/+ or Cdk5−/− embryos to enable analyses of the role of Cdk5 in GVHD, as germ line Cdk5 gene deletion is embryonically lethal. The immunophenotype of adult Cdk5−/−C mice is identical to control Cdk5+/+C mice. However, transplantation of donor Cdk5−/−C bone marrow and T cells dramatically reduced the severity of systemic and target organ GVHD. This phenotype is attributed to decreased T-cell migration to secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs), reduced in vivo proliferation within these organs, and fewer cytokine-producing donor T cells during GVHD development. Moreover, these defects in Cdk5−/− T-cell function are associated with altered CCR7 signaling following ligation by CCL19, a receptor:ligand interaction critical for T-cell migration into SLOs. Although Cdk5 activity in donor T cells contributed to graft-versus-tumor effects, pharmacologic inhibition of Cdk5 preserved leukemia-free survival. Collectively, our data implicate Cdk5 in allogeneic T-cell responses after HCT and as an important new target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28064242

  19. Regulation of the Histone Deacetylase Hst3 by Cyclin-dependent Kinases and the Ubiquitin Ligase SCFCdc4*

    PubMed Central

    Delgoshaie, Neda; Tang, Xiaojing; Kanshin, Evgeny D.; Williams, Elizabeth C.; Rudner, Adam D.; Thibault, Pierre; Tyers, Mike; Verreault, Alain

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is a modification of new H3 molecules deposited throughout the genome during S-phase. H3K56ac is removed by the sirtuins Hst3 and Hst4 at later stages of the cell cycle. Previous studies indicated that regulated degradation of Hst3 plays an important role in the genome-wide waves of H3K56 acetylation and deacetylation that occur during each cell cycle. However, little is known regarding the mechanism of cell cycle-regulated Hst3 degradation. Here, we demonstrate that Hst3 instability in vivo is dependent upon the ubiquitin ligase SCFCdc4 and that Hst3 is phosphorylated at two Cdk1 sites, threonine 380 and threonine 384. This creates a diphosphorylated degron that is necessary for Hst3 polyubiquitylation by SCFCdc4. Mutation of the Hst3 diphospho-degron does not completely stabilize Hst3 in vivo, but it nonetheless results in a significant fitness defect that is particularly severe in mutant cells treated with the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. Unexpectedly, we show that Hst3 can be degraded between G2 and anaphase, a window of the cell cycle where Hst3 normally mediates genome-wide deacetylation of H3K56. Our results suggest an intricate coordination between Hst3 synthesis, genome-wide H3K56 deacetylation by Hst3, and cell cycle-regulated degradation of Hst3 by cyclin-dependent kinases and SCFCdc4. PMID:24648511

  20. Non-aggregating tau phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 contributes to motor neuron degeneration in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nimrod; Feng, Zhihua; Edens, Brittany M; Yang, Ben; Shi, Han; Sze, Christie C; Hong, Benjamin Taige; Su, Susan C; Cantu, Jorge A; Topczewski, Jacek; Crawford, Thomas O; Ko, Chien-Ping; Sumner, Charlotte J; Ma, Long; Ma, Yong-Chao

    2015-04-15

    Mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the leading inherited cause of infant mortality, remain largely unknown. Many studies have established the importance of hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, tau phosphorylation in SMA pathogenesis has yet to be investigated. Here we show that tau phosphorylation on serine 202 (S202) and threonine 205 (T205) is increased significantly in SMA motor neurons using two SMA mouse models and human SMA patient spinal cord samples. Interestingly, phosphorylated tau does not form aggregates in motor neurons or neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), even at late stages of SMA disease, distinguishing it from other tauopathies. Hyperphosphorylation of tau on S202 and T205 is mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in SMA disease condition, because tau phosphorylation at these sites is significantly reduced in Cdk5 knock-out mice; genetic knock-out of Cdk5 activating subunit p35 in an SMA mouse model also leads to reduced tau phosphorylation on S202 and T205 in the SMA;p35(-/-) compound mutant mice. In addition, expression of the phosphorylation-deficient tauS202A,T205A mutant alleviates motor neuron defects in a zebrafish SMA model in vivo and mouse motor neuron degeneration in culture, whereas expression of phosphorylation-mimetic tauS202E,T205E promotes motor neuron defects. More importantly, genetic knock-out of tau in SMA mice rescues synapse stripping on motor neurons, NMJ denervation, and motor neuron degeneration in vivo. Altogether, our findings suggest a novel mechanism for SMA pathogenesis in which hyperphosphorylation of non-aggregating tau by Cdk5 contributes to motor neuron degeneration. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/356038-13$15.00/0.

  1. Regulation of the activation of the Fanconi anemia pathway by the p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Rego, M A; Harney, J A; Mauro, M; Shen, M; Howlett, N G

    2012-01-19

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare disease characterized by congenital defects, progressive bone marrow failure and heightened cancer susceptibility. The FA proteins, BRCA1 and FANCD1/BRCA2 function cooperatively in the FA-BRCA pathway to repair damaged DNA. Activation of the FA-BRCA pathway occurs via the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 and FANCI proteins, targeting these proteins to discrete nuclear foci where they function in DNA repair. The cellular regulation of FANCD2/I monoubiquitination, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the roles of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, as well as its downstream target, the p21(Cip1/Waf1) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, in the regulation of the activation of the FA-BRCA pathway. We demonstrate that, in contrast to p53, p21 has a major role in the regulation of the activation of the FA-BRCA pathway: p21 promotes S-phase and DNA damage-inducible FANCD2/I monoubiquitination and nuclear foci formation. Several lines of evidence establish that this effect is not a consequence of a defective G1-S checkpoint or altered cell-cycle progression in the absence of p21. Instead, we demonstrate that p21 is required for the transcriptional repression of the USP1 deubiquitinating enzyme upon exposure to DNA-damaging agents. In the absence of p21, persistent USP1 expression precludes the DNA damage-inducible accumulation of monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI. Consequently, p21(-/-) cells exhibit increased levels of mitomycin C-inducible complex chromosomal aberrations and elevated γH2AX nuclear foci formation. Our results demonstrate that p21 has a critical role in the regulation of the activation of the FA-BRCA pathway and suggest a broader role for p21 in the orchestration of DNA repair processes following exposure to DNA crosslinking agents.

  2. Differential expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 in cortical thymocytes and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Chilosi, M.; Doglioni, C.; Yan, Z.; Lestani, M.; Menestrina, F.; Sorio, C.; Benedetti, A.; Vinante, F.; Pizzolo, G.; Inghirami, G.

    1998-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-6 (CDK6) is the earliest inducible member of the CDK family in human T lymphocytes, involved in growth factor stimulation and cell cycle progression. CDK6 is one of the targets of p16 and p15, CDK inhibitors encoded by MTS1 and MTS2, two tumor suppressor genes that are frequently deleted in T-cell leukemia. In this study we have investigated CDK6 expression in normal and neoplastic lymphoid tissues using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. In normal (six samples) and hyperplastic (four samples) thymuses, strong CDK6 expression was observed in a discrete proportion of cortical thymocytes (10 to 15%), mainly located in the peripheral (subcapsular) zone of the cortex. All tested cases of T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia (T-LBL/ALL) showed strong CDK6 expression in the majority (up to 100%) of neoplastic lymphoid cells. Western blot analysis confirmed the expected CDK6 protein size (40 kd). According to Southern blot analysis, CDK6 overexpression in neoplastic T lymphoblasts was not due to gene amplification. In all other lymphomas investigated (28 peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin's lympohomas (T-NHLs), 7 CD30+ anaplastic NHLs, 22 high-grade B-NHLs, 15 low-grade B-NHLs, 25 B-cell precursor ALLs), CDK6 was not expressed or expressed at low levels, with the only exception of three nasal angiocentric T-NHLs, all exhibiting CDK6 immunoreactivity comparable to that observed in T-LBL/ALL. These data provide evidence that CDK6 is abnormally expressed in T-LBL/ALL and may be involved in the pathogenesis of this malignancy. In addition, the quantitative difference of CDK6 expression between neoplastic and non-neoplastic cortical thymocytes can be potentially useful in the differential diagnosis of thymic neoplasms on histological and cytological specimens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9422538

  3. Understanding the Structural Basis for Inhibition of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases. New Pieces in the Molecular Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Levin, Nayara M Bernhardt; Pintro, Val Oliveira; de Avila, Mauricio Boff; de Mattos, Bruna Boldrini; De Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2017-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) comprise an important protein family for development of drugs, mostly aimed for use in treatment of cancer but there is also potential for development of drugs for neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes. Since the early 1990s, structural studies have been carried out on CDKs, in order to determine the structural basis for inhibition of this protein target. Our goal here is to review recent structural studies focused on CDKs. We concentrate on latest developments in the understanding of the structural basis for inhibition of CDKs, relating structures and ligand-binding information. Protein crystallography has been successfully applied to elucidate over 400 CDK structures. Most of these structures are complexed with inhibitors. We use this richness of structural information to describe the major structural features determining the inhibition of this enzyme. Structures of CDK1, 2, 4-9, 12 13, and 16 have been elucidated. Analysis of these structures in complex with a wide range of different competitive inhibitors, strongly indicate some common features that can be used to guide the development of CDK inhibitors, such as a pattern of hydrogen bonding and the presence of halogen atoms in the ligand structure. Nowadays we have structural information for hundreds of CDKs. Combining the structural and functional information we may say that a pattern of intermolecular hydrogen bonds is of pivotal importance for inhibitor specificity. In addition, machine learning techniques have shown improvements in predicting binding affinity for CDKs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Non-Aggregating Tau Phosphorylation by Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Contributes to Motor Neuron Degeneration in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nimrod; Feng, Zhihua; Edens, Brittany M.; Yang, Ben; Shi, Han; Sze, Christie C.; Hong, Benjamin Taige; Su, Susan C.; Cantu, Jorge A.; Topczewski, Jacek; Crawford, Thomas O.; Ko, Chien-Ping; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Ma, Long

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the leading inherited cause of infant mortality, remain largely unknown. Many studies have established the importance of hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, tau phosphorylation in SMA pathogenesis has yet to be investigated. Here we show that tau phosphorylation on serine 202 (S202) and threonine 205 (T205) is increased significantly in SMA motor neurons using two SMA mouse models and human SMA patient spinal cord samples. Interestingly, phosphorylated tau does not form aggregates in motor neurons or neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), even at late stages of SMA disease, distinguishing it from other tauopathies. Hyperphosphorylation of tau on S202 and T205 is mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in SMA disease condition, because tau phosphorylation at these sites is significantly reduced in Cdk5 knock-out mice; genetic knock-out of Cdk5 activating subunit p35 in an SMA mouse model also leads to reduced tau phosphorylation on S202 and T205 in the SMA;p35−/− compound mutant mice. In addition, expression of the phosphorylation-deficient tauS202A,T205A mutant alleviates motor neuron defects in a zebrafish SMA model in vivo and mouse motor neuron degeneration in culture, whereas expression of phosphorylation-mimetic tauS202E,T205E promotes motor neuron defects. More importantly, genetic knock-out of tau in SMA mice rescues synapse stripping on motor neurons, NMJ denervation, and motor neuron degeneration in vivo. Altogether, our findings suggest a novel mechanism for SMA pathogenesis in which hyperphosphorylation of non-aggregating tau by Cdk5 contributes to motor neuron degeneration. PMID:25878277

  5. Cyclin-dependent kinase-9 is a component of the p300/GATA4 complex required for phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Yoichi; Morimoto, Tatsuya; Takaya, Tomohide; Kaichi, Shinji; Wada, Hiromichi; Kawamura, Teruhisa; Fujita, Masatoshi; Shimatsu, Akira; Kita, Toru; Hasegawa, Koji

    2010-03-26

    A zinc finger protein GATA4 is one of the hypertrophy-responsive transcription factors and forms a complex with an intrinsic histone acetyltransferase, p300. Disruption of this complex results in the inhibition of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and heart failure in vivo. By tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometric analyses, we identified cyclin-dependent kinase-9 (Cdk9) as a novel GATA4-binding partner. Cdk9 also formed a complex with p300 as well as GATA4 and cyclin T1. We showed that p300 was required for the interaction of GATA4 with Cdk9 and for the kinase activity of Cdk9. Conversely, Cdk9 kinase activity was required for the p300-induced transcriptional activities, DNA binding, and acetylation of GATA4. Furthermore, the kinase activity of Cdk9 was required for the phosphorylation of p300 as well as for cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. These findings demonstrate that Cdk9 forms a functional complex with the p300/GATA4 and is required for p300/GATA4- transcriptional pathway during cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

  6. Characterization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory domain of the INK4 family as a model for a synthetic tumour suppressor molecule.

    PubMed

    Fåhraeus, R; Laín, S; Ball, K L; Lane, D P

    1998-02-05

    We have previously shown that a 20 amino acid peptide derived from the third ankyrin-like repeat of the p16CDKN2/INK4a (p16) tumour suppressor protein (residues 84-103 of the human p16 protein) can bind to cdk4 and cdk6 and inhibit cdk4-cyclin D1 kinase activity in vitro as well as block cell cycle progression through G1. Substitution of two valine residues corresponding to amino acids 95 and 96 (V95A and V96A) of the p16 peptide reduces the binding to cdk4 and cdk6 and increases its IC0.5 for kinase inhibition approximately threefold when linked to the Antennapedia homeodomain carrier sequence. The same mutations increase the IC0.5 approximately fivefold in the p16 protein. Substitution of aspartic acid 92 by alanine instead increases the binding of the peptide to cdk4 and cdk6 and the kinase inhibitory activity. The p16 peptide blocks S-phase entry in non-synchronized human HaCaT cells by approximately 90% at a 24 microM concentration. The V95A and V96A double substitution minimizes the cell cycle inhibitory capacity of the peptide whereas the D92A substitution increases its capacity to block cell cycle progression. A deletion series of the p16 derived peptide shows that a 10 residue peptide still retains cdk4-cyclin D1 kinase and cell cycle inhibitory activity. The p16 peptide inhibited S-phase entry in five cell lines tested, varying between 47-75%, but had only a limited (11%) inhibitory effect in the pRb negative Saos-2 cells at a concentration of 24 microM. Like the full length p16 protein, the p16 peptide does not inhibit cyclin E dependent cdk2 kinase activity in vitro. These data suggest that acute inhibition of CDK-cyclin D activity by a peptide derived from the INK4 family will stop cells in late G1 in a pRb dependent fashion.

  7. Cell growth of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells is promoted by di-n-butyl phthalate and hexabromocyclododecane via upregulation of the cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase-4 genes.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Ah; Hwang, Kyung-A; Lee, Hye-Rim; Yi, Bo-Rim; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2012-03-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are environmentally persistent exogenous compounds released from various industrial products such as plastics, pesticides, drugs, detergents and cosmetics. They can cause a variety of adverse effects to the reproductive, developmental, immune and nervous systems in humans and wildlife. Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) is the main compound of phthalates and is reported to inhibit estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated gene expression and to interfere with normal fetal development of the male reproductive system. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD or HBCDD) is one of the brominated flame retardants (BFRs) which have been widely used in plastic, electronic and textile applications and are known to cause endocrine disruption with toxicity of the nervous system. In the present study, the estrogenic effects of DBP and HBCD were examined in an ovarian cancer cell line, BG-1, expressing high levels of ER via MTT assay and semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Treatment with DBP (10(-8)-10(-5) M) or HBCD (2 x 10(-8) -2 x 10(-6) M) resulted in increased cell proliferation of BG-1 cells as observed with 17-β estradiol (E2). In addition, both DBP and HBCD upregulated the expression levels of cell cycle-regulatory genes, such as cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (cdk-4), which are downstream target genes of ER, at 6 h after treatment. However, the expression of the p21 gene was not altered by DBP or HBCD at any time as with E2. Taken together, these results suggest that DBP and HBCD are EDCs which have apparent estrogenic activities by stimulating the cell proliferation of BG-1 cells and by inducing the expression of cyclin D and cdk-4. Our results suggest that DBP and HBCD have sufficient potency to disrupt the endocrine system and to stimulate cell growth in ER-positive cancer cells.

  8. Constitutive activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β correlates with better prognosis and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aberrant regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has been implicated in several human cancers; however, it has not been reported in the gastric cancer tissues to date. The present study was performed to determine the expression status of active form of GSK-3β phosphorylated at Tyr216 (pGSK-3β) and its relationship with other tumor-associated proteins in human gastric cancers. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue array slides containing 281 human gastric carcinoma specimens. In addition, gastric cancer cells were cultured and treated with a GSK-3β inhibitor lithium chloride (LiCl) for immunoblot analysis. Results We found that pGSK-3β was expressed in 129 (46%) of 281 cases examined, and was higher in the early-stages of pathologic tumor-node-metastasis (P < 0.001). The expression of pGSK-3β inversely correlated with lymphatic invasion (P < 0.001) and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001) and correlated with a longer patient survival (P < 0.001). In addition, pGSK-3β expression positively correlated with that of p16, p21, p27, p53, APC, PTEN, MGMT, SMAD4, or KAI1 (P < 0.05), but not with that of cyclin D1. This was confirmed by immunoblot analysis using SNU-668 gastric cancer cells treated with LiCl. Conclusions GSK-3β activation was frequently observed in early-stage gastric carcinoma and was significantly correlated with better prognosis. Thus, these findings suggest that GSK-3β activation is a useful prognostic marker for the early-stage gastric cancer. PMID:20704706

  9. A Dominant Negative Mutant of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase A Reduces Endoreduplication but Not Cell Size or Gene Expression in Maize Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Leiva-Neto, João T.; Grafi, Gideon; Sabelli, Paolo A.; Dante, Ricardo A.; Woo, Young-min; Maddock, Sheila; Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Larkins, Brian A.

    2004-01-01

    Cells in maize (Zea mays) endosperm undergo multiple cycles of endoreduplication, with some attaining DNA contents as high as 96C and 192C. Genome amplification begins around 10 d after pollination, coincident with cell enlargement and the onset of starch and storage protein accumulation. Although the role of endoreduplication is unclear, it is thought to provide a mechanism that increases cell size and enhances gene expression. To investigate this process, we reduced endoreduplication in transgenic maize endosperm by ectopically expressing a gene encoding a dominant negative mutant form of cyclin-dependent kinase A. This gene was regulated by the 27-kD γ-zein promoter, which restricted synthesis of the defective enzyme to the endoreduplication rather than the mitotic phase of endosperm development. Overexpression of a wild-type cyclin-dependent kinase A increased enzyme activity but had no effect on endoreduplication. By contrast, ectopic expression of the defective enzyme lowered kinase activity and reduced by half the mean C-value and total DNA content of endosperm nuclei. The lower level of endoreduplication did not affect cell size and only slightly reduced starch and storage protein accumulation. There was little difference in the level of endosperm gene expression with high and low levels of endoreduplication, suggesting that this process may not enhance transcription of genes associated with starch and storage protein synthesis. PMID:15208390

  10. A dominant negative mutant of cyclin-dependent kinase A reduces endoreduplication but not cell size or gene expression in maize endosperm.

    PubMed

    Leiva-Neto, João T; Grafi, Gideon; Sabelli, Paolo A; Dante, Ricardo A; Woo, Young-min; Maddock, Sheila; Gordon-Kamm, William J; Larkins, Brian A

    2004-07-01

    Cells in maize (Zea mays) endosperm undergo multiple cycles of endoreduplication, with some attaining DNA contents as high as 96C and 192C. Genome amplification begins around 10 d after pollination, coincident with cell enlargement and the onset of starch and storage protein accumulation. Although the role of endoreduplication is unclear, it is thought to provide a mechanism that increases cell size and enhances gene expression. To investigate this process, we reduced endoreduplication in transgenic maize endosperm by ectopically expressing a gene encoding a dominant negative mutant form of cyclin-dependent kinase A. This gene was regulated by the 27-kD gamma-zein promoter, which restricted synthesis of the defective enzyme to the endoreduplication rather than the mitotic phase of endosperm development. Overexpression of a wild-type cyclin-dependent kinase A increased enzyme activity but had no effect on endoreduplication. By contrast, ectopic expression of the defective enzyme lowered kinase activity and reduced by half the mean C-value and total DNA content of endosperm nuclei. The lower level of endoreduplication did not affect cell size and only slightly reduced starch and storage protein accumulation. There was little difference in the level of endosperm gene expression with high and low levels of endoreduplication, suggesting that this process may not enhance transcription of genes associated with starch and storage protein synthesis.

  11. Molecular cloning, expression pattern, and chromosomal localization of human CDKN2D/INK4d, an inhibitor of cyclin D-dependent kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Tsukasa; Shurtleff, S.A.; Downing, J.R.

    1995-10-10

    Progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle is dependent on the activity of holoenzymes formed between D-type cyclins and their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases cdk4 and cdk6. p16{sup INK4a} p15{sup INK4b}, and p18{sup INK4c}, a group of structurally related proteins, function as specific inhibitors of the cyclin D-dependent kinases and are likely to play physiologic roles as specific regulators of these kinases in vivo. A new member of the INK4 gene family, murine INK4d, has recently been identified. Here we report the isolation of human INK4d (gene symbol CDKN2D), which is 86 identical at the amino acid level to the murine clone and {approximately}44% identical to each of the other human INK4 family members. The INK4d gene is ubiquitously expressed as a single 1.4-kb mRNA with the highest levels detected in thymus, spleen, peripheral blood leukocytes, fetal liver, brain, and testes. The abundance of INK4d mRNA oscillates in a cell-cycle-dependent manner with expression lowest at mid G1 and maximal during S phase. Using a P1-phage genomic clone of INK4d for fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, the location of this gene was mapped to chromosome 19p13. No rearrangements or deletions of the INK4d gene were observed in Southern blot analysis of selected cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) containing a variant (1;19)(q23;p13) translocation that lacks rearrangement of either E2A or PBX1, or in ALL cases containing homozygous or hemizygous deletions of the related genes, INK4a and INK4b. 39 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Immortalization of Fetal Bovine Colon Epithelial Cells by Expression of Human Cyclin D1, Mutant Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4, and Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase: An In Vitro Model for Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Kengo; Kiyono, Tohru; Isogai, Emiko; Masuda, Mizuki; Narita, Moe; Okuno, Katsuya; Koyanagi, Yukako; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Cattle are the economically important animals in human society. They are essential for the production of livestock products such as milk and meats. The production efficiency of livestock products is negatively impacted by infection with zoonotic pathogens. To prevent and control infectious diseases, it is important to understand the interaction between cattle tissue and pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we established an in vitro infection model of an immortalized bovine colon-derived epithelial cell line by transducing the cells with lentiviral vectors containing genes encoding cell cycle regulators cyclin D1, mutant cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). The established cell line showed continuous cell proliferation, expression of epithelial markers, and an intact karyotype, indicating that the cells maintained their original nature as colon-derived epithelium. Furthermore, we exposed the established cell line to two strains of Salmonella enterica and EHEC. Interestingly, S. Typhimurium showed higher affinity for the established cell line and invaded the cytoplasm than S. Enteritidis. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR 2 and TLR 3, whereas TLR 4, 5 and 6 were not detectable in established cells. Our established immortalized colon-derived epithelial cell should be a useful tool for studies evaluating the molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial infection. PMID:26624883

  13. Chromium-VI arrests cell cycle and decreases granulosa cell proliferation by down-regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and cyclins and up-regulating CDK-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jone A; Lee, JeHoon; Nithy, Thamizh K; Arosh, Joe A; Burghardt, Robert C; Banu, Sakhila K

    2011-07-01

    Environmental contamination with hexavalent chromium (CrVI) has been increasing in the drinking water of the USA and developing countries. CrVI causes various health problems including menstrual disorders and infertility. Recently, we reported that CrVI causes granulosa cell apoptosis through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Our previous studies showed that postnatal exposure to CrVI arrests follicle development. In order to explore the underlying mechanism, primary and immortalized granulosa cells from rats were treated with 10 μM potassium dichromate and analyses of the cell cycle, and cell cycle regulatory proteins were performed. CrVI decreased cell proliferation as a result of cell cycle arrest and down-regulated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), cyclins, and PCNA while up-regulating CDK-inhibitors and down-regulating FSH receptor and ERβ. Vitamin C mitigated the effects of CrVI. This study shows that CrVI causes cell cycle arrest in granulosa cells by altering cell cycle regulatory proteins with potential intervention by vitamin C. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Chromium-VI arrests cell cycle and decreases granulosa cell proliferation by down-regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and cyclins and up-regulating CDK-Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jone A.; Lee, JeHoon; Nithy, Thamizh K.; Arosh, Joe A.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Banu, Sakhila K.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental contamination with hexavalent chromium (CrVI) has been increasing in the drinking water of the USA and developing countries. CrVI causes various health problems including menstrual disorders and infertility. Recently, we reported that CrVI causes granulosa cell apoptosis through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Our previous studies showed that postnatal exposure to CrVI arrests follicle development. In order to explore the underlying mechanism, primary and immortalized granulosa cells from rats were treated with 10 μM potassium dichromate and analyses of the cell cycle, and cell cycle regulatory proteins were performed. CrVI decreased cell proliferation as a result of cell cycle arrest and down-regulated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), cyclins, and PCNA while up-regulating CDK-inhibitors and down-regulating FSH receptor and ERβ. Vitamin C mitigated the effects of CrVI. This study shows that CrVI causes cell cycle arrest in granulosa cells by altering cell cycle regulatory proteins with potential intervention by vitamin C. PMID:21621607

  15. Accelerated turnover of taste bud cells in mice deficient for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mammalian taste buds contain several specialized cell types that coordinately respond to tastants and communicate with sensory nerves. While it has long been appreciated that these cells undergo continual turnover, little is known concerning how adequate numbers of cells are generated and maintained. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 has been shown to influence cell number in several developing tissues, by coordinating cell cycle exit during cell differentiation. Here, we investigated its involvement in the control of taste cell replacement by examining adult mice with targeted ablation of the p27Kip1 gene. Results Histological and morphometric analyses of fungiform and circumvallate taste buds reveal no structural differences between wild-type and p27Kip1-null mice. However, when examined in functional assays, mutants show substantial proliferative changes. In BrdU incorporation experiments, more S-phase-labeled precursors appear within circumvallate taste buds at 1 day post-injection, the earliest time point examined. After 1 week, twice as many labeled intragemmal cells are present, but numbers return to wild-type levels by 2 weeks. Mutant taste buds also contain more TUNEL-labeled cells and 50% more apoptotic bodies than wild-type controls. In normal mice, p27 Kip1 is evident in a subset of receptor and presynaptic taste cells beginning about 3 days post-injection, correlating with the onset of taste cell maturation. Loss of gene function, however, does not alter the proportions of distinct immunohistochemically-identified cell types. Conclusions p27Kip1 participates in taste cell replacement by regulating the number of precursor cells available for entry into taste buds. This is consistent with a role for the protein in timing cell cycle withdrawal in progenitor cells. The equivalence of mutant and wild-type taste buds with regard to cell number, cell types and general structure contrasts with the hyperplasia and tissue disruption seen

  16. TORC1 kinase and the S-phase cyclin Clb5 collaborate to promote mitotic spindle assembly and DNA replication in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Lieu T.; Wang’ondu, Ruth W.; Weng, Jessica B.; Wanjiku, Grace W.; Fong, Chi M.; Kile, Andrew C.; Koepp, Deanna M.; Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer K.

    2011-01-01

    The Target of Rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is a central regulator of eukaryotic cell growth that is inhibited by the drug rapamycin. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, translational defects associated with TORC1 inactivation inhibit cell cycle progression at an early stage in G1, but little is known about the possible roles for TORC1 later in the cell cycle. We investigated the rapamycin-hypersensitivity phenotype of cells lacking the S phase cyclin Clb5 (clb5Δ) as a basis for uncovering novel connections between TORC1 and the cell cycle regulatory machinery. Dosage suppression experiments suggested that the clb5Δ rapamycin hypersensitivity reflects a unique Clb5-associated cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) function that cannot be performed by mitotic cyclins and that also involves motor proteins, particularly the kinesin-like protein Kip3. Synchronized cell experiments revealed rapamycin-induced defects in pre-anaphase spindle assembly and S phase progression that were more severe in clb5Δ than in wild type cells but no apparent activation of Rad53-dependent checkpoint pathways. Some rapamycin-treated cells had aberrant spindle morphologies, but rapamycin did not cause gross defects in the microtubule cytoskeleton. We propose a model in which TORC1 and Clb5/CDK act coordinately to promote both spindle assembly via a pathway involving Kip3 and S phase progression. PMID:20697716

  17. AML1/RUNX1 Phosphorylation by Cyclin-Dependent Kinases Regulates the Degradation of AML1/RUNX1 by the Anaphase-Promoting Complex‡

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Joseph R.; Peterson, Luke F.; Zhang, Youhong; Kraft, Andrew S.; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2006-01-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) regulates hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, muscle function, and neurogenesis. Previous studies have shown that phosphorylation of AML1, particularly at serines 276 and 303, affects its transcriptional activation. Here, we report that phosphorylation of AML1 serines 276 and 303 can be blocked in vivo by inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) Cdk1 and Cdk2. Furthermore, these residues can be phosphorylated in vitro by purified Cdk1/cyclin B and Cdk2/cyclin A. Mutant AML1 protein which cannot be phosphorylated at these sites (AML1-4A) is more stable than wild-type AML1. AML-4A is resistant to degradation mediated by Cdc20, one of the substrate-targeting subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC). However, Cdh1, another targeting subunit used by the APC, can mediate the degradation of AML1-4A. A phospho-mimic protein, AML1-4D, can be targeted by Cdc20 or Cdh1. These observations suggest that both Cdc20 and Cdh1 can target AML1 for degradation by the APC but that AML1 phosphorylation may affect degradation mediated by Cdc20-APC to a greater degree. PMID:17015473

  18. The C-terminal domain of the Xenopus cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p27Xic1, is both necessary and sufficient for phosphorylation-independent proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Li-Chiou; Zhu, Xi-Ning; Herrera, Carlos R; Tseng, Hui-Min; Pfleger, Cathie M; Block, Karen; Yew, P Renee

    2005-10-21

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), cyclins, and CDK inhibitors. In the frog, Xenopus laevis, the CDK inhibitor p27(Xic1) (Xic1) inhibits DNA synthesis by negatively regulating CDK2-cyclin E. Using the frog egg extract as a model system for the study of Xic1, studies have demonstrated that Xic1 protein levels are regulated by nuclear ubiquitination and proteolysis. To characterize the molecular mechanism that regulates Xic1 turnover, we have identified the minimal sequences of Xic1 that are necessary and sufficient for its nuclear ubiquitination and degradation. Using deletion mutagenesis, our studies indicated that the C-terminal 50 amino acids of Xic1 are critical for its proteolysis beyond a role in nuclear transport. Replacement of the Xic1 C terminus with the SV40 nuclear localization sequence resulted in the nuclear localization of Xic1 but not its ubiquitination or degradation. Our deletion studies also indicated that the CDK2-cyclin binding domain of Xic1 is important for its efficient retention in the nucleus. Further deletion analyses identified at least 3 lysine residues within the Xic1 C terminus that are targeted for specific ubiquitination. Importantly, our studies demonstrated that the Xic1 C-terminal 50 amino acids can serve as a nuclear degradation signal when fused to a stable heterologous nuclear protein. Moreover, a 30-amino-acid region within the C terminus of Xic1 can serve as a nuclear ubiquitination signal. To address the role of phosphorylation on Xic1 turnover, all the potential phosphorylation sites within the C-terminal 50 amino acids of Xic1 were mutated to alanine to prevent possible phosphorylation. This resulted in a Xic1 protein that was nevertheless degraded in a manner similar to wild-type Xic1, suggesting that phosphorylation of Xic1 is not critical for its nuclear ubiquitination or proteolysis.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of tetrahydro[1,4]diazepino[1,2-a]indol-1-ones as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Putey, Aurélien; Fournet, Guy; Lozach, Olivier; Perrin, Lionel; Meijer, Laurent; Joseph, Benoît

    2014-08-18

    New series of 2,3,4,5-tetrahydro[1,4]diazepino[1,2-a]indol-1-ones and 3,4,5,10-tetrahydro-2H-diazepino[3,4-b]indol-1-ones have been synthesized through an iodolactonisation/lactone-to-lactam rearrangement sequence. These compounds were evaluated as potential protein kinase inhibitors (CDK1, CDK5 and GSK-3). 11-Iodo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro[1,4]diazepino[1,2-a]indol-1-one derivatives exhibited sub-micromolar inhibitory activity against cyclin-dependent kinases. Docking studies were realized to determine the binding mode of the inhibitors into the ATP binding domain of the CDK5 catalytic site. Our result highlighted two weak Van-der-Waals bonding interactions established between the iodine atom and both phenyl group of Phe 80 and ammonium end of Lys 33.

