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Sample records for cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors non-selective

  1. Cardiovascular effects of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Krum, Henry; Liew, Danny; Aw, Juan; Haas, Steven

    2004-03-01

    Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors represent a significant advance in the management of inflammatory disorders. They have similar efficacy to nonselective 'conventional' nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but a superior gastrointestinal safety profile. However, a significant caveat is the perceived potential of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to cause adverse cardiovascular effects, an issue first raised by the Vioxx Gastrointestinal Outcomes Research (VIGOR) study of rofecoxib (Vioxx, Merck & Co. Inc.). Mechanisms by which cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors may increase cardiovascular risk are selective inhibition of prostaglandin I2 over thromboxane A2 within the eicosanoid pathway, which promotes thrombosis, and inhibition of prostaglandins E2 and I2 within the kidney, which leads to sodium and water retention and blood pressure elevation. In spite of this, the cardiovascular findings from VIGOR are not firmly supported by observations from large cohort studies and other clinical trials of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, including the Celecoxib Long-term Arthritis Safety Study. The two main theories that explain the VIGOR findings are that the comparator used (naproxen; Naprosyn, Roche) is cardioprotective and that very high doses of rofecoxib were used, but at present neither is backed by firm evidence. Indeed, there is now early evidence that selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition with celecoxib may even protect against the progression of cardiovascular disease, on the basis that cyclooxygenase-2 mediates key processes in atherothrombosis. Currently, it is not clear what the net cardiovascular effects of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors are. The data are inconsistent and at best, speculative. It may be also that celecoxib and rofecoxib differ in their cardiovascular effects. Clarification of these issues is of vital importance given the vast number of patients presently taking both types of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. Therefore, what is clear in this situation is

  2. [Cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bernardeau-Mozer, Marianne; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2004-05-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox2) is an inductible isoenzyme of cyclooxygenase undetectable in normal colonic mucosa and overexpressed in 80% colonic tumor. Several works in vitro and in vivo showed that Cox2 plays a key role in the multistep process of colorectal tumorigenesis such apoptosis inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis induction. So that Cox2 represent a potential molecular target in colorectal management and specific Cox2 inhibitors may be useful as chemopreventive as well as therapeutic agent in humans. In animals study Cox2 inhibitors was shown to be effective and in humans Cox2 inhibitors are approved by the Food and Drug Administration as an adjunct to endoscopic surveillance and surgery in patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP). The purpose of this article is to review the relationship between Cox2/Cox2 inhibitors and differents signaling pathways of colorectal carcinogenesis and to precise their possible molecular mechanisms of action. This work although review clinicals data of their efficacy as chemopreventive agent as well as therapeutic in the differents group at risk for colorectal cancer. PMID:15239336

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors: promise or peril?

    PubMed Central

    Mengle-Gaw, Laurel J; Schwartz, Benjamin D

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of two isoforms of the cyclooxygenase enzyme, COX-1 and COX-2, and the development of COX-2-specific inhibitors as anti-inflammatories and analgesics have offered great promise that the therapeutic benefits of NSAIDs could be optimized through inhibition of COX-2, while minimizing their adverse side effect profile associated with inhibition of COX-1. While COX-2 specific inhibitors have proven to be efficacious in a variety of inflammatory conditions, exposure of large numbers of patients to these drugs in postmarketing studies have uncovered potential safety concerns that raise questions about the benefit/risk ratio of COX-2-specific NSAIDs compared to conventional NSAIDs. This article reviews the efficacy and safety profiles of COX-2-specific inhibitors, comparing them with conventional NSDAIDs. PMID:12467519

  4. Specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rubin, B R

    1999-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are currently among the most widely prescribed drugs worldwide. Their therapeutic benefits and their side effects in the gastrointestinal tract and kidney, as well as in hemostasis, are of great importance in modern medicine. Within the past decade, new insights into how NSAIDs produce both their therapeutic benefits and their serious side effects have been discovered. It is now known that there are two froms of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme that metabolize arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. Drugs that specifically inhibit the COX-2 enzyme were formulated and put into clinical trials during the past 5 years. These drugs are now available to treat patients in the United States. Specific COX-2 inhibitors offer the benefit of being able to treat the pain and inflammation of arthritis with potentially little risk of serious gastrointestinal injury.

  5. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors reduce anti-Mycobacterium antibodies in adjuvant arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Turull, A; Queralt, J

    2000-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis, induced by Mycobacterium butyricum, is an experimental immunopathy that shares many features of human rheumatoid arthritis and, as such, is one of the most widely used models for studying the anti-inflammatory activity of compounds. In rats with adjuvant induced arthritis, IgG antibodies to M. butyricum have been detected and autoantigens that cross react with mycobacteria may be involved in the pathogenesis of adjuvant arthritis. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities of two cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors, flosulide and L-745,337, at doses of 0.1, 1 and 5 mg/kg/day, were examined in adjuvant arthritic rats. After 14 days of treatment, a clear dose-dependent inhibition of plantar edema was seen for both flosulide (ID50 lower than 0.1 mg/kg) and L-745,337 (ID50 = 0.4 mg/kg). Plasma levels of IgG anti-M. butyricum antibodies were also decreased by both drugs. In each case the maximal immunosuppressive effect was observed at doses lower than 5 mg/kg. The non-selective COX-2 inhibitor, indomethacin (1 mg/kg) decreased paw edema by 65% and the levels of IgG anti-M. butyricum by 45%. Neither cyclooxygenase selective inhibitors nor indomethacin decreased the delayed hypersensitivity reaction induced by M. butyricum. Thus, in vivo inhibition of COX-2 inhibited articular swelling and also the humoral immune response to Mycobacterium.

  6. A selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 reverses endotoxin-induced pyretic responses in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Chan, C C; Panneton, M; Taylor, A M; Therien, M; Rodger, I W

    1997-05-30

    The anti-pyretic effect of a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, DFU (5,5-dimethyl-3-(3-fluorophenyl)-4-(4-methylsulfonyl)phenyl-2(5H)-furano ne), was examined in conscious, un-restrained squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) using a radio telemetric system. Injection of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, 6 microg kg(-1), i.v.) in squirrel monkeys caused a gradual increase in core body temperature reaching a plateau of 2.07 +/- 0.17 degrees C above baseline at 2 h post-injection. Oral administration of DFU (1 mg kg(-1)) reduced, and DFU (3 mg kg(-1)) completely reversed the lipopolysaccharide-induced pyretic responses. The onset of action of DFU (about 30 min) is in good agreement with the pharmacokinetic profile of this compound in squirrel monkeys. The effect of DFU is comparable to that of a conventional non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), diclofenac (3 mg kg(-1)). Since the plasma levels achieved for DFU at the dose employed in the present study are below the threshold required for inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1, it is concluded that the anti-pyretic effect of DFU can be attributed predominantly to an inhibitory action on cyclooxygenase-2. Thus, lipopolysaccharide-induced pyresis in squirrel monkeys can be used as a model for evaluation of anti-pyretic activity of cyclooxygenase inhibitors. PMID:9200563

  7. Differential inhibition of fracture healing by non-selective and cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Thiede, Mark; Seibert, Karen; Mielke, Cindy; Phippard, Deborah; Svagr, Bohus; Cullinane, Dennis; Einhorn, Thomas A

    2003-07-01

    . Histological analysis at 21 days showed that the calluses in the ketorolac-treated group contained substantial amounts of residual cartilage while neither the control nor the parecoxib-treated animals showed comparable amounts of cartilage at this stage. These results demonstrate that ketorolac and parecoxib delay fracture healing in this model, but in this study daily administration of ketorolac, a non-selective COX inhibitor had a greater affect on this process. They further demonstrate that a COX-2 selective NSAID, such as parecoxib (valdecoxib), has only a small effect on delaying fracture healing even at doses that are known to fully inhibit prostaglandin production.

  8. Pharmacological separation between peripheral and central functions of cyclooxygenase-2 with CIAA, a novel cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Takako; Murata, Yoko; Hizue, Masanori; Matsuura, Tomomi; Naganeo, Rie; Kanai, Yoshihito; Murase, Akio; Sakakibara, Ayano; Fujita, Isami; Nakao, Kazunari

    2006-06-01

    There are many reports concerning the physiological and pathological involvement of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in the central nervous system and peripheral tissue cells. Selective COX-2 inhibitors that mainly distribute peripherally have not been reported thus far. Therefore central and peripheral roles of COX-2 remain classified pharmacologically. In this study, in vivo pharmacological profiles of CIAA ([6-chloro-2-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]acetic acid), a novel selective COX-2 inhibitor which distributes at higher concentrations in plasma than in brain, were compared with those of well-known selective COX-2 inhibitors, celecoxib and rofecoxib. Additionally, the possibility of pharmacological separation between peripheral and central actions of COX-2 with the inhibitors was investigated. CIAA selectively inhibited COX-2 activity compared with COX-1 in in vitro assays with rat whole blood. The compound exhibited lower brain penetration and higher plasma concentration (the brain/plasma concentration ratio was approximately 0.02) than celecoxib and rofecoxib after oral administration. Therefore, CIAA is mainly expected to act peripherally. Edema and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in Carrageenan-injected rat paws, and pyrexia and PGE2 production in the brain in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected rats were measured in in vivo experiments. CIAA exhibited lower ratios of anti-pyretic/anti-edematous activities and of inhibitory activities of PGE2 production in brain/paw than those of celecoxib and rofecoxib, and these ratios well-reflected brain/plasma concentration ratios. In conclusion, we discovered a novel selective COX-2 inhibitor, CIAA, which distributes at higher concentrations in plasma than in brain, which would make possible the pharmacological separation of the peripheral and central functions of COX-2. PMID:16690052

  9. O-desmethylquinine as a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors using AutoDock Vina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damayanti, Sophi; Mahardhika, Andhika Bintang; Ibrahim, Slamet; Chong, Wei Lim; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Tjahjono, Daryono Hadi

    2014-10-01

    Computational approach was employed to evaluate the biological activity of novel cyclooxygenase-2 COX-2 inhibitor, O-desmethylquinine, in comparison to quinine as common inhibitor which can also be used an agent of antipyretic, antimalaria, analgesic and antiinflamation. The molecular models of the compound were constructed and optimized with the density function theory with at the B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) level using Gaussian 09 program. Molecular docking studies of the compounds were done to obtain the COX-2 complex structures and their binding energies were analyzed using the AutoDock Vina. The results of docking of the two ligands were comparable and cannot be differentiated from the energy scoring function with AutoDock Vina.

  10. DNA-PKcs-Dependent Modulation of Cellular Radiosensitivity by a Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kodym, Elisabeth; Kodym, Reinhard; Chen, Benjamin P.; Chen, David J.; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Choy, Hak; Saha, Debabrata

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 has been shown to increase radiosensitivity. Recently, the suppression of radiation-induced DNA-dependant protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity by the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib was reported. Given the importance of DNA-PK for repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end-joining and the clinical use of the substance, we investigated the relevance of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) for the modulation of cellular radiosensitivity by celecoxib. Methods and Materials: We used a syngeneic model of Chinese hamster ovarian cell lines: AA8, possessing a wild-type DNK-PKcs; V3, lacking a functional DNA-PKcs; and V3/WT11, V3 stably transfected with the DNA-PKcs. The cells were treated with celecoxib (50 {mu}M) for 24 h before irradiation. The modulation of radiosensitivity was determined using the colony formation assay. Results: Treatment with celecoxib increased the cellular radiosensitivity in the DNA-PKcs-deficient cell line V3 with a dose-enhancement ratio of 1.3 for a surviving fraction of 0.5. In contrast, clonogenic survival was increased in DNA-PKcs wild-type-expressing AA8 cells and in V3 cells transfected with DNA-PKcs (V3/WT11). The decrease in radiosensitivity was comparable to the radiosensitization in V3 cells, with a dose-enhancement ratio of 0.76 (AA8) and 0.80 (V3/WT11) for a survival of 0.5. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a DNA-PKcs-dependent differential modulation of cellular radiosensitivity by celecoxib. These effects might be attributed to alterations in signaling cascades downstream of DNA-PK toward cell survival. These findings offer an explanation for the poor outcomes in some recently published clinical trials.

  11. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors used for preventing or regressing cancer.

    PubMed

    de Souza Pereira, Ricardo

    2009-06-01

    The current use of antineoplastic drugs in human therapy causes a substancial number of toxic or side effects which consequently lead to a reduction of the amount of drug to be administered, and in some cases to discontinuation of the therapy. A reduction of the amount of drug to be administered or discontinuation of the therapy causes an increase in primary tumour growth and/or the occurrence of tumour metastases. For this reason, the development of new anti-cancer drugs with lower side effects is necessary. This review gives a general idea about the origins of cancer and the importance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in oncogenesis. Evidence from clinical and preclinical studies indicates that COX-2-derived prostaglandins participate in carcinogenesis, inflammation, immune response suppression, apoptosis inhibition, angiogenesis, and tumour cell invasion and metastasis. The recent anti-tumour drugs are based on tests of known selective COX-2 inhibitors and on the drawing and synthesis of new potent derivatives. Maybe, this can be the way to obtain new anti-tumour drugs with very low collateral effects. Selective COX-2 inhibitors are being mixtured with new anti-cancer drugs in order to obtain better results in the regression of cancers. Some natural products are selective COX-2 inhibitors and have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. The relevant patents are discussed.

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and most traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs cause similar moderately increased risks of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hennekens, Charles H; Borzak, Steven

    2008-03-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors relieve pain from inflammatory conditions by decreasing the gastrointestinal side effects from traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Basic research provided plausible mechanisms and some observational epidemiological studies, case-control and cohort, indicated that patients prescribed with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs had increased risks for myocardial infarction and stroke. Because patients prescribed with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors were systematically different, uncontrolled and uncontrollable confounding by indication was as large as the observed risks. Thus, epidemiological studies or their meta-analyses could not discern whether, and if so, how much, the risks were real. A comprehensive meta-analysis of randomized trials indicated that cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors increased the risk of vascular events by 42%, almost exclusively myocardial infarction, as did high-dose regimens of ibuprofen and diclofenac, but not naproxen. Individual clinical judgments and policy decisions should include cardiovascular disease and noncardiovascular disease risks including gastrointestinal side effects and clinical benefits including improved quality of life from less pain and disability.

  13. Premedication with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor meloxicam reduced postoperative pain in patients after oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Yamaguchi, H; Naito, H; Shiiki, K; Izawa, K; Ota, Y; Sakamoto, H; Kaneko, A

    2006-07-01

    The efficacy of the selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor meloxicam for treatment of postoperative oral surgical pain was assessed in a randomized controlled trial. Patients undergoing unilateral mandibular 3rd molar extraction surgery were allocated to 3 groups, A, B and C. After oral premedication of meloxicam 10 mg in group A, ampiroxicam 27 mg in group B and placebo in group C, surgery was completed within 30 min under local anaesthesia using 2% lidocaine. For postoperative pain relief the patients were allowed to take oral loxoprofen (60 mg per tablet). Postoperative pain was evaluated at the clinic on the 1st, 7th and 14th postoperative day (POD) using a visual analogue scale (VAS), as was the number of loxoprofen tablets consumed, and the results were compared among the 3 groups with statistical significance of P<0.05. VAS scores on 1 POD were significantly lower in group A than in group C. Loxoprofen consumption on the day of surgery and 1 POD was significantly lower in group A than in group C (P<0.01). Total analgesic consumption was significantly lower in groups A and B than in group C (P<0.02). The COX-2 inhibitor, meloxicam 10 mg used for premedication reduced postoperative pain compared with control in oral surgery. PMID:16540287

  14. The cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, etodolac, but not aspirin reduces neovascularization in a murine ischemic hind limb model.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kohei; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Tsujimoto, Shunsuke; Uozumi, Naonori; Kita, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Akio; Shimizu, Takao; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2010-02-10

    Cyclooxygenase inhibitors are often prescribed to relieve severe ischemic leg pain in critical ischemic limb patients. Prescription of high doses of aspirin and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors is reported to increase cardiovascular events through suppression of the vasodilative prostanoid prostaglandin I(2) in endothelium. Here, we evaluated the influence of aspirin and etodolac, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on neovascularization using a murine ischemia hind limb model. C57BL/6J mice were treated with aspirin or etodolac for twenty-eight days after induction of ischemia. We exploited a concentration of the agents that suppressed cyclooxygenase activity efficiently, especially in prostaglandin I(2) production. Recovery of limb blood perfusion and capillary density in ischemic limbs was significantly suppressed by etodolac treatment when compared to the aspirin treated group and untreated group. Production of 6-keto prostaglandin F(1alpha) and prostaglandin E(2) was lower in the aspirin treated group when compared with the etodolac-treated group. Also, these concentrations were lower in both treatment groups compared with the untreated group. Immunohistochemical analysis suggested cyclooxygenase-2 was expressed in endothelium but not in inflammatory cells in ischemic tissue from the acute to chronic phase. Cyclooxygenase-1 was expressed strongly in inflammatory cells in the acute phase. Furthermore, bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell transplantation improved neovascularization, whereas aspirin and etodolac did not inhibit these effects. Production of arachidonic acid metabolites by transplanted cells was independent of the improvement of neovascularization. In conclusion, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces ischemia-induced neovascularization. PMID:19879866

  15. Zoledronic acid cooperates with a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor and gefitinib in inhibiting breast and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Melisi, Davide; Caputo, Rosa; Damiano, Vincenzo; Bianco, Roberto; Veneziani, Bianca Maria; Bianco, A Raffaele; De Placido, Sabino; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2005-12-01

    Biphosphonates (BPs) are widely used to inhibit osteoclastic activity in malignant diseases such as bone metastatic breast and prostate carcinoma. Recent studies reported that BPs could also cause a direct antitumor effect, probably due to their ability to interfere with several intracellular signalling molecules. The enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) play an important role in the control of cancer cell growth and inhibitors of COX-2 and EGFR have shown antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in several tumor types. We, and others, have previously shown that EGFR and COX-2 may be directly related to each other and that their selective inhibitors may have a cooperative effect. In the present study we have evaluated the combined effect of zoledronic acid, the most potent nitrogen-containing BP, with the COX-2 inhibitor SC-236 and the selective EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib, on breast and prostate cancer models in vitro and in xenografted nude mice. We show that combination of zoledronic acid with SC-236 and gefitinib causes a cooperative antitumor effect accompanied by induction of apoptosis and regulation of the expression of mitogenic factors, proangiogenic factors and cell cycle controllers both in vitro and in xenografted nude mice. The modulatory effect on protein expression and the inhibitory effect on tumor growth is much more potent when the three agents are used together. Since studies are ongoing to explore the antitumor effect of zoledronic acid, our results provide new insights into the mechanism of action of these agents and a novel rationale to translate this feasible combination treatment strategy into a clinical setting.

  16. Interferon-α and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor cooperatively mediates TRAIL-induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Chaohui; Qiu, Xiaoxin; Liu, Nianli; Yang, Darong; Xia, Man; Liu, Jingshi; Wang, Xiaohong; and others

    2015-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has recently been recognized to harbor therapeutic potential in the prevention and treatment of HCC, but it remains controversial as to whether IFN-α exerts direct cytotoxicity against HCC. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is overexpressed in HCC and is considered to play a role in hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the combined effect of a COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, and IFN-α on in vitro growth suppression of HCC using the hepatoma cell line HLCZ01 and the in vivo nude mouse xenotransplantation model using HLCZ01 cells. Treatment with celecoxib and IFN-α synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptosis was identified by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride and fluorescent staining. IFN-α upregulated the expression of TRAIL, while celecoxib increased the expression of TRAIL receptors. The combined regimen with celecoxib and IFN-α reduced the growth of xenotransplanted HCCs in nude mice. The regulation of IFN-α- and COX-2 inhibitor-induced cell death is impaired in a subset of TRAIL-resistant cells. The molecular mechanisms of HCC cells resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis were explored using molecular biological and immunological methods. Interferon-α and the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib synergistically increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma. These data suggest that IFN-α and celecoxib may offer a novel role with important implications in designing new therapeutics for TRAIL-resistant tumors. - Highlights: ●The cytotoxic effect of TRAIL on a developed HCC HLCZ01 cells infected with HBV. ●IFN-α and celecoxib induced apoptosis in HLCZ01 cells infected with HBV. ●The combined regime reduced the growth of xenotransplanted HCCs in nude mice model.

  17. Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor Reduces Hepatic Stiffness in Pediatric Chronic Liver Disease Patients Following Kasai Portoenterostomy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hye Kyung; Chang, Eun Young; Ryu, Seonae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to define the role of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (COX-2i) in reducing hepatic fibrosis in pediatric patients with chronic liver disease. Materials and Methods From September 2009 to September 2010, patients over 2 years old who visited our outpatient clinic for follow-up to manage their chronic liver disease after Kasai portoenterostomy for biliary atresia, were included in this study. Volunteers were assigned to the study or control groups, according to their preference. A COX-2i was given to only the study group after obtaining consent. The degree of hepatic fibrosis (liver stiffness score, LSS) was prospectively measured using FibroScan, and liver function was examined using serum analysis before and after treatment. After 1 year, changes in LSSs and liver function were compared between the two groups. Results Twenty-five patients (18 females and 7 males) were enrolled in the study group. The control group included 44 patients (26 females and 18 males). After 1 year, the least square mean values for the LSSs were significantly decreased by 3.91±0.98 kPa (p=0.004) only in the study group. Serum total bilirubin did not decrease significantly in either group. Conclusion COX-2i treatment improved the LSS in patients with chronic liver disease after Kasai portoenterostomy for biliary atresia. PMID:27189282

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, inhibits leiomyoma cell proliferation through the nuclear factor κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Bin; Jee, Byung Chul; Kim, Seok Hyun; Cho, Yeon Jean; Han, Myoungseok

    2014-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitor, decreases the in vitro proliferation of leiomyoma cells if the inflammatory pathway is blocked. Menstruation is an inflammation of uterus that produces cytokines and prostanoids, but the inflammatory mechanism underlying the growth of leiomyoma remains unexplained. Using in vitro cultures of leiomyoma cells obtained from 5 patients who underwent hysterectomy, cell proliferation, inflammatory signaling, transcription factors, growth factors, and extracellular matrix were examined by (4,5-dimethylthiaxol-2-yi)-2,5-diphenyltetraxolium bromide assay, immunoblotting, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Prostaglandin E2 was used to induce menstruation-like condition in the cells. We found that celecoxib inhibited COX-2 through the expression of nuclear factor κB in the cells. Celcoxib also decreased the gene expression of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor α, collagen A, fibronectin, platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and transforming growth factor β. In conclusion, the present study indicated that celecoxib could inhibit leiomyoma cell proliferation through blocking the inflammatory pathway that is probably one of the mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis.

  19. Study of osteoarthritis treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs: cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor and steroids.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongsik; Walker, Andrew; Williams, Jeb; Hasty, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA), a condition characterized by cartilage degradation, are often treated with steroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective NSAIDs. Due to their inhibition of the inflammatory cascade, the drugs affect the balance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and inflammatory cytokines, resulting in preservation of extracellular matrix (ECM). To compare the effects of these treatments on chondrocyte metabolism, TNF-α was incubated with cultured chondrocytes to mimic a proinflammatory environment with increasing production of MMP-1 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The chondrocytes were then treated with either a steroid (prednisone), a nonspecific COX inhibitor NSAID (piroxicam), or a COX-2 selective NSAID (celecoxib). Both prednisone and celecoxib decreased MMP-1 and PGE-2 production while the nonspecific piroxicam decreased only the latter. Both prednisone and celecoxib decreased gene expression of MMP-1 and increased expression of aggrecan. Increased gene expression of type II collagen was also noted with celecoxib. The nonspecific piroxicam did not show these effects. The efficacy of celecoxib in vivo was investigated using a posttraumatic OA (PTOA) mouse model. In vivo, celecoxib increases aggrecan synthesis and suppresses MMP-1. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that celecoxib and steroids exert similar effects on MMP-1 and PGE2 production in vitro and that celecoxib may demonstrate beneficial effects on anabolic metabolism in vivo.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and safety of JTE-522, a novel selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, in healthy male volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yasuhiko; Umemura, Kazuo; Kondo, Kazunao; Nakashima, Mitsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Takuo; Takahashi, Mitsuru

    2002-01-01

    Aims The pharmacokinetics and safety profile of JTE-522, 4-(4-cyclohexyl-2 methyloxazol-5-yl)-2-fluorobenzensulphonamide, a novel selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor were investigated in healthy male volunteers. Methods Initially, as a pilot study, five groups of two subjects were given oral doses of 3–100 mg of JTE-522. After safety assessment, subjects were given 150 and 200 mg of JTE-522. The effect of food-intake on the pharmacokinetics of JTE-522 at a dose of 150 mg was examined. In the multiple-dose study, subjects were given 150 mg of JTE-522 once a day for 7 days. Concentrations of unchanged JTE-522 in plasma, blood and urine were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). Concentrations of metabolites were estimated with h.p.l.c. chromatograms and calibration curves for quantification of unchanged JTE-522. Results In the course of this study, no serious abnormality attributable to the test drug was observed, suggesting that JTE-522 was well tolerated in healthy subjects. In a single-dose study, the concentrations of JTE-522 in blood were much higher than the corresponding concentrations in plasma. JTE-522 was readily distributed to blood cells and percentage distribution into blood cells was more than 99.0%. However, the values of Cmax in blood at doses of 100, 150, 200 mg JTE-522 were 15241, 20445 ± 3918 (16333–24556), 20965 ± 3260 (17544–24386) ng ml−1, respectively. These findings suggest that JTE-522 has a high affinity for blood cells and the distribution into blood cells is limited at the higher doses of over 100 mg. In a multiple dose study, pharmacokinetic parameters including t1/2 and AUC after the fourth administration were comparable with that of the seventh administration. Thus, these findings suggest the absence of accumulation on the multiple-dosing of JTE-522. Conclusions These results indicate that JTE-522 has an acceptable pharmacokinetic profile for clinical use without any serious adverse events as we

  1. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk of cardiovascular diseases: are we going to see the revival of cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Głuszko, Piotr; Bielińska, Aneta

    2009-04-01

    The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) is associated with a number of gastrointestinal and other adverse effects. Introduction of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors at the end of the 20th century raised hopes for a substantial reduction in the rate of serious events such as upper gastrointestinal ulcers, bleeding and perforations. In 2004 and 2005, predictions of some pharmacologists were confirmed when the Adenomatous Polyp Prevention on VIOXX trial (APPROVE) and other randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with COX-2 inhibitors showed an increased rate of thrombotic vascular events, including myocardial infarction, in patients treated with coxibs. So far, only limited long-term data on cardiovascular risk associated with non-selective NSAID have been available; however, some studies have suggested that both selective COX-2 inhibitors and traditional NSAID increase the risk of cardiovascular events. For patients at high cardiovascular risk, contradictory warnings and recommendations have been published recently by the American Heart Association, Food and Drug Administration, and by independent experts. The current paper reviews these recommendations and discusses the therapeutic challenge to minimize the risk of serious adverse events associated with the use of NSAID.

  2. Ursolic acid from Plantago major, a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ringbom, T; Segura, L; Noreen, Y; Perera, P; Bohlin, L

    1998-10-01

    A hexane extract of Plantago major was investigated by bioactivity-directed fractionation, using an in vitro cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis inhibition assay, and resulted in the isolation of ursolic acid (1). This triterpenoid showed a significant COX-2 inhibitory effect, directly on the enzyme activity, with an IC50 value of 130 microM and a COX-2/COX-1 selectivity ratio of 0.6. The structural isomer oleanolic acid (2) was found to be less active than 1, with an IC50 value of 295 microM, but showed a similar selectivity ratio (0.8). Furthermore, no significant inhibition on COX-2 or COX-1 was observed by the triterpenoid, 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (3). The direct inhibitory effect of 1 and 2 on COX-2 catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis increased with preincubation, indicating a time-dependent inhibition, while the effect on COX-1 was found to be independent of preincubation time.

  3. A Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor Reduces Vascular Wall Thickness and Ameliorates Cognitive Impairment in a Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Xiao, Weizhong; Li, Qinghua; Deng, Qiuqiong; Chu, Xinquan; Chen, Yang; Pan, Danhong; Fu, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a group of diseases that originate from changes in cerebral small vessels and that cause many conditions, such as cognitive impairment. However, there is no effective therapy for these diseases. Recent studies have suggested that inflammation is associated with this disease. Cyclooxygenase-2 (cox-2) is an inflammatory mediator; however, whether a cox-2 inhibitor could protect against the CSVD progression remains unknown. In the present study, stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRsp) were used as a model of CSVD, and Sprague Dawley (SD) rats served as the control. SHRsp were treated with the cox-2 inhibitor celecoxib or vehicle. The Morris water maze test was performed, and vascular morphometry and the expression of collagen I and fibronectin were examined in cerebral small vessels and cerebral tissue. The results revealed that thickened small veesel walls, increased expression of collagen I and fibronectin and impaired cognitive function in SHRsp compared with SD rats. Additionally, celecoxib significantly down-regulated the expression of collagen I and fibronectin, attenuated the increase in vascular wall thickness and ameliorates the cognitive impairment. Our study indicated that this cox-2 inhibitor may serve as a promising candidate for the pharmacological intervention of CSVD. PMID:26159203

  4. Comparison of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors use in Australia and Nova Scotia (Canada)

    PubMed Central

    Barozzi, Nadia; Sketris, Ingrid; Cooke, Charmaine; Tett, Susan

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors were marketed aggressively and their rapid uptake caused safety concerns and budgetary challenges in Canada and Australia. The objectives of this study were to compare and contrast COX-2 inhibitors and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (ns-NSAID) use in Nova Scotia (Canada) and Australia and to identify lessons learned from the two jurisdictions. METHODS Ns-NSAID and COX-2 inhibitor Australian prescription data (concession beneficiaries) were downloaded from the Medicare Australia website (2001–2006). Similar Pharmacare data were obtained for Nova Scotia (seniors and those receiving Community services). Defined daily doses per 1000 beneficiaries day−1 were calculated. COX-2 inhibitors/all NSAIDs ratios were calculated for Australia and Nova Scotia. Ns-NSAIDs were divided into low, moderate and high risk for gastrointestinal side-effects and the proportions of use in each group were determined. Which drugs accounted for 90% of use was also calculated. RESULTS Overall NSAID use was different in Australia and Nova Scotia. However, ns-NSAID use was similar. COX-2 inhibitor dispensing was higher in Australia. The percentage of COX-2 inhibitor prescriptions over the total NSAID use was different in the two countries. High-risk NSAID use was much higher in Australia. Low-risk NSAID prescribing increased in Nova Scotia over time. The low-risk/high-risk ratio was constant throughout over the period in Australia and increased in Nova Scotia. CONCLUSIONS There are significant differences in Australia and Nova Scotia in use of NSAIDs, mainly due to COX-2 prescribing. Nova Scotia has a higher proportion of low-risk NSAID use. Interventions to provide physicians with information on relative benefits and risks of prescribing specific NSAIDs are needed, including determining their impact. PMID:19660008

  5. Etodolac, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, attenuates paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model of mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Ito, Sunao; Tajima, Koyuki; Nogawa, Masaki; Inoue, Naoki; Kyoi, Takashi; Takahashi, Yosuke; Sasagawa, Takahiro; Nakamura, Akio; Kotera, Takashi; Ueda, Makoto; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Banno, Kouji

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor etodolac on the mechanical allodynia induced by paclitaxel was investigated in mice and compared with the effects of the nonselective COX inhibitors indomethacin and diclofenac, the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib, the calcium channel α(2)δ subunit inhibitor pregabalin, the sodium channel blocker mexiletine, and the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine. The decrease in the paw-withdrawal threshold induced by paclitaxel was reversed by oral administration of etodolac at 10 mg/kg but was not affected by indomethacin, diclofenac, or celecoxib. The antiallodynic effect of etodolac gradually increased during repeated administration, and after 2 weeks the paw-withdrawal threshold at the preadministration point was significantly increased. Pregabalin, duloxetine, and mexiletine also showed an antiallodynic effect in this model. Whereas pregabalin had a preadministration effect similar to that of etodolac during repeated administration, mexiletine or duloxetine had no such effect. There was almost no difference in the distribution of etodolac and diclofenac in nervous tissue, indicating that COX inhibition is unlikely to be involved in the antiallodynic effect of etodolac. Etodolac did not show a neuroprotective effect against morphological transformations such as the axonal degeneration induced by paclitaxel. Instead, etodolac probably acts at the level of functional changes accompanying paclitaxel treatment, such as alterations in the activation state of components of the pain transmission pathway. Our findings suggest that etodolac attenuates paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy by a COX-independent pathway and that it might be useful for the treatment of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22460833

  6. Changes in rates of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage after the introduction of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in British Columbia and Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Mamdani, Muhammad; Warren, Leanne; Kopp, Alex; Paterson, J. Michael; Laupacis, Andreas; Bassett, Ken; Anderson, Geoffrey M.

    2006-01-01

    Background Population rates of upper gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage have been observed to increase with the introduction and rapid uptake of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors. Changes in COX-2 inhibitor use and upper GI bleeding rates in regions with relatively restrictive drug policies (e.g., British Columbia) have not been compared with changes in regions with relatively less restrictive drug policies (e.g., Ontario). Methods We collected administrative data for about 1.4 million people aged 66 years and older in British Columbia and Ontario for the period January 1996 to November 2002. We examined temporal changes in the prevalence of NSAID use and admissions to hospital because of upper GI hemorrhage in both provinces using cross-sectional time series analysis. Results During the period studied, the prevalence of NSAID use in British Columbia's population of older people increased by 25% (from 8.7% to 10.9%; p < 0.01), as compared with a 51% increase in Ontario (from 10.9% to 16.5%; p < 0.01). Hospital admissions because of upper GI hemorrhage increased significantly in Ontario by about 16% on average, or about 2 admissions per 10 000 elderly people, above expected values (p < 0.01). A similar increase was not observed in British Columbia. Interpretation More restrictive drug coverage policies, although limiting access to drugs and their potential benefits, may protect the population from adverse drug effects. PMID:17146090

  7. Comparison of benefit–risk preferences of patients and physicians regarding cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors using discrete choice experiments

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Ji-Hye; Kwon, Sun-Hong; Lee, Ji-Eun; Cheon, Ji-Eun; Jang, Eun-Jin; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate and compare benefit–risk preferences among Korean patients and physicians concerning cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) inhibitor treatments for arthritis. Materials and methods Subjects included 100 patients with arthritis and 60 board-certified orthopedic surgeon physicians in South Korea. Through a systematic review of the literature, beneficial attributes of using Cox-2 inhibitors were defined as a decrease in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index for pain score and improvement in physical function. Likewise, risk attributes included upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications and cardiovascular (CV) adverse events. Discrete choice experiments were used to determine preferences for these four attributes among Korean patients and physicians. Relative importance and maximum acceptable risk for improving beneficial attributes were assessed by analyzing the results of the discrete choice experiment by using a conditional logit model. Results Patients ranked the relative importance of benefit–risk attributes as follows: pain reduction (35.2%); physical function improvement (30.0%); fewer CV adverse events (21.5%); fewer GI complications (13.4%). The physicians’ ranking for the same attributes was as follows: fewer CV (33.5%); pain reduction (32.4%); fewer GI complications (18.1%); physical function improvement (16.0%). Patients were more willing than physicians to accept risks when pain improved from 20% or 45% to 55% and physical function improved from 15% or 35% to 45%. Conclusion We confirmed that patients and physicians had different benefit–risk preferences regarding Cox-2 inhibitors. Patients with arthritis prioritized the benefits of Cox-2 inhibitors over the risks; moreover, in comparison with the physicians, arthritis patients were more willing to accept the trade-off between benefits and risks to achieve the best treatment level. To reduce the preference gap and achieve treatment goals, physicians must better

  8. Hemicrania continua changed to chronic paroxysmal hemicrania after treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Müller, Kai Ivar; Bekkelund, Svein Ivar

    2011-02-01

    Remission of hemicrania continua (HC) and transformation from HC to chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH) are unusual. We report a patient with left-sided HC who, after a period of remission, presented as CPH. The continuous HC headache disappeared completely after initiating treatment with cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, but reappeared on the same side after 14 months remission with paroxysmal, frequent, intense and short-lasting headache attacks accompanied by ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. This happened shortly after the treatment was discontinued because of withdrawal of the COX-2 inhibitor from the market. The response to indomethacin was prompt, and the patient became completely free from her paroxysmal headache with a dose of 50 mg 2 times daily. This case questions a possible modification effect on the course of HC by use of COX-2 inhibitor, as well as further supporting that some aspects of the pathophysiology of HC may resemble those of CPH, and may argue for common biological mechanisms in HC and CPH.

  9. Modulation of Ionizing Radiation-Induced G{sub 2} Arrest by Cyclooxygenase-2 and its Inhibitor Celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Hyun Jung; Kim, Young Mee; Park, Soo Yeon; Park, Ji Sun; Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Shin Ae; Pyo, Hongryull

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Prolongation or attenuation of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced G{sub 2}-M arrest in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpressing or celecoxib-treated cells, respectively, has been previously observed. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we investigated the molecules involved in G{sub 2} checkpoint pathways after treatment with IR {+-} celecoxib. Methods and Materials: Various molecules in the G{sub 2} checkpoint pathways were investigated in HCT-116-Mock and -COX-2 cells. Western blot, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, confocal microscopy, and fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analyses were performed to investigate whether expression and activity of the ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) could be modulated by COX-2 and its selective inhibitors. Results: COX-2 overexpression increased expression and activity of ATR after IR exposure. Celecoxib downregulated ATR in all tested cell lines independent of COX-2 expression, but downregulation was greater in COX-2 overexpressing cells after cells were irradiated. Celecoxib pretreatment before radiation caused strongly inhibited G{sub 2} arrest. Conclusions: COX-2 appears to prolong IR-induced G{sub 2} arrest by upregulating ATR. Celecoxib downregulated ATR preferentially in irradiated COX-2 overexpressing cells. Celecoxib may radiosensitize cancer cells by inhibiting G{sub 2} arrest through ATR downregulation.

  10. [Prevention of colorectal cancer: acetylsalicyclic acid and cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors are only partially effective].

    PubMed

    Kleibeuker, J H; de Vries, E G

    2003-11-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid was recently shown to inhibit the development of colorectal adenomas in subjects with a moderately increased risk for colorectal cancer. The mechanisms by which acetylsalicylic acid and other NSAIDs, including COX-2 inhibitors, exert this effect include: inhibition of COX-2, induction of apoptosis and induction of the P21 protein that controls the development of crypt cells. For the majority of the population, a healthy lifestyle and healthy eating habits are the best means of preventing colorectal cancer. In addition, population-wide screening should be encouraged. For people with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, acetylsalicylic acid only has a partial effect and therefore endoscopic surveillance is still indicated. Sulindac or celecoxib may be useful for patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and in particular for inhibiting the development of rectal adenomas after subtotal colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis. However, in these cases endoscopic surveillance is also still necessary.

  11. Isoorientin, a Selective Inhibitor of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) from the Tubers of Pueraria tuberosa.

    PubMed

    Sumalatha, Manne; Munikishore, Rachakunta; Rammohan, Aluru; Gunasekar, Duvvuru; Kumar, Kotha Anil; Reddy, Kakularam Kumar; Azad, Rajaram; Reddanna, Pallu; Bodo, Bernard

    2015-10-01

    Bioassay-guided fraction of the methanol extract of the roots of Pueraria tuberose DC yielded puerarin, an isoflavone C-glycoside (PT-1), isoorientin, a flavone C-glycoside (PT-2) and mangiferin, a xanthone C-glycoside (PT-3). The extracts and the isolated compounds were screened for potent anti-inflammatory components inhibiting the cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), the target enzymes of inflammation, by employing spectroscopic/polorographic methods. Among these, isoorientin was found to be a potent inhibitor of COX-2with an IC50 value of 39 μM. Docking studies were carried out to understand the interactions of isorientin (PT-2) with COX-2.The structures of the isolates were determined by mass spectrometry and 2D-NMR techniques including HSQC, HMBC, NOESY and 1H-1H COSY experiments. Although isoorientin and mangiferin have been reported from several plant sources, this is the first report of their isolation from a Pueraria species. PMID:26669106

  12. Clinical pharmacology of lumiracoxib: a selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Rordorf, Christiane M; Choi, Les; Marshall, Paul; Mangold, James B

    2005-01-01

    Lumiracoxib (Prexige) is a selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor developed for the treatment of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and acute pain. Lumiracoxib possesses a carboxylic acid group that makes it weakly acidic (acid dissociation constant [pKa] 4.7), distinguishing it from other selective COX-2 inhibitors. Lumiracoxib has good oral bioavailability (74%). It is rapidly absorbed, reaching maximum plasma concentrations 2 hours after dosing, and is highly plasma protein bound. Lumiracoxib has a short elimination half-life from plasma (mean 4 hours) and demonstrates dose-proportional plasma pharmacokinetics with no accumulation during multiple dosing. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, peak lumiracoxib synovial fluid concentrations occur 3-4 hours later than in plasma and exceed plasma concentrations from 5 hours after dosing to the end of the 24-hour dosing interval. These data suggest that lumiracoxib may be associated with reduced systemic exposure, while still reaching sites where COX-2 inhibition is required for pain relief. Lumiracoxib is metabolised extensively prior to excretion, with only a small amount excreted unchanged in urine or faeces. Lumiracoxib and its metabolites are excreted via renal and faecal routes in approximately equal amounts. The major metabolic pathways identified involve oxidation of the 5-methyl group of lumiracoxib and/or hydroxylation of its dihaloaromatic ring. Major metabolites of lumiracoxib in plasma are the 5-carboxy, 4'-hydroxy and 4'-hydroxy-5-carboxy derivatives, of which only the 4'-hydroxy derivative is active and COX-2 selective. In vitro, the major oxidative pathways are catalysed primarily by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 with very minor contribution from CYP1A2 and CYP2C19. However, in patients genotyped as poor CYP2C9 metabolisers, exposure to lumiracoxib (area under the plasma concentration-time curve) is not significantly increased compared with control subjects, indicating no requirement for adjustment

  13. Cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death in experimental colon carcinogenesis: intervening with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2015-01-01

    Relative imbalance in the pathways regulating cell cycle, cell proliferation, or cell death marks a prerequisite for neoplasm. C-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis and a selective COX-2 inhibitor along with piroxicam, a traditional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug was used to investigate the role of cell cycle regulatory proteins and proinflammatory transcription factor NFκB in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Cell cycle regulators [cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), CDK4, and p53], NFκB (p65) pathway, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were evaluated by gene and protein expression, whereas apoptosis was studied by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and apoptotic bleb assay. Molecular docking of ligand protein interaction was done to validate the in vivo results. Cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, and CDK4 were overexpressed in DMH, whereas piroxicam and c-phycocyanin promoted the cell cycle arrest by downregulating them. Both drugs mediated apoptosis through p53 activation. Piroxicam and c-phycocyanin also stimulated antiproliferation by restraining PCNA expression and reduced cell survival via inhibiting NFκB (p65) pathway. Molecular docking revealed that phycocyanobilin (a chromophore of c-phycocyanin) interact with DNA binding site of NFκB. Inhibition of cyclin/CDK complex by piroxicam and c-phycocyanin affects the expression of p53 in colon cancer followed by downregulation of NFκB and PCNA levels, thus substantiating the antineoplastic role of these agents. PMID:25825916

  14. Preclinical pharmacology of robenacoxib: a novel selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    King, J N; Dawson, J; Esser, R E; Fujimoto, R; Kimble, E F; Maniara, W; Marshall, P J; O'Byrne, L; Quadros, E; Toutain, P L; Lees, P

    2009-02-01

    This manuscript reports the results of preclinical studies in the rat with robenacoxib, a novel selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor. Robenacoxib selectively inhibited COX-2 in vitro as evidenced from COX-1:COX-2 IC50 ratios of 27:1 in purified enzyme preparations and >967:1 in isolated cell assays. Binding to COX-1 was rapid and readily reversible (dissociation t(1/2) < 1 min), whilst COX-2 binding was slowly reversible (t(1/2) = 25 min). In vivo, robenacoxib inhibited PGE2 production (an index of COX-2 inhibition) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated air pouches (ID50 0.3 mg/kg) and for at least 24 h in zymosan-induced inflammatory exudate (at 2 mg/kg). Robenacoxib was COX-1 sparing, as it inhibited serum TxB2 synthesis ex vivo (an index of COX-1 inhibition) only at very high doses (100 mg/kg but not at 2-30 mg/kg). Robenacoxib inhibited carrageenan-induced paw oedema (ID50 0.40-0.48 mg/kg), LPS-induced fever (ID50 1.1 mg/kg) and Randall-Selitto pain (10 mg/kg). Robenacoxib was highly bound to plasma protein (99.9% at 50 ng/mL in vitro). After intravenous dosing, clearance was 2.4 mL/min/kg and volume of distribution at steady-state was 306 mL/kg. Robenacoxib was preferentially distributed into inflammatory exudate; the AUC for exudate was 2.9 times higher than for blood and the MRT in exudate (15.9 h) was three times longer than in blood (5.3 h). Robenacoxib produced significantly less gastric ulceration and intestinal permeability as compared with the reference nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), diclofenac, and did not inhibit PGE2 or 6-keto PGF(1alpha) concentrations in the stomach and ileum at 30 mg/kg. Robenacoxib also had no relevant effects on kidney function at 30 mg/kg. In summary, results of preclinical studies in rats studies suggest that robenacoxib has an attractive pharmacological profile for potential use in the intended target species, cats and dogs.

  15. Radiation-enhancement of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell invasion prevented by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, B; Therriault, H; Desmarais, G; Wagner, R; Royer, R; Bujold, R

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recent evidences support that radiation can promote the invasion of cancer cells. As interactions between cancer cells and surrounding stromal cells can have an important role in tumour progression, we determined whether an irradiation to fibroblasts can enhance the invasiveness of breast cancer cells. The role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inflammatory enzyme frequently induced by radiotherapy, was investigated. Methods: Irradiated 3T3 fibroblasts were plated in the lower compartment of invasion chambers and used as chemoattractant for non-irradiated human breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231, which are oestrogen receptor negative (ER(−)) and the oestrogen receptor positive (ER(+)) MCF-7 cells. Stimulation of COX-2 expression in irradiated 3T3 cells was measured by a semi-quantitative qPCR and western blot. Capacity of the major product of COX-2, the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), to stimulate the production of the matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and cancer cell invasion were assessed with a zymography gel and invasion chambers. Results: Irradiation (5 Gy) of 3T3 fibroblasts increased COX-2 expression and enhanced by 5.8-fold the invasiveness of non-irradiated MDA-MB-231 cells, while their migration was not modified. Addition of the COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 completely prevented radiation-enhancement of cancer cell invasion. Further supporting the potential role of COX-2, addition of PGE2 has increased cancer cell invasion and release of MMP-2 from the MDA-MB-231 cells. This effect of radiation was dependant on the expression of membrane type 1 (MT1)–MMP, which is required to activate the MMP-2, but was not associated with the ER status. Although irradiated fibroblasts stimulated the invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 ER(−) cells, no enhancement was measured with the ER(+) cell line MCF-7. Conclusions: Radiation-enhancement of breast cancer cell invasion induced by irradiated 3T3 fibroblasts is not dependant on the ER status, but rather the expression of MT1

  16. Meloxicam, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, increases the level of serum G-CSF and might be usable as an auxiliary means in G-CSF therapy.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Pospísil, M; Znojil, V; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Streitová, D

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoiesis-modulating action of meloxicam, a cyclooxyge-nase-2 inhibitor, has been evaluated in mice. Increased serum level of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) after meloxicam administration has been found in sublethally gamma-irradiated animals. In further experiments hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of meloxicam and G-CSF given alone or in combination have been investigated. Granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells counts were used to monitor these effects. Meloxicam and exogenous G-CSF did not act synergistically when given in combination, but could be mutually substituted during their repeated administration. The results suggest a promising possibility of using meloxicam as an auxiliary drug reducing the high costs of G-CSF therapy of myelosuppression.

  17. Analgesic Efficacy of Firocoxib, a Selective Inhibitor of Cyclooxygenase 2, in a Mouse Model of Incisional Pain

    PubMed Central

    Reddyjarugu, Balagangadharreddy; Pavek, Todd; Southard, Teresa; Barry, Jason; Singh, Bhupinder

    2015-01-01

    Pain management in laboratory animals is generally accomplished by using opioids and NSAIDs. However, opioid use is hindered by controlled substance requirements and a relatively short duration of action. In this study, we compared the analgesic efficacy of firocoxib (a cyclooxygenase-2-selective NSAID) with that of buprenorphine in the mouse model of plantar incisional pain by objective measurement of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia using von Frey and Hargreaves equipment, respectively. Our experimental design included 5 treatment groups: firocoxib at 10 mg/kg IP every 24 h (F10 group); firocoxib at 20 mg/kg IP every 24 h (F20); buprenorphine at 0.2 mg/kg SC every 8 h; intraperitoneal normal saline every 24 h; and sham group (anesthesia, no incision) treated with firocoxib at 20 mg/kg IP every 24 h (sham+F20). All mice underwent nociceptive assays at 24 h before and 4, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery. Buprenorphine alleviated allodynia at all time points after incision. The F10 treatment alleviated allodynia at 4, 24, and 48 h, whereas F20 alleviated allodynia at 24, 48, and 72 h. None of the treatments alleviated thermal hyperalgesia at 4h. Except for F10 and buprenorphine at 24 h, all treatments alleviated thermal hyperalgesia at 24, 48, and 72 h. No significant differences were noted between the 2 doses of firocoxib and buprenorphine regarding mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at all time points. In conclusion, the analgesic efficacy of firocoxib is comparable to that of buprenorphine in this mouse pain model. PMID:26224441

  18. Assessment of the effects of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor rofecoxib on visuospatial learning and hippocampal cell death following kainate-induced seizures in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Tina; Marklund, Niklas; Hillered, Lars; Oliw, Ernst H

    2005-12-01

    Kainate-induced seizures result in hippocampal neurodegeneration and spatial learning deficits in rodents. Previous studies show that rofecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, protects against kainate-induced hippocampal cell death 3 days after seizures. Our aim was to determine whether rofecoxib attenuates visuospatial learning deficits and late neuronal death after kainate-induced seizures. Seizures were induced in Sprague-Dawley rats with kainic acid (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Eight hours later, animals received rofecoxib (10 mg/kg; n = 15) or vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide, n = 11). Animals were then treated daily for additional 2 or 9 days. Visuospatial learning was assessed in the Morris water maze (MWM) on days 5-9 after seizures. Seizure animals learned the MWM task significantly slower than non-seizure controls, but seizure animals showed higher swim speed (P < 0.05). Seizure animals receiving rofecoxib for 2 days showed no significant improvement in acquisition of the task compared to the vehicle group, even though mean latencies in the rofecoxib group were shorter from the third trial day onwards. This tendency was lost when rofecoxib was given for 9 days. TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling showed cell death in limbic structures 9 days after seizures. The time course of kainate-induced hippocampal cell death might be delayed by rofecoxib treatment, as the attenuation of cell death observed 3 days after seizures was no longer present after 9 days. We conclude that even though increasing evidence points to an injurious role of cyclooxygenase-2 products in acute brain injury processes, rofecoxib treatment failed to attenuate seizure-induced visuospatial learning deficits and the late phase of hippocampal neurodegeneration. PMID:16263251

  19. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of New 2-Phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one Derivatives as Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zarghi, Afshin; Kakhki, Samaneh

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop new selective COX-2 inhibitors, a new series of 2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one derivatives possessing a methylsulfonyl pharmacophore group at the para position of the C-4 phenyl ring were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitory activity. In vitro COX-1/COX-2 isozyme inhibition structure-activity studies identified 3-(benzyloxy)-2-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-4H-chromen-4-one (5d) as a potent COX-2 inhibitor (IC50 = 0.07 μM) with a high COX-2 selectivity index (SI = 287.1) comparable to the reference drug celecoxib (COX-2 IC50 = 0.06 μM; COX-2 SI = 405). A molecular modeling study where 3-(benzyloxy)-2-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-4H-chromen-4-one (5d) was docked into the active site of COX-2 showed that the p-MeSO2 substituent on the C-4 phenyl ring was well-oriented in the vicinity of the COX-2 secondary pocket (Arg513, Val523, and His90) and the carbonyl group of the chromene ring could interact with Ser530. The structure-activity data acquired indicated that the nature and size of the substituent on the C-3 chromene scaffold are important for COX-2 inhibitory activity. Our results also indicated that the chromene moiety constitutes a suitable template to design new COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:26839798

  20. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 5-Oxo-1,4,5,6,7,8 Hexahydroquinoline Derivatives as Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zarghi, Afshin; Sabakhi, Iman; Topuzyan, Vigen; Hajimahdi, Zahra; Daraie, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    A group of regioisomeric 5-oxo-1,4,5,6,7,8 hexahydroquinoline derivatives possessing a COX-2 SO2Me pharmacophore at the para position of the C-2 or C-4 phenyl ring, in conjunction with a C-4 or C-2 phenyl (4-H) or substituted-phenyl ring (4-F,4-Cl,4-Br,4-OMe,4-Me, 4-NO2), were designed for evaluation as selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors. These target 5-oxo-1,4,5,6,7,8 hexahydroquinolines were synthesized via a Hansch condensation reaction. In vitro COX-1/COX-2 isozyme inhibition structure-activity studies identified 7,8-dihydro- 7,7-dimethyl-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)quinolin-5(1H,4H,6H)- one (9c) as a potent COX-2 inhibitor (IC50 = 0.17 M) with a high COX-2 selectivity index (S.I. = 97.6) comparable to the reference drug celecoxib (COX-2 IC50 = 0.05 mM; COX-2 S.I= 405). A molecular modeling study where 9c was docked in active site of COX-2 showed that the p-SO2Me substituent on the C-2 phenyl ring is inserted into the secondary COX-2 binding site. The structure activity data acquired indicate that the position of the COX-2 SO2Me pharmacophore and type of substituent are important for COX-2 inhibitory activity. PMID:24711830

  1. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2, but not cyclooxygenase-1 provide structural and functional protection against quinolinic acid-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Salzberg-Brenhouse, Heather C; Chen, Er-Yun; Emerich, Dwaine F; Baldwin, Sam; Hogeland, Ken; Ranelli, Sharon; Lafreniere, Denise; Perdomo, Brigido; Novak, Leah; Kladis, Theodora; Fu, Karen; Basile, Anthony S; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Bartus, Raymond T

    2003-07-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COXs) are implicated in neurodegenerative processes associated with acute and chronic neurological diseases. Given the potential utility of COX inhibitors in treating these disorders, we examined the nonselective COX inhibitor flurbiprofen, the specific COX-1 inhibitor valeryl salicylate (VS), and the COX-2 inhibitor N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]methanesulfonamide (NS-398) for their abilities to protect striatal neurons against a quinolinic acid (QA)-induced excitotoxic lesion. Rats were administered COX inhibitors 10 min before a unilateral QA lesion of the striatum, and then tested 2 to 3 weeks later in a battery of motor tasks (bracing, placing, akinesia, and apomorphine-induced rotations). Lesion volume was assessed using immunohistochemical methods 1 month after lesioning. Orally administered flurbiprofen (50 mg) was highly neuroprotective, preserving 84 to 99% of motor performance (ED50 = 8.6-9.7 mg) while reducing lesion volume 75% (ED50 = 3.2 mg). The identities of the COX isoforms associated with QA-induced neurodegeneration were determined using VS and NS-398. Oral VS was ineffective in virtually all indices of functional neuroprotection. In contrast, oral NS-398 was highly effective, preserving approximately 83% of motor performance at2mg(ED50 = 0.1-0.4 mg), and reducing lesion volume 100% (ED50 = 0.4 mg). Similar results were obtained using inhaled flurbiprofen (2 mg), which preserved 88 to 100% of motor performance while reducing striatal lesion size 92%. These results demonstrate that COX-2 inhibition protects neurons from acute, excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Moreover, formulating a nonselective COX inhibitor into an inhalable preparation dramatically improves its potency in treating acute neuronal damage, a situation where the rapidity of drug delivery and onset of action is critical to clinical efficacy.

  2. Action at a distance: mutations of peripheral residues transform rapid reversible inhibitors to slow, tight binders of cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Blobaum, Anna L; Xu, Shu; Rowlinson, Scott W; Duggan, Kelsey C; Banerjee, Surajit; Kudalkar, Shalley N; Birmingham, William R; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2015-05-15

    Cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin G2. The inhibitory activity of rapid, reversible COX inhibitors (ibuprofen, naproxen, mefenamic acid, and lumiracoxib) demonstrated a significant increase in potency and time dependence of inhibition against double tryptophan murine COX-2 mutants at the 89/90 and 89/119 positions. In contrast, the slow, time-dependent COX inhibitors (diclofenac, indomethacin, and flurbiprofen) were unaffected by those mutations. Further mutagenesis studies suggested that mutation at position 89 was principally responsible for the changes in inhibitory potency of rapid, reversible inhibitors, whereas mutation at position 90 may exert some effect on the potency of COX-2-selective diarylheterocycle inhibitors; no effect was observed with mutation at position 119. Several crystal structures with or without NSAIDs indicated that placement of a bulky residue at position 89 caused a closure of a gap at the lobby, and alteration of histidine to tryptophan at position 90 changed the electrostatic profile of the side pocket of COX-2. Thus, these two residues, especially Val-89 at the lobby region, are crucial for the entrance and exit of some NSAIDs from the COX active site.

  3. Opioid-sparing effect of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors on surgical outcomes after open colorectal surgery within an enhanced recovery after surgery protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the opioid-sparing effect of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors on short-term surgical outcomes after open colorectal surgery. METHODS: Patients undergoing open colorectal resection within an enhanced recovery after surgery protocol from 2011 to 2015 were reviewed. Patients with combined general anesthesia and epidural anesthesia, and those with acute colonic obstruction or perforation were excluded. Patients receiving selective COX-2 inhibitor were compared with well-matched individuals without such a drug. Outcome measures included numeric pain score and morphine milligram equivalent (MME) consumption on postoperative day (POD) 1-3, gastrointestinal recovery (time to tolerate solid diet and time to defecate), complications and length of postoperative stay. RESULTS: There were 75 patients in each group. Pain score on POD 1-3 was not significantly different between two groups. However, MME consumption and MME consumption per kilogram body weight on POD 1-3 was significantly less in patients receiving a selective COX-2 inhibitor (P < 0.001). Median MME consumption per kilogram body weight on POD 1-3 was 0.09, 0.06 and nil, respectively in patients receiving a selective COX-2 inhibitor and 0.22, 0.25 and 0.07, respectively in the comparative group (P < 0.001), representing at least 59% opioid reduction. Patients prescribing a selective COX-2 inhibitor had a shorter median time to resumption of solid diet [1 (IQR 1-2) d vs 2 (IQR 2-3) d; P < 0.001] and time to first defecation [2 (IQR 2-3) d vs 3 (IQR 3-4) d; P < 0.001]. There was no significant difference in overall postoperative complications between two groups. However, median postoperative stay was significantly 1-d shorter in patients prescribing a selective COX-2 inhibitor [4 (IQR 3-5) d vs 5 (IQR 4-6) d; P < 0.001]. CONCLUSION: Perioperative administration of oral selective COX-2 inhibitors significantly decreased intravenous opioid consumption, shortened time to gastrointestinal

  4. Celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, potentiates the chemotherapic effect of vinorelbine in the medullary thyroid cancer TT cell line.

    PubMed

    Vivaldi, A; Ciampi, R; Tacito, A; Molinaro, E; Agate, L; Bottici, V; Pinchera, A; Collecchi, P; Elisei, R

    2012-05-15

    We analyzed the in vitro effects of celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, and determined if celecoxib can sensitize a human MTC-derived cell line (TT) to chemotherapeutics. We found that celecoxib induced apoptosis in TT cells and decreased drug efflux by reducing the expression of MDR-1 mRNA, which codes for the drug efflux pump P-gp. We also observed that TT cells were 10-fold more resistant to doxorubicin than to vinorelbine, mimicking what can be observed in clinical practice. In addition, we found that the combination of celecoxib and vinorelbine, but not doxorubicin, induced a significant reduction in cell viability and a significant increase in apoptosis. In conclusion, we showed that celecoxib was able to enhance the chemotherapeutic effect of vinorelbine. A clinical trial exploring the in vivo activities of celecoxib in MTC patients who cannot benefit from available treatments would be desirable, taking into account the possible risks of cardiovascular effects of this drug. PMID:22305971

  5. Inhibitory effect of etodolac, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on stomach carcinogenesis in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils

    SciTech Connect

    Magari, Hirohito; Shimizu, Yasuhito; Inada, Ken-ichi; Enomoto, Shotaro; Tomeki, Tatsuji; Yanaoka, Kimihiko; Tamai, Hideyuki; Arii, Kenji; Nakata, Hiroya; Oka, Masashi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Tatematsu, Masae; Ichinose, Masao E-mail: ichinose@wakayama-med.ac.jp

    2005-08-26

    The effect of the selective COX-2 inhibitor, etodolac, on Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-associated stomach carcinogenesis was investigated in Mongolian gerbils (MGs). Hp-infected MGs were fed for 23 weeks with drinking water containing 10 ppm N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. They were then switched to distilled water and placed on a diet containing 5-30 mg/kg/day etodolac for 30 weeks. We found that etodolac dose-dependently inhibited the development of gastric cancer, and no cancer was detected at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day. Etodolac did not affect the extent of inflammatory cell infiltration or oxidative DNA damage, but it significantly inhibited mucosal cell proliferation and dose-dependently repressed the development of intestinal metaplasia in the stomachs of Hp-infected MGs. These results suggest that COX-2 is a key molecule in inflammation-mediated stomach carcinogenesis and that chemoprevention of stomach cancer should be possible by controlling COX-2 expression or activity.

  6. Novel di-tertiary-butyl phenylhydrazones as dual cyclooxygenase-2/5-lipoxygenase inhibitors: synthesis, COX/LOX inhibition, molecular modeling, and insights into their cytotoxicities.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Vyas, Alok; Misra, Suniti; O'Brien, Paul; Zambre, Ajit; Fresco, Victor M; Markwald, Roger R; Swamy, K Venkateshwara; Afrasiabi, Zahra; Choudhury, Amitava; Khetmalas, Madhukar; Padhye, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Although dual inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) enzymes is highly effective than targeting COX or LOX alone, there are only a few reports of examining such compounds in case of colorectal cancers (CRC). In the present work we report that the novel di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors DTPSAL, DTPBHZ, DTPINH, and DTPNHZ exhibit significant cytotoxicity against human CRC cell lines. Molecular docking studies revealed a good fit of these compounds in the COX-2 and 5-LOX protein cavities. The inhibitors show significant inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and are effective against a panel of human colon cancer cell lines including HCA-7, HT-29, SW480 and intestinal Apc10.1 cells as well as the hyaluronan synthase-2 (Has2) enzyme over-expressing colon cancer cells, through inhibition of the Hyaluronan/CD44v6 cell survival pathway. Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors reduce the expression of COX-2, 5-LOX, and CD44v6 in human colon cancer HCA-7 cells, while the combination of CD44v6shRNA and DTPSAL has an additional inhibitory effect on CD44v6 mRNA expression. The synergistic inhibitory effect of Celecoxib and Licofelone on CD44v6 mRNA expression suggests that the present dual inhibitors down-regulate cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes through CD44v6. The compounds also exhibited enhanced antiproliferative potency compared to standard dual COX/LOX inhibitor, viz. Licofelone. Importantly, the HA/CD44v6 antagonist CD44v6shRNA in combination with synthetic compounds had a sensitizing effect on the cancer cells which enhanced their antiproliferative potency, a finding which is crucial for the anti-proliferative potency of the novel synthetic di-tert-butyl phenol based dual COX-LOX inhibitors in colon cancer cells.

  7. Novel di-tertiary-butyl phenylhydrazones as dual cyclooxygenase-2/5-lipoxygenase inhibitors: synthesis, COX/LOX inhibition, molecular modeling, and insights into their cytotoxicities.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Vyas, Alok; Misra, Suniti; O'Brien, Paul; Zambre, Ajit; Fresco, Victor M; Markwald, Roger R; Swamy, K Venkateshwara; Afrasiabi, Zahra; Choudhury, Amitava; Khetmalas, Madhukar; Padhye, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Although dual inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) enzymes is highly effective than targeting COX or LOX alone, there are only a few reports of examining such compounds in case of colorectal cancers (CRC). In the present work we report that the novel di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors DTPSAL, DTPBHZ, DTPINH, and DTPNHZ exhibit significant cytotoxicity against human CRC cell lines. Molecular docking studies revealed a good fit of these compounds in the COX-2 and 5-LOX protein cavities. The inhibitors show significant inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and are effective against a panel of human colon cancer cell lines including HCA-7, HT-29, SW480 and intestinal Apc10.1 cells as well as the hyaluronan synthase-2 (Has2) enzyme over-expressing colon cancer cells, through inhibition of the Hyaluronan/CD44v6 cell survival pathway. Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors reduce the expression of COX-2, 5-LOX, and CD44v6 in human colon cancer HCA-7 cells, while the combination of CD44v6shRNA and DTPSAL has an additional inhibitory effect on CD44v6 mRNA expression. The synergistic inhibitory effect of Celecoxib and Licofelone on CD44v6 mRNA expression suggests that the present dual inhibitors down-regulate cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes through CD44v6. The compounds also exhibited enhanced antiproliferative potency compared to standard dual COX/LOX inhibitor, viz. Licofelone. Importantly, the HA/CD44v6 antagonist CD44v6shRNA in combination with synthetic compounds had a sensitizing effect on the cancer cells which enhanced their antiproliferative potency, a finding which is crucial for the anti-proliferative potency of the novel synthetic di-tert-butyl phenol based dual COX-LOX inhibitors in colon cancer cells. PMID:24295787

  8. Kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration and activation of inflammatory processes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures: treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor does not prevent neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Juha T; Ruohonen, Saku; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Plysjuk, Anna; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Holopainen, Irma E

    2011-06-01

    In the postnatal rodent hippocampus status epilepticus (SE) leads to age- and region-specific excitotoxic neuronal damage, the precise mechanisms of which are still incompletely known. Recent studies suggest that the activation of inflammatory responses together with glial cell reactivity highly contribute to excitotoxic neuronal damage. However, pharmacological tools to attenuate their activation in the postnatal brain are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of inflammatory mediators in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal damage in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs). A specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398) was used to study whether or not it could ameliorate neuronal death. Our results show that KA treatment (24 h) resulted in a dose-dependent degeneration of CA3a/b pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, COX-2 immunoreactivity was pronouncedly enhanced particularly in CA3c pyramidal neurons, microglial and astrocyte morphology changed from a resting to active appearance, the expression of the microglial specific protein, Iba1, increased, and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production increased. These indicated the activation of inflammatory processes. However, the expression of neither proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), nor the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 mRNA was significantly altered by KA treatment as studied by real-time PCR. Despite activation of an array of inflammatory processes, neuronal damage could not be rescued either with the combined pre- and co-treatment with a specific COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398. Our results suggest that KA induces activation of a repertoire of inflammatory processes in immature OHCs, and that the timing of anti-inflammatory treatment to achieve neuroprotection is a challenge due to developmental properties and the complexity of inflammatory processes activated by

  9. Selective and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors delay stress fracture healing in the rat ulna.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Lisa J; Cowling, Nick R; Wu, Andy C; Kelly, Wendy L; Forwood, Mark R

    2013-02-01

    Anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used to manage pain associated with stress fractures (SFxs), but little is known about their effects on healing of those injuries. We hypothesized that selective and non-selective anti-inflammatory treatments would retard the healing of SFx in the rat ulna. SFxs were created by cyclic loading of the ulna in Wistar rats. Ulnae were harvested 2, 4 or 6 weeks following loading. Rats were treated with non-selective NSAID, ibuprofen (30 mg/kg/day); selective COX-2 inhibition, [5,5-dimethyl-3-3 (3 fluorophenyl)-4-(4 methylsulfonal) phenyl-2 (5H)-furanone] (DFU) (2.0 mg/kg/day); or the novel c5a anatagonist PMX53 (10 mg/kg/day, 4 and 6 weeks only); with appropriate vehicle as control. Quantitative histomorphometric measurements of SFx healing were undertaken. Treatment with the selective COX-2 inhibitor, DFU, reduced the area of resorption along the fracture line at 2 weeks, without affecting bone formation at later stages. Treatment with the non-selective, NSAID, ibuprofen decreased both bone resorption and bone formation so that there was significantly reduced length and area of remodeling and lamellar bone formation within the remodeling unit at 6 weeks after fracture. The C5a receptor antagonist PMX53 had no effect on SFx healing at 4 or 6 weeks after loading, suggesting that PMX53 would not delay SFx healing. Both selective COX-2 inhibitors and non-selective NSAIDs have the potential to compromise SFx healing, and should be used with caution when SFx is diagnosed or suspected. PMID:22847634

  10. Efficient synthesis of apricoxib, CS-706, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, and evaluation of inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production in inflammatory breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Pijus K; Freiter, Eric M; Bagsby, Allison L; Robertson, Fredika M; McMurray, John S

    2011-10-15

    An efficient synthesis of apricoxib (CS-706), a selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor, was developed using copper catalyzed homoallylic ketone formation from methyl 4-ethoxybenzoate followed by ozonolysis to an aldehyde, and condensation with sulfanilamide. This method provided multi-gram access of aprocoxib in good yield. Apricoxib exhibited potency equal to celecoxib at inhibition of prostaglandin E2 synthesis in two inflammatory breast cancer cell lines. PMID:21903394

  11. The novel benzopyran class of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. Part 2: The second clinical candidate having a shorter and favorable human half-life

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jane L.; Limburg, David; Graneto, Matthew J.; Springer, John; Hamper, Joseph Rogier Bruce; Liao, Subo; Pawlitz, Jennifer L.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Maziasz, Timothy; Talley, John J.; Kiefer, James R.; Carter, Jeffery

    2012-05-29

    In this Letter, we provide the structure-activity relationships, optimization of design, testing criteria, and human half-life data for a series of selective COX-2 inhibitors. During the course of our structure-based drug design efforts, we discovered two distinct binding modes within the COX-2 active site for differently substituted members of this class. The challenge of a undesirably long human half-life for the first clinical candidate 1t{sub 1/2} = 360 h was addressed by multiple strategies, leading to the discovery of 29b-(S) (SC-75416) with t{sub 1/2} = 34 h.

  12. Discovery of a potent cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, S4, through docking-based pharmacophore screening, in vivo and in vitro estimations.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Chuang, Show-Mei; Hsiao, Nai-Wan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lee, Yu-Ching; Lin, Chi-Chen; Huang, Cheng; Tsai, Keng-Chang

    2016-07-19

    Cyclooxygenase (COX; EC: 1.14.99.1), the key enzyme in prostaglandin production in the human body, is a major pharmacological target for developing anti-inflammatory agents. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs exhibit anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities when inhibiting COX-2 but cause gastrointestinal toxicity and other side effects because of concurrent inhibition of COX-1. Thus, potent and safe inhibitors against COX-2 are urgently required. We constructed a novel docking-based pharmacophore model for screening selective COX-2 inhibitors and discovered compounds S1, S2, S3, and S4, which apparently inhibit COX-2. Particularly, S4 inhibits COX-2 in vitro and shows a potent anti-inflammatory effect in vivo without cytotoxicity. Molecular docking analyses revealed that S4 interacted satisfactorily with the active site of COX-2 but not with that of COX-1. This reveals that S4 more specifically inhibits COX-2 and has potential for application in developing anti-inflammatory and anticancer agents.

  13. Regulation of tumorigenic Wnt signaling by cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase and their pharmacological inhibitors: A basis for novel drugs targeting cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Roos, Jessica; Grösch, Sabine; Werz, Oliver; Schröder, Peter; Ziegler, Slava; Fulda, Simone; Paulus, Patrick; Urbschat, Anja; Kühn, Benjamin; Maucher, Isabelle; Fettel, Jasmin; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Piesche, Matthias; Matrone, Carmela; Steinhilber, Dieter; Parnham, Michael J; Maier, Thorsten J

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is a highly conserved pathway with a prominent role in embryogenic development, adult tissue homeostasis, cell polarization, stem cell biology, cell differentiation, and proliferation. Furthermore, canonical Wnt signaling is of pivotal importance in the pathogenesis of a number of cancer types and crucially affects tumor initiation, cancer cell proliferation, cancer cell apoptosis, and metastasis. Reports over the last decade have provided strong evidence for a pathophysiological role of Wnt signaling in non-malignant classical inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Although, several agents suppressing the Wnt pathway at different levels have been identified, the development of clinically relevant Wnt-inhibiting agents remains challenging due to selectivity and toxicity issues. Several studies have shown that long-term administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs protects against colon cancer and potentially other tumor types by interfering both with the COX and the Wnt pathway. Our own studies have shown that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs suppress Wnt signaling by targeting the pro-inflammatory enzyme 5-lipoxygenase which is the key enzyme pathophysiologically involved in the synthesis of leukotrienes. Furthermore, we found a direct link between the 5-lipoxygenase and Wnt signaling pathways, which is essential for the maintenance of leukemic stem cells. Accordingly, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase led to an impairment of Wnt-dependent acute and chronic myeloid leukemic stem cells. We believe that 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors might represent a novel type of Wnt inhibitor activating a potentially naturally occurring novel mechanism of suppression of Wnt signaling that is non-toxic, at least in mice, and is potentially well tolerated in patients.

