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Sample records for cyclosporine

  1. Cyclosporine

    MedlinePlus

    ... with methotrexate (Rheumatrex) to treat the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (arthritis caused by swelling of the lining of ... If you are taking cyclosporine (modified) to treat rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis, your doctor will probably start you ...

  2. Cyclosporine Ophthalmic

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmic cyclosporine is used to increase tear production in people with dry eye disease. Cyclosporine is in a class of medications called immunomodulators. It works by decreasing swelling in the eye ...

  3. Cyclosporine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used with other medications to prevent transplant rejection (attack of the transplanted organ by the ... people who have received kidney, liver, and heart transplants. Cyclosporine injection should only be used to treat ...

  4. Cyclosporine in veterinary dermatology.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Brian S

    2013-01-01

    Cyclosporine is an immunomodulatory medication that is efficacious and approved for atopic dermatitis in dogs and allergic dermatitis in cats; it has also been used to successfully manage a variety of immune-mediated dermatoses in dogs and cats. This article reviews the use of cyclosporine in veterinary dermatology including its mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, side effects, and relevant clinical updates. Dermatologic indications including atopic/allergic dermatitis, perianal fistulas, sebaceous adenitis, and other immune-mediated skin diseases are discussed.

  5. Cyclosporin-A associated malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Durnian, Jonathan M; Stewart, Rosalind MK; Tatham, Richard; Batterbury, Mark; Kaye, Stephen B

    2007-01-01

    The use of cyclosporin is well established within the ophthalmology community, especially against sight threatening intraocular inflammation. It is well known however, that immunosuppression in general is a risk factor for the development of malignancy and numerous studies point to the risk imposed by cyclosporin. This article analyses and reviews all relevant studies with regard to the development of malignancy associated with the use of cyclosporin and extrapolates this into the ophthalmic setting. This is to enable clinicians to assess the risks in individual patients and to present a monitoring regime which can be used in patients undergoing cyclosporin treatment. The review is solely concerned with the risk of the development of malignancy following cyclosporin immunosuppression and not with any other adverse effect. PMID:19668519

  6. Spanish experience with cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J; Marcén, R; Burgos, F J; Villafruela, J J; Teruel, J L; Mampaso, F; Quereda, C; Ortuño, J

    2004-03-01

    Our experience with cyclosporine (CsA) in de novo renal transplantation (RT) may be systematized in four consecutive periods. From February 1986 to December 1989, patient survival was higher among 128 consecutive CsA-prednisone-treated cadaver allograft recipients than in previous patients on azathioprine. One-year graft survival was significantly higher in CsA patients, a difference that was thereafter progressively reduced: at 10 years graft survivals were 50% versus 45%, and at 15 years 37% versus 35%, respectively. The most frequent cause of graft loss was death with a functioning graft. Acute rejection caused more graft losses among Aza-treated patients than CsA-treated ones. However, chronic allograft nephropathy produced more graft losses in CsA patients. After this initial experience with CsA-based immunosuppression we developed a second phase in which better results were obtained in 209 first cadaveric RT recipients. The use of lower initial CsA doses, more rapid steroid tapering, and a better approach to CsA nephrotoxicity or chronic nephropathy by substantial reductions in CsA exposure and delayed azathioprine addition, lead to these improvements. From March 1995 through 2000, we used the new microemulsion CsA formulation (Neoral) with steroids or azathioprine in 110 first de novo RT recipients. Mean donor and recipient ages were significantly higher in this phase than in previous ones; consequently, survival and function results were slightly worse. Blood CsA concentrations measured 2 hours after administration represent a more precise predictor of exposure than trough concentrations. The last step in optimizing Neoral use in RT on our service was application of reduced-dosage with C2 monitoring instead of classical C0 testing. Acute rejection and treatment failure rates were low and renal allograft function improved with respect to previous full-dose C0 experiences. CsA use has evolved in these two decades in four consecutive phases. Short-term results

  7. Comparison of the pharmacological profiles of cyclosporine, (Nva2)-cyclosporine and (Val2)dihydro-cyclosporine.

    PubMed Central

    Hiestand, P C; Gunn, H C; Gale, J M; Ryffel, B; Borel, J F

    1985-01-01

    The pharmacological profiles of two new derivatives of the immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine, is presented here. (Nva2)-CS has very similar properties to CS, but lacks the nephrotoxic side-effects. This derivative appears to be a potential successor to cyclosporine. (Val2)DH-CS seems to have a different spectrum of activities. It does not suppress humoral immunity and allograft rejection, but suppresses some types of cell-mediated immune responses. This derivative may prove useful in autoimmune situations where T cells are involved in the disease process. PMID:3891595

  8. Cyclosporine increases calcium in kidney medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Borowitz, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of rats with 20, 50, or 100 mg/kg of cyclosporine p.o. markedly increased /sup 45/Ca accumulation in kidney slices especially in medulla. The effect was related to dose and duration of treatment, and was also observed in slices of kidney medulla from cyclosporine-treated mice. Total calcium was elevated in kidney medulla of cyclosporine-treated rats so that the effect is not merely an increased exchange but a build-up of calcium in the tissue. No histopathologic evidence of cyclosporine-related cell necrosis was present in mouse kidney, showing that calcium accumulation is not dystrophic in character. Accumulation of /sup 45/Ca in slices of rat heart, liver, or brain was not affected by cyclosporine pretreatment of the animals. It is suggested that cyclosporine-induced changes in calcium metabolism in kidney medulla may influence kidney function.

  9. Cyclosporine A-Induced Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Craig; Campbell, Eric; McMorrow, Tara; Ryan, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Cyclosporine A, which has been the foremost immunosuppressive agent since the early 1980’s, significantly improves the success of organ transplantation. However, common complications of cyclosporine A therapy, such as severe renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, limit the drug’s clinical use. Although the exact mechanisms driving cyclosporine A-induced tubulointerstitial fibrosis remain elusive, we hypothesized that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) may play a major role. We investigated this in vitro by treating human proximal tubular cells with cyclosporine A. Morphological changes were observed after cyclosporine A treatment, including cell elongation (with a large degree of detachment), cytoskeletal rearrangement, and junctional disruption. In addition, expression of the myofibroblast-specific marker α-smooth muscle actin was detected in treated cells. These observations are consistent with events described during EMT. Using Affymetrix gene microarrays, we identified 128 genes that were differentially regulated in renal tubular cells after cyclosporine A treatment, including known profibrotic factors, oncogenes, and transcriptional regulators. Cyclosporine A induced a dose-dependent increase in transforming growth factor-β secretion from proximal tubular cells. Subsequent functional studies revealed that protein kinase C-β isoforms play a key role in cyclosporine A-induced effects. These findings provide novel insights into cyclosporine A-induced renal fibrosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying EMT, events that may be relevant in other disease states. PMID:16049326

  10. 21 CFR 520.522 - Cyclosporine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cyclosporine. 520.522 Section 520.522 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.522 Cyclosporine. (a)...

  11. 21 CFR 520.522 - Cyclosporine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cyclosporine. 520.522 Section 520.522 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.522 Cyclosporine. (a)...

  12. 21 CFR 520.522 - Cyclosporine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cyclosporine. 520.522 Section 520.522 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.522 Cyclosporine. (a)...

  13. 21 CFR 520.522 - Cyclosporine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cyclosporine. 520.522 Section 520.522 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.522 Cyclosporine. (a)...

  14. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  15. Derivatives of cyclosporin compatible with antibody-based assays. I. The generation of (/sup 125/I)-labeled cyclosporin

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, W.C.; Orf, J.W.

    1985-03-01

    The immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A, has been successfully iodinated to a specific activity of 300 Ci per gram. /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporin and (/sup 3/H)cyclosporin are nearly equivalent as tracers in a radioimmunoassay in producing standard lines (suppression by unlabeled cyclosporin) and in assigning values to clinical samples. In addition, the (/sup 125/I)-labeled cyclosporin has greater than twice the sensitivity, and it is stable to long-term storage. Use of a (/sup 125/I)-labeled cyclosporin tracer is more convenient, more reproducible, more precise, and easier than the tritiated-cyclosporin alternative in radioimmunoassay of this compound.

  16. Cyclosporin: applications in small animal dermatology.

    PubMed

    Robson, David C; Burton, Gregory G

    2003-02-01

    Cyclosporin has been increasingly used for the treatment of skin diseases in small animals. Reported uses include the treatment of atopy, cutaneous lupus erythematosus, feline acquired alopecia resembling pseudopelade of humans, pemphigus erythematosus, pemphigus foliaceus, perianal fistulae and sebaceous adenitis. In addition, cyclosporin has been used anecdotally for several other skin diseases. Few side effects have been noted at doses therapeutic for dermatologic diseases. Current suggestions for monitoring, and the value of trough cyclosporin serum concentrations for prediction of toxicity and efficacy are discussed.

  17. Cyclosporine and herbal supplement interactions.

    PubMed

    Colombo, D; Lunardon, L; Bellia, G

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporine (CyA) is a well-known immunosuppressant with a narrow therapeutic window. Its bioavailability is affected by many other traditional drugs and herbal extracts. Cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 and protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are involved in CyA bioavailability. Interactions of CyA with herbal extracts are not well known, but, given their increased concomitant use, it is important to know which extracts, many of which are commonly self-prescribed, can affect CyA blood concentrations. Decreased CyA blood concentration has been shown with St John's wort in case reports and, in vivo animal studies, with ginger, liquorice, scutellariae radix, and quercetin. Increased CyA concentration has been reported in patients with grapefruit juice, chamomile, or berberine, and with cannabidiol or resveratrol in animal studies. Effects of Echinacea and Serenoa repens on CyA levels have not been shown consistently, but concomitant use should be avoided. Although findings from animal studies cannot be directly translated into humans, avoiding concomitant use of herbal extracts is prudent until human clinical studies have ruled out any possible interaction. Clinicians should interview their patients carefully about their use of herbal supplements before CyA administration, and those receiving CyA should be warned about possible interactions between herbal preparations and CyA.

  18. Cyclosporine and Herbal Supplement Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, D.; Lunardon, L.; Bellia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporine (CyA) is a well-known immunosuppressant with a narrow therapeutic window. Its bioavailability is affected by many other traditional drugs and herbal extracts. Cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 and protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are involved in CyA bioavailability. Interactions of CyA with herbal extracts are not well known, but, given their increased concomitant use, it is important to know which extracts, many of which are commonly self-prescribed, can affect CyA blood concentrations. Decreased CyA blood concentration has been shown with St John's wort in case reports and, in vivo animal studies, with ginger, liquorice, scutellariae radix, and quercetin. Increased CyA concentration has been reported in patients with grapefruit juice, chamomile, or berberine, and with cannabidiol or resveratrol in animal studies. Effects of Echinacea and Serenoa repens on CyA levels have not been shown consistently, but concomitant use should be avoided. Although findings from animal studies cannot be directly translated into humans, avoiding concomitant use of herbal extracts is prudent until human clinical studies have ruled out any possible interaction. Clinicians should interview their patients carefully about their use of herbal supplements before CyA administration, and those receiving CyA should be warned about possible interactions between herbal preparations and CyA. PMID:24527031

  19. Possible interaction between cyclosporine and glibenclamide in posttransplant diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Islam, S I; Masuda, Q N; Bolaji, O O; Shaheen, F M; Sheikh, I A

    1996-10-01

    The possible occurrence of a kinetic interaction between cyclosporine A and glibenclamide was assessed by reviewing data of six posttransplant diabetic patients who received the two drugs concurrently. Coadministration of the two drugs resulted in a 57% increase in the steady-state plasma cyclosporine levels despite normal hepatic and renal functions in the patients. This elevation in cyclosporine level is possibly due to an interaction between the two drugs resulting from an inhibition of CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of cyclosporine by glibenclamide. This observation calls for a closer monitoring of cyclosporine plasma levels during concomitant administration of these two drugs in this group of patients.

  20. Absorption of transdermal and oral cyclosporine in six healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rose; Schick, Anthea E; Boothe, Dawn M; Lewis, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporine is commonly used orally to treat feline dermatoses. Due to difficulties administering oral medications, veterinarians sometimes prescribe compounded transdermal cyclosporine, despite studies showing limited absorption. The study objective was to compare cyclosporine blood concentrations after oral administration to concentrations after transdermal application of cyclosporine (prepared in pluronic lecithin organogel [PLO]) in six cats using a controlled, cross-over design with a 2 wk washout period. Cats were dosed at 5.1-7.4 mg/kg of cyclosporine q 24 hr either per os for 7 days or transdermally for 21 days. Cyclosporine blood concentrations were measured q 7 days and after the washout period. A monoclonal-based immunoassay (lower limit of quantitation was 25 ng/mL) was used. Median concentrations on the seventh day were 2,208 ng/mL (range, 1,357-3,419 ng/mL) 2 hr after orally administered cyclosporine and 37 ng/mL (range, 25-290 ng/mL) 2 hr after transdermally applied cyclosporine. Median concentration on day 21 was 58 ng/mL (range, 51-878 ng/mL) 2 hr after transdermally applied cyclosporine. Concentrations were quantifiable for transdermally applied cyclosporine, but considered therapeutic in only one of six cats. Based on those results, transdermally applied cyclosporine was not recommended in cats because of inconsistent absorption.

  1. Cyclosporin in the treatment of severe chronic idiopathic uveitis.

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, J; Baarsma, G S; Zaal, M J; Boen-Tan, T N; Rothova, A; Buitenhuis, H J; Schweitzer, C M; de Keizer, R J; Kijlstra, A

    1990-01-01

    In a randomised double-masked study of 27 patients with a severe chronic idiopathic uveitis we evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of cyclosporin. All received prednisone in a low dose (0.3 mg/kg/day). In 14 patients this was combined with cyclosporin in a single daily dose of 10 mg/kg/day, while 13 patients received a placebo. The dosages were tapered off in accordance with a protocol, and we compared the number of months of successful therapy before the uveitis relapsed. The efficacy results, as expressed in a Kaplan-Meier curve, were in favour of cyclosporin. Owing to the small sample size, however, this difference did not reach statistical significance. The immunosuppressive effect of cyclosporin was not permanent, and in all but one patient the intraocular inflammation relapsed on reduction of dosage. Rather small cumulative doses of cyclosporin proved to be nephrotoxic, but subjective tolerability for cyclosporin was good. PMID:2198928

  2. Preclinical safety evaluation of inhaled cyclosporine in propylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Noonberg, Sarah; Steigerwalt, Ronald; Lynch, Maryellen; Kovelesky, Rosemary A; Rodríguez, Carlos A; Sprugel, Katherine; Turner, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Cyclosporine inhalation solution has the potential to improve outcomes following lung transplantation by delivering high concentrations of an immunosuppressant directly to the allograft while minimizing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicity. The objective of these studies was to evaluate the potential toxicity of aerosolized cyclosporine formulated in propylene glycol when given by inhalation route to rats and dogs for 28 days. Sprague-Dawley rats received total inhaled doses of 0 (air), 0 (vehicle, propylene glycol), 7.4, 24.3, and 53.9 mg cyclosporine/kg/day. In a separate study, beagle dogs were exposed to 0, 4.4, 7.7, and 9.7 mg cyclosporine/kg/day. Endpoints used to evaluate potential toxicity of inhaled cyclosporine were clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, respiratory functions, toxicokinetics, and clinical/anatomic pathology. Daily administration of aerosolized cyclosporine did not result in observable accumulation of cyclosporine in blood or lung tissue. Toxicokinetic analysis from the rat study showed that the exposure of cyclosporine was approximately 18 times higher in the lung tissue compared to the blood. Systemic effects were consistent with those known for cyclosporine. There was no unexpected systemic toxicity or clinically limiting local respiratory toxicity associated with inhalation exposure to cyclosporine inhalation solution at exposures up to 2.7 times the maximum human exposure in either rats or dogs. There were no respiratory or systemic effects of high doses of propylene glycol relative to air controls. These preclinical studies demonstrate the safety of aerosolized cyclosporine in propylene glycol and support its continued clinical investigation in patients undergoing allogeneic lung transplantation.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine after renal transplant in children.

    PubMed

    Mochon, M; Cooney, G; Lum, B; Caputo, G C; Dunn, S; Goldsmith, B; Baluarte, H J; Polinsky, M S; Kaiser, B A

    1996-07-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine and the relationship between blood levels and average drug concentration were prospectively evaluated in 18 children 1 month after renal transplantation. All children had normal renal function and no hepatic or gastrointestinal dysfunction. Cyclosporine was administered after an overnight fast, and serial blood samples were drawn over a 24-hour period. Analysis of cyclosporine levels was performed by means of monoclonal radio immunoassay on whole blood. Children were divided into three age groups for comparison: 2-5 years, 5-10 years, and > 10 years. There were no differences between age groups in serum protein, serum lipids, or hemoglobin levels, or in the pharmacokinetic parameters of cyclosporine except as follows: significant differences were noted in cyclosporine dose based on body weight, apparent steady-state volume of distribution, and apparent blood clearance, with the youngest children (2-5) requiring higher doses, a relative greater distribution, and exhibiting more rapid drug clearance than those > 10 years of age. In addition, we observed diurnal variation in trough levels, with morning levels (0 hr) significantly higher than those obtained in the evening (12 hours after administration of cyclosporine). Trough levels demonstrated a fair correlation with area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and average concentration (Cav), but an abbreviated kinetic profile using cyclosporine levels 1 and 3.5 hours after administration accurately predicted AUC.

  4. The absorption site of cyclosporin in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    Drewe, J; Beglinger, C; Kissel, T

    1992-01-01

    1. An emulsion preparation of cyclosporin was administered locally to different parts of the small and large intestine by gavage: to the duodenum (opposite to the papilla of Vater), jejunum (150 cm distal to the teeth), ileum (300 cm distal to the teeth), and to the colon descendens (30 cm proximal to the anus). 2. The bioavailability of cyclosporin after these instillations was compared with that after oral administration of a hard gelatine capsule formulation. 3. Cyclosporin was found to be absorbed predominantly in the small intestine. This may have implications for dosage in patients with reduced absorptive surface area. PMID:1540489

  5. Radioimmunoassay of salivary cyclosporine with use of /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, J.E.; Lam, S.F.; McGaw, W.T.

    1988-08-01

    We prepared /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine (/sup 125/I-CS) by modifying the procedure of Mahoney and Orf and characterized it with regards to maximal immunoreactivity (greater than 90%), trichloroacetic acid precipitability (greater than 90%), and stability (90% immunoreactive after five half-lives of /sup 125/I). For a particular preparation of /sup 125/I-CS, we estimated its immunoreaction concentration (50 pmol/L) and the equilibrium constant for its reaction with Sandoz polyclonal antiserum (K = 3.9 X 10(9) L/mol). By substituting /sup 125/I-CS as tracer in the Sandoz radioimmunoassay and by modifying other aspects of the assay, we developed a procedure that is sufficiently sensitive (0.34 micrograms/L) to allow measurement of trough (lowest inter-dose) cyclosporine concentrations in parotid saliva. Of 38 kidney-transplant patients, 35 had measurable concentrations in saliva (mean 8.3, SD 5.2 micrograms/L), and these correlated moderately with paired serum concentrations (r = 0.68, P less than 0.001). We believe that measurement of salivary cyclosporine may offer a simple way of estimating the free fraction of the drug in serum or plasma.

  6. Use of Cyclosporine in Uterine Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Saso, Srdjan; Logan, Karl; Abdallah, Yazan; Louis, Louay S.; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Smith, J. Richard; Del Priore, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Uterine transplantation has been proposed as a possible solution to absolute uterine factor infertility untreatable by any other option. Since the first human attempt in 2000, various teams have tried to clarify which immunosuppressant would be most suitable for protecting the allogeneic uterine graft while posing a minimal risk to the fetus. Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressant widely used by transplant recipients. It is currently being tested as a potential immunosuppressant to be used during UTn. Its effect on the mother and fetus and its influence upon the graft during pregnancy have been of major concern. We review the role of CsA in UTn and its effect on pregnant transplant recipients and their offspring. PMID:22132302

  7. Cyclosporin A in cadaveric organ transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Calne, R Y; White, D J; Evans, D B; Thiru, S; Henderson, R G; Hamilton, D V; Rolles, K; McMaster, P; Duffy, T J; MacDougall, B R; Williams, R

    1981-01-01

    The use of cyclosporin A (CyA) with a protocol designed to avoid the effects of nephrotoxicity resulted in a one-year survival of 86% in recipients of renal allografts from unmatched cadaveric donors. The drug also controlled rejection of liver and pancreatic allografts. It was possible to change patients initially treated with CyA to azathioprine and corticosteroids and vice versa, thus enlarging the potential value of CyA in organ allografting. Of 34 recipients of renal allografts, 29 were currently receiving only CyA as immunosuppressive treatment. Twelve patients never required any adjuvant steroid treatment. These results suggest that CyA is an effective immunosuppressant, and if used with care side effects need not be severe. PMID:6781658

  8. Cyclosporin metabolism by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, I R; Peters, W H; Back, D J

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin (CsA) by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes has been studied. Macroscopically normal intestinal (n = 4) and liver (n = 2) tissue was obtained from kidney transplant donors, and microsomes prepared. Intestinal metabolism was most extensive with duodenal protein (15% conversion to metabolites M1/M17 after 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C; metabolite measurement by h.p.l.c). Western blotting confirmed the presence of P-4503A (enzyme subfamily responsible for CsA metabolism) in duodenum and ileum tissue, but not in colon tissue. The results of this study indicate that the gut wall may play a role in the first-pass metabolism of CsA, and could therefore be a contributory factor to the highly variable oral bioavailability of CsA. PMID:1389941

  9. Effects of cyclosporin on collagen induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Takagishi, K; Kaibara, N; Hotokebuchi, T; Arita, C; Morinaga, M; Arai, K

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin on collagen induced arthritis in mice. Cyclosporin, when given prophylactically, was capable of suppressing the development of collagen induced arthritis and the immunological response to native type II collagen in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment with cyclosporin, started on the same day as the booster injection with type II collagen, also resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and of immunity to collagen. These findings suggest that the time of a booster injection, three weeks after the initial immunisation, might be still within the induction phase of arthritis since reinoculation is required to produce a high incidence of arthritis in mice. In addition, therapeutic treatment with cyclosporin did not affect the clinical course of the disease or the immune response to collagen. PMID:3754714

  10. Combination cyclosporine and (hydroxy)chloroquine in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dijkmans, B A; Landewé, R B; van den Borne, B E; Breedveld, F C

    1999-01-01

    Antimalarials are attractive candidates for combination therapy. In vitro experiments have revealed a synergistic mode of action of cyclosporine and chloroquine which could not, however, be confirmed in a clinical trial.

  11. Pituitary transplantation: cyclosporine enables transplantation across a minor histocompatibility barrier.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, N B; Huang, S; Allen, G S

    1986-03-01

    Pituitary glands from neonatal donors were transplanted to the median eminence of hypophysectomized adult rats. Rats with transplants were then treated for 2 weeks with the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine. For 5 weeks thereafter, blood was drawn at regular intervals for determination of serum thyroxine, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone. Cyclosporine-treated recipients of grafts with minor histocompatibility differences had normal levels of thyroxine and prolactin, whereas untreated animals did not. In addition, the treated animals responded to oophorectomy with a marked elevation in serum luteinizing hormone. This evidence indicates that cyclosporine enables successful transplantation across a minor histocompatibility barrier. It also suggests that these grafts interact with the hypothalamus. Transplantation across a major histocompatibility barrier was unsuccessful even in the presence of cyclosporine.

  12. Intravenous tacrolimus and cyclosporine induced anaphylaxis: what is next?

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Yoon; Sohn, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2015-07-01

    Tacrolimus and cyclosporine have been used in various formulations, but their hypersensitivity reactions are rare in practice. Castor oil derivatives are nonionic surfactants used in aqueous preparations of hydrophobic active pharmaceutical ingredients. Castor oil derivatives that can be used as additives to tacrolimus and cyclosporine may play a role in the development of hypersensitivity reactions, especially anaphylaxis. Various immunologic and nonimmunologic mechanisms have been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions induced by castor oil derivatives. Physicians should be aware that not only the drug itself, but also its additives or metabolites could induce hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of anaphylaxis caused by vitamin K (phytonadine), serotonin antagonist (granisetron), intravenous tacrolimus, and cyclosporine. Interestingly, the patient tolerated oral cyclosporine, which did not contain Cremophor EL or polysorbate 80.

  13. Impact of cyclosporine in the development of immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Chaverri, C

    2004-03-01

    Cyclosporine has been of great interest to the transplant community during the last 20 years. It has permitted an evolution of knowledge through the changes in its original galenic formulation of Sandimmune to Neoral, and now through the recent application of the knowledge of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics to tailor drug doses to each individual. The achievements of cyclosporine are still valid and possibly will be for the next years.

  14. Effects of Nigella sativa and Lepidium sativum on Cyclosporine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jenoobi, F. I.; Al-Suwayeh, S. A.; Muzaffar, Iqbal; Al-Kharfy, Khalid M.; Korashy, Hesham M.; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M.; Raish, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of Nigella sativa and Lepidium sativum on the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine in rabbits. Two groups of animals were treated separately with Nigella sativa (200 mg/kg p.o.) or Lepidium sativum (150 mg/kg p.o.) for eight consecutive days. On the 8th day, cyclosporine (30 mg/kg p.o.) was administered to each group one hour after herbal treatment. Blood samples were withdrawn at different time intervals (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, 12, and 24 hrs) from marginal ear vein. Cyclosporine was analyzed using UPLC/MS method. The coadministration of Nigella sativa significantly decreased the Cmax and AUC0−∞ of cyclosporine; the change was observed by 35.5% and 55.9%, respectively (P ≤ 0.05). Lepidium sativum did not produce any significant change in Cmax of cyclosporine, although its absorption was significantly delayed compared with control group. A remarkable change was observed in Tmax and AUC0−t of Lepidium sativum treated group. Our findings suggest that concurrent consumption of Nigella sativa and Lepidium sativum could alter the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine at various levels. PMID:23957013

  15. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshama, Said Said; EL-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  16. Tissue distribution, disposition, and metabolism of cyclosporine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, O.; Schreier, E.; Heitz, F.; Maurer, G.

    1987-05-01

    Tissue distribution, disposition, and metabolism of /sup 3/H-cyclosporine were studied in rats after single and repeated oral doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg and after an iv dose of 3 mg/kg. The oral doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg were dissolved in polyethylene glycol 200/ethanol or in olive oil/Labrafil/ethanol. Absorption from both formulations was slow and incomplete, with peak /sup 3/H blood levels at 3-4 hr. Approximately 30% of the radioactive dose was absorbed, which is consistent with oral bioavailability data for cyclosporine. More than 70% of the radioactivity was excreted in feces and up to 15% in urine. Elimination via the bile accounted for 10 and 60% of the oral and iv doses, respectively. Since unchanged cyclosporine predominated in both blood and tissues at early time points, the half-lives of the distribution phases (t 1/2 alpha) of parent drug and of total radioactivity were similar. In blood, kidney, liver, and lymph nodes, t 1/2 alpha of cyclosporine ranged from 6-10 hr. Elimination of radioactivity from the systemic circulation was multiphasic, with a terminal half-life of 20-30 hr. /sup 3/H-Cyclosporine was extensively distributed throughout the body, with highest concentrations in liver, kidney, endocrine glands, and adipose tissue. The concentrations of both total radioactivity and parent drug were greater in tissues than in blood, which is consistent with the high lipid solubility of cyclosporine and some of its metabolites. Skin and adipose tissue were the main storage sites for unchanged cyclosporine. Elimination half-lives were slower for most tissues than for blood and increased with multiple dosing. The amount of unchanged drug was negligible in urine and bile.

  17. Cyclosporin in cell therapy for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jansen Of Lorkeers, S J; Hart, E; Tang, X L; Chamuleau, M E D; Doevendans, P A; Bolli, R; Chamuleau, S A J

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy in promoting cardiac repair in the setting of ischemic heart disease. Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that cell therapy improves cardiac function. Whether autologous or allogeneic cells should be used, and the need for immunosuppression in non-autologous settings, is a matter of debate. Cyclosporin A (CsA) is frequently used in preclinical trials to reduce cell rejection after non-autologous cell therapy. The direct effect of CsA on the function and survival of stem cells is unclear. Furthermore, the appropriate daily dosage of CsA in animal models has not been established. In this review, we discuss the pros and cons of the use of CsA on an array of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we present a small collection of data put forth by our group supporting the efficacy and safety of a specific daily CsA dosage in a pig model.

  18. Improved dose linearity of cyclosporine pharmacokinetics from a microemulsion formulation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, E A; Kovarik, J M; van Bree, J B; Tetzloff, W; Grevel, J; Kutz, K

    1994-02-01

    The pharmacokinetic dose proportionality and relative bioavailability of cyclosporine from a microemulsion formulation (Sandimmune Neoral) were compared to those of the commercial formulation (Sandimmune) over the dosage range 200 to 800 mg. Single oral administrations were given as soft gelatin capsules in an open randomized study with 48 healthy volunteers. Whole-blood cyclosporine concentrations were determined by a specific monoclonal radioimmunoassay. In comparison to Sandimmune, the absorption rate (maximum concentration) and systemic availability (area under the curve) of cyclosporine were greater for Sandimmune Neoral at all dose levels investigated. The area under the curve for Sandimmune increased in a less than proportional manner with respect to dose, whereas that for Sandimmune Neoral was consistent with linear pharmacokinetics. Because of this difference, no global assessment of relative bioavailability could be performed. The relative bioavailability of cyclosporine from Sandimmune Neoral ranged from 174 to 239% compared to Sandimmune, depending on the dose level. The improvements in oral bioavailability and dose linearity of cyclosporine exposure after administration as Sandimmune Neoral should facilitate more accurate dosage titration in the clinical setting.

  19. [Effect of verapamil on cyclosporine-induced vasoconstriction in human or murine isolated glomerules].

    PubMed

    L'Azou, B; Lakhdar, B; Potaux, L; Aparicio, M; Cambar, J

    1991-11-27

    Cyclosporin is a very potent immunosuppressant, but it often produces renal disturbances which limit its clinical use. Using an image analyzer which determines the areas of isolated glomerules, we were able to demonstrate that cyclosporin in various concentrations exerts a direct vasoconstrictive effect on human and murine glomerules. We also showed that verapamil has an almost total inhibitory effect on cyclosporin-induced vasoconstriction. These findings seem to be of interest in clinical practice to reduce the nephrotoxicity of cyclosporin.

  20. Arginine feeding modifies cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    De Nicola, L; Thomson, S C; Wead, L M; Brown, M R; Gabbai, F B

    1993-01-01

    Glycine (G) infusion causes renal vasodilation mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Cyclosporine A (CsA) nephrotoxicity is characterized by preglomerular vasoconstriction and decreased efferent arteriolar tone probably related to reduced NO and angiotensin II, respectively. L-Arginine (ARG) is a precursor to NO. To test the hypothesis that chronic CsA decreases renal NO activity, we compared the glomerular hemodynamic response to glycine infusion in rats after 8 d of CsA (30 mg/kg per d s.c.), CsA and ARG (1.6 g/kg per d p.o.) (A/CsA), and in two groups of pair-fed controls (CON, A/CON). Single nephron GFR (SNGFR), single nephron plasma flow (SNPF), glomerular capillary hydrostatic pressure gradient (delta P), proximal tubular reabsorption (APR), and kidney tissue angiotensin II (AIIk) were measured before and during G. CsA was associated with baseline decrements in SNGFR, SNPF, delta P, and AIIk, and with a blunted hemodynamic response to G. In CON, ARG did not affect baseline hemodynamics or modify the response to G. In CsA, ARG decreased baseline preglomerular resistance and restored the glomerular hemodynamic response to G. G was associated with a significant increase in AIIk in both CON and CsA. These findings suggest that (a) CsA is associated with decreased AIIk, and (b) CsA may diminish NO activity within the kidney, and that this capacity may be partially restored by arginine feeding. PMID:8408638

  1. Cyclosporine Amicellar delivery system for dry eyes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Han; Cha, Kwang-Ho; Cho, Wonkyung; Park, Junsung; Park, Hee Jun; Sun, Bo Kyung; Hyun, Sang-Min; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were to develop stable cyclosporine A (CsA) ophthalmic micelle solutions for dry-eye syndrome and evaluate their physicochemical properties and therapeutic efficacy. Materials and methods CsA-micelle solutions (MS-CsA) were created by a simple method with Cremophor EL, ethanol, and phosphate buffer. We investigated the particle size, pH, and osmolarity. In addition, long-term physical and chemical stability for MS-CsA was observed. To confirm the therapeutic efficacy, tear production in dry eye-induced rabbits was evaluated using the Schirmer tear test (STT). When compared to a commercial product, Restasis, MS-CsA demonstrated improvement in goblet-cell density and conjunctival epithelial morphology, as demonstrated in histological hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results MS-CsA had a smaller particle size (average diameter 14–18 nm) and a narrow size distribution. Physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, osmolarity, and remaining CsA concentration were all within the expected range of 60 days. STT scores significantly improved in MS-CsA treated groups (P<0.05) in comparison to those of the Restasis-treated group. The number of goblet cells for rabbit conjunctivas after the administration of MS-CsA was 94.83±8.38, a significantly higher result than the 65.17±11.51 seen with Restasis. The conjunctival epithelial morphology of dry eye-induced rabbits thinned with loss of goblet cells. However, after 5 days of treatment with drug formulations, rabbit conjunctivas recovered epithelia and showed a relative increase in the number of goblet cells. Conclusion The results of this study indicate the potential use of a novel MS for the ophthalmic delivery of CsA in treating dry eyes. PMID:27382280

  2. [Cyclosporine-induced gingival hyperplasia: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Bahamondes, Carlos; Godoy, Jorge

    2007-03-01

    Gingival enlargement can be an adverse effect of cyclosporine A and nifedipine use. It has a high relapse rate if the drugs are not discontinued. There is a genetic predisposition to the development of this condition and dental biofilm can also play a role. We report a 64 years old male who received a renal allograft and was treated with cyclosporine and nifedipine. He required six surgical interventions for generalized gingival enlargement. After the sixth relapse, the patient was subjected to a periodontal treatment to eliminate the dental biofilm, which decreased the rate of recurrence of gingival enlargement.

  3. Successful treatment of autoimmunity in (NZB X NZW)F1 mice with cyclosporin and (Nva2)-cyclosporin: I. Reduction of autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, H C

    1986-01-01

    Autoimmune (NZB X NZW)F1 mice were treated with the immunosuppressive agent, cyclosporin, and its new derivative (Nva2)-cyclosporin. Both compounds prevented the development of autoantibodies in young mice, and also reduced the levels of the autoantibodies in old mice. These findings established that autoantibodies, at least in the (NZB X NZW)F1 mice, can be controlled pharmacologically. This study supports the possibility that treatment with cyclosporin and (Nva2)-cyclosporin might be effective in the treatment of certain autoimmune diseases in man. PMID:3488856

  4. Successful treatment with cyclosporin administration for persistent benign migratory glossitis.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masatoshi; Sogabe, Yoko; Syuto, Tomoko; Ishibuchi, Hirohisa; Yokoyama, Yoko; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2007-05-01

    We herein describe a 54 year-old female patient with a 5-year history of persistent and painful benign migratory glossitis (BMG), which was remarkably improved by systemic administration of cyclosporin. She had noted some white patches leaving smooth denuded red areas with whitish elevated borders on the dorsum of her tongue, and finally felt strong pain. The lesion was refractory to the previous treatment with topical corticosteroid treatment for the last 2 years. Because clinicopathological findings were compatible with BMG, systemic administration of 20 mg/day prednisolone and topical 0.1% dexamethasone application were started, however, she suffered a severe relapse after tapering the dosage of prednisolone to 10 mg/day. Because some investigations have suggested that BMG is an oral manifestation of psoriasis, we introduced cyclosporin administration. The systemic treatment of cyclosporin microemulsion pre-concentrate, 3 mg/kg/day, resulted in a satisfactory improvement. Two months later, we could reduce cyclosporin microemulsion pre-concentrate dosage to 1.5 mg/kg/day for maintenance therapy, and the disease has been well controlled so far.

  5. Effects of embryonic cyclosporine exposures on brain development and behavior.

    PubMed

    Clift, Danielle E; Thorn, Robert J; Passarelli, Emily A; Kapoor, Mrinal; LoPiccolo, Mary K; Richendrfer, Holly A; Colwill, Ruth M; Creton, Robbert

    2015-04-01

    Cyclosporine, a calcineurin inhibitor, is successfully used as an immunosuppressant in transplant medicine. However, the use of this pharmaceutical during pregnancy is concerning since calcineurin is thought to play a role in neural development. The risk for human brain development is difficult to evaluate because of a lack of basic information on the sensitive developmental times and the potentially pleiotropic effects on brain development and behavior. In the present study, we use zebrafish as a model system to examine the effects of embryonic cyclosporine exposures. Early embryonic exposures reduced the size of the eyes and brain. Late embryonic exposures did not affect the size of the eyes or brain, but did lead to substantial behavioral defects at the larval stages. The cyclosporine-exposed larvae displayed a reduced avoidance response to visual stimuli, low swim speeds, increased resting, an increase in thigmotaxis, and changes in the average distance between larvae. Similar results were obtained with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506, suggesting that most, but not all, effects on brain development and behavior are mediated by calcineurin inhibition. Overall, the results show that cyclosporine can induce either structural or functional brain defects, depending on the exposure window. The observed functional brain defects highlight the importance of quantitative behavioral assays when evaluating the risk of developmental exposures.

  6. 21 CFR 862.1235 - Cyclosporine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cyclosporine test system. 862.1235 Section 862.1235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1235 - Cyclosporine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cyclosporine test system. 862.1235 Section 862.1235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1235 - Cyclosporine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cyclosporine test system. 862.1235 Section 862.1235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1235 - Cyclosporine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cyclosporine test system. 862.1235 Section 862.1235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1235 - Cyclosporine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cyclosporine test system. 862.1235 Section 862.1235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  11. Cyclosporin A inhibits DNA synthesis by epidermal Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Haftek, M; Urabe, A; Kanitakis, J; Dusserre, N; Thivolet, J

    Cyclosporin A, a potent immunosuppressive drug currently used in organ transplant recipients, has been shown to exert in vitro a direct antiproliferative effect on a number of cell types present in the skin, including keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Although in vitro studies suggest that cyclosporin A may interfere with the functional capacities of epidermal Langerhans cells, there is no evidence that the treatment influences the distribution or number of Langerhans cells in vivo. We used a model of normal human skin graft to "nude" mice, which is free of the human systemic control mechanisms, for studies on the DNA synthesis of human Langerhans cells under the influence of cyclosporin A. The grafted animals were given daily subcutaneous (50 mg/kg) or intraperitoneal (5, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg) drug injections during three weeks, which resulted in mean blood levels comparable to those observed in treated patients with organ transplants or psoriasis, respectively. BrdU administered during the last week of the experiment was incorporated by all cells synthesizing DNA, including those passing through S-phase. Langerhans cells were detected on deparaffinized or frozen tissue sections of xenografts with anti-CD1a and anti-HLA DR monoclonal antibodies, and the number of BrdU-positive cells was determined by double labeling. Our results indicate that the Langerhans cell DNA synthesis is impaired by therapeutic levels of cyclosporin A.

  12. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen on cyclosporine-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ay, Hakan; Uzun, Gunalp; Onem, Yalcin; Aydinoz, Secil; Yildiz, Senol; Bilgi, Oguz; Topal, Turgut; Atasoyu, Enes Murat

    2007-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been suggested to be involved in cyclosporine nephrotoxicity. Hyperbaric oxygen is known to induce the generation of reactive oxygen species in tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of hyperbaric oxygen concurrently with cyclosporine potentiates cyclosporine nephrotoxicity by inducing oxidative stress in kidneys. The study consisted of four groups of rats: a control group, a cyclosporine group (15 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally for 14 days), a hyperbaric oxygen group (60 min. every day for five days at 2.5 atmosphere absolute), and a cyclosporine + hyperbaric oxygen group (cyclosporine 15 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally for 14 days + hyperbaric oxygen for 60 min at 2.5 atmosphere absolute every day for five days on the last five days of cyclosporine treatment). Oxidative stress was determined by measuring renal thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances content, renal superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase activities. Cyclosporine increased serum urea and creatinine levels, indicating the development of nephrotoxicity, and induced significant oxidative stress in rat kidneys. Hyperbaric oxygen alone did not alter any of the biochemical and oxidative stress parameters compared to the control group. When used concurrently with cyclosporine, hyperbaric oxygen significantly reduced cyclosporine-induced oxidative stress, but it neither attenuated nor aggravated cyclosporine-induced nephrotoxicity. These results suggest that reactive oxygen species are involved in cyclosporine nephrotoxicity, but are not the direct cause of the toxicity. Although concurrent use of cyclosporine and hyperbaric oxygen did not exacerbate cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in this model, we recommend that the renal functions of patients be monitored periodically when these treatments are used concurrently.

  13. Study of Aplastic Anaemia with Cyclosporine in Resource Poor Setting

    PubMed Central

    Narendra, Anukonda Moti Venkata Raja; Adiraju, Krishna Prasad; Modugu, Nageshwar Rao

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aplastic Anaemia (AA) is a syndrome characterized by peripheral pancytopenia with hypo-cellular marrow. Acquired idiopathic AA is the most common variety, probably of an autoimmune aetiology. Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) is the treatment of choice but cost is the limiting factor. Antithymocyte Globulin and Cyclosporine-A is an alternative to BMT. Cyclosporine alone has been tried as a single agent in resource poor setting. Aim The study was conducted with the aim to observe the treatment response in aplastic anaemia to Cycloserine-A. Materials and Methods Patients who were diagnosed as AA and opted for Cyclosporine with informed consent were included in the study. All the subjects were started on 5mg/kg of Cyclosporine and were followed up for three months to see the treatment response. This study had the approval from IEC. Results Twenty patients were enrolled in the study. Age of the patients ranged from 10 to 65 years. Maximum number (10/20) of patients was in the 2nd decade. Most of the patients presented with mucosal bleeds and breathlessness on exertion; the predominant sign was pallor. Eleven patients had severe AA, eight had non severe and one had very severe anaemia. Out of 20, three patients were lost to follow-up and one patient discontinued therapy due to renal dysfunction; finally sixteen patients’ data was analysed. Out of 16 patients, 9 responded was and 7 did not respond. Complete response was observed in three patients, partial response in six patients. Seven patients had drug toxicity in the form of acute renal failure and gum hypertrophy. Conclusion Cyclosporine seems to be a reasonable therapeutic option with good response rate and minimal side effects. PMID:27504327

  14. [Pyoderma gangrenosum--positive effect of cyclosporin A therapy ].

    PubMed

    Krauze, Ewa; Lis, Anna; Kamińska-Budzińska, Grazyna; Wygledowska-Kania, Mariola; Pierzchała, Ewa; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2002-10-01

    Although pyoderma gangrenosum is a disorder known since over 70 years, it still remains a diagnostic and therapeutic problem. We describe three subjects with pyoderma gangrenosum; two were females, one was male, one case was associated with colitis ulcerosa, two were without any related disorders. Histopathologic examinations supported the diagnosis in all cases. In spite of intensive topical and systemic treatment with corticosteroids, Dapsone, Clofazimine, no sufficient effects were achieved. Cyclosporin A introduced in the dose of 5 mg/kg/d resulted in dramatic response and complete remission. Serum CyA levels, biochemical parameters of liver and kidney function, blood pressure were monitored during the therapy. No adverse events due to Cyclosporin A were observed.

  15. The Genome of Tolypocladium inflatum: Evolution, Organization, and Expression of the Cyclosporin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bushley, Kathryn E.; Raja, Rajani; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Cumbie, Jason S.; Nonogaki, Mariko; Boyd, Alexander E.; Owensby, C. Alisha; Knaus, Brian J.; Elser, Justin; Miller, Daniel; Di, Yanming; McPhail, Kerry L.; Spatafora, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    The ascomycete fungus Tolypocladium inflatum, a pathogen of beetle larvae, is best known as the producer of the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin. The draft genome of T. inflatum strain NRRL 8044 (ATCC 34921), the isolate from which cyclosporin was first isolated, is presented along with comparative analyses of the biosynthesis of cyclosporin and other secondary metabolites in T. inflatum and related taxa. Phylogenomic analyses reveal previously undetected and complex patterns of homology between the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) that encodes for cyclosporin synthetase (simA) and those of other secondary metabolites with activities against insects (e.g., beauvericin, destruxins, etc.), and demonstrate the roles of module duplication and gene fusion in diversification of NRPSs. The secondary metabolite gene cluster responsible for cyclosporin biosynthesis is described. In addition to genes necessary for cyclosporin biosynthesis, it harbors a gene for a cyclophilin, which is a member of a family of immunophilins known to bind cyclosporin. Comparative analyses support a lineage specific origin of the cyclosporin gene cluster rather than horizontal gene transfer from bacteria or other fungi. RNA-Seq transcriptome analyses in a cyclosporin-inducing medium delineate the boundaries of the cyclosporin cluster and reveal high levels of expression of the gene cluster cyclophilin. In medium containing insect hemolymph, weaker but significant upregulation of several genes within the cyclosporin cluster, including the highly expressed cyclophilin gene, was observed. T. inflatum also represents the first reference draft genome of Ophiocordycipitaceae, a third family of insect pathogenic fungi within the fungal order Hypocreales, and supports parallel and qualitatively distinct radiations of insect pathogens. The T. inflatum genome provides additional insight into the evolution and biosynthesis of cyclosporin and lays a foundation for further investigations of the role

  16. Multiple Eruptive Sebaceous Hyperplasia Secondary to Cyclosporin in a Patient with Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Begonia; Kaya, Gürkan

    2016-01-01

    Many cutaneous complications have been described in patients treated with cyclosporin. Alterations of the pilosebaceous unit such as hypertrichosis are particularly frequent. However, the occurrence of sebaceous hyperplasia is exceptional. These lesions seem to be specific to cyclosporin rather than secondary to immunosuppression. Here, we report an exceptional case of eruptive and disseminated sebaceous hyperplasia arising in a bone marrow transplant recipient only a few months after starting immunosuppressive treatment with cyclosporin. PMID:27990417

  17. Management of Cyclosporine and Nifedipine-Induced Gingival Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Erhan; Aral, Kübra; Sarica, Yagmur; Sivrikoz, Oya Nermin

    2015-01-01

    Gingival enlargements modified by medications are becoming more common because of the increased use of inducing drugs, and may create speech, mastication, tooth eruption, periodontal, and aesthetic problems. We hereby present a case of a 54-year-old man with 12-month history of generalized gingival enlargement in the keratinized gingiva was referred to our clinic. The patient had a history of kidney transplant and was under medication of cyclosporine and nifedipine. After medical consultation, cyclosporine was changed to tacrolimus and nifedipine was changed to captopril. Gingivectomy was performed using a diode laser, and scaling and root planning were performed. At five months postoperative, the gingival enlargements relapsed and diode laser-assisted surgery was repeated. The patient was followed-up on second postoperatively at 18 months and no relapse was seen. Diode laser-assisted gingivectomy was found to be useful for coagulation during surgery and decreased postoperative bleeding. Recurrence risk of cyclosporine and nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth is high, thus, there is a great need for prolonged care of patients following treatment and prosthetic restoration. PMID:26812935

  18. Chitosan functionalized nanocochleates for enhanced oral absorption of cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Zhong, Xiaoming; Yang, Zhiwen

    2017-01-01

    It remains a significant challenge to overcome the poor permeability of cyclosporine A and enhance its oral absorption. In this study, we have identified a positively charged chitosan that is able to induce coiling up of anionic lipids to form nanocochleates with an average size of 114.2 ± 0.8 nm, without the need for calcium ions. These functional chitosan-induced nanocochleates enhanced gastrointestinal absorption of cyclosporine A, up to a 3-fold increase in oral bioavailability. A fluorescence-labeling study confirmed that absorption mainly occurred in the duodenum and jejunum. Transport studies indicated that uptake of chitosan-induced nanocochleates by Caco-2 cells was by clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, but not by macropinocytosis. Furthermore, three cellular tight junction proteins, ZO-1, F-actin and claudin-4, were significantly down-regulated, suggesting that chitobiose-induced nanocochleates are able to reconstruct and open tight junctions in intestinal epithelial cells to enhance drug absorption. In summary, these novel bifunctional chitosan-induced nanocochleates appear to have potential to facilitate oral delivery of cyclosporine A. PMID:28112262

  19. [Hierba del clavo (Geum chiloense) modifying cyclosporine levels: potential risk for transplanted people].

    PubMed

    Duclos, J; Goecke, H

    2001-07-01

    We report a 54 years old male that received a renal allograft without complications. One year after the transplantation, she was receiving cyclosporine doses of 2 to 3 mg/kg and maintained serum levels of 60 to 90 mg/dl. An abrupt increase in cyclosporine serum levels to 469 and 600 mg/dl was noted after 15 months of transplantation. After a careful interrogation the patient admitted the use of Geum chiloense ("hierba del clavo"). Discontinuing this herbal remedy, cyclosporine levels decreased to 55 mg/dl, despite the maintenance of the same cyclosporine dose. The potential side effects of herbal remedies must be borne in mind.

  20. Safe conversion from cyclosporine to azathioprine with improved renal function in pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, B A; Lawless, S T; Palmer, J M; Dunn, S P; Polinsky, M S; Baluarte, H J

    1989-10-01

    Although cyclosporine has improved allograft survival in renal transplant patients, problems with drug toxicity remain, raising the question whether cyclosporine should be stopped at some point post-transplant. However, the relative safety of converting from cyclosporine to another immunosuppressive agent, or simply stopping cyclosporine remains an issue of debate and has not been evaluated in children. We have developed a protocol to convert children, who are 6 months post-transplant and have stable kidney function, from cyclosporine and prednisone to azathioprine and prednisone. Eleven children have undergone conversion because of suspected/potential nephrotoxicity or because of other difficulties with cyclosporine (expense, hirsutism). These children were compared with a control group of 12 children who met all criteria for conversion at 6 months but remained on cyclosporine. Allograft survival was similar in both groups but the children converted from cyclosporine experienced an improvement in renal function as measured by calculated creatinine clearance. There were no episodes of rejection for a period of 4 months post-conversion and all rejection episodes that developed subsequently occurred during or after the change from daily to alternate-day prednisone. We believe that conversion from cyclosporine to azathioprine can be accomplished safely in children with stable allograft function but long-term risks and benefits need further evaluation.

  1. The effect of prostaglandin E1 analog misoprostol on chronic cyclosporin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    John, E G; Fornell, L C; Radhakrishnan, J; Anutrakulchai, S; Jonasson, O

    1993-11-01

    Cyclosporin A has markedly improved graft survival in transplant patients but its side effects, such as renal toxicity and hypertension, pose management problems in transplant recipients. This toxicity has been attributed to prostaglandin inhibition. Concurrent administration of misoprostol (a prostaglandin E1 analog) prevents chronic cyclosporin A-induced nephrotoxicity but not hypertension in rats.

  2. Cutaneous malignant melanomas occurring under cyclosporin A therapy: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Mérot, Y; Miescher, P A; Balsiger, F; Magnenat, P; Frenk, E

    1990-08-01

    Two patients are reported with cutaneous malignant melanoma who had been on treatment with cyclosporin A. The first case was a 44-year-old man with systemic sclerosis and the second a 52-year-old woman who had a renal transplant. In both cases cyclosporin A was administered with a low dose of prednisone.