  20. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Phosphorylates S/T-P Sites in the Hepadnavirus Core Protein C-Terminal Domain and Is Incorporated into Viral Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Ludgate, Laurie; Ning, Xiaojun; Nguyen, David H.; Adams, Christina; Mentzer, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is important for viral RNA packaging, reverse transcription, and subcellular localization. Hepadnavirus capsids also package a cellular kinase. The identity of the host kinase that phosphorylates the core CTD or gets packaged remains to be resolved. In particular, both the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core CTDs harbor several conserved serine/threonine-proline (S/T-P) sites whose phosphorylation state is known to regulate CTD functions. We report here that the endogenous kinase in the HBV capsids was blocked by chemical inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), in particular, CDK2 inhibitors. The kinase phosphorylated the HBV CTD at the serine-proline (S-P) sites. Furthermore, we were able to detect CDK2 in purified HBV capsids by immunoblotting. Purified CDK2 phosphorylated the S/T-P sites of the HBV and DHBV CTD in vitro. Inhibitors of CDKs, of CDK2 in particular, decreased both HBV and DHBV CTD phosphorylation in vivo. Moreover, CDK2 inhibitors blocked DHBV CTD phosphorylation, specifically at the S/T-P sites, in a mammalian cell lysate. These results indicate that cellular CDK2 phosphorylates the functionally critical S/T-P sites of the hepadnavirus core CTD and is incorporated into viral capsids. PMID:22951823

  1. Plant Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors of the KRP Family: Potent Inhibitors of Root-Knot Nematode Feeding Sites in Plant Roots.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Paulo; de Almeida Engler, Janice

    2017-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN), Meloidogyne spp., are distributed worldwide and impose severe economic damage to many agronomically important crops. The plant cell cycle machinery is considered one of the pivotal components for the formation of nematode feeding sites (NFSs) or galls. These feeding sites contain five to nine hypertrophied giant cells (GC) resulting from developmental reprogramming of host root cells by this pathogen. GC undergo synchronous waves of mitotic activity uncoupled from cytokinesis giving rise to large multinucleate cells. As development of the NFS progresses, multiple rounds of DNA synthesis occur in the nuclei of GC, coupled with nuclear and cellular expansion. These cells are highly metabolically active and provide the nematode with nutrients necessary for its development and completion of its life cycle. In Arabidopsis seven cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs) belonging to the interactors/inhibitors of the cyclin dependent kinases (ICK) family, also referred as Kip-Related Proteins (KRPs) have been identified. Interactions of KRPs with CDK/Cyclin complexes decrease CDK activity, affecting both cell cycle progression and DNA content in a concentration-dependent manner. We performed the functional analysis of all Arabidopsis KRP gene members during RKN interaction in Arabidopsis to obtain more insight into their role during gall development. We demonstrated that three members of this family (KRP2, KRP5, and KRP6) were highly expressed in galls and were important for cell cycle regulation during NFS development as shown by their different modes of action. We also pointed out that cell cycle inhibition through overexpression of all members of the KRP family can affect NFS development and consequently compromise the nematode's life cycle. In this review we summarized our recent understanding of the KRP family of genes, and their role in controlling cell cycle progression at the RKN feeding site.

  2. CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE G1 is associated with the spliceosome to regulate CALLOSE SYNTHASE5 splicing and pollen wall formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xue-Yong; Niu, Jin; Sun, Ming-Xi; Zhu, Jun; Gao, Ju-Fang; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Que; Yang, Zhong-Nan

    2013-02-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana CYCLIN-DEPEDENT KINASE G1 (CDKG1) belongs to the family of cyclin-dependent protein kinases that were originally characterized as cell cycle regulators in eukaryotes. Here, we report that CDKG1 regulates pre-mRNA splicing of CALLOSE SYNTHASE5 (CalS5) and, therefore, pollen wall formation. The knockout mutant cdkg1 exhibits reduced male fertility with impaired callose synthesis and abnormal pollen wall formation. The sixth intron in CalS5 pre-mRNA, a rare type of intron with a GC 5' splice site, is abnormally spliced in cdkg1. RNA immunoprecipitation analysis suggests that CDKG1 is associated with this intron. CDKG1 contains N-terminal Ser/Arg (RS) motifs and interacts with splicing factor Arginine/Serine-Rich Zinc Knuckle-Containing Protein33 (RSZ33) through its RS region to regulate proper splicing. CDKG1 and RS-containing Zinc Finger Protein22 (SRZ22), a splicing factor interacting with RSZ33 and U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) component U1-70k, colocalize in nuclear speckles and reside in the same complex. We propose that CDKG1 is recruited to U1 snRNP through RSZ33 to facilitate the splicing of the sixth intron of CalS5.

  3. Mechanisms of MEOX1 and MEOX2 regulation of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p16 in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Douville, Josette M; Cheung, David Y C; Herbert, Krista L; Moffatt, Teri; Wigle, Jeffrey T

    2011-01-01

    Senescence, the state of permanent cell cycle arrest, has been associated with endothelial cell dysfunction and atherosclerosis. The cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p16(INK4a) govern the G(1)/S cell cycle checkpoint and are essential for determining whether a cell enters into an arrested state. The homeodomain transcription factor MEOX2 is an important regulator of vascular cell proliferation and is a direct transcriptional activator of both p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p16(INK4a). MEOX1 and MEOX2 have been shown to be partially functionally redundant during development, suggesting that they regulate similar target genes in vivo. We compared the ability of MEOX1 and MEOX2 to activate p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p16(INK4a) expression and induce endothelial cell cycle arrest. Our results demonstrate for the first time that MEOX1 regulates the MEOX2 target genes p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p16(INK4a). In addition, increased expression of either of the MEOX homeodomain transcription factors leads to cell cycle arrest and endothelial cell senescence. Furthermore, we show that the mechanism of transcriptional activation of these cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor genes by MEOX1 and MEOX2 is distinct. MEOX1 and MEOX2 activate p16(INK4a) in a DNA binding dependent manner, whereas they induce p21(CIP1/WAF1) in a DNA binding independent manner.

  4. Targeted overexpression of CKI-insensitive cyclin-dependent kinase 4 increases functional β-cell number through enhanced self-replication in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyu; Maddison, Lisette A; Crees, Zachary; Chen, Wenbiao

    2013-06-01

    β-Cells of the islet of Langerhans produce insulin to maintain glucose homeostasis. Self-replication of β-cells is the predominant mode of postnatal β-cell production in mammals, with about 20% of rodent β cells dividing in a 24-hour period. However, replicating β-cells are rare in adults. Induction of self-replication of existing β-cells is a potential treatment for diabetes. In zebrafish larvae, β-cells rarely self-replicate, even under conditions that favor β-cell genesis such overnutrition and β-cell ablation. It is not clear why larval β-cells are refractory to replication. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that insufficient activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 may be responsible for the low replication rate by ectopically expressing in β-cells a mutant CDK4 (CDK4(R24C)) that is insensitive to inhibition by cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Our data show that expression of CDK4(R24C) in β-cells enhanced β-cell replication. CDK4(R24C) also dampened compensatory β-cell neogenesis in larvae and improved glucose tolerance in adult zebrafish. Our data indicate that CDK4 inhibition contributes to the limited β-cell replication in larval zebrafish. To our knowledge, this is the first example of genetically induced β-cell replication in zebrafish.

  5. Slowed N-Type Calcium Channel (CaV2.2) Deactivation by the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Roscovitine

    PubMed Central

    Buraei, Zafir; Anghelescu, Mircea; Elmslie, Keith S.

    2005-01-01

    The lack of a calcium channel agonist (e.g., BayK8644) for CaV2 channels has impeded their investigation. Roscovitine, a potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 1, 2, and 5, has recently been reported to slow the deactivation of P/Q-type calcium channels (CaV2.1). We show that roscovitine also slows deactivation (EC50 ∼53 μM) of N-type calcium channels (CaV2.2) and investigate gating alterations induced by roscovitine. The onset of slowed deactivation was rapid (∼2 s), which contrasts with a slower effect of roscovitine to inhibit N-current (EC50 ∼300 μM). Slow deactivation was specific to roscovitine, since it could not be induced by a closely related cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, olomoucine (300 μM). Intracellularly applied roscovitine failed to slow deactivation, which implies an extracellular binding site. The roscovitine-induced slow deactivation was accompanied by a slight left shift in the activation-voltage relationship, slower activation at negative potentials, and increased inactivation. Additional data showed that roscovitine preferentially binds to the open channel to slow deactivation. A model where roscovitine reduced a backward rate constant between two open states was able to reproduce the effect of roscovitine on both activation and deactivation. PMID:15951378

  6. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 represses Foxp3 gene expression and Treg development through specific phosphorylation of Stat3 at Serine 727

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Eric; Choi, Sung Hee; Pareek, Tej K.; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Letterio, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is known as a unique member of the cyclin-dependent family of serine/threonine kinases. Previously, we demonstrated Cdk5 to be an important regulator of T cell function and that disruption of Cdk5 expression ameliorates T cell mediated neuroinflammation. Here, we show a novel role of Cdk5 in the regulation of Foxp3 expression in murine CD4+ T cells. Our data indicate that disruption of Cdk5 activity in T cells abrogates the IL-6 suppression of Foxp3 expression. This effect is achieved through Cdk5 phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) specifically at Serine 727 in T cells, and we show this post-translational modification is required for proper Stat3 DNA binding to the Foxp3 gene on the enhancer II region. Taken together, our data point to an essential role for Cdk5 in the differentiation of T cells as it regulates Foxp3 gene expression through phosphorylation of Stat3. PMID:26198700

  7. Protein conformational transitions coupled to binding in molecular recognition of unstructured proteins: deciphering the effect of intermolecular interactions on computational structure prediction of the p27Kip1 protein bound to the cyclin A-cyclin-dependent kinase 2 complex.

    PubMed

    Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2005-02-15

    The relationship between folding mechanism coupled to binding and structure prediction of the tertiary complexes is studied for the p27(Kip) (1) protein which has an intrinsically disordered unbound form and undergoes a functional folding transition during complex formation with the phosphorylated cyclin A-cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) binary complex. Hierarchy of p27(Kip1) structural loss determined in our earlier studies from temperature-induced Monte Carlo simulations and subsequent characterization of the transition state ensemble (TSE) for the folding reaction have shown that simultaneous ordering of the p27(Kip1) native intermolecular interface for the beta-hairpin and beta-strand secondary structure elements is critical for nucleating a rapid kinetic transition to the native tertiary complex. In the present study, we investigate the effect of forming specific intermolecular interactions on structure prediction of the p27(Kip1) tertiary complex. By constraining different secondary structure elements of p27(Kip1) in their native bound conformations and conducting multiple simulated annealing simulations, we analyze differences in the success rate of predicting the native structure of p27(Kip1) in the tertiary complex. In accordance with the nucleation-condensation mechanism, we have found that further stabilization of the native intermolecular interface for the beta-hairpin and beta-strand elements of p27(Kip1), that become ordered in the TSE, but are hardly populated in the unbound state, results in a consistent acquisition of the native bound structure. Conversely, the excessive stablization of the local secondary structure elements, which are rarely detected in the TSE, has a detrimental effect on convergence to the native bound structure. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Alternative splicing of human cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Sewing, A; Rönicke, V; Bürger, C; Funk, M; Müller, R

    1994-02-01

    Cyclin E is a regulatory subunit of the cdc2-related protein kinase cdk2, which is activated shortly before S-phase entry, thus defining it as a G1 cyclin. We report here the existence of a 43 kDa splice variant of human cyclin E, termed cyclin Es, which lacks 49 amino acids within the cyclin box compared to the known 48 kDa cyclin E. Cyclin Es is expressed at approximately 1/10 of the level of full-length cyclin E in several cell lines analysed. The two cyclin E forms differ functionally in that cyclin E, but not cyclin Es, is able to complex with cdk2, to activate the histone H1, pRb and p107 in vitro kinase activity of cdk2 and to rescue a triple CLN mutation in S. cerevisiae. Cyclin Es is the first splice variant of a cell cycle regulatory protein to be described. Our findings also indicate that the cyclin box in cyclin E mediates the interaction with cdk2.

  9. Viral Cyclins Mediate Separate Phases of Infection by Integrating Functions of Distinct Mammalian Cyclins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Katherine S.; Suarez, Andrea L.; Claypool, David J.; Armstrong, Taylor K.; Buckingham, Erin M.; van Dyk, Linda F.

    2012-01-01

    Gammaherpesvirus cyclins have expanded biochemical features relative to mammalian cyclins, and promote infection and pathogenesis including acute lung infection, viral persistence, and reactivation from latency. To define the essential features of the viral cyclin, we generated a panel of knock-in viruses expressing various viral or mammalian cyclins from the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 cyclin locus. Viral cyclins of both gammaherpesvirus 68 and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus supported all cyclin-dependent stages of infection, indicating functional conservation. Although mammalian cyclins could not restore lung replication, they did promote viral persistence and reactivation. Strikingly, distinct and non-overlapping mammalian cyclins complemented persistence (cyclin A, E) or reactivation from latency (cyclin D3). Based on these data, unique biochemical features of viral cyclins (e.g. enhanced kinase activation) are not essential to mediate specific processes during infection. What is essential for, and unique to, the viral cyclins is the integration of the activities of several different mammalian cyclins, which allows viral cyclins to mediate multiple, discrete stages of infection. These studies also demonstrated that closely related stages of infection, that are cyclin-dependent, are in fact genetically distinct, and thus predict that cyclin requirements may be used to tailor potential therapies for virus-associated diseases. PMID:22319441

  10. Regulation of the Action of Early Mitotic Inhibitor 1 on the Anaphase-promoting Complex/Cyclosome by Cyclin-dependent Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Moshe, Yakir; Bar-On, Ortal; Ganoth, Dvora; Hershko, Avram

    2011-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is characterized by alternating activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and of the ubiquitin ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). During S-phase APC/C is inhibited by early mitotic inhibitor 1 (Emi1) to allow the accumulation of cyclins A and B and to prevent re-replication. Emi1 is degraded at prophase by a Plk1-dependent pathway. Recent studies in which the degradation pathway of Emi1 was disrupted have shown that APC/C is activated at mitotic entry despite stabilization of Emi1. These results suggested the possibility of additional mechanisms other than degradation of Emi1, which release APC/C from inhibition by Emi1 upon entry into mitosis. In this study we report one such mechanism, by which the ability of Emi1 to inhibit APC/C is negatively regulated by CDKs. We show that in Plk1-inhibited cells Emi1 is stabilized and phosphorylated, that Emi1 is phosphorylated by CDKs in mitotic but not S-phase cell extracts, and that Emi1 phosphorylation by mitotic cell extracts or purified CDKs markedly reduces the ability of Emi1 to bind and to inhibit APC/C. Finally, we show that the addition of extracts from S-phase cells to extracts from mitotic cells protects Emi1 from CDK-mediated inactivation. PMID:21454540

  11. Characterization of Human Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 12 (CDK12) and CDK13 Complexes in C-Terminal Domain Phosphorylation, Gene Transcription, and RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kaiwei; Gao, Xin; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Smith, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and CDK12 have each been demonstrated to phosphorylate the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) at serine 2 of the heptad repeat, both in vitro and in vivo. CDK9, as part of P-TEFb and the super elongation complex (SEC), is by far the best characterized of CDK9, CDK12, and CDK13. We employed both in vitro and in vivo assays to further investigate the molecular properties of CDK12 and its paralog CDK13. We isolated Flag-tagged CDK12 and CDK13 and found that they associate with numerous RNA processing factors. Although knockdown of CDK12, CDK13, or their cyclin partner CCNK did not affect the bulk CTD phosphorylation levels in HCT116 cells, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis revealed that CDK12 and CDK13 losses in HCT116 cells preferentially affect expression of DNA damage response and snoRNA genes, respectively. CDK12 and CDK13 depletion also leads to a loss of expression of RNA processing factors and to defects in RNA processing. These findings suggest that in addition to implementing CTD phosphorylation, CDK12 and CDK13 may affect RNA processing through direct physical interactions with RNA processing factors and by regulating their expression. PMID:25561469

  12. Unliganded estrogen receptor alpha inhibits breast cancer cell growth through interaction with a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (p21(WAF1)).

    PubMed

    Maynadier, Marie; Ramirez, Jean-Marie; Cathiard, Anne-Marie; Platet, Nadine; Gras, Delphine; Gleizes, Michel; Sheikh, M Saeed; Nirde, Philippe; Garcia, Marcel

    2008-03-01

    Estrogens are mitogenic in human breast cancer cells, but the presence of estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) is associated with a favorable prognosis in primary tumors and the molecular basis for this paradoxical relationship remains unknown. Here we show that ER alpha and ER alpha mutants devoid of ligand and DNA-binding domains inhibit cell growth in three-dimensional matrix as well as tumor formation in nude mice. Using in vitro and intracellular approaches, we have found that ER alpha, via its amino acids 184-283, interacts with cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1). Both proteins exhibit mutual interactions in the absence of estrogens or in the presence of pure antiestrogen ICI(182,780), whereas estradiol treatment disrupts their interactions. Cross-linking experiments reveal that these proteins are present in a larger complex of approximately 200 kDa that also contains cdk2 and cyclin E. We further demonstrate that the unliganded full-length ER alpha or the variant having the p21(WAF1) interaction region significantly increases p21(WAF1) expression, whereas ER alpha silencing reduces p21(WAF1) levels and silencing of p21(WAF1) is sufficient to prevent ER alpha-induced growth inhibition. Taken together, our results point to an antiproliferative function of the unliganded ER alpha through its physical interactions with p21(WAF1) that may also explain the favorable prognosis of ER alpha-positive breast cancers.

  13. Cyclin-dependent Kinase 8 Module Expression Profiling Reveals Requirement of Mediator Subunits 12 and 13 for Transcription of Serpent-dependent Innate Immunity Genes in Drosophila*

    PubMed Central

    Kuuluvainen, Emilia; Hakala, Heini; Havula, Essi; Sahal Estimé, Michelle; Rämet, Mika; Hietakangas, Ville; Mäkelä, Tomi P.

    2014-01-01

    The Cdk8 (cyclin-dependent kinase 8) module of Mediator integrates regulatory cues from transcription factors to RNA polymerase II. It consists of four subunits where Med12 and Med13 link Cdk8 and cyclin C (CycC) to core Mediator. Here we have investigated the contributions of the Cdk8 module subunits to transcriptional regulation using RNA interference in Drosophila cells. Genome-wide expression profiling demonstrated separation of Cdk8-CycC and Med12-Med13 profiles. However, transcriptional regulation by Cdk8-CycC was dependent on Med12-Med13. This observation also revealed that Cdk8-CycC and Med12-Med13 often have opposite transcriptional effects. Interestingly, Med12 and Med13 profiles overlapped significantly with that of the GATA factor Serpent. Accordingly, mutational analyses indicated that GATA sites are required for Med12-Med13 regulation of Serpent-dependent genes. Med12 and Med13 were also found to be required for Serpent-activated innate immunity genes in defense to bacterial infection. The results reveal a novel role for the Cdk8 module in Serpent-dependent transcription and innate immunity. PMID:24778181

  14. ATM/ATR-dependent Tyr15 phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinases in response to hydroxyurea in Vicia faba root meristem cells.

    PubMed

    Winnicki, Konrad

    2013-10-01

    DNA damage or stalled replication forks activate cell cycle checkpoints. However, the regulation of metabolic pathways that are responsible for maintenance of genome integrity in plants is still largely unknown. Present research on Vicia faba root meristem cells indicates that inhibitory phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) at Tyr15 plays a prominent role during blockage of cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress. Phosphorylation of P-loop in Cdks takes place in ATM/ATR-dependent manner. Although, Tyr15 phosphorylation upon hydroxyurea (HU) treatment was found in most cells classified to G1 and S phase, interestingly, the number of phoshpo-Tyr15-positive cells decreases in G2 phase. Presented data confirm much similarity in regulation of Cdks functions under genotoxic stress between plants and animals; however, they may also substantiate evolutionarily developed differences especially in regulation of G2/M transition between these two kingdoms.

  15. ONIOM study of the nonbonding interaction of the 2PU inhibitor with the CDK2 and CDK4 cyclin-dependant kinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aixiao; Maurel, François; Delamar, Michel; Wang, Baoshan

    We discuss in this article, the applicability of hybrid techniques [especially the our-own N-layered integrated molecular orbital and molecular mechanics (ONIOM) method] to weak chemical interactions in large systems, such as the interaction of cyclin-dependant kinases, CDK4, and CDK2, with a specific ligand (2PU) showing selectivity for CDK4. Our results show that the energies from the ONIOM calculations perfectly match our former molecular dynamics results, both for determining the amino acids which have strongest interactions with the ligand and for explaining the selectivity of 2PU towards CDK4, as compared with CDK2. We show that the ONIOM method is a good candidate for studying such interactions in large systems, even though there are still some technical and theoretical problems to solve. The calculation details will be presented together with the methodology we devised for using the ONIOM approach in such a context.

  16. A Cyclin Dependent Kinase Regulatory Subunit (CKS) Gene of Pigeonpea Imparts Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Regulates Plant Growth and Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha R.; Khareedu, Venkateswara R.

    2017-01-01

    Frequent climatic changes in conjunction with other extreme environmental factors are known to affect growth, development and productivity of diverse crop plants. Pigeonpea, a major grain legume of the semiarid tropics, endowed with an excellent deep-root system, is known as one of the important drought tolerant crop plants. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are core cell cycle regulators and play important role in different aspects of plant growth and development. The cyclin-dependent kinase regulatory subunit gene (CKS) was isolated from the cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. Pigeonpea CKS (CcCKS) gene expression was detected in both the root and leaf tissues of pigeonpea and was upregulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), mannitol, NaCl and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. The overexpression of CcCKS gene in Arabidopsis significantly enhanced tolerance of transgenics to drought and salt stresses as evidenced by different physiological parameters. Under stress conditions, transgenics showed higher biomass, decreased rate of water loss, decreased MDA levels, higher free proline contents, and glutathione levels. Moreover, under stress conditions transgenics exhibited lower stomatal conductance, lower transpiration, and higher photosynthetic rates. However, under normal conditions, CcCKS-transgenics displayed decreased plant growth rate, increased cell size and decreased stomatal number compared to those of wild-type plants. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that CcCKS could regulate the expression of both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent genes associated with abiotic stress tolerance as well as plant growth and development. As such, the CcCKS seems promising and might serve as a potential candidate gene for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants. PMID:28239388

  17. The Role of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Early Drug Development with reference to the Cyclin-dependent Kinase (Cdk) Inhibitor - Roscovitine.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Moustapha; Sallam, Hatem; Hassan, Zuzana

    2011-05-01

    Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenetics play an important role in drug discovery and contribute to treatment success. This is an essential issue in cancer treatment due to its high toxicity. During the last decade, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors were recognised as a new class of compounds that was introduced for the treatment of several diseases including cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) play a key role in the regulation of cell cycle progression and ribonucleic acid transcription. Deregulation of Cdks has been associated with several malignancies, neurodegenerative disorders, viral and protozoa infections, glomerulonephritis and inflammatory diseases. (R)-roscovitine is a synthetic tri-substituted purine that inhibits selectively Cdk1, 2, 5, 7 and 9. Roscovitine has shown promising cytotoxicity in cell lines and tumor xenografts. In this paper, we present several aspects of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of roscovitine. We present also some of our investigations including bioanalysis, haematotoxicity, age dependent kinetics, PK and effects on Cdks in the brain. Unfavourable kinetic parameters in combination with poor distribution to the bone marrow compartment could explain the absence of myelosuppression in vivo despite the efficacy in vitro. Higher plasma and brain exposure and longer elimination half-life found in rat pups compared to adult rats may indicate that roscovitine can be a potential candidate for the treatment of brain tumours in children. Cdk5 inhibition and Erk1/2 activation that was detected in brain of rat pups may suggest the use of roscovitine in neurodegenerative diseases. Early pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies are important issues in drug discovery and may affect further development of promising drug candidates.

  18. Differential Roles of Two Homologous Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Genes in Regulating Cell Cycle and Innate Immunity in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hamdoun, Safae; Zhang, Chong; Gill, Manroop; Churchman, Michelle; Larkin, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Precise cell-cycle control is critical for plant development and responses to pathogen invasion. Two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes, SIAMESE (SIM) and SIM-RELATED 1 (SMR1), were recently shown to regulate Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) defense based on phenotypes conferred by a sim smr1 double mutant. However, whether these two genes play differential roles in cell-cycle and defense control is unknown. In this report, we show that while acting synergistically to promote endoreplication, SIM and SMR1 play different roles in affecting the ploidy of trichome and leaf cells, respectively. In addition, we found that the smr1-1 mutant, but not sim-1, was more susceptible to a virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain, and this susceptibility could be rescued by activating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense. Consistent with these results, smr1-1 partially suppressed the dwarfism, high SA levels, and cell death phenotypes in acd6-1, a mutant used to gauge the change of defense levels. Thus, SMR1 functions partly through SA in defense control. The differential roles of SIM and SMR1 are due to differences in temporal and spatial expression of these two genes in Arabidopsis tissues and in response to P. syringae infection. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis of plants with altered SA signaling revealed that SA is necessary, but not sufficient, to change cell-cycle progression. We further found that a mutant with three CYCD3 genes disrupted also compromised disease resistance to P. syringae. Together, this study reveals differential roles of two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in regulating cell-cycle progression and innate immunity in Arabidopsis and provides insights into the importance of cell-cycle control during host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26561564

  19. Effect of positive feedback loops on the robustness of oscillations in the network of cyclin-dependent kinases driving the mammalian cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Claude; Gonze, Didier; Goldbeter, Albert

    2012-09-01

    The transitions between the G(1), S, G(2) and M phases of the mammalian cell cycle are driven by a network of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), whose sequential activation is regulated by intertwined negative and positive feedback loops. We previously proposed a detailed computational model for the Cdk network, and showed that this network is capable of temporal self-organization in the form of sustained oscillations, which govern ordered progression through the successive phases of the cell cycle [Gérard and Goldbeter (2009) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106, 21643-21648]. We subsequently proposed a skeleton model for the cell cycle that retains the core regulatory mechanisms of the detailed model [Gérard and Goldbeter (2011) Interface Focus 1, 24-35]. Here we extend this skeleton model by incorporating Cdk regulation through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and by including the positive feedback loops that underlie the dynamics of the G(1)/S and G(2)/M transitions via phosphatase Cdc25 and via phosphatase Cdc25 and kinase Wee1, respectively. We determine the effects of these positive feedback loops and ultrasensitivity in phosphorylation/dephosphorylation on the dynamics of the Cdk network. The multiplicity of positive feedback loops as well as the existence of ultrasensitivity promote the occurrence of bistability and increase the amplitude of the oscillations in the various cyclin/Cdk complexes. By resorting to stochastic simulations, we further show that the presence of multiple, redundant positive feedback loops in the G(2)/M transition of the cell cycle markedly enhances the robustness of the Cdk oscillations with respect to molecular noise. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  20. Insight into the interactions between novel isoquinolin-1,3-dione derivatives and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 combining QSAR and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junxia; Kong, Hao; Wilson, James M; Guo, Jialiang; Chang, Yiqun; Yang, Mengjia; Xiao, Gaokeng; Sun, Pinghua

    2014-01-01

    Several small-molecule CDK inhibitors have been identified, but none have been approved for clinical use in the past few years. A new series of 4-[(3-hydroxybenzylamino)-methylene]-4H-isoquinoline-1,3-diones were reported as highly potent and selective CDK4 inhibitors. In order to find more potent CDK4 inhibitors, the interactions between these novel isoquinoline-1,3-diones and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 was explored via in silico methodologies such as 3D-QSAR and docking on eighty-one compounds displaying potent selective activities against cyclin-dependent kinase 4. Internal and external cross-validation techniques were investigated as well as region focusing, bootstraping and leave-group-out. A training set of 66 compounds gave the satisfactory CoMFA model (q2 = 0.695, r2 = 0.947) and CoMSIA model (q2 = 0.641, r2 = 0.933). The remaining 15 compounds as a test set also gave good external predictive abilities with r2pred values of 0.875 and 0.769 for CoMFA and CoMSIA, respectively. The 3D-QSAR models generated here predicted that all five parameters are important for activity toward CDK4. Surflex-dock results, coincident with CoMFA/CoMSIA contour maps, gave the path for binding mode exploration between the inhibitors and CDK4 protein. Based on the QSAR and docking models, twenty new potent molecules have been designed and predicted better than the most active compound 12 in the literatures. The QSAR, docking and interactions analysis expand the structure-activity relationships of constrained isoquinoline-1,3-diones and contribute towards the development of more active CDK4 subtype-selective inhibitors.