  14. Structure-activity relationship of novel series of 1,5-disubstituted tetrazoles as cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors: Design, synthesis, bioassay screening and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Jawabrah Al-Hourani, Baker; Al-Awaida, Wajdy; Matalka, Khalid Z; El-Barghouthi, Musa I; Alsoubani, Fatima; Wuest, Frank

    2016-10-01

    A novel class of modified 1,5-disubstituted tetrazoles was designed and synthesized, their biological activity as cyclooxygenases inhibitors was screened, and their molecular docking studies were performed. The structural modifications of the first category included the 4-methylsulfonyl phenyl at C-1 of the central moiety and the linkers (-OH, -CH2OH, -CH2CH2OH) with different lengths at the para position of the N-1 phenyl group. For the second category, the 4-methylsulfonyl phenyl group at C-1 was replaced with 4-aminosulfonyl phenyl. While for the third category, a methylene unit was inserted between the C-1 of the tetrazole central ring and the 4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl group, keeping the same linkers of various extensions at the para position of the N-1 phenyl group. Among the screened compounds, tetrazole 4i showed the best inhibition potency and selectivity values for both COX-2 enzyme (IC50=3μM, SI>67) and COX-1 isoenzyme (IC50>200μM). Compounds 4e, 4h, and 4i, which have the highest inhibition potency toward COX-2 were selected for the molecular docking studies to verify their inhibition and selectivity for COX-2 over COX-1 with their modified structure. The obtained theoretical studies are in agreement with the in vitro bioassay screening results, which supports the importance of the structural modifications for our studied compounds. PMID:27567369

  15. Structure-activity relationship of novel series of 1,5-disubstituted tetrazoles as cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors: Design, synthesis, bioassay screening and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Jawabrah Al-Hourani, Baker; Al-Awaida, Wajdy; Matalka, Khalid Z; El-Barghouthi, Musa I; Alsoubani, Fatima; Wuest, Frank

    2016-10-01

    A novel class of modified 1,5-disubstituted tetrazoles was designed and synthesized, their biological activity as cyclooxygenases inhibitors was screened, and their molecular docking studies were performed. The structural modifications of the first category included the 4-methylsulfonyl phenyl at C-1 of the central moiety and the linkers (-OH, -CH2OH, -CH2CH2OH) with different lengths at the para position of the N-1 phenyl group. For the second category, the 4-methylsulfonyl phenyl group at C-1 was replaced with 4-aminosulfonyl phenyl. While for the third category, a methylene unit was inserted between the C-1 of the tetrazole central ring and the 4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl group, keeping the same linkers of various extensions at the para position of the N-1 phenyl group. Among the screened compounds, tetrazole 4i showed the best inhibition potency and selectivity values for both COX-2 enzyme (IC50=3μM, SI>67) and COX-1 isoenzyme (IC50>200μM). Compounds 4e, 4h, and 4i, which have the highest inhibition potency toward COX-2 were selected for the molecular docking studies to verify their inhibition and selectivity for COX-2 over COX-1 with their modified structure. The obtained theoretical studies are in agreement with the in vitro bioassay screening results, which supports the importance of the structural modifications for our studied compounds.

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in ginger (Zingiber officinale)

    PubMed Central

    van Breemen, Richard B.; Tao, Yi; Li, Wenkui

    2010-01-01

    Ginger roots have been used to treat inflammation and have been reported to inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX). Ultrafiltration liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was used to screen a chloroform partition of a methanol extract of ginger roots for COX-2 ligands, and 10-gingerol, 12-gingerol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, 6-gingerdione, 8-gingerdione, 10-gingerdione, 6-dehydro-10-gingerol, 6-paradol, and 8-paradol bound to the enzyme active site. Purified 10-gingerol, 8-shogaol and 10-shogaol inhibited COX-2 with IC50 values of 32 μM, 17.5 μM and 7.5 μM, respectively. No inhibition of COX-1 was detected. Therefore, 10-gingerol, 8-shogaol and 10-shogaol inhibit COX-2 but not COX-1, which can explain, in part, anti-inflammatory properties of ginger. PMID:20837112

  17. Cyclooxygenase-2 in newborn hyperoxic lung injury.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Velten, Markus; Tipple, Trent E; Nelin, Leif D; Rogers, Lynette K

    2013-08-01

    Supraphysiological O2 concentrations, mechanical ventilation, and inflammation significantly contribute to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD).Exposure of newborn mice to hyperoxia causes inflammation and impaired alveolarization similar to that seen in infants with BPD.Previously, we demonstrated that pulmonary cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression is increased in hyperoxia-exposed newborn mice.The present studies were designed to define the role of COX-2 in newborn hyperoxic lung injury.We tested the hypothesis that attenuation of COX-2 activity would reduce hyperoxia-induced inflammation and improve alveolarization.Newborn C3H/HeN micewere injected daily with vehicle, aspirin (nonselective COX-2 inhibitor), or celecoxib (selective COX-2 inhibitor) for the first 7 days of life.Additional studies utilized wild-type (C57Bl/6, COX-2(+/+)), heterozygous (COX-2(+/-)), and homozygous (COX-2(-/-)) transgenic mice.Micewere exposed to room air (21% O2) or hyperoxia (85% O2) for 14 days.Aspirin-injected and COX-2(-/-) pups had reduced levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL).Both aspirin and celecoxib treatment reduced macrophage numbers in the alveolar walls and air spaces.Aspirin and celecoxib treatment attenuated hyperoxia-induced COX activity, including altered levels of prostaglandin (PG)D2 metabolites.Decreased COX activity, however, did not prevent hyperoxia-induced lung developmental deficits.Our data suggest thatincreased COX-2 activity may contribute to proinflammatory responses, including macrophage chemotaxis, during exposure to hyperoxia.Modulation of COX-2 activity may be a useful therapeutic target to limit hyperoxia-induced inflammation in preterm infants at risk of developing BPD. PMID:23624331

  18. Risk of Bias in Systematic Reviews of Non-Randomized Studies of Adverse Cardiovascular Effects of Thiazolidinediones and Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors: Application of a New Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool

    PubMed Central

    Bilandzic, Anja; Fitzpatrick, Tiffany; Rosella, Laura; Henry, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Systematic reviews of the effects of healthcare interventions frequently include non-randomized studies. These are subject to confounding and a range of other biases that are seldom considered in detail when synthesizing and interpreting the results. Our aims were to assess the reliability and usability of a new Cochrane risk of bias (RoB) tool for non-randomized studies of interventions and to determine whether restricting analysis to studies with low or moderate RoB made a material difference to the results of the reviews. Methods and Findings We selected two systematic reviews of population-based, controlled non-randomized studies of the relationship between the use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors and major cardiovascular events. Two epidemiologists applied the Cochrane RoB tool and made assessments across the seven specified domains of bias for each of 37 component studies. Inter-rater agreement was measured using the weighted Kappa statistic. We grouped studies according to overall RoB and performed statistical pooling for (a) all studies and (b) only studies with low or moderate RoB. Kappa scores across the seven bias domains ranged from 0.50 to 1.0. In the COX-2 inhibitor review, two studies had low overall RoB, 14 had moderate RoB, and five had serious RoB. In the TZD review, six studies had low RoB, four had moderate RoB, four had serious RoB, and two had critical RoB. The pooled odds ratios for myocardial infarction, heart failure, and death for rosiglitazone versus pioglitazone remained significantly elevated when analyses were confined to studies with low or moderate RoB. However, the estimate for myocardial infarction declined from 1.14 (95% CI 1.07–1.24) to 1.06 (95% CI 0.99–1.13) when analysis was confined to studies with low RoB. Estimates of pooled relative risks of cardiovascular events with COX-2 inhibitors compared with no nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug changed little when analyses were

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces stress-induced affective pathology.

    PubMed

    Gamble-George, Joyonna Carrie; Baldi, Rita; Halladay, Lindsay; Kocharian, Adrina; Hartley, Nolan; Silva, Carolyn Grace; Roberts, Holly; Haymer, Andre; Marnett, Lawrence J; Holmes, Andrew; Patel, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric conditions and are exacerbated by stress. Recent studies have suggested cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition could represent a novel treatment approach or augmentation strategy for affective disorders including anxiety disorders and major depression. We show that traditional COX-2 inhibitors and a newly developed substrate-selective COX-2 inhibitor (SSCI) reduce a variety of stress-induced behavioral pathologies in mice. We found that these behavioral effects were associated with a dampening of neuronal excitability in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) ex vivo and in vivo, and were mediated by small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel and CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation. Taken together, these data provide further support for the potential utility of SSCIs, as well as traditional COX-2 inhibitors, as novel treatment approaches for stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:27162170

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces stress-induced affective pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gamble-George, Joyonna Carrie; Baldi, Rita; Halladay, Lindsay; Kocharian, Adrina; Hartley, Nolan; Silva, Carolyn Grace; Roberts, Holly; Haymer, Andre; Marnett, Lawrence J; Holmes, Andrew; Patel, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric conditions and are exacerbated by stress. Recent studies have suggested cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition could represent a novel treatment approach or augmentation strategy for affective disorders including anxiety disorders and major depression. We show that traditional COX-2 inhibitors and a newly developed substrate-selective COX-2 inhibitor (SSCI) reduce a variety of stress-induced behavioral pathologies in mice. We found that these behavioral effects were associated with a dampening of neuronal excitability in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) ex vivo and in vivo, and were mediated by small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel and CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation. Taken together, these data provide further support for the potential utility of SSCIs, as well as traditional COX-2 inhibitors, as novel treatment approaches for stress-related psychiatric disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14137.001 PMID:27162170

  1. Synthesis and crystal structure of N-[(dimethylamino)methylidene]-4-[1-(4-nitrophenyl)-1H-tetrazol-5-yl]-benzenesulfonamide: Molecular docking and bioassay studies as cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawabrah Al-Hourani, Baker; El-Barghouthi, Musa I.; McDonald, Robert; Al-Awaida, Wajdy; Sharma, Sai Kiran; Wuest, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of N-[(dimethylamino)methylidene]-4-[1-(4-nitrophenyl)-1H-tetrazol-5-yl]benzenesulfonamide (3) has been easily approached and the structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Tetrazole 3 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c, with the cell parameters determined as a = 35.5408 (18) Å, b = 7.6972 (4) Å, c = 13.0700 (7) Å3, β = 96.8598 (6)°, V = 3549.9 (3) Å3, and Z = 8. Its structure refines to R1 = 0.0341 (for 2986 observed reflections [I ≥ 2σ(I)]) and wR2 = 0.0990 (for all 3637 unique reflections). The aryl rings at the 1- and 5-positions show no conjugation to the tetrazole group, and the [(Dimethylamino)methylene]aminosulfonyl (Me2NCHNSO2) group is disordered, with the two disorder conformers being related by a pseudo mirror plane. In the crystal, intermolecular interactions between adjacent molecule of 3 are dominated by weak (2.4-2.7 Å) CeH…O and CeH…N hydrogen bonds. The molecular docking studies were carried out to understand the interaction of compound 3 within the active site of the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme, followed by a comparison study with the celecoxib drug as a reference compound. The in vitro bioassay studies of tetrazole 3 toward cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 enzymes showed that compound 3 has no inhibition potency for either enzyme.

  2. Selective Visualization of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Inflammation and Cancer by Targeted Fluorescent Imaging Agents†

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jashim; Crews, Brenda C.; Blobaum, Anna L.; Kingsley, Philip J.; Gorden, D. Lee; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Matrisian, Lynn M.; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Piston, David W.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    Effective diagnosis of inflammation and cancer by molecular imaging is challenging because of interference from non-selective accumulation of the contrast agents in normal tissues. Here we report a series of novel fluorescence imaging agents that efficiently target cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which is normally absent from cells, but is found at high levels in inflammatory lesions, and in many premalignant and malignant tumors. After either intraperitoneal or intravenous injection, these reagents become highly enriched in inflamed or tumor tissue compared to normal tissue and this accumulation provides sufficient signal for in vivo fluorescence imaging. Further, we show that only the intact parent compound is found in the region of interest. COX-2-specific delivery was unambiguously confirmed using animals bearing targeted deletions of COX-2 and by blocking the COX-2 active site with high affinity inhibitors in both in vitro and in vivo models. Because of their high specificity, contrast, and detectability, these COX-2 beacons are ideal candidates for detection of inflammatory lesions or early-stage COX-2-expressing human cancers, such as those in the esophagus, oropharynx, and colon. PMID:20430759

  3. Targeting Cyclooxygenase-2 in Hematological Malignancies: Rationale and Promise

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, M. P.; Bancos, S.; Sime, P. J.; Phipps, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    There is much interest in the potential use of Cox-2 selective inhibitors in combination with other cancer therapeutics. Malignancies of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origin often have increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), a key modulator of inflammation. For example, hematological malignancies such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma often highly express Cox-2, which correlates with poor patient prognosis. Expression of Cox-2 enhances survival and proliferation of malignant cells, while negatively influencing anti-tumor immunity. Hematological malignancies expressing elevated levels of Cox-2 potentially avoid immune responses by producing factors that enhance angiogenesis and metastases. Cellular immune responses regulated by natural killer cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and T regulatory cells are also influenced by Cox-2 expression. Therefore, Cox-2 selective inhibitors have promising therapeutic potential in patients suffering from certain hematological malignancies. PMID:18691115

  4. Targeting cyclooxygenase-2 in hematological malignancies: rationale and promise.

    PubMed

    Bernard, M P; Bancos, S; Sime, P J; Phipps, R P

    2008-01-01

    There is much interest in the potential use of Cox-2 selective inhibitors in combination with other cancer therapeutics. Malignancies of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origin often have increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), a key modulator of inflammation. For example, hematological malignancies such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma often highly express Cox-2, which correlates with poor patient prognosis. Expression of Cox-2 enhances survival and proliferation of malignant cells, while negatively influencing anti-tumor immunity. Hematological malignancies expressing elevated levels of Cox-2 potentially avoid immune responses by producing factors that enhance angiogenesis and metastasis. Cellular immune responses regulated by natural killer cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and T regulatory cells are also influenced by Cox-2 expression. Therefore, Cox-2 selective inhibitors have promising therapeutic potential in patients suffering from certain hematological malignancies.

  5. A Revised Mechanism for Human Cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Roth, Justine P

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation by wild-type cyclooxygenase 2 and the Y334F variant, lacking a conserved hydrogen bond to the catalytic tyrosyl radical/tyrosine, was examined for the first time under physiologically relevant conditions. The enzymes show apparent bimolecular rate constants and deuterium kinetic isotope effects that increase in proportion to co-substrate concentrations before converging to limiting values. The trends exclude multiple dioxygenase mechanisms as well as the proposal that initial hydrogen atom abstraction from the fatty acid is the first irreversible step in catalysis. Temperature dependent kinetic studies reinforce the novel finding that hydrogen transfer from the reduced catalytic tyrosine to a terminal peroxyl radical is the first irreversible step that controls regio- and stereospecific product formation. PMID:26565028

  6. [Cyclooxygenase-2: a new therapeutic target in atherosclerosis?].

    PubMed

    Páramo, José A; Beloqui, Oscar; Orbe, Josune

    2006-05-27

    It is now widely accepted that atherosclerosis is a complex chronic inflammatory disorder of the arterial tree associated with several risk factors. From the initial phases to eventual rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, a low-grade inflammation, also termed microinflammation, appears to play a key pathogenetic role. Systemic inflammatory markers (C reactive protein, cytokines adhesion molecules) also play a role in this process. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an enzyme which catalyzes the generation of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid, also contributes to lesion formation. Recent reports by our group have demonstrated increased monocyte COX-2 activity and the production of prostaglandin E2 in relation to cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic subjects. Our findings support the notion that the COX-2/prostaglandin E2 axis may have a role, raising the question as to whether its selective inhibition might be an attractive therapeutic target in atherosclerosis. COX-2 inhibitors, collectively called "coxibs" (celecoxib, rofecoxib, valdecoxib, lumiracoxib, etc), held a promise as anti-inflammatory drugs without the some of the side effects of aspirin or non steroidal antiinflammatory agents. However, clinical studies raise several clinically relevant questions as to their beneficial role in atherosclerosis prevention, because of increased thrombogenicity and cardiovascular risk, and therefore coxibs should be restricted in atherosclerosis-prone patients.

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis for joint pain treatment in patients with osteoarthritis treated at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS): Comparison of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) vs. cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Hernández, Iris; Mould-Quevedo, Joaquín F; Torres-González, Rubén; Goycochea-Robles, María Victoria; Pacheco-Domínguez, Reyna Lizette; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Garduño-Espinosa, Juan

    2008-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the main causes of disability worldwide, especially in persons >55 years of age. Currently, controversy remains about the best therapeutic alternative for this disease when evaluated from a cost-effectiveness viewpoint. For Social Security Institutions in developing countries, it is very important to assess what drugs may decrease the subsequent use of medical care resources, considering their adverse events that are known to have a significant increase in medical care costs of patients with OA. Three treatment alternatives were compared: celecoxib (200 mg twice daily), non-selective NSAIDs (naproxen, 500 mg twice daily; diclofenac, 100 mg twice daily; and piroxicam, 20 mg/day) and acetaminophen, 1000 mg twice daily. The aim of this study was to identify the most cost-effective first-choice pharmacological treatment for the control of joint pain secondary to OA in patients treated at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). Methods A cost-effectiveness assessment was carried out. A systematic review of the literature was performed to obtain transition probabilities. In order to evaluate analysis robustness, one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Estimations were done for a 6-month period. Results Treatment demonstrating the best cost-effectiveness results [lowest cost-effectiveness ratio $17.5 pesos/patient ($1.75 USD)] was celecoxib. According to the one-way sensitivity analysis, celecoxib would need to markedly decrease its effectiveness in order for it to not be the optimal treatment option. In the probabilistic analysis, both in the construction of the acceptability curves and in the estimation of net economic benefits, the most cost-effective option was celecoxib. Conclusion From a Mexican institutional perspective and probably in other Social Security Institutions in similar developing countries, the most cost-effective option for treatment of knee and/or hip OA would be celecoxib. PMID

  8. Nimesulide, a cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, suppresses obesity-related non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic insulin resistance through the regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Shunsuke; Kishina, Manabu; Koda, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kohei; Harada, Yusuke; Yoshida, Akio; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors suppress non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); however, the precise mechanism of action remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine how the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide suppresses NAFLD in a murine model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Mice were fed either a normal chow diet (NC), an HFD, or HFD plus nimesulide (HFD-nime) for 12 weeks. Body weight, hepatic COX-2 mRNA expression and triglyceride accumulation were significantly increased in the HFD group. Triglyceride accumulation was suppressed in the HFD-nime group. The mRNA expression of hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and the natural PPARγ agonist 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) were significantly increased in the HFD group and significantly suppressed in the HFD-nime group. Glucose metabolism was impaired in the HFD group compared with the NC group, and it was significantly improved in the HFD-nime group. In addition, the plasma insulin levels in the HFD group were increased compared with those in the NC group, and were decreased in the HFD-nime group. These results indicate that HFD-induced NAFLD is mediated by the increased hepatic expression of COX-2. We suggest that the production of 15d-PGJ2, which is mediated by COX-2, induces NAFLD and hepatic insulin resistance by activating PPARγ. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), procollagen-1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as the number of F4/80-positive hepatic (Kupffer) cells, were significantly increased in the HFD group compared with the NC group, and they were reduced by nimesulide. In conclusion, COX-2 may emerge as a molecular target for preventing the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in diet-related obesity. PMID:27431935

  9. Suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 gene transcription by humulon of beer hop extract studied with reference to glucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Wang, J; Yamamoto, S; Tobe, H

    2000-01-14

    In murine osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells which produced prostaglandin E2 as a bone resorption factor, the cyclooxygenase-2 induction by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) was suppressed by dexamethasone with an IC(50) of 1 nM. Humulon isolated from hop extract for beer brewing was reported previously as an inhibitor of bone resorption [Tobe, H. et al. (1997) Biosci. Biotech. Biochem. 61, 158-159]. We showed that the compound suppressed the TNFalpha-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 induction with an IC(50) of as low as about 30 nM as demonstrated experimentally by catalytic activity assay, Northern blot analysis and promoter analysis. Reporter gene experiments suggested that humulon blocked the cyclooxygenase-2 expression mediated by NFkappaB and NF-IL6, but the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor was not involved. The catalytic activity of cyclooxygenase-2 was inhibited by humulon with an IC(50) of as high as 1.6 microM. These results showed that humulon suppressed cyclooxygenase-2 induction at the step of transcription.

  10. Role of cyclo-oxygenase-2 induction in interleukin-1β induced attenuation of cultured human airway smooth muscle cell cyclic AMP generation in response to isoprenaline

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Linhua; Holland, Elaine; Knox, Alan J

    1998-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) in human asthma shows reduced relaxation and cyclic AMP generation in response to β-adrenoceptor agonists. IL-β attenuates cyclic AMP generation but the underlying mechanism is unclear. We have reported that IL-1β induces cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) in human ASM cells and results in a marked increase in prostanoid generation with PGE2 and PGI2 as the major products.We investigated the role of COX-2 induction and prostanoid release (measured as PGE2) in IL-1β induced attenuation of cyclic AMP generation in response to the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline (ISO).Pre-treatment of human ASM cells with IL-1β significantly attenuated cyclic AMP generation in response to high concentrations of ISO (1.0–10.0 μM) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The effect was accompanied by a high concentration of PGE2 release. The non-selective COX inhibitor indomethacin (Ind), the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS-398, the protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide (CHX) and actinomycin D and the steroid dexamethasone (Dex) all abolished the PGE2 release and prevented the attenuated cyclic AMP generation.COX substrate arachidonic acid time- and concentration-dependently mimicked IL-1β induced attenuation and the effect was prevented by the non-selective COX inhibitors Ind and flurbiprofen, but not by NS-398, CHX and Dex.In contrast to IL-1β, TNFα and IFNγ, which are ineffective in inducing COX-2 and releasing PGE2 from human ASM cells, did not affect the cyclic AMP formation.Our study demonstrates that COX-2 induction and the consequent release of prostanoids plays a crucial role in IL-1β induced attenuation of human ASM cell cyclic AMP response to ISO. PMID:9863663

  11. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 Prevents Chronic and Recurrent Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Thomas J.; Roberts, Pacita L.; Riehl, Terrence E.; van der Post, Sjoerd; Binkley, Jana M.; Schwartz, Drew J.; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Mack, Matthias; Schwendener, Reto A.; Hooton, Thomas M.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Stenson, William F.; Colonna, Marco; Stapleton, Ann E.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant microorganisms globally has created an urgent need for novel therapeutic strategies to combat urinary tract infections (UTIs). Immunomodulatory therapy may provide benefit, as treatment of mice with dexamethasone during acute UTI improved outcome by reducing the development of chronic cystitis, which predisposes to recurrent infection. Here we discovered soluble biomarkers engaged in myeloid cell development and chemotaxis that were predictive of future UTI recurrence when elevated in the sera of young women with UTI. Translation of these findings revealed that temperance of the neutrophil response early during UTI, and specifically disruption of bladder epithelial transmigration of neutrophils by inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2, protected mice against chronic and recurrent cystitis. Further, proteomics identified bladder epithelial remodeling consequent to chronic infection that enhances sensitivity to neutrophil damage. Thus, cyclooxygenase-2 expression during acute UTI is a critical molecular trigger determining disease outcome and drugs targeting cyclooxygenase-2 could prevent recurrent UTI. PMID:26125048

  12. Crystallization of recombinant cyclo-oxygenase-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Anna M.; Pawlitz, Jennifer L.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Gierse, James K.; Moreland, Kirby T.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Loduca, Jina Y.; Stallings, William C.

    1999-01-01

    The integral membrane protein, prostaglandin H 2 synthase, or cyclo-oxygenase (COX), catalyses the first step in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PGs) and is the target of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Two isoforms are known. The constitutive enzyme, COX-1, is present in most tissues and is responsible for the physiological production of PGs. The isoform responsible for the elevated production of PGs during inflammation is COX-2 which is induced specifically at inflammatory sites. Three-dimensional structures of inhibitor complexes of COX-2, and of site variants of COX-2 which mimic COX-1, provide insight into the structural basis for selective inhibition of COX-2. Additionally, structures of COX-2 mutants and complexes with the substrate can provide a clearer understanding of the catalytic mechanism of the reaction. A crystallization protocol has been developed for COX-2 which reproducibly yields diffraction quality crystals. Polyethyleneglycol 550 monomethylether (MMP550) and MgCl 2 were systematically varied and used in conjunction with the detergent β- D-octylglucopyranoside ( β-OG). As a result of many crystallization trials, we determined that the initial β-OG concentration should be held constant, allowing the salt concentration to modulate the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the detergent. Over 25 crystal structures have been solved using crystals generated from this system. Most crystals belong to the space group P2 12 12, with lattice constants of a=180, b=134, c=120 Å in a pseudo body-centered lattice.

  13. Exploring the Molecular Determinants of Substrate-Selective Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 by Lumiracoxib

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, Matthew A.; Valk, Pieter L.; Xu, Shu; Banerjee, Surajit; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2013-01-01

    Lumiracoxib is a substrate-selective inhibitor of endocannabinoid oxygenation by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We assayed a series of lumiracoxib derivatives to identify the structural determinants of substrate-selective inhibition. The hydrogen-bonding potential of the substituents at the ortho positions of the aniline ring dictated the potency and substrate selectivity of the inhibitors. The presence of a 5’-methyl group on the phenylacetic acid ring increased the potency of molecules with a single ortho substituent. Des-fluorolumiracoxib (2) was the most potent and selective inhibitor of endocannabinoid oxygenation. The positioning of critical substituents in the binding site was identified from a 2.35 Å crystal structure of lumiracoxib bound to COX-2. PMID:24060487

  14. Fluorescence quenching analysis of the association and dissociation of a diarylheterocycle to cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2: dynamic basis of cyclooxygenase-2 selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lanzo, C A; Sutin, J; Rowlinson, S; Talley, J; Marnett, L J

    2000-05-23

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are the enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the precursor to the biologically active prostaglandins, prostacyclin, and thromboxane and are the molecular targets for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Selective COX-2 inhibitors are antiinflammatory and analgesic but lack gastrointestinal toxicity, an undesirable side effect attributed to COX-1 inhibition. Crystallographic analysis of selective COX inhibitors complexed with either isoform provides some information about the molecular determinants of selectivity but does not provide information about the dynamics of inhibitor association/dissociation. We employed rapid-mixing techniques and fluorescence quenching to monitor the association and dissociation of a selective COX-2 inhibitor to COX-1 or COX-2. The association of the fluorescent diaryloxazole, SC299, with both enzymes occurs in a time-dependent fashion. Its binding to COX-2 occurs in three kinetically distinct steps whereas its binding to COX-1 occurs in two steps. In contrast to the relatively rapid association of SC299 with both enzymes, its dissociation from COX-2 is quite slow and occurs over several hours whereas the dissociation from COX-1 is complete in less than 1 min. The selectivity of SC299 as a COX-2 inhibitor correlates to its relative rates of dissociation from the two COX isoforms. A model is proposed for diarylheterocycle binding to COX's that integrates these kinetic data with available structural information.

  15. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in esophageal epithelium before and after photodynamic therapy for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yachimski, Patrick; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Sherwood, Margaret E; Puricelli, William P; Nishioka, Norman S; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2011-12-01

    that observed in native esophageal squamous epithelium. Post-photodynamic therapy neoplastic recurrence is associated with elevated cyclooxygenase-2 expression. Prospective studies should determine whether cyclooxygenase inhibitors have a role as adjuvant therapy to prevent recurrence of Barrett's esophagus following endoscopic therapy.

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in canine intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, J H; Robertson, J L; Zimmerman, K L; Higgins, M A; Geiger, D A

    2009-09-01

    Meningiomas are the most common canine intracranial tumour. Neurologic disability and death from treatment failure remain problematic despite current surgical and radiotherapeutic treatments for canine intracranial meningiomas. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression has been demonstrated in multiple canine malignancies, and COX-2 inhibitory treatment strategies have been shown to have both preventative and therapeutic effects in spontaneous and experimental models of cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate COX-2 expression in canine intracranial meningiomas. Immunohistochemical and Western blot (WB) analyses showed COX-2 expression in multiple tissues of the normal canine brain, and 87% (21/24) of intracranial meningiomas studied were immunoreactive to COX-2. No significant associations between COX-2 immunoreactivity and tumour grade were identified. Further studies are required to elucidate the physiologic roles of constitutive COX-2 expression in the central nervous system as well as its participation in meningioma tumourigenesis. PMID:19691646

  17. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in high-risk premalignant oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Sudbø, Jon; Ristimäki, Ari; Sondresen, Jan Erik; Kildal, Wanja; Boysen, Morten; Koppang, Hanna S; Reith, Albrecht; Risberg, Björn; Nesland, Jahn M; Bryne, Magne

    2003-07-01

    Emerging data indicate a link between genetic instability and up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). To see if individuals at high risk of oral cancer are candidates for treatment with selective COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs), levels of COX-2 expression in healthy, premalignant and cancerous oral mucosa were compared with the occurrence of DNA ploidy status as a genetic risk marker of oral cancer. COX-2 gene product was evaluated immunohistochemically in 30 healthy persons, in 22 patients with dysplastic lesions without previous or concomitant carcinomas, and in 29 patients with oral carcinomas. The immunohistochemical findings were verified by western blotting. COX-2 expression was correlated to DNA content as a genetic risk marker of oral cancer. COX-2 was up-regulated from healthy to premalignant to cancerous oral mucosa. Thus, COX-2 expression was found in 1 case of healthy oral mucosa (3%). All specimens from healthy mucosa had a normal DNA content. In patients with premalignancies. In 29 patients with oral carcinomas, cyclooxygenase-2 expression was observed in 26 (88%), and aneuploidy was observed in 25 cases (94%, P=0.04). Notably, of 22 patients with dysplastic lesions, COX-2 was exclusively expressed in a subgroup of nine patients (41%) identified to be at high risk of cancer by the aberrant DNA content of their lesions. Seven of these patients were followed for 5 years or more. An oral carcinoma developed in six of them (85%; P=0.02). These findings emphasize the need to determine whether coxibs can reduce the risk of oral cancer in patients with high-risk precancerous lesions. PMID:12747975

  18. Selective inhibition of inducible cyclooxygenase 2 in vivo is antiinflammatory and nonulcerogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Masferrer, J L; Zweifel, B S; Manning, P T; Hauser, S D; Leahy, K M; Smith, W G; Isakson, P C; Seibert, K

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the role of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in a model of inflammation in vivo. Carrageenan administration to the subcutaneous rat air pouch induces a rapid inflammatory response characterized by high levels of prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes in the fluid exudate. The time course of the induction of COX-2 mRNA and protein coincided with the production of PGs in the pouch tissue and cellular infiltrate. Carrageenan-induced COX-2 immunoreactivity was localized to macrophages obtained from the fluid exudate as well as to the inner surface layer of cells within the pouch lining. Dexamethasone inhibited both COX-2 expression and PG synthesis in the fluid exudate but failed to inhibit PG synthesis in the stomach. Furthermore, NS-398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, and indomethacin, a nonselective COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor, blocked proinflammatory PG synthesis in the air pouch. In contrast, only indomethacin blocked gastric PG and, additionally, produced gastric lesions. These results suggest that inhibitors of COX-2 are potent antiinflammatory agents which do not produce the typical side effects (e.g., gastric ulcers) associated with the nonselective, COX-1-directed antiinflammatory drugs. Images PMID:8159730

  19. Post-training intrahippocampal infusion of the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib impaired spatial memory retention in rats.

    PubMed

    Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Naghdi, Nasser; Khosrovani, Sara; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Sharifzadeh, Kurdistan; Roghani, Ali

    2005-03-28

    In this study, we investigated the effects of intrahippocampal infusion of indomethacin as a non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor and celecoxib as a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor on spatial memory in the Morris water maze. Rats were trained for 3 days; each day included two blocks, and each block contained 4 trials. Tests were performed 48 h after surgery. Bilateral intrahippocampal infusion of indomethacin (0.01, 0.1, or 1 M) did not show any significant effect on spatial memory retention at these concentrations in rats. We also examined effects of infusion of celecoxib (0.02, 0.06, or 0.1 M) on memory retention. Bilateral infusion of 0.1 M celecoxib significantly altered escape latency and traveled distance in rats. These results strongly suggest that cyclooxygenase-2 is involved in spatial memory retention.

  20. Competition and allostery govern substrate selectivity of cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Mitchener, Michelle M; Hermanson, Daniel J; Shockley, Erin M; Brown, H Alex; Lindsley, Craig W; Reese, Jeff; Rouzer, Carol A; Lopez, Carlos F; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2015-10-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) oxygenates arachidonic acid (AA) and its ester analog, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), to prostaglandins (PGs) and prostaglandin glyceryl esters (PG-Gs), respectively. Although the efficiency of oxygenation of these substrates by COX-2 in vitro is similar, cellular biosynthesis of PGs far exceeds that of PG-Gs. Evidence that the COX enzymes are functional heterodimers suggests that competitive interaction of AA and 2-AG at the allosteric site of COX-2 might result in differential regulation of the oxygenation of the two substrates when both are present. Modulation of AA levels in RAW264.7 macrophages uncovered an inverse correlation between cellular AA levels and PG-G biosynthesis. In vitro kinetic analysis using purified protein demonstrated that the inhibition of 2-AG oxygenation by high concentrations of AA far exceeded the inhibition of AA oxygenation by high concentrations of 2-AG. An unbiased systems-based mechanistic model of the kinetic data revealed that binding of AA or 2-AG at the allosteric site of COX-2 results in a decreased catalytic efficiency of the enzyme toward 2-AG, whereas 2-AG binding at the allosteric site increases COX-2's efficiency toward AA. The results suggest that substrates interact with COX-2 via multiple potential complexes involving binding to both the catalytic and allosteric sites. Competition between AA and 2-AG for these sites, combined with differential allosteric modulation, gives rise to a complex interplay between the substrates, leading to preferential oxygenation of AA.

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brazowski, Eli; Misonzhnick-Bedny, Faina; Rozen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome (HMPS), characterized by hyperplastic, juvenile, admixed, serrated adenomas and eventually colorectal cancer, is managed by repeated polypectomy and surgery. We determined if HMPS polyps express cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Nineteen recent HMPS polyps, from five family members, were stained for COX-2. Polyps' epithelium and stroma and comparison tissues (normal colonic mucosa [9], sporadic juvenile polyps [18], colorectal cancers [3]) were quantified for COX-2 by: area of staining (0-3) x intensity (0-3). Epithelial, stromal, and total scores were evaluated in relationship to histology and dysplasia. HMPS polyps COX-2 mean epithelial (5.0+/-3.0), stromal (6.9+/-1.9), and total (11.8+/-4.6) scores were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than sporadic juvenile polyps (0.6+/-0.7, 3.1+/-2.2, and 3.6+/- 2.2 respectively), while colorectal cancer scored 9, 9, and 18. There was a positive association (P < 0.01) among histology, degree of dysplasia, and COX-2 expression. COX-2 expression in HMPS polyps and its association with dysplasia suggest that chemoprevention might be a useful adjunct therapy.

  2. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in deoxynivalenol-induced immunoglobulin a nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qunshan; Pestka, James J

    2005-05-01

    Ingestion of the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces serum IgA elevation and kidney mesangial IgA deposition in a manner that mimics the early stages of IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common human glomerulonephritis. Previous studies indicate that elevated interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression is crucial for this model and that DON induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) might drive IL-6 upregulation. We hypothesized that COX-2 and its metabolites are essential for DON-induced IgAN and thus might be a suitable target for prophylaxis against aberrant IgA upregulation. DON feeding studies using COX-2 knockout mice or the COX-2 specific inhibitor, rofecoxib (Vioxx), were employed to test the hypothesis. Study 1 results demonstrated that DON consumption induced serum IgA and IgA-immune complex (IC) accumulation, IgA kidney deposition and splenic IgA secretion in wild-type mice. COX-2 deficiency did not affect upregulation of these parameters but rather, promoted DON-induced serum IgA elevation. Study 2 demonstrated that rofecoxib could not block DON-induced serum IgA, serum IgA-IC and mesangial IgA accumulation but instead increased enhanced serum IgA upregulation. These corroborating results suggest that COX-2 is not a requisite for DON-induced IgAN and furthermore, that COX-2 inhibitors such as rofecoxib would be contraindicated for the prevention of early stages of IgAN.

  3. Chronic inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 attenuates antibody responses against vaccinia infection.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Matthew P; Bancos, Simona; Chapman, Timothy J; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Treanor, John J; Rose, Robert C; Topham, David J; Phipps, Richard P

    2010-02-01

    Generation of optimal humoral immunity to vaccination is essential to protect against devastating infectious agents such as the variola virus that causes smallpox. Vaccinia virus (VV), employed as a vaccine against smallpox, provides an important model of infection. Herein, we evaluated the importance cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) in immunity to VV using Cox-2 deficient mice and Cox-2 selective inhibitory drugs. The effects of Cox-2 inhibition on antibody responses to live viruses such as vaccinia have not been previously described. Here, we used VV infection in Cox-2 deficient mice and in mice chronically treated with Cox-2 selective inhibitors and show that the frequency of VV-specific B cells was reduced, as well as the production of neutralizing IgG. VV titers were approximately 70 times higher in mice treated with a Cox-2 selective inhibitor. Interestingly, Cox-2 inhibition also reduced the frequency of IFN-gamma producing CD4(+) T helper cells, important for class switching. The significance of these results is that the chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and other drugs that inhibit Cox-2 activity or expression, blunt the ability of B cells to produce anti-viral antibodies, thereby making vaccines less effective and possibly increasing susceptibility to viral infection. These new findings support an essential role for Cox-2 in regulating humoral immunity.

  4. Chronic Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 Attenuates Antibody Responses against Vaccinia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Matthew P.; Bancos, Simona; Chapman, Timothy J.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Treanor, John J.; Rose, Robert C.; Topham, David J.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    Generation of optimal humoral immunity to vaccination is essential to protect against devastating infectious agents such as the variola virus that causes smallpox. Vaccinia virus (VV), employed as a vaccine against smallpox, provides an important model of infection. Herein, we evaluated the importance cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) in immunity to VV using Cox-2 deficient mice and Cox-2 selective inhibitory drugs. The effects of Cox-2 inhibition on antibody responses to live viruses such as vaccinia have not been previously described. Here, we used VV infection in Cox-2 deficient mice and in mice chronically treated with Cox-2 selective inhibitors and show that the frequency of VV-specific B cells was reduced, as well as the production of neutralizing IgG. VV titers were approximately 70 times higher in mice treated with a Cox-2 selective inhibitor. Interestingly, Cox-2 inhibition also reduced the frequency of IFN-γ producing CD4+ T helper cells, important for class switching. The significance of these results is that the chronic use of NSAIDs, and other drugs that inhibit Cox-2 activity or expression, blunt the ability of B cells to produce anti-viral antibodies, thereby making vaccines less effective and possibly increasing susceptibility to viral infection. These new findings support an essential role for Cox-2 in regulating humoral immunity. PMID:19941994

  5. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition attenuates hypoxic cancer cells induced m2-polarization of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P; Shrivastava, R; Tripathi, C; Jain, N K; Tewari, B N; Lone, M-U-D; Baghel, K S; Kumar, V; Misra, S; Bhadauria, S; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-09-12

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), represent a major subpopulation of tumor infiltrating immune cells. These alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages are well known for their pro-tumor functions. Owing to their established role in potentiating tumor-neovasculogenesis and metastasis, TAMs have emerged as promising target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. One of the key TAMs related phenomenon that is amenable to therapeutic intervention is their phenotype switching into alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages. Hindering macrophage polarization towards a pro-tumor M2 phenotype, or better still reprogramming the M2 like TAMs towards M1 subtype is being considered a beneficial anti-cancer strategy. Hypoxic tumor milieu has been proposed as one of the most plausible factor governing M2-polarization of macrophages. We recently demonstrated that hypoxic tumor cells imparted a pro—angiogenic M2 skewed phenotype to macrophages. Furthermore, sizeable body of data indicates for participation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in macrophage polarization. Concordantly, inhibition of COX-2 is associated with impaired macrophage polarization. Prompted by this in the current study we decided to explore if inhibition of COX-2 activity via chemical inhibitors may prevent hypoxic cancer cell induced M2-polarization of macrophages. We observed that treatment with Flunixin meglumine, an established preferential inhibitor of COX-2 activity markedly inhibited hypoxic cancer cell induced of M2-polarization of macrophages thereby indicating for usage of COX-2 inhibition as possible anti-cancer treatment modality.

  6. Eugenol suppresses cyclooxygenase-2 expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Suk; Oh, O-Jin; Min, Hye-Young; Park, Eun-Jung; Kim, Youngleem; Park, Hyen Joo; Nam Han, Yong; Lee, Sang Kook

    2003-06-01

    Inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2) has been implicated in the processes of inflammation and carcinogenesis. Thus, the potential COX-2 inhibitors have been considered as anti-inflammatory or cancer chemopreventive agents. In this study, the methanolic extract of the cortex of Eugenia caryophyllata Thunberg (Myrtaceae) was found to potently inhibit the prostaglandin E(2) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells (98.3% inhibition at the test concentration of 10 microg/ml). Further, hexane-soluble layer was the most active partition compared to ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water-soluble parts. By bioassay-guided fractionation of hexane-soluble partition, eugenol was isolated and exhibited a significant inhibition of PGE(2) production (IC(50) = 0.37 microM). In addition, eugenol suppressed the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression in LPS-stimulated mouse macrophage cells. On the line of COX-2 playing an important role in colon carcinogenesis further study was designed to investigate the effect of eugenol on the growth and COX-2 expression in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Eugenol inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells and the mRNA expression of COX-2, but not COX-1. This result suggests that eugenol might be a plausible lead candidate for further developing the COX-2 inhibitor as an anti-inflammatory or cancer chemopreventive agent.

  7. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 by NS398 attenuates noise-induced hearing loss in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Yu, Jintao; Lin, Xi; Tang, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is an important occupational disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying NIHL have not been fully clarified; therefore, the condition lacks effective therapeutic methods. Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is an inducible enzyme involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins, and has been implicated in many pathophysiological events, such as oxidative stress and inflammation. In this study, we investigated the possible role of Cox-2 in the mechanisms of NIHL and the therapeutic effect of the Cox-2 inhibitor NS398 on NIHL using a mouse model. We demonstrated that Cox-2 is constitutively expressed in the mouse cochlea, and its expression could be dramatically up-regulated by high levels of noise exposure. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pre-treatment with the Cox-2 inhibitor NS398 could inhibit Cox-2 expression during noise overstimulation; and could attenuate noise-induced hearing loss and hair cell damage. Our results suggest that Cox-2 is involved in the pathogenesis of NIHL; and pharmacological inhibition of Cox-2 has considerable therapeutic potential in NIHL. PMID:26934825

  8. Cyclooxygenase-2 and p53 expressions in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yong-Tark; Kang, Sokbom; Kang, Dae-Hee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Park, In-Ae; Bang, Yung-Jue; Kim, Jae Weon; Park, Noh-Hyun; Kang, Soon-Beom; Lee, Hyo-Pyo; Song, Yong-Sang

    2004-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been known to be related with various types of carcinoma, but we have insufficient knowledge about the association between COX-2 and endometrial cancer. Many have reported a close relationship between p53 expression and a poor prognosis in endometrial cancer, but it is unclear whether p53 is an independent prognostic factor. To clarify these uncertainties, we examined the expressions of COX-2 and p53 in endometrial cancer tissues. The study was carried on 152 endometrial cancer patients who had operation at Seoul National University Hospital. Paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were sectioned and immunostained using monoclonal anti-COX-2 and anti-p53 antibodies. Twenty-seven (17.8%) specimens stained as COX-2 positive. COX-2 positivity was more frequently observed in postmenopausal patients than in premenopausal patients (8.8% versus 25.0%; P = 0.009). However, COX-2 positivity did not show a statistically significant association with any other clinicopathologic characteristic (parity, body mass index, histotype, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, grade, lymph node metastasis, deep myometrial invasion, or p53 overexpression). Thirty-one (20.4%) specimens showed p53 overexpression and this was significantly correlated with an advanced stage (P = 0.001), poor differentiation (P < 0.001), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.012), and deep myometrial invasion (P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that advanced stage was an independent prognostic factor of survival, but p53 overexpression was not. COX-2 may be associated with endometrial cancer carcinogenesis during the postmenopausal period but not with tumor aggressiveness and p53 overexpression. The p53 overexpression was found to be strongly associated with endometrial cancer aggressiveness.

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 Mediates Anandamide Metabolism in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kaczocha, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mediates inflammation and contributes to neurodegeneration. Best known for its pathological up-regulation, COX-2 is also constitutively expressed within the brain and mediates synaptic transmission through prostaglandin synthesis. Along with arachidonic acid, COX-2 oxygenates the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in vitro. Inhibition of COX-2 enhances retrograde signaling in the hippocampus, suggesting COX-2 mediates endocannabinoid tone in healthy brain. The degree to which COX-2 may regulate endocannabinoid metabolism in vivo is currently unclear. Therefore, we explored the effect of COX-2 inhibition on [3H]AEA metabolism in mouse brain. Although AEA is hydrolyzed primarily by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), ex vivo autoradiography revealed that COX-2 inhibition by nimesulide redirected [3H]AEA substrate from COX-2 to FAAH in the cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray. These data indicate that COX-2 possesses the capacity to metabolize AEA in vivo and can compete with FAAH for AEA in several brain regions. Temporal fluctuations in COX-2 expression were observed in the brain, with an increase in COX-2 protein and mRNA in the hippocampus at midnight compared with noon. COX-2 immunolocalization was robust in the hippocampus and several cortical regions. Although most regions exhibited no temporal changes in COX-2 immunolocalization, increased numbers of immunoreactive cells were detected at midnight in layers II and III of the somatosensory and visual cortices. These temporal variations in COX-2 distribution reduced the enzyme's contribution toward [3H]AEA metabolism in the somatosensory cortex at midnight. Taken together, our findings establish COX-2 as a mediator of regional AEA metabolism in mouse brain. PMID:20702753

  10. Competition and allostery govern substrate selectivity of cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Mitchener, Michelle M.; Hermanson, Daniel J.; Shockley, Erin M.; Brown, H. Alex; Lindsley, Craig W.; Reese, Jeff; Rouzer, Carol A.; Lopez, Carlos F.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) oxygenates arachidonic acid (AA) and its ester analog, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), to prostaglandins (PGs) and prostaglandin glyceryl esters (PG-Gs), respectively. Although the efficiency of oxygenation of these substrates by COX-2 in vitro is similar, cellular biosynthesis of PGs far exceeds that of PG-Gs. Evidence that the COX enzymes are functional heterodimers suggests that competitive interaction of AA and 2-AG at the allosteric site of COX-2 might result in differential regulation of the oxygenation of the two substrates when both are present. Modulation of AA levels in RAW264.7 macrophages uncovered an inverse correlation between cellular AA levels and PG-G biosynthesis. In vitro kinetic analysis using purified protein demonstrated that the inhibition of 2-AG oxygenation by high concentrations of AA far exceeded the inhibition of AA oxygenation by high concentrations of 2-AG. An unbiased systems-based mechanistic model of the kinetic data revealed that binding of AA or 2-AG at the allosteric site of COX-2 results in a decreased catalytic efficiency of the enzyme toward 2-AG, whereas 2-AG binding at the allosteric site increases COX-2’s efficiency toward AA. The results suggest that substrates interact with COX-2 via multiple potential complexes involving binding to both the catalytic and allosteric sites. Competition between AA and 2-AG for these sites, combined with differential allosteric modulation, gives rise to a complex interplay between the substrates, leading to preferential oxygenation of AA. PMID:26392530

  11. Resistance of cyclooxygenase-2 expressing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells against γδ T cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gonnermann, Daniel; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Kellner, Christian; Peipp, Matthias; Sebens, Susanne; Kabelitz, Dieter; Wesch, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The prostaglandin (PG) synthetase cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) promotes tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis in a variety of human cancer entities including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In this study, we demonstrate that in PDAC cells such as Colo357 cells, enhanced Cox-2 expression and increased release of the Cox-2 metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes resistance against γδ T cell-mediated lysis. Co-culture with activated γδ T cells induced an upregulation of Cox-2 expression in Colo357 cells, and thereby an enhanced PGE2 release, in response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) secretion from γδ T cells. The PGE2-mediated inhibition of γδ T cell cytotoxicity against Cox-2-expressing PDAC cells can be partially overcome by Cox-2 inhibitors. Our results show that differences between PDAC cells in regards to sensitivity to γδ T-cell cytotoxicity can be due to distinct levels of Cox-2 expression associated with varying amounts of PGE2 release. While γδ T cell cytotoxicity against PDAC cells expressing low levels of Cox-2 can be effectively enhanced by tribody [(Her2)2×Vγ9] with specificity for Vγ9 T cell receptor and HER-2/neu on PDAC cells, a combination of tribody [(Her2)2×Vγ9] and Cox-2 inhibitor is necessary to induce complete lysis of Cox-2 high expressing Colo357. In conclusion, our results suggest that the application of tribody [(Her2)2×Vγ9] that enhances γδ T-cell cytotoxicity and Cox-2 inhibitors that overcome PGE2-mediated resistance of PDAC cells to the cytotoxic activity of γδ T cells might offer a promising combined immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25949900

  12. Progressive Metaplastic and Dysplastic Changes in Mouse Pancreas Induced by Cyclooxygenase-2 Overexpression1

    PubMed Central

    Colby, Jennifer KL; Klein, Russell D; McArthur, Mark J; Conti, Claudio J; Kiguchi, Kaoru; Kawamoto, Toru; Riggs, Penny K; Pavone, Amy I; Sawicki, Janet; Fischer, Susan M

    2008-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpression is an established factor linking chronic inflammation with metaplastic and neoplastic change in various tissues. We generated transgenic mice (BK5.COX-2) in which elevation of COX-2 and its effectors trigger a metaplasia-dysplasia sequence in exocrine pancreas. Histologic evaluation revealed a chronic pancreatitis-like state characterized by acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and a well-vascularized fibroinflammatory stroma that develops by 3 months. By 6 to 8 months, strongly dysplastic features suggestive of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma emerge in the metaplastic ducts. Increased proliferation, cellular atypia, and loss of normal cell/tissue organization are typical features in transgenic pancreata. Alterations in biomarkers associated with human inflammatory and neoplastic pancreatic disease were detected using immunohistochemistry. The abnormal pancreatic phenotype can be completely prevented by maintaining mice on a diet containing celecoxib, a well-characterized COX-2 inhibitor. Despite the high degree of atypia, only limited evidence of invasion to adjacent tissues was observed, with no evidence of distant metastases. However, cell lines derived from spontaneous lesions are aggressively tumorigenic when injected into syngeneic or nude mice. The progressive nature of the metaplastic/dysplastic changes observed in this model make it a valuable tool for examining the transition from chronic inflammation to neoplasia. PMID:18670639

  13. Targeted imaging of cancer by fluorocoxib C, a near-infrared cyclooxygenase-2 probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Md. Jashim; Crews, Brenda C.; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Daniel, Cristina K.; Kingsley, Philip J.; Xu, Shu; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2015-05-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a promising target for the imaging of cancer in a range of diagnostic and therapeutic settings. We report a near-infrared COX-2-targeted probe, fluorocoxib C (FC), for visualization of solid tumors by optical imaging. FC exhibits selective and potent COX-2 inhibition in both purified protein and human cancer cell lines. In vivo optical imaging shows selective accumulation of FC in COX-2-overexpressing human tumor xenografts [1483 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)] implanted in nude mice, while minimal uptake is detectable in COX-2-negative tumor xenografts (HCT116) or 1483 HNSCC xenografts preblocked with the COX-2-selective inhibitor celecoxib. Time course imaging studies conducted from 3 h to 7-day post-FC injection revealed a marked reduction in nonspecific fluorescent signals with retention of fluorescence in 1483 HNSCC tumors. Thus, use of FC in a delayed imaging protocol offers an approach to improve imaging signal-to-noise that should improve cancer detection in multiple preclinical and clinical settings.

  14. Substrate-Selective Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2: Development and Evaluation of Achiral Profen Probes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) oxygenates arachidonic acid and the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA). We recently reported that (R)-profens selectively inhibit endocannabinoid oxygenation but not arachidonic acid oxygenation. In this work, we synthesized achiral derivatives of five profen scaffolds and evaluated them for substrate-selective inhibition using in vitro and cellular assays. The size of the substituents dictated the inhibitory strength of the analogs, with smaller substituents enabling greater potency but less selectivity. Inhibitors based on the flurbiprofen scaffold possessed the greatest potency and selectivity, with desmethylflurbiprofen (3a) exhibiting an IC50 of 0.11 μM for inhibition of 2-AG oxygenation. The crystal structure of desmethylflurbiprofen complexed to mCOX-2 demonstrated a similar binding mode to other profens. Desmethylflurbiprofen exhibited a half-life in mice comparable to that of ibuprofen. The data presented suggest that achiral profens can act as lead molecules toward in vivo probes of substrate-selective COX-2 inhibition. PMID:22984634

  15. Substrate-Selective Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2: Development and Evaluation of Achiral Profen Probes.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Matthew A; Hermanson, Daniel J; Kingsley, Philip J; Xu, Shu; Crews, Brenda C; Ho, Winnie; Keenan, Catherine M; Banerjee, Surajit; Sharkey, Keith A; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2012-09-13

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) oxygenates arachidonic acid and the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA). We recently reported that (R)-profens selectively inhibit endocannabinoid oxygenation but not arachidonic acid oxygenation. In this work, we synthesized achiral derivatives of five profen scaffolds and evaluated them for substrate-selective inhibition using in vitro and cellular assays. The size of the substituents dictated the inhibitory strength of the analogs, with smaller substituents enabling greater potency but less selectivity. Inhibitors based on the flurbiprofen scaffold possessed the greatest potency and selectivity, with desmethylflurbiprofen (3a) exhibiting an IC(50) of 0.11 μM for inhibition of 2-AG oxygenation. The crystal structure of desmethylflurbiprofen complexed to mCOX-2 demonstrated a similar binding mode to other profens. Desmethylflurbiprofen exhibited a half-life in mice comparable to that of ibuprofen. The data presented suggest that achiral profens can act as lead molecules toward in vivo probes of substrate-selective COX-2 inhibition.

  16. Follicle-stimulating hormone enhances alveolar bone resorption via upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chunxia; Ji, Yaoting; Liu, Shengbo; Bian, Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced alveolar bone resorption was mediated by a cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) enzyme related mechanism. Experimental periodontitis was induced in bilateral ovariectomized (OVX) rats, some of which were injected with triptorelin, an FSH inhibitor. After mandibles were collected, we performed micro-computed tomography to evaluate alveolar bone loss and immunohistochemical staining to assess COX-2 expression. As well, human periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) were treated with FSH (30 ng/ml), and the COX-2 mRNA and protein expression levels were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blotting, respectively; prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results indicated that FSH significantly increased alveolar bone resorption and the expression of COX-2 in the bilateral OVX + Ligatured rats compared with the other treatment groups. FSH also increased the mRNA and protein expression of COX-2 and PGE2 (P < 0.01) in human PDLCs. Further, the analysis of signaling pathways revealed the activation of COX-2-mediated pathways including Erk, p38, and Akt. These data suggest that FSH aggravates alveolar bone loss via a COX-2-upregulation mechanism and that the Erk, p38, and Akt pathways are involved in this pathological process. PMID:27725865

  17. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in deoxynivalenol-induced immunoglobulin a nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qunshan; Pestka, James J

    2005-05-01

    Ingestion of the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces serum IgA elevation and kidney mesangial IgA deposition in a manner that mimics the early stages of IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common human glomerulonephritis. Previous studies indicate that elevated interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression is crucial for this model and that DON induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) might drive IL-6 upregulation. We hypothesized that COX-2 and its metabolites are essential for DON-induced IgAN and thus might be a suitable target for prophylaxis against aberrant IgA upregulation. DON feeding studies using COX-2 knockout mice or the COX-2 specific inhibitor, rofecoxib (Vioxx), were employed to test the hypothesis. Study 1 results demonstrated that DON consumption induced serum IgA and IgA-immune complex (IC) accumulation, IgA kidney deposition and splenic IgA secretion in wild-type mice. COX-2 deficiency did not affect upregulation of these parameters but rather, promoted DON-induced serum IgA elevation. Study 2 demonstrated that rofecoxib could not block DON-induced serum IgA, serum IgA-IC and mesangial IgA accumulation but instead increased enhanced serum IgA upregulation. These corroborating results suggest that COX-2 is not a requisite for DON-induced IgAN and furthermore, that COX-2 inhibitors such as rofecoxib would be contraindicated for the prevention of early stages of IgAN. PMID:15778012

  18. Structure of the β-form of human MK2 in complex with the non-selective kinase inhibitor TEI-L03090

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Aiko; Fukushima, Kei; Kubota, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki; Takimoto-Kamimura, Midori

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2 or MAPKAP-K2), a serine/threonine kinase from the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway, plays an important role in the production of TNF-α and other cytokines. In a previous report, it was shown that MK2 in complex with the selective inhibitor TEI-I01800 adopts an α-helical glycine-rich loop that is induced by the stable nonplanar conformer of TEI-I01800. To understand the mechanism of the structural change, the structure of MK2 bound to TEI-L03090, which lacks the key substituent found in TEI-I01800, was determined. MK2–TEI-L03090 has a β-sheet glycine-rich loop in common with other kinases, as predicted. This result suggests that a small compound can induce a drastic conformational change in the target protein structure and can be used to design potent and selective inhibitors. PMID:24316826

  19. Parawixin2, a novel non-selective GABA uptake inhibitor from Parawixia bistriata spider venom, inhibits pentylenetetrazole-induced chemical kindling in rats.

    PubMed

    Gelfuso, Erica A; Liberato, José L; Cunha, Alexandra O S; Mortari, Márcia R; Beleboni, Renê O; Lopes, Norberto P; Dos Santos, Wagner F

    2013-05-24

    The aims of the present work were to investigate the effects of the repeated administration of Parawixin2 (2-amino-5-ureidopentanamide; formerly FrPbAII), a novel GABA and glycine uptake inhibitor, in rats submitted to PTZ-induced kindling. Wistar rats were randomly divided in groups (n=6-8) for different treatments. Systemic injections of PTZ were administered every 48 h in the dose of 33 mg/kg; i.p., that is sufficient to induce fully kindled seizures in saline i.c.v. treated rats in a short period of time (28 days). Treatments in two types of positive controls (diazepam - DZP and nipecotic acid - NA groups) consisted in daily systemic injections of DZP (2mg/kg; i.p.) or i.c.v. injections of NA (12 μg/μL), while in experimental groups in daily i.c.v. injections of different doses of Parawixin2 (0.15; 0.075; 0.015 μg/μL). Seizures were analyzed using the Lamberty & Klitgaard score and kindling was considered as established after at least three consecutive seizures of score 4 or 5. Cumulative seizure scores for each group were analyzed using repeated measures of ANOVA followed by Tukey test. PTZ induced 4 and 5-score seizures after 12 injections in saline treated rats, whereas daily injection of Parawixin2 inhibited the onset of seizures in a dose dependent manner. Also, the challenging administration of PTZ did not raise seizure score in animals treated with the highest dose of Parawixin2 or those treated with DZP or NA. These findings together with previous data from our laboratory show that Parawixin2 could be a useful probe to design new antiepileptic drugs.

  20. Interaction between inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nogawa, S; Forster, C; Zhang, F; Nagayama, M; Ross, M E; Iadecola, C

    1998-09-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia is associated with expression of both inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), enzymes whose reaction products contribute to the evolution of ischemic brain injury. We tested the hypothesis that, after cerebral ischemia, nitric oxide (NO) produced by iNOS enhances COX-2 activity, thereby increasing the toxic potential of this enzyme. Cerebral ischemia was produced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats or mice. Twenty-four hours after ischemia in rats, iNOS-immunoreactive neutrophils were observed in close proximity (<20 micrometer) to COX-2-positive cells at the periphery of the infarct. In the olfactory bulb, only COX-2 positive cells were observed. Cerebral ischemia increased the concentration of the COX-2 reaction product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the ischemic area and in the ipsilateral olfactory bulb. The iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine reduced PGE2 concentration in the infarct, where both iNOS and COX-2 were expressed, but not in the olfactory bulb, where only COX-2 was expressed. Postischemic PGE2 accumulation was reduced significantly in iNOS null mice compared with wild-type controls (C57BL/6 or SV129). The data provide evidence that NO produced by iNOS influences COX-2 activity after focal cerebral ischemia. Pro-inflammatory prostanoids and reactive oxygen species produced by COX-2 may be a previously unrecognized factor by which NO contributes to ischemic brain injury. The pathogenic effect of the interaction between NO, or a derived specie, and COX-2 is likely to play a role also in other brain diseases associated with inflammation.

  1. Pre-existent asymmetry in the human cyclooxygenase-2 sequence homodimer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Sharma, Narayan P; Jurban, Brice J; Smith, William L

    2013-10-01

    Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthase-2 (PGHS-2), also known as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is a sequence homodimer. However, the enzyme exhibits half-site heme and inhibitor binding and functions as a conformational heterodimer having a catalytic subunit (Ecat) with heme bound and an allosteric subunit (Eallo) lacking heme. Some recombinant heterodimers composed of a COX-deficient mutant subunit and a native subunit (i.e. Mutant/Native PGHS-2) have COX activities similar to native PGHS-2. This suggests that the presence of heme plus substrate leads to the subunits becoming lodged in a semi-stable Eallo-mutant/Ecat-Native∼heme form during catalysis. We examined this concept using human PGHS-2 dimers composed of combinations of Y385F, R120Q, R120A, and S530A mutant or native subunits. With some heterodimers (e.g. Y385F/Native PGHS-2), heme binds with significantly higher affinity to the native subunit. This correlates with near native COX activity for the heterodimer. With other heterodimers (e.g. S530A/Native PGHS-2), heme binds with similar affinities to both subunits, and the COX activity approximates that expected for an enzyme in which each monomer contributes equally to the net COX activity. With or without heme, aspirin acetylates one-half of the subunits of the native PGHS-2 dimer, the Ecat subunits. Subunits having an S530A mutation are refractory to acetylation. Curiously, aspirin acetylates only one-quarter of the monomers of S530A/Native PGHS-2 with or without heme. This implies that there are comparable amounts of two noninterchangeable species of apoenzymes, Eallo-S530A/Ecat-Native and Eallo-Native/Ecat-S530A. These results suggest that native PGHS-2 assumes a reasonably stable, asymmetric Eallo/Ecat form during its folding and processing. PMID:23955344

  2. Epigenetic regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 by methylation of c8orf4 in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Iona C; Barnes, Josephine L; Garner, Ian M; Pearce, David R; Maher, Toby M; Shiwen, Xu; Renzoni, Elisabetta A; Wells, Athol U; Denton, Christopher P; Laurent, Geoffrey J; Abraham, David J; McAnulty, Robin J

    2016-04-01

    Fibroblasts derived from the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and systemic sclerosis (SSc) produce low levels of prostaglandin (PG) E2, due to a limited capacity to up-regulate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). This deficiency contributes functionally to the fibroproliferative state, however the mechanisms responsible are incompletely understood. In the present study, we examined whether the reduced level of COX-2 mRNA expression observed in fibrotic lung fibroblasts is regulated epigenetically. The DNA methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5AZA) restored COX-2 mRNA expression by fibrotic lung fibroblasts dose dependently. Functionally, this resulted in normalization of fibroblast phenotype in terms of PGE2 production, collagen mRNA expression and sensitivity to apoptosis. COX-2 methylation assessed by bisulfite sequencing and methylation microarrays was not different in fibrotic fibroblasts compared with controls. However, further analysis of the methylation array data identified a transcriptional regulator, chromosome 8 open reading frame 4 (thyroid cancer protein 1, TC-1) (c8orf4), which is hypermethylated and down-regulated in fibrotic fibroblasts compared with controls. siRNA knockdown of c8orf4 in control fibroblasts down-regulated COX-2 and PGE2 production generating a phenotype similar to that observed in fibrotic lung fibroblasts. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c8orf4 regulates COX-2 expression in lung fibroblasts through binding of the proximal promoter. We conclude that the decreased capacity of fibrotic lung fibroblasts to up-regulate COX-2 expression and COX-2-derived PGE2 synthesis is due to an indirect epigenetic mechanism involving hypermethylation of the transcriptional regulator, c8orf4.

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 gene disruption promotes proliferation of murine calvarial osteoblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Choudhary, Shilpa; Okada, Yosuke; Voznesensky, Olga; Alander, Cynthia; Raisz, Lawrence; Pilbeam, Carol

    2007-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is highly expressed in osteoblasts, and COX-2 produced prostaglandins (PGs) can increase osteoblastic differentiation in vitro. The goal of this study was to examine effects of COX-2 expression on calvarial osteoblastic proliferation and apoptosis. Primary osteoblasts (POBs) were cultured from calvariae of COX-2 wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. POB proliferation was evaluated by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and analysis of cell replication and cell cycle distribution by flow cytometry. POB apoptosis was evaluated by annexin and PI staining on flow cytometry. As expected, PGE(2) production and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were increased in WT cultures compared to KO cultures. In contrast, cell numbers were decreased in WT compared to KO cells by day 4 of culture. Proliferation, measured on days 3-7 of culture, was 2-fold greater in KO than in WT POBs and associated with decreased Go/G1 and increased S cell cycle distribution. There was no significant effect of COX-2 genotype on apoptosis under basal culture conditions on day 5 of culture. Cell growth was decreased in KO POBs by the addition of PGE(2) or a protein kinase A agonist and increased in WT POBs by the addition of NS398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor. In contrast, differentiation and cell growth in marrow stromal cell (MSC) cultures, evaluated by ALP and crystal violet staining respectively, were increased in MSCs from WT mice compared to MSCs from KO mice, and exogenous PGE(2) increased cell growth in KO MSC cultures. We conclude that PGs secondary to COX-2 expression decrease osteoblastic proliferation in cultured calvarial cells but increase growth of osteoblastic precursors in MSC cultures.

  4. Salidroside suppresses solar ultraviolet-induced skin inflammation by targeting cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Changshu; Xiong, Hua; Chen, Jingwen; Guo, Jinguang; Lu, Mingmin; Ding, Yanyan; Fan, Xiaoming; Duan, Qiuhong; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (SUV) irradiation causes skin disorders such as inflammation, photoaging, and carcinogenesis. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays a key role in SUV-induced skin inflammation, and targeting COX-2 may be a strategy to prevent skin disorders. In this study, we found that the expression of COX-2, phosphorylation of p38 or JNKs were increased in human solar dermatitis tissues and SUV-irradiated human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cells and mouse epidermal JB6 Cl41 cells. Knocking down COX-2 inhibited the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the phosphorylation of p38 or JNKs in SUV-irradiated cells, which indicated that COX-2 is not only the key enzyme for PGs synthesis, but also an upstream regulator of p38 or JNKs after SUV irradiation. The virtual ligand screening assay was used to search for natural drugs in the Chinese Medicine Database, and indicated that salidroside might be a COX-2 inhibitor. Molecule modeling indicated that salidroside can directly bind with COX-2, which was proved by in vitro pull-down binding assay. Ex vivo studies showed that salidroside has no toxicity to cells, and inhibits the production of PGE2, phosphorylation of p38 or JNKs, and secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) caused by SUV irradiation. In vivo studies demonstrated that salidroside attenuates the skin inflammation induced by SUV. In brief, our data provided the evidences for the protective role of salidroside against SUV-induced inflammation by targeting COX-2, and salidroside might be a promising drug for the treatment of SUV-induced skin inflammation. PMID:27028995

  5. Flaxseed oil increases aortic reactivity to phenylephrine through reactive oxygen species and the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Flaxseed oil has the highest concentration of omega-3 α-linolenic acid, which has been associated with cardiovascular benefit. However, the mechanism underlying the vascular effects induced through flaxseed oil is not well known. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of flaxseed oil on vascular function in isolated rat aortic rings. Methods Wistar rats were treated daily with flaxseed oil or a control (mineral oil) intramuscular (i.m.) for fifteen days. Isolated aortic segments were used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression, superoxide anion levels and vascular reactivity experiments. Results Flaxseed oil treatment increased the vasoconstrictor response of aortic rings to phenylephrine. Endothelium removal increased the response to phenylephrine in aortic segments isolated from both groups, but the effect was smaller in the treated group. L-NAME incubation similarly increased the phenylephrine response in segments from both groups. The TXA2 synthase inhibitor furegrelate, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS 398, the TP receptor antagonist SQ 29.548, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger apocynin, the superoxide anion scavengers tiron and the phospholipase A2 inhibitor dexamethasone partially reversed the flaxseed oil-induced increase in reactivity to phenylephrine. Conclusions These findings suggest that flaxseed oil treatment increased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine through an increase in ROS production and COX-2-derived TXA2 production. The results obtained in the present study provide new insight into the effects of flaxseed oil treatment (i.m.) on vascular function. PMID:24993607

  6. Prostaglandin E2 EP3 receptor regulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz-Munoz, Mariana; Cuevas, Catherina A.; Cespedes, Carlos; Ferreri, Nicholas R.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is constitutively expressed and highly regulated in the thick ascending limb (TAL). As COX-2 inhibitors (Coxibs) increase COX-2 expression, we tested the hypothesis that a negative feedback mechanism involving PGE2 EP3 receptors regulates COX-2 expression in the TAL. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with a Coxib [celecoxib (20 mg·kg−1·day−1) or rofecoxib (10 mg·kg−1·day−1)], with or without sulprostone (20 μg·kg−1·day−1). Sulprostone was given using two protocols, namely, previous to Coxib treatment (prevention effect; Sulp7-Coxib5 group) and 5 days after initiation of Coxib treatment (regression effect; Coxib10-Sulp5 group). Immunohistochemical and morphometric analysis revealed that the stained area for COX-2-positive TAL cells (μm2/field) increased in Coxib-treated rats (Sham: 412 ± 56.3, Coxib: 794 ± 153.3). The Coxib effect was inhibited when sulprostone was used in either the prevention (285 ± 56.9) or regression (345 ± 51.1) protocols. Western blot analysis revealed a 2.1 ± 0.3-fold increase in COX-2 protein expression in the Coxib-treated group, an effect abolished by sulprostone using either the prevention (1.2 ± 0.3-fold) or regression (0.6 ± 0.4-fold vs. control, P < 0.05) protocols. Similarly, the 6.4 ± 0.6-fold increase in COX-2 mRNA abundance induced by Coxibs (P < 0.05) was inhibited by sulprostone; prevention: 0.9 ± 0.3-fold (P < 0.05) and regression: 0.6 ± 0.1 (P < 0.05). Administration of a selective EP3 receptor antagonist, L-798106, also increased the area for COX-2-stained cells, COX-2 mRNA accumulation, and protein expression in the TAL. Collectively, the data suggest that COX-2 levels are regulated by a novel negative feedback loop mediated by PGE2 acting on its EP3 receptor in the TAL. PMID:22622465

  7. Effects of NSAIDs on proliferation of gastric cancer cells in vitro: possible implication of cyclooxygenase-2 in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Sawaoka, H; Kawano, S; Tsuji, S; Tsujii, M; Murata, H; Hori, M

    1998-01-01

    The roles of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the development of gastric cancer are unknown. We investigated the effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are specific and nonspecific inhibitors of COX-2, on proliferation of the gastric cancer cell lines KATOIII, MKN28, and MKN45. The protein level of COX-2 was examined in these cell lines by Western analysis, and mRNA levels of COX-1/2 by Northern analysis. These cell lines expressed comparable levels of COX-1 mRNA. However, mRNA and protein expression of COX-2 in these cell lines was different. MKN45 expressed higher levels of COX-2 mRNA and protein than KATOIII and MKN28. We also examined the effects of NS-398 and indomethacin, specific and nonspecific inhibitors of COX-2, on the increase in cell number and [3H]thymidine uptake of these cell lines. NS-398 and indomethacin suppressed proliferation of MKN45 cells that overexpressed COX-2, although they exerted minimal effects on proliferation of KATOIII and MKN28, which expressed lower levels of COX-2. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that COX-2 is expressed in certain groups of gastric cancers and is related to their cell proliferation. It was proposed that COX-2 plays an important role in development of gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, NSAIDs may exert antiproliferative activity against gastric adenocarcinomas that overexpress COX-2. PMID:9872498

  8. Targeting the prostaglandin E2 EP1 receptor and cyclooxygenase-2 in the amygdala kindling model in mice.

    PubMed

    Fischborn, Sarah Verena; Soerensen, Jonna; Potschka, Heidrun

    2010-09-01

    The prostaglandin E2 EP1 receptor as well as the inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 have been suggested as targets for disease modulation, improvement of therapeutic response, and restoration of pharmacosensitivity in epilepsies. Translational development of respective add-on approaches requires careful analysis of putative effects on ictogenesis. Therefore we evaluated the impact of the EP1 receptor antagonist SC-51089, the EP1 receptor agonist misoprostol and the COX-2 inhibitors celecoxib and NS-398 in the mouse amygdala kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Neither celecoxib nor NS-398 affected the generation, spread and termination of seizure activity. Whereas SC-51089 did not affect the seizure threshold, the highest dose (30mg/kg) significantly decreased the seizure severity when administered 60min before stimulation. Moreover, SC-51089 significantly prolonged seizure duration at the highest dose. The EP1 receptor agonist misoprostol exerted contrasting effects on seizure duration with a significant decrease in the duration of motor seizure activity. The data suggest that doses of COX-2 inhibitors and EP1 receptor antagonists which exert disease modulating or antiepileptic drug potentiating effects do not negatively affect seizure control in temporal lobe epilepsy. The contrasting impact of the EP1 receptor antagonist and agonist suggests that EP1 receptors can influence endogenous mechanisms involved in termination of seizure activity.