  3. Edoxaban drug–drug interactions with ketoconazole, erythromycin, and cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Parasrampuria, Dolly A.; Mendell, Jeanne; Shi, Minggao; Matsushima, Nobuko; Zahir, Hamim

    2016-01-01

    Aims Edoxaban, a novel factor Xa inhibitor, is a substrate of cytochrome P450 3 A4 (CYP3A4) and the efflux transporter P‐glycoprotein (P‐gp). Three edoxaban drug–drug interaction studies examined the effects of P‐gp inhibitors with varying degrees of CYP3A4 inhibition. Methods In each study, healthy subjects received a single oral dose of 60 mg edoxaban with or without an oral dual P‐gp/CYP3A4 inhibitor as follows: ketoconazole 400 mg once daily for 7 days, edoxaban on day 4; erythromycin 500 mg four times daily for 8 days, edoxaban on day 7; or single dose of cyclosporine 500 mg with edoxaban. Serial plasma samples were obtained for pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Safety was assessed throughout the study. Results Coadministration of ketoconazole, erythromycin, or cyclosporine increased edoxaban total exposure by 87%, 85%, and 73%, respectively, and the peak concentration by 89%, 68%, and 74%, respectively, compared with edoxaban alone. The half‐life did not change appreciably. Exposure of M4, the major active edoxaban metabolite, was consistent when edoxaban was administered alone or with ketoconazole and erythromycin. With cyclosporine, M4 total exposure increased by 6.9‐fold and peak exposure by 8.7‐fold, suggesting an additional interaction. Pharmacodynamic effects were reflective of increased edoxaban exposure. No clinically significant adverse events were observed. Conclusions Administration of dual inhibitors of P‐gp and CYP3A4 increased edoxaban exposure by less than two‐fold. This effect appears to be primarily due to inhibition of P‐gp. The impact of CYP3A4 inhibition appears to be less pronounced, and its contribution to total clearance appears limited in healthy subjects. PMID:27530188

  4. A resistant case of pemphigus gestationis successfully treated with cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Özhan; Atalay, Cemal Resat; Asgarova, Vusala; Ilgin, Bunyamin Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigoid gestationis (PG) is a rare autoimmune blistering disease of pregnancy caused by antibasement membrane zone auto-antibodies. The usual clinical findings are multiple pruritic urticarial papules and plaques, target lesions, vesicles, and blisters that occur during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy or in the immediate postpartum period. The disease is often treated with topical corticosteroids and oral antihistaminics. In more severe cases, systemic corticosteroids are needed. Herein, we report a case of resistant PG that responded to treatment with cyclosporine. PMID:28250977

  5. Enhancement of the oral absorption of cyclosporin in man.

    PubMed Central

    Drewe, J; Meier, R; Vonderscher, J; Kiss, D; Posanski, U; Kissel, T; Gyr, K

    1992-01-01

    1. The oral absorption of cyclosporin from three new semi-solid oral formulations was compared with the standard soft gelatine preparation in twelve healthy male volunteers. One formulation was based on a solid micellar solution, while the other two, with different in vitro release properties, were based on a microemulsion principle. 2. The results showed that the solid micellar solution and the faster releasing microemulsion formulation increased the extent of absorption on average by 45.2 and 49.0%, respectively, compared with the reference soft gelatine capsule. PMID:1633069

  6. Dosing and safety of cyclosporine in patients with severe brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, Jimmi; Rosbolt, Bonnie; Empey, Philip; Kryscio, Richard; Young, Byron

    2009-01-01

    Object Cyclosporine neuroprotection has been reported in brain injury models but safety and dosing guidelines have not been determined in humans with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this investigation was to establish the safety of cyclosporine using 4 clinically relevant dosing schemes. Methods The authors performed a prospective, blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, dose-escalation trial of cyclosporine administration initiated within 8 hours of TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score range 4–8; motor score range 2–5). Four dosing cohorts (8 patients treated with cyclosporine and 2 receiving placebo treatment per cohort) received cyclosporine (1.25–5 mg/kg/day) or placebo in 2 divided doses (Cohorts I–III) or continuous infusion (Cohort IV) over 72 hours. Adverse events and outcome were monitored for 6 months. Results Forty patients were enrolled over 3 years (cyclosporine cohorts, 24 male and 8 female patients; placebo group, 8 male patients). Systemic trough concentrations were below 250 ng/ml during intermittent doses. Higher blood concentrations were observed in Cohorts III and IV. There was no significant difference in immunological effects, adverse events, infection, renal dysfunction, or seizures. Mortality rate was not affected by cyclosporine administration, independent of dose, compared with placebo (6 of 32 patients receiving cyclosporine and 2 of 8 receiving placebo died, p > 0.05). At 6 months, a dose-related improvement in favorable outcome was observed in cyclosporine-treated patients (p < 0.05). Conclusions In patients with acute TBI who received cyclosporine at doses up to 5 mg/kg/day, administered intravenously, with treatment initiated within 8 hours of injury, the rate of mortality or other adverse events was not significantly different from that of the placebo group. PMID:18826358

  7. The effect of food and bile acid administration on the relative bioavailability of cyclosporin.

    PubMed Central

    Lindholm, A; Henricsson, S; Dahlqvist, R

    1990-01-01

    1. The relative bioavailability of cyclosporin was studied in 11 healthy volunteers after single oral capsule doses of cyclosporin on three separate occasions; fasting, with breakfast and with breakfast together with bile acid tablets (400 mg of cholic acid and 100 mg of dehydrocholic acid). 2. There was a significant increase in the area under the blood concentration vs time curve (AUC) of cyclosporin when the drug was taken together with breakfast and bile acid tablets (9078 ng ml-1 h) as compared with breakfast alone (7453 ng ml-1 h, P less than 0.05) or fasting conditions (7283 ng ml-1 h, P less than 0.01). 3. A blood drug concentration vs time curve displaying two peaks was present in 9/11 subjects when cyclosporin was taken with breakfast or with breakfast and bile acid tablets, but only one peak was present when cyclosporin was taken during fasting, suggesting an enterohepatic circulation of cyclosporin or a second absorption phase after the meal. 4. In a separate study, 12 h trough blood cyclosporin concentrations were measured before and after 1 week of bile acid treatment in 19 clinically stable, out-patient transplant recipients who were treated with oral cyclosporin solution (mean dose 2.0 mg kg-1 twice daily). The administration of cyclosporin was not standardized with regard to food intake. There was no significant difference in the blood concentrations of cyclosporin before and after bile acid treatment (114 +/- 38 ng ml-1 vs 121 +/- 38 ng ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2350530

  8. Cyclosporin A and multiple fibroadenomas of the breast.

    PubMed

    Baildam, A D; Higgins, R M; Hurley, E; Furlong, A; Walls, J; Venning, M C; Ackrill, P; Mansel, R E

    1996-12-01

    Multiple bilateral fibroadenomas are uncommon. This finding in four women who had received renal transplants prompted further inquiry. A prospective study was performed on 39 women under the age of 55 years who had received a renal transplant at least 1 year earlier. Clinical examination and breast ultrasonography were performed. Factors considered included immunosuppressive therapy, concurrent medication and renal function. Blood was taken for estimation of oestradiol, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and sex hormone binding globulin levels. Fibroadenomas were found in 13 of 29 women who had received cyclosporin A: multiple in ten and bilateral in five. No abnormal breast findings were seen in 10 patients immunosuppressed with steroids and azathioprine alone (chi 2 = 7.30, 1 d.f., P < 0.01). Serum oestradiol concentration was raised in women with fibroadenomas compared with that in those with normal breasts (P < 0.05) and the level of FSH was lower (P < 0.01). Cyclosporin A may act on breast fibroblasts by humoral mechanisms and direct action.

  9. Ca(2+)-loading modulates potencies of cyclosporin A, Mg2+ and ADP to recouple permeabilized rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Andreyev AYu; Mikhaylova, L M; Starkov, A A; Kushnareva YuE

    1994-09-01

    We studied the relative potencies of cyclosporin A and endogenous effectors (Mg2+ and ADP) to recouple rat liver mitochondria permeabilized by different Ca(2+)-loading in a P(i)-containing medium. Recoupling efficiency of cyclosporin A dramatically decreased at high Ca(2+)-loading (approx. 100 nM of Ca2+/mg protein and more). Mitochondria permeabilized by high Ca2+ were recoupled with approximately equal efficiency by higher cyclosporin A concentrations or by adding 1-5 mM Mg2+ together with low concentrations of cyclosporin A while potentiating effect of ADP on the cyclosporin A recoupling potency was insignificant. Mg2+ ions at concentrations of 3 mM and higher also prevented the carboxyatractylate-induced reversion of cyclosporin A recoupling effect. The data point to competitive relationships between cyclosporin A and/or Mg2+ ions and Ca2+ ions for the site(s) regulating permeability state of the pore.

  10. Prolonged heart xenograft survival using combined total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtle, S.J.; Halperin, E.C.; Saad, T.; Bollinger, R.R.

    1986-05-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine have profound immunosuppressive properties and permit successful heart allotransplantation. Cyclosporine used alone has not permitted consistently successful transplantation between species in all cases. Total lymphoid irradiation has not been applied to xenotransplantation. The efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation alone and in combination with cyclosporine was examined using an animal model of heart xenotransplantation. Heterotopic heart transplants were performed using inbred Syrian hamsters as donors and Lewis rats as recipients. Total lymphoid irradiation was administered preoperatively over 3 weeks for a total dose of 15 gray. Cyclosporine was started on the day of surgery and was given as a daily intramuscular injection of 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day until rejection was complete. Neither total lymphoid irradiation nor cyclosporine alone markedly prolonged graft survival. However, combined total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day, dramatically prolonged graft survival to greater than 100 days in most recipients. There were no treatment-related deaths. In conclusion, combined total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine permit successful long-term survival of heart xenotransplants in this hamster-to-rat model.

  11. Cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome in childhood: clinical features and risk of seizure recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, J G; duPlessis, A J; Barnes, P D; Riviello, J J

    1998-07-01

    Cyclosporin A is associated with an acute encephalopathy including seizures and alterations in mental status, herein referred to as cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome. The clinical history, electroencephalogram (EEG), and neuroimaging findings in 19 children with cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome over a 10-year period were reviewed in order to delineate clinical characteristics, imaging features, and to determine the risk of seizure recurrence in this population. All 19 had motor seizures associated with other features of cortical and subcortical dysfunction. The acute mean cyclosporin A level was 342 microg/L, but was within the "therapeutic" range in five cases. Brain imaging by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute or subacute phase revealed lesions characteristic of cyclosporin A toxicity in 14 cases. Acute EEG abnormalities were present in all and included epileptiform discharges or focal slowing. Patients were followed for a median of 49 months (1-9 years). Follow-up imaging (n = 10) showed lesion resolution or improvement in the majority while EEG (n = 10) had normalized in only three. Seizures recurred in six patients and only in those with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities. No patient had a second episode of cyclosporin A associated neurotoxicity or seizure. It appears that a significant risk of seizure recurrence exists following cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome and primarily in those children with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities.

  12. A Comparative Study of Oral Cyclosporine and Betamethasone Minipulse Therapy in the Treatment of Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yong Hyun; Kim, Sang Lim; Lee, Kyou Chae; Kim, Min Ji; Park, Kyung Hea; Lee, Weon Ju; Lee, Seok-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background Various systemic agents have been assessed for the treatment of alopecia areata (AA); however, there is a paucity of comparative studies. Objective To assess and compare cyclosporine and betamethasone minipulse therapy as treatments for AA with regard to effectiveness and safety. Methods Data were collected from 88 patients who received at least 3 months of oral cyclosporine (n=51) or betamethasone minipulse therapy (n=37) for AA. Patients with ≥50% of terminal hair regrowth in the alopecic area were considered responders. Results The responder of the cyclosporine group was 54.9% and that of the betamethasone minipulse group was 37.8%. In the cyclosporine group, patients with mild AA were found to respond better to the treatment. Based on the patient self-assessments, 70.6% of patients in the cyclosporine group and 43.2% of patients in the betamethasone minipulse group rated their hair regrowth as excellent or good. Side effects were less frequent in the cyclosporine group. Conclusion Oral cyclosporine appeared to be superior to betamethasone minipulse therapy in terms of treatment effectiveness and safety. PMID:27746635

  13. Investigation into the potential of low-frequency ultrasound facilitated topical delivery of Cyclosporin A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongzhuo; Li, Sanming; Pan, Weisan; Wang, Yongjun; Han, Fei; Yao, Huimin

    2006-12-01

    The potential for low-frequency ultrasound facilitated topical transport of Cyclosporin A was investigated using rat skin. Studies of intensity and exposure time acting on the deposition of Cyclosporin A into deeper skin of in vitro sonophoresis were performed. Low-frequency ultrasound increased the amount of Cyclosporin A retained in the skin only seven times than the passive diffusion. Furthermore, we also tested the synergistic effect of ultrasound and other approaches such as chemical enhancers and electroporation on topical drug delivery of Cyclosporin A. We found that the efficacy of low-frequency ultrasound in enhancing topical delivery could be further increased by pretreatment of skin with chemical enhancers, such as laurocapram (Azone) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). Meanwhile only a small amount was seen to across the full skin into the receiver compartment. Trimodality treatment comprising of pretreatment with Azone+ultrasound in combination followed by electroporation was not effective in enhancing the topical delivery of Cyclosporin A. However, this combination strategy increased the penetration of Cyclosporin A through rat skin by order of 15. The histopathological findings revealed that there was almost no change observed in the structure of skin after ultrasound or combination with ultrasound and enhancers as compared with the control group. In general, the enhanced skin accumulation of Cyclosporin A by the combination of low-frequency ultrasound and chemical enhancers could help significantly to optimize the targeting of the drug without of a concomitant increase of the systemic side effects.

  14. Pharmacokinetic interaction studies of fenugreek with CYP3A substrates cyclosporine and carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Al-Jenoobi, Fahad I; Alam, Mohd Aftab; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Korashy, Hesham M; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Iqbal, Muzaffar; Ahad, Abdul; Raish, Mohammad

    2014-06-01

    The present study investigated the effect of fenugreek seed powder on disposition of CYP3A substrates, cyclosporine and carbamazepine. Rabbits were treated with fenugreek seed powder (300 mg/kg p.o.) for 8 days and on 8th day the single dose of cyclosporine (30 mg/kg, p.o.) and carbamazepine (40 mg/kg, p.o.) were administered to the corresponding group after 1 h of fenugreek administration. Blood samples were drawn at several time points and analyzed by using UPLC-MS (cyclosporine) and HPLC (carbamazepine). Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by using PK Solver. The present investigation reveals that there was no statistically significant difference between pre- and post-treated pharmacokinetic parameters such as AUC(o-t), AUC(o-∞), C(max), T(max), T(1/2), K(el), MRT(o-∞) , V(z/F), and Cl/F for cyclosporine and carbamazepine. Two tailed "P" values for all these pharmacokinetic parameters were more than 0.05, indicating insignificant impact of fenugreek treatment on the disposition of cyclosporine and carbamazepine. Further, fenugreek may also not have any significant effect on the functionality of P-glycoprotein as cyclosporine is a substrate to P-glycoprotein. The outcomes of present study suggested that fenugreek may not likely to interfere cyclosporine and carbamazepine pharmacokinetics, when co-administered with these drugs.

  15. Enzyme and combination therapy with cyclosporin A in the rat developing adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rovenská, E; Svík, K; Stancíková, M; Rovenský, J

    1999-01-01

    Recent knowledge of the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis and the mechanism of drug effects have enabled the use of new drugs and drug combinations in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. This study investigates the efficacy of both enzyme therapy and combined therapy with cyclosporin in rats with adjuvant arthritis. Rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis were administered either cyclosporin A (2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg/day per os), a mixture of enzymes (Phlogenzym (PHL); 45 mg/kg twice daily intrarectally), or a combination of 2.5 mg cyclosporin A and 90 mg PHL for a period of 40 days from the adjuvant application. Levels of serum albumin, changes in hind paw swelling and bone erosions were measured in rats as variables of inflammation and arthritis-associated destructive changes. Treatment with 5 mg of cyclosporin A, as well as with the combination therapy with cyclosporin A plus PHL, significantly inhibited both the inflammation and destructive arthritis-associated changes. However, 2.5 mg of cyclosporin A and PHL alone inhibited these disease markers, although to a lesser extent and at a later stage of arthritis development. The results show the inhibitory effect of enzyme therapy on rat adjuvant arthritis, as well as the efficacy of a low dose of cyclosporin A given in combination with enzyme therapy, which may be useful in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Cyclosporin A reduces canalicular membrane fluidity and regulates transporter function in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Yasumiba, S; Tazuma, S; Ochi, H; Chayama, K; Kajiyama, G

    2001-01-01

    Changes of the biliary canalicular membrane lipid content can affect membrane fluidity and biliary lipid secretion in rats. The immunosuppressant cyclosporin A is known to cause intrahepatic cholestasis. This study investigated whether cyclosporin A influenced canalicular membrane fluidity by altering membrane phospholipids or transporter expression. In male Sprague-Dawley rats, a bile-duct cannula was inserted to collect bile, and sodium taurocholate was infused (100 nmol/min per 100 g) for 60 min. During steady-state taurocholate infusion, cyclosporin A (20 mg/kg) or vehicle was injected intravenously and then bile was collected for 80 min. After killing the rats, canalicular membrane vesicles were prepared. Expression of canalicular membrane transporters was assessed by Western blotting and canalicular membrane vesicle fluidity was estimated by fluorescence polarization. Cyclosporin A reduced biliary lipid secretion along with a disproportionate reduction of lipids relative to bile acids. Cyclosporin A significantly decreased canalicular membrane fluidity along with an increase of the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio. Only expression of the transporter P-glycoprotein was increased by cyclosporin A. Because canalicular membrane transporter expression was largely unchanged by cyclosporin A despite a marked decrease of biliary lipid secretion, transporter activity may partly depend upon canalicular membrane fluidity. PMID:11237863

  17. Formulation and evaluation of Cyclosporin A emulgel for ocular delivery.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Ling, Xiang; Jiang, Weiwei; Du, Shuang; Lu, Yang; Tu, Jiasheng

    2015-01-01

    Emulgels have been extensively covered as a promising drug delivery system for the administration of lipophilic drugs. This work was conducted to develop an emulgel formulation for Cyclosporin A (CsA) employing polycarbophil as the gelling agent for ocular delivery. The prepared emulgels were evaluated for their physical appearance, rheological behavior, drug release, stability, precorneal clearance and irritation. Results showed that CsA emulgel formulations prepared with polycarbophil exhibited acceptable physical properties and drug release, which remained consistent after storage for 3 months. A prolonged retention time was also observed on the ocular surface with improved ocular bioavailability and no irritation. Therefore, the polycarbophil-based emulgel could be exploited as a potential hydrophobic drug carrier for topical ocular drug delivery.

  18. Conformational Heterogeneity of Cyclosporin A in Cyclophilin 18 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weilin; Quintero, Andres; Zhang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    The immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA) binds to its receptor protein cyclophilin 18 (Cyp18) in two distinct kinetic phases, while the mechanism remains elusive. Stopped-flow measurements coupled with titration and competition experiments were used to investigate the puzzling two-phase process of CsA and Cyp18 interaction. This study leads to the dissection of different conformational fractions of either direct fast binding or slow binding with rate-limiting conformational inter-conversion and the real-time measurement of kon value (8.34 ± 0.22 x106 M-1s-1) in solution. Furthermore, our study indicates that the structure of CsA during dissociation from the protein possesses a distribution of conformations different from those in solution under equilibrium condition. PMID:27082870

  19. Leaching of diethylhexyl phthalate from polyvinyl chloride bags into intravenous cyclosporine solution

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataramanan, R.; Burckart, G.J.; Ptachcinski, R.J.; Blaha, R.; Logue, L.W.; Bahnson, A.; Giam, C.S.; Brady, J.E.

    1986-11-01

    The release of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) from flexible polyvinyl chloride containers into intravenous cyclosporine solutions was studied. Intravenous cyclosporine solution or solutions containing the vehicle Cremophor EL and alcohol in dextrose were prepared in an all-glass system and stored in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags. Four samples were obtained at different time intervals, and DEHP content was analyzed by gas chromatography. The amount of DEHP that was leached into solutions stored in the PVC bags increased as storage time increased. By 48 hours, nearly 33 mg of DEHP had leached into the solution. Intravenous cyclosporine solutions should be prepared in glass containers to minimize patient exposure to DEHP. If plastic bags are used for preparing cyclosporine injections, the injections must be used immediately after preparation.

  20. Treatment of pure red-cell aplasia with cyclosporine in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Rahsan; Bilen, Yusuf; Keles, Mustafa; Uyanik, Abdullah; Gokbulut, Puren; Aydinli, Bulent

    2013-02-01

    Acquired pure red-cell aplasia is a rare disorder that can be either idiopathic or associated with certain autoimmune diseases, pregnancy, lymphoproliferative disorders, nutritional deficiencies, or medicines. We present a deceased-donor renal transplant patient who developed pure red-cell aplasia associated with mycophenolate mofetil or tacrolimus and was treated with cyclosporine. A 20-year-old woman was transplanted from a deceased donor 1 month earlier and presented to us with symptoms of fatigue, prostration, and palpitation. The results of a laboratory examination revealed anemia. A diagnostic work-up resulted in a diagnosis of pure red-cell aplasia. Mycophenolate mofetil was discontinued. Tacrolimus also was replaced with cyclosporine 2 months after mycophenolate mofetil was halted because of a lack of improvement in anemia. Three months later, her anemia improved with cyclosporine. Starting cyclosporine instead of tacrolimus or mycophenolate mofetil showed good improvement in our patient within 6 months of therapy.

  1. Development and evaluation of in situ gel forming system for sustained delivery of cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Sanju; Kapil, Rishi; Kapoor, Deepak N; Kumar, Manoj

    2009-10-01

    Phase-sensitive in situ gel forming controlled release formulations of cyclosporine were prepared using poly (lactide-co-glycolide) and a solvent system consisting of various proportions of benzyl benzoate and benzyl alcohol. Uniformity of content of cyclosporine in the formulation and in vitro release samples was determined by radio immune assay (RIA). FTIR and CD spectroscopy ratified the conformational stability of cyclosporine in the formulation and in vitro release samples, respectively. Rheological properties of the formulations, assessed under isothermal conditions, showed dilatant behavior of all the formulations. In vivo studies were carried out on the optimized formulations vis-à-vis pure cyclosporine in rats and drug levels were monitored for 13 days. Mean plasma concentration of cyclosporine was calculated for all the animals and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using Win NonLin software. The studies construed better regulation of plasma drug levels with the optimized formulation vis-à-vis routine once-a-day administration of cyclosporine. The subcutaneous tissues, further subjected to histopathological examinations ascertained the biocompatibility of the formulation.

  2. Immunosuppressive and antiparasitic effects of cyclosporin A on Hymenolepis nana infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, K; Nakamura, F; Abe, M; Okamoto, K

    1998-04-01

    The effect of cyclosporin A, which is known to act both as immunosuppressant and as an antiparasitic drug in many host-parasite systems, was examined in a mouse-Hymenolepis nana system. When BDF1 mice were injected s.c. with cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) every 48 h from 11 days p.i. with eggs, expulsion of the adult worms from the intestines of mice was prevented completely until at least 30 days p.i. Worm burden, dry weight and the number of gravid proglottids were not significantly reduced. By contrast, in untreated mice most of the worms were eliminated by 19 days p.i. The drug also completely abolished acquired resistance to a challenge infection with eggs when mice were injected s.c. with cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) around the time of challenge infection (Days -2, -1, 0, 1 and 2 relative to challenge). Such immunosuppressive effects of cyclosporin A on worm expulsion and protective immunity to reinfection were similar to those of another immunosuppressant, cyclophosphamide. As for the antiparasitic action of cyclosporin A against H. nana, a smaller number of cysticercoids developed from eggs in mice given cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) for 5 days beginning 1 day before infection, than in untreated controls.

  3. The NMR structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.; Wilder, G.; von Freyberg, B.; Braun, W.; Wuethrich, K. ); Traber, R.; Widmer, H. )

    1991-07-02

    Cyclosporin A bound to the presumed receptor protein cyclophilin was studied in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using uniform {sup 15}N- or {sup 13}C-labeling of cyclosporin A and heteronuclear spectral editing techniques. With an input of 108 intramolecular NOEs and four vicinal {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} coupling constants, the three-dimensional structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin was calculated with the distance geometry program DISMAN, and the structures resulting from 181 converged calculations were energy refined with the program FANTOM. A group of 120 conformers was selected on the basis of the residual constraint violations and energy criteria to represent the solution structure. The average of the pairwise root-mean-square distances calculated for the backbone atoms of the 120 structures was 0.58 {angstrom}. The structure represents a novel conformation of cyclosporin A, for which the backbone conformation is significantly different from the previously reported structures in single crystals and in chloroform solution. The structure has all peptide bonds in the trans form, contains no elements of regular secondary structure and no intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and exposes nearly all polar groups to its environment. The root-mean-square distance between the backbone atoms of the crystal structure of cyclosporin A and the mean of the 120 conformers representing the NMR structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin is 2.5 {angstrom}.

  4. T-Cell Proliferation Involving the CD28 Pathway is Associated with Cyclosporine-Resistant Interleukin 2 Gene Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Security Classification) T-CELL PROLIFERATION INVOLVING THE CD28 PATHWAY IS ASSOCIATED WITH CYCLOSPORINE-RESISTANT INTERLEUKIN 2 GENE EXPRESSION 12. PERSONAL...Cyclosporins,. T Lymphocytes) r’jh ,,.. "’’ .. - | Gene Expression 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block num’ber) DTIC...American Society tor Microbiology T-Cell Proliferation Involving the CD28 Pathway Is Associated with Cyclosporine-Resistant Interleukin 2 Gene Expression

  5. Can clinical response to cyclosporin in chronic severe asthma be predicted by an in vitro T-lymphocyte proliferation assay?

    PubMed

    Alexander, A G; Barnes, N C; Kay, A B; Corrigan, C J

    1996-07-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that the clinical response to cyclosporin therapy of patients with chronic severe asthma is related to the sensitivity of their T-lymphocytes to the antiproliferative effects of cyclosporin in vitro. In a previous study, we observed such a relationship with glucocorticoids and the same lectin-driven proliferation assay was used in the present study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from 33 patients participating in a cross-over trial of oral cyclosporin therapy during both cyclosporin and placebo treatment periods, and cultured in the presence of phytohaemagglutinin and serial dilutions of cyclosporin and dexamethasone. Proliferation was measured by tritiated thymidine uptake. Both cyclosporin and dexamethasone inhibited T-lymphocyte proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro at concentrations encompassing those achieved in peripheral blood during therapy in vivo. T-lymphocytes from the asthmatic patients showed a range of sensitivity to the antiproliferative effects of cyclosporin, but this could not be correlated with improvements in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) or forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) during cyclosporin therapy as compared with placebo. In contrast to previous observations with glucocorticoids, this in vitro T-lymphocyte proliferation assay is not predictive of clinical response to cyclosporin therapy in chronic severe asthmatics.

  6. Cyclosporine-induced gingival overgrowth in New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Jean, Sherrie M; Sharma, Prachi; Taylor, Douglas; Mook, Deborah

    2009-08-01

    A high incidence of gingival overgrowth occurred in a group of New Zealand White rabbits receiving daily cyclosporine (15 mg/kg IM) while on a retinoblastoma study. Over the course of 2 mo, rabbits presented with clinical signs of ptyalism (4 of 18 rabbits), inappetence (3 of 18), or both (3 of 18); facial dermatitis and erythema occurred secondary to ptyalism. Reducing the dose of cyclosporine to 10 mg/kg led to complete resolution of clinical signs in all but 2 rabbits, which then received azithromycin (62.5 mg PO once daily for 7 d), a common treatment for cyclosporine-induced gingival overgrowth in other species. After dose reduction and azithromycin treatment, clinical signs resolved and did not reoccur for the remainder of the study. Fourteen rabbits were necropsied at the end of the study, and gingival width was measured. Although some rabbits were clinically normal, the gingiva in all rabbits was grossly thickened. Rabbits on cyclosporine had molar gingiva that was significantly thicker (4.8 mm) than controls (2.5 mm) not treated with cyclosporine. Histologic analysis of the gingiva revealed mild to moderate gingival epithelial hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and mild inflammation. Gingival overgrowth is a known side effect of cyclosporine administration in other species but, to our knowledge, this report is the first description of the condition in rabbits. Because rabbits frequently are used in studies that involve systemic cyclosporine administration, clinicians are advised to include this possibility in their differential list for cases involving hypersalivation, facial dermatitis, or inappetence in rabbits.

  7. [Successful combination therapy of cyclosporine and steroids in two cases with interstitial pneumonitis associated with polymyositis].

    PubMed

    Ando, S; Kobayashi, S; Yamanaka, K; Takasaki, Y; Hashimoto, H

    1995-02-01

    Cyclosporine is an immunosuppressive agent which is well-established in the transplantation of organs including kidney, liver and bone marrow. It acts by inhibiting the production of interleukin 2, thereby blocking both the development of cytotoxic lymphocytes, and the proliferation of helper T cells. T cell-mediated muscle damage is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of polymyositis. And activated cytotoxic T cells are thought to play an important role of polymyositis/dermatomyositis with active pneumonitis. It is thereby likely that cyclosporine would be effective in the management of polymyositis with interstitial pneumonitis. We have used cyclosporine in two cases of corticosteroids resistant polymyositis associated with pneumonitis. The first case was admitted because of the relapse of polymyositis. She was partially responded by the high dose of steroid, but showed decreased %DLCO and increased AaDO2 during the therapy. And oral cyclosporine was given with steroid. Within two weeks, serum creatinine kinase level was reduced to normal range, and the improvement of pneumonitis was observed. The second case was admitted because of the flare of pneumonitis. She was treated with high dose of steroid with insufficient response. And cyclosporine was prescribed. Within two weeks of treatment, her symptom was relieved, and blood gas analysis showed an improvement of pulmonary function. And steroid could be tapered. In both cases, the initial dose of cyclosporine was 200 mg/day, and the optimal trough level was thought to be ranged 100 to 150 ng/ml. In the second case, renal dysfunction was observed but it was recovered by the reduction of the dose of cyclosporine. No other side effect was appeared.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Cyclosporine-Induced Gingival Overgrowth in New Zealand White Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Sherrie M; Sharma, Prachi; Taylor, Douglas; Mook, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    A high incidence of gingival overgrowth occurred in a group of New Zealand White rabbits receiving daily cyclosporine (15 mg/kg IM) while on a retinoblastoma study. Over the course of 2 mo, rabbits presented with clinical signs of ptyalism (4 of 18 rabbits), inappetence (3 of 18), or both (3 of 18); facial dermatitis and erythema occurred secondary to ptyalism. Reducing the dose of cyclosporine to 10 mg/kg led to complete resolution of clinical signs in all but 2 rabbits, which then received azithromycin (62.5 mg PO once daily for 7 d), a common treatment for cyclosporine-induced gingival overgrowth in other species. After dose reduction and azithromycin treatment, clinical signs resolved and did not reoccur for the remainder of the study. Fourteen rabbits were necropsied at the end of the study, and gingival width was measured. Although some rabbits were clinically normal, the gingiva in all rabbits was grossly thickened. Rabbits on cyclosporine had molar gingiva that was significantly thicker (4.8 mm) than controls (2.5 mm) not treated with cyclosporine. Histologic analysis of the gingiva revealed mild to moderate gingival epithelial hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and mild inflammation. Gingival overgrowth is a known side effect of cyclosporine administration in other species but, to our knowledge, this report is the first description of the condition in rabbits. Because rabbits frequently are used in studies that involve systemic cyclosporine administration, clinicians are advised to include this possibility in their differential list for cases involving hypersalivation, facial dermatitis, or inappetence in rabbits. PMID:19712576

  9. Ocular penetration of cyclosporin A. III: The human eye.

    PubMed Central

    BenEzra, D; Maftzir, G; de Courten, C; Timonen, P

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of cyclosporin A (CsA) in the blood, saliva, tears, aqueous humour, vitreous, and cerebrospinal fluid has been studied after oral treatment with 5 mg/kg/day of CsA or application of 2% CsA eye drops in olive oil solution. After oral treatment all patients had high CsA levels in blood. Measurable levels of CsA were also found in the saliva and tears. Patients without any intraocular inflammation or patients with mild uveitis did not have any detectable CsA in the aqueous humour. However, patients with severe uveitis had significant levels of CsA in the aqueous humour and in the vitreous. No CsA was found in the cerebrospinal fluid of two patients with central nervous system manifestations of Behçet's disease. After local treatment with 2% CsA eye drops no detectable levels of CsA were found in the blood, the saliva, the aqueous humour, or the vitreous even in patients with severe uveitis. PMID:2378841

  10. Cyclosporin a. Inhibition of experimental autoimmune uveitis in Lewis rats.

    PubMed Central

    Nussenblatt, R B; Rodrigues, M M; Wacker, W B; Cevario, S J; Salinas-Carmona, M C; Gery, I

    1981-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CS-A), a selective inhibitor of T lymphocytes, is reported here to prevent S antigen (S-Ag) induced uveitis in Lewis rats. The S-Ag, found in all mammalian retinas, is uveitogenic under experimental conditions and patients with certain uveitic entities demonstrate cell mediated responses to this antigen. Daily treatment with CS-A (10 mg/kg) begun on the same day as S-Ag immunization totally inhibited the development of the uveitis in this experimental autoimmune model. Moreover a greater CS-A dose (40 mg/kg) efficiently prevented the disease process when therapy was started 7 d after S-Ag immunization. Anti-S-Ag antibody titers were observed to be similar in rats either protected or not protected with CS-A. Our data support strongly the need for T cell participation in this disease model. Since ocular inflammatory disease is an important cause of visual impairment, the data further suggest that CS-A may be useful in the treatment of patients with intractable uveitis. Images PMID:7204576

  11. Paradoxical effects of cyclosporin A on collagen arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin A (CS-A) on collagen arthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats is investigated. A 14-d course of CS-A treatment at doses of 15 mg/kg per day or more, begun on the same day as type II collagen immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis as well as humoral and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test responses to type II collagen, possibly by interfering with helper T cells. Additional studies demonstrated that CS-A treatment only during the induction phase of immunity proved to be successful. When CS-A treatment was started only during the immediately preclinical phase of arthritis or after the disease onset, a significant enhancement of the disease was obtained in a dose-dependent manner. This enhancement was accompanied by an augmentation of DTH skin reactions, while antibody responses were either suppressed or unaffected. These results appear to be attributable at least in part to a suppressive effect of CS-A on a population of suppressor T cells, thus resulting in a T cell-mediated helper effect. It is therefore reasonable to assume that the paradoxical effects of CS-A on collagen arthritis in rats might be caused by an altering of the sensitive balance of the two regulatory subpopulations of T cells. It is also possible that cell-mediated immune responses may play an important role in influencing the course of the disease. PMID:6644238

  12. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of morin and cyclosporin

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, S.-H. . E-mail: shfang@mail.cmu.edu.tw; Hou, Y.-C.; Chao, P.-D.L.

    2005-05-15

    Morin is a flavonoid present in mulberry and herbs. We have reported that morin exerted anti-inflammatory activity on the activated macrophages. Cyclosporin (CsA) is a potent immunosuppressive agent with narrow therapeutic range, which is widely used for the treatments of autoimmune diseases and transplantation rejection. This study aimed to measure the effects of morin on the disposition of CsA in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues, and on the functions of immune cells in mice. CsA (Neoral, 10 mg/kg) was orally administered with and without a concomitant dose of morin (0, 50, 100, 200 mg/kg) to mice once daily for 2 weeks. CsA concentrations in blood, liver, kidney, and spleen were determined by a specific monoclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay. The decreased levels of CsA in tissues were found well correlated to increased doses of morin. The coadministration of 200 mg/kg morin significantly decreased CsA in blood, liver, kidney, and spleen by 33%, 17%, 38%, and 45%, respectively. On the other hand, coadministration of morin decreased dramatically the nitric oxide production by the activated macrophages when compared to CsA treatment alone. Moreover, morin maintained the level of CsA-suppressed T helper 1 (Th1) type cytokine, although the CsA concentration in spleen was markedly reduced. In conclusion, morin coadministration profoundly reduced CsA concentration but did not significantly alter the CsA-suppressed Th1 immune response in mice.

  13. The use of cyclosporin A in clinical organ grafting.

    PubMed Central

    Calne, R Y; White, D J

    1982-01-01

    Experiments in animals with organ allografts showed that Cyclosporin A (CyA) was an extremely powerful immunosuppressant with a good therapeutic index. A pilot study of the drug in human recipients of renal allografts revealed an unexpected side effect, nephrotoxicity, which made care of patients difficult. Following a policy of deliberate hydration of patients in the perioperative phase and withholding CyA until diuresis was occurring in the graft, excellent results have been obtained in clinical practice. An 82% actuarial functional survival at both one and two years has been obtained in the 59 patients treated with this protocol. A multicenter trial is now in progress in eight centers in Europe, comparing CyA used in the manner described above with conventional azathioprine and steroids. CyA has also been used in 17 recipients of liver allografts, ten of whom are still alive and 11 recipients of segmental pancreatic allografts, one of whom remains off insulin after two and a quarter years. Sudden graft failure occurred between three months and two years in three patients whose pancreatic duct had been occluded. The authors' most recent segmental pancreas graft has been drained into a long roux loop without complications. The main objective in the use of this drug is to obtain consistent immunosuppression without nephrotoxicity. It is possible that maintaining blood level between defined limits would improve results. PMID:7051997

  14. Pharmacokinetic strategies for cyclosporin therapy in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kahan, B D; Welsh, M; Knight, R; Katz, S; Lewis, R; Grevel, J; Van Buren, C T

    1992-04-01

    Marked interindividual variations in cyclosporin (CsA) produce disparate clinical results in organ transplant recipients. In an attempt to eliminate marked deviations of insufficient or excessive CsA concentrations consequent to the administration of uniform drug doses, test dose pharmacokinetics were performed on each potential organ transplant candidate. An intravenous 3 mg/kg test dose delivered over 3 h proved to be readily performed, namely 53% perfect studies, and relatively reliable, namely 73% of observed concentrations within 10% of the predicted values. Furthermore, the use of CsA doses predicted by pretransplant studies reduces the incidence of delayed graft function, early rejection episodes and transplant loss. The oral test dose study predicted a suitable amount of CsA to achieve sufficient gastrointestinal absorption but was less accurate than the iv prediction method: namely, 40% of observed post-transplant concentrations were within 10% of the predicted target value. Furthermore, patients who received oral doses predicted by the test dose strategy showed no improvement in the incidence of acute rejection episodes between 7 and 60 days, and only modestly improved serum creatinine values. The lower accuracy of predictions from oral test dose studies may reflect the impact of non-linear oral (as opposed to iv) drug pharmacokinetics, of variable diet, and/or of altered postoperative gastrointestinal function.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of oral cyclosporin A (Sandimmun) in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Nüesch, E; Abisch, E; Kutz, K

    1986-01-01

    Extensive pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles after oral dosing of 300 mg cyclosporin A (CsA) were determined in whole blood by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in 14 healthy male volunteers, using two-compartment models with either first order (M1) or zero order (M0) absorption. According to zero order absorption the mean of the following PK parameters was determined: terminal half-life = 12.1 +/- 5.0 h, apparent volume of distribution at steady-state = 5.6 +/- 2.11 X kg-1, apparent clearance = 0.51 +/- 0.11 l X h-1 X kg-1. The time lag between drug ingestion and first blood level was short, 0.38 +/- 0.11 h. Drug absorption lasted for 2.8 +/- 1.6 h. The end of absorption was indicated in each individual by a sharp drop in blood levels. The observations support the assumption that CsA is absorbed in the upper part of the small intestine with a clear-cut termination (absorption window). This assumption may explain the high degree of variability in the bioavailability of CsA.

  16. Lipid abnormalities in cyclosporine-prednisone-treated renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Vathsala, A; Weinberg, R B; Schoenberg, L; Grevel, J; Goldstein, R A; Van Buren, C T; Lewis, R M; Kahan, B D

    1989-07-01

    Hyperlipidemia and hypertension, two major risk factors for accelerated atherosclerosis, undoubtedly contribute to the excessive cardiovascular morbidity and mortality experienced by renal transplant recipients. The present survey of posttransplant hyperlipidemia in 500 cyclosporine-treated patients documented a 37.6% incidence of hypercholesterolemia, which occurred within 6 months posttransplant in 82% of patients. An etiologic relation to corticosteroid therapy was suggested by the strong correlation between prednisone doses and cholesterol levels, by the reduced cholesterol levels in patients undergoing steroid withdrawal, and by the reduction in hypercholesterolemia to 13% by 3 years posttransplant when steroid doses were less than 10 mg daily. Hypertriglyceridemia, which was present in 14.7% of the patients, was more severe under CsA-prednisone compared with azathioprine-prednisone therapy. Hypertriglyceridemia, which occurred later in the posttransplant course than hypercholesterolemia, strongly correlated with an excessive percent relative weight and elevated serum creatinine but not with steroid or CsA doses. Increasing age, diabetes mellitus, beta-blockers and nephrotic syndrome contribute to posttransplant hyperlipidemia in the CsA-Pred era as they did in the azathioprine era of immunosuppression.

  17. The mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist eplerenone reduces renal interstitial fibrosis after long-term cyclosporine treatment in rat: antagonizing cyclosporine nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic cyclosporine-(CsA)-mediated loss of kidney function is a major clinical problem in organ transplantation. We hypothesized that the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist eplerenone (EPL) prevents chronic CsA-induced renal interstitial volume increase, tubule loss, and functional impairment in a rat model. Methods Sprague–Dawley rats received CsA alone (15 mg/kg/d p.o.), CsA and EPL (approximately 100 mg/kg/day p.o.) or vehicle (control) for 12 weeks. At 11 weeks, chronic indwelling arterial and venous catheters were implanted for continuous measurements of arterial blood pressure (BP) and GFR (inulin clearance) in conscious, freely moving animals. Plasma was sampled for analysis and kidney tissue was fixed for quantitative stereological analyses. Results Compared to controls, CsA-treatment reduced relative tubular volume (0.73±0.03 vs. 0.85±0.01, p<0.05) and increased relative interstitial volume (0.080±0.004 vs. 0.045±0.003, p<0.05); EPL attenuated these changes (0.82±0.02, p<0.05, and 0.060±0.006, p<0.05, respectively). CsA-treated rats had more sclerotic glomeruli and a higher degree of vascular depositions in arterioles; both were significantly reduced in CsA+EPL-treated animals. CsA increased BP and reduced body weight gain and GFR. In CsA+EPL rats, weight gain, GFR and BP at rest (daytime) were normalized; however, BP during activity (night) remained elevated. Plasma sodium and potassium concentrations, kidney-to-body weight ratios and CsA whole blood concentration were similar in CsA and CsA+EPL rats. Conclusions It is concluded that in the chronic cyclosporine rat nephropathy model, EPL reduces renal tissue injury, hypofiltration, hypertension, and growth impairment. MR antagonists should be tested for their renoprotective potential in patients treated with calcineurin inhibitors. PMID:23425330

  18. Effect of cyclosporine, total lymphoid irradiation, and cobra venom factor on hyperacute rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtle, S.J.; Halperin, E.C.; Murphy, C.E.; Saad, T.; Abernethy, K.; Miller, D.; Bollinger, R.R.

    1985-09-01

    Transplantation into sensitized recipients is contraindicated due to the potential for hyperacute rejection. In order to study the mechanism of hyperacute rejection and the role of immunosuppression in the face of presensitization, we evaluated the effect of total lymphoid irradiation, cyclosporine, and cobra venom factor, alone and in combination, on hyperacute rejection of heterotopic rat heart allografts. Lewis rats were sensitized to strongly RT-1-incompatible ACI rats by three successive skin grafts. Heart allografts were then performed, and survived for a mean period of 15.7 +/- 7.4 hours. Neither preoperative treatment of hypersensitized rats with total lymphoid irradiation alone nor with cyclosporine (5 mg/kg/day) resulted in a prolongation of survival (20.4 +/- 16.6 hours and 35.6 +/- 6.2 hours, respectively). However, complement depletion using cobra venom factor significantly prolonged mean graft survival time to 114.4 +/- 31.0 hours (p less than 0.05). Cyclosporine (10 mg/kg/day) also significantly prolonged survival to 149 +/- 29 hours (p less than 0.01), but did not lower the antibody or complement levels. The addition of total lymphoid irradiation or cyclosporine to treatment with cobra venom factor did not result in longer survival than cobra venom factor alone. In conclusion, cobra venom factor and cyclosporine delay but do not prevent hyperacute rejection, while total lymphoid irradiation has no observable effect on hyperacute rejection.

  19. Bromocriptine and low dose cyclosporine in the treatment of experimental autoimmune uveitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Palestine, A G; Muellenberg-Coulombre, C G; Kim, M K; Gelato, M C; Nussenblatt, R B

    1987-01-01

    The immunologic effects of bromocriptine and low dose cyclosporine on experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced in Lewis rats by S-antigen immunization were studied. Rats treated with a sub-optimal dose (low dose) of cyclosporine (2 mg/kg per d), bromocriptine (1.8 mg/kg per d), or both drugs were compared with untreated rats in regard to the development of EAU, lymphocyte proliferative responses, and anti-S-antigen serum antibodies. Bromocriptine alone decreased the incidence of EAU only in female rats (P less than 0.01), did not effect the lymphocyte proliferative response, but did significantly decrease antibody titers in both males (P less than 0.004) and females (P less than 0.0005). Low dose cyclosporine also partially decreased the incidence of EAU in female rats, but did not decrease antibody titers or lymphocyte proliferative responses. Bromocriptine plus low-dose cyclosporine led to more marked decreases in the incidence of EAU and anti-S-antigen antibody titers as well as in the lymphocyte proliferative assay (P less than 0.01 for males, P less than 0.0005 for females). This study suggests that bromocriptine can enhance the immunosuppression of low dose cyclosporine. PMID:3494043

  20. Accuracy of cyclosporin measurements made in capillary blood samples obtained by skin puncture.

    PubMed

    Merton, G; Jones, K; Lee, M; Johnston, A; Holt, D W

    2000-10-01

    International consensus guidelines suggest that cyclosporin should be measured in whole blood. In some instances it may be advantageous to collect capillary blood, by a finger or ear prick method. However, drug concentrations in skin-puncture blood may not necessarily correlate with those measured in venous blood. This study compared cyclosporin concentrations in blood collected from the fingertip or earlobe with blood collected by standard venipuncture. Patient preference for each of the blood collection methods was also assessed. Specimens were obtained from organ transplant patients receiving cyclosporin, using each of the three methods: venipuncture, finger prick, and earlobe prick. The samples were assayed using a specific radioimmunoassay and the results were compared. In the 102 sets of samples collected, the mean difference (+/- standard deviation) in cyclosporin concentration between finger prick and venipuncture and ear prick and venipuncture was 2.6% (+/- 9.5%) and 2.7% (+/- 12.1%), respectively, while the comparable median (IQR) differences were 1.9% (-3.4% to +6.6%) and -1.1% (-2.8% to +7.2%), respectively. A high degree of correlation was observed between finger prick and venipuncture or ear prick and venipuncture or ear prick and finger prick (r2 > 0.86). Of the three methods of blood collection, finger prick was the patients' preferred method (P < 0.01). These data suggest that capillary blood collected by skin puncture is suitable for use in cyclosporin blood monitoring and acceptable to patients.

  1. Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) successfully treated with low-dose cyclosporine.

    PubMed Central

    Herr, H.; Koh, J. K.

    2001-01-01

    Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells'syndrome) is an uncommon skin disorder. We report two adult male patients who had recurrent erythematous plaques and a nodular lesion on the abdomen. The histopathologic feature of their skin biopsies similarly indicated a marked infiltrate of eosinophils in the dermis with the fashion of "flame figures". One of the patients demonstrated blood eosinophilia. Given the clinicohistological findings, the patients fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of eosinophilic cellulitis. The skin lesions remained refractory to medications such as corticosteroids, sulfones, antihistamines, and minocycline. Considering the beneficial effect of cyclosporine in the treatment of eosinophilia-associated dermatoses, we speculated that eosinophilic cellulitis might respond to cyclosporine therapy. Thus, each of the two patients was given cyclosporine (microemulsion formulation) at a daily dose of 1.25 or 2.5 mg/kg, i.e., 100 or 200 mg, respectively. Complete remission of the skin eruptions was obtained in both patients during a 3- or 4-week period of treatment. No side effects were observed. Neither of the patients experienced relapse of the disease at least over 10 months after the discontinuation of the cyclosporine therapy. We suggest that administration of low-dose cyclosporine be a safe and useful therapeutic option in patients with eosinophilic cellulitis. PMID:11641541

  2. The kinetics of cyclosporine and its metabolites in bone marrow transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Schwinghammer, T L; Przepiorka, D; Venkataramanan, R; Wang, C P; Burckart, G J; Rosenfeld, C S; Shadduck, R K

    1991-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine (CsA) and the time course of CsA metabolites were studied in five bone marrow transplant patients after intravenous (i.v.) administration on two separate occasions and once after oral CsA administration. 2. Cyclosporine and cyclosporine metabolites were measured in whole blood by h.p.l.c. 3. Cyclosporine clearance after i.v. administration decreased from 3.9 +/- 1.7 ml min-1 kg-1 to 2.0 +/- 0.6 ml min-1 kg-1 after 14 days of treatment. The mean +/- s.d. absolute oral bioavailability of cyclosporine was 17 +/- 11%. 4. Hydroxylated CsA (M-17) was the major metabolite in blood. There were no significant differences in the mean metabolite/CsA AUC ratios between the first and second i.v. studies. 5. After oral administration, the metabolite to CsA AUC ratios were higher for most metabolites compared to those observed in the second i.v. study, suggesting a contribution of intestinal metabolism to the clearance of CsA. PMID:1777368

  3. A 16 Month Survey of Cyclosporine Utilization Evaluation in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli Ardakani, Maria; Tafazoli, Ali; Mehdizadeh, Mahshid; Hajifathali, Abbas; Dadashzadeh, Simin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a life threatening reaction in the stem cell transplantation process. Nowadays Cyclosporine is the most commonly utilized agent for GVHD prophylaxis and it has a major role in successful transplantation. Cyclosporine has been applied for many years in this field but it could be stated that currently no general consensus is available for its optimal method of administration. Conditions related to cyclosporine administration and possible related adverse reactions observed closely in our patients with the aim of constructing a comprehensive practice guideline in the future. Patients and Methods: Allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients who have been taking cyclosporine were monitored during and after their hospitalization while recording all observations on predefined questionnaires on the basis of periodic clinical and laboratory examinations for a 16 month period. Results: Mean recorded duration of infusions was 1.44 ± 0.68 h and by twice daily administration, means intravenous and oral dose was 101.85 ± 22.03 mg and 219.28 ± 63.9 mg, respectively. A mean CsA trough level after about 12 h of specified unique doses was 223 ± 65 ng/mL. We found hypertension, nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in about 14, 20, 48, and 94 percent of patients. Conclusions: This study proposed that permanent guidance of healthcare team according to a fixed and standard method of cyclosporine administration routine with using efficient facilities and protocols would be helpful considerably for an optimal pharmacotherapy. PMID:27610174

  4. Feasibility of early tapering of cyclosporine following reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation for advanced hematologic or solid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hori, Akiko; Kami, Masahiro; Ohnishi, Mutsuko; Murashige, Naoko; Kojima, Rie; Takaue, Yoichi

    2005-07-01

    Although some researchers have reported that early tapering of cyclosporine is feasible and beneficial to augment graft-versus-leukemia effects after conventional stem-cell transplantation, there is little information on the feasibility of this strategy following reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST). We summarized outcomes of 17 patients who underwent early tapering of cyclosporine following RIST from HLA-identical siblings.

  5. Identification of Spongionella compounds as cyclosporine A mimics.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jon Andoni; Alfonso, Amparo; Leirós, Marta; Alonso, Eva; Rateb, Mostafa E; Jaspars, Marcel; Houssen, Wael E; Ebel, Rainer; Tabudravu, J; Botana, Luís M

    2016-05-01

    Marine sponges are found to be a wide source of bioactive compounds with different effects such as anti-inflammatory or anticancer actions among others. Cyclophilin A (Cyp A) is a target protein implicated in the mechanism of action of immunosuppressive compounds such as Cyclosporine A (CsA). In the present paper we studied the binding between 4 Spongionella compounds (Gracilins H, A, L and Tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1) and Cyp A immobilized over a CM5 sensor chip. Thus, we found that Spongionella compounds showed to have similar binding affinities than CsA with dissociation equilibrium constant in the range. Next, the effect of these Spongionella isolated compounds was tested over calcineurin phosphatase activity. The same than CsA, Gracilin H, A and Tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1 were able to inhibit phosphatase activity once the complex between Cyp A-CsA/Spongionella compounds was formed. The ability to avoid the dephosphorylation of NFATc1 was also checked in human T cells isolated from peripheral blood. First, cells were pre-treated with Spongionella compounds or CsA following by Concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation. In these conditions nuclear NFATc1 levels were diminished either by CsA or Gracilin A, L, and Tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1 treatment. Moreover, as happens with CsA due to the inhibition of NFATc1, Interleukine-2 (IL-2) released to the culture medium was significantly decreased with all Spongionella compounds. Results conclude that, Spongionella derivatives preserve T lymphocytes from activation modulating the same pathway than CsA. Thus, this mechanism of action suggests that these compounds could be interesting candidates in drug development as immunosuppressive or anti-inflammatory drugs.

  6. Bioequivalence of a new cyclosporine a formulation to Neoral.

    PubMed

    David-Neto, Elias; Kakehashi, Erica; Alves, Cristiane Feres; Pereira, Lilian M; de Castro, Maria Cristina R; de Mattos, Renata Maciel; Sumita, Nairo Massakazu; Romano, Paschoalina; Mendes, Maria Elizabete; Nahas, William Carlos; Ianhez, Luiz Estevam

    2004-02-01

    New cyclosporine A (CsA) formulations must prove their bioequivalence to Neoral, the reference CsA formulation, to allow free prescription for the patients. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a new CsA formulation (Zinograf-ME), produced by Strides-Arcolab, to Neoral and to demonstrate their interchangeability in stable renal transplant recipients. Twelve-hour PK studies were obtained from 18 (13 M/5 F) adult patients (mean age 44.7 +/- 12 years). They received their renal allografts from 13 cadaver and 5 living donors. Before enrollment, all patients were receiving a third generic CsA for a mean of 48 months. Nine patients were also under azathioprine and 9 under mycophenolate mofetil; 17 received prednisone. A single oral dose of either Zinograf or Neoral was administered. The first PK study was performed with one formulation, and 1 week later, a second PK was done with the other formulation. During the washout period, patients continued taking the third CsA formulation. The drug substitution was done milligram-for-milligram. The CsA whole-blood level was measured by TDx immunoassay. Mean +/- SD of area under the curve (AUC), maximum concentration (C(max)), and concentration at the second hour (C2) of Zinograf were not statistically different from those with Neoral (4019 +/- 1466 vs 3971 +/- 1325 ng x h/mL, 998 +/- 376 vs 1021 +/- 356 ng/mL, and 707 +/- 254 vs 734 +/- 229 ng/mL, respectively). In the same way, the Zinograf 90% confidence interval for either C(max) (-123, +77 ng/mL) or AUC (-214, +311 ng.mL/h) were within the Neoral bioequivalence interval for the same parameters (+/-204 ng/mL and +/-794 ng x mL/h, respectively). These data demonstrate that the ZinografME CsA formulation is bioequivalent to Neoral.