  1. A Cyclin Dependent Kinase Regulatory Subunit (CKS) Gene of Pigeonpea Imparts Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Regulates Plant Growth and Development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha R; Khareedu, Venkateswara R

    2017-01-01

    Frequent climatic changes in conjunction with other extreme environmental factors are known to affect growth, development and productivity of diverse crop plants. Pigeonpea, a major grain legume of the semiarid tropics, endowed with an excellent deep-root system, is known as one of the important drought tolerant crop plants. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are core cell cycle regulators and play important role in different aspects of plant growth and development. The cyclin-dependent kinase regulatory subunit gene (CKS) was isolated from the cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. Pigeonpea CKS (CcCKS) gene expression was detected in both the root and leaf tissues of pigeonpea and was upregulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), mannitol, NaCl and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. The overexpression of CcCKS gene in Arabidopsis significantly enhanced tolerance of transgenics to drought and salt stresses as evidenced by different physiological parameters. Under stress conditions, transgenics showed higher biomass, decreased rate of water loss, decreased MDA levels, higher free proline contents, and glutathione levels. Moreover, under stress conditions transgenics exhibited lower stomatal conductance, lower transpiration, and higher photosynthetic rates. However, under normal conditions, CcCKS-transgenics displayed decreased plant growth rate, increased cell size and decreased stomatal number compared to those of wild-type plants. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that CcCKS could regulate the expression of both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent genes associated with abiotic stress tolerance as well as plant growth and development. As such, the CcCKS seems promising and might serve as a potential candidate gene for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants.

  2. Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (Tppp1) phosphorylation by Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (rock) and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) inhibits microtubule dynamics to increase cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Alice V; Gamell, Cristina; Suryadinata, Randy; Sarcevic, Boris; Bernard, Ora

    2013-03-15

    Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (Tppp1) regulates microtubule (MT) dynamics via promoting MT polymerization and inhibiting histone deacetylase 6 (Hdac6) activity to increase MT acetylation. Our results reveal that as a consequence, Tppp1 inhibits cell proliferation by delaying the G1/S-phase and the mitosis to G1-phase transitions. We show that phosphorylation of Tppp1 by Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (Rock) prevents its Hdac6 inhibitory activity to enable cells to enter S-phase. Whereas, our analysis of the role of Tppp1 during mitosis revealed that inhibition of its MT polymerizing and Hdac6 regulatory activities were necessary for cells to re-enter the G1-phase. During this investigation, we also discovered that Tppp1 is a novel Cyclin B/Cdk1 (cyclin-dependent kinase) substrate and that Cdk phosphorylation of Tppp1 inhibits its MT polymerizing activity. Overall, our results show that dual Rock and Cdk phosphorylation of Tppp1 inhibits its regulation of the cell cycle to increase cell proliferation.

  3. Subcellular distribution of cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) is regulated through phosphorylation by dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A).

    PubMed

    Oi, Ami; Katayama, Syouichi; Hatano, Naoya; Sugiyama, Yasunori; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2017-01-08

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase primarily expressed in the central nervous system and is known to cause X-linked neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome. However, the mechanisms regulating CDKL5 have not yet been fully clarified. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the protein kinase that directly phosphorylates CDKL5, identifying it as dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), an enzyme binding to and phosphorylating CDKL5. We showed that subcellular distribution of CDKL5 was regulated by its phosphorylation by DYRK1A. In mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells, CDKL5 was localized in both the cytosol and nucleus, whereas DYRK1A showed a typical nuclear localization. When CDKL5 and DYRK1A were co-expressed, the cytosolic localization of CDKL5 was significantly increased. Results of site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the phosphorylation site was Ser-308, in the vicinity of the nuclear localization signal. A mutation mimicking the phosphorylated serine residue by aspartate substitution (S308D) changed CDKL5 localization to the cytosol, whereas the corresponding alanine-substituted analog, CDKL5(S308A), was primarily localized to the nucleus. Taken together, these results strongly suggested that DYRK1A bound to CDKL5 and phosphorylated it on Ser-308, thus interfering with its nuclear localization.

  4. An inhibitor of yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase plays an important role in ensuring the genomic integrity of daughter cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nugroho, T T; Mendenhall, M D

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding a 40-kDa protein, previously studied as a substrate and inhibitor of the yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase, Cdc28, has been cloned. The DNA sequence reveals that p40 is a highly charged protein of 32,187 Da with no significant homology to other proteins. Overexpression of the gene encoding p40, SIC1, produces cells with an elongated but morphology similar to that of cells with depleted levels of the CLB gene products, suggesting that p40 acts as an inhibitor of Cdc28-Clb complexes in vivo. A SIC1 deletion is viable and has highly increased frequencies of broken and lost chromosomes. The deletion strain segregates out many dead cells that are primarily arrested at the G2 checkpoint in an asymmetric fashion. Only daughters and young mothers display the lethal defect, while experienced mothers appear to grow normally. These results suggest that negative regulation of Cdc28 protein kinase activity by p40 is important for faithful segregation of chromosomes to daughter cells. Images PMID:8164683

  5. Pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine bioisostere of roscovitine: evaluation of a novel selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases with antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Jorda, Radek; Havlícek, Libor; McNae, Iain W; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D; Voller, Jirí; Sturc, Antonín; Navrátilová, Jana; Kuzma, Marek; Mistrík, Martin; Bártek, Jirí; Strnad, Miroslav; Krystof, Vladimír

    2011-04-28

    Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) with small molecules has been suggested as a strategy for treatment of cancer, based on deregulation of CDKs commonly found in many types of human tumors. Here, a new potent CDK2 inhibitor with pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold has been synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in cellular and biochemical assays. 7-Benzylamino-5(R)-[2-(hydroxymethyl)propyl]amino-3-isopropyl-1(2)H-pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine, compound 7, was prepared as a bioisostere of the well-known CDK inhibitor roscovitine. An X-ray crystal structure of compound 7 bound to CDK2 has been determined, revealing a binding mode similar to that of roscovitine. Protein kinase selectivity profile of compound 7 and its biological effects (cell cycle arrest, dephosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein, accumulation of the tumor suppressor protein p53, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of homologous recombination) are consistent with CDK inhibition as a primary mode of action. Importantly, as the anticancer activities of the pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine 7 exceed those of its bioisostere roscovitine, compound 7 reported here may be preferable for cancer therapy.

  6. Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, affects several gating mechanisms to inhibit cardiac L-type (Ca(V)1.2) calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Yarotskyy, V; Elmslie, K S

    2007-10-01

    L-type calcium channels (Ca((V))1.2) play an important role in cardiac contraction. Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and promising anticancer drug, has been shown to affect Ca((V))1.2 by inhibiting current amplitude and slowing activation. This research investigates the mechanism by which roscovitine inhibits Ca((V))1.2 channels. Ca((V))1.2 channels were transfected into HEK 293 cells, using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, and currents were measured using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Roscovitine slows activation at all voltages, which precludes one previously proposed mechanism. In addition, roscovitine enhances voltage-dependent, but not calcium-dependent inactivation. This enhancement resulted from both an acceleration of inactivation and a slowing of the recovery from inactivation. Internally applied roscovitine failed to affect Ca((V))1.2 currents, which supports a kinase-independent mechanism and extracellular binding site. Unlike the dihydropyridines, closed state inactivation was not affected by roscovitine. Inactivation was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50)=29.5+/-12 microM, which is close to that for slow activation and inhibition. We conclude that roscovitine binds to an extracellular site on Ca((V))1.2 channels to inhibit current by both slowing activation and enhancing inactivation. Purine-based drugs could become a new option for treatment of diseases that benefit from L-channel inhibition such as cardiac arrhythmias and hypertension.

  7. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 contributes to endoplasmic reticulum stress induced podocyte apoptosis via promoting MEKK1 phosphorylation at Ser280 in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Shuanggang; Zhao, Min; Chen, Jing; Liu, Rui; Cheng, Shengyang; Qi, Mengyuan; Wang, Shuo; Liu, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been reported to be associated with podocyte apoptosis in diabetic nephropathy, but the mechanism of ER signaling in podocyte apoptosis hasn't been fully understood. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) was associated with podocyte apoptosis in diabetic nephropathy. The present study was designed to examine whether and how Cdk5 activity plays a role in ER stress induced podocyte apoptosis in diabetic nephropathy. The results showed that along with induction of Cdk5 and apoptosis, GRP78 and its two sensors as well as CHOP and cleaved caspase-12 were induced in high glucose treated podocytes. These responses were attenuated by treated salubrinal. The ER stress inducer, tunicamycin, also up-regulated the kinase activity and protein expression of Cdk5 in podocytes accompanied with the increasing of GRP78. On the other hand, Cdk5 phosphorylates MEKK1 at Ser280 in tunicamycin treated podocytes, and together, they increase the JNK phosphorylation. Moreover, disruption of this pathway can decrease the podocyte apoptosis induced by tunicamycin. Therefore, our study proved that Cdk5 may play an important role in ER stress induced podocyte apoptosis through MEKK1/JNK pathway in diabetic nephropathy.

  8. MicroRNA-26a/cyclin-dependent kinase 5 axis controls proliferation, apoptosis and in vivo tumor growth of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Floriana Maria; Inguscio, Alessandra; Kunderfranco, Paolo; Cortesi, Alice; Elia, Leonardo; Quintavalle, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most frequent type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Despite a favorable therapeutic response to first-line chemo-immunotherapy, still 30–40% of patients is refractory, or relapse after this treatment. Thus, alternative strategies must be sought. Previous studies have indicated that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is involved in tumor development and progression, and it may represent a potential therapeutic target. However, its role in modulating DLBCL growth and progression remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that CDK5 and its activator, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activator 1 (CDK5R1 or p35), are overexpressed in DLBCL cell lines and that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and activity is dependent on CDK5 expression in DLBCL. Using public data sets, we also demonstrate that patients with DLBCL show a higher expression of CDK5 compared with healthy individuals. By using loss-of-function approaches, we demonstrate that CDK5’s activity regulates proliferation and survival of DLBCL cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulating gene expression and are involved in cancer initiation and progression. We identify miR-26a as direct regulator of p35 expression and CDK5 activity. We show that miR-26a expression is lower in DLBCL cell lines compared to B lymphocytes and that its ectopic expression leads to a drastic reduction of DLBCL tumor growth in vivo and decreased proliferation, cell-cycle progression, and survival in vitro. Remarkably, concomitant overexpression of a 3′-UTR-truncated form of p35 promoted tumor growth in vivo and cell proliferation, cell-cycle progression, and cell survival in vitro. In conclusion, these results demonstrate an important role for miR-26a and CDK5 together in the survival and growth of DLBCL cells, suggesting the existence of potential novel therapeutic targets for the

  9. Ribociclib (LEE011): Mechanism of Action and Clinical Impact of This Selective Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitor in Various Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Debu; Bardia, Aditya; Sellers, William R

    2017-07-01

    The cyclin D-cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6-p16-retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway is commonly disrupted in cancer, leading to abnormal cell proliferation. Therapeutics targeting this pathway have demonstrated antitumor effects in preclinical and clinical studies. Ribociclib is a selective, orally bioavailable inhibitor of CDK4 and CDK6, which received FDA approval in March 2017 and is set to enter the treatment landscape alongside other CDK4/6 inhibitors, including palbociclib and abemaciclib. Here, we describe the mechanism of action of ribociclib and review preclinical and clinical data from phase I, II, and III trials of ribociclib across different tumor types, within the context of other selective CDK4/6 inhibitors. The pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety, tolerability, and clinical responses with ribociclib as a single agent or in combination with other therapies are discussed, and an overview of the broad portfolio of ongoing clinical trials with ribociclib across a wide range of indications is presented. On the basis of the available data, ribociclib has a manageable tolerability profile and therapeutic potential for a variety of cancer types. Its high selectivity makes it an important partner drug for other targeted therapies, and it has been shown to enhance the clinical activity of existing anticancer therapies and delay the development of treatment resistance, without markedly increasing toxicity. Ongoing trials of doublet and triplet targeted therapies containing ribociclib seek to identify optimal CDK4/6-based targeted combination regimens for various tumor types and advance the field of precision therapeutics in oncology. Clin Cancer Res; 23(13); 3251-62. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Germline and somatic mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes CDKN1A, CDKN2B, and CDKN2C in sporadic parathyroid adenomas.

    PubMed

    Costa-Guda, Jessica; Soong, Chen-Pang; Parekh, Vaishali I; Agarwal, Sunita K; Arnold, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of sporadic parathyroid adenomas is incompletely understood. The possible role of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) genes was raised by recognition of cyclin D1 as a parathyroid oncogene, identification of rare germline mutations in CDKI genes in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1; that in rodents, mutation in Cdkn1b caused parathyroid tumors; and subsequently through identification of rare predisposing germline sequence variants and somatic mutation of CDKN1B, encoding p27(kip1), in sporadic human parathyroid adenoma. We therefore sought to determine whether mutations/variants in the other six CDKI genes CDKN1A, CDKN1C, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, CDKN2C, and CDKN2D, encoding p21, p57, p14(ARF)/p16, p15, p18, and p19, respectively, contribute to the development of typical parathyroid adenomas. In a series of 85 sporadic parathyroid adenomas, direct DNA sequencing identified alterations in five adenomas (6 %): Two contained distinct heterozygous changes in CDKN1A, one germline and one of undetermined germline status; one had a CDKN2B germline alteration, accompanied by loss of the normal allele in the tumor (LOH); two had variants of CDKN2C, one somatic and one germline with LOH. Abnormalities of three of the mutant proteins were readily demonstrable in vitro. Thus, germline mutations/rare variants in CDKN1A, CDKN2B, and CDKN2C likely contribute to the development of a significant subgroup of common sporadic parathyroid adenomas, and somatic mutation in CDKN2C further suggests a direct role for CDKI alteration in conferring a selective growth advantage to parathyroid cells, providing novel support for the concept that multiple CDKIs can play primary roles in human neoplasia.

  11. Regulation of proliferation in developing human tooth germs by MSX muscle segment homeodomain proteins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p19(INK4d).

    PubMed

    Kero, Darko; Vukojevic, Katarina; Stazic, Petra; Sundov, Danijela; Brakus, Snjezana Mardesic; Saraga-Babic, Mirna

    2017-09-21

    Before the secretion of hard dental tissues, tooth germs undergo several distinctive stages of development (dental lamina, bud, cap and bell). Every stage is characterized by specific proliferation patterns, which is regulated by various morphogens, growth factors and homeodomain proteins. The role of MSX homeodomain proteins in odontogenesis is rather complex. Expression domains of genes encoding for murine Msx1/2 during development are observed in tissues containing highly proliferative progenitor cells. Arrest of tooth development in Msx knockout mice can be attributed to impaired proliferation of progenitor cells. In Msx1 knockout mice, these progenitor cells start to differentiate prematurely as they strongly express cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p19(INK4d). p19(INK4d) induces terminal differentiation of cells by blocking the cell cycle in mitogen-responsive G1 phase. Direct suppression of p19(INK4d) by Msx1 protein is, therefore, important for maintaining proliferation of progenitor cells at levels required for the normal progression of tooth development. In this study, we examined the expression patterns of MSX1, MSX2 and p19(INK4d) in human incisor tooth germs during the bud, cap and early bell stages of development. The distribution of expression domains of p19(INK4d) throughout the investigated period indicates that p19(INK4d) plays active role during human tooth development. Furthermore, comparison of expression domains of p19(INK4d) with those of MSX1, MSX2 and proliferation markers Ki67, Cyclin A2 and pRb, indicates that MSX-mediated regulation of proliferation in human tooth germs might not be executed by the mechanism similar to one described in developing tooth germs of wild-type mouse.

  12. Evidence of gene deletion of p21 (WAF1/CIP1), a cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitor, in thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Y.; Zou, M.; Farid, N. R.; al-Sedairy, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression is controlled by a host of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), that are themselves regulated by multiple factors, including a group of small cyclin-Cdk inhibitor proteins (p15, p16, p21 and p27). The involvement of Cdk inhibitors in carcinogenesis has been demonstrated by the studies of p16. p53 is frequently mutated in thyroid carcinomas and p21/Waf1 is a downstream effector of p53. It is conceivable that genetic defects of genes downstream in the p53 pathway could also be oncogenic. We, therefore, examined a series of 57 thyroid tumour specimens (eight follicular adenomas and 49 carcinomas) for deletion and point mutation of the p21/Waf1 gene. Three different kinds of deletions ranging from 349 to 450 bp were detected in five papillary carcinoma specimens by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). All the deletions were involved in the second exon of the p21/Waf1 gene. RT-PCR single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of remaining samples failed to reveal any point mutations in the coding region of the gene, except for a polymorphism at codon 31 (Ser to Arg). Genomic Southern blot analysis did not demonstrate any gene deletion or rearrangement in these samples, indicating abnormal RNA splicing may be involved. Analysis of intron-exon boundary and the coding region of the second exon did not reveal any mutation except for a point mutation (C to G) located 16 bp downstream from the splice donor site of the second intron in three out of five samples with p21/Waf1 deletions. Whether the mutation plays any role in aberrant RNA splicing remains to be determined. Among the five samples with p21/Waf1 gene deletions, none of them simultaneously carried a p53 or retinoblastoma (Rb) gene mutation. No p21/Waf1 abnormality was found in the benign adenomas. Thus, 12.5% (5/40) of thyroid papillary carcinoma specimens harboured p21/Waf1 gene deletions. Our data suggest that p21/Waf1 gene deletion is involved

  13. The Cyclin Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21 Is Essential for Resolution of Murine Inflammatory Arthritis via its C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mavers, Melissa; Cuda, Carla M.; Misharin, Alexander V.; Gierut, Angelica K.; Agrawal, Hemant; Weber, Evan; Novack, Deborah Veis; Haines, G. Kenneth; Balomenos, Dimitrios; Perlman, Harris

    2011-01-01

    Objective The mechanism responsible for persistent inflammation of the synovium that occurs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unknown. Previously, we were the first to demonstrate that expression of the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1) is reduced in synovial tissue from RA patients compared to osteoarthritis patients and that p21 is a novel suppressor of the inflammatory response in macrophages. Here, we sought to determine the role and mechanism of p21-mediated suppression of experimental inflammatory arthritis. Methods Experimental arthritis was induced in WT or p21−/− (C57BL/6) mice using the K/BxN serum transfer induced model. p21-peptide mimetics were administered to mice as a prophylactic for arthritis development. LPS-induced cytokine and signal transduction pathways were examined in macrophages that were treated with p21-peptide mimetics using Luminex-based assays, flow cytometry, or ELISAs. Results p21−/− mice exhibit enhanced and sustained development of experimental inflammatory arthritis, which is associated with markedly increased numbers of macrophages and severe articular destruction. Administration of a p21-peptide mimetic suppresses activation of macrophages and reduces the severity of experimental arthritis only in p21-intact mice. Mechanistically, treatment with the p21-peptide mimetic leads to activation of the serine/threonine kinase Akt and subsequent reduction in the activated isoform of mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 in macrophages. Conclusion These data are the first to reveal that p21 plays an important role in limiting the activation response of macrophages in an inflammatory disease such as RA. Thus, targeting p21 in macrophages may be crucial for suppressing the development and persistence of RA. PMID:21898359

  14. The effect of Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 on voltage-dependent calcium channels in PC12 cells varies according to channel type and cell differentiation state.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Kotaro; Asada, Akiko; Saito, Taro; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a Ser/Thr kinase that plays an important role in the release of neurotransmitter from pre-synaptic terminals triggered by Ca(2+) influx into the pre-synaptic cytoplasm through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs). It is reported that Cdk5 regulates L-, P/Q-, or N-type VDCC, but there is conflicting data as to the effect of Cdk5 on VDCC activity. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we examined the role of Cdk5 in regulating the Ca(2+) -channel property of VDCCs, using PC12 cells expressing endogenous, functional L-, P/Q-, and N-type VDCCs. The Ca(2+) influx, induced by membrane depolarization with high K(+) , was monitored with a fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator protein in both undifferentiated and nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells. Overall, Ca(2+) influx was increased by expression of Cdk5-p35 in undifferentiated PC12 cells but suppressed in differentiated PC12 cells. Moreover, we found that different VDCCs are distinctly regulated by Cdk5-p35 depending on the differentiation states of PC12 cells. These results indicate that Cdk5-p35 regulates L-, P/Q-, or N-type VDCCs in a cellular context-dependent manner. Calcium (Ca(2+) ) influx through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) triggers neurotransmitter release from pre-synaptic terminal of neurons. The channel activity of VDCCs is regulated by Cdk5-p35, a neuronal Ser/Thr kinase. However, there have been debates about the regulation of VDCCs by Cdk5. Using PC12 cells, we show that Cdk5-p35 regulates VDCCs in a type (L, P/Q, and N) and differentiation-dependent manner. NGF = nerve growth factor.

  15. The Activators of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 p35 and p39 Are Essential for Oligodendrocyte Maturation, Process Formation, and Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fucheng; Zhang, Jessie; Burke, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation in the CNS is poorly defined. Multiple signals influence the rate and extent of CNS myelination, including the noncanonical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) whose functions are regulated by its activators p35 and p39. Here we show that selective loss of either p35 or p39 perturbed specific aspects of oligodendrocyte development, whereas loss of both p35 and p39 completely inhibited the development of mature oligodendrocytes and myelination. In the absence of p35, oligodendrocyte differentiation was delayed, process outgrowth was truncated in vitro, and the patterning and extent of myelination were perturbed in the CNS of p35−/− mice. In the absence of p39, oligodendrocyte maturation was transiently affected both in vitro and in vivo. However, loss of both p35 and p39 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells completely inhibited oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and myelination both in vitro and after transplantation into shiverer slice cultures. Loss of p35 and p39 had a more profound effect on oligodendrocyte development than simply the loss of Cdk5 and could not be rescued by Cdk5 overexpression. These data suggest p35 and p39 have specific and overlapping roles in oligodendrocyte development, some of which may be independent of Cdk5 activation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The development of oligodendrocytes and myelination is essential for normal CNS function and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) activity is critical for oligodendrocyte maturation, but how Cdk5 activity is controlled is unclear. Here we show that the coactivators of Cdk5, p35 and p39, regulate distinct stages of oligodendrocyte development and myelination. Loss of p35 perturbs oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation, whereas loss of p39 delays oligodendrocyte maturation. Loss of both completely inhibits oligodendrogenesis and myelination. Disruption of oligodendrocyte development was more pronounced in p35−/−;p39

  16. Phosphorylation of synapsin I by cyclin-dependent kinase-5 sets the ratio between the resting and recycling pools of synaptic vesicles at hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Verstegen, Anne M J; Tagliatti, Erica; Lignani, Gabriele; Marte, Antonella; Stolero, Tamar; Atias, Merav; Corradi, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Gitler, Daniel; Onofri, Franco; Fassio, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2014-05-21

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (Cdk5) was reported to downscale neurotransmission by sequestering synaptic vesicles (SVs) in the release-reluctant resting pool, but the molecular targets mediating this activity remain unknown. Synapsin I (SynI), a major SV phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of SV trafficking and neurotransmitter release, is one of the presynaptic substrates of Cdk5, which phosphorylates it in its C-terminal region at Ser(549) (site 6) and Ser(551) (site 7). Here we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylation of SynI fine tunes the recruitment of SVs to the active recycling pool and contributes to the Cdk5-mediated homeostatic responses. Phosphorylation of SynI by Cdk5 is physiologically regulated and enhances its binding to F-actin. The effects of Cdk5 inhibition on the size and depletion kinetics of the recycling pool, as well as on SV distribution within the nerve terminal, are virtually abolished in mouse SynI knock-out (KO) neurons or in KO neurons expressing the dephosphomimetic SynI mutants at sites 6,7 or site 7 only. The observation that the single site-7 mutant phenocopies the effects of the deletion of SynI identifies this site as the central switch in mediating the synaptic effects of Cdk5 and demonstrates that SynI is necessary and sufficient for achieving the effects of the kinase on SV trafficking. The phosphorylation state of SynI by Cdk5 at site 7 is regulated during chronic modification of neuronal activity and is an essential downstream effector for the Cdk5-mediated homeostatic scaling.

  17. Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of the Involvement of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase A during the Early Development of Tomato Fruit1

    PubMed Central

    Joubès, Jérôme; Phan, Thi-Hai; Just, Daniel; Rothan, Christophe; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raymond, Philippe; Chevalier, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Following fruit set, the early development of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit comprises two distinct phases: a cell division phase and a consecutive phase of cell expansion until the onset of ripening. In this study, we analyzed cytological and molecular changes characterizing these early phases of tomato fruit development. First we investigated the spatial and temporal regulation of the mitotic activity during fruit development. The DNA content of isolated nuclei from the different fruit tissues was determined by flow cytometry analysis. The results confirm the data of mitotic activity measurements and show that cell differentiation, leading to expanded cells, is characterized by endoreduplication. Second, we isolated two cDNAs, named Lyces;CDKA1 (accession no. Y17225) and Lyces;CDKA2 (accession no. Y17226), encoding tomato homologs of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) p34cdc2. Tomato CDKA gene expression was followed at both the transcriptional and translational levels during fruit development. The transcripts for Lyces;CDKA1 and Lyces;CDKA2 and the corresponding CDKA proteins are predominantly accumulated during the phase of cell division between anthesis and 5 d post anthesis (DPA). In whole fruits, the maximum CDK activity was obtained between 5 and 10 DPA. The determination of the kinase activity using protein extracts from the different fruit tissues was in agreement with mitotic activity analysis. It showed the particular disappearance of the activity in the gel tissue as early as 15 DPA. The overall data of CDK activity measurements suggest a strong post-translational regulation of CDK at the temporal and spatial levels during early tomato fruit development. PMID:10557234

  18. Acute and chronic stress differentially regulate cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in mouse brain: implications to glucocorticoid actions and major depression

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, A; Siamatras, T; Delgado-Morales, R; Amin, N D; Shukla, V; Zheng, Y-L; Pant, H C; Almeida, O F X; Kino, T

    2015-01-01

    Stress activates the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which in turn increases circulating glucocorticoid concentrations and stimulates the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Chronically elevated glucocorticoids by repetitive exposure to stress are implicated in major depression and anxiety disorders. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a molecule essential for nervous system development, function and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, can modulate GR activity through phosphorylation. We examined potential contribution of CDK5 to stress response and pathophysiology of major depression. In mice, acute immobilized stress (AS) caused a biphasic effect on CDK5 activity, initially reducing but increasing afterwards in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HIPPO), whereas chronic unpredictable stress (CS) strongly increased it in these brain areas, indicating that AS and CS differentially regulate this kinase activity in a brain region-specific fashion. GR phosphorylation contemporaneously followed the observed changes of CDK5 activity after AS, thus CDK5 may in part alter GR phosphorylation upon this stress. In the postmortem brains of subjects with major depression, CDK5 activity was elevated in Brodmann's area 25, but not in entire PFC and HIPPO. Messenger RNA expression of glucocorticoid-regulated/stress-related genes showed distinct expression profiles in several brain areas of these stressed mice or depressive subjects in which CDK5-mediated changes in GR phosphorylation may have some regulatory roles. Taken together, these results indicate that CDK5 is an integral component of stress response and major depression with regulatory means specific to different stressors, brain areas and diseases in part through changing phosphorylation of GR. PMID:26057048

  19. Cell cycle in the fucus zygote parallels a somatic cell cycle but displays a unique translational regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Corellou, F; Brownlee, C; Detivaud, L; Kloareg, B; Bouget, F Y

    2001-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the basic machinery of cell cycle control is highly conserved. In particular, many cellular events during cell cycle progression are controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The cell cycle in animal early embryos, however, differs substantially from that of somatic cells or yeasts. For example, cell cycle checkpoints that ensure that the sequence of cell cycle events is correct have been described in somatic cells and yeasts but are largely absent in embryonic cells. Furthermore, the regulation of CDKs is substantially different in the embryonic and somatic cells. In this study, we address the nature of the first cell cycle in the brown alga Fucus, which is evolutionarily distant from the model systems classically used for cell cycle studies in embryos. This cycle consists of well-defined G1, S, G2, and M phases. The purine derivative olomoucine inhibited CDKs activity in vivo and in vitro and induced different cell cycle arrests, including at the G1/S transition, suggesting that, as in somatic cells, CDKs tightly control cell cycle progression. The cell cycle of Fucus zygotes presented the other main features of a somatic cell cycle, such as a functional spindle assembly checkpoint that targets CDKs and the regulation of the early synthesis of two PSTAIRE CDKs, p32 and p34, and the associated histone H1 kinase activity as well as the regulation of CDKs by tyrosine phosphorylation. Surprisingly, the synthesis after fertilization of p32 and p34 was translationally regulated, a regulation not described previously for CDKs. Finally, our results suggest that the activation of mitotic CDKs relies on an autocatalytic amplification mechanism.

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 is a calmodulin-binding protein that associates with puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase in the nucleus of Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert J; Catalano, Andrew; O'Day, Danton H

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a serine/threonine kinase that has been implicated in a number of cellular processes. In Dictyostelium, Cdk5 localizes to the nucleus and cytoplasm, interacts with puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase A (PsaA), and regulates endocytosis, secretion, growth, and multicellular development. Here we show that Cdk5 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) in Dictyostelium. Cdk5, PsaA, and CaM were all present in isolated nuclei and Cdk5 and PsaA co-immunoprecipitated with nuclear CaM. Although nuclear CaMBPs have previously been identified in Dictyostelium, the detection of CaM in purified nuclear fractions had not previously been shown. Putative CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs) were identified in Cdk5 and PsaA. Deletion of one of the two putative CaMBDs in Cdk5 ((132)LLINRKGELKLADFGLARAFGIP(154)) prevented CaM-binding indicating that this region encompasses a functional CaMBD. This deletion also increased the nuclear distribution of Cdk5 suggesting that CaM regulates the nucleocytoplasmic transport of Cdk5. A direct binding between CaM and PsaA could not be determined since deletion of the one putative CaMBD in PsaA prevented the nuclear localization of the deletion protein. Together, this study provides the first direct evidence for nuclear CaM in Dictyostelium and the first evidence in any system for Cdk5 being a CaMBP.