  9. The superoxide anion donor, potassium superoxide, induces pain and inflammation in mice through production of reactive oxygen species and cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Maioli, N A; Zarpelon, A C; Mizokami, S S; Calixto-Campos, C; Guazelli, C F S; Hohmann, M S N; Pinho-Ribeiro, F A; Carvalho, T T; Manchope, M F; Ferraz, C R; Casagrande, R; Verri, W A

    2015-04-01

    It is currently accepted that superoxide anion (O2•-) is an important mediator in pain and inflammation. The role of superoxide anion in pain and inflammation has been mainly determined indirectly by modulating its production and inactivation. Direct evidence using potassium superoxide (KO2), a superoxide anion donor, demonstrated that it induced thermal hyperalgesia, as assessed by the Hargreaves method. However, it remains to be determined whether KO2 is capable of inducing other inflammatory and nociceptive responses attributed to superoxide anion. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the nociceptive and inflammatory effects of KO2. The KO2-induced inflammatory responses evaluated in mice were: mechanical hyperalgesia (electronic version of von Frey filaments), thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate), edema (caliper rule), myeloperoxidase activity (colorimetric assay), overt pain-like behaviors (flinches, time spent licking and writhing score), leukocyte recruitment, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression (quantitative PCR). Administration of KO2 induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw edema, leukocyte recruitment, the writhing response, paw flinching, and paw licking in a dose-dependent manner. KO2 also induced time-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression in the paw skin. The nociceptive, inflammatory, and oxidative stress components of KO2-induced responses were responsive to morphine (analgesic opioid), quercetin (antioxidant flavonoid), and/or celecoxib (anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) treatment. In conclusion, the well-established superoxide anion donor KO2 is a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms and pharmacological susceptibilities of superoxide anion-triggered nociceptive and inflammatory responses ranging from mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia to overt pain-like behaviors, edema, and leukocyte recruitment.

  10. The superoxide anion donor, potassium superoxide, induces pain and inflammation in mice through production of reactive oxygen species and cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, N.A.; Zarpelon, A.C.; Mizokami, S.S.; Calixto-Campos, C.; Guazelli, C.F.S.; Hohmann, M.S.N.; Pinho-Ribeiro, F.A.; Carvalho, T.T.; Manchope, M.F.; Ferraz, C.R.; Casagrande, R.; Verri, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    It is currently accepted that superoxide anion (O2 •−) is an important mediator in pain and inflammation. The role of superoxide anion in pain and inflammation has been mainly determined indirectly by modulating its production and inactivation. Direct evidence using potassium superoxide (KO2), a superoxide anion donor, demonstrated that it induced thermal hyperalgesia, as assessed by the Hargreaves method. However, it remains to be determined whether KO2 is capable of inducing other inflammatory and nociceptive responses attributed to superoxide anion. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the nociceptive and inflammatory effects of KO2. The KO2-induced inflammatory responses evaluated in mice were: mechanical hyperalgesia (electronic version of von Frey filaments), thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate), edema (caliper rule), myeloperoxidase activity (colorimetric assay), overt pain-like behaviors (flinches, time spent licking and writhing score), leukocyte recruitment, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression (quantitative PCR). Administration of KO2 induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw edema, leukocyte recruitment, the writhing response, paw flinching, and paw licking in a dose-dependent manner. KO2 also induced time-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression in the paw skin. The nociceptive, inflammatory, and oxidative stress components of KO2-induced responses were responsive to morphine (analgesic opioid), quercetin (antioxidant flavonoid), and/or celecoxib (anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) treatment. In conclusion, the well-established superoxide anion donor KO2 is a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms and pharmacological susceptibilities of superoxide anion-triggered nociceptive and inflammatory responses ranging from mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia to overt pain-like behaviors, edema, and leukocyte recruitment. PMID:25714890

  11. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in the development of interstitial fibrosis in kidneys following unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Mariko; Hosono, Kanako; Fujita, Tomoe; Kamata, Kouju; Majima, Masataka

    2015-03-01

    Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) induced tubulointerstitial fibrosis in kidneys mimics the pathogenesis of chronic kidney diseases and is considered a suitable model for studying the mechanisms leading to fibrosis. To study the role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in kidney fibrosis, we investigated whether a selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, affected renal interstitial fibrosis during UUO in mice. To induce UUO, the left proximal ureter was ligated in male C57BL/6 mice. The mice were fed a diet with or without celecoxib from the day of UUO induction. Following UUO, the renal pelvis was observed to be dilated and the kidney cortex was significantly thinner than that of sham-operated mice. Immunofluorescent staining of type I, III, and IV collagen in UUO kidneys revealed that interstitial collagen deposition was significantly increased in the celecoxib-treated group. Expression of type I, III, and IV collagen in UUO kidneys was also significantly higher in the celecoxib-treated group than in the vehicle-treated group. In the celecoxib-treated group, mRNA levels of TGF-β/FGF-2 were also significantly higher than those in the vehicle-treated group. The present study demonstrates that COX-2 plays a protective role against fibrosis in UUO kidneys and suggests that supplementation of COX-2 products, such as PG analogues, will be a good option for preventing interstitial fibrosis. PMID:25776498

  12. Are cyclooxygenase-2 and nitric oxide involved in the dyskinesia of Parkinson's disease induced by l-DOPA?†

    PubMed Central

    Bortolanza, Mariza; Padovan-Neto, Fernando E.; Cavalcanti-Kiwiatkoski, Roberta; dos Santos-Pereira, Maurício; Mitkovski, Miso; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Del-Bel, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory mechanisms are proposed to play a role in l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) contributes to inflammation pathways in the periphery and is constitutively expressed in the central nervous system. Considering that inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) formation attenuates l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, this study aimed at investigating if a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor would change COX2 brain expression in animals with l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. To this aim, male Wistar rats received unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine microinjection into the medial forebrain bundle were treated daily with l-DOPA (21 days) combined with 7-nitroindazole or vehicle. All hemi-Parkinsonian rats receiving l-DOPA showed dyskinesia. They also presented increased neuronal COX2 immunoreactivity in the dopamine-depleted dorsal striatum that was directly correlated with dyskinesia severity. Striatal COX2 co-localized with choline-acetyltransferase, calbindin and DARPP-32 (dopamine-cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein-32), neuronal markers of GABAergic neurons. NOS inhibition prevented l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia and COX2 increased expression in the dorsal striatum. These results suggest that increased COX2 expression after l-DOPA long-term treatment in Parkinsonian-like rats could contribute to the development of dyskinesia. PMID:26009769

  13. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor κB Activation and Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression by Aqueous Extracts of Hispanic Medicinal Herbs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Amanda M.; Hunsaker, Lucy A.; Franco, Carolina R.; Royer, Robert E.; Vander Jagt, David L.; Vander Jagt, Dorothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a primary choice of therapy for diseases with a chronic inflammatory component. Unfortunately, long-term NSAID therapy is often accompanied by severe side effects, including cardiovascular and gastrointestinal complications. Because of this, there is critical need for identification of new and safer treatments for chronic inflammation to circumvent these side effects. Inflammatory diseases have been successfully remedied with natural herbs by many cultures. To better understand the potential of natural herbs in treating chronic inflammation and to identify their mechanism of action, we have evaluated the anti-inflammatory activities of 20 medicinal herbs commonly used in the Hispanic culture. We have established a standardized method for preparing aqueous extracts (teas) from the selected medicinal herbs and screened for inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which is the central signaling pathway of the inflammatory response. A number of herbal teas were identified that exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity. In particular, tea from the herb commonly called laurel was found to be an especially potent inhibitor of NF-κB-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression and prostaglandin E2 production in cultured murine macrophages. These findings indicate that laurel tea extract contains potent anti-inflammatory compounds that function by inhibiting the major signal transduction pathway responsible for inducing an inflammatory event. Based on these results, laurel may represent a new, safe therapeutic agent for managing chronic inflammation. PMID:20482259

  14. Prolactin (PRL) induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression and prostaglandin (PG) production in hamster Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Matzkin, María Eugenia; Ambao, Verónica; Carino, Mónica Herminia; Rossi, Soledad Paola; González, Lorena; Turyn, Daniel; Campo, Stella; Calandra, Ricardo Saúl; Frungieri, Mónica Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Serum prolactin (PRL) variations play a crucial role in the photoperiodic-induced testicular regression-recrudescence transition in hamsters. We have previously shown that cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins (PGs), is expressed mostly in Leydig cells of reproductively active hamsters with considerable circulating and pituitary levels of PRL. In this study, we describe a stimulatory effect of PRL on COX2/PGs in hamster Leydig cells, which is mediated by IL-1β and prevented by P38-MAPK and JAK2 inhibitors. Furthermore, by preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF), we isolated PRL charge analogues from pituitaries of active [isoelectric points (pI): 5.16, 4.61, and 4.34] and regressed (pI: 5.44) hamsters. More acidic PRL charge analogues strongly induced COX2 expression, while less acidic ones had no effect. Our studies suggest that PRL induces COX2/PGs in hamster Leydig cells through IL-1β and activation of P38-MAPK and JAK2. PRL microheterogeneity detected in active/inactive hamsters may be responsible for the photoperiodic variations of COX2 expression in Leydig cells.

  15. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R.; Redondo, Santiago; Peçanha, Franck; Martín, Angela; Fortuño, Ana; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Tejerina, Teresa; Salaices, Mercedes; and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  16. Parathyroid hormone induction of cyclooxygenase-2 in murine osteoblasts: role of the calcium-calcineurin-NFAT pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hechang; Chikazu, Daichi; Voznesensky, Olga S; Herschman, Harvey R; Kream, Barbara E; Drissi, Hicham; Pilbeam, Carol C

    2010-04-01

    Murine MC3T3-E1 and MC-4 cells were stably transfected with -371/+70 bp of the murine cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) promoter fused to a luciferase reporter (Pluc371) or with Pluc371 carrying site-directed mutations. Mutations were made in (1) the cAMP response element (CRE) at -57/-52 bp, (2) the activating protein-1 (AP-1)-binding site at -69/-63 bp, (3) the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT)-binding site at -77/-73 bp, and (4) both the AP-1 and NFAT sites, which comprise a composite consensus sequence for NFAT/AP-1. Single mutation of CRE, AP-1, or NFAT sites decreased parathyroid hormone (PTH)-stimulated COX-2 promoter activity 40% to 60%, whereas joint mutation of NFAT and AP-1 abrogated the induction. On electrophoretic mobility shift analysis, PTH stimulated binding of phosphorylated CREB to an oligonucleotide spanning the CRE and binding of NFATc1, c-Fos, and c-Jun to an oligonucleotide spanning the NFAT/AP-1 composite site. Mutation of the NFAT site was less effective than mutation of the AP-1 site in competing binding to the composite element, suggesting that cooperative interactions of NFATc1 and AP-1 are more dependent on NFAT than on AP-1. Both PTH and forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, stimulated NFATc1 nuclear translocation. PTH- and forskolin-stimulated COX-2 promoter activity was inhibited 56% to 80% by calcium chelation or calcineurin inhibitors and 60% to 98% by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors. These results indicate an important role for the calcium-calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway in the PTH induction of COX-2 and suggest that cross-talk between the cAMP/PKA pathway and the calcium-calcineurin-NFAT pathway may play a role in other functions of PTH in osteoblasts.

  17. Simultaneous Inhibition of EGFR/VEGFR and Cyclooxygenase-2 Targets Stemness-Related Pathways in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Araceli; Peñarando, Jon; Cañas, Amanda; López-Sánchez, Laura M.; Conde, Francisco; Hernández, Vanessa; Peralbo, Esther; López-Pedrera, Chary; de la Haba-Rodríguez, Juan; Aranda, Enrique; Rodríguez-Ariza, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Despite the demonstrated benefits of anti-EGFR/VEGF targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), many patients initially respond, but then show evidence of disease progression. New therapeutic strategies are needed to make the action of available drugs more efficient. Our study aimed to explore whether simultaneous targeting of EGFR/VEGF and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) may aid the treatment and management of mCRC patients. The dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor AEE788 and celecoxib were used to inhibit EGFR/VEGFR and COX-2, respectively, in colorectal cancer cells. COX-2 inhibition with celecoxib augmented the antitumoral and antiangiogenic efficacy of AEE788, as indicated by the inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest, down-regulation of VEGF production by cancer cells and reduction of cell migration. These effects were related with a blockade in the EGFR/VEGFR signaling axis. Notably, the combined AEE788/celecoxib treatment prevented β-catenin nuclear accumulation in tumor cells. This effect was associated with a significant downregulation of FOXM1 protein levels and an impairment in the interaction of this transcription factor with β-catenin, which is required for its nuclear localization. Furthermore, the combined treatment also reduced the expression of the stem cell markers Oct 3/4, Nanog, Sox-2 and Snail in cancer cells, and contributed to the diminution of the CSC subpopulation, as indicated by colonosphere formation assays. In conclusion, the combined treatment of AEE788 and celecoxib not only demonstrated enhanced anti-tumoral efficacy in colorectal cancer cells, but also reduced colon CSCs subpopulation by targeting stemness-related pathways. Therefore, the simultaneous targeting of EGFR/VEGF and COX-2 may aid in blocking mCRC progression and improve the efficacy of existing therapies in colorectal cancer. PMID:26107817

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 impairs treatment effects of radiotherapy for cervical cancer by inhibition of radiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi . E-mail: hisikawa@med.gunma-u.ac.jp; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kato, Shingo; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Ohta, Toshie M.S.; Imai, Takashi; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Noda, Shin-ei; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays a pivotal role in regulation of radiation-induced apoptosis. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between COX-2 expression and postradiotherapy outcomes of patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Biopsy specimens from 47 consecutive patients who had undergone definitive radiotherapy alone or radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy between October 2002 and November 2004 were investigated. Results: The COX-2 expression rate of the pretreatment samples was 46.1% {+-} 21.0%, and the apoptotic index (AI) 1 week after start of radiotherapy was 2.1% {+-} 0.9%. There was a significant negative correlation between the pretreatment COX-2 expression and the AI during radiotherapy (r = -0.52, p = 0.0002). Complete response rates were 59% for COX-2-positive patients compared with 80% for COX-2-negative patients (p = 0.12). The 2-year local control rate for COX-2-positive patients was 71.3%, whereas the corresponding rate for COX-2-negative patients was 96.0% (p 0.06). Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to prove clinically that COX-2 can make cervical squamous cell carcinomas more refractory to radiotherapy by inhibition of radiation-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, expression of COX-2 may be a good indicator to predict local tumor control after radiotherapy. Although long-term results are ultimately needed, the combination therapy of radiotherapy with use of a COX-2 inhibitor could yield improved outcomes for patients with COX-2 expressing cervical cancer.

  19. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in cervical cancer is associated with lymphovascular invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hoellen, Friederike; Waldmann, Annika; Banz-Jansen, Constanze; Rody, Achim; Heide, Maria; Köster, Frank; Ribbat-Idel, Julika; Thorns, Christoph; Gebhard, Maximilian; Oberländer, Martina; Habermann, Jens K.; Thill, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is associated with carcinogenesis and tumor progression. The current study analyzed the effect of COX-2 expression in patients with invasive squamous cervical cancer. Tissue samples from 123 cervical cancer patients were collected for a retrospective analysis using immunohistochemistry (IHC) with an antibody against COX-2. The clinical and survival data of the patients were analyzed. Positive staining for COX-2 (defined as an immunoreactivity score of ≥4) was detected in 28 patients (23%), with significantly higher percentages of staining in tumor cells compared with peritumoral stroma cells (P<0.001). COX-2 expression was significantly associated with lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI; P=0.017). The association of COX-2 expression with LVSI suggests a possible effect of COX-2 on tumor progression in cervical cancer. Further studies including larger patient collectives are required in order to perform analyses of clinical subgroups and patient survival. PMID:27698799

  20. Suppressive effects of the kahweol and cafestol on cyclooxygenase-2 expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Jung, Kyung Sik; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2004-07-01

    Inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been suggested to play a role in the processes of inflammation and carcinogenesis. Recent studies have shown the chemoprotective effects of kahweol and cafestol, which are coffee-specific diterpenes. This study investigated the effects of kahweol and cafestol on the expression of COX-2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Kahweol and cafestol significantly suppressed the LPS-induced production of prostaglandin E(2), COX-2 protein and mRNA expression, and COX-2 promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, kahweol blocked the LPS-induced activation of NF-kappaB by preventing IkappaB degradation and inhibiting IkappaB kinase activity. These results will provide new insights into the anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties of kahweol and cafestol. PMID:15225655

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2 is induced by p38 MAPK and promotes cell survival.

    PubMed

    Parente, Rosanna; Trifirò, Elisabetta; Cuozzo, Francesca; Valia, Sandro; Cirone, Mara; Di Renzo, Livia

    2013-05-01

    The Na+ ionophore monensin affects cellular pH and, depending on its concentration, causes the survival or death of tumor cells. In the present study, we elucidated the survival pathway activated in U937 cells, a human lymphoma-derived cell line. These cells treated with monensin at a concentration of 5 µM were growth-arrested in G1, activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and showed an increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The latter two molecular events were linked, as pharmacological inhibition of the MAPK did not allow COX-2 increased expression. Furthermore, we showed that p38 and COX-2 keep monensin-stressed U937 cells alive, as pharmacological inhibition of each enzyme caused cell death. PMID:23446663

  2. Up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 by product-prostaglandin E2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of prostate cancer has been linked to high level of dietary fat intake. Our laboratory investigates the connection between cancer cell growth and fatty acid products. Studying human prostatic carcinoma PC-3 cells, we found that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increased cell growth and up-regulated the gene expression of its own synthesizing enzyme, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). PGE2 increased COX-2 mRNA expression dose-dependently with the highest levels of stimulation seen at the 3-hour period following PGE2 addition. The NSAID flurbiprofen (5 microM), in the presence of exogenous PGE2, inhibited the up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA and cell growth. These data suggest that the levels of local intracellular PGE2 play a major role in the growth of prostate cancer cells through an activation of COX-2 gene expression.

  3. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in cervical cancer is associated with lymphovascular invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hoellen, Friederike; Waldmann, Annika; Banz-Jansen, Constanze; Rody, Achim; Heide, Maria; Köster, Frank; Ribbat-Idel, Julika; Thorns, Christoph; Gebhard, Maximilian; Oberländer, Martina; Habermann, Jens K.; Thill, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is associated with carcinogenesis and tumor progression. The current study analyzed the effect of COX-2 expression in patients with invasive squamous cervical cancer. Tissue samples from 123 cervical cancer patients were collected for a retrospective analysis using immunohistochemistry (IHC) with an antibody against COX-2. The clinical and survival data of the patients were analyzed. Positive staining for COX-2 (defined as an immunoreactivity score of ≥4) was detected in 28 patients (23%), with significantly higher percentages of staining in tumor cells compared with peritumoral stroma cells (P<0.001). COX-2 expression was significantly associated with lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI; P=0.017). The association of COX-2 expression with LVSI suggests a possible effect of COX-2 on tumor progression in cervical cancer. Further studies including larger patient collectives are required in order to perform analyses of clinical subgroups and patient survival.

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition improves amyloid-β-mediated suppression of memory and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kotilinek, Linda A.; Westerman, Marcus A.; Wang, Qinwen; Panizzon, Kimberly; Lim, Giselle P.; Simonyi, Agnes; Lesne, Sylvain; Falinska, Agnieszka; Younkin, Linda H.; Younkin, Steven G.; Rowan, Michael; Cleary, James; Wallis, Roi Ann; Sun, GraceY.; Cole, Greg; Frautschy, Sally; Anwyl, Roger; Ashe, Karen H.

    2008-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are associated with a marked reduction in the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, a form of dementia characterized by the accumulation of amyloid plaques containing the amyloid-β protein (Aβ). Studies of the effects of NSAIDs upon the inflammatory response surrounding amyloid plaques and upon the generation of Aβ from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) have led to two proposed mechanisms by which NSAIDs may protect against Alzheimer’s disease: one, the selective lowering of Aβ42 by a subset of NSAIDs; and two, the reduction of inflammation. Although Alzheimer’s disease is a disorder of brain and synaptic function, the effects of NSAIDs on Aβ-mediated suppression of synaptic plasticity and memory function have never been reported. We therefore investigated how three different NSAIDs, chosen for their distinct effects on Aβ42 production and the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) isoenzymes, COX-1 and COX-2, affect memory function and synaptic plasticity. By focusing upon brain and synapse function, we made novel observations about the effects of NSAIDs on Aβ-mediated neural processes. Here we report that the selective inhibition of COX-2, but not COX-1, acutely prevented the suppression of hippocampal long-term plasticity (LTP) by Aβ. The non-selective NSAIDs, ibuprofen and naproxen, and a selective COX-2 inhibitor, MF-tricyclic, each restored memory function in Tg2576 mice over-expressing APP, and also blocked Aβ-mediated inhibition of LTP. There was no advantage of ibuprofen, a selective Aβ42-lowering agent (SALA), over the non-SALAs, naproxen and MF-tricyclic. The beneficial effects on memory did not depend upon lowered levels of Aβ42 or the inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β). Intriguingly, improved memory function was inversely related to prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. Conversely, exogenous PGE2 prevented the restorative effects of COX-2

  5. Discovery of novel (4-piperidinyl)-piperazines as potent and orally active acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1/2 non-selective inhibitors: F-Boc and triF-Boc groups are acid-stable bioisosteres for the Boc group.

    PubMed

    Chonan, Tomomichi; Wakasugi, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Yashiro, Miyoko; Oi, Takahiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Ohoka-Sugita, Ayumi; Io, Fusayo; Koretsune, Hiroko; Hiratate, Akira

    2011-03-01

    Novel (4-piperidinyl)-piperazine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as ACC1/2 non-selective inhibitors. Optimization of the substituents on the nitrogen of the piperidine ring led to the identification of the fluorine substituted tert-butoxycarbonyl group. Advanced analog, 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-methylpropan-2-yl 4-{4-[(2-amino-6-methyl-1-benzothiophen-3-yl)carbonyl]piperazin-1-yl}piperidine-1-carboxylate (12c) showed potent inhibitory activities in enzyme-assay and cell-based assays. Compound 12c also exhibited reduction of hepatic de novo fatty acid synthesis in rats after oral administration.

  6. Cyclooxygenase-2 blockade can improve efficacy of VEGF-targeting drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Batalla, Isabel; Cubas-Cordova, Miguel; Udonta, Florian; Wroblewski, Mark; Waizenegger, Jonas S.; Janning, Melanie; Sawall, Stefanie; Gensch, Victoria; Zhao, Lin; Martinez-Zubiaurre, Iñigo; Riecken, Kristoffer; Fehse, Boris; Pantel, Klaus; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Loges, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapies were approved for different cancers. However, significant primary and secondary resistance hampers efficacy in several tumor types including breast cancer. Thus, we need to develop clinically applicable strategies to enhance efficacy of anti-angiogenic drugs. We report that anti-angiogenic therapies can induce upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) and of its product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in breast cancer models. Upon Cox-2 inhibition PGE2 levels were normalized and efficacy of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (anti-VEGFR-2) antibodies and sunitinib was enhanced. Interestingly, both treatments exerted additive anti-angiogenic effects. Following Cox-2 inhibition, we observed reduced infiltration of tumors with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and lower levels of pro-angiogenic factors active besides the VEGF axis including hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2). Mechanistic studies indicated that Cox-2 inhibition reduced PGE2-induced migration and proliferation of CAFs via inhibiting phosphorylation of Akt. Hence, Cox-2 inhibition can increase efficacy of anti-angiogenic treatments and our findings might pave the road for clinical investigations of concomitant blockade of Cox-2 and VEGF-signaling. PMID:25849942

  7. Paeoniflorin ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis in rat models through oxidative stress, inflammation and cyclooxygenase 2

    PubMed Central

    JIA, ZHILIN; HE, JIAO

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin has anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy, immune regulatory and pain-relieving effects, amongst other roles. However, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of paeoniflorin on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain under investigation; the objective of the current study was to evaluate these protective effects in the context of an RA model. Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, as follows: The control group, the RA rat model group, and the paeoniflorin groups, in which paeoniflorin was administered at concentrations of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg for 3 weeks. The pain thresholds and arthritic symptoms of the RA rats were measured. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were also analyzed and western blot analysis was used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression levels. Paeoniflorin significantly increased the pain threshold and decreased the arthritic symptoms in the RA rat model. Notably, paeoniflorin reduced the malondialdehyde concentration and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Furthermore, paeoniflorin attenuated the activity of nuclear factor-κB p65 unit, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and reduced the COX-2 protein expression level. The present study indicates that paeoniflorin ameliorates disease in rat models of RA through oxidative stress, inflammation and alterations to COX-2 expression. PMID:26893662

  8. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  9. Expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway and cyclooxygenase-2 in dog tumors.

    PubMed

    Giantin, M; Vascellari, M; Lopparelli, R M; Ariani, P; Vercelli, A; Morello, E M; Cristofori, P; Granato, A; Buracco, P; Mutinelli, F; Dacasto, M

    2013-02-01

    In humans, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene battery constitutes a set of contaminant-responsive genes, which have been recently shown to be involved in the regulation of several patho-physiological conditions, including tumorigenesis. As the domestic dog represents a valuable animal model in comparative oncology, mRNA levels of cytochromes P450 1A1, 1A2 and 1B1 (CYP1A1, 1A2 and 1B1), AHR, AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT), AHR repressor (AHRR, whose partial sequence was here obtained) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) were measured in dog control tissues (liver, skin, mammary gland and bone), in 47 mast cell tumors (MCTs), 32 mammary tumors (MTs), 5 osteosarcoma (OSA) and related surgical margins. Target genes were constitutively expressed in the dog, confirming the available human data. Furthermore, their pattern of expression in tumor biopsies was comparable to that already described in a variety of human cancers; in particular, both AHR and COX2 genes were up-regulated and positively correlated, while CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNAs were generally poorly expressed. This work demonstrated for the first time that target mRNAs are expressed in neoplastic tissues of dogs, thereby increasing the knowledge about dog cancer biology and confirming this species as an useful animal model for comparative studies on human oncology.

  10. Cyclooxygenase-2 Mediates Dialysate-Induced Alterations of the Peritoneal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Aroeira, Luiz S.; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Loureiro, Jesús; Aguilera, Abelardo; Ramírez-Huesca, Marta; González-Mateo, Guadalupe; Pérez-Lozano, M. Luisa; Albar-Vizcaíno, Patricia; Bajo, M-Auxiliadora; del Peso, Gloria; Sánchez-Tomero, José Antonio; Jiménez-Heffernan, José Antonio; Selgas, Rafael; López-Cabrera, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), exposure of the peritoneal membrane to nonphysiologic solutions causes inflammation, ultimately leading to altered structure and function. Myofibroblasts, one of the cell types that contribute to dysfunction of the peritoneal membrane, can originate from mesothelial cells (MCs) by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process that has been associated with an increased rate of peritoneal transport. Because cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is induced by inflammation, we studied the role of COX-2 in the deterioration of the peritoneal membrane. We observed that nonepithelioid MCs found in peritoneal effluent expressed higher levels of COX-2 than epithelioid MCs. The mass transfer coefficient for creatinine correlated with MC phenotype and with COX-2 levels. Although COX-2 was upregulated during EMT of MCs in vitro, COX-2 inhibition did not prevent EMT. In a mouse model of PD, however, COX-2 inhibition with Celecoxib resulted in reduced fibrosis and in partial recovery of ultrafiltration, outcomes that were associated with a reduction of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, PD fluid with a low content of glucose degradation products did not induce EMT or COX-2; the peritoneal membranes of mice treated with this fluid showed less worsening than mice exposed to standard fluid. In conclusion, upregulation of COX-2 during EMT may mediate peritoneal inflammation, suggesting COX-2 inhibition as a potential strategy to ameliorate peritoneal deterioration in PD patients. PMID:19158357

  11. A cyclooxygenase-2 homologue encoded by rhesus cytomegalovirus is a determinant for endothelial cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Rue, Cary A; Jarvis, Michael A; Knoche, Amber J; Meyers, Heather L; DeFilippis, Victor R; Hansen, Scott G; Wagner, Markus; Früh, Klaus; Anders, David G; Wong, Scott W; Barry, Peter A; Nelson, Jay A

    2004-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a cellular enzyme in the eicosanoid synthetic pathway that mediates the synthesis of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. The eicosanoids function as critical regulators of a number of cellular processes, including the acute and chronic inflammatory response, hemostasis, and the innate immune response. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), which does not encode a viral COX-2 isoform, has been shown to induce cellular COX-2 expression. Importantly, although the precise role of COX-2 in CMV replication is unknown, COX-2 induction was shown to be critical for normal HCMV replication. In an earlier study, we identified an open reading frame (Rh10) within the rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) genome that encoded a putative protein (designated vCOX-2) with high homology to cellular COX-2. In the current study, we show that vCOX-2 is expressed with early-gene kinetics during RhCMV infection, resulting in production of a 70-kDa protein. Consistent with the expression of a viral COX-2 isoform, cellular COX-2 expression was not induced during RhCMV infection. Finally, analysis of growth of recombinant RhCMV with vCOX-2 deleted identified vCOX-2 as a critical determinant for replication in endothelial cells. PMID:15507640

  12. A Cyclooxygenase-2 Homologue Encoded by Rhesus Cytomegalovirus Is a Determinant for Endothelial Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Rue, Cary A.; Jarvis, Michael A.; Knoche, Amber J.; Meyers, Heather L.; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Hansen, Scott G.; Wagner, Markus; Früh, Klaus; Anders, David G.; Wong, Scott W.; Barry, Peter A.; Nelson, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a cellular enzyme in the eicosanoid synthetic pathway that mediates the synthesis of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. The eicosanoids function as critical regulators of a number of cellular processes, including the acute and chronic inflammatory response, hemostasis, and the innate immune response. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), which does not encode a viral COX-2 isoform, has been shown to induce cellular COX-2 expression. Importantly, although the precise role of COX-2 in CMV replication is unknown, COX-2 induction was shown to be critical for normal HCMV replication. In an earlier study, we identified an open reading frame (Rh10) within the rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) genome that encoded a putative protein (designated vCOX-2) with high homology to cellular COX-2. In the current study, we show that vCOX-2 is expressed with early-gene kinetics during RhCMV infection, resulting in production of a 70-kDa protein. Consistent with the expression of a viral COX-2 isoform, cellular COX-2 expression was not induced during RhCMV infection. Finally, analysis of growth of recombinant RhCMV with vCOX-2 deleted identified vCOX-2 as a critical determinant for replication in endothelial cells. PMID:15507640

  13. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 impacts chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation during endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Welting, T J M; Caron, M M J; Emans, P J; Janssen, M P F; Sanen, K; Coolsen, M M E; Voss, L; Surtel, D A M; Cremers, A; Voncken, J W; van Rhijn, L W

    2011-01-01

    Skeletogenesis and bone fracture healing involve endochondral ossification, a process during which cartilaginous primordia are gradually replaced by bone tissue. In line with a role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the endochondral ossification process, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were reported to negatively affect bone fracture healing due to impaired osteogenesis. However, a role for COX-2 activity in the chondrogenic phase of endochondral ossification has not been addressed before. We show that COX-2 activity fulfils an important regulatory function in chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Our data reveal essential cross-talk between COX-2 and bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) during chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. BMP-2 mediated chondrocyte hypertrophy is associated with increased COX-2 expression and pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 activity by NSAIDs (e.g., Celecoxib) decreases hypertrophic differentiation in various chondrogenic models in vitro and in vivo, while leaving early chondrogenic development unaltered. Our findings demonstrate that COX-2 activity is a novel factor partaking in chondrocyte hypertrophy in the context of endochondral ossification and these observations provide a novel etiological perspective on the adverse effects of NSAIDs on bone fracture healing and have important implications for the use of NSAIDs during endochondral skeletal development. PMID:22183916

  14. In vivo glucocorticoids regulate cyclooxygenase-2 but not cyclooxygenase-1 in peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Masferrer, J L; Reddy, S T; Zweifel, B S; Seibert, K; Needleman, P; Gilbert, R S; Herschman, H R

    1994-09-01

    Acute inflammatory stimuli elevate both the production of prostaglandins and the synthesis and activity of prostaglandin synthase/cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX) in murine peritoneal macrophages. Adrenalectomy also elevates prostaglandin production, COX synthesis and COX activity in these cells. We have utilized cDNA probes and antisera specific for the products of the prostaglandin synthase/cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and TIS10/prostaglandin synthase-2/cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) genes to demonstrate that adrenalectomy causes elevation of mRNA and protein from the COX-2 gene, but not from the COX-1 gene, in peritoneal macrophages. Dexamethasone replacement suppressed the elevation of COX-2 mRNA message, COX-2 protein and the increased COX enzyme activity observed in adrenalectomized animals. In contrast, both COX-1 message and COX-1 protein levels were unaffected either by adrenalectomy or by dexamethasone administration. Thus, under normal physiological conditions, tonic glucocorticoid inhibition appears to play a major role in the in vivo regulation of the COX-2 gene. These data are consistent with COX-1 being the constitutive, housekeeping enzyme in macrophages in normal physiological conditions and with the enhanced prostaglandin synthesis seen after an inflammatory stimulus resulting from the rapid induction and activity of COX-2.

  15. MAPK pathway activation by chronic lead-exposure increases vascular reactivity through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, Maylla Ronacher; Aguado, Andrea; Fiorim, Jonaína; Silveira, Edna Aparecida; Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Toscano, Cindy Medice; Zhenyukh, Olha; Briones, Ana María; Alonso, María Jesús; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Chronic exposure to low lead concentration produces hypertension; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways and MAPK in the vascular alterations induced by chronic lead exposure. Aortas from lead-treated Wistar rats (1st dose: 10 μg/100 g; subsequent doses: 0.125 μg/100 g, intramuscular, 30 days) and cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Sprague Dawley rats stimulated with lead (20 μg/dL) were used. Lead blood levels of treated rats attained 21.7 ± 2.38 μg/dL. Lead exposure increased systolic blood pressure and aortic ring contractile response to phenylephrine, reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and did not affect sodium nitroprusside relaxation. Endothelium removal and L-NAME left-shifted the response to phenylephrine more in untreated than in lead-treated rats. Apocynin and indomethacin decreased more the response to phenylephrine in treated than in untreated rats. Aortic protein expression of gp91(phox), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and COX-2 increased after lead exposure. In cultured VSMCs lead 1) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and gene and/or protein levels of NOX-1, NOX-4, Mn-SOD, EC-SOD and COX-2 and 2) activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and mRNA levels of NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2. Blockade of the ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished lead-induced NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2 expression. Results show that lead activation of the MAPK signaling pathways activates inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2, suggesting a reciprocal interplay and contribution to vascular dysfunction as an underlying mechanisms for lead-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Lead-exposure increases oxidative stress, COX-2 expression and vascular reactivity. • Lead exposure activates MAPK signaling pathway. • ROS and COX-2 activation by

  16. Altered mRNA editing and expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors after kainic acid exposure in cyclooxygenase-2 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Luca; Barbon, Alessandro; Palumbo, Sara; Mora, Cristina; Toscano, Christopher D; Bosetti, Francesca; Barlati, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) binds to the AMPA/KA receptors and induces seizures that result in inflammation, oxidative damage and neuronal death. We previously showed that cyclooxygenase-2 deficient (COX-2(-/-)) mice are more vulnerable to KA-induced excitotoxicity. Here, we investigated whether the increased susceptibility of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA is associated with altered mRNA expression and editing of glutamate receptors. The expression of AMPA GluR2, GluR3 and KA GluR6 was increased in vehicle-injected COX-2(-/-) mice compared to wild type (WT) mice in hippocampus and cortex, whereas gene expression of NMDA receptors was decreased. KA treatment decreased the expression of AMPA, KA and NMDA receptors in the hippocampus, with a significant effect in COX-2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, we analyzed RNA editing levels and found that the level of GluR3 R/G editing site was selectively increased in the hippocampus and decreased in the cortex in COX-2(-/-) compared with WT mice. After KA, GluR4 R/G editing site, flip form, was increased in the hippocampus of COX-2(-/-) mice. Treatment of WT mice with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib for two weeks decreased the expression of AMPA/KA and NMDAR subunits after KA, as observed in COX-2(-/-) mice. After KA exposure, COX-2(-/-) mice showed increased mRNA expression of markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, such as cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), microglia (CD11b) and astrocyte (GFAP). Thus, COX-2 gene deletion can exacerbate the inflammatory response to KA. We suggest that COX-2 plays a role in attenuating glutamate excitotoxicity by modulating RNA editing of AMPA/KA and mRNA expression of all ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits and, in turn, neuronal excitability. These changes may contribute to the increased vulnerability of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA. The overstimulation of glutamate receptors as a consequence of COX-2 gene deletion suggests a functional coupling between COX-2 and the

  17. Role of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase, calcitonin gene-related peptide and cyclooxygenase-2 in experimental rat models of migraine.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaomeng; Hu, Yaozhi; Jing, Long; Chen, Jinbo

    2015-08-01

    Although migraine is a common neurological condition, the pathomechanism is not yet fully understood. Activation of the trigeminovascular system (TVS) has an important function in this disorder and neurogenic inflammation and central sensitization are important mechanisms underlying this condition. Nitroglycerin (NTG) infusion in rats closely mimics a universally accepted human model of migraine. Electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (ESTG) of rats can also activate TVS during a migraine attack. Numerous studies have revealed that phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are involved in pain and nociceptive pathways. However, few studies have examined whether p-ERK, CGRP and COX-2 are involved in neurogenic inflammation and central sensitization. In the present study, the expression of p-ERK, CGRP and COX-2 was detected in the dura mater, trigeminal ganglion (TG) and spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis in NTG-induced rats and ESTG models by immunohistochemistry. The three areas considered were crucial components of the TVS. The selective COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide was used in ESTG rats to examine the association between p-ERK, CGRP and COX-2. The results demonstrated that p‑ERK, CGRP and COX-2 mediated neurogenic inflammation and central sensitization in migraine. In addition, the expression of p-ERK and CGRP was attenuated by the COX-2 inhibitor.

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes is modulated by cyclic AMP, prostaglandin E(2), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Hinz, B; Brune, K; Pahl, A

    2000-11-30

    Using human blood monocytes (for determination of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA by RT-PCR) and human whole blood (for prostanoid determination), the present study investigates the influence of the second messenger cAMP on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced COX-2 expression with particular emphasis on the role of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in this process. Elevation of intracellular cAMP with a cell-permeable cAMP analogue (dibutyryl cAMP), an adenylyl cyclase activator (cholera toxin), or a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) substantially enhanced LPS-induced PGE(2) formation and COX-2 mRNA expression, but did not modify COX-2 enzyme activity. Moreover, up-regulation of LPS-induced COX-2 expression was caused by PGE(2), butaprost (selective agonist of the adenylyl cyclase-coupled EP(2) receptor) and 11-deoxy PGE(1) (EP(2)/EP(4) agonist), whereas sulprostone (EP(3)/EP(1) agonist) left COX-2 expression unaltered. Abrogation of LPS-induced PGE(2) synthesis with the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 caused a decrease in COX-2 mRNA levels that was restored by exogenous PGE(2) and mimicked by S(+)-flurbiprofen and ketoprofen. Overall, these results indicate a modulatory role of cAMP in the regulation of COX-2 expression. PGE(2), a cAMP-elevating final product of the COX-2 pathway, may autoregulate COX-2 expression in human monocytes via a positive feedback mechanism.

  19. Involvement of hypothalamic cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-1β and melanocortin in the development of docetaxel-induced anorexia in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kouichi; Asano, Keiko; Ito, Yui; Matsukawa, Naoki; Kim, Seikou; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2012-12-16

    Docetaxel, a taxane derivative, is frequently used for the treatment of advanced breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and metastatic prostate cancer. Clinical reports demonstrated that docetaxel-based chemotherapy often induces anorexia, but the etiology is not completely understood. To elucidate possible mechanisms, we investigated the involvement of central interleukin (IL)-1β, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) in the development of docetaxel-induced anorexia in rats. Rats received docetaxel (10mg/kg, i.p.) with or without pretreatment with selective COX-2 inhibitors, NS-398 (10 and 30 mg/kg, i.g.) or celecoxib (10 and 30 mg/kg, i.g.), and a non-selective COX inhibitor, indomethacin (10mg/kg, i.g.), then food intake was monitored for 24h after administration. We also examined expression of IL-1β, COX-2, and POMC mRNA in hypothalamus of docetaxel-treated rats and the effect of a COX-2 inhibitor on docetaxel-induced POMC mRNA expression. Food consumption in rats was significantly decreased 24h after administration of docetaxel and anorexia was partially reversed by all COX inhibitors. Administration of docetaxel increased IL-1β, COX-2, and POMC mRNA expression in the hypothalamus of rats. The time required to increase these gene expressions was comparable to the latency period of docetaxel-induced anorexia in rats. In addition, pretreatment with COX-2 inhibitors suppressed docetaxel-induced expression of POMC mRNA. These results suggest that IL-1β and COX-2 mRNA expression and subsequent activation of POMC in the hypothalamus may contribute to the development of docetaxel-induced anorexia in rats.

  20. 2,2',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl upregulates cyclooxygenase-2 in HL-60 cells via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Bezdecny, Steven A.; Karmaus, Peer; Roth, Robert A.; Ganey, Patricia E. . E-mail: ganey@msu.edu

    2007-06-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous, persistent environmental contaminants that affect a number of cellular systems, including neutrophils. Among the effects caused by the noncoplanar PCB 2,2',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (2244-TCB) in granulocytic HL-60 cells are increases in superoxide anion production, activation of phospholipase A{sub 2} with subsequent release of arachidonic acid (AA) and upregulation of the inflammatory gene cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The objective of this study was to determine the signal transduction pathways involved in the upregulation of COX-2 by 2244-TCB. Treatment of HL-60 cells with 2244-TCB led to increased expression of COX-2 mRNA. This increase was prevented by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D in cells pretreated with 2244-TCB for 10 min. The increase in COX-2 mRNA was associated with release of {sup 3}H-AA, phosphorylation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, increased levels of nuclear NF-{kappa}B and increased superoxide anion production. Bromoenol lactone, an inhibitor of the calcium-independent phospholipase A{sub 2}, reduced {sup 3}H-AA release but had no effect on COX-2 mRNA, protein or activity. Pretreatment with SB-202190 or SB-203580, inhibitors of the p38 MAP kinase pathway, prevented the 2244-TCB-mediated induction of COX-2 and phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. These inhibitors did not alter {sup 3}H-AA release. Treatment with PD 98059 or U 0126, inhibitors of the MAP/ERK (MEK) pathway, prevented the 2244-TCB-mediated activation of ERK but had no effect on COX-2 induction or p38 phosphorylation. 2244-TCB treatment did not affect c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. 2244-TCB exposure increased the amount of nuclear NF-{kappa}B. This increase was prevented by pretreatment with p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, but not by pretreatment with MEK inhibitors. Pretreatment with inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B prevented the 2244-TCB

  1. Lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius Inhibits Nuclear Transcription Factor-kappa B Activation, Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression and Prostaglandin E2 Production in Stimulated Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Naila; Alghasham, Abdullah; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive joint disorder, which remains the leading cause of chronic disability in aged people. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF)-κB is a major cellular event in OA and its activation by interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays a critical role in cartilage breakdown in these patients. Objective: In this study, we examined the effect of lactoferrin on NF-κB activation, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in stimulated human articular chondrocytes. Materials and Methods: Human chondrocytes were derived from OA articular cartilage and treated with camel lactoferrin and then stimulated with IL-1β. Gene expression was determined by TaqMan assays and protein expression was studied by Western immunoblotting. NF-κB activity and PGE2 levels were determined by ELISA based assays. NF-κB activity was also determined by treatment of chondrocytes with NF-κB specific inhibitor Bay 11–7082. Results: Lactoferrin inhibited IL-1β-induced activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in human OA chondrocytes. Lactoferrin also inhibited mRNA/protein expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. Moreover, Bay 11–7082 also inhibited IL-1β-induced expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. The inhibitory effect of lactoferrin on the IL-1β induced expression of COX-2 or production of PGE2 was mediated at least in part via suppression of NF-κB activation. Conclusions: Our data determine camel lactoferrin as a novel inhibitor of IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB signaling events and production of cartilage-degrading molecule PGE2 via inhibition of COX-2 expressions. These results may have important implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the prevention/treatment of OA and other degenerative/inflammatory diseases. SUMMARY Lactoferrin shows anti-arthritic activity in IL-1β stimulated primary human chondrocytes.Lactoferrin inhibits IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation.Lactoferrin inhibits

  2. Aged garlic extract attenuates cerebral damage and cyclooxygenase-2 induction after ischemia and reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, Ana Laura; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Barrera, Diana; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Maldonado, Perla D

    2011-11-01

    Different garlic products reduce the cerebral ischemic damage due to their antioxidant properties. In this work, we investigated the effect of aged garlic extract (AGE) on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels and activity, and its role as a possible mechanism of neuroprotection in a cerebral ischemia model. Animals were subjected to 1 h of ischemia plus 24 h of reperfusion. AGE (1.2 ml/kg weight, i.p.) was administered at onset of reperfusion. To evaluate the damage induced by cerebral ischemia, the neurological deficit, the infarct area, and the histological alterations were measured. As an oxidative stress marker to deoxyribonucleic acid, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels were determined. Finally, as inflammatory markers, TNFα levels and COX-2 protein levels and activity were measured. AGE treatment diminished the neurological alterations (61.6%), the infarct area (54.8%) and the histological damage (37.7%) induced by cerebral ischemia. AGE administration attenuated the increase in 8-OHdG levels (77.8%), in TNFα levels (76.6%), and in COX-2 protein levels (73.6%) and activity (30.7%) induced after 1 h of ischemia plus 24 h of reperfusion. These data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of AGE is associated not only to its antioxidant properties, but also with its capacity to diminish the increase in TNFα levels and COX-2 protein expression and activity. AGE may have the potential to attenuate the cerebral ischemia-induced inflammation.

  3. Lower cyclooxygenase-2 expression is associated with recurrence of solitary non-muscle invasive bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A new modality is necessary to prevent recurrence of superficial bladder cancer after complete transurethral resection because of the high recurrence rate even with current prophylaxis protocols. Methods In order to analyze the predictive value of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in recurrence of this disease tumor specimens from 127 patients with solitary papillary non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), 78 with recurrent disease and 49 without recurrence during follow up of minimum 5 years, were retrieved for tissue microarrays construction and immunohistochemical analysis. COX-2 expression was scored according to Allred’s scoring protocol, while presence of TILs was categorized as absent (no) or present (yes) on whole tissue sections. Results COX-2 immunoreactivity was presented in 70 (71%), weak in 16% and strong in 55% of cases, while 29 (29%) tumors were negative. TILs were present in 64 (58%) NMIBC, while 44 cases (41%) did not reveal mononuclear infiltration in tumoral stroma. Statistical analysis demonstrated a higher proportion of patients with recurrence in the group with the COX-2 score 0, and lower in the group with score 2 (p=0.0001, p=0.0101, respectively). In addition, a higher proportion of recurrent patients in the group with no TILs, and lower proportion in the group with TILs were found (p=0.009, p=0.009, respectively). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed overexpression of COX-2 and presence of TILs as negative predictors. Conclusion Patients with lower COX-2 expression and absence of TILs in NMIBC need to be followed up more vigorously and probably selected for adjuvant therapy. Virtual slide The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1411318819790406 PMID:23126361

  4. Activating enhancer-binding protein-2α induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression and promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lijun; Xie, Fangyun; Sun, Rui; Wang, Jingshu; Li, Wenbin; Liu, Tianze; Xiao, Yao; Yu, Wendan; Guo, Wei; Xiong, Yuqing; Qiu, Huijuan; Kang, Tiebang; Huang, Wenlin; Zhao, Chong; Deng, Wuguo

    2015-01-01

    Activating enhancer-binding protein-2α (AP-2α) regulates the expression of many cancer-related genes. Here, we demonstrated a novel mechanism by which AP-2α up-regulated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression to promote the growth of nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPCs). High expression of AP-2α in NPC cell lines and tumor tissues from NPC patients was detected and significantly correlated with COX-2 expression. Overexpression of AP-2α and COX-2 in tumor tissues was associated with advanced tumor stage, clinical progression, and short survival of patients with NPCs. Knockdown of AP-2α by siRNA markedly inhibited COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in NPC cells. Exogenous expression of AP-2α up-regulated the COX-2 and PGE2. Knockdown of AP-2α also significantly suppressed cell proliferation in NPC cells in vitro and tumor growth in a NPC xenograft mouse model. Moreover, we found that p300 played an important role in the AP-2α/COX-2 pathway. AP-2α could co-localize and interact with p300 in NPC cells. Overexpression of the p300, but not its histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain deletion mutant, promoted the acetylation of AP-2α and its binding on the COX-2 promoter, thereby up-regulated COX-2 expression. Our results indicate that AP-2α activates COX-2 expression to promote NPC growth and suggest that the AP-2α/COX-2 signaling is a potential therapeutic target for NPC treatment. PMID:25669978

  5. Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Human Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ristimäki, Ari; Nieminen, Outi; Saukkonen, Kirsi; Hotakainen, Kristina; Nordling, Stig; Haglund, Caj

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is elevated in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder and that inhibition of Cox-2 activity suppresses bladder cancer in experimental animal models. We have investigated the expression of Cox-2 protein in human TCCs (n = 85), in in situ carcinomas (Tis) of the urinary bladder (n = 17), and in nonneoplastic urinary bladder samples (n = 16) using immunohistochemistry. Cox-2 immunoreactivity was detected in 66% (67 of 102) of the carcinomas, whereas only 25% (4 of 16) of the nonneoplastic samples were positive (P < 0.005). Cox-2 immunoreactivity localized to neoplastic cells in the carcinoma samples. The rate of positivity was the same in invasive (T1–3; 70%, n = 40) and in noninvasive (Tis and Ta; 65%, n = 62) carcinomas, but noninvasive tumors had a higher frequency (32%) of homogenous pattern of staining (>90% of the tumor cells positive) than the invasive carcinomas (10%) (P < 0.05). However, several invasive TCCs exhibited the strongest intensity of Cox-2 staining in the invading cells, whereas other parts of the tumor were virtually negative. Finally, strong Cox-2 positivity was also found in nonneoplastic ulcerations (2 of 2) and in inflammatory pseudotumors (2 of 2), in which the immunoreactivity localized to the nonepithelial cells. Taken together, our data suggest that Cox-2 is highly expressed in noninvasive bladder carcinomas, whereas the highest expression of invasive tumors associated with the invading cells, and that Cox-2 may also have a pathophysiological role in nonneoplastic conditions of the urinary bladder, such as ulcerations and inflammatory pseudotumors. PMID:11238034

  6. Aged garlic extract attenuates cerebral damage and cyclooxygenase-2 induction after ischemia and reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, Ana Laura; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Barrera, Diana; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Maldonado, Perla D

    2011-11-01

    Different garlic products reduce the cerebral ischemic damage due to their antioxidant properties. In this work, we investigated the effect of aged garlic extract (AGE) on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels and activity, and its role as a possible mechanism of neuroprotection in a cerebral ischemia model. Animals were subjected to 1 h of ischemia plus 24 h of reperfusion. AGE (1.2 ml/kg weight, i.p.) was administered at onset of reperfusion. To evaluate the damage induced by cerebral ischemia, the neurological deficit, the infarct area, and the histological alterations were measured. As an oxidative stress marker to deoxyribonucleic acid, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels were determined. Finally, as inflammatory markers, TNFα levels and COX-2 protein levels and activity were measured. AGE treatment diminished the neurological alterations (61.6%), the infarct area (54.8%) and the histological damage (37.7%) induced by cerebral ischemia. AGE administration attenuated the increase in 8-OHdG levels (77.8%), in TNFα levels (76.6%), and in COX-2 protein levels (73.6%) and activity (30.7%) induced after 1 h of ischemia plus 24 h of reperfusion. These data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of AGE is associated not only to its antioxidant properties, but also with its capacity to diminish the increase in TNFα levels and COX-2 protein expression and activity. AGE may have the potential to attenuate the cerebral ischemia-induced inflammation. PMID:21850441

  7. Neuronal NOS and cyclooxygenase-2 contribute to DNA damage in a mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tuan; Choi, Dong-Kug; Nagai, Makiko; Wu, Du-Chu; Nagata, Tetsuya; Prou, Delphine; Wilson, Glenn L; Vila, Miquel; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise; Przedborski, Serge

    2009-10-01

    DNA damage is a proposed pathogenic factor in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson disease. To probe the underpinning mechanism of such neuronal perturbation, we sought to produce an experimental model of DNA damage. We thus first assessed DNA damage by in situ nick translation and emulsion autoradiography in the mouse brain after administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP; 4 x 20 mg/kg, ip, every 2 h), a neurotoxin known to produce a model of Parkinson disease. Here we show that DNA strand breaks occur in vivo in this mouse model of Parkinson disease with kinetics and a topography that parallel the degeneration of substantia nigra neurons, as assessed by FluoroJade labeling. Previously, nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) were found to modulate MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal death. We thus assessed the contribution of these enzymes to DNA damage in mice lacking neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), or Cox-2. We found that the lack of Cox-2 and nNOS activities but not of iNOS activity attenuated MPTP-related DNA damage. We also found that not only nuclear, but also mitochondrial, DNA is a target for the MPTP insult. These results suggest that the loss of genomic integrity can be triggered by the concerted actions of nNOS and Cox-2 and provide further support to the view that DNA damage may contribute to the neurodegenerative process in Parkinson disease. PMID:19616617

  8. Cholesterol affects flow-stimulated cyclooxygenase-2 expression and prostanoid secretion in the cortical collecting duct

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Flores, Daniel; Carrisoza-Gaytán, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Essential hypertension (eHTN) is associated with hypercholesterolemia, but how cholesterol contributes to eHTN is unknown. Recent evidence demonstrates that short-term dietary cholesterol ingestion induces epithelial Na channel (ENaC)-dependent Na absorption with a subsequent rise in blood pressure (BP), implicating cholesterol in salt-sensitive HTN. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an autocrine/paracrine molecule, is induced by flow in endothelia to vasodilate the vasculature and inhibit ENaC-dependent Na absorption in the renal collecting duct (CD), which reduce BP. We hypothesize that cholesterol suppresses flow-mediated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and PGE2 release in the CD, which, in turn, affects Na absorption. Cortical CDs (CCDs) were microperfused at 0, 1, and 5 nl·min−1·mm−1, and PGE2 release was measured. Secreted PGE2 was similar between no- and low-flow (151 ± 28 vs. 121 ± 48 pg·ml−1·mm−1) CCDs, but PGE2 was greatest from high-flow (578 ± 146 pg·ml−1·mm−1; P < 0.05) CCDs. Next, mice were fed either a 0 or 1% cholesterol diet, injected with saline to generate high urine flow rates, and CCDs were microdissected for PGE2 secretion. CCDs isolated from cholesterol-fed mice secreted less PGE2 and had a lower PGE2-generating capacity than CCDs isolated from control mice, implying cholesterol repressed flow-induced PGE2 synthesis. Next, cholesterol extraction in a CD cell line induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 release while cholesterol incorporation, conversely, suppressed their expression. Moreover, fluid shear stress (FSS) and cholesterol extraction induced COX-2 protein abundance via p38-dependent activation. Thus cellular cholesterol composition affects biomechanical signaling, which, in turn, affects FSS-mediated COX-2 expression and PGE2 release via a p38-dependent mechanism. PMID:25761882

  9. Isoform-selective interaction of cyclooxygenase-2 with indomethacin amides studied by real-time fluorescence, inhibition kinetics, and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Timofeevski, Sergei L; Prusakiewicz, Jeffery J; Rouzer, Carol A; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2002-07-30

    Conversion of carboxylate-containing nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, such as indomethacin, to esters or amides provides potent and selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) [Kalgutkar et al. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 925-930]. Synthesis of cinnamyl- or coumarinyl-substituted ethanolamide derivatives of indomethacin produced fluorescent probes of inhibitor interaction with COX-2 and COX-1. Binding of either derivative to apoCOX-2 or apoCOX-1 resulted in a rapid, reversible enhancement of fluorescence. Following this rapid phase, a slow additional increase in fluorescence was observed with apoCOX-2 but not with apoCOX-1. The slow, COX-2-specific increase in fluorescence was prevented or reversed by addition of the nonfluorescent COX inhibitor (S)-flurbiprofen. Detailed kinetic studies of the interaction of the coumarinyl derivative with COX-2 showed that the observed changes in fluorescence could be described by two sequential equilibria, the first of which is rapid, reversible, and bimolecular in the forward direction. The second equilibrium is slower, reversible, and unimolecular in both directions. The forward rate constant for the slow equilibrium determined by fluorescence enhancement [(3.1 +/- 0.6) x 10(-3) s(-1)] corresponded closely to the forward rate constant for inhibition of COX-2 activity [(6.8 +/- 2.3) x 10(-3) s(-1)], suggesting that the slow fluorescence enhancement is associated with selective COX-2 inhibition. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that residues in the carboxylate-binding region of the COX-2 active site (Arg-120, Tyr-355, and Glu-524) are critical for the binding of the indomethacin conjugates that leads to slow fluorescence enhancement and cyclooxygenase inhibition. The indomethacin conjugates described herein represent powerful tools for the investigation of a novel class of selective inhibitors of COX-2.

  10. Prognostic significance of cyclooxygenase-2 expression in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guodong; Li, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jing; Li, Jie; Wang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is believed to be an important enzyme in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, it is still controversial whether COX-2 expression can be regarded as a prognostic factor for HCC patients. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing the clinical and prognostic significance of COX-2 expression in HCC. Material and methods Identification and review of publications assessing clinical or prognostic significance of COX-2 expression in HCC until November 1, 2014. A meta-analysis was performed to clarify the association between COX-2 expression and clinical outcomes. Results A total of 11 publications met the criteria and included 943 cases. Analysis of these data showed that COX-2 expression was not significantly correlated with capsular formation (OR = 0.84, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.46–1.55, p = 0.58), tumor TNM stage (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.23–2.33, p = 0.59), vascular invasion (OR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.25–4.35, p = 0.96), tumor size (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.21–2.86, p = 0.71), or tumor differentiation degree (OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.42–2.79, p = 0.87). However, in the identified studies, COX-2 expression was strongly associated with high alpha-fetoprotein level (OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.01–3.33, p = 0.05), HBsAg status (OR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.13–3.03, p = 0.01), decreased overall survival (relative risk (RR): 1.54, 95% CI: 1.18–2.02, p = 0.001) and decreased disease-free survival (RR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.22–1.81, p < 0.001). Conclusions This meta-analysis shows that COX-2 expression in HCC is associated with decreased overall and disease-free survival and thus marks a worse prognosis. Nevertheless, more large sample and well-designed studies are warranted to confirm this finding. PMID:27695503

  11. Role of the cyclooxygenase 2-thromboxane pathway in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced decrease in mesencephalic vein blood flow in the zebrafish embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Teraoka, Hiroki Kubota, Akira; Dong, Wu; Kawai, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Koji; Mori, Chisato; Harada, Yoshiteru; Peterson, Richard E.; Hiraga, Takeo

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we reported that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) evoked developmental toxicity required activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor type 2 (AHR2), using zebrafish embryos. However, the downstream molecular targets of AHR2 activation are largely unknown and are the focus of the present investigation. TCDD induces cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), a rate-limiting enzyme for prostaglandin synthesis in certain cells. In the present study, we investigated the role of the COX2-thromboxane pathway in causing a specific endpoint of TCDD developmental toxicity in the zebrafish embryo, namely, a decrease in regional blood flow in the dorsal midbrain. It was found that the TCDD-induced reduction in mesencephalic vein blood flow was markedly inhibited by selective COX2 inhibitors, NS-398 and SC-236, and by a general COX inhibitor, indomethacin, but not by a selective COX1 inhibitor, SC-560. Gene knock-down of COX2 by two different types of morpholino antisense oligonucleotides, but not by their negative homologs, also protected the zebrafish embryos from mesencephalic vein circulation failure caused by TCDD. This inhibitory effect of TCDD on regional blood flow in the dorsal midbrain was also blocked by selective antagonists of the thromboxane receptor (TP). Treatment of control zebrafish embryos with a TP agonist also caused a reduction in mesencephalic vein blood flow and it too was blocked by a TP antagonist, without any effect on trunk circulation. Finally, gene knock-down of thromboxane A synthase 1 (TBXS) with morpholinos but not by the morpholinos' negative homologs provided significant protection against TCDD-induced mesencephalic circulation failure. Taken together, these results point to a role of the prostanoid synthesis pathway via COX2-TBXS-TP in the local circulation failure induced by TCDD in the dorsal midbrain of the zebrafish embryo.

  12. Caveolin-1-mediated suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 via a beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcriptional mechanism reduced prostaglandin E2 production and survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Diego A; Tapia, Julio C; Fernandez, Jaime G; Torres, Vicente A; Muñoz, Nicolas; Galleguillos, Daniela; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2009-04-01

    Augmented expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and enhanced production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) are associated with increased tumor cell survival and malignancy. Caveolin-1 is a scaffold protein that has been proposed to function as a tumor suppressor in human cancer cells, although mechanisms underlying this ability remain controversial. Intriguingly, the possibility that caveolin-1 regulates the expression of COX-2 has not been explored. Here we show that augmented caveolin-1 expression in cells with low basal levels of this protein, such as human colon cancer (HT29, DLD-1), breast cancer (ZR75), and embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells reduced COX-2 mRNA and protein levels and beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef and COX-2 gene reporter activity, as well as the production of PGE(2) and cell proliferation. Moreover, COX-2 overexpression or PGE(2) supplementation increased levels of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin by a transcriptional mechanism, as determined by PCR analysis, survivin gene reporter assays and Western blotting. Furthermore, addition of PGE(2) to the medium prevented effects attributed to caveolin-1-mediated inhibition of beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription. Finally, PGE(2) reduced the coimmunoprecipitation of caveolin-1 with beta-catenin and their colocalization at the plasma membrane. Thus, by reducing COX-2 expression, caveolin-1 interrupts a feedback amplification loop involving PGE(2)-induced signaling events linked to beta-catenin/Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription of tumor survival genes including cox-2 itself and survivin. PMID:19244345

  13. Relationship between the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 and MDR1/P-glycoprotein in invasive breast cancers and their prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Surowiak, Pawel; Materna, Verena; Matkowski, Rafal; Szczuraszek, Katarzyna; Kornafel, Jan; Wojnar, Andrzej; Pudelko, Marek; Dietel, Manfred; Denkert, Carsten; Zabel, Maciej; Lage, Hermann

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Recent reports suggest that expression of the cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) enzyme may up-regulate expression of MDR1/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), an exponent of resistance to cytostatic drugs. The present study aimed at examining the relationship between the expression of COX-2 and of MDR1/P-gp in a group of breast cancer cases. Methods Immunohistochemical reactions were performed using monoclonal antibodies against COX-2 and MDR1/P-gp on samples originating from 104 cases of primary invasive breast cancer. Results COX-2-positive cases were shown to demonstrate higher expression of MDR1/P-gp (P < 0.0001). The studies also demonstrate that COX-2 expression was typical for cases of a higher grade (P = 0.01), a shorter overall survival time (P < 0.0001) and a shorter progression-free time (P < 0.0001). In the case of MDR1/P-gp, its higher expression characterised cases of a higher grade (P < 0001), with lymph node involvement (P < 0001), and shorter overall survival (P < 0.0001) and progression-free time (P < 0.0001). Conclusion Our studies confirmed the unfavourable prognostic significance of COX-2 and MDR1/P-gp. We also document a relationship between COX-2 and MDR1/P-gp, which suggests that COX-2 inhibitors should be investigated in trials as a treatment supplementary to chemotherapy of breast cancers. PMID:16168133

  14. The effects of a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and inhibition on human uveal melanoma cell proliferation and macrophage nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jean-Claude; Caissie, Amanda L; Cruess, Stephanie R; Cools-Lartigue, Jonathan; Burnier, Miguel N

    2007-01-01

    Background Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression has previously been identified in uveal melanoma although the biological role of COX-2 in this intraocular malignancy has not been elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a COX-2 inhibitor on the proliferation rate of human uveal melanoma cells, as well as its effect on the cytotoxic response of macrophages. Methods Human uveal melanoma cell lines were transfected to constitutively express COX-2 and the proliferative rate of these cells using two different methods, with and without the addition of Amfenac, was measured. Nitric oxide production by macrophages was measured after exposure to melanoma-conditioned medium from both groups of cells as well as with and without Amfenac, the active metabolite of Nepafenac. Results Cells transfected to express COX-2 had a higher proliferation rate than those that did not. The addition of Amfenac significantly decreased the proliferation rate of all cell lines. Nitric oxide production by macrophages was inhibited by the addition of melanoma conditioned medium, the addition of Amfenac partially overcame this inhibition. Conclusion Amfenac affected both COX-2 transfected and non-transfected uveal melanoma cells in terms of their proliferation rates as well as their suppressive effects on macrophage cytotoxic activity. PMID:18042295

  15. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional...

  16. Radiation Therapy Overcomes Adverse Prognostic Role of Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression on Reed-Sternberg Cells in Early Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mestre, Francisco; Gutiérrez, Antonio; Rodriguez, Jose; Ramos, Rafael; Garcia, Juan Fernando; Martinez-Serra, Jordi; Casasus, Marta; Nicolau, Cristina; Bento, Leyre; Herraez, Ines; Lopez-Perezagua, Paloma; Daumal, Jaime; Besalduch, Joan

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To analyze the role of radiation therapy (RT) on the adverse prognostic influence of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression on Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells, in the setting of early Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treated with ABVD (adriamycin, vinblastine, bleomycin, dacarbazine). Methods and Materials: In the present study we retrospectively investigated the prognostic value of COX-2 expression in a large (n=143), uniformly treated early HL population from the Spanish Network of HL using tissue microarrays. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done, including the most recognized clinical variables and the potential role of administration of adjuvant RT. Results: Median age was 31 years; the expression of COX-2 defined a subgroup with significantly worse prognosis. Considering COX-2{sup +} patients, those who received RT had significantly better 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) (80% vs 54% if no RT; P=.008). In contrast, COX-2{sup −} patients only had a modest, nonsignificant benefit from RT in terms of 5-year PFS (90% vs 79%; P=.13). When we compared the outcome of patients receiving RT considering the expression of COX-2 on RS cells, we found a nonsignificant 10% difference in terms of PFS between COX-2{sup +} and COX-2{sup −} patients (P=.09), whereas the difference between the 2 groups was important (25%) in patients not receiving RT (P=.04). Conclusions: Cyclooxygenase-2 RS cell expression is an adverse independent prognostic factor in early HL. Radiation therapy overcomes the worse prognosis associated with COX-2 expression on RS cells, acting in a chemotherapy-independent way. Cyclooxygenase-2 RS cell expression may be useful for determining patient candidates with early HL to receive consolidation with RT.

  17. Novel anti-inflammatory chalcone derivatives inhibit the induction of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Herencia, F; Ferrándiz, M L; Ubeda, A; Guillén, I; Dominguez, J N; Charris, J E; Lobo, G M; Alcaraz, M J

    1999-06-18

    In a previous work, we tested a series of chalcone derivatives as possible anti-inflammatory compounds. We now investigate the effects of three of those compounds, CHI, CH8 and CH12, on nitric oxide and prostanoid generation in mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and in the mouse air pouch injected with zymosan, where they showed a dose-dependent inhibition with inhibitory concentration 50% values in the microM range. This effect was not the consequence of a direct inhibitory action on enzyme activities. Our results demonstrated that chalcone derivatives inhibited de novo inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 synthesis, being a novel therapeutic approach for inflammatory diseases.

  18. The Bitter Barricading of Prostaglandin Biosynthesis Pathway: Understanding the Molecular Mechanism of Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition by Amarogentin, a Secoiridoid Glycoside from Swertia chirayita

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Durai; Thorat, Sunil S.

    2014-01-01

    Swertia chirayita, a medicinal herb inhabiting the challenging terrains and high altitudes of the Himalayas, is a rich source of essential phytochemical isolates. Amarogentin, a bitter secoiridoid glycoside from S. chirayita, shows varied activity in several patho-physiological conditions, predominantly in leishmaniasis and carcinogenesis. Experimental analysis has revealed that amarogentin downregulates the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity and helps to curtail skin carcinogenesis in mouse models; however, there exists no account on selective inhibition of the inducible cyclooxygenase (COX) isoform by amarogentin. Hence the computer-aided drug discovery methods were used to unravel the COX-2 inhibitory mechanism of amarogentin and to check its selectivity for the inducible isoform over the constitutive one. The generated theoretical models of both isoforms were subjected to molecular docking analysis with amarogentin and twenty-one other Food and Drug Authority (FDA) approved lead molecules. The post-docking binding energy profile of amarogentin was comparable to the binding energy profiles of the FDA approved selective COX-2 inhibitors. Subsequent molecular dynamics simulation analysis delineated the difference in the stability of both complexes, with amarogentin-COX-2 complex being more stable after 40ns simulation. The total binding free energy calculated by MMGBSA for the amarogentin-COX-2 complex was −52.35 KCal/mol against a binding free energy of −8.57 KCal/mol for amarogentin-COX-1 complex, suggesting a possible selective inhibition of the COX-2 protein by the natural inhibitor. Amarogentin achieves this potential selectivity by small, yet significant, structural differences inherent to the binding cavities of the two isoforms. Hypothetically, it might block the entry of the natural substrates in the hydrophobic binding channel of the COX-2, inhibiting the cyclooxygenation step. To sum up briefly, this work highlights the mechanism of the possible

  19. Human cyclooxygenase-2 is a sequence homodimer that functions as a conformational heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Vecchio, Alex J; Sharma, Narayan P; Jurban, Brice J; Malkowski, Michael G; Smith, William L

    2011-05-27

    Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases 1 and 2, also known as cyclooxygenases (COXs) 1 and 2, convert arachidonic acid (AA) to prostaglandin endoperoxide H(2). Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases are targets of nonspecific nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and COX-2-specific inhibitors called coxibs. PGHS-2 is a sequence homodimer. Each monomer has a peroxidase and a COX active site. We find that human PGHS-2 functions as a conformational heterodimer having a catalytic monomer (E(cat)) and an allosteric monomer (E(allo)). Heme binds tightly only to the peroxidase site of E(cat), whereas substrates, as well as certain inhibitors (e.g. celecoxib), bind the COX site of E(cat). E(cat) is regulated by E(allo) in a manner dependent on what ligand is bound to E(allo). Substrate and nonsubstrate fatty acids (FAs) and some COX inhibitors (e.g. naproxen) preferentially bind to the COX site of E(allo). AA can bind to E(cat) and E(allo), but the affinity of AA for E(allo) is 25 times that for E(cat). Palmitic acid, an efficacious stimulator of human PGHS-2, binds only E(allo) in palmitic acid/murine PGHS-2 co-crystals. Nonsubstrate FAs can potentiate or attenuate actions of COX inhibitors depending on the FA and whether the inhibitor binds E(cat) or E(allo). Our studies suggest that the concentration and composition of the free FA pool in the environment in which PGHS-2 functions in cells, the FA tone, is a key factor regulating PGHS-2 activity and its responses to COX inhibitors. We suggest that differences in FA tone occurring with different diets will likely affect both base-line prostanoid synthesis and responses to COX inhibitors. PMID:21467029

  20. Involvement of cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 activity in the therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the course of ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Dembinski, M; Cieszkowski, J; Ginter, G; Ptak-Belowska, A; Dembinski, A

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that treatment with ghrelin exhibits protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. Aim of our present investigation was to examine the influence of ghrelin administration on the healing of ethanol-induced gastric ulcers and determine the role of cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 in this effect. Our studies were performed on male Wistar rats. Gastric ulcers were induced by intragastric administration of 75% ethanol. Ghrelin alone or in combination with cyclooxygenase inhibitors was administered twice, 1 and 13 hours after ethanol application. Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitor (SC-560, 10 mg/kg/dose) or COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib, 10 mg/kg/dose) were given 30 min prior to ghrelin. Twelve or 24 hours after administration of ethanol, rats were anesthetized and experiments were terminated. The study revealed that administration of ethanol induced gastric ulcers in all animals and this effect was accompanied by the reduction in gastric blood flow and mucosal DNA synthesis. Moreover induction of gastric ulcer by ethanol significantly increased mucosal expression of mRNA for COX-2, IL-1β and TNF-α. Treatment with ghrelin significantly accelerated gastric ulcer healing. Therapeutic effect of ghrelin was associated with significant reversion of the ulcer-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Ghrelin administration also caused the reduction in mucosal expression of mRNA for IL-1β and TNF-α. Addition of SC-560 slightly reduced the therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the healing of ethanol-induced ulcer and the ulcer area in rats treated SC-560 plus ghrelin was significantly smaller than that observed in rats treated with saline or SC-560 alone. Pretreatment with celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, abolished therapeutic effect of ghrelin. We concluded that treatment with ghrelin increases healing rate of gastric ulcers evoked by ethanol and this effect is related to improvement in mucosal blood flow, an increase in mucosal cell

  1. Targeting angiogenic pathway for chemoprevention of experimental colon cancer using C-phycocyanin as cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2014-06-01

    An angiogenic pathway was studied that involved stromal tissue degradation with matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), vesicular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) mediated growth regulation in a complex interaction with chemokines, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β). Gene and protein expression was studied with real-time PCR, Western immunoblot, and immunofluorescence. Morphological and histopathological analysis of tumor was done, as also the activity of MMPs and HIF-1α by gelatin zymography and ELISA. Binding interactions of proteins were studied by molecular docking. Piroxicam, a traditional NSAID and C-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis, were utilized in the chemoprevention of DMH-induced rat colon cancer. A significant number of tumors was evident in DMH treated animals, while with piroxicam and C-phycocyanin, the number and size of tumors/lesions were reduced. Colonic tissues showed severe dysplasia, tubular adenoma, and adenocarcinoma from DMH, with invasive features along with signet ring cell carcinoma. No occurrence of carcinoma was detected in either of the drug treatments or in a combination regimen. An elevated VEGF-A, MMP-2, and MMP-9 level was observed, which is required for metastasis and invasion into surrounding tissues. Drugs induced chemoprevention by down-regulating these proteins. Piroxicam docked in VEGF-A binding site of VEGF-A receptors i.e., VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, while phycocyanobilin (a chromophore of C-phycocyanin) docked with VEGFR1 alone. HIF-1α is up-regulated which is associated with increased oxygen demand and angiogenesis. MCP-1 and MIP-1β expression was also found altered in DMH and regulated by the drugs. Anti-angiogenic role of piroxicam and C-phycocyanin is well demonstrated. PMID:24861078

  2. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic modelling of the analgesic effects of lumiracoxib, a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Bahena, DA; Salazar-Morales, UE; Ortiz, MI; Castañeda-Hernández, G; Trocóniz, IF

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study establishes a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model to describe the time course and in vivo mechanisms of action of the antinociceptive effects of lumiracoxib, evaluated by the thermal hyperalgesia test in rats. Experimental approach: Female Wistar fasted rats were injected s.c. with saline or carrageenan in the right hind paw, followed by either 0, 1, 3, 10 or 30 mg·kg−1 of oral lumiracoxib at the time of carrageenan injection (experiment I), or 0, 10 or 30 mg·kg−1 oral lumiracoxib at 4 h after carrageenan injection (experiment II). Antihyperalgesic responses were measured as latency time (LT) to a thermal stimulus. PK/PD modelling of the antinociceptive response was performed using the population approach with NONMEM VI. Results: A two-compartment model described the plasma disposition. A first-order model, including lag time and decreased relative bioavailability as a function of the dose, described the absorption process. The response model was: LT=LT0/(1 +MED). LT0 is the baseline response, and MED represents the level of inflammatory mediators. The time course of MED was assumed to be equivalent to the predicted profile of COX-2 activity and was modelled according to an indirect response model with a time variant synthesis rate. Drug effects were described as a reversible inhibition of the COX-2 activity. The in vivo estimate of the dissociation equilibrium constant of the COX-2-lumiracoxib complex was 0.24 µg·mL−1. Conclusions: The model developed appropriately described the time course of pharmacological responses to lumiracoxib, in terms of its mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics. PMID:19958362

  3. Naturally occurring biflavonoid, ochnaflavone, inhibits cyclooxygenases-2 and 5-lipoxygenase in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Son, Min Jung; Moon, Tae Chul; Lee, Eun Kyung; Son, Kun Ho; Kim, Hyun Pyo; Kang, Sam Sik; Son, Jong Keun; Lee, Seung Ho; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2006-04-01

    Ochnaflavone is a medicinal herbal product isolated from Lonicera japonica that inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) dependent phases of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) generation in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 0.6 microM. Western blotting probed with specific anti-COX-2 antibodies showed that the decrease in quantity of the PGD2 product was accompanied by a decrease in the COX-2 protein level. In addition, this compound consistently inhibited the production of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) in a dose dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 6.56 microM. These results demonstrate that ochnaflavone has a dual cyclooxygenase-2/5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. Furthermore, this compound strongly inhibited degranulation reaction in a dose dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 3.01 microM. Therefore, this compound might provide a basis for novel anti-inflammatory drugs.