  7. Cyclosporin A Disrupts Notch Signaling and Vascular Lumen Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Raghav; Botros, Mark A.; Nacev, Benjamin A.; Albig, Allan R.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CSA) suppresses immune function by blocking the cyclophilin A and calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathways. In addition to immunosuppression, CSA has also been shown to have a wide range of effects in the cardiovascular system including disruption of heart valve development, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and angiogenesis inhibition. Circumstantial evidence has suggested that CSA might control Notch signaling which is also a potent regulator of cardiovascular function. Therefore, the goal of this project was to determine if CSA controls Notch and to dissect the molecular mechanism(s) by which CSA impacts cardiovascular homeostasis. We found that CSA blocked JAG1, but not Dll4 mediated Notch1 NICD cleavage in transfected 293T cells and decreased Notch signaling in zebrafish embryos. CSA suppression of Notch was linked to cyclophilin A but not calcineurin/NFAT inhibition since N-MeVal-4-CsA but not FK506 decreased Notch1 NICD cleavage. To examine the effect of CSA on vascular development and function, double transgenic Fli1-GFP/Gata1-RFP zebrafish embryos were treated with CSA and monitored for vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and overall cardiovascular function. Vascular patterning was not obviously impacted by CSA treatment and contrary to the anti-angiogenic activity ascribed to CSA, angiogenic sprouting of ISV vessels was normal in CSA treated embryos. Most strikingly, CSA treated embryos exhibited a progressive decline in blood flow that was associated with eventual collapse of vascular luminal structures. Vascular collapse in zebrafish embryos was partially rescued by global Notch inhibition with DAPT suggesting that disruption of normal Notch signaling by CSA may be linked to vascular collapse. However, multiple signaling pathways likely cause the vascular collapse phenotype since both cyclophilin A and calcineurin/NFAT were required for normal vascular function. Collectively, these results show that CSA is a novel inhibitor of Notch signaling and

  8. Modification of c and n sources for enhanced production of cyclosporin 'a' by Aspergillus Terreus.

    PubMed

    Tanseer, Sundas; Anjum, Tehmina

    2011-10-01

    Most of the studies regarding cyclosporin 'A' production through fungi concentrate around Tolypocladium inflatum. This is mainly due to lower reported production of this drug in other fungi. The present study was therefore conducted to explore indigenous isolates of Aspergillus terreus for synthesis of this drug and defining a production medium for obtaining high yield of cyclosporin 'A'. For this purpose carbon and nitrogen sources were optimized for the selected best strain of A. terreus. Overall results depicted that the best cyclosporin 'A' yield from selected Aspergillus terreus (FCBP58) could be obtained by using production medium containing glucose 10% as carbon source and peptone 0.5% as nitrogen source. This modification in production medium enhanced drug synthesis by selected fungi significantly. The production capabilities when compared with biomass of fungi there was found no relationship between the two confirming that the medium modification increased overall drug synthesis powers of the fungi.

  9. Accurate diagnosis of renal transplant rejection by indium-111 platelet imaging despite postoperative cyclosporin therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.D.; Adams, M.B.; Kauffman, H.M.; Trembath, L.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Tisdale, P.L.; Rao, S.A.; Hellman, R.S.; Isitman, A.T.

    1988-08-01

    Previous reports indicate that In-111 platelet scintigraphy (IPS) is a reliable test for the early diagnosis of acute post-operative renal transplant rejection (TR). However, the recent introduction of cyclosporin for post-transplantation immunosuppression requires that the diagnostic efficacy of IPS once again be established. Therefore, a prospective IPS study of 73 post-operative renal transplant recipients was conducted. Fourty-nine patients received cyclosporin and 24 patients did not receive this drug. Between these two patient groups, there were no significant differences in the diagnostic sensitivities (0.86 vs 0.80) and specificities (0.93 vs 0.84) with which TR was identified. We conclude that during the first two weeks following renal transplantation the cyclosporin treatment regimen used at our institution does not limit the reliability of IPS as a test for TR.

  10. Anorexia nervosa in a pediatric renal transplant recipient and its reversal with cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Okechuku, Gyongyi; Boulos, Andrew K; Herman, Lettie; Upadhyay, Kiran

    2015-05-01

    We report a 16-yr-old female who developed AN within a month after renal transplantation and its resolution after switching from tacrolimus to cyclosporine. Her initial maintenance immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and steroid. She had 7 kg weight loss within the first month of transplant with subsequent 10, 12, 17, and 19 kg loss after three, five, seven, and nine months of transplant, respectively. Besides weight loss and disturbances in body image, the patient developed alopecia, bradycardia, and persistent secondary amenorrhea. Upon switching to cyclosporine from tacrolimus nine months after transplant, she started regaining weight with 5 kg gain within two months and 10 kg after four months. She restarted her menstrual cycle, alopecia and bradycardia resolved, and her body image disturbance improved. Here, we describe a very unusual neuropsychiatric side effect of tacrolimus and its resolution with another calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporine, in an adolescent renal transplant recipient.

  11. Effect of cyclosporin A treatment on the production of antibody in insulin-dependent (type I) diabetic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Boitard, C; Feutren, G; Castano, L; Debray-Sachs, M; Assan, R; Hors, J; Bach, J F

    1987-01-01

    Anti-islet cell and anti-insulin antibody production was studies over a 12-mo period in 82 recently diagnosed diabetics randomly receiving either cyclosporin or placebo. Cyclosporin had only minimal effects on the production of anti-islet cell antibodies whether directed to islet cytoplasmic (immunofluorescence) or membrane (cytotoxicity assay) antigens even in patients undergoing remission. These data suggest that these antibodies do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of the disease particularly since their (irregular) presence is not predictive of the clinical response to cyclosporin. Conversely, cyclosporin completely suppressed the synthesis of antibodies elicited by exogenous insulin irrespective of the insulin doses received, and decreased the autoantibody production against thyroid antigens, indicating that cyclosporin has variable effects on antibody production against various antigens. PMID:3316278

  12. Reversible fibroadenomatous mammary hyperplasia in male and female New Zealand white rabbits associated with cyclosporine A administration.

    PubMed

    Krimer, P M; Harvey, S B; Blas-Machado, U; Lauderdale, J D; Moore, P A

    2009-11-01

    All male and female New Zealand white rabbits in a limbal cell graft study developed marked generalized mammary gland hypertrophy. Postprocedural medications included ophthalmic 0.1% dexamethasone, ophthalmic 0.5% cyclosporine, and subcutaneous cyclosporine A. Cytologic examination revealed epithelial clusters with minimal malignant criteria. On histologic evaluation, there was diffuse glandular hyperplasia with mild cellular atypia and ductal ectasia separated by abundant hypercellular fibrous stroma, consistent with fibroadenomatous mammary gland hyperplasia. The hyperplasia resolved within 2 weeks of cessation of cyclosporine, and at necropsy identifiable mammary masses were not found. Very little has been reported about the use of cyclosporine in laboratory rabbits and its association with development of mammary gland hyperplasia. This is the first report in which administration of cyclosporine to male and female rabbits at a dose as low as 5 mg/kg/day induced benign fibroadenomatous mammary gland hyperplasia. This change regressed after cessation of the drug.

  13. Conversion from tacrolimus to cyclosporine--a based immunosuppression following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doria, Cataldo; Jain, Ashok Kumar B; Scott, Victor L; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Marino, Ignazio R; Doyle, Howard R; Fung, John J

    2003-06-01

    We examined the frequency, reasons and outcome after conversion from Tacrolimus to Cyclosporine A. From August 1989 to December 1992, 1000 consecutive liver transplantation patients were studied, which included 834 adults (age>18 yr.) and 166 children with mean follow-up of 77 months (range 56 to 96). A prospectively populated electronic database was queried to identify patients that underwent conversion, the clinical indication and outcomes. Thirty-seven out of 834 adult recipients (4.43%), mean age of 48.4+/-12.9 years, 19 male (51.35%) and 18 females (48.64%) required conversion from Tacrolimus to Cyclosporine A baseline immunosuppressive therapy. No pediatric patient required conversion. The mean time interval from liver transplantation to Cyclosporine A conversion was 443.45+/-441.44 days (range 22 to 1641). The clinical indications for conversion included: 20 neurological (54%), 6 gastrointestinal (16%), 5 hematological (14%), and 6 other (16%) scenarios. Seven of the 37 patients (18.9%) died. The causes of death were multi-organ failure (2), sepsis (2), pancreatitis (1), hepatic failure due to relapse of ethanol abuse (1), and unknown cause (1). Nine out of 37 patients (24.32%) had to be reconverted to Tacrolimus (mean 282.22+/-499.79 days; range 15 to 1583 day with a median of 135) after institution of Cyclosporine A; none showed recurrence of the original symptoms. The reasons for these re-conversions were acute cellular rejection (44%, n=4), chronic rejection (11%, n=1), increased hepatic enzymes (33%, n=3) and progressively worsening neurological symptoms (11%, n=1). The frequency of conversion from Tacrolimus to Cyclosporine A was 4.43%. Conversion is safe and efficacious if done in a controlled setting. Additionally, re-conversion to Tacrolimus for lack of efficacy of Cyclosporine A did not appear to be associated with a recurrence of the condition that caused the initial switch.

  14. Cyclosporine A or intravenous cyclophosphamide for lupus nephritis: the Cyclofa-Lune study.

    PubMed

    Zavada, J; Pesickova, Ss; Rysava, R; Olejarova, M; Horák, P; Hrncír, Z; Rychlík, I; Havrda, M; Vítova, J; Lukác, J; Rovensky, J; Tegzova, D; Böhmova, J; Zadrazil, J; Hána, J; Dostál, C; Tesar, V

    2010-10-01

    Intravenous cyclophosphamide is considered to be the standard of care for the treatment of proliferative lupus nephritis. However, its use is limited by potentially severe toxic effects. Cyclosporine A has been suggested to be an efficient and safe treatment alternative to cyclophosphamide. Forty patients with clinically active proliferative lupus nephritis were randomly assigned to one of two sequential induction and maintenance treatment regimens based either on cyclophosphamide or Cyclosporine A. The primary outcomes were remission (defined as normal urinary sediment, proteinuria <0.3 g/24 h, and stable s-creatinine) and response to therapy (defined as stable s-creatinine, 50% reduction in proteinuria, and either normalization of urinary sediment or significant improvement in C3) at the end of induction and maintenance phase. Secondary outcomes were incidence of adverse events, and relapse-free survival. At the end of the induction phase, 24% of the 21 patients treated by cyclophosphamide achieved remission, and 52% achieved response, as compared with 26% and 43%, respectively of the 19 patients treated by the Cyclosporine A. At the end of the maintenance phase, 14% of patients in cyclophosphamide group, and 37% in Cyclosporine A group had remission, and 38% and 58% respectively response. Treatment with Cyclosporine A was associated with transient increase in blood pressure and reversible decrease in glomerular filtration rate. There was no significant difference in median relapse-free survival. In conclusion, Cyclosporine A was as effective as cyclophosphamide in the trial of sequential induction and maintenance treatment in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis and preserved renal function.(ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00976300)

  15. Low-dose allopurinol plus azathioprine/cyclosporin/prednisolone, a novel immunosuppressive regimen.

    PubMed

    Chocair, P; Duley, J; Simmonds, H A; Cameron, J S; Ianhez, L; Arap, S; Sabbaga, E

    1993-07-10

    Early rejection can still complicate renal transplantation even with cyclosporin. We added low-dose allopurinol (25 mg on alternative days) to "triple" immunosuppression with cyclosporin, prednisolone, and azathioprine for twelve recipients of cadaver renal grafts. The controls were fifteen patients on triple therapy alone. Only one rejection episode occurred among the allopurinol-treated patients, whereas eleven controls had rejections (seven with more than one episode). Allopurinol may be toxic when combined with azathioprine, yet the bone marrow tolerated the new regimen well. As expected, reduction of the azathioprine dose was necessary in the treated group.

  16. An underlying role for hepatobiliary dysfunction in cyclosporine A nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Aleo, Michael D.

    2008-07-01

    Renal-derived cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLT), such as leukotrienes C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) and D{sub 4} (LTD{sub 4}) are thought to mediate acute and chronic cyclosporine A (CSA) nephrotoxicity. However, whole-body cysLT elimination is regulated primarily by hepatobiliary excretion. Since CSA is known to alter hepatobiliary function, the effects of CSA on whole-body cysLT elimination were investigated in vivo, with respect to hepatobiliary and renal function. Male rats were anesthetized and cannulated (jugular vein, bile duct, and urinary bladder). A tracer dose of tritiated LTC{sub 4} ({sup 3}H-LTC{sub 4}) was administered systemically (i.v.) immediately following vehicle and then 90 min later after vehicle or CSA. In vehicle/vehicle controls, hepatobiliary {sup 3}H-cysLT elimination predominated over renal elimination without altering glomerular filtration rate (GFR), bile flow, and urine production. {sup 3}H-cysLT elimination kinetics were comparable between each 90 min collection period. In vehicle/CSA-treated rats, an acutely nephrotoxic dose of CSA (20 mg/kg, i.v.) reduced urine flow 74 {+-} 9% and caused a transient reduction in GFR, while total bile flow decreased 40 {+-} 13%. Hepatobiliary and renal {sup 3}H-cysLT elimination was also impaired 59 {+-} 5 and 61 {+-} 18%, respectively. In contrast, a non-nephrotoxic dose (2 mg/kg i.v.) increased renal {sup 3}H-cysLT elimination due to impaired hepatobiliary elimination without affecting GFR, bile flow or urine production. Both doses caused {sup 3}H-cysLT retention in hepatic and renal tissue. These findings demonstrate that CSA alters whole-body handling of cysLT by disrupting hepatobiliary cysLT elimination. This disruption leads to increased renal exposure to systemically derived cysLT and renal cysLT tissue retention. Renal exposure to and accumulation of systemically derived cysLT products may be underlying factors in CSA nephrotoxicity.

  17. Randomized trial of tacrolimus versus cyclosporin microemulsion in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Trompeter, Richard; Filler, Guido; Webb, Nicholas J A; Watson, Alan R; Milford, David V; Tyden, Gunnar; Grenda, Ryszard; Janda, Jan; Hughes, David; Ehrich, Jochen H H; Klare, Bernd; Zacchello, Graziella; Bjorn Brekke, Inge; McGraw, Mary; Perner, Ferenc; Ghio, Lucian; Balzar, Egon; Friman, Styrbjörn; Gusmano, Rosanna; Stolpe, Jochen

    2002-03-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the efficacy and safety of tacrolimus (Tac) with the microemulsion formulation of cyclosporin (CyA) in children undergoing renal transplantation. A 6-month, randomized, prospective, open, parallel group study with an open extension phase was conducted in 18 centers from nine European countries. In total, 196 pediatric patients (<18 years) were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either Tac ( n=103) or CyA microemulsion ( n=93) administered concomitantly with azathioprine and corticosteroids. The primary endpoint was incidence and time to first acute rejection. Baseline characteristics were comparable between treatment groups. Tac therapy resulted in a significantly lower incidence of acute rejection (36.9%) compared with CyA therapy (59.1%) ( P=0.003). The incidence of corticosteroid-resistant rejection was also significantly lower in the Tac group compared with the CyA group (7.8% vs. 25.8%, P=0.001). The differences were also significant for biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (16.5% vs. 39.8%, P<0.001). At 1 year, patient survival was similar (96.1% vs. 96.6%), while 10 grafts were lost in the Tac group compared with 17 graft losses in the CyA group ( P=0.06). At 1 year, mean glomerular filtration rate (Schwartz estimate) was significantly higher in the Tac group (62+/-20 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), n=84) than in the CyA group (56+/-21 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), n=74, P=0.03). The most frequent adverse events during the first 6 months were hypertension (68.9% vs. 61.3%), hypomagnesemia (34.0% vs. 12.9%, P=0.001), and urinary tract infection (29.1% vs. 33.3%). Statistically significant differences ( P<0.05) were observed for diarrhea (13.6% vs. 3.2%), hypertrichosis (0.0% vs. 7.5%), flu syndrome (0.0% vs. 5.4%), and gum hyperplasia (0.0% vs. 5.4%). In previously non-diabetic children, the incidence of long-term (>30 days) insulin use was 3.0% (Tac) and 2.2% (CyA). Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease was observed in 1 patient in the

  18. Cyclosporin Therapeutic Drug Monitoring - an Established Service Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Raymond G

    2003-01-01

    Despite the routine application of therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporin (CsA) for two decades, there remain significant analytical issues. In addition, new developments have arisen in the delivery of this laboratory service as well as alternative clinical strategies for delivering optimal benefit to organ transplant recipients. Sample collection strategies are evolving away from the traditional pre-dose/trough (C0) sample in favour of estimates of the absorption phase in the first 4–6 hours after the oral dose of CsA. This is based on the recognition of the relatively poor relationship between C0 and CsA exposure indices, such as area under the blood CsA concentration versus time curve (AUC), especially in the first few hours after the dose. By collecting serial blood samples over this limited period (4hr after the dose) and estimating the AUC0-4, one can gain insight into how well CsA has been absorbed for each transplant recipient, and individualise CsA dosage. However, a recent survey of Australasian CsA laboratories revealed that such AUC0-4 sampling strategies in the early post-dose period were poorly accepted in clinics across Australasia. The alternative that has proven to be more clinically acceptable is the use of a single sample 2-hours after the dose (C2). The C2 concentration has been demonstrated (particularly in kidney and liver transplant recipients) as correlating well with AUC0-4, allowing it to be used as a surrogate index of CsA absorption and exposure. The laboratory survey also showed several areas of concern in the analytical sphere. The major one is that the majority of laboratories employ the two immunoassays that deliver the least specific result on C0 samples within the range of monoclonal methods, leading to high variability and clinically significant errors with patient samples. Laboratories have also adopted a range of dilution protocols for the significantly higher C2 concentrations, and this has proved a source of significant

  19. Fresh vein allograft survival in dogs after cyclosporine treatment.

    PubMed

    Mingoli, A; Edwards, J D; Feldhaus, R J; Hunter, W J; Naspetti, R; Cavallari, N; Sapienza, P; Kretchmar, D H; Cavallaro, A

    1996-04-01

    Synthetic grafts are widely used for peripheral arterial reconstructions when autologous veins are not available, but their results have not been satisfactory. Venous allograft may be used as an alternative to synthetic prostheses. The aim of the study was to explore the immunosuppressive efficacy of Cyclosporine A (CyA) as a means of preventing venous allograft failures and rejection. We utilized 56 mongrel dogs. Immunological incompatibility was checked with the skin graft method. Donor inferior vena cava was transplanted into the infrarenal abdominal aorta of recipient animals. One group (group 1, 10 dogs) served as a control and three groups received CyA treatment regimens. Group 2 (10 dogs) received postoperative oral CyA treatment for 30 days. Group 3 (12 dogs) received a vein graft pretreated with a CyA solution without postoperative immunosuppressive therapy. Group 4 (9 dogs) received a vein graft pretreated with a CyA solution and postoperative CyA treatment for 30 days. Allografts were examined at 30 days for patency, aneurysmal dilatation, gross structural changes, inflammatory response, and lymphocytic infiltration. Sex chromatine assessment determined the origin (donor or recipient) of the endothelial cells. The allografts from groups 1 and 3 showed significant aneurysmal dilatation and perivenous inflammation when compared to dogs treated with oral CyA therapy (P < 0.0002). Moreover allografts treated with CyA therapy had a better-developed venous neointima (P < 0.009) with less fibrin (P < 0.02) and thinner medial (P < 0.0009) with less fibrin (P < 0.02), and thinner medial (P < 0.0009) and adventitial layers (P < 0.02). No significant differences were observed in neointimal thickness among the four groups. Lymphocytic infiltration was greater in the group of animals who did not receive oral CyA therapy (P < 0.0004). Barr bodies status showed significant differences between oral CyA treated groups and nontreated groups (P < 0.0003). Oral CyA therapy

  20. Comparative pharmacokinetic profile of cyclosporine (CsA) with a decapeptide and a linear analogue.

    PubMed

    Price, David A; Eng, Heather; Farley, Kathleen A; Goetz, Gilles H; Huang, Yong; Jiao, Zhaodong; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Kablaoui, Natasha M; Khunte, Bhagyashree; Liras, Spiros; Limberakis, Chris; Mathiowetz, Alan M; Ruggeri, Roger B; Quan, Jun-Min; Yang, Zhen

    2017-03-07

    The synthesis and in vivo pharmacokinetic profile of an analogue of cyclosporine is disclosed. An acyclic congener was also profiled in in vitro assays to compare cell permeability. The compounds possess similar calculated and measured molecular descriptors however have different behaviors in an RRCK assay to assess cell permeability.

  1. Cyclosporine versus tacrolimus: cost-effectiveness analysis for renal transplantation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guerra Júnior, Augusto Afonso; Silva, Grazielle Dias; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal; Costa, Juliana de Oliveira; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cost-effectiveness of treatment regimens with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, five years after renal transplantation. METHODS This cost-effectiveness analysis was based on historical cohort data obtained between 2000 and 2004 and involved 2,022 patients treated with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, matched 1:1 for gender, age, and type and year of transplantation. Graft survival and the direct costs of medical care obtained from the National Health System (SUS) databases were used as outcome results. RESULTS Most of the patients were women, with a mean age of 36.6 years. The most frequent diagnosis of chronic renal failure was glomerulonephritis/nephritis (27.7%). In five years, the tacrolimus group had an average life expectancy gain of 3.96 years at an annual cost of R$78,360.57 compared with the cyclosporine group with a gain of 4.05 years and an annual cost of R$61,350.44. CONCLUSIONS After matching, the study indicated better survival of patients treated with regimens using tacrolimus. Moreover, regimens containing cyclosporine were more cost-effective [corrected].

  2. Urticarial Dermatitis: Clinical Characteristics of Itch and Therapeutic Response to Cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Lim, Kyung-Min; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum

    2017-01-01

    Background Urticarial dermatitis, which is characterised by persistent wheals with eczematous papules and plaques, is frequently misdiagnosed and difficult to treat. Patients commonly experience intolerable pruritus which may greatly affect their quality of life. Objective The objective of this study is to characterize the clinical patterns of pruritus in patients with urticarial dermatitis and to determine the effectiveness of cyclosporine treatment. Methods This prospective study included 50 histopathologically confirmed patients with urticarial dermatitis. A face-to-face structured questionnaire was given to all patients, and they were treated with low-dose cyclosporine (1~3 mg/kg/d) for at least 2 weeks. Results The majority of patients (80.0%) had moderate to severe pruritus. Most patients experienced exacerbation of the itch in the evening (74.0%), with the extremities (upper, 86.0%; lower, 94.0%) being the most commonly involved sites. Due to severe pruritus, patients complained about reduced social contact, quality of life and difficulties in falling asleep et al. Cyclosporine significantly reduced the mean itch score and extent of erythema, and improved interference with daily activities and sleep. Conclusion Our study highlights the detailed description and characteristics of pruritus in patients with urticarial dermatitis. And we recommend alternative and effective therapeutic option of low-dose cyclosporine. PMID:28392640

  3. Cyclosporine versus tacrolimus: cost-effectiveness analysis for renal transplantation in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Silva, Grazielle Dias; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal; Costa, Juliana de Oliveira; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cost-effectiveness of treatment regimens with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, five years after renal transplantation. METHODS This cost-effectiveness analysis was based on historical cohort data obtained between 2000 and 2004 and involved 2,022 patients treated with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, matched 1:1 for gender, age, and type and year of transplantation. Graft survival and the direct costs of medical care obtained from the National Health System (SUS) databases were used as outcome results. RESULTS Most of the patients were women, with a mean age of 36.6 years. The most frequent diagnosis of chronic renal failure was glomerulonephritis/nephritis (27.7%). In five years, the tacrolimus group had an average life expectancy gain of 3.96 years at an annual cost of R$78,360.57 compared with the cyclosporine group with a gain of 4.05 years and an annual cost of R$61,350.44. CONCLUSIONS After matching, the study indicated better survival of patients treated with regimens using tacrolimus. However, regimens containing cyclosporine were more cost-effective. PMID:25741648

  4. Quality by design approach for understanding the critical quality attributes of cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ziyaur; Xu, Xiaoming; Katragadda, Usha; Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Yu, Lawrence; Khan, Mansoor A

    2014-03-03

    Restasis is an ophthalmic cyclosporine emulsion used for the treatment of dry eye syndrome. There are no generic products for this product, probably because of the limitations on establishing in vivo bioequivalence methods and lack of alternative in vitro bioequivalence testing methods. The present investigation was carried out to understand and identify the appropriate in vitro methods that can discriminate the effect of formulation and process variables on critical quality attributes (CQA) of cyclosporine microemulsion formulations having the same qualitative (Q1) and quantitative (Q2) composition as that of Restasis. Quality by design (QbD) approach was used to understand the effect of formulation and process variables on critical quality attributes (CQA) of cyclosporine microemulsion. The formulation variables chosen were mixing order method, phase volume ratio, and pH adjustment method, while the process variables were temperature of primary and raw emulsion formation, microfluidizer pressure, and number of pressure cycles. The responses selected were particle size, turbidity, zeta potential, viscosity, osmolality, surface tension, contact angle, pH, and drug diffusion. The selected independent variables showed statistically significant (p < 0.05) effect on droplet size, zeta potential, viscosity, turbidity, and osmolality. However, the surface tension, contact angle, pH, and drug diffusion were not significantly affected by independent variables. In summary, in vitro methods can detect formulation and manufacturing changes and would thus be important for quality control or sameness of cyclosporine ophthalmic products.

  5. Cyclosporine treatment of perianal gland adenoma concurrent with benign prostatic hyperplasia in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Ha-Jung; Lim, Chae-Young; Kim, Ju-Won; Lee, So-Young; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Jang, Jae-Im; Park, Hee-Myung

    2010-01-01

    A 13-year-old, intact male, mixed-breed dog was evaluated for multiple intradermal nodules around the anus. The nodules were diagnosed as perianal gland adenoma based on histopathologic examination. After therapy with cyclosporin A for 5 wk, the perianal masses were moderately shrunken. The dog’s condition has remained stable over 6 mo. PMID:21286331

  6. Topical cyclosporin as an alternative treatment for vision threatening blepharokeratoconjunctivitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Abdul-Salim; Taharin, Rohana; Embong, Zunaina

    2012-01-01

    Here, a case of vision threatening blepharokeratoconjunctivitis that responded well to topical cyclosporin is reported. A 9-year-old Malay girl with a history of bilateral blepharokeratoconjunctivitis was regularly treated with lid scrubbing using diluted baby shampoo, fusidic acid gel, and topical steroids as well as an intermittent course of oral doxycycline for the past year. She developed acute onset bilateral eye redness associated with poor vision in her right eye. Both eyes showed marked diffuse hyperemic conjunctiva with corneal vascularization. The presence of corneal vascularization obscured the visual axis in the right eye. The condition did not improve with regular intensive lid hygiene using diluted baby shampoo, fusidic acid gel, and topical steroids. She was started on topical cyclosporin A 0.5% every 6 hours. There was a dramatic regression of corneal vascularization after 3 days on topical cyclosporin, with marked improvement in visual acuity. This is a single case in which cyclosporin improved the status of the ocular surface. A large cohort study is required to justify its effectiveness in treating blepharokeratoconjunctivitis and to test its potential as an alternative immunosuppressive agent in comparison to conventional corticosteroids.

  7. Evidence for pre-hepatic metabolism of oral cyclosporine in children.

    PubMed Central

    Hoppu, K; Koskimies, O; Holmberg, C; Hirvisalo, E L

    1991-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine were investigated before renal transplantation in 20 children aged 1.1 to 16.8 years. Cyclosporine was given as a single oral dose (10 mg kg-1) or as a 4 h i.v. infusion (3 mg kg-1). 2. The blood drug concentration was measured by both specific and nonspecific monoclonal radioimmunoassays. 3. The mean oral availability of cyclosporine was 20.6% (range 10.8-34.1%). 4. The mean ratio of AUCs measured by nonspecific and specific r.i.a. was 1.96 (range 1.4-2.7) after oral administration and 1.43 (range 1.1-2.0) after i.v. administration. The mean difference between the ratios was 38.5% (P = 0.0001). The ratio of AUCnonspecific to AUCspecific was inversely related to blood drug clearance (r = 0.57; P = 0.009). 5. The findings are suggestive of presystemic, pre-hepatic metabolism of cyclosporine which could contribute to the low, and highly variable bioavailability of this drug. PMID:1958443

  8. Dose-response curve and optimal dosing regimen of cyclosporin A after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, P G; Rabchevsky, A G; Hicks, R R; Gibson, T R; Fletcher-Turner, A; Scheff, S W

    2000-01-01

    Acute neuropathology following experimental traumatic brain injury results in the rapid necrosis of cortical tissue at the site of injury. This primary injury is exacerbated in the ensuing hours and days via the progression of secondary injury mechanism(s) leading to significant neurological dysfunction. Recent evidence from our laboratory demonstrates that the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A significantly ameliorates cortical damage following traumatic brain injury. The present study extends the previous findings utilizing a unilateral controlled cortical impact model of traumatic brain injury in order to establish a dose-response curve and optimal dosing regimen of cyclosporin A. Following injury to adult rats, cyclosporin A was administrated at various dosages and the therapy was initiated at different times post-injury. In addition to examining the effect of cyclosporin A on the acute disruption of the blood-brain barrier following controlled cortical impact, we also assessed the efficacy of cyclosporin A to reduce tissue damage utilizing the fluid percussion model of traumatic brain injury. The findings demonstrate that the neuroprotection afforded by cyclosporin A is dose-dependent and that a therapeutic window exists up to 24h post-injury. Furthermore, the optimal cyclosporin dosage and regimen markedly reduces disruption of the blood-brain barrier acutely following a cortical contusion injury, and similarly affords significant neuroprotection following fluid percussion injury. These findings clearly suggest that the mechanisms responsible for tissue necrosis following traumatic brain injury are amenable to pharmacological intervention.

  9. Area under the curve monitoring of cyclosporine therapy: the early posttransplant period.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Kahan, B D

    1991-03-01

    The impact of a new monitoring strategy on whole blood concentrations of cyclosporine measured by a specific monoclonal radioimmunoassay was investigated in a group of 37 renal transplant patients. Before transplantation, the patients received a standard intravenous (i.v.) and oral (p.o.) test dose of cyclosporine to calculate their individual i.v. and p.o. starting dose rates to achieve a certain target steady-state cyclosporine concentration. After transplantation, the designated i.v. dose rate was continuously infused for 2 days, at which time the steady-state concentration was measured. Then, the designated oral dose for 24 h was administered while the infusion was continued at an unaltered rate. The oral absorption of cyclosporine was documented by blood samples over the following 8 h. If necessary, this overlap of i.v. and p.o. dosing was repeated until blood concentrations of cyclosporine rose at least 700 ng/ml over the steady-state concentration. By that time, the infusion was stopped and oral dosing continued. Individualized infusions led to steady-state concentrations within a range that did not exceed 1.1 times the median concentration of 472 ng/ml. Standard infusion rates in the past produced a much wider range of steady-state concentrations (9.6 times the median). Individualized infusions reached the target steady-state concentration with a significant positive bias of 17% (SEM = +/- 32%, range of -36 to +105%). Individualized oral doses reached the target average steady-state concentration (calculated by dividing the area under the concentration-time curve by the dosing interval) with an inferior precision (median = 2.6%, range of -54 to +130%) but without a positive or negative bias.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Clinical response to cyclosporin in chronic severe asthma is associated with reduction in serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor concentrations.

    PubMed

    Alexander, A G; Barnes, N C; Kay, A B; Corrigan, C J

    1995-04-01

    Activated T-lymphocytes play an important role in asthma pathogenesis and release soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R), which can be detected in the serum. In a recent randomized, cross-over trial we showed that cyclosporin, an inhibitor of T-lymphocyte activation, improved lung function in patients with chronic severe asthma. To investigate whether changes in serum sIL-2R concentration could be related to clinical response we prospectively compared serum sIL-2R concentrations in patients during cyclosporin and placebo treatment. Peripheral venous blood was obtained from 22 patients during the last 4 weeks of both the cyclosporin and placebo treatment periods and serum stored at -80 degrees C pending measurement of sIL-2R concentration by enzyme immunoassay. Soluble IL-2R was detected in all samples at a concentration range of 191-2,297 U.ml-1. Mean serum concentrations of sIL-2R were significantly lower on cyclosporin therapy (560 U.ml-1) as compared with placebo (676 U.ml-1). The decreases in serum sIL-2R concentrations associated with cyclosporin therapy in these patients correlated with the percentage increases in their morning peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) measurements on cyclosporin as compared with placebo. These data demonstrate that in patients with chronic severe asthma, cyclosporin therapy which results in clinical improvement is associated with a decrease in serum concentrations of sIL-2R. This is compatible with the hypothesis that cyclosporin ameliorates asthma, at least partly, by inhibition of T-lymphocyte activation.

  11. Morphometric and ultrastructural analysis of the effect of bromocriptine and cyclosporine on the vasospastic femoral artery of rats

    PubMed Central

    Tokmak, Mehmet; Başocak, Kahan; Canaz, Hüseyin; Canaz, Gökhan; İplikçioğlu, Celal

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm is the main causes of mortality and morbidity in patiens with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The arterial narrowing mechanism that develops after SAH is not yet fully understood but many studies showed that hypotension, neurogenic reflexes, clots in the subarachnoidal space, spasmogenic agents, humoral and celluler immunity play a role in the etiology. In this study we investigate the effects of Bromocriptine and Cyclosporine A in vasospasm secondary to SAH on rat femoral artery from ultrastructural and morphometric perspectives. 120 male Sprague-Dawley rats divided into 12 groups: Vasospasm (V), control (K), surgical control (CK) groups, vasospasm+Bromocriptine and/or Cyclosporine-A groups (VCyA, VBr, VBr+CyA), Bromocriptine and/or Cyclosporine-A control groups (CK, BK, Br+CyAK), Bromocriptine and/or Cyclosporine-A surgical control groups (BCK, CyCK, Br+CyACK). In order to create SAH model, 0, 1 cm3 blood injected into silastic sheath wrapped rat femoral artery. Bromocriptine (2 mg/kg/d) and Cyclosporine A (10 mg/kg/d) combinations applied to control, surgical control and vasospastic models. Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy used during this study. Statistical evaluation of the morphometric measurement data concerning vascular wall thickness and luminal cross-sectional areas of all groups were performed using Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon-signed rank, and Student-t tests. Cyclosporine A, whose effects in the prevention of vasospasm have been demonstrated in previous studies. In this study we discovered that Bromocriptine demonstrated strong effects similar to Cyclosporine-A. Bromocriptine and Cyclosporine A markedly prevent the development of chronic morphologic vasospasm following SAH. The combined use of both drugs does not change this preventive effect. PMID:26770311

  12. Cyclosporine A-Nanosuspension: Formulation, Characterization and In Vivo Comparison with a Marketed Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Nakarani, Mahendra; Patel, Priyal; Patel, Jayvadan; Patel, Pankaj; Murthy, Rayasa S. R.; Vaghani, Subhash S.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclosporine A-nanosuspensions were prepared using zirconium oxide beads as a milling media, Poloxamer 407 as a stabilizer and distilled water as an aqueous medium using the Pearl Milling technique. The optimized formulation was characterized in terms of particle size distribution, surface morphology, drug-surfactant interaction, drug content, saturation solubility, osmolarity, and stability. The nanoparticles consisting of Poloxamer-bound cyclosporin A with a mean diameter of 213 nm revealed a spherical shape and 5.69 fold increased saturation solubility as compared to the parent drug. The formulation was found to be iso-osmolar with blood and stable up to 3 months at 2–8°C. In-vivo studies were carried out in albino rats and the pharmacokinetic parameters were compared with a marketed formulation, which indicated better results of the prepared formulation than the marketed one. PMID:21179351

  13. Treatment of ligneous conjunctivitis with amniotic membrane transplantation and topical cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Tok, Ozlem Yalcin; Kocaoglu, Fatma Akbas; Tok, Levent; Burcu, Ayse; Ornek, Firdevs

    2012-01-01

    Ligneous conjunctivitis (LC) is a rare form of bilateral chronic recurrent disease in which thick membranes form on the palpebral conjunctiva and other mucosal sites. We report the clinical features and describe the management of two cases. Case 1 was an 8-month-old patient with bilateral membranous conjunctivitis. Case 2 was a 5-year-old patient with unilateral membranous conjunctivitis, esotropia, mechanical ptosis and complicated cataract, and had been treated with a number of medications. Histological investigation of the membrane in both cases showed LC. Treatments with amniotic membrane transplantation and institution of topical cyclosporine have shown good response. There has been complete resolution of the membranes with no recurrence at the end of 40- and 28-month follow-ups, respectively. No treatment related side effects were seen. Thus, it appears that amniotic membrane transplantation and topical cyclosporine are effective alternatives for the treatment of LC.

  14. The influence of cyclosporin A on experimental autoimmune thyroid disease in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, A.M.; Rennie, D.P.; Weetman, A.P.; Hassman, R.A.; Foord, S.M.; Dieguez, C.; Hall, R.

    1983-01-01

    Female PVG/c rats, thymectomised on weaning and given 4 courses of whole body irradiation to a total dose of 1000 rads, developed experimental autoimmune thyroid disease (EAITD) as assessed by histological evidence of thyroiditis and circulating levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies. Hypothyroidism resulted. Induction of the disease was associated with a highly significant fall in T lymphocyte numbers. Eight weeks after their last dose of irradiation the animals commenced treatment with cyclosporin A (10 mg/kg rat/day, intragastrically) and were treated for varying time intervals thereafter. The reversal of the T lymphocyte helper: suppressor ratio on cyclosporin A therapy was associated with a significant improvement in the disease process. The alterations in the T cell subsets and in the disease lasted only as long as the drug was administered and thereafter reverted towards that seen in the control groups of animals receiving no treatment.

  15. Tacrolimus Versus Cyclosporine as Primary Immunosuppressant After Renal Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis and Economics Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Yu; You, Ru-Xu; Guo, Min; Zeng, Lu; Zhou, Pu; Zhu, Lan; Xu, Gang; Li, Juan; Liu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Tacrolimus and cyclosporine are the major immunosuppressants for renal transplantation. Several studies have compared these 2 drugs, but the outcomes were not consistent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacoeconomics of cyclosporine and tacrolimus in the treatment of renal transplantation and provide evidence for the selection of essential drugs. Trials were identified through a computerized literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Renal Group Specialized Register of randomized controlled trials, and Chinese Biomedical database. Two independent reviewers assessed trials for eligibility and quality and then extracted data. Data were extracted for patient and graft mortality, acute rejection, and adverse events. Dichotomous outcomes were reported as relative risk with 95% confidence intervals. A decision tree model was populated with data from a literature review and used to estimate costs and quality-adjusted life years gained and incremental cost-effectiveness. Altogether, 6137 patients from 27 randomized controlled trials were included. The results of our analysis were that tacrolimus reduced the risks after renal transplantation of patient mortality, graft loss, acute rejection, and hypercholesterolemia. Nevertheless, tacrolimus increased the risk of new-onset diabetes. Pharmacoeconomic analysis showed that tacrolimus represented a more cost-effective treatment than does cyclosporine for the prevention of adverse events following renal transplant. Tacrolimus is an effective and safe immunosuppressive agent and it may be more cost-effective than cyclosporine for the primary prevention of graft rejection in renal transplant recipients. However, new-onset diabetes should be closely monitored during the medication period.

  16. A Comparative Study of Topical Mitomycin C, Cyclosporine, and Bevacizumab after Primary Pterygium Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Shinyoung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the recurrence rates and complications associated with instillation of topical mitomycin C, cyclosporine, and bevacizumab after primary pterygium surgery. Methods Between July 2013 and June 2014, we performed surgery using the bare sclera method on 132 eyes (132 patients) with primary pterygium. We randomly selected 33 eyes (33 patients) and treated them with artificial tears four times a day for three months, 29 eyes (29 patients) were treated with topical 0.02% mitomycin C four times a day for five days, 34 eyes (34 patients) were treated with topical 0.05% cyclosporine four times a day for three months, and 36 eyes (36 patients) were treated with topical 2.5% bevacizumab four times a day for three months after surgery. We prospectively determined the recurrence rates of pterygium and complications at the six-month follow-up examination. Results At six months after surgery, the recurrence rates in each group were as follows: 45.5% (15 eyes) in the control group, 10.3% (three eyes) in the mitomycin C group, 20.6% (seven eyes) in the cyclosporine group, and 41.7% (15 eyes) in the bevacizumab group (p = 0.004). No serious complications, except subconjunctival hemorrhages, were observed in any group. Conclusions Groups receiving topical 0.02% mitomycin C and 0.05% cyclosporine after surgery showed lower recurrence rates than the control group; however, no difference in recurrence rate was observed between the control group and the group receiving topical 2.5% bevacizumab after surgery. PMID:26635453

  17. Quality of life improvement in treatment of psoriasis with intermittent short course cyclosporin (Neoral).

    PubMed

    Salek, M S; Finlay, A Y; Lewis, J J C; Sumner, M I

    2004-02-01

    Due to concern over long term safety of continuous treatment with cyclosporin, the aim of this 1-year study was to assess the effect of intermittent therapy with cyclosporin (Neoral) on the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic plaque psoriasis. A total of 41 patients with chronic plaque psoriasis (26 male, mean age: 36 years, range: 18-61; duration of psoriasis 17 years, range: 2-31) entered a 9-centre open study in which cyclosporin was taken as an initial dose of 5 mg/kg/daily for a maximum of 12 weeks for up to three cycles. Each patient completed a psoriasis specific QOL measure (Psoriasis Disability Index, PDI) at the beginning and end of each treatment cycle and at the end of study. Clinical parameters including Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) were measured. The PDI scores showed a significant improvement (p < 0.01) between the beginning and end of all three treatment cycles. The various clinical assessments for each treatment period also showed significant improvement (p < 0.001) for all three cycles. When comparing the last follow-up value to baseline there was a clear indication of relapse, but these scores were still significantly better than at baseline (p < 0.01). Notably, the mean PASI score improved by more than 50% (p < 0.001) between first baseline and end of the study. These findings indicate that a short course of intermittent therapy with cyclosporin in microemulsion formulation, used at starting doses of 5 mg/kg/day, improves QOL of patients with chronic plaque psoriasis. Once again, the applicability and validity of the PDI as a useful QOL tool has been demonstrated.

  18. Cyclosporine-inhibitable Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Transport Influences Clinical Morphine Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Konrad; Avram, Michael J.; Yermolenka, Viktar; Francis, Amber M.; Blood, Jane; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The blood-brain barrier is richly populated by active influx and efflux transporters influencing brain drug concentrations. Morphine, a drug with delayed clinical onset, is a substrate for the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein in vitro and in animals. This investigation tested whether morphine is a transporter substrate in humans. Methods Fourteen healthy volunteers received morphine (0.1 mg/kg, 1 h intravenous infusion) in a crossover study after nothing (control) or the validated P-glycoprotein inhibitor cyclosporine (5 mg/kg, 2 h infusion). Plasma and urine morphine and morphine glucuronide metabolite concentrations were measured by mass spectrometry. Morphine effects were measured by miosis and analgesia. Results Cyclosporine minimally altered morphine disposition, increasing the area under the plasma morphine concentration versus time curve to 100 ± 21 versus 85 ± 24 ng/ml•hr (p < 0.05) without changing maximum plasma concentration. Cyclosporine enhanced (3.2 ± 0.9 vs. 2.5 ± 1.0 mm peak) and prolonged miosis, and increased the area under the miosis-time curve (18 ± 9 vs. 11 ± 5 mm-hr), plasma-effect site transfer rate constant (ke0, median 0.27 vs. 0.17 hr−1), and maximum calculated effect site morphine concentration (11.5 ± 3.7 vs. 7.6 ± 2.9 ng/ml) (all p < 0.05). Analgesia testing was confounded by cyclosporine-related pain. Conclusions Morphine is a transporter substrate at the human blood-brain barrier. Results suggest a role for P-glycoprotein or other efflux transporters in brain morphine access, although the magnitude of the effect is small, and unlikely to be a major determinant of morphine clinical effects. Efflux may explain some variability in clinical morphine effects. PMID:23851346

  19. Acquired generalized anhidrosis: review of the literature and report of a case with lymphocytic hidradenitis and sialadenitis successfully treated with cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kumi; Hatta, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of acquired generalized anhidrosis successfully treated with cyclosporine. A skin biopsy showed T cell infiltration around the sweat glands and labial biopsy revealed lymphoplasmacytic infiltration around the minor salivary gland, suggesting an underlying autoimmune disease such as Sjögren's syndrome. Administration of cyclosporine markedly improved the patient's condition and sympathetic skin response; thus cyclosporine may be effective for treating anhidrosis in patients with autoimmune disorders.

  20. Cyclosporine A: Novel concepts in its role in drug-induced gingival overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Ponnaiyan, Deepa; Jegadeesan, Visakan

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine is a selective immunosuppressant that has a variety of applications in medical practice. Like phenytoin and the calcium channel blockers, the drug is associated with gingival overgrowth. This review considers the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and unwanted effects of cyclosporine, in particular the action of the drug on the gingival tissues. In addition, elucidates the current concepts in mechanisms of cyclosporine-induced gingival overgrowth. Clinical and cell culture studies suggest that the mechanism of gingival overgrowth is a result of the interaction between the drug and its metabolites with susceptible gingival fibroblasts. Plaque-induced gingival inflammation appears to enhance this interaction. However, understanding of the pathogenesis of gingival overgrowth is incomplete at best. Hence, it would be pertinent to identify and explore possible risk factors relating to both prevalence and severity of drug-induced gingival overgrowth. Newer molecular approaches are needed to clearly establish the pathogenesis of gingival overgrowth and to provide novel information for the design of future preventive and therapeutic modalities. PMID:26759584

  1. Surgical treatment of cyclosporine A- and nifedipine-induced gingival enlargement: gingivectomy versus periodontal flap.

    PubMed

    Pilloni, A; Camargo, P M; Carere, M; Carranza, F A

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare probing depth resolution achieved by gingivectomy and periodontal flap techniques in the treatment of cyclosporine A- and nifedipine-induced gingival enlargement. Ten kidney transplant patients who were receiving cyclosporine A and nifedipine for at least 6 months participated in the study. Five patients were randomly assigned to the gingivectomy group and 5 patients to the periodontal flap group. Only anterior segments of the oral cavity (canine to canine) were surgically treated. Clinical measurements, including probing depths, plaque index, and gingival sulcus index, were taken at baseline, 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year. Results showed that probing depths, while similar for both groups in the first 6 weeks of the study, were significantly shallower for the periodontal flap group when compared to the gingivectomy group at 6 months (2.48 +/- 0.34 mm versus 4.87 +/- 0.79 mm, respectively) and 1 year (322 +/- 0.65 mm versus 6.40 +/- 1.02 mm, respectively). Within its limitations, this study suggests that the pocket reduction achieved by the periodontal flap may be sustained for longer periods of time than by the gingivectomy technique in the treatment of cyclosporine A- and nifedipine-induced gingival enlargement.

  2. Effect of Cyclosporin A on the Uptake of D3-Selective PET Radiotracers in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Li, Shihong; Xu, Jinbin; Chu, Wenhua; Jones, Lynne A.; Luedtke, Robert R.; Mach, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Four benzamide analogs having a high affinity and selectivity for D3 versus D2 receptors were radiolabeled with 11C or 18F for in vivo evaluation. Methods Precursors were synthesized and the four D3 selective benzamide analogs were radiolabeled. The tissue distribution and brain uptake of the four compounds were evaluated in control rats and rats pretreated with cyclosporin A, a modulator of P-glycoprotein and an inhibitor of other ABC efflux transporters that contribute to the blood brain barrier. MicroPET imaging was carried out for [11C]6 in a control and a cyclosporin A pre-treated rat. Results All four compounds showed low brain uptake in control rats at 5 and 30 min post-injection; despite recently reported rat behavioral studies conducted on analogs 6 (WC-10) and 7 (WC-44). Following administration of cyclosporin A, increased brain uptake was observed with all four PET radiotracers at both 5 and 30 min post-i.v. injection. An increase in brain uptake following modulation/inhibition of the ABC transporters was also observed in the microPET study. Conclusions These data suggest that D3 selective conformationally-flexible benzamide analogs which contain a N-2-methoxyphenylpiperazine moiety are substrates for P-glycoprotein or other ABC transporters expressed at the blood-brain barrier, and that PET radiotracers containing this pharmacophore may display low brain uptake in rodents due to the action of these efflux transporters. PMID:21718948

  3. Management of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis with Plasmapheresis and Cyclosporine A: Our 10 Years’ Experience

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Giuseppe; Maggio, Giulio; Bufano, Loredana; Memeo, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Background: The management of toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is controversial and there is no uniform strategy. Objective: To share our 10 years’ experience in treating severe TEN with a novel protocol based on the association of cyclosporine A and plasmapheresis. Methods: In this case series, we retrospectively collected and assessed the 12 cases of severe TEN treated from 2005 to 2015 at the Burn Unit of the University of Bari Policlinico hospital. Results: Average body surface area was 77; average SCORETEN was 4.3. The 12 patients had been treated with culprit drug withdrawal, systemic corticosteroids, and/or cyclosporine A with no response. The protocol was successfully administered in all 12 cases. Average time to response from protocol start was 4.9 days. Average time to remission from protocol start was 22 days; average hospital stay at our unit was 24.8 days. Four patients developed severe complications; 1 patient died. No complications linked to the protocol therapeutic measures were observed. The relatively small number of cases given the rarity of the condition is a limitation of this report. Conclusion: Our protocol based on the association of cyclosporine A and plasmapheresis is safe and efficacious in treating severe TEN. PMID:28280663

  4. Consensus document: Hawk's Cay meeting on therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Kahan, B D; Shaw, L M; Holt, D; Grevel, J; Johnston, A

    1990-08-01

    The optimal measurement method and clinical application of the therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporine remain uncertain. At a workshop held at Hawk's Cay, FL, from January 14 to January 17, 1990, 57 scientists presented their latest research findings, either in formal papers or as discussants. Lively debate and discussion followed presentation of extant and new methodologies for drug measurements as well as multicenter validation studies: applications of trough-concentration monitoring in renal, hepatic, and bone-marrow transplants as well as in autoimmune disease; and alternative pharmacokinetic approaches to guide cyclosporine therapy. The process of inducing and maintaining optimal immunosuppression to facilitate graft success is a complex and often challenging task, requiring the combined expertise of multiple disciplines. Thus, the assembly of four of the groups essential to the transplant process--clinicians, laboratory scientists, the pharmaceutical company, and the manufacturers of cyclosporine measurement kits--provided a unique opportunity to evaluate therapeutic drug monitoring issues facing the transplant field. Here we present the major conclusions reached at the meeting, brief discussions of the study data on which they are based, and a summary of unresolved problems that will require further rigorous investigations. The Consensus Document was reviewed by all the workshop participants before we submitted this final manuscript.

  5. Cyclosporine-associated renal arteriopathy resulting in loss of allograft function

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, B.G.; Innes, J.T.; Whitehurst, R.M.; Sharma, H.M.; Ferguson, R.M.

    1985-06-01

    Cyclosporine-associated arteriopathy was the cause of graft loss in 40 percent of all allografts that failed in a series of 200 consecutive cadaveric renal transplants. Arteriopathy was diagnosed by biopsy and renal uptake of indium 111m labeled platelets in the face of acute renal deterioration. A moderate thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic picture of hemolytic uremia was also present on peripheral blood smear. Immunofluorescence and histologic characteristics of the allograft biopsy specimens failed to show evidence for acute rejection: immunoglobulin M, immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G, C1q, C3, and C4 were not present, and there was no evidence of an interstitial or vascular mononuclear cellular infiltrate. Two clinical presentations have been described. In Group I (seven patients), anuria occurred rapidly within the first 2 weeks after transplantation. In Group II (nine patients) renal function gradually diminished 1 to 5 months after starting cyclosporine therapy. Fifteen of the 16 recipients had progressive and irreversible loss of renal function which was pathologically associated with fibrin deposition, intimal proliferation, and thrombotic occlusion of the cortical interlobular and arcuate arteries, with subsequent focal glomerular ischemia and cortical infarction. One recipient with rapid loss of renal function received an intraarterial allograft infusion of streptokinase and subsequent systemic heparinization, which resulted in return of normal allograft function. The syndrome of cyclosporine-associated arteriopathy has been linked to a lack of or reduced amounts of prostacyclin-stimulating factor or prostacyclin.

  6. Cyclosporin A corrects mitochondrial dysfunction and muscle apoptosis in patients with collagen VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Luciano; Angelin, Alessia; Tiepolo, Tania; Braghetta, Paola; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Zamparelli, Alessandra; Ferlini, Alessandra; Maraldi, Nadir M; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bernardi, Paolo

    2008-04-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy are skeletal muscle diseases that are due to mutations in the genes encoding collagen VI, an extracellular matrix protein forming a microfibrillar network that is particularly prominent in the endomysium of skeletal muscle. Myoblasts from patients affected by Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy display functional and ultrastructural mitochondrial alterations and increased apoptosis due to inappropriate opening of the permeability transition pore, a mitochondrial inner membrane channel. These alterations could be normalized by treatment with cyclosporin A, a widely used immunosuppressant that desensitizes the permeability transition pore independently of calcineurin inhibition. Here, we report the results of an open pilot trial with cyclosporin A in five patients with collagen VI myopathies. Before treatment, all patients displayed mitochondrial dysfunction and increased frequency of apoptosis, as determined in muscle biopsies. Both of these pathologic signs were largely normalized after 1 month of oral cyclosporin A administration, which also increased muscle regeneration. These findings demonstrate that collagen VI myopathies can be effectively treated with drugs acting on the pathogenic mechanism downstream of the genetic lesion, and they represent an important proof of principle for the potential therapy of genetic diseases.