  1. Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, affects several gating mechanisms to inhibit cardiac L-type (Ca(V)1.2) calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yarotskyy, V; Elmslie, K S

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: L-type calcium channels (Ca (V)1.2) play an important role in cardiac contraction. Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and promising anticancer drug, has been shown to affect Ca (V)1.2 by inhibiting current amplitude and slowing activation. This research investigates the mechanism by which roscovitine inhibits Ca (V)1.2 channels. Experimental approach: Ca (V)1.2 channels were transfected into HEK 293 cells, using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, and currents were measured using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Key results: Roscovitine slows activation at all voltages, which precludes one previously proposed mechanism. In addition, roscovitine enhances voltage-dependent, but not calcium-dependent inactivation. This enhancement resulted from both an acceleration of inactivation and a slowing of the recovery from inactivation. Internally applied roscovitine failed to affect Ca (V)1.2 currents, which supports a kinase-independent mechanism and extracellular binding site. Unlike the dihydropyridines, closed state inactivation was not affected by roscovitine. Inactivation was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50=29.5±12 μM, which is close to that for slow activation and inhibition. Conclusions and implications: We conclude that roscovitine binds to an extracellular site on Ca (V)1.2 channels to inhibit current by both slowing activation and enhancing inactivation. Purine-based drugs could become a new option for treatment of diseases that benefit from L-channel inhibition such as cardiac arrhythmias and hypertension. PMID:17700718

  2. Specific activity of cyclin-dependent kinase I is a new potential predictor of tumour recurrence in stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeestraten, E C M; Maak, M; Shibayama, M; Schuster, T; Nitsche, U; Matsushima, T; Nakayama, S; Gohda, K; Friess, H; van de Velde, C J H; Ishihara, H; Rosenberg, R; Kuppen, P J K; Janssen, K-P

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are no established biomarkers to identify tumour recurrence in stage II colon cancer. As shown previously, the enzymatic activity of the cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2 (CDK1 and CDK2) predicts outcome in breast cancer. Therefore, we investigated whether CDK activity identifies tumour recurrence in colon cancer. Methods: In all, 254 patients with completely resected (R0) UICC stage II colon cancer were analysed retrospectively from two independent cohorts from Munich (Germany) and Leiden (Netherlands). None of the patients received adjuvant treatment. Development of distant metastasis was observed in 27 patients (median follow-up: 86 months). Protein expression and activity of CDKs were measured on fresh-frozen tumour samples. Results: Specific activity (SA) of CDK1 (CDK1SA), but not CDK2, significantly predicted distant metastasis (concordance index=0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.55–0.79, P=0.036). Cutoff derivation by maximum log-rank statistics yielded a threshold of CDK1SA at 11 (SA units, P=0.029). Accordingly, 59% of patients were classified as high-risk (CDK1SA ⩾11). Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed CDK1SA as independent prognostic variable (hazard ratio=6.2, 95% CI: 1.44–26.9, P=0.012). Moreover, CKD1SA was significantly elevated in microsatellite-stable tumours. Conclusion: Specific activity of CDK1 is a promising biomarker for metastasis risk in stage II colon cancer. PMID:22108518

  3. Immunohistochemical study of nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1 in invasive breast carcinoma of no special type.

    PubMed

    Symonowicz, Krzysztof; Duś-Szachniewicz, Kamila; Woźniak, Marta; Murawski, Marek; Kołodziej, Paweł; Osiecka, Beata; Jurczyszyn, Kamil; Ziółkowski, Piotr

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinases substrate 1 (NUCKS1) in invasive breast carcinoma of no special type, in association with clinicopathological characteristics, including the tumor grade, frequency of lymph node involvement and distant metastasis. In addition, associations between NUCKS1 and other tumor subtype markers, including estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), Ki-67 and cytokeratin 5/6 (CK 5/6), were investigated. NUCKS1 expression was shown to be associated with the formation of distant metastases and lymph node involvement. Furthermore, an association between the presence of NUCKS1 and histological grading was observed. The results confirmed that the expression of NUCKS1 in low grade invasive breast carcinoma of no special type was significantly less common compared with cases of high grade carcinoma. With regard to the additional tumor subtype markers, NUCKS1 expression was demonstrated to be significantly associated with Ki-67 and CK 5/6; however, no association was identified with ER, PR and HER2. Therefore, NUCKS1 may be a novel prognostic marker in the histopathological evaluation of invasive breast carcinoma of no special type.

  4. Cyclin Kinase-independent role of p21(CDKN1A) in the promotion of nascent DNA elongation in unstressed cells.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, Sabrina F; Bertolin, Agustina P; Bergoglio, Valérie; Pillaire, Marie-Jeanne; González Besteiro, Marina A; Luzzani, Carlos; Miriuka, Santiago G; Cazaux, Christophe; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2016-10-14

    The levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 are low in S phase and insufficient to inhibit CDKs. We show here that endogenous p21, instead of being residual, it is functional and necessary to preserve the genomic stability of unstressed cells. p21depletion slows down nascent DNA elongation, triggers permanent replication defects and promotes the instability of hard-to-replicate genomic regions, namely common fragile sites (CFS). The p21's PCNA interacting region (PIR), and not its CDK binding domain, is needed to prevent the replication defects and the genomic instability caused by p21 depletion. The alternative polymerase kappa is accountable for such defects as they were not observed after simultaneous depletion of both p21 and polymerase kappa. Hence, in CDK-independent manner, endogenous p21 prevents a type of genomic instability which is not triggered by endogenous DNA lesions but by a dysregulation in the DNA polymerase choice during genomic DNA synthesis.

  5. Cyclin-dependent kinase-dependent phosphorylation of Lif1 and Sae2 controls imprecise nonhomologous end joining accompanied by double-strand break resection.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kenichiro; Terasawa, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Daichi; Higashide, Mika; Shinohara, Miki

    2012-06-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by two distinct pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). NHEJ includes two pathways, that is, precise and imprecise end joining. We found that Lif1, a component of the DNA ligase IV complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) at Ser261 during the S to G2 phase but not during G1 phase. This phosphorylation was required for efficient NHEJ in G2/M cells, rather than in G1 cells. It also promotes the stable binding of Lif1 protein to DSBs, specifically in G2/M-arrested cells, which shows the resection of DSB ends. Thus, Lif1 phosphorylation plays a critical role in a certain type of imprecise NHEJ accompanied by DSB end resection and micro-homology. Lif1 phosphorylation at Ser261 is probably involved in micro-homology-dependent end joining associated with producing single-stranded DSB ends that are formed by Sae2 as early intermediates in the HR pathway. CDK-dependent modification of the NHEJ pathway might make DSB ends compatible for NHEJ and thus prevent competition between HR and NHEJ in hierarchy on the choice of DSB repair pathways. © 2012 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2012 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Autophagy and ER stress play an essential role in the mechanism of action and drug resistance of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Emilia; Byrd, John C; Johnson, Amy J

    2013-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a mature B cell malignancy and is the most prevalent type of leukemia in adults. There is no curative therapy for this disease; however, several new agents have shown very promising results. Autophagy has not been studied in CLL and in this study we first sought to determine if autophagy was functional in CLL with classic inducers, and if this contributes to direct cytotoxicity or protection from cell death. While autophagy is activated with all classic stimuli of this process, only unfolded protein endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated autophagy protects from cell death. Interestingly, select therapeutic agents (fludarabine, GS-1101, flavopiridol), which are active in CLL, also induce autophagy. Of interest, only the broad cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol has improved efficacy when autophagy is antagonized biochemically (chloroquine) or by siRNA. This promoted an investigation which demonstrated unexpectedly that flavopiridol mediates ER stress and downstream activation of MAP3K5/ASK1, which ultimately is responsible for cell death. Similarly, autophagy activated in part via ER stress and also CDK5 inhibition is protective against cell death induced by this process. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that in CLL, autophagy is induced by multiple stimuli but only acts as a mechanism of resistance against ER stress-mediating agents. Similarly, flavopiridol mediates ER stress as a primary mechanism of action in CLL, and autophagy serves as a mechanism of resistance to this agent.

  7. Cell cycle-dependent control of polarised development by a cyclin-dependent kinase-like protein in the Fucus zygote.

    PubMed

    Corellou, F; Brownlee, C; Kloareg, B; Bouget, F Y

    2001-11-01

    Although iterative development can be uncoupled from morphogenesis in plant organs, the relationship between the cell cycle and developmental events is not well established in embryos. Zygotes of fucoid algae, including Fucus and Pelvetia are particularly well suited for studying the interaction(s) between cell cycle progression and the early morphogenetic events, as the establishment of polarity and its morphogenetic expression, i.e. germination, and the first cell cycle are concomitant. We have previously demonstrated that, in Fucus zygotes, various aspects of cell cycle progression are tightly controlled by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-like proteins, including two PSTAIRE CDK-like proteins, p34 and p32, which are synthesised after fertilisation. We show that specific inhibition of CDK-like proteins, either with purine derivatives such as olomoucine and amino-purvalanol or by microinjection of the CDK inhibitor p21(cip1), prevents germination and cell division. Whereas direct inhibition of DNA replication by aphidicolin did not affect polarised development, olomoucine, which has previously been shown to prevent entry in S phase, and other purine derivatives also inhibited photopolarisation. Early microinjection of a monoclonal anti-PSTAIRE antibody also prevented germination and cell division. Only p34 had affinity for amino-purvalanol, suggesting that among PSTAIRE CDKs, this protein is the main target of purine derivatives. Models to account for the simultaneous control of early cell cycle progression and polarisation are proposed.

  8. Differential p16/INK4A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor expression correlates with chemotherapy efficacy in a cohort of 88 malignant pleural mesothelioma patients

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, C J; Murer, B; O'Grady, A; Hearn, L M; Harvey, B J; Kay, E W; Thomas, W

    2015-01-01

    Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and essentially incurable malignancy most often linked with occupational exposure to asbestos fibres. In common with other malignancies, the development and progression of MPM is associated with extensive dysregulation of cell cycle checkpoint proteins that modulate cell proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair and senescence. Methods: The expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16/INK4A was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using tumour biopsy specimens from 88 MPM cases and a semi-quantitative score for p16/INK4A expression was obtained. Post-diagnosis survival and the survival benefit of chemotherapeutic intervention was correlated with p16/INK4A expression. Results: A low, intermediate and high score for p16/INK4A expression was observed for 45 (51.1%), 28 (31.8%) and 15 (17.1%) of the MPM cases, respectively. Those cases with intermediate or high p16/INK4A tumour expression had a significantly better post-diagnosis survival than those cases whose tumours lost p16 expression (log-rank P<0.001). Those patients with sustained p16/INK4A expression who received chemotherapy also had a better survival than those treated patients whose tumours had lost p16/INK4A expression (log-rank P<0.001). Conclusions: Sustained p16/INK4A expression predicts better post-diagnosis survival in MPM and also better survival following chemotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26057448

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinases 7 and 9 specifically regulate neutrophil transcription and their inhibition drives apoptosis to promote resolution of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, A E; Lucas, C D; Marwick, J A; Duffin, R; Haslett, C; Rossi, A G

    2012-01-01

    Terminally differentiated neutrophils are short-lived but the key effector cells of the innate immune response, and have a prominent role in the pathogenesis and propagation of many inflammatory diseases. Delayed apoptosis, which is responsible for their extended longevity, is critically dependent on a balance of intracellular survival versus pro-apoptotic proteins. Here, we elucidate the mechanism by which the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor drugs such as R-roscovitine and DRB (5,6-dichloro-1-beta-𝒟-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole) mediate neutrophil apoptosis. We demonstrate (by a combination of microarray, confocal microscopy, apoptosis assays and western blotting) that the phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II by CDKs 7 and 9 is inhibited by R-roscovitine and that specific effects on neutrophil transcriptional capacity are responsible for neutrophil apoptosis. Finally, we show that specific CDK7 and 9 inhibition with DRB drives resolution of neutrophil-dominant inflammation. Thus, we highlight a novel mechanism that controls both primary human neutrophil transcription and apoptosis that could be targeted by selective CDK inhibitor drugs to resolve established inflammation. PMID:22743999

  10. Effects of roscovitine, a cell cyclin [correction of cycling]-dependent kinase inhibitor, on intraocular pressure of rabbit and retinal ganglion cell damage.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Hiroyoshi; Imamura, Tomoyo; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Yuji; Kurasawa, Takashi; Hirata, Haruhisa; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2013-02-22

    Glaucoma is characterized by increased intraocular pressure (IOP) and the death of retinal ganglion cells. Previously, we reported that roscovitine, a cell cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, strongly induced relaxation of porcine trabecular meshwork cells, implicating an interaction with lowered IOP. In addition, the activity of CDKs is known to increase in response to high IOP, which is linked to retinal ganglion cell damage. However, the effects of roscovitine on IOP and retinal damage have not been investigated. Roscovitine has racemic isomers that differ in their inhibition of CDKs. Therefore, we investigated the effects of both the R-isomer and the S-isomer on the IOP of rabbits and on the death of cultured retinal ganglion cells. In the in vivo rabbit experiment, instillation of both isomers significantly lowered the IOP. In the in vitro cell experiment, the R-isomer amplified the effects of tunicamycin, an endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer, and increased oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced cell death, whereas S-isomer significantly inhibited this cell death. Therefore, both isomers of roscovitine can lower the IOP, but from the perspective of neuroprotective effects, the S-isomer was superior to the R-isomer. The S-isomer of roscovitine may be useful as an agent for lowering IOP and its neuroprotective effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  12. New scoring functions for virtual screening from molecular dynamics simulations with a quantum-refined force-field (QRFF-MD). Application to cyclin-dependent kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Ph; Curioni, A; Vangrevelinghe, E; Meyer, T; Mordasini, T; Andreoni, W; Acklin, P; Jacoby, E

    2006-01-01

    A recently introduced new methodology based on ultrashort (50-100 ps) molecular dynamics simulations with a quantum-refined force-field (QRFF-MD) is here evaluated in its ability both to predict protein-ligand binding affinities and to discriminate active compounds from inactive ones. Physically based scoring functions are derived from this approach, and their performance is compared to that of several standard knowledge-based scoring functions. About 40 inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) representing a broad chemical diversity were considered. The QRFF-MD method achieves a correlation coefficient, R(2), of 0.55, which is significantly better than that obtained by a number of traditional approaches in virtual screening but only slightly better than that obtained by consensus scoring (R(2) = 0.50). Compounds from the Available Chemical Directory, along with the known active compounds, were docked into the ATP binding site of CDK2 using the program Glide, and the 650 ligands from the top scored poses were considered for a QRFF-MD analysis. Combined with structural information extracted from the simulations, the QRFF-MD methodology results in similar enrichment of known actives compared to consensus scoring. Moreover, a new scoring function is introduced that combines a QRFF-MD based scoring function with consensus scoring, which results in substantial improvement on the enrichment profile.

  13. The comparison of nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinases substrate (NUCKS) with Ki67 proliferation marker expression in common skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Zduniak, Krzysztof; Agrawal, Siddarth; Symonowicz, Krzysztof; Jurczyszyn, Kamil; Ziółkowski, Piotr

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinases substrate (NUCKS) is a chromosomal protein of unknown function. Its amino acid composition and structure of its DNA binding domain resemble those of high mobility group A (HMGA) proteins which are associated with various malignancies. Since changes in expression of HMGA are considered as a marker of tumor progression, it is possible that similar changes in expression of NUCKS could be a useful tool in diagnosis of malignant skin tumors. To investigate this assumption we used specific antibodies against NUCKS for immunohistochemistry of squamous (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) as well as keratoacanthoma (KA). We found high expression of NUCKS in nuclei of SCC and BCC cells which exceeded expression of the well-known proliferation marker Ki67. Expression of NUCKS in benign KA was much below that of malignant tumors. With the present study and based on our previous experience we would like to suggest the NUCKS protein as a novel proliferation marker for immunohistochemical evaluation of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded skin tumor specimens. We would like to emphasize that NUCKS abundance in malignant skin tumors is higher than that of the well-known proliferation marker Ki67, thus allowing more precise assessment of tumor proliferation potential.

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates the transcriptional activity of the mineralocorticoid receptor and regulates expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Kino, Tomoshige; Jaffe, Howard; Amin, Niranjana D; Chakrabarti, Mayukh; Zheng, Ya-Li; Chrousos, George P; Pant, Harish C

    2010-05-01

    Glucocorticoids, major end effectors of the stress response, play an essential role in the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and contribute to memory consolidation and emotional control through their intracellular receptors, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), on the other hand, plays important roles in the morphogenesis and functions of the central nervous system, and its aberrant activation has been associated with development of neurodegenerative disorders. We previously reported that CDK5 phosphorylated the glucocorticoid receptor and modulated its transcriptional activity. Here we found that CDK5 also regulated mineralocorticoid receptor-induced transcriptional activity by phosphorylating multiple serine and threonine residues located in its N-terminal domain through physical interaction. Aldosterone and dexamethasone, respectively, increased and suppressed mRNA/protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat cortical neuronal cells, whereas the endogenous glucocorticoid corticosterone showed a biphasic effect. CDK5 enhanced the effect of aldosterone and dexamethasone on BDNF expression. Because this neurotrophic factor plays critical roles in neuronal viability, synaptic plasticity, consolidation of memory, and emotional changes, we suggest that aberrant activation of CDK5 might influence these functions through corticosteroid receptors/BDNF.

  15. Deficiency of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Akyuerek, Levent M.; Boehm, Manfred; Olive, Michelle; Zhou, Alex-Xianghua; San, Hong; Nabel, Elizabeth G.

    2010-05-28

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}, are upregulated during vascular cell proliferation and negatively regulate growth of vascular cells. We hypothesized that absence of either p21{sup Cip1} or p27{sup Kip1} in apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficiency may increase atherosclerotic plaque formation. Compared to apoE{sup -/-} aortae, both apoE{sup -/-}/p21{sup -/-} and apoE{sup -/-}/p27{sup -/-} aortae exhibited significantly more atherosclerotic plaque following a high-cholesterol regimen. This increase was particularly observed in the abdominal aortic regions. Deficiency of p27{sup Kip1} accelerated plaque formation significantly more than p21{sup -/-} in apoE{sup -/-} mice. This increased plaque formation was in parallel with increased intima/media area ratios. Deficiency of p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} accelerates atherogenesis in apoE{sup -/-} mice. These findings have significant implications for our understanding of the molecular basis of atherosclerosis associated with excessive proliferation of vascular cells.

  16. CyclinG1 Amplification Enhances Aurora Kinase Inhibitor-Induced Polyploid Resistance and Inhibition of Bcl-2 Pathway Reverses the Resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenfeng; Xu, Jie; Ji, Dexiang; Li, Zhangyun; He, Wenxing; Yang, Fei; Lan, Huiyin; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhengping; Liu, Xiaoshan; Huang, Shanhua; Li, Longkun; Zhou, Weihua

    2017-08-25

    CyclinG1 (CycG1) is frequently overexpressed in solid tumors and overexpression of CycG1 promotes cell survival upon paclitaxel exposure by inducing polyploidy. Whether and how CycG1 regulates polyploidization caused by small molecular targeted inhibitors remains unclear. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting were utilized to examine protein expression. Cell proliferation was measured by ATPlite assay, and cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry and/or DNA fragmentation assays. Overexpression of CycG1 in breast cancer cells caused apoptosis-resistant polyploidy upon treatment with Aurora kinase inhibitor, ZM447439 (ZM). Addition of ABT-263, a small-molecule BH3 mimetic, to ZM, produced a synergistic loss of cell viability with greater sustained tumor growth inhibition in breast cancer cell lines. Decrease of Mcl-1 and increase of NOXA caused by ZM treatment, were responsible for the synergy. Furthermore, CycG1 was highly expressed in Triple-Negative-Breast-Cancer patients treated with paclitaxel and was paralleled by decreased cell survival. CycG1 is a crucial factor in ZM-induced polyploidy resistance, and ABT-263/ZM combination hold therapeutic utility in the CycG1-amplified subset of breast cancer and CycG1, thus, is a promising target in breast cancer. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Cellular senescence in human myoblasts is overcome by human telomerase reverse transcriptase and cyclin-dependent kinase 4: consequences in aging muscle and therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chun-Hong; Mouly, Vincent; Cooper, Racquel N; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Bigot, Anne; Shay, Jerry W; Di Santo, James P; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Wright, Woodring E

    2007-08-01

    Cultured human myoblasts fail to immortalize following the introduction of telomerase. The availability of an immortalization protocol for normal human myoblasts would allow one to isolate cellular models from various neuromuscular diseases, thus opening the possibility to develop and test novel therapeutic strategies. The parameters limiting the efficacy of myoblast transfer therapy (MTT) could be assessed in such models. Finally, the presence of an unlimited number of cell divisions, and thus the ability to clone cells after experimental manipulations, reduces the risks of insertional mutagenesis by many orders of magnitude. This opportunity for genetic modification provides an approach for creating a universal donor that has been altered to be more therapeutically useful than its normal counterpart. It can be engineered to function under conditions of chronic damage (which are very different than the massive regeneration conditions that recapitulate normal development), and to overcome the biological problems such as cell death and failure to proliferate and migrate that limit current MTT strategies. We describe here the production and characterization of a human myogenic cell line, LHCN-M2, that has overcome replicative aging due to the expression of telomerase and cyclin-dependent kinase 4. We demonstrate that it functions as well as young myoblasts in xenotransplant experiments in immunocompromized mice under conditions of regeneration following muscle damage.

  18. p39, the Primary Activator for Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 (Cdk5) in Oligodendroglia, Is Essential for Oligodendroglia Differentiation and Myelin Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Bankston, Andrew N.; Li, Wenqi; Zhang, Hui; Ku, Li; Liu, Guanglu; Papa, Filomena; Zhao, Lixia; Bibb, James A.; Cambi, Franca; Tiwari-Woodruff, Seema K.; Feng, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) plays key roles in normal brain development and function. Dysregulation of Cdk5 may cause neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. Besides the well demonstrated role of Cdk5 in neurons, emerging evidence suggests the functional requirement of Cdk5 in oligodendroglia (OL) and CNS myelin development. However, whether neurons and OLs employ similar or distinct mechanisms to regulate Cdk5 activity remains elusive. We report here that in contrast to neurons that harbor high levels of two Cdk5 activators, p35 and p39, OLs express abundant p39 but negligible p35. In addition, p39 is selectively up-regulated in OLs during differentiation along with elevated Cdk5 activity, whereas p35 expression remains unaltered. Specific knockdown of p39 by siRNA significantly attenuates Cdk5 activity and OL differentiation without affecting p35. Finally, expression of p39, but not p35, is increased during myelin repair, and remyelination is impaired in p39−/− mice. Together, these results reveal that neurons and OLs harbor distinct preference of Cdk5 activators and demonstrate important functions of p39-dependent Cdk5 activation in OL differentiation during de novo myelin development and myelin repair. PMID:23645679

  19. Small-molecule screening of PC3 prostate cancer cells identifies tilorone dihydrochloride to selectively inhibit cell growth based on cyclin-dependent kinase 5 expression.

    PubMed

    Wissing, Michel D; Dadon, Tikva; Kim, Eunice; Piontek, Klaus B; Shim, Joong S; Kaelber, Nadine S; Liu, Jun O; Kachhap, Sushant K; Nelkin, Barry D

    2014-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is a potential target for prostate cancer treatment, the enzyme being essential for prostate tumor growth and formation of metastases. In the present study, we identified agents that target prostate cancer cells based on CDK5 expression. CDK5 activity was suppressed by transfection of PC3 prostate cancer cells with a dominant-negative construct (PC3 CDK5dn). PC3 CDK5dn and PC3 control cells were screened for compounds that selectively target cells based on CDK5 expression, utilizing the Johns Hopkins Drug Library. MTS proliferation, clonogenic and 3D growth assays were performed to validate the selected hits. Screening of 3,360 compounds identified rutilantin, ethacridine lactate and cetalkonium chloride as compounds that selectively target PC3 control cells and a tilorone analog as a selective inhibitor of PC3 CDK5dn cells. A PubMed literature study indicated that tilorone may have clinical use in patients. Validation experiments confirmed that tilorone treatment resulted in decreased PC3 cell growth and invasion; PC3 cells with inactive CDK5 were inhibited more effectively. Future studies are needed to unravel the mechanism of action of tilorone in CDK5 deficient prostate cancer cells and to test combination therapies with tilorone and a CDK5 inhibitor for its potential use in clinical practice.

  20. APC/C(Cdh1) Enables Removal of Shugoshin-2 from the Arms of Bivalent Chromosomes by Moderating Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Rattani, Ahmed; Ballesteros Mejia, Randy; Roberts, Katherine; Roig, Maurici B; Godwin, Jonathan; Hopkins, Michael; Eguren, Manuel; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Okaz, Elwy; Ogushi, Sugako; Wolna, Magda; Metson, Jean; Pendás, Alberto M; Malumbres, Marcos; Novák, Béla; Herbert, Mary; Nasmyth, Kim

    2017-05-22

    In mammalian females, germ cells remain arrested as primordial follicles. Resumption of meiosis is heralded by germinal vesicle breakdown, condensation of chromosomes, and their eventual alignment on metaphase plates. At the first meiotic division, anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome associated with Cdc20 (APC/C(Cdc20)) activates separase and thereby destroys cohesion along chromosome arms. Because cohesion around centromeres is protected by shugoshin-2, sister chromatids remain attached through centromeric/pericentromeric cohesin. We show here that, by promoting proteolysis of cyclins and Cdc25B at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage, APC/C associated with the Cdh1 protein (APC/C(Cdh1)) delays the increase in Cdk1 activity, leading to germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD). More surprisingly, by moderating the rate at which Cdk1 is activated following GVBD, APC/C(Cdh1) creates conditions necessary for the removal of shugoshin-2 from chromosome arms by the Aurora B/C kinase, an event crucial for the efficient resolution of chiasmata. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition by 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine derivatives using artificial neural network ensembles.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Michael; Tundidor-Camba, Alain; Caballero, Julio

    2005-01-01

    Artificial neural network ensembles were used for modeling the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine derivatives. The structural characteristics of these inhibitors were encoded in relevant 3D-spatial descriptors extracted by genetic algorithm feature selection. Bayesian-regularized multilayer neural networks, trained by the back-propagation algorithm, were developed using these variables as inputs. The predictive power of the model was tested by leave-one-out cross validation. In addition, for a more rigorous measure of the predictive capacity, multiple validation sets were randomly generated as members of neural network ensembles, which makes doing averaged predictions feasible. In this way, the predictive power was analyzed accounting for the averaged test set R values and test set mean-square errors. Otherwise, Kohonen self-organizing maps were used as an additional tool for the same modeling. The location of the inhibitors in a map facilitates the analysis of the connection between compounds and serves as a useful tool for qualitative predictions.

  2. Some cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors-related genes are regulated by vitamin C in a model of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Boqué, Noemí; Campión, Javier; Milagro, Fermín Ignacio; Moreno-Aliaga, Maria-Jesús; Martinez, José Alfredo

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate differential gene expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs) in white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver from high-fat fed male Wistar rats with or without vitamin C (VC) supplementation (750 mg/kg of body weight). After 56 d of experimentation, animals fed on a cafeteria diet increased significantly body weights and total body fat. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies showed that cafeteria diet decreased p21 and p57 mRNA expression in subcutaneous WAT and increased p21 mRNA in liver. Overall, these data provide new information about the role of high fat intake on mRNA levels of several CKIs with implications in adipogenesis, cell metabolism and weight homeostasis. Interestingly, VC supplementation partially prevented diet-induced adiposity and increased p27 mRNA in liver without any changes in the other tissues and genes analyzed. Thus, hepatic mRNA changes induced by ascorbic acid indicate a possible role of these genes in diet-induced oxidative stress processes.

  3. Interaction energies for the purine inhibitor roscovitine with cyclin-dependent kinase 2: correlated ab initio quantum-chemical, DFT and empirical calculations.

    PubMed

    Dobes, Petr; Otyepka, Michal; Strnad, Miroslav; Hobza, Pavel

    2006-05-24

    The interaction between roscovitine and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) was investigated by performing correlated ab initio quantum-chemical calculations. The whole protein was fragmented into smaller systems consisting of one or a few amino acids, and the interaction energies of these fragments with roscovitine were determined by using the MP2 method with the extended aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. For selected complexes, the complete basis set limit MP2 interaction energies, as well as the coupled-cluster corrections with inclusion of single, double and noninteractive triples contributions [CCSD(T)], were also evaluated. The energies of interaction between roscovitine and small fragments and between roscovitine and substantial sections of protein (722 atoms) were also computed by using density-functional tight-binding methods covering dispersion energy (DFTB-D) and the Cornell empirical potential. Total stabilisation energy originates predominantly from dispersion energy and methods that do not account for the dispersion energy cannot, therefore, be recommended for the study of protein-inhibitor interactions. The Cornell empirical potential describes reasonably well the interaction between roscovitine and protein; therefore, this method can be applied in future thermodynamic calculations. A limited number of amino acid residues contribute significantly to the binding of roscovitine and cdk2, whereas a rather large number of amino acids make a negligible contribution.

  4. Cyclin Kinase-independent role of p21CDKN1A in the promotion of nascent DNA elongation in unstressed cells

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, Sabrina F; Bertolin, Agustina P; Bergoglio, Valérie; Pillaire, Marie-Jeanne; González Besteiro, Marina A; Luzzani, Carlos; Miriuka, Santiago G; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    The levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 are low in S phase and insufficient to inhibit CDKs. We show here that endogenous p21, instead of being residual, it is functional and necessary to preserve the genomic stability of unstressed cells. p21depletion slows down nascent DNA elongation, triggers permanent replication defects and promotes the instability of hard-to-replicate genomic regions, namely common fragile sites (CFS). The p21’s PCNA interacting region (PIR), and not its CDK binding domain, is needed to prevent the replication defects and the genomic instability caused by p21 depletion. The alternative polymerase kappa is accountable for such defects as they were not observed after simultaneous depletion of both p21 and polymerase kappa. Hence, in CDK-independent manner, endogenous p21 prevents a type of genomic instability which is not triggered by endogenous DNA lesions but by a dysregulation in the DNA polymerase choice during genomic DNA synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18020.001 PMID:27740454

  5. Expression of p21(Cip1/Waf1/Sdi1) and p27(Kip1) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors during human hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, T; Endo, H; Chikatsu, N; Uchimaru, K; Asano, S; Fujita, T; Nakahata, T; Motokura, T

    1999-06-15

    Expression of p21 and p27 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors is associated with induced differentiation and cell-cycle arrest in some hematopoietic cell lines. However, it is not clear how these inhibitors are expressed during normal hematopoiesis. We examined various human hematopoietic colonies derived from cord blood CD34(+) cells, bone marrow, and peripheral blood cells using a quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay, immunochemistry, and/or Western blot analysis. p21 mRNA was expressed increasingly over time in all of the colonies examined (granulocytes, macrophages, megakaryocytes, and erythroblasts), whereas p27 mRNA levels remained low, except for erythroid bursts. Erythroid bursts expressed both p21 and p27 mRNAs with differentiation but expressed neither protein, whereas both proteins were expressed in megakaryocytes and peripheral blood monocytes. In bone marrow, p21 was immunostained almost exclusively in a subset of megakaryocytes and p27 protein was present in megakaryocytes, plasma cells, and endothelial cells. In megakaryocytes, reciprocal expression of p27 to Ki-67 was evident and an inverse relationship between p21 and Ki-67 positivities was also present, albeit less obvious. These observations suggest that a complex lineage-specific regulation is involved in p21 and p27 expression and that these inhibitors are involved in cell-cycle exit in megakaryocytes.