  4. Non-Selective Evolution of Growing Populations

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Heinrich; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-selective effects, like genetic drift, are an important factor in modern conceptions of evolution, and have been extensively studied for constant population sizes (Kimura, 1955; Otto and Whitlock, 1997). Here, we consider non-selective evolution in the case of growing populations that are of small size and have varying trait compositions (e.g. after a population bottleneck). We find that, in these conditions, populations never fixate to a trait, but tend to a random limit composition, and that the distribution of compositions “freezes” to a steady state. This final state is crucially influenced by the initial conditions. We obtain these findings from a combined theoretical and experimental approach, using multiple mixed subpopulations of two Pseudomonas putida strains in non-selective growth conditions (Matthijs et al, 2009) as model system. The experimental results for the population dynamics match the theoretical predictions based on the Pólya urn model (Eggenberger and Pólya, 1923) for all analyzed parameter regimes. In summary, we show that exponential growth stops genetic drift. This result contrasts with previous theoretical analyses of non-selective evolution (e.g. genetic drift), which investigated how traits spread and eventually take over populations (fixate) (Kimura, 1955; Otto and Whitlock, 1997). Moreover, our work highlights how deeply growth influences non-selective evolution, and how it plays a key role in maintaining genetic variability. Consequently, it is of particular importance in life-cycles models (Melbinger et al, 2010; Cremer et al, 2011; Cremer et al, 2012) of periodically shrinking and expanding populations. PMID:26274606

  5. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong Silbajoris, Robert A.; Cao Dongsun; Bromberg, Philip A.; Zhang Qiao; Peden, David B.; Samet, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional and posttranscriptional events that regulate COX-2 expression in a human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B exposed to Zn{sup 2+}. Zn{sup 2+} exposure resulted in pronounced increases in COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, which were prevented by pretreatment with the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, implying the involvement of transcriptional regulation. This was supported by the observation of increased COX-2 promoter activity in Zn{sup 2+}-treated BEAS-2B cells. Mutation of the cAMP response element (CRE), but not the {kappa}B-binding sites in the COX-2 promoter markedly reduced COX-2 promoter activity induced by Zn{sup 2+}. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B activation did not block Zn{sup 2+}-induced COX-2 expression. Measurement of mRNA stability demonstrated that Zn{sup 2+} exposure impaired the degradation of COX-2 mRNA in BEAS-2B cells. This message stabilization effect of Zn{sup 2+} exposure was shown to be dependent on the integrity of the 3'-untranslated region found in the COX-2 transcript. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the CRE and mRNA stability regulates COX-2 expression induced in BEAS-2B cells exposed to extracellular Zn{sup 2+}.

  6. Arachidonoyl-ethanolamide activates endoplasmic reticulum stress-apoptosis in tumorigenic keratinocytes: Role of cyclooxygenase-2 and novel J-series prostamides.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Eman; Henderson, Kate L; Danell, Allison S; Van Dross, Rukiyah

    2016-02-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer and other epithelial tumors overexpress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), differentiating them from normal cells. COX-2 metabolizes arachidonic acid to prostaglandins including, the J-series prostaglandins, which induce apoptosis by mechanisms including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Arachidonoyl-ethanolamide (AEA) is a cannabinoid that causes apoptosis in diverse tumor types. Previous studies from our group demonstrated that AEA was metabolized by COX-2 to J-series prostaglandins. Thus, the current study examines the role of COX-2, J-series prostaglandins, and ER stress in AEA-induced apoptosis. In tumorigenic keratinocytes that overexpress COX-2, AEA activated the PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol requiring kinase-1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor-6 (ATF6) ER stress pathways and the ER stress apoptosis-associated proteins, C/EBP homologous protein-10 (CHOP10), caspase-12, and caspase-3. Using an ER stress inhibitor, it was determined that ER stress was required for AEA-induced apoptosis. To evaluate the role of COX-2 in ER stress-apoptosis, HaCaT keratinocytes with low endogenous COX-2 expression were transfected with COX-2 cDNA or an empty vector and AEA-induced ER stress-apoptosis occurred only in the presence of COX-2. Moreover, LC-MS analysis showed that the novel prostaglandins, 15-deoxyΔ(12,14) PGJ2 -EA and Δ(12) PGJ2 /PGJ2-EA, were synthesized from AEA. These findings suggest that AEA will be selectively toxic in tumor cells that overexpress COX-2 due to the metabolism of AEA by COX-2 to J-series prostaglandin-ethanolamides (prostamides). Hence, AEA may be an ideal topical agent for the elimination of malignancies that overexpress COX-2.

  7. Estrogen-Dependent Prognostic Significance of Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancers Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Haffty, Bruce G. Yang Qifeng; Moran, Meena S.; Tan, Antoinette R.; Reiss, Michael

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy (CS+RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1975 and 2003, we retrieved specimens from 504 breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT. The specimens were constructed into tissue microarrays processed and stained for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, Her2/neu, and COX-2. Each core was scored as positive or negative. All data including demographics, clinical, pathologic, staging, and outcome variables were entered into a computerized database. Results: Expression of COX-2 was positive in 58% of cases and correlated with younger age (p = 0.01) and larger tumor size (p 0.001). Expression of COX-2 was predictive of local relapse (relative risk[RR], 3.248; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.340-7.871; p = 0.0091), distant metastasis (RR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.259-3.896; p = 0.0058), and decreased survival (RR, 2.321; 95% CI, 1.324-4.071; p = 0.0033). Among ER-positive patients, COX-2 expression was predictive of worse local control (85% vs. 93%, p = 0.04), distant metastasis (75% vs. 95%, p = 0.002) and worse survival (65% vs. 94%, p = 0.002). Among ER-negative tumors COX-2 expression was not significantly correlated with local control (87 vs. 95%, p = 0.12), distant metastasis (73% vs. 78%, p = 0.39), or survival (77% vs. 87%, p 0.15). Conclusions: In breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT, COX-2 expression is associated with younger age, larger tumor size, worse local control, distant metastasis, and worse overall survival. The significance is limited to hormone receptor-positive tumors, consistent with the known effect of COX-2/PGE2 on aromatase activity. Use of COX-2 inhibitors in estrogen-dependent breast cancers warrants further investigation.

  8. Effects of nimesulide, acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen and nabumetone on cyclooxygenase-1- and cyclooxygenase-2-mediated prostanoid production in healthy volunteers ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Kerola, Markku; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Kosonen, Outi; Kankaanranta, Hannu; Sarna, Seppo; Moilanen, Eeva

    2009-01-01

    : The beneficial actions of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), whereas some of their adverse effects are associated mainly with inhibition of COX-1. Selective COX-2 inhibitors reduce the risk of gastrointestinal adverse events, but increase the risk of thromboembolic events pointing to importance of optimal COX-1/COX-2 inhibition in drug safety. We compared the effects of acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen, nabumetone and nimesulide on COX-1 and COX-2 pathways in healthy volunteers in an ex vivo set-up using single oral doses commonly used to treat acute pain. In a randomized, double-blind four-phase cross-over study, 15 healthy volunteers were given orally a single dose of either acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, nabumetone 1 g or nimesulide 100 mg. Blood samples were drawn before and 1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 hr after the drug for the assessment of COX-1 and COX-2 activity. COX-1 activity was measured as thromboxane(2) production during blood clotting and COX-2 activity as endotoxin-induced prostaglandin E(2) synthesis in blood leucocytes. The data show that after a single oral dose these four NSAIDs have different profiles of action on COX-1 and COX-2. As expected, acetylsalicylic acid appeared to be COX-1-selective and ibuprofen effectively inhibited both COX-1 and COX-2. Nabumetone showed only a slight inhibitory effect on COX-1 and COX-2. Nimesulide caused almost complete suppression of COX-2 activity and a partial reduction of COX-1 activity. This confirms the relative COX-2 selectivity of nimesulide.

  9. Persistent cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition downregulates NF-{kappa}B, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation in the min/+ mouse model of colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Carothers, Adelaide M; Davids, Jennifer S; Damas, Beatrice C; Bertagnolli, Monica M

    2010-06-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition prevents adenoma formation in humans and mouse models of colon cancer. The selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib reduces COX-2 and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) expression and adenomas in the intestine of Min/+ mice after treatment for several weeks, but prolonged treatment increases PGE(2) production, resulting in drug-resistant tumor formation and transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta)-dependent intestinal fibrosis. In this study, we examined pathways that regulate COX-2 expression and suppress chronic intestinal inflammation. We show that NF-kappaB signaling was inhibited in the ileum of Min/+ mice receiving long-term treatment with celecoxib. This effect was associated with inhibition of TGFbeta-associated kinase-1 and IkappaB kinase alpha/beta activities and reduced expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 that enhance colonic barrier function. Additionally, we observed reduced activities of protein kinases c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase 1 and protein kinase A and transcription factor cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein, regulators of COX-2 expression, which cross-talk with NF-kappaB. In ileum subjected to long-term celecoxib treatment, we noted relatively higher expression of COX-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and interleukin-1beta in Paneth cells, whereas NF-kappaB and COX-2 were more strongly expressed by an expanded population of stromal myofibroblasts. Our findings argue that celecoxib resistance is an acquired adaptation to changes in the crypt microenvironment that is associated with chronic intestinal inflammation and impaired acute wound-healing responsiveness. PMID:20484034

  10. Arachidonoyl-ethanolamide activates endoplasmic reticulum stress-apoptosis in tumorigenic keratinocytes: Role of cyclooxygenase-2 and novel J-series prostamides.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Eman; Henderson, Kate L; Danell, Allison S; Van Dross, Rukiyah

    2016-02-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer and other epithelial tumors overexpress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), differentiating them from normal cells. COX-2 metabolizes arachidonic acid to prostaglandins including, the J-series prostaglandins, which induce apoptosis by mechanisms including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Arachidonoyl-ethanolamide (AEA) is a cannabinoid that causes apoptosis in diverse tumor types. Previous studies from our group demonstrated that AEA was metabolized by COX-2 to J-series prostaglandins. Thus, the current study examines the role of COX-2, J-series prostaglandins, and ER stress in AEA-induced apoptosis. In tumorigenic keratinocytes that overexpress COX-2, AEA activated the PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol requiring kinase-1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor-6 (ATF6) ER stress pathways and the ER stress apoptosis-associated proteins, C/EBP homologous protein-10 (CHOP10), caspase-12, and caspase-3. Using an ER stress inhibitor, it was determined that ER stress was required for AEA-induced apoptosis. To evaluate the role of COX-2 in ER stress-apoptosis, HaCaT keratinocytes with low endogenous COX-2 expression were transfected with COX-2 cDNA or an empty vector and AEA-induced ER stress-apoptosis occurred only in the presence of COX-2. Moreover, LC-MS analysis showed that the novel prostaglandins, 15-deoxyΔ(12,14) PGJ2 -EA and Δ(12) PGJ2 /PGJ2-EA, were synthesized from AEA. These findings suggest that AEA will be selectively toxic in tumor cells that overexpress COX-2 due to the metabolism of AEA by COX-2 to J-series prostaglandin-ethanolamides (prostamides). Hence, AEA may be an ideal topical agent for the elimination of malignancies that overexpress COX-2. PMID:25557612

  11. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and protein expression by epoxy resin and zinc oxide-eugenol based root canal sealers in human osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Chou, Ming-Yung; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2003-05-01

    An ideal root canal sealer should be nonirritating to the surrounding tissues. Unfortunately, all histological investigation demonstrated that all types of root canal sealer can induce mild to severe inflammatory alternations. However, there is little information on the precise mechanisms about root canal sealers-induced inflammatory reaction. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible enzyme believed to be responsible for prostaglandin synthesis at site of inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epoxy resin (AH26) and zinc oxide-eugenol based (Endomethansone and N2) root canal sealers on the expression of COX-2 mRNA gene and protein in cultured human osteoblastic cells. Investigations of the time dependence of COX-2 mRNA expression in root canal sealer-treated human osteoblastic cells revealed a rapid accumulation of the transcript, a significant signal first detectable within 2h and diminished to control level after 24h. In addition, all root canal sealers also induced COX-2 protein expression in human osteoblastic cells. Furthermore, to elucidate whether induction of COX-2 is associated with cytotoxicity, NS-398 (a selective COX-2 inhibitor), was added to test its protective effects. NS-398 at non-cytotoxic dose is not able to prevent root canal sealers-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, the activation of COX-2 expression may be one of the pathogenesis of root canal sealers-induced periapical inflammation. In addition, root canal sealers-induced cytotoxicity is not directly via the induction of COX-2 expression.

  12. Intraplantar-injected ceramide in rats induces hyperalgesia through an NF-κB- and p38 kinase-dependent cyclooxygenase 2/prostaglandin E2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Tim; Chen, Zhoumou; Muscoli, Carolina; Obeid, Lina M.; Salvemini, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory pain represents an important unmet clinical need with important socioeconomic implications. Ceramide, a potent proinflammatory sphingolipid, has been shown to elicit mechanical hyperalgesia, but the mechanisms remain largely unknown. We now demonstrate that, in addition to mechanical hyperalgesia, intraplantar injection of ceramide (10 μg) led to the development of thermal hyperalgesia that was dependent on induction of the inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and subsequent increase of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The development of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and increased production of PGE2 was blocked by NS-398 (15–150 ng), a selective COX-2 inhibitor. The importance of the COX-2 to PGE2 pathway in ceramide signaling was underscored by the findings that intraplantar injection of a monoclonal PGE2 antibody (4 μg) blocked the development of hyperalgesia. Our results further revealed that COX-2 induction is regulated by NF-κB and p38 kinase activation, since intraplantar injection of SC-514 (0.1–1 μg) or SB 203580 (1–10 μg), well-characterized inhibitors of NF-κB and p38 kinase activation, respectively, blocked COX-2 induction and increased formation of PGE2 and thermal hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, activation of NF-κB was dependent on upstream activation of p38 MAPK, since SB 203580 (10 μg) blocked p65 phosphorylation, whereas p38 kinase phosphorylation was unaffected by NF-κB inhibition by SC-514 (1 μg). Our findings not only provide mechanistic insight into the signaling pathways engaged by ceramide in the development of hyperalgesia, but also provide a potential pharmacological basis for developing inhibitors targeting the ceramide metabolic-to-COX-2 pathway as novel analgesics.—Doyle, T., Chen, Z., Muscoli, C., Obeid, L. M., Salvemini, D. Intraplantar-injected ceramide in rats induces hyperalgesia through an NF-κB- and p38 kinase-dependent cyclooxygenase 2/prostaglandin E2 pathway. PMID:21551240

  13. Effects of specific inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 on sodium balance, hemodynamics, and vasoactive eicosanoids.

    PubMed

    Catella-Lawson, F; McAdam, B; Morrison, B W; Kapoor, S; Kujubu, D; Antes, L; Lasseter, K C; Quan, H; Gertz, B J; FitzGerald, G A

    1999-05-01

    Conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit both cyclooxygenase (Cox) isoforms (Cox-1 and Cox-2) and may be associated with nephrotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to assess the renal effects of the specific Cox-2 inhibitor, MK-966. Healthy older adults (n = 36) were admitted to a clinical research unit, placed on a fixed sodium intake, and randomized under double-blind conditions to receive the specific Cox-2 inhibitor, MK-966 (50 mg every day), a nonspecific Cox-1/Cox-2 inhibitor, indomethacin (50 mg t.i.d.), or placebo for 2 weeks. All treatments were well tolerated. Both active regimens were associated with a transient but significant decline in urinary sodium excretion during the first 72 h of treatment. Blood pressure and body weight did not change significantly in any group. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was decreased by indomethacin but was not changed significantly by MK-966 treatment. Thromboxane biosynthesis by platelets was inhibited by indomethacin only. The urinary excretion of the prostacyclin metabolite 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha was decreased by both MK-966 and indomethacin and was unchanged by placebo. Cox-2 may play a role in the systemic biosynthesis of prostacyclin in healthy humans. Selective inhibition of Cox-2 by MK-966 caused a clinically insignificant and transient retention of sodium, but no depression of GFR. Inhibition of both Cox isoforms by indomethacin caused transient sodium retention and a decline in GFR. Our data suggest that acute sodium retention by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in healthy elderly subjects is mediated by the inhibition of Cox-2, whereas depression of GFR is due to inhibition of Cox-1.

  14. Anti-inflammatory action of legume isoflavonoid sophoricoside through inhibition on cyclooxygenase-2 activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hak; Chung, Eun Yong; Min, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Min, Kyung Rak; Kim, Youngsoo

    2003-05-01

    Soy is a main source of isoflavonoids which are of high dietary intake for the oriental population. In this study, the anti-inflammatory action of sophoricoside, an isoflavone glycoside isolated from immature fruits of Sophora japonica L. (Leguminosae), has been demonstrated. When administered orally at > 100 mg/kg or injected intravenously at > 10 mg/kg, sophoricoside showed significant reduction of carrageenin-induced paw edema in mice. Sophoricoside has been identified as a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 activity with an IC50 value of 3.3 microM. PMID:12802736

  15. Entamoeba histolytica: inflammatory process during amoebic liver abscess formation involves cyclooxygenase-2 expression in macrophages and trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Alarcón, A; Moguel-Torres, M; Mata-Leyva, O; Cuellar-Nevárez, G; Siqueiros-Cendón, T; Erosa, G; Ramos-Martínez, E; Talamás-Rohana, P; Sánchez-Ramírez, B

    2006-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) isoform is induced by Entamoeba histolytica in macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells during amoebic liver abscess (ALA) formation in hamsters. Trophozoites present in the lesion were also positive for COX-2 signal. However, no cross reactivity of the anti-COX-2 antibody with protein extract of cultivated trophozoites was found. To clarify if trophozoites are involved in PGE(2) production during ALA development, COX-2 expression was detected by in situ hybridization and RT-PCR in liver tissue from intrahepatically infected hamsters. COX-2 mRNA was in polymorphonuclear cells since 4h postinfection, and subsequently, local macrophages expressed COX-2 mRNA in a similar way. Additionally, a positive signal for COX-2 mRNA expression was detected in E. histolytica trophozoites, suggesting that, in vivo, parasite COX expression may be an important mechanism to promote inflammation.

  16. Temporal and topographic profiles of cyclooxygenase-2 expression during 24 h of focal brain ishemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Chiaki; Kaji, Tomohito; Kuge, Yuji; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Tamaki, Nagara; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2004-03-11

    Substantial increases in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA and protein levels were demonstrated in the peri-infarct and focal ischemic areas after 3-24 and 12-24 h, respectively, in rats. In the ischemic core, significant increases in COX-2 mRNA followed 6 h of ischemia, though the peak level was about one-third of that in the peri-infarct area. Increases in COX-2 protein in the ischemic core were not observed during ischemic periods. Diffuse, neuronal COX-2 staining was found in peri-infarct areas as well as in discrete, immunoreactive neurons in the ischemic core. Robust increases in prostaglandin E2 levels in the peri-infarct area were demonstrated following 24 h of ischemia. Prostaglandin production as well as COX-2 expression in ischemic tissues depended on the degree and duration of the reduction in cerebral blood flow.

  17. Cyclic stretch induces cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in vascular endothelial cells via activation of nuclear factor kappa-{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haige; Hiroi, Toyoko; Hansen, Baranda S.; Rade, Jeffrey J.

    2009-11-27

    Vascular endothelial cells respond to biomechanical forces, such as cyclic stretch and shear stress, by altering gene expression. Since endothelial-derived prostanoids, such as prostacyclin and thromboxane A{sub 2}, are key mediators of endothelial function, we investigated the effects of cyclic stretch on the expression of genes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells controlling prostanoid synthesis: cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) and thromboxane A{sub 2} synthase (TXAS). COX-2 and TXAS mRNAs were upregulated by cyclic stretch for 24 h. In contrast, PGIS mRNA was decreased and stretch had no effect on COX-1 mRNA expression. We further show that stretch-induced upregulation of COX-2 is mediated by activation of the NF-{kappa}{beta} signaling pathway.

  18. Lack of association between the cyclooxygenase 2 -765G>C polymorphism and prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y-Q; Li, Y U; Xiao, W-D; Wang, G-X; Li, Y O

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) -765G>C (rs20417) polymorphism and prostate cancer (PC) risk using meta-analysis. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar databases by using the terms "cyclooxygenase-2/COX-2/PTGs2", "polymorphism" or "variation", and "prostate" and "cancer" or "carcinoma" to identify relevant articles up to June 14, 2014. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were assessed for PC risk associated with COX2 -765G>C polymorphism using fixed- and random-effect models. We identified a total of nine publications, including 5952 cases and 5078 controls, to investigate the effect of COX2 -765G>C on PC risk, and found no significant association in any genetic model tested (CC vs GG: OR = 0.993, 95%CI = 0.923-1.068; GC+CC vs GG: OR = 1.041, 95%CI = 0.931-1.103; CC vs GC+GG: OR = 0.858, 95%CI = 0.689-1.067; CC vs GG: OR = 0.871, 95%CI = 0.689-1.086; GC vs GG: OR = 1.032, 95%CI = 0.945-1.127). Power analysis and tests for publication bias ensured the reliability of our results. This meta-analysis suggested that the functional COX2 -765G>C polymorphism, located in the COX2 gene promoter, is unlikely to be associated with PC risk. However, additional larger, well-designed studies are still required to reach a conclusive result on this issue. PMID:26535654

  19. Clinical significance of cyclooxygenase-2 expression in extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Su Jung; Yang, Woo-Ick; Shin, Eunah; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Yong Bae; Cho, Jae Ho; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Joo Hang; Kim, Gwi Eon . E-mail: gekim@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether there are any differences in therapeutic response, patterns of systemic recurrence, and prognosis of patients with extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, by the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. Patients and Methods: Thirty-four patients with Ann Arbor Stage I and II extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma who underwent chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or both, were retrospectively reviewed. These patients were divided into two groups according to their immunohistochemical staining for COX-2 expressions: a COX-2-negative group (n = 10 patients) and a COX-2-positive group (n = 24 patients). The treatment response, patterns of treatment failure, and survival data for the patients were compared between the COX-2-positive and negative groups. Results: There was no significant difference in the clinical profiles between the COX-2-negative and COX-2-positive groups. All patients (100%) in the COX-2-negative group achieved complete response after initial treatment, whereas only 14 patients (58%) in the COX-2-positive group achieved complete response (p = 0.03). Compared with the patients in the COX-2-negative group, those in the COX-2-positive group had a significantly lower 2-year systemic recurrence-free survival rate (100% for the COX-2-negative group vs. 54% for the COX-2-positive group) (p = 0.02) and a decreased 5-year overall survival rate (70% for the COX-2-negative group vs. 32% for the COX-2-positive group) (p = 0.06). Conclusion: Cyclooxygenase-2 expression can serve as a predictive factor for poor treatment response, higher systemic recurrence, and unfavorable prognosis in patients with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type.

  20. Targeting cyclooxygenase-2 with sodium butyrate and NSAIDs on colorectal adenoma/carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Ouyang, Qin; Gan, Hua-Tian

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The protective effects of sodium butyrate and NSAIDs (especially the highly selective COX-2 inhibitors) have attracted considerable interest recently. In this study, primary adenoma cells and HT-29 were used to investigate whether the above drugs would be effective for reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, it was investigated whether NSAIDs would strengthen the effects of sodium butyrate and its possible mechanisms. METHODS: In vitro primary cell culture of colorectal adenomas and HT-29 were used for this investigation. PGE2 isolated from HT-29 cell culture supernatants was investigated by ELISA. MTT was employed to detect the anti-proliferative effects on both adenoma and HT-29 culture cells. FCM was used for apoptosis rate and cell cycle analysis. The morphology of apoptotic cells was investigated by means of electromicroscopy. RESULTS: Sodium butyrate could stimulate the secretion of PGE2, while NSAIDs inhibited it to below 30 pg/106 cells. Both butyrate and NSAIDs could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. The effects were time- and dose-dependent (P < 0.05). Aspirin and NS-398 could enhance the effects of sodium butyrate. The effects were stronger while sodium butyrate was used in combination with NS-398 than it was used in combination with Aspirin. CONCLUSION: Butyrate and NSAIDs could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis respectively. NSAIDs could enhance the effects of sodium butyrate by down-regulating COX-2 expression. Selective COX-2 inhibitor is better than traditional NSAIDs. PMID:15378772

  1. Synthesis and characterization of novel oxazines and demonstration that they specifically target cyclooxygenase 2.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, V; Mohan, Chakrabhavi Dhananjaya; Baburajeev, C P; Rangappa, Shobith; Jagadish, Swamy; Fuchs, Julian E; Sukhorukov, Alexey Yu; Chandra; Mason, Daniel J; Sharath Kumar, Kothanahally Shivaramu; Madegowda, Mahendra; Bender, Andreas; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal Subbegowda

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, we used solution combustion synthesis-bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) as catalyst for the simple and efficient synthesis of 1,2-oxazine based derivatives of 6-fluoro-3-(piperidin-4-yl)benzo[d]isoxazoles, 1-arylpiperazine and carbazoles. (4aR,8aR)-4-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-3-((4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)methyl)-4a,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-4H-benzo[e][1,2]oxazine was found to be the most potent compound with a high degree of selectivity in inhibition towards COX2 (1.7 μM) over COX1 (40.4 μM) demonstrating the significance of 1,2-oxazine derivatives in developing COX2 specific inhibitors. Molecular docking analyses demonstrated that an isoleucine residue in the active site of COX1 is responsible for lower affinity to COX1 and increased potency towards COX2. Overall, our study reveals that the new 1,2-oxazine-based small molecules qualify as lead structures in developing COX2-specific inhibitors for anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:26048794

  2. Adverse Effects of Oral Nonselective and cyclooxygenase-2-Selective NSAIDs on Hospitalization for Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-I.; Shih, Chia-Jen; Chen, Yung-Tai; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Yang, Chih-Yu; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chu, Dachen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the association between the use of nonselective or cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-selective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in a general Asian population. We conducted an observational, nationwide, nested case–control cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database between 2010 and 2012. AKI cases were defined as hospitalization with a principle diagnosis of AKI. Each case was matched to 4 randomly selected controls based on age, sex, and the month and year of cohort entry. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to demonstrate the association between hospitalization for AKI and current, recent, or past use of an oral NSAID. During the study period, we identified 6199 patients with AKI and 24,796 matched controls. Overall, current users (adjusted OR 2.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.28–3.28) and recent users (adjusted OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01–1.35) were associated with increased risk of hospitalization for AKI. The risk was also similar for nonselective NSAIDs. However, neither current nor recent use of COX-2 inhibitors was significantly associated with AKI events. Our study supported that the initiation of nonselective NSAIDs rather than COX-2 inhibitors is associated with an increased risk of AKI requiring hospitalization. Future randomized trials are needed to elucidate these findings. PMID:26945352

  3. Cyclooxygenase 2-implications on maintenance of gastric mucosal integrity and ulcer healing: controversial issues and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Halter, F; Tarnawski, A S; Schmassmann, A; Peskar, B M

    2001-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX), the key enzyme for synthesis of prostaglandins, exists in two isoforms (COX-1 and COX-2). COX-1 is constitutively expressed in the gastrointestinal tract in large quantities and has been suggested to maintain mucosal integrity through continuous generation of prostaglandins. COX-2 is induced predominantly during inflammation. On this premise selective COX-2 inhibitors not affecting COX-1 in the gastrointestinal tract mucosa have been developed as gastrointestinal sparing anti-inflammatory drugs. They appear to be well tolerated by experimental animals and humans following acute and chronic (three or more months) administration. However, there is increasing evidence that COX-2 has a greater physiological role than merely mediating pain and inflammation. Thus gastric and intestinal lesions do not develop when COX-1 is inhibited but only when the activity of both COX-1 and COX-2 is suppressed. Selective COX-2 inhibitors delay the healing of experimental gastric ulcers to the same extent as non-COX-2 specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Moreover, when given chronically to experimental animals, they can activate experimental colitis and cause intestinal perforation. The direct involvement of COX-2 in ulcer healing has been supported by observations that expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein is upregulated at the ulcer margin in a temporal and spatial relation to enhanced epithelial cell proliferation and increased expression of growth factors. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that upregulation of COX-2 mRNA and protein occurs during exposure of the gastric mucosa to noxious agents or to ischaemia-reperfusion. These observations support the concept that COX-2 represents (in addition to COX-1) a further line of defence for the gastrointestinal mucosa necessary for maintenance of mucosal integrity and ulcer healing.

  4. The functional interaction between Acyl-CoA synthetase 4, 5-lipooxygenase and cyclooxygenase-2 controls tumor growth: a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Ulises D; Garona, Juan; Ripoll, Giselle V; Maloberti, Paula M; Solano, Ángela R; Avagnina, Alejandra; Gomez, Daniel E; Alonso, Daniel F; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2012-01-01

    The acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4), which esterify mainly arachidonic acid (AA) into acyl-CoA, is increased in breast, colon and hepatocellular carcinoma. The transfection of MCF-7 cells with ACSL4 cDNA transforms the cells into a highly aggressive phenotype and controls both lipooxygenase-5 (LOX-5) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) metabolism of AA, suggesting a causal role of ACSL4 in tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that ACSL4, LOX-5 and COX-2 may constitute potential therapeutic targets for the control of tumor growth. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use a tetracycline Tet-Off system of MCF-7 xenograft model of breast cancer to confirm the effect of ACSL4 overexpression on tumor growth in vivo. We also aim to determine whether a combinatorial inhibition of the ACSL4-LOX-COX-2 pathway affects tumor growth in vivo using a xenograft model based on MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly aggressive breast cancer cell line naturally overexpressing ACSL4. The first novel finding is that stable transfection of MCF-7 cells with ACSL4 using the tetracycline Tet-Off system of MCF-7 cells resulted in development of growing tumors when injected into nude mice. Tumor xenograft development measured in animals that received doxycycline resulted in tumor growth inhibition. The tumors presented marked nuclear polymorphism, high mitotic index and low expression of estrogen and progesterone receptor. These results demonstrate the transformational capacity of ACSL4 overexpression. We examined the effect of a combination of inhibitors of ACSL4, LOX-5 and COX-2 on MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts. This treatment markedly reduced tumor growth in doses of these inhibitors that were otherwise ineffective when used alone, indicating a synergistic effect of the compounds. Our results suggest that these enzymes interact functionally and form an integrated system that operates in a concerted manner to regulate tumor growth and consequently may be potential therapeutic targets for the control of

  5. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Correlation with microvessel density

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Hans U.; Wolf, Hella; Drebber, Uta; Wolf, Helmut K.; Kern, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Cyclooxygenases (COX) are key enzymes for conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is the enzyme responsible for formation of nitric oxide. Both have constitutive and inducible isoforms. The inducible isoforms (iNOS and COX-2) are of great interest as regulators of tumor angiogenesis, tumorigenesis and inflammatory processes. This study was to clarify their role in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. METHODS: We investigated the immunohistochemical iNOS and COX-2 expression in 40 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas of different grade and stage. The results were compared with microvessel density and clinicopathological data. RESULTS: Twenty-one (52.5%) of the cases showed iNOS expression, 15 (37.5%) of the cases were positive for COX-2. The immunoreaction was heterogeneously distributed within the tumors. Staining intensity was different between the tumors. No correlation between iNOS and COX-2 expression was seen. There was no relationship with microvessel density. However, iNOS positive tumors developed more often distant metastases and the more malignant tumors showed a higher COX-2 expression. There was no correlation with other clinicopathological data. CONCLUSION: Approximately half of the cases expressed iNOS and COX-2. These two enzymes do not seem to be the key step in angiogenesis or carcinogenesis of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Due to a low prevalence of COX-2 expression, chemoprevention of pancreatic carcinomas by COX-2 inhibitors can only achieve a limited success. PMID:15222037

  6. Cyclooxygenase-2 in Endothelial and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Restrains Atherogenesis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Soon Yew; Monslow, James; Todd, Leslie; Lawson, John; Puré, Ellen; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Placebo controlled trials of nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) selective for inhibition of COX-2 reveal an emergent cardiovascular hazard in patients selected for low risk of heart disease. Postnatal global deletion of COX-2 accelerates atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic mice, a process delayed by selective enzyme deletion in macrophages. Methods and Results Here, selective depletion of COX-2 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) depressed biosynthesis of prostaglandin (PG)I2 and PGE2, elevated blood pressure and accelerated atherogenesis in Ldlr knockout (KO) mice. Deletion of COX-2 in VSMCs and ECs coincided with an increase in COX-2 expression in lesional macrophages and increased biosynthesis of thromboxane. Increased accumulation of less organized intimal collagen, laminin, α-smooth muscle actin and matrix-rich fibrosis was also apparent in lesions of the mutants. Conclusions Although atherogenesis is accelerated in global COX-2 KOs, consistent with evidence of risk transformation during chronic NSAID administration, this masks the contrasting effects of enzyme depletion in macrophages versus VSMCs and ECs. Targeting delivery of COX-2 inhibitors to macrophages may conserve their efficacy while limiting cardiovascular risk. PMID:24519928

  7. Rutin inhibits B[a]PDE-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression by targeting EGFR kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seunghwan; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Hwang, Mun Kyung; Kim, Yoon-A; Kim, Jiyoung; Kang, Nam Joo; Jang, Tae Su; Park, Jun-Seong; Yeom, Myeong Hun; Lee, Ki Won

    2013-11-15

    Rutin is a well-known flavonoid that exists in various natural sources. Accumulative studies have represented the biological effects of rutin, such as anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the underlying mechanisms of rutin and its direct targets are not understood. We investigated whether rutin reduced B[a]PDE-induced-COX-2 expression. The transactivation of AP-1 and NF-κB were inhibited by rutin. Rutin also attenuated B[a]PDE-induced Raf/MEK/ERK and Akt activation, but had no effect on the phosphorylation of EGFR. An in vitro kinase assay revealed rutin suppressed EGFR kinase activity. We also confirmed direct binding between rutin and EGFR, and found that the binding was regressed by ATP. The EGFR inhibitor also inhibited the B[a]PDE-induced MEK/ERK and Akt signaling pathways and subsequently, suppressed COX-2 expression and promoter activity, in addition to suppressing the transactivation of AP-1 and NF-κB. In EGFR(-/-)mouse embryonic fibroblast cells, B[a]PDE-induced COX-2 expression was also diminished. Collectively, rutin inhibits B[a]PDE-induced COX-2 expression by suppressing the Raf/MEK/ERK and Akt signaling pathways. EGFR appeared to be the direct target of rutin.

  8. Guggulsterone of Commiphora mukul resin reverses drug resistance in imatinib-resistant leukemic cells by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-2 and P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Bin; Xu, Lu-Zhong; Mao, Xia-Ping; Fu, Jun

    2014-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of guggulsterone on cyclooxygenase-2 and P-glycoprotein mediated drug resistance in imatinib-resistant K562 cells (K562/IMA). MTT cytotoxicity assay, flow cytometry, western blot analysis, and ELISA were performed to investigate the anti-proliferative effect, the reversal action of drug resistance, and the inhibitory effect on cyclooxygenase-2, P-glycoprotein, BCR/ABL kinase, and PGE2 release in K562/IMA cells by guggulsterone. The results showed that co-administration of guggulsterone resulted in a significant increase in chemo-sensitivity of K562/IMA cells to imatinib, compared with imatinib treatment alone. Rhodamine123 accumulation in K562/IMA cells was significantly enhanced after incubation with guggulsterone (60, 120 μM), compared with untreated K562/IMA cells (p<0.05). When imatinib (1 μM) was combined with guggulsterone (60, 120 μM), the mean apoptotic population of K562/IMA cells was 15.47% and 24.91%. It was increased by 3.82 and 6.79 times, compared with imatinib (1 μM) treatment alone. Furthermore, guggulsterone had significantly inhibitory effects on the levels of cyclooxygenase-2, P-glycoprotein and prostaglandin E2. However, guggulsterone had little inhibitory effect on the activity of BCR/ABL kinase. The present study indicates guggulsterone induces apoptosis by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-2 and down-regulating P-glycoprotein expression in K562/IMA cells.

  9. P38 AND EGF RECEPTOR KINASE-MEDIATED ACTIVATION OF THE PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL 3-KINASE/AKT PATHWAY IS REQUIRED FOR ZN2+INDUCED CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression is induced by physiological and inflammatory stimuli. Regulation of COX-2 expression is stimulus- and cell type-specific. Exposure to Zn2+ has been associated with activation of multiple intracellular signaling pathways as well as the induction...

  10. The G-765C promoter polymorphism in cyclooxygenase-2 (PTGS2), aspirin utilization and cardiovascular disease risk: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclooxygenase-2 derived prostaglandins modulate cardiovascular disease risk. We sought to determine if the reduced function G-765C promoter polymorphism in PTGS2 was associated with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) or ischemic stroke risk, and if this was modified by aspirin utilization. Usin...

  11. Misoprostol Reverse Hippocampal Neuron Cyclooxygenase-2 Downstream Signaling Imbalance in Aluminum-Overload Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanxin; Lei, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Hu, Xinyue; Wei, Yuling; Ji, Chaonan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Although COX-2 inhibition in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases has shown neuroprotection, recent studies have revealed some serious side effects (ulcers, bleeding, fatal cerebrovascular diseases etc.) and the limited benefits of COX-2 inhibitors. A more focused approach is necessary to explore the therapeutic effect of the COX downstream signaling pathway in neurological research. The aim of this study was to explore the alterations of the PGES-PGE2-EP signal pathway and the effect of misoprostol on neurodegeneration by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Adult rats were treated by intragastric administration of aluminum gluconate. The PGE2 content and expression of PGES and EPs in the hippocampi of rats were detected using ELISA, q-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the rat hippocampi were also detected. The misoprostol treatment dose-dependently improved spatial learning and memory function as well as healing after hippocampal neuron damage induced by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Meanwhile, the administration of misoprostol resulted in a decrease in the PGE2 level and down-regulation of the mPGES-1, EP2 and EP4 expression levels, while there was a dose-dependent up-regulation of EP3 expression. These results suggest that misoprostol possesses a neuroprotective property, and the mechanism involves affecting the EP3 level and reducing the endogenous production of PGE2 through a negative feedback mechanism, increasing the EP3 expression level, decreasing the EP2 and EP4 expression levels, and rebuilding the mPGES-1-PGE2-EP1-4 signal pathway balance. In this way, misoprostol has a counteractive effect on oxidant stress and inflammation in the central nervous system. The PGES-PGE2-EPs signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating neurodegeneration in patients. PMID:27033056

  12. Chronic elevation of IL-1β induces diuresis via a cyclooxygenase 2-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Boesen, E I

    2013-07-15

    Chronic renal inflammation is an increasingly recognized phenomenon in multiple disease states, but the impact of specific cytokines on renal function is unclear. Previously, we found that 14-day interleukin-1β (IL-1β) infusion increased urine flow in mice. To determine the mechanism by which this occurs, the current study tested the possible involvement of three classical prodiuretic pathways. Chronic IL-1β infusion significantly increased urine flow (6.5 ± 1 ml/day at day 14 vs. 2.3 ± 0.3 ml/day in vehicle group; P < 0.05) and expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, all three nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms, and endothelin (ET)-1 in the kidney (P < 0.05 in all cases). Urinary prostaglandin E metabolite (PGEM) excretion was also significantly increased at day 14 of IL-1β infusion (1.21 ± 0.26 vs. 0.29 ± 0.06 ng/day in vehicle-infused mice; P = 0.001). The selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib markedly attenuated urinary PGEM excretion and abolished the diuretic response to chronic IL-1β infusion. In contrast, deletion of NOS3, or inhibition of NOS1 with L-VNIO, did not blunt the diuretic effect of IL-1β, nor did pharmacological blockade of endothelin ETA and ETB receptors with A-182086. Consistent with a primary effect on water transport, IL-1β infusion markedly reduced inner medullary aquaporin-2 expression (P < 0.05) and did not alter urinary Na⁺ or K⁺ excretion. These data indicate a critical role for COX-2 in mediating the effects of chronic IL-1β elevation on the kidney.

  13. Misoprostol Reverse Hippocampal Neuron Cyclooxygenase-2 Downstream Signaling Imbalance in Aluminum-Overload Rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanxin; Lei, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Hu, Xinyue; Wei, Yuling; Ji, Chaonan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Although COX-2 inhibition in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases has shown neuroprotection, recent studies have revealed some serious side effects (ulcers, bleeding, fatal cerebrovascular diseases etc.) and the limited benefits of COX-2 inhibitors. A more focused approach is necessary to explore the therapeutic effect of the COX downstream signaling pathway in neurological research. The aim of this study was to explore the alterations of the PGES-PGE2-EP signal pathway and the effect of misoprostol on neurodegeneration by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Adult rats were treated by intragastric administration of aluminum gluconate. The PGE2 content and expression of PGES and EPs in the hippocampi of rats were detected using ELISA, q-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the rat hippocampi were also detected. The misoprostol treatment dose-dependently improved spatial learning and memory function as well as healing after hippocampal neuron damage induced by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Meanwhile, the administration of misoprostol resulted in a decrease in the PGE2 level and down-regulation of the mPGES-1, EP2 and EP4 expression levels, while there was a dosedependent up-regulation of EP3 expression. These results suggest that misoprostol possesses a neuroprotective property, and the mechanism involves affecting the EP3 level and reducing the endogenous production of PGE2 through a negative feedback mechanism, increasing the EP3 expression level, decreasing the EP2 and EP4 expression levels, and rebuilding the mPGES-1-PGE2-EP1-4 signal pathway balance. In this way, misoprostol has a counteractive effect on oxidant stress and inflammation in the central nervous system. The PGES-PGE2-EPs signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating neurodegeneration in patients. PMID:27033056

  14. Cyclooxygenase-2 knockdown using retinoic acid chalcone (RAC), a promising therapeutic strategy for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chao; Wang, Qiong; Xu, Zhe; Li, Wei-Su; Chen, Che; Yao, Xue-Quan; Liu, Fu-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid is an effective agent in the treatment of epithelial and hematological malignancies. The present study demonstrates that retinoic acid chalcone (RAC), an analogue of retinoic acid inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in HCT-15 and CT26.WT colon cancer cell lines. In HCT-15 cells the percentage of apoptotic cells increased from 32.4 ± 3, 45.0 ± 3 to 72.6 ± 5% respectively at 10, 15 and 20 μg/mL compared to 3.7% in control. Similarly in CT26.WT cells the percentage increased from 28.6 ± 3, 41.2 ± 3 to 65.4 ± 5% on treatment with 10, 15 and 20 μg/mL concentrations of RAC after 72 h compared to 2.9 ± 1% in control. Western blotting, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and reverse transcription-PCR assays were used to investigate these effects. RAC inhibited the overexpression of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptor (EP1 and EP4) in the colon cancer cell lines. RAC mediated inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis through COX-2 inhibition was also confirmed by treating the HCT-15 and CT26.WT colon cancer cells with COX-2 inhibitor, indomethacin and transfection of cells with COX-2 small interfering RNA. In nude mice with tumor xenografts, treatment with RAC-supplemented diet caused inhibition of COX-2, PGE2, and PGE2 receptors (EP1, EP3, and EP4) in tumors. Thus RAC can be a potential candidate for the treatment of colon cancer through the inhibition of COX-2 expression and subsequent inhibition of PGE2 and PGE2 receptors. PMID:26269760

  15. Molecular imaging of cyclooxygenase-2 in canine transitional cell carcinomas in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md Jashim; Bartges, Joseph W; Callens, Amanda; Legendre, Alfred M; Rathore, Kusum; Wright, Laura; Carter, Amanda; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2013-05-01

    The enzyme COX-2 is induced at high levels in tumors but not in surrounding normal tissues, which makes it an attractive target for molecular imaging of cancer. We evaluated the ability of novel optical imaging agent, fluorocoxib A to detect urinary bladder canine transitional cell carcinomas (K9TCC). Here, we show that fluorocoxib A uptake overlapped with COX-2 expression in primary K9TCC cells in vitro. Using subcutaneously implanted primary K9TCC in athymic mice, we show specific uptake of fluorocoxib A by COX-2-expressing K9TCC xenograft tumors in vivo. Fluorocoxib A uptake by COX-2-expressing xenograft tumors was blocked by 70% (P < 0.005) when pretreated with the COX-2 selective inhibitor, celecoxib (10 mg/kg), 4 hours before intravenous administration of fluorocoxib A (1 mg/kg). Fluorocoxib A was taken up by COX-2-expressing tumors but not by COX-2-negative human UMUC-3 xenograft tumors. UMUC-3 xenograft tumors with no expression of COX-2 showed no uptake of fluorocoxib A. In addition, fluorocoxib A uptake was evaluated in five dogs diagnosed with TCC. Fluorocoxib A specifically detected COX-2-expressing K9TCC during cystoscopy in vivo but was not detected in normal urothelium. Taken together, our findings show that fluorocoxib A selectively bound to COX-2-expressing primary K9TCC cells in vitro, COX-2-expressing K9TCC xenografts tumors in nude mice, and heterogeneous canine TCC during cystoscopy in vivo. Spontaneous cancers in companion animals offer a unique translational model for evaluation of novel imaging and therapeutic agents using primary cancer cells in vitro and in heterogeneous cancers in vivo. PMID:23531445

  16. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  17. Increased cyclooxygenase-2 and thromboxane synthase expression is implicated in diosgenin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in human erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Cailleteau, C; Liagre, B; Battu, S; Jayat-Vignoles, C; Beneytout, J L

    2008-09-01

    Differentiation induction as a therapeutic strategy has, so far, the greatest impact in hematopoietic malignancies, most notably leukemia. Diosgenin is a very interesting natural product because, depending on the specific dose used, its biological effect is very different in HEL (human erythroleukemia) cells. For example, at 10 microM, diosgenin induced megakaryocytic differentiation, in contrast to 40 microM diosgenin, which induced apoptosis in HEL cells previously demonstrated using sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF). The goal of this work focused on the correlation between cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and thromboxane synthase (TxS) and megakaryocytic differentiation induced by diosgenin in HEL cells. Furthermore, the technique of SdFFF, having been validated in our models, was used in this new study as an analytical tool that provided us with more or less enriched differentiated cell fractions that could then be used for further analyses of enzyme protein expression and activity for the first time. In our study, we showed the implication of COX-2 and TxS in diosgenin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in HEL cells. Furthermore, we showed that the analytical technique of SdFFF may be used as a tool to confirm our results as a function of the degree of cell differentiation.

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinases, and cyclooxygenase-2 influence prognosis of uterine cervical cancer in young women.

    PubMed

    Noriyuki, Maiko; Sumi, Toshiyuki; Zhi, Xu; Misugi, Fumiko; Nobeyama, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Yoshinari; Yasui, Tomoyo; Honda, Ken-Ichi; Ishiko, Osamu

    2007-09-01

    Recent changes in the lifestyle of young women have led to an increase in the rate of uterine cervical cancer. We investigated the clinicopathological characteristics of uterine cervical cancer in young women, and examined the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Tumor samples from 439 patients with uterine cervical cancer, who were initially treated at Osaka City University Medical School Hospital, Japan between 1995 and 2004, were stained immunohistochemically. The patients were classified into two groups according to age at onset: group Y included women aged < or =35 years, and group O included women aged > or =36 years. Group Y had more cases of squamous cell carcinoma, while group O had more advanced cases (P<0.05). Advanced cases (beyond stage Ib2) had a significantly worse prognosis in group Y than in group O (P<0.05). There were no differences between the two groups in the expressions of VEGF, MMP-2 and COX-2. However, in advanced cases (beyond stage Ib2), the expression of VEGF, MMP-2 and COX-2 was significantly greater in group Y than in group O (P<0.05). The above findings suggest that the expression of VEGF, MMPs and COX-2 is related to a worse prognosis for advanced uterine cervical cancer in young women.

  19. Differences in expression of uroplakin III, cytokeratin 7, and cyclooxygenase-2 in canine proliferative urothelial lesions of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Sledge, D G; Patrick, D J; Fitzgerald, S D; Xie, Y; Kiupel, M

    2015-01-01

    The expression of immunohistochemical markers that have been used in diagnosis and/or prognostication of urothelial tumors in humans (uroplakin III [UPIII], cytokeratin 7 [CK7], cyclooxygenase-2 [COX-2], and activated caspase 3) was evaluated in a series of 99 canine proliferative urothelial lesions of the urinary bladder and compared to the lesion classification and grade as defined by the World Health Organization / International Society of Urologic Pathology consensus system. There were significant associations between tumor classification and overall UPIII pattern (P = 1.49 × 10(-18)), loss of UPIII (P = 1.27 × 10(-4)), overall CK7 pattern (P = 4.34 × 10(-18)), and COX-2 pattern (P = 8.12 × 10(-25)). In addition, there were significant associations between depth of neoplastic cell infiltration into the urinary bladder wall and overall UPIII pattern (P = 1.54 × 10(-14)), loss of UPIII (P = 2.07 × 10(-4)), overall CK7 pattern (P = 1.17 × 10(-13)), loss of CK7 expression (P = .0485), and COX-2 pattern (P = 8.23 × 10(-21)). There were no significant associations between tumor classification or infiltration and caspase 3 expression pattern.

  20. Endogenous 2-Arachidonoylglycerol Alleviates Cyclooxygenases-2 Elevation-Mediated Neuronal Injury From SO2 Inhalation via PPARγ Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Ben; Chen, Minjun; Guo, Lin; Yun, Yang; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2015-10-01

    Although the health effects of sulfur dioxide (SO2) pollution in the atmospheric environment are not new, epidemiological studies and parallel experimental investigations indicate that acute SO2 exposure causes glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity and even contributes to the outcome of cerebral ischemia. Additionally, the free radical-related inflammatory responses are responsible for neuronal insults and consequent brain disorders. However, few medications are available for preventing the inflammatory responses and relieving the subsequent harmful insults from SO2 inhalation. Here, we show that endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) prevents neurotoxicity from SO2 inhalation by suppressing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpression, and this action appears to be mediated via cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1)-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways. Furthermore, CB1-dependent peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) expression was an important modulator of the 2-AG-mediated resolution on NF-κB-coupled COX-2 elevation in response to SO2 neuroinflammation. This finding provides evidence of a possible therapeutic effect of endogenous 2-AG regulation for protecting against neurological dysfunction from SO2 inhalation in polluted areas.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils from Chamaecyparis obtusa via the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    An, Beum-Soo; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Hyun; Jung, Eui-Man; Kang, Hong-Seok; Choi, In-Gyu; Park, Mi-Jin; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-07-01

    Essential oils are concentrated hydrophobic liquids containing volatile aromatic compounds from plants. In the present study, the essential oil of Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa), which is commercially used in soap, toothpaste and cosmetics, was extracted. Essential oil extracted from C. obtusa contains several types of terpenes, which have been shown to have anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of C. obtusa essential oil in vivo and in vitro following the induction of inflammation by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in rats. While LPS induced an inflammatory response through the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs), these levels were reduced when essential oil was pre-administered. Additionally, the mechanism of action underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of C. obtusa essential oil was investigated by measuring the mRNA expression of inflammation‑associated genes. LPS treatment significantly induced the expression of transforming growth factor α (TNFα) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in rats, while C. obtusa essential oil inhibited this effect. Taken together, our results demonstrate that C. obtusa essential oil exerts anti‑inflammatory effects by regulating the production of PGE2 and TNFα gene expression through the COX-2 pathway. These findings suggest that C. obtusa essential oil may constitute a novel source of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  2. Genetic association of cyclooxygenase-2 gene polymorphisms with Parkinson’s disease susceptibility in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yi; Wu, Yuquan; Li, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the genetic association of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) gene promoter region polymorphisms with Parkinson’s disease (PD) susceptibility in Chinese Han population. Methods: The genotyping of COX2 gene polymorphisms was conducted by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in 122 patients with PD and 120 healthy persons. The association strength of gene polymorphism with disease was measured by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) calculated using χ2 test which also evaluated the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) of gene polymorphism in controls. The linkage disequilibrium and haplotype were also analyzed as evidence in the analysis of association. Results: On condition that the genotypes distributions of COX2 -1290A>G, -1195G>A, -765G>C in the control group all conformed to HWE, however, only the homozygous genotype AA of -1195G>A polymorphism showed an association with PD (OR=0.432, 95% CI=0.196-0.950). In addition, in haplotype analysis, G-A-C haplotype frequency in cases was significantly lower than the controls, compared with the common haplotype A-G-G (P=0.031, OR=0.375, 95% CI=0.149-0.940). Conclusions: COX2 -1195G>A polymorphism might play a protective role in the onset of PD and G-A-C haplotype in this three promoter region polymorphisms also showed a negative association. PMID:26722563

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is associated with initiation of hepatocellular carcinoma, while prostaglandin receptor-1 expression predicts survival

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao-Jie; Jiang, Jing-Hang; Yang, Yu-Ting; Yang, Xiang-Di; Guo, Zhe; Qi, Ya-Peng; Zeng, Feng-Hua; Zhang, Ke-Lan; Chen, Neng-Zhi; Xiang, Bang-De; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E1 receptor (EP1) contribute to disease and whether they help predict prognosis. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed the records of 116 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who underwent surgery between 2008 and 2011 at our hospital. Expression of COX-2 and EP1 receptor was examined by immunohistochemistry of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using polyclonal antibodies. Possible associations between immunohistochemical scores and survival were determined. RESULTS Factors associated with poor overall survival (OS) were alpha-fetoprotein > 400 ng/mL, tumor size ≥ 5 cm, and high EP1 receptor expression, but not high COX-2 expression. Disease-free survival was not significantly different between patients with low or high levels of COX-2 or EP1. COX-2 immunoreactivity was significantly higher in well-differentiated HCC tissues (Edmondson grade I-II) than in poorly differentiated tissues (Edmondson grade III-IV) (P = 0.003). EP1 receptor immunoreactivity was significantly higher in poorly differentiated tissue than in well-differentiated tissue (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION COX-2 expression appears to be linked to early HCC events (initiation), while EP1 receptor expression may participate in tumor progression and predict survival.

  4. Expression of prostaglandin synthesizing enzymes (cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2) in the ovary of the ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Rodler, Daniela; Sinowatz, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase is the rate limiting enzyme in the production of prostaglandins. In birds two isoforms are present: cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Despite evidence implicating that cyclooxygenases and PGs are critical factors in female reproduction in birds, little is known about COX expression in the avian ovary. In birds, cyclooxygenases have been studied in very few species only. In this study we report on the expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the ovary of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) using immunohistochemistry and non-radioactive in situ hybridization techniques. Our results demonstrate that COX-1 is strongly expressed in the cytoplasm of oocytes of previtellogenic follicles, whereas COX-2 shows the strongest immunostaining in the granulosa cells of previtellogenic follicles. The signals of both isoenzymes fade significantly with increasing diameter and finally nearly vanish in the vitellogenic follicles with a size >1.8 cm. This expression pattern in the ostrich (S. camelus) is, therefore, completely different from the localization of COX-1 and COX-2 in the hen (Gallus gallus), a finding which also suggests different functions of the cyclooxygenases in the ostrich species. Non-radioactive in situ hybridization confirmed that COX-1 is synthesized in the ooplasm and COX-2 in the granulosa layers of early previtellogenic follicles. According to the results of this study it appears unlikely that COX-1 or COX-2 play a major role in ovulation and oviposition in the ostrich. PMID:25528171

  5. K-Ras and cyclooxygenase-2 coactivation augments intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and Notch1 mimicking human pancreas lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chiblak, Sara; Steinbauer, Brigitte; Pohl-Arnold, Andrea; Kucher, Dagmar; Abdollahi, Amir; Schwager, Christian; Höft, Birgit; Esposito, Irene; Müller-Decker, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Mutational activation of K-Ras is an initiating event of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) that may develop either from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is causally related to pancreatic carcinogenesis. Here, we deciphered the impact of COX-2, a key modulator of inflammation, in concert with active mutant K-RasG12D on tumor burden and gene expression signature using compound mutant mouse lines. Concomitant activation of COX-2 and K-RasG12D accelerated the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial lesions predominantly with a cystic papillary phenotype resembling human IPMN. Transcriptomes derived from laser capture microdissected preneoplastic lesions of single and compound mutants revealed a signature that was significantly enriched in Notch1 signaling components. In vitro, Notch1 signaling was COX-2-dependent. In line with these findings, human IPMN stratified into intestinal, gastric and pancreatobillary types displayed Notch1 immunosignals with high prevalence, especially in the gastric lesions. In conclusion, a yet unknown link between activated Ras, protumorigenic COX-2 and Notch1 in IPMN onset was unraveled. PMID:27381829

  6. Spatiotemporal expression of cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 during delayed implantation and the periimplantation period in the Western spotted skunk.

    PubMed

    Das, S K; Wang, J; Dey, S K; Mead, R A

    1999-04-01

    Embryonic development in the western spotted skunk is arrested after blastocyst formation for about 200 days. This developmental arrest is believed to be due to insufficiency of uterine conditions to support continuous development. Implantation and decidualization are defective in cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox2)-, but not Cox1-, deficient mice. We therefore used Northern and in situ hybridization to investigate changes in uterine expression of Cox1 and Cox2 genes during various stages of pregnancy in the spotted skunk. Cox1 was constitutively expressed at all stages of pregnancy examined, but it did exhibit localized up-regulation in the trophoblast and necks of uterine glands at early implantation sites. Cox2 expression was highly regulated with little or no expression during delayed implantation. Cox2 expression was first detected in the uterus and trophoblast prior to blastocyst attachment and remained detectable for 5-6 days after blastocyst attachment. Cox2 expression was also localized in the luminal and glandular epithelia of uterine segments located between implantation chambers. Changes in Cox expression were not correlated with the abrupt increase in uterine weight that occurs simultaneously with renewed embryonic development but was correlated with an influx of serum proteins into the uterus observed in a previous study.

  7. Quantitative Assessment of the Association of COX-2 (Cyclooxygenase-2) Immunoexpression with Prognosis in Human Osteosarcoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zengming; Wu, Hao; Wu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background Numerous studies examining the relationship between Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) immunoexpression and clinical outcome in osteosarcoma patients have yielded inconclusive results. Methods We accordingly conducted a meta-analysis of 9 studies (442 patients) that evaluated the correlation between COX-2 immunoexpression and clinical prognosis (death). Pooled odds ratios (OR) and risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using the random-effects or fixed-effects model. Results Meta–analysis showed no significant association between COX-2 positivity and age, gender, tumor location, histology, stage, metastasis or 90% necrosis. Conversely, COX-2 immunoexpression was associated with overall survival rate (RR=2.12; 95% CI: 1.10–3.74; P=0.009) and disease-free survival rate (RR=1.63; 95% CI: 1.17–2.28; P=0.004) at 2 years. Sensitivity analysis performed by omitting low quality studies showed that the pooled results were stable. Conclusions COX-2 positivity was associated with a lower 2-year overall survival rate and disease-free survival rate. COX-2 expression change is an independent prognostic factor in patients with osteosarcoma. PMID:24358237

  8. Dehydroepiandrosterone and metformin modulate progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and cytokines in early pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, C G; Mikó, E; Szekeres-Bartho, J; Paz, D A; Motta, A B

    2008-09-01

    The present study examined the mechanism by which metformin (N,N'-dimethylbiguanide) prevents embryonic resorption induced in mice by dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Treatment with DHEA (60mg/kg, s.c. 24 and 48h post-implantation) induces embryo resorption of early pregnant BALB/c mice while simultaneous treatment with metformin (240mg/kg, oral 24 and 48h post-implantation) prevents it. During pregnancy progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) modulates prostaglandins (PGs) and cytokine production. These findings prompted us to investigate the effect of DHEA and metformin on both PIBF and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expressions at the implantation sites, as well as cytokine production. PIBF and COX2 expression were detected by immunohistochemistry from DHEA and DHEA+ metformin treated 8 days-pregnant mice and serum cytokine levels of these animals were determined by ELISA. DHEA treatment both abolished PIBF expression and increased COX2 expression. Embryo resorption correlates with the lack of PIBF expression, diminished IL-6 levels and increased IL-2 concentration while metformin was able to reverse the effect of DHEA on both PIBF and COX2 expression and IL-6 levels. We concluded that hyperandrogenization induces embryo resorption in early pregnancy diminishing PIBF in implantation sites, having a pro-inflammatory effect. Metformin is able to prevent such effects.

  9. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  10. Regulation of Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression by Heat: A Novel Aspect of Heat Shock Factor 1 Function in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Edoardo; Angelini, Mara; Santoro, M. Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    The heat-shock response, a fundamental defense mechanism against proteotoxic stress, is regulated by a family of heat-shock transcription factors (HSF). In humans HSF1 is considered the central regulator of heat-induced transcriptional responses. The main targets for HSF1 are specific promoter elements (HSE) located upstream of heat-shock genes encoding cytoprotective heat-shock proteins (HSP) with chaperone function. In addition to its cytoprotective function, HSF1 was recently hypothesized to play a more complex role, regulating the expression of non-HSP genes; however, the non-canonical role of HSF1 is still poorly understood. Herein we report that heat-stress promotes the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a key regulator of inflammation controlling prostanoid and thromboxane synthesis, resulting in the production of high levels of prostaglandin-E2 in human cells. We show that heat-induced COX-2 expression is regulated at the transcriptional level via HSF1-mediated signaling and identify, by in-vitro reporter gene activity assay and deletion-mutant constructs analysis, the COX-2 heat-responsive promoter region and a new distal cis-acting HSE located at position −2495 from the transcription start site. As shown by ChIP analysis, HSF1 is recruited to the COX-2 promoter rapidly after heat treatment; by using shRNA-mediated HSF1 suppression and HSE-deletion from the COX-2 promoter, we demonstrate that HSF1 plays a central role in the transcriptional control of COX-2 by heat. Finally, COX-2 transcription is also induced at febrile temperatures in endothelial cells, suggesting that HSF1-dependent COX-2 expression could contribute to increasing blood prostaglandin levels during fever. The results identify COX-2 as a human non-classical heat-responsive gene, unveiling a new aspect of HSF1 function. PMID:22347460

  11. Delphinidin suppresses ultraviolet B-induced cyclooxygenases-2 expression through inhibition of MAPKK4 and PI-3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung Yeon; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jong-Eun; Jung, Sung Keun; Kang, Nam Joo; Hwang, Mun Kyung; Heo, Yong-Seok; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2009-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a key mediator of inflammation, and its product, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), enhance carcinogenesis, particularly in skin. Ultraviolet (UV) B is the most carcinogenic component of solar irradiation, and a crucial role of COX-2 in UVB-mediated skin carcinogenesis has been reported. Here, we investigated the effects of delphinidin, an abundant dietary anthocyanin, on UVB-induced COX-2 upregulation and the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that delphinidin suppressed UVB-induced COX-2 expression in JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells. COX-2 promoter activity and PGE(2) production were also suppressed by delphinidin treatment within non-cytotoxic concentrations. Activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB, crucial transcription factors involved in COX-2 expression, were activated by UVB and delphinidin abolished this activation. UVB-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 kinase and Akt was inhibited by delphinidin. The activities of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) 4 and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K) were inhibited markedly by delphinidin. A pull-down assay using delphinidin-Sepharose beads revealed that delphinidin binds directly with MAPKK4 or PI-3K in a manner that was competitive with adenosine triphosphate. Moreover, in vivo investigations using mouse skin revealed that the upregulation of COX-2 expression, MAPKK4 activity and PI-3K activity induced by UVB was abolished with delphinidin treatment. Collectively, our results demonstrated that delphinidin targets MAPKK4 and PI-3K directly to suppress COX-2 overexpression, suggesting a potential protective role for delphinidin against UVB-mediated skin carcinogenesis.

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mediates arsenite inhibition of UVB-induced cellular apoptosis in mouse epidermal Cl41 cells.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Z; Ouyang, W; Li, J; Costa, M; Huang, C

    2012-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is an environmental human carcinogen, and has been shown to act as a co-carcinogen with solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation in mouse skin tumor induction even at low concentrations. However, the precise mechanism of its co-carcinogenic action is largely unknown. Apoptosis plays an essential role as a protective mechanism against neoplastic development in the organism by eliminating genetically damaged cells. Thus, suppression of apoptosis is thought to contribute to carcinogenesis. It is known that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can promote carcinogenesis by inhibiting cell apoptosis under stress conditions; and our current studies investigated the potential contribution of COX-2 to the inhibitory effect of arsenite in UV-induced cell apoptosis in mouse epidermal Cl41 cells. We found that treatment of cells with low concentration (5 μM) arsenite attenuated cellular apoptosis upon UVB radiation accompanied with a coinductive effect on COX-2 expression and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) transactivation. Our results also showed that the COX-2 induction by arsenite and UVB depended on an NFκB pathway because COX-2 co-induction could be attenuated in either p65-deficient or p50-deficient cells. Moreover, UVB-induced cell apoptosis could be dramatically reduced by the introduction of exogenous COX-2 expression, whereas the inhibitory effect of arsenite on UVB-induced cell apoptosis could be impaired in COX-2 knockdown C141 cells. Our results indicated that COX-2 mediated the anti-apoptotic effect of arsenite in UVB radiation through an NFκB-dependent pathway. Given the importance of apoptosis evasion during carcinogenesis, we anticipated that COX-2 induction might be at least partially responsible for the co-carcinogenic effect of arsenite on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis.

  13. Viscum album Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Effect by Selectively Inhibiting Cytokine-Induced Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Pushpa; Maddur, Mohan S.; Friboulet, Alain; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srini V.

    2011-01-01

    Viscum album (VA) preparations are extensively used as complementary therapy in cancer and are shown to exert anti-tumor activities which involve the cytotoxic properties, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis and several other immunomodulatory mechanisms. In addition to their application in cancer therapy, VA preparations have also been successfully utilized in the treatment of several inflammatory pathologies. Owing to the intricate association of inflammation and cancer and in view of the fact that several anti-tumor phytotherapeutics also exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect, we hypothesized that VA exerts an anti-inflammatory effect that is responsible for its therapeutic benefit. Since, inflammatory cytokine-induced cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of VA on regulation of cyclo-oxygenase expression and PGE2 biosynthesis by using human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 cells) as a model. A549 cells were stimulated with IL-1β and treated with VA preparation (VA Qu Spez) for 18 hours. PGE2 was analysed in the culture supernatants by enzyme immunoassay. Expression of COX-2 and COX-1 proteins was analyzed by immunoblotting and the expression of COX-2 mRNA was assessed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. We found that VA Qu Spez inhibit the secretion of IL-1β-induced PGE2 in a dose-dependent manner. Further, we also show that this inhibitory action was associated with a reduced expression of COX-2 without modulating the COX-1 expression. Together these results demonstrate a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of VA preparations wherein VA exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting cytokine-induced PGE2 via selective inhibition of COX-2. PMID:22028854

  14. Pro-migratory actions of the prostacyclin receptor in human breast cancer cells that over-express cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Allison, Sarah E; Petrovic, Nenad; Mackenzie, Peter I; Murray, Michael

    2015-08-15

    Metastasis is the major cause of death in cancer patients. Elevated expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is observed in many human cancers and over-production of downstream prostaglandins (PGs) has been shown to stimulate metastasis. A role for increased PGE2 production has been proposed, but whether other PGs contribute is currently unclear. In this study the pro-migratory actions of individual PGs were evaluated in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells that stably over-expressed COX-2 (MDA-COX-2 cells); cell migration was quantified using 3D-matrigel droplet assays. Inhibition of the prostacyclin and PGE synthases, but not alternate prostanoid synthases, prevented the increase in MDA-COX-2 cell migration produced by arachidonic acid (AA); direct treatment of cells with the stable prostacyclin analogue cicaprost also promoted migration. Pharmacological antagonism and knockdown of the IP receptor decreased cell migration, while antagonists of the alternate DP, EP2, FP, and TP prostanoid receptors were inactive. In support of these findings, activation of the IP receptor also enhanced migration in the MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231 and A549 cell lines, and IP receptor knock-down in MDA-COX-2 cells decreased the expression of a number of pro-migratory genes. In further studies, the prostacyclin/IP receptor and PGE2/EP4 receptor pathways were found to be functionally independent and the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) selectively impaired the IP-receptor-dependent migration in MDA-COX-2 cells. Taken together, the prostacyclin/IP/PI3K-p38 MAPK axis has emerged as a novel pro-migratory pathway in breast cancer cells that over-express COX-2. This information could be utilized in novel treatment strategies to minimize tumor metastasis.

  15. Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression as a Predictor of Para-Aortic Lymph Node Recurrence in Uterine Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun-Sang Li Shengjin; Kim, Jin-Man; Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Cho, Moon-June

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: The overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is associated with a worse prognosis and the development of distant metastases in cervical cancer. This matched-pair analysis examined whether COX-2 expression is associated with para-aortic lymph node (PALN) recurrence in uterine cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: For this study, we matched 20 patients with PALN recurrence after definitive or postoperative RT by stage with 20 others who did not have PALN recurrence. Of the 20 patients with PALN recurrence, definitive or postoperative RT was performed in 11 and 9 patients, respectively. COX-2 expression was assessed immunohistochemically using a mouse monoclonal antibody on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor specimens taken before RT. A logistic regression model was used to predict for PALN recurrence. Results: COX-2 was expressed in 28 (70%) of the 40 patients. The staining intensity was as follows: weak in 19 (47%), moderate in 6 (15%), and strong in 3 (8%) patients. The patients with PALN recurrence had much greater expression of COX-2 (17 patients, 85%) than did the control group (11 patients, 55%; p = 0.04). Strong staining intensity of COX-2 was seen only in the PALN recurrence group. The statistically significant factors associated with PALN recurrence were positive pelvic lymph nodes (odds ratio, 7.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.55-37.37; p = 0.01) and COX-2 expression (odds ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-2.09; p = 0.03). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that COX-2 overexpression in the initial tumor tissue might be associated with PALN recurrence after RT in cervical cancer patients.

  16. An investigation of the rate of cyclooxygenase-2 expression on the surface of adenomatous and colorectal adenocarcinoma polyps

    PubMed Central

    Baghaei, Ramin; Beiraghdar, Mozhdeh; Sobhani, Ahmad; Rafei, Rahmatolah; Kolahi, Leila; Foladi, Lotfolah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) (adenomatous, adenocarcinoma) is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in human societies. Considering the importance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the incidence of CRC, in this study, the rate of COX-2 gene expression on polyps and CRCs were addressed. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive analytic study carried out on the blocks of sampled tissue of adenomatous and colorectal adenocarcinoma polyps on 68 patients referred to Digestive Clinic in Isfahan Shariati Hospital in 2013. Patients were divided into two groups of polyps (n = 52) and cancer (n = 16). Given the presence of CRC or polyps by colonoscopy, samples were sent to the laboratory to measure the rate of COX-2 gene expression using immunohistochemistry. Results: In polyp group, 41 individuals (78.8%) had two or <2 polyps, 24 cases (46.2%) had a tubular polyp, and about a third of all patients had a big polyp. The most frequency of the polyp site was related to sigmoid with 19 cases (36.54%), in cancer group, it was related to the rectum with 9 cases (56.25%) that there was no significant difference between two groups (P < 0.05). The overall prevalence of COX-2 expression was positive in 51 cases (75%) and negative in 17 cases (25%). COX-2 gene expression was separately observed in 38 individuals (73.10%) in the polyp group and in 13 cases (81.25%) in the cancer group, and no significant difference was found (P > 0.05). Conclusion: There is no relationship between COX-2 gene expression and the surface of adenomatous and colorectal adenocarcinoma polyps. PMID:26601088

  17. Effect of quercetin on metallothionein, nitric oxide synthases and cyclooxygenase-2 expression on experimental chronic cadmium nephrotoxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Ana I.; Vicente-Sanchez, Cesar; Jerkic, Mirjana; Santiago, Jose M.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Penelope D.; Perez-Barriocanal, Fernando; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M. . E-mail: jmlnovoa@usal.es

    2006-01-15

    Inflammation can play a key role in Cd-induced dysfunctions. Quercetin is a potent oxygen free radical scavenger and a metal chelator. Our aim was to study the effect of quercetin on Cd-induced kidney damage and metallothionein expression. The study was performed in Wistar rats that were administered during 9 weeks with either cadmium (1.2 mg Cd/kg/day, s.c.), quercetin (50 mg/kg/day, i.p.) or cadmium + quercetin. Renal toxicity was evaluated by measuring blood urea nitrogen concentration and urinary excretion of enzymes marker of tubular damage. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) renal expression were assessed by Western blot. Renal expression of metallothionein 1 and 2 (MT-1, MT-2) and eNOS mRNA was assessed by Northern blot. Our data demonstrated that Cd-induced renal toxicity was markedly reduced in rats that also received quercetin. MT-1 and MT-2 mRNA levels in kidney were substantially increased during treatment with Cd, being even higher when the animals received Cd and quercetin. Renal eNOS expression was significantly higher in rats receiving Cd and quercetin than in animals receiving Cd alone or in control rats. In the group that received Cd, COX-2 and iNOS expression was markedly higher than in control rats. In the group Cd + quercetin, no changes in COX-2 and iNOS expression were observed compared with the control group. Our results demonstrate that quercetin treatment prevents Cd-induced overexpression of iNOS and COX-2, and increases MT expression. These effects can explain the protection by quercetin of Cd-induced nephrotoxicity.