  7. Measurement of cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood: HPLC and radioimmunoassay with a specific monoclonal antibody and /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled ligand compared

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, B.A.; Daft, M.C.; Koenig, J.W.; Flye, M.W.; Turk, J.W.; Scott, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    We compared cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood as measured by HPLC and by RIA with a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine with /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine ligand. The /sup 3/H-RIA kit slightly underestimated cyclosporine concentrations (greater than 600 micrograms/L) in comparison with HPLC. Over a wide range of concentrations, cyclosporine measured with the /sup 125/I-RIA kit correlated well with HPLC (slope = 0.99, n = 301, r = 0.98), observed for samples from recipients of kidney, heart, or liver allografts (respective slopes: 1.01, 0.93, and 1.00). The /sup 125/I-RIA standard curve was linear to 1000 micrograms of cyclosporine per liter. Inter- and intra-assay CVs for /sup 125/I-RIA measurements of cyclosporine were less than or equal to 7%. Evidently, the /sup 125/I-RIA kit involving a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine is equivalent to the HPLC assay and can replace it for therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporine therapy.

  8. Angiotensin Type-2 (AT-2)-Receptor activation reduces renal fibrosis in cyclosporine nephropathy: Evidence for blood-pressure independent effect.

    PubMed

    Castoldi, Giovanna; di Gioia, Cira R T; Carletti, Raffaella; Roma, Francesca; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Stella, Andrea

    2016-09-27

    Compound 21 (C21), selective agonist of AT2 receptors, shows antinflammatory effects in hypertension and nephroprotection in diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of C21 in cyclosporine nephropathy, which is characterized mainly by tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. Ten days before and during the experimental periods, low-salt diet was administered to Sprague Dawley rats. Cyclosporine-A (15mg/kg/day, i.p.) and cyclosporine-A plus C21 (0.3 mg/kg /day, i.p) were administered for 1 and 4 weeks. Control groups was left without any treatment. Blood pressure (plethysmographic method) and 24 hour albuminuria were measured once a week. At the end of the experiments, the kidneys were excised for histomorphometric analysis of renal fibrosis and for immunohistochemical evaluation of inflammatory infiltrates and type I and IV collagen expression.
    After 1 and 4 weeks, the rats treated with cyclosporine showed a significant increase (p <0.01) in blood pressure, no significant changes in albuminuria, a significant increase (p <0.01) in glomerular and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis and inflammatory infiltrates as compared to the control rats. Treatment with C21 did not modify the cyclosporine dependent increase of blood pressure, which was higher than in control rats, but after 4 weeks of treatment significantly reduced (p <0.01) glomerular and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis, type 1 collagen expression and macrophage infiltration, as compared to rats treated with cyclosporine.The administration of C21 showed a protective effect on cyclosporine nephropathy, decreasing renal fibrosis and macrophage infiltration. These data suggest that C21 may counteract tubulo-interstitial fibrosis, the most potent predictor of the progression of renal diseases.

  9. Cyclosporine in the treatment of childhood idiopathic steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome: a single centre experience in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ladapo, Taiwo Augustina; Esezobor, Christopher Imokhuede; Lesi, Foluso Ebunoluwa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Children with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome usually require treatment with second-line agents and calcineurin inhibitors such as cyclosporine are now recommended as initial therapy. These agents only recently become available in our environment and their impact on care is unknown. We reviewed the short-term treatment outcomes of their use in comparison with previous outcomes. Methods Medical records of children managed for idiopathic steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome over a 5 year period were reviewed. Remission rates and improvement in renal function following use of various agents were compared. Results Of 103 children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, 25(24.3%) were steroid resistant, of whom 17 received additional medications. Full remission rate for cyclosporine was 70% (7/10). Remission rates prior to the availability of cyclosporine were 40% (2/5) for cyclophosphamide and 66% (2/3), (partial remission only) with enalapril, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor used in combination with alternate day prednisolone. One child with cyclophosphamide resistance subsequently achieved remission with cyclosporine. Remission was not related to sex (p=0.96), age (p=0.54), serum albumin (p=0.37) or hypertension (p=0.43) but to serum cholesterol (p= 0.02). The estimated glomerular filteration rate (eGFR) among children treated with cyclosporine ranged from 30-167 ml/min/1.73m2 as follows: >90 (5); 60-89 (3); 30-59 (2) while the mean pre and post treatment eGFR in those with eGFR <90 were 60 and 104ml/min/1.73m2 respectively (p=0.03). Mortality rate was 10% (1/10) in children treated with cyclosporine compared with 28.6% (2/7) in those treated with other medications (p=0.54). Conclusion Cyclosporine resulted in improved treatment outcomes in children with idiopathic steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome. PMID:28293374

  10. Cyclosporine treatment reduces oxygen free radical generation and oxidative stress in the brain of hypoxia-reoxygenated newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Gill, Richdeep S; Lee, Tze-Fun; Liu, Jiang-Qin; Chaudhary, Hetal; Brocks, Dion R; Bigam, David L; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It has previously been shown in traumatic brain injury animal models that treatment with cyclosporine reduces brain injury. However, the potential neuroprotective effect of cyclosporine in asphyxiated neonates has yet to be fully studied. Using an acute newborn swine model of hypoxia-reoxygenation, we evaluated the effects of cyclosporine on the brain, focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production and markers of oxidative stress. Piglets (1-4 d, 1.4-2.5 kg) were block-randomized into three hypoxia-reoxygenation experimental groups (2 h hypoxia followed by 4 h reoxygenation) (n = 8/group). At 5 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. saline (placebo, controls) or cyclosporine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg i.v. bolus) in a blinded-randomized fashion. An additional sham-operated group (n = 4) underwent no hypoxia-reoxygenation. Systemic hemodynamics, carotid arterial blood flow (transit-time ultrasonic probe), cerebral cortical H(2)O(2) production (electrochemical sensor), cerebral tissue glutathione (ELISA) and cytosolic cytochrome-c (western blot) levels were examined. Hypoxic piglets had cardiogenic shock (cardiac output 40-48% of baseline), hypotension (mean arterial pressure 27-31 mmHg) and acidosis (pH 7.04) at the end of 2 h of hypoxia. Post-resuscitation cyclosporine treatment, particularly the higher dose (10 mg/kg), significantly attenuated the increase in cortical H(2)O(2) concentration during reoxygenation, and was associated with lower cerebral oxidized glutathione levels. Furthermore, cyclosporine treatment significantly attenuated the increase in cortical cytochrome-c and lactate levels. Carotid blood arterial flow was similar among groups during reoxygenation. Conclusively, post-resuscitation administration of cyclosporine significantly attenuates H(2)O(2) production and minimizes oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia-reoxygenation.

  11. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics in liver transplant recipients: evaluation of results using both polyclonal radioimmunoassay and liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Tredger, J M; Grevel, J; Naoumov, N; Steward, C M; Niven, A A; Whiting, B; Williams, R

    1991-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic variables were derived from cyclosporine measurements using liquid chromatography (HPLC) and radioimmunoassay with a non-selective polyclonal antibody (PARIA) in 11 orthotopic liver transplant recipients studied in paired oral and intravenous studies both before and after permanent clamping of the biliary T-tube. After oral drug administration, mean areas under blood cyclosporine concentration versus time curves before clamping were around 5.2-fold greater by PARIA than HPLC but 2.9-fold greater after clamping and closer to comparable values after intravenous cyclosporine (2.5 and 2.3-fold, respectively). Cyclosporine clearance was smaller by PARIA than HPLC (mean 7.3 versus 3.3 ml.min-1.kg-1, respectively, before clamping). Both values decreased by 25% after clamping (to 5.5 and 2.4 ml.min-1.kg-1, respectively), although there was no significant change in distribution or elimination half-lives (around 0.5 and 8 h, respectively). The mean bioavailability of oral cyclosporine increased significantly after clamping in 9 patients (from 10.6% to 28.1% by HPLC and from 14.8 to 35.1% by PARIA) but in two patients who developed the vanishing bile duct syndrome values fell to less than 10% and the proportional overestimation of cyclosporine concentrations by PARIA increased. Clamping had no singificant effect on the mean apparent volumes of distribution but values of Vz were approximately twice those of Vss (around 2.6 and 1.31.kg-1 by PARIA and HPLC respectively). Mean half lives after clamping were shorter following oral than intravenous cyclosporine (t 1/2 lambda 2 around 15 h enterally versus 8 h parenterally).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Prediction of area under the cyclosporine concentration versus time curve in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, L Lee; Seto, Winnie; Teuffel, Oliver; Gibson, Paul; Schultz, Kirk R; Doyle, John D; Gassas, Adam; Egeler, R Maarten; Sung, Lillian; Schechter, Tal

    2013-03-01

    This prospective study aimed to validate a previously developed first-dose limited sampling strategy (LSS) to predict the area under the cyclosporine concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) and to develop and then validate an LSS to predict cyclosporine AUC at steady state. This two-center Canadian study included children (ages .4 to 17.2 years) undergoing myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation receiving cyclosporine for acute graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. There were three cohorts, each incorporating 24 AUC determinations: first-dose LSS validation, steady-state LSS development, and steady-state LSS validation. Patients contributing data to either of the development cohorts were excluded from the corresponding validation group. Cyclosporine was given every 12 hours as a 2-hour infusion. Cyclosporine AUC was determined after administration of the first cyclosporine dose (8 samples) and then once weekly (9 samples) until engraftment. Steady-state LSSs were developed using stepwise multiple linear regression. An LSS was considered to provide an acceptable estimate of AUC if the lower limit of the 95% confidence limit (CL) of the intraclass coefficient was .8 or higher and both bias and precision were 15% or less. Fifty-three children age .4 to 18 years participated. Cyclosporine concentrations drawn up to 4 hours from the start of the infusion correlated most strongly with AUC. The previously developed first-dose LSSs and three steady-state LSSs met criteria for acceptability. The intraclass coefficients of the three-point first-dose LSS validation cohort, three-point steady-state LSS development cohort, and three-point steady-state LSS validation cohort were .974 (95% CL: .941 to .988), .984 (95% CL: .965 to .993), and .993 (95% CL: .984 to .997), respectively. The three-point first-dose (2, 6, and 8 hours) and steady-state (2, 2.5, and 8 hours) LSSs are valid measures of cyclosporine AUC after intravenous administration over 2 hours

  13. Cyclosporine A decreases the fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration of Candida albicans clinical isolates but not biofilm formation and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, T; Nurrokhman; Baly, I; Daeli, P R; Kartasasmita, G; Wijayanti, N

    2015-03-01

    Among the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most abundant species in humans. One of the virulent factors of C. albicans is its ability to develop biofilm. Biofilm forming microbes are characterized by decreasing of its susceptibility to antibiotics and antifungal. The fungicidal effect of fluconazole may be enhanced by cyclosporine A in laboratory engineered C. albicans strains. The aim of this work is to analyze the synergistic effect of cyclosporine A with fluconazole in C. albicans clinical isolates and the effect of cycolsporine A alone in the biofilm formation. Six fluconazole resistant and six sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates were analyzed for its minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs), biofilm formation, and cell growths. A semi-quantitative XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5- sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction assay was conducted to measure the biofilm formation. Cyclosporine A has synergistic effect with fluconazole that was shown by decreasing MICs of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. However, cyclosporine A alone did not influence the biofilm formation and cell growth of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. These results indicated that cyclosporine A might be a promising candidate of adjuvant therapy for fluconazole against both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates.

  14. Structural characterization of cyclosporin A, C and microbial bio-transformed cyclosporin A analog AM6 using HPLC-ESI-ion trap-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eun Young; Shrestha, Anil; Hoang, Nguyen Huu; Huong, Nguyen Lan; Yoon, Yeo Joon; Park, Je Won

    2014-06-01

    Cyclosporin A (CyA), a cyclic undecapeptide produced by a number of fungi, contains 11 unusual amino acids, and has been one of the most commonly prescribed immunosuppressive drugs. To date, there are over sixty different analogs reported as congeners and analogs resulting from precursor-directed biosynthesis, human CYP-mediated metabolites, or microbial bio-transformed analogs. However, there is still a need for more structurally diverse CyA analogs in order to discover new biological potentials and/or improve the physicochemical properties of the existing cyclosporins. As a result of the complexity of the resulting mass spectrometric (MS) data caused by its unusual amino acid composition and its cyclic nature, structural characterization of these cyclic peptides based on fragmentation patterns using multiple tandem MS analyses is challenging task. Here, we describe, an efficient HPLC-ESI-ion trap MS(n) (up to MS(8)) was developed for the identification of CyA and CyC, a (Thr(2))CyA congener in which L-aminobutyric acid (Abu) is replaced by L-threonine (Thr). In addition, we examined the fragmentation patterns of a CyA analog obtained from the cultivation of a recombinant Streptomyces venezuelae strain fed with CyA, assigning this analog as (γ-hydroxy-MeLeu(6))CyA (otherwise, known as an human CYP metabolite AM6). This is the first report on both the MS(n)-aided identification of CyC and the structural characterization of a CyA analog by employing HPLC-ESI-ion trap MS(n) analysis.

  15. Optimal initial dose of oral cyclosporine in relation to its toxicities for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis following reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Y; Murashige, N; Kami, M; Miyakoshi, S; Shibagaki, Y; Hamaki, T; Takaue, Y; Taniguchi, S

    2005-06-01

    Since the introduction of reduced-intensity stem-cell transplantation (RIST), allogeneic stem-cell transplantation has become available for elderly patients. While pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine might differ according to age or other factors, cyclosporine is uniformly started at an oral dose of 6 mg/kg/day. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 35 patients aged between 32 and 65 (median 52) years who had undergone RIST. Doses of cyclosporine were adjusted to the target blood trough level of 150-250 ng/ml. Cyclosporine dosages were changed in 33 patients (94%). Dose reduction was required in 32 patients because of high blood levels (n=25), renal dysfunction (n=3), hepatic dysfunction (n=2), and hypertension (n=2). Cyclosporine doses were increased in one because of the suboptimal level. The median of the achieved stable doses was 3.1 mg/kg/day (range, 1.0-7.4). Five patients sustained Grade III toxicities according to NCI-CTC version 2.0: renal dysfunction (n=4), hyperbilirubinemia (n=2), and hypertension (n=2). No patients developed grade IV toxicity. There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency and severity of cyclosporine toxicities between patients aged 50 years and above and those below 50 years. The initial oral cyclosporine dose of 6 mg/kg/day was unnecessarily high irrespective of age. The possible overdose of cyclosporine might have aggravated regimen-related toxicities.

  16. Utility of C-2 (Cyclosporine) monitoring in postrenal transplant patients: A study in the Indian population.

    PubMed

    Thakur, V; Kumar, R; Gupta, P N

    2008-07-01

    The study was planned and conducted to assess the benefit of C-2 levels (blood cyclosporine levels two hours postdosing) monitoring over trough (C0) levels (predosing) in postrenal transplant patients. The patient population included 34 postrenal transplant individuals (28 males and six females, mean age of 39.9 +/- 12.3 years). The patients were first-transplant patients and were receiving a microemulsion form of cyclosporine A (CsA) as an immunosuppressant along with azathioprine and prednisolone. In addition, they were not on any enzyme inducer/inhibitor drugs, except for diltiazem. Timed collection of C0 and C-2 samples was done and the samples were immediately processed using the cedia cyclosporine plus assay kit. Estimation was done on a Beckman synchron CX5CE fully automated chemistry analyzer. Serum urea nitrogen and creatinine levels were checked. Poor graft survival was found in this population with 29.3% patients showing graft rejection. The graft rejection patients were assigned to two groups: group I with chronic graft rejection patients (17.6%) and group II with acute graft rejection patients (11.7%). Group III consisted of graft survival patients (70.7%). Mean +/- SD was calculated for C0 and C2 levels. Individual values for C0 and C-2 were plotted on a scatter chart. C0 and C-2 levels were normalized by calculating them as the percentage of their targets (data not shown) and compared using the Kruskal Wallis one-way analysis of variance. C0 levels in all the three groups were within the recommended therapeutic range (150-300 ng/mL) (P < 0.182). Blood C-2 concentrations did not achieve the recommended target levels in these patients. One-way analysis of variance for C-2 values when expressed as the percentage of the target values did not show any significant difference between these groups (P < 0.84). No significant difference was found in C0 levels between groups I, II, and group III patients when expressed as the percentage of the target values (P

  17. Modification of c and n sources for enhanced production of cyclosporin ‘a’ by Aspergillus Terreus

    PubMed Central

    Tanseer, Sundas; Anjum, Tehmina

    2011-01-01

    Most of the studies regarding cyclosporin ‘A’ production through fungi concentrate around Tolypocladium inflatum. This is mainly due to lower reported production of this drug in other fungi. The present study was therefore conducted to explore indigenous isolates of Aspergillus terreus for synthesis of this drug and defining a production medium for obtaining high yield of cyclosporin ‘A’. For this purpose carbon and nitrogen sources were optimized for the selected best strain of A. terreus. Overall results depicted that the best cyclosporin ‘A’ yield from selected Aspergillus terreus (FCBP58) could be obtained by using production medium containing glucose 10% as carbon source and peptone 0.5% as nitrogen source. This modification in production medium enhanced drug synthesis by selected fungi significantly. The production capabilities when compared with biomass of fungi there was found no relationship between the two confirming that the medium modification increased overall drug synthesis powers of the fungi. PMID:24031766

  18. Glucocorticoid-resistant Th17 cells are selectively attenuated by cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Schewitz-Bowers, Lauren P; Lait, Philippa J P; Copland, David A; Chen, Ping; Wu, Wenting; Dhanda, Ashwin D; Vistica, Barbara P; Williams, Emily L; Liu, Baoying; Jawad, Shayma; Li, Zhiyu; Tucker, William; Hirani, Sima; Wakabayashi, Yoshiyuki; Zhu, Jun; Sen, Nida; Conway-Campbell, Becky L; Gery, Igal; Dick, Andrew D; Wei, Lai; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Lee, Richard W J

    2015-03-31

    Glucocorticoids remain the cornerstone of treatment for inflammatory conditions, but their utility is limited by a plethora of side effects. One of the key goals of immunotherapy across medical disciplines is to minimize patients' glucocorticoid use. Increasing evidence suggests that variations in the adaptive immune response play a critical role in defining the dose of glucocorticoids required to control an individual's disease, and Th17 cells are strong candidate drivers for nonresponsiveness [also called steroid resistance (SR)]. Here we use gene-expression profiling to further characterize the SR phenotype in T cells and show that Th17 cells generated from both SR and steroid-sensitive individuals exhibit restricted genome-wide responses to glucocorticoids in vitro, and that this is independent of glucocorticoid receptor translocation or isoform expression. In addition, we demonstrate, both in transgenic murine T cells in vitro and in an in vivo murine model of autoimmunity, that Th17 cells are reciprocally sensitive to suppression with the calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporine A. This result was replicated in human Th17 cells in vitro, which were found to have a conversely large genome-wide shift in response to cyclosporine A. These observations suggest that the clinical efficacy of cyclosporine A in the treatment of SR diseases may be because of its selective attenuation of Th17 cells, and also that novel therapeutics, which target either Th17 cells themselves or the effector memory T-helper cell population from which they are derived, would be strong candidates for drug development in the context of SR inflammation.

  19. Immunohistochemical Localization of Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition Markers in Cyclosporine A Induced Gingival Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Hitesh; Madapusi, Balaji Thodur; Ramamurti, Anjana; Narasimhan, Malathi; Periasamy, Soundararajan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cyclosporine, an immunosuppressive agent used in the management of renal transplant patients is known to produce Drug Induced Gingival Overgrowth (DIGO) as a side effect. Several mechanisms have been elucidated to understand the pathogenesis of DIGO. Recently, epithelial mesenchymal transition has been proposed as a mechanism underlying fibrosis of various organs. Aim The aim of the study was to investigate if Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) operates in Cyclosporine induced gingival overgrowth. Materials and Methods The study involved obtaining gingival tissue samples from healthy individuals (n=17) and subjects who exhibited cyclosporine induced gingival overgrowth (n=18). Presence and distribution of E-Cadherin, S100 A4 and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was assessed using immunohistochemistry and cell types involved in their expression were determined. The number of α– SMA positive fibroblasts were counted in the samples. Results In control group, there was no loss of E-Cadherin and a pronounced staining was seen in the all layers of the epithelium in all the samples analysed (100%). S100 A4 staining was noted in langerhans cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and endothelial lined blood capillaries in Connective Tissue (CT) of all the samples (100%) while α - SMA staining was seen only on the endothelial lined blood capillaries in all the samples (100%). However in DIGO, there was positive staining of E-Cadherin only in the basal and suprabasal layers of the epithelium in all the samples (100%). Moreover there was focal loss of E-Cadherin in the epithelium in eight out of 18 samples (44%). A break in the continuity of the basement membrane was noted in three out of 18 samples (16%) on H & E staining. Conclusion Based on the analysis of differential staining of the markers, it can be concluded that EMT could be one of the mechanistic pathways underlying the pathogenesis of DIGO. PMID:27656563

  20. Combining cytochrome P-450 3A4 modulators and cyclosporine or everolimus in transplantation is successful

    PubMed Central

    González, Fernando; Valjalo, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the long term follow-up of kidney allograft recipients receiving ketoconazole with calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) alone or combined with everolimus. METHODS: This is an open-label, prospective observational clinical trial in low immunologic risk patients who, after signing an Institutional Review Board approved consent form, were included in one of two groups. The first one (n = 59) received everolimus (target blood level, 3-8 ng/mL) and the other (n = 114) azathioprine 2 mg/kg per day or mycophenolate mofetyl (MMF) 2 g/d. Both groups also received tapering steroids, the cytochrome P-450 3A4 (CYP3A4) modulator, ketoconazole 50-100 mg/d, and cyclosporine with C0 targets in the everolimus group of 200-250 ng/mL in 1 mo, 100-125 ng/mL in 2 mo, and 50-65 ng/mL thereafter, and in the azathioprine or MMF group of 250-300 ng/mL in 1 mo, 200-250 ng/mL in 2 mo, 180-200 ng/mL until 3-6 mo, and 100-125 ng/mL thereafter. Clinical visits were performed monthly the first year and quarterly thereafter by treating physicians and all data was extracted by the investigators. RESULTS: The clinical characteristics of these two cohorts were similar. During the follow up (66 + 31 mo), both groups showed comparable clinical courses, but the biopsy proven acute rejection rate during the full follow-up period seemed to be lower in the everolimus group (20% vs 36%; P = 0.04). The everolimus group did not show a higher surgical complication rate than the other group. By the end of the follow-up period, the everolimus group tended to show a higher glomerular filtration rate. Nevertheless, we found no evidence of a consistent negative slope of the temporal allograft function estimated by the modification of the diet in renal disease formula in any of both groups. At 6 years of follow-up, the uncensored and death-censored graft survivals were 91% and 93%, and 91% and 83% in the everolimus plus cyclosporine, and cyclosporine alone groups, respectively. The addition of ketoconazole

  1. Oral administration of cyclosporin A for recipients of allogeneic marrow transplants: implications of clinical gut dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, K; Biggs, J C; Britton, K; Short, R; Mrongovius, R; Concannon, A; Dodds, A

    1984-02-01

    Cyclosporin A (CyA) was used to minimize graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in 28 recipients of allogeneic marrow transplants. When given orally, the absorption of CyA was markedly dependent on normal gut function. Patients without gut dysfunction showed normal serum concentration-time curves while those with diarrhoea from any cause (chemo-radiation enteritis, acute GVHD of the gut, infectious enteritis) showed minimal absorption of the drug. These data indicate the desirability of the intravenous administration of CyA during periods of gut dysfunction in marrow transplant recipients.

  2. Cyclosporin A in the treatment of CLL associated PRCA and bone marrow hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Tura, S; Finelli, C; Bandini, G; Cavo, M; Gobbi, M

    1988-01-01

    Three patients (1 PRCA-T-CLL, 1 PRCA-B-CLL, 1 B-CLL aplasia) were treated with cyclosporin A (CS-A). Patient no 1 had relapsed during steroid therapy and the remaining two patients had been resistant to conventional immunosuppression. CS-A produced in all cases a prompt remission (within 1-4 weeks) of bone marrow failure. Mild reversible renal toxicity was the only side-effect noted. CS-A might be tried in every case of CLL-associated bone marrow failure.

  3. The effect of cyclosporin A on peripheral blood T cell subpopulations in renal allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Sweny, P; Tidman, N

    1982-01-01

    Treatment with cyclosporin A (CyA) produces a reversal of the normal ratio of OKT4+ (inducer type) to OKT84 (suppressor-cytotoxic type) cells so that renal allograft recipients on CyA alone develop a four-fold increase in the absolute number of circulating OKT8 positive cells. Conventional immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisolone reduces both populations of T cells without altering the ratio of OKT4+ to OKT8+ cells. This effect of CyA may help to explain its action as an immunosuppressive agent. PMID:6210475

  4. Pneumonia associated with Salmonella spp. infection in a cat receiving cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Callegari, C; Palermo, G; Greco, M F; Corrente, M; Piseddu, E; Auriemma, E; Zini, E

    2014-10-01

    Salmonellosis is uncommon in cats, usually affects the gastrointestinal tract or skin, and can be fatal. This report describes a domestic shorthair cat with severe pneumonia caused by Salmonella spp. without accompanying gastrointestinal or skin manifestations, in which previous administration of cyclosporine may have played a permissive role in its development. Clinical and laboratory findings as well as follow-up are described from diagnosis until complete recovery. This unusual presentation serves to alert practitioners to consider Salmonella spp. as a possible cause of lung disease in cats, especially if immunocompromised.

  5. Cyclosporin A inhibits HTLV-I tax expression and shows anti-tumor effects in combination with VP-16.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Atsuo; Arima, Naomichi; Matsushita, Kakushi; Uozumi, Kimiharu; Akimoto, Masaki; Hamada, Heiichiro; Kawada, Hideaki; Horai, Sawako; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Tei, Chuwa

    2007-12-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is one of the most refractory malignant hematological diseases. Our previous studies demonstrated HTLV-1Tax protein involvement in clinical manifestation of the aggressive type of ATL and suggested the potential application of agents to inhibit Tax expression for ATL treatment. In the present study, we first examined Tax involvement in the resistance to VP-16-induced apoptosis using four HTLV-1 infected T cell clones and cTax DNA-transfected cells. Next, we examined whether cyclosporin A reduced expression of Tax and its related transfer factors on Western blot and CAT assay. We further investigated whether cyclosporin A in combination with VP-16 can induce apoptosis in HTLV-1 infected T cells. Tax-producing T cells, K3T and F6T, were resistant to VP-16 induced growth inhibition compared with that of the nonproducing cells, S1T and Su9T01. Experiments using S1T and Tax-expressing cDNA-transfected S1T demonstrated Tax-induced resistance to VP-16 induction of apoptosis by DNA ladder formation. Cyclosporin A reduced Tax expression in K3T by Western blot analysis and on CAT assay, showing maximal reduction of 61% and 60% compared to control culture using LTR CAT transfected Jurkat cells and K3T cells, respectively. Cyclosporin A also reduced the nuclear expression of two Tax-related transfer factors, ATF-1 and ATF-2 on Western blot. Cyclosporin A alone did not show any cytotoxicity by itself, but sensitized cells to VP-16 when combined with VP-16. Cyclosporin A may be a useful anti-ATL agent when combined with other anti-cancer agents possibly related to Tax inhibition.

  6. Higher plasma bilirubin predicts veno-occlusive disease in early childhood undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwi Suk; Moon, Aree; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Choi, Young Hee; Kim, Hyang Sook; Kim, Sang Geon

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the association between plasma bilirubin levels and veno-occlusive disease (VOD) in non-adult patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) during cyclosporine therapy. METHODS: A total of 123 patients taking cyclosporine were evaluated using an electronic medical system at the Seoul National University Children’s Hospital from the years 2004 through 2011. Patients were grouped by age and analyzed for incidence and type of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including VOD. RESULTS: The HSCT patients were divided into three age groups: G#1 ≥ 18; 9 ≤ G#2 ≤ 17; and G#3 ≤ 8 years of age). The majority of transplant donor types were cord blood transplantations. Most prevalent ADRs represented acute graft-vs-host disease (aGVHD) and VOD. Although the incidences of aGVHD did not vary among the groups, the higher frequency ratios of VOD in G#3 suggested that an age of 8 or younger is a risk factor for developing VOD in HSCT patients. After cyclosporine therapy, the trough plasma concentrations of cyclosporine were lower in G#3 than in G#1, indicative of its increased clearance. Moreover, in G#3 only, a maximal total bilirubin level (BILmax) of ≥ 1.4 mg/dL correlated with VOD incidence after cyclosporine therapy. CONCLUSION: HSCT patients 8 years of age or younger are more at risk for developing VOD, diagnosed as hyperbilirubinemia, tender hepatomegaly, and ascites/weight gain after cyclosporine therapy, which may be represented by a criterion of plasma BILmax being ≥ 1.4 mg/dL, suggestive of more sensitive VOD indication in this age group. PMID:27358786

  7. Efficacy of cyclosporine for chronic, refractory stomatitis in cats: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical study.

    PubMed

    Lommer, Milinda J

    2013-01-01

    Sixteen cats with chronic stomatitis, that had previously undergone premolar-molar or full-mouth extractions, were randomly assigned a group to receive 2.5 mg/kg cyclosporine or placebo orally twice daily Neither the clinician nor the clients were aware of the group assignments. Cats were evaluated prior to treatment and every 2 weeks for 6 weeks using a 30 point Stomatitis Disease Activity Index (SDAI) score. Mean improvement in SDAI scores among cats in the treatment group after 6 weeks was 52.7 %. This was significantty diffrent fom the mean improvement (12.2 %) of cats in the placebo group. During the 6 week study period, 7 of the 9 cats in the treatment group (77.8 %) showed a > 40 % improvement in SDAI score, while 1 of 7 cats in placebo group (14.3 %) showed a > 40 % improvement in SDAI score. This difference was statistically significant. Individual variability in the absorption of orally-administered cyclosporine was high. Trough whole-blood cyclosporine levels ranged firm 32.1 ng/ml to 1,576.2 ng/ml. At the end of the 6 week observation period, there was a statistically significant diference among cats with trough whole-blood cyclosporine levels >300 ng/ml (72.3 % improvement) compared with cats with cyclosporine levels < 300 ng/ml (28.2 % improvement). Whole-blood cyclosporine levels > 300 ng/ml were associated with significant improvement in oral inflammation in cats with chronic stomatitis that had previously undergone premolar-molar or fuill-mouth extraction.

  8. Systematic review and meta-analysis of third-line salvage therapy with infliximab or cyclosporine in severe ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Feuerstein, Joseph D.; Akbari, Mona; Tapper, Elliot B.; Cheifetz, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients with ulcerative colitis who fail corticosteroids and are treated with rescue therapy (e.g. infliximab or cyclosporine) but fail to respond, salvage therapy with infliximab or cyclosporine can be considered. We sought to assess the efficacy and safety of this third-line salvage therapy. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of trials published in PubMed up to January 2015 relating to the use of third-line salvage therapy following failure of intravenous corticosteroids and infliximab or cyclosporine. Pooled outcome rates for each salvage strategy and pooled odds ratio comparing the two strategies were calculated using the random effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed by the Q and I2 statistics. Results The search strategy yielded 40 articles of which 4 were eligible for inclusion. Four articles assessed patients who were treated with infliximab after failure of cyclosporine and 2 articles assessed the use of cyclosporine after failure of infliximab. There were 138 patients using infliximab as a third-line salvage therapy and 30 patients using cyclosporine. When comparing these two strategies, there was no significant difference in clinical response (RR 1.03, 95%CI 0.7-1.46 P=0.87), clinical remission (RR 0.69, 95%CI 0.30-1.57 P=0.37), or colectomy at 12 months (RR 1.14, 95%CI 0.79-1.67 P=0.48). Similarly, there was no significant difference in total (RR 1.91, 95% CI0.38-9.64 p=0.43) or serious adverse events (RR 1.18, 95%CI 0.34-4.07 P=0.80). Conclusion While third-line salvage therapy may be efficacious in achieving short-term clinical response/remission, there remains a significant risk of colectomy and adverse events. PMID:27366036

  9. Effects of chronic volume expansion and enalapril on chronic cyclosporine nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gillum, D M; Truong, L

    1990-04-01

    Prolonged treatment with cyclosporine (CS) results in an irreversible renal lesion consisting of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, as well as prominent hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA). Ischemia to the tubulointerstitial compartment caused by intense CS-mediated renal vasoconstriction may contribute significantly to the development of this lesion. To explore the potential role of volume contraction and activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the genesis of this lesion, we have employed a recently described rodent model of chronic cyclosporine nephropathy (CCN). Over 28 days of CS therapy, animals received plain drinking water, 1% saline, or enalapril (ENAL), 50 mg/l in drinking water. At the end of 28 days, Na+ balance in saline-treated animals was markedly positive, and plasma volume was increased; however, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) did not change, and the tubulointerstitial lesion and JGA hyperplasia as evaluated by morphometric techniques were unaffected. Enalapril-treated animals were relatively hypotensive with lower GFR than CS controls. Enalapril conferred no protection against the development of tubulointerstitial disease and exacerbated the development of JGA hyperplasia and hyperkalemia. We conclude that volume contraction is not an important contributor to the reduced GFR, tubulointerstitial lesion, or JGA hyperplasia associated with long-term CS treatment. Blockade of the RAS also conferred no protection against the development of tubulointerstitial disease but resulted in worsening of JGA hyperplasia and hyperkalemia.

  10. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus induce vascular inflammation and endothelial activation through TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R.; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián M.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine and tacrolimus greatly reduced the rate of allograft rejection, although their chronic use is marred by a range of side effects, among them vascular toxicity. In transplant patients, it is proved that innate immunity promotes vascular injury triggered by ischemia-reperfusion damage, atherosclerosis and hypertension. We hypothesized that activation of the innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to CNI toxicity, therefore we investigated whether TLR4 mediates toxic responses of CNIs in the vasculature. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and endothelial activation markers in cultured murine endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in ex vivo cultures of murine aortas. CNI-induced proinflammatory events were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of TLR4. Moreover, CNIs were unable to induce inflammation and endothelial activation in aortas from TLR4−/− mice. CNI-induced cytokine and adhesion molecules synthesis in endothelial cells occurred even in the absence of calcineurin, although its expression was required for maximal effect through upregulation of TLR4 signaling. CNI-induced TLR4 activity increased O2−/ROS production and NF-κB-regulated synthesis of proinflammatory factors in cultured as well as aortic endothelial and VSMCs. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with CNI vascular inflammation. PMID:27295076

  11. Cyclosporine: A Historical Perspective on Its Role in the Treatment of Noninfectious Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wendy M

    2017-03-13

    The history of cyclosporine and uveitis is intertwined with the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) animal models and the understanding that T lymphocytes play a major role in the pathogenesis of uveitis. The early studies of CsA in uveitis also demonstrated the power of collaborative efforts in translational research. Dr. Robert Nussenblatt and his colleagues were the first to show that CsA can inhibit EAU. Over many years after the initial CsA experiments, Dr. Nussenblatt's group as well as others continued to study CsA under experimental conditions as well as in clinical trials with human patients. The data and observations from these studies significantly advanced our knowledge of uveitis pathophysiology and demonstrated the value of well-designed masked, controlled treatment trials in uveitis. Dr. Nussenblatt and his collaborators delved into the most significant adverse effect of CsA, renal toxicity, and helped elucidate the pathophysiology of renal injury. They explored adjunctive treatments to improve the efficacy and decrease the toxicity of CsA and also studied other members of the cyclosporine family. Among the immunosuppressives used to treat ocular inflammation, CsA was the first, and remains the only medication comprehensively studied under both experimental and clinical conditions.

  12. Spore inoculum optimization to maximize cyclosporin A production in Tolypocladium niveum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Jin; Lee, Han-Na; Han, Kyubeom; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2008-05-01

    The cyclic undecapeptide, cyclosporin A (CyA), is one of the most commonly prescribed immunosuppressive drugs. It is generated nonribosomally from a multifunctional cyclosporin synthetase enzyme complex by the filamentous fungus Tolypocladium niveum. In order to maximize the production of CyA by wild-type T. niveum (ATCC 34921), each of three culture stages (sporulation culture, growth culture, and production culture) were sequentially optimized. Among the three potential sporulation media, the SSMA medium generated the highest numbers of T. niveum spores. The SSM and SM media were then selected as the optimal growth and production culture media, respectively. The addition of valine and fructose to the SM production medium was also determined to be crucial for CyA biosynthesis. In this optimized three-stage culture system, 3% of the spore inoculum generated the highest level of CyA productivity in a 15-day T. niveum production culture, thereby implying that the determination of an appropriate size of T. niveum spore inoculum plays a critical role in the maximization of CyA production.

  13. Pathologic studies of acute rejection of mismatched feline musculocutaneous flaps. Effect of cyclosporine and prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Gregory, C R; Gourley, I M; Ferreira, H; Moore, P F; Imondi, K A; Patz, J D; Gregory, T A; Pedersen, N C

    1991-06-01

    The gracilis musculocutaneous flap was developed as an allograft model to study acute rejection and immunosuppression in the cat. Twelve adult cats received a MLC incompatible flap. Six of the cats received cyclosporine oral solution and prednisolone (0.5 mg/kg/24 hr) for 100 days and six cats were not treated. Trough whole-blood levels of cyclosporine in the treatment group were maintained at approximately 750 ng/ml for 70 days, then 500 ng/ml for the remaining 30 days. Three flaps failed due to technical problems; 5 flaps were studied in the treatment group and 4 in the untreated group. All 5 flaps in the treatment group survived the 100 day treatment period and were rejected 30 +/- 26 days following cessation of treatment. Prior to discontinuation of treatment, with the exception of one cat, inflammatory changes associated with rejection were not observed in biopsy specimen. The flaps in the untreated group survived 13 +/- 1.5 days. Histopathologic examination of the flaps revealed little difference in the appearance of acute rejection and rejection after cessation of therapy. The most prominent lesion was a vasculitis with extensive perivascular lymphohistocytic inflammation. The lymphoid infiltrates consisted predominantly of T cells of both major classes (CD4 and CD8). Full-thickness epidermal necrosis and subsequent bacterial invasion followed vascular compromise.

  14. Prolactin and prolactin secretagogues reverse immunosuppression in mice treated with cysteamine, glucocorticoids, or cyclosporin-A.

    PubMed

    Bernton, E; Bryant, H; Holaday, J; Dave, J

    1992-12-01

    Suppression of prolactin (PRL) secretion with the dopamine agonist, bromocriptine, has been shown in rodents to diminish a variety of immunologic responses, including delayed type hypersensitivity, primary antibody response, T-cell dependent macrophage activation, and ex vivo T- and B-lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens. These same responses can be suppressed by endogenous or exogenous glucocorticosteroids and, in large measure, the immunosuppressant peptide cyclosporin A. The sulfhydryl reducing agent cysteamine (2-aminoethanethiol) is known to reduce pituitary and plasma prolactin levels. Treatment of mice with cysteamine at doses which suppressed circulating PRL levels resulted in suppression of ex vivo blastogenic responses of lymphocytes from treated mice. The T-cell-dependent primary IgM response to immunization with sheep red blood cells was also suppressed by cysteamine treatment. Treatment of mice with drugs stimulating the release of endogenous PRL, or with exogenous ovine PRL, was found to antagonize the suppression of lymphocyte proliferative responses to mitogens induced in mice by glucocorticoid or cyclosporin treatment. These data suggest that many drugs in common clinical use could have potential immunomodulatory actions due to suppression or stimulation of pituitary PRL secretion. Furthermore, lactogenic hormones appear to exert counterregulatory actions which may modify glucocorticosteroid actions on immune and other target issues.

  15. Pure red cell aplasia associated with autoimmune hepatitis successfully treated with cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Sano, Fumiaki; Ishii, Toshiya; Adachi, Kayo; Negishi, Ryujirou; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Okuse, Chiaki

    2014-02-01

    A 47-year-old female with a 17-year history of autoimmune hepatitis had been treated with prednisolone, azathioprine, and ursodeoxycholic acid. Although her alanine aminotransferase level occasionally showed mild abnormality, the prednisolone dose could not be increased because she had developed cataract during the course of her illness. In May 2012, she developed severe normochromic normocytic anemia without hemorrhage, and azathioprine was discontinued because it was suspected of being the cause. However, anemia recurred frequently even after discontinuation, necessitating repeated blood transfusions. Bone marrow analysis revealed selective erythroblastopenia, thus leading to a diagnosis of pure red cell aplasia. Cyclosporine A was administered, which led to a dramatic recovery from anemia, and stabilized her alanine aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, the prednisolone dose could be gradually tapered. Pure red cell aplasia associated with autoimmune hepatitis is extremely rare. The present case shows that patients with autoimmune hepatitis refractory to the standard treatment regimen and those with concomitant pure red cell aplasia may be treated with cyclosporine A.

  16. Abbreviated kinetic profiles in area-under-the-curve monitoring of cyclosporine therapy.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Kahan, B D

    1991-11-01

    Abbreviated kinetic profiles can reduce the number of phlebotomies and drug assays, and thereby the cost of area-under-the-curve (AUC) monitoring. In the present investigation, we used two independent data sets: group 1, 101 AUC profiles from 77 stable renal-transplant patients, which included a 5-h sample in addition to the usual 0-, 2-, 4-, 6-, 10-, 14-, and 24-h samples; and group 2, 100 profiles from 50 stable renal-transplant patients before and after a change in their daily oral dose of cyclosporine. Group I demonstrated a fair correlation between cyclosporine trough concentrations and the AUC calculated from a complete set of seven concentrations (r2 = 0.820 and 0.758 for the 24- and 0-h samples, respectively). Stepwise multiple linear-regression analysis revealed that the abbreviated set of three time points (2, 6, and 14 h) explained 96% of the variance in AUC values calculated from the full set of seven samples; additional time points increased the accuracy only slightly. For group 2, we examined the difference between the observed and the predicted concentrations by linear extrapolation; the error in the observed AUC value, compared with the predicted value calculated from seven time points (-13.2% to -1.2%), was similar to the error from just three time points (-11.5% to 4.5%). Abbreviated AUC profiles involving three time points used with a model equation seem to provide a reliable alternative to full seven-point profiles.

  17. Oxidative Stress and Liver Morphology in Experimental Cyclosporine A-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Czechowska, Grażyna; Irla-Miduch, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine A is an immunosuppressive drug used after organ's transplantation. The adverse effects on such organs as kidney or liver may limit its use. Oxidative stress is proposed as one of the mechanisms of organs injury. The study was designed to elucidate CsA-induced changes in liver function, morphology, oxidative stress parameters, and mitochondria in rat's hepatocytes. Male Wistar rats were used: group A (control) receiving physiological saline, group B cyclosporine A in a dose of 15 mg/kg/day subcutaneously, and group C the CsA-vehicle (olive oil). On the 28th day rats were anesthetized. The following biochemical changes were observed in CsA-treated animals: increased levels of ALT, AST, and bilirubin in the serum, statistically significant changes in oxidative stress parameters, and lipid peroxidation products in the liver supernatants: MDA+4HAE, GSH, GSSG, caspase 3 activity, and ADP/ATP, NAD+/NADH, and NADP+/NADPH ratios. Microscopy of the liver revealed congestion, sinusoidal dilatation, and focal hepatocytes necrosis with mononuclear cell infiltration. Electron microscope revealed marked mitochondrial damage. Biochemical studies indicated that CsA treatment impairs liver function and triggers oxidative stress and redox imbalance in rats hepatocytes. Changes of oxidative stress markers parallel with mitochondrial damage suggest that these mechanisms play a crucial role in the course of CsA hepatotoxicity. PMID:27298826

  18. Ultra fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry routine method for simultaneous determination of cyclosporin A, tacrolimus, sirolimus, and everolimus in whole blood using deuterated internal standards for cyclosporin A and everolimus.

    PubMed

    Meinitzer, Andreas; Gartner, Gabriele; Pilz, Stefan; Stettin, Mariana

    2010-02-01

    Specific chromatographic methods for the measurement of cyclosporin A, tacrolimus, sirolimus, and everolimus blood levels in patients with organ transplants are time consuming when large numbers of samples must be processed. The authors developed a robust and fast (1 minute) online solid-phase extraction liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of cyclosporin A, tacrolimus, sirolimus, and everolimus. After protein precipitation of the whole blood with zinc sulphate and methanol, the supernatant was loaded on a wide pore reversed-phase column and cleansed of potential interferences with high flow for 20 seconds. After column switching, the analytes were transferred within 20 seconds in the back-flush mode to a short phenyl-hexyl column. The valve was then returned to its initial position and the chromatographic separation performed within 20 seconds. In the meantime, the loading column was prepared for the next injection. Ammoniated adducts of protonated molecules were used as precursor ions for all analytes. Multiple-reaction mode transitions for each immunosuppressant and the internal standards were used for quantification. The working range of the method was 10-1500 microg/L for cyclosporin A, 1.0-44 microg/L for tacrolimus, 1.0-48 microg/L for sirolimus, and 1.2-48 microg/L for everolimus. Within and between-run assay coefficients of variation ranged from 1.8% to 13.0%. The described liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method shows best performance using the internal standards cyclosporin A-d4 for cyclosporin A, everolimus-d4 for everolimus and ascomycin for tacrolimus and sirolimus. In conclusion, the authors present a very fast, robust, and economical analytical method for therapeutic monitoring of multiple immunosuppressants in daily clinical practice.

  19. Combination therapy of cyclosporine and anti-tumor necrosis factor α in psoriasis: a case series of 10 patients.

    PubMed

    Cohen Barak, Eran; Kerner, Miryam; Rozenman, Dganit; Ziv, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapy has become important in treating psoriasis, using synergism between different mechanisms to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity. Little has been published on the combination of cyclosporine and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α agents. In this study, a retrospective chart review was made of the effects of this combination therapy in 10 patients with recalcitrant psoriasis. Treatment included a conditioning phase with cyclosporine, 3.14 ± 0.37 mg/kg for 4.6 ± 2 weeks, and a combination phase during which etanercept/adalimumab were initiated and cyclosporine was tapered over 10.2 ± 3.7 weeks. Treatment success, evaluated after each phase, was classified as complete recovery (CR, more than 75% improvement), partial response (PR, 25-75% improvement), and no response (NR, less than 25% improvement). All patients reached CR at the end of the combination therapy. Two were still on combination therapy after 12 and 20 weeks. Adverse event occurred in three cases, all in the conditioning phase. We conclude that combination therapy with cyclosporine and anti-TNF α appears to offer an effective and safe approach to treatment of psoriasis.

  20. Comparative effects of the antimycotic drugs ketoconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafine on the metabolism of cyclosporin by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Back, D J; Tjia, J F

    1991-01-01

    Four antimycotic drugs, the azoles ketoconazole, itraconazole and fluconazole, and the allylamine terbinafine have been studied for their effect on the metabolism of cyclosporin by human liver microsomes (n = 3) in vitro. Ketoconazole caused marked inhibition of cyclosporin hydroxylase (to metabolites M17 and M1) with IC50 and Ki values of 0.24 +/- 0.01 and 0.022 +/- 0.004 microM, respectively. Based on IC50 values, itraconazole was ten times less potent (IC50 value of 2.2 +/- 0.2 microM) and both fluconazole and terbinafine had values above 100 microM. Ki values for itraconazole and fluconazole were 0.7 +/- 0.2 and 40 +/- 5.6 microM, respectively. No kinetic parameters were calculated for terbinafine because of the lack of inhibitory effects. Based on these data, ketoconazole is confirmed as being a potent inhibitor of cyclosporin metabolism and this has clinical relevance. Although inhibition by fluconazole was much less than that by itraconazole at equimolar concentrations, it should be noted that in patients plasma concentrations of fluconazole are much greater than those of itraconazole. Clinical interactions of cyclosporin with both fluconazole and itraconazole have been reported. In contrast to the azoles, terbinafine does not have the same potential for interaction. PMID:1659439

  1. Cyclosporine versus tacrolimus in patients with HCV infection after liver transplantation: Effects on virus replication and recurrent hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hilgard, Philip; Kahraman, Alisan; Lehmann, Nils; Seltmann, Cornelia; Beckebaum, Susanne; Ross, R Stefan; Baba, Hideo A; Malago, Massimo; Broelsch, Christoph E; Gerken, Guido

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effects of the calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporine and tacrolimus, on hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and activity of recurrent hepatitis C in patients post liver transplantation. METHODS: The data of a cohort of 107 patients who received liver transplantation for HCV-associated liver cirrhosis between 1999 and 2003 in our center were retrospectively analyzed. The level of serum HCV-RNA and the activity of recurrent hepatitis were compared between 47 patients who received either cyclosporine or tacrolimus as the primary immunosuppressive agent and an otherwise similar immunosuppressive regimen which did not lead to biliary complications within the first 12 mo after transplantation. RESULTS: HCV-RNA increased within 3 mo after transplantation but the differences between the cyclosporine group and the tacrolimus group were insignificant (P = 0.49 at 12 mo). In addition, recurrent hepatitis as determined by serum transaminases and histological grading of portal inflammation and fibrosis showed no significant difference after 12 mo (P = 0.34). CONCLUSION: Cyclosporine or tacrolimus as a primary immunosuppressive agent does not influence the induction or severity of recurrent hepatitis in HCV-infected patients after liver transplantation. PMID:16521181

  2. Cyclosporine-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN): drug-lipid physicochemical interactions and characterization of drug incorporation.

    PubMed

    Müller, R H; Runge, S A; Ravelli, V; Thünemann, A F; Mehnert, W; Souto, E B

    2008-03-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) were produced loaded with cyclosporine A in order to develop an improved oral formulation. In this study, the particles were characterized with regard to the structure of the lipid particle matrix, being a determining factor for mode of drug incorporation and drug release. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements were employed for the analysis of the polymorphic modifications and mode of drug incorporation. Particles were produced using Imwitor 900 as lipid matrix (the suspension consisted of 10% particles, 8% Imwitor 900, 2% cyclosporine A), 2.5% Tagat S, 0.5% sodium cholate and 87% water. DSC and WAXS were used to analyse bulk lipid, bulk drug, drug incorporated in the bulk and unloaded and drug-loaded SLN dispersions. The processing of the bulk lipid into nanoparticles was accompanied by a polymorphic transformation from the beta to the alpha-modification. After production, the drug-free SLN dispersions converted back to beta-modification, while the drug-loaded SLN stayed primarily in alpha-modification. After incorporation of cyclosporine A into SLN, the peptide lost its crystalline character. Based on WAXS data, it could be concluded that cyclosporine is molecularly dispersed in between the fatty acid chains of the liquid-crystalline alpha-modification fraction of the loaded SLN.

  3. Cyclosporin A pharmacokinetics in liver transplant recipients in relation to biliary T-tube clamping and liver dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Naoumov, N V; Tredger, J M; Steward, C M; O'Grady, J G; Grevel, J; Niven, A; Whiting, B; Williams, R

    1989-01-01

    Cyclosporin A pharmacokinetics were studied after oral (4-14 mg/kg body weight) and intravenous dosing (1.5-3.5 mg/kg) in 13 orthotopic liver transplant recipients before and after permanent clamping of the biliary T-tube. After T-tube clamping, cyclosporin A absorption was faster and more complete with the mean time of peak concentration, tmax, reduced to around three hours from around six hours and mean bioavailability rising from only 16.6% (n = 13) to 30% in the entire group (n = 11 after clamping) or to 35% after excluding two patients who developed severe cholestasis after the preclamping study. Bioavailability in these two patients fell below 8% and to around 1% in a further patient with severe graft dysfunction. Clamping reduced the metabolic clearance of cyclosporin A by only 25% from a mean before clamping of 2.9 ml/min/kg to 2.3 ml/min/kg (n = 11). Oral cyclosporin A becomes a reliable means of maintaining therapeutic drug concentrations only after bioavailability increases in association with T-tube clamping and in the absence of severe liver dysfunction or cholestasis. PMID:2651227

  4. Cyclosporin A pharmacokinetics in liver transplant recipients in relation to biliary T-tube clamping and liver dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Naoumov, N V; Tredger, J M; Steward, C M; O'Grady, J G; Grevel, J; Niven, A; Whiting, B; Williams, R

    1989-03-01

    Cyclosporin A pharmacokinetics were studied after oral (4-14 mg/kg body weight) and intravenous dosing (1.5-3.5 mg/kg) in 13 orthotopic liver transplant recipients before and after permanent clamping of the biliary T-tube. After T-tube clamping, cyclosporin A absorption was faster and more complete with the mean time of peak concentration, tmax, reduced to around three hours from around six hours and mean bioavailability rising from only 16.6% (n = 13) to 30% in the entire group (n = 11 after clamping) or to 35% after excluding two patients who developed severe cholestasis after the preclamping study. Bioavailability in these two patients fell below 8% and to around 1% in a further patient with severe graft dysfunction. Clamping reduced the metabolic clearance of cyclosporin A by only 25% from a mean before clamping of 2.9 ml/min/kg to 2.3 ml/min/kg (n = 11). Oral cyclosporin A becomes a reliable means of maintaining therapeutic drug concentrations only after bioavailability increases in association with T-tube clamping and in the absence of severe liver dysfunction or cholestasis.