  6. The Activators of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 p35 and p39 Are Essential for Oligodendrocyte Maturation, Process Formation, and Myelination.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fucheng; Zhang, Jessie; Burke, Kathryn; Miller, Robert H; Yang, Yan

    2016-03-09

    The regulation of oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation in the CNS is poorly defined. Multiple signals influence the rate and extent of CNS myelination, including the noncanonical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) whose functions are regulated by its activators p35 and p39. Here we show that selective loss of either p35 or p39 perturbed specific aspects of oligodendrocyte development, whereas loss of both p35 and p39 completely inhibited the development of mature oligodendrocytes and myelination. In the absence of p35, oligodendrocyte differentiation was delayed, process outgrowth was truncated in vitro, and the patterning and extent of myelination were perturbed in the CNS of p35(-/-) mice. In the absence of p39, oligodendrocyte maturation was transiently affected both in vitro and in vivo. However, loss of both p35 and p39 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells completely inhibited oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and myelination both in vitro and after transplantation into shiverer slice cultures. Loss of p35 and p39 had a more profound effect on oligodendrocyte development than simply the loss of Cdk5 and could not be rescued by Cdk5 overexpression. These data suggest p35 and p39 have specific and overlapping roles in oligodendrocyte development, some of which may be independent of Cdk5 activation.

  7. Study of the inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases with roscovitine and indirubin-3'-oxime from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Tan, Vincent B C; Lim, Kian Meng; Tay, Tong Earn; Zhuang, Shulin

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to elucidate the interactions of CDK2 and CDK5 complexes with three inhibitors: R-roscovitine, S-roscovitine, and indirubin-3'-oxime. The preference of the two complexes for R-roscovitine over the S enantiomer, as reported by the experiment, was also found by the simulations. More importantly, the simulations showed that the cause of the stronger affinity for the R enantiomer is the presence of an important hydrogen bond between R-roscovitine and the kinases not found with S-roscovitine. The simulations also showed two amino acid mutations in the active site of CDK5/R-roscovitine that favor binding-enhanced electrostatic contributions, making the inhibitor more effective for CDK5 than for CDK2. This suggests that the effectiveness of roscovitine-like inhibitors can be improved by enhancing their electrostatic interaction with the kinases. Finally, molecular mechanics-Possion-Boltzmann/surface area calculations of the CDK5/indirubin-3'-oxime system in both water-excluded and water-included environments gave significantly different electrostatic contributions to the binding. The simulations detected the displacement of a water molecule in the active site of the water-included CDK/indirubin-3'-oxime system. This resulted in a more conserved binding pattern than the water-excluded structure. Hence, in the design of new indirubin-like inhibitors, it is important to include the water molecule in the analysis.

  8. The Requirement for Cyclin D Function in Tumor Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jong; Li, Xiaoyu; Hydbring, Per; Sanda, Takaomi; Stefano, Joanna; Christie, Amanda L.; Signoretti, Sabina; Look, A. Thomas; Kung, Andrew L.; von Boehmer, Harald; Sicinski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY D-cyclins represent components of cell cycle machinery. To test the efficacy of targeting D-cyclins in cancer treatment, we engineered mouse strains which allow acute and global ablation of individual D-cyclins in a living animal. Ubiquitous shutdown of cyclin D1 or inhibition of cyclin D-associated kinase activity in mice bearing ErbB2-driven mammary carcinomas triggered tumor cell senescence, without compromising the animals’ health. Ablation of cyclin D3 in mice bearing Notch1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALL) triggered tumor cell apoptosis. Such selective killing of leukemic cells can also be achieved by inhibiting cyclin D-associated kinase activity in mouse and human T-ALL models. Inhibition of cyclin D-kinase activity represents a highly-selective anti-cancer strategy that specifically targets cancer cells without significantly affecting normal tissues. PMID:23079655

  9. Two Degradation Pathways of the p35 Cdk5 (Cyclin-dependent Kinase) Activation Subunit, Dependent and Independent of Ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Toshiyuki; Minegishi, Seiji; Asada, Akiko; Saito, Taro; Kawahara, Hiroyuki; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2016-02-26

    Cdk5 is a versatile protein kinase that is involved in various neuronal activities, such as the migration of newborn neurons, neurite outgrowth, synaptic regulation, and neurodegenerative diseases. Cdk5 requires the p35 regulatory subunit for activation. Because Cdk5 is more abundantly expressed in neurons compared with p35, the p35 protein levels determine the kinase activity of Cdk5. p35 is a protein with a short half-life that is degraded by proteasomes. Although ubiquitination of p35 has been previously reported, the degradation mechanism of p35 is not yet known. Here, we intended to identify the ubiquitination site(s) in p35. Because p35 is myristoylated at the N-terminal glycine, the possible ubiquitination sites are the lysine residues in p35. We mutated all 23 Lys residues to Arg (p35 23R), but p35 23R was still rapidly degraded by proteasomes at a rate similar to wild-type p35. The degradation of p35 23R in primary neurons and the Cdk5 activation ability of p35 23R suggested the occurrence of ubiquitin-independent degradation of p35 in physiological conditions. We found that p35 has the amino acid sequence similar to the ubiquitin-independent degron in the NKX3.1 homeodomain transcription factor. An Ala mutation at Pro-247 in the degron-like sequence made p35 stable. These results suggest that p35 can be degraded by two degradation pathways: ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent. The rapid degradation of p35 by two different methods would be a mechanism to suppress the production of p25, which overactivates Cdk5 to induce neuronal cell death.

  10. Analyses of two rice (Oryza sativa) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and effects of transgenic expression of OsiICK6 on plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifang; Tang, Qicai; Wang, Huimei; Zhang, Xiaobo; Pan, Gang; Wang, Hong; Tu, Jumin

    2011-05-01

    Plants have a family of proteins referred to as ICKs (inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase, CDK) or KRPs (Kip-related proteins) that function to regulate the activities of CDK. Knowledge of these plant CDK inhibitors has been gained mostly from studies of selected members in dicotyledonous plants, particularly Arabidopsis. Much remains to be learned regarding the differences among various members of the ICK/KRP family, and regarding the function and regulation of these proteins in monocotyledonous plants. We analysed ICK-related sequences in the rice (Orysa sativa L. subsp. indica) genome and determined that there are six members with the conserved C-terminal signature region for ICK/KRP proteins. They are referred to as OsiICKs and further analyses were performed. The interactions with CDKs and cyclins were determined by a yeast two-hybrid assay, and cellular localization by fusion with the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). The expression of OsiICK6 in different tissues and in response to several treatments was analysed by reverse transcriptase-mediated polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR. Furthermore, OsiICK6 was over-expressed in transgenic rice plants and significant phenotypes were observed. Based on putative protein sequences, the six OsiICKs are grouped into two classes, with OsiICK1 and OsiICK6 in each of the two classes, respectively. Results showed that OsiICK1 and OsiICK6 interacted with OsCYCD, but differed in their interactions with CDKA. Both EGFP:OsiICK1 and EGFP:OsiICK6 were localized in the nucleus. Whereas EGFP:OsiICK6 showed a punctuate subnuclear distribution, OsiICK1 had a homogeneous pattern. Over-expression of OsiICK6 resulted in multiple phenotypic effects on plant growth, morphology, pollen viability and seed setting. In OsiICK6-over-expressing plants, leaves rolled toward the abaxial side, suggesting that cell proliferation is critical in maintaining an even growth along the dorsal-ventral plane of leaf blades.

  11. A variant form of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) in a malignantly transformed rat thyroid (FRTL-Tc) cell line.

    PubMed

    Kotani, S; Endo, T; Kitagawa, M; Higashi, H; Onaya, T

    1995-02-16

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) controls the transition from the G1 to the S phase in the mammalian cell cycle. We found by immunoblotting that anti-Cdk2 antibodies recognize three Cdk2 proteins (of 33, 34 and 39 kDa) in FRTL-5 and FRTL-Tc cells (malignantly transformed FRTL cells). Although 33 kDa protein is a phosphorylated form of 34 kDa protein previously reported, the nature of 39 kDa protein is unknown. In order to determine the nature of this protein, we screened a FRTL-5 cDNA library. Two cDNA clones of the rat homologue (rat Cdk2-alpha and -beta) of human Cdk2 were isolated. The open reading frame of rat Cdk2-alpha cDNA encoded a protein with 428 amino acids and has a high degree of conservation with human Cdk2. The calculated molecular weight of Cdk2-alpha protein is 33892 Da. The rat Cdk2-beta cDNA was identical to Cdk2-alpha cDNA except that it had extra 144 bp; this coincided with insertion of 48 amino acids into Cdk2-alpha protein between Met 196 and Val 197. The calculated molecular weight of Cdk2-beta protein is 39087 Da. Northern blot analysis indicated that the sizes of rat Cdk2-alpha and -beta mRNAs are approximately 2.5 kb and 3.0 kb, respectively. Partial proteolytic mapping showed that Cdk2-beta gene product is 39 kDa Cdk2 in the immunoblotting. We also found that Cdk2-beta protein binds to cyclin A and suc1 proteins. During G1-S phase in FRTL-Tc cells, Cdk2-alpha protein level is constant, but is gradually phosphorylated. In contrast, the level of Cdk2-beta protein increases through the S phase and decreases at the early G2 phase. These results suggest that a variant form of Cdk2 protein might be required for entry into the S phase of the cell cycle in FRTL-Tc cells.

  12. Identification of Arabidopsis meiotic cyclins reveals functional diversification among plant cyclin genes.

    PubMed

    Bulankova, Petra; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Fellner, Nicole; Riha, Karel

    2013-05-01

    Meiosis is a modified cell division in which a single S-phase is followed by two rounds of chromosome segregation resulting in the production of haploid gametes. The meiotic mode of chromosome segregation requires extensive remodeling of the basic cell cycle machinery and employment of unique regulatory mechanisms. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins represent an ancient molecular module that drives and regulates cell cycle progression. The cyclin gene family has undergone a massive expansion in angiosperm plants, but only a few cyclins were thoroughly characterized. In this study we performed a systematic immunolocalization screen to identify Arabidopsis thaliana A- and B-type cyclins expressed in meiosis. Many of these cyclins exhibit cell-type-specific expression in vegetative tissues and distinct subcellular localization. We found six A-type cyclins and a single B-type cyclin (CYCB3;1) to be expressed in male meiosis. Mutant analysis revealed that these cyclins contribute to distinct meiosis-related processes. While A2 cyclins are important for chromosome segregation, CYCB3;1 prevents ectopic cell wall formation. We further show that cyclin SDS does not contain a D-box and is constitutively expressed throughout meiosis. Analysis of plants carrying cyclin SDS with an introduced D-box motif determined that, in addition to its function in recombination, SDS acts together with CYCB3;1 in suppressing unscheduled cell wall synthesis. Our phenotypic and expression data provide extensive evidence that multiplication of cyclins is in plants accompanied by functional diversification.

  13. Inhibition of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 but Not of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3-β Prevents Neurite Retraction and Tau Hyperphosphorylation Caused by Secretable Products of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type I-Infected Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Horacio; Ramírez, Eugenio; Utreras, Elias; Pando, María E.; Kettlun, Ana M.; Chiong, Mario; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Collados, Lucía; Puente, Javier; Cartier, Luis; Valenzuela, María A.

    2012-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of axons and myelin in the corticospinal tracts. This central axonopathy may originate from the impairment of anterograde axoplasmic transport. Previous work showed tau hyperphosphorylation at T181 in cerebrospinal fluid of HAM/TSP patients. Similar hyperphosphorylation occurs in SH-SY5Y cells incubated with supernatant from MT-2 cells (HTLV-I-infected lymphocytes secreting viral proteins, including Tax) that produce neurite shortening. Tau phosphorylation at T181 is attributable to glycogen synthase kinase 3-β (GSK3-β) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activation. Here we investigate whether neurite retraction in the SH-SY5Y model associates with concurrent changes in other tau hyperphosphorylable residues. Threonine 181 turned out to be the only tau hyperphosphorylated residue. We also evaluate the role of GSK3-β and CDK5 in this process by using specific kinase inhibitors (LiCl, TDZD-8, and roscovitine). Changes in both GSK3-β active and inactive forms were followed by measuring the regulatory phosphorylable sites (S9 and Y216, inactivating and activating phosphorylation, respectively) together with changes in β-catenin protein levels. Our results showed that LiCl and TDZD-8 were unable to prevent MT-2 supernatant-mediated neurite retraction and also that neither Y216 nor S9 phosphorylations were changed in GSK3-β. Thus, GSK3-β seems not to play a role in T181 hyperphosphorylation. On the other hand, the CDK5 involvement in tau phosphorylation was confirmed by both the increase in its enzymatic activity and the absence of MT-2 neurite retraction in the presence of roscovitine or CDK5 siRNA transfection. PMID:21671254

  14. Self-Renewal and High Proliferative Colony Forming Capacity of Late-Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitors Is Regulated by Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors Driven by Notch Signaling.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jatin; Wong, Ho Yi; Wang, Weili; Alexis, Josue; Shafiee, Abbas; Stevenson, Alexander J; Gabrielli, Brian; Fisk, Nicholas M; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2016-04-01

    Since the discovery of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC), there has been significant interest in their therapeutic potential to treat vascular injuries. ECFC cultures display significant heterogeneity and a hierarchy among cells able to give rise to high proliferative versus low proliferative colonies. Here we aimed to define molecularly this in vitro hierarchy. Based on flow cytometry, CD34 expression levels distinguished two populations. Only CD34 + ECFC had the capacity to reproduce high proliferative potential (HPP) colonies on replating, whereas CD34- ECFCs formed only small clusters. CD34 + ECFCs were the only ones to self-renew in stringent single-cell cultures and gave rise to both CD34 + and CD34- cells. Upon replating, CD34 + ECFCs were always found at the centre of HPP colonies and were more likely in G0/1 phase of cell cycling. Functionally, CD34 + ECFC were superior at restoring perfusion and better engrafted when injected into ischemic hind limbs. Transcriptomic analysis identified cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) cell cycle inhibiting genes (p16, p21, and p57), the Notch signaling pathway (dll1, dll4, hes1, and hey1), and the endothelial cytokine il33 as highly expressed in CD34 + ECFC. Blocking the Notch pathway using a γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) led to reduced expression of cell cycle inhibitors, increased cell proliferation followed by a loss of self-renewal, and HPP colony formation capacity reflecting progenitor exhaustion. Similarly shRNA knockdown of p57 strongly affected self-renewal of ECFC colonies. ECFC hierarchy is defined by Notch signalling driving cell cycle regulators, progenitor quiescence and self-renewal potential.

  15. c-Myc represses FOXO3a-mediated transcription of the gene encoding the p27(Kip1) cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, Vidyalakshmi; Mineva, Nora D; Burke, Brian; Jeay, Sébastien; Wu, Min; Shen, Jian; Yang, William; Hann, Stephen R; Sonenshein, Gail E

    2008-08-15

    The p27(Kip1) (p27) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and c-Myc oncoprotein play essential roles in control of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Induction of p27 (CDKN1B) gene transcription by Forkhead box O proteins such as FOXO3a leads to growth arrest and apoptosis. Previously, we observed that B cell receptor (surface IgM) engagement of WEHI 231 immature B lymphoma cells with an anti-IgM antibody results in activation of FOXO3a, growth arrest and apoptosis. As ectopic c-Myc expression in these cells prevented anti-IgM induction of p27 and cell death, we hypothesized that c-Myc represses FOXO3a-mediated transcription. Here we show that c-Myc inhibits FOXO3a-mediated activation of the p27 promoter in multiple cell lines. The mechanism of this repression was explored using a combination of co-immunoprecipitation, oligonucleotide precipitation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. The studies demonstrate a functional association of FOXO3a and c-Myc on a proximal Forkhead binding element in the p27 promoter. This association involves the Myc box II domain of c-Myc and the N-terminal DNA-binding portion of FOXO3a. Analysis of publicly available microarray datasets showed an inverse pattern of c-MYC and p27 RNA expression in primary acute myeloid leukemia, prostate cancer and tongue squamous cell carcinoma samples. The inhibition of FOXO3a-mediated activation of the p27 gene by the high aberrant expression of c-Myc in many tumor cells likely contributes to their uncontrolled proliferation and invasive phenotype.

  16. Induction of anergy in Th1 cells associated with increased levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S K; DeLoose, A; Gilbert, K M

    2001-01-15

    Th1 cells exposed to Ag and the G(1) blocker n-butyrate in primary cultures lose their ability to proliferate in Ag-stimulated secondary cultures. The ability of n-butyrate to induce anergy in Ag-stimulated, but not resting, Th1 cells was shown here to be blocked by cycloheximide. Subsequent experiments to delineate the nature of the protein apparently required for n-butyrate-induced Th1 cell anergy focused on the role of cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Normally, entry into S phase by Th1 cells occurs around 24 h after Ag stimulation and corresponds with relatively low levels of both p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). However, unlike control Th1 cells, anergic Th1 cells contained high levels of both p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1) when examined 24 h after Ag stimulation. The increase in p21(Cip1) observed in Ag-stimulated anergic Th1 cells appeared to be initiated in primary cultures. In contrast, the increase in p27(Kip1) observed in these anergic Th1 cells appears to represent a re-expression of the protein much earlier than control cells following Ag stimulation in secondary cultures. The anergic Th1 cells contained functionally active cdk inhibitors capable of inhibiting the activity of both endogenous and exogenous cdks. Consequently, it appears that n-butyrate-induced anergy in Th1 cells correlated with the up-regulation of p21(Cip1) and perhaps the downstream failure to maintain low levels of p27(Kip1). Increased levels of both p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1) at the end of G(1) could prevent cdk-mediated entry into S phase, and thus help maintain the proliferative unresponsiveness found in the anergic Th1 cells.

  17. Gene expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and effect of heparin on their expression in mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lunyin; Quinn, Deborah A.; Garg, Hari G.; Hales, Charles A. . E-mail: chales@partners.org

    2006-07-14

    The balance between cell proliferation and cell quiescence is regulated delicately by a variety of mediators, in which cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and CDK inhibitors (CDKI) play a very important role. Heparin which inhibits pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation increases the levels of two CDKIs, p21 and p27, although only p27 is important in inhibition of PASMC growth in vitro and in vivo. In the present study we investigated the expression profile of all the cell cycle regulating genes, including all seven CDKIs (p21, p27, p57, p15, p16, p18, and p19), in the lungs of mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. A cell cycle pathway specific gene microarray was used to profile the 96 genes involved in cell cycle regulation. We also observed the effect of heparin on gene expression. We found that (a) hypoxic exposure for two weeks significantly inhibited p27 expression and stimulated p18 activity, showing a 98% decrease in p27 and 81% increase in p18; (b) other CDKIs, p21, p57, p15, p16, and p19 were not affected significantly in response to hypoxia; (c) heparin treatment restored p27 expression, but did not influence p18; (d) ERK1/2 and p38 were mediators in heparin upregulation of p27. This study provides an expression profile of cell cycle regulating genes under hypoxia in mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and strengthens the previous finding that p27 is the only CDKI involved in heparin regulation of PASMC proliferation and hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

  18. eIF4A RNA Helicase Associates with Cyclin-Dependent Protein Kinase A in Proliferating Cells and Is Modulated by Phosphorylation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Maxwell S.; Pierrat, Olivier; Nibau, Candida; Mikitova, Veronika; Zheng, Tao; Corke, Fiona M. K.; Mayberry, Laura K.; Browning, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) is a highly conserved RNA-stimulated ATPase and helicase involved in the initiation of messenger RNA translation. Previously, we found that eIF4A interacts with cyclin-dependent kinase A (CDKA), the plant ortholog of mammalian CDK1. Here, we show that this interaction occurs only in proliferating cells where the two proteins coassociate with 5′-cap-binding protein complexes, eIF4F or the plant-specific eIFiso4F. CDKA phosphorylates eIF4A on a conserved threonine residue (threonine-164) within the RNA-binding motif 1b TPGR. In vivo, a phospho-null (APGR) variant of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) eIF4A1 protein retains the ability to functionally complement a mutant (eif4a1) plant line lacking eIF4A1, whereas a phosphomimetic (EPGR) variant fails to complement. The phospho-null variant (APGR) rescues the slow growth rate of roots and rosettes, together with the ovule-abortion and late-flowering phenotypes. In vitro, wild-type recombinant eIF4A1 and its phospho-null variant both support translation in cell-free wheat germ extracts dependent upon eIF4A, but the phosphomimetic variant does not support translation and also was deficient in ATP hydrolysis and helicase activity. These observations suggest a mechanism whereby CDK phosphorylation has the potential to down-regulate eIF4A activity and thereby affect translation. PMID:27388680

  19. Fatigue, alopecia and stomatitis among patients with breast cancer receiving cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and 6 inhibitors: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lasheen, Shaimaa; Shohdy, Kyrillus S; Kassem, Loay; Abdel-Rahman, Omar

    2017-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors emerge as efficacious agents in hormone positive metastatic breast cancer with more acceptable toxicity profiles than cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, some adverse effects such as fatigue, alopecia and stomatitis, vastly concern patients. The search was conducted in PubMed, American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting library, European Society for Medical Oncology meeting abstract, and the San Antonio meeting abstract databases. We identified phase 2 or 3 trials recruiting patients with breast cancer, randomized to receive hormonal treatment plus either CDK4/6 inhibitors or placebo. We considered studies providing incidence of fatigue, alopecia and stomatitis relevant. One thousand records were screened. 34 studies were considered relevant. Four studies were found to be eligible for meta-analysis with a total of 2007 patients. The relative risk for all grade fatigue was 1.34 [95% CI: 1.17-1.54, p < 0.0001], for all grade alopecia was 2.14 [95% CI: 1.23-3.73, p = 0.007], and for all grade stomatitis 4.87 [95% CI: 2.11-11.24, p = 0.0002]. In addition, the relative risk for high grade fatigue was 2.40 [95% CI: 1.10-5.26, p = 0.03]. CDK4/6 inhibitors were associated with an increased risk of fatigue, alopecia and stomatitis. Further studies with self-reported questionnaires may elucidate the impact of the increased risk of these selected adverse effects on the patients' quality of life.

  20. Down-regulation of the PTTG1 proto-oncogene contributes to the melanoma suppressive effects of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor PHA-848125.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Simona; Alvino, Ester; Levati, Lauretta; Esposito, Alessia I; Ciomei, Marina; Brasca, Maria G; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Desideri, Marianna; Bonmassar, Enzo; Pfeffer, Ulrich; D'Atri, Stefania

    2012-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that PHA-848125, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor presently under Phase II clinical investigation, impairs melanoma cell growth. In this study, gene expression profiling showed that PHA-848125 significantly modulated the expression of 128 genes, predominantly involved in cell cycle control, in the highly drug-sensitive GL-Mel (p53 wild-type) melanoma cells. Up-regulation of 4 selected genes (PDCD4, SESN2, DDIT4, DEPDC6), and down-regulation of 6 selected genes (PTTG1, CDC25A, AURKA, AURKB, PLK1, BIRC5) was confirmed at protein levels. The same protein analysis performed in PHA-848125-treated M10 melanoma cells - p53 mutated and less sensitive to the drug than GL-Mel cells - revealed no DEPDC6 expression and no changes of PTTG1, PDCD4 and BIRC5 levels. Upon PHA-848125 treatment, a marked PTTG1 down-modulation was also observed in A375 cells (p53 wild-type) but not in CN-Mel cells (p53 mutated). PTTG1 silencing significantly inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and induced senescence, with effects less pronounced in p53 mutated cells. PTTG1 silencing increased PHA-848125 sensitivity of p53 mutated cells but not that of A375 or GL-Mel cells. Accordingly, in M10 but not in A375 cells a higher level of senescence was detected in PHA-848125-treated/PTTG1-silenced cells with respect to PHA-848125-treated controls. In A375 and GL-Mel cells, TP53 silencing attenuated PHA-848125-induced down-modulation of PTTG1 and decreased cell sensitivity to the drug. These findings indicate that PHA-848125-induced down-regulation of PTTG1 depends, at least in part, on p53 function and contributes to the antiproliferative activity of the drug. Our study provides further molecular insight into the antitumor mechanism of PHA-848125. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Apoptosis, cell proliferation and modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(cip1) in vascular remodelling during vein arterialization in the rat.

    PubMed

    Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Miyakawa, Ayumi Aurea; Cardoso, Leandro; de Figueiredo Borges, Luciano; Gonçalves, Giovana Aparecida; Krieger, Jose Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    Neo-intima development and atherosclerosis limit long-term vein graft use for revascularization of ischaemic tissues. Using a rat model, which is technically less challenging than smaller rodents, we provide evidence that the temporal morphological, cellular, and key molecular events during vein arterialization resemble the human vein graft adaptation. Right jugular vein was surgically connected to carotid artery and observed up to 90 days. Morphometry demonstrated gradual thickening of the medial layer and important formation of neo-intima with deposition of smooth muscle cells (SMC) in the subendothelial layer from day 7 onwards. Transmission electron microscopy showed that SMCs switch from the contractile to synthetic phenotype on day 3 and new elastic lamellae formation occurs from day 7 onwards. Apoptosis markedly increased on day 1, while alpha-actin immunostaining for SMC almost disappeared by day 3. On day 7, cell proliferation reached the highest level and cellular density gradually increased until day 90. The relative magnitude of cellular changes was higher in the intima vs. the media layer (100 vs. 2 times respectively). Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) p27(Kip1) and p16(INKA) remained unchanged, whereas p21(Cip1) was gradually downregulated, reaching the lowest levels by day 7 until day 90. Taken together, these data indicate for the first time that p21(Cip1) is the main CDKI protein modulated during the arterialization process the rat model of vein arterialization that may be useful to identify and validate new targets and interventions to improve the long-term patency of vein grafts.

  2. MicroRNA-93-5p increases multidrug resistance in human colorectal carcinoma cells by downregulating cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor 1A gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi-Jun; Cao, Yun-Fei; Yang, Zu-Qing; Jiang, Zhi-Yuan; Cai, Bin; Guo, Jiao; Zhang, Sen; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) impedes successful chemotherapy in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and emerging evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRs) are involved in the development of MDR. In the present study, the role of miR-93-5p in the modulation of drug resistance in CRC was investigated using HCT-8 and MDR HCT-8/vincristine (VCR) cell lines. The results demonstrated upregulated expression of miR-93-5p and MDR protein 1 (MDR1) in HCT-8/VCR cells, compared with the parental HCT-8 cells. Furthermore, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) was identified as a potential target of miR-93-5p using miR target analysis tools, including PicTar, TargetScan and miRanda. In addition, inhibition of miR-93-5p expression in HCT-8/VCR cells markedly downregulated MDR1 gene expression, upregulated CDKN1A gene expression and induced cell cycle arrest in G1. Conversely, the overexpression of miR-93-5p in HCT-8/VCR cells upregulated MDR1 gene expression, downregulated CDKN1A gene expression and promoted G1/S transition. Furthermore, the in vitro drug sensitivity assay performed suggested that downregulation of miR-93-5p enhanced the sensitivity of HCT-8/VCR cells to VCR, while the upregulation of miR-93-5p decreased the sensitivity of HCT-8 cells to VCR. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that miR-93-5p serves a role in the development of MDR through downregulating CDKN1A gene expression in CRC.

  3. A phase I trial of the selective oral cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor seliciclib (CYC202; R-Roscovitine), administered twice daily for 7 days every 21 days

    PubMed Central

    Benson, C; White, J; Bono, J De; O'Donnell, A; Raynaud, F; Cruickshank, C; McGrath, H; Walton, M; Workman, P; Kaye, S; Cassidy, J; Gianella-Borradori, A; Judson, I; Twelves, C

    2006-01-01

    Seliciclib (CYC202; R-roscovitine) is the first selective, orally bioavailable inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 1, 2, 7 and 9 to enter clinical trial. Preclinical studies showed antitumour activity in a broad range of human tumour xenografts. A phase I trial was performed with a 7-day b.i.d. p.o. schedule. Twenty-one patients (median age 62 years, range: 39–73 years) were treated with doses of 100, 200 and 800 b.i.d. Dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 800 mg b.i.d.; grade 3 fatigue, grade 3 skin rash, grade 3 hyponatraemia and grade 4 hypokalaemia. Other toxicities included reversible raised creatinine (grade 2), reversible grade 3 abnormal liver function and grade 2 emesis. An 800 mg portion was investigated further in 12 patients, three of whom had MAG3 renograms. One patient with a rapid increase in creatinine on day 3 had a reversible fall in renal perfusion, with full recovery by day 14, and no changes suggestive of renal tubular damage. Further dose escalation was precluded by hypokalaemia. Seliciclib reached peak plasma concentrations between 1 and 4 h and elimination half-life was 2–5 h. Inhibition of retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation was not demonstrated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. No objective tumour responses were noted, but disease stabilisation was recorded in eight patients; this lasted for a total of six courses (18 weeks) in a patient with ovarian cancer. PMID:17179992

  4. PANDER-induced cell-death genetic networks in islets reveal central role for caspase-3 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21).

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Brant R; Greene, Scott R; White, Peter; Wong, Ryan K; Brestelli, John E; Yang, Jichun; Robert, Claudia E; Brusko, Todd M; Wasserfall, Clive H; Wu, Jianmei; Atkinson, Mark A; Gao, Zhiyong; Kaestner, Klaus H; Wolf, Bryan A

    2006-03-15

    PANcreatic DERived factor is an islet-specific cytokine that promotes apoptosis in primary islets and islet cell lines. To elucidate the genetic mechanisms of PANDER-induced cell death we performed expression profiling using the mouse PancChip version 5.0 in conjunction with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Murine islets were treated with PANDER and differentially expressed genes were identified at 48 and 72 h post-treatment. 64 genes were differentially expressed in response to PANDER treatment. 22 genes are associated with cell death. In addition, the genes with the highest fold change were linked with cell death or apoptosis. The most significantly affected gene at 48 h was the downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A or p21). Approximately half of the genes impacted at 72 h were linked to cell death. Cell death differentially expressed genes were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Further analysis identified cell death genetic networks at both time points with 21 of the 22 cell death genes related in various biological pathways. Caspase-3 (CASP3) was biologically linked to CDKN1A in several genetic networks and these two genes were further examined. Elevated cleaved CASP3 levels in PANDER-treated beta-TC3 insulinoma cells were found to abrogate CDKN1A expression. Levels of CDKN1A were not affected in the absence of cleaved CASP3. PANDER-induced downregulation of CDKN1A expression coupled with induced CASP3-activation may serve a central role in islet cell death and offers further insight into the mechanisms of cytokine-induced beta-cell apoptosis.