  18. Enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 expression levels and metalloproteinase 2 and 9 activation by Hexachlorobenzene in human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Florencia; Bastón, Juan Ignacio; Vaccarezza, Agustina; Singla, José Javier; Pontillo, Carolina; Miret, Noelia; Farina, Mariana; Meresman, Gabriela; Randi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is an organochlorine pesticide that induces toxic reproductive effects in laboratory animals. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of functional endometrial tissues outside the uterine cavity. Experimental studies indicate that exposure to organochlorines can interfere with both hormonal regulation and immune function to promote endometriosis. Altered expression of metalloproteinases (MMPs) in patients with endometriosis, suggests that MMPs may play a critical role. In the endometriotic lesions, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) produced by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), binds to its EP4 receptor (EP4), and via c-Src kinase induces MMPs activation, promoting endometriosis. We examined the HCB action on MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities and expression, COX-2 levels, PGE2 signaling, and the AhR involvement in HCB-induced effects. We have used different in vitro models: (1) human endometrial stromal cell line T-HESC, (2) primary cultures of Human Uterine Fibroblast (HUF), and (3) primary cultures of endometrial stromal cells from eutopic endometrium of control (CESC) and subjects with endometriosis (EESC). Our results show that HCB enhances MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in T-HESC, HUF and ESC cells. The MMP-9 levels were elevated in all models, while the MMP-2 expression only increased in ESC cells. HCB enhanced COX-2 and EP4 expression, PGE2 secretion and the c-Src kinase activation in T-HESC. Besides, we observed that AhR is implicated in these HCB-induced effects. In conclusion, our results show that HCB exposure could contribute to endometriosis development, affecting inflammation and invasion parameters of human endometrial cells. PMID:27038655

  19. Phosphorylation of STAT3 mediates the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 by cortisol in the human amnion at parturition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wangsheng; Guo, Chunming; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Jiangwen; Li, Wenjiao; Liu, Chao; Xie, Huiliang; Myatt, Leslie; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Sun, Kang

    2015-10-27

    The induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and subsequent production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by cortisol in the amnion contrast with the effect of cortisol on most other tissues, but this proinflammatory effect of cortisol may be a key event in human parturition (labor). We evaluated the underlying mechanism activated by cortisol in primary human amnion fibroblasts. Exposure of the amnion fibroblasts to cortisol led to the activation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, which induced the phosphorylation of the kinase SRC and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). STAT3 interacted with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the transcription factor CREB-1 (cAMP response element-binding protein 1) at the promoter of the gene encoding COX-2, which promoted the production of the secreted prostaglandin PGE2. PGE2 activates the prostaglandin receptors EP2 and EP4, which stimulate cAMP-PKA signaling. Thus, cortisol reinforced the activation of cAMP-PKA signaling through an SRC-STAT3-COX-2-PGE2-mediated feedback loop. Inhibiting STAT3, SRC, or the cAMP-PKA pathway attenuated the cortisol-stimulated induction of COX-2 and PGE2 production in amnion fibroblasts. In human amnion tissue, the amount of phosphorylated STAT3 correlated positively with that of cortisol, COX-2, and PGE2, and all were more abundant in tissue obtained after active labor than in tissue obtained from cesarean surgeries in the absence of labor. These results indicated that the coordinated recruitment of STAT3, CREB-1, and GR to the promoter of the gene encoding COX-2 contributes to the feed-forward induction of COX-2 activity and prostaglandin synthesis in the amnion during parturition.

  20. Expression of integrin α3β1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) are positively correlated in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of integrin α3β1 is associated with tumor progression, metastasis, and poor prognosis in several cancers, including breast cancer. Moreover, preclinical studies have revealed important pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic functions for this integrin, including tumor growth, survival, invasion, and paracrine induction of angiogenesis. Our previously published work in a preclinical breast cancer model showed that integrin α3β1 promotes expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2/PTGS2), a known driver of breast cancer progression. However, the clinical significance of this regulation was unknown. The objective of the current study was to assess the clinical relevance of the relationship between integrin α3β1 and COX2 by testing for their correlated expression among various forms of human breast cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess co-expression of α3 and COX2 in specimens of human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), either on a commercial tissue microarray (n = 59 samples) or obtained from Albany Medical Center archives (n = 68 samples). Immunostaining intensity for the integrin α3 subunit or COX2 was scored, and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient analysis was performed to assess their co-expression across and within different tumor subtypes or clinicopathologic criteria. Results Although expression of integrin α3 or COX2 varied among clinical IDC samples, a statistically significant, positive correlation was detected between α3 and COX2 in both tissue microarrays (rs = 0.49, p < 0.001, n = 59) and archived samples (rs = 0.59, p < 0.0001, n = 68). In both sample sets, this correlation was independent of hormone receptor status, histological grade, or disease stage. Conclusions COX2 and α3 are correlated in IDC independently of hormone receptor status or other clinicopathologic features, supporting the hypothesis that integrin α3β1 is a determinant of COX2 expression in human breast

  1. Polymorphisms in regulatory regions of Cyclooxygenase-2 gene and breast cancer risk in Brazilians: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is up-regulated in several types of cancer, and it is hypothesized that COX-2 expression may be genetically influenced. Here, we evaluate the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the COX-2 gene (PTGS2) and the occurrence of breast cancer among Brazilian women. Methods The study was conducted prospectively in two steps: First, we screened the promoter region and three fragments of the 3'-untranslated region of PTGS2 from 67 healthy Brazilians to identify SNPs and to select those with a minor allele frequency (MAF) of at least 0.10. The MAF of these selected SNPs was further characterized in 402 healthy volunteers to evaluate potential differences related to heterogeneous racial admixture and to estimate the existence of linkage disequilibrium among the SNPs. The second step was a case-control study with 318 patients and 273 controls designed to evaluate PTGS2 genotype- or haplotype-associated risk of breast cancer. Results The screening analysis indicated nine SNPs with the following MAFs: rs689465 (0.22), rs689466 (0.15), rs20415 (0.007), rs20417 (0.32), rs20419 (0.015), rs5270 (0.02), rs20424 (0.007), rs5275 (0.22) and rs4648298 (0.01). The SNPs rs689465, rs689466, rs20417 and rs5275 were further studied: Their genotypic distributions followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the MAFs were not affected by gender or skin color. Strong linkage disequilibrium was detected for rs689465, rs20417 and rs5275 in the three possible pairwise combinations. In the case-control study, there was a significant increase of rs5275TC heterozygotes in cases compared to controls (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.01-2.06; P = 0.043), and the haplotype formed by rs689465G, rs689466A, rs20417G and rs5275C was only detected in cases. The apparent association with breast cancer was not confirmed for rs5275CC homozygotes or for the most frequent rs5275C-containing haplotypes. Conclusions Our results indicate no strong association between the

  2. Suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression by epimuqubilin A via IKK/IκB/NF-κB pathways in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Jung; Cheenpracha, Sarot; Chang, Leng Chee; Pezzuto, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells are commonly used as a model for assessing the anti-inflammatory or chemopreventive potential of test compounds. Epimuqubilin A, a norsesterterpene peroxide isolated from marine sponge Latrunculia sp., inhibits nitric oxide production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells (IC50 = 7.6 µM). At both the mRNA and protein levels, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are suppressed in a dose-dependent manner. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), one major upstream signaling pathway involved in the transcription of both COX-2 and iNOS, were not affected by treatment of epimuqubilin A. However, the compound blocked the phosphorylation of inhibitor κB (IκB) kinase (IKKβ), resulting in the stabilization of IκBα, and inhibition of NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and DNA binding. Levels of phosphorylated IKKα were not affected. This is an unique mechanistic relationship that suggests epimuqubilin A warrants further exploration as a potential therapeutic agent. PMID:22180763

  3. Yu Ping Feng San, an Ancient Chinese Herbal Decoction, Regulates the Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and Cyclooxygenase-2 and the Activity of Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase in Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Du, Crystal Y. Q.; Choi, Roy C. Y.; Dong, Tina T. X.; Lau, David T. W.; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2014-01-01

    Yu Ping Feng San (YPFS), a Chinese herbal decoction comprising Astragali Radix (AR; Huangqi), Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma (AMR; Baizhu), and Saposhnikoviae Radix (SR; Fangfeng), has been used clinically to treat inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Previously, we demonstrated a dual role of YPFS in regulating cytokine release in cultured macrophages. In this study, we elucidated the anti-inflammatory effect of YPFS that is mediated through modulating the expression of three key enzymes involved in IBD: inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IALP). In a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced chronic-inflammation model of cultured murine macrophages, YPFS treatment suppressed the activation of iNOS and COX-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, application of YPFS in cultured small intestinal enterocytes markedly induced the expression of IALP in a time-dependent manner, which might strengthen the intestinal detoxification system. A duality of YPFS in modulating the expression of iNOS and COX-2 was determined here. The expression of iNOS and COX-2 in macrophages was induced by YPFS, and this activation was partially blocked by the NF-κB-specific inhibitor BAY 11-7082, indicating a role of NF-κB signaling. These YPFS-induced changes in gene regulation strongly suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of YPFS are mediated through the regulation of inflammatory enzymes. PMID:24967898

  4. Manassantin B isolated from Saururus chinensis inhibits cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin D2 generation by blocking Fyn-mediated nuclear factor-kappaB and mitogen activated protein kinase pathways in bone marrow derived-mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Son, Jong Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of manassantin B (Man B) isolated from Saururus chinensis (S. chinensis) on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) generation in mouse bone marrow derived-mast cells (BMMCs). Man B inhibited the generation of PGD2 dose-dependently by inhibiting COX-2 expression in immunoglobulin E (IgE)/Ag-stimulated BMMCs. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for the inhibition of COX-2 expression by Man B, the effects of Man B on the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), a transcription factor essential and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) for COX-2 induction, were examined. Man B attenuated the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and its DNA-binding activity by inhibiting inhibitors of kappa Bα (IκBα) degradation and concomitantly suppressing IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation. In addition, Man B suppressed phosphorylation of MAPKs including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. It was also found that Man B suppressed Fyn kinase activation and consequent downstream signaling processes, including those involving Syk, Gab2, and Akt. Taken together, the present results suggest that Man B suppresses COX-2 dependent PGD2 generation by primarily inhibiting Fyn kinase in FcεRI-mediated mast cells.

  5. Effects of COX inhibitors on neurodegeneration and survival in mice exposed to the marine neurotoxin domoic acid.

    PubMed

    Ryan, James C; Cross, Cheryl A; Van Dolah, Frances M

    2011-01-01

    The marine neurotoxin domoic acid (DA) is a rigid analogue of the neurotransmitter glutamate and a potent agonist of kainate subtype glutamate receptors. Persistent activation of these receptor subtypes results in rapid excitotoxicity, calcium-dependent cell death, and neuronal degeneration in regions of the brain where glutamatergic pathways are concentrated. Previous work has shown that DA promotes the expression of inflammatory genes in the brain, such as cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). To investigate the impact of inflammation on the development of neurodegeneration, and ultimately survival following DA administration, we used selective (L745337, Merck) and non-selective (acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)) COX inhibitors in DA exposed mice. Adult male ICR mice were given a regime of either ASA or L23547 both before and after a single LD50 dose of DA. Mice were observed immediately after toxin introduction and then sacrificed at 2 days post exposure. Our lower dose of L23547 increased survival and was most effective at decreasing neuronal degeneration in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, areas especially sensitive to DA excitotoxicity. This study shows that COX2 plays a role in DA induced neurodegeneration and death, and that inhibitors may be of value for treatment in human and wildlife DA exposure. PMID:20934488

  6. Protective role of cyclooxygenase inhibitors in the adverse action of passive cigarette smoking on the initiation of experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, X; Liu, E S; Ko, J K; Wong, B C; Ye, Y; Lam, S; Cho, C

    2001-01-01

    Clinical and experimental findings had indicated that cigarette smoke exposure, and cyclooxygenase-2, are strongly associated with inflammatory bowel disease. The present study aimed to evaluate the role of cyclooxygenase-2 in the pathogenesis of experimental inflammatory bowel disease as well as in the adverse action of cigarette-smoke exposure. Rats were pretreated with different cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (indomethacin, nimesulide, or SC-236 (4-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]benzenesulfonamide)) along with cigarette-smoke exposure before 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-enema. Results indicated that pretreatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors not only protected against 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced inflammatory bowel disease, but also attenuated the potentiating effect of cigarette-smoke exposure on colonic damage. Furthermore, the colonic cyclooxygenase-2 protein and mRNA expression was markedly induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-enema, and it was potentiated further by cigarette-smoke exposure, while the cyclooxygenase-1 expression was not changed. The present study suggests that the highly induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression not only plays a pathogenic role in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced inflammatory bowel disease, but also contributes to the adverse action of cigarette-smoke exposure on this disorder.

  7. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced periodontal inflammation is associated with the up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin synthase 1 in human gingival epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahama, Yu; Obama, Takashi; Usui, Michihiko; Kanazawa, Yukari; Iwamoto, Sanju; Suzuki, Kazushige; Miyazaki, Akira; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Itabe, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} OxLDL-induced responses in human gingival epithelial cells were studied. {yields} OxLDL enhanced the production of IL-8, IL-1{beta} and PGE{sub 2} in Ca9-22 cells. {yields} An NF-{kappa}B inhibitor suppressed the expression of COX-2 and mPGES1 induced by oxLDL. {yields} Unlike the case in macrophages, oxLDL did not increase the CD36 level. -- Abstract: Periodontitis is characterized by chronic gingival tissue inflammation, and inflammatory mediators such as IL-8 and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) are associated with disease progression. Previously we showed that oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) was present in gingival crevicular fluid. In this study, the role of oxLDL in the gingival epithelial cell inflammatory response was further investigated using Ca9-22 cells and primary human oral keratinocytes (HOK). Treatment of Ca9-22 cells and HOK with oxLDL induced an up-regulation of IL-8 and the PGE{sub 2}-producing enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal PGE{sub 2} synthase-1. These responses induced by oxLDL were significantly suppressed by a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) inhibitor. However, unlike the result in macrophages, oxLDL did not lead to an increase in CD36 expression in these two cells. These results suggest that oxLDL elicits gingival epithelial cell inflammatory responses through an activation of the NF-{kappa}B pathway. These data suggest a mechanistic link between periodontal disease and lipid metabolism-related disorders, including atherosclerosis.

  8. Nicotine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity in human gastric cancer cells: Involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Vivian Yvonne; Jin, H.C.; Ng, Enders K.O.; Yu Jun; Leung, W.K.; Cho, C.H.; Sung, J.J.Y.

    2008-12-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associates with cigarette smoke exposure in many malignancies. Nicotine and its derivative, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), are the two important components in cigarette smoke that contributes to cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which nicotine or NNK promotes gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We found that nicotine and NNK significantly enhanced cell proliferation in AGS cells that expressed both alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7 nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptors. Treatment of cells with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX, {alpha}7nAChR antagonist) or propranolol ({beta}-adrenergic receptor antagonist) blocked NNK-induced COX-2/PGE{sub 2} and cell proliferation, while nicotine-mediated cell growth and COX-2/PGE{sub 2} induction can only be suppressed by propranolol, but not {alpha}-BTX. Moreover, in contrast to the dependence of growth promoting effect of nicotine on Erk activation, inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) repressed NNK-induced COX-2 upregulation and resulted in suppression of cell growth. In addition, nicotine and NNK mediated COX-2 induction via different receptors to modulate several G1/S transition regulatory proteins and promote gastric cancer cell growth. Selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236) caused G1 arrest and abrogated nicotine/NNK-induced cell proliferation. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 and other G1 regulatory proteins are reversed by blockade of COX-2. These results pointed to the importance of adrenergic and nicotinic receptors in gastric tumor growth through MAPK/COX-2 activation, which may perhaps provide a chemoprevention strategy for cigarette smoke-related gastric carcinogenesis.

  9. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and inducible nitric oxide synthase by 4-[(2′-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate from Moringa oleifera

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Jung; Cheenpracha, Sarot; Chang, Leng Chee; Kondratyuk, Tamara P.; Pezzuto, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lamarack is commonly consumed for nutritional or medicinal properties. We recently reported the isolation and structure elucidation of novel bioactive phenolic glycosides, including 4-[(2′-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate (RBITC), which was found to suppress inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells. Inhibitors of proteins such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and iNOS are potential anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive agents. The inhibitory activity of RBITC on NO production (IC50 = 0.96 ± 0.23 µM) was greater than that mediated by other well-known isothiocyanates such as sulforaphane (IC50 = 2.86 ± 0.39 µM) and benzyl isothiocyanate (IC50 = 2.08 ± 0.28 µM). RBITC inhibited expression of COX-2 and iNOS at both the protein and mRNA levels. Major upstream signaling pathways involved mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). RBITC inhibited phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase and stress-activated protein kinase, as well as ubiquitin-dependent degradation of inhibitor κBα (IκBα). In accordance with IκBα degradation, nuclear accumulation of NF-κB, and subsequent binding to NF-κB cis-acting element, was attenuated by treatment with RBITC. These data suggest RBITC should be included in the dietary armamentarium of isothiocyanates potentially capable of mediating anti-inflammatory or cancer chemopreventive activity. PMID:21774591

  10. The inhibition of 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) biosynthesis, rather than enhancing striatal damage, protects striatal neurons from malonate-induced death: a potential role of cyclooxygenase-2-dependent metabolism of 2-AG

    PubMed Central

    Valdeolivas, S; Pazos, M R; Bisogno, T; Piscitelli, F; Iannotti, F A; Allarà, M; Sagredo, O; Di Marzo, V; Fernández-Ruiz, J

    2013-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB2 receptor, which is activated by the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG), protects striatal neurons from apoptotic death caused by the local administration of malonate, a rat model of Huntington's disease (HD). In the present study, we investigated whether endocannabinoids provide tonic neuroprotection in this HD model, by examining the effect of O-3841, an inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipases, the enzymes that catalyse 2-AG biosynthesis, and JZL184 or OMDM169, two inhibitors of 2-AG inactivation by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). The inhibitors were injected in rats with the striatum lesioned with malonate, and several biochemical and morphological parameters were measured in this brain area. Similar experiments were also conducted in vitro in cultured M-213 cells, which have the phenotypic characteristics of striatal neurons. O-3841 produced a significant reduction in the striatal levels of 2-AG in animals lesioned with malonate. However, surprisingly, the inhibitor attenuated malonate-induced GABA and BDNF deficiencies and the reduction in Nissl staining, as well as the increase in GFAP immunostaining. In contrast, JZL184 exacerbated malonate-induced striatal damage. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was induced in the striatum 24 h after the lesion simultaneously with other pro-inflammatory responses. The COX-2-derived 2-AG metabolite, prostaglandin E2 glyceryl ester (PGE2-G), exacerbated neurotoxicity, and this effect was antagonized by the blockade of PGE2-G action with AGN220675. In M-213 cells exposed to malonate, in which COX-2 was also upregulated, JZL184 worsened neurotoxicity, and this effect was attenuated by the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib or AGN220675. OMDM169 also worsened neurotoxicity and produced measurable levels of PGE2-G. In conclusion, the inhibition of 2-AG biosynthesis is neuroprotective in rats lesioned with malonate, possibly through the counteraction of the formation of pro-neuroinflammatory PGE2-G, formed from COX-2

  11. The inhibition of 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) biosynthesis, rather than enhancing striatal damage, protects striatal neurons from malonate-induced death: a potential role of cyclooxygenase-2-dependent metabolism of 2-AG.

    PubMed

    Valdeolivas, S; Pazos, M R; Bisogno, T; Piscitelli, F; Iannotti, F A; Allarà, M; Sagredo, O; Di Marzo, V; Fernández-Ruiz, J

    2013-10-17

    The cannabinoid CB2 receptor, which is activated by the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG), protects striatal neurons from apoptotic death caused by the local administration of malonate, a rat model of Huntington's disease (HD). In the present study, we investigated whether endocannabinoids provide tonic neuroprotection in this HD model, by examining the effect of O-3841, an inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipases, the enzymes that catalyse 2-AG biosynthesis, and JZL184 or OMDM169, two inhibitors of 2-AG inactivation by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). The inhibitors were injected in rats with the striatum lesioned with malonate, and several biochemical and morphological parameters were measured in this brain area. Similar experiments were also conducted in vitro in cultured M-213 cells, which have the phenotypic characteristics of striatal neurons. O-3841 produced a significant reduction in the striatal levels of 2-AG in animals lesioned with malonate. However, surprisingly, the inhibitor attenuated malonate-induced GABA and BDNF deficiencies and the reduction in Nissl staining, as well as the increase in GFAP immunostaining. In contrast, JZL184 exacerbated malonate-induced striatal damage. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was induced in the striatum 24 h after the lesion simultaneously with other pro-inflammatory responses. The COX-2-derived 2-AG metabolite, prostaglandin E2 glyceryl ester (PGE2-G), exacerbated neurotoxicity, and this effect was antagonized by the blockade of PGE2-G action with AGN220675. In M-213 cells exposed to malonate, in which COX-2 was also upregulated, JZL184 worsened neurotoxicity, and this effect was attenuated by the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib or AGN220675. OMDM169 also worsened neurotoxicity and produced measurable levels of PGE2-G. In conclusion, the inhibition of 2-AG biosynthesis is neuroprotective in rats lesioned with malonate, possibly through the counteraction of the formation of pro-neuroinflammatory PGE2-G, formed from COX-2

  12. Key role for constitutive cyclooxygenase-2 of MDCK cells in basal signaling and response to released ATP.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Gabot, K; Rana, B K; Insel, P A

    2001-08-01

    Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells release ATP upon mechanical or biochemical activation, initiating P2Y receptor signaling that regulates basal levels of multiple second messengers, including cAMP (J Biol Chem 275: 11735--11739, 2000). Data shown here document inhibition of cAMP formation by Gd(3+) and niflumic acid, channel inhibitors that block ATP release. cAMP production is stimulated via Ca(2+)-dependent activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2), release of arachidonic acid (AA), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent production of prostaglandins, which activate prostanoid receptors coupled to G(s) and adenylyl cyclase. In the current investigation, we assessed the expression and functional role of the two known isoforms of COX, COX-1 and COX-2. Treatment of cells with either a COX-1-selective inhibitor, SC-560, or COX-2-selective inhibitors, SC-58125 or NS-398, inhibited basal and UTP-stimulated cAMP levels. COX inhibitors also decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation, implying this response is in part attributable to an action of AA metabolites. These findings imply an important role for the inducible form of COX, COX-2, under basal conditions. Indeed, COX-2 expression was readily detectable by immunoblot, and treatments that induce or reduce COX-2 expression in other cells (interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, phorbol ester, or dexamethasone) had minimal or no effect on the levels of COX-2 immunoreactivity. RT-PCR using isoform-specific primers detected COX-2 mRNA. We conclude that COX-2 is constitutively expressed in MDCK-D(1) cells and participates in basal and P2Y(2)-mediated signaling, implying a key role for COX-2 in regulation of epithelial cell function. PMID:11443051

  13. Oxidative Stress-Dependent Cyclooxygenase-2-Derived Prostaglandin F2α Impairs Endothelial Function in Renovascular Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Leung, Fung Ping; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lee, Hung Kay; Ng, Chi Fai; Chen, Zhen Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Au, Chak Leung; Lau, Chi Wai; Vanhoutte, Paul M.; Cooke, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The role of endothelium-derived contracting factors (EDCFs) in regulating renovascular function is yet to be elucidated in renovascular hypertension (RH). The current study investigated whether oxidative stress-dependent cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-derived prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) impairs endothelial function in renal arteries of renovascular hypertensive rats (RHR). Results: Renal hypertension was induced in rats by renal artery stenosis of both kidneys using the 2-kidney 2-clip model. Acute treatment with reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers, COX-2 inhibitors, and thromboxane-prostanoid receptor antagonists, but not COX-1 inhibitors, improved endothelium-dependent relaxations and eliminated endothelium-dependent contractions in RHR renal arteries. Five weeks of treatment with celecoxib or tempol reduced blood pressure, increased renal blood flow, and restored endothelial function in RHRs. Increased ROS production in RHR arteries was inhibited by ROS scavengers, but unaffected by COX-2 inhibitors; whereas increased PGF2α release was reduced by both ROS scavengers and COX-2 inhibitors. ROS also induced COX-2-dependent contraction in RHR renal arteries, which was accompanied by the release of COX-2-derived PGF2α. Further, chronic tempol treatment reduced COX-2 and BMP4 upregulation, p38MAPK phosphorylation, and the nitrotyrosine level in RHR renal arteries. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate the functional importance of oxidative stress, which serves as an initiator of increased COX-2 activity, and that COX-2-derived PGF2α plays an important role in mediating endothelial dysfunction in RH. Innovation: The current study, thus, suggests that drugs targeting oxidative stress-dependent COX-2-derived PGF2α may be useful in the prevention and management of RH. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 363–373. PMID:21951274

  14. Key role for constitutive cyclooxygenase-2 of MDCK cells in basal signaling and response to released ATP.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Gabot, K; Rana, B K; Insel, P A

    2001-08-01

    Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells release ATP upon mechanical or biochemical activation, initiating P2Y receptor signaling that regulates basal levels of multiple second messengers, including cAMP (J Biol Chem 275: 11735--11739, 2000). Data shown here document inhibition of cAMP formation by Gd(3+) and niflumic acid, channel inhibitors that block ATP release. cAMP production is stimulated via Ca(2+)-dependent activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2), release of arachidonic acid (AA), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent production of prostaglandins, which activate prostanoid receptors coupled to G(s) and adenylyl cyclase. In the current investigation, we assessed the expression and functional role of the two known isoforms of COX, COX-1 and COX-2. Treatment of cells with either a COX-1-selective inhibitor, SC-560, or COX-2-selective inhibitors, SC-58125 or NS-398, inhibited basal and UTP-stimulated cAMP levels. COX inhibitors also decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation, implying this response is in part attributable to an action of AA metabolites. These findings imply an important role for the inducible form of COX, COX-2, under basal conditions. Indeed, COX-2 expression was readily detectable by immunoblot, and treatments that induce or reduce COX-2 expression in other cells (interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, phorbol ester, or dexamethasone) had minimal or no effect on the levels of COX-2 immunoreactivity. RT-PCR using isoform-specific primers detected COX-2 mRNA. We conclude that COX-2 is constitutively expressed in MDCK-D(1) cells and participates in basal and P2Y(2)-mediated signaling, implying a key role for COX-2 in regulation of epithelial cell function.

  15. Urethane dimethacrylate induces cytotoxicity and regulates cyclooxygenase-2, hemeoxygenase and carboxylesterase expression in human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiao-Hua; Chang, Mei-Chi; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Huang, Guay-Fen; Lee, Yuan-Ling; Wang, Yin-Lin; Chan, Chiu-Po; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Tseng, Shuei-Kuen; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2014-02-01

    The toxic effect of urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), a major dental resin monomer, on human dental pulp is not fully clear. In this study, we investigated the influence of UDMA on the cytotoxicity, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and related gene expression of dental pulp cells. The role of reactive oxygen species, hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and carboxylesterase (CES) in UDMA cytotoxicity, was evaluated. UDMA induced morphological changes of pulp cells and decreased cell viability by 29-49% at concentrations of 0.1-0.35 mM. UDMA induced G0/G1, G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The expression of cdc2, cyclinB1 and cdc25C was inhibited by UDMA. Moreover, UDMA stimulated COX-2, HO-1 and CES2 mRNA expression of pulp cells. The cytotoxicity of UDMA was attenuated by N-acetyl-l-cysteine, catalase and esterase, but was enhanced by Zn-protoporphyrin (HO-1 inhibitor), BNPP (CES inhibitor) and loperamide (CES2 inhibitor). Exposure of UDMA may potentially induce the inflammation and toxicity of dental pulp. These findings are important for understanding the clinical response of human pulp to resin monomers after operative restoration and pulp capping, and also provide clues for improvement of dental materials. PMID:24140606

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 induced β1-integrin expression in NSCLC and promoted cell invasion via the EP1/MAPK/E2F-1/FoxC2 signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jinshun; Yang, Qinyi; Shao, Jiaofang; Zhang, Li; Ma, Juan; Wang, Yipin; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Leng, Jing; Bai, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been implicated in cell invasion in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the mechanism is unclear. The present study investigated the effect of COX-2 on β1-integrin expression and cell invasion in NSCLC. COX-2 and β1-integrin were co-expressed in NSCLC tissues. COX-2 overexpression or Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) treatment increased β1-integrin expression in NSCLC cell lines. β1-integrin silencing suppressed COX-2-mediated tumour growth and cancer cell invasion in vivo and in vitro. Prostaglandin E Receptor EP1 transfection or treatment with EP1 agonist mimicked the effect of PGE2 treatment. EP1 siRNA blocked PGE2-mediated β1-integrin expression. EP1 agonist treatment promoted Erk1/2, p38 phosphorylation and E2F-1 expression. MEK1/2 and p38 inhibitors suppressed EP1-mediated β1-integrin expression. E2F-1 silencing suppressed EP1-mediated FoxC2 and β1-integrin upregulation. ChIP and Luciferase Reporter assays identified that EP1 agonist treatment induced E2F-1 binding to FoxC2 promotor directly and improved FoxC2 transcription. FoxC2 siRNA suppressed β1-integrin expression and EP1-mediated cell invasion. Immunohistochemistry showed E2F-1, FoxC2, and EP1R were all highly expressed in the NSCLC cases. This study suggested that COX-2 upregulates β1-integrin expression and cell invasion in NSCLC by activating the MAPK/E2F-1 signalling pathway. Targeting the COX-2/EP1/PKC/MAPK/E2F-1/FoxC2/β1-integrin pathway might represent a new therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of this cancer. PMID:27654511

  17. Safrole oxide induces human umbilical vein endothelial cell transdifferentiation to 5-hydroxytryptaminergic neuron-like cells through tropomyosin receptor kinase A/cyclooxygenase 2/nuclear factor-kappa B/interleukin 8 signaling.

    PubMed

    Su, Le; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Bao Xiang; Zhang, Shang Li; Miao, Jun Ying

    2011-10-01

    The phenomenon of endothelial-neural transdifferentiation has been observed for a long time, but the mechanism is not clear. We previously found that safrole oxide induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell transdifferentiation into neuron-like cells. In this study, we first validated that these cells induced by safrole oxide were functional 5-hydroxytryptaminergic neuron-like cells. Then, we performed microarray analysis of safrole oxide-treated and -untreated human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Safrole oxide elevated the levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was accompanied by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation during the transdifferentiation. Blockade of tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) by an inhibitor or short hairpin RNA inhibited the levels of COX-2/IL-8 and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB but did not suppress the increased ROS level. As a result, cells underwent apoptosis. Therefore, via TrkA, safrole oxide may induce endothelial cell transdifferentiation into functional neuron-like cells. During this process, the increased levels of COX-2/IL-8 and the subsequent elevation of ROS production induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and IL-8 secretion. With the activity of TrkA inhibited, the inactive NF-κB regulated the ROS level in a negative feedback manner. Finally, the transdifferentiation pathway was blocked and cells became apoptotic. The TrkA/COX-2/IL-8 signal pathway may have an important role in endothelial-neural transdifferentiation, and safrole oxide may trigger this process by activating TrkA.

  18. DNA Sequence Variants in the Five Prime Untranslated Region of the Cyclooxygenase-2 Gene Are Commonly Found in Healthy Dogs and Gray Wolves.

    PubMed

    Safra, Noa; Hayward, Louisa J; Aguilar, Miriam; Sacks, Benjamin N; Westropp, Jodi L; Mohr, F Charles; Mellersh, Cathryn S; Bannasch, Danika L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of regional DNA variants upstream to the translation initiation site of the canine Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) gene in healthy dogs. Cox-2 plays a role in various disease conditions such as acute and chronic inflammation, osteoarthritis and malignancy. A role for Cox-2 DNA variants in genetic predisposition to canine renal dysplasia has been proposed and dog breeders have been encouraged to select against these DNA variants. We sequenced 272-422 bases in 152 dogs unaffected by renal dysplasia and found 19 different haplotypes including 11 genetic variants which had not been described previously. We genotyped 7 gray wolves to ascertain the wildtype variant and found that the wolves we analyzed had predominantly the second most common DNA variant found in dogs. Our results demonstrate an elevated level of regional polymorphism that appears to be a feature of healthy domesticated dogs.

  19. c-Jun N-terminal kinase negatively regulates epidermal growth factor-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Husvik, Camilla; Bryne, Magne; Halstensen, Trond S

    2009-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in squamous cell carcinomas is mediated through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 pathways. Examination of a basaloid and a conventional oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line revealed that inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) with SP600125 increased EGF-induced (but not basal) COX-2 transcription 1.5-1.9-fold in extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 pathway-dependent manners. Although JNK may phosphorylate the cyclosporine A-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells c3, it was seemingly not involved because cyclosporine A did not reduce EGF-induced COX-2 expression. Thus, JNK negatively regulated EGF-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and/or p38-mediated COX-2 transcription, presumably through activating an unidentified phosphatase. PMID:20121928

  20. Bisphenol A-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition is mediated by cyclooxygenase-2 up-regulation in human endometrial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Hung; Kao, An-Pei; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Lin, Ta-Chin; Kuo, Tsung-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have highlighted the correlation between the increase of bisphenol A (BPA) level in the environment and the incidence of tumor in humans. In human carcinogenesis, the overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are closely related with tumor development. In this study, human endometrial carcinoma cells line (RL95-2) was used to investigate whether BPA can induce EMT and COX-2 expression. The results show that BPA increased growth rate and colony-forming efficiency in a dose-dependent manner, induced EMT and COX-2 gene expression and promoted the migration and invasion ability of RL95-2 cells. Furthermore, our study showed that the expression of COX-2 was essential for BPA-induced cell migration and invasion. The results of this study provide new insights into the mechanism of endometrial cancer cell growth and invasion and potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:26546977

  1. Meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid isolated from Saururus chinensis inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 and 5-lipoxygenase in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Tae Chul; Seo, Chang Seob; Haa, Kyungmi; Kim, Jin Cheul; Hwang, Nam Kyung; Hong, Tae Gyun; Kim, Jee Hyeun; Kim, Do Hun; Son, Jong Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2008-05-01

    Meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (MDGA) is a medicinal herbal product isolated from the aerial parts of Saururus chinensis that inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent phase of prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) generation in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) (IC(50) 9.8 microM). However, this compound did not inhibit COX-2 protein expression in BMMC at concentrations up to 30 microM, indicating that MDGA directly inhibits COX-2 activity. In addition, this compound consistently inhibited the production of leukotriene C(4) (IC(50) 1.3 microM). These results demonstrate that MDGA inhibits both COX-2 and 5-lipoxygenase. Furthermore, this compound strongly inhibited the degranulation reaction in BMMC (IC(50) 11.4 microM). Therefore, this compound might provide a basis for novel anti-inflammatory drug development.

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is related to nuclear grade in ductal carcinoma in situ and is increased in its normal adjacent epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shim, Veronica; Gauthier, Mona L.; Sudilovsky, Daniel; Mantei, Kristin; Chew, Karen L.; Moore, Dan H.; Cha, Imok; Tlsty, Thea D.; Esserman, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is emerging as an important cancer biomarker and is now an experimental target for solid tumor treatment.However, no study has exclusively focused on COX-2 expression in early lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We examined COX-2 expression by immunohistochemistry in 46 cases of women undergoing surgical resection for DCIS. We found that COX-2 expression was detected in 85% of all DCIS specimens, with increased COX-2 staining correlating with higher nuclear grade. Strikingly, COX-2 staining intensity in the normal adjacent epithelium was stronger than in the DCIS lesion itself. Our observations demonstrate that COX-2 is up-regulated in the normal adjacent epithelium and supports the hypothesis that the surrounding epithelial tissue is part of the disease process in DCIS.

  3. DNA Sequence Variants in the Five Prime Untranslated Region of the Cyclooxygenase-2 Gene Are Commonly Found in Healthy Dogs and Gray Wolves

    PubMed Central

    Safra, Noa; Hayward, Louisa J.; Aguilar, Miriam; Sacks, Benjamin N.; Westropp, Jodi L.; Mohr, F. Charles; Mellersh, Cathryn S.; Bannasch, Danika L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of regional DNA variants upstream to the translation initiation site of the canine Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) gene in healthy dogs. Cox-2 plays a role in various disease conditions such as acute and chronic inflammation, osteoarthritis and malignancy. A role for Cox-2 DNA variants in genetic predisposition to canine renal dysplasia has been proposed and dog breeders have been encouraged to select against these DNA variants. We sequenced 272–422 bases in 152 dogs unaffected by renal dysplasia and found 19 different haplotypes including 11 genetic variants which had not been described previously. We genotyped 7 gray wolves to ascertain the wildtype variant and found that the wolves we analyzed had predominantly the second most common DNA variant found in dogs. Our results demonstrate an elevated level of regional polymorphism that appears to be a feature of healthy domesticated dogs. PMID:26244515

  4. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the oral mucosa following cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Logan, Richard M; Gibson, Rachel J; Sonis, Stephen T; Keefe, Dorothy M K

    2007-04-01

    Oral mucositis is a serious and debilitating side effect of cancer treatment. Greater understanding of the pathobiology of mucositis has recently led to the advent of targeted treatments for specific patient populations; however the treatment for mucositis remains palliative for most patients. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) are thought to play important roles in the development of mucositis. In this study, 20 patients undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy had oral mucosal biopsies taken prior to and following administration of cytotoxic chemotherapy. The samples were stained for NF-kappaB and COX-2 using routine immunohistochemistry. The results from this preliminary study demonstrated statistically significant increased oral mucosal staining for NF-kappaB and COX-2 following cytotoxic chemotherapy and provide further support for the role of NF-kappaB and COX-2 in the pathogenesis of mucositis. PMID:16979925

  5. Spontaneous adenocarcinoma immunoreactive to cyclooxygenase-2 and transforming growth factor-beta1 in the buccal salivary gland of a Richardson's ground squirrel (Spermophilus richardsonii).

    PubMed

    Yamate, Jyoji; Yamamoto, Emi; Nabe, Mikoto; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Fujita, Daisuke; Sasai, Hiroshi

    2007-10-01

    The ground squirrel is used as an experimental animal because of its unique biological nature. A 3-year-old female Richardson's ground squirrel developed a mass, 1.5 cm in diameter, in the buccal mucosa. The mass consisted of neoplastic epithelial cells showing acinar, ductular, intraductal papillary, solid, and lobular growth patterns; the cells were immunoreactive to cytokeratin, cyclooxygenase-2 (a marker of malignancy) and TGF-beta1. After resection, the tumor recurred with increased area having a solid or lobular pattern with little differentiation. This tumor was diagnosed as an adenocarcinoma arising from the buccal gland, the first case reported in the ground squirrel. A prominent desmoplastic reaction was present. The interstitial cells reacted to alpha-smooth muscle actin and vimentin, indicating a myofibroblastic nature, presumably induced by epithelial TGF-beta1.

  6. Conservative Secondary Shell Substitution In Cyclooxygenase-2 Reduces Inhibition by Indomethacin Amides and Esters via Altered Enzyme Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Konkle, Mary E; Blobaum, Anna L; Moth, Christopher W; Prusakiewicz, Jeffery J; Xu, Shu; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Akingbade, Dapo; Jacobs, Aaron T; Rouzer, Carol A; Lybrand, Terry P; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2016-01-19

    The cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) are the therapeutic targets of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Neutralization of the carboxylic acid moiety of the NSAID indomethacin to an ester or amide functionality confers COX-2 selectivity, but the molecular basis for this selectivity has not been completely revealed through mutagenesis studies and/or X-ray crystallographic attempts. We expressed and assayed a number of divergent secondary shell COX-2 active site mutants and found that a COX-2 to COX-1 change at position 472 (Leu in COX-2, Met in COX-1) reduced the potency of enzyme inhibition by a series of COX-2-selective indomethacin amides and esters. In contrast, the potencies of indomethacin, arylacetic acid, propionic acid, and COX-2-selective diarylheterocycle inhibitors were either unaffected or only mildly affected by this mutation. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed identical equilibrium enzyme structures around residue 472; however, calculations indicated that the L472M mutation impacted local low-frequency dynamical COX constriction site motions by stabilizing the active site entrance and slowing constriction site dynamics. Kinetic analysis of inhibitor binding is consistent with the computational findings. PMID:26704937

  7. Trefoil peptides as proangiogenic factors in vivo and in vitro: implication of cyclooxygenase-2 and EGF receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Sylvie; Van Aken, Elisabeth; Van Bocxlaer, Saskia; Attoub, Samir; Nguyen, Quang-Dé; Bruyneel, Erik; Westley, Bruce R; May, Felicity E B; Thim, Lars; Mareel, Marc; Gespach, Christian; Emami, Shahin

    2003-01-01

    We previously established that the trefoil peptides (TFFs) pS2, spasmolytic polypeptide, and intestinal trefoil factor are involved in cellular scattering and invasion in kidney and colonic cancer cells. Using the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and the formation of tube-like structures by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) plated on the Matrigel matrix substratum, we report here that TFFs are proangiogenic factors. Angiogenic activity of TFFs is comparable to that induced by vascular endothelial growth factor, leptin, and transforming growth factor-alpha. Stimulation of angiogenesis by pS2 in the CAM assay is blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of cyclooxygenase COX-2 (NS-398) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) tyrosine kinase (ZD1839), but is independent of KDR/Flk-1 and thromboxane A2 receptors. In contrast, the morphogenic switch induced by pS2 in HUVEC cells could be inhibited by the specific KDR heptapeptide antagonist ATWLPPR and by inhibitors of COX-2 and EGF-R signaling. These results implicate TFFs in the formation of new blood vessels during normal and pathophysiological processes linked to wound healing, inflammation, and cancer progression in the digestive mucosa and other human solid tumors associated with aberrant expression of TFFs.

  8. Dehydrodiisoeugenol, an isoeugenol dimer, inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nuclear factor kappa B activation and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yukio; Shoji, Masao; Hirata, Atsushi; Tanaka, Shoji; Yokoe, Ichiro; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2005-02-15

    o-Methoxyphenols such as eugenol and isoeugenol exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, but at higher concentrations act as oxidants and potent allergens. We recently demonstrated the eugenol dimer bis-eugenol to be an efficient inhibitor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages without cytotoxicity. This result suggested that dimer compound of o-methoxyphenols may possess anti-inflammatory activity. Thus, we further synthesized dehydrodiisoeugenol and alpha-diisoeugenol from isoeugenols, and investigated whether these dimers could inhibit LPS-stimulated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 gene expression, both of which are closely involved in inflammation and mutagenesis. The expression of the COX-2 gene was strongly inhibited by dehydrodiisoeugenol in RAW264.7 murine macrophages stimulated with LPS. In contrast, isoeugenol and alpha-diisoeugenol did not inhibit it. Dehydrodiisoeugenol also significantly inhibited LPS-stimulated phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis of inhibitor kappaB-alpha and transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB in the cells. These findings suggest that dehydrodiisoeugenol acts as a potent anti-inflammatory agent.

  9. On Non-Selective Harvesting of a Multispecies Fishery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kar, Tapan Kuman; Chaudhuri, K. S.

    2002-01-01

    The present paper deals with the problem of non-selective harvesting of a prey-predator system in which both the prey and the predator species obey the law of logistic growth and each predators functional response to the prey approaches a constant as the prey population increases. Boundedness of the exploited system is examined. The existence of…

  10. Non-Selective Lexical Access in Different-Script Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Jihye; Jiang, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Lexical access in bilinguals is known to be largely non-selective. However, most studies in this area have involved bilinguals whose two languages share the same script. This study aimed to examine bilingual lexical access among bilinguals whose two languages have distinct scripts. Korean-English bilinguals were tested in a phoneme monitoring task…

  11. Angiotensin II activates the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway and induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression in rat endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Florencia; Sacerdoti, Flavia; De León, Romina; Gentile, Teresa; Canellada, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, the inducible isoform of cyclooxygenase, plays a role in the process of uterine decidualization and blastocyst attachment. On the other hand, overexpression of COX-2 is involved in the proliferation of the endometrial tissue during endometriosis. Deregulation of the renin-angiotensin-system plays a role in the pathophysiology of endometriosis and pre-eclampsia. Angiotensin II increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration by targeting phospholypase C-gamma in endometrial stromal cells (ESC). A key element of the cellular response to Ca(2+) signals is the activity of the Ca(2+)- and calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. Our first aim was to study whether angiotensin II stimulated Cox-2 gene expression in rat ESC and to analyze whether calcineurin activity was involved. In cells isolated from non-pregnant uteri, COX-2 expression--both mRNA and protein--was induced by co-stimulation with phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (PIo), as well as by angiotensin II. Pretreatment with the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A inhibited this induction. We further analyzed the role of the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway in the induction of Cox-2 gene expression in non-pregnant rat ESC. Cyclosporin A abolished NFATc1 dephosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus. Cyclosporin A also inhibited the transcriptional activity driven by the Cox-2 promoter. Exogenous expression of the peptide VIVIT -specific inhibitor of calcineurin/NFAT binding- blocked the activation of Cox-2 promoter and the up-regulation of COX-2 protein in these cells. Finally we analyzed Cox-2 gene expression in ESC of early-pregnant rats. COX-2 expression--both mRNA and protein--was induced by stimulation with PIo as well as by angiotensin II. This induction appears to be calcineurin independent, since it was not abrogated by cyclosporin A. In conclusion, angiotensin II induced Cox-2 gene expression by activating the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway in endometrial stromal

  12. Angiotensin II Activates the Calcineurin/NFAT Signaling Pathway and Induces Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Rat Endometrial Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Florencia; Sacerdoti, Flavia; De León, Romina; Gentile, Teresa; Canellada, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, the inducible isoform of cyclooxygenase, plays a role in the process of uterine decidualization and blastocyst attachment. On the other hand, overexpression of COX-2 is involved in the proliferation of the endometrial tissue during endometriosis. Deregulation of the renin-angiotensin-system plays a role in the pathophysiology of endometriosis and pre-eclampsia. Angiotensin II increases intracellular Ca2+ concentration by targeting phospholypase C-gamma in endometrial stromal cells (ESC). A key element of the cellular response to Ca2+ signals is the activity of the Ca2+- and calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. Our first aim was to study whether angiotensin II stimulated Cox-2 gene expression in rat ESC and to analyze whether calcineurin activity was involved. In cells isolated from non-pregnant uteri, COX-2 expression -both mRNA and protein- was induced by co-stimulation with phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (PIo), as well as by angiotensin II. Pretreatment with the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A inhibited this induction. We further analyzed the role of the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway in the induction of Cox-2 gene expression in non-pregnant rat ESC. Cyclosporin A abolished NFATc1 dephosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus. Cyclosporin A also inhibited the transcriptional activity driven by the Cox-2 promoter. Exogenous expression of the peptide VIVIT -specific inhibitor of calcineurin/NFAT binding- blocked the activation of Cox-2 promoter and the up-regulation of COX-2 protein in these cells. Finally we analyzed Cox-2 gene expression in ESC of early-pregnant rats. COX-2 expression -both mRNA and protein- was induced by stimulation with PIo as well as by angiotensin II. This induction appears to be calcineurin independent, since it was not abrogated by cyclosporin A. In conclusion, angiotensin II induced Cox-2 gene expression by activating the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway in endometrial stromal cells of

  13. Involvement of reactive oxygen intermediates in cyclooxygenase-2 expression induced by interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Feng, L; Xia, Y; Garcia, G E; Hwang, D; Wilson, C B

    1995-01-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) play an important role in inflammatory processes as mediators of injury and potentially in signal transduction leading to gene expression. Cyclooxygenase (COX) is a rate-limiting enzyme in prostanoid biosynthesis, and its recently cloned inducible form, COX-2, is induced by proinflammatory cytokines. This study linked ROIs to the signaling pathways that induce COX-2 expression. The hydroxyl radical scavengers DMSO (1%), as well as di- and tetramethylthiourea, inhibited IL-1-, TNF alpha-, and LPS-induced COX-2 expression in rat mesangial cells. The suppression of COX-2 mRNA expression correlated with the COX-2 protein level. In comparison with the prolonged induction of the inducible gene encoding protein-tyrosine phosphatase by hydrogen peroxide, the COX-2 gene was only transiently induced. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase is also induced by heat shock and chemical stress, whereas COX-2 is not. Superoxide was a more potent inducer for COX-2 than hydrogen peroxide. In addition, NADPH stimulated COX-2 expression, and an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase blocked COX-2 expression induced by TNF alpha. COX-2 and KC gene expression costimulated by IL-1 were inhibited differentially by the scavengers. These studies demonstrate that oxidant stress is a specific and important inducer of COX-2 gene expression. This induction may contribute to the deleterious amplification of prostanoids in inflammation and compound the direct effects of ROI production. Images PMID:7706475

  14. Anti-inflammatory mode of isoflavone glycoside sophoricoside by inhibition of interleukin-6 and cyclooxygenase-2 in inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hak; Chung, Eun Yong; Ryu, Jae-Chun; Jung, Sang-Hun; Min, Kyung Rak; Kim, Youngsoo

    2003-04-01

    Soy, high dietary intake for the oriental population, is a main source of isoflavonoids. Sophoricoside (SOP) an isoflavone glycoside was isolated from immature fruits of Sophora japonica (Leguminosae family) and its inhibitory effect on chemical mediators involved in inflammatory response was investigated in this study. SOP inhibited the interleukin (IL)-6 bioactivity with an IC50 value of 6.1 microM whereas it had no effects on IL-1beta and TNF-alpha bioactivities. SOP was identified as a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 activity with an IC50 value of 4.4 microM, but did not show inhibitory effect on the synthesis of COX-2. However, SOP had no effect on the production of reactive oxygen species including superoxide anions and nitric oxide. These results revealed that in vitro anti-inflammatory action of SOP is significantly different from that of genistein known as a phytoestrogen of soy products. This experimental study has documented an importance of dietary soy isoflavonoids as multifunctional agents beneficial to human health, and will help to clarify protective mechanisms of SOP against inflammatory conditions. PMID:12735689

  15. Critical role of cyclooxygenase-2 activation in pathogenesis of hydronephrosis caused by lactational exposure of mice to dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Noriko Matsumura, Fumio; Vogel, Christopher F.A.; Nishimura, Hisao; Yonemoto, Junzo; Yoshioka, Wataru; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2008-09-15

    Congenital hydronephrosis is a serious disease occurring among infants and children. Besides the intrinsic genetic factors, in utero exposure to a xenobiotic, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), has been suggested to induce hydronephrosis in rodents owing to anatomical obstruction in the ureter. Here, we report that hydronephrosis induced in mouse pups exposed lactationally to TCDD is not associated with anatomical obstruction, but with abnormal alterations in the subepithelial mesenchyma of the ureter. In the kidneys of these pups, the expressions of a battery of inflammatory cytokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF{alpha}) and interleukin (IL) -1{beta} were up-regulated as early as postnatal day (PND) 7. The amounts of cyclooxygenase (COX) -2 mRNA and protein as well as prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) were conspicuously up-regulated in an arylhydrocarbon-receptor-dependent manner in the TCDD-induced hydronephrotic kidney, with a subsequent down-regulation of the gene expressions of Na{sup +} and K{sup +} transporters, NKCC2 and ROMK. Daily administration of a COX-2 selective inhibitor to newborns until PND 7 completely abrogated the TCDD-induced PGE{sub 2} synthesis and gene expressions of inflammatory cytokines and electrolyte transporters, and eventually prevented the onset of hydronephrosis. These findings suggest an essential role of COX-2 in mediating the TCDD action of inducing hydronephrosis through the functional impairment rather than the anatomical blockade of the ureter.

  16. Activated hepatic stellate cells promote liver cancer by induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells through cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianfeng; Li, Jie; Hong, Zaifa; Yin, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical mediators of immunosuppression and the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our previous work indicates that HSCs promote HCC progression by enhancing immunosuppressive cell populations including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs). MDSCs are induced by inflammatory cytokines (e.g., prostaglandins) and are important in immune suppression. However, how HSCs mediate expansion of MDSCs is uncertain. Thus, we studied activated HSCs that could induce MDSCs from bone marrow cells and noted that HSC-induced MDSCs up-regulated immunosuppressive activity via iNOS, Arg-1, and IL-4Rα. After treating cells with a COX-2 inhibitor or an EP4 antagonist, we established that HSC-induced MDSC accumulation was mediated by the COX2-PGE2-EP4 signaling. Furthermore, in vivo animal studies confirmed that inhibition of HSC-derived PGE2 could inhibit HSC-induced MDSC accumulation and HCC growth. Thus, our data show that HSCs are required for MDSC accumulation mediated by the COX2-PGE2-EP4 pathway, and these data are the first to link HSC and MDSC subsets in HCC immune microenvironment and provide a rationale for targeting PGE2 signaling for HCC therapy. PMID:26758420

  17. Cyclooxygenase-2 Generates the Endogenous Mutagen trans-4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal in Enterococcus faecalis-infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingmin; Allen, Toby D.; Yang, Yonghong; Moore, Danny R.; Huycke, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of macrophages by the human intestinal commensal Enterococcus faecalis generates DNA damage and chromosomal instability in mammalian cells through bystander effects. These effects are characterized by clastogenesis and damage to mitotic spindles in target cells and are mediated, in part, by trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE). In this study we investigated the role of cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in producing this reactive aldehyde using E. faecalis-infected macrophages and interleukin-10 knockout mice colonized with this commensal. 4-HNE production by E. faecalis-infected macrophages was significantly reduced by COX and LOX inhibitors. The infection of macrophages led to decreased Cox1 and Alox5 expression while COX-2 and 4-HNE increased. Silencing Alox5 and Cox1 with gene-specific siRNAs had no effect on 4-HNE production. In contrast, silencing Cox2 significantly decreased 4-HNE production by E. faecalis-infected macrophages. Depleting intracellular glutathione increased 4-HNE production by these cells. Next, to confirm COX-2 as a source for 4-HNE, we assayed the products generated by recombinant human COX-2 and found 4-HNE in a concentration-dependent manner using arachidonic acid as a substrate. Finally, tissue macrophages in colon biopsies from interleukin-10 knockout mice colonized with E. faecalis were positive for COX-2 by immunohistochemical staining. This was associated with increased staining for 4-HNE-protein adducts in surrounding stroma. These data show that E. faecalis, a human intestinal commensal, can trigger macrophages to produce 4-HNE through COX-2. Importantly, it reinforces the concept of COX-2 as a procarcinogenic enzyme capable of damaging DNA in target cells through bystander effects that contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:23321929

  18. Crystal Structure of Aspirin-Acetylated Human Cyclooxygenase-2: Insight into the Formation of Products with Reversed Stereochemistry.

    PubMed

    Lucido, Michael J; Orlando, Benjamin J; Vecchio, Alex J; Malkowski, Michael G

    2016-03-01

    Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs target the cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) to block the formation of prostaglandins. Aspirin is unique in that it covalently modifies each enzyme by acetylating Ser-530 within the cyclooxygenase active site. Acetylation of COX-1 leads to complete loss of activity, while acetylation of COX-2 results in the generation of the monooxygenated product 15(R)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15R-HETE). Ser-530 has also been shown to influence the stereochemistry for the addition of oxygen to the prostaglandin product. We determined the crystal structures of S530T murine (mu) COX-2, aspirin-acetylated human (hu) COX-2, and huCOX-2 in complex with salicylate to 1.9, 2.0, and 2.4 Å, respectively. The structures reveal that (1) the acetylated Ser-530 completely blocks access to the hydrophobic groove, (2) the observed binding pose of salicylate is reflective of the enzyme-inhibitor complex prior to acetylation, and (3) the observed Thr-530 rotamer in the S530T muCOX-2 crystal structure does not impede access to the hydrophobic groove. On the basis of these structural observations, along with functional analysis of the S530T/G533V double mutant, we propose a working hypothesis for the generation of 15R-HETE by aspirin-acetylated COX-2. We also observe differential acetylation of COX-2 purified in various detergent systems and nanodiscs, indicating that detergent and lipid binding within the membrane-binding domain of the enzyme alters the rate of the acetylation reaction in vitro.

  19. Memory B cells from older people express normal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and produce higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10 upon in vitro activation

    PubMed Central

    Bancos, Simona; Phipps, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide the elderly population is increasing. The elderly show deficiencies in immune function. B lymphocytes are essential elements of the immune system responsible for antibody production. This laboratory previously showed that activated human B cells isolated from young adults express cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) and that Cox-2 is essential for optimal antibody responses. Recent data suggests that Cox-2 expression decreases with age in mouse bone tissue. There is no information regarding Cox-2 expression in B cells from older human subjects. We investigated the expression and activity of Cox-2 in naïve and memory B cells from older people. We show that B cells from older subjects show similar Cox-2 protein expression and activity, antibody production and proliferation compared to younger people. However, we found that activated memory B cells from older people produce higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10 compared to young adults. Therefore, the dysregulated cytokine production could contribute to immune senescence in the elderly. PMID:20889146

  20. Memory B cells from older people express normal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and produce higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10 upon in vitro activation.

    PubMed

    Bancos, Simona; Phipps, Richard P

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide the elderly population is increasing. The elderly show deficiencies in immune function. B lymphocytes are essential elements of the immune system responsible for antibody production. This laboratory previously showed that activated human B cells isolated from young adults express cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) and that Cox-2 is essential for optimal antibody responses. Recent data suggests that Cox-2 expression decreases with age in mouse bone tissue. There is no information regarding Cox-2 expression in B cells from older human subjects. We investigated the expression and activity of Cox-2 in naïve and memory B cells from older people. We show that B cells from older subjects show similar Cox-2 protein expression and activity, antibody production and proliferation compared to younger people. However, we found that activated memory B cells from older people produce higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10 compared to young adults. Therefore, the dysregulated cytokine production could contribute to immune senescence in the elderly.

  1. Harmine combined with paclitaxel inhibits tumor proliferation and induces apoptosis through down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Kun; Tang, Xiao-He; Zhou, Cun-Jin; Sun, Hui; Yan, Zhe; Fang, Ling; Wu, Hong-Wen; Xie, Yi-Kui; Gu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) serves an important role in the carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer. Harmine (HM) and paclitaxel (PTX) are reported as promising drug candidates for cancer therapy, but whether a synergistic anti-tumor effect of HM combined with PTX exists in human gastric cancer remains unknown. The present study evaluated the effects of HM and/or PTX on cell proliferation and apoptosis in a gastric cancer cell line, SGC-7901. HM and PTX inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Both HM and PTX alone induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. The combination of HM and PTX exerted synergistic effects on proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction in SGC-7901 cells, with down-regulation of COX-2, PCNA and Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax expression. The results indicated that combination chemotherapy using HM with PTX exerts an anti-tumor effect for treating gastric cancer. The combination of the two drugs inhibits gastric cancer development more effectively than each drug alone through down-regulation of COX-2 expression. PMID:27446381

  2. Delivery of ursolic acid (UA) in polymeric nanoparticles effectively promotes the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells through enhanced inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Xiaolin; Ding, Jing; Xu, Huae; Dai, Xinzheng; Hou, Zhibo; Zhang, Kai; Sun, Kun; Sun, Weihao

    2013-01-30

    It has been demonstrated that ursolic acid (UA) could effectively induces apoptosis of cancer cells by inhibiting the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), which constitutively expresses in gastric cancer. However, the hydrophobicity of UA increases the difficulty in its potential clinical application, which raises the possibility for its application as a novel model drug in nanoparticle-based delivery system. UA-loaded nanoparticles (UA-NPs) were prepared by a nano-precipitation method using amphilic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-polycaprolactone (mPEG-PCL) block copolymers as drug carriers. UA was effectively transported into SGC7901 cells by nanoparticles and localized around the nuclei in the cytoplasms. The in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis test indicated that UA-NPs significantly elicited more cell death at almost equivalent dose and corresponding incubation time. Moreover, UA-NPs led to more cell apoptosis through stronger inhibition of COX-2 and activation of caspase 3. The most powerful evidence from this report is that the significant differences between the cytotoxicity of free UA and UA-NPs are closely related to the expression levels of COX-2 and caspase-3, which demonstrates the superiority of UA-NPs over free UA through penetrating cell membrane. Therefore, the study offer an effective way to improve the anticancer efficiency of UA through nano-drug delivery system.

  3. Gq protein mediates UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression by stimulating HB-EGF secretion from HaCaT human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, MiRan; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2010-03-05

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression to produce cellular responses including aging and carcinogenesis in skin. We hypothesised that heterotrimeric G proteins mediate UV-induced COX-2 expression by stimulating secretion of soluble HB-EGF (sHB-EGF). In this study, we aimed to elucidate the role and underlying mechanism of the {alpha} subunit of Gq protein (G{alpha}q) in UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion and COX-2 induction. We found that expression of constitutively active G{alpha}q (G{alpha}qQL) augmented UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion, which was abolished by knockdown of G{alpha}q with shRNA in HaCaT human keratinocytes. G{alpha}q was found to mediate the UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion by sequential activation of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), and matrix metaloprotease-2 (MMP-2). Moreover, G{alpha}qQL mediated UVB-induced COX-2 expression in an HB-EGF-, EGFR-, and p38-dependent manner. From these results, we concluded that G{alpha}q mediates UV-induced COX-2 expression through activation of EGFR by HB-EGF, of which ectodomain shedding was stimulated through sequential activation of PLC, PKC{delta} and MMP-2 in HaCaT cells.

  4. Localized inflammation in peripheral tissue signals the CNS for sickness response in the absence of interleukin-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 in the blood and brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Ching, S; Chen, Q; Li, Q; An, Y; Quan, N

    2008-12-10

    The CNS can be activated by both local and systemic inflammation, resulting in the manifestation of sickness symptoms. The pathways by which the CNS is activated under these two conditions, however, may differ. In this study, we injected casein into the peritoneal cavity (i.p.) or into an s.c. air pouch of mice to induce restricted local inflammation. Both routes of casein injection caused fever and reduced locomotor activity. These responses were not accompanied by the statistically significant induction of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) in the blood and brain. Further, these responses were produced without the induction of brain cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which has been implicated as an obligatory step in systemic inflammation-induced activation of the CNS. Induction of IL-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and COX-2, however, was found consistently at the sites of casein injection. The local inflammation-induced febrile and locomotor activity responses were blunted in animals deficient in functional Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), type I interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R1), IL-6, or COX-2. Therefore, the observed febrile and locomotor activity effects appear to require local, but not central, IL-1, IL-6, and COX-2. These findings suggest that local inflammation can activate the CNS via pathways distinguishable from those mediating systemic inflammation-induced CNS activation.

  5. Date syrup-derived polyphenols attenuate angiogenic responses and exhibits anti-inflammatory activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Taleb, Hajer; Morris, R Keith; Withycombe, Cathryn E; Maddocks, Sarah E; Kanekanian, Ara D

    2016-07-01

    Bioactive components such as polyphenols, present in many plants, are purported to have anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties. Date syrup, produced from date fruit of the date palm tree, has traditionally been used to treat a wide range of diseases with etiologies involving angiogenesis and inflammation. It was hypothesized that polyphenols in date syrup reduce angiogenic responses such as cell migration, tube formation, and matrix metalloproteinase activity in an inflammatory model by exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the prostaglandin enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in endothelial cells. Date syrup polyphenols at 60 and 600μg/mL reduced inflammation and suppressed several stages of angiogenesis, including endothelial cell migration, invasion, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and tube formation, without evidence of cytotoxicity. VEGF and COX-2 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha at both gene expression and protein level was significantly reduced by date syrup polyphenols in comparison to untreated cells. In conclusion, polyphenols in date syrup attenuated angiogenic responses and exhibited anti-inflammatory activity mediated by VEGF and COX-2 expression in endothelial cells. PMID:27333954

  6. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2, alpha 1-acid-glycoprotein and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the developing lesions of murine leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Silva Miranda, Mayra; Rodríguez, Kendy Wek; Martínez Cordero, Erasmo; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Murine leprosy is a chronic disease of the mouse, the most popular animal model used in biomedical investigation, which is caused by Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) whose characteristic lesion is the macrophage-made granuloma. From onset to the end of the disease, the granuloma undergoes changes that gradually transform the environment into a more appropriate milieu for the growth of M. lepraemurium. The mechanisms that participate in the formation and maturation of the murine leprosy granulomas are not completely understood; however, microbial and host-factors are believed to participate in their formation. In this study, we analysed the role of various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory proteins in granulomas of murine leprosy after 21 weeks of infection. We assessed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), alpha acid-glycoprotein (AGP), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at sequential stages of infection. We also looked for the nitric-oxide nitrosylation product, nitrotyrosine (NT) in the granulomatous lesions of murine leprosy. We found that a pro-inflammatory environment predominates in the early granulomas while an anti-inflammatory environment predominates in late granulomas. No obvious signs of bacillary destruction were observed during the entire period of infection, but nitrosylation products and cell alterations were observed in granulomas in the advanced stages of disease. The change from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory environment, which is probably driven by the bacillus itself, results in a more conducive environment for both bacillus replication and the disease progression. PMID:17222216

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells alleviate airway inflammation and emphysema in COPD through down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 via p38 and ERK MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wen; Song, Lin; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Di; Guo, Xue-Jun; Xu, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified as one possible strategy for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our previous studies have demonstrated that MSC administration has therapeutic potential in airway inflammation and emphysema via a paracrine mechanism. We proposed that MSCs reverse the inflammatory process and restore impaired lung function through their interaction with macrophages. In our study, the rats were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS), followed by the administration of MSCs into the lungs for 5 weeks. Here we show that MSC administration alleviated airway inflammation and emphysema through the down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and COX-2-mediated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, possibly through the effect on alveolar macrophages. In vitro co-culture experiments provided evidence that MSCs down-regulated COX-2/PGE2 in macrophages through inhibition of the activation-associated phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK. Our data suggest that MSCs may relieve airway inflammation and emphysema in CS-exposed rat models, through the inhibition of COX-2/PGE2 in alveolar macrophages, mediated in part by the p38 MAPK and ERK pathways. This study provides a compelling mechanism for MSC treatment in COPD, in addition to its paracrine mechanism. PMID:25736434

  8. miR-144 and targets, c-fos and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), modulate synthesis of PGE2 in the amnion during pregnancy and labor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huanan; Zhou, Jiawei; Wei, Xiajie; Chen, Ran; Geng, Junnan; Zheng, Rong; Chai, Jin; Li, Fenge; Jiang, Siwen

    2016-01-01

    Labor is initiated as a result of hormonal changes that are induced by the activation of the inflammatory response and a series of biochemical events. The amnion, which is the primary source of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), plays an important role in the process of labor. In the present study, we uncovered a pathway in which c-fos, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and miR-144 function as hormonal modulators in the amnions of pregnant mice and humans. miR-144 down-regulated the synthesis of PGE2 during pregnancy by directly and indirectly inhibiting COX2 expression and by directly inhibiting the expression of c-fos, a transcriptional activator of COX2 and miR-144. Estrogen (E2) activated c-fos, thus promoting the expression of miR-144 and COX2 during labor. However, the increase in COX2 resulted in the partial inhibition of COX2 expression by miR-144, thereby slightly reducing the secretion of PGE2. These observations suggest that miR-144 inhibits PGE2 secretion by section to prevent the initiation of premature labor. Up-regulated expression of miR-144, c-fos and COX2 was also observed both in preterm mice and in mice undergoing normal labor. In summary, miR-144, c-fos and COX2 play important roles in regulating PGE2 secretion in the amnion during pregnancy and labor. PMID:27297132

  9. USP22 acts as an oncogene by regulating the stability of cyclooxygenase-2 in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Haibo; Tian, Yue; Yang, Yang; Hu, Fengqing; Xie, Xiao; Mei, Ju; Ding, Fangbao

    2015-05-08

    The histone ubiquitin hydrolase ubiquitin-specific protease 22 (USP22) is an epigenetic modifier and an oncogene that is upregulated in many types of cancer. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), aberrant expression of USP22 is a predictor of poor survival, as is high expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Despite its oncogenic role, few substrates of USP22 have been identified and its mechanism of action in cancer remains unclear. Here, we identified COX-2 as a direct substrate of USP22 and showed that its levels are modulated by USP22 mediated deubiquitination. Silencing of USP22 downregulated COX-2, decreased its half-life, and inhibited lung carcinoma cell proliferation by directly interacting with and modulating the stability and activity of COX-2 through the regulation of its ubiquitination status. The findings of the present study suggest a potential mechanism underlying the oncogenic role of USP22 mediated by the modulation of the stability and activity of COX-2. - Highlights: • USP22 interacts with COX-2. • USP22 deubiquitinates and stabilizes COX-2. • USP22 is required for COX-2-mediated upregulation of prostaglandin E2.

  10. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 by ginsenoside Rd via activation of CCAAT-enhancer binding proteins and cyclic AMP response binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hye Gwang; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Han, Eun Hee; Kang, Keon Wook . E-mail: kwkang@chosun.ac.kr

    2007-07-20

    Panax ginseng is a widely used herbal medicine in East Asia and is reported to have a variety of pharmacological effects against cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Here we show a unique effect of ginsenoside Rd (Rd) on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in RAW264.7 macrophages. Rd (100 {mu}g/ml), but not other ginsenosides induced COX-2 and increased prostaglandin E{sub 2} production. Gel shift and Western blot analyses using nuclear fractions revealed that Rd increased both the DNA binding of and the nuclear levels of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP){alpha}/{beta} and cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), but not of p65, in RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, Rd increased the luciferase reporter gene activity in cells transfected with a 574-bp mouse COX-2 promoter construct. Site-specific mutation analyses confirmed that Rd-mediated transcriptional activation of COX-2 gene was regulated by C/EBP and CREB. These results provide evidence that Rd activated C/EBP and CREB, and that the activation of C/EBP and CREB appears to be essential for induction of COX-2 in RAW264.7 cells.

  11. NO2 inhalation promotes Alzheimer’s disease-like progression: cyclooxygenase-2-derived prostaglandin E2 modulation and monoacylglycerol lipase inhibition-targeted medication

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei; Yun, Yang; Ku, Tingting; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution has been reported to be associated with increased risks of cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative diseases. Because NO2 is a typical primary air pollutant and an important contributor to secondary aerosols, NO2-induced neuronal functional abnormalities have attracted greater attention, but the available experimental evidence, modulating mechanisms, and targeting medications remain ambiguous. In this study, we exposed C57BL/6J and APP/PS1 mice to dynamic NO2 inhalation and found for the first time that NO2 inhalation caused deterioration of spatial learning and memory, aggravated amyloid β42 (Aβ42) accumulation, and promoted pathological abnormalities and cognitive defects related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The microarray and bioinformation data showed that the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-mediated arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) played a key role in modulating this aggravation. Furthermore, increasing endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) prevented PGE2 production, neuroinflammation-associated Aβ42 accumulation, and neurodegeneration, indicating a therapeutic target for relieving cognitive impairment caused by NO2 exposure. PMID:26928013

  12. Aqueous extract of the edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata inhibits hepatitis C viral replication via cyclooxygenase-2 suppression and reduces virus-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Jen; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Chang, Fang-Rong; Yang, Jin-Iong; Yeh, Chi-Chen; Chen, Wei-Chun; Wu, Shou-Fang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important human pathogen leading to hepatocellular carcinoma. Using an in vitro cell-based HCV replicon and JFH-1 infection system, we demonstrated that an aqueous extract of the seaweed Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT) concentration-dependently inhibited HCV replication at nontoxic concentrations. AEGT synergistically enhanced interferon-α (IFN-α) anti-HCV activity in a combination treatment. We found that AEGT also significantly suppressed virus-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression at promoter transactivation and protein levels. Notably, addition of exogenous COX-2 expression in AEGT-treated HCV replicon cells gradually abolished AEGT anti-HCV activity, suggesting that COX-2 down-regulation was responsible for AEGT antiviral effects. Furthermore, we highlighted the inhibitory effect of AEGT in HCV-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression such as the expression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, inducible nitrite oxide synthase and COX-2 in a concentration-dependent manner to evaluate the potential therapeutic supplement in the management of patients with chronic HCV infections.