  5. Simple, rapid /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine double antibody/polyethylene glycol radioimmunoassay used in a pediatric cardiac transplant program

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, L.S.; Webb, G.; Imperio, N.C.; Nehlsen-Cannarella, S.L.; Eby, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    We modified the Sandoz cyclosporine radioimmunoassay because of our need for frequent clinical monitoring of cyclosporine drug levels in allo- and xenograft pediatric cardiac transplant patients. With application of a commercially available (/sup 125/I)cyclosporine label in place of (/sup 3/H)cyclosporine and a second antibody/polyethylene glycol (PEG) method of separation in place of charcoal separation, we simplified and enhanced the speed and precision of assay performance. Studies of 140 whole blood samples comparing this new method to the (/sup 3/H)cyclosporine radioimmunoassay (RIA) method of Berk and colleagues yielded a coefficient of correlation of 0.96 (p less than 0.00001) with means of 626 and 667 ng/ml for (/sup 3/H)RIA and (/sup 125/I)RIA, respectively, and a regression equation of y = 28 + 1.02x. The major advantages are that total assay time is reduced to approximately 1 h; (/sup 125/I)cyclosporine label is used, avoiding the problems associated with liquid scintillation counting; and precision is enhanced by separating bound and free fractions with second antibody/PEG. These modifications should provide for greater ease of assay performance and improved clinical utility of cyclosporine monitoring not only in the pediatric but also in the adult transplant patient.

  6. [Therapeutic follow-up of cyclosporine: specific problems in kidney, liver, bone marrow grafts and in the treatment of autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Garraffo, R

    1992-01-01

    In transplantation, the advantage of therapeutical follow-up of immunosuppressive treatment involving cyclosporine is generally recognized, even though the ideal therapeutic index has as yet not been perfectly defined. Cyclosporine blood level determination is merely one factor among many others in therapeutical success, but if replaced in its context, can provide valuable and relevant information. A certain number of rules exist regarding the use, and pharmacological surveillance, of cyclosporine in all patients treated with this medicine. These rules take into consideration the patients immunological responsivity, the length of time since transplantation, the position of cyclosporine in immunosuppressive treatment, related pathologies and medicines. However, it is of special interest to consider a few points according to the nature of the indication. In kidney transplantation, and nephrotoxicity, determination of cyclosporine blood level will help differential diagnosis between an immunological origin (graft rejection) and an iatrogenic origin; in liver transplantation the consideration of metabolite determination, and study of metabolite ratio, will enable the gathering of information on performance status and toxicity hazards. In some cases, the necessity to administer intravenous cyclosporine, and the special weakness of some patients as in bone marrow transplantation, treatment surveillance patterns will be altered. Finally in spite of our lack of background information, the use of cyclosporine in autoimmune diseases has shown that principles of treatment and surveillance differed from one pathology to another, this being increased in some cases (juvenile diabetes), or occasional and even non-essential (psoriasis).

  7. The Advantage of Cyclosporine A and Methotrexate Rotational Therapy in Long-Term Systemic Treatment for Chronic Plaque Psoriasis in a Real World Practice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chong Won; Kim, Bo Ri; Ohn, Jungyoon

    2017-01-01

    Background Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease. In the treatment of psoriasis, cyclosporine is commonly prescribed systemic agents. However, long-term use of cyclosporine is not recommended because of side effects such as nephrotoxicity or hypertension. Objective To ascertain the improved safety of rotational therapy using cyclosporine and methotrexate, we investigated the frequency of abnormal results in laboratory test after long term rotational therapy using cyclosporine and methotrexate. Methods From January 2009 to June 2014, patients who were treated with cyclosporine or methotrexate were enrolled. The clinical data and usage of medications were reviewed. Laboratory tests were conducted before starting the treatment and regularly follow-up. The occurrences of any laboratory abnormalities during the treatments were investigated. Results A total of 21 psoriatic patients were enrolled. The mean of medication period and cumulative dose of cyclosporine and methotrexate were 497.81±512.06 days and 115.68±184.34 g in cyclosporine and 264.19±264.71 days and 448.71±448.63 mg in methotrexate. Laboratory abnormalities were found in total two patients after rotational therapy: two patients (9.5%) in aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase and one patient (4.8%) in uric acid. No laboratory abnormalities were found in renal function test. Conclusion We found that the rotational approaches using cyclosporine and methotrexate reduced the possibility of the development of nephrotoxicity. In addition to other advantage such as quick switching from one agent to another, the rotational therapy using cyclosporine and methotrexate can minimize the adverse events during the systemic treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis. PMID:28223747

  8. Safety of Eplerenone for Kidney-Transplant Recipients with Impaired Renal Function and Receiving Cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Coralie; Lavaud, Sylvie; Toupance, Olivier; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Jaisser, Frederic; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Animal studies have highlighted the role of vascular mineralocorticoid receptor during Cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists could improve kidney survival but are not commonly used during renal impairment and in association with several immunosuppressive drugs due to a supposed higher risk of adverse events. We tested the tolerance of eplerenone according to its expected adverse events: hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, hypotension, acute kidney failure, or any other adverse event. Methods We conducted a single-center, prospective, open-label study in 31 kidney-transplant recipients with impaired renal function (30 and 50 mL/min/1.73m2) and receiving cyclosporine A. All patients received eplerenone 25 mg/d for 8 weeks. Serum potassium, renal function and expected adverse events were closely monitored. Results Eight patients experienced mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L), one moderate hyperkalemia (>5.5 mmol/L) and had to receive potassium-exchange resin. No severe hyperkalemia (>6 mmol/L) occurred. One acute kidney failure was observed, secondary to diarrhea. Basal serum potassium and bicarbonate were independently associated with a higher risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L) under treatment (OR 6.5, p = 0.003 and 0.7, p = 0.007, respectively). A cut-off value of 4.35 mmol/L for basal serum potassium was the best factor to predict the risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L). Conclusions Until eGFR falls to 30 mL/min/1.73m2, eplerenone could be safely given to kidney-transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine A, if kalemia is closely monitored. When renal function is impaired and if basal kalemia is >4.35 mmol/L, then clinicians should properly balance risk and benefit of eplerenone use and offer dietary advice. An adequately powered prospective randomized study is now needed to test its efficiency (and safety) in this population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01834768 PMID:27088859

  9. [Protective effect of verapamil and dopamine against cyclosporine-induced vasoconstriction in isolated glomeruli in rats].

    PubMed

    L'Azou, B; Lagroye, I; Plande, J; Lakhdar, B; Cambar, J

    1992-12-02

    Cyclosporin A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity is characterized by dramatic changes in glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow, largely limiting the clinical use of this drug. The vasoconstrictive response of CsA could explain, in part, these hemodynamic alterations. The present study compares the area changes in rat-isolated glomeruli incubated with CsA alone or after pre-treatment with verapamil and dopamine. In verapamil-pretreated CsA-intoxicated glomeruli, size decrease was reduced (-1.5 percent at T10, -3.1 percent at T20 and -4.8 percent at T30), when compared with CsA alone (-4.7 percent at T10, -10.1 percent at T20 and -12 percent at T30). The results obtained with dopamine were similar. In conclusion, verapamil and dopamine can be regarded as fair protective agents against CsA-induced vasoconstriction in rat-isolated glomeruli.

  10. Effect of cyclosporin and the prostacyclin analogue iloprost on human glomerular vasoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, E; Morel, D; L'Azou, B; Cambar, J; Potaux, L

    1994-01-01

    Cyclosporin is known to cause a decrease in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate in both humans and animals. These acute modifications are reversible if the drug is withdrawn, and seem to be caused by a local hormonal imbalance between vasoconstricting and vasodilating substances. We studied human glomeruli incubated with either CsA alone, iloprost alone, or CsA + iloprost. Photomicrographs of glomeruli were taken at t0, t1, t2 and t5 min and glomerular areas were measured with a videoanalyser linked to a computer. Results show a significant vasoconstriction with CsA alone, and no significant modification of glomerular areas with iloprost or CsA + iloprost. We conclude that iloprost prevents CsA-induced vasoconstriction in human glomeruli in vitro.

  11. Cyclosporin a aerosol improves the anticancer effect of Paclitaxel aerosol in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Vernon; Koshkina, N. V.; Golunski, E.; Roberts, L. E.; Gilbert, B. E.

    2004-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a lipophilic agent with broad anticancer activity. In the present study we examined the antitumor effect and toxicity of co-administration of cyclosporine A (CsA) and PTX in liposomal aerosol using the Renca lung metastases mouse model. The untreated and PTX-only groups exhibited cancer growth while CsA aerosol plus PTX had more favorable effects on tumor growth. Weight loss was seen in mice treated with CsA/PTX+CsA by day 9 to 22. Histopathological examination showed no toxicity following treatment. The findings offer evidence that a combination of CsA and PTX may be suitable for aerosol treatment of lung cancer if it is possible to control toxicity of the therapy. Images Fig. 1 PMID:17060982

  12. Prevention of diabetes mellitus in the BB/W rat with Cyclosporin-A.

    PubMed Central

    Like, A. A.; Dirodi, V.; Thomas, S.; Guberski, D. L.; Rossini, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    Autoimmune diabetes mellitus occurs spontaneously in 40-60% of a colony of BioBreeding/Worcester rats. Pretreatment of susceptible animals for 10-day intervals prior to 70 days of age with Cyclosporin-A (CSA) significantly reduced the frequency and delayed the onset of diabetes. The relatively narrow time frame of successful treatment suggests that effector cells responsible for beta cell destruction in this model of Type I diabetes may be activated during this period of time prior to the onset of overt hyperglycemia. CSA administration did not protect against the occurrence of lymphocytic thyroiditis or autoantibodies directed against smooth muscle or thyroid colloid, suggesting that these BB immunologic phenomena may be controlled by a distinct series of immunologic events. PMID:6385729

  13. Hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome transformed in acute myeloid leukemia after androgens and cyclosporin. A treatment.

    PubMed

    Gologan, R; Ostroveanu, Daniela; Dobrea, Camelia; Gioadă, Liliana

    2003-01-01

    The apparent contradiction between clonal expansion and marrow failure encountered in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is more evident in hypocellular forms at presentation. Hypoplastic MDS (hMDS) appears to be a distinct clinicopathologic entity, accounting for about 15% from all MDS. The pathogeny is supposed to result from immunosupressive mechanisms and some observations on successful treatment with Cyclosporine A (CsA) are reported. The case of a young female patient diagnosed by bone marrow core biopsy with hMDS - refractory anemia (FAB and WHO classification) with normal karyotype and scarce CD34(+) cells by immunohistophenotyping is presented. She was treated with androgens followed by CsA for a few months and shortly after she developed an acute myeloid leukemia (M4) which responded to low-doses of daily oral melphalan. This is one of the first few reports on such an event during the immunosuppressive therapy in MDS and the possible explanations for this unusual evolution are discussed.

  14. Combined treatment approach of gingivectomy and CO2 laser for cyclosporine-induced gingival overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Haytac, Cenk M; Ustun, Yakup; Essen, Emin; Ozcelik, Onur

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this report is to present a combined treatment approach with gingivectomy and CO2 laser for the management of cyclosporine-induced gingival overgrowth in 4 cases. Four renal transplant patients were surgically treated for marked gingival overgrowth by means of gingivectomy and CO2 laser. Postoperatively, all patients were followed for bleeding, pain, infection during the early healing period, and recurrence of gingival overgrowth for 12 months. The healing was uneventful, and no signs of bleeding, postoperative pain, or infection were observed in any patient during the early healing period. In the 12th postoperative month, there was evidence of mild recurrence in 1 patient, while no sign of recurrence was observed in the other patients during the follow-up period. The advantages of this combined technique include satisfactory bleeding control and clear visibility during the procedure, as well as reduced postoperative pain and swelling.

  15. Lymphocyte activation by OKT3: cyclosporine sensitivity and synergism with phorbol ester.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, J E; Benzie, C R

    1986-01-01

    Lymphocyte activation by the mitogenic monoclonal antibody OKT3 is less effective than activation by mitogenic lectins such as phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A). Activation by OKT3 is also very sensitive to inhibition by cyclosporine (CSA), which selectively inhibits Ca2+-activated steps in the activation process. In addition, the magnitude of the OKT3 response can be raised to that seen with mitogenic lectins by coincubation with phorbol esters (which activate protein kinase C). These observations suggest that OKT3 may deliver efficiently the Ca2+ signal involved in the initiation of lymphocyte activation, and that the comparatively weak overall response is due to a failure to generate a second signal, probably the activation of protein kinase C, as efficiently as the mitogenic lectins. PMID:3485075

  16. Drug interaction in a renal transplant patient: cyclosporin-Neoral and orlistat.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sally; Michael, Robson; Wells, Hayley; Maclean, Douglas; Gordon, Isabel; Taylor, John; Goldsmith, David

    2003-02-01

    An overweight 56-year-old type II diabetic on peritoneal dialysis (body mass index 35 kg/m(2)) was taking Orlistat for some months up until live-unrelated renal transplantation. Despite oral cyclosporin A (CyA) for 48 hours pretransplantation, it was very difficult to achieve adequate CyA blood levels for the first week postengraftment despite the use of much larger oral CyA doses. After opening his bowels on day 7, and the use of 3 days intravenous CyA, good CyA blood levels were achieved then maintained with conventional oral doses. The authors believe that this case shows important interactions between CyA and Orlistat.

  17. Characterization of Folding Cores in the Cyclophilin A-Cyclosporin A Complex

    PubMed Central

    Heal, Jack W.; Wells, Stephen A.; Blindauer, Claudia A.; Freedman, Robert B.; Römer, Rudolf A.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the folding core of a protein yields information about its folding process and dynamics. The experimental procedures for identifying the amino acids that make up the folding core include hydrogen-deuterium exchange and Φ-value analysis and can be expensive and time consuming. Because of this, there is a desire to improve upon existing methods for determining protein folding cores theoretically. We have obtained HDX data for the complex of cyclophilin A with the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A. We compare these data, as well as literature values for uncomplexed cyclophilin A, to theoretical predictions using a combination of rigidity analysis and coarse-grained simulations of protein motion. We find that in this case, the most specific prediction of folding cores comes from a combined approach that models the rigidity of the protein using the first software suite and the dynamics of the protein using the froda tool. PMID:25863065

  18. Cyclosporin A significantly improves preeclampsia signs and suppresses inflammation in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bihui; Yang, Jinying; Huang, Qian; Bao, Junjie; Brennecke, Shaun Patrick; Liu, Huishu

    2016-05-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with an increased inflammatory response. Immune suppression might be an effective treatment. The aim of this study was to examine whether Cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressant, improves clinical characteristics of preeclampsia and suppresses inflammation in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced preeclampsia rat model. Pregnant rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: group 1 (PE) rats each received LPS via tail vein on gestational day (GD) 14; group 2 (PE+CsA5) rats were pretreated with LPS (1.0 μg/kg) on GD 14 and were then treated with CsA (5mg/kg, ip) on GDs 16, 17 and 18; group 3 (PE+CsA10) rats were pretreated with LPS (1.0 μg/kg) on GD 14 and were then treated with CsA (10mg/kg, ip) on GDs 16, 17 and 18; group 4 (pregnant control, PC) rats were treated with the vehicle (saline) used for groups 1, 2 and 3. Systolic blood pressure, urinary albumin, biometric parameters and the levels of serum cytokines were measured on day 20. CsA treatment significantly reduced LPS-induced systolic blood pressure and the mean 24-h urinary albumin excretion. Pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-17, IFN-γ and TNF-α were increased in the LPS treatment group but were reduced in (LPS+CsA) group (P<0.05). Anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 was decreased in the LPS group but was increased in (LPS+CsA) group (P<0.05). Cyclosporine A improved preeclampsia signs and attenuated inflammatory responses in the LPS induced preeclampsia rat model which suggests that immunosuppressant might be an alternative management option for preeclampsia.

  19. Topical, Aqueous, Clear Cyclosporine Formulation Design for Anterior and Posterior Ocular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cholkar, Kishore; Gilger, Brian C.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this study was to optimize cyclosporine (CsA) nanomicellar solution and study in vivo ocular CsA tissue distribution with a topical drop. Methods: An optimized blend of hydrogenated castor oil-40 and octoxynol-40 was prepared to entrap CsA within nanomicelles. In vivo studies were conducted in New Zealand White albino rabbits with topical drop instillation. Results: Average size of CsA-loaded nanomicelles was approximately 22.4 nm. Ocular tissue CsA quantification with single and multiple dosing revealed that CsA levels followed as cornea → iris-ciliary body → aqueous humor → lens. Cyclosporine levels were also found to be in the following order: conjunctiva → sclera → retina/choroid → vitreous humor. High CsA level was detected in retina/choroid (53.7 ng/g tissue). Conclusions: Ocular tissue CsA distribution studies revealed high CsA concentrations in anterior ocular tissues. Moreover, it appears that nanomicelles are transported through a conjunctival–scleral pathway and deliver CsA to the retina/choroid. Results suggest polymeric blend to be a safe carrier for anterior and posterior ocular tissues. Translational Relevance: This study has significant translational relevance, disclosing results that suggest that aqueous nanomicellar approach can provide high corneal and conjunctival CsA concentrations. Aqueous nanomicelles can deliver high drug concentrations not only to anterior but also to back of the eye tissues, including retina. This article provides a platform for noninvasive back of the eye drug delivery with topical eye drops. Aqueous CsA nanomicelles have no perceptible toxicity such as cell membrane damage or cytotoxicity to corneal and retinal pigment epithelial cells. Clear aqueous nanomicellar solution can be translated to human conditions for keratoconjunctivitis sicca and other anti-inflammatory conditions. PMID:25964868

  20. Seasonal influence on mitogen and cyclosporin responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Michelis, Fotios V; Delitheos, Andreas K; Tiligada, Ekaterini

    2013-06-01

    The immune response and lymphocyte activation in particular are affected by environmental factors. In vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate variability in lymphocyte activation according to seasonal changes. This study focused on the effects of season on the ex vivo mitogen-induced activation of lymphocytes from peripheral blood of healthy humans living in a temperate climate, as well as the ex vivo lymphocyte activation of rabbits living under constant laboratory conditions. The possible impact of season on the action of the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A (CsA) on lymphocyte activation was investigated in both species. Cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes from human donors (n=13, 22-63years of age) and from animals housed under 12:12hour light:dark cycle were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in the absence or presence of 10 and 25μg/mL CsA. Lymphocyte activation was assessed by morphometric analysis under a light microscope. Percentages of unactivated lymphocytes, activated lymphoblasts and aberrant cells reflecting cytotoxicity were determined. Human lymphocytes demonstrated a significant decrease in response to PHA during the winter months, in comparison to the rest of the year. In contrast, the peripheral blood lymphocytes of rabbits housed under constant conditions did not demonstrate similar variations in response to PHA stimulation. The immunosuppressive action of cyclosporin A on this experimental model was unaffected by the observed seasonal variation in mitogen response in humans. These findings may guide research towards the identification of factors associated with the seasonality of the immune response and its potential influence on therapeutic interventions.

  1. The protective effect of erdosteine against cyclosporine A-induced cardiotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Selcoki, Yusuf; Uz, Ebru; Bayrak, Reyhan; Sahin, Semsettin; Kaya, Arif; Uz, Burak; Karanfil, Aydin; Ozkara, Adem; Akcay, Ali

    2007-09-24

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a frequently used immunosuppressive agent in transplant medicine to prevent rejection and in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, CsA generates reactive oxygen species, which causes nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity. The use of antioxidants reduces the adverse effects of CsA. The aim of this study is to determine the protective effects of erdosteine on CsA-induced heart injury through tissue oxidant/antioxidant parameters and light microscopic evaluation in rats. CsA cardiotoxicity was induced by administrating an oral dose of 15mg/kg CsA daily for 21 days. The rats were divided into four groups: control group (n=4), CsA administrated group (15mg/kg, n=5), CsA+erdosteine administrated group (10mg/kg day orally erdosteine, n=4) and only erdosteine administrated group (10mg/kg day orally n=5). CsA treated rats showed increase in the number of infiltrated cells and disorganization of myocardial fibers with interstitial fibrosis. The number of infiltrated cells, disorganization of myocardial fibers and interstitial fibrosis was diminished in the hearts of CsA-treated rats given erdosteine. The malondialdehyde, the protein carbonyl content and nitric oxide levels were increased in the cyclosporine A group in comparison with the control and CsA plus erdosteine groups. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were higher in CsA plus erdosteine group than CsA group. However, the CAT, GSH-Px and SOD activities were significantly lower in CsA group than in control group and erdosteine group. These results suggest that erdosteine has protective effect against CsA-induced cardiotoxicity.

  2. Pharmacokinetic Assessment of Drug‐Drug Interactions of Isavuconazole With the Immunosuppressants Cyclosporine, Mycophenolic Acid, Prednisolone, Sirolimus, and Tacrolimus in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Groll, Andreas H.; Desai, Amit; Han, David; Howieson, Corrie; Kato, Kota; Akhtar, Shahzad; Kowalski, Donna; Lademacher, Christopher; Lewis, William; Pearlman, Helene; Mandarino, Debra; Yamazaki, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This report summarizes phase 1 studies that evaluated pharmacokinetic interactions between the novel triazole antifungal agent isavuconazole and the immunosuppressants cyclosporine, mycophenolic acid, prednisolone, sirolimus, and tacrolimus in healthy adults. Healthy subjects received single oral doses of cyclosporine (300 mg; n = 24), mycophenolate mofetil (1000 mg; n = 24), prednisone (20 mg; n = 21), sirolimus (2 mg; n = 22), and tacrolimus (5 mg; n = 24) in the presence and absence of clinical doses of oral isavuconazole (200 mg 3 times daily for 2 days; 200 mg once daily thereafter). Coadministration with isavuconazole increased the area under the concentration‐time curves (AUC0–∞) of tacrolimus, sirolimus, and cyclosporine by 125%, 84%, and 29%, respectively, and the AUCs of mycophenolic acid and prednisolone by 35% and 8%, respectively. Maximum concentrations (Cmax) of tacrolimus, sirolimus, and cyclosporine were 42%, 65%, and 6% higher, respectively; Cmax of mycophenolic acid and prednisolone were 11% and 4% lower, respectively. Isavuconazole pharmacokinetics were mostly unaffected by the immunosuppressants. Two subjects experienced elevated creatinine levels in the cyclosporine study; most adverse events were not considered to be of clinical concern. These results indicate that isavuconazole is an inhibitor of cyclosporine, mycophenolic acid, sirolimus, and tacrolimus metabolism. PMID:27273343

  3. Oral Cyclosporin A Inhibits CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein Activity in HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Treatment with Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Donahue, John P.; Smeaton, Laura; Pu, Minya; Wang, Hongying; Lederman, Michael M.; Smith, Kimberly; Valdez, Hernan; Pilcher, Christopher; Haas, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose P-glycoprotein limits tissue penetration of many antiretroviral drugs. We characterized effects of the P-glycoprotein substrate cyclosporin A on T cell P-glycoprotein activity in HIV-infected AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5138 participants. Methods We studied P-glycoprotein activity on CD4 and CD8 T cells in 16 participants randomized to receive oral cyclosporin A (n=9) or not (n=7) during initiation antiretroviral therapy (ART) that did not include protease or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Results CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity decreased by a median of 8 percentage points with cyclosporin A/ART (difference between cyclosporin A/ART versus ART only P=0.001). Plasma trough cyclosporin A concentrations correlated with change in P-glycoprotein activity in several T cell subsets. Conclusions Oral cyclosporin A can inhibit peripheral blood CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity. Targeted P-glycoprotein inhibition might enhance delivery of ART to T cells. PMID:19779705

  4. [Evaluation of the heterogeneous immunoassay (ACMIA) for the measurement of blood cyclosporin on the Behring dimension RXL clinical chemistry analyzer].

    PubMed

    Morand, K; Huet, E; Blanchet, B; Astier, A; Hulin, A

    2003-01-01

    We propose an evaluation of a new heterogeneous immunoassay of cyclosporin on RXL HM Dimension (Dade Behring) for therapeutic cyclosporin monitoring in whole-blood patients transplant. The pretreatment step is performed automatically into the apparatus while it is a manual step with EMIT. Linearity, intra- and inter-day precision, limit of quantification, precision and accuracy of dilution steps and stability into the equipment were studied. We realized the comparison between ACMIA and EMIT methods on whole-blood patients transplant recipients. Heterogeneous immunoassay showed a good linearity between 0 and 500 ng/mL, intra- and inter-day precision with coefficient of variation inferior to 7.2%. We observed reproducible and accurate dilutions of high concentrations (500 to 2,000 ng/mL). The correlation with EMIT technique was correct for different type of transplant (n=55).

  5. A case of fatal systemic toxoplasmosis in a cat being treated with cyclosporin A for feline atopy.

    PubMed

    Last, Robert D; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Manning, Thomas; Lindsay, David; Galipeau, Laura; Whitbread, Trevor J

    2004-06-01

    Acute systemic toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a 4-5-year-old, male, Domestic Short Hair cat, which had been on cyclosporine A immunomodulatory therapy for feline atopy, over an 8-month period. Cyclosporin A (CsA) has shown promising results as a immunosuppressive agent in the cat for the treatment of eosinophilic plaque and granulomas, allergic cervico-facial pruritus, feline atopy and other immune-mediated dermatoses. However, inhibition of T-lymphocyte function by CsA is believed to have predisposed this cat to the development of a newly acquired, acute Toxoplasma gondii infection, as characterized by severe hepatic and pancreatic pathology in conjunction with the heavy parasite load demonstrated on immunohistochemical (IHC) stains for T. gondii. Cats on CsA therapy appear to be at risk of developing fatal systemic toxoplasmosis.

  6. Angiotensin type-2 (AT-2)-receptor activation reduces renal fibrosis in cyclosporine nephropathy: evidence for blood pressure independent effect

    PubMed Central

    Castoldi, Giovanna; di Gioia, Cira R.T.; Carletti, Raffaella; Roma, Francesca; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Stella, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Compound 21 (C21), selective agonist of angiotensin type-2 (AT-2) receptors, shows anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models of hypertension and nephroprotection in diabetes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of C21 in cyclosporine nephropathy, which is characterized mainly by tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. Ten days before and during the experimental periods, low-salt diet was administered to Sprague–Dawley rats. Cyclosporine-A (CsA; 15 mg/kg per day, intraperitoneal injection) and CsA plus C21 (0.3 mg/kg per day, intraperitoneal injection) were administered for 1 and 4 weeks. Control groups were left without any treatment. Blood pressure (plethysmographic method) and 24 h urinary albumin excretion were measured once a week. At the end of the experimental protocols, the kidneys were excised for histomorphometric analysis of renal fibrosis and for immunohistochemical evaluation of inflammatory infiltrates and type I and type IV collagen expression. After 1 and 4 weeks, the rats treated with CsA showed a significant increase (P<0.01) in blood pressure, no significant changes in urinary albumin excretion and a significant increase (P<0.01) in glomerular and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis and inflammatory infiltrates as compared with the control rats. Treatment with C21 did not modify the CsA dependent increase of blood pressure, which was higher than in control rats, but after 4 weeks of treatment significantly reduced (P<0.01) glomerular and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis, type 1 collagen expression and macrophage infiltration, as compared with rats treated with cyclosporine. The administration of C21 showed a protective effect on cyclosporine nephropathy, decreasing renal fibrosis and macrophage infiltration. These data suggest that C21 may counteract tubulo-interstitial fibrosis, the most potent predictor of the progression of renal diseases. PMID:27679859

  7. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Growth of Infected T Cells by the Immunosuppressive Drugs Cyclosporin A and FK 506

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpas, Abraham; Lowdell, Mark; Jacobson, S. Kim; Hill, Fergal

    1992-09-01

    The effects of the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A and FK 506 were studied on cells chronically infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as well as on uninfected and newly infected cells. When cells chronically infected with HIV-1 or with HIV-2 were cocultivated with uninfected cells in the presence of cyclosporin A or FK 506 there was a delay in the formation of syncytia and of cytopathic effects. This inhibitory effect was not due to decreased membrane expression of CD4. In addition, there was an ≈100-fold reduction in the yield of infectious HIV-1 when the infected cells were grown in the presence of these drugs, a finding consistent with other evidence of decreased HIV expression. Both drugs were found to inhibit the growth of chronically infected cells at concentrations that did not inhibit the growth of the uninfected cells. These results, demonstrating that cyclosporin A and FK 506 interfere with HIV production and selectively inhibit the growth of infected cells, suggest that they may be useful in the treatment of this infection and indicate further cellular targets for antiviral agents.

  8. Impact of physical properties of formulations on bioavailability of active substance: current and novel drugs with cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Andrysek, T

    2003-07-01

    During the long period of cyclosporine-containing dosage forms development a lot of significant findings have been done especially in the field of drug delivery systems. Currently available drugs are based, from technological point of view, on self-dispersible drug delivery systems, which contain cyclosporine solved in pharmaceutically acceptable vehicle. One can find difference among particular systems: (a) at particle size distribution after dispergation; (b) at composition; and (c) at bioavailability of cyclosporine. As far as improvement of bioavailability between original brand leader formulation Sandimmune and recent brand leader formulation Neoral was followed by significant improvement in particle size distribution, it was generally assumed that the reason for this improvement have been found. Several other formulations, e.g. Consupren or SangCyA-self-dispersible systems, more or less correspond with above-mentioned theory that smaller is better and by this principle bridged liquid based dosage forms with solid dosage forms. Bioavailability of novel drug delivery system which gives coarse dispersion with average particle size between 1-150 microm when dispersed have been tested on healthy volunteers. No difference among pharmacokinetic parameters of novel drug delivery system and microemulsion system have been observed in spite of fact that average particle size of novel system is almost 1000x bigger.

  9. Eight-year results of the Spiesser study, a randomized trial comparing de novo sirolimus and cyclosporine in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gatault, Philippe; Bertrand, Dominique; Büchler, Matthias; Colosio, Charlotte; Hurault de Ligny, Bruno; Weestel, Pierre-François; Rerolle, Jean-Philippe; Thierry, Antoine; Sayegh, Johnny; Moulin, Bruno; Snanoudj, Renaud; Rivalan, Joseph; Heng, Anne-Elisabeth; Sautenet, Bénédicte; Lebranchu, Yvon

    2016-01-01

    We present the results at 8 years of the Spiesser study, a randomized trial comparing de novo sirolimus and cyclosporine in kidney transplant recipients at low immunologic risk. We assessed estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR), graft, patient, and death-censored graft survival (log-rank compared), de novo DSA appearance, risk of malignancy, post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM), and anemia. Intent-to-treat and on-treatment analyses were performed. Graft survival was similar in both groups (sirolimus: 73.3%, cyclosporine: 77.7, P = 0.574). No difference was observed between treatment groups concerning patient survival (P = 0.508) and death-censored graft survival (P = 0.858). In conditional intent-to-treat analysis, mean eGFR was greater in sirolimus than in cyclosporine group (62.5 ± 27.3 ml/min vs. 47.8 ± 17.1 ml/min, P = 0.004), in particular because graft function was excellent in patients maintained under sirolimus (eGFR = 74.0 ml/min). Importantly, no detrimental impact was observed in patients in whom sirolimus has been withdrawn (eGFR = 49.5 ml/min). Overall, 17 patients showed de novo DSAs, with no difference between the two groups (P = 0.520). Malignancy did not differ by treatment. An initial maintenance regimen based on sirolimus provides a long-term improvement in renal function for kidney transplant patients, especially for those maintained on sirolimus.

  10. [Treatment of transfusion-dependent nonsevere aplastic anemia with cyclosporine A plus ATG/ALG versus cyclosporine A plus androgens: a retrospective single center study].

    PubMed

    Song, L; Peng, G X; Wu, Z J; Zhang, L; Jing, L P; Zhou, K; Li, Y; Li, Y; Ye, L; Li, J P; Fan, H H; Zhao, X; Yang, W R; Yang, Y; Zhang, F K

    2016-11-14

    Objective: To determine whether cyclosporine A (CsA) plus androgens was as effective as the current standard immunosuppressive therapy (IST) for transfusion-dependent nonsevere aplastic anemia (TD-NSAA). Methods: The records of 125 consecutive TD-NSAA patients who were treated between Aug. 2007 and Sept. 2014, with either CsA plus androgen or ALG/ATG plus CsA regimen were reviewed. The 3-month and 6-month hematologic responses and survival were evaluated. Results: There were 125 TD-NSAA patients (70 were male and 55 female, 1.25∶1). Median age was 27 (6-66) years. There was no significant difference in early mortality between 48 treated by ATG/ALG plus CsA and 77 by CsA plus androgen patients (1/48 vs 0/77, P=0.384). Both the total hematologic response and the better hematological response rates at 3-month (70.8% vs 45.5%, P=0.006 and 27.1% vs 10.4%, P=0.015, respectively) and 6-month (75.0% vs 55.8%, P=0.031 and 41.7% vs 22.1% P =0.020, respectively) after treatment were much higher in the standard IST group than that in CsA plus androgen group. The median time to transfusion independent of 36.5 (0-149) days in the standard IST group was significantly shorter than 98 (14-180) days in CsA plus androgen group (P<0.001). Survival was comparable between the two groups (97.9% vs 100.0%, P=0.227). It was superior (71.2% vs 59.5%) but not significantly (P=0.227) in event-free survival in standard IST group. Conclusions: CsA plus androgen was inferior to the standard IST of ATG/ALG and CsA regimen in treating TD-NSAA in terms of the hematologic response and the quality of response, despite of comparable short-term survival.

  11. Cyclosporin A drug interactions. Screening for inducers and inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 (cyclosporin A oxidase) in primary cultures of human hepatocytes and in liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Pichard, L; Fabre, I; Fabre, G; Domergue, J; Saint Aubert, B; Mourad, G; Maurel, P

    1990-01-01

    In previous papers we demonstrated that cyclosporin A (CsA) was specifically oxidized in rabbit and human liver by cytochrome P-450IIIA. We therefore anticipated that any drug that is an inducer or an inhibitor of this cytochrome should lead to interaction with CsA when given in association with it. In order to confirm this hypothesis, primary cultures of human hepatocytes and human liver microsomes were used to "reproduce" in vitro clinically significant interactions observed between CsA and drugs known either as specific inducers (i.e., rifampicin) or as specific inhibitors (i.e., erythromycin) of P-450IIIA. Our results were in close agreement with the clinical reports. Human hepatocytes maintained in primary cultures for 72 hr in the presence of 50 microM rifampicin exhibited increased levels of P-450IIIA, determined by Western blot using specific antibodies, and concomitant increase in CsA oxidase activity, determined by HPLC analysis of extra and intracellular media. Conversely, these cultures exhibited erythromycin concentration-dependent decreases in CsA oxidase activity when incubated in the presence of 5, 20, and 100 microM erythromycin. In addition, a Lineweaver-Burk analysis of the erythromycin-mediated inhibition of CsA oxidase activity in human liver microsomes revealed competitive inhibition (with Ki of 75 microM) as expected, this macrolide being a specific substrate of P-450IIIA. Using this experimental approach, 59 molecules representative of 17 different therapeutic classes were screened for inducers and inhibitors of CsA oxidase activity. Our results allowed us to elucidate the molecular mechanism of previously observed, but unexplained, drug interactions involving CsA, and to detect drugs that should interfere with CsA metabolism as inducers or inhibitors. Drugs detected as potential inducers of CsA oxidase included: rifampicin, sulfadimidine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, phenylbutazone, dexamethasone, sulfinpyrazone, and carbamazepine. Drugs

  12. Cyclosporine A and palmitic acid treatment synergistically induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yi Rana, Payal; Will, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    Immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment can cause severe side effects. Patients taking immunosuppressant after organ transplantation often display hyperlipidemia and obesity. Elevated levels of free fatty acids have been linked to the etiology of metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis. The contribution of free fatty acids to CsA-induced toxicity is not known. In this study we explored the effect of palmitic acid on CsA-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells. CsA by itself at therapeutic exposure levels did not induce detectible cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Co-treatment of palmitic acid and CsA resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity, suggesting that fatty acid could sensitize cells to CsA-induced cytotoxicity at the therapeutic doses of CsA. A synergized induction of caspase-3/7 activity was also observed, indicating that apoptosis may contribute to the cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that CsA reduced cellular oxygen consumption which was further exacerbated by palmitic acid, implicating that impaired mitochondrial respiration might be an underlying mechanism for the enhanced toxicity. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) attenuated palmitic acid and CsA induced toxicity, suggesting that JNK activation plays an important role in mediating the enhanced palmitic acid/CsA-induced toxicity. Our data suggest that elevated FFA levels, especially saturated FFA such as palmitic acid, may be predisposing factors for CsA toxicity, and patients with underlying diseases that would elevate free fatty acids may be susceptible to CsA-induced toxicity. Furthermore, hyperlipidemia/obesity resulting from immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate CsA-induced toxicity and worsen the outcome in transplant patients. -- Highlights: ► Palmitic acid and cyclosporine (CsA) synergistically increased cytotoxicity. ► The impairment of mitochondrial functions may contribute to the enhanced toxicity. ► Inhibition of JNK activity attenuated

  13. Long-term graft survival after conversion from cyclosporin to azathioprine 1 year after renal transplantation. A prospective, randomized study from 1 to 6 years after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, E B; Hansen, H E; Kornerup, H J; Madsen, S; Sørensen, A W

    1993-01-01

    Cyclosporin has improved graft survival after renal transplantation, but cyclosporin nephrotoxicity is a severe clinical problem. Conversion from cyclosporin to azathioprine 1 year after transplantation might improve long-term graft survival by avoidance of cyclosporin nephrotoxicity. After treatment with cyclosporin and prednisolone during the first year after renal transplantation, 106 patients were consecutively randomized to treatment with either azathioprine and prednisolone or cyclosporin and prednisolone in a prospective, controlled study during the following 5 years, i.e. 6 years after transplantation. Actuarial estimates of graft survival rates after inclusion in the study were obtained by the product-limit method of Kaplan-Meier, and the Mantel-Cox log rank test was used to compare the two treatment regimens. When the end-points in the analyses were cessation of graft function or withdrawal of immunosuppressive treatment due to side-effects, and when patients alive with graft function or who had died with a functioning graft were treated as censored observations, graft survival 5 years after inclusion in the study was 57.7 +/- 5.2% in the total material and was the same in both the azathioprine group (52.4 +/- 7.7%) and the cyclosporin group (63.3 +/- 6.7%) (log rank = 0.40, P = 0.53). When cessation of graft function was the only end-point, graft survival 5 years after inclusion in the study was 73.7 +/- 5.2% for the total material with no significant differences between the two groups (log rank = 0.58, P = 0.45).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Calcineurin phosphatase activity in T lymphocytes is inhibited by FK 506 and cyclosporin A.

    PubMed Central

    Fruman, D A; Klee, C B; Bierer, B E; Burakoff, S J

    1992-01-01

    The immunosuppressive agents cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK 506 bind to distinct families of intracellular proteins (immunophilins) termed cyclophilins and FK 506-binding proteins (FKBPs). Recently, it has been shown that, in vitro, the complexes of CsA-cyclophilin and FK 506-FKBP-12 bind to and inhibit the activity of calcineurin, a calcium-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase. We have investigated the effects of drug treatment on phosphatase activity in T lymphocytes. Calcineurin is expressed in T cells, and its activity can be measured in cell lysates. Both CsA and FK 506 specifically inhibit cellular calcineurin at drug concentrations that inhibit interleukin 2 production in activated T cells. Rapamycin, which binds to FKBPs but exhibits different biological activities than FK 506, has no effect on calcineurin activity. Furthermore, excess concentrations of rapamycin prevent the effects of FK 506, apparently by displacing FK 506 from FKBPs. These results show that calcineurin is a target of drug-immunophilin complexes in vivo and establish a physiological role for calcineurin in T-cell activation. Images PMID:1373887

  15. Segmental pancreatic allograft survival in baboons treated with combined irradiation and cyclosporine: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Laker, L.; Els, D.; Weideman, A.; Wolfe-Coote, S.; van der Merwe, E.A.

    1985-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of cyclosporine (CS) alone, total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) alone, and CS in combination with total body irradiation (TBI) in suppressing segmental pancreatic allograft rejection in totally pancreatectomized outbred chacma baboons. The administration of CS 25 mg/kg/day and 50 mg/ kg/day resulted in mean graft survival of 21.5 days and 24.5 days, respectively. CS 85 mg/kg/day resulted in median graft survival of 9 days. There was a wide daily fluctuation of CS serum trough levels exhibited between primates receiving the same oral dose. TBI in excess of 300 rads resulted in irreversible bone marrow suppression. Modest results were achieved in recipients of TBI-76 rads (38 x 2 rads), with median graft survival of 21 days, results not different from recipients treated with CS. TLI recipients of 600 rads (150 x 4 rads) resulted in median pancreatic graft survival of 16 days. TBI together with oral CS administration exhibited no synergistic or additive effect and a single peroperative donor-specific blood transfusion did not enhance pancreatic allograft survival in this model. However, of 10 primates receiving TBI 100 rads (50 x 2 rads) and CS 25 mg/kg/day administered orally indefinitely, four remained normoglycemic for more than 60 days. TBI 100 rads (50 x 2 rads) together with oral and parenteral CS resulted in necrotizing enterocolitis in four of six recipients.

  16. Improved dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior of cyclosporine A using high-energy amorphous solid dispersion approach.

    PubMed

    Onoue, Satomi; Sato, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Kumiko; Kawabata, Yohei; Mizumoto, Takahiro; Yuminoki, Kayo; Hashimoto, Naofumi; Yamada, Shizuo

    2010-10-31

    The aim of the present investigation is to develop solid dispersion (SD) formulations of cyclosporine A (CsA) for improving the oral bioavailability of CsA. Amorphous SDs of CsA with eight hydrophilic polymers were prepared with wet-mill employing zirconia beads. The physicochemical properties were characterized with a focus on morphology, crystallinity, thermal behavior, dissolution, and interaction of CsA with co-existing polymer. Although CsA molecules were found to be amorphous in all wet-milled formulations, some SD formulations failed to improve the dissolution. Of all CsA formulations, SD using polymer with HPC(SSL) exhibited the largest improvement in dissolution behavior. Pharmacokinetic profiling of orally dosed CsA in rats was carried out using UPLC/ESI-MS. After the oral administration of HPC(SSL)-based SD, enhanced CsA exposure was observed with increases in C(max) and AUC of ca. 5-fold, and the variation in AUC was ca. 40% less than that of amorphous CsA. Infrared spectroscopic studies suggested an interaction between CsA and HPC(SSL), as evidenced by the conformational transition of CsA. From the improved dissolution and pharmacokinetic data, the amorphous SD approach using wet-milling technology should lead to consistent and enhanced bioavailability, leading to an improved therapeutic potential of CsA.

  17. Prevention of murine cerebral malaria by low-dose cyclosporin A.

    PubMed Central

    Grau, G E; Gretener, D; Lambert, P H

    1987-01-01

    The effects of cyclosporin A (CsA) were investigated in an experimental model of cerebral malaria. In this model, Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected CBA/Ca mice develop a clinically and histologically characterized neurological syndrome which is considered to be the result of immunopathological reactions mediated by L3T4+ T cells. It was shown that CsA displayed a strong protective effect on neurological complications when given at a dose 1 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days (Days 4-8), which had no effect on the parasite. Paradoxically, this protection against neurological complications was not seen when parasiticidal doses were used during this limited 5-day period. A similar protective effect was observed with two CsA derivatives, C5-34 and H7-94. The mechanisms by which CsA and the two derivatives could prevent murine cerebral malaria are unknown but can be related to exquisite effects on some lymphocyte functions. In view of these results, it might be conceivable to investigate the benefits of using low doses of CsA in man, in conjunction with the classical antiparasite therapy, for the management of cerebral malaria. PMID:3327806

  18. Xenograft survival in two species combinations using total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtle, S.J.; Halperin, E.C.; Bollinger, R.R.

    1987-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) has profound immunosuppressive actions and has been applied successfully to allotransplantation but not xenotransplantation. Cyclosporine (CsA) has not generally permitted successful xenotransplantation of organs but has not been used in combination with TLI. TLI and CsA were given alone and in combination to rats that were recipients of hamster or rabbit cardiac xenografts. Combined TLI and CsA prolonged survival of hamster-to-rat cardiac xenografts from three days in untreated controls to greater than 100 days in most recipients. TLI alone significantly prolonged rabbit to rat xenograft survival with doubling of survival time. However, combined treatment did not significantly prolong rabbit-to-rat cardiac xenograft survival compared with TLI alone. The hamster and rat are phylogenetically closely related. Transplants from hamsters to rat are concordant xenografts since the time course of unmodified rejection is similar to first-set rejection of allografts. Although the rabbit-to-rat transplant is also between concordant species (average survival of untreated controls: 3.2 days) the rabbit and rat are more distantly related. These results suggest that TLI is an effective immunosuppressant when applied to cardiac xenotransplants in these animal models; that the choice of species critically affects xenograft survival when TLI and/or CsA are used for immunosuppression; and that the closely related species combination tested has markedly prolonged (greater than 100 days) survival using combined TLI and CsA.

  19. Long-term salvage therapy with cyclosporin A in refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Emilia, Giovanni; Morselli, Monica; Luppi, Mario; Longo, Giuseppe; Marasca, Roberto; Gandini, Giovanna; Ferrara, Leonardo; D'Apollo, Nicola; Potenza, Leonardo; Bertesi, Marcello; Torelli, Giuseppe

    2002-02-15

    Treatment of severe, chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) refractory to most usual therapies is a difficult challenge. Little information exists on the clinical use of cyclosporin A (CyA) in the treatment of ITP. This report describes long-term treatment with CyA (median, 40 months) and follow-up (median, 36.8 months) in 12 adult patients with resistant ITP. CyA used in relatively low doses (2.5-3 mg/kg of body weight per day) led to a clinical improvement in 10 patients (83.3%). Five had a complete response (41.1%), 4 a complete response to maintenance therapy (33.3%), and one a partial response (8.3%). Two patients had no response. Most patients with a response (60%) had a long-term remission (mean, 28.6 months) after discontinuation of CyA. One patient had a relapse of ITP 4 years after CyA therapy was stopped. Side effects were moderate and transient, even in patients dependent on continued CyA treatment. CyA seems to represent reasonable salvage treatment in severe, potentially life-threatening, refractory ITP.

  20. Prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts in the primate with total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Els, D.; Du Toit, L.B.; Weideman, A.; Davids, H.; van der Merwe, E.

    1987-09-01

    The prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts (PDA) by total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and in combination with cyclosporine (CsA) was assessed in a well established total pancreatectomy, diabetic, primate transplantation model. Pancreatic transplantation was performed in 119 pancreatectomized baboons (Papio ursinus). Of a total of 109 allografts performed, 71 were segmental allografts (open duct drainage) and 38 PDA. Of 119 graft recipients, 10 received segmental pancreatic autografts. TLI and CsA administered separately to segmental allograft recipients resulted in modest allograft survival and indefinite graft survival was not observed. 8 of 17 (47%) segmental allograft recipients that received TLI and CsA had graft survival beyond 100 days, indicating highly significant pancreatic allograft survival. All long-term segmental allograft recipients were rendered normoglycemic (plasma glucose less than 8 mmol/L) by this immunosuppressive regimen. In contrast, poor results were observed in PDA recipients treated with TLI and CsA. Mean survival in 18 treated PDA recipients was 23.8 days, 8 survived longer than 20 days (44.4%), and 1 greater than 100 days (5.5%). Despite treatment, early rejection of the duodenum in PDA recipients frequently resulted in necrosis and perforation and contributed to a high morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that, in contrast to the significant prolongation of segmental allografts by TLI and CsA, poor immunosuppression was achieved by this regimen in PDA recipients and was associated with a high morbidity and mortality caused by early rejection of the duodenum.

  1. Suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions and lymphokine production by cyclosporin A in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, A W; Moon, D K; Nelson, D S

    1983-01-01

    Two consecutive daily i.m. injections of cyclosporin A (Cs A) (greater than 50 mg/kg) inhibited delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses in mice immunized with SRBC. Maximal suppression was observed when Cs A was administered 24 and 48 h after sensitization. Culture of spleen cells from these animals with antigen, insoluble concanavalin A (iCon A) or PHA revealed inhibition of the production of two lymphokines: that inducing macrophage procoagulant activity (MPCA) and macrophage chemotactic factor (LDCF). The inhibitory effect on lymphokine production was not due to depletion of T cells. In vitro, 25 ng/ml Cs A suppressed T cell proliferative responses to antigen and mitogen but much higher doses were required to impair the response to LPS. Similar doses of Cs A also suppressed lymphokine production, but the responses of macrophages to these lymphokines was unaffected, even at doses which totally inhibited lymphokine production. Production of interleukin 1 by LPS stimulated macrophages was inhibited by Cs A only at concentrations much greater than those required to suppress lymphokine production. PMID:6872317

  2. Management of cyclosporine-induced gingival hyperplasia by use of an argon laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenau, Richard J.; Triolo, P.; Powell, G. L.

    1994-09-01

    This is a report of a case study with interesting laser applications. A 7 year old female was referred to us for treatment of hyperplastic tissue. At age two the patient had successfully undergone a liver transplant. She had undergone two periodontal surgeries under general anesthetic for the same soft tissue problem. Other possible complications were chronic sinusitis and frequent headaches. She has allergies to penicillin and sulfa. Her daily medications are Predisone and Cyclosporin. We consulted with her transplant team and they had no contraindication for the proposed dental surgery. The doctor placed her on prophylactic erythromycin for the procedure, as a preventive measure. The patient desired not to have any more general anesthetics administered. Clinical examination revealed electric pulp tests were normal for all teeth tested. No visible carious lesions were observed and there was no need for radiographs at this time. Soft tissue revealed red inflamed fibrous tissue consistent with gingival hyperplasia. Probing demonstrated 4 - 6 mm pockets around the anterior teeth.

  3. Evaluation of cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in rats with various renal radioactive agents

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, J.G.; Thomas, F.D.; Subramanian, G.; Roskopf, M.; Hellwig, B.

    1988-09-01

    The efficacy of different radiodiagnostic agents for demonstrating the decline in renal function from cyclosporine (CyA) nephrotoxicity was assessed in rats receiving a standard dose of the drug for 2 wk, compared with control rats. The agents included (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA, (/sup 131/I)hippuran, (/sup 111/In)lysozyme, (/sup 99m/Tc)glucoheptonate (GHA), (/sup 99m/Tc)dimercaptosuccinate (DMS) and (/sup 111/In)aminated dextran (amdex). A small dose of (/sup 99m/Tc)- or (/sup 111/In)DTPA was administered simultaneously to normalize the results for variations in drug response from one animal to another. There were statistically significant differences in the detectability of the renal functional impairment by plasma clearance, early and 2-hr renal uptake among the different agents. However, none was clearly superior to DTPA. This conclusion is consistent with previous studies which showed a parallel decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow in acute CyA toxicity probably due primarily to vasoconstriction.

  4. Taste-masked orodispersible tablets of cyclosporine self-nanoemulsion lyophilized with dry silica.

    PubMed

    Zidan, Ahmed S; Aljaeid, Bader M; Mokhtar, Mahmoud; Shehata, Tamer M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of formulation parameters on the disintegration, water absorption and dissolution characteristics of cyclosporine A (CyA) loaded self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) in an orodispersible compacts. Its taste masking efficiency was also attempted using an electronic tongue. ODTs were prepared by freeze-drying liquid SEDDS and synthetic amorphous silica suspension followed by direct compression. The influences of the compression forces and super-disintegrant were evaluated to optimize tablet characteristics. The liquid SEDDS was characterized by vesicular size of 48.5 nm, polydispersity index of 0.95, turbidity of 40.7 NTU and rapid CyA dissolution and emulsification rate. The results of micrometric studies demonstrated an acceptable flow, hardness and friability to indicate good mechanical strength of ODTs. The interaction and Pareto charts demonstrated a greater effect of low compression force to increase the porosity and facilitate the disintegration rather than the deformation action of the super-disintegrant. Super-disintegrant level was the most important factor affecting the dissolution parameter followed by the compression force then their interaction effect. Moreover, as indicated by Euclidean distance values and discrimination indices, the unpalatable taste and aversion taste of CyA to stimuli were masked in its optimized SEDDS incorporated ODTs.

  5. The protective effect of vildagliptin in chronic experimental cyclosporine A-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbeeny, Nagla A; Nader, Manar A

    2016-03-01

    The study examined the effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, vildagliptin, in cyclosporine (CsA)-induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were divided into 4 groups treated for 28 days: control (vehicle), vildagliptin (10 mg/kg, orally), CsA (20 mg/kg, s.c.), and CsA-vildagliptin group. Liver function was assessed by measuring serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma glutamyltransferase (γGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and albumin, and histopathological changes of liver were examined. Oxidative stress markers were evaluated. Assessment of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity in hepatic nuclear extract, serum DPP-4, and expression of Bax and Bcl2 were also done. CsA-induced hepatotoxicity was evidenced by increase in serum levels of AST, ALT, and γGT; a decrease in serum albumin; and a significant alteration in hepatic architecture. Also, significant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione (GSH) levels, increased expression Bax proteins with deceased expression of Bcl2, and increased hepatic activity of NF-κB and serum DPP-4 level were observed upon CsA treatment. Vildagliptin significantly improved all altered parameters induced by CsA administration. Vildagliptin has the potential to protect the liver against CsA-induced hepatotoxicity by reducing oxidative stress, DPP-4 activity, apoptosis, and inflammation.