  5. miR-107 regulates cisplatin chemosensitivity of A549 non small cell lung cancer cell line by targeting cyclin dependent kinase 8

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Lu; Yin, Zhi-Yi; Fan, Xing-Long; Hu, Bo; Wang, Lun-Qing; Zhang, Di

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the acquired drug resistance of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was related to deregulation of miRNAs. However, the effects of miR-107 and the mechanism through which miR-107 affects the cisplatin chemoresistance in NSCLC have not been reported. TaqMan RT-PCR or Western blot assay was performed to detect the expression of mature miR-107 and cyclin dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) protein. The viabilities of treated cells were analyzed using MTT assay. We found that the expression level of miR-107 in A549 cells was significantly lower than that in normal human bronchial epithelial cells (0.45 ± 0.26 vs. 1.00 ± 0.29, P = 0.032). The MTT assay showed that the A549 cells transfected with miR-107 mimics were significantly more sensitive to the therapy of cisplatin than control cells. A549 cells transfected with miR-107 mimics showed a decreased CDK8 protein expression. Downregulation of CDK8 expression by siRNAs, A549 cells became more sensitive to the therapy of cisplatin. In addition, the enhanced growth-inhibitory effect by the miR-107 mimic transfection was enhanced after the addition of CDK8 siRNA. In conclusion, the present study provides the first evidence that miR-107 plays a key role in cisplatin resistance by targeting the CDK8 protein in NSCLC cell lines, suggesting that miR-107 can be used to predict a patient’s response to chemotherapy as well as serve as a novel potential maker for NSCLC therapy. PMID:25400821

  6. A first-in-human, phase 1, dose-escalation study of dinaciclib, a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, administered weekly in subjects with advanced malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dinaciclib, a small-molecule, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, inhibits cell cycle progression and proliferation in various tumor cell lines in vitro. We conducted an open-label, dose-escalation study to determine the safety, tolerability, and bioactivity of dinaciclib in adults with advanced malignancies. Methods Dinaciclib was administered starting at a dose of 0.33 mg/m2, as a 2-hour intravenous infusion once weekly for 3 weeks (on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle), to determine the maximum administered dose (MAD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), and safety and tolerability. Pharmacodynamics of dinaciclib were assessed using an ex vivo phytohemagglutinin lymphocyte stimulation assay and immunohistochemistry staining for retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation in skin biopsies. Evidence of antitumor activity was assessed by sequential computed tomography imaging after every 2 treatment cycles. Results Forty-eight subjects with solid tumors were treated. The MAD was found to be 14 mg/m2 and the RP2D was determined to be 12 mg/m2; DLTs at the MAD included orthostatic hypotension and elevated uric acid. Forty-seven (98%) subjects reported adverse events (AEs) across all dose levels; the most common AEs were nausea, anemia, decreased appetite, and fatigue. Dinaciclib administered at the RP2D significantly inhibited lymphocyte proliferation, demonstrating a pharmacodynamic effect. Ten subjects treated at a variety of doses achieved prolonged stable disease for at least 4 treatment cycles. Conclusions Dinaciclib administered every week for 3 weeks (on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle) was generally safe and well tolerated. Initial bioactivity and observed disease stabilization support further evaluation of dinaciclib as a treatment option for patients with advanced solid malignancies. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT00871663 PMID:24131779

  7. Identification of multiple cyclin subunits of human P-TEFb

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Junmin; Zhu, Yuerong; Milton, Jeffrey T.; Price, David H.

    1998-01-01

    The transition from abortive into productive elongation is proposed to be controlled by a positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) through phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Drosophila P-TEFb was identified recently as a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK9) paired with a cyclin subunit (cyclin T). We demonstrate here the cloning of multiple cyclin subunits of human P-TEFb (T1 and T2). Cyclin T2 has two forms (T2a and T2b) because of alternative splicing. Both cyclin T1 and T2 are ubiquitously expressed. Immunoprecipitation and immunodepletion experiments carried out on HeLa nuclear extract (HNE) indicated that cyclin T1 and T2 were associated with CDK9 in a mutually exclusive manner and that almost all CDK9 was associated with either cyclin T1 or T2. Recombinant CDK9/cyclin T1, CDK9/cyclin T2a, and CDK9/cyclin T2b produced in Sf9 cells possessed DRB-sensitive kinase activity and functioned in transcription elongation in vitro. Either cyclin T1 or T2 was required to activate CDK9, and the truncation of the carboxyl terminus of the cyclin reduced, but did not eliminate, P-TEFb activity. Cotransfection experiments indicated that all three CDK9/cyclin combinations dramatically activated the CMV promoter. PMID:9499409

  8. Systematic Determination of Human Cyclin Dependent Kinase (CDK)-9 Interactome Identifies Novel Functions in RNA Splicing Mediated by the DEAD Box (DDX)-5/17 RNA Helicases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Zhao, Yingxin; Kalita, Mridul; Li, Xueling; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Tian, Bing; Edeh, Chukwudi B; Wiktorowicz, John E; Kudlicki, Andrzej; Brasier, Allan R

    2015-10-01

    Inducible transcriptional elongation is a rapid, stereotypic mechanism for activating immediate early immune defense genes by the epithelium in response to viral pathogens. Here, the recruitment of a multifunctional complex containing the cyclin dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) triggers the process of transcriptional elongation activating resting RNA polymerase engaged with innate immune response (IIR) genes. To identify additional functional activity of the CDK9 complex, we conducted immunoprecipitation (IP) enrichment-stable isotope labeling LC-MS/MS of the CDK9 complex in unstimulated cells and from cells activated by a synthetic dsRNA, polyinosinic/polycytidylic acid [poly (I:C)]. 245 CDK9 interacting proteins were identified with high confidence in the basal state and 20 proteins in four functional classes were validated by IP-SRM-MS. These data identified that CDK9 interacts with DDX 5/17, a family of ATP-dependent RNA helicases, important in alternative RNA splicing of NFAT5, and mH2A1 mRNA two proteins controlling redox signaling. A direct comparison of the basal versus activated state was performed using stable isotope labeling and validated by IP-SRM-MS. Recruited into the CDK9 interactome in response to poly(I:C) stimulation are HSPB1, DNA dependent kinases, and cytoskeletal myosin proteins that exchange with 60S ribosomal structural proteins. An integrated human CDK9 interactome map was developed containing all known human CDK9- interacting proteins. These data were used to develop a probabilistic global map of CDK9-dependent target genes that predicted two functional states controlling distinct cellular functions, one important in immune and stress responses. The CDK9-DDX5/17 complex was shown to be functionally important by shRNA-mediated knockdown, where differential accumulation of alternatively spliced NFAT5 and mH2A1 transcripts and alterations in downstream redox signaling were seen. The requirement of CDK9 for DDX5 recruitment to NFAT5 and mH2A1

  9. Differences in substrate specificity between Cdk2-cyclin A and Cdk2-cyclin E in vitro.

    PubMed

    Higashi, H; Suzuki-Takahashi, I; Taya, Y; Segawa, K; Nishimura, S; Kitagawa, M

    1995-11-13

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), when bound to either cyclin A or cyclin E, recognizes the Ser/Thr-Pro-X-basic amino acid (motif A) as a phosphorylation site. In this study, we designed several peptides based on motif A and examined the substrate specificity of Cdk2-cyclin A and Cdk2-cyclin E using these peptides. Peptides containing a proline residue in the sequence Pro-X-Thr-Pro-X-basic amino acid (motif B) had higher affinity for both Cdk2 complexes than peptides containing motif A. Furthermore, differences in substrate affinity between the two Cdk2 complexes were caused by a proline residue adjacent to or three positions before the threonine residue. Similarly, the presence of different basic amino acids in motif B also had different effects on affinity for each complex. We demonstrate the possibility that the substrate specificity of Cdk2 bound to cyclin might be regulated by the species of cyclin.

  10. The cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activators p35 and p39 interact with the alpha-subunit of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and alpha-actinin-1 in a calcium-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dhavan, Rani; Greer, Paul L; Morabito, Maria A; Orlando, Lianna R; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2002-09-15

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a critical regulator of neuronal migration in the developing CNS, and recent studies have revealed a role for Cdk5 in synaptogenesis and regulation of synaptic transmission. Deregulation of Cdk5 has been linked to the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Activation of Cdk5 requires its association with a regulatory subunit, and two Cdk5 activators, p35 and p39, have been identified. To gain further insight into the functions of Cdk5, we identified proteins that interact with p39 in a yeast two-hybrid screen. In this study we report that alpha-actinin-1 and the alpha-subunit of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIalpha), two proteins localized at the postsynaptic density, interact with Cdk5 via their association with p35 and p39. CaMKIIalpha and alpha-actinin-1 bind to distinct regions of p35 and p39 and also can interact with each other. The association of CaMKIIalpha and alpha-actinin-1 to the Cdk5 activators, as well as to each other, is stimulated by calcium. Further, the activation of glutamate receptors increases the association of p35 and p39 with CaMKIIalpha, and the inhibition of CaMKII activation diminishes this effect. The glutamate-mediated increase in association of p35 and CaMKIIalpha is mediated in large part by NMDA receptors, suggesting that cross talk between the Cdk5 and CaMKII signal transduction pathways may be a component of the complex molecular mechanisms contributing to synaptic plasticity, memory, and learning.

  11. Discovery of [4-Amino-2-(1-methanesulfonylpiperidin-4-ylamino)pyrimidin-5-yl](2,3-difluoro-6-methoxyphenyl)methanone (R547), A Potent and Selective Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor with Significiant in Vivo Antitumor Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chu,X.; DePinto, W.; Bartkovitz, D.; So, S.; Vu, B.; Packman, K.; Lukacs, C.; Ding, Q.; Jiang, N.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their cyclin partners are key regulators of the cell cycle. Since deregulation of CDKs is found with high frequency in many human cancer cells, pharmacological inhibition of CDKs with small molecules has the potential to provide an effective strategy for the treatment of cancer. The 2,4-diamino-5-ketopyrimidines 6 reported here represent a novel class of potent and ATP-competitive inhibitors that selectively target the cyclin-dependent kinase family. This diaminopyrimidine core with a substituted 4-piperidine moiety on the C2-amino position and 2-methoxybenzoyl at the C5 position has been identified as the critical structure responsible for the CDK inhibitory activity. Further optimization has led to a good number of analogues that show potent inhibitory activities against CDK1, CDK2, and CDK4 but are inactive against a large panel of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases (K{sub i} > 10 {mu}M). As one of these representative analogues, compound 39 (R547) has the best CDK inhibitory activities (K{sub i} = 0.001, 0.003, and 0.001 M for CDK1, CDK2, and CDK4, respectively) and excellent in vitro cellular potency, inhibiting the growth of various human tumor cell lines including an HCT116 cell line (IC{sub 50} = 0.08 {mu}M). An X-ray crystal structure of 39 bound to CDK2 has been determined in this study, revealing a binding mode that is consistent with our SAR. Compound 39 demonstrates significant in vivo efficacy in the HCT116 human colorectal tumor xenograft model in nude mice with up to 95% tumor growth inhibition. On the basis of its superior overall profile, 39 was chosen for further evaluation and has progressed into Phase I clinical trial for the treatment of cancer.

  12. Long non-coding RNA colon cancer-associated transcript 1 functions as a competing endogenous RNA to regulate cyclin-dependent kinase 1 expression by sponging miR-490-3p in hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Dou, Chunqing; Sun, Liyuan; Jin, Xin; Han, Mingming; Zhang, Bao; Li, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is an aggressive neoplasm and is one of the most common human cancers. Recently, long non-coding RNAs have been demonstrated to participate in pathogenesis of many diseases including the progression in several cancers. In this study, we found that the long non-coding RNA colon cancer-associated transcript 1 was upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues (p < 0.05), and high colon cancer-associated transcript 1 expression level was positively associated with tumor volume (p < 0.05) and American Joint Committee on Cancer stage (p < 0.05) in hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Luciferase reporter assays and RNA-pulldown assays showed that colon cancer-associated transcript 1 is a target of miR-490-3p. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis indicated that colon cancer-associated transcript 1 regulated cyclin-dependent kinase 1 expression as a competing endogenous RNA by sponging miR-490-3p in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Furthermore, colon cancer-associated transcript 1 silencing decreased hepatocellular carcinoma cells proliferation and invasion and overexpression promoted cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. These data demonstrated that the colon cancer-associated transcript 1/miR-490-3p/cyclin-dependent kinase 1 regulatory pathway promotes the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma. Inhibition of colon cancer-associated transcript 1 expression may be a novel therapeutic strategy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. Helical fold prediction for the cyclin box.

    PubMed

    Bazan, J F

    1996-01-01

    The smooth progression of the eukaryotic cell cycle relies on the periodic activation of members of a family of cell cycle kinases by regulatory proteins called cyclins. Outside of the cell cycle, cyclin homologs play important roles in regulating the assembly of transcription complexes; distant structural relatives of the conserved cyclin core or "box" can also function as general transcription factors (like TFIIB) or survive embedded in the chain of the tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein. The present work attempts the prediction of the canonical secondary, supersecondary, and tertiary fold of the minimal cyclin box domain using a combination of techniques that make use of the evolutionary information captured in a multiple alignment of homolog sequences. A tandem set of closely packed, helical modules are predicted to form the cyclin box domain.

  14. Nuclear Import of Cdk/Cyclin Complexes: Identification of Distinct Mechanisms for Import of Cdk2/Cyclin E and Cdc2/Cyclin B1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jonathan D.; Yang, Jing; Truant, Ray; Kornbluth, Sally

    1999-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of nuclear proteins is required for both DNA replication and entry into mitosis. Consequently, most cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)/cyclin complexes are localized to the nucleus when active. Although our understanding of nuclear transport processes has been greatly enhanced by the recent identification of nuclear targeting sequences and soluble nuclear import factors with which they interact, the mechanisms used to target Cdk/cyclin complexes to the nucleus remain obscure; this is in part because these proteins lack obvious nuclear localization sequences. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms responsible for Cdk/cyclin transport, we examined nuclear import of fluorescent Cdk2/cyclin E and Cdc2/cyclin B1 complexes in digitonin-permeabilized mammalian cells and also examined potential physical interactions between these Cdks, cyclins, and soluble import factors. We found that the nuclear import machinery recognizes these Cdk/cyclin complexes through direct interactions with the cyclin component. Surprisingly, cyclins E and B1 are imported into nuclei via distinct mechanisms. Cyclin E behaves like a classical basic nuclear localization sequence–containing protein, binding to the α adaptor subunit of the importin-α/β heterodimer. In contrast, cyclin B1 is imported via a direct interaction with a site in the NH2 terminus of importin-β that is distinct from that used to bind importin-α. PMID:9922449

  15. Identification of Arabidopsis Meiotic Cyclins Reveals Functional Diversification among Plant Cyclin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bulankova, Petra; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Fellner, Nicole; Riha, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Meiosis is a modified cell division in which a single S-phase is followed by two rounds of chromosome segregation resulting in the production of haploid gametes. The meiotic mode of chromosome segregation requires extensive remodeling of the basic cell cycle machinery and employment of unique regulatory mechanisms. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins represent an ancient molecular module that drives and regulates cell cycle progression. The cyclin gene family has undergone a massive expansion in angiosperm plants, but only a few cyclins were thoroughly characterized. In this study we performed a systematic immunolocalization screen to identify Arabidopsis thaliana A- and B-type cyclins expressed in meiosis. Many of these cyclins exhibit cell-type-specific expression in vegetative tissues and distinct subcellular localization. We found six A-type cyclins and a single B-type cyclin (CYCB3;1) to be expressed in male meiosis. Mutant analysis revealed that these cyclins contribute to distinct meiosis-related processes. While A2 cyclins are important for chromosome segregation, CYCB3;1 prevents ectopic cell wall formation. We further show that cyclin SDS does not contain a D-box and is constitutively expressed throughout meiosis. Analysis of plants carrying cyclin SDS with an introduced D-box motif determined that, in addition to its function in recombination, SDS acts together with CYCB3;1 in suppressing unscheduled cell wall synthesis. Our phenotypic and expression data provide extensive evidence that multiplication of cyclins is in plants accompanied by functional diversification. PMID:23671425

  16. A new screening test for antimitotic compounds using the universal M phase-specific protein kinase, p34cdc2/cyclin Bcdc13, affinity-immobilized on p13suc1-coated microtitration plates.

    PubMed

    Rialet, V; Meijer, L

    1991-01-01

    A universal intracellular factor, the "M phase-Promoting Factor" (MPF), triggers the G2/M transition of the cell cycle in all organisms. This factor displays an easily assayable histone H1 kinase (H1K) activity and is composed of at least two subunits, p34cdc2 (catalytic) and cyclin Bcdc13 (regulatory). We describe here a microtitration plate assay using affinity-immobilized H1K-MPF as a cell cycle-specific target to screen for antimitotic compounds. First, meiotic starfish oocytes were selected as the most convenient and abundant source of M phase extracts containing high levels of H1K. Second, we used the strong and specific interaction between p34cdc2 and p13suc1 to affinity-immobilize H1K-MPF on p13suc1-coated microtitration plates. p13suc1-coated wells specifically retain the M phase kinase, the activity of which is assayed with histone H1 and gamma-32P-ATP. Among 10 microtitration plates, Maxisorp plates (Nunc) proved to be the most efficient at retaining H1K through p13suc1. Experimental conditions to coat the plates with p13suc1, to immobilize and to measure p34cdc2/cyclin Bcdc13 kinase activity, as well as to store p13suc1-precoated plates, have been optimized. Using this system we tested 18 currently used anticancer drugs and S or G2 inhibitors; none of them displayed any inhibitory activity. The microtitration assay has allowed the detection of two H1K inhibitors, isopentenyladenine (I50: 40 microM) and staurosporine (I50: 3.2 nM). This affinity-immobilized H1K-MPF can thus now be used as a simple screening system to detect inhibitors of a major cell cycle-regulating component. This method may prove useful to screen for antimitotic compounds of potential anticancer interest.

  17. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces cell cycle arrest by activating atypical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 through up-regulation of Smad3-dependent p35 expression in human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Ji; Yang, Sun Woo; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2016-04-08

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) play important roles in control of cell division. Cdk5 is an atypical member of Cdk family with non-cyclin-like regulatory subunit, p35, but its role in cell cycle progression is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of Cdk5/p35 on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced cell cycle arrest. In human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells, TGF-β1 induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and increased p27KIP1 expression. Interestingly, pretreatment with roscovitine, an inhibitor of Cdk5, or transfection with small interfering (si) RNAs specific to Cdk5 and p35 significantly attenuated the TGF-β1-induced p27KIP1 expression and cell cycle arrest. TGF-β1 increased Cdk5 activity via up-regulation of p35 gene at transcriptional level, and these effects were abolished by transfection with Smad3 siRNA or infection of adenovirus carrying Smad3 mutant at the C-tail (3SA). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay further revealed that wild type Smad3, but not mutant Smad3 (3SA), binds to the region of the p35 promoter region (-1000--755) in a TGF-β1-dependent manner. These results for the first time demonstrate a role of Cdk5/p35 in the regulation of cell cycle progression modulated by TGF-β1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Candida albicans Cyclin Clb4 Carries S-Phase Cyclin Activity▿†

    PubMed Central

    Ofir, Ayala; Kornitzer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are key regulators of eukaryotic cell cycle progression. The cyclin subunit activates the CDK and also imparts to the complex, at least in some cases, substrate specificity. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an organism in which the roles of individual cyclins are best studied, contains nine cyclins (three G1 cyclins and six B-type cyclins) capable of activating the main cell cycle CDK, Cdc28. Analysis of the genome of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans revealed only two sequences corresponding to B-type cyclins, C. albicans Clb2 (CaClb2) and CaClb4. Notably, no homolog of the S. cerevisiae S-phase-specific cyclins, Clb5/Clb6, could be detected. Here, we performed an in vitro analysis of the activity of CaClb2 and CaClb4 and of three G1 cyclins, as well as an analysis of the phenotype of S. cerevisiae cells expressing CaClb2 or CaClb4 instead of Clb5. Remarkably, replacement of CLB5 by CaCLB4 caused rapid diploidization of S. cerevisiae. In addition, both in vivo and in vitro analyses indicate that, in spite of the higher sequence similarity of CaClb2 to Clb5/Clb6, CaClb4 is the functional homolog of Clb5/Clb6. The activity of a CaClb2/CaClb4 cyclin hybrid suggests that the cyclin box domain of CaClb4 carries the functional specificity of the protein. These results have implications for our understanding of the evolution of specificity of the cell cycle cyclins. PMID:20639412

  19. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) acts as a novel potentiator of cyclin-dependent kinases to enhance cell proliferation independently of its hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Kabuta, Tomohiro; Mitsui, Takeshi; Takahashi, Masaki; Fujiwara, Yuuki; Kabuta, Chihana; Konya, Chiho; Tsuchiya, Yukihiro; Hatanaka, Yusuke; Uchida, Kenko; Hohjoh, Hirohiko; Wada, Keiji

    2013-05-03

    Dysregulation of cell proliferation and the cell cycle are associated with various diseases, such as cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play central roles in cell proliferation and the cell cycle. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is expressed in a restricted range of tissues, including the brain and numerous types of cancer. However, the molecular functions of UCH-L1 remain elusive. In this study, we found that UCH-L1 physically interacts with CDK1, CDK4, and CDK5, enhancing their kinase activity. Using several mutants of UCH-L1, we showed that this enhancement is dependent upon interaction levels between UCH-L1 and CDKs but is independent of the known ubiquitin-related functions of UCH-L1. Gain- and loss-of-function studies revealed that UCH-L1 enhances proliferation of multiple cell types, including human cancer cells. Inhibition of the interaction between UCH-L1 and cell cycle-associated CDK resulted in the abolishment of UCH-L1-induced enhancement of cell proliferation. RNA interference of UCH-L1 reduced the growth of human xenograft tumors in mice. We concluded that UCH-L1 is a novel regulator of the kinase activities of CDKs. We believe that our findings from this study will significantly contribute to our understanding of cell cycle-associated diseases.

  20. Cdks, cyclins and CKIs: roles beyond cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shuhui; Kaldis, Philipp

    2013-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are serine/threonine kinases and their catalytic activities are modulated by interactions with cyclins and Cdk inhibitors (CKIs). Close cooperation between this trio is necessary for ensuring orderly progression through the cell cycle. In addition to their well-established function in cell cycle control, it is becoming increasingly apparent that mammalian Cdks, cyclins and CKIs play indispensable roles in processes such as transcription, epigenetic regulation, metabolism, stem cell self-renewal, neuronal functions and spermatogenesis. Even more remarkably, they can accomplish some of these tasks individually, without the need for Cdk/cyclin complex formation or kinase activity. In this Review, we discuss the latest revelations about Cdks, cyclins and CKIs with the goal of showcasing their functional diversity beyond cell cycle regulation and their impact on development and disease in mammals.

  1. Cdkn2a, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor encoding p16INK4a and p19ARF, is a candidate for the plasmacytoma susceptibility locus, Pctr1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuling; Ramsay, Edward S.; Mock, Beverly A.

    1998-01-01

    Plasma cell tumor induction in mice by pristane is under multigenic control. BALB/c mice are susceptible to tumor development; whereas DBA/2 mice are resistant. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms between BALB/c and DBA/2 for Cdkn2a(p16) and Cdkn2b(p15), and between BALB/c and Mus spretus for Cdkn2c(p18INK4c) were used to position these loci with respect to the Pctr1 locus. These cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors mapped to a 6 cM interval of chromosome 4 between Ifna and Tal1. C.D2-Chr 4 congenic strains harboring DBA/2 alleles associated with the Pctr1 locus contained DBA/2 “resistant” alleles of the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors p16 and p15. On sequencing p16 and p18 cDNAs, two different allelic variants within ankyrin repeat regions of p16 were found between BALB/c and DBA/2 mice. By using an assay involving PCR amplification and restriction enzyme digestion, allelic variants were typed among several inbred strains of mice. One of the variants, G232A, was specific to two inbred strains, BALB/cAn and ABP/Le, of mice and occurred in a highly conserved amino acid in both human and rat p16. When tested with wild-type (DBA/2) p16, both A134C and G232A BALB/c-specific variants of p16 were inefficient in their ability to inhibit the activity of cyclin D2/CDK4 in kinase assays with retinoblastoma protein, suggesting this defective, inherited allele plays an important role in the genetic susceptibility of BALB/c mice for plasmacytoma induction and that p16INK4a is a strong candidate for the Pctr1 locus. PMID:9482902

  2. Efflux Transporters at the Blood-Brain Barrier Limit Delivery and Efficacy of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitor Palbociclib (PD-0332991) in an Orthotopic Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Karen E.; Pokorny, Jenny; Mittapalli, Rajendar K.; Bakken, Katrina; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2015-01-01

    6-Acetyl-8-cyclopentyl-5-methyl-2-([5-(piperazin-1-yl)pyridin-2-yl]amino)pyrido(2,3-d)pyrimidin-7(8H)-one [palbociclib (PD-0332991)] is a cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and is currently undergoing clinical trials for many solid tumors. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and has limited treatment options. The cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 pathway is commonly dysregulated in GBM and is a promising target in treating this devastating disease. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits the delivery of drugs to invasive regions of GBM, where the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein can prevent treatments from reaching the tumor. The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanisms limiting the effectiveness of palbociclib therapy in an orthotopic xenograft model. The in vitro intracellular accumulation results demonstrated that palbociclib is a substrate for both P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein. In vivo studies in transgenic mice confirmed that efflux transport is responsible for the limited brain distribution of palbociclib. There was an ∼115-fold increase in brain exposure at steady state in the transporter deficient mice when compared with wild-type mice, and the efflux inhibitor elacridar significantly increased palbociclib brain distribution. Efficacy studies demonstrated that palbociclib is an effective therapy when GBM22 tumor cells are implanted in the flank, but ineffective in an orthotopic (intracranial) model. Moreover, doses designed to mimic brain exposure were ineffective in treating flank tumors. These results demonstrate that efflux transport in the BBB is involved in limiting the brain distribution of palbociclib and this has critical implications in determining effective dosing regimens of palbociclib therapy in the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:26354993

  3. Rescue of cyclin D1 deficiency by knockin cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Geng, Y; Whoriskey, W; Park, M Y; Bronson, R T; Medema, R H; Li, T; Weinberg, R A; Sicinski, P

    1999-06-11

    D-type cyclins and cyclin E represent two very distinct classes of mammalian G1 cyclins. We have generated a mouse strain in which the coding sequences of the cyclin D1 gene (Ccnd1) have been deleted and replaced by those of human cyclin E (CCNE). In the tissues and cells of these mice, the expression pattern of human cyclin E faithfully reproduces that normally associated with mouse cyclin D1. The replacement of cyclin D1 with cyclin E rescues all phenotypic manifestations of cyclin D1 deficiency and restores normal development in cyclin D1-dependent tissues. Thus, cyclin E can functionally replace cyclin D1. Our analyses suggest that cyclin E is the major downstream target of cyclin D1.