  13. Cyclooxygenase-2 Silencing for the Treatment of Colitis: A Combined In Vivo Strategy Based on RNA Interference and Engineered Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Spisni, Enzo; Valerii, Maria C; De Fazio, Luigia; Cavazza, Elena; Borsetti, Francesca; Sgromo, Annamaria; Candela, Marco; Centanni, Manuela; Rizello, Fernando; Strillacci, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Nonpathogenic-invasive Escherichia coli (InvColi) bacteria are suitable for genetic transfer into mammalian cells and may act as a vehicle for RNA Interference (RNAi) in vivo. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is overexpressed in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), two inflammatory conditions of the colon and small intestine grouped as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We engineered InvColi strains for anti-COX-2 RNAi (InvColishCOX2), aiming to investigate the in vivo feasibility of a novel COX-2 silencing strategy in a murine model of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Enema administrations of InvColishCOX2 in DSS-treated mice led to COX-2 downregulation, colonic mucosa preservation, reduced colitis disease activity index (DAI) and increased mice survival. Moreover, DSS/InvColishCOX2-treated mice showed lower levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and a reduced colitis-associated shift of gut microbiota. Considering its effectiveness and safety, we propose our InvColishCOX2 strategy as a promising tool for molecular therapy in intestinal inflammatory diseases. PMID:25393372

  14. Nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression in the irradiated colorectum is associated with subsequent histopathological changes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Ann S.J. . E-mail: ann.yeoh@imvs.sa.gov.au; Bowen, Joanne M.; Gibson, Rachel J.; Keefe, Dorothy M.K.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have proposed that mucositis development is the same throughout the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), as it is formed from one structure embryologically. Radiation-induced oral mucositis studies have outlined the key involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) in its pathobiology. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the expression of NF{kappa}B and Cox-2 in the irradiated colorectum and to correlate these with the associated histopathologic changes. Methods and Materials: Colorectal tissues from 28 colorectal cancer patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy were analyzed for histopathologic changes using a variety of tissue staining methods. The expression of NF{kappa}B and Cox-2 in these tissues was investigated using immunohistochemistry. Changes in expression of these proteins were then correlated with the histopathologic changes. Results: Radiation therapy caused injury to the normal colorectal tissue surrounding tumor site, particularly around the blood vessels. These changes were reflected in changes in NF{kappa}B and Cox-2 expression. Conclusions: We conclude that different regions of the GIT, the colorectum, and oral cavity have similar underlying mechanisms of radiation-induced mucositis. Understanding these mechanisms will allow new approaches to be developed to specifically target steps in the evolution of alimentary mucositis.

  15. NO2 inhalation promotes Alzheimer’s disease-like progression: cyclooxygenase-2-derived prostaglandin E2 modulation and monoacylglycerol lipase inhibition-targeted medication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei; Yun, Yang; Ku, Tingting; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2016-03-01

    Air pollution has been reported to be associated with increased risks of cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative diseases. Because NO2 is a typical primary air pollutant and an important contributor to secondary aerosols, NO2-induced neuronal functional abnormalities have attracted greater attention, but the available experimental evidence, modulating mechanisms, and targeting medications remain ambiguous. In this study, we exposed C57BL/6J and APP/PS1 mice to dynamic NO2 inhalation and found for the first time that NO2 inhalation caused deterioration of spatial learning and memory, aggravated amyloid β42 (Aβ42) accumulation, and promoted pathological abnormalities and cognitive defects related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The microarray and bioinformation data showed that the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-mediated arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) played a key role in modulating this aggravation. Furthermore, increasing endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) prevented PGE2 production, neuroinflammation-associated Aβ42 accumulation, and neurodegeneration, indicating a therapeutic target for relieving cognitive impairment caused by NO2 exposure.

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 -1195G>A (rs689466) polymorphism and cancer susceptibility: an updated meta-analysis involving 50,672 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yafeng; Jiang, Heping; Liu, Tianyun; Tang, Weifeng; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The association between cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) -1195G>A (rs689466) polymorphism and cancer risk has been extensively explored. However, the results of previous studies remain controversial. To address this gap, we performed an updated meta-analysis of fifty-eight studies involving a total of 50,672 subjects. Searching of PubMed and Embase databases was performed for publications on the association between COX-2 -1195G>A polymorphism and the risk of cancer. Statistical correlation was identified between COX-2 -1195G>A variants and overall cancer risk in five genetic models. In a sub-group analysis based on cancer type, significant association between COX-2 -1195G>A polymorphism and increased risk of gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma and other cancers was found. In a sub-group analysis by ethnicity, increased cancer risk was observed among Asians instead of Caucasians, Africans and mixed populations. Furthermore, in a sub-group analysis based on cancer system, increased cancer risk was found in digestive system cancer and other system cancer. Non-parametric “trim-and-fill” method was harnessed as a sensitivity analysis method and the results suggested our findings reliable. In summary, the results of our meta-analysis highlight that COX-2 -1195G>A polymorphism may be a risk factor for cancer. PMID:26550156

  17. Piperine inhibits PMA-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression through downregulating NF-κB, C/EBP and AP-1 signaling pathways in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Han, Eun Hee; Jang, Woo-Seok; Choi, Jae Ho; Khanal, Tilak; Park, Bong Hwan; Tran, Thu Phuong; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2012-07-01

    Piperine is a major component of black (Piper nigrum Linn) and long (Piper longum Linn) peppers, and is widely used as a traditional food and medicine. It also exhibits a variety of biological activities, which include antioxidant, anti-tumor and anti-pyretic properties. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of piperine on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and analyzed the molecular mechanism of its activity in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. Piperine dose-dependently decreased PMA-induced COX-2 expression and PGE(2) production, as well as COX-2 promoter-driven luciferase activity. Transient transfections utilizing COX-2 promoter deletion constructs and COX-2 promoter constructs, in which specific enhancer elements were mutagenized, revealed that the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) and activator protein-1 (AP-1), were the predominant contributors to the effects of piperine. In addition, piperine inhibited PMA-induced NF-κB, C/EBP and c-Jun nuclear translocation. Furthermore, piperine significantly inhibited PMA-induced activation of the Akt and ERK. These findings demonstrate that piperine effectively attenuates COX-2 production, and provide further insight into the signal transduction pathways involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of piperine. PMID:22542552

  18. Celecoxib enhanced the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin in chemo-resistant gastric cancer xenograft mouse models through a cyclooxygenase-2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Bin; Shen, Fu-Ming; Lv, Qian-Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Our previous study suggested that co-administration of celecoxib increased chemo-sensitivity of multidrug-resistant human gastric cancer SGC-7901/DDP cells to cisplatin (DDP) in vitro. The present study was designed to investigate whether celecoxib had the similar activities in vivo. SGC-7901/DDP and SGC-7901 xenograft mouse models were established. At the end of the experiment, cisplatin treatment alone significantly inhibited tumor growth in SGC-7901 xenograft, as compared with that in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft, suggesting that it maintained cisplatin sensitivity. When cisplatin and celecoxib were co-administrated, their antitumor activities were augmented in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft. The levels of Ki67 and PCNA after combination therapy were significantly decreased in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft, as compared with those of cisplatin treatment alone. Moreover, examining the apoptotic index by TUNEL assay showed similar results. Further studies demonstrated the inhibitory effect of celecoxib on cyclooxygenase-2 and P-glycoprotein expression was the possible reason to increase sensitivity of SGC-7901/DDP cells to cisplatin in vivo. However, the ratio of thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin F1α was elevated after celecoxib treatment in mice. This has been proposed to increase the risk of thrombogenesis. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of celecoxib for reducing chemo-resistance in gastric cancer. PMID:26879869

  19. Increase of carcinogenic risk via enhancement of cyclooxygenase-2 expression and hydroxyestradiol accumulation in human lung cells as a result of interaction between BaP and 17-beta estradiol.

    PubMed

    Chang, Louis W; Chang, Yun-Ching; Ho, Chia-Chi; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Lin, Pinpin

    2007-07-01

    Animal studies demonstrated that females are more susceptible than males to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)-induced toxicities, including lung carcinogenesis. Elevation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression has been shown to increase the risk of cancer development. BaP induces COX-2 expression, and an interaction between BaP and estrogen in relation to COX-2 expression is suspected. In the present study, 10 muM BaP alone only slightly increased COX-2 mRNA expression and 10 nM 17-beta estradiol (E(2)) alone slightly increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion in human bronchial epithelial cells. However, co-treatment with BaP and E(2) potentiated COX-2 mRNA expression and significantly elevated PGE2 secretion. Utilizing specific inhibitors and reporter assays, we further investigated the potentiation mechanisms of E(2) on BaP-induced COX-2 expression. First, E(2) activated estrogen receptor to increase PGE2 secretion, which directly increased COX-2 expression. Second, E(2) potentiated BaP-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation, which regulates COX-2 expression. Third, although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) did not play a role in BaP-induced COX-2 expression, the potentiation effect of E(2) itself was AhR dependent. We further demonstrated that BaP induced the production of genotoxic E(2) metabolites (2- and 4-hydroxyestradiols) via AhR-up-regulated cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1B1. These metabolites could directly activate NF-kappaB to further promote COX-2 mRNA expression in human lung epithelial cells. These findings were further supported by increased PGE2 secretion in rat lung slice cultures. Our findings that the BaP-E(2) interaction enhanced COX-2 expression and hydroxyestradiol accumulation in the media of cultivated lung cells and tissues provide the needed scientific basis for higher risk of BaP-associated lung cancer in females.

  20. Leukotriene B(4) BLT receptor signaling regulates the level and stability of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA through restricted activation of Ras/Raf/ERK/p42 AUF1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Beibei; Yang, Huiqing; Mancini, Arturo; He, QingWen; Antoniou, John; Di Battista, John A

    2010-07-30

    Recent studies suggest that active resolution of the inflammatory response in animal models of arthritis may involve leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4))-dependent stimulation of "intermediate" prostaglandin production, which in turn favors the synthesis of "downstream" anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins. We explored a putative mechanism involving LTB(4)-dependent control of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, the rate-limiting step in inflammatory prostaglandin biosynthesis. Indeed, LTB(4) potently up-regulated/stabilized interleukin-1beta-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression under conditions of COX-2 inhibitor-dependent blockade of PGE(2) release in human synovial fibroblasts (EC(50) = 16.5 + or - 1.7 nm for mRNA; 19 + or - 2.4 nm for protein, n = 4). The latter response was pertussis toxin-sensitive, and semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the quantitative predominance of the BLT2 receptor. Transfection experiments, using human COX-2 promoter plasmids and chimeric luciferase-COX-2 mRNA 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) reporter constructs, revealed that LTB(4) exerted its stabilizing effect at the post-transcriptional level through a 116-bp adenylate/uridylate-rich sequence in the proximal region of the COX-2 3'-UTR. Using luciferase-COX-2 mRNA 3'-UTR reporter constructs and Ras/c-Raf expression and mutant constructs, we showed that the Ras/c-Raf/MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling pathway mediated LTB(4)-dependent COX-2 mRNA stabilization. Knockdown experiments with specific short hairpin RNAs confirmed that LTB(4) stabilization of COX-2 mRNA was apparently mediated through the RNA-binding protein, p42 AUF1. The nuclear export of p42 AUF1 was driven by c-Raf/MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling and sensitive to leptomycin B treatment, suggesting a CRM1-dependent mechanism. We conclude that LTB(4) may support the resolution phase of the inflammatory response by stabilizing COX-2, ensuring a reservoir of ambient pro-resolution lipid

  1. Thiram and ziram stimulate non-selective cation channel and induce apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Sook Han, Myoung; Shin, Kum Joo; Kim, Yun Hee; Kim, Sun Hee; Lee, Taehoon; Kim, Euikyung; Ho Ryu, Sung; Suh, Pann Ghill

    2003-06-01

    The neurotoxicity of dithiocarbamates has been previously reported, however, the detailed mechanism underlying the neurotoxicity is still not fully understood. Among the dithiocarbamates, we investigated thiram and ziram in a neuronal-like pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Thiram and ziram strongly induced cell death in both dose- and time-dependent manners with the LC(50) of 0.3 and 2 microM, respectively. The cell death showed typical apoptotic features, such as DNA fragmentation and an increase of subdiploidy nuclei. Interestingly, both thiram and ziram induced rapid and sustained increases of intracellular Ca(2+) in PC12 cells, which were almost completely blocked by flufenamic acid (FFA), an inhibitor of non-selective cation channel. BAPTA-AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, inhibited the thiram- and ziram-induced apoptotic cell death. These results suggest that thiram and ziram induce apoptotic neuronal cell death by Ca(2+) influx through non-selective cation channels. The present study may provide a clue for understanding the mechanism of neurotoxicity of thiram and ziram.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress eIF2α-ATF4 pathway-mediated cyclooxygenase-2 induction regulates cadmium-induced autophagy in kidney.

    PubMed

    Luo, B; Lin, Y; Jiang, S; Huang, L; Yao, H; Zhuang, Q; Zhao, R; Liu, H; He, C; Lin, Z

    2016-01-01

    The heavy metal cadmium (Cd) is nephrotoxic. Recent studies show that autophagy plays an essential role in Cd-induced kidney injury. However, the mechanisms of Cd-induced kidney injury accompanied by autophagy are still obscure. In the present study, we first confirmed that Cd induced kidney damage and dysfunction, along with autophagy, both in vivo and in vitro. Then, we observed that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the eIF2α-ATF4 pathway of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were induced by Cd in both kidney tissues and cultured cells. Further studies showed that inhibition of COX-2 with celecoxib or RNA interference (RNAi) inhibited the Cd-induced autophagy in kidney cells. In addition, blocking ER stress with 4-phenylbutyrate or RNAi partially counteracted COX-2 overexpression and autophagy induced by Cd, which suggested that ER stress was required for Cd-induced kidney autophagy. Significantly, our results showed that Cd activated ATF4 and induced its translocation to the nucleus. Knockdown of ATF4 inhibited Cd-induced COX-2 overexpression. While COX-2 overexpression is involved in renal dysfunction, there is no prior report on the role of COX-2 in autophagy regulation. The results of the current study suggest a novel molecular mechanism that the ER stress eIF2α-ATF4 pathway-mediated COX-2 overexpression contributes to Cd-induced kidney autophagy and injury. The present study implies that COX-2 may be a potential target for therapy against Cd-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:27253415

  3. An aqueous extract of Ilex paraguariensis reduces carrageenan-induced edema and inhibits the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase in animal models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schinella, Guillermo; Neyret, Elisa; Cónsole, Gloria; Tournier, Horacio; Prieto, José M; Ríos, José-Luis; Giner, Rosa María

    2014-08-01

    Mate (Ilex paraguariensis) is a highly popular herbal beverage in South America due to its high content of caffeine. Its hypolipidemic and antioxidant properties are of increasing interest in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders and for weight control. In the present study, we show for the first time both the local and systemic anti-inflammatory effects of an aqueous extract of mate in three classic in vivo models, namely acute and chronic 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-induced mouse ear edema and acute carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema. Caffeine, rutin, chlorogenic acid, 3,5-dicafeoyl quinic acid, and 4,5-dicafeoyl quinic acid, accompanied by a complex mixture of other simple phenolic acids, were identified in the extract by HPLC-UV analyses. In the acute edema model, mate extract applied topically (1 mg/ear) halved the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-induced acute edema (50 %) and almost suppressed neutrophil infiltration (93 %), while in the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-induced subchronic inflammation, the edema was significantly reduced by 62 % (1 mg/ear/day × seven doses). The oral administration of the mate extract (250 mg/kg) significantly reduced the carrageenan-induced edema at all time points, an effect which was accompanied by a 43 % and 53 % reduction of the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase, respectively. Histological analyses confirmed a reduction of epithelium thickness, dermis with mild inflammation, hair follicles with some secretory cells of sebaceous glands, and hypodermic adipocytes. In conclusion, mate is endowed with in vivo preventative or therapeutic anti-inflammatory effects in both local and systemic inflammatory processes.

  4. Clinical Significance of Hu-Antigen Receptor (HuR) and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Karavokyros, Ioannis; Danas, Eugene; Giagini, Athina; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2016-01-01

    Hu-antigen R (HuR) is considered to play a crucial role in tumor formation and growth by binding to mRNAs encoding proteins such as Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducing their expression via mRNA stabilization and/or altered translation. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of HuR and COX-2 proteins’ expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. HuR and COX-2 proteins’ expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 98 patients with benign (n = 48) and malignant (n = 50) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells’ proliferative capacity and recurrence risk rate. Enhanced HuR and COX-2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0073 and p = 0.0016, respectively), as well as in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0039 and p = 0.0009, respectively). Positive associations of both HuR and COX-2 expression with follicular cells’ proliferation rate were also noted (p = 0.0087 and p = 0.0127, respectively). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated COX-2 expression was significantly associated with female patients’ gender (p = 0.0381) and the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0296). The present data support evidence that both HuR and COX-2 may be involved in the malignant state of thyroid neoplasia and may be utilized in the diagnosis of malignant thyroid tumors.

  5. Common polymorphisms of cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin E2 receptor and increased risk for acute coronary syndrome in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, Wojciech; Sanak, Marek; Rostoff, Pawel; Piwowarska, Wieslawa; Jakiela, Bogdan; Szczeklik, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    The arachidonic acid metabolites participate in development of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the plaque's instability. We assessed two common genetic polymorphisms: of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) (COX2.8473, rs5275) and prostaglandin EP2 receptor gene (uS5, rs708494) in patients with CAD. Out of 1,368 patients screened by coronary arteriography, two groups fulfilled the entry criteria and were studied: stable coronary disease (sCAD, n = 125) and acute coronary syndromes (ACS, n = 63). They did not differ in the main characteristics. All patients were on aspirin at least seven days prior to the study. In 70 control subjects, the same genotypes were ascertained, expression of cyclooxygenases in peripheral blood monocytes was assessed by flow cytometry, and in-vitro biosynthesis of PGE(2) was measured by mass spectrometry. COX-2 CC homozygotes (variant allele), were more common, while EP2 GG homozygotes (wild-type) were less common in ACS (p = 0.03 and p = 0.017) than in the sCAD group. A combined genotype characterized by the presence of the wild-type COX2.8743T allele and the wild type homozygous EP2uS5 genotype (TT or CT | GG) decreased risk ratio of ACS in CAD patients (relative risk 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.21-0.81). COX-2 polymorphism in control subjects did not affect the enzyme expression or PGE(2) production by peripheral blood monocytes, but production of PGE(2) increased by 40.1% in the subjects homozygous for EP2 receptor allele uS5A following lipopolysaccharide stimulation. In conclusion, the combined COX-2 (COX2.8473) and the EP2 receptor (uS5) genotypes seem to influence CAD stability, but in peripheral blood monocytes only EP2 receptor modulates PGE(2) production. PMID:18989535

  6. Functional interaction between acyl-CoA synthetase 4, lipooxygenases and cyclooxygenase-2 in the aggressive phenotype of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, Paula M; Duarte, Alejandra B; Orlando, Ulises D; Pasqualini, María E; Solano, Angela R; López-Otín, Carlos; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2010-11-11

    The acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) is increased in breast cancer, colon and hepatocellular carcinoma. ACSL4 mainly esterifies arachidonic acid (AA) into arachidonoyl-CoA, reducing free AA intracellular levels, which is in contradiction with the need for AA metabolites in tumorigenesis. Therefore, the causal role of ACSL4 is still not established. This study was undertaken to determine the role of ACSL4 in AA metabolic pathway in breast cancer cells. The first novel finding is that ACSL4 regulates the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the production of prostaglandin in MDA-MB-231 cells. We also found that ACSL4 is significantly up-regulated in the highly aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. In terms of its overexpression and inhibition, ACSL4 plays a causal role in the control of the aggressive phenotype. These results were confirmed by the increase in the aggressive behaviour of MCF-7 cells stably transfected with a Tet-off ACSL4 vector. Concomitantly, another significant finding was that intramitochondrial AA levels are significantly higher in the aggressive cells. Thus, the esterification of AA by ACSL4 compartmentalizes the release of AA in mitochondria, a mechanism that serves to drive the specific lipooxygenase metabolization of the fatty acid. To our knowledge, this is the first report that ACSL4 expression controls both lipooxygenase and cyclooxygenase metabolism of AA. Thus, this functional interaction represents an integrated system that regulates the proliferating and metastatic potential of cancer cells. Therefore, the development of combinatory therapies that profit from the ACSL4, lipooxygenase and COX-2 synergistic action may allow for lower medication doses and avoidance of side effects.

  7. Up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 by cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia is mediated by phospholipase D isozymes in human astroglioma cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Bong-Hyun; Park, Mi Hee; Lee, Young Han; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Min, Do Sik

    2007-12-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an isoform of prostaglandin H synthase induced by hypoxia and has been implicated in the growth and progression of a variety of human cancers. In the present study, we investigated the role of phospholipase D (PLD) isozymes in cobalt chloride (CoCl(2))-induced hypoxia-driven COX-2 expression in U87 MG human astroglioma cells. CoCl(2) stimulated PLD activity and synthesis of COX-2 protein in a dose and time-dependent manner. Moreover, elevated expression of PLD1 and PLD2 increased hypoxia-induced COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) production. Pretreatment of cells with 1-butanol, but not 3-butanol, suppressed CoCl(2)-induced COX-2 expression and PGE(2) formation. In addition, evidence that PLD activity was involved in the stimulation of COX-2 expression was provided by the observations that overexpression of wild type PLD isozymes, but not catalytically inactive PLD isozymes, stimulated CoCl(2)-induced COX-2 expression and PGE(2) production. PLD1 enhanced COX-2 expression by CoCl(2) via reactive oxygen species (ROS), p38 MAPK kinase, PKC-delta, and PKA, but not ERK, whereas PLD2 enhanced CoCl(2)-induced COX-2 expression via ROS and p38 MAPK, but not ERK, PKC-delta, and PKA. Differential regulation of COX-2 expression mediated through PLD isozymes was comparable with that of CoCl(2)-induced PLD activity in these two PLD isozymes. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that PLD1 and PLD2 isozymes enhance CoCl(2)-induced COX-2 expression through differential signaling pathways in astroglioma cells.

  8. Progestin treatment does not affect expression of cytokines, steroid receptors, oxytocin receptor, and cyclooxygenase 2 in fetal membranes and endometrium from pony mares at parturition.

    PubMed

    Palm, F; Walter, I; Nowotny, N; Budik, S; Helmreich, M; Aurich, C

    2013-01-01

    In most mammalian species, progestins have a major function in maintaining pregnancy. In humans, the physiologic initiation of parturition bears similarities with inflammatory processes and anti-inflammatory effects of progestins have been suggested to postpone birth until term. To examine if comparable effects exist in the horse, mares were treated with the synthetic progestin altrenogest from day 280 of gestation until parturition (N = 5) or were left untreated as controls (N = 7). Tissue from the amnion (AMN), allantochorion (AC), and endometrium (EM) was collected at foaling and mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and -8, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), estrogen receptor (ER) α, progesterone receptor, and oxytocin receptor (OTR) was analyzed. Leukocytes, steroid receptors, COX2, and OTR were also investigated by histology and immunohistochemistry. Expression of mRNA for IL-6 was higher in AMN and EM versus AC (P < 0.01). Expression of IL-8 was higher in AMN than AC and EM (P < 0.001). Steroid receptors and OTR were highly expressed in EM but not in AMN and AC (P < 0.001). Expression of COX2 was most pronounced in AC whereas IL expression was not upregulated in AC. No differences in mRNA expression existed between altrenogest-treated and control animals. Endometrial polymorphonuclear leukocytes were increased in altrenogest-treated mares. Epithelial cells of all tissues, except AC chorionic villi stained progesterone receptor-positive. Staining for ER was more pronounced in the amnion facing epithelium of the AC in altrenogest-treated versus control animals (P < 0.01). In conclusion, COX2 is highly expressed in the AC. The fetal membranes thus might play a role in the onset of labor in the horse. Altrenogest did not affect gene expression in the AMN, AC, and EM but had localized effects on inflammatory cells and ER expression. No anti-inflammatory effects of altrenogest in healthy, late pregnant pony mares could be detected.

  9. Regulation of p53, nuclear factor {kappa}B and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by bromelain through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Neetu; Bhui, Kulpreet; Roy, Preeti; Srivastava, Smita; George, Jasmine; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2008-01-01

    Bromelain is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and immature fruits of pineapples (Ananas cosmosus), which has been shown to have anti-edematous, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-metastatic properties. In the present study, antitumorigenic activity of bromelain was recorded in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted 2-stage mouse skin model. Results showed that bromelain application delayed the onset of tumorigenesis and reduced the cumulative number of tumors, tumor volume and the average number of tumors/mouse. To establish a cause and effect relationship, we targeted the proteins involved in the cell death pathway. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in mouse skin. Since persistent induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is frequently implicated in tumorigenesis and is regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), we also investigated the effect of bromelain on Cox-2 and NF-{kappa}B expression. Results showed that bromelain application significantly inhibited Cox-2 and inactivated NF-{kappa}B by blocking phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. In addition, bromelain treatment attenuated DMBA-TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Taken together, we conclude that bromelain induces apoptosis-related proteins along with inhibition of NF-{kappa}B-driven Cox-2 expression by blocking the MAPK and Akt/protein kinase B signaling in DMBA-TPA-induced mouse skin tumors, which may account for its anti-tumorigenic effects.

  10. Cytokine-mediated induction of cyclo-oxygenase-2 by activation of tyrosine kinase in bovine endothelial cells stimulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Akarasereenont, P.; Bakhle, Y. S.; Thiemermann, C.; Vane, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    1. The induction of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) afforded by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) is mediated by tyrosine kinase. LPS also causes the generation of several cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). This study investigates whether endogenous IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, EGF or PDGF contribute to the induction of COX-2 elicited by LPS in BAEC and if their action is due to activation of tyrosine kinase. Furthermore, we have studied the induction of COX-2 by exogenous cytokines. 2. Accumulation of 6-oxo-prostaglandin (PG) F1 alpha in cultures of BAEC was measured by radioimmunoassay at 24 h after addition of either LPS (1 microgram ml-1) alone or LPS together with a polyclonal antibody to one of the various cytokines. In experiments designed to measure 'COX activity', 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha generated by BAEC activated with recombinant human IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, EGF or PDGF for 12 h was measured after incubation of washed cells with exogenous arachidonic acid (30 microM for 15 min). Western blot analysis determined the expression of COX-2 protein in BAEC. 3. The accumulation of 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha caused by LPS in BAEC was attenuated by co-incubation with one of the polyclonal antibodies, anti-IL-1 beta, anti-TNF-alpha, anti-EGF, anti-PDGF or with the IL-1 receptor antagonist, in a dose-dependent manner. Exogenous IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha or EGF also caused an increase in COX activity, while PDGF was ineffective.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 4 PMID:7582449

  11. Underwater trauma causes a long-term specific increase in the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in the ventral CA₁ of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sood, Rapita; Ritov, Gilad; Boltyansky, Boris; Spector-Chotiner, Almog; Richter-Levin, Gal; Barki-Harrington, Liza

    2014-11-01

    The pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is regularly expressed in the hippocampal neurons, but its role in emotional trauma is not known. Here we show that a single acute stress caused by a near-drowning experience results in heightened anxiety-like behavior one month after the trauma. Biochemical analyses of dorsal and ventral hippocampal CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus revealed decreased ubiquitination and elevated levels of COX-2 in the traumatized animals only in the ventral CA1. To reveal the identity of the ubiquitin E3 ligase that targets COX-2, we tested the effect of several representative E3 ligases on COX-2 expression in vitro. We found that while AIP4 and Nedd4 had no effect, Mdm2 lowered COX-2 expression by nearly 50%, an effect that was not observed by its dominant negative form. To test whether this also occurs in the hippocampus, we immunoprecipitated Mdm2 from dorsal and ventral CA1 of traumatized and control animals and probed for the presence of COX-2. Our results showed that the levels of Mdm2 were not affected by the trauma but there was significantly less COX-2 associated with Mdm2 in the ventral but not dorsal CA1 of the traumatized animals. Together these data propose that an increase in COX-2 expression in ventral CA1 following trauma is likely due to its attenuated degradation. Unraveling the pathways and mechanisms that control hippocampal COX-2 degradation is important to boost the development of novel therapeutic approaches designed to treat stress-related pathologies.

  12. Coordinate up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and cyclo-oxygenase-2 gene expression in human colorectal cells and in colorectal adenocarcinoma biopsies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, D. F.; McQuaid, K. R.; Gilbertson, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers have high levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), an enzyme that metabolizes the essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) is involved in the uptake of essential fatty acids, we studied the effect of LDL on growth and gene regulation in colorectal cancer cells. DiFi cells grown in lipoprotein-deficient sera (LPDS) grew more slowly than cells with LDL. LDLr antibody caused significant inhibition of tumor cell growth but did not affect controls. In addition, LDL uptake did not change in the presence of excess LDL, suggesting that ldlr mRNA lacks normal feedback regulation in some colorectal cancers. Analysis of the ldlr mRNA showed that excess LDL in the medium did not cause down-regulation of the message even after 24 hr. The second portion of the study examined the mRNA expression of ldlr and its co-regulation with cox-2 in normal and tumor specimens from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. The ratio of tumor:paired normal mucosa of mRNA expression of ldlr and of cox-2 was measured in specimens taken during colonoscopy. ldlr and cox-2 transcripts were apparent in 11 of 11 carcinomas. There was significant coordinate up-regulation both of ldlr and of cox-2 in 6 of 11 (55%) tumors compared with normal colonic mucosa. There was no up-regulation of cox-2 without concomitant up-regulation of ldlr. These data suggest that the LDLr is abnormally regulated in some colorectal tumors and may play a role in the up-regulation of cox-2. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Cervical changes in estrogen receptor alpha, oxytocin receptor, LH receptor, and cyclooxygenase-2 depending on the histologic compartment, longitudinal axis, and day of the ovine estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Piñón, M; Gonzalez, R; Tasende, C; Bielli, A; Genovese, P; Garófalo, E G

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to investigate the histologic distribution of estrogen receptor α (ERα), oxytocin receptor (OxR), LH receptor (LHR), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the cervix of the ewe during the estrous cycle. Immunohistochemistry was performed in the cranial and caudal cervix of Corriedale ewes on Day 1 (n = 6), 6 (n = 5), or 13 (n = 6) after estrous detection (Day 0). The ERα proportional score (%ERα nuclei) was lower in the cranial cervix than in the caudal cervix, whereas the OxR and COX-2 immunostaining areas (%areas) were greater in the cranial cervix than in the caudal cervix (P < 0.04). The %ERα nuclei decreased from Days 1 to 13 in luminal epithelia, but increased from Days 1 to 6 or remained unchanged in stromata (P < 0.003). The %OxR area was higher on Day 6 than on Days 1 and 13 in the superficial glandular epithelium, and increased from Days 1 to 13 in the deep glandular epithelium (P < 0.04). The %LHR area increased during the estrous cycle in luminal epithelia and fold stroma (P < 0.004). The %COX-2 area was restricted to epithelia, and it was lower on Day 1 than on Days 6 and 13 in luminal epithelia (P < 0.05). Differences in ERα, OxR, LHR, and COX-2 between cranial and caudal cervical zones indicate different physiological functions, and their cyclic variations in the cervical epithelia, in contrast to little or no variations in the stroma, suggest a hormone-responsive driving role of epithelia in cervical function. PMID:24485556

  14. Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 and Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 in HCV-Induced Chronic Liver Disease and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    El-Bassiouny, Azza E.I.; Zoheiry, Mona M.K.; Nosseir, Mona M.F.; El-Ahwany, Eman G.; Ibrahim, Raafat A.; El-Bassiouni, Nora E.I.

    2007-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) were modulated in a variety of viral infections, but there is a paucity of data about their role in the pathologic process of cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The material of the current study included 50 cases of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) without cirrhosis, 30 cases of CHC with cirrhosis, and 30 cases of HCC with HCV admitted to the Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department of Theodor Bilharz Research Institute, Giza, Egypt. Fifteen wedge liver biopsies, taken during laparoscopic cholecystectomy, were included in the study as normal controls. Laboratory investigations, serologic markers for viral hepatitis, and serum alpha fetoprotein levels (alpha-FP) were done for all cases of the study. Immunohistochemistry using primary antibodies against both factors revealed weak to faint immunoreactivity to COX-2 and TGF-beta1 in normal hepatic tissue (< 30% and < 50% of the cells, respectively). COX-2 expression was upregulated in patients with CHC with and without cirrhosis, yet 80% of positively stained cirrhotic cases showed marked staining intensity. Higher COX-2 expression was observed in well-differentiated HCC cases (80%) with marked staining intensity (75%) compared with advanced HCC tumors (P < .001). TGF-beta1 was expressed in the hepatocytes of all cases of CHC with and without cirrhosis as well as in 67% of HCC cases. Extensive cytoplasmic expression was detected in 52%, 93.3%, and 46.6% of CHC patients without cirrhosis, patients with cirrhosis, and patients with HCC, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between hepatic expression of COX-2 and TGF-beta1 (r = 0.67, P < .05); however, no correlation was detected between the latter and grade of HCC differentiation (r = 0.33, P > .05). Conclusion These findings may suggest that TGF-beta1 plays a role in hepatic cell damage following HCV infection thus stressing

  15. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity exacerbates ultraviolet B radiation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and cell survival signals in ultraviolet B-irradiated mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Som D.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2010-05-01

    Obesity has been implicated in several inflammatory diseases and in different types of cancer. Chronic inflammation induced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been implicated in various skin diseases, including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. As the relationship between obesity and susceptibility to UV radiation-caused inflammation is not clearly understood, we assessed the role of obesity on UVB-induced inflammation, and mediators of this inflammatory response, using the genetically obese (leptin-deficient) mouse model. Leptin-deficient obese (ob/ob) mice and wild-type counterparts (C57/BL6 mice) were exposed to UVB radiation (120 mJ/cm{sup 2}) on alternate days for 1 month. The mice were then euthanized and skin samples collected for analysis of biomarkers of inflammatory responses using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, ELISA and real-time PCR. Here, we report that the levels of inflammatory responses were higher in the UVB-exposed skin of the ob/ob obese mice than those in the UVB-exposed skin of the wild-type non-obese mice. The levels of UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression, prostaglandin-E{sub 2} production, proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell survival signals (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and p-Akt-Ser{sup 473}) were higher in the skin of the ob/ob obese mice than the those in skin of their wild-type non-obese counterparts. Compared with the wild-type non-obese mice, the leptin-deficient obese mice also exhibited greater activation of NF-kappaB/p65 and fewer apoptotic cells in the UVB-irradiated skin. Our study suggests for the first time that obesity in mice is associated with greater susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammatory responses and, therefore, obesity may increase susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammation-associated skin diseases, including the risk of skin cancer.

  16. Axinelline A, a new COX-2 inhibitor from Streptomyces axinellae SCSIO02208.

    PubMed

    Ai, Wen; Lin, Xiu-Ping; Tu, Zhengchao; Tian, Xin-Peng; Lu, Xin; Mangaladoss, Fredimoses; Zhong, Zhi-Long; Liu, Yonghong

    2014-01-01

    Axinelline A, a new cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, was isolated from Streptomyces axinellae SCSIO02208. The structures of compounds 1-9 were determined by analysing the NMR and MS data. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by using optical rotation and comparing with the reported data. Compound 1 exhibited COX-2 inhibitory activity, the IC50 value being 2.8 μM.

  17. Interaction profile of macitentan, a new non-selective endothelin-1 receptor antagonist, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Johanna; Theile, Dirk; Rüppell, Maximilian Alexander; Speck, Tobias; Spalwisz, Adriana; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2013-02-15

    Macitentan is a new non-selective endothelin-1 receptor antagonist under development for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Information on the potential for macitentan to influence the pharmacokinetics of concomitantly administered drugs by inhibition or induction of drug metabolising enzymes or drug transporters is sparse. We therefore studied the potential of macitentan to inhibit and induce critical targets of drug metabolism and drug distribution (transporters) in vitro. Induction was quantified at the mRNA level by real-time RT-PCR in LS180 cells and revealed that macitentan significantly induced mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), solute carrier of organic anions 1B1 (SLCO1B1), and uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 1A3 (UGT1A9). By means of a reporter gene assay our study establishes macitentan as a potent activator of pregnane X receptor (PXR). Inhibition of drug transporters was evaluated by using transporter over-expressing cell lines and fluorescent specific substrates of the respective transporters and revealed that macitentan is an inhibitor of P-gp, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), SLCO1B1, and SLCO1B3. Using commercial kits macitentan was demonstrated to be a moderate inhibitor of CYP3A4 and CYP2C19. In conclusion our data provide a comprehensive analysis of the interaction profile of macitentan with drug metabolising and transporting enzymes in vitro. Although macitentan has a similar or higher potency for induction and inhibition of drug metabolising enzymes and transporters than bosentan, its low plasma concentrations and minimal accumulation in the liver suggest that it will be markedly less prone to drug-drug interactions than bosentan.

  18. Non-selective cation channels mediate chloroquine-induced relaxation in precontracted mouse airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Luo, Xiao-Jing; Sai, Wen-Bo; Yu, Meng-Fei; Li, Wen-Er; Ma, Yun-Fei; Chen, Weiwei; Zhai, Kui; Qin, Gangjian; Guo, Donglin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Shen, Jin-Hua; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs) or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs). In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs) precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH). In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM), ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3), an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle.

  19. Efficacy and tolerability of naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium tablets compared with non-specific NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors: a systematic review and network analyses

    PubMed Central

    Datto, Catherine; Hellmund, Richard; Siddiqui, Mohd Kashif

    2013-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as non-selective NSAIDs (nsNSAIDs) or selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, are commonly prescribed for arthritic pain relief in patients with osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Treatment guidelines for chronic NSAID therapy include the consideration for gastroprotection for those at risk of gastric ulcers (GUs) associated with the chronic NSAID therapy. The United States Food and Drug Administration has approved naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium tablets for the relief of signs and symptoms of OA, RA, and AS, and to decrease the risk of developing GUs in patients at risk of developing NSAID-associated GUs. The European Medical Association has approved this therapy for the symptomatic treatment of OA, RA, and AS in patients who are at risk of developing NSAID-associated GUs and/or duodenal ulcers, for whom treatment with lower doses of naproxen or other NSAIDs is not considered sufficient. Naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium tablets have been compared with naproxen and celecoxib for these indications in head-to-head trials. This systematic literature review and network meta-analyses of data from randomized controlled trials was performed to compare naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium tablets with a number of additional relevant comparators. For this study, an original review examined MEDLINE®, Embase®, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register from database start to April 14, 2009. Using the same methodology, a review update was conducted to December 21, 2009. The systematic review and network analyses showed naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium tablets have an improved upper gastrointestinal tolerability profile (dyspepsia and gastric or gastroduodenal ulcers) over several active comparators (naproxen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, ketoprofen, etoricoxib, and fixed-dose diclofenac sodium plus misoprostol), and are equally effective as all active comparators in treating

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress stimulates the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 through activation of NF-kappaB and pp38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jui-Hsiang; Su, Ih-Jen; Lei, Huan-Yao; Wang, Hui-Ching; Lin, Wan-Chi; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Huang, Wenya; Chang, Wen-Chang; Chang, Yung-Sheng; Chen, Ching-Chow; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2004-11-01

    Expression of mutant proteins or viral infection may interfere with proper protein folding activity in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Several pathways that maintain cellular homeostasis were activated in response to these ER disturbances. Here we investigated which of these ER stress-activated pathways induce COX-2 and potentially oncogenesis. Tunicamycin and brefeldin A, two ER stress inducers, increased the expression of COX-2 in ML-1 or MCF-7 cells. Nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB and activation of pp38 MAPK were observed during ER stress. IkappaBalpha kinase inhibitor Bay 11-7082 or IkappaBalpha kinase dominant negative mutant significantly inhibited the induction of COX-2. pp38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 or eIF2alpha phosphorylation inhibitor 2-aminopurine attenuated the nuclear NF-kappaB DNA binding activity and COX-2 induction. Expression of mutant hepatitis B virus (HBV) large surface proteins, inducers of ER stress, enhanced the expression of COX-2 in ML-1 and HuH-7 cells. Transgenic mice showed higher expression of COX-2 protein in liver and kidney tissue expressing mutant HBV large surface protein in vivo. Similarly, increased expression of COX-2 mRNA was observed in human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue expressing mutant HBV large surface proteins. In ML-1 cells expressing mutant HBV large surface protein, anchorage-independent growth was enhanced, and the enhancement was abolished by the addition of specific COX-2 inhibitors. Thus, ER stress due either to expression of viral surface proteins or drugs can stimulate the expression of COX-2 through the NF-kappaB and pp38 kinase pathways. Our results provide important insights into cellular carcinogenesis associated with latent endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  1. Opposing Effects of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) on Estrogen Receptor β (ERβ) Response to 5α-Reductase Inhibition in Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Teresa T; Grubisha, Melanie J; Frahm, Krystle A; Wendell, Stacy G; Liu, Jiayan; Ricke, William A; Auchus, Richard J; DeFranco, Donald B

    2016-07-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), an androgen receptor-driven, inflammatory disorder affecting elderly men, include 5α-reductase (5AR) inhibitors (i.e. dutasteride and finasteride) to block the conversion of testosterone to the more potent androgen receptor ligand dihydrotestosterone. Because dihydrotestosterone is the precursor for estrogen receptor β (ERβ) ligands, 5AR inhibitors could potentially limit ERβ activation, which maintains prostate tissue homeostasis. We have uncovered signaling pathways in BPH-derived prostate epithelial cells (BPH-1) that are impacted by 5AR inhibition. The induction of apoptosis and repression of the cell adhesion protein E-cadherin by the 5AR inhibitor dutasteride requires both ERβ and TGFβ. Dutasteride also induces cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2), which functions in a negative feedback loop in TGFβ and ERβ signaling pathways as evidenced by the potentiation of apoptosis induced by dutasteride or finasteride upon pharmacological inhibition or shRNA-mediated ablation of COX-2. Concurrently, COX-2 positively impacts ERβ action through its effect on the expression of a number of steroidogenic enzymes in the ERβ ligand metabolic pathway. Therefore, effective combination pharmacotherapies, which have included non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, must take into account biochemical pathways affected by 5AR inhibition and opposing effects of COX-2 on the tissue-protective action of ERβ. PMID:27226548

  2. Anti-inflammatory effect and low ulcerogenic activity of etodolac, a cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masaki; Inoue, Naoki; Yoshida, Eri; Matsui, Masami; Ukai, Yojiro; Yano, Junichi

    2003-06-01

    Adjuvant arthritic rats are known to be more susceptible to gastric damage induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) than are normal rats. We compared the relative gastric safety profile of etodolac with those of meloxicam, diclofenac sodium and indometacin in adjuvant arthritic rats and normal rats or mice. As a measure of the safety profiles of NSAIDs, we used the safety index, the ratio of the dose that elicits gastric mucosal lesions to the effective dose as an anti-inflammatory or analgesic compound. The anti-inflammatory or analgesic effects of NSAIDs were assessed by paw swelling in adjuvant arthritic rats, and either carrageenin-induced paw edema or brewer's yeast-induced hyperalgesia, as well as acetic acid-induced writhing, in normal rats or mice. In addition, we also investigated the effects of these NSAIDs on human COX-1 and COX-2 activity. Etodolac and other NSAIDs inhibited paw swelling and caused gastric mucosal lesions in adjuvant arthritic rats in a dose-dependent manner. Etodolac showed the highest UD(50) value and safety index among these NSAIDs in arthritic rats. In normal rats, etodolac also showed the highest UD(50) value and safety index, except when its effects were assessed by acetic acid-induced writhing. Etodolac and meloxicam showed selectivity for human COX-2 over COX-1. In contrast, diclofenac sodium and indometacin were selective for COX-1. These results suggest that etodolac, a COX-2 selective NSAID, has anti-inflammatory effects with a better safety profile for the stomach than do non-selective NSAIDs, including diclofenac sodium and indometacin, in adjuvant arthritic as well as normal rats.

  3. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression in rat oviductal epithelial cells: Evidence for involvement of GPR30/Src kinase-mediated EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Popli, Pooja; Sirohi, Vijay Kumar; Manohar, Murli; Shukla, Vinay; Kaushal, Jyoti Bala; Gupta, Kanchan; Dwivedi, Anila

    2015-11-01

    The oviduct plays a crucial role in female reproduction by regulating gamete transport, providing a specific microenvironment for fertilization and early embryonic development. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostaglandins play essential role in carrying out these oviduct-specific functions. Estrogen upregulates COX-2 expression in rat oviduct; however, the mechanisms responsible for regulation of COX-2 expression in rat oviductal epithelial cells (OECs) remain unclear. In the present study, we proposed that estrogen induces COX-2 expression via G-protein coupled receptor i.e., GPR30 in OECs. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the effects of E2-BSA, ICI 182,780, GPR30 agonist and GPR30 antagonist on COX-2 expression and explored potential signaling pathway leading to COX-2 expression. Co-localization experiments revealed GPR30 to be primarily located in the peri-nuclear space, which was also the site of E2-BSA-fluorescein isothiocyanate (E2-BSA-FITC) binding. The E2-BSA induced-COX-2 and prostaglandin release were subjected to regulation by both EGFR and PI3K signaling as inhibitors of c-Src kinase (PP2), EGFR (EGFR inhibitor) and PI-3 kinase (LY294002) attenuated E2-BSA mediated effect. These results suggest that EGFR transactivation leading to activation of PI-3K/Akt pathway participates in COX-2 expression in rat OECs. Interestingly, E2-BSA induced COX-2 expression and subsequent prostaglandin release were abolished by NF-κB inhibitor. In addition, E2-BSA induced the nuclear translocation of p65-NF-κB and up-regulated the NF-κB promoter activity in rat OECs. Taken together, results demonstrated that E2-BSA induced the COX-2 expression and consequent PGE2 and PGF2α release in rat OECs. These effects are mediated through GPR30-derived EGFR transactivation and PI-3K/Akt cascade leading to NF-κB activation.

  4. Distribution and time-course of 4-hydroxynonenal, heat shock protein 110/105 family members and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the hippocampus of rat during trimethyltin-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Corvino, V; Marchese, E; Zarkovic, N; Zarkovic, K; Cindric, M; Waeg, G; Michetti, F; Geloso, M C

    2011-08-01

    Trimethyltin (TMT), an organotin compound considered a useful tool to obtain an experimental model of neurodegeneration, exhibits neurotoxicant effects selectively localised in the limbic system and especially in the hippocampus, which are different in the rat and in mice. In the rat hippocampus, we investigated the expression of aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal, a major bioactive marker of membrane lipid peroxidation, heat shock protein (HSP) 110/105 family members, markers of oxidative stress, and the neuroinflammatory marker cyclooxygenase-2 after TMT-intoxication at various time points after treatment. Our data show that TMT-induced neurodegeneration in the rat hippocampus is associated specifically with oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, but not with HSP expression, indicating species-specific differences in the neurotoxicity of TMT between rats and mice.

  5. Adverse Effects of Oral Nonselective and cyclooxygenase-2-Selective NSAIDs on Hospitalization for Acute Kidney Injury: A Nested Case-Control Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-I; Shih, Chia-Jen; Chen, Yung-Tai; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Yang, Chih-Yu; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chu, Dachen

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the association between the use of nonselective or cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-selective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in a general Asian population. We conducted an observational, nationwide, nested case-control cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database between 2010 and 2012. AKI cases were defined as hospitalization with a principle diagnosis of AKI. Each case was matched to 4 randomly selected controls based on age, sex, and the month and year of cohort entry. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to demonstrate the association between hospitalization for AKI and current, recent, or past use of an oral NSAID. During the study period, we identified 6199 patients with AKI and 24,796 matched controls. Overall, current users (adjusted OR 2.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.28-3.28) and recent users (adjusted OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.35) were associated with increased risk of hospitalization for AKI. The risk was also similar for nonselective NSAIDs. However, neither current nor recent use of COX-2 inhibitors was significantly associated with AKI events. Our study supported that the initiation of nonselective NSAIDs rather than COX-2 inhibitors is associated with an increased risk of AKI requiring hospitalization. Future randomized trials are needed to elucidate these findings. PMID:26945352

  6. Melatonin-mediated Bim up-regulation and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) down-regulation enhances tunicamycin-induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seon Min; Min, Kyoung-jin; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Melatonin is involved in many physiological functions, and it has differential effects on apoptosis in normal and cancer cells. However, the mechanism of its antitumor roles is not well understood. In this study, we show that melatonin enhances tunicamycin-induced apoptosis in human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells. Melatonin up-regulates pro-apoptotic protein Bim expression at the transcriptional levels in the presence of tunicamycin. Melatonin inhibits tunicamycin-induced COX-2 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of COX-2 activity using the COX-2 inhibitor, NS398, increases tunicamycin-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, these effects were not associated with melatonin receptor signal pathways. Pertussis toxin (a general Gi protein inhibitor) or luzindole (a nonspecific melatonin receptor antagonist) did not reverse the effect of melatonin. In addition, melatonin blocked tunicamycin-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity, p65 nuclear translocation, and p38 MAPK activation. Melatonin-mediated p38 MAPK inhibition contributed to decreased COX-2 mRNA stability. Taken together, our results suggest that melatonin enhances antitumor function through up-regulation of Bim expression and down-regulation of COX-2 expression in tunicamycin-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. PMID:25711465

  7. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, inhibits melanoma cancer cell migration by reducing the expressions of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin E2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tripti; Vaid, Mudit; Katiyar, Nandan; Sharma, Samriti; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin disease due, in large part, to its propensity to metastasize. We have examined the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, on human melanoma cancer cell migration and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using melanoma cell lines, A375 and Hs294. Using an in vitro cell migration assay, we show that over expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGE2 receptors promote the migration of cells. We found that treatment of A375 and Hs294 cells with berberine resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of migration of these cells, which was associated with a reduction in the levels of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptors (EP2 and EP4). Treatment of cells with celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, or transient transfection of cells with COX-2 small interfering RNA, also inhibited cell migration. Treatment of the cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an inducer of COX-2 or PGE2, enhanced cell migration, whereas berberine inhibited TPA- or PGE2-promoted cell migration. Berberine reduced the basal levels as well as PGE2-stimulated expression levels of EP2 and EP4. Treatment of the cells with the EP4 agonist stimulated cell migration and berberine blocked EP4 agonist-induced cell migration activity. Moreover, berberine inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), an upstream regulator of COX-2, in A375 cells, and treatment of cells with caffeic acid phenethyl ester, an inhibitor of NF-κB, inhibited cell migration. Together, these results indicate for the first time that berberine inhibits melanoma cell migration, an essential step in invasion and metastasis, by inhibition of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptors. PMID:20974686

  8. Induction of G2/M arrest and inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 activity by curcumin in human bladder cancer T24 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol; Kim, Gi Young; Kim, Gun Do; Choi, Byung Tae; Park, Yeong-Min; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2006-05-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenol compound derived from Curcuma longa Linn, has been recognized as a promising anti-cancer drug due to its multiple properties including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-carcinogenic activities. To elucidate the mechanisms by which curcumin inhibits human bladder carcinoma T24 cell proliferation, we tested the effects of curcumin on specific cell cycle pathways and on the expression of cyclooxygenases (COXs). Curcumin inhibited the growth of T24 cells and induced G2/M arrest in a concentration-dependent manner, effects associated with the down-regulation of cyclin A and up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p21 (WAF1/CIP1). However, other G2/M regulatory molecules, such as cyclin A, Cdc2, Cdk2, Wee1 and Cdc25C, were not modulated by curcumin treatment. Furthermore, curcumin decreased the levels of COX-2 mRNA and protein expression without significant changes in the levels of COX-1, which correlated with a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis. These observations suggest that curcumin may have therapeutic potential for bladder cancer patients. PMID:16596191

  9. Protein Kinase Cα-dependent Phosphorylation of the mRNA-stabilizing Factor HuR: Implications for Posttranscriptional Regulation of Cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Doller, Anke; Huwiler, Andrea; Müller, Roswitha; Radeke, Heinfried H.; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the ATP analogue adenosine-5′-O-(3-thio)triphosphate–induced nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the mRNA stabilizing factor HuR in human (h) mesangial cells (MC). Using synthetic protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors and small interfering RNA approaches, we demonstrated that knockdown of PKCα efficiently blocked the ATP-dependent nuclear HuR export to the cytoplasm. The functional importance of PKCα in HuR shuttling is highlighted by the high cytosolic HuR content detected in hMC stably overexpressing PKCα compared with mock-transfected cells. The ATP-induced recruitment of HuR to the cytoplasm is preceded by a direct interaction of PKCα with nuclear HuR and accompanied by increased Ser phosphorylation as demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Mapping of putative PKC target sites identified serines 158 and 221 as being indispensable for HuR phosphorylation by PKCα. RNA pull-down assay and RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that the HuR shuttling by ATP is accompanied by an increased HuR binding to cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 mRNA. Physiologically, the ATP-dependent increase in RNA binding is linked with an augmentation in COX-2 mRNA stability and subsequent increase in prostaglandin E2 synthesis. Regulation of HuR via PKCα-dependent phosphorylation emphasizes the importance of posttranslational modification for stimulus-dependent HuR shuttling. PMID:17392515

  10. Epidermal growth factor-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines is mediated through extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 but is Src and nuclear factor-kappa B independent.

    PubMed

    Husvik, Camilla; Bryne, Magne; Halstensen, Trond S

    2009-10-01

    The intracellular signalling cascade(s) mediating epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression is poorly defined in oral carcinomas. Investigation of two different oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines with high EGF-induced COX-2 expression revealed, however, that this expression was dependent on two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways [extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38] because combined inhibition of these pathways was needed to abolish EGF-induced COX-2 expression. Surprisingly, inhibition of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) increased EGF-induced COX-2 expression in the basaloid OSCC cell line (C12), suggesting a PI3K-controlled, inhibitory COX-2-regulating pathway. Neither the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), nor Src, was involved in EGF-induced COX-2 expression. The results suggest that EGF-induced COX-2 expression is regulated by several pathways, and emphasizes that individual tumors use different strategies for intracellular signalling. PMID:19758248

  11. Upregulation of Cyclooxygenase-2/Prostaglandin E2 (COX-2/PGE2) Pathway Member Multiple Drug Resistance-Associated Protein 4 (MRP4) and Downregulation of Prostaglandin Transporter (PGT) and 15-Prostaglandin Dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kochel, Tyler J.; Goloubeva, Olga G.; Fulton, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are indicators of a poor prognosis in breast cancer. Using several independent publicly available breast cancer gene expression databases, we investigated other members of the PGE2 pathway. PGE2 is produced by COX-2 and actively exported by multiple drug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) into the extracellular microenvironment, where PGE2 can bind four cognate EP receptors (EP1–EP4) and initiate diverse biological signaling pathways. Alternatively, PGE2 is imported via the prostaglandin transporter (PGT) and metabolized by 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH/HPGD). We made the novel observation that MRP4, PGT, and 15-PGDH are differentially expressed among distinct breast cancer molecular subtypes; this finding was confirmed in independent datasets. In triple-negative breast cancer, the observed gene expression pattern (high COX-2, high MRP4, low PGT, and low 15-PGDH) would favor high levels of tumor-promoting PGE2 in the tumor microenvironment that may contribute to the overall poor prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:27257388

  12. Upregulation of Cyclooxygenase-2/Prostaglandin E2 (COX-2/PGE2) Pathway Member Multiple Drug Resistance-Associated Protein 4 (MRP4) and Downregulation of Prostaglandin Transporter (PGT) and 15-Prostaglandin Dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kochel, Tyler J; Goloubeva, Olga G; Fulton, Amy M

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are indicators of a poor prognosis in breast cancer. Using several independent publicly available breast cancer gene expression databases, we investigated other members of the PGE2 pathway. PGE2 is produced by COX-2 and actively exported by multiple drug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) into the extracellular microenvironment, where PGE2 can bind four cognate EP receptors (EP1-EP4) and initiate diverse biological signaling pathways. Alternatively, PGE2 is imported via the prostaglandin transporter (PGT) and metabolized by 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH/HPGD). We made the novel observation that MRP4, PGT, and 15-PGDH are differentially expressed among distinct breast cancer molecular subtypes; this finding was confirmed in independent datasets. In triple-negative breast cancer, the observed gene expression pattern (high COX-2, high MRP4, low PGT, and low 15-PGDH) would favor high levels of tumor-promoting PGE2 in the tumor microenvironment that may contribute to the overall poor prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:27257388

  13. (R)-Profens Are Substrate-Selective Inhibitors of Endocannabinoid Oxygenation by COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Kelsey C.; Hermanson, Daniel J.; Musee, Joel; Prusakiewicz, Jeffery J.; Scheib, Jami L.; Carter, Bruce D.; Banerjee, Surajit; Oates, J.A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) catalyzes the oxygenation of arachidonic acid and the endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonoylglycerol and arachidonoylethanolamide. Evaluation of a series of COX-2 inhibitors revealed that many weak, competitive inhibitors of arachidonic acid oxygenation are potent inhibitors of endocannabinoid oxygenation. (R)-Enantiomers of ibuprofen, naproxen, and flurbiprofen, which are considered to be inactive as COX-2 inhibitors, are potent “substrate-selective inhibitors” of endocannabinoid oxygenation. Crystal structures of the COX-2-(R)-naproxen and COX-2-(R)-flurbiprofen complexes verified this unexpected binding and defined the orientation of the (R)-enantiomers relative to (S)-enantiomers. (R)-Profens selectively inhibited endocannabinoid oxygenation by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated dorsal root ganglion cells. Substrate-selective inhibition provides novel tools for investigating the role of COX-2 in endocannabinoid oxygenation and a possible explanation for the ability of (R)-profens to maintain endocannabinoid tone in models of neuropathic pain. PMID:22053353

  14. Molecular docking analysis of known flavonoids as duel COX-2 inhibitors in the context of cancer.

    PubMed

    Dash, Raju; Uddin, Mir Muhammad Nasir; Hosen, S M Zahid; Rahim, Zahed Bin; Dinar, Abu Mansur; Kabir, Mohammad Shah Hafez; Sultan, Ramiz Ahmed; Islam, Ashekul; Hossain, Md Kamrul

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) catalyzed synthesis of prostaglandin E2 and it associates with tumor growth, infiltration, and metastasis in preclinical experiments. Known inhibitors against COX-2 exhibit toxicity. Therefore, it is of interest to screen natural compounds like flavanoids against COX-2. Molecular docking using 12 known flavanoids against COX-2 by FlexX and of ArgusLab were performed. All compounds showed a favourable binding energy of >-10 KJ/mol in FlexX and > -8 kcal/mol in ArgusLab. However, this data requires in vitro and in vivo verification for further consideration. PMID:26770028

  15. Molecular docking analysis of known flavonoids as duel COX-2 inhibitors in the context of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Raju; Uddin, Mir Muhammad Nasir; Hosen, S.M. Zahid; Rahim, Zahed Bin; Dinar, Abu Mansur; Kabir, Mohammad Shah Hafez; Sultan, Ramiz Ahmed; Islam, Ashekul; Hossain, Md Kamrul

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) catalyzed synthesis of prostaglandin E2 and it associates with tumor growth, infiltration, and metastasis in preclinical experiments. Known inhibitors against COX-2 exhibit toxicity. Therefore, it is of interest to screen natural compounds like flavanoids against COX-2. Molecular docking using 12 known flavanoids against COX-2 by FlexX and of ArgusLab were performed. All compounds showed a favourable binding energy of >-10 KJ/mol in FlexX and > -8 kcal/mol in ArgusLab. However, this data requires in vitro and in vivo verification for further consideration. PMID:26770028

  16. Endoglin regulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Jerkic, Mirjana; Rivas-Elena, Juan V; Santibanez, Juan F; Prieto, Marta; Rodríguez-Barbero, Alicia; Perez-Barriocanal, Fernando; Pericacho, Miguel; Arévalo, Miguel; Vary, Calvin P H; Letarte, Michelle; Bernabeu, Carmelo; López-Novoa, Jose M

    2006-08-01

    The endoglin heterozygous (Eng(+/-)) mouse, which serves as a model of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), was shown to express reduced levels of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) with impaired activity. Because of intricate changes in vasomotor function in the Eng(+/-) mice and the potential interactions between the NO- and prostaglandin-producing pathways, we assessed the expression and function of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoforms. A specific upregulation of COX-2 in the vascular endothelium and increased urinary excretion of prostaglandin E(2) were observed in the Eng(+/-) mice. Specific COX-2 inhibition with parecoxib transiently increased arterial pressure in Eng(+/-) but not in Eng(+/+) mice. Transfection of endoglin in L6E9 myoblasts, shown previously to stimulate eNOS expression, led to downregulation of COX-2 with no change in COX-1. In addition, COX-2 promoter activity and protein levels were inversely correlated with endoglin levels, in doxycyclin-inducible endothelial cells. Chronic NO synthesis inhibition with N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester induced a marked increase in COX-2 only in the normal Eng(+/+) mice. N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester also increased COX-2 expression and promoter activity in doxycyclin-inducible endoglin expressing endothelial cells, but not in control cells. The level of COX-2 expression following transforming growth factor-beta1 treatment was less in endoglin than in mock transfected L6E9 myoblasts and was higher in human endothelial cells silenced for endoglin expression. Our results indicate that endoglin is involved in the regulation of COX-2 activity. Furthermore, reduced endoglin levels and associated impaired NO production may be responsible, at least in part, for augmented COX-2 expression and activity in the Eng(+/-) mice. PMID:16840721

  17. o,p'-DDT induces cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in murine macrophages: Role of AP-1 and CRE promoter elements and PI3-kinase/Akt/MAPK signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Eun Hee; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hyung-Kyun; Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-12-01

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has been used as an insecticide to prevent the devastation of malaria in tropical zones. However, many reports suggest that DDT may act as an endocrine disruptor and may have possible carcinogenic effects. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) acts as a link between inflammation and carcinogenesis through its involvement in tumor promotion. In the present study, we examined the effect of o,p'-DDT on COX-2 gene expression and analyzed the molecular mechanism of its activity in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. Exposure to o,p'-DDT markedly enhanced the production of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), a major COX-2 metabolite, in murine macrophages. Furthermore, o,p'-DDT dose-dependently increased the levels of COX-2 protein and mRNA. Transfection with human COX-2 promoter construct, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNA-affinity protein-binding assay experiments revealed that o,p'-DDT activated the activator protein 1 (AP-1) and cyclic AMP response element (CRE) sites, but not the NF-{kappa}B site. Phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3)-kinase, its downstream signaling molecule, Akt, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) were also significantly activated by the o,p'-DDT-induced AP-1 and CRE activation. These results demonstrate that o,p'-DDT induced COX-2 expression via AP-1 and CRE activation through the PI3-K/Akt/ERK, JNK, and p38 MAP kinase pathways. These findings provide further insight into the signal transduction pathways involved in the carcinogenic effects of o,p'-DDT.

  18. Relationship between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and serum cyclooxygenase-2 Level, and the synergistic effect of celecoxib and gefitinib on EGFR expression in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Li, Huanhuan; Su, Fan; Li, Jing; Ma, Xiaoping; Gong, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations occur mostly in patients with lung adenocarcinoma; such patients are also more likely to express cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), indicating a possible relationship between EGFR mutation and COX-2. The COX-2 and EGFR pathways mutually enhance their procarcinogenic effects in different tumor types. Therefore, simultaneous EGFR and COX-2 inhibition may be a promising therapeutic approach for patients with lung adenocarcinoma. We obtained tissue and serum samples from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to detect the relationship between EGFR mutation and serum COX-2 level. Subsequently, gefitinib was combined with celecoxib to investigate the efficacy of inhibition in vitro in two NSCLC cell lines: HCC827 (del E746-A750) and A549 (wild-type EGFR). The cells were treated with gefitinib or celecoxib alone or with gefitinib plus celecoxib. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed and correlated with expression of COX-2 and phosphorylated (p)-EGFR. The EGFR mutation rate of the high-COX-2 patients was significantly higher than that in the low-COX-2 patients. Multivariate analysis showed that high COX-2 levels were independently associated with EGFR mutation. Celecoxib and gefitinib inhibited cell growth in both cell lines. At sufficiently high concentrations, celecoxib plus gefitinib significantly mutually enhanced their anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects in both cell lines. At low concentrations, the combination had no additional effects on A549 cells. There was increased down regulation of COX-2 and p-EGFR when both cell lines were treated with high-concentration celecoxib plus gefitinib compared to either agent alone. This study demonstrates that high serum COX-2 levels may indicate EGFR mutations and that the efficacy of combined celecoxib and gefitinib is significantly greater in NSCLC cells with EGFR mutations; at high concentrations, the combination is efficacious in wild-type NSCLC cells.

  19. Hu-antigen receptor (HuR) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in human non-small-cell lung carcinoma: associations with clinicopathological parameters, tumor proliferative capacity and patients' survival.

    PubMed

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Sfiniadakis, Ioannis; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Agapitos, Emmanuel; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    Hu-antigen R (HuR) is considered to play a central role in tumor formation, growth, and metastasis by binding to messenger RNAs (mRNAs) encoding proteins such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducing their expression via mRNA stabilization and/or altered translation. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of HuR and COX-2 protein expression in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). HuR and COX-2 expression was assessed immunohistochemically on tissue microarrays of 81 surgically resected NSCLC and was analyzed in relation with clinicopathological characteristics and patients' survival. Enhanced total HuR expression was significantly associated with tumor histological type and presence of lymph node metastases, as well as with increased tumor proliferative capacity and poor patients' outcome (p = 0.039, p = 0.017, p = 0.033, and p = 0.022, respectively). Enhanced COX-2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymphovascular invasion and increased tumor proliferative capacity (p = 0.031 and p = 0.023, respectively). Concomitant elevated HuR/COX-2 expression levels were significantly associated with tumor histological type and increased proliferative capacity (p = 0.002 and p = 0.045, respectively). Enhanced total HuR expression, as well as its cytoplasmic localization, was significantly associated with increased COX-2 expression (p = 0.015 and p = 0.001, respectively). The present study supported evidence that HuR may participate in malignant transformation of NSCLC, reinforcing its usefulness as potential therapeutic target in this type of neoplasia.

  20. Cynanchum wilfordii Radix attenuates liver fat accumulation and damage by suppressing hepatic cyclooxygenase-2 and mitogen-activated protein kinase in mice fed with a high-fat and high-fructose diet.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seon-A; Lee, SungRyul; Sohn, Eun-Hwa; Yang, Jaehyuk; Park, Dae Won; Jeong, Yong Joon; Kim, Inhye; Kwon, Jung Eun; Song, Hae Seong; Cho, Young Mi; Meng, Xue; Koo, Hyun Jung; Kang, Se Chan

    2016-09-01

    Excessive consumption of fat and fructose augments the pathological progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through hepatic fibrosis, inflammation, and hepatic de novo lipogenesis. We hypothesized that supplementation with Cynanchum wilfordii extract (CWE) decreases fat accumulation in the liver by suppressing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The beneficial effect of CWE was evaluated in a murine model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Mice were fed either a normal diet or an atherogenic diet with fructose (ATHFR) in the presence or absence of CWE (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg; n=6/group). Treatment with ATHFR induced a hepatosplenomegaly-like condition (increased liver and spleen weight); this pathological change was attenuated in the presence of CWE. The ATHFR group exhibited impaired liver function, as evidenced by increased blood levels of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic pyruvic transaminase, fat accumulation in the liver, and lipid profiles. Supplementation of CWE (100 and 200 mg/kg, P<.05) ameliorated these impaired liver functions. Atherogenic diet with fructose increased the protein levels of COX-2 and p38 MAPK, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. These signaling pathways, which are associated with the inflammatory response, were markedly suppressed after CWE treatment (100 and 200 mg/kg). In summary, CWE supplementation reduced high-fat and high-fructose diet-induced fat accumulation and damage in the liver by suppressing COX-2, NF-κB, and p38 MAPK. PMID:27632911

  1. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase and cyclooxygenase-2 increases levels of endocannabinoid related molecules and produces analgesia via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha in a model of inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Maulik D; Richardson, Denise; Robinson, Ian; Garle, Michael J; Patel, Annie; Sun, Yan; Sagar, Devi R; Bennett, Andrew J; Alexander, Stephen P H; Kendall, David A; Barrett, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2008-07-01

    The antinociceptive effects of the endocannabinoids (ECs) are enhanced by inhibiting catabolic enzymes such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The physiological relevance of the metabolism of ECs by other pathways, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) is less clear. To address this question we compared the effects of local inhibition of FAAH versus COX2 (URB597 and nimesulide, respectively) on inflammatory hyperalgesia and levels of endocannabinoids and related molecules in the hindpaw. Inflammatory hyperalgesia was measured following intraplantar injection of carrageenan. Effects of intraplantar injection of URB597 (25 microg and 100 microg) or nimesulide (50 microg) on hyperalgesia and hindpaw levels of anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2AG) and N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) were determined. Although both doses of URB597 increased levels of AEA and 2AG in the carrageenan inflamed hindpaw, only the lower dose of URB597 attenuated hyperalgesia (P<0.05). Nimesulide attenuated both hyperalgesia and hindpaw oedema (P<0.001, P<0.01, respectively) and increased levels of PEA (P<0.05) in the hindpaw. Since both AEA and PEA are ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha), the effects of the PPARalpha antagonist GW6471 on nimesulide- and URB597-mediated effects were studied. GW6471, but not a PPARgamma antagonist, blocked the inhibitory effects of nimesulide and URB597 on hyperalgesia. Our data suggest that both COX2 and FAAH play a role in the metabolism of endocannabinoids and related molecules. The finding that PPARalpha antagonism blocked the inhibitory effects of nimesulide and URB597 suggests that PPARalpha contributes to their antinociceptive effects in the carrageenan model of inflammatory hyperalgesia.

  2. Posttranslational Modification of the AU-Rich Element Binding Protein HuR by Protein Kinase Cδ Elicits Angiotensin II-Induced Stabilization and Nuclear Export of Cyclooxygenase 2 mRNA▿

    PubMed Central

    Doller, Anke; Akool, El-Sayed; Huwiler, Andrea; Müller, Roswitha; Radeke, Heinfried H.; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The mRNA stabilizing factor HuR is involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of many genes, including that coding for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Employing RNA interference technology and actinomycin D experiments, we demonstrate that in human mesangial cells (hMC) the amplification of cytokine-induced COX-2 by angiotensin II (AngII) occurs via a HuR-mediated increase of mRNA stability. Using COX-2 promoter constructs with different portions of the 3′ untranslated region of COX-2, we found that the increase in COX-2 mRNA stability is attributable to a distal class III type of AU-rich element (ARE). Likewise, the RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed AngII-induced binding of HuR to this ARE. Using the RNA pulldown assay, we demonstrate that the AngII-caused HuR assembly with COX-2 mRNA is found in free and cytoskeleton-bound polysomes indicative of an active RNP complex. Mechanistically, the increased HuR binding to COX-2-ARE by AngII is accompanied by increased nucleocytoplasmic HuR shuttling and depends on protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), which physically interacts with nuclear HuR, thereby promoting its phosphorylation. Mapping of phosphorylation sites identified serines 221 and 318 as critical target sites for PKCδ-triggered HuR phosphorylation and AngII-induced HuR export to the cytoplasm. Posttranslational modification of HuR by PKCδ represents an important novel mode of HuR activation implied in renal COX-2 regulation. PMID:18285462

  3. Inhibition of PK-PBAN-mediated functions in insects: Discovery of selective and non-selective inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antagonistic properties of a few linear and backbone cyclic (BBC) conformationally constraint peptide libraries and their analogs, were tested for the ability to inhibit pyrokinin/pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PK/PBAN) mediated functions: sex pheromone biosynthesis in Heliothis...

  4. Clinical Impact of Selective and Non-selective Beta Blockers on Survival in Ovarian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Jack L.; Thaker, Premal H.; Nick, Alpa M.; Ramondetta, Lois M.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Urbauer, Diana L.; Matsuo, Koji; Squires, Kathryn; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Sood, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Preclinical evidence suggests that sustained adrenergic activation can promote ovarian cancer growth and metastasis. We examined the impact of beta-adrenergic blockade on clinical outcome of women with epithelial ovarian, primary peritoneal or fallopian tube cancers (collectively, EOC). METHODS A multicenter review of 1,425 women with histopathologically confirmed EOC was performed. Comparisons were made between patients with documented beta blocker use during chemotherapy and those without beta blocker use. RESULTS The median age of patients in this study was 63 years (range, 21–93 years). The sample included 269 patients who received beta blockers. Of those, 193 (71.7%) were receiving beta-1 adrenergic receptor (ADRB1) selective agents, and the remaining patients were receiving non-selective beta antagonists. The primary indication for beta blocker use was hypertension but also included arrhythmia and post-myocardial infarction management. For patients receiving any beta blocker, the median overall survival (OS) was 47.8 months versus42 months (P = 0.04) for non-users. The median OS based on beta blocker receptor selectivity was 94.9 months for those receiving non-selective beta blockers versus 38 months for those receiving ADRB1 selective agents (P < 0.001). Hypertension was associated with decreased OS compared to no hypertension across all groups. However, even in patients with hypertension, users of a non-selective beta blocker had a longer median OS than non-users observed (38.2 vs 90 months, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Use of non-selective beta blockers in epithelial ovarian cancer patients was associated with longer OS. These findings may have implications for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26301456

  5. Pyrimidine-based fluorescent COX-2 inhibitors: synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Ole; Kaur, Jatinder; Bhardwaj, Atul; Wuest, Frank R

    2016-07-26

    The cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme is overexpressed in a variety of cancers and mediates inflammatory processes that aid the growth and progression of malignancies. Three novel and selective fluorescent COX-2 inhibitors have been designed and synthesized on the basis of previously reported pyrimidine-based COX-2 inhibitors and the 7-nitrobenzofurazan fluorophore. In vitro evaluation of COX-1/COX-2 isozyme inhibition identified N-(2-((7-nitro-benzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)amino)propyl)-4-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-6-(trifluoro-methyl)-pyrimidin-2-amine (6) as a novel potent and selective COX-2 inhibitor (IC50 = 1.8 μM). Lead compound (6) was further evaluated for its ability to selectively visualize COX-2 isozyme in COX-2 expressing human colon cancer cell line HCA-7 using confocal microscopy experiments. PMID:27383140

  6. Development of Antioxidant COX-2 Inhibitors as Radioprotective Agents for Radiation Therapy—A Hypothesis-Driven Review

    PubMed Central

    Laube, Markus; Kniess, Torsten; Pietzsch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) evolved to be a primary treatment modality for cancer patients. Unfortunately, the cure or relief of symptoms is still accompanied by radiation-induced side effects with severe acute and late pathophysiological consequences. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are potentially useful in this regard because radioprotection of normal tissue and/or radiosensitizing effects on tumor tissue have been described for several compounds of this structurally diverse class. This review aims to substantiate the hypothesis that antioxidant COX-2 inhibitors are promising radioprotectants because of intercepting radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in normal tissue, especially the vascular system. For this, literature reporting on COX inhibitors exerting radioprotective and/or radiosensitizing action as well as on antioxidant COX inhibitors will be reviewed comprehensively with the aim to find cross-points of both and, by that, stimulate further research in the field of radioprotective agents. PMID:27104573

  7. Non-selective cation channels in plasma and vacuolar membranes and their contribution to K+ transport.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Dobrovinskaya, Oxana

    2014-05-15

    Both in vacuolar and plasma membranes, in addition to truly K(+)-selective channels there is a variety of non-selective channels, which conduct K(+) and other ions with little preference. Many non-selective channels in the plasma membrane are active at depolarized potentials, thus, contributing to K(+) efflux rather than to K(+) uptake. They may play important roles in xylem loading or contribute to a K(+) leak, induced by salt or oxidative stress. Here, three currents, expressed in root cells, are considered: voltage-insensitive cation current, non-selective outwardly rectifying current, and low-selective conductance, activated by reactive oxygen species. The latter two do not only poorly discriminate between different cations (like K(+)vs Na(+)), but also conduct anions. Such solute channels may mediate massive electroneutral transport of salts and might be involved in osmotic adjustment or volume decrease, associated with cell death. In the tonoplast two major currents are mediated by SV (slow) and FV (fast) vacuolar channels, respectively, which are virtually impermeable for anions. SV channels conduct mono- and divalent cations indiscriminately and are activated by high cytosolic Ca(2+) and depolarized voltages. FV channels are inhibited by micromolar cytosolic Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and polyamines, and conduct a variety of monovalent cations, including K(+). Strikingly, both SV and FV channels sense the K(+) content of vacuoles, which modulates their voltage dependence, and in case of SV, also alleviates channel's inhibition by luminal Ca(2+). Therefore, SV and FV channels may operate as K(+)-sensing valves, controlling K(+) distribution between the vacuole and the cytosol.