  6. Cyclosporine A-induced hyperactivity in rats: is it mediated by immunosuppression, neurotrophism, or both?

    PubMed

    Borlongan, C V; Stahl, C E; Fujisaki, T; Sanberg, P R; Watanabe, S

    1999-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) immunosuppressive treatment has become an adjunctive therapy in neural transplantation of dopamine-secreting cells for treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, CsA and its analogues have been shown to promote trophic effects against neurodegenerative disorders, and therefore CsA may have direct beneficial effects on dopaminergic neurons and dopamine-mediated behaviors. The present study examined the interaction between the reported CsA-induced hyperactivity and the possible alterations in nigral tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive neurons in rats with damaged blood-brain barrier. CsA was administered at a therapeutic dose (10 mg/kg/day, IP, for 9 days) used in neural transplantation protocol for PD animal models. CsA-treated animals displayed significantly higher general spontaneous locomotor activity than control animals at drug injection days 7 and 9. Histological assays at day 9 revealed that there was a significant increase in TH-immunoreactive neurons in the nigra of CsA-treated rats compared to that of the vehicle-treated rats. The nigral TH elevation was accompanied by suppressed calcium-phosphotase calcineurin activity, indicating an inhibition of host immune response. This is the first report of CsA exerting simultaneous immunosuppressive and neurotrophic effects, as well as increasing general spontaneous locomotor behavior. These results support the utility of CsA as a therapeutic agent for PD and other movement disorders.

  7. Beneficial effect of shallot (Allium ascalonicum L.) extract on cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Wongmekiat, O; Leelarugrayub, N; Thamprasert, K

    2008-05-01

    The clinical use of an immunosuppressive cyclosporine A (CsA) is limited by its serious nephrotoxic effect. Evidences have suggested the role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Shallot (Allium ascalonicum L.) has recently been shown to possess antioxidative and free radical scavenging abilities. The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible beneficial effect of shallot extract on renal injury caused by CsA. Male Wistar rats were treated orally with vehicle, CsA (25 mg/kg), shallot extract (1 g/kg), and CsA plus shallot extract for 21 days. Renal function, histopathology, tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels were evaluated 24 h after the last treatment. CsA-induced nephrotoxicity was evidenced by increased blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, but decreased urea and creatinine clearance. The kidney of CsA treated rats exhibited severe vacuolations and tubular necrosis. CsA also induced oxidative stress, as indicated by increased renal MDA and reduced GSH concentrations. Administration of shallot extract along with CsA counteracted the deleterious effects of CsA on renal dysfunction, oxidative stress markers, and morphological changes. These data indicate the protective potential of shallot extract against CsA nephrotoxicity and suggest a significant contribution of its antioxidant property to this beneficial effect.

  8. Cyclosporin A inhibits calcineurin (phosphatase 2B) and P-glycoprotein activity in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Julio C; Lugo, Haydee; Pérez, D Guillermo; Ortiz-Martínez, César; Laclette, Juan P

    2004-08-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibits the proliferation of several protozoan parasites through blocking the activity of calcineurin (Cn) or P-glycoproteins (Pgp). We report here, that inhibition of the proliferation of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites, the causal agent of human amebiasis, is due to interference of the phosphatase activity of Cn, in a similar fashion to the effect of this immunosuppressive drug on T lymphocytes. The non-immunosuppressive CsA analog PSC-833, which binds Pgp without interfering the function of Cn, did not inhibit the proliferation of HM1:IMSS trophozoites. Moreover, phosphatase activity of amebic Cn, detected using the phosphopeptide RII, was drastically affected by incubation with CsA, but not with PSC-833. On the other hand, both drugs were also tested on clone C2 trophozoites, which grow in the presence of emetine due to over-expression of Pgp. The effect of CsA was similar to that observed on HM1:IMSS trophozoites, whereas PSC-833 only affected the proliferation and viability of clone C2 when the trophozoites were grown in the presence of 40 microM of emetine, suggesting an interference of the Pgp activity. This suggestion was confirmed by results from experiments of Pgp-dependent effux of rhodamine from pre-loaded trophozoites, in the presence of either of these drugs. Therefore, CsA inhibition of E. histolytica trophozoite proliferation is more likely due to Cn than Pgp activity inhibition.

  9. Cyclosporine A immunosuppression drives catastrophic squamous cell carcinoma through IL-22

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Hiroshi; Roudiani, Nazanin; Ovits, Channa; Bryan, Teddy; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; Tober, Kathleen L.; Gonzalez, Juana; Krueger, James G.; Felsen, Diane; Carucci, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Immune-suppressed organ transplant recipients (OTRs) can develop catastrophic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), characterized by multiple primary tumors, extensive body surface area involvement, or metastases. There are currently no curative systemic therapies available. We previously showed that IL-22 enhances SCC proliferation. Herein, we examined links between cyclosporine (CSA), IL-22, and SCC in patients, cell lines, and mice with UV light–induced SCC. Eighteen of 114 OTRs developed catastrophic SCC, which was strongly associated with CSA treatment. We found that CSA drives T cell polarization toward IL-22–producing T22 cells, and CSA treatment increased IL-22 receptor in SCC cells. SCC tissue from OTRs showed increased expression of IL-22RA1. CSA potentiated rescue by IL-22 of serum-starved SCC cells; treatment of SCC cells with IL-22 and CSA increased both their migratory and invasive capacity. In a UV-induced model of SCC in SKH-1 immunocompetent mice, treatment with anti–IL-22 antibody reduced tumor number and tumor burden. We found that catastrophic SCC in OTRs is associated with CSA use, which may be acting by favoring T22 polarization. Since anti–IL-22 antibody administration decreased tumor number and tumor burden in vivo, blockade of the IL-22 axis may be developed as a viable therapeutic option for catastrophic SCC. PMID:27699266

  10. Safety of the concomitant use of caspofungin and cyclosporin A in patients with invasive fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Rodriguez, C; Lopez-Duarte, M; Jurado, M; Lopez, J; Arranz, R; Cisneros, J-M; Martino, M L; Garcia-Sanchez, P J; Morales, P; Olivé, T; Rovira, M; Solano, C

    2004-07-01

    Caspofungin, an echinocandin antifungal agent, is active against invasive Aspergillus and Candida infections. In a phase I study in healthy volunteers, mild transient increases in serum aminotransferases were observed with the concomitant administration of caspofungin and cyclosporin A (CsA). As a result, it is recommended that the concomitant use of the two drugs be limited to those settings with appropriate risk-benefit balance. We retrospectively assessed safety data in 14 patients with refractory invasive mycoses who were treated concomitantly with CsA and caspofungin before the drug was licensed in Spain. In all, 13 patients were adults (median age, 31.5 years; range, 14-67 years). The average duration of concomitant therapy was 15 days (range, 2-43 days). No clinically significant elevations of serum aminotransferases were observed, and no patient had concomitant therapy discontinued or interrupted due to a drug-related adverse event. In this study of a limited number of patients, the coadministration of caspofungin and CsA was generally well tolerated.

  11. Bone metabolism in renal transplant patients treated with cyclosporine or sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Campistol, Josep M; Holt, David W; Epstein, Solomon; Gioud-Paquet, Martine; Rutault, Karine; Burke, James T

    2005-09-01

    Sirolimus is a new immunosuppressive agent used as treatment to prevent acute renal allograft rejection. One of the complications of renal transplantation and subsequent long-term immunosuppression is bone loss associated with osteoporosis and consequent fracture. Two open-label, randomized, phase 2 studies comparing sirolimus versus cyclosporine (CsA) included indices of bone metabolism as secondary end-points. Markers of bone turnover, serum osteocalcin and urinary N-telopeptides, were measured over a 1-year period in 115 patients receiving either CsA or sirolimus as a primary therapy in combination with azathioprine and glucocorticoids (study A) or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and glucocorticoids (study B). Urinary excretion of N-telopeptides and the concentrations of serum osteocalcin were consistently higher in the CsA-treated patients and significantly different at week 24 for N-telopeptides and at weeks 12, 24, and 52 for osteocalcin. In conclusion, future trials are warranted to test whether a sirolimus-based regimen conserves bone mineral density compared with a CsA-based regimen.

  12. Sirolimus therapy following early cyclosporine withdrawal in transplant patients: mechanisms of action and clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Thervet, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Cyclosporine (CsA), a member of the family of calcineurin inhibitors, is a cornerstone of the immunosuppressive treatments used after organ transplantation. However, it exhibits significant toxicity, including nephrotoxicity and increased cardiovascular risk factors. CsA withdrawal has been used as a strategy to improve renal allograft function and other CsA-related toxicities. In order to maintain adequate immunosuppression levels, sirolimus may be used in association with CsA withdrawal. Sirolimus is a member of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) family. It presents a good immunosuppressive efficacy associated with antiproliferative actions. Early withdrawal of CsA with sirolimus is associated with a significant improvement of renal function. Despite numerically a higher incidence of acute rejection episodes, this maneuver seems also to be associated with a better allograft survival in the long-term, and improvement of renal histology and blood pressure. However, CsA withdrawal is only feasible in a selected population. Furthermore, the use of sirolimus is associated with other side-effects including lipid abnormalities, abnormal liver tests, and thrombocytopenia. Other studies are mandatory to define the population who can benefit from this maneuver. Finally, complete CsA avoidance has been already reported and is currently under clinical investigation. PMID:17717968

  13. Response of human renal tubular cells to cyclosporine and sirolimus: A toxicogenomic study

    SciTech Connect

    Pallet, Nicolas Rabant, Marion; Xu-Dubois, Yi-Chun; LeCorre, Delphine; Mucchielli, Marie-Helene; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Agier, Nicolas; Thervet, Eric; Legendre, Christophe; Beaune, Philippe; Anglicheau, Dany

    2008-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the potentially nephrotoxic response of tubular cells to immunosuppressive drugs remain poorly understood. Transcriptional profiles of human proximal tubular cells exposed to cyclosporine A (CsA), sirolimus (SRL) or their combination, were established using oligonucleotide microarrays. Hierarchical clustering of genes implicated in fibrotic processes showed a clear distinction between expression profiles with CsA and CsA + SRL treatments on the one hand and SRL treatment on the other. Functional analysis found that CsA and CsA + SRL treatments preferentially alter biological processes located at the cell membrane, such as ion transport or signal transduction, whereas SRL modifies biological processes within the nucleus and related to transcriptional activity. Genome wide expression analysis suggested that CsA may induce an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in tubular cells in vitro. Moreover we found that CsA exposure in vivo is associated with the upregulation of the ER stress marker BIP in kidney transplant biopsies. In conclusion, this toxicogenomic study highlights the molecular interaction networks that may contribute to the tubular response to CsA and SRL. These results may also offer a new working hypothesis for future research in the field of CsA nephrotoxicity. Further studies are needed to evaluate if ER stress detection in tubular cells in human biopsies can predict CsA nephrotoxicity.

  14. Expression of Ammonia Transporters, Rhbg and Rhcg, in Chronic Cyclosporine Nephropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Woo; Ahn, Kyung Ohk; Kim, Wan Young; Han, Dong He; Li, Can; Ghee, Jung Yeon; Han, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hye-Young; Handlogten, Mary E.; Kim, Jin; Yang, Chul Woo; Weiner, I. David

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Cyclosporine (CsA)-induced renal injury causes renal tubular acidosis. The current study was performed to evaluate the influence of CsA-induced renal injury on the ammonia transporter family members, Rh B-glyco-protein (Rhbg) and Rh C-glycoprotein (Rhcg). Methods Rats were treated daily for 1 or 4 weeks with vehicle (VH) or CsA. Induction of chronic CsA-induced nephropathy was confirmed by demonstrating impaired renal function and characteristic histopathology. Rhbg and Rhcg expression was evaluated with immunoblot, immunohistochemistry, real-time RT-PCR and electron microscopy. Results CsA treatment for 4 weeks developed mild metabolic acidosis and decreased urinary ammonia excretion. Rhcg mRNA expression was unchanged in both the cortex and outer medulla, but Rhcg protein expression in the CsA group was significantly reduced in the cortex and outer medulla. There were no significant differences in Rhbg mRNA and protein expression between the CsA and VH group. Conclusion Long-term treatment with CsA in rats results in decreased urinary ammonia excretion accompanied by decreased expression of Rhcg; these changes are likely to mediate the CsA-induced defect in ammonium excretion in the collecting duct. PMID:18776723

  15. Preparation, characterization and in silico modeling of biodegradable nanoparticles containing cyclosporine A and coenzyme Q10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankola, D. D.; Durbin, E. W.; Buxton, G. A.; Schäfer, J.; Bakowsky, U.; Kumar, M. N. V. Ravi

    2010-02-01

    Combination therapy will soon become a reality, particularly for those patients requiring poly-therapy to treat co-existing disease states. This becomes all the more important with the increasing cost, time and complexity of the drug discovery process prompting one to look at new delivery systems to increase the efficacy, safety and patient compliance of existing drugs. Along this line, we attempted to design nano-scale systems for simultaneous encapsulation of cyclosporine A (CsA) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and model their encapsulation and release kinetics. The in vitro characterization of the co-encapsulated nanoparticles revealed that the surfactant nature, concentration, external phase volume, droplet size reduction method and drug loading concentration can all influence the overall performance of the nanoparticles. The semi-quantitative solubility study indicates the strong influence of CoQ10 on CsA entrapment which was thought to be due to an increase in the lipophilicity of the overall system. The in vitro dissolution profile indicates the influence of CoQ10 on CsA release (64%) to that of individual particles of CsA, where the release is faster and higher (86%) on 18th day. The attempts to model the encapsulation and release kinetics were successful, offering a possibility to use such models leading to high throughput screening of drugs and their nature, alone or in combination for a particular polymer, if chi-parameters are understood.

  16. Attenuation of Cyclosporine-Induced Sperm Impairment and Embryotoxicity by Crataegus monogyna Fruit Aqueous Extract

    PubMed Central

    Zahra, Armand; Gholamreza, Najafi; Farokhi, Farah; Shalizar Jalali, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Cyclosporine (Cs), a cyclic undecapeptide with potent immuno suppressive activity, causes several adverse effects including reproductive toxicity. This study aims to examine the ability of Crataegus monogyna aqueous fruit extract as an antioxidant to protect against Cs-induced reproductive toxicity. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 32 adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups of eight animals each. Rats in two groups received 40 mg/kg/day Cs for 45 days by oral gavage. In addition, one of the two groups received Crataegus monogyna aqueous extract at a dose of 20 mg/kg/day orally four hours after Cs administration. The remaining two groups consisted of a vehicle treated control (Cont) group and a Crataegus monogyna control (Cr) group. Differences between groups were assessed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) using the SPSS software package for Windows. Results: Cs treatment caused a signiifcant decrease in sperm count and viability with an increase in DNA damage and protamine deifciency of the sperm cells. We observed signiifcant decreases in fertilization rate and embryonic development, in addition to an increased rate of embryo arrest in Cs-treated rats. Crataegus monogyna co-administration attenuated all Cs-induced negative changes in the above-mentioned parameters. Conclusion: Supplementation with Crataegus monogyna a queous fruit extract could be useful against reproductive toxicity during Cs treatment in a rat model PMID:24027659

  17. Experimental immunologically mediated aplastic anemia (AA) in mice: cyclosporin A fails to protect against AA

    SciTech Connect

    Knospe, W.H.; Steinberg, D.; Gratwohl, A.; Speck, B.

    1984-07-01

    Immunologically mediated aplastic anemia (AA) in mice was induced by the i.v. injection of 10(7) lymph node cells (LNC) from H-2k identical but Mls mismatched CBA/J donor mice into previously irradiated (600 rad total body gamma) C3H/HeJ mice. Cyclosporin A (CsA), 25 mg/kg, was administered subcutaneously from day -1 to day 30. Control mice included C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad alone, C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad plus CsA as above, and C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad total body irradiation followed by 10(7) LNC from CBA/J donors. CsA failed to prevent lethal AA. These results suggest that the pathogenetic mechanisms operating in immunologically mediated AA differ from the mechanisms operating in rodents transplanted with allogeneically mismatched marrow or spleen cells which develop graft-versus-host disease. The results are consistent with a non-T cell-dependent mechanism causing the AA.

  18. Comparison of the effects of FK-506, cyclosporin A and rapamycin on IL-2 production.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, D J; Naya, I; Bundick, R V; Smith, G M; Schmidt, J A

    1991-01-01

    The immunosuppressive compounds FK-506, cyclosporin A (CsA) and rapamycin inhibit both the human and mouse mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) with IC50s of 2-5 x 10(-10) M for FK-506 and rapamycin and 10(-8) M for CsA. FK-506 and CsA were also potent inhibitors of A23187/PMA-stimulated IL-2 production by Jurkat and HuT-78 cells but had no effect on the response of mouse CTLL cells to IL-2. IC50 values for inhibition of IL-2 production closely matched those for inhibition of the MLR and both drugs were active only during the first 4-6 hr following stimulation. In contrast, rapamycin was a poor inhibitor of IL-2 production, although it inhibited cellular responses to IL-2. The IC50 values for these two activities indicated that neither alone accounted for rapamycin inhibition of the MLR. FK-506 and CsA affected IL-2 gene transcription in Jurkat cells by the same mechanism. Both inhibited the appearance of the transcription factor, NFAT, whereas rapamycin did not. The appearance of another transcription factor, NFK beta, was unaffected by all three drugs. The effects of FK-506 and CsA on IL-2 gene expression, therefore, are similar even though the two drugs act through distinct cytosolic receptors. Images Figure 4 PMID:1715317

  19. Deletion of mineralocorticoid receptors in smooth muscle cells blunts renal vascular resistance following acute cyclosporine administration

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Cristian A.; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Andre-Gregoire, Gwennan; Placier, Sandrine; Van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Berger, Stefan; Warnock, David G.; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Rieu, Philippe; Jaisser, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors such as cyclosporine A (CsA) are still commonly used after renal transplantation, despite CsA–induced nephrotoxicity (CIN), which is partly related to vasoactive mechanisms. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is now recognized as a key player in the control of vascular tone, and both endothelial cell- and vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC)-MR modulate the vasoactive responses to vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. Here we tested whether vascular MR is involved in renal hemodynamic changes induced by CsA. The relative contribution of vascular MR in acute CsA treatment was evaluated using mouse models with targeted deletion of MR in endothelial cell or SMC. Results indicate that MR expressed in SMC, but not in endothelium, contributes to the increase of plasma urea and creatinine, the appearance of isometric tubular vacuolization, and overexpression of a kidney injury biomarker (neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin) after CsA treatment. Inactivation of MR in SMC blunted CsA–induced phosphorylation of contractile proteins. Finally, the in vivo increase of renal vascular resistance induced by CsA was blunted when MR was deleted from SMC cells, and this was associated with decreased L-type Ca2+ channel activity. Thus, our study provides new insights into the role of vascular MR in renal hemodynamics during acute CIN, and provides rationale for clinical studies of MR antagonism to manage the side effects of calcineurin inhibitors. PMID:26422501

  20. Statistical evaluation and experimental design of a psoriasis xenograft transplantation model treated with cyclosporin A.

    PubMed

    Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Alifrangis, Lene; Andersen, Søren; Dam, Tomas Norman

    2011-05-01

    Psoriasis xenograft transplantation models where human skin is transplanted onto immune-deficient mice are generally accepted in psoriasis research. Over the last decade, they have been widely employed to screen for new therapeutics with a potential anti-psoriatic effect. However, experimental designs differ in several parameters. Especially, the number of donors and grafts per experimental design varies greatly; numbers that are directly related to the probability of detecting statistically significant drug effects. In this study, we performed a statistical evaluation of the effect of cyclosporine A, a recognized anti-psoriatic drug, to generate a statistical model employable to simulate different scenarios of experimental designs and to calculate the associated statistical study power, defined as the probability of detecting a statistically significant anti-psoriatic drug treatment effect. Results showed that to achieve a study power of 0.8, at least 20 grafts per treatment group and a minimum of five donors should be included in the chosen experimental setting. To our knowledge, this is the first time that study power calculations have been performed to evaluate treatment effects in a psoriasis xenograft transplantation model. This study was based on a defined experimental protocol, thus other parameters such as drug potency, treatment protocol, mouse strain and graft size should, also, be taken into account when designing an experiment. We propose that the results obtained in this study may lend a more quantitative support to the validity of results obtained when exploring new potential anti-psoriatic drug effects.

  1. Cyclosporin-A-induced prion protein aggresomes are dynamic quality-control cellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Ben-Gedalya, Tziona; Lyakhovetsky, Roman; Yedidia, Yifat; Bejerano-Sagie, Michal; Kogan, Natalya M; Karpuj, Marcela Viviana; Kaganovich, Daniel; Cohen, Ehud

    2011-06-01

    Despite the activity of cellular quality-control mechanisms, subsets of mature and newly synthesized polypeptides fail to fold properly and form insoluble aggregates. In some cases, protein aggregation leads to the development of human neurodegenerative maladies, including Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Aggregates of misfolded prion protein (PrP), which appear in cells after exposure to the drug cyclosporin A (CsA), and disease-linked PrP mutants have been found to accumulate in juxtanuclear deposition sites termed 'aggresomes'. Recently, it was shown that cells can contain at least two types of deposition sites for misfolded proteins: a dynamic quality-control compartment, which was termed 'JUNQ', and a site for terminally aggregated proteins called 'IPOD'. Here, we show that CsA-induced PrP aggresomes are dynamic structures that form despite intact proteasome activity, recruit chaperones and dynamically exchange PrP molecules with the cytosol. These findings define the CsA-PrP aggresome as a JUNQ-like dynamic quality-control compartment that mediates the refolding or degradation of misfolded proteins. Together, our data suggest that the formation of PrP aggresomes protects cells from proteotoxic stress.

  2. Long-term use of cyclosporine in the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Radowicz, Stacey N; Power, Helen T

    2005-04-01

    This retrospective study of 51 dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated with cyclosporine (CsA) for a minimum of 6 months assessed the frequency of dosing and the need for continual treatment to control clinical signs. The study evaluated both medical records and information supplied by the owners in the form of written questionnaires and telephone follow-up. Laboratory parameters, possible adverse effects and owner satisfaction were assessed. The dose of CsA was 5 mg/kg orally per day and dogs received CsA for 6-30 months. At the conclusion of the study period, 28 dogs (55%) needed ongoing CsA to control clinical signs of AD: 8 (15%) received CsA 2-3 days per week, 10 (20%) 4-5 days per week, and 10 (20%) daily. CsA was discontinued in 23 dogs (45%) after 6-24 months due to either a limited response (22%) or after achieving a clinical response (24%). The results suggest that some dogs with AD treated with CsA may not require daily or even ongoing treatment to control clinical signs. Laboratory abnormalities were detected in 13 dogs (25%) during their CsA treatment. Two dogs developed oral growths and three developed hirsuitism. Forty owners (78%) reported no adverse events in their dogs during the treatment period. Thirty-six owners (71%) were satisfied with CsA as treatment for their atopic dog.

  3. Cyclosporin A in the treatment of refractory immune thrombocytopenia purpura in children.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, B; Cividalli, G; Freeman, A; Yatziv, S; Koren, G; Baruchel, S

    2001-05-01

    Patients with refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenia do not respond to standard therapy with high-dose corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, and splenectomy. We describe the cases of two patients with refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenia treated with oral cyclosporin A (CsA) to evaluate the efficacy of this alternative therapy. Blood pressure and hepatic and renal function were in the normal range before initiation of treatment. Induction therapy with pulses of high-dose methylprednisolone was used for 3 consecutive days to improve the initial immune suppression. Gradual dose reduction of CsA, according the platelet count, minimized the long-term adverse effects of CsA. Oral CsA with pulses of high-dose methylprednisolone induced remission of the thrombocytopenia. Gradual weaning of CsA over months, according the platelet count, produced no observable adverse effects of the CsA. Rapid dose reduction caused thrombocytopenia, which resolved with higher dosages of CsA. Our cases show the efficacy of CsA for refractory immune thrombocytopenia. This therapeutic option with oral CsA as an additional salvage option may avoid splenectomy and the adverse effects of long-term corticosteroids. Larger clinical investigations are necessary to establish the indications and therapeutic regimen for CsA in immune thrombocytopenia.

  4. Calcineurin-independent inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake by cyclosporin A

    PubMed Central

    Montero, M; Lobatón, C D; Gutierrez-Fernández, S; Moreno, A; Alvarez, J

    2003-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is a widely used compound because of its potent immunosupressive properties, derived mainly from the inhibition of calcineurin, and also because of its ability to block the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP). This second effect has been involved in the protection against apoptosis mediated by release of mitochondrial factors. We show here that CsA (1–10μM) has an additional effect on Ca2+ homeostasis in mitochondria that cannot be attributed to inhibition of PTP. By measuring specifically mitochondrial [Ca2+] with targeted aequorin, we show that CsA inhibited Ca2+ entry into mitochondria both in intact and in permeabilized cells, and this effect was stronger when Ca2+ entry was triggered by low cytosolic [Ca2+], below 5 μM. Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake required micromolar concentrations of CsA and was not mimicked by other inhibitors of calcineurin such as FK-506 or cypermethrin, nor by a different inhibitor of the PTP, bongkrekic acid. CsA blocked the increase in mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake rate induced by the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter activator SB202190. Our results suggest that CsA inhibits Ca2+ entry through the Ca2+ uniporter by a mechanism independent of the inhibition of PTP or calcineurin. This effect may contribute to reduce depolarization and Ca2+ overloading in mitochondria after cell stimulation, and thus cooperate with the direct inhibition of PTP to prevent apoptosis. PMID:14691054

  5. Calcineurin-independent inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake by cyclosporin A.

    PubMed

    Montero, M; Lobatón, C D; Gutierrez-Fernández, S; Moreno, A; Alvarez, J

    2004-01-01

    1. Cyclosporin A (CsA) is a widely used compound because of its potent immunosupressive properties, derived mainly from the inhibition of calcineurin, and also because of its ability to block the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP). This second effect has been involved in the protection against apoptosis mediated by release of mitochondrial factors. We show here that CsA (1-10 microm) has an additional effect on Ca(2+) homeostasis in mitochondria that cannot be attributed to inhibition of PTP. 2. By measuring specifically mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] with targeted aequorin, we show that CsA inhibited Ca(2+) entry into mitochondria both in intact and in permeabilized cells, and this effect was stronger when Ca(2+) entry was triggered by low cytosolic [Ca(2+)], below 5 microm. 3. Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake required micromolar concentrations of CsA and was not mimicked by other inhibitors of calcineurin such as FK-506 or cypermethrin, nor by a different inhibitor of the PTP, bongkrekic acid. 4. CsA blocked the increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake rate induced by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter activator SB202190. 5. Our results suggest that CsA inhibits Ca(2+) entry through the Ca(2+) uniporter by a mechanism independent of the inhibition of PTP or calcineurin. This effect may contribute to reduce depolarization and Ca(2+) overloading in mitochondria after cell stimulation, and thus cooperate with the direct inhibition of PTP to prevent apoptosis.

  6. Tacrolimus versus cyclosporine after hematopoietic cell transplantation for acquired aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Wang, Tao; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Hemmer, Michael T.; Cutler, Corey S.; Couriel, Daniel R.; Alousi, Amin M.; Antin, Joseph H.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gupta, Vikas; Hamilton, Betty K.; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Marks, David I.; Ringdén, Olle T.H.; Socié, Gérard; Solh, Melhem M.; Akpek, Görgün; Cairo, Mitchel S.; Chao, Nelson J.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Nishihori, Taiga; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman; Shah, Ami; Teshima, Takanori; Tallman, Martin S.; Wirk, Baldeep; Spellman, Stephen R.; Arora, Mukta; Martin, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cyclosporine (CSP) with methotrexate (MTX) have been widely used for immunosuppression after allogeneic transplantation for acquired aplastic anemia. We compared outcomes with tacrolimus (TAC)+MTX versus CSP+MTX after transplantation from HLA-identical siblings (SIB) or unrelated donors (URD) in a retrospective cohort of 949 patients with severe aplastic anemia. Study endpoints included hematopoietic recovery, graft failure, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD and mortality. TAC+MTX was used more frequently in older patients and in recent years in both SIB and URD groups. In multivariate analysis, TAC+MTX was associated with a lower risk of mortality in URD recipients and with slightly earlier ANC recovery in SIB recipients. Other outcomes did not differ statistically between the two regimens. No firm conclusions were reached regarding the relative merits of TAC+MTX versus CSP+MTX after HCT for acquired aplastic anemia. Prospective studies would be needed to determine whether the use of TAC+MTX is associated with lower risk of mortality in URD recipients with acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:26033280

  7. The use of oral cyclosporin to treat feline dermatoses: a retrospective analysis of 23 cases.

    PubMed

    Vercelli, A; Raviri, G; Cornegliani, L

    2006-06-01

    Limited information is available regarding the use of cyclosporin A (CsA) for the treatment of feline dermatoses. The aim of this retrospective study was therefore to describe the efficacy of CsA for the therapy of eosinophilic granuloma (EG), eosinophilic plaque, indolent ulcer, linear granulomas, idiopathic pruritus and stomatitis. A computer search for feline dermatological cases treated with CsA between 1999 and 2004 was performed. Based on history, clinical signs and laboratory diagnostic tests, it was then possible to divide cases into three groups and to select 23 cats. Seven cats had one or more of the following conditions: EG, eosinophilic plaque, indolent ulcer and/or linear granuloma (group A); eight cats had idiopathic pruritus (group B) and eight cats had plasmacytic stomatitis (group C). Doses ranged from 5.8 to 13.3 mg kg(-1) oral CsA. All cats were monitored, with complete serum blood analysis and physical examination, monthly for a minimum of 6 months. Response to therapy was scored (severity of lesions and pruritus) with a 0-10 visual analogue scale at each visit (day 0, day, 30, day 60, day 90). All cats in groups A and B were cured and were maintained on alternate day therapy. In group C, 4/8 patients went into remission, while remaining cats have a fair to good improvement. Routine haematological and biochemical examination failed to reveal abnormalities related to CsA administration.

  8. Tacrolimus versus Cyclosporine after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acquired Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Flowers, Mary E D; Wang, Tao; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Hemmer, Michael T; Cutler, Corey S; Couriel, Daniel R; Alousi, Amin M; Antin, Joseph H; Gale, Robert Peter; Gupta, Vikas; Hamilton, Betty K; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Marks, David I; Ringdén, Olle T H; Socié, Gérard; Solh, Melhem M; Akpek, Görgün; Cairo, Mitchell S; Chao, Nelson J; Hayashi, Robert J; Nishihori, Taiga; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman; Shah, Ami; Teshima, Takanori; Tallman, Martin S; Wirk, Baldeep; Spellman, Stephen R; Arora, Mukta; Martin, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Combinations of cyclosporine (CSP) with methotrexate (MTX) have been widely used for immunosuppression after allogeneic transplantation for acquired aplastic anemia. We compared outcomes with tacrolimus (TAC)+MTX versus CSP+MTX after transplantation from HLA-identical siblings (SIB) or unrelated donors (URD) in a retrospective cohort of 949 patients with severe aplastic anemia. Study endpoints included hematopoietic recovery, graft failure, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, and mortality. TAC+MTX was used more frequently in older patients and, in recent years, in both SIB and URD groups. In multivariate analysis, TAC+MTX was associated with a lower risk of mortality in URD recipients and with slightly earlier absolute neutrophil count recovery in SIB recipients. Other outcomes did not differ statistically between the 2 regimens. No firm conclusions were reached regarding the relative merits of TAC+MTX versus CSP+MTX after hematopoietic cell transplantation for acquired aplastic anemia. Prospective studies would be needed to determine whether the use of TAC+MTX is associated with lower risk of mortality in URD recipients with acquired aplastic anemia.

  9. Effect of Cyclosporin A and Angiotensin II on cytosolic calcium levels in primary human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Supraja, Ajitkumar; Dinesh, Murugan Girija; Rajasekaran, Subbarayan; Balaji, Thodur Madapusi; Rao, Suresh Ranga

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the effect of Cyclosporin A (CsA) and angiotensin II (Ang II) on cytosolic calcium levels in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Materials and Methods: Healthy gingival samples from six volunteers were obtained, and primary HGFs were cultured. Cell viability and proliferation assay were performed to identify the ideal concentrations of CsA and Ang II. Cytosolic calcium levels in cultured gingival fibroblasts treated with CsA and Ang II were studied using colorimetric assay, confocal and fluorescence imaging. Statistical analyses were done using SPSS software and GraphPad Prism. Results: Higher levels of cytosolic levels were evident in cells treated with CsA and Ang II when compared to control group and was statistically significant (P < 0.05) in both colorimetric assay and confocal imaging. Fluorescent images of the cultured HGFs revealed the same. Conclusion: Thus calcium being a key player in major cellular functions, plays a major role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival overgrowth. PMID:27857765

  10. Impact of cyclosporine reduction with MMF: a randomized trial in chronic allograft dysfunction. The 'reference' study.

    PubMed

    Frimat, L; Cassuto-Viguier, E; Charpentier, B; Noël, C; Provôt, F; Rostaing, L; Glotz, D; Sraer, J D; Bourbigot, B; Moulin, B; Lang, P; Ducloux, D; Pouteil-Noble, C; Girardot-Seguin, S; Kessler, M

    2006-11-01

    Long-term use of calcineurine inhibitors (CNIs) may contribute to the development of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD). We investigate the impact of the introduction of MMF combined with cyclosporine (CsA) 50% dose reduction. An open, randomized, controlled, multicenter, prospective study was conducted in 103 patients, receiving a CsA-based therapy with a serum creatinine between 1.7-3.4 mg/dL, more than 1 year after transplantation. They were randomized to receive MMF with half dose of CsA (MMF group) or to continue their maintenance CsA dose (control group). A total of 96 weeks after randomization, the evolution of renal function assessed by regression line analysis of 1/SeCr improved in the MMF group (positive slope) vs. the control group (negative slope), 4.2 x 10(-4) vs. -3.0 x 10(-4), respectively (p < 0.001). Concurrently, the absolute renal function improved significantly in the MMF group. No episode of biopsy-proven acute rejection occurred. One patient in each group lost his graft because of biopsy-proven chronic allograft nephropathy. There was a significant decrease of triglycerides level in the MMF group. Anemia and diarrhea were statistically more frequent in the MMF group. In CAD, the reduction of CsA in the presence of MMF results in significant improvement in renal function during a 2-year follow-up.

  11. Optimization of cyclosporine therapy in renal transplantation by a pharmacokinetic strategy.

    PubMed

    Kahan, B D; Grevel, J

    1988-11-01

    Although cyclosporine (CsA) displays high immunosuppressive efficacy due to potent selective inhibition of T cell, but not nonspecific, immune functions, the pleiotropic toxicities of the drug result in a low therapeutic index. Thus for a given individual there is at best only a narrow dosage range producing immunosuppression not beclouded by toxicity. Selection of the appropriate CsA dose to achieve this state is complicated by marked inter- and intraindividual variability in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (1). Even considering renal transplant recipients solely, pharmacokinetic variations in drug absorption, volume of distribution, and metabolism as estimated by clearance rates are so great that strategies based on median population values are not useful for a great proportion of patients. Thus it is necessary to devise a CsA strategy that tailors therapy to compensate for interindividual variations. Implementation of such a strategy not only standardizes drug therapy, but also reveals the clinical impact of interindividual differences in the profile of CsA metabolites and in pharmacodynamic effects of a given quantity of CsA, reflecting both the therapeutic actions on the immune system and toxic effects on target organs. Thus a dosing strategy that achieves uniform drug levels by compensating for pharmacokinetic variation is essential for the eventual dissection of a rational CsA regimen.

  12. Influence of demographic factors on cyclosporine pharmacokinetics in adult uremic patients.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Reynolds, K L; Rutzky, L P; Kahan, B D

    1989-03-01

    The causes of variability in cyclosporine (CS) clearance (CL) are mostly unknown. The pharmacokinetics of CS were studied in 30 adult uremic patients after single intravenous and oral doses by analyzing serial concentrations in serum by radioimmunoassay (SR) and in whole blood by radioimmunoassay (WR) and high pressure liquid chromatography (WH). Bioavailability (F) and CL were calculated by noncompartmental models and were significantly different depending upon the assay method except for FSR = FWR: FSR = 43.2 +/- 21.7%; FWR = 43.5 +/- 18.5%; FWH = 36.4 +/- 17.3%; CLSR = 849 +/- 363 ml/min; CLWR = 380 +/- 156 ml/min; CLWH = 559 +/- 174 ml/min. The age of the patients and parameters describing body size such as weight, surface area and percent of ideal weight were not correlated with CL. The height of the patients correlated with CLWH but not CLSR or CLWR. Parameters responsible for CS binding in blood such as cholesterol, triglyceride, hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit did not explain variability in CL. Of the factors indicative of liver function alanine transaminase activity but not aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase activity nor total bilirubin concentration in serum was correlated with CL. F was not correlated with any of the demographic factors except for alanine transaminase. None of the significant correlations explained enough of the variability to afford a reliable prediction of CL or F.

  13. The cyclosporin-erythromycin interaction: impaired first pass metabolism in the pig.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, D. J.; Grant, D. R.; Carruthers, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetic interaction between cyclosporin (CsA) and erythromycin has been studied in the weanling pig model. 2. Blood CsA and metabolite-1 (M1) concentrations were monitored by high performance liquid chromatography in portal, hepatic and jugular venus blood before and after treatment with erythromycin stearate for 7 days. 3. Erythromycin significantly increased maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC) of CsA in the peripheral circulation. This was accompanied by a significant reduction in the hepatic extraction ratio calculated from portal and hepatic Cmax and AUC data. 4. The extraction ratio appears to be concentration-dependent in that values derived from Cmax (high concentrations) were greater than those from AUC (average concentrations). 5. Time to Cmax (tmax) and t1/2 of CsA were essentially unchanged and no significant changes were observed in peripheral M1 kinetics apart from a small increase in tmax. 6. The pharmacokinetic changes observed in the pig suggest that the CsA-erythromycin interaction is caused by inhibition of hepatic metabolism and the impact of inhibition is greatest during first-pass when CsA concentrations are at their highest. PMID:1933135

  14. FTY720 in combination with cyclosporine--an analysis of skin allograft survival and renal function.

    PubMed

    Silva, Francieli Ruiz; Silva, Lea Bueno Lucas; Cury, Patricia Maluf; Burdmann, Emmanuel Almeida; Bueno, Valquiria

    2006-12-20

    Acute and chronic nephrotoxicity caused by CsA continuous administration impair kidney allograft survival. Several clinical and experimental protocols have shown benefits to the kidney after decreasing CsA dose, withdrawing the drug or delaying its introduction after transplantation. FTY720 is a new compound that has immunosuppressive characteristics and increase allograft survival in animal models without causing the side effects of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). FTY720 described mechanism of action that consists to alter the lymphocyte migration pattern without impairment of the immune system response against pathogens. In our mice model, FTY720 administered alone or in combination with CsA during 21 days increased skin allograft survival in a fully mismatched strain combination and did not cause significant changes in renal function. Moreover, renal structure was normal in all groups suggesting that at low doses (10 mg/kg/day) CsA can be associated during short-term period to other immunosuppressive drugs, i.e. FTY720 without affecting the kidney. Combination of immunosuppressive compounds with FTY720 and/or delayed introduction of low cyclosporine dose could prevent graft rejection and avoid nephrotoxicity.

  15. Cremophor EL, the cyclosporine vehicle, suppresses in vitro natural killer cell cytotoxicity(NKCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, L.; Nehlsen-Cannarella, S.; Eby, W.; Tan, S.; Kramer, J.; Hirokane, J.

    1986-03-01

    Cyclosporine I.V. (CIV), in its vehicle, Cremophor EL, (CEL), is a potent immunosuppressive agent which prolongs survival of allogeneic transplants. NKCC is postulated to be involved in allograft rejection. This study was designed to investigate the effect of CEL, a polyoxyethylated castor oil, on in vitro spontaneous cytotoxicity induced by human natural killer cells. NKCC was measured by a standard /sup 51/Cr release assay with K562 target cells. After a 4 hr NKCC assay, both CIV at 10/sup -3/M to 10/sup -7/M and CEL at the equivalent dilution, suppressed NKCC 46 to 6%, relative to control lysis (p 0.05). There was no significant suppression of NKCC at dilutions greater than 10/sup -7/M. The differences in NKCC between CIV and CEL at all dilutions tested were not significant. Both CIV and CEL with increasing dilutions correlated negatively with NKCC (r = -0.67, p < 0.0001; r = -0.74, p < 0.0001, respectively). With a 4 hr preincubation, both CIV at 10/sup -4/M and CEL at the equivalent dilution suppressed NKCC (p < 0.01). However, after a 24 hr preincubation of CIV and CEL, NKCC did not differ from control lysis. These data suggest that the CIV vehicle CEL transiently suppresses in vitro NKCC and, therefore, may play a role in the survival of allogeneic transplants.

  16. Identification of novel indicators of cyclosporine A nephrotoxicity in a CD-1 mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, Sein; Slattery, Craig; Ryan, Michael P.; McMorrow, Tara

    2011-04-15

    The calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) is a widely used immunosuppressive agent. However, nephrotoxicity is a serious side effect observed in patients which limits clinical use of CsA. CsA nephrotoxicity is associated with tubulointerstitial injury progressing to nephropathy. This is typically diagnosed by invasive renal biopsy and is often only detected when the disease process is well advanced. Therefore identification of novel, early indicators of CsA nephrotoxicity could be clinically advantageous. This study aimed to establish a murine model of CsA nephrotoxicity and to identify urinary proteins that may indicate the onset of CsA-induced nephropathy using 2-D gel electrophoresis. CsA nephrotoxicity was induced in CD-1 mice by daily CsA administration for 4 weeks. By week 4, elevated serum creatinine and proteinuria were observed after CsA treatment indicating significant renal dysfunction. Decreased cadherin-1, increased {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and fibroblast specific protein 1 in kidney tissue indicated disruption of normal tubular architecture. Alterations in podocin and uromodulin were also observed which may indicate damage to other segments of the nephron. Proteomic analysis of urine identified a number of differentially regulated proteins that may be involved in early CsA nephropathy including cadherin 1, superoxide dismutase and vinculin. These findings suggest novel mechanisms of CsA nephrotoxicity and identify novel potential markers of the disease.

  17. Effects of erdosteine on cyclosporine-A-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Erarslan, Elife; Ekiz, Fuat; Uz, Burak; Koca, Cemile; Turkcu, Ummuhani Ozel; Bayrak, Reyhan; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2011-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a potent immunosuppressive agent used for organ transplantations and various autoimmune disorders. However, hepatotoxicity due to CsA remains one of the major side effects. The use of antioxidants reduces the adverse effects of CsA. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effects of erdosteine on CsA-induced liver injury through tissue oxidant/antioxidant parameters and to evaluate light microscopic alterations in rat-liver tissues. Rats were randomly divided into four experimental groups: The control group received sunflower oil (2 mL/kg/day, per orally; p.o.), while the other groups were treated with CsA (25 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or erdosteine (10 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or CsA+erdosteine, respectively. Serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels, tissue malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels, and superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase enzyme activities were measured. Histological examination was performed. CsA caused a significant deterioration in the hepatic function tests, morphology, and gave rise to severe oxidative stress in the liver. Erdostein significantly improved the functional and histological parameters and attenuated the oxidative stresss induced by CsA. Erdostein protects liver tissue against oxygen free radicals and prevents hepatic dysfunction and morphological abnormalities associated with chronic CsA administration.

  18. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of 6-month daily dosing of an oral formulation of cyclosporine (ATOPICA for cats®) in cats

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, E S; VanLare, K A; Strehlau, G; Peyrou, M; Roycroft, L M; King, S

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporine was proven efficacious in the treatment of feline hypersensitivity dermatitis. This target animal study was conducted to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of ATOPICA for Cats® (cyclosporine oral solution, USP) MODIFIED following 6-month daily dosing in cats. Forty healthy cats (four cats/sex/group) received 0, 8 (1×), 16 (2×), 24 (3×), or 40 (5×) mg/kg cyclosporine once daily for 6 months (183 days). Body weight, food consumption, ophthalmoscopic, physical examinations including neurological assessments, blood pressure, electrocardiography, clinical pathology (hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry, urinalysis), organ weights, and macroscopic and microscopic examinations were performed and assessed. In addition, blood concentrations of cyclosporine were measured at the pretreatment trough on Days 1, 2, 7, 14, 31, 91, 154, and 182, and post-treatment on Days 1, 31, and 182. Adverse effects possibly related to treatment included prolonged APTT and one report each of bone marrow hypocellularity and lymphoma; all occurred in cats treated with doses more than 16 mg/kg. There was no significant accumulation of cyclosporine beyond the first week of treatment. Results confirm that ATOPICA for Cats is safe and well tolerated in cats without unexpected accumulation beyond the first week of treatment when administered as directed. PMID:24134659

  19. Effects of oral cyclosporine on canine T-cell expression of IL-2 and IFN-gamma across a 12-h dosing interval

    PubMed Central

    FELLMAN, C. L.; ARCHER, T. M.; STOKES, J. V.; WILLS, R. W.; LUNSFORD, K. V.; MACKIN, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The duration of immunosuppressive effects following oral cyclosporine in dogs is unknown. This study used flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate the effects of high-dose oral cyclosporine across a 12-h dosing interval. Expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) was compared before and after 8 days of cyclosporine at 10 mg/kg every 12 h in six healthy dogs. Samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h postdosing for analysis of unactivated and activated T-cell and whole blood cytokine expression using flow cytometry and qRT-PCR, respectively, and at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 h postdosing for measurement of cyclosporine concentrations. Flow cytometry and qRT-PCR both demonstrated significant marked reductions in IL-2 and IFN-γ levels at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h after dosing compared to pretreatment levels (P < 0.05) for activated samples, with less consistent effects observed for unactivated samples. Both flow cytometry and qRT-PCR are viable techniques for measuring cyclosporine pharmacodynamics in dogs, yielding comparable results with activated samples. Two hours postdrug administration is the preferred time for concurrent assessment of peak drug concentration and cytokine expression, and T-cell activation is needed for optimal results. PMID:26676223

  20. [Closure of Ca2+-dependent pores by cyclosporin A: the role of magnesium ions, adenine nucleotides, and conformation status of the ADP/ATP antiporter].

    PubMed

    Andreev, A Iu; Mikhaĭlova, L M; Starkov, A A

    1994-10-01

    Effects of ADP and Mg2+ on the ability of cyclosporin A to "reseal" mitochondria permeabilized by Ca2+ and P(i) have been studied. Cyclosporin A was completely ineffective, when ADP and Mg2+ were not included into the incubation medium. Both ADP and Mg2+ used at high concentrations potentiated the effect of cyclosporin A and prevented it reversal by carboxyatractylate. Data on the influence of different concentrations of ADP and Mg2+ on the resealing efficiency of cyclosporin A suggest that the true effector modulating the state of the Ca(2+)-dependent pore is the ADP-Mg2+ complex, but not ADP or Mg2+ used separately. The ability of non-hydrolyzable analogs of adenine nucleotides, ADP-S and ATP-S, to potentiate the resealing action of cyclosporin on mitochondria permeabilized by loading of different Ca2+ concentrations to that of ADP was compared. ATP-S was ineffective when the pore was induced by high concentrations of Ca2+. The results obtained are discussed in terms of hypothesis on the direct involvement of the ADP/ATP antiporter in regulation of the inner mitochondrial membrane Ca(2+)-dependent pore state.

  1. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of 6-month daily dosing of an oral formulation of cyclosporine (ATOPICA for cats®) in cats.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E S; Vanlare, K A; Strehlau, G; Peyrou, M; Roycroft, L M; King, S

    2014-04-01

    Cyclosporine was proven efficacious in the treatment of feline hypersensitivity dermatitis. This target animal study was conducted to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of ATOPICA for Cats® (cyclosporine oral solution, USP) MODIFIED following 6-month daily dosing in cats. Forty healthy cats (four cats/sex/group) received 0, 8 (1×), 16 (2×), 24 (3×), or 40 (5×) mg/kg cyclosporine once daily for 6 months (183 days). Body weight, food consumption, ophthalmoscopic, physical examinations including neurological assessments, blood pressure, electrocardiography, clinical pathology (hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry, urinalysis), organ weights, and macroscopic and microscopic examinations were performed and assessed. In addition, blood concentrations of cyclosporine were measured at the pretreatment trough on Days 1, 2, 7, 14, 31, 91, 154, and 182, and post-treatment on Days 1, 31, and 182. Adverse effects possibly related to treatment included prolonged APTT and one report each of bone marrow hypocellularity and lymphoma; all occurred in cats treated with doses more than 16 mg/kg. There was no significant accumulation of cyclosporine beyond the first week of treatment. Results confirm that ATOPICA for Cats is safe and well tolerated in cats without unexpected accumulation beyond the first week of treatment when administered as directed.

  2. Influence of a fat-rich meal on the pharmacokinetics of a new oral formulation of cyclosporine in a crossover comparison with the market formulation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, E A; Kovarik, J M; van Bree, J B; Grevel, J; Lücker, P W; Kutz, K

    1994-01-01

    The influence of a fat-rich meal on the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine from a new oral formulation (Sandimmune Neoral) was compared in a randomized, four-way crossover study to the currently marketed formulation (Sandimmune) in 24 healthy male volunteers. Single oral doses of 300 mg Sandimmune and 180 mg Sandimmune Neoral were each administered once under fasting conditions and once 30 min after starting a high-fat meal. Serial blood samples were obtained over a 48-hr period after each administration, and whole-blood cyclosporine concentrations were determined by a specific monoclonal radioimmunoassay method. Food had a marked effect on cyclosporine absorption from Sandimmune manifested by a nearly doubled time to reach the peak concentration and a 37% increase in the area under the curve. This was associated with significant elevations in subsequent whole-blood cyclosporine concentrations compared to the fasting administration. For Sandimmune Neoral the influence was less pronounced. The maximum concentration was decreased by 26%, without a relevant change in the time to reach the peak; the area under the curve showed a slight reduction of 15%. The relatively minor influence of a fat-rich meal on the absorption of cyclosporine from Sandimmune Neoral is advantageous when individualizing a dosage regimen under clinical and outpatient administration conditions.

  3. Protective effect of verapamil in cyclosporin-incubated human and murine isolated glomeruli.

    PubMed

    L'Azou, B; Lakhdar, B; Potaux, L; Cambar, J

    1994-11-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity is characterized by a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) which is associated with a large increase in renal vascular resistance (RVR). Using a video image analyzer, we have demonstrated CsA-induced glomerular vasoconstriction in rat isolated glomeruli as assessed by a significant reduction of glomerular area. This vasoactive response explains in part the renal hemodynamic changes and the development of CsA-induced reversible decline in renal function. To confirm the direct vasoactive effect of CsA on glomeruli and to determine if calcium-blocking agents modified this response, we compared the changes in area of isolated rat and human glomeruli incubated either with CsA alone or with CsA plus verapamil. The area of the isolated glomeruli was quantitatively evaluated by a camera video image analyzer; each glomerulus served as its own control. Area kinetics were studied at 5 min intervals over 30 min. CsA-induced glomerular size reduction is dose dependent (-4.2% for 10(-10) M and -10.2% for 10(-6) M) and time dependent (-2.3% at 5 min, -4.7% at 10 min, and -12.1% at 30 min for 10(-6) M). With verapamil pretreatment, CsA-induced reduction in glomerular size was reduced (-0.6% and -3.6%, respectively, for 10(-6) M and 10(-7) M verapamil). Thus, verapamil can be considered as a protective agent against CsA-induced vasoconstriction in rat and human isolated glomeruli.

  4. Cyclosporin A-induced free radical generation is not mediated by cytochrome P-450

    PubMed Central

    Krauskopf, Alexandra; Buetler, Timo M; Nguyen, Nathalie S D; Macé, Katherine; Ruegg, Urs T

    2002-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proposed to play a role in the side effects of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA). The aim of this study was to investigate whether cytochrome P-450 (CYP) dependent metabolism of CsA could be responsible for ROS generation since it has been suggested that CsA may influence the CYP system to produce ROS. We show that CsA (1 – 10 μM) generated antioxidant-inhibitable ROS in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC) using the fluorescent probe 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. Using cytochrome c as substrate, we show that CsA (10 μM) did not inhibit NADPH cytochrome P-450 reductase in microsomes prepared from rat liver, kidney or RASMC. CsA (10 μM) did not uncouple the electron flow from NADPH via NADPH cytochrome P-450 reductase to the CYP enzymes because CsA did not inhibit the metabolism of substrates selective for several CYP enzymes that do not metabolize CsA in rat liver microsomes. CsA (10 μM) did not generate more radicals in CYP 3A4 expressing immortalized human liver epithelial cells (T5-3A4 cells) than in control cells that do not express CYP 3A4. Neither diphenylene iodonium nor the CYP 3A inhibitor ketoconazole were able to block ROS formation in rat aortic smooth muscle or T5-3A4 cells. These results demonstrate that CYP enzymes do not contribute to CsA-induced ROS formation and that CsA neither inhibits NADPH cytochrome P-450 reductase nor the electron transfer to the CYP enzymes. PMID:11861326

  5. In vitro models to study mechanisms involved in cyclosporine A-mediated glomerular contraction.

    PubMed

    L'Azou, B; Medina, J; Frieauff, W; Cordier, A; Cambar, J; Wolf, A

    1999-08-01

    The immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporin A (CsA), which is successfully used to prevent rejection in organ transplantation, induces renal side-effects as shown by a decrease in glomerular filtration rate and ultrafiltration coefficient regulated by the tone of mesangial cells.The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of CsA on isolated glomeruli and mesangial cells, which constitute appropriate in vitro models for renal vasoreactivity studies. The roles of different intracellular and extracellular mediators such as calcium, endothelin-1 (ET-1), prostaglandins (TXA(2 )and PGI(2)) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) were analysed. CsA caused a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in the planar cross-sectional areas of isolated glomeruli and mesangial cells as determined by image analysis. Intracytosolic free calcium concentration determined by fluorimetric analysis was significantly increased after 30 min CsA (10 microM) incubation. In the contraction experiment, the calcium antagonist verapamil inhibited the CsA response. ET-1, TXB(2) and keto-PGF(1alpha) were determined directly, however no changes were found statistically significantly different from respective controls. In contrast to these results, the ET-1 specific antibody was able to reduce CsA-mediated cell contraction. In the presence of a prostacyclin agonist iloprost, CsA-induced contraction was also modified. The role of ROIs using a 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFdAc) fluorimetric method was directly determined by observing, with 10 microM CsA, a significant production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), which was able alone to induce mesangial cell contraction. Coincubation with the antioxidants led to a significant inhibition of mesangial cell contraction. These results suggest that CsA caused an imbalance in the normal level of all investigated vasoconstrictive and vasodilator mediators, which shifted towards the advantage of vasoconstrictive action.