  4. Cyclin I is involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Taiki; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Nakashima, Akio; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Kikkawa, Ushio; Kamada, Shinji

    2013-08-15

    Cyclins control cell cycle progression by regulating the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Cyclin I is a member of the cyclin family because of the presence of a cyclin box motif. It has been suggested that Cyclin I is involved in various biological processes, such as cell survival, angiogenesis, and cell differentiation. However, whether or not Cyclin I has a role in regulating the cell cycle similarly to other cyclins has yet to be clarified. Therefore, we investigated the role for Cyclin I in cell cycle progression. We showed that the protein level of Cyclin I oscillated during the cell cycle, and that Cyclin I was subjected to ubiquitination and degradation in cells. The interaction between Cyclin I and Cdk5 was detected in cells overexpressed with both proteins. Furthermore, depletion of Cyclin I by siRNAs prevented cell proliferation, suggesting the positive role of Cyclin I for the cell cycle progression. In addition, flow cytometric analysis revealed that cells depleted of Cyclin I were accumulated at G₂/M phases. By using HeLa.S-Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) cells, we further confirmed that knockdown of Cyclin I induced cell cycle arrest at S/G₂/M phases. These results strongly suggest that Cyclin I has the role in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

  5. Proteomic Landscape of Tissue-Specific Cyclin E Functions in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Odajima, Junko; Jung, Piotr; Ndassa-Colday, Yasmine; Ficaro, Scott; Geng, Yan; Marco, Eugenio; Michowski, Wojciech; Wang, Yaoyu E.; DeCaprio, James A.; Litovchick, Larisa; Marto, Jarrod; Sicinski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    E-type cyclins (cyclins E1 and E2) are components of the cell cycle machinery that has been conserved from yeast to humans. The major function of E-type cyclins is to drive cell division. It is unknown whether in addition to their ‘core’ cell cycle functions, E-type cyclins also perform unique tissue-specific roles. Here, we applied high-throughput mass spectrometric analyses of mouse organs to define the repertoire of cyclin E protein partners in vivo. We found that cyclin E interacts with distinct sets of proteins in different compartments. These cyclin E interactors are highly enriched for phosphorylation targets of cyclin E and its catalytic partner, the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2). Among cyclin E interactors we identified several novel tissue-specific substrates of cyclin E-Cdk2 kinase. In proliferating compartments, cyclin E-Cdk2 phosphorylates Lin proteins within the DREAM complex. In the testes, cyclin E-Cdk2 phosphorylates Mybl1 and Dmrtc2, two meiotic transcription factors that represent key regulators of spermatogenesis. In embryonic and adult brains cyclin E interacts with proteins involved in neurogenesis, while in adult brains also with proteins regulating microtubule-based processes and microtubule cytoskeleton. We also used quantitative proteomics to demonstrate re-wiring of the cyclin E interactome upon ablation of Cdk2. This approach can be used to study how protein interactome changes during development or in any pathological state such as aging or cancer. PMID:27828963

  6. Nucleolar GTP-binding Protein-1 (NGP-1) Promotes G1 to S Phase Transition by Activating Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1*

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Debduti; Anbarasu, Kumaraswamy; Rajabather, Suryaraja; Priya, Rangasamy Sneha; Desai, Pavitra; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy

    2015-01-01

    Nucleolar GTP-binding protein (NGP-1) is overexpressed in various cancers and proliferating cells, but the functional significance remains unknown. In this study, we show that NGP-1 promotes G1 to S phase transition of cells by enhancing CDK inhibitor p21Cip-1/Waf1 expression through p53. In addition, our results suggest that activation of the cyclin D1-CDK4 complex by NGP-1 via maintaining the stoichiometry between cyclin D1-CDK4 complex and p21 resulted in hyperphosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein at serine 780 (p-RBSer-780) followed by the up-regulation of E2F1 target genes required to promote G1 to S phase transition. Furthermore, our data suggest that ribosomal protein RPL23A interacts with NGP-1 and abolishes NGP-1-induced p53 activity by enhancing Mdm2-mediated p53 polyubiquitination. Finally, reduction of p-RBSer-780 levels and E2F1 target gene expression upon ectopic expression of RPL23a resulted in arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Collectively, this investigation provides evidence that NGP-1 promotes cell cycle progression through the activation of the p53/p21Cip-1/Waf1 pathway. PMID:26203195

  7. Determinants of Human Cyclin B1 Association with Mitotic Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, Kathleen L.; King, Randall W.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin B1–CDK1 activity is essential for mitotic entry, but questions remain regarding how the activity of this kinase is spatially regulated. Previous studies showed that the cyclin B1 subunit localizes to several compartments of a mitotic cell, including the centrosomes, mitotic spindle, kinetochores and chromosomes via distinct sequence elements. Mitotic chromosome association occurs through the unstructured N-terminal domain of cyclin B1 and is independent of CDK1 binding. Here, we use live cell imaging of human cyclin B1 fused to GFP to precisely define the sequence elements within cyclin B1 that mediate its association with condensed mitotic chromosomes. We find that a short, evolutionarily conserved N-terminal motif is required for cyclin B1 to localize to mitotic chromosomes. We further reveal a role for arginine residues within and near the destruction box sequence in the chromosome association of cyclin B1. Additionally, our data suggest that sequences further downstream in cyclin B1, such as the cytoplasmic retention sequence and the cyclin box, may negatively modulate chromosome association. Because multiple basic residues are required for cyclin B1 association with mitotic chromosomes, electrostatic interactions with DNA may facilitate cyclin B1 localization to chromosomes. PMID:23505570

  8. Molecular evolution of cyclin proteins in animals and fungi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The passage through the cell cycle is controlled by complexes of cyclins, the regulatory units, with cyclin-dependent kinases, the catalytic units. It is also known that cyclins form several families, which differ considerably in primary structure from one eukaryotic organism to another. Despite these lines of evidence, the relationship between the evolution of cyclins and their function is an open issue. Here we present the results of our study on the molecular evolution of A-, B-, D-, E-type cyclin proteins in animals and fungi. Results We constructed phylogenetic trees for these proteins, their ancestral sequences and analyzed patterns of amino acid replacements. The analysis of infrequently fixed atypical amino acid replacements in cyclins evidenced that accelerated evolution proceeded predominantly during paralog duplication or after it in animals and fungi and that it was related to aromorphic changes in animals. It was shown also that evolutionary flexibility of cyclin function may be provided by consequential reorganization of regions on protein surface remote from CDK binding sites in animal and fungal cyclins and by functional differentiation of paralogous cyclins formed in animal evolution. Conclusions The results suggested that changes in the number and/or nature of cyclin-binding proteins may underlie the evolutionary role of the alterations in the molecular structure of cyclins and their involvement in diverse molecular-genetic events. PMID:21798004

  9. Discovery of 8-Cyclopentyl-2-[4-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-yl)-phenylamino]-7-oxo-7,8-dihydro-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-6-carbonitrile (7x) as a Potent Inhibitor of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 (CDK4) and AMPK-Related Kinase 5 (ARK5)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The success of imatinib, a BCR-ABL inhibitor for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia, has created a great impetus for the development of additional kinase inhibitors as therapeutic agents. However, the complexity of cancer has led to recent interest in polypharmacological approaches for developing multikinase inhibitors with low toxicity profiles. With this goal in mind, we analyzed more than 150 novel cyano pyridopyrimidine compounds and identified structure–activity relationship trends that can be exploited in the design of potent kinase inhibitors. One compound, 8-cyclopentyl-2-[4-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-yl)-phenylamino]-7-oxo-7,8-dihydro-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-6-carbonitrile (7x), was found to be the most active, inducing apoptosis of tumor cells at a concentration of approximately 30–100 nM. In vitro kinase profiling revealed that 7x is a multikinase inhibitor with potent inhibitory activity against the CDK4/CYCLIN D1 and ARK5 kinases. Here, we report the synthesis, structure–activity relationship, kinase inhibitory profile, in vitro cytotoxicity, and in vivo tumor regression studies by this lead compound. PMID:24417566

  10. Ubiquitination of free cyclin D1 is independent of phosphorylation on threonine 286.

    PubMed

    Germain, D; Russell, A; Thompson, A; Hendley, J

    2000-04-21

    Cyclin D1 binds and regulates the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6. Phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein by cyclin D1.CDK4/6 complexes during the G(1) phase of the cell cycle promotes entry into S phase. Cyclin D1 protein is ubiquitinated and degraded by the 26 S proteasome. Previous studies have demonstrated that cyclin D1 ubiquitination is dependent on its phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) on threonine 286 and that this phosphorylation event is greatly enhanced by binding to CDK4 (Diehl, J. A., Cheng, M. G., Roussel, M. F., and Sherr, C. J. (1998) Genes Dev. 12, 3499-3511). We now report an additional pathway for the ubiquitination of free cyclin D1 (unbound to CDKs). We show that, when unbound to CDK4, a cyclin D1-T286A mutant is ubiquitinated. Further, we show that a mutant of cyclin D1 that cannot bind to CDK4 (cyclin D1-KE) is also ubiquitinated in vivo. Our results demonstrate that free cyclin D1 is ubiquitinated independently of its phosphorylation on threonine 286 by GSK-3beta, suggesting that, as has been shown for cyclin E, distinct pathways of ubiquitination lead to the degradation of free and CDK-bound cyclin D1. The pathway responsible for ubiquitination of free cyclin D1 may be important in limiting the effects of cyclin D1 overexpression in a variety of cancers.

  11. Synergistic effects of AKAP95, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cx43 in the development of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Fengjie; Yuan, Yangyang; Zhi, Xuehong; Huang, Qian; Chen, Yuexin; Zhuang, Wenxin; Zhang, Dengcheng; Teng, Bogang; Kong, Xiangyu; Zhang, Yongxing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression of A-kinase anchor protein 95 (AKAP95), Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Connexin43 (Cx43) in rectal cancer tissues and assess the associations between each of the proteins and pathological parameters, as well as their inter-relationships. Methods: AKAP95, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cx43 protein expression rates were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 50 rectal cancer specimens and 16 pericarcinoma tissues. Results: The positive rates of AKAP95, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin D1 proteins were 54.00 vs. 18.75%, 62.00 vs. 6.25%, and 72.00 vs. 31.25% in rectal cancer specimens and pericarcinoma tissues, respectively, representing statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). The positive rate of Cx43 protein expression in rectal cancer tissues was 44.00% and 62.50% in pericarcinoma tissues, and the difference between them was not significant (P > 0.05). No significant associations were found between protein expression of AKAP95, Cyclin E1, Cyclin D1, and Cx43, and the degree of differentiation, histological type, and lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer (P > 0.05). However, significant correlations were obtained between the expression rates of AKAP95 and Cyclin E1, Cyclin E1 and Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1 and Cx43 protein, and Cyclin D1 and Cx43, respectively (P < 0.05). Conclusion: AKAP95, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin D1 protein expression rates were significantly higher in rectal cancer tissues compared with pericarcinoma samples, suggesting an association between these proteins and the development and progression of rectal cancer. In addition, the significant correlations between the proteins (AKAP95 and Cyclin E1, Cyclin E1 and Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1 and Cx43 protein, and Cyclin D1 and Cx43) indicate the possible synergistic effects of these factors in the development and progression of rectal cancer. PMID:25973052

  12. PaKRP, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor from avocado, may facilitate exit from the cell cycle during fruit growth.

    PubMed

    Sabag, Michal; Ben Ari, Giora; Zviran, Tali; Biton, Iris; Goren, Moshe; Dahan, Yardena; Sadka, Avi; Irihimovitch, Vered

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies using 'Hass' avocado cultivar showed that its small-fruit (SF) phenotype is limited by cell number. To explore the molecular components affecting avocado cell production, we isolated four cDNAs encoding: an ICK/KRP protein, known to play cell cycle-regulating roles through modulation of CDK function; two CDK proteins and a D-type cyclin, and monitored their expression patterns, comparing NF (normal fruit) versus SF profiles. The accumulation of PaKRP gradually deceased during growth in both fruit populations. Despite these similarities, SF exhibited higher levels of PaKRP accumulation at early stages of growth. Moreover, in NF, augmented PaKRP expression coincided with a decrease in CDK and PaCYCD1 levels, whereas in SF, enhanced PaKPR expression was coupled with an earlier decline of CDK and PaCYCD1 levels. For both NF and SF, enhanced mesocarp PaKRP transcript accumulation, was associated with elevated abscisic acid (ABA) and ABA catabolites content. Nevertheless, the collective ABA levels, including catabolites, were substantially higher in SF tissues, as compared with NF tissues. Finally, additional expression analysis revealed that in cultured cells, PaKRP could be induced by ABA. Together, our data links PaKRP with exit from the fruit cell cycle and suggest a role for ABA in controlling its expression.

  13. Lipin1 Regulates Skeletal Muscle Differentiation through Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Activation and Cyclin D Complex-regulated Cell Cycle Withdrawal*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weihua; Zhu, Jing; Zhuang, Xun; Zhang, Xiping; Luo, Tao; Esser, Karyn A.; Ren, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Lipin1, an intracellular protein, plays critical roles in controlling lipid synthesis and energy metabolism through its enzymatic activity and nuclear transcriptional functions. Several mouse models of skeletal muscle wasting are associated with lipin1 mutation or altered expression. Recent human studies have suggested that children with homozygous null mutations in the LPIN1 gene suffer from rhabdomyolysis. However, the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism is still poorly understood. In the present study we examined whether lipin1 contributes to regulating muscle regeneration. We characterized the time course of skeletal muscle regeneration in lipin1-deficient fld mice after injury. We found that fld mice exhibited smaller regenerated muscle fiber cross-sectional areas compared with wild-type mice in response to injury. Our results from a series of in vitro experiments suggest that lipin1 is up-regulated and translocated to the nucleus during myoblast differentiation and plays a key role in myogenesis by regulating the cytosolic activation of ERK1/2 to form a complex and a downstream effector cyclin D3-mediated cell cycle withdrawal. Overall, our study reveals a previously unknown role of lipin1 in skeletal muscle regeneration and expands our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:26296887

  14. Inhibition of P-TEFb (CDK9/Cyclin T) kinase and RNA polymerase II transcription by the coordinated actions of HEXIM1 and 7SK snRNA.

    PubMed

    Yik, Jasper H N; Chen, Ruichuan; Nishimura, Rieko; Jennings, Jennifer L; Link, Andrew J; Zhou, Qiang

    2003-10-01

    The positive transcriptional elongation factor b (P-TEFb), consisting of CDK9 and cyclin T, stimulates transcription by phosphorylating RNA polymerase II. It becomes inactivated when associated with the abundant 7SK snRNA. Here, we show that the 7SK binding alone was not sufficient to inhibit P-TEFb. P-TEFb was inhibited by the HEXIM1 protein in a process that specifically required 7SK for mediating the HEXIM1:P-TEFb interaction. This allowed HEXIM1 to inhibit transcription both in vivo and in vitro. P-TEFb dissociated from HEXIM1 and 7SK in cells undergoing stress response, increasing the level of active P-TEFb for stress-induced transcription. P-TEFb was the predominant HEXIM1-associated protein factor, and thus likely to be the principal target of inhibition coordinated by HEXIM1 and 7SK. Since HEXIM1 expression is induced in cells treated with hexamethylene bisacetamide, a potent inducer of cell differentiation, targeting the general transcription factor P-TEFb by HEXIM1/7SK may contribute to the global control of cell growth and differentiation.

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Cyclin Gene Family in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tingyan; Wang, Xin; Lu, Yongen; Cai, Xiaofeng; Ye, Zhibiao; Zhang, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Cyclins play important roles in cell division and cell expansion. They also interact with cyclin-dependent kinases to control cell cycle progression in plants. Our genome-wide analysis identified 52 expressed cyclin genes in tomato. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino sequences of tomato and Arabidopsis cyclin genes divided them into 10 types, A-, B-, C-, D-, H-, L-, T-, U-, SDS- and J18. Pfam analysis indicated that most tomato cyclins contain a cyclin-N domain. C-, H- and J18 types only contain a cyclin-C domain, and U-type cyclins contain another potential cyclin domain. All of the cyclin genes are distributed throughout the tomato genome except for chromosome 8, and 30 of them were found to be segmentally duplicated; they are found on the duplicate segments of chromosome 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11 and 12, suggesting that tomato cyclin genes experienced a mass of segmental duplication. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis indicates that the expression patterns of tomato cyclin genes were significantly different in vegetative and reproductive stages. Transcription of most cyclin genes can be enhanced or repressed by exogenous application of gibberellin, which implies that gibberellin maybe a direct regulator of cyclin genes. The study presented here may be useful as a guide for further functional research on tomato cyclins. PMID:24366066

  16. The ability of antigen, but not interleukin-2, to promote n-butyrate-induced T helper 1 cell anergy is associated with increased expression and altered association patterns of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Stephanie K; DeLoose, Annick; Gilbert, Kathleen M

    2002-01-01

    The ability of the cell cycle inhibitor n-butyrate to induce T helper 1 (Th1) cell anergy is dependent upon its ability to block the cell cycle progression of activated Th1 cells in G1. Results reported here show that although both interleukin (IL)-2 and antigen (Ag) push Th1 cells into G1 where they are blocked by n-butyrate, only the Ag-activated Th1 cells demonstrate functional anergy once the n-butyrate has been removed from the culture. Because n-butyrate-induced Th1 cell anergy has been linked to increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1, mechanistic experiments focused on the role of these inhibitors. It was found that when Th1 cells were reincubated in Ag-stimulated secondary cultures, the Th1 cells previously exposed to Ag and n-butyrate (anergic Th1 cells) demonstrated a cumulative increase in p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 when compared with Th1 cells previously exposed to recombinant (r)IL-2 and n-butyrate (non-anergic Th1 cells). p27Kip1 in the anergic Th1 cells from the secondary cultures was associated with cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks). In contrast, p21Cip1 in the anergic Th1 cells, although present at high levels, did not associate significantly with cdks, suggesting that p21Cip1 may target some other protein in the anergic Th1 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that Th1 cell exposure to Ag and n-butyrate, rather than IL-2 and n-butyrate, is needed to induce the cumulative increase in p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 that is associated with the proliferative unresponsiveness in anergic Th1 cells. In addition, p21Cip1 may inhibit proliferation in the anergic Th1 cells by some mechanism other than suppression of cdks that is unique to the induction of Th1 cell anergy. PMID:12153511

  17. The ability of antigen, but not interleukin-2, to promote n-butyrate-induced T helper 1 cell anergy is associated with increased expression and altered association patterns of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stephanie K; DeLoose, Annick; Gilbert, Kathleen M

    2002-08-01

    The ability of the cell cycle inhibitor n-butyrate to induce T helper 1 (Th1) cell anergy is dependent upon its ability to block the cell cycle progression of activated Th1 cells in G1. Results reported here show that although both interleukin (IL)-2 and antigen (Ag) push Th1 cells into G1 where they are blocked by n-butyrate, only the Ag-activated Th1 cells demonstrate functional anergy once the n-butyrate has been removed from the culture. Because n-butyrate-induced Th1 cell anergy has been linked to increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1, mechanistic experiments focused on the role of these inhibitors. It was found that when Th1 cells were reincubated in Ag-stimulated secondary cultures, the Th1 cells previously exposed to Ag and n-butyrate (anergic Th1 cells) demonstrated a cumulative increase in p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 when compared with Th1 cells previously exposed to recombinant (r)IL-2 and n-butyrate (non-anergic Th1 cells). p27Kip1 in the anergic Th1 cells from the secondary cultures was associated with cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks). In contrast, p21Cip1 in the anergic Th1 cells, although present at high levels, did not associate significantly with cdks, suggesting that p21Cip1 may target some other protein in the anergic Th1 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that Th1 cell exposure to Ag and n-butyrate, rather than IL-2 and n-butyrate, is needed to induce the cumulative increase in p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 that is associated with the proliferative unresponsiveness in anergic Th1 cells. In addition, p21Cip1 may inhibit proliferation in the anergic Th1 cells by some mechanism other than suppression of cdks that is unique to the induction of Th1 cell anergy.

  18. Regulation of Exit from Quiescence by p27 and Cyclin D1-CDK4

    PubMed Central

    Ladha, Mohamed H.; Lee, Kwang Y.; Upton, Todd M.; Reed, Michael F.; Ewen, Mark E.

    1998-01-01

    The synthesis of cyclin D1 and its assembly with cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) to form an active complex is a rate-limiting step in progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Using an activated allele of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), we show that this kinase plays a significant role in positively regulating the expression of cyclin D1. This was found both in quiescent serum-starved cells and in cells expressing dominant-negative Ras. Despite the observation that cyclin D1 is a target of MEK1, in cycling cells, activated MEK1, but not cyclin D1, is capable of overcoming a G1 arrest induced by Ras inactivation. Either wild-type or catalytically inactive CDK4 cooperates with cyclin D1 in reversing the G1 arrest induced by inhibition of Ras activity. In quiescent NIH 3T3 cells expressing either ectopic cyclin D1 or activated MEK1, cyclin D1 is able to efficiently associate with CDK4; however, the complex is inactive. A significant percentage of the cyclin D1-CDK4 complexes are associated with p27 in serum-starved activated MEK1 or cyclin D1 cell lines. Reduction of p27 levels by expression of antisense p27 allows for S-phase entry from quiescence in NIH 3T3 cells expressing ectopic cyclin D1, but not in parental cells. PMID:9774675

  19. Differential regulation of cyclins D1 and D3 in hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rickheim, David G; Nelsen, Christopher J; Fassett, John T; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Hansen, Linda K; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2002-07-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that cyclin D1 plays a pivotal role in the control of the hepatocyte cell cycle in response to mitogenic stimuli, whereas the closely related protein cyclin D3 has not been extensively evaluated. In the current study, we examined the regulation of cyclins D1 and D3 during hepatocyte proliferation in vivo after 70% partial hepatectomy (PH) and in culture. In contrast to cyclin D1, which was nearly undetectable in quiescent liver and substantially up-regulated after PH, cyclin D3 was constitutively expressed and induced only modestly. In the regenerating liver, the concentration of cyclin D3 was only about 10% of that of cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 formed complexes primarily with cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4), which were markedly activated in the regenerating liver and readily sequestered the cell cycle inhibitory proteins, p21 and p27. Cyclin D3 bound to both cdk4 and cdk6. Cyclin D3/cdk6 activity was readily detectable in quiescent liver and changed little after PH, and this complex appeared to play a minor role in sequestering p21 and p27. In cultured hepatocytes, epidermal growth factor or insulin had little effect, but the combination of these agents substantially induced cyclin D1 and cell cycle progression. Inhibition of Mek1 or phosphoinositide 3-kinase markedly inhibited cyclin D1 expression and replication. In contrast, cyclin D3 was expressed in the absence of mitogens and was only modestly affected by these manipulations. In addition, growth-inhibitory extracellular matrix conditions inhibited cyclin D1 but not cyclin D3 expression. In conclusion, these results support the concept that cyclin D1 is critically regulated by extracellular stimuli that control proliferation, whereas cyclin D3 is regulated through different pathways and plays a distinct role in the liver.

  20. A new indole-3-carbinol tetrameric derivative inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 6 expression, and induces G1 cell cycle arrest in both estrogen-dependent and estrogen-independent breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Brandi, Giorgio; Paiardini, Mirko; Cervasi, Barbara; Fiorucci, Chiara; Filippone, Paolino; De Marco, Cinzia; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Magnani, Mauro

    2003-07-15

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), autolysis product of glucosinolates present in cruciferous vegetables, has been indicated as a promising agent in preventing the development and progression of breast cancer. I3C has been shown to inhibit the growth of human cancer cells in vitro and possesses anticarcinogenic activity in vivo. Because I3C is unstable and may be converted into many polymeric products in the digestive tract, it is not yet clear whether the biological activity observed can be attributed to I3C or some of its polymeric products. In this study we synthesized a stable I3C cyclic tetrameric derivative and investigated its effects on a panel of human breast cancer cell lines. The I3C tetramer suppressed the growth of both estrogen receptor (ER) -positive (MCF-7, 734B, and BT474) and ER-negative (BT20, MDA-MB-231, and BT539) human breast cancer cell lines, and it was found to induce G(1) cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner without evidence of apoptosis, suggesting a growth arrest via a cytostatic mechanism. At the molecular level, the tetramer inhibited cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 6 expression and activity, induced an increase in the level of p27(kip1), and reduced the level of retinoblastoma protein expression. Contrarily to CDK6, the level of CDK4, the other kinase involved in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, remains unchanged. Interestingly, the tetramer resulted about five times more active than I3C in suppressing the growth of human breast cancer cells. On the whole, our data suggest that the I3C tetrameric derivative is a novel lead inhibitor of breast cancer cell growth that may be a considered a new, promising therapeutic agent for both ER+ and ER- breast cancer.

  1. Mitosis-Specific Promoter of the Alfalfa Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Gene (Medsa;CDKB2;1) Is Activated by Wounding and Ethylene in a Non-Cell Division-Dependent Manner1[W

    PubMed Central

    Zhiponova, Miroslava K.; Pettkó-Szandtner, Aladár; Stelkovics, Éva; Neer, Zsuzsanna; Bottka, Sándor; Krenács, Tibor; Dudits, Dénes; Fehér, Attila; Szilák, László

    2006-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent serine/threonine kinases (CDKs) have pivotal roles in regulating the eukaryotic cell cycle. Plants possess a unique class of CDKs (B-type CDKs) with preferential protein accumulation at G2/M-phases; however, their exact functions are still enigmatic. Here we describe the functional characterization of a 360-bp promoter region of the alfalfa (Medicago sativa) CDKB2;1 gene in transgenic plants and cell lines. It is shown that the activity of the analyzed promoter was characteristic for proliferating meristematic regions in planta and specific for cells in the G2/M-phases in synchronized cell cultures. Immunohistochemical analysis of transgenic root sections further confirmed the correlation of the expression of the CDKB2;1 promoter-linked reporter genes with the accumulation of the correspondent kinase. It was found that, in addition to auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) treatment, wounding could also induce both the reporter and endogenous genes in transgenic leaf explants. Furthermore, ethylene, known as a wound-response mediator, had a similar effect. The gene activation in response to wounding or ethephon was faster and occurred without the induction of cell cycle progression in contrast to the control auxin treatment. In silico analysis of this promoter indeed revealed the presence of a set of cis-elements, indicating not only cell cycle- but wound- and ethylene-dependent regulation of this CDK gene. Based on the presented data, we discuss the functional significance of the complex regulation of mitosis-specific CDK genes in plants. PMID:16407448

  2. Degradation of p21Cip1 through anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and its activator Cdc20 (APC/CCdc20) ubiquitin ligase complex-mediated ubiquitylation is inhibited by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Goto, Ikuko; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Yasukawa, Takashi; Aso, Teijiro; Okazaki, Tomoki; Kitajima, Shigetaka

    2011-12-23

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Cip1 plays a crucial role in regulating cell cycle arrest and differentiation. It is known that p21Cip1 increases during terminal differentiation of cardiomyocytes, but its expression control and biological roles are not fully understood. Here, we show that the p21Cip1 protein is stabilized in cardiomyocytes after mitogenic stimulation, due to its increased CDK2 binding and inhibition of ubiquitylation. The APC/CCdc20 complex is shown to be an E3 ligase mediating ubiquitylation of p21Cip1 at the N terminus. CDK2, but not CDC2, suppressed the interaction of p21Cip1 with Cdc20, thereby leading to inhibition of anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and its activator Cdc20 (APC/CCdc20)-mediated p21Cip1 ubiquitylation. It was further demonstrated that p21Cip1 accumulation caused G2 arrest of cardiomyocytes that were forced to re-enter the cell cycle. Taken together, these data show that the stability of the p21Cip1 protein is actively regulated in terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes and plays a role in inhibiting their uncontrolled cell cycle progression. Our study provides a novel insight on the control of p21Cip1 by ubiquitin-mediated degradation and its implication in cell cycle arrest in terminal differentiation.

  3. In situ allicin generation using targeted alliinase delivery for inhibition of MIA PaCa-2 cells via epigenetic changes, oxidative stress and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) expression.

    PubMed

    Chhabria, Sagar V; Akbarsha, Mohammad A; Li, Albert P; Kharkar, Prashant S; Desai, Krutika B

    2015-10-01

    Allicin, an extremely active constituent of freshly crushed garlic, is produced upon reaction of substrate alliin with the enzyme alliinase (EC 4.4.1.4). Allicin has been shown to be toxic to several mammalian cells in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. In the present study this cytotoxicity was taken to advantage to develop a novel approach to cancer treatment, based on site directed generation of allicin. Alliinase was chemically conjugated to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) which was directed against a specific pancreatic cancer marker, CA19-9. After the CA19-9 mAb-alliinase conjugate was bound to targeted pancreatic cancer cells (MIA PaCa-2 cells), on addition of alliin, the cancer cell-localized alliinase produced allicin, which effectively induced apoptosis in MIA PaCa-2 cells. Specificity of anticancer activity of in situ generated allicin was demonstrated using a novel in vitro system-integrated discrete multiple organ co-culture technique. Further, allicin-induced caspase-3 expression, DNA fragmentation, cell cycle arrest, p21(Waf1/Cip1) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor expression, ROS generation, GSH depletion, and led to various epigenetic modifications which resulted in stimulation of apoptosis. This approach offers a new therapeutic strategy, wherein alliin and alliinase-bound antibody work together to produce allicin at targeted locations which would reverse gene silencing and suppress cancer cell growth, suggesting that combination of these targeted agents may improve pancreatic cancer therapy.

  4. Transcriptional analysis of an E2F gene signature as a biomarker of activity of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor PHA-793887 in tumor and skin biopsies from a phase I clinical study.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Giuseppe; Bosotti, Roberta; Ciomei, Marina; Brasca, Maria G; Calogero, Raffaele; Mercurio, Ciro; Fiorentini, Francesco; Bertolotti, Matteo; Scacheri, Emanuela; Scaburri, Angela; Galvani, Arturo; Pesenti, Enrico; De Baere, Thierry; Soria, Jean-Charles; Lazar, Vladimir; Isacchi, Antonella

    2010-05-01

    A transcriptional signature of the pan-cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor PHA-793887 was evaluated as a potential pharmacodynamic and/or response biomarker in tumor and skin biopsies from patients treated in a phase I clinical study. We first analyzed the expression of a number of known E2F-dependent genes that were predicted to be modulated after Cdk2 and Cdk4 inhibition in xenograft tumor and skin samples of mice treated with the compound. This panel of 58 selected genes was then analyzed in biopsies from seven patients treated with PHA-793887 in a phase I dose escalation clinical trial in solid tumors. Quantitative real-time PCR or microarray analyses were done in paired skin and tumor biopsies obtained at baseline and at cycle 1. Analysis by quantitative real-time PCR of the signature in skin biopsies of patients treated at three different doses showed significant transcriptional downregulation with a dose-response correlation. These data show that PHA-793887 modulates genes involved in cell cycle regulation and proliferation in a clinical setting. The observed changes are consistent with its mechanism of action and correlate with target modulation in skin and with clinical benefit in tumors.

  5. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 7 Controls mRNA Synthesis by Affecting Stability of Preinitiation Complexes, Leading to Altered Gene Expression, Cell Cycle Progression, and Survival of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Timothy W. R.; Baumgart, Karen; Eickhoff, Jan; Albert, Thomas; Antrecht, Claudia; Lemcke, Sarah; Klebl, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) activates cell cycle CDKs and is a member of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Although there is substantial evidence for an active role of CDK7 in mRNA synthesis and associated processes, the degree of its influence on global and gene-specific transcription in mammalian species is unclear. In the current study, we utilize two novel inhibitors with high specificity for CDK7 to demonstrate a restricted but robust impact of CDK7 on gene transcription in vivo and in in vitro-reconstituted reactions. We distinguish between relative low- and high-dose responses and relate them to distinct molecular mechanisms and altered physiological responses. Low inhibitor doses cause rapid clearance of paused RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules and sufficed to cause genome-wide alterations in gene expression, delays in cell cycle progression at both the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, and diminished survival of human tumor cells. Higher doses and prolonged inhibition led to strong reductions in RNAPII carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation, eventual activation of the p53 program, and increased cell death. Together, our data reason for a quantitative contribution of CDK7 to mRNA synthesis, which is critical for cellular homeostasis. PMID:25047832

  6. A Novel Non-agonist Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) Ligand UHC1 Blocks PPARγ Phosphorylation by Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5) and Improves Insulin Sensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Sil; Kim, Eun Sun; Koh, Minseob; Lee, Soo-Jin; Lim, Donghyun; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Seo, Kyung-ah; Min, Sang-Hyun; Lee, In Hee; Park, Seung Bum; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Choi, Jang Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Thiazolidinedione class of anti-diabetic drugs which are known as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) ligands have been used to treat metabolic disorders, but thiazolidinediones can also cause several severe side effects, including congestive heart failure, fluid retention, and weight gain. In this study, we describe a novel synthetic PPARγ ligand UNIST HYUNDAI Compound 1 (UHC1) that binds tightly to PPARγ without the classical agonism and which blocks cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5)-mediated PPARγ phosphorylation. We modified the non-agonist PPARγ ligand SR1664 chemically to improve its solubility and then developed a novel PPARγ ligand, UHC1. According to our docking simulation, UHC1 occupied the ligand-binding site of PPARγ with a higher docking score than SR1664. In addition, UHC1 more potently blocked CDK5-mediated PPARγ phosphorylation at Ser-273. Surprisingly, UHC1 treatment effectively ameliorated the inflammatory response both in vitro and in high-fat diet-fed mice. Furthermore, UHC1 treatment dramatically improved insulin sensitivity in high-fat diet-fed mice without causing fluid retention and weight gain. Taken together, compared with SR1664, UHC1 exhibited greater beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism by blocking CDK5-mediated PPARγ phosphorylation, and these data indicate that UHC1 could be a novel therapeutic agent for use in type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders. PMID:25100724

  7. Tob2, a novel anti-proliferative Tob/BTG1 family member, associates with a component of the CCR4 transcriptional regulatory complex capable of binding cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Ikematsu, N; Yoshida, Y; Kawamura-Tsuzuku, J; Ohsugi, M; Onda, M; Hirai, M; Fujimoto, J; Yamamoto, T

    1999-12-09

    Human cDNAs encoding a novel member of Tob/BTG1 anti-proliferative family proteins were cloned. The putative protein product termed Tob2 consisted of 344 amino acids with high similarity to the Tob protein. The tob2 mRNA was 4.1 kb long and was ubiquitously expressed in human adult tissues, as was revealed by Northern blot hybridization. However, further in situ hybridization analysis showed a characteristic expression of the tob2 mRNA in oocytes, suggesting a unique role of Tob2 in oogenesis. Like the Tob protein, Tob2 inhibited cell cycle progression from the G0/G1 to S phases. Intriguingly, the amino-terminal half of Tob2 as well as that of Tob was associated with a human homologue of yeast Caf1, a component of the CCR4 transcription factor complex. Moreover, Caf1 was associated with cyclin dependent kinases. These data suggested that both Tob and Tob2 were involved in cell cycle regulation through their interaction with Caf1. Finally, the tob2 gene was mapped to human chromosome 22q13.1-q13.31.