  8. BSL-3 laboratory practices in the United States: comparison of select agent and non-select agent facilities.

    PubMed

    Richards, Stephanie L; Pompei, Victoria C; Anderson, Alice

    2014-01-01

    New construction of biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) laboratories in the United States has increased in the past decade to facilitate research on potential bioterrorism agents. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention inspect BSL-3 facilities and review commissioning documentation, but no single agency has oversight over all BSL-3 facilities. This article explores the extent to which standard operating procedures in US BSL-3 facilities vary between laboratories with select agent or non-select agent status. Comparisons are made for the following variables: personnel training, decontamination, personal protective equipment (PPE), medical surveillance, security access, laboratory structure and maintenance, funding, and pest management. Facilities working with select agents had more complex training programs and decontamination procedures than non-select agent facilities. Personnel working in select agent laboratories were likely to use powered air purifying respirators, while non-select agent laboratories primarily used N95 respirators. More rigorous medical surveillance was carried out in select agent workers (although not required by the select agent program) and a higher level of restrictive access to laboratories was found. Most select agent and non-select agent laboratories reported adequate structural integrity in facilities; however, differences were observed in personnel perception of funding for repairs. Pest management was carried out by select agent personnel more frequently than non-select agent personnel. Our findings support the need to promote high quality biosafety training and standard operating procedures in both select agent and non-select agent laboratories to improve occupational health and safety. PMID:24552359

  9. Rethinking the role of non-selective beta blockers in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ferrarese, Alberto; Zanetto, Alberto; Germani, Giacomo; Burra, Patrizia; Senzolo, Marco

    2016-08-28

    Non-selective beta blockers (NSBB) are commonly used to prevent portal hypertensive bleeding in cirrhotics. Nevertheless, in the last years, the use of NSBB in critically decompensated patients, especially in those with refractory ascites, has been questioned, mainly for an increased risk of mortality and worsening of systemic hemodynamics. Moreover, even if NSBB have been reported to correlate with a higher risk of renal failure and severe infection in patients with advanced liver disease and hypotension, their use has been associated with a reduction of risk of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, modification of gut permeability and reduction of bacterial translocation. This manuscript systematically reviews the published evidences about harms and benefits of the use of NSBB in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. PMID:27648153

  10. Multilevel Concatenated Block Modulation Codes for the Frequency Non-selective Rayleigh Fading Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Rhee, Dojun

    1996-01-01

    This paper is concerned with construction of multilevel concatenated block modulation codes using a multi-level concatenation scheme for the frequency non-selective Rayleigh fading channel. In the construction of multilevel concatenated modulation code, block modulation codes are used as the inner codes. Various types of codes (block or convolutional, binary or nonbinary) are being considered as the outer codes. In particular, we focus on the special case for which Reed-Solomon (RS) codes are used as the outer codes. For this special case, a systematic algebraic technique for constructing q-level concatenated block modulation codes is proposed. Codes have been constructed for certain specific values of q and compared with the single-level concatenated block modulation codes using the same inner codes. A multilevel closest coset decoding scheme for these codes is proposed.

  11. Rethinking the role of non-selective beta blockers in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, Alberto; Zanetto, Alberto; Germani, Giacomo; Burra, Patrizia; Senzolo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Non-selective beta blockers (NSBB) are commonly used to prevent portal hypertensive bleeding in cirrhotics. Nevertheless, in the last years, the use of NSBB in critically decompensated patients, especially in those with refractory ascites, has been questioned, mainly for an increased risk of mortality and worsening of systemic hemodynamics. Moreover, even if NSBB have been reported to correlate with a higher risk of renal failure and severe infection in patients with advanced liver disease and hypotension, their use has been associated with a reduction of risk of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, modification of gut permeability and reduction of bacterial translocation. This manuscript systematically reviews the published evidences about harms and benefits of the use of NSBB in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. PMID:27648153

  12. Predators reduce abundance and species richness of coral reef fish recruits via non-selective predation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinlein, J. M.; Stier, A. C.; Steele, M. A.

    2010-06-01

    Predators have important effects on coral reef fish populations, but their effects on community structure have only recently been investigated and are not yet well understood. Here, the effect of predation on the diversity and abundance of young coral reef fishes was experimentally examined in Moorea, French Polynesia. Effects of predators were quantified by monitoring recruitment of fishes onto standardized patch reefs in predator-exclosure cages or uncaged reefs. At the end of the 54-day experiment, recruits were 74% less abundant on reefs exposed to predators than on caged ones, and species richness was 42% lower on reefs exposed to predators. Effects of predators varied somewhat among families, however, rarefaction analysis indicated that predators foraged non-selectively among species. These results indicate that predation can alter diversity of reef fish communities by indiscriminately reducing the abundance of fishes soon after settlement, thereby reducing the number of species present on reefs.

  13. Rethinking the role of non-selective beta blockers in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, Alberto; Zanetto, Alberto; Germani, Giacomo; Burra, Patrizia; Senzolo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Non-selective beta blockers (NSBB) are commonly used to prevent portal hypertensive bleeding in cirrhotics. Nevertheless, in the last years, the use of NSBB in critically decompensated patients, especially in those with refractory ascites, has been questioned, mainly for an increased risk of mortality and worsening of systemic hemodynamics. Moreover, even if NSBB have been reported to correlate with a higher risk of renal failure and severe infection in patients with advanced liver disease and hypotension, their use has been associated with a reduction of risk of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, modification of gut permeability and reduction of bacterial translocation. This manuscript systematically reviews the published evidences about harms and benefits of the use of NSBB in patients with decompensated cirrhosis.

  14. Therapeutic Efficacy of E-64-d, a Selective Calpain Inhibitor, in Experimental Acute Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zifeng; Huang, Zheng; Dai, Hao; Wei, Licheng; Sun, Songtao; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the therapeutic effect of calpain inhibitor E-64-d on SCI and to find a new approach to treat SCI. When an SCI rat model was established, it was immediately administered with E-64-d. RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to determine the protein and mRNA levels of calpain 1 and 68-kD NFP. TUNEL staining and NeuN labeling were performed to analyze neuronal apoptosis in the lesion. Immunohistochemistry assay was carried out to observe the expressions of calpain 1 and GFAP. Cyclooxygenase-2 activity was measured to show the immune response status. Locomotor function was evaluated by inclined plane test and Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor rating scale. The results showed that calpain 1 was activated after SCI occurred. Treatment with E-64-d decreased expressions of calpain 1 and GFAP, alleviated neuronal apoptosis, inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 activity, and resulted in the promoted locomotor function. Furthermore, combination of E-64-d and MP had better efficacy than did E-64-d or MP alone. E-64-d is expected to be applied to treat SCI, and its alliance with MP may provide a valid strategy for SCI therapy. PMID:26240815

  15. Location of inhibitor binding sites in the human inducible prostaglandin E synthase, MPGES1.

    PubMed

    Prage, Edward B; Pawelzik, Sven-Christian; Busenlehner, Laura S; Kim, Kwangho; Morgenstern, Ralf; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Armstrong, Richard N

    2011-09-01

    The inducible microsomal prostaglandin E(2) synthase 1 (MPGES1) is an integral membrane protein coexpressed with and functionally coupled to cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) generating the pro-inflammatory molecule PGE(2). The development of effective inhibitors of MPGES1 holds promise as a highly selective route for controlling inflammation. In this paper, we describe the use of backbone amide H/D exchange mass spectrometry to map the binding sites of different types of inhibitors of MPGES1. The results reveal the locations of specific inhibitor binding sites that include the GSH binding site and a hydrophobic cleft in the protein thought to accommodate the prostaglandin H(2) substrate. In the absence of three-dimensional crystal structures of the enzyme-bound inhibitors, the results provide clear physical evidence that three pharmacologically active inhibitors bind in a hydrophobic cleft composed of sections of transmembrane helices Ia, IIb, IIIb, and IVb at the interface of subunits in the trimer. In principle, the H/D exchange behavior of the protein can be used as a preliminary guide for optimization of inhibitor efficacy. Finally, a comparison of the structures and H/D exchange behavior of MPGES1 and the related enzyme MGST1 in the presence of glutathione and the inhibitor glutathione sulfonate confirms the unusual observation that two proteins from the same superfamily harbor GSH binding sites in different locations.

  16. [Problems of cardiovascular toxicity of coxibs and non-selective NSA].

    PubMed

    Forejtová, S

    2006-01-01

    Non-steroidal antirheumatics (NSA) belong to the most often prescribed drugs. Certain observation studies indicate that they are used by 20 to 30% of population of developed countries. The most common NSA's adverse effects are gastrointestinal complications. Coxibs have been developed as an alternative to conventional non-selective NSA; with similar efficacy, they should reduce the risk of development of gastrointestinal complications. In the few last years, possible toxicity of coxibs and other non-steroidal antirheumatics has been widely discussed. The VIGOR study, which was performed 6 years ago, showed five times higher incidence of nonfatal myocardial infarction in patients with rofecoxib therapy as compared with naproxen. Afterwards, there was much debate about rofecoxib, and coxibs in general, whose cardiotoxicity was supported and confuted at the same time. Possible cardioprotective effect of naproxen was discussed too. Later on, results of the APPROVE study (Adenoma Polyp Prevention on Vioxx) made Merck & Co., Inc. withdraw rofecoxib from all markets voluntarily. In the end of 2004, three controversial studies on celecoxib were published. Although the first study (Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib study, APC) showed higher cardiovascular risk of celecoxib, the second study (Prevention of Adenomatosus Polyps, PreSAP) did not verify these results. Surprisingly, the third study (Alzheimer Disease and Prevention Trial, ADAPT) proved 50% increase of the risk of cardiovascular (CV) toxicity of naproxen. In the last year, researchers have tried to decide whether CV toxicity is a class effect of coxib group or a class effect of all NSA. Many observation studies proved higher CV risk both of coxibs (particularly rofecoxib) and non-selective NSA including naproxen. These new findings moved the American FDA (Food and Drug Administration) to publish guidance concerning higher CV risk of all coxibs and NSA. For the time being, the EMEA (European Agency for Evaluation

  17. COX-2 inhibitors are contraindicated for treatment of combined injury.

    PubMed

    Jiao, W; Kiang, J G; Cary, L; Elliott, T B; Pellmar, T C; Ledney, G D

    2009-12-01

    Casualties of radiation dispersal devices, nuclear detonation or major ionizing radiation accidents, in addition to radiation exposure, may sustain physical and/or thermal trauma. Radiation exposure plus additional tissue trauma is known as combined injury. There are no definitive therapeutic agents. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible enzyme expressed in pathological disorders and radiation injury, plays an important role in inflammation and the production of cytokines and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and could therefore affect the outcome for victims of combined injury. The COX-2 inhibitors celecoxib and meloxicam were evaluated for their therapeutic value against combined injury in mice. In survival studies, the COX-2 inhibitors had no beneficial effect on 30-day survival, wound healing or body weight gain after radiation injury alone or after combined injury. Meloxicam accelerated death in both wounded and combined injury mice. These drugs also induced severe hepatic toxicity, exaggerated inflammatory processes, and did not enhance hematopoietic cell regeneration. This study points to potential contraindications for use of COX-2 inhibitors in patients undergoing therapy for radiation injury and combined injury. PMID:19929415

  18. Horizontal cells of the rabbit retina are non-selectively connected to the cones.

    PubMed

    Hack, I; Peichl, L

    1999-07-01

    Mammalian horizontal cells have generally been assumed to be spectrally non-selective in their cone contacts until recently, when specific contacts have been found for some species. The rabbit retina is frequently studied as a representative of dichromatic mammalian retinae. These are the reasons for elucidating the connections of the two types of horizontal cells (A-HCs and B-HCs) with the green-sensitive and blue-sensitive cones of the rabbit retina. Individual A-HCs and B-HCs were revealed by Lucifer Yellow injections, the total cone population overlying them was stained using peanut agglutinin, and the blue cones among these were identified by the antiserum JH 455 against blue cone opsin. Both A-HCs and B-HCs indiscriminately contact the two cone types available. This holds for the green cone-dominated dorsal retina and the blue cone-dominated ventral retina. No evidence was found for a third, potentially blue cone-selective, horizontal cell type [postulated by Famiglietti, E. V. (1990) Brain Res., 535, 174-179].

  19. Effect of non-selective dopaminergic receptor agonist on disrupted maternal behavior in olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsushi; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Tan-No, Koichi; Onogi, Hiroshi; Niijima, Fukie; Tadano, Takeshi

    2010-07-11

    Olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) animals are considered a putative model of depression that produces behavioral, physiological, and neurochemical alterations resembling clinical depression. Depression is a critical cause of child abuse and neglect, and it has been reported that maternal behavior involves dopaminergic neurons of the mesolimbic pathway. In this study, we investigated the effect of apomorphine, a non-selective dopaminergic receptor agonist, on maternal behavior to examine the influence of activated brain dopaminergic function in OBX mice. In addition, we conducted the sucrose preference test to examine the reward system which has a critical relationship to mesolimbic dopaminergic function and maternal behavior. Maternal behavior was observed on postnatal day (PND) 0 and 4. OBX female mice showed a reduction in sucrose preference 2 weeks post surgery. OBX dams showed maternal behavior deficits on PND 0, and these deficits were ameliorated by administration of apomorphine. These results suggest that maternal behavior deficits in OBX dams may involve brain hypodopaminergic function in the central nervous system induced by OBX. PMID:20219556

  20. Dimethyl sulfoxide at high concentrations inhibits non-selective cation channels in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nardid, Oleg A; Schetinskey, Miroslav I; Kucherenko, Yuliya V

    2013-03-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a by-product of the pulping industry, is widely used in biological research, cryobiology and medicine. On cellular level DMSO was shown to suppress NMDA-AMPA channels activation, blocks Na+ channel activation and attenuates Ca2+ influx (Lu and Mattson 2001). In the present study we explored the whole-cell patch-clamp to examine the acute effect of high concentrations of DMSO (0.1-2 mol/l) on cation channels activity in human erythrocytes. Acute application of DMSO (0.1-2 mol/l) dissolved in Cl--containing saline buffer solution significantly inhibited cation conductance in human erythrocytes. Inhibition was concentration-dependent and had an exponential decay profile. DMSO (2 mol/l) induced cation inhibition in Cl-- containing saline solutions of: 40.3 ± 3.9% for K+, 35.4 ± 3.1% for Ca2+ and 47.4 ± 1.9% for NMDG+. Substitution of Cl- with gluconate- increased the inhibitory effect of DMSO on the Na+ current. Inhibitory effect of DMSO was neither due to high permeability of erythrocytes to DMSO nor to an increased tonicity of the bath media since no effect was observed in 2 mol/l glycerol solution. In conclusion, we have shown that high concentrations of DMSO inhibit the non-selective cation channels in human erythrocytes and thus protect the cells against Na+ and Ca2+ overload. Possible mechanisms of DMSO effect on cation conductance are discussed. PMID:23531832

  1. Differences of binding characteristics of non-selective opiates towards and delta receptor types

    SciTech Connect

    Delay-Goyet, P.; Roques, B.P.; Zajac, J.M.

    1987-08-10

    (TH)ET (etorphine), which is considered either as an universal ligand or a agonist, interacts with identical affinities K/sub D/ = 0.33 - 0.38 nM to hybrid cells and rabbit cerebellum, pure delta and -enriched opioid receptor preparations, respectively. In rat brain tissue, (TH)ET binding is inhibited by DAGO (Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-(Me)-Phe-Gly-ol), a selective agonist, in a competitive manner without apparent modification of the maximal number of sites. Furthermore, even at a DAGO concentration (300 nM) which should be sufficient to block (TH)ET interaction with sites, no variation in the total capacity of the tritiated ligand is observed. In contrast, DTLET (Tyr-D-Thr-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr), a delta-preferential agonist, blocks (TH)ET binding in rat brain at a concentration able to saturate delta-sites. At higher concentrations, where DTLET cross reacts with -sites, this ligand exhibits similar properties to those of DAGO. These data are very different from those obtained with (TH)EKC (ethylketocyclazocine), another universal ligand, the binding properties of which are easily explained by the occurrence in rat brain tissue of independent sites exhibiting pharmacological profiles of , delta and kappa sites. The authors results underline the possible misinterpretation of binding data obtained by using (TH) etorphine as a non-selective ligand. 28 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  2. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  3. Single-Molecule FISH Reveals Non-selective Packaging of Rift Valley Fever Virus Genome Segments.

    PubMed

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    The bunyavirus genome comprises a small (S), medium (M), and large (L) RNA segment of negative polarity. Although genome segmentation confers evolutionary advantages by enabling genome reassortment events with related viruses, genome segmentation also complicates genome replication and packaging. Accumulating evidence suggests that genomes of viruses with eight or more genome segments are incorporated into virions by highly selective processes. Remarkably, little is known about the genome packaging process of the tri-segmented bunyaviruses. Here, we evaluated, by single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the intracellular spatio-temporal distribution and replication kinetics of the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) genome and determined the segment composition of mature virions. The results reveal that the RVFV genome segments start to replicate near the site of infection before spreading and replicating throughout the cytoplasm followed by translocation to the virion assembly site at the Golgi network. Despite the average intracellular S, M and L genome segments approached a 1:1:1 ratio, major differences in genome segment ratios were observed among cells. We also observed a significant amount of cells lacking evidence of M-segment replication. Analysis of two-segmented replicons and four-segmented viruses subsequently confirmed the previous notion that Golgi recruitment is mediated by the Gn glycoprotein. The absence of colocalization of the different segments in the cytoplasm and the successful rescue of a tri-segmented variant with a codon shuffled M-segment suggested that inter-segment interactions are unlikely to drive the copackaging of the different segments into a single virion. The latter was confirmed by direct visualization of RNPs inside mature virions which showed that the majority of virions lack one or more genome segments. Altogether, this study suggests that RVFV genome packaging is a non-selective process. PMID:27548280

  4. Single-Molecule FISH Reveals Non-selective Packaging of Rift Valley Fever Virus Genome Segments

    PubMed Central

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J.; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The bunyavirus genome comprises a small (S), medium (M), and large (L) RNA segment of negative polarity. Although genome segmentation confers evolutionary advantages by enabling genome reassortment events with related viruses, genome segmentation also complicates genome replication and packaging. Accumulating evidence suggests that genomes of viruses with eight or more genome segments are incorporated into virions by highly selective processes. Remarkably, little is known about the genome packaging process of the tri-segmented bunyaviruses. Here, we evaluated, by single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the intracellular spatio-temporal distribution and replication kinetics of the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) genome and determined the segment composition of mature virions. The results reveal that the RVFV genome segments start to replicate near the site of infection before spreading and replicating throughout the cytoplasm followed by translocation to the virion assembly site at the Golgi network. Despite the average intracellular S, M and L genome segments approached a 1:1:1 ratio, major differences in genome segment ratios were observed among cells. We also observed a significant amount of cells lacking evidence of M-segment replication. Analysis of two-segmented replicons and four-segmented viruses subsequently confirmed the previous notion that Golgi recruitment is mediated by the Gn glycoprotein. The absence of colocalization of the different segments in the cytoplasm and the successful rescue of a tri-segmented variant with a codon shuffled M-segment suggested that inter-segment interactions are unlikely to drive the copackaging of the different segments into a single virion. The latter was confirmed by direct visualization of RNPs inside mature virions which showed that the majority of virions lack one or more genome segments. Altogether, this study suggests that RVFV genome packaging is a non-selective process. PMID:27548280

  5. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  6. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  7. Zingiberaceous and citrus constituents, 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, zerumbone, auraptene, and nobiletin, suppress lipopolysaccharide-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in RAW264.7 murine macrophages through different modes of action.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akira; Shigemori, Tomohiro; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2005-12-01

    In the present study, we explored the suppressive activities of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), auraptene, nobiletin, and zerumbone toward LPS-induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 mRNA expression in mouse macrophages and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Pretreatment of RAW264.7 cells with LPS led to the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)s [p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2] and Akt, together with degradation of the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB (IkappaB)-alpha protein and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB p65, and the resultant activation of activator protein (AP)-1, NF-kappaB, and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) transcription factors. ACA abrogated ERK1/2 and JNK1/2, but not p38 MAPK, as well as the activation of those transcription factors. Although it allowed LPS-triggered phosphorylation of those MAPKs and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation, nobiletin suppressed the activation of AP-1, NF-kappaB, and CREB. Zerumbone had no effect on those transcription factors, though it attenuated COX-2 mRNA expression, suggesting that it disrupts the stabilization of COX-2 mRNA. Conversely, zerumbone significantly accelerated spontaneous COX-2 mRNA decay, the potency of which was comparable with that of SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, whose activation has key roles in the proinflammatory mRNA stabilization processes. Because SB203580 but not zerumbone suppressed LPS-induced p38 MAPK activation, the molecular targets of zerumbone may be MAPK-activated protein kinase-2 or located downstream. However, auraptene suppressed the expression of COX-2 protein but not mRNA, implying that it targets translation. We propose that these phytochemicals are promising chemopreventive agents for inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. Their use in combination may enhance their efficacy because of their different modes of action.

  8. Crystal Structures of mPGES-1 Inhibitor Complexes Form a Basis for the Rational Design of Potent Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Luz, John Gately; Antonysamy, Stephen; Kuklish, Steven L; Condon, Bradley; Lee, Matthew R; Allison, Dagart; Yu, Xiao-Peng; Chandrasekhar, Srinivasan; Backer, Ryan; Zhang, Aiping; Russell, Marijane; Chang, Shawn S; Harvey, Anita; Sloan, Ashley V; Fisher, Matthew J

    2015-06-11

    Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1) is an α-helical homotrimeric integral membrane inducible enzyme that catalyzes the formation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) from prostaglandin H2 (PGH2). Inhibition of mPGES-1 has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pain, inflammation, and some cancers. Interest in mPGES-1 inhibition can, in part, be attributed to the potential circumvention of cardiovascular risks associated with anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors (coxibs) by targeting the prostaglandin pathway downstream of PGH2 synthesis and avoiding suppression of antithrombotic prostacyclin production. We determined the crystal structure of mPGES-1 bound to four potent inhibitors in order to understand their structure-activity relationships and provide a framework for the rational design of improved molecules. In addition, we developed a light-scattering-based thermal stability assay to identify molecules for crystallographic studies. PMID:25961169

  9. Insights from the docking analysis of biologically active compounds from plant Litsea Genus as potential COX-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Bezbaruah, Rajib Lochan; Bordoloi, Manabjyoti; Sarmah, Rajeev; Bora, Tarun Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Litsea spp of Laural family are traditionally used as herbal medicine for treating inflammation including gastroenterologia, oedema and rheumatic arthritis. Therefore, it is of interest to investigate and understand the molecular principles for such actions. Here, we have illustrated the binding of thirteen Litsea derived biologically active compounds against the inflammation associated target COX (cyclo-oxygenase) -2 enzymes. We compared the binding information of these compounds with a selected number of already known COX-2 inhibitors. The comparison reflected that some of these compounds such as linderol, catechin, 6'-hydroxy-2',3',4' - trimethoxy-chalcone and litseaone have better or equivalent binding features compared to already known inhibitory compounds namely celecoxib, acetylsalicylic acid, rofecoxib. Therefore, all these small compounds reported from plant Litsea spp were found to possess potential medicinal values with anti-inflammatory properties.

  10. Impact of Medicaid Prior Authorization Requirement for COX-2 Inhibitor Drugs in Nebraska

    PubMed Central

    Siracuse, Mark V; Vuchetich, Phillip J

    2008-01-01

    Objective Determine the impact of a Prior Authorization Requirement (PAR) program on Medicaid pharmacy expenditures and utilization. Data Source Prescription claims for Nebraska Medicaid recipients who received a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory (NSAID) drug, or other pain relievers between July 2001 and June 2003. Study Design and Data Collection/Extraction This was a retrospective cross-sectional study with a 12-month pre-PAR implementation period and a 12-month post-PAR implementation period. Pharmacy transactions for COX-2 inhibitors, NSAIDs, other pain relievers, and gastroprotectants were identified by their National Drug Code (NDC) in a Microsoft SQL query. The PAR was designed to approve COX-2 inhibitor use only for recipients at high risk of GI side effects while restricting access to those patients at low to moderate risk of GI side effects. Principal Findings One year following implementation of the PAR, overall expenditures on COX-2 inhibitors for Nebraska Medicaid dropped 50 percent. The overall impact on pharmacy expenditures, including NSAIDs, pain relief medications, and gastroprotectants when necessary to relieve gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, for those recipients who switched from a COX-2 inhibitor to an NSAID or other pain relievers was a decline of approximately 35 percent. Conclusion and Implications for State Policy PAR for COX-2 inhibitors successfully reduced Medicaid prescription expenditures. Recipients at high risk for GI side effects appropriately received COX-2 inhibitors. Recipients at low to moderate risk for GI side effects who were switched to NSAIDs or other pain relievers had lower overall prescription expenditures. Further research is needed to determine the impact of PAR on overall health outcomes and costs. In this study, rather than take a “one size fits all” approach to prescription drug cost-saving strategies, Medicaid policy makers understood that patient variation

  11. Mimosine Dipeptide Enantiomsers: Improved Inhibitors against Melanogenesis and Cyclooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Binh Cao Quan; Tawata, Shinkichi

    2015-01-01

    Melanogenesis plays an important role in the protection of skin against UV through production of melanin pigments, but abnormal accumulation of this pigment causes unaesthetic hyperpigmentation. Much effort is being made to develop effective depigmenting agents. Here, we show for the first time that a small library of mimosine dipeptide enantiomers (Mi-L/D-amino acid) inhibit the melanogenesis in B16F10 melanoma cells by down-regulating the cellular tyrosinase with little effect on their growth or viability. Two of them, Mi-D-Trp and Mi-D-Val, turned out to be the most potent inhibitors on melanin content and cellular tyrosinase in B16F10 melanoma cells. In addition, most of the mimosine dipeptides were more potent than mimosine for inhibiting cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) with IC50 of 18-26 μM. Among them, Mi-L-Val and Mi-L-Trp inhibited cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) more potently than indomethacin, with IC50 values of 22 and 19 μM, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest the possibility that mimosine dipeptides could be better candidates (than mimosine) for anti-melanogenic (skin hyperpigmentation treatment) and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. PMID:26287130

  12. Brainstorming: weighted voting prediction of inhibitors for protein targets.

    PubMed

    Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    The "Brainstorming" approach presented in this paper is a weighted voting method that can improve the quality of predictions generated by several machine learning (ML) methods. First, an ensemble of heterogeneous ML algorithms is trained on available experimental data, then all solutions are gathered and a consensus is built between them. The final prediction is performed using a voting procedure, whereby the vote of each method is weighted according to a quality coefficient calculated using multivariable linear regression (MLR). The MLR optimization procedure is very fast, therefore no additional computational cost is introduced by using this jury approach. Here, brainstorming is applied to selecting actives from large collections of compounds relating to five diverse biological targets of medicinal interest, namely HIV-reverse transcriptase, cyclooxygenase-2, dihydrofolate reductase, estrogen receptor, and thrombin. The MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR) database was used for selecting known inhibitors for these protein targets, and experimental data was then used to train a set of machine learning methods. The benchmark dataset (available at http://bio.icm.edu.pl/∼darman/chemoinfo/benchmark.tar.gz ) can be used for further testing of various clustering and machine learning methods when predicting the biological activity of compounds. Depending on the protein target, the overall recall value is raised by at least 20% in comparison to any single machine learning method (including ensemble methods like random forest) and unweighted simple majority voting procedures.

  13. Incipient allochronic speciation due to non-selective assortative mating by flowering time, mutation and genetic drift

    PubMed Central

    Devaux, Céline; Lande, Russell

    2008-01-01

    We model the evolution of flowering time using a multilocus quantitative genetic model with non-selective assortative mating and mutation to investigate incipient allochronic speciation in a finite population. For quantitative characters with evolutionary parameters satisfying empirical observations and two approximate inequalities that we derived, disjunct clusters in the population flowering phenology originated within a few thousand generations in the absence of disruptive natural or sexual selection. Our simulations and the conditions we derived showed that cluster formation was promoted by limited population size, high mutational variance of flowering time, short individual flowering phenology and a long flowering season. By contrast, cluster formation was hindered by inbreeding depression, stabilizing selection and pollinator limitation. Our results suggest that incipient allochronic speciation in populations of limited size (satisfying two inequalities) could be a common phenomenon. PMID:18700202

  14. Home point-of-care international normalised ratio monitoring sustained by a non-selective educational program in children.

    PubMed

    Bajolle, Fanny; Lasne, Dominique; Elie, Caroline; Cheurfi, Radhia; Grazioli, Aurélie; Traore, Maladon; Souillard, Patrick; Boudjemline, Younes; Jourdain, Patrick; Bonnet, Damien

    2012-10-01

    Adverse events related to vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy might be reduced by point-of-care international normalised ratio (POC INR) monitoring supported by an education program (EP). Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a non-selective VKA paediatric EP (regardless of the social, economic, educational or linguistic levels) by analysing the time spent in the therapeutic range (TTR), VKA adverse events and compliance to treatment, and INR control prescriptions. The EP was modified from the pediatric EP previously described but improved by a specifically devised child-focused game. One hundred four consecutive children (median age 8 years) receiving VKA were included in a standardised EP. Patients were in self-testing, and dose adjustments were made by a single physician for three tolerance ranges according to the underlying disease: [2.5-4], [1.8-3.2], and [1.5-2.5]. The median follow-up was 481 days [70-1,001]. The overall TTR was 81.4% [36-100]. The TTR were 74%, 85.6% and 89% for the ranges [2.5-4], [1.8-3.2], and [1.5-2.5], respectively. These results were sustainable during the study period. Only one serious VKA adverse event was recorded. The median number of POC INR tests was 2.5 [1.6-5.7] INR per patient and month. Patients/families performed POC INR when requested in 86.9% of the cases. More than 90% of the families found the EP supportive and wished to follow a long-term reinforcement program. In conclusion, this non-selective child-focused EP for VKA therapy, strongly supported by our dedicated game, is useful in maintaining efficacy, safety and compliance to anticoagulation and its monitoring.

  15. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, cyclooxygenase-2, and the kidneys.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Saadur; Malcoun, Anthony

    2014-12-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most commonly used classes of medications in the world, which function by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes and downregulating the inflammatory pathway. COX enzymes are constitutively expressed in the kidneys and function to maintain a homeostatic environment in terms of maintaining the glomerular filtration rate, blood pressure, sodium, water, and osmotic regulation. When the COX enzymes are inhibited by NSAIDs, a multitude of renal and vascular complications occur. This article aims to enlighten primary care physicians of the complications that arise with NSAIDs from a renal perspective and to present some management strategies.

  16. Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in naturally occurring bovine cutaneous fibropapillomas.

    PubMed

    Bocaneti, F; Altamura, G; Corteggio, A; Solcan, C; Velescu, E; Borzacchiello, G

    2015-01-01

    Bovine cutaneous fibropapillomas are benign skin tumours characterized by epithelial and dermal proliferation and induced by Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs). Cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and 2 are enzymes involved in pathological conditions, such as inflammation and epithelial carcinogenesis. Here we investigated biochemically and immunohistochemically COX-2 expression in bovine cutaneous fibropapillomas. Eight of twelve fibropapillomas (67%) showed COX-2 positive immunosignal mostly in the cytoplasm of the basal cell layer, while the normal skin did not stain. Biochemical analysis confirmed the expression of COX-2 in tumour samples. This study shows COX-2 expression in cutaneous fibropapillomas, suggesting a contribution in epithelial tumour development. PMID:26618600

  17. Structure-based design, synthesis, molecular docking study and biological evaluation of 1,2,4-triazine derivatives acting as COX/15-LOX inhibitors with anti-oxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Khoshneviszadeh, Mehdi; Shahraki, Omolbanin; Khoshneviszadeh, Mahsima; Foroumadi, Alireza; Firuzi, Omidreza; Edraki, Najmeh; Nadri, Hamid; Moradi, Alireza; Shafiee, Abbas; Miri, Ramin

    2016-12-01

    A set of 1,2,4-triazine derivatives were designed as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors. These compounds were synthesized and screened for inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) based on a cellular assay using human whole blood (HWB) and lipoxygenase (LOX-15) that are key enzymes in inflammation. The results showed that 3-(2-(benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-ylmethylene)hydrazinyl)-5,6-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazine (G11) was identified as the most potent COX-2 inhibitor (78%) relative to COX-1 (50%). Ferric reducing anti-oxidant power (FRAP) assay revealed that compound G10 possesses the highest anti-oxidant activity. The compound G3 with IC50 value of 124 μM was the most potent compound in LOX inhibitory assay. Molecular docking was performed and a good agreement was observed between computational and experimental results.

  18. Non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibition before periodic acceleration (pGz) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bassuk, Jorge A; Wu, Dongmei; Lozano, Hector; Arias, Jaqueline; Kurlansky, Paul; Lamas, Gervasio A; Adams, Jose A

    2008-05-01

    Whole body periodic acceleration (pGz) along the spinal axis is a novel method of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Oscillatory motion of the supine body in a horizontal fashion provides ventilation and blood flow to vital organs during cardiac arrest and pulsatile shear stress to the vascular endothelium. We previously showed in pigs that pGz-CPR affords better overall survival, post resuscitation myocardial function, and neurological outcomes compared to conventional chest compression CPR. pGz through pulsatile shear stress on the vascular endothelium elicits acute production of prostaglandins and endothelial-derived nitric oxide (eNO) in whole animal models and in vitro preparations. The salutary effects associated with pGz-CPR compared to chest compression CPR are in part related to endothelial-derived nitric oxide. Both eNO and prostaglandins are cardioprotective in ischemia reperfusion models. To differentiate between the roles of these mediators, indomethacin a non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor (COX) was used as a tool to investigate prostaglandin effects during pGz-CPR by acute outcomes of survival, cardioprotection and regional blood flows (RBF). Two groups of anesthetized, intubated pigs weighing 25-36kg were studied. Prior to electrical induction of ventricular fibrillation (VF) animals received equal volumes of either saline placebo Control (CONT) (n=9) or indomethacin (INDO), (n=8), (2mg/kg). After 3min of unsupported VF, both groups received 15min of pGz-CPR followed by pharmacologic and electrical attempts for resuscitation. Return of circulation (ROSC) to 3h occurred in (78%) in CONT and (63%) in INDO pretreated animals. There was no statistically significant difference in hemodynamics between groups at baseline or during the protocol. At baseline, INDO caused a decrease in brain RBF. Two hours after ROSC, INDO blunted the hyperemia response to brain and heart. Echocardiographic evidence of myocardial dysfunction was most notable for the

  19. [Cyclooxygenase inhibitors in some dietary vegetables inhibit platelet aggregation function induced by arachidonic acid].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Hua; Shao, Dong-Hua; Liang, Guo-Wei; Zhang, Ru; Xin, Qin; Zhang, Tao; Cao, Qing-Yun

    2011-10-01

    The study was purposed to investigate whether the cyclooxygenase inhibitors from some dietary vegetables can inhibit platelet aggregation function by the arachidonic acid (AA). The vegetable juice was mixed with platelet rich plasma (PRP), and asprin was used as positive control. The maximum ratio of platelet aggregation induced by AA was measured on the aggregometer; heme and cyclooxygenase-1 (COX(1)) or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX(2)) were added to test tubes containing COX reaction buffer, the mixture was vortex-mixed and exposed to aspirin or vegetable juice, followed by addition of AA and then hydrochloric acid (1 mol/L) was added to stop the COX reaction, followed by chemical reduction with stannous chloride solution. The concentration of COX inhibitors was detected by the enzyme immunoassay kit; vegetable juice (aspirin as positive control) was mixed with whole blood, which was followed by the addition of AA, and then the reaction was stopped by adding indomethacin, centrifuged, then the supernatant was collected, and the plasma thromboxane B(2) (TXB(2)) was measured by radioimmunoassay. The results showed that spinach juice, garlic bolt juice, blanched garlic leave juice and Chinese leek juice could inhibit by 80% human platelet aggregation induced by AA. 4 kinds of vegetables were all found a certain amount of cyclooxygenase inhibitors, which COX(1) and COX(2) inhibitor concentrations of spinach were higher than that of aspirin; 4 vegetable juice could significantly reduce the human plasma concentrations of TXB(2) induced by AA (p < 0.05). It is concluded that 4 kinds of raw vegetables containing cyclooxygenase inhibitors inhibit the production of TXA(2) and thus hinder platelet aggregation. Raw spinach, garlic bolt, blanched garlic and chinese leek inhibit significantly AA-induced human platelet aggregation in vitro. 4 kinds of vegetables may have a good potential perspective of anti-platelet aggregation therapy or prevention of thrombosis.

  20. Discovery of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Human Platelet type 12-Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Victor; Rai, Ganesha; Jadhav, Ajit; Schultz, Lena; Armstrong, Michelle; Jameson, J. Brian; Perry, Steven; Joshi, Netra; Bougie, James M.; Leister, William; Taylor-Fishwick, David A.; Nadler, Jerry L.; Holinstat, Michael; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J.; Holman, Theodore R.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of novel small molecule inhibitors of platelet type 12-human lipoxygenase, which display nanomolar activity against the purified enzyme, using a quantitative high throughput screen (qHTS) on a library of 153,607 compounds. These compounds also exhibit excellent specificity, >50-fold selectivity vs. the paralogs, 5-human lipoxygenase, reticulocyte 15-human lipoxygenase type-1, and epithelial 15-human lipoxygenase type-2, and >100-fold selectivity vs. ovine cyclooxygenase-1 and human cyclooxygenase-2. Kinetic experiments indicate this chemotype is a non-competitive inhibitor that does not reduce the active site iron. Moreover, chiral HPLC separation of two of the racemic lead molecules revealed a strong preference for the (–)-enantiomers (IC50 of 0.43 +/- 0.04 and 0.38 +/- 0.05 μM) compared to the (+)-enantiomers (IC50 of >25 μM for both), indicating a fine degree of selectivity in the active site due to chiral geometry. In addition, these compounds demonstrate efficacy in cellular models, which underscores their relevance to disease modification. PMID:21739938

  1. Combining non selective gas sensors on a mobile robot for identification and mapping of multiple chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Bennetts, Victor Hernandez; Schaffernicht, Erik; Pomareda, Victor; Lilienthal, Achim J; Marco, Santiago; Trincavelli, Marco

    2014-09-17

    In this paper, we address the task of gas distribution modeling in scenarios where multiple heterogeneous compounds are present. Gas distribution modeling is particularly useful in emission monitoring applications where spatial representations of the gaseous patches can be used to identify emission hot spots. In realistic environments, the presence of multiple chemicals is expected and therefore, gas discrimination has to be incorporated in the modeling process. The approach presented in this work addresses the task of gas distribution modeling by combining different non selective gas sensors. Gas discrimination is addressed with an open sampling system, composed by an array of metal oxide sensors and a probabilistic algorithm tailored to uncontrolled environments. For each of the identified compounds, the mapping algorithm generates a calibrated gas distribution model using the classification uncertainty and the concentration readings acquired with a photo ionization detector. The meta parameters of the proposed modeling algorithm are automatically learned from the data. The approach was validated with a gas sensitive robot patrolling outdoor and indoor scenarios, where two different chemicals were released simultaneously. The experimental results show that the generated multi compound maps can be used to accurately predict the location of emitting gas sources.

  2. Combining Non Selective Gas Sensors on a Mobile Robot for Identification and Mapping of Multiple Chemical Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Victor Hernandez, Bennetts; Schaffernicht, Erik; Pomareda, Victor; Lilienthal, Achim J.; Marco, Santiago; Trincavelli, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we address the task of gas distribution modeling in scenarios where multiple heterogeneous compounds are present. Gas distribution modeling is particularly useful in emission monitoring applications where spatial representations of the gaseous patches can be used to identify emission hot spots. In realistic environments, the presence of multiple chemicals is expected and therefore, gas discrimination has to be incorporated in the modeling process. The approach presented in this work addresses the task of gas distribution modeling by combining different non selective gas sensors. Gas discrimination is addressed with an open sampling system, composed by an array of metal oxide sensors and a probabilistic algorithm tailored to uncontrolled environments. For each of the identified compounds, the mapping algorithm generates a calibrated gas distribution model using the classification uncertainty and the concentration readings acquired with a photo ionization detector. The meta parameters of the proposed modeling algorithm are automatically learned from the data. The approach was validated with a gas sensitive robot patrolling outdoor and indoor scenarios, where two different chemicals were released simultaneously. The experimental results show that the generated multi compound maps can be used to accurately predict the location of emitting gas sources. PMID:25232911

  3. Nuclear accumulation of plasmid DNA can be enhanced by non-selective gating of the nuclear pore

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.; Lucas, Bart; Demeester, Joseph; De Smedt, Stefaan C.; Sanders, Niek N.

    2007-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in non-viral gene transfer is the nuclear membrane. Attempts to improve the transport of DNA to the nucleus through the use of nuclear localization signals or importin-β have achieved limited success. It has been proposed that the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) through which nucleocytoplasmic transport occurs are filled with a hydrophobic phase through which hydrophobic importins can dissolve. Therefore, considering the hydrophobic nature of the NPC channel, we evaluated whether a non-selective gating of nuclear pores by trans-cyclohexane-1,2-diol (TCHD), an amphipathic alcohol that reversibly collapses the permeability barrier of the NPCs, could be obtained and used as an alternative method to facilitate nuclear entry of plasmid DNA. Our data demonstrate for the first time that TCHD makes the nucleus permeable for both high molecular weight dextrans and plasmid DNA (pDNA) at non-toxic concentrations. Furthermore, in line with these observations, TCHD enhanced the transfection efficacy of both naked DNA and lipoplexes. In conclusion, based on the proposed structure of NPCs we succeeded to temporarily open the NPCs for macromolecules as large as pDNAs and demonstrated that this can significantly enhance non-viral gene delivery. PMID:17584788

  4. Combining non selective gas sensors on a mobile robot for identification and mapping of multiple chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Bennetts, Victor Hernandez; Schaffernicht, Erik; Pomareda, Victor; Lilienthal, Achim J; Marco, Santiago; Trincavelli, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we address the task of gas distribution modeling in scenarios where multiple heterogeneous compounds are present. Gas distribution modeling is particularly useful in emission monitoring applications where spatial representations of the gaseous patches can be used to identify emission hot spots. In realistic environments, the presence of multiple chemicals is expected and therefore, gas discrimination has to be incorporated in the modeling process. The approach presented in this work addresses the task of gas distribution modeling by combining different non selective gas sensors. Gas discrimination is addressed with an open sampling system, composed by an array of metal oxide sensors and a probabilistic algorithm tailored to uncontrolled environments. For each of the identified compounds, the mapping algorithm generates a calibrated gas distribution model using the classification uncertainty and the concentration readings acquired with a photo ionization detector. The meta parameters of the proposed modeling algorithm are automatically learned from the data. The approach was validated with a gas sensitive robot patrolling outdoor and indoor scenarios, where two different chemicals were released simultaneously. The experimental results show that the generated multi compound maps can be used to accurately predict the location of emitting gas sources. PMID:25232911

  5. HDAC Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olzscha, Heidi; Bekheet, Mina E; Sheikh, Semira; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is one of the most abundant posttranslational modifications in eukaryotic cells. The dynamic homeostasis of lysine acetylation and deacetylation is dictated by the action of histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and histone deacetylases (HDAC). Important substrates for HATs and HDACs are histones, where lysine acetylation generally leads to an open and transcriptionally active chromatin conformation. Histone deacetylation forces the compaction of the chromatin with subsequent inhibition of transcription and reduced gene expression. Unbalanced HAT and HDAC activity, and therefore aberrant histone acetylation, has been shown to be involved in tumorigenesis and progression of malignancy in different types of cancer. Therefore, the development of HDAC inhibitors (HDIs) as therapeutic agents against cancer is of great interest. However, treatment with HDIs can also affect the acetylation status of many other non-histone proteins which play a role in different pathways including angiogenesis, cell cycle progression, autophagy and apoptosis. These effects have led HDIs to become anticancer agents, which can initiate apoptosis in tumor cells. Hematological malignancies in particular are responsive to HDIs, and four HDIs have already been approved as anticancer agents. There is a strong interest in finding adequate biomarkers to predict the response to HDI treatment. This chapter provides information on how to assess HDAC activity in vitro and determine the potency of HDIs on different HDACs. It also gives information on how to analyze cellular markers following HDI treatment and to analyze tissue biopsies from HDI-treated patients. Finally, a protocol is provided on how to detect HDI sensitivity determinants in human cells, based on a pRetroSuper shRNA screen upon HDI treatment. PMID:27246222

  6. The incentive amplifying effects of nicotine are reduced by selective and non-selective dopamine antagonists in rats.

    PubMed

    Palmatier, Matthew I; Kellicut, Marissa R; Brianna Sheppard, A; Brown, Russell W; Robinson, Donita L

    2014-11-01

    Nicotine is a psychomotor stimulant with 'reinforcement enhancing' effects--the actions of nicotine in the brain increase responding for non-nicotine rewards. We hypothesized that this latter effect of nicotine depends on increased incentive properties of anticipatory cues; consistent with this hypothesis, multiple laboratories have reported that nicotine increases sign tracking, i.e. approach to a conditioned stimulus (CS), in Pavlovian conditioned-approach tasks. Incentive motivation and sign tracking are mediated by mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission and nicotine facilitates mesolimbic DA release. Therefore, we hypothesized that the incentive-promoting effects of nicotine would be impaired by DA antagonists. To test this hypothesis, separate groups of rats were injected with nicotine (0.4mg/kg base) or saline prior to Pavlovian conditioning sessions in which a CS (30s illumination of a light or presentation of a lever) was immediately followed by a sweet reward delivered in an adjacent location. Both saline and nicotine pretreated rats exhibited similar levels of conditioned approach to the reward location (goal tracking), but nicotine pretreatment significantly increased approach to the CS (sign tracking), regardless of type (lever or light). The DAD1 antagonist SCH-23390 and the DAD2/3 antagonist eticlopride reduced conditioned approach in all rats, but specifically reduced goal tracking in the saline pretreated rats and sign tracking in the nicotine pretreated rats. The non-selective DA antagonist flupenthixol reduced sign-tracking in nicotine rats at all doses tested; however, only the highest dose of flupenthixol reduced goal tracking in both nicotine and saline groups. The reductions in conditioned approach behavior, especially those by SCH-23390, were dissociated from simple motor suppressant effects of the antagonists. These experiments are the first to investigate the effects of dopaminergic drugs on the facilitation of sign-tracking engendered by

  7. α-Synuclein forms non-selective cation channels and stimulates ATP-sensitive potassium channels in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, Sergej L

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease and several other neurodegenerative diseases, the protein α-synuclein (αS) is produced within neurons and accumulates in the extracellular fluid. Several mechanisms of αS action are proposed, one of which is the formation of cation-permeable pores that may mediate toxicity. αS induces non-selective cation channels in lipid bilayers, but whether this occurs in living neurons and which properties the channels possess have not yet been examined. In this study the properties of αS channels in dissociated hippocampal neurons are documented. In cell-attached recordings the incorporation of αS into membranes was driven by applied negative potentials. These channels exhibited multiple levels of conductance (30, 70 and 120 pS at −100 mV) and inward rectification. The persistent activity of αS channels induced local changes in intracellular Na+ and Ca2+, depolarized neurons and augmented bursting activity. αS channels formed by adding αS to the intracellular membrane in inside-out patches exhibited outward rectification. αS channels were equally permeable to Na+, K+ and Ca2+. These channels were also observed in neurons transfected with wild-type or mutant A53T αS, and after extracellular application of wild-type or mutant A53T αS proteins. Opening of αS channels stimulated opening of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP ) channels and did not interfere with the activity of delayed rectifier K+ channels. The properties of αS channels in neuronal membranes suggest stronger toxicity of extracellularly applied αS than intracellular αS. Enhancement of neuronal excitability and distortions in ion homeostasis may underlie the toxic effects of αS that can be dampened by KATP channels. PMID:25556793

  8. Comparison of subtypes of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from naturally contaminated watershed samples using a combination of non-selective and selective enrichment methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two enrichment methods for Listeria monocytogenes using Immuno Magnetic Separation were tested to determine if they selected the same subtypes of isolates. Both methods included a non-selective enrichment and one included subculture in Fraser Broth. Naturally contaminated watershed samples from the ...

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitors as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Clawson, Gary A

    2016-08-01

    Cancer cells contain significant alterations in their epigenomic landscape, which several enzyme families reversibly contribute to. One class of epigenetic modifying enzymes is that of histone deacetylases (HDAC), which are receiving considerable scrutiny clinically as a therapeutic target in many cancers. The underlying rationale is that inhibiting HDACs will reverse dysregulated target gene expression by modulating functional histone (or other) acetylation marks. This perspective will discuss a recent paper by Markozashvili and co-workers which appeared in Gene, which indicates that the mechanisms by which HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) alter the epigenetic landscape include widespread alternative effects beyond simply controlling regional epigenetic marks. HDACs are involved in many processes/diseases, and it is not surprising that HDACis have considerable off-target effects, and thus a major effort is being directed toward identification of inhibitors which are selective for HDAC isoforms often uniquely implicated in various cancers. This Perspective will also discuss some representative work with inhibitors targeting individual HDAC classes or isoforms. At present, it is not really clear that isoform-specific HDACis will avoid non-selective effects on other unrecognized activities of HDACs. PMID:27568481

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors as cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells contain significant alterations in their epigenomic landscape, which several enzyme families reversibly contribute to. One class of epigenetic modifying enzymes is that of histone deacetylases (HDAC), which are receiving considerable scrutiny clinically as a therapeutic target in many cancers. The underlying rationale is that inhibiting HDACs will reverse dysregulated target gene expression by modulating functional histone (or other) acetylation marks. This perspective will discuss a recent paper by Markozashvili and co-workers which appeared in Gene, which indicates that the mechanisms by which HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) alter the epigenetic landscape include widespread alternative effects beyond simply controlling regional epigenetic marks. HDACs are involved in many processes/diseases, and it is not surprising that HDACis have considerable off-target effects, and thus a major effort is being directed toward identification of inhibitors which are selective for HDAC isoforms often uniquely implicated in various cancers. This Perspective will also discuss some representative work with inhibitors targeting individual HDAC classes or isoforms. At present, it is not really clear that isoform-specific HDACis will avoid non-selective effects on other unrecognized activities of HDACs. PMID:27568481

  11. The TRPM4 channel inhibitor 9-phenanthrol

    PubMed Central

    Guinamard, R; Hof, T; Del Negro, C A

    2014-01-01

    The phenanthrene-derivative 9-phenanthrol is a recently identified inhibitor of the transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 4 channel, a Ca2+-activated non-selective cation channel whose mechanism of action remains to be determined. Subsequent studies performed on other ion channels confirm the specificity of the drug for TRPM4. In addition, 9-phenanthrol modulates a variety of physiological processes through TRPM4 current inhibition and thus exerts beneficial effects in several pathological conditions. 9-Phenanthrol modulates smooth muscle contraction in bladder and cerebral arteries, affects spontaneous activity in neurons and in the heart, and reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced cell death. Among promising potential applications, 9-phenanthrol exerts cardioprotective effects against ischaemia-reperfusion injuries and reduces ischaemic stroke injuries. In addition to reviewing the biophysical effects of 9-phenanthrol, here we present information about its appropriate use in physiological studies and possible clinical applications. PMID:24433510

  12. Divalent cation permeability and blockade of Ca2+-permeant non-selective cation channels in rat adrenal zona glomerulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Lotshaw, David P; Sheehan, Katherine A

    1999-01-01

    The effects of the divalent cations Ca2+, Mg2+ and Ni2+ on unitary Na+ currents through receptor-regulated non-selective cation channels were studied in inside-out and cell-attached patches from rat adrenal zona glomerulosa cells.External Ca2+ caused a concentration-dependent and voltage-independent inhibition of inward Na+ current, exhibiting an IC50 of 1.4 mm. The channel was also Ca2+ permeant and external Ca2+ shifted the reversal potential as expected for a channel exhibiting a constant Ca2+:Na+ permeability ratio near to 4.External and internal 2 mm Mg2+ caused voltage-dependent inhibition of inward and outward Na+ current, respectively. Modelling Mg2+ as an impermeant fast open channel blocker indicated that external Mg2+ blocked the pore at a single site exhibiting a zero voltage Kd of 5.1 mm for Mg2+ and located 19% of the distance through the transmembrane electric field from the external surface. Internal Mg2+ blocked the pore at a second site exhibiting a Kd of 1.7 mm for Mg2+ and located 36% of the distance through the transmembrane electric field from the cytosolic surface.External Ni2+ caused a voltage- and concentration-dependent slow blockade of inward Na+ current. Modelling Ni2+ as an impermeant slow open channel blocker indicated that Ni2+ blocked the pore at a single site exhibiting a Kd of 1.09 mm for Ni2+ and located 13.7% of the distance through the transmembrane electric field from the external surface.External 2 mm Mg2+ increased the Kd for external Ni2+ binding to 1.27 mm, consistent with competition for a single binding site. Changing ionic strength did not substantially affect Ni2+ blockade indicating the absence of surface potential under physiological ionic conditions.It is concluded that at least two divalent cation binding sites, separated by a high free energy barrier (the selectivity filter), are located in the pore and contribute to Ca2+ selectivity and permeability of the channel. PMID:9852322

  13. Cost effectiveness of etoricoxib versus celecoxib and non-selective NSAIDS in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jeroen P; Gaugris, Sabine; Choy, Ernest H; Ostor, Andrew; Nash, Julian T; Stam, Wiro

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the cost effectiveness of etoricoxib (90 mg/day) relative to celecoxib (200 or 400 mg/day), and the non-selective NSAIDs naproxen (1000 mg/day) and diclofenac (150 mg/day) in the initial treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) from the UK NHS perspective. A Bayesian cost-effectiveness model was developed to estimate the costs and benefits associated with initiating AS treatment with etoricoxib, celecoxib, diclofenac or naproxen. Efficacy, safety and medical resource and cost data were obtained from the literature. The obtained efficacy estimates were synthesized with a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis. Treatment benefit and degree of disease activity, as reflected with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) scores, were related to QALYs and AS-specific costs (related to BASDAI). Other cost outcomes related to drug acquisition, and gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety. Uncertainty in the source data was translated into uncertainty in cost-effectiveness estimates and therefore decision uncertainty. Costs and outcomes were discounted at 3.5% per annum. There was a >98% probability that treatment with etoricoxib results in greater QALYs than the other interventions. Over a 30-year time horizon, starting AS treatment with etoricoxib was associated with about 0.4 more QALYs than the other interventions. At 2 years there was a 77% probability that etoricoxib had the lowest cost. This increased to >99% at 30 years. Etoricoxib is expected to save 13 620 UK pounds (year 2007 values) relative to celecoxib (200/400 mg), 9957 UK pounds relative to diclofenac and 9863 UK pounds relative to naproxen. For a willingness-to-pay ceiling ratio of 20 000 UK pounds per QALY, there was a >97% probability that etoricoxib was the most cost-effective treatment. Additional analysis with different assumptions, including celecoxib 200 mg, and ignoring cost-offsets associated with

  14. Effects of selective and non-selective glucocorticoid receptor II antagonists on rapid-onset diabetes in young rats.

    PubMed

    Beaudry, Jacqueline L; Dunford, Emily C; Teich, Trevor; Zaharieva, Dessi; Hunt, Hazel; Belanoff, Joseph K; Riddell, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    The blockade of glucocorticoid (GC) action through antagonism of the glucocorticoid receptor II (GRII) has been used to minimize the undesirable effects of chronically elevated GC levels. Mifepristone (RU486) is known to competitively block GRII action, but not exclusively, as it antagonizes the progesterone receptor. A number of new selective GRII antagonists have been developed, but limited testing has been completed in animal models of overt type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, two selective GRII antagonists (C113176 and C108297) were tested to determine their effects in our model of GC-induced rapid-onset diabetes (ROD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (∼ six weeks of age) were placed on a high-fat diet (60%), surgically implanted with pellets containing corticosterone (CORT) or wax (control) and divided into five treatment groups. Each group was treated with either a GRII antagonist or vehicle for 14 days after surgery: CORT pellets (400 mg/rat) + antagonists (80 mg/kg/day); CORT pellets + drug vehicle; and wax pellets (control) + drug vehicle. After 10 days of CORT treatment, body mass gain was increased with RU486 (by ∼20% from baseline) and maintained with C113176 administration, whereas rats given C108297 had similar body mass loss (∼15%) to ROD animals. Fasting glycemia was elevated in the ROD animals (>20 mM), normalized completely in animals treated with RU486 (6.2±0.1 mM, p<0.05) and improved in animals treated with C108297 and C113176 (14.0±1.6 and 8.8±1.6 mM, p<0.05 respectively). Glucose intolerance was normalized with RU486 treatment, whereas acute insulin response was improved with RU486 and C113176 treatment. Also, peripheral insulin resistance was attenuated with C113176 treatment along with improved levels of β-cell function while C108297 antagonism only provided modest improvements. In summary, C113176 is an effective agent that minimized some GC-induced detrimental metabolic effects and may provide an alternative to the effective, but non-selective

  15. Effects of Selective and Non-Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor II Antagonists on Rapid-Onset Diabetes in Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, Jacqueline L.; Dunford, Emily C.; Teich, Trevor; Zaharieva, Dessi; Hunt, Hazel; Belanoff, Joseph K.; Riddell, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The blockade of glucocorticoid (GC) action through antagonism of the glucocorticoid receptor II (GRII) has been used to minimize the undesirable effects of chronically elevated GC levels. Mifepristone (RU486) is known to competitively block GRII action, but not exclusively, as it antagonizes the progesterone receptor. A number of new selective GRII antagonists have been developed, but limited testing has been completed in animal models of overt type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, two selective GRII antagonists (C113176 and C108297) were tested to determine their effects in our model of GC-induced rapid-onset diabetes (ROD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (∼ six weeks of age) were placed on a high-fat diet (60%), surgically implanted with pellets containing corticosterone (CORT) or wax (control) and divided into five treatment groups. Each group was treated with either a GRII antagonist or vehicle for 14 days after surgery: CORT pellets (400 mg/rat) + antagonists (80 mg/kg/day); CORT pellets + drug vehicle; and wax pellets (control) + drug vehicle. After 10 days of CORT treatment, body mass gain was increased with RU486 (by ∼20% from baseline) and maintained with C113176 administration, whereas rats given C108297 had similar body mass loss (∼15%) to ROD animals. Fasting glycemia was elevated in the ROD animals (>20 mM), normalized completely in animals treated with RU486 (6.2±0.1 mM, p<0.05) and improved in animals treated with C108297 and C113176 (14.0±1.6 and 8.8±1.6 mM, p<0.05 respectively). Glucose intolerance was normalized with RU486 treatment, whereas acute insulin response was improved with RU486 and C113176 treatment. Also, peripheral insulin resistance was attenuated with C113176 treatment along with improved levels of β-cell function while C108297 antagonism only provided modest improvements. In summary, C113176 is an effective agent that minimized some GC-induced detrimental metabolic effects and may provide an alternative to the effective, but non-selective

  16. In pursuit of small molecule chemistry for calcium-permeable non-selective TRPC channels -- mirage or pot of gold?

    PubMed

    Bon, Robin S; Beech, David J

    2013-10-01

    The primary purpose of this review is to address the progress towards small molecule modulators of human Transient Receptor Potential Canonical proteins (TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6 and TRPC7). These proteins generate channels for calcium and sodium ion entry. They are relevant to many mammalian cell types including acinar gland cells, adipocytes, astrocytes, cardiac myocytes, cochlea hair cells, endothelial cells, epithelial cells, fibroblasts, hepatocytes, keratinocytes, leukocytes, mast cells, mesangial cells, neurones, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, platelets, podocytes, smooth muscle cells, skeletal muscle and tumour cells. There are broad-ranging positive roles of the channels in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, survival and turning, vascular permeability, hypertrophy, wound-healing, hypo-adiponectinaemia, angiogenesis, neointimal hyperplasia, oedema, thrombosis, muscle endurance, lung hyper-responsiveness, glomerular filtration, gastrointestinal motility, pancreatitis, seizure, innate fear, motor coordination, saliva secretion, mast cell degranulation, cancer cell drug resistance, survival after myocardial infarction, efferocytosis, hypo-matrix metalloproteinase, vasoconstriction and vasodilatation. Known small molecule stimulators of the channels include hyperforin, genistein and rosiglitazone, but there is more progress with inhibitors, some of which have promising potency and selectivity. The inhibitors include 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, 2-aminoquinolines, 2-aminothiazoles, fatty acids, isothiourea derivatives, naphthalene sulfonamides, N-phenylanthranilic acids, phenylethylimidazoles, piperazine/piperidine analogues, polyphenols, pyrazoles and steroids. A few of these agents are starting to be useful as tools for determining the physiological and pathophysiological functions of TRPC channels. We suggest that the pursuit of small molecule modulators for TRPC channels is important but that it requires substantial additional effort and

  17. (4-Piperidinyl)-piperazine: a new platform for acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chonan, Tomomichi; Oi, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Yashiro, Miyoko; Wakasugi, Daisuke; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Ohoka-Sugita, Ayumi; Io, Fusayo; Koretsune, Hiroko; Hiratate, Akira

    2009-12-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs), the rate limiting enzymes in de novo lipid synthesis, play important roles in modulating energy metabolism. The inhibition of ACC has demonstrated promising therapeutic potential for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in transgenic mice and preclinical animal models. We describe herein the synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a series of disubstituted (4-piperidinyl)-piperazine derivatives as a new platform for ACC1/2 non-selective inhibitors.

  18. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  19. The role of COX-2 inhibitors in the perioperative setting: efficacy and safety--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zemmel, Melissa Holmes

    2006-02-01

    A new class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) selective for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) offers new options for managing perioperative pain. However, new and conflicting data have emerged regarding all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including those selective for COX-2. The data highlight the potential for increased risks of adverse cardiovascular events associated with all NSAIDs and of potential serious skin reactions and gastrointestinal bleeding with specific agents. As of June 2005, the National Institutes of Health and Food and Drug Administration suspended all clinical trials involving NSAIDs. This article reviews 30 prospective studies on the role of COX-2 selective inhibitors in the perioperative setting. The studies examined a variety of variables, including efficacy, perioperative opioid reduction, and effects on platelet aggregation and renal function. The data reveal an overall reduction in postoperative opioid use and significant patient satisfaction with perioperative COX-2 use, no effect on platelet aggregation, and a minor negative effect on renal function. The literature suggests that perioperative use of selective COX-2 inhibitors can be well tolerated and efficacious in carefully selected patient groups. Further data are needed to fully examine the role of these drugs in the perioperative setting. Intensive research into cardiovascular issues surrounding all NSAIDs is warranted.

  20. A Series of COX-2 Inhibitors Endowed with NO-Releasing Properties: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Docking Analysis.

    PubMed

    Consalvi, Sara; Poce, Giovanna; Ragno, Rino; Sabatino, Manuela; La Motta, Concettina; Sartini, Stefania; Calderone, Vincenzo; Martelli, Alma; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Biava, Mariangela

    2016-08-19

    Herein we report the synthesis, biological evaluation, and docking analysis of a class of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors with nitric oxide (NO)-releasing properties. In an earlier study, a number of selective COX-2 inhibitors/NO donors were developed by conjugating a diarylpyrrole scaffold endowed with selective COX-2 inhibitory properties with various nitrooxyalkyl side chains such as esters, α-amino esters, amides, α-amino amides, ethers, β-amino ethers, inverse esters, and amides. These candidates were found to have high in vitro potencies (COX-2 inhibition at 10 μm: ≥96 %), great efficacy in determining NO-vasorelaxing responses, and good antinociceptive activity in an abdominal writhing test. Among the compounds synthesized in the present work, derivative 2 b [2-(2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-methyl-5-(4-sulfamoylphenyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-yl)acetamido)ethyl nitrate] showed particularly outstanding activity, with efficacy similar to that of celecoxib even at very low concentrations. PMID:27229194

  1. Potential roles of the interaction between model V1 neurons with orientation-selective and non-selective surround inhibition in contour detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai-Fu; Li, Chao-Yi; Li, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Both the neurons with orientation-selective and with non-selective surround inhibition have been observed in the primary visual cortex (V1) of primates and cats. Though the inhibition coming from the surround region (named as non-classical receptive field, nCRF) has been considered playing critical role in visual perception, the specific role of orientation-selective and non-selective inhibition in the task of contour detection is less known. To clarify above question, we first carried out computational analysis of the contour detection performance of V1 neurons with different types of surround inhibition, on the basis of which we then proposed two integrated models to evaluate their role in this specific perceptual task by combining the two types of surround inhibition with two different ways. The two models were evaluated with synthetic images and a set of challenging natural images, and the results show that both of the integrated models outperform the typical models with orientation-selective or non-selective inhibition alone. The findings of this study suggest that V1 neurons with different types of center–surround interaction work in cooperative and adaptive ways at least when extracting organized structures from cluttered natural scenes. This work is expected to inspire efficient phenomenological models for engineering applications in field of computational machine-vision. PMID:26136664

  2. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; Rojas, Camilo; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B; Auld, Douglas S; Ferraris, Dana V; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2013-08-23

    Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC(1280))) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease. PMID:23850693

  3. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ajit G.; Rojas, Camilo; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B.; Auld, Douglas S.; Ferraris, Dana V.; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC1280)) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease. PMID:23850693

  4. Combined therapy with COX-2 inhibitor and 20-HETE inhibitor reduces colon tumor growth and the adverse effects of ischemic stroke associated with COX-2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Hoda, Md Nasrul; Zheng, Xuan; Li, Weiguo; Luo, Pengcheng; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Seki, Tsugio; Ergul, Adviye

    2014-01-01

    20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), Cyp4a-derived eicosanoid, is a lipid mediator that promotes tumor growth, as well as causing detrimental effects in cerebral circulation. We determined whether concurrent inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 20-HETE affects colon tumor growth and ischemic stroke outcomes. The expression of Cyp4a and COXs and production of 20-HETE and PGE2 were determined in murine colon carcinoma (MC38) cells. We then examined the effects of combined treatment with rofecoxib, a potent COX-2 inhibitor, and HET0016, a potent Cyp4a inhibitor, on the growth and proliferation of MC38 cells. Subsequently, we tested the effects of HET0016 plus rofecoxib in MC38 tumor and ischemic stroke models. Cyp4a and COXs are highly expressed in MC38 cells. Respectively, HET0016 and rofecoxib inhibited 20-HETE and PGE2 formation in MC38 cells. Moreover, rofecoxib combined with HET0016 had greater inhibitory effects on the growth and proliferation of MC38 cells than did rofecoxib alone. Importantly, rofecoxib combined with HET0016 provided greater inhibition on tumor growth than did rofecoxib alone in MC38 tumor-bearing mice. Prolonged treatment with rofecoxib selectively induced circulating 20-HETE levels and caused cerebrovascular damage after ischemic stroke, whereas therapy with rofecoxib and HET0016 attenuated 20-HETE levels and reduced rofecoxib-induced cerebrovascular damage and stroke outcomes during anti-tumor therapy. Thus these results demonstrate that combination therapy with rofecoxib and HET0016 provides a new treatment of colon tumor, which can not only enhance the anti-tumor efficacy of rofecoxib, but also reduce rofecoxib-induced cerebrovascular damage and stroke outcomes. PMID:24990856

  5. Bromoenol Lactone, an Inhibitor of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2, Suppresses Carrageenan-Induced Prostaglandin Production and Hyperalgesia in Rat Hind Paw

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, Keiichiro; Ibuki, Takae; Matsumura, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2 and PGI2 are essential to hyperalgesia in inflammatory tissues. These prostaglandins are produced from arachidonic acid, which is cleaved from membrane phospholipids by the action of phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Which isozyme of PLA2 is responsible for the cleavage of arachidonic acid and the production of prostaglandins essential to inflammation-induced hyperalgesia is not clear. In this study, we examined the effects of two PLA2 isozyme-specific inhibitors on carrageenan-induced production of PGE2 and PGI2 in rat hind paw and behavioral nociceptive response to radiant heat. Local administration of bromoenol lactone (BEL), an inhibitor of calcium-independent PLA2 (iPLA2), significantly reduced carrageenan-induced elevation of prostaglandins in the inflamed foot pad 3 h after injection. It also ameliorated the hyperalgesic response between 1 h and 3 h after carrageenan injection. On the other hand, AACOCF3, an inhibitor of cytosolic PLA2, suppressed neither prostaglandin production nor the hyperalgesic response. BEL did not suppress the mRNA levels of iPLA2β, iPLA2γ, cyclooxygenase-2, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase, prostaglandin I synthase, or proinflammatory cytokines in the inflamed foot pad, indicating that BEL did not suppress inflammation itself. These results suggest that iPLA2 is involved in the production of prostaglandins and hyperalgesia at the inflammatory loci. PMID:26063975

  6. Pharmacophore Elucidation and Molecular Docking Studies on 5-Phenyl-1-(3-pyridyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxylic Acid Derivatives as COX-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Marc; Sippl, Wolfgang; Radwan, Awwad A.

    2010-01-01

    A set of 5-phenyl-1-(3-pyridyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxylic acid derivatives (16–32) showing anti-inflammatory activity was analyzed using a three-dimensional qualitative structure-selectivity relationship (3D QSSR) method. The CatalystHipHop approach was used to generate a pharmacophore model for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors based on a training set of 15 active inhibitors (1–15). The degree of fitting of the test set compounds (16–32) to the generated hypothetical model revealed a qualitative measure of the more or less selective COX-2 inhibition of these compounds. The results indicate that most derivatives (16, 18, 20–25, and 30–32) are able to effectively satisfy the proposed pharmacophore geometry using energy accessible conformers (Econf < 20 kcal/mol). In addition, the triazole derivatives (16–32) were docked into COX-1 and COX-2 X-ray structures, using the program GOLD. Based on the docking results it is suggested that several of these novel triazole derivatives are active COX inhibitors with a significant preference for COX-2. In principle, this work presents an interesting, comprehensive approach to theoretically predict the mode of action of compounds that showed anti-inflammatory activity in an in vivo model. PMID:21179343

  7. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  8. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ajit G.; Rojas, Camilo; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B.; Auld, Douglas S.; Ferraris, Dana V.; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine were identified as glutaminase inhibitors. •These had greater affinities and efficiency of inhibition than known prototypes. •Their previously reported biological activity could be due to glutaminase inhibition. -- Abstract: Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC{sup 1280})) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease.

  9. Discovery of lesser known flavones as inhibitors of NF-κB signaling in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells--A SAR study.

    PubMed

    Amrutha, K; Nanjan, Pandurangan; Shaji, Sanu K; Sunilkumar, Damu; Subhalakshmi, K; Rajakrishna, Lakshmi; Banerji, Asoke

    2014-10-01

    Seventeen flavonoids with different substitutions were evaluated for inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in the invasive breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. They were screened using an engineered MDA-MB-231 cell line reporting NF-κB activation. The modulation of expression of two NF-κB regulated genes involved in tumorigenesis, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were also analyzed in these cells. Among the compounds tested, all except gossypetin and quercetagetin inhibited the activation of NF-κB, and the expression of MMP-9 and COX-2 to different degree. Methylated flavone, chrysoeriol (luteolin-3'-methylether), was found to be the most potent inhibitor of MMP-9 and COX-2 expressions. The effect of chrysoeriol on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and metastasis was analyzed by established methods. Chrysoeriol caused cell cycle arrest at G2/M and inhibited migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. The structure-activity relations amongst the flavonoids as NF-κB signaling inhibitors was studied. The study indicates differences between the actions of various flavonoids on NF-κB activation and on the biological activities of breast cancer cells. Flavones in general, were more active than the corresponding flavonols.