  6. Amorphous solid dispersion of cyclosporine A prepared with fine droplet drying process: Physicochemical and pharmacokinetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroki; Moritani, Tatsuru; Morinaga, Tadahiko; Seto, Yoshiki; Sato, Hideyuki; Onoue, Satomi

    2017-03-15

    The present study aimed to develop an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) of cyclosporine A (CsA) by a fine droplet drying (FDD) process for improvement in oral absorption of CsA. CsA and hydroxypropyl cellulose-SSL were dissolved in 1,4-dioxane, and the solution was powdered by the FDD process to obtain the ASD formulation of CsA (ASD/CsA). The ASD/CsA was characterized in terms of morphology, particle size distribution, crystallinity, dissolution behavior, physicochemical stability, and pharmacokinetic behavior in rats. The ASD/CsA was obtained in the form of uniform spherical particles, and the span factor was calculated to be ca. 0.4. CsA in the formulation existed in an amorphous state. The ASD/CsA exhibited a higher dissolution behavior of CsA than amorphous CsA, whereas storage of the ASD/CsA under accelerated conditions led to impairment in the dissolution behavior. The constant release of CsA from non-aged ASD/CsA was observed during dissolution testing. After oral administration of CsA samples (10mg-CsA/kg) in rats, the ASD/CsA showed a high and sustained plasma concentration of CsA as evidenced by a 18-fold increase in the oral bioavailability of CsA compared with amorphous CsA. From these findings, the FDD process might be an efficacious option for the ASD formulation of CsA with enhanced biopharmaceutics properties.

  7. Induction of synapse associated protein 102 expression in cyclosporin A-stimulated hair growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Deok; Lee, Min-Ho; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Kim, Jin-Man; Li, Sheng Jin; Rang, Moon-Jeong; Roh, Seok-Seon; Oh, Young-Seon; Yoon, Tae-Jin; Im, Myung; Seo, Young-Joon; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Park, Jang-Kyu

    2008-08-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) has been used as a potent immunosuppressive agent for inhibiting the graft rejection after organ transplantation. However, CsA provokes lots of side effects including hirsutism, the phenomenon of abnormal hair growth in the body. In the present study, we investigated the hair growth stimulating effect of CsA using in vivo and in vitro test models. When topically applied on the back skin of mice, CsA induced fast telogen to anagen transition. In contrast, CsA had no effect on the growth of human hair follicle tissues cultured in vitro, indicating that it might not have the mitogenic effect on hair follicles. To identify the genes related with CsA-induced hair growth, we performed differential display RT-PCR. Among the genes obtained, the expression of synapse associated protein 102 (SAP102) was verified using competitive RT-PCR. The result showed that the expression of SAP102 was significantly induced by CsA treatment in the back skin of C57BL/6 mice. However, the increase of SAP102 mRNA was also seen in spontaneous anagen mice, suggesting that induction of SAP102 is one event of the anagen hair growth response regardless of how the growth state was induced. SAP102 was not expressed in cultured human hair outer root sheath and dermal papilla cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that CsA induced the expression of SAP102 in perifollicular region of mouse anagen hair. Together, these results suggest that SAP102 is one of hair-cycle-dependent genes, whose expression is related with the anagen progression.

  8. Attenuation of cyclosporine A toxicity by sublethal heat shock. Role of catalase.

    PubMed

    Andrés, David; Bautista, Mirandeli; Cascales, María

    2005-02-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is the immunosuppressor most frequently used in transplant surgery and in the treatment of autoimmune diseases because of its specific inhibiting effect on signal transduction pathways of cell T receptor. It has been shown that CsA is able to generate reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, which are directly involved in the CsA hepatotoxicity. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a sublethal heat pre-treatment (43 degrees C for 30 min) on the hepatoma cell line HepG2 exposed to cytotoxic concentrations of CsA (10 and 25 microM) for 3 and 24 h. Parameters of cytotoxicity were assayed by measuring LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) leakage into the medium. Peroxide concentration was tested by flow cytometry by measuring the fluorescence intensity of DCF (dichlorofluorescein). Gene expression of catalase was detected by measuring the respective mRNA and proteins, as well as protein level of HSP70. The enzymatic activity of catalase was also determined. Heat pre-treatment significantly reduced CsA cytotoxicity as well as the level of peroxide generation. The protective effect of the previous heat treatment (corroborated by the irreversible catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole) against the CsA cytotoxicity was due to an increased expression and activity of catalase that was significantly reduced by the effect of CsA. We conclude that heat pre-treatment strongly protects against CsA injury, and the mechanism of this protection is by means of inducing not only the expression of HSP70 but also the expression and activity of catalase, the main enzyme system involved in H(2)O(2) elimination.

  9. A Multidisciplinary Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Cyclosporine A in Dystrophic Mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Annamaria; Nico, Beatrice; Liantonio, Antonella; Paola Didonna, Maria; Fraysse, Bodvael; Pierno, Sabata; Burdi, Rosa; Mangieri, Domenica; Rolland, Jean-François; Camerino, Claudia; Zallone, Alberta; Confalonieri, Paolo; Andreetta, Francesca; Arnoldi, Elisa; Courdier-Fruh, Isabelle; Magyar, Josef P.; Frigeri, Antonio; Pisoni, Michela; Svelto, Maria; Conte-Camerino, Diana

    2005-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a secondary reaction of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and may contribute to disease progression. To examine whether immunosuppressant therapies could benefit dystrophic patients, we analyzed the effects of cyclosporine A (CsA) on a dystrophic mouse model. Mdx mice were treated with 10 mg/kg of CsA for 4 to 8 weeks throughout a period of exercise on treadmill, a protocol that worsens the dystrophic condition. The CsA treatment fully prevented the 60% drop of forelimb strength induced by exercise. A significant amelioration (P < 0.05) was observed in histological profile of CsA-treated gastrocnemius muscle with reductions of nonmuscle area (20%), centronucleated fibers (12%), and degenerating area (50%) compared to untreated exercised mdx mice. Consequently, the percentage of normal fibers increased from 26 to 35% in CsA-treated mice. Decreases in creatine kinase and markers of fibrosis were also observed. By electrophysiological recordings ex vivo, we found that CsA counteracted the decrease in chloride conductance (gCl), a functional index of degeneration in diaphragm and extensor digitorum longus muscle fibers. However, electrophysiology and fura-2 calcium imaging did not show any amelioration of calcium homeostasis in extensor digitorum longus muscle fibers. No significant effect was observed on utrophin levels in diaphragm muscle. Our data show that the CsA treatment significantly normalized many functional, histological, and biochemical endpoints by acting on events that are independent or downstream of calcium homeostasis. The beneficial effect of CsA may involve different targets, reinforcing the usefulness of immunosuppressant drugs in muscular dystrophy. PMID:15681831

  10. Antioxidant properties of repaglinide and its protections against cyclosporine A-induced renal tubular injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dao; Li, Jin; Li, Hui; Wu, Qiong; Li, Qi-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Repaglinide (RG) is an antihyperglycemic agent used for the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. It has a good safety and efficacy profile in diabetic patients with complications in renal impairment and is an appropriate treatment choice, even for individuals with more severe degrees of renal malfunctions. The aim of the present study was to examine the protective effect of RG on cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced rat renal impairment and to evaluate the antioxidant mechanisms by which RG exerts its protective actions. Materials and Methods: Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250–300 g were randomly divided into five groups: administrations of olive oil (control, PO), RG (0.4 mg/kg, PO), CsA (30 mg/kg in olive oil, SC), RG (0.2 or 0.4 mg/kg, PO) plus CsA (30 mg/kg in olive oil SC) every day for 15 days. Results: SC administration of CsA (30 mg/kg) to rats produced marked elevations in the levels of renal impairment parameters such as urinary protein, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), serum creatinine (SCr), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). It also caused histologic injury to the kidneys. Oral administration of RG (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) markedly decreased all the aforementioned changes. In addition, CsA caused increases in the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and decreases in superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GSR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and glutathione in kidney homogenate, which were reversed significantly by both doses of RG. Conclusion: The findings of our study indicate that RG may play an important role in protecting the kidney from oxidative insult. PMID:27635199

  11. Cyclosporine A and palmitic acid treatment synergistically induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi; Rana, Payal; Will, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    Immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment can cause severe side effects. Patients taking immunosuppressant after organ transplantation often display hyperlipidemia and obesity. Elevated levels of free fatty acids have been linked to the etiology of metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis. The contribution of free fatty acids to CsA-induced toxicity is not known. In this study we explored the effect of palmitic acid on CsA-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells. CsA by itself at therapeutic exposure levels did not induce detectible cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Co-treatment of palmitic acid and CsA resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity, suggesting that fatty acid could sensitize cells to CsA-induced cytotoxicity at the therapeutic doses of CsA. A synergized induction of caspase-3/7 activity was also observed, indicating that apoptosis may contribute to the cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that CsA reduced cellular oxygen consumption which was further exacerbated by palmitic acid, implicating that impaired mitochondrial respiration might be an underlying mechanism for the enhanced toxicity. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) attenuated palmitic acid and CsA induced toxicity, suggesting that JNK activation plays an important role in mediating the enhanced palmitic acid/CsA-induced toxicity. Our data suggest that elevated FFA levels, especially saturated FFA such as palmitic acid, may be predisposing factors for CsA toxicity, and patients with underlying diseases that would elevate free fatty acids may be susceptible to CsA-induced toxicity. Furthermore, hyperlipidemia/obesity resulting from immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate CsA-induced toxicity and worsen the outcome in transplant patients.

  12. Protective effect of schisandrin B against cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaohua; Wang, Yan; Chen, Meiwan; Jin, Jing; Qiu, Yuwen; Huang, Min; Huang, Zhiying

    2012-01-01

    Schisandrin B (Sch B) is an active ingredient of the fruit of Schisandra chinensis. It has many therapeutic effects arising from its tonic, sedative, antitussive and antiaging activities and is also used in the treatment of viral and chemical hepatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of Sch B on cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity in mice and HK-2 cells (a human proximal tubular epithelial cell line). After gavage with Sch B (20 mg/kg) or olive oil (vehicle), mice received CsA (30 mg/kg) by subcutaneous injection once daily for four weeks. Renal function, histopathology, and tissue glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were evaluated after the last treatment. The effects of Sch B on CsA-induced oxidative damage in HK-2 cells were investigated by measuring cell viability, the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the cellular GSH and ATP concentrations. Cellular apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. Treatment with Sch B in CsA-treated mice significantly suppressed the elevation of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine levels and attenuated the histopathological changes. Additionally, Sch B also decreased renal MDA levels and increased GSH levels in CsA-treated mice. Using an in vitro model, Sch B (2.5, 5 and 10 μM) significantly increased the cell viability and reduced LDH release and apoptosis induced by CsA (10 μM) in HK-2 cells. Furthermore, Sch B increased the intracellular GSH and ATP levels and attenuated CsA-induced ROS generation. In conclusion, Sch B appears to protect against CsA-induced nephrotoxicity by decreasing oxidative stress and cell death.

  13. Precipitation of experimental autoallergic uveoretinitis by cyclosporin A withdrawal: an experimental model of uveitis relapse.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, E G; Dinning, W J; Kasp, E; Graham, E M; Dumonde, D C

    1989-01-01

    This study set out to determine whether withdrawal of cyclosporin A (CyA) in Lewis rats sensitized to retinal S antigen would precipitate experimental autoallergic uveoretinitis (EAU), and whether challenge of such animals with S antigen or an unrelated stimulus would accelerate EAU onset after drug withdrawal. Rats were sensitized with 50 micrograms S antigen in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and EAU onset was suppressed by 18 days of treatment with CyA at doses ranging from 3 to 10 mg/kg daily. Without challenge, seven out of 11 animals developed EAU with a median onset of 78 days. This was reduced to 68 days in rats challenged on day 32 with FCA alone, to 48 days with 10 micrograms S antigen in FCA, and to 41 days with 50 micrograms S antigen in FCA. The incidence, onset and severity of anterior uveitis and extent of photoreceptor destruction were related to both CyA dose and nature of challenge. The extent of photoreceptor destruction ran parallel with severity of anterior uveitis; and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactivity on day 43 was related to both severity of anterior uveitis (P less than 0.001) and photoreceptor damage (P less than 0.002). At the highest dose, CyA also delayed the appearance of antibody to S antigen; however, subsequent antibody levels were unrelated to EAU severity or to nature of challenge. The results indicate that CyA-induced suppression of the immunological response to S antigen can recover spontaneously after drug withdrawal, that challenge with either S antigen or FCA alone can accelerate the subsequent onset of EAU, and that these phenomena may provide a basis for investigating mechanisms underlying relapse of human uveoretinitis. Images Fig. 5 PMID:2805414

  14. Metabolism of cyclosporin A. I. Study in freshly isolated rabbit hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Fabre, G.; Bertault-Peres, P.; Fabre, I.; Maurel, P.; Just, S.; Cano, J.P.

    1987-05-01

    The metabolism of cyclosporin A (CsA), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, was evaluated in freshly isolated rabbit hepatocytes by HPLC which separated CsA from its major group of derivatives, e.g. first generation metabolites (monohydroxylated and N-demethylated) and second generation derivatives (dihydroxylated and dihydroxy-N-demethylated). After exposure of hepatocytes to radiolabeled CsA (0.5 mg/liter), CsA was rapidly accumulated inside the cells and metabolized. The dihydroxylated metabolites represent the major intracellular forms after 1 hr. CsA metabolites synthesized inside the cells are then rapidly detected in the extracellular compartment. Unchanged drug and the various metabolites are concentrated inside the cells with transmembrane chemical gradients ranging between 20:1 and 40:1. Transport and metabolic processes for CsA have been evaluated over the following CsA extracellular concentration range, 0.1-10 mg/liter. Metabolism appears to be the rate-limiting step. The apparent affinity constant of CsA for the enzyme system involved in its metabolism is approximately 15 microM. Besides the lipophilicity of the molecule, which is responsible for the retention of CsA and its metabolites in the intracellular compartment, the presence of a binding component(s) in the hepatocytes was also demonstrated. CsA and its metabolites seem to have similar affinities for this binding site. These studies demonstrate that CsA is rapidly transformed inside the hepatocytes to various metabolites which may play an important role in the pharmacological activity of the drug and/or in its clinical toxicity.

  15. Effect of Wuzhi tablet (Schisandra sphenanthera extract) on the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporin A in rats.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xin-ping; Qin, Xiao-ling; Xu, Chenshu; Zhong, Guo-ping; Wang, Ying; Huang, Min; Bi, Hui-chang

    2013-08-01

    In our previous reports, Wuzhi tablet (an herbal preparation of ethanol extract of Wuweizi (Schisandra sphenanthera)) can significantly increase the blood concentration of tacrolimus and paclitaxel in rats by inhibiting the CYP3A-mediated metabolism and the P-gp-mediated efflux. Cyclosporin A (CsA), a well-known immunosuppressant agent, is also a substrate of CYP3A and P-gp. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate whether and how WZ affects pharmacokinetics of CsA in rats. The AUC0-48 h and Cmax of CsA were increased by 40.1% and 13.1%, respectively, with a single oral co-administration of WZ and high dose of CsA (37.8 mg/kg). Interestingly, after a single oral co-administration of WZ and low dose of CsA (1.89 mg/kg), the AUC0-36 h and Cmax of CsA were dramatically increased by 293.1% (from 1103.2 ± 293.0 to 4336.5 ± 1728.3 ng.h/mL; p < 0.05) and 84.1% (from 208.5 ± 67.9 to 383.1 ± 92.5 ng/mL; p < 0.05), respectively. The CL/F was decreased from 1.7 L/h/kg to 0.5 L/h/kg. Thus, the effect of WZ on high dose of CsA was not significant, but pharmacokinetic parameters of CsA at low dose were significantly influenced by co-administration of WZ. The herb-drug interaction should be taken into consideration at this situation.

  16. Cyclosporine a augments P-glycoprotein expression in the regenerating rat liver.

    PubMed

    Daoudaki, Maria; Fouzas, Ioannis; Stapf, Verena; Ekmekcioglu, Cem; Imvrios, George; Andoniadis, Antonios; Demetriadou, Aphrodite; Thalhammer, Theresia

    2003-03-01

    In the liver, the multidrug resistance (MDR) protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is physiologically expressed at the bile canalicular membrane, where it participates in the biliary excretion of various lipophilic drugs and xenobiotics. Previous studies showed that the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CsA) modulates P-gp and exerts a hepatotrophic influence in the regenerating liver. Hepatocytes isolated from regenerating rat liver, after 2/3 partial hepatectomy (PH 2/3), were used as an in vivo experimental model of cells with high proliferating activity in order to investigate whether CsA influences cellular levels of P-gp in those cells. Male Wistar rats were treated with CsA (20 mg/kg body weight) for 4 d preoperatively and 1 d postoperatively, and regenerating hepatocytes were isolated by collagenase perfusion 12, 24 and 48 h after PH 2/3. Flow cytometry and Western blotting studies with the monoclonal antibodies C494 and C219 showed that after PH 2/3, cellular levels of P-gp were initially suppressed, 12 h after PH 2/3, by 23%, but were significantly elevated thereafter, 24 and 48 h after PH 2/3 by 28% and 73%, respectively. In CsA pretreated animals, P-gp levels were increased even in normal hepatocytes by 34%, and an additional augmentation was seen in hepatocytes from 24 and 48 h regenerating livers (60% and 56%, respectively). In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that CsA has an additive effect on the expression of P-glycoprotein during liver regeneration in the rat. Therefore, induction of P-gp might also be considered in patients receiving CsA after liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma and chemotherapy as an adjuvant treatment for the prevention of tumor recurrence.

  17. Effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acids on cellular immune response of piglets after cyclosporin A injection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y X; Zhu, K Y; Liu, Y L; Jiang, D F

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on the cellular immune response of piglets after cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment. The experimental study had a 2×2 factorial design, and the main factors consisted of diets (0% or 2% CLA) and immunosuppression treatments (CsA or saline injection). CsA injection significantly increased feed : gain (F : G) of piglets (P<0.05); however, dietary CLA significantly decreased F : G of piglets (P<0.05). Dietary CLA partly ameliorated the deterioration of the feed conversion rate caused by CsA treatment (P<0.01). CsA treatment significantly decreased the percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the thymus (P<0.01). Dietary CLA increased the percentages of CD4+ CD8+ double-positive and CD8+ single-positive T lymphocytes in the thymus (P<0.05), and had the trend to inhibit the decrease of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the thymus after CsA injection (P=0.07). CsA treatment significantly depleted the peripheral blood CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes (P<0.01). Dietary CLA significantly increased the number of peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytes and interleukin-2 (IL-2) production (P<0.05), and inhibited the decreases of peripheral blood CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes counts (P<0.01) as well as IL-2 production (P<0.05) after CsA treatment. Dietary CLA partly rescued the decrease of lymphocyte proliferation after CsA injection (P<0.05). In summary, dietary CLA effectively ameliorated CsA-induced cellular immunosuppression in piglets.

  18. Survival benefit associated with early cyclosporine treatment for dermatomyositis-associated interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Go, Dong Jin; Park, Jin Kyun; Kang, Eun Ha; Kwon, Hyun Mi; Lee, Yun Jong; Song, Yeong Wook; Lee, Eun Bong

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the most common cause of death in dermatomyositis (DM). Cyclosporine A (CsA) has shown to be effective in DM-associated ILD (DM-ILD). This study aimed to define the optimal time of CsA administration. A total of 47 patients with DM-ILD, who were treated with CsA at Seoul National University Hospital between January 1998 and June 2013, were enrolled. ILD was diagnosed based on typical chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings. Patients with early and delayed CsA treatment were compared in regard to the mortality and ILD progression on HRCT. The early (n = 16) and the delayed treatment group (n = 31) did not differ in regard to baseline clinical characteristics including HRCT scores and pulmonary function. Patients with clinically amyopathic DM (CADM) were more common in the early treatment group. The mortality rate was significantly lower in the early treatment group than in the delayed treatment group (p = 0.009). The survival benefit of early CsA treatment remained significant even after adjusting for age, degree of dyspnea, CADM status, and the year of CsA treatment (hazard ratio 0.057, 95 % confidence interval 0.007-0.472). CsA stabilized disease progression on HRCT in the early treatment group (p = 0.738). Delay in CsA treatment is associated with a worse survival in patients with DM-ILD. Early CsA treatment should be considered at DM-ILD diagnosis especially in patients at a higher risk of developing a rapidly progressive ILD.

  19. Cyclosporin A inhibits colon cancer cell growth independently of the calcineurin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Werneck, Miriam B.F.; Hottz, Eugênio; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Viola, João P.B.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for the development of colon cancer, providing genotoxic insults, growth and pro-angiogenic factors that can promote tumorigenesis and tumor growth. Immunomodulatory agents can interfere with the inflammation that feeds cancer, but their impact on the transformed cell is poorly understood. The calcium/calcineurin signaling pathway, through activation of NFAT, is essential for effective immune responses, and its inhibitors cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506 are used in the clinics to suppress immunity. Moreover, the kinases GSK3β and mTOR, modulated by PI-3K/Akt, can inhibit NFAT activity, suggesting a cross-talk between the calcium and growth factor signaling pathways. Both NFAT and mTOR activity have been associated with tumorigenesis. We therefore investigated the impact of calcineurin and PI-3K/mTOR inhibition in growth of human colon carcinoma cells. We show that despite the efficient inhibition of NFAT1 activity, FK506 promotes tumor growth, whereas CsA inhibits it due to a delay in cell cycle progression and induction of necroptosis. We found NFκB activation and mTORC1 activity not to be altered by CsA or FK506. Similarly, changes to mitochondrial homeostasis were equivalent upon treatment with these drugs. We further show that, in our model, NFAT1 activation is not modulated by PI3K/mTOR. We conclude that CsA slows cell cycle progression and induces necroptosis of human carcinoma cell lines in a TGFβ-, NFAT-, NFκB- and PI3K/mTOR-independent fashion. Nevertheless, our data suggest that CsA, in addition to its anti-inflammatory capacity, may target transformed colon and esophagus carcinoma cells without affecting non-transformed cells, promoting beneficial tumoristatic effects. PMID:22992618

  20. Effects of cyclosporine A on plasma cells in experimental gingivitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Berglundh, T; Lindhe, J; Tarkowski, A

    1996-06-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of Cyclosporine A (CsA) on the inflammatory lesion formed in the gingival tissues during de novo plaque formation. 5 beagle dogs were used. On day 0, all teeth of the 5 dogs were scaled and polished. A 6-week period of plaque control including daily tooth cleaning with toothbrush and dentifrice was initiated. A clinical examination regarding plaque and gingivitis was performed, and the plaque control measures were abandoned on the right side of mandible. 3 weeks later, the clinical examination was repeated, samples of subgingival plaque harvested and biopsies obtained from the 3rd and 4th right mandibular premolar regions. The tooth cleaning measures on the left side of the mandible were terminated at this interval. During the following 3 weeks, the animals formed plaque in the lower left premolar regions, and received, 1 x daily, a subcutaneous injection of CsA. At the end of this 2nd plaque formation period (test), the clinical examination was repeated, subgingival plaque was sampled and biopsies from the 3rd and 4th left mandibular premolar regions harvested. The biopsies were prepared for histometric and morphometric analyses. The clinical and histological examinations demonstrated that plaque formation resulted in a gingival lesion (ICT) which, in the 2 periods, had similar size and apical extension. The ICT formed during the CsA administration period, however, harbored an increased number of plasma cells and a reduced macrophage density than the control lesion. It is suggested that CsA administration may result in a Th-2 (T-helper 2-cell) dependent activation of B-lymphocytes.

  1. Sirolimus and tacrolimus rather than cyclosporine A cause bone loss in healthy adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Rubert, Mercedes; Montero, Mercedes; Guede, David; Caeiro, Jose-Ramón; Martín-Fernández, Marta; Díaz-Curiel, Manuel; de la Piedra, Concepción

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effects of cyclosporine (CsA), tacrolimus (FK-506), and rapamycin (RAPA) on bone mass, femoral microstructure, femoral biomechanical properties, and bone remodeling in healthy adult male rats. Forty-eight 5-month-old male Wistar rats were used. CsA (2 mg/kg/day), FK-506 (3 mg/kg/day), RAPA (1.25 mg/kg/day), or water (0.5 ml/rat/day, control group) were administered orally for 3 months. After sacrifice, mean values of immunosuppressants in blood were: CsA (670.4 ng/ml), FK-506 (19.2 ng/ml), and RAPA (4.8 ng/ml). Levels of biochemical parameters were normal in all groups. Femoral BMD was decreased in FK-506 and RAPA groups and lumbar BMD in FK-506 group. Trabecular volume fraction (BV/TV) decreased only in FK-506 group. RAPA and CsA affected femoral cortical structure, but FK-506 did not. FK-506 produced an increase in bone remodeling, and CsA a decrease. FK-506 group showed a decrease in biomechanical parameters relative to all groups. RAPA group showed a decrease in ultimate stress vs control group, and CsA group presented an increase in biomechanical parameters versus control group. We found that administration of both RAPA and FK-506 as monotherapy for healthy rats produced osteopenia. CsA treatment only produces slight damages in the cortical zone of the femur.

  2. Enhancement of oral bioavailability of cyclosporine A: comparison of various nanoscale drug-delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Qi, Jianping; Weng, Tengfei; Tian, Zhiqiang; Lu, Yi; Hu, Kaili; Yin, Zongning; Wu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A variety of nanoscale delivery systems have been shown to enhance the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs. However, the performance of these systems has seldom been evaluated simultaneously. The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability enhancement effect of lipid-based nanocarriers with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) to highlight the importance of the lipid composition, with cyclosporine A (CyA) as a model drug. CyA-loaded PLGA NPs, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), and self-microemulsifying drug-delivery systems (SMEDDS) were prepared. The particle size of PLGA NPs (182.2±12.8 nm) was larger than that of NLCs (89.7±9.0 nm) and SMEDDS (26.9±1.9 nm). All vehicles are charged negatively. The entrapment efficiency of PLGA NPs and NLCs was 87.6%±1.6% and 80.3%±0.6%, respectively. In vitro release tests indicated that the cumulative release of CyA was lower than 4% from all vehicles, including Sandimmun Neoral®, according to the dialysis method. Both NLCs and SMEDDS showed high relative oral bioavailability, 111.8% and 73.6%, respectively, after oral gavage administration to beagle dogs, which was not statistically different from commercial Sandimmun Neoral®. However, PLGA NPs failed to achieve efficient absorption, with relative bioavailability of about 22.7%. It is concluded that lipid-based nanoscale drug-delivery systems are superior to polymeric NPs in enhancing oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs. PMID:25378925

  3. Gamma irradiation of isolated rat islets pretransplantation produces indefinite allograft survival in cyclosporine-treated recipients

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.F.; Lake, S.P.; Chamberlain, J.; Thirdborough, S.; Bassett, P.D.; Mistry, N.; Bell, P.R.

    1989-06-01

    In this study we have examined the use of low-dose gamma-irradiation for the reduction of islet immunogenicity in the strong allogeneic combination of WAG rat islets transplanted into diabetic AUG recipients. First, we determined that gamma-irradiation reduced immunogenicity in vitro by use of a modified MLR with WAG islets as stimulators and AUG splenocytes as responders. We then determined the maximum dose of gamma-irradiation that could be used (250 rads) before islet function was affected. As 250 rads islet pretreatment alone was ineffective in prolonging allograft survival, we combined the pretreatment with a short course (days 0, 1, 2; 30 mg/kg) of cyclosporine. We found that CsA was only effective in significantly prolonging allograft survival when given subcutaneously in olive oil. The CsA treatment alone gave a significantly prolonged survival time for the islet allografts (median, 37 days vs. 6 days for controls), but when combined with the 250 rads islet pretreatment a synergistic effect was seen with 100% becoming long-term survivors (greater than 100 days). The long-term surviving AUG rats from both the CsA alone group and the CsA plus 250 rads pretreated islets group were challenged with WAG dendritic cells (DC). The islets from the 250 rads pretreated group were subsequently rejected (day 6) while the CsA alone group were not affected. The role of low dose gamma-irradiation when combined with CsA treatment of islet graft recipients in inducing specific unresponsiveness will be discussed.

  4. [Cyclosporin A causes oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells].

    PubMed

    Pérez de Hornedo, J; de Arriba, G; Calvino, M; Benito, S; Parra, T

    2007-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cyclosporin A (CsA) nephrotoxicity. As mitochondria are one of the main sources of ROS in cells, we evaluated the role of CsA in mitochondrial structure and function in LLC-PK1 cells. We incubated cells with CsA 1 microM for 24 hours and studies were performed with flow citometry and confocal microscopy. We studied mitochondrial NAD(P)H content, superoxide anion (O2.-) production (MitoSOX Red), oxidation of cardiolipin of inner mitochondrial membrane (NAO) and mitochondrial membrane potential (DIOC2(3)). Also we analyzed the intracellular ROS synthesis (H2DCF-DA) and reduced glutation (GSH) of cells. Our results showed that CsA decreased NAD(P)H and membrane potential, and increased O2.- in mitochondria. CsA also provoked oxidation of cardiolipin. Furthermore, CsA increased intracellular ROS production and decreased GSH content. These results suggest that CsA has crucial effects in mitochondria. CsA modified mitochondrial physiology through the decrease of antioxidant mitochondrial compounds as NAD(P)H and the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and increase of oxidants as O2.-. Also, CsA alters lipidic structure of inner mitochondrial membrane through the oxidation of cardiolipin. These effects trigger a chain of events that favour intracellular synthesis of ROS and depletion of GSH that can compromise cellular viability. Nephrotoxic cellular effects of CsA can be explained, at least in part, through its influence on mitochondrial functionalism.

  5. Cyclosporine Sparing Effect of Enteric-Coated Mycophenolate Sodium in De Novo Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Hyung; Oh, Chang-Kwon; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Sung Joo; Ha, Jongwon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The increased tolerability of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS), compared to mycophenolate mofetil, among kidney transplant recipients has the potential to facilitate cyclosporine (CsA) minimization. Therefore, a prospective trial to determine the optimum EC-MPS dose in CsA-based immunosuppression regimens is necessary. Materials and Methods A comparative, parallel, randomized, open-label study was performed for 140 patients from four centers to compare the efficacy and tolerability of low dose CsA with standard dose EC-MPS (the investigational group) versus standard dose CsA with low dose EC-MPS (the control group) for six months in de novo kidney transplant recipients. Graft function, the incidence of efficacy failure [biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (BCAR), death, graft loss, loss to follow-up], and adverse events were compared. Results The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of the investigational group at six months post-transplantation was non-inferior to that of the control group (confidence interval between 57.3 mL/min/1.73m2 and 67.4 mL/min/1.73 m2, p<0.001). One graft loss was reported in the control group, and no patient deaths were reported in either group. The incidence of BCAR of the investigational group was 8.7%, compared to 18.8% in the control group (p=0.137), during the study period. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in the incidence of discontinuations and serious adverse events (SAE) between the groups. Conclusion CsA minimization using a standard dose of EC-MPS kept the incidence of acute rejection and additional risks as low as conventional immunosuppression and provided therapeutic equivalence in terms of renal graft function and safety issues. PMID:27873516

  6. Readily restoring freeze-dried probilosomes as potential nanocarriers for enhancing oral delivery of cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Guan, Peipei; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Wu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Formulating vesicular nanocarriers into dried precursors so as to overcome the drawbacks associated with liquid formulations is challengeable due to low efficiency of restoration. In this study, bilosomes interiorly thickened with gelatin (G-BLs) was evaluated for the ability to withstand freeze-drying stress and enhanced oral bioavailability of a model drug, cyclosporine A (CyA). The restoration efficiency of freeze-dried pro-G-BLs is investigated by comparing the particle size distribution, entrapment efficiency and morphology of the bilosomes before and after freeze-drying. Particle size and polydispersity index (PI) of pro-G-BLs after restoration was similar to that before freeze-drying, whereas freeze-dried bilosomes without gelatin thickening (pro-BLs) show irreversible damage and aggregation along with significantly increased particle size and PI after restoration. Entrapment efficiency of pro-G-BLs remains as high as 83.7%, in sharp contrast with 66.7% for pro-BLs. Pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs show improved absorption of CyA in pro-G-BLs as compared to pro-BLs, G-BLs and microemulsion-based Sandimmun Neoral(®). The relative oral bioavailability of CyA-loaded pro-G-BLs, pro-BLs and G-BLs was 165.2%, 123.5% and 130.1%, respectively, with Neoral(®) as the reference. It is concluded that interior thickening with gelatin significantly enhanced the stability against freeze-drying stress, which as a result improves the restoring efficiency and oral bioavailability.

  7. Low-salt diet and cyclosporine nephrotoxicity: changes in kidney cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Klawitter, Jelena; Klawitter, Jost; Schmitz, Volker; Brunner, Nina; Crunk, Amanda; Corby, Kyler; Bendrick-Peart, Jamie; Leibfritz, Dieter; Edelstein, Charles L; Thurman, Joshua M; Christians, Uwe

    2012-11-02

    Cyclosporine (CsA) is a highly effective immunosuppressant used in patients after transplantation; however, its use is limited by nephrotoxicity. Salt depletion is known to enhance CsA-induced nephrotoxicity in the rat, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. The goal of our study was to identify the molecular effects of salt depletion alone and in combination with CsA on the kidney using a proteo-metabolomic strategy. Rats (n = 6) were assigned to four study groups: (1) normal controls, (2) low-salt fed controls, (3) 10 mg/kg/d CsA for 28 days on a normal diet, (4) 10 mg/kg/d CsA for 28 days on low-salt diet. Low-salt diet redirected kidney energy metabolism toward mitochondria as indicated by a higher energy charge than in normal-fed controls. Low-salt diet alone reduced phospho-AKT and phospho-STAT3 levels and changed the expression of ion transporters PDZK1 and CLIC1. CsA induced macro- and microvesicular tubular epithelial vacuolization and reduced energy charge, changes that were more significant in low-salt fed animals, probably because of their more pronounced dependence on mitochondria. Here, CsA increased phospho-JAK2 and phospho-STAT3 levels and reduced the phospho-IKKγ and p65 proteins, thus activating NF-κB signaling. Decreased expression of lactate transport regulator CD147 and phospho-AKT was also observed after CsA exposure in low-salt rats, indicating a decrease in glycolysis. In summary, our study suggests a key role for PDZK1, CD147, JAK/STAT, and AKT signaling in CsA-induced nephrotoxicity and proposes mechanistic explanations on why rats fed a low-salt diet have higher sensitivity to CsA.

  8. Domain Characterization of Cyclosporin Regio-Specific Hydroxylases in Rare Actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Woo, Min-Woo; Lee, Bo-Ram; Nah, Hee-Ju; Choi, Si-Sun; Li, Shengying; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2015-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 hydroxylase (CYP) in actinomycetes plays an important role in the biosynthesis and bioconversion of various secondary metabolites. Two unique CYPs named CYP-sb21 and CYP-pa1, which were identified from Sebekia benihana and Pseudonocardia autotrophica, respectively, were proven to transfer a hydroxyl group at the 4(th) or 9(th) N-methyl leucine position of immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin A (CsA). Interestingly, these two homologous CYPs showed different CsA regio-selectivities. CYP-sb21 exhibited preferential hydroxylation activity at the 4(th) position over the 9(th) position, whereas CYP-pa1 showed the opposite preference. To narrow down the CYP domain critical for CsA regio-selectivity, each CYP was divided into four domains, and each domain was swapped with its counterpart from the other CYP. A total of 18 hybrid CYPs were then individually tested for CsA regioselectivity. Although most of the hybrid CYPs failed to exhibit a significant change in regioselectivity in the context of CsA hydroxylation, hybrid CYP-pa1 swapped with the second domain of CYP-sb21 showed a higher preference for the 9th position. Moreover, hybrid CYPsb21 containing seven amino acids from the 2nd domain of CYP-pa1 showed higher preference for the 4(th) position. These results imply that the 2nd domain of CsA-specific CYP plays a critical role in CsA regio-selectivity, thereby setting the stage for biotechnological application of CsA regio-selective hydroxylation.

  9. Ubiquitous protective effects of cyclosporine A in preventing cardiac arrest-induced multiple organ failure.

    PubMed

    Cour, Martin; Abrial, Maryline; Jahandiez, Vincent; Loufouat, Joseph; Belaïdi, Elise; Gharib, Abdallah; Varennes, Annie; Monneret, Guillaume; Thibault, Hélène; Ovize, Michel; Argaud, Laurent

    2014-10-15

    Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) appears to be a pivotal event in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Resuscitated cardiac arrest (CA) leads to the post-CA syndrome that encompasses, not only myocardial dysfunction, but also brain injury, failure of other organs (kidney, liver, or lung), and systemic response to I/R. We aimed to determine whether cyclosporine A (CsA) might prevent multiple organ failure following CA through a ubiquitous mPTP inhibition in each distant vital organ. Anesthetized New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to 15 min of CA and 120 min of reperfusion. At the onset of resuscitation, the rabbits received CsA, its non-immunosuppressive derivative NIM811, or vehicle (controls). Survival, hemodynamics, brain damage, organ injuries, and systemic I/R response were analyzed. Fresh mitochondria were isolated from the brain, heart, kidney, liver, and lung to assess both oxidative phosphorylation and permeability transition. CsA analogs significantly improved short-term survival and prevented multiple organ failure, including brain damage and myocardial dysfunction (P < 0.05 vs. controls). Susceptibility of mPTP opening was significantly increased in heart, brain, kidney, and liver mitochondria isolated from controls, while mitochondrial respiration was impaired (P < 0.05 vs. sham). CsA analogs prevented these mitochondrial dysfunctions (P < 0.05 vs. controls). These results suggest that CsA and NIM811 can prevent the post-CA syndrome through a ubiquitous mitochondrial protective effect at the level of each major distant organ.

  10. Cyclosporin A markedly enhances superantigen-induced peripheral T cell deletion and inhibits anergy induction

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is a well-known immunosuppressive agent that modulates immune tolerance in many ways. CsA can give rise to a state of long-term nonimmunosuppressed transplantation tolerance, but it can also aggravate autoimmune diseases, and provoke specific forms of autoimmunity. These effects, which are often paradoxical, remain largely unexplained. In this study, we investigated the effects of CsA on superantigen (superAg)-reactive peripheral T cells. The intravenous injection of either staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), or Mls-1a cells into Mls-1b recipients, causes long-term in vitro nonresponsiveness (anergy) and partial elimination of the peripheral T cell receptor (TCR) V beta 8+/CD4+ and -V beta 6+/CD4+ T cell subsets, respectively. We report that CsA markedly enhances the peripheral elimination of SEB- and Mls-1a-reactive T cells such that up to 90% of the targeted CD4+/V beta subpopulations are deleted. The degree of deletion depends on the dose and the schedule of CsA administration, and the number of superAg injections. In situations where the extent of deletion is only moderate, we find that the remaining superAg-reactive T cells fail to develop anergy, unlike the T cells of control superAg-immunized mice. Higher doses of CsA are required to enhance T cell deletion (greater than or equal to 25 mg/kg/d, i.p.) than to impair anergy induction (greater than or equal to 6.25 mg/kg/d, i.p.). In view of these results, it appears that the degree of tolerance in CsA/superAg-treated mice depends on the balance between these opposing effects, i.e., enhancement of peripheral elimination versus the abrogation of anergy. The possibility of enhancing or preventing immune tolerance with a drug may have important clinical implications. PMID:1613464

  11. Synergistic Inhibition of Endothelial Cell Proliferation, Tube Formation, and Sprouting by Cyclosporin A and Itraconazole

    PubMed Central

    Nacev, Benjamin A.; Liu, Jun O.

    2011-01-01

    Pathological angiogenesis contributes to a number of diseases including cancer and macular degeneration. Although angiogenesis inhibitors are available in the clinic, their efficacy against most cancers is modest due in part to the existence of alternative and compensatory signaling pathways. Given that angiogenesis is dependent on multiple growth factors and a broad signaling network in vivo, we sought to explore the potential of multidrug cocktails for angiogenesis inhibition. We have screened 741 clinical drug combinations for the synergistic inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. We focused specifically on existing clinical drugs since the re-purposing of clinical drugs allows for a more rapid and cost effective transition to clinical studies when compared to new drug entities. Our screen identified cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressant, and itraconazole, an antifungal drug, as a synergistic pair of inhibitors of endothelial cell proliferation. In combination, the IC50 dose of each drug is reduced by 3 to 9 fold. We also tested the ability of the combination to inhibit endothelial cell tube formation and sprouting, which are dependent on two essential processes in angiogenesis, endothelial cell migration and differentiation. We found that CsA and itraconazole synergistically inhibit tube network size and sprout formation. Lastly, we tested the combination on human foreskin fibroblast viability as well as Jurkat T cell and HeLa cell proliferation, and found that endothelial cells are selectively targeted. Thus, it is possible to combine existing clinical drugs to synergistically inhibit in vitro models of angiogenesis. This strategy may be useful in pursuing the next generation of antiangiogenesis therapy. PMID:21969860

  12. Effects of OKY-046 and nifedipine in cyclosporine-induced renal dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, N; Darlametsos, I; Tsipas, G; Morphake, P; Bokas, S; Gkikas, G; Hornych, A; Bariety, J; Gkika, E L; Karageorgou, I; Patsialos, K

    1996-10-01

    Cyclosporine (CsA) (37.4 mumol/kg per day for 7 days) treated female Wistar rats exhibited significantly decreased creatinine clearance (Ccr) and body weight loss (BWL), but had neither proteinuria (PU) nor alteration in their urine volume (V). Light microscopic (LM) sections of rat kidneys showed that all kidneys were affected by lesions, mainly diffuse vacuolization. These changes were associated with decreased urinary excretion ratios of 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha to thromboxane B2 (6kPGF1 alpha/TXB2) and prostaglandin E2 to TXB2 (PGE2/TXB2). When OKY-046, a TXA2-synthetase inhibitor or nifedipine (NFD), a calcium channel blocker and an antagonist of endotheline (ET), were administered in addition to CsA, they restored Ccr and increased urine V but they did not prevent BWL. LM sections showed that only 5 or 7 out of 9 kidneys of animals were affected, respectively. These changes were associated with prevention of the diminished ratios of urinary PGE2/TXB2 and 6kPGF1 alpha/TXB2 mainly in the OKY-046 treated animals. In conclusion, our results suggest that inhibitors of TXA2 or antagonists and/or inhibitors of endothelin play a protective role in the development of the dysfunction induced by CsA. However, the protection observed using OKY-046 and NFD did not reach that obtained by evening primrose oil (EPO) or Ketanserine (KTS), substances which prevented the fall of Ccr and BWL. Furthermore, with these protective agents only 5 out of 9 kidneys were affected and the lesions were of minor importance.

  13. Molybdate modulates mitogen and cyclosporin responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Michelis, Fotios V; Delitheos, Andreas; Tiligada, Ekaterini

    2011-07-01

    The trace element molybdenum (Mo) is an essential component of key physiological systems in animals, plants and microorganisms. The molybdate oxoanion MoO(4)(2-) has been demonstrated to cause diverse yet poorly understood biochemical and pharmacological effects, such as non-specific inhibition of phosphatases and stabilization of steroid receptors. This study aimed to investigate the effects of molybdate on the activation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs) ex vivo and its potential interaction with the widely used immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A (CsA). Lymphocyte activation was evaluated by performing multiple experiments determining blastogenesis in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from 5 healthy volunteers, following stimulation induced by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), in the absence or presence of 0.05-10 mM sodium molybdate or/and 2.5-30 μg/mL CsA. Blastogenesis was assessed by a morphometric assay based on the relative proportions of unactivated lymphocytes, activated lymphoblasts and cells with aberrant morphology after PHA-induced activation. Molybdate concentrations up to 1 mM showed no effect on lymphocyte blastogenesis, while higher concentrations exerted immunosuppressive actions on cultured hPBLs. Co-administration of 0.1 mM sodium molybdate with CsA, at doses up to 20 μg/mL, induced no alteration in the response of cultured hPBLs to CsA. However, molybdate potentiated the immunosuppressive action of higher CsA concentrations, implying a likely dose-related synergistic interaction of the two agents in PHA-stimulated blood lymphocytes. These observations are indicative of the possible biological importance of molybdate oxoanions in the modulation of hPBL activation that may have pharmacological consequences during the therapeutic application of immunomodulatory drugs.

  14. The effects of valsartan on renal glutathione peroxidase expression in alleviation of cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Raeisi, Sina; Ghorbanihaghjo, Amir; Argani, Hassan; Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Ghasemi, Babollah; Ghazizadeh, Teimour; Rashtchizadeh, Nadereh; Mesgari Abbasi, Mehran; Bargahi, Nasrin; Nemati, Mahboob; Mota, Ali; Vatankhah, Amir Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nephrotoxicity as a side effect caused by the immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine-A (CsA), can be a major problem in transplant medicine. Oxidative stress may play an important role in the CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. It has been shown that the antihypertensive drug, valsartan (Val), has also renoprotective effects but, its molecular mechanism is largely unknown. In the present study, it was aimed to evaluate the Val effect in the alleviation of CsA nephrotoxicity via probable renal glutathione peroxidase (GPx) upregulation and oxidative stress decrease. Methods: Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups based on CsA and/or Val administration: group A (Control, 1 mL/kg/day of olive oil as vehicle), group B (CsA, 30 mg/kg/day), group C (CsA+Val, 30+30 mg/kg/day), and group D (Val, 30 mg/kg/day). After the administration period (six weeks), renal GPx expression was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma levels of GPx and 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl groups (PCG) were measured by spectrophotometer. Plasma levels of urea and creatinine were measured by an autoanalyzer. Results: CsA treatment led to the decrease in renal expression and plasma levels of GPx in comparison to other study groups. Rats received CsA were detected to have significantly (p<0.05) higher plasma 8-OHdG, MDA, PCG, urea, and creatinine levels in comparison to other groups. Plasma urea and creatinine levels were negatively correlated with renal GPx expression and positively correlated with the oxidative stress markers. Conclusion:Administration of Val may result in attenuating the nephrotoxic side effect of CsA via probable renal GPx upregulation, and subsequently oxidative stress decrease. PMID:27853675

  15. Effect of cyclosporin A intervention on the immunological mechanisms of coronary heart disease and restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Hu, Yue-Cheng; Zhang, Ru-Yan; Jin, Dong-Xia; Jiang, Yuan; Zhang, He-Nan; Cong, Hong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of cyclosporin A (CSA) intervention on the immunological mechanisms underlying coronary heart disease (CHD) and restenosis (RS) in rabbits. A total of 48 rabbits were randomly divided into normal control (N), N + CSA, CHD model, CHD + CSA, RS model and RS + CSA groups. Rabbits in the respective groups received different treatments prior to sacrifice at the end of week 12. Iliac arteries were harvested from the rabbits for morphological analysis and to determine the mRNA and protein expression levels of cluster of differentiation (CD) 40/CD40 ligand (CD40L), CD134/CD134 ligand (CD134L) and inflammatory factors, including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-9, vascular cell adhesion protein (VCAM)-1, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining. As compared with the N group, the mRNA expression levels of MMP-9, VCAM-1 and TNF-α were significantly increased in the CHD and RS groups (P<0.05), but were significantly decreased in the groups with CSA intervention, as compared with those without CSA intervention (P<0.05). Conversely, there were no significant differences in the expression levels of MMP-1 and IL-6 among the six groups, although a decreasing trend of IL-6 expression was observed following intervention with CSA. Furthermore, there were significant differences in the mRNA and protein expression levels of CD40/CD40L and CD134/CD134L among the N, CHD and RS groups (P<0.05), and between the groups with and without CSA intervention. The present study demonstrated that CSA intervention exerted beneficial effects on CHD and RS, and further studies are required to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effects of CSA on CHD. PMID:27882144

  16. Preparation and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles containing cyclosporine by the emulsification-diffusion method

    PubMed Central

    Urbán-Morlán, Zaida; Ganem-Rondero, Adriana; Melgoza-Contreras, Luz María; Escobar-Chávez, José Juan; Nava-Arzaluz, María Guadalupe; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2010-01-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have been used for carrying different therapeutic agents because they improve absorption and bioavailability. The aim of the study was to prepare lipidic nanoparticles containing cyclosporine (CyA) by the emulsification-diffusion method and to study their physicochemical stability. Glyceryl behenate (Compritol® ATO 888) and lauroyl macrogolglycerides (Gelucire® 44/14) were used as carrier materials. Nanoparticles with good stability were obtained with Gelucire®, while it was difficult to obtain stable systems with Compritol®. Systems with Gelucire® were characterized by particle size, Z-potential, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), entrapment efficiency and in vitro release. Particle size and Z-potential were evaluated for at least three months. With a high CyA content (≥60 mg) in Gelucire® SLNs, variations in size were greater and particle size also increased over time in all batches; this effect may have been caused by a probable expulsion of the drug due to the lipid’s partial rearrangement. While the Z-potential decreased 10 mV after three months, this effect may be explained by the superficial properties of the drug that make the molecules to be preferably oriented at the solid-liquid interface, causing a change in the net charge of the particle. SEM confirmed size and shape of the nanoparticles. DSC studies evidenced that CyA affects the lipid structure by a mechanism still unknown. The entrapment efficiency was higher than 92%, and CyA release from SLNs was relatively fast (99.60% in 45 min). PMID:20856836

  17. The role of inflammation and apoptosis in cyclosporine A – induced gingival overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Mitic, Kristina; Popovska, Mirjana; Pandilova, Maja; Jovanovic, Rubens; Spasovski, Goce; Nikolov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Cyclosporin A(CsA) - induced gingival overgrowth(GO) is a current problem of tissue-specific mechanism which is still incompletely explained. The apoptotic process has been of particular interest like a new concept in the etiology of this unwanted effect. The aim of our study was to detect the level of apoptosis, expression bcl-2 and p53, associated with the different dosis of CsA. in gingival stroma. A cohort of 84 kidney transplant recipients was divided into four subgroups based on average daily dose of therapeutically applied CsA (Ne-oral®), (100 mg, 125 mg, 150 mg and 175 mg). The control group consisted of 21 patients, clinically diagnosed with periodontitis, who were not subjected to any medicamentous treatment causing gingival overgrowth. The following indexes were analyzed: plaque index (PI), index of gingival inflammation (GI) according to Loe-Silnes, and gingival overgrowth index (GOI) according to MacGaw et al. The tissue samples were subjected to a semiquantitative analysis to detect apoptotical cells and imunohistochemically stained to detect the expression of the bcl-2 and p53 proteins. The difference in percentage of apoptotic cells between the group taking 175mg and other subgroups, as well as the control group was statistically significant (p<0.05). There was a significant difference in percentage of expression bcl-2 between the 175 mg group compared to the other three subgroups and the control (p=0.001). However, a statistically significant positive correlation between the medicament dose, p53, apoptosis, and bcl-2 was registered (p<0.05). Inflammation plays the most important role in the induction of apoptosis and proliferation in gingival tissues. PMID:23448605

  18. Beyond cyclosporine: a systematic review of limited sampling strategies for other immunosuppressants.

    PubMed

    Ting, Lillian S L; Villeneuve, Eric; Ensom, Mary H H

    2006-06-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring has gained much attention in the management of immunosuppressive therapy. Area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve (AUC) is the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameter most commonly used to assess total exposure to a drug. However, estimation of AUC requires multiple blood samples throughout the dosing period, which is often inconvenient and expensive. Limited sampling strategies (LSSs) are therefore developed to estimate AUC and other PK parameters accurately and precisely while minimizing the number of blood samples needed. This greatly reduces costs, labor and inconvenience for both patients and clinical staff. In the therapeutic management of solid organ transplantation, LSSs for cyclosporine are commonplace and have been extensively reviewed. Thus, this systematic review paper focuses on other immunosuppressive agents and categorizes the 24 pertinent citations according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force rating scale. Thirteen articles (3 level I, 1 level II-1, 2 level II-2, and 7 level III) involved LSSs for mycophenolate, 7 citations (1 level I and 6 level III) for tacrolimus (TAC), and 3 citations (all level III) for other drugs (sirolimus) or multiple drugs. The 2 main approaches to establishing LSSs, multiple regression and Bayesian analyses, are also reviewed. Important elements to consider for future LSS studies, including proper validation of LSSs, convenient sampling times, and application of LSSs to the appropriate patient population and drug formulation are discussed. Limited sampling strategies are a useful tool to help clinicians make decisions on drug therapy. However, patients' pathophysiology, environmental and genetic factors, and pharmacologic response to therapy, in conjunction with PK profiling tools such as LSSs, should be considered collectively for optimal therapy management.