  8. Novel dipeptidyl proteasome inhibitors overcome Bcl-2 protective function and selectively accumulate the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 and induce apoptosis in transformed, but not normal, human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    An, B; Goldfarb, R H; Siman, R; Dou, Q P

    1998-12-01

    It has been suggested that overexpression of the Bcl-2 oncoprotein in human cancer cells contributes to their resistance to apoptosis induced by chemotherapy. We report here that a novel dipeptidyl proteasome inhibitor, CEP1612, at low concentrations rapidly induces apoptosis in human Jurkat T cells overexpressing Bcl-2 and also in all human prostate, breast, tongue and brain tumor cell lines we have tested to date, without exception. In contrast, etoposide, a standard anticancer drug, fails to kill these cells when employed under the same conditions. The apoptosis-inducing abilities of CEP1612 and its analogous compounds match precisely their order for inhibition of the proteasome chymotrypsin-like activity. CEP1612-induced apoptosis is p53-independent, inhibitable by a tetrapeptide caspase inhibitor, and associated with accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27. Furthermore, CEP1612 selectively accumulates p27 and induces apoptosis in simian virus 40-transformed, but not the parental normal, human fibroblasts. Proteasome inhibitors such as those investigated herein might therefore have potential use as novel anticancer drugs.

  9. Cyclin A is required at two points in the human cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, M; Pepperkok, R; Verde, F; Ansorge, W; Draetta, G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclins play a fundamental role in regulating cell cycle events in all eukaryotic cells. The human cyclin A gene was identified as the site of integration of hepatitis B virus in a hepatocarcinoma cell line; in addition, cyclin A is associated with the E2F transcription factor in a complex which is dissociated by the E1A oncogene product. Such findings suggest that cyclin A is a target for oncogenic signals. We have now found that DNA synthesis and entry into mitosis are inhibited in human cells microinjected with anti-cyclin A antibodies at distinct times. Cyclin A binds both cdk2 and cdc2, giving two distinct cyclin A kinase activities, one appearing in S phase, the other in G2. These results suggest that cyclin A defines novel control points of the human cell cycle. Images PMID:1312467

  10. Function of cyclins in regulating the mitotic and meiotic cell cycles in male germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2014-01-01

    The specialized cell cycles that characterize various aspects of the differentiation of germ cells provide a unique opportunity to understand heretofore elusive aspects of the in vivo function of cell cycle regulators. Key components of the cell cycle machinery are the regulatory sub-units, the cyclins, and their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases. Some of the cyclins exhibit unique patterns of expression in germ cells that suggest possible concomitant distinct functions, predictions that are being explored by targeted mutagenesis in mouse models. A novel, meiosis-specific function has been shown for one of the A-type cyclins, cyclin A1. Embryonic lethality has obviated understanding of the germline functions of cyclin A2 and cyclin B1, while yet other cyclins, although expressed at specific stages of germ cell development, may have less essential function in the male germline. PMID:19001847

  11. Role of cyclins in controlling progression of mammalian spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wolgemuth, Debra J; Manterola, Marcia; Vasileva, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Cyclins are key regulators of the mammalian cell cycle, functioning primarily in concert with their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). While their function during mitosis in somatic cells has been extensively documented, their function during both mitosis and meiosis in the germ line is poorly understood. From the perspective of cell cycle regulation there are several aspects of mammalian spermatogenesis that suggest unique modes of regulation and hence, possible unique functions for the cyclins. This review will summarize our current understanding of cyclin expression and function in the male germ line, with particular focus on the A and E type cyclins in the mouse model. While the focus is on mammalian spermatogenesis, we note contrasts with similar functions in the female germ line when relevant and also draw upon observations in other model systems to provide further insight.

  12. Role of cyclins in controlling progression of mammalian spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    WOLGEMUTH, DEBRA J.; MANTEROLA, MARCIA; VASILEVA, ANA

    2014-01-01

    Cyclins are key regulators of the mammalian cell cycle, functioning primarily in concert with their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). While their function during mitosis in somatic cells has been extensively documented, their function during both mitosis and meiosis in the germ line is poorly understood. From the perspective of cell cycle regulation there are several aspects of mammalian spermatogenesis that suggest unique modes of regulation and hence, possible unique functions for the cyclins. This review will summarize our current understanding of cyclin expression and function in the male germ line, with particular focus on the A and E type cyclins in the mouse model. While the focus is on mammalian spermatogenesis, we note contrasts with similar functions in the female germ line when relevant and also draw upon observations in other model systems to provide further insight. PMID:23784826

  13. RNAi mediated silencing of cyclin-dependent kinases of G1 phase slows down the cell-cycle progression and reduces apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sierant, Malgorzata; Piotrzkowska, Danuta; Nawrot, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    One of the hypotheses on the origin of Alzheimer's disease (AD) stems from a close relation between a re-activation of a cell-cycle in post-mitotic neurons and a neural cells death observed in pathologically affected parts of AD brains. In the normal, healthy brain almost all neural cells are terminally differentiated and "locked" in the G0 phase of the cell-cycle. For these cells, the consequence of the re-entry to the cell-cycle is targeting them towards cellular divisions and turning on the apoptotic pathway. We used an RNA interference (RNAi) methodology in neural cells to switch-off genes for two cyclindependent kinases 4 and 6 (cdk4, cdk6), which control the activation of the initial steps of the cell-cycle. As a result, some evidences are delivered that silencing these genes, which are expressed during cell proliferation but inhibited at mature neurons, prevents the stimulation of apoptotic pathways in the neural cells cultured in a oxidative stress conditions and may have a neuroprotective effect. We demonstrate that down-regulation of genes important in the G1 phase of the cell-cycle may play the protective function on the neuronal cells, and can be considered as the promising approach for the potential gene therapy of neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Cyclin E Uses Cdc6 as a Chromatin-Associated Receptor Required for DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Furstenthal, Laura; Kaiser, Brett K.; Swanson, Craig; Jackson, Peter K.

    2001-01-01

    Using an in vitro chromatin assembly assay in Xenopus egg extract, we show that cyclin E binds specifically and saturably to chromatin in three phases. In the first phase, the origin recognition complex and Cdc6 prereplication proteins, but not the minichromosome maintenance complex, are necessary and biochemically sufficient for ATP-dependent binding of cyclin E–Cdk2 to DNA. We find that cyclin E binds the NH2-terminal region of Cdc6 containing Cy–Arg-X-Leu (RXL) motifs. Cyclin E proteins with mutated substrate selection (Met-Arg-Ala-Ile-Leu; MRAIL) motifs fail to bind Cdc6, fail to compete with endogenous cyclin E–Cdk2 for chromatin binding, and fail to rescue replication in cyclin E–depleted extracts. Cdc6 proteins with mutations in the three consensus RXL motifs are quantitatively deficient for cyclin E binding and for rescuing replication in Cdc6-depleted extracts. Thus, the cyclin E–Cdc6 interaction that localizes the Cdk2 complex to chromatin is important for DNA replication. During the second phase, cyclin E–Cdk2 accumulates on chromatin, dependent on polymerase activity. In the third phase, cyclin E is phosphorylated, and the cyclin E–Cdk2 complex is displaced from chromatin in mitosis. In vitro, mitogen-activated protein kinase and especially cyclin B–Cdc2, but not the polo-like kinase 1, remove cyclin E–Cdk2 from chromatin. Rebinding of hyperphosphorylated cyclin E–Cdk2 to interphase chromatin requires dephosphorylation, and the Cdk kinase–directed Cdc14 phosphatase is sufficient for this dephosphorylation in vitro. These three phases of cyclin E association with chromatin may facilitate the diverse activities of cyclin E–Cdk2 in initiating replication, blocking rereplication, and allowing resetting of origins after mitosis. PMID:11257126

  15. Phosphorylation of synaptic GTPase-activating protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) alters the ratio of its GAP activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J; Carlisle, Holly J; Graham, Robert L; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-02-20

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Phosphorylation of Synaptic GTPase-activating Protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII) and Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5) Alters the Ratio of Its GAP Activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Carlisle, Holly J.; Graham, Robert L.; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2015-01-01

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons. PMID:25533468

  17. Functional characterization of a rare germline mutation in the gene encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 (CDKN1B) in a Spanish patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Donatella; De Gisi, Silvia; Riccardi, Miriam; Scrima, Marianna; De Marco, Carmela; Robledo, Mercedes; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of germline mutations in the CDKN1B gene that encodes the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27 in multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1)-like Spanish index patients. The CDKN1B gene has recently been identified as a tumor susceptibility gene for MEN4, with six germline mutations reported so far in patients with a MEN-like phenotype but negative for MEN1 mutations. Fifteen Spanish index cases with MEN-like symptoms were screened for mutations in the CDKN1B gene and the mutant variant was studied functionally by transcription/translation assays in vitro and in transiently transfected HeLa cells. We report the identification of a heterozygous GAGA deletion in the 5'-UTR of CDKN1B, NM_004064.3:c.-32_-29del, in a patient affected by gastric carcinoid tumor and hyperparathyroidism. This deletion falls inside the region that is responsible for CDKN1B transcription and is predicted to destroy a secondary stem and loop structure that includes the GAGAGA element responsible for ribosome recruitment. Accordingly, in vitro studies of coupled transcription/translation assays and transient transfection in HeLa cells showed that the GAGA deletion in the CDKN1B 5'-UTR significantly impairs the transcription of downstream reporter luciferase (of ∼40-60%) and, possibly, the translation of the corresponding mRNA. This mutation was associated with a significant reduction in the amount of CDKN1B mRNA in peripheral blood leukocytes from the patient, as demonstrated by quantitative real-time PCR. Our results confirm that germline CDKN1B mutations may predispose to a human MEN4 condition and add novel evidence that alteration in the transcription/translation rate of CDKN1B mRNA might be the mechanism implicated in tumor susceptibility.

  18. Artemisinin triggers a G1 cell cycle arrest of human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells and inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase-4 promoter activity and expression by disrupting nuclear factor-κB transcriptional signaling.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kalvin Q; Tin, Antony S; Firestone, Gary L

    2014-03-01

    Relatively little is known about the antiproliferative effects of artemisinin, a naturally occurring antimalarial compound from Artemisia annua, or sweet wormwood, in human endometrial cancer cells. Artemisinin induced a G1 cell cycle arrest in cultured human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells and downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) and CDK4 transcript and protein levels. Analysis of CDK4 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs showed that the artemisinin ablation of CDK4 gene expression was accounted for by the loss of CDK4 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that artemisinin inhibited nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) subunit p65 and p50 interactions with the endogenous Ishikawa cell CDK4 promoter. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed that artemisinin disrupts endogenous p65 and p50 nuclear translocation through increased protein-protein interactions with IκB-α, an NF-κB inhibitor, and disrupts its interaction with the CDK4 promoter, leading to a loss of CDK4 gene expression. Artemisinin treatment stimulated the cellular levels of IκB-α protein without altering the level of IκB-α transcripts. Finally, expression of exogenous p65 resulted in the accumulation of this NF-κB subunit in the nucleus of artemisinin-treated and artemisinin-untreated cells, reversed the artemisinin downregulation of CDK4 protein expression and promoter activity, and prevented the artemisinin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a key event in the artemisinin antiproliferative effects in endometrial cancer cells is the transcriptional downregulation of CDK4 expression by disruption of NF-κB interactions with the CDK4 promoter.

  19. Mechanisms and regulation of the degradation of cyclin B.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A

    1999-01-01

    The degradation of the cyclin B subunit of protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B is required for inactivation of the kinase and exit from mitosis. Cyclin B is degraded by the ubiquitin pathway, a system involved in most selective protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. In this pathway, proteins are targeted for degradation by ligation to ubiquitin, a process carried out by the sequential action of three enzymes: the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, a ubiquitin-carrier protein E2 and a ubiquitin-protein ligase E3. In the system responsible for cyclin B degradation, the E3-like function is carried out by a large complex called cyclosome or anaphase-promoting complex (APC). In the early embryonic cell cycles, the cyclosome is inactive in the interphase, but becomes active at the end of mitosis. Activation requires phosphorylation of the cyclosome/APC by protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B. The lag kinetics of cyclosome activation may be explained by Suc1-assisted multiple phosphorylations of partly phosphorylated complex. The presence of a Fizzy/Cdc20-like protein is necessary for maximal activity of the mitotic form of cyclosome/APC in cyclin-ubiquitin ligation. PMID:10582242

  20. Cyclin C mediates stress-induced mitochondrial fission and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Yan, Ruilan; Cooper, Katrina F.; Strich, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo constant fission and fusion cycles. In response to cellular damage, this balance is shifted dramatically toward fission. Cyclin C–Cdk8 kinase regulates transcription of diverse gene sets. Using knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we demonstrate that cyclin C directs the extensive mitochondrial scission induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin or oxidative stress. This activity is independent of transcriptional regulation, as Cdk8 is not required for this activity. Furthermore, adding purified cyclin C to unstressed permeabilized MEF cultures induced complete mitochondrial fragmentation that was dependent on the fission factors Drp1 and Mff. To regulate fission, a portion of cyclin C translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it associates with Drp1 and is required for its enhanced mitochondrial activity in oxidatively stressed cells. In addition, although HeLa cells regulate cyclin C in a manner similar to MEF cells, U2OS osteosarcoma cultures display constitutively cytoplasmic cyclin C and semifragmented mitochondria. Finally, cyclin C, but not Cdk8, is required for loss of mitochondrial outer membrane permeability and apoptosis in cells treated with cisplatin. In conclusion, this study suggests that cyclin C connects stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfission and programmed cell death in mammalian cells. PMID:25609094

  1. Distinct and Overlapping Requirements for Cyclins A, B, and B3 in Drosophila Female Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bourouh, Mohammed; Dhaliwal, Rajdeep; Rana, Ketki; Sinha, Sucheta; Guo, Zhihao; Swan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis, like mitosis, depends on the activity of the cyclin dependent kinase Cdk1 and its cyclin partners. Here, we examine the specific requirements for the three mitotic cyclins, A, B, and B3 in meiosis of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that all three cyclins contribute redundantly to nuclear envelope breakdown, though cyclin A appears to make the most important individual contribution. Cyclin A is also required for biorientation of homologs in meiosis I. Cyclin B3, as previously reported, is required for anaphase progression in meiosis I and in meiosis II. We find that it also plays a redundant role, with cyclin A, in preventing DNA replication during meiosis. Cyclin B is required for maintenance of the metaphase I arrest in mature oocytes, for spindle organization, and for timely progression through the second meiotic division. It is also essential for polar body formation at the completion of meiosis. With the exception of its redundant role in meiotic maturation, cyclin B appears to function independently of cyclins A and B3 through most of meiosis. We conclude that the three mitotic cyclin-Cdk complexes have distinct and overlapping functions in Drosophila female meiosis. PMID:27652889

  2. Phylogenetic analysis reveals the evolution and diversification of cyclins in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhaowu; Wu, Yuliang; Jin, Jialu; Yan, Jun; Kuang, Shuzhen; Zhou, Mi; Zhang, Yuexuan; Guo, An-Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Cyclins are a family of diverse proteins that play fundamental roles in regulating cell cycle progression in Eukaryotes. Cyclins have been identified from protists to higher Eukaryotes, while its evolution remains vague and the findings turn out controversial. Current classification of cyclins is mainly based on their functions, which may not be appropriate for the systematic evolutionary analysis. In this work, we performed comparative and phylogenetic analysis of cyclins to investigate their classification, origin and evolution. Cyclins originated in early Eukaryotes and evolved from protists to plants, fungi and animals. Based on the phylogenetic tree, cyclins can be divided into three major groups designated as the group I, II and III with different functions and features. Group I plays key roles in cell cycle, group II varied in actions are kingdom (plant, fungi and animal) specific, and group III functions in transcription regulation. Our results showed that the dominating cyclins (group I) diverged from protists to plants, fungi and animals, while divergence of the other cyclins (groups II and III) has occurred in protists. We also discussed the evolutionary relationships between cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and found that the cyclins have undergone divergence in protists before the divergence of animal CDKs. This reclassification and evolutionary analysis of cyclins might facilitate understanding eukaryotic cell cycle control.

  3. Regulation of cyclin E stability in Xenopus laevis embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt-(Webb), Yekaterina

    Cyclin-Cdk complexes positively regulate cell cycle progression. Cyclins are regulatory subunits that bind to and activate cyclin-dependent kinases or Cdks. Cyclin E associates with Cdk2 to mediate G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle. Cyclin E is overexpressed in breast, lung, skin, gastrointestinal, cervical, and ovarian cancers. Its overexpression correlates with poor patient prognosis and is involved in the etiology of breast cancer. We have been studying how this protein is downregulated during development in order to determine if these mechanisms are disrupted during tumorigenesis, leading to its overexpression. Using Xenopus laevis embryos as a model, we have shown previously that during the first 12 embryonic cell cycles Cyclin E levels remain constant yet Cdk2 activity oscillates twice per cell cycle. Cyclin E is abruptly destabilized by an undefined mechanism after the 12th cell cycle, which corresponds to the midblastula transition (MBT). Based on work our work and work by others, we have hypothesized that differential phosphorylation and a change in localization result in Cyclin E degradation by the 26S proteasome at the MBT. To test this, we generated a series of point mutations in conserved threonine/serine residues implicated in degradation of human Cyclin E. Using Western blot analysis, we show that similarly to human Cyclin E, mutation of these residues to unphosphorylatable alanine stabilizes Cyclin E past the MBT when they are expressed in vivo. Cyclin E localization was studied by immunofluorescence analysis of endogenous and exogenous protein in pre-MBT, MBT, and post-MBT embryos. In addition, we developed a novel method of conjugating recombinant His6-tagged Cyclin E to fluorescent (CdSe)ZnS nanoparticles (quantum dots) capped with dihydrolipoic acid. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize His6Cyclin E-quantum dot complexes inside embryo cells in real time. We found that re-localization at the MBT from the cytoplasm to the nucleus

  4. Orphan kinases turn eccentric

    PubMed Central

    Mikolcevic, Petra; Rainer, Johannes; Geley, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    PCTAIRE kinases (PCTK) are a highly conserved, but poorly characterized, subgroup of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). They are characterized by a conserved catalytic domain flanked by N- and C-terminal extensions that are involved in cyclin binding. Vertebrate genomes contain three highly similar PCTAIRE kinases (PCTK1,2,3, a.k.a., CDK16,17,18), which are most abundant in post-mitotic cells in brain and testis. Consistent with this restricted expression pattern, PCTK1 (CDK16) has recently been shown to be essential for spermatogenesis. PCTAIREs are activated by cyclin Y (CCNY), a highly conserved single cyclin fold protein. By binding to N-myristoylated CCNY, CDK16 is targeted to the plasma membrane. Unlike conventional cyclin-CDK interactions, binding of CCNY to CDK16 not only requires the catalytic domain, but also domains within the N-terminal extension. Interestingly, phosphorylation within this domain blocks CCNY binding, providing a novel means of cyclin-CDK regulation. By using these functional characteristics, we analyzed “PCTAIRE” sequence containing protein kinase genes in genomes of various organisms and found that CCNY and CCNY-dependent kinases are restricted to eumetazoa and possibly evolved along with development of a central nervous system. Here, we focus on the structure and regulation of PCTAIREs and discuss their established functions. PMID:22895054

  5. Cyclin A2 is an RNA binding protein that controls Mre11 mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Kanakkanthara, Arun; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Limzerwala, Jazeel F.; Baker, Darren J.; Hamada, Masakazu; Nam, Hyun-Ja; van Deursen, Willemijn H.; Hamada, Naomi; Naylor, Ryan M.; Becker, Nicole A.; Davies, Brian A.; van Ree, Janine H.; Mer, Georges; Shapiro, Virginia S.; Maher, L. James; Katzmann, David J.; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin A2 activates the cyclin-dependent kinases Cdk1 and Cdk2 and is expressed at elevated levels from S phase until early mitosis. We found that mutant mice that cannot elevate cyclin A2 are chromosomally unstable and tumor-prone. Underlying the chromosomal instability is a failure to up-regulate the meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11) nuclease in S phase, which leads to impaired resolution of stalled replication forks, insufficient repair of double-stranded DNA breaks, and improper segregation of sister chromosomes. Unexpectedly, cyclin A2 controlled Mre11 abundance through a C-terminal RNA binding domain that selectively and directly binds Mre11 transcripts to mediate polysome loading and translation.These data reveal cyclin A2 as a mechanistically diverse regulator of DNA replication combining multifaceted kinase-dependent functions with a kinase-independent, RNA binding–dependent role that ensures adequate repair of common replication errors. PMID:27708105

  6. CCY-1a-E2 induces G2/M phase arrest and apoptotic cell death in HL-60 leukemia cells through cyclin-dependent kinase 1 signaling and the mitochondria-dependent caspase pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Fen; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lin, Chingju; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Lee, Miau-Rong

    2016-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that 2-[(3-methoxybenzyl)oxy]benzaldehyde (CCY-1a-E2) is a potent compound that acts against multiple human leukemia cell lines. CCY-1a-E2 was also shown to have efficacious anti‑leukemic activity in vivo. However, the molecular mechanism of action of CCY‑1a‑E2 attributed to its anticancer effect remains poorly understood. In the present study, CCY‑1a‑E2 suppressed cell viability in multiple leukemia cell lines (HL‑60, K562, KG‑1 and KG‑1a) via inhibition of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. CCY‑1a‑E2 exhibited a marked toxic effect on HL‑60 cells and displayed low cytotoxicity in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results from flow cytometric analysis indicated that CCY‑1a‑E2 promoted G2/M phase arrest and promoted apoptosis in the HL‑60 cells. CCY‑1a‑E2 treatment upregulated cyclin B, cyclin‑dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), cell division cycle 25C (cdc25C) and p21 protein expression. CCY‑1a‑E2 caused apoptotic cell death and DNA fragmentation as determined by 4',6‑diamidino‑2‑phenylindole (DAPI) staining and DNA gel electrophoresis. Elevated activities of caspase‑8, ‑9 and ‑3 were observed during CCY‑1a‑E2‑induced cell apoptosis; their specific inhibitors were found to block CCY‑1a‑E2‑induced apoptosis, respectively. Moreover, CCY‑1a‑E2 time‑dependently disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and it enhanced the protein levels of Fas/CD95, cytochrome c, Bax, cleaved PARP, as well as attenuated Bcl‑2 expression in the HL‑60 cells. Our results provide direct evidence that supports the future potential therapeutic application of CCY-1a-E2 in leukemia.

  7. Quinazolines as cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sielecki, Thais M.; Johnson, Tricia L.; Liu, Jie; Muckelbauer, Jodi K.; Grafstrom, Robert H.; Cox, Sarah; Boylan, John; Burton, Catherine R.; Chen, Haiying; Smallwood, Angela; Chang, Chong-Hwan; Boisclair, Michael; Benfield, Pamela A.; Trainor, George L.; Seitza, Steven P.

    2010-03-08

    Quinazolines have been identified as inhibitors of CDK4/D1 and CDK2/E. Aspects of the SAR were investigated using solution-phase, parallel synthesis. An X-ray crystal structure was obtained of quinazoline 51 bound in CDK2 and key interactions within the ATP binding pocket are defined.

  8. The PP2A-B56 phosphatase opposes cyclin E autocatalytic degradation via site-specific dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ryan J; Swanger, Jherek; Hughes, Bridget T; Clurman, Bruce E

    2017-01-30

    Cyclin E, in conjunction with its catalytic partner cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), regulates cell cycle progression as cells exit quiescence and enter S-phase. Multiple mechanisms control cyclin E periodicity during the cell cycle, including phosphorylation-dependent cyclin E ubiquitylation by the SCF(Fbw7) ubiquitin ligase. Serine 384 (S384) is the critical cyclin E phosphorylation site that stimulates Fbw7 binding and cyclin E ubiquitylation and degradation. Because S384 is autophosphorylated by bound CDK2, this presents a paradox as to how cyclin E can evade autocatalytically induced degradation in order to phosphorylate its other substrates. We found that S384 phosphorylation is dynamically regulated in cells, and that cyclin E is specifically dephosphorylated at S384 by the PP2A-B56 phosphatase, thereby uncoupling cyclin E degradation from cyclin E-CDK2 activity. Furthermore, the rate of S384 dephosphorylation is high in interphase but low in mitosis. This provides a mechanism whereby interphase cells can oppose autocatalytic cyclin E degradation and maintain cyclin E-CDK2 activity, while also enabling cyclin E destruction in mitosis, when inappropriate cyclin E expression is genotoxic.

  9. The PP2A-B56 Phosphatase Opposes Cyclin E Autocatalytic Degradation via Site-Specific Dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ryan J.; Swanger, Jherek; Hughes, Bridget T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclin E, in conjunction with its catalytic partner cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), regulates cell cycle progression as cells exit quiescence and enter S-phase. Multiple mechanisms control cyclin E periodicity during the cell cycle, including phosphorylation-dependent cyclin E ubiquitylation by the SCFFbw7 ubiquitin ligase. Serine 384 (S384) is the critical cyclin E phosphorylation site that stimulates Fbw7 binding and cyclin E ubiquitylation and degradation. Because S384 is autophosphorylated by bound CDK2, this presents a paradox as to how cyclin E can evade autocatalytically induced degradation in order to phosphorylate its other substrates. We found that S384 phosphorylation is dynamically regulated in cells and that cyclin E is specifically dephosphorylated at S384 by the PP2A-B56 phosphatase, thereby uncoupling cyclin E degradation from cyclin E-CDK2 activity. Furthermore, the rate of S384 dephosphorylation is high in interphase but low in mitosis. This provides a mechanism whereby interphase cells can oppose autocatalytic cyclin E degradation and maintain cyclin E-CDK2 activity while also enabling cyclin E destruction in mitosis, when inappropriate cyclin E expression is genotoxic. PMID:28137908

  10. A roller coaster ride with the mitotic cyclins.

    PubMed

    Fung, Tsz Kan; Poon, Randy Y C

    2005-06-01

    Cyclins are discovered as proteins that accumulate progressively through interphase and disappear abruptly at mitosis during each cell cycle. In mammalian cells, cyclin A accumulates from late G1 phase and is destroyed before metaphase, and cyclin B is destroyed slightly later at anaphase. The abundance of the mitotic cyclins is mainly regulated at the levels of transcription and proteolysis. Transcription is stimulated and repressed by several transcription factors, including B-MYB, E2F, FOXM1, and NF-Y. Elements in the promoter, including CCRE/CDE and CHR, are in part responsible for the cell cycle oscillation of transcription. Destruction of the mitotic cyclins is carried out by the ubiquitin ligases APC/C(CDC20) and APC/C(CDH1). Central to our knowledge is the understanding of how APC/C is turned on from anaphase to early G1 phase, and turned off from late G1 till the spindle-assembly checkpoint is deactivated in metaphase. Reciprocal actions of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) on APC/C, as well as on the SCF complexes ensure that the mitotic cyclins are destroyed only at the proper time.

  11. Regulation of small GTPase activity by G1 cyclins.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Neus; Cemeli, Tània; Monserrat, Ma Ventura; Garí, Eloi; Ferrezuelo, Francisco

    2017-01-27

    Together with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) partner G1 cyclins control cell cycle entry by phosphorylating a number of nuclear targets and releasing a transcriptional program at the end of G1 phase. Yeast G1 cyclins also operate on cytoplasmic targets involved in the polarization of the cytoskeleton and vesicle trafficking. These processes are mainly controlled by the small GTPase Cdc42, and G1 cyclins regulate the activity of this and other small GTPases through the modulation of their regulators and effectors. This regulation is key for different developmental outcomes in unicellular organisms. In mammalian cells cytoplasmic G1 cyclin D1 has been shown to promote the activity of Rac1 and Ral GTPases and to block RhoA. Regulation of these small GTPases by G1 cyclins may constitute a mechanism to coordinate proliferation with cell migration and morphogenesis, important processes not only during normal development and organogenesis but also for tumor formation and metastasis. Here we briefly review the evidence supporting a role of G1 cyclins and CDKs as regulators of the activity of small GTPases, emphasizing their functional relevance both in budding yeast and in mammalian cells.

  12. The assembly, activation, and substrate specificity of Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Stephan C.; Law, Mary E.; Corsino, Patrick E.; Rowe, Thomas C.; Davis, Bradley J.; Law, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting data regarding Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes and, considering the widespread overexpression of Cyclin D1 in cancer, it is important to fully understand their relevance. While many have shown Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes to form active complexes, others have failed to show activity or association. Here, using a novel p21-PCNA fusion protein as well as p21 mutant proteins, we show that p21 is a required scaffolding protein, with Cyclin D1 and Cdk2 failing to complex in its absence. These p21/Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes are active and also bind the trimeric PCNA complex, with each trimer capable of independently binding distinct Cyclin/Cdk complexes. We also show that increased p21 levels due to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents result in increased formation and kinase activity of Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes, and that Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes are able to phosphorylate a number of substrates in addition to Rb. Nucleophosmin and Cdh1, two proteins important for centrosome replication and implicated in the chromosomal instability of cancer are shown to be phosphorylated by Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes. Additionally, PSF is identified as a novel Cdk2 substrate, being phosphorylated by Cdk2 complexed with either Cyclin E or Cyclin D1, and given the many functions of PSF, it could have important implications on cellular activity. PMID:23627734

  13. Cyclin B1–Cdk1 Activation Continues after Centrosome Separation to Control Mitotic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Arne; van Zon, Wouter; Karlsson Rosenthal, Christina; Wolthuis, Rob M. F

    2007-01-01

    Activation of cyclin B1–cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), triggered by a positive feedback loop at the end of G2, is the key event that initiates mitotic entry. In metaphase, anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome–dependent destruction of cyclin B1 inactivates Cdk1 again, allowing mitotic exit and cell division. Several models describe Cdk1 activation kinetics in mitosis, but experimental data on how the activation proceeds in mitotic cells have largely been lacking. We use a novel approach to determine the temporal development of cyclin B1–Cdk1 activity in single cells. By quantifying both dephosphorylation of Cdk1 and phosphorylation of the Cdk1 target anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome 3, we disclose how cyclin B1–Cdk1 continues to be activated after centrosome separation. Importantly, we discovered that cytoplasmic cyclin B1–Cdk1 activity can be maintained even when cyclin B1 translocates to the nucleus in prophase. These experimental data are fitted into a model describing cyclin B1–Cdk1 activation in human cells, revealing a striking resemblance to a bistable circuit. In line with the observed kinetics, cyclin B1–Cdk1 levels required to enter mitosis are lower than the amount of cyclin B1–Cdk1 needed for mitotic progression. We propose that gradually increasing cyclin B1–Cdk1 activity after centrosome separation is critical to coordinate mitotic progression. PMID:17472438

  14. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 binds and activates cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (Cdk4/6) to phosphoryla