  10. Computational Structure-Based De Novo Design of Hypothetical Inhibitors against the Anti- Inflammatory Target COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Khushboo; Katiyar, Shashank Prakash; Goyal, Sukriti; Grover, Abhinav; Sundar, Durai

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) produces prostaglandins in inflamed tissues and hence has been considered as an important target for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs since long. Administration of traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and other COX-2 selective inhibitors (COXIBS) for the treat of inflammation has been found to be associated with side effects, which mainly includes gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicity. The present study involves developing a virtual library of novel molecules with high druglikeliness using structure-based de novo drug designing and 2D fingerprinting approach. A library of 2657 drug like molecules was generated. 2D fingerprinting based screening of the designed library gave a unique set of compounds. Molecular docking approach was then used to identify two compounds highly specific for COX-2 isoform. Molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand complexes revealed that the candidate ligands were dynamically stable within the cyclooxygenase binding site of COX-2. The ligands were further analyzed for their druglikeliness, ADMET properties and synthetic accessibility using knowledge based set of rules. The results revealed that the molecules are predicted to selectively bind to COX-2 enzyme thereby potentially overcoming the limitations posed by the drugs in clinical use. PMID:26241744

  11. Reduced tonicity stimulates an inflammatory response in nucleus pulposus tissue that can be limited by a COX-2-specific inhibitor.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Bart; Potier, Esther; van DIjk, Maarten; Langelaan, Marloes; Papen-Botterhuis, Nicole; Ito, Keita

    2015-11-01

    In intervertebral disc herniation with nucleus pulposus (NP) extrusion, the elicited inflammatory response is considered a key pain mechanism. However, inflammatory cytokines are reported in extruded herniated tissue, even before monocyte infiltration, suggesting that the tissue itself initiates the inflammation. Since herniated tissue swells, we investigated whether this simple mechanobiological stimulus alone could provoke an inflammatory response that could cause pain. Furthermore, we investigated whether sustained-release cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitor would be beneficial in such conditions. Healthy bovine NP explants were allowed to swell freely or confined. The swelling explants were treated with Celecoxib, applied either as a bolus or in sustained-release. Swelling explants produced elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) for 28 days, while confined explants did not. Both a high concentration bolus and 10 times lower concentration in sustained release completely inhibited PGE2 production, but did not affect IL-6 production. Swelling of NP tissue, without the inflammatory system response, can trigger cytokine production and Celecoxib, even in bolus form, may be useful for pain control in extruded disc herniation. PMID:25991050

  12. Cytosolic PTEN-induced Putative Kinase 1 Is Stabilized by the NF-κB Pathway and Promotes Non-selective Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Grace G Y; Chua, Doreen S K; Basil, Adeline H; Chan, Hui-Ying; Chai, Chou; Arumugam, Thiruma; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2015-07-01

    The potential cellular function of the 53-kDa cytosolic form of PINK1 (PINK1-53) is often overlooked because of its rapid degradation by the proteasome upon its production. Although a number of recent studies have suggested various roles for PINK1-53, how this labile PINK1 species attains an adequate expression level to fulfil these roles remains unclear. Here we demonstrated that PINK1-53 is stabilized in the presence of enhanced Lys-63-linked ubiquitination and identified TRAF6-related NF-κB activation as a novel pathway involved in this. We further showed that a mimetic of PINK1-53 promotes mitophagy but, curiously, in apparently healthy mitochondria. We speculate that this "non-selective" form of mitophagy may potentially help to counteract the build-up of reactive oxygen species in cells undergoing oxidative stress and, as such, represent a cytoprotective response.

  13. Modulation by purines of calcium-activated non-selective cation channels in the outer hair cells of the guinea-pig cochlea.

    PubMed Central

    Van den Abbeele, T; Tran Ba Huy, P; Teulon, J

    1996-01-01

    1. The cell-attached and cell-free configurations of the patch-clamp technique were used to investigate whether external ATP and its derivatives modulate channel activity in outer hair cells freshly isolated from the guinea-pig cochlea. 2. Submicromolar concentrations of ATP stimulated a non-selective cation channel with a conductance of about 25 pS. The ATP-elicited stimulation was partly blocked by the membrane-permeant blocker 3',5-dichlorodiphenylamine-2-carboxylic acid (DCDPC), and mimicked by the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, suggesting that the channel activated by ATP is identical to a previously reported calcium-activated non-selective (CAN) cation channel. 3. The P2x agonist beta, gamma-methylene-ATP (beta, gamma-MeATP, 10 microM) and the P2Y agonist 2-methyl-thio-ATP (2-MeSATP, 1 microM) both activated CAN channels. The effect of ATP was inhibited by the P2 antagonist suramin but not by the P2Y antagonist Reactive Blue 2. These results suggest that both purinergic receptors are involved in the ATP-evoked response and that internal calcium acts as a second messenger for opening CAN channels. 4. In contrast, adenosine inhibited CAN channels. This effect was reproduced by the A2 agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine (NECA) and the permeant cAMP analogue 8-bromo-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP), but not by the A1 agonist N6-cyclo-hexyladenosine (CHA). CAN channels were also inhibited when the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A was applied internally on inside-out patches, suggesting that adenosine A2 receptor downregulates CAN channels via a cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. Images Figure 10 PMID:8814608

  14. γ-Secretase Inhibitors and Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Golde, Todd E.; Koo, Edward H.; Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Osborne, Barbara A.; Miele, Lucio

    2013-01-01

    γ-Secretase is a fascinating, multi-subunit, intramembrane-cleaving protease that is now being considered as a therapeutic target for a number of diseases. Potent, orally bioavailable γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) have been developed and tested in humans with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer. Preclinical studies also suggest the therapeutic potential for GSIs in other disease conditions. However, due to inherent mechanism based-toxicity of non-selective inhibition of γ-secretase, clinical development of GSIs will require empirical testing with careful evaluation of benefit versus risk. In addition to GSIs, compounds referred to as γ-secretase modulators (GSMs) remain in development as AD therapeutics. GSMs do not inhibit γ-secretase, but modulate γ-secretase processivity and thereby shift the profile of the secreted amyloid β peptides (Aβ) peptides produced. Although GSMs are thought to have an inherently safe mechanism of action, their effects on substrates other than the amyloid β protein precursor (APP) have not been extensively investigated. Herein, we will review the current state of development of GSIs and GSMs and explore pertinent biological and pharmacological questions pertaining to the use of these agents for select indications. PMID:23791707

  15. Pathway modulators and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A

    2009-07-01

    Inhibitors of specific cellular pathways are useful for investigating the roles of proteins of unknown function, and for selectively inhibiting a protein in complex pathways to uncover its relationships to other proteins in this and other interacting pathways. This appendix provides links to Web sites that describe cellular processes and pathways along with the various classes of inhibitors, numerous references, downloadable diagrams, and technical tips.

  16. Update on TNF Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kerdel, Francisco A

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors dramatically improved the management of psoriasis. Some newer or investigational biologics with different mechanisms of action have demonstrated noninferiority or superiority to etanercept, the first self-injectable anti-TNF-α agent to become available in the United States. Nonetheless, TNF-α inhibitors are likely to remain a mainstay of therapy for many years.

  17. Synthetic inhibitors of elastase.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P D; Bernstein, P R

    1994-03-01

    For more than two decades investigators around the world, in both academic and industrial institutions, have been developing inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. A number of very elegant and insightful strategies have been reported. In the case of reversible peptidic inhibitors, this has resulted in the identification of some extremely potent compounds with dissociation constants in the 10(-11) M range. This is quite an accomplishment considering that these low molecular-weight inhibitors are only tri- and tetrapeptides. In the case of the heterocyclic-based inhibitors, the challenge of balancing the heterocycle's inherent reactivity and aqueous stability with the stability of the enzyme-inhibitor adduct has been meet by either using a latent, reactive functionality which is only activated within the enzyme, or by incorporating features which selectively obstruct deacylation but have little effect on the enzyme acylation step. The underlying goal of this research has been the identification of agents to treat diseases associated with HNE. Several animal models have been developed for evaluating the in vivo activity of elastase inhibitors, and compounds have been shown to be effective in all of these models by the intravenous, intratrachael or oral routes of administration. However, only a very small percentage of compounds have possessed all the necessary properties, including lack of toxicity, for progression into the clinic. The peptidyl TFMK ICI 200,880 (25-12) has many of the desired characteristics of a drug to treat the diseases associated with HNE: chemical stability, in vitro and in vivo activity, a long duration of action, and adequate metabolic stability. Currently ICI 200,880 is the only low molecular-weight HNE inhibitor known to be undergoing clinical trials, and may be the compound which finally demonstrates the clinical utility of a synthetic HNE inhibitor. PMID:8189835

  18. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking.

    PubMed

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel; Schmid, Tobias; Brauss, Thilo; Pleli, Thomas; zu Heringdorf, Dagmar Meyer; Piiper, Albrecht; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D1 encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E2 synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC.

  19. Small-molecule caspase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenodarova, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    The review considers low-molecular weight inhibitors of caspases, cysteine proteases being key contributors to apoptosis (programmed cell death). The inhibitors with aspartic acid residues or various heterocyclic systems (both synthetic and natural) are covered. Their possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Data on inhibitor structure-activity relationship studies are systematically surveyed. The interactions of the non-peptide fragments of an inhibitor with the enzymes are examined. Examples of the use of some inhibitors for apoptosis suppression are provided.

  20. Chronic Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection. A Retrospective, Observational Study on the Treatment Strategy and Prognosis in 130 Non-Selected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Troelsen, Anders; Søballe, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Limited information is available regarding the treatment strategy and prognosis of non-selected patients treated for chronic periprosthetic hip joint infection. Such information is important as no head-to-head studies on treatment strategies are available. The purpose of this study is to report on the treatment strategy and prognosis of a non-selected, consecutive patient population Methods We identified 130 patients in the National Patient Registry, consecutively treated for a chronic periprosthetic hip joint infection between 2003–2008 at 11 departments of orthopaedic surgery. We extracted information regarding patient demographics, treatment and outcome. 82 patients were re-implanted in a two-stage revision (national standard), the remaining 48 were not re-implanted in a two-stage revision. We were able to collect up-to-date information on all patients to date of death or medical chart review with a minimum of 5 years follow-up by the nationwide electronic patient record system Results After primary revision surgery, 53 patients (41%) had a spacer in situ, 64 (50%) had a resection arthroplasty and 13 (9%) did not have the infected implant removed. 63% were re-implanted in a two-stage revision. Re-implantation was performed after an interim period of 14 weeks (IQR 10–18). Patients re-implanted were younger (p-value 0.0006), had a lower CCS score (p-value 0.005), a lower ASA score (p-value 0.0001) and a 68% lower mortality risk in the follow-up period (p-value <0.00001). After adjusting for selected confounders, the mortality risk was no longer significantly different. The 5-year re-infection rate after re-implantation was 14.6% (95%CI 8.0–23.1). Re-infections occurred mainly within 3 years of follow-up. The overall 1-year survival rate was 92% (95%CI 86–96) and the overall 5-year survival rate was 68% (95%CI 59–75). The 5-year survival rate after a two-stage revision was 82% (95%CI 71–89) and in those not re-implanted 45% (95%CI 30–58

  1. Natural inhibitors of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Huntington, James A

    2014-04-01

    The serine protease thrombin is the effector enzyme of blood coagulation. It has many activities critical for the formation of stable clots, including cleavage of fibrinogen to fibrin, activation of platelets and conversion of procofactors to active cofactors. Thrombin carries-out its multiple functions by utilising three special features: a deep active site cleft and two anion binding exosites (exosite I and II). Similarly, thrombin inhibitors have evolved to exploit the unique features of thrombin to achieve rapid and specific inactivation of thrombin. Exogenous thrombin inhibitors come from several different protein families and are generally found in the saliva of haematophagous animals (blood suckers) as part of an anticoagulant cocktail that allows them to feed. Crystal structures of several of these inhibitors reveal how peptides and proteins can be targeted to thrombin in different and interesting ways. Thrombin activity must also be regulated by endogenous inhibitors so that thrombi do not occlude blood flow and cause thrombosis. A single protein family, the serpins, provides all four of the endogenous thrombin inhibitors found in man. The crystal structures of these serpins bound to thrombin have been solved, revealing a similar exosite-dependence on complex formation. In addition to forming the recognition complex, serpins destroy the structure of thrombin, allowing them to be released from cofactors and substrates for clearance. This review examines how the special features of thrombin have been exploited by evolution to achieve inhibition of the ultimate coagulation protease.

  2. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM. PMID:26362302

  3. A Rational Approach for the Identification of Non-Hydroxamate HDAC6-Selective Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goracci, Laura; Deschamps, Nathalie; Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco; Petit, Charlotte; Dos Santos Passos, Carolina; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Simões-Pires, Claudia; Nurisso, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    The human histone deacetylase isoform 6 (HDAC6) has been demonstrated to play a major role in cell motility and aggresome formation, being interesting for the treatment of multiple tumour types and neurodegenerative conditions. Currently, most HDAC inhibitors in preclinical or clinical evaluations are non-selective inhibitors, characterised by a hydroxamate zinc-binding group (ZBG) showing off-target effects and mutagenicity. The identification of selective HDAC6 inhibitors with novel chemical properties has not been successful yet, also because of the absence of crystallographic information that makes the rational design of HDAC6 selective inhibitors difficult. Using HDAC inhibitory data retrieved from the ChEMBL database and ligand-based computational strategies, we identified 8 original new non-hydroxamate HDAC6 inhibitors from the SPECS database, with activity in the low μM range. The most potent and selective compound, bearing a hydrazide ZBG, was shown to increase tubulin acetylation in human cells. No effects on histone H4 acetylation were observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an HDAC6 selective inhibitor bearing a hydrazide ZBG. Its capability to passively cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as observed through PAMPA assays, and its low cytotoxicity in vitro, suggested its potential for drug development.

  4. A Rational Approach for the Identification of Non-Hydroxamate HDAC6-Selective Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Goracci, Laura; Deschamps, Nathalie; Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco; Petit, Charlotte; Dos Santos Passos, Carolina; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Simões-Pires, Claudia; Nurisso, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The human histone deacetylase isoform 6 (HDAC6) has been demonstrated to play a major role in cell motility and aggresome formation, being interesting for the treatment of multiple tumour types and neurodegenerative conditions. Currently, most HDAC inhibitors in preclinical or clinical evaluations are non-selective inhibitors, characterised by a hydroxamate zinc-binding group (ZBG) showing off-target effects and mutagenicity. The identification of selective HDAC6 inhibitors with novel chemical properties has not been successful yet, also because of the absence of crystallographic information that makes the rational design of HDAC6 selective inhibitors difficult. Using HDAC inhibitory data retrieved from the ChEMBL database and ligand-based computational strategies, we identified 8 original new non-hydroxamate HDAC6 inhibitors from the SPECS database, with activity in the low μM range. The most potent and selective compound, bearing a hydrazide ZBG, was shown to increase tubulin acetylation in human cells. No effects on histone H4 acetylation were observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an HDAC6 selective inhibitor bearing a hydrazide ZBG. Its capability to passively cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as observed through PAMPA assays, and its low cytotoxicity in vitro, suggested its potential for drug development. PMID:27404291

  5. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  6. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  7. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cockrill, Barbara A; Waxman, Aaron B

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling plays a key role in modulating vascular tone and remodeling in the pulmonary circulation. The guanylate cyclase/cyclic guanylate monophosphate-signaling pathway primarily mediates nitric oxide signaling. This pathway is critical in normal regulation of the pulmonary vasculature, and is an important target for therapy in patients with pulmonary hypertension. In the pulmonary vasculature, degradation of cGMP is primarily regulated by PDE-5, and inhibition of this enzyme has important effects on pulmonary vasculature smooth muscle tone. Large randomized placebo-controlled trials of PDE-5 inhibitors demonstrated improved exercise capacity, hemodynamics and quality of life in adult patients with PAH. This chapter will discuss the mechanisms of NO signaling in the vasculature, characteristics of the PDE5-inhibitors approved for treatment of PH, and review available data on the use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in PH. PMID:24092343

  8. CASEIN KINASE-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF SERINE 839 IS NECESSARY FOR BASOLATERAL LOCALIZATION OF THE Ca2+-ACTIVATED NON-SELECTIVE CATION CHANNEL TRPM4

    PubMed Central

    Cerda, Oscar; Cáceres, Mónica; Park, Kang-Sik; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Romero, Aníbal; Varela, Diego

    2014-01-01

    TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cation channel expressed in a wide range of human tissues. TRPM4 participates in a variety of physiological processes such as T cell activation, myogenic vasoconstriction and allergic reactions. TRPM4 Ca2+ sensitivity is enhanced by calmodulin (CaM) and phosphathydilinositol 4, 5-biphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) binding, as well as, under certain conditions, PKC activation. However, information as to the mechanisms of modulation of this channel remain unknown, including direct identification of phosphorylation sites on TRPM4 and their role in channel features. Here, we use mass-spectrometric-based proteomic approaches (immunoprecipitation and tandem mass spectrometry), to unambiguously identify S839 as a phosphorylation site present on human TRPM4 expressed in a human cell line. Site-directed mutagenesis employing a serine to alanine mutation to eliminate phosphorylation, and a phospho-mimetic aspartate mutation, as well as biochemical and immunocytochemical experiments, revealed a role for S839 phosphorylation in the basolateral expression of TRPM4 channels in epithelial cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that casein kinase 1 (CK1) phosphorylates S839 and is responsible for the basolateral localization of TRPM4. PMID:25231975

  9. Pyroptosis is driven by non-selective gasdermin-D pore and its morphology is different from MLKL channel-mediated necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; He, Wan-Ting; Hu, Lichen; Li, Jingxian; Fang, Yuan; Wang, Xin; Xu, Xiaozheng; Wang, Zhuo; Huang, Kai; Han, Jiahuai

    2016-09-01

    Necroptosis and pyroptosis are two forms of programmed cell death with a common feature of plasma membrane rupture. Here we studied the morphology and mechanism of pyroptosis in comparison with necroptosis. Different from necroptosis, pyroptosis undergoes membrane blebbing and produces apoptotic body-like cell protrusions (termed pyroptotic bodies) prior to plasma membrane rupture. The rupture in necroptosis is explosion-like, whereas in pyroptosis it leads to flattening of cells. It is known that the execution of necroptosis is mediated by mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) oligomers in the plasma membrane, whereas gasdermin-D (GSDMD) mediates pyroptosis after its cleavage by caspase-1 or caspase-11. We show that N-terminal fragment of GSDMD (GSDMD-N) generated by caspase cleavage also forms oligomer and migrates to the plasma membrane to kill cells. Both MLKL and GSDMD-N are lipophilic and the N-terminal sequences of both proteins are important for their oligomerization and plasma membrane translocation. Unlike MLKL which forms channels on the plasma membrane that induces influx of selected ions which osmotically swell the cells to burst, GSDMD-N forms non-selective pores and does not rely on increased osmolarity to disrupt cells. Our study reveals the pore-forming activity of GSDMD and channel-forming activity of MLKL determine different ways of plasma membrane rupture in pyroptosis and necroptosis. PMID:27573174

  10. Pyroptosis is driven by non-selective gasdermin-D pore and its morphology is different from MLKL channel-mediated necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; He, Wan-ting; Hu, Lichen; Li, Jingxian; Fang, Yuan; Wang, Xin; Xu, Xiaozheng; Wang, Zhuo; Huang, Kai; Han, Jiahuai

    2016-01-01

    Necroptosis and pyroptosis are two forms of programmed cell death with a common feature of plasma membrane rupture. Here we studied the morphology and mechanism of pyroptosis in comparison with necroptosis. Different from necroptosis, pyroptosis undergoes membrane blebbing and produces apoptotic body-like cell protrusions (termed pyroptotic bodies) prior to plasma membrane rupture. The rupture in necroptosis is explosion-like, whereas in pyroptosis it leads to flattening of cells. It is known that the execution of necroptosis is mediated by mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) oligomers in the plasma membrane, whereas gasdermin-D (GSDMD) mediates pyroptosis after its cleavage by caspase-1 or caspase-11. We show that N-terminal fragment of GSDMD (GSDMD-N) generated by caspase cleavage also forms oligomer and migrates to the plasma membrane to kill cells. Both MLKL and GSDMD-N are lipophilic and the N-terminal sequences of both proteins are important for their oligomerization and plasma membrane translocation. Unlike MLKL which forms channels on the plasma membrane that induces influx of selected ions which osmotically swell the cells to burst, GSDMD-N forms non-selective pores and does not rely on increased osmolarity to disrupt cells. Our study reveals the pore-forming activity of GSDMD and channel-forming activity of MLKL determine different ways of plasma membrane rupture in pyroptosis and necroptosis. PMID:27573174

  11. Pectin methylesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Giovane, A; Servillo, L; Balestrieri, C; Raiola, A; D'Avino, R; Tamburrini, M; Ciardiello, M A; Camardella, L

    2004-02-12

    Pectin methylesterase (PME) is the first enzyme acting on pectin, a major component of plant cell wall. PME action produces pectin with different structural and functional properties, having an important role in plant physiology. Regulation of plant PME activity is obtained by the differential expression of several isoforms in different tissues and developmental stages and by subtle modifications of cell wall local pH. Inhibitory activities from various plant sources have also been reported. A proteinaceous inhibitor of PME (PMEI) has been purified from kiwi fruit. The kiwi PMEI is active against plant PMEs, forming a 1:1 non-covalent complex. The polypeptide chain comprises 152 amino acid residues and contains five Cys residues, four of which are connected by disulfide bridges, first to second and third to fourth. The sequence shows significant similarity with the N-terminal pro-peptides of plant PME, and with plant invertase inhibitors. In particular, the four Cys residues involved in disulfide bridges are conserved. On the basis of amino acid sequence similarity and Cys residues conservation, a large protein family including PMEI, invertase inhibitors and related proteins of unknown function has been identified. The presence of at least two sequences in the Arabidopsis genome having high similarity with kiwi PMEI suggests the ubiquitous presence of this inhibitor. PMEI has an interest in food industry as inhibitor of endogenous PME, responsible for phase separation and cloud loss in fruit juice manufacturing. Affinity chromatography on resin-bound PMEI can also be used to concentrate and detect residual PME activity in fruit and vegetable products.

  12. Oxytocin Increases Invasive Properties of Endometrial Cancer Cells Through Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/AKT-Dependent Up-Regulation of Cyclooxygenase-1, -2, and X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein1

    PubMed Central

    Déry, Marie-Claude; Chaudhry, Parvesh; Leblanc, Valérie; Parent, Sophie; Fortier, Anne-Marie; Asselin, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, oxytocin (OT) is well known to play a crucial role in the regulation of cyclic changes in the uterus, implantation of the embryo, and parturition. Recently, an additional role for OT has been identified in several types of cancer cells in which OT acts as a growth regulator. In endometrial cancer cells, OT is known to efficiently inhibit cellular proliferation. In the present study, we show that OT increases invasiveness of human endometrial carcinoma (HEC) cells, which are otherwise resistant to the growth-inhibiting effects of OT. Using pharmacological inhibitors, invasion assay, RNA interference, and immunofluorescence, we found that OT enhances the invasive properties of HEC cells through up-regulation of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), matrix-metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2), and matrix-metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14). In addition, we show that OT-mediated invasion is both cyclooxygenase 1 (PTGS1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (PTGS2) dependent via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT (PIK3/AKT) pathway. PTGS2 knockdown by shRNA resulted in XIAP down-regulation. We also show that OT receptor is overexpressed in grade I to III endometrial cancer. Taken together, our results describe for the first time a novel role for OT in endometrial cancer cell invasion. PMID:21816851

  13. Association of lipoprotein subclass distribution with use of selective and non-selective beta-blocker medications in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Superko, H R; Haskell, W L; Krauss, R M

    1993-06-01

    The relationship of beta-blocker drug use to plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), lipoprotein mass distribution, (LDL, Sf0-12), intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL, Sf12-20), very low density lipoproteins (VLDL, Sf20-400), and high density lipoproteins (HDL, F(1.2)0-9) were examined in 206 men with coronary heart disease. Thirty-three used non-selective (NSEL), 49 used selective (SEL), and were compared to 124 who used no beta-blockade (NoBB). No significant between group differences were seen for potentially confounding variables. LDL and IDL mass, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were not significantly different between groups. HDL-C was significantly lower in both NSEL (P < 0.005) and SEL (P < 0.01). NSEL and SEL had significantly lower HDL mass (P < 0.005 and P < 0.005) and SEL (P < 0.01 and P = 0.06), and HDL3 mass (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05). VLDL mass was significantly higher (P < 0.02) only in NSEL. Small LDL (Sf0-7) was not significantly different between groups and large LDL (Sf7-12) was significantly lower in NSEL (P < 0.05) and SEL (P < 0.05). LDL peak Sf was significantly lower in both NSEL (P < 0.005) and SEL (P < 0.02) compared to NoBB. Despite the lack of differences in levels of LDL-cholesterol, beta-blocker use is associated with a significant difference in the distribution of larger, more buoyant to smaller, more dense LDL particles. Reduced HDL levels in subjects on beta-blockade therapy are associated with reductions in both HDL2 and HDL3 subclasses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Effect of selective and non-selective serotonin receptor activation on L-DOPA-induced therapeutic efficacy and dyskinesia in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Tronci, E; Fidalgo, C; Stancampiano, R; Carta, M

    2015-10-01

    Selective activation of 5-HT1 receptors has been shown to produce near to full suppression of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in animal models of Parkinson's disease; however, a reduction of the therapeutic effect of L-DOPA has been reported in several studies. Conversely, we recently found that increasing the serotonergic tone with chronic administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HTP) can reduce LID in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, without affecting L-DOPA efficacy. To directly compare the effects of selective versus non-selective serotonin receptor activation, here we first tested different acute doses of the 5-HT1A/1B receptor agonist eltoprazine and 5-HTP on LID in order to identify doses of the individual compounds showing similar anti-dyskinetic efficacy in L-DOPA-primed dyskinetic rats. About 50% reduction of LID was observed with 0.1 mg/kg and 24 mg/kg of eltoprazine and 5-HTP, respectively; we then compared the effect of the two drugs, individually and in combination, on L-DOPA-induced stepping test in L-DOPA-naïve parkinsonian animals and LID over three weeks of L-DOPA treatment. Results showed that eltoprazine induced significant worsening of L-DOPA-mediated performance in the stepping test, while 5-HTP did not. Interestingly, combination of 5-HTP with eltoprazine prevented the reduction in the forelimb use induced by eltoprazine. Moreover, 5-HTP and eltoprazine given individually showed similar efficacy also upon chronic treatment, and had additive effect in dampening the appearance of LID when given in combination. Finally, chronic administration of eltoprazine and/or 5-HTP did not affect striatal serotonin innervation, compared to l-DOPA alone, as measured by serotonin transporter expression.

  15. Design of non-selective refocusing pulses with phase-free rotation axis by gradient ascent pulse engineering algorithm in parallel transmission at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massire, Aurélien; Cloos, Martijn A.; Vignaud, Alexandre; Le Bihan, Denis; Amadon, Alexis; Boulant, Nicolas

    2013-05-01

    At ultra-high magnetic field (⩾7 T), B1 and ΔB0 non-uniformities cause undesired inhomogeneities in image signal and contrast. Tailored radiofrequency pulses exploiting parallel transmission have been shown to mitigate these phenomena. However, the design of large flip angle excitations, a prerequisite for many clinical applications, remains challenging due the non-linearity of the Bloch equation. In this work, we explore the potential of gradient ascent pulse engineering to design non-selective spin-echo refocusing pulses that simultaneously mitigate severe B1 and ΔB0 non-uniformities. The originality of the method lays in the optimization of the rotation matrices themselves as opposed to magnetization states. Consequently, the commonly used linear class of large tip angle approximation can be eliminated from the optimization procedure. This approach, combined with optimal control, provides additional degrees of freedom by relaxing the phase constraint on the rotation axis, and allows the derivative of the performance criterion to be found analytically. The method was experimentally validated on an 8-channel transmit array at 7 T, using a water phantom with B1 and ΔB0 inhomogeneities similar to those encountered in the human brain. For the first time in MRI, the rotation matrix itself on every voxel was measured by using Quantum Process Tomography. The results are complemented with a series of spin-echo measurements comparing the proposed method against commonly used alternatives. Both experiments confirm very good performance, while simultaneously maintaining a low energy deposition and pulse duration compared to well-known adiabatic solutions.

  16. Effect of selective and non-selective serotonin receptor activation on L-DOPA-induced therapeutic efficacy and dyskinesia in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Tronci, E; Fidalgo, C; Stancampiano, R; Carta, M

    2015-10-01

    Selective activation of 5-HT1 receptors has been shown to produce near to full suppression of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in animal models of Parkinson's disease; however, a reduction of the therapeutic effect of L-DOPA has been reported in several studies. Conversely, we recently found that increasing the serotonergic tone with chronic administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HTP) can reduce LID in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, without affecting L-DOPA efficacy. To directly compare the effects of selective versus non-selective serotonin receptor activation, here we first tested different acute doses of the 5-HT1A/1B receptor agonist eltoprazine and 5-HTP on LID in order to identify doses of the individual compounds showing similar anti-dyskinetic efficacy in L-DOPA-primed dyskinetic rats. About 50% reduction of LID was observed with 0.1 mg/kg and 24 mg/kg of eltoprazine and 5-HTP, respectively; we then compared the effect of the two drugs, individually and in combination, on L-DOPA-induced stepping test in L-DOPA-naïve parkinsonian animals and LID over three weeks of L-DOPA treatment. Results showed that eltoprazine induced significant worsening of L-DOPA-mediated performance in the stepping test, while 5-HTP did not. Interestingly, combination of 5-HTP with eltoprazine prevented the reduction in the forelimb use induced by eltoprazine. Moreover, 5-HTP and eltoprazine given individually showed similar efficacy also upon chronic treatment, and had additive effect in dampening the appearance of LID when given in combination. Finally, chronic administration of eltoprazine and/or 5-HTP did not affect striatal serotonin innervation, compared to l-DOPA alone, as measured by serotonin transporter expression. PMID:26119238

  17. Ability of preoperative falls to predict postsurgical outcomes in non-selected patients undergoing elective surgery at an academic medical centre: protocol for a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abdallah, Arbi; McKinnon, Sherry L; Wildes, Troy S; Avidan, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Falls are increasingly recognised for their ability to herald impending health decline. Despite the likely susceptibility of postsurgical patients to falls, a detailed description of postoperative falls in an unselected surgical population has never been performed. One study suggests that preoperative falls may forecast postoperative complications. However, a larger study with non-selected surgical patients and patient-centred outcomes is needed to provide the generalisability and justification necessary to implement preoperative falls assessment into routine clinical practice. The aims of this study are therefore twofold. First, we aim to describe the main features of postoperative falls in a population of unselected surgical patients. Second, we aim to test the hypothesis that a history of falls in the 6 months prior to surgery predicts postoperative falls, poor quality of life, functional dependence, complications and readmission. Methods and analysis To achieve these goals, we study adult patients who underwent elective surgery at our academic medical centre and were recruited to participate in a prospective, survey-based cohort study called Systematic Assessment and Targeted Improvement of Services Following Yearlong Surgical Outcomes Surveys (SATISFY-SOS) (NCT02032030). Patients who reported falling in the 6 months prior to surgery will be considered ‘exposed.’ The primary outcome of interest is postoperative falls within 30 days of surgery. Secondary outcomes include postoperative functional dependence, quality of life (both physical and mental), in-hospital complications and readmission. Regression models will permit controlling for important confounders. Ethics and dissemination The home institution's Institutional Review Board approved this study (IRB ID number 201505035). The authors will publish the findings, regardless of the results. PMID:27655260

  18. Increase in cytosolic Ca2+ produced by hypoxia and other depolarizing stimuli activates a non-selective cation channel in chemoreceptor cells of rat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dawon; Wang, Jiaju; Hogan, James O; Vennekens, Rudi; Freichel, Marc; White, Carl; Kim, Donghee

    2014-05-01

    The current model of O2 sensing by carotid body chemoreceptor (glomus) cells is that hypoxia inhibits the outward K(+) current and causes cell depolarization, Ca(2+) influx via voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels and a rise in intracellular [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)]i). Here we show that hypoxia (<5% O2), in addition to inhibiting the two-pore domain K(+) channels TASK-1/3 (TASK), indirectly activates an ∼20 pS channel in isolated glomus cells. The 20 pS channel was permeable to K(+), Na(+) and Cs(+) but not to Cl(-) or Ca(2+). The 20 pS channel was not sensitive to voltage. Inhibition of TASK by external acid, depolarization of glomus cells with high external KCl (20 mm) or opening of the Ca(2+) channel with FPL64176 activated the 20 pS channel when 1 mm Ca(2+) was present in the external solution. Ca(2+) (10 μm) applied to the cytosolic side of inside-out patches activated the 20 pS channel. The threshold [Ca(2+)]i for activation of the 20 pS channel in cell-attached patches was ∼200 nm. The reversal potential of the 20 pS channel was estimated to be -28 mV. Our results reveal a sequential mechanism in which hypoxia (<5% O2) first inhibits the K(+) conductance and then activates a Na(+)-permeable, non-selective cation channel via depolarization-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i. Our results suggest that inhibition of K(+) efflux and stimulation of Na(+) influx both contribute to the depolarization of glomus cells during moderate to severe hypoxia.

  19. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  20. A SMALL MOLECULE SCREEN IDENTIFIES SELECTIVE INHIBITORS OF UREA TRANSPORTER UT-A

    PubMed Central

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Anderson, Marc O.; Verkman, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Urea transporter (UT) proteins, including UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta microvessels, facilitate urinary concentrating function. A screen for UT-A inhibitors was developed in MDCK cells expressing UT-A1, water channel aquaporin-1, and YFP-H148Q/V163S. An inwardly directed urea gradient produces cell shrinking followed by UT-A1-dependent swelling, which was monitored by YFP-H148Q/V163S fluorescence. Screening of ~90,000 synthetic small molecules yielded four classes of UT-A1 inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 that fully and reversibly inhibited urea transport by a non-competitive mechanism. Structure-activity analysis of >400 analogs revealed UT-A1-selective and UT-A1/UT-B non-selective inhibitors. Docking computations based on homology models of UT-A1 suggested inhibitor binding sites. UT-A inhibitors may be useful as diuretics (‘urearetics’) with a novel mechanism of action that may be effective in fluid-retaining conditions in which conventional salt transport-blocking diuretics have limited efficacy. PMID:24055006

  1. [JAK2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hernández Boluda, Juan Carlos; Gómez, Montse; Pérez, Ariadna

    2016-07-15

    Pharmacological inhibition of the kinase activity of JAK proteins can interfere with the signaling of immunomodulatory cytokines and block the constitutive activation of the JAK-STAT pathway that characterizes certain malignancies, including chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. JAK inhibitors may, therefore, be useful to treat malignancies as well as inflammatory or immune disorders. Currently, the most significant advances have been made in the treatment of myelofibrosis, where these drugs may lead to a remarkable improvement in the control of hyperproliferative manifestations. However, available data suggest that this treatment is not curative of myelofibrosis. In general, JAK2 inhibition induces cytopaenias, with this being considered a class side-effect. By contrast, the extrahaematologic toxicity profile varies significantly among the different JAK inhibitors. At present, there are several clinical trials evaluating the combination of ruxolitinib with other drugs, in order to improve its therapeutic activity as well as reducing haematologic toxicity. PMID:27033437

  2. Coagulation inhibitors in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Esmon, C T

    2005-04-01

    Coagulation is triggered by inflammatory mediators in a number of ways. However, to prevent unwanted clot formation, several natural anticoagulant mechanisms exist, such as the antithrombin-heparin mechanism, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor mechanism and the protein C anticoagulant pathway. This review examines the ways in which these pathways are down-regulated by inflammation, thus limiting clot formation and decreasing the natural anti-inflammatory mechanisms that these pathways possess. PMID:15787615

  3. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  4. The non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 attenuates responses of C-fiber nociceptors in a murine model of cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Uhelski, Megan L.; Cain, David M.; Harding-Rose, Catherine; Simone, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Pain from cancer can be severe, difficult to treat, and greatly diminishes patients’ quality of life. It is therefore important to gain new information on the mechanisms of cancer pain and develop new treatment strategies. We have used a murine model of bone cancer pain to investigate underlying peripheral neural mechanisms and novel treatment approaches. In this model, implantation of fibrosarcoma cells into and around the calcaneous bone produces mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice. C-fiber nociceptors in tumor-bearing mice develop spontaneous ongoing activity and sensitization to thermal stimuli. However, it is unclear whether sensitization of nociceptors to mechanical stimuli underlies the mechanical hyperalgesia seen in tumor-bearing mice. We therefore examined responses of C-fiber nociceptors to suprathreshold mechanical stimuli in tumor-bearing mice and found they did not differ from those of C-nociceptors in control mice. Thus, sensitization of C-fiber nociceptors to mechanical stimulation does not appear to underlie tumor-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia in this murine model of bone cancer pain. We also examined the effect of the non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55, 212-2, on spontaneous activity and responses evoked by mechanical stimuli of C-fiber nociceptors innervating the tumor-bearing paw. Selective CB1 and CB2 antagonists were administered to determine the contribution of each receptor subtype to the effects of WIN 55,212-2. Intraplantar administration of WIN 55,212-2 attenuated spontaneous discharge and responses evoked by mechanical stimulation of C-fiber nociceptors. These effects were inhibited by prior intraplantar administration of selective CB1 (AM281) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists but not by vehicle. These results indicate that activation of either CB1 or CB2 receptors reduced the spontaneous activity of C-fiber nociceptors associated with tumor growth as well as their evoked responses. Our results provide

  5. In the polymorphic ciliate Tetrahymena vorax, the non-selective phagocytosis seen in microstomes changes to a highly selective process in macrostomes.

    PubMed

    Grønlien, Heidi K; Berg, Trond; Løvlie, Arne M

    2002-07-01

    Ciliates use phagocytosis to acquire edible particles. The polymorphic ciliate Tetrahymena vorax appears in two forms ('microstomes' and 'macrostomes'). Transformation of microstomes into macrostomes takes place in the presence of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila and enables the macrostome to phagocytose the latter species. The non-specific, constitutive phagocytosis in microstomes thereby changes into a specific inducible process in macrostomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the phagocytotic process in macrostomes is specifically aimed at catching T. thermophila. The two forms of phagocytosis represent an interesting model system for studying the mechanism whereby phagosomes are formed. The macrostomal form capture deciliated and ciliated Tetrahymena thermophila, latex beads with diameters of 20.3 and 30.0 microm and small microstomal cells. However, the macrostomes select T. thermophila as a prey when they have the opportunity to choose between deciliated T. thermophila and latex beads and between T. thermophila and microstomes. The non-selective formation of phagosomes seen in microstomes changes to a highly selective process during the transformation to macrostomes. Unlike microstomes, macrostomes do not form a closed vacuole after capturing a latex bead, indicating that mechanical stimulation by the prey does not in itself trigger phagocytosis in the macrostomal form of T. vorax. Although macrostomes captured T. thermophila in preference to microstomes, phagocytosis of microstomes started immediately following capture, indicating that the substance/molecule that triggers the formation of the phagosome is not specific for T. thermophila cells. After capturing a T. thermophila cell, the macrostomal cell, which normally swims in a forward direction, reverses direction and swims backwards for a short time before starting to rotate. Macrostomal cells did not change their swimming pattern after capturing a latex bead. We believe, therefore

  6. Differential effects of selective frankincense (Ru Xiang) essential oil versus non-selective sandalwood (Tan Xiang) essential oil on cultured bladder cancer cells: a microarray and bioinformatics study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    cancer cell death. While frankincense essential oil elicited selective cancer cell death via NRF-2-mediated oxidative stress, sandalwood essential oil induced non-selective cell death via DNA damage and cell cycle arrest. PMID:25006348

  7. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D{sub 1} encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E{sub 2} synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on

  8. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Salaski, Edward J

    2002-05-01

    Specific mutations in the ras gene impair the guanosine triphophatase (GTPase) activity of Ras proteins, which play a fundamental role in the signaling cascade, leading to uninterrupted growth signals and to the transformation of normal cells into malignant phenotypes. It has been shown that normal cells transfected with mutant ras gene become cancerous and that unfarnesylated, cytosolic mutant Ras protein does not anchor onto cell membranes and cannot induce this transformation. Posttranslational modification and plasma membrane association of mutant Ras is necessary for this transforming activity. Since its identification, the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) that catalyzes the first and essential step of the three Ras-processing steps has emerged as the most promising target for therapeutic intervention. FTase has been implicated as a potential target in inhibiting the prenylation of a variety of proteins, thus in controlling varied disease states (e.g. cancer, neurofibromatosis, restenosis, viral hepatitis, bone resorption, parasitic infections, corneal inflammations, and diabetes) associated with prenyl modifications of Ras and other proteins. Furthermore, it has been suggested that FTase inhibitors indirectly help in inhibiting tumors via suppression of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Major milestones have been achieved with small-molecule FTase inhibitors that show efficacy without toxicity in vitro, as well as in mouse models bearing ras-dependent tumors. With the determination of the crystal structure of mammalian FTase, existent leads have been fine-tuned and new potent molecules of diverse structural classes have been designed. A few of these molecules are currently in the clinic, with at least three drug candidates in Phase II studies and one in Phase III. This article will review the progress that has been reported with FTase inhibitors in drug discovery and in the clinic. PMID:12733981

  9. Human bronchial cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isoenzymes: biochemical and pharmacological analysis using selective inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, J.; Philpott, A. J.; van Amsterdam, R. G.; Shahid, M.; Zaagsma, J.; Nicholson, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    1 The aims of the present study were to characterize the cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzyme activities present in human bronchi and to examine the ability of selective isoenzyme inhibitors to relax histamine and methacholine precontracted preparations of human bronchi. 2 Three separations of pooled human bronchial tissue samples were performed. Ion-exchange chromatography showed that the soluble fraction of human bronchial preparations contains PDE I, II, III, IV and V isoenzyme activities. Multiple forms of PDE I and PDE IV were observed and PDE IV was the main cyclic AMP hydrolytic activity. 3 3-Isobutyl-l-methylxanthine (IBMX) non-selectively inhibited all separated isoenzyme activities. Zaprinast selectively inhibited PDE V, but also effectively inhibited one of the two PDE I isoforms identified. The PDE IV selective inhibitors rolipram and RO-201724, inhibited the PDE IV activities as did the dual PDE III/IV inhibitor, Org 30029. Org 9935, a PDE III selective inhibitor, potently attenuated part of the PDE IV activity peak in one of three separations performed, indicating that some PDE III activity may co-elute with PDE IV under the experimental conditions employed. 4 PDE IV-selective (rolipram), PDE III-selective (Org 9935) and dual PDE III/IV (Org 30029) inhibitors were effective relaxants of human bronchial smooth muscle. The PDE V/PDE I inhibitor, zaprinast was relatively ineffective. 5 The present study demonstrates in human bronchi, as in animal airways smooth muscle, that inhibitors of PDE III, PDEIV and dual PDE III/IV have potentially useful bronchodilator activity and are worthy of further consideration as anti-asthma drugs. PMID:1393276

  10. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  11. High performance oilfield scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Duccini, Y.; Dufour, A.; Hann, W.M.; Sanders, T.W.; Weinstein, B.

    1997-08-01

    Sea water often reacts with the formation water in offshore fields to produce barium, calcium and strontium sulfate deposits that hinder oil production. Newer fields often have more difficult to control scale problems than older ones, and current technology scale inhibitors are not able to control the deposits as well as needed. In addition, ever more stringent regulations designed to minimize the impact of inhibitors on the environment are being enacted. Three new inhibitors are presented that overcome many of the problems of older technology scale inhibitors.

  12. Amyloid precursor protein selective gamma-secretase inhibitors for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Inhibition of gamma-secretase presents a direct target for lowering Aβ production in the brain as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, gamma-secretase is known to process multiple substrates in addition to amyloid precursor protein (APP), most notably Notch, which has limited clinical development of inhibitors targeting this enzyme. It has been postulated that APP substrate selective inhibitors of gamma-secretase would be preferable to non-selective inhibitors from a safety perspective for AD therapy. Methods In vitro assays monitoring inhibitor potencies at APP γ-site cleavage (equivalent to Aβ40), and Notch ε-site cleavage, in conjunction with a single cell assay to simultaneously monitor selectivity for inhibition of Aβ production vs. Notch signaling were developed to discover APP selective gamma-secretase inhibitors. In vivo efficacy for acute reduction of brain Aβ was determined in the PDAPP transgene model of AD, as well as in wild-type FVB strain mice. In vivo selectivity was determined following seven days x twice per day (b.i.d.) treatment with 15 mg/kg/dose to 1,000 mg/kg/dose ELN475516, and monitoring brain Aβ reduction vs. Notch signaling endpoints in periphery. Results The APP selective gamma-secretase inhibitors ELN318463 and ELN475516 reported here behave as classic gamma-secretase inhibitors, demonstrate 75- to 120-fold selectivity for inhibiting Aβ production compared with Notch signaling in cells, and displace an active site directed inhibitor at very high concentrations only in the presence of substrate. ELN318463 demonstrated discordant efficacy for reduction of brain Aβ in the PDAPP compared with wild-type FVB, not observed with ELN475516. Improved in vivo safety of ELN475516 was demonstrated in the 7d repeat dose study in wild-type mice, where a 33% reduction of brain Aβ was observed in mice terminated three hours post last dose at the lowest dose of inhibitor tested. No overt in-life or post

  13. Free energy calculation provides insight into the action mechanism of selective PARP-1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ran

    2016-04-01

    Selective poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 inhibitor represents promising therapy against cancers with a good balance between efficacy and safety. Owing to the conserved structure between PARP-1 and PARP-2, most of the clinical and experimental drugs show equivalent inhibition against both targets. Most recently, it's disclosed a highly selective PARP-1 inhibitor (NMS-P118) with promising pharmacokinetic properties. Herein, we combined molecular simulation with free energy calculation to gain insights into the selective mechanism of NMS-P118. Our results suggest the reduction of binding affinity for PARP-2 is attributed to the unfavorable conformational change of protein, which is accompanied by a significant energy penalty. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis study further reveals the important role for a tyrosine residue of donor loop (Tyr889(PARP-1) and Tyr455(PARP-2)) in contributing to the ligand selectivity. Retrospective structural analysis indicates the ligand-induced movement of Tyr455(PARP-2) disrupts the intra-molecule hydrogen bonding network, which partially accounts for the "high-energy" protein conformation in the presence of NMS-P118. Interestingly, such effect isn't observed in other non-selective PARP inhibitors including BMN673 and A861695, which validates the computational prediction. Our work provides energetic insight into the subtle variations in the crystal structures and could facilitate rational design of new selective PARP inhibitor.

  14. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  15. Osteocompatibility of biofilm inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  16. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  17. Anthranilamide inhibitors of factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Mendel, David; Marquart, Angela L; Joseph, Sajan; Waid, Philip; Yee, Ying K; Tebbe, Anne Louise; Ratz, Andrew M; Herron, David K; Goodson, Theodore; Masters, John J; Franciskovich, Jeffry B; Tinsley, Jennifer M; Wiley, Michael R; Weir, Leonard C; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Klimkowski, Valentine J; Smith, Gerald F; Towner, Richard D; Froelich, Larry L; Buben, John; Craft, Trelia J

    2007-09-01

    SAR about the B-ring of a series of N(2)-aroyl anthranilamide factor Xa (fXa) inhibitors is described. B-ring o-aminoalkylether and B-ring p-amine probes of the S1' and S4 sites, respectively, afforded picomolar fXa inhibitors that performed well in in vitro anticoagulation assays.

  18. Proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C

    2004-02-12

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous alpha-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological approaches have been outlined for exploitation of the inhibitory function. PMID:14871655

  19. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  20. Deletion of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibits K-ras–induced lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yong; Jiang, Yan; Tan, Lin; K. Ravoori, Murali; Gagea, Mihai; Vikas Kundra, Vikus; Fischer, Susan M.; Yang, Peiying

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the role COX-2 plays in K-ras–induced lung carcinogenesis. We crossed COX-2–homozygous knockout mice with K-rasLA1 (G12D) expressing mice to obtain COX-2–deficient mice with K-ras expression (K-ras/COX-2−/− mice) and COX-2 wild type mice with K-ras expression (K-ras mice). At 3.5 months of age, the K-ras/COX-2−/− mice had significantly fewer lung adenocarcinomas and substantially smaller tumors than K-ras mice. K-ras/COX-2−/− mice also had significantly fewer bronchioalveolar hyperplasias than K-ras mice. Compared with lung tumors from K-Ras mice, the levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were significantly lower, whereas levels of the PGE2 metabolite 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2 were significantly higher, in lung tumors from K-ras/COX-2−/− mice. In addition, K-ras/COX-2−/− mice had strikingly lower rates of tumor cell proliferation and expressed less MEK and p-Erk1/2 protein than K-ras mice did. In line with this, knocking down COX-2 in mutant K-ras non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells reduced colony formation, PGE2 synthesis and ERK phosphorylation compared to that of vector control cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that COX-2 deletion contributes to the repression of K-ras–induced lung tumorigenesis by reducing tumor cell proliferation, decreasing the production of PGE2, and increasing the production of 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2, possibly via the MAPK pathway. Thus, COX-2 is likely important in lung tumorigenesis, and COX-2 and its product, PGE2, are potential targets for lung cancer prevention. PMID:26452035

  1. Regional Differences in the Neuronal Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the Newborn Pig Brain

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Orsolya; Németh, István; Tóth-Szűki, Valéria; Bari, Ferenc; Domoki, Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is the major constitutively expressed COX isoform in the newborn brain. COX-2 derived prostanoids and reactive oxygen species appear to play a major role in the mechanism of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic injury in the newborn piglet, an accepted animal model of the human term neonate. The study aimed to quantitatively determine COX-2 immunopositive neurons in different brain regions in piglets under normoxic conditions (n=15), and 4 hours after 10 min asphyxia (n=11). Asphyxia did not induce significant changes in neuronal COX-2 expression of any studied brain areas. In contrast, there was a marked regional difference in all experimental groups. Thus, significant difference was observed between fronto-parietal and temporo-occipital regions: 59±4% and 67±3% versus 41±2%* and 31±3%* respectively (mean±SEM, data are pooled from all subjects, n=26, *p<0.05, vs. fronto-parietal region). In the hippocampus, COX-2 immunopositivity was rare (highest expression in CA1 region: 14±2%). The studied subcortical areas showed negligible COX-2 staining. Our findings suggest that asphyxia does not significantly alter the pattern of neuronal COX-2 expression in the early reventilation period. Furthermore, based on the striking differences observed in cortical neuronal COX-2 distribution, the contribution of COX-2 mediated neuronal injury after asphyxia may also show region-specific differences. PMID:22829712

  2. Silkworm Thorn Stem Extract Targets RSK2 and Suppresses Solar UV-Induced Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to solar UV (sUV) is associated with numerous human skin disorders, such as carcinogenesis, skin photoaging and skin inflammation. Silkworm Thorn (Cudraniatricuspidata, SW) is a plant belonging to the Moraceae family and widely present throughout Korea, China, and Japan. Most parts of the tree (including the fruit, leaf, stem, root, and bark) is consumable as a functional food or tea. In this study, we found that SW extract (SWE) inhibited the elevated expression of sUV-induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 levels in both HaCaT and JB6 cells. Levels of nuclear factor-κB and activator protein-1, two crucial transcription factors involved in COX-2 expression, were elevated by sUV treatment. Treatment with SWE abolished this activation. SWE also inhibited sUV-induced histone H3 phosphorylation. However, sUV-induced phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 kinase remained unchanged in the presence of SWE. SWE inhibited RSK2 activity, and pull-down assays using SWE-Sepharose beads revealed that SWE binds directly with RSK2 in an ATP-competitive manner. These results suggest a potential for SWE to be developed as a cosmeceutical material and functional food constituent for the promotion of skin health. PMID:26506342

  3. SIRT1 Suppresses Activator Protein-1 Transcriptional Activity and Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ran; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, Jin-Jing; Jia, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Yang, Rui-Feng; Zhang, Yuan; Xu, Jing; Wei, Yu-Sheng; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    SIRT1 (Sirtuin type 1), a mammalian orthologue of yeast SIR2 (silent information regulator 2), has been shown to mediate a variety of calorie restriction (CR)-induced physiological events, such as cell fate regulation via deacetylation of the substrate proteins. However, whether SIRT1 deacetylates activator protein-1 (AP-1) to influence its transcriptional activity and target gene expression is still unknown. Here we demonstrate that SIRT1 directly interacts with the basic leucine zipper domains of c-Fos and c-Jun, the major components of AP-1, by which SIRT1 suppressed the transcriptional activity of AP-1. This process requires the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. Notably, SIRT1 reduced the expression of COX-2, a typical AP-1 target gene, and decreased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production of peritoneal macrophages (pMΦs). pMΦs with SIRT1 overexpression displayed improved phagocytosis and tumoricidal functions, which are associated with depressed PGE2. Furthermore, SIRT1 protein level was up-regulated in CR mouse pMΦs, whereas elevated SIRT1 decreased COX-2 expression and improved PGE2-related macrophage functions that were reversed following inhibition of SIRT1 deacetylase activity. Thus, our results indicate that SIRT1 may be a mediator of CR-induced macrophage regulation, and its deacetylase activity contributes to the inhibition of AP-1 transcriptional activity and COX-2 expression leading to amelioration of macrophage function. PMID:20042607

  4. Genetic Variants in Cyclooxygenase- 2 Contribute to Post-treatment Pain among Endodontic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, Elizabeth; Nackley, Andrea G.; Bair, Eric; Maixner, William; Khan, Asma A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have a well-established analgesic efficacy for inflammatory pain. These drugs exert their effect by inhibiting the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX) and are commonly used for the management of pain following endodontic treatment. There are two distinct isoforms of COX: COX-1, which is constitutively expressed; and COX-2, which is primarily induced by inflammation. Previous studies have shown that functional human genetic variants of the COX-2 gene may explain individual variations in acute pain. The present study extends this work by examining the potential contribution of the two COX isoforms to pain after endodontic treatment. Methods Ninety-four patients treated by endodontic residents at the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry were enrolled into a prospective cohort study. Data on potential predictors of post-treatment pain was collected and all patients submitted saliva samples for genetic analysis. Non-surgical root canal therapy was performed and participants recorded pain levels for five days following. Results In this study, 63% of patients experienced at least mild pain after root canal therapy and 24% experienced moderate to severe pain. Presence of pretreatment pain was correlated with higher post-treatment pain (p=0.01). Elevated heart rate (p=0.02) and higher diastolic blood pressure (p=0.024) were also correlated with decreased post-treatment pain. Finally, we identified genetic variants in COX-2 (haplotype composed of rs2383515 G, rs5277 G, rs5275 T, and rs2206593 A) associated with post-treatment pain following endodontic treatment (p= 0.025). Conclusion Understanding the genetic basis of pain following endodontic treatment will advance its prevention and management. PMID:26081267

  5. Implication of gastrin in cyclooxygenase-2 expression in Helicobacter pylori infected gastric ulceration.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Konturek, P C; Plonka, A; Duda, A; Sito, E; Zuchowicz, M; Hahn, E G

    2001-08-01

    Gastroduodenal ulcerations have worldwide distribution and the infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP) has been implicated in pathogenesis of this disease. The HP infection is usually accompanied by hypergastrinemia and enhanced generation of prostaglandins (PG), both implicated in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcerations but no study has been undertaken to assess the relationship between the HP infection and coexpression of gastrin and cyclooxygenases (COX), the rate limiting enzymes in the PG production. Since HP infection, usually accompanying peptic ulcerations, results in increased release of gastrin, a potent gastric mitogen that might be capable to induce COX-2 and to generate PG, we decided 1) to compare the seroprevalence of HP and its cytotoxic protein, CagA, in gastric ulcer patients with those in age- and gender-matched controls; 2) to determine the gene expression of gastrin and its receptors (CCK(B)-R) at the margin of gastric ulcer and in the mucosa of antrum and corpus before and after successful eradication of HP, 3) to assess the plasma levels and gastric luminal contents of gastrin before and after HP eradication and 4) to examine the mRNA and enzyme protein expression of COX-1 and COX-2 as well as the PGE2 generation in ulcer margin tissue and gastric antral and fundic mucosa before and after the HP eradication. The trial material included 20 patients with gastric ulcer and 40 age- and gender-matched controls. Anti-HP and anti-CagA IgG seroprevalence was estimated by specific antisera using ELISA tests. Gene expressions of gastrin, CCK(B)-R, COX-1 and COX-2 were examined using RT-PCR with beta-actin as a reference and employing Western blotting for COX-2 expression, while gastrin and PGE2 were measured by RIA. All gastric ulcers were located at smaller curvature within the antral mucosal area. The seroprevalence of HP, especially that expressing CagA, was significantly higher in gastric ulcers (85%) than in controls (62.5%). Both gastrin and CCK(B)-R mRNA were detected by RT-PCR in ulcer margin and gastrin mRNA was overexpressed in remaining antral mucosa, while CCK(B)-R mRNA was overexpressed in fundic mucosa of HP infected patients. Similarly, COX-2 mRNA and protein were found in margin of gastric ulcer and in the HP infected antral and fundic mucosa but not in the mucosa of HP eradicated patients in whom ulcers completely healed and gastrin was expressed only in antrum, CCK(B)-R only in corpus, while COX-1 was detected both in antrum and corpus. HP positive gastric ulcer patients showed about three times higher levels of plasma immunoreactive gastrin and about 50% higher luminal gastrin contents than the HP negative controls and this increased plasma and luminal gastrin was normalized following the HP eradication. A significant fall in gastrin and CCK(B)-R mRNA expression was noticed six weeks after HP eradication in gastric antral and fundic mucosa, while COX-2 mRNA completely disappeared after this treatment. We conclude that 1) HP infected gastric ulcer margin coexpresses gastrin, its receptors (CCK(B)-R), and COX-2; 2) HP infection may be implicated in gastric ulceration via increased release of gastrin that could be responsible for the overexpression of COX-2 that in turn could help ulcer healing through the stimulation of mucosal cell growth, restoration of the glandular structure and angiogenesis in the ulcer area and 3) gastrin produced in HP infected antral mucosa seems to be involved in the induction of COX-2 and PG production by this enzyme and this may contribute to the ulcer healing.

  6. Silkworm Thorn Stem Extract Targets RSK2 and Suppresses Solar UV-Induced Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to solar UV (sUV) is associated with numerous human skin disorders, such as carcinogenesis, skin photoaging and skin inflammation. Silkworm Thorn (Cudraniatricuspidata, SW) is a plant belonging to the Moraceae family and widely present throughout Korea, China, and Japan. Most parts of the tree (including the fruit, leaf, stem, root, and bark) is consumable as a functional food or tea. In this study, we found that SW extract (SWE) inhibited the elevated expression of sUV-induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 levels in both HaCaT and JB6 cells. Levels of nuclear factor-κB and activator protein-1, two crucial transcription factors involved in COX-2 expression, were elevated by sUV treatment. Treatment with SWE abolished this activation. SWE also inhibited sUV-induced histone H3 phosphorylation. However, sUV-induced phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 kinase remained unchanged in the presence of SWE. SWE inhibited RSK2 activity, and pull-down assays using SWE-Sepharose beads revealed that SWE binds directly with RSK2 in an ATP-competitive manner. These results suggest a potential for SWE to be developed as a cosmeceutical material and functional food constituent for the promotion of skin health.

  7. Hypoxia activates the cyclooxygenase-2–prostaglandin E synthase axis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James J.; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Ohashi, Shinya; Wong, Gabrielle S.; Takaoka, Munenori; Michaylira, Carmen Z.; Budo, Daniela; Tobias, John W.; Kanai, Michiyuki; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Naomoto, Yoshio; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.P.; Haase, Volker H.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), in particular HIF-1α, have been implicated in tumor biology. However, HIF target genes in the esophageal tumor microenvironment remain elusive. Gene expression profiling was performed upon hypoxia-exposed non-transformed immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells, EPC2-hTERT, and comparing with a gene signature of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In addition to known HIF-1α target genes such as carbonic anhydrase 9, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP3) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) was identified as a novel target gene among the commonly upregulated genes in ESCC as well as the cells exposed to hypoxia. The PTGES induction was augmented upon stabilization of HIF-1α by hypoxia or cobalt chloride under normoxic conditions and suppressed by dominant-negative HIF-1α. Whereas PTGES messenger RNA (mRNA) was negatively regulated by normoxia, PTGES protein remained stable upon reoxygenation. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) biosynthesis was documented in transformed human esophageal cells by ectopic expression of PTGES as well as RNA interference directed against PTGES. Moreover, hypoxia stimulated PGE2 production in a HIF-1α-dependent manner. In ESCC, PTGES was overexpressed frequently at the mRNA and protein levels. Finally, COX-2 and PTGES were colocalized in primary tumors along with HIF-1α and IGFBP3. Activation of the COX-2–PTGES axis in primary tumors was further corroborated by concomitant upregulation of interleukin-1β and downregulation of hydroxylprostaglandin dehydrogenase. Thus, PTGES is a novel HIF-1α target gene, involved in prostaglandin E biosynthesis in the esophageal tumor hypoxic microenvironment, and this has implications in diverse tumors types, especially of squamous origin. PMID:20042640

  8. Silkworm Thorn Stem Extract Targets RSK2 and Suppresses Solar UV-Induced Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to solar UV (sUV) is associated with numerous human skin disorders, such as carcinogenesis, skin photoaging and skin inflammation. Silkworm Thorn (Cudraniatricuspidata, SW) is a plant belonging to the Moraceae family and widely present throughout Korea, China, and Japan. Most parts of the tree (including the fruit, leaf, stem, root, and bark) is consumable as a functional food or tea. In this study, we found that SW extract (SWE) inhibited the elevated expression of sUV-induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 levels in both HaCaT and JB6 cells. Levels of nuclear factor-κB and activator protein-1, two crucial transcription factors involved in COX-2 expression, were elevated by sUV treatment. Treatment with SWE abolished this activation. SWE also inhibited sUV-induced histone H3 phosphorylation. However, sUV-induced phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 kinase remained unchanged in the presence of SWE. SWE inhibited RSK2 activity, and pull-down assays using SWE-Sepharose beads revealed that SWE binds directly with RSK2 in an ATP-competitive manner. These results suggest a potential for SWE to be developed as a cosmeceutical material and functional food constituent for the promotion of skin health. PMID:26506342

  9. Inhibitory effect of dihydroartemisinin against phorbol ester-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Yang, Ji Hye; Han, Eun Hee; Choi, Jae Ho; Khanal, Tilak; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2013-06-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua L., has recently been shown to possess antitumor activity in various cancer cells. However, the effect of anti-inflammatory potentials of DHA in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells has not been studied. The present study investigated the effect of COX-2 and molecular mechanisms by DHA in PMA stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. DHA dose-dependently decreased PMA-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production, as well as COX-2 promoter-driven luciferase activity. Additionally, DHA decreased luciferase activity of COX-2 regulation-related transcription factors including NF-κB, AP-1, C/EBP and CREB. DHA also remarkably reduced PMA-induced p65, C/EBPβ, c-jun and CREB nuclear translocation. Furthermore, DHA evidently inhibited PMA-induced phosphorylation of AKT and the MAP Kinases, such as ERK, JNK and p38. Taken together, our data indicated that DHA effectively attenuates COX-2 production via down-regulation of AKT and MAPK pathway, revealing partial molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory properties of DHA. PMID:23429041

  10. Correlation between expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and angiogenesis in human gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Xia; Chang, Xin-Ming; Song, Zheng-Jun; He, Shui-Xiang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and the relationship with tumor angiogenesis and advancement in gastric adenocarcinoma. METHODS: Immunohistochemical stain was used for detecting the expression of COX-2 in 45 resected specimens of gastric adenocarcinoma; the monoclonal antibody against CD34 was used for displaying vascular endothelial cells, and microvascular density (MVD) was detected by counting of CD34-positive vascular endothelial cells. Paracancerous tissues were examined as control. RESULTS: Immunohistological staining with COX-2-specific polyclonal antibody showed cytoplasmic staining in the cancer cells, some atypical hyperplasia and intestinal metaplasia, as well as angiogenic vasculature present within the tumors and prexisting vasculature adjacent to cancer lesions. The rate of expression of COX-2 and MVD index in gastric cancers were significantly increased, compared with those in the paracancerous tissues (77.78 vs 33.33%, 58.13 ± 19.99 vs 24.02 ± 10.28, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively). In 36 gastric carcinoma specimens with lymph node metastasis, the rate of COX-2 expression and MVD were higher than those in the specimens without metostasis (86.11 vs 44.44%, 58.60 ± 18.24 vs 43.54 ± 15.05, P < 0.05, P < 0.05, respectively). The rate of COX-2 expression and MVD in the specimens with invasive serosa were significantly higher than those in the specimens without invasion to serosa (87.88 vs 50.0%, 57.01 ± 18.79 vs 42.35 ± 14.65, P < 0.05, P < 0.05). Moreover, MVD in COX-2-positive specimens was higher than that in COX-2-negative specimens (61.29 ± 14.31 vs 45.38 ± 12.42, P < 0.05). COX-2 expression was positively correlated with MVD (r = 0.63, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: COX-2 expression might correlate with the occurance and advancement of gastric carcinoma and is involved in tumor angiogenesis in gastric carcinoma. It is likely that COX-2 by inducing angiogenesis can be one of mechanisms which promotes invasion and metastasis of gastric carcinoma. It may become a new therapeutic target for anti-angiogenesis. PMID:12679908

  11. Roles of the cyclooxygenase 2 matrix metalloproteinase 1 pathway in brain metastasis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kerui; Fukuda, Koji; Xing, Fei; Zhang, Yingyu; Sharma, Sambad; Liu, Yin; Chan, Michael D; Zhou, Xiaobo; Qasem, Shadi A; Pochampally, Radhika; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2015-04-10

    Brain is one of the major sites of metastasis in breast cancer; however, the pathological mechanism of brain metastasis is poorly understood. One of the critical rate-limiting steps of brain metastasis is the breaching of blood-brain barrier, which acts as a selective interface between the circulation and the central nervous system, and this process is considered to involve tumor-secreted proteinases. We analyzed clinical significance of 21 matrix metalloproteinases on brain metastasis-free survival of breast cancer followed by verification in brain metastatic cell lines and found that only matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) is significantly correlated with brain metastasis. We have shown that MMP1 is highly expressed in brain metastatic cells and is capable of degrading Claudin and Occludin but not Zo-1, which are key components of blood-brain barrier. Knockdown of MMP1 in brain metastatic cells significantly suppressed their ability of brain metastasis in vivo, whereas ectopic expression of MMP1 significantly increased the brain metastatic ability of the cells that are not brain metastatic. We also found that COX2 was highly up-regulated in brain metastatic cells and that COX2-induced prostaglandins were directly able to promote the expression of MMP1 followed by augmenting brain metastasis. Furthermore, we found that COX2 and prostaglandin were able to activate astrocytes to release chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7), which in turn promoted self-renewal of tumor-initiating cells in the brain and that knockdown of COX2 significantly reduced the brain metastatic ability of tumor cells. Our results suggest the COX2-MMP1/CCL7 axis as a novel therapeutic target for brain metastasis.

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition does not impair block bone grafts healing in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Moreschi, Eduardo; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Comparim, Eliston; De Andrade Holgado, Leandro; Ribeiro-Junior, Paulo Domingos; Nary-Filho, Hugo; Matsumoto, Mariza Akemi

    2013-12-01

    Success of alveolar reconstructions using onlay autogenous block bone grafts depends on their adequate integration to the recipient bed influenced by a number of local molecules. Considering the fundamental role of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) in bone repair, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of its inhibition in the integration of endochondral (EC) iliac crest, and intramembranous (IM) calvaria bone grafts. Thirty-two rabbits were divided into 4 groups: Calvaria Control (CC) and Iliac Control--treated with oral 0.9 % saline solution, and Calvarial-NSAID (C-NSAID) and Iliac-NSAID (I-NSAID) groups--treated with oral 6 mg/Kg non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug etoricoxib. After 7, 14, 30 and 60 days the animals were euthanized and the specimens removed for histological, histomorphometric and immunohistochemistry analysis. At day 60, a tight integration of IM blocks could be seen with the presence of remodeling bone, whereas integration of EC grafts was mainly observed at the edges of the grafts. A significant higher percentage of bone matrix in the interface region of the CC grafts in comparison to C-NSAID only at day 14, whereas no differences were detected comparing the EC grafts. No differences were observed in Runx-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunolabeling when comparing CC and C-NSAID groups, while a significant weaker Runx-2 and VEGF labeling was detected in I-NSAID group at day 60. Although some influence was detected in osteogenesis, it is concluded that drug induced inhibition of COX-2 does not impair onlay bone grafts' healing of both embryologic origins in rabbits. PMID:23783533

  13. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress RSV infection and alleviate virus-induced airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qiuqin; Su, Zhonglan; Song, Shiyu; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Bin; Yi, Long; Tian, Man; Wang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. However, the majority of RSV-infected patients only show mild symptoms. Different severities of infection and responses among the RSV-infected population indicate that epigenetic regulation as well as personal genetic background may affect RSV infectivity. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) is an important epigenetic regulator in lung diseases. The present study aimed to explore the possible connection between HDAC expression and RSV-induced lung inflammation. To address this question, RSV-infected airway epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were prepared and a mouse model of RSV infection was established, and then treated with various concentrations of HDAC inhibitors (HDACis), namely trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Viral replication and markers of virus-induced airway inflammation or oxidative stress were assessed. The activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathways was evaluated by western blot analysis. Our results showed that RSV infection in airway epithelial cells (AECs) significantly decreased histone acetylation levels by altering HDAC2 expression. The treatment of RSV-infected AECs with HDACis significantly restricted RSV replication by upregulating the interferon-α (IFN-α) related signaling pathways. The treatment of RSV-infected AECs with HDACis also significantly inhibited RSV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release [interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8] and oxidative stress-related molecule production [malondialdehyde (MDA), and nitrogen monoxide (NO)]. The activation of NF-κB, COX-2, MAPK and Stat3, which orchestrate pro-inflammatory gene expression and oxidative stress injury, was also significantly inhibited. Our in vivo study using a mouse model of RSV infection

  15. Histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress RSV infection and alleviate virus-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qiuqin; Su, Zhonglan; Song, Shiyu; Χu, Hui; Zhang, Bin; Yi, Long; Tian, Man; Wang, Hongwei

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. However, the majority of RSV-infected patients only show mild symptoms. Different severities of infection and responses among the RSV-infected population indicate that epigenetic regulation as well as personal genetic background may affect RSV infectivity. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) is an important epigenetic regulator in lung diseases. The present study aimed to explore the possible connection between HDAC expression and RSV-induced lung inflammation. To address this question, RSV-infected airway epithelial cells (BEAS‑2B) were prepared and a mouse model of RSV infection was established, and then treated with various concentrations of HDAC inhibitors (HDACis), namely trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Viral replication and markers of virus-induced airway inflammation or oxidative stress were assessed. The activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathways was evaluated by western blot analysis. Our results showed that RSV infection in airway epithelial cells (AECs) significantly decreased histone acetylation levels by altering HDAC2 expression. The treatment of RSV-infected AECs with HDACis significantly restricted RSV replication by upregulating the interferon-α (IFN-α) related signaling pathways. The treatment of RSV-infected AECs with HDACis also significantly inhibited RSV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release [interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8] and oxidative stress-related molecule production [malondialdehyde (MDA), and nitrogen monoxide (NO)]. The activation of NF-κB, COX-2, MAPK and Stat3, which orchestrate pro‑inflammatory gene expression and oxidative stress injury, was also significantly inhibited. Our in vivo study using a mouse model of

  16. Flavivirus Entry Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-09-11

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Although effective vaccines are available for yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitic virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus, these and other flaviviruses still cause thousands of human deaths and millions of illnesses each year. No clinically approved antiviral therapy is available for flavivirus treatment. To meet this unmet medical need, industry and academia have taken multiple approaches to develop antiflavivirus therapy, among which targeting viral entry has been actively pursued in the past decade. Here we review the current knowledge of flavivirus entry and its use for small molecule drug discovery. Inhibitors of two major steps of flaviviral entry have been reported: (i) molecules that block virus-receptor interaction; (ii) compounds that prevent conformational change of viral envelope protein during virus-host membrane fusion. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of targeting viral entry for treatment of flavivirus infection as compared to targeting viral replication proteins. PMID:27617926

  17. Small molecules inhibitors of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 - an overview.

    PubMed

    Rouch, Anne; Vanucci-Bacqué, Corinne; Bedos-Belval, Florence; Baltas, Michel

    2015-03-01

    PAI-1, a glycoprotein from the serpin family and the main inhibitor of tPA and uPA, plays an essential role in the regulation of intra and extravascular fibrinolysis by inhibiting the formation of plasmin from plasminogen. PAI-1 is also involved in pathological processes such as thromboembolic diseases, atherosclerosis, fibrosis and cancer. The inhibition of PAI-1 activity by small organic molecules has been observed in vitro and with some in vivo models. Based on these findings, PAI-1 appears as a potential therapeutic target for several pathological conditions. Over the past decades, many efforts have therefore been devoted to developing PAI-1 inhibitors. This article provides an overview of the publishing activity on small organic molecules used as PAI-1 inhibitors. The chemical synthesis of the most potent inhibitors as well as their biological and biochemical evaluations is also presented.

  18. Synthetic conversion of ACAT inhibitor to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Otoguro, K; Tomoda, H; Harigaya, Y; Omura, S

    2000-06-19

    Natural product acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor pyripyropene A was synthetically converted to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor via heterolitic cleavage of the 2-pyrone ring, followed by gamma-acylation/cyclization with several aroyl chlorides. The 4-pyridyl analogue selectively showed AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 7.9 microM) and no ACAT inhibitory activity IC50 = >1000 microM. PMID:10890154

  19. Glycosylasparaginase inhibition studies: competitive inhibitors, transition state mimics, noncompetitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Risley, J M; Huang, D H; Kaylor, J J; Malik, J J; Xia, Y Q

    2001-01-01

    Glycosylasparaginase catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosylic bond between asparagine and N-acetylglucosamine in the catabolism of N-linked glycoproteins. Previously only three competitive inhibitors, one noncompetitive inhibitor, and one irreversible inhibitor of glycosylasparaginase activity had been reported. Using human glycosylasparaginase from human amniotic fluid, L-aspartic acid and four of its analogues, where the alpha-amino group was substituted with a chloro, bromo, methyl or hydrogen, were competitive inhibitors having Ki values between 0.6-7.7 mM. These results provide supporting evidence for a proposed intramolecular autoproteolytic activation reaction. A proposed phosphono transition state mimic and a sulfo transition state mimic were competitive inhibitors with Ki values 0.9 mM and 1.4 mM, respectively. These results support a mechanism for the enzyme-catalyzed reaction involving formation of a tetrahedral high-energy intermediate. Three analogues of the natural substrate were noncompetitive inhibitors with Ki values between 0.56-0.75 mM, indicating the presence of a second binding site that may recognize (substituted)acetamido groups.

  20. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853