  19. Cyclosporin A reduces expression of adhesion molecules in the kidney of rats with chronic serum sickness

    PubMed Central

    Rincón, J; Parra, G; Quiroz, Y; Benatuil, L; Rodríguez-Iturbe, B

    2000-01-01

    Treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA) improves proteinuria and reduces renal cellular infiltration in chronic serum sickness (CSS). We examined if these effects were associated with a reduced renal expression of CD54 and its ligands, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and MHC class II molecules. We studied two groups of rats in which CSS was induced by daily injections of ovalbumin (OVA): a group treated with CsA (OVA.CsA group, n = 11) and a group that received no treatment (OVA.CSS group, n = 11). An additional group of five rats (control group) received only phosphate buffer. Immunostaining techniques were used to follow CSS and to study the expression of CD54, CD18, CD11b/c, IFN-γ, TNF-α and MHC class molecules. Proteinuria (mg/24 h) was reduced from 248·2 ± 73·1 (OVA.CCS group) to 14·5 ± 13·1 with CsA treatment (P < 0·0001). The renal expression of CD54 and its ligands (CD18 and CD11b/c) was reduced by 50% to 75%. Correspondingly, there was a 60% to 85% reduction in the number of infiltrating leucocytes. The number of cells expressing TNF-α, IFN-γ and MHC II molecules was also reduced. CsA reduces expression of CD54 and its ligands. This effect is associated with a reduction of cellular infiltration, IFN-γ, TNF-α-producing cells and with MHC II expression in the kidney. These findings suggest that expression of adhesion molecules plays a critical role in CSS and underline the importance of cellular immunity in this experimental model. PMID:10931158

  20. Prediction of acute graft rejection in renal transplantation: the utility of cyclosporine blood concentrations.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Napoli, K L; Welsh, M S; Atkinson, N E; Kahan, B D

    1991-02-01

    While cyclosporine is recommended to be used only in conjunction with monitoring of its blood concentrations, the utility of these measurements in preventing treatment failure is not established. In a group of 52 patients trough levels and steady-state concentrations were monitored in serum and whole blood by specific (SP) and nonspecific (NS) assays (polyclonal radioimmunoassay, PR; fluorescence polarization immunoassay, FP; high-pressure liquid chromatography, HP). From as many as 10 determinations of trough level and steady state concentrations during the first 40 days after renal transplantation, the lowest measurement was selected. In the case of an acute rejection episode within that time period, only values until that event were considered. Trough level measurements in serum by PR/NS and by FP/NS and in whole blood by HP/SP were not significantly different between patients with and patients without rejection episodes. However, simultaneously measured steady-state values (serum/PR/NS and serum/FP/NS) were significantly lower in patients suffering from rejection (with rejection SS/serum/PR/NS mean = 127 ng/ml, SD = 41 ng/ml; without rejection mean = 163 ng/ml, SD = 60 ng/ml; P = 0.027, t test). This difference could not be demonstrated for steady state/whole blood/HP/SP measurements. A logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the probability of rejection can be decreased by up to 40% if steady state/serum/PR/NS or steady state/serum/FP/NS values never drop below 250 ng/ml early after renal transplantation.

  1. Bayesian estimation of cyclosporin exposure for routine therapeutic drug monitoring in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Bourgoin, Hélène; Paintaud, Gilles; Büchler, Matthias; Lebranchu, Yvon; Autret-Leca, Elisabeth; Mentré, France; Guellec, Chantal Le

    2005-01-01

    Aims AUC-based monitoring of cyclosporin A (CsA) is useful to optimize dose adaptation in difficult cases. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to describe dose-exposure relationships for CsA in renal transplant patients and applied it to the Bayesian estimation of AUCs using three blood concentrations. Methods A total of 84 renal graft recipients treated with CsA microemulsion were included in this study. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using NONMEM. A two-compartment model with zero-order absorption and a lag time best described the data. Bayesian estimation was based on CsA blood concentrations measured before dosing and 1 h and 2 h post dose. Predictive performance was evaluated using a cross-validation approach. Estimated AUCs were compared with AUCs calculated by the trapezoidal method. The Bayesian approach was also applied to an independent group of eight patients exhibiting unusual pharmacokinetic profiles. Results Mean population pharmacokinetic parameters were apparent clearance 30 l h−1, apparent volume of distribution 79.8 l, duration of absorption 52 min, absorption lag time 7 min. No significant relationships were found between any of the pharmacokinetic parameters and individual characteristics. A good correlation was obtained between Bayesian-estimated and experimental AUCs, with a mean prediction error of 2.8% (95% CI [−0.6, 6.2]) and an accuracy of 13.1% (95% CI [7.5, 17.2]). A good correlation was also obtained in the eight patients with unusual pharmacokinetic profiles (r2 = 0.96, P < 0.01). Conclusions Our Bayesian approach enabled a good estimation of CsA exposure in a population of patients with variable pharmacokinetic profiles, showing its usefulness for routine AUC-based therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:15606436

  2. Tacrolimus confers lower acute rejection rates and better renal allograft survival compared to cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Mahmoud; Kadian, Manish; Srinivas, Titte; Taber, David; Posadas Salas, Maria Aurora

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the impact of tacrolimus (FK) and cyclosporine (CYA) on acute rejection and graft survival and to assess the predominant causes of graft loss between patients receiving these two calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). METHODS Retrospective review of 1835 patients who received a kidney transplant (KTX) between 1999-2012. Patients were grouped based on initial CNI utilized: 1195 in FK group, 640 in CYA group. Data on baseline characteristics, clinical outcomes, and causes of graft loss in both groups were analyzed. RESULTS Cumulative acute rejection rates were 14% in the FK vs 24% in the CYA group. Despite more marginal donor characteristics in the FK group, these patients had better graft survival rates compared to the CYA group. Three and five year graft survival rates were 88% and 84% respectively in the FK group compared to 79% and 70% respectively in the CYA group (P < 0.001). After multivariate analysis, which controlled for confounders, FK use was a strong predictor for lower acute rejection rates [odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95%CI: 0.45-0.79] and better renal allograft survival (OR 0.740, 95%CI: 0.58-0.94). Death with a functioning graft was the most common cause of graft loss in both groups. Common causes of death included cardiovascular disease, infections, and malignancies. Chronic allograft nephropathy was also found to be an important cause of graft loss, being more prevalent in the CYA group. CONCLUSION The use of FK-based maintenance immunosuppression therapy is associated with a significantly lower rate of acute rejection and better graft survival compared to CYA-based regimen. Individualizing immunosuppression through risk-stratified CNI choice may lead to improved outcomes across all spectra of KTX patients. PMID:28058220

  3. Neurologic Evaluation of Acute Lacrimomimetic Effect of Cyclosporine in an Experimental Rabbit Dry Eye Model

    PubMed Central

    Toshida, Hiroshi; Nguyen, Doan H.; Beuerman, Roger W.; Murakami, Akira

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate neurologically acute lacrimation caused by cyclosporine (CsA) eyedrops in rabbit. METHODS Normal adult male New Zealand White rabbits and those that underwent parasympathectomy each received a single instillation of 0.1% CsA or vehicle eyedrops. Schirmer tear test (STT) results, flow rate of lacrimal gland (LG) fluid from the excretory lacrimal duct of the main LG, and blink rate (over a 3-minute period) were measured before and after instillation of CsA or vehicle. Light microscopy was performed to examine the main LG in vitro. Protein release from LG fragments was assessed after incubation with CsA for 30 minutes. RESULTS In normal rabbits, the STT value and the flow rate of LG fluid were significantly increased after treatment with CsA compared with vehicle (P < 0.05). In contrast, no changes were found in denervated eyes. The blink rate of CsA-treated eyes was significantly higher than that of vehicle- treated eyes in normal rabbits (P < 0.005), whereas that of denervated eyes decreased significantly after CsA instillation compared with before administration (P < 0.005). Light microscopy showed that the cytoplasm of acinar cells was packed with secretory granules in denervated LG tissue 7 days after parasympathectomy. The same finding was observed 3 hours after CsA instillation. CsA had no stimulatory effect on protein release by acinar cells in LG fragments at all concentrations tested. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that CsA has no direct effect on tear fluid secretion from the LG in an acute model. Instead, CsA increases reflex tear flow. PMID:19218606

  4. Proper balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid supplements with topical cyclosporine attenuated contact lens-related dry eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Chen, Xi; Hao, Jingfang; Yang, Lu

    2016-12-01

    Essential fatty acids had been applied in the treatment of dry eye syndrome (DES), but the effects of different combinations of fatty acids have not been investigated. 360 long-term contact lens wearers were included in this double-blinded study. Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids were combined in different ratios and supplied to the participants that were randomly divided into six groups, and the effects of different essential fatty acids mixture on DES with or without topical cyclosporine were investigated. More than half of long-term contact lens wearers suffered from DES, which were found to be attenuated by oral supplement of properly balanced O3FA and O6FA fatty acid. The topical cyclosporine treatment considerably inhibited the production of cytokines compared to the cyclosporine negative groups, which further relieved DES. Proper balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid combination significantly alleviated contact lens-related DES.

  5. Multiple papillomavirus-associated epidermal hamartomas and squamous cell carcinomas in situ in a dog following chronic treatment with prednisone and cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Callan, Mary Beth; Preziosi, Diane; Mauldin, Elizabeth

    2005-10-01

    A 4-year-old, spayed female toy fox terrier developed multiple epidermal hamartomas and squamous cell carcinomas in situ following chronic immunosuppressive therapy with prednisone and cyclosporine for management of an immune-mediated nonregenerative anaemia. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for papillomavirus antigen within both benign (n = 19) and malignant (n = 8) cutaneous lesions that developed during a 3-year period of observation, with positive staining most often seen in keratinocytes in the granular cell layer. Treatment of the papillomavirus infection with interferon-alpha was discontinued after 2 weeks because of diarrhoea and a further increase in liver enzymes. The cutaneous lesions of this dog persisted and new lesions developed during the year following discontinuation of both cyclosporine and prednisone. This is the first reported case of papillomavirus-associated squamous cell carcinoma in situ developing in a dog following chronic administration of cyclosporine and prednisone.

  6. [Efficacy, tolerability and safety of cyclosporine for microemulsion in the treatment of active rheumatoid arthritis. Open study].

    PubMed

    Marcos, J C; Maccagno, A; Gutfraind, E; Garsd, A; Messina, D O; Maldonado Cocco, J; Battagliotti, C; Onetti, C M; Tate, G; Venarotti, H O; Grosman, H; Díaz, E A; Otero, A B

    2000-01-01

    Cyclosporine for microemulsion has been widely used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with remarkably good results over progression of joint damage, as reported by the GRISAR Study. A local group in Argentina, performed a prospective, open label study (Neo-Ra-02), consisting of 12 centres which recruited 50 RA patients, who were followed during 6 months in order to assess efficacy, tolerability and safety of cyclosporine microemulsion in the treatment of RA. Efficacy parameters were: morning stiffness, functional evaluation (HAQ, Lee and Ritchie index) and laboratory and radiological (Larsen score) assessments. Safety parameters were: blood pressure and renal, liver and hematological laboratory data. Patients criteria for participation were: presence of active RA (as defined by the ACR), Steinbrocker anatomic and functional grade I to III, disease evolution no longer than 5 years, no previous history of hypertension, renal or liver disease and absence of DMARDs use during the previous 2 months. There was a statistically significant decrease in morning stiffness and in pain evolution. Improvement became evident after 4 weeks of treatment. Reduction of Ritchie index was significant also at 4 weeks and the same observation was made with tenderness and swollen joint scores. Regarding evolution of CRP and RF, a statistically significant reduction was observed only in positive RF. Safety parameters showed no significant increase in serum creatinine or uric acid: 6/50 patients developed mild hypertension with only a significant increase in systolic blood pressure in comparison with baseline. Cyclosporine microemulsion demonstrated efficacy with minimal adverse events (12% mild hypertension) when appropriately monitored and administered in low doses (3 mg/kg/day).

  7. Combination of glucosamine improved therapeutic effect of low-dose cyclosporin A in patients with atopic dermatitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyok-Bu; Ahn, Byung-Jin; Choi, Yunseok; Jin, Sang Y; Cheong, Kyung A; Lee, Joongyub; Lee, Ai-Young

    2013-03-01

    Both glucosamine and cyclosporin have been reported to show immunomodulatory effect with inhibition of each different key transcription factor for cytokine gene expression and T-cell function. The overall purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of the combination of cyclosporin with glucosamine for the treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis. Twelve patients more than 12 years old who required systemic cyclosporin were included in the study. Two of them dropped out due to violation of medication schedule. The single (S) and combination (C) regimens were crossed over every 2 weeks without a washout period between the cross-over for 6 months. Five patients were randomly assigned to the S regimen first (SC sequence), whereas the other five were given the C first (CS sequence). The change of SCORAD index was analyzed as the primary efficacy end-point by general linear model and piecewise linear mixed model. The SCORAD index was reduced with both SC and CS sequence regimens. In particular, index reduction with the C was more than that associated with S regimen; this difference increased as time lapsed. The glucosamine combination was predicted to cause an additive decrease in the mean percent change of the SCORAD index (~6%), with decreasing interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 cytokine levels but without increasing treatment-related adverse events. This study suggests that the C would produce better clinical outcomes than the S regimen in patients with atopic dermatitis, although confirmatory clinical trials are warranted to determine the effect of combination.

  8. Synchrotron radiation small- and wide- angle scattering study of dispergation of Equoral, a novel drug delivery system with cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Uhríková, D; Andrýsek, T; Funari, S S; Balgavý, P

    2004-08-01

    Equoral oral solution is a novel drug delivery system for cyclosporine consisting mainly of non-ionic surfactants, polyglycerol esters and polyoxyethylated fatty acids aggregates, and gives microdispersions in the aqueous enviroment. To simulate dispergation, Equoral was mixed with varying amounts of water. Changes in the structure of the prepared aggregates were studied using synchrotron x-ray small- and wide-angle scattering. A lamellar phase is the most probable structure, arising spontaneously after dispergation of Equoral in the region of 30-70 wt% H2O.

  9. Total lymphoid irradiation in rat heart albgrafts: dose, fractionation, and combination with cyclosporin-A. [X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Rynasiewicz, J.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Kawahara, K.; Kim, T.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-03-01

    The survival or organ allografts is prolonged in mice and rats treated with fractionated, high-dose total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). We have studied the effect of TLI, alone or in combination with donor bone marrow or pharmacologic immunosuppression (cyclosporin-A: CY-A), on the survival of heterotopic rat heart allografts. Specifically, we evaluated the generalized immunosuppressive effect of TLI as a function of accumulated dose and fractionation schedule. In addition, TLI and CY-A were used individually in schedules that by themselves gave only moderate graft prolongation and then subsequently in sequential combination.

  10. Effects of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors on Hyperglycemia and Blood Cyclosporine Levels in Renal Transplant Patients with Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jaehyun; Lee, Min Jung; Choe, Eun Yeong; Jung, Chang Hee; Wang, Hye Jin; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Yu Seun

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors is increasing among renal transplant patients with diabetes. However, the glucose-lowering efficacies of various DPP-4 inhibitors and their effects on blood cyclosporine levels have not been fully investigated. We compared the glucose-lowering efficacies of DPP 4 inhibitors and evaluate their effects on the blood levels of cyclosporine in renal transplant recipients with diabetes. Methods Sixty-five renal allograft recipients who received treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors (vildagliptin, sitagliptin, or linagliptin) following kidney transplant were enrolled. The glucose-lowering efficacies of the DPP-4 inhibitors were compared according to the changes in the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels after 3 months of treatment. Changes in the trough levels of the cyclosporine were also assessed 2 months after treatment with each DPP-4 inhibitor. Results HbA1c significantly decreased in the linagliptin group in comparison with other DPP-4 inhibitors (vildagliptin –0.38%±1.03%, sitagliptin –0.53%±0.95%, and linagliptin –1.40±1.34; P=0.016). Cyclosporine trough levels were significantly increased in the sitagliptin group compared with vildagliptin group (30.62±81.70 ng/mL vs. –24.22±53.54 ng/mL, P=0.036). Cyclosporine trough levels were minimally changed in patients with linagliptin. Conclusion Linagliptin demonstrates superior glucose-lowering efficacy and minimal effect on cyclosporine trough levels in comparison with other DPP-4 inhibitors in kidney transplant patients with diabetes. PMID:26754588

  11. Effects of rifampin, cyclosporine A, and probenecid on the pharmacokinetic profile of canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, in healthy participants

    PubMed Central

    Devineni, Damayanthi; Vaccaro, Nicole; Murphy, Joe; Curtin, Christopher; Mamidi, Rao N.V.S.; Weiner, Sveta; Wang, Shean-Sheng; Ariyawansa, Jay; Stieltjes, Hans; Wajs, Ewa; Di Prospero, Nicholas A.; Rothenberg, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Canagliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, approved for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is metabolized by uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) 1A9 and UGT2B4, and is a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Canagliflozin exposures may be affected by coadministration of drugs that induce (e.g., rifampin for UGT) or inhibit (e.g. probenecid for UGT; cyclosporine A for P-gp) these pathways. The primary objective of these three independent studies (single-center, open-label, fixed-sequence) was to evaluate the effects of rifampin (study 1), probenecid (study 2), and cyclosporine A (study 3) on the pharmacokinetics of canagliflozin in healthy participants. Methods: Participants received; in study 1: canagliflozin 300 mg (days 1 and 10), rifampin 600 mg (days 4 – 12); study 2: canagliflozin 300 mg (days 1 – 17), probenecid 500 mg twice daily (days 15 – 17); and study 3: canagliflozin 300 mg (days 1 – 8), cyclosporine A 400 mg (day 8). Pharmacokinetics were assessed at pre-specified intervals on days 1 and 10 (study 1); on days 14 and 17 (study 2), and on days 2 – 8 (study 3). Results: Rifampin decreased the maximum plasma canagliflozin concentration (Cmax) by 28% and its area under the curve (AUC) by 51%. Probenecid increased the Cmax by 13% and the AUC by 21%. Cyclosporine A increased the AUC by 23% but did not affect the Cmax. Conclusion: Coadministration of canagliflozin with rifampin, probenecid, and cyclosporine A was well-tolerated. No clinically meaningful interactions were observed for probenecid or cyclosporine A, while rifampin coadministration modestly reduced canagliflozin plasma concentrations and could necessitate an appropriate monitoring of glycemic control. PMID:25407255

  12. Comparison of Efficacy of Two Different Topical 0.05% Cyclosporine A Formulations in the Treatment of Adenoviral Keratoconjunctivitis-Related Subepithelial Infiltrates

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktutar, Betül N.; Uçakhan, Ömur Ö.

    2016-01-01

    Subepithelial infiltrates secondary to adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis may persist for years and cause blurred vision, halos, glare, and photophobia. These infiltrates arise from immune reaction against the virus, and few studies have reported topical cyclosporine A to be effective in the treatment of subepithelial infiltrates. Herein, we describe a patient with adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis-related subepithelial infiltrates who did not respond to treatment with a new topical cyclosporine A emulsion prepared with castor oil (Depores 0.05%; Deva İlaç, Kocaeli, Turkey), while the FDA-approved nanoemulsion formulation provided improvement in symptoms and reduced the inflammatory reaction (Restasis 0.05%; Allergan, Irvine, Calif., USA). PMID:27065851

  13. Area-under-the-curve monitoring of cyclosporine therapy: Performance of different assay methods and their target concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Grevel, J.; Napoli, K.L.; Gibbons, S.; Kahan, B.D. )

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of areas under the concentration-time curve (AUC) was recently introduced as an alternative to trough level monitoring of cyclosporine therapy. The AUC is divided by the oral dosing interval to calculate an average concentration. All measurements are performed at clinical steady state. The initial evaluation of AUC monitoring showed advantages over trough level monitoring with concentrations of cyclosporine measured in serum by the polyclonal radioimmunoassay of Sandoz. This assay technique is no longer available and the following assays were performed in parallel during up to 173 AUC determinations in 51 consecutive renal transplant patients: polyclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay of Abbott in serum, specific and nonspecific monoclonal radioimmunoassays using {sup 3}H and {sup 125}I tracers in serum and whole blood, and high performance liquid chromatography in whole blood. Both trough levels and average concentrations at steady state measured by those different techniques were significantly correlated with the oral dose. The best correlation (r2 = 0.54) was shown by average concentrations measured in whole blood by the specific monoclonal radioimmunoassay of Sandoz ({sup 3}H tracer). This monitoring technique was also associated with the smallest absolute error between repeated observations in the same patient while the oral dose rate remained the same or was changed. Both allegedly specific monoclonal radioimmunoassays (with {sup 3}H and {sup 125}I tracer) measured significantly higher concentrations than the liquid chromatography.

  14. Development and Validation of a HPLC Method for the Determination of Cyclosporine A in New Bioadhesive Nanoparticles for Oral Administration

    PubMed Central

    Pecchio, M.; Salman, H.; Irache, J. M.; Renedo, M. J.; Dios-Viéitez, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    A simple and reliable high performance liquid chromatography method was developed and validated for the rapid determination of cyclosporine A in new pharmaceutical dosage forms based on the use of poly (methylvinylether-co-maleic anhydride) nanoparticles. The chromatographic separation was achieved using Ultrabase C18 column (250×4.6 mm, 5 μm), which was kept at 75°. The gradient mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and water with a flow rate of 1 ml/min. The effluent was monitored at 205 nm using diode array detector. The method exhibited linearity over the assayed concentration range (22-250 μg/ml) and demonstrated good intraday and interday precision and accuracy (relative standard deviations were less than 6.5% and the deviation from theoretical values is below 5.5%). The detection limit was 1.36 μg/ml. This method was also applied for quantitative analysis of cyclosporine A released from poly (methylvinylether-co-maleic anhydride) nanoparticles. PMID:24843186

  15. Azithromycin, rifabutin, and rifapentine for treatment and prophylaxis of Mycobacterium avium complex in rats treated with cyclosporine.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S T; Edwards, F F; Bernard, E M; Tong, W; Armstrong, D

    1993-01-01

    Azithromycin, rifabutin, and rifapentine were used to treat or prevent disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections produced in rats immunosuppressed with cyclosporine. Animals with bacteremic infections were treated 1 week after intravenous inoculation with 10(7) CFU of MAC with azithromycin, 100 mg/kg of body weight administered subcutaneously for 5 days and then 75 mg/kg on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, or with rifabutin or rifapentine, 20 mg/kg administered intraperitoneally on Monday through Friday. All three drugs showed efficacy after 1 and 2 months. Rifabutin cleared the organisms from tissues more rapidly than azithromycin or rifapentine. To approximate prophylaxis, treatment was started 2 weeks before intravenous inoculation with 10(4) organisms. MAC infections were undetectable in treated animals after 4 months, while control animals had disseminated infections. These findings support the rationale for clinical trials of treatment and prophylaxis with these agents. The cyclosporine-treated rat appears to be a useful model in which to evaluate compounds for the treatment and prophylaxis of disseminated MAC infections. PMID:8384809

  16. Prospective study of rabbit antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine for aplastic anemia from the EBMT Severe Aplastic Anaemia Working Party.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Judith C; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Tichelli, Andre; Risitano, Antonio M; Passweg, Jakob R; Killick, Sally B; Warren, Alan J; Foukaneli, Theodora; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Al-Zahrani, H A; Höchsmann, Britta; Schafhausen, Philip; Roth, Alexander; Franzke, Anke; Brummendorf, Tim H; Dufour, Carlo; Oneto, Rosi; Sedgwick, Philip; Barrois, Alain; Kordasti, Shahram; Elebute, Modupe O; Mufti, Ghulam J; Socie, Gerard

    2012-06-07

    Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG; thymoglobulin, Genzyme) in combination with cyclosporine, as first-line immunosuppressive therapy, was evaluated prospectively in a multicenter, European, phase 2 pilot study, in 35 patients with aplastic anemia. Results were compared with 105 age- and disease severity-matched patients from the European Blood and Marrow Transplant registry, treated with horse ATG (hATG; lymphoglobulin) and cyclosporine. The primary end point was response at 6 months. At 3 months, no patients had achieved a complete response to rATG. Partial response occurred in 11 (34%). At 6 months, complete response rate was 3% and partial response rate 37%. There were 10 deaths after rATG (28.5%) and 1 after subsequent HSCT. Infections were the main cause of death in 9 of 10 patients. The best response rate was 60% for rATG and 67% for hATG. For rATG, overall survival at 2 years was 68%, compared with 86% for hATG (P = .009). Transplant-free survival was 52% for rATG and 76% for hATG (P = .002). On multivariate analysis, rATG (hazard ratio = 3.9, P = .003) and age more than 37 years (hazard ratio = 4.7, P = .0008) were independent adverse risk factors for survival. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00471848.

  17. Effects of sterilizing gamma irradiation on bloodspot newborn screening tests and whole blood cyclosporine and tacrolimus measurements.

    PubMed

    Stickle, Douglas F; McKenzie, David A; Landmark, James D; Pirruccello, Samuel J; Post, Gregory R; Iwen, Peter C; Thompson, Robert B; Hinrichs, Steven H

    2003-02-01

    Sterilizing irradiation of the US mail has been proposed as a method to prevent delivery of viable anthrax spores. Because newborn screening samples (bloodspots) and cyclosporine and tacrolimus specimens (whole blood) are delivered routinely through the mail, we studied whether sterilizing gamma irradiation could affect these test results. Specimens were exposed to 18 kGy gamma irradiation (100 hours x 18,000 rad/h), a "kill dose" for Bacillus pumilus spore strips. Irradiation had no significant effect on whole blood cyclosporine or tacrolimus results, but it had a degradative effect on bloodspot phenylalanine, hemoglobins, biotinidase, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase, thyroxine, and thyrotropin. Such irradiation potentially could cause false-negative results for the detection of phenylketonuria and likely would lead to an increase in secondary testing for hemoglobin variants, but it is unlikely to lead to false-negative or false-positive results for the remaining newborn screening tests. These experiments cannot rule out possible greater effects by larger doses or other types of irradiation.

  18. Area-under-the-curve monitoring of cyclosporine therapy: performance of different assay methods and their target concentrations.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Napoli, K L; Gibbons, S; Kahan, B D

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of areas under the concentration-time curve (AUC) was recently introduced as an alternative to trough level monitoring of cyclosporine therapy. The AUC is divided by the oral dosing interval to calculate an average concentration. All measurements are performed at clinical steady state. The initial evaluation of AUC monitoring showed advantages over trough level monitoring with concentrations of cyclosporine measured in serum by the polyclonal radioimmunoassay of Sandoz. This assay technique is no longer available and the following assays were performed in parallel during up to 173 AUC determinations in 51 consecutive renal transplant patients: polyclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay of Abbott in serum, specific and nonspecific monoclonal radioimmunoassays using 3H and 125I tracers in serum and whole blood, and high performance liquid chromatography in whole blood. Both trough levels and average concentrations at steady state measured by those different techniques were significantly correlated with the oral dose. The best correlation (r2 = 0.54) was shown by average concentrations measured in whole blood by the specific monoclonal radioimmunoassay of Sandoz (3H tracer). This monitoring technique was also associated with the smallest absolute error between repeated observations in the same patient while the oral dose rate remained the same or was changed. Both allegedly specific monoclonal radioimmunoassays (with 3H and 125I tracer) measured significantly higher concentrations than the liquid chromatography. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Michaelis-Menten kinetics determine cyclosporine steady-state concentrations: a population analysis in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Post, B K; Kahan, B D

    1993-06-01

    Dosage adjustments of cyclosporine are confounded with an unexpected degree of variability, thus invalidating a direct proportionality between the oral dose rate and the steady-state concentration. In 1033 observations of dose rate and average steady-state concentration collected during therapeutic monitoring (area under the curve method) in 134 adult kidney transplant patients, a population pharmacokinetic analysis showed that a Michaelis-Menten model fitted the data better than a linear clearance model. It was further shown that the Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) parameter of the Michaelis-Menten model (the average steady-state concentration at half-maximal dose rate) increased during the first 4 months after transplantation whereas the maximal dose rate of the Michaelis-Menten model (Vmax) remained constant. The following parameters with interindividual variation in parenthesis were estimated: Vmax = 852 mg/24 hr (43%) and Km at 114 days after transplantation = 349 ng/ml (117%). An algorithm was derived from this population model that guides the clinician during the adjustment of oral cyclosporine dose rates.

  20. Evidence for a functional receptor for cyclosporin A on the surface of lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cacalano, N A; Chen, B X; Cleveland, W L; Erlanger, B F

    1992-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is an immunosuppressive agent that inhibits the synthesis of lymphokines by T lymphocytes at the level of transcription. A cytoplasmic protein, cyclophilin, is the most thoroughly studied CsA-binding protein, but its ubiquitous presence in cells of all types raises questions about its role in immunosuppression. In an attempt to ascertain the presence of a cell surface receptor, we synthesized two polyvalent macromolecular CsA derivatives, CsA-BBa-ovalbumin and CsA-BBa-aminodextran (CBD), from the product of the photochemical reaction of CsA and 4-benzoylbenzoic acid (CsA-BBa). (i) They inhibited the peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of cyclophilin and the synthesis of interleukin 2 by phorbol ester-activated EL-4 cells. (ii) CBD also inhibited interleukin 2 secretion by Con A-activated T-cell-enriched mouse splenocytes. 4-Benzoylbenzoic acid (BBa)-aminodextran and aminodextran were inactive. (iii) Direct binding and competition studies with [3H]CsA indicated that CBD does not enter EL-4 cells (i.e., it acted at the surface). (iv) CBD caused agglutination of EL-4 cells, murine B and T lymphocytes, human thymocytes, and two T-cell hybridomas. Agglutination was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody to CsA and by CsA and CsA-BBa, but not by BBa. No agglutination was seen with BBa-aminodextran or aminodextran. HeLa cells, Vero (monkey kidney) cells, a mouse plasmacytoma, COS cells, and a poorly differentiated B-cell lymphoma were not agglutinated. (v) EL-4 cells failed to be agglutinated after treatment with trypsin or chymotrypsin. Specific agglutination was again possible after incubation for 5 h at 37 degrees C in the absence of enzyme. (vi) CBD covalently linked to crosslinked agarose beads inhibited interleukin 2 production by phorbol ester-stimulated EL-4 cells. No activity was seen if cell-to-bead contact was prevented by a 0.02-microns microporous filter that did not interfere with the passage of CBD. Our findings support the presence

  1. Pharmacodynamic monitoring of immunosuppressive effects indicates reduced cyclosporine activity during telaprevir therapy.

    PubMed

    Roos, Katja; Gotthardt, Daniel; Giese, Thomas; Schnitzler, Paul; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Czock, David; Eisenbach, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    Drug interactions with immunosuppressive drugs are a major problem associated with protease inhibitor-based antiviral triple therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) reinfection after liver transplantation. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed biomarkers of the immunosuppressive effects of cyclosporine A (CSA) by quantifying nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-regulated gene expression during telaprevir (TVR) therapy in 5 liver transplant patients. Furthermore, dose adjustments and blood concentrations of CSA as well as the clinical course were analyzed. We observed a clear impact of TVR not only on doses and blood concentrations but also on the immunosuppressive effects of CSA. Despite apparently adequate CSA trough concentrations, the CSA peak concentration decreased to 68% (range = 44%-90%). This was associated with a 1.9-fold (1.6- to 4.1-fold) increase in the residual gene activity of NFAT-regulated genes, which indicated reduced immunosuppressive activity of CSA with TVR co-medication. The median dose of CSA was reduced to 25% (range = 16%-48%) and 31% (range = 22%-64%) after 1 and 2 weeks, respectively. The CSA drug clearance was reduced to 38.7% (range = 31.0%-49.4%). We report excellent antiviral efficacy. At the end of the observation period, all patients were HCV RNA-negative (1 patient at 18 weeks, 1 patient at 12 weeks, and 3 patients at 4 weeks after the end of therapy). Safety was acceptable, with mild acute rejection and reactivation of cytomegalovirus being the most serious adverse events. One patient with histologically proven recurrent cholestatic hepatitis before therapy underwent retransplantation during the course of antiviral therapy. In conclusion, the immunomonitoring of NFAT-regulated gene expression indicated reduced immunosuppressive activity of CSA during antiviral therapy with TVR in our cohort of liver transplant patients. Thus, the immunosuppressive effects of CSA may be overestimated if one is looking

  2. Cyclosporine and methotrexate-related pharmacogenomic predictors of acute graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Laverdière, Isabelle; Guillemette, Chantal; Tamouza, Ryad; Loiseau, Pascale; de Latour, Regis Peffault; Robin, Marie; Couture, Félix; Filion, Alain; Lalancette, Marc; Tourancheau, Alan; Charron, Dominique; Socié, Gérard; Lévesque, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Effective immunosuppression is mandatory to prevent graft-versus-host disease and to achieve a successful clinical outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we tested whether germline single nucleotide polymorphisms in 20 candidate genes related to methotrexate and cyclosporine metabolism and activity influence the incidence of graft-versus-host disease in patients who undergo stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders. Recipient genetic status of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 transporters, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/ inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase within the methotrexate pathway, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) loci exhibit a remarkable influence on severe acute graft-versus-host disease prevalence. Indeed, an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease was observed in association with single nucleotide polymorphisms located in 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (hazard ratio=3.04; P=0.002), nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) (hazard ratio=2.69; P=0.004), adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 (hazard ratio=3.53; P=0.0018) and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 (hazard ratio=3.67; P=0.0005). While donor single nucleotide polymorphisms of dihydrofolate reductase and solute carrier family 19 (member 1) genes are associated with a reduced risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio=0.32–0.41; P=0.0009–0.008), those of nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 2) are found to increase such risk (hazard ratio=3.85; P=0.0004). None of the tested single nucleotide polymorphisms was associated with the occurrence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, by targeting drug-related biologically relevant genes, this work emphasizes the potential

  3. Mechanisms of hepatic transport of cyclosporin A: an explanation for its cholestatic action?

    PubMed Central

    Fricker, G.; Fahr, A.

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic transport of the immunosuppressive Cyclosporin A (CyA) was studied using liposomal phospholipid membranes, freshly isolated rat hepatocytes and bile canalicular plasma membrane vesicles from rat liver. The Na(+)-dependent, saturable uptake of the bile acid 3H-taurocholate into isolated rat liver cells was apparently competitively inhibited by CyA. However, the uptake of CyA into the cells was neither saturable, nor temperature-dependent nor Na(+)-dependent, nor could it be inhibited by bile salts or CyA-derivatives, indicating passive diffusion. In steady state depolarization fluorescence studies, CyA caused a concentration-dependent decrease of anisotropy, indicating a membrane fluidizing effect. Ion flux experiments demonstrated that CyA dramatically increases the permeability of Na+ and Ca2+ across phospholipid membranes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting a iontophoretic activity that might have a direct impact on cellular ion homeostasis and regulation of bile acid uptake. Photoaffinity labeling with a [3H]-labeled photolabile CyA-derivative resulted in the predominant incorporation of radioactivity into a membrane polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 160,000 and a minor labeling of polypeptides with molecular weights of 85,000-90,000. In contrast, use of a photolabile bile acid resulted in the labeling of a membrane polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 110,000, representing the bile canalicular bile acid carrier. The photoaffinity labeling as well as CyA transport by canalicular membrane vesicles were inhibited by CyA and the p-glycoprotein substrates daunomycin and PSC-833, but not by taurocholate, indicating that CyA is excreted by p-glycoprotein. CyA uptake by bile canalicular membrane vesicles was ATP-dependent and could not be inhibited by taurocholate. CyA caused a decrease in the maximum amount of bile salt accumulated by the vesicles with time. However, initial rates of [3H]-taurocholate uptake within

  4. Endothelin-1 receptor antagonist: effects on endothelin- and cyclosporine-treated mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, M; Breyer, M D; Noland, T D; Homma, T; Hoover, R L; Inagami, T; Kon, V

    1992-06-01

    Endothelin-1 (Et) has profound effects on glomerular microcirculation and mesangial cell contraction. A parameter of mesangial cell contraction was examined by measuring myosin light chain phosphorylation (MLCP) in glomerular mesangial cells in the presence and absence of a newly developed endothelin-1 receptor antagonist (EtA). Addition of Et alone (10 nM) caused a marked increase in MLCP, which, on average, rose by 53 +/- 6% above the level in cells exposed to vehicle (P less than 0.0005). This effect was shown to continue for at least one hour; MLCP at 60 minutes was 64 +/- 12% higher than controls, (P less than 0.025), constituting a unique observation of an in vitro parameter which parallels the characteristic in vivo effect of Et. Treatment of cells with EtA virtually abolished this Et-induced increase in MLCP, which rose by only 2 +/- 3% and -1 +/- 4% for doses of EtA of 44 nM and 66 nM, respectively. Examination of the intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, revealed that EtA almost completely abolished the transient increase in [Ca2+]i evoked by Et and also suppressed the early portions of the sustained increase in [Ca2+]i. EtA was ineffective in abolishing [Ca2+]i increase in response to arginine vasopressin. Finally, to evaluate EtA's efficacy in a pathophysiologic setting, we also studied mesangial cells exposed to cyclosporine (Cs). Exposure of mesangial cells to Cs (10(-5) M) for 60 minutes caused a significant increase in MLCP, on average, by 38 +/- 6% above control (P less than 0.0005), while cells exposed to Cs in the presence of EtA increased MLCP significantly less, by only 15 +/- 9%. These data provide further evidence for Et's long-lasting cellular actions, and demonstrate inhibitory effects of an Et receptor antagonist after direct cellular exposure to Et and also after Cs exposure, a pathophysiologic setting which likely involves Et.

  5. Lipid nanoparticles for cyclosporine A administration: development, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of their immunosuppression activity

    PubMed Central

    Guada, Melissa; Sebastián, Victor; Irusta, Silvia; Feijoó, Esperanza; Dios-Viéitez, María del Carmen; Blanco-Prieto, María José

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressant commonly used in transplantation for prevention of organ rejection as well as in the treatment of several autoimmune disorders. Although commercial formulations are available, they have some stability, bioavailability, and toxicity related problems. Some of these issues are associated with the drug or excipients and others with the dosage forms. With the aim of overcoming these drawbacks, lipid nanoparticles (LN) have been proposed as an alternative, since excipients are biocompatible and also a large amount of surfactants and organic solvents can be avoided. CsA was successfully incorporated into LN using the method of hot homogenization followed by ultrasonication. Three different formulations were optimized for CsA oral administration, using different surfactants: Tween® 80, phosphatidylcholine, taurocholate and Pluronic® F127 (either alone or mixtures). Freshly prepared Precirol nanoparticles showed mean sizes with a narrow size distribution ranging from 121 to 202 nm, and after freeze-drying were between 163 and 270 nm, depending on the stabilizer used. Surface charge was negative in all LN developed. High CsA entrapment efficiency of approximately 100% was achieved. Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the morphology of the optimized LN. Also, the crystallinity of the nanoparticles was studied by X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The presence of the drug in LN surfaces was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The CsA LN developed preserved their physicochemical properties for 3 months when stored at 4°C. Moreover, when the stabilizer system was composed of two surfactants, the LN formulations were also stable at room temperature. Finally, the new CsA formulations showed in vitro dose-dependent immuno-suppressive effects caused by the inhibition of IL-2 levels secreted from stimulated Jurkat cells. The findings obtained in this paper suggest that new lipid

  6. Limited sampling strategy for cyclosporine (Neoral) area under the curve monitoring in pediatric kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Strong, Dawn K; Lai, Amanda; Primmett, Dennis; White, Colin T; Lirenman, David S; Carter, James E; Hurley, R Morrison; Virji, Mumtaz; Ensom, Mary H H

    2005-10-01

    Cyclosporine (CSA; Neoral) is one of the most common immunosuppressants used in pediatric renal transplantation. Research in adult renal transplant recipients has shown that 2-h post-dose concentration (C2) monitoring and limited sampling strategies (LSSs) are better at predicting drug exposure and outcome than trough concentrations (C0). While C0 monitoring is the usual practice in pediatric renal transplant patients, area under the curve (AUC) monitoring has been shown to be superior in terms of predictive ability and outcomes. However, AUC monitoring is impractical and inconvenient in a clinic setting because it involves many blood samples. An LSS provides a reliable alternative. The purpose of this study was to prospectively define an LSS (AUC(0-12)) for CSA monitoring and to test its predictive performance. As well, an LSS (AUC(0-4)) for CSA was developed and its predictive performance tested. Blood samples for CSA concentrations were collected in 29 stable pediatric renal transplant patients prior to (t = 0) and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h following a steady-state morning CSA dose. AUC was calculated by the trapezoidal method; LSSs for AUC(0-12) and AUC(0-4) were determined using multiple regression analysis in 14 patients; and the LSSs' predictive performance was tested in 15 additional patients. Both LSSs require two blood samples. For the LSS (AUC(0-12)), blood samples are required immediately before the dose and 2 h post-dose: AUC(0-12) = 12.45 C0 + 2.17 C2 + 723.16 (r2 = 0.909). For the LSS (AUC(0-4)), blood samples are required at one and 2 h post-dose, AUC(0-4) = 1.17 C1 + 1.85 C2 - 41.00 (r2 = 0.971). The LSSs demonstrated low bias and high precision for both AUC(0-12) and AUC(0-4). Our two-concentration LSSs are accurate and precise predictors that are more clinically useful for our patient population than other LSSs that have been developed for pediatric renal transplant patients. Our study template provides a guide for other centers to develop

  7. The impact of steady-state cyclosporine concentrations on renal allograft outcome.

    PubMed

    Dunn, J; Grevel, J; Napoli, K; Lewis, R M; Van Buren, C T; Kahan, B D

    1990-01-01

    It has been reported that initial cyclosporine levels over 400 ng/ml posttransplantation result in an increased incidence of delayed graft function (DGF). Several studies have shown early graft function to be a major determinant for long-term graft survival. Continuous intravenous infusion (CIVI) has been employed to induce immunosuppression establishing therapeutic drug levels while minimizing toxicity in renal allograft recipients. This study examines the impact of the achieved serum CsA steady-state concentration (Css) levels upon transplant outcome in 228 patients given CsA by CIVI. In spite of administration of a specific drug dose, interindividual variation in elimination rates yields a broad range of Css levels. Six groups were stratified by CsA Css levels: group A 0-75 ng/ml, group B 76-100 ng/ml, group C 101-150 ng/ml, group D 151-200 ng/ml, group E 201-250 ng/ml, and group F greater than 250 ng/ml. Group A showed a significantly lower age and greater incidence of rejection at 0-10 days. Group F had significantly higher incidences of nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and delayed graft function. The findings suggest that the antirejection Css threshold for CsA may be at least 75 ng/ml, and the toxicity threshold above 250 ng/ml. Controversy exists about whether CsA influences the incidence of DGF, therefore risk factors for DGF were examined among the groups stratified by CsA Css levels. While cold ischemia time for all 228 patients as a group was highly correlated with DGF (P less than 0.001), neither cold ischemia time nor donor age was significantly different among the groups. There does appear to be a synergistic effect between CsA Css and CIT, since the incidence of DGF was significantly higher when the cold ischemia time was 21-24 hr and CsA Css greater than 200 ng/ml. Long-term graft function did not appear to be affected by early CsA Css levels. The Css of 100-250 ng/ml appears to achieve a satisfactory outcome with a 19.5% incidence of rejection

  8. Biowaiver extension potential and IVIVC for BCS Class II drugs by formulation design: Case study for cyclosporine self-microemulsifying formulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Geun

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this work was to suggest the biowaiver potential of biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) Class II drugs in self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS) which are known to increase the solubility, dissolution and oral absorption of water-insoluble drugs. Cyclosporine was selected as a representative BCS Class II drug. New generic candidate of cyclosporine SMEDDS (test) was applied for the study with brand SMEDDS (reference I) and cyclosporine self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS, reference II). Solubility and dissolution of cyclosporine from SMEDDS were critically enhanced, which were the similar behaviors with BCS class I drug. The test showed the identical dissolution rate and the equivalent bioavailability (0.34, 0.42 and 0.68 of p values for AUC₀(→)₂₄(h), C(max) and T(max), respectively) with the reference I. Based on the results, level A in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) was established from these two SMEDDS formulations. This study serves as a good example for speculating the biowaiver extension potential of BCS Class II drugs specifically in solubilizing formulation such as SMEDDS.

  9. The combination of sirolimus plus tacrolimus improves outcome after reduced-intensity conditioning, unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation compared with cyclosporine plus mycofenolate

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Simón, Jose Antonio; Martino, Rodrigo; Parody, Rocío; Cabrero, Mónica; Lopez-Corral, Lucía; Valcarcel, David; Martinez, Carmen; Solano, Carlos; Vazquez, Lourdes; Márquez-Malaver, Francisco J.; Sierra, Jordi; Caballero, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Different types of graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis have been proposed in the setting of reduced intensity and non-myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation. An alternative combination with sirolimus and tacrolimus has recently been tested although comparative studies against the classical combination of a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil or methotrexate are lacking. We describe the results of a prospective, multicenter trial using sirolimus + tacrolimus as immunoprophylaxis, and compare this approach with our previous experience using cyclosporine + mycophenolate in the setting of unrelated donor transplantation setting after reduced-intensity conditioning. Forty-five patients received cyclosporine + mycophenolate between 2002 and mid-2007, while the subsequent 50 patients, who were transplanted from late 2007, were given sirolimus + tacrolimus. No significant differences were observed in terms of hematopoietic recovery or acute graft-versus-host disease overall, although gastrointestinal acute graft-versus-host disease grade ≥2 was more common in the cyclosporine + mycophenolate group (55% versus 21%, respectively, P=0.003). The 1-year cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease was 50% versus 90% for the patients treated with the sirolimus- versus cyclosporine-based regimen, respectively (P<0.001), while the incidence of extensive chronic disease was 27% versus 49%, respectively (P=0.043). The 2-year non-relapse mortality rate was 18% versus 38% for patients receiving the sirolimus- versus the cyclosporine-based regimen, respectively (P=0.02). The event-free survival and overall survival at 2 years were 53% versus 29% (P=0.028) and 70% versus 45% (P=0.018) among patients receiving the sirolimus- versus the cyclosporine-based regimen, respectively. In conclusion, in the setting of reduced intensity transplantation from an unrelated donor, promising results can be achieved with the combination of sirolimus + tacrolimus

  10. Co-administration of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine aggravates colon ulceration of acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis via facilitation of NO/COX-2/miR-210 cascade.

    PubMed

    El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Saad, Evan I; Abdel-Galil, Abdel-Galil A; Ibrahim, Einas R

    2015-11-01

    In this work, α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine demonstrated significant protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats. We proposed that α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine co-administration might modulate their individual effects. Induction of ulcerative colitis in rats was performed by intra-rectal acetic acid (5% v/v) administration for 3 consecutive days. Effects of individual or combined used of α-lipoic acid (35 mg/kg ip) or cyclosporine (5mg/kg sc) for 6 days starting 2 days prior to acetic acid were assessed. Acetic acid caused colon ulceration, bloody diarrhea and weight loss. Histologically, there was mucosal atrophy and inflammatory cells infiltration in submucosa, associated with depletion of colon reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and elevated colon malondialdehyde, serum C-reactive protein (C-RP) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Colon gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and miR-210 was also elevated. These devastating effects of acetic acid were abolished upon concurrent administration of α-lipoic acid. Alternatively, cyclosporine caused partial protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis. Cyclosporine did not restore colon reduced glutathione, catalase activity, serum C-RP or TNF-α. Unexpectedly, co-administration of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine aggravated colon ulceration. Concomitant use of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine significantly increased nitric oxide production, cyclooxygenase-2 and miR-210 gene expression compared to all other studied groups. The current findings suggest that facilitation of nitric oxide/cyclooxygenase-2/miR-210 cascade constitutes, at least partially, the cellular mechanism by which concurrent use of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine aggravates colon damage. Collectively, the present work highlights the probable risk of using α-lipoic acid/cyclosporine combination in ulcerative colitis patients.

  11. Efficacy and safety of concentration-controlled everolimus with reduced-dose cyclosporine in Japanese de novo renal transplant patients: 12-month results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background No study to date has evaluated the efficacy and safety of everolimus with reduced-exposure cyclosporine in Japanese de-novo renal transplant (RTx) patients. Methods This 12-month, multicenter, open-label study randomized (1:1) 122 Japanese de-novo RTx patients to either an everolimus regimen (1.5 mg/day starting dose (target trough: 3 to 8 ng/ml) + reduced-dose cyclosporine) or a mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) regimen (2 g/day + standard dose cyclosporine). All patients received basiliximab and corticosteroids. Key endpoints at month 12 were composite efficacy failure (treated biopsy-proven acute rejection, graft loss, death, or loss to follow-up) and renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate; Modification of Diet in Renal Disease-4). Results Clear cyclosporine exposure reduction was achieved in the everolimus group throughout the study (52% reduction at month 12). Month 12 efficacy failure rates showed everolimus 1.5 mg to be non-inferior to MMF (11.5% vs. 11.5%). The median estimated glomerular filtration rate at month 12 was 58.00 ml/minute/1.73 m2 in the everolimus group versus 55.25 ml/minute/1.73 m2 in the MMF group (P = 0.063). Overall, the incidence of adverse events was comparable between the groups with some differences in line with the known safety profile of the treatments. The everolimus group had a higher incidence of wound healing events and edema, whereas a higher rate of cytomegalovirus infections was reported in the MMF group. Conclusions This study confirmed the efficacy of everolimus 1.5 mg/day (target trough: 3 to 8 ng/ml) in Japanese RTx patients for preventing acute rejection, while allowing for substantial cyclosporine sparing. Renal function and safety findings were comparable with previous reports from other RTx populations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT00658320 PMID:23866828

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of cyclosporin A: The crystal structure and dynamic modelling of a structure in apolar solution based on NMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautz, J.; Kessler, H.; Kaptein, R.; van Gunsteren, W. F.

    1987-10-01

    The conformation of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CPA), both in apolar solution and in crystalline state, has been studied by computer simulation techniques. Three molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed: one modelling the crystal structure and two modelling the structure in apolar solution, using a restrained MD approach in which data from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are taken into account. The simulation of the crystalline state (MDC) concerns a system of 4 unit cells containing 16 cyclosporin A molecules and 22 water molecules, which is simulated using crystalline periodic boundary conditions. The simulations modelling the apolar solvent conformation (MDS) concern one isolated cyclosporin A molecule. In these simulations an extra term in the interatomic potential function is used, which forces the molecule to satisfy a set of 57 atom-atom distance constraints originating from nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) obtained from NMR spectroscopy and one distance constraint deduced from IR spectroscopy. From a comparison of the results of the crystal simulation to those of the X-ray experiment in terms of structure, atomic fluctuations, hydrogen bond pattern, etc., it is concluded that the force field that is used yields an adequate representation of crystalline cyclosporin A. Secondly, it is shown that the dynamic modelling technique that is used to obtain a structure in a polar solution from NMR distance information works well. Starting from initial conformations which have a root mean square difference of 0.14 nm both distance restrained MD simulations converge to the same final solution structure. A comparison of the crystal structure of cyclosporin A and the one in apolar solution shows that there are significant differences. The overall difference in atomic positions is 0.09 nm for the Cx atoms and 0.17 nm for all atoms. In apolar solution, the molecule is slightly more bent and the side chains of 1

  13. Efficacy and safety of conversion from cyclosporine to everolimus in living-donor kidney transplant recipients: an analysis from the ZEUS study.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Frank; Budde, Klemens; Zeier, Martin; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Reinke, Petra; Eisenberger, Ute; Mühlfeld, Anja; Arns, Wolfgang; Stahl, Rolf; Heller, Katharina; Witzke, Oliver; Wolters, Heiner H; Suwelack, Barbara; Klehr, Hans Ulrich; Stangl, Manfred; Hauser, Ingeborg A; Nadalin, Silvio; Porstner, Martina; May, Christoph; Paulus, Eva-Maria; Sommerer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Conversion of living-donor kidney transplant patients from calcineurin inhibitor therapy to an mTOR inhibitor is poorly documented. In the prospective, multicentre ZEUS study, 300 kidney transplant recipients without prior rejection (Banff grade >1) and serum creatinine ≤265 μmol/l were randomized to continue cyclosporine or convert to everolimus at 4.5 months post-transplant. In a post hoc analysis of 80 living-donor recipients, adjusted estimated GFR (Nankivell) at month 12 (the primary endpoint) was 74.3 (95% CI [70.7, 77.9]) ml/min/1.73 m(2) with everolimus versus 63.8 (95% CI [60.0, 67.7]) ml/min/1.73 m(2) ) with cyclosporine, a difference of 10.5 ml/min/1.73 m(2) in favour of everolimus (P < 0.001). From randomization to month 12, adjusted estimated GFR increased by a mean of 9.8 (95% CI [6.2, 13.4]) ml/min/1.73 m(2) with everolimus versus -0.7 (95% CI [-4.6, 3.1]) ml/min/1.73 m(2) ) (P < 0.001) with cyclosporine. There were six biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes in everolimus-treated patients (five Banff grade I) and one episode in cyclosporine-treated patients (Banff grade 1). Overall safety profile was similar between groups. Discontinuation due to adverse events occurred in three everolimus patients (7.1%) and five cyclosporine patients (13.2%) between randomization and month 12. Initiation of everolimus with early elimination of calcineurin therapy is associated with a significant renal benefit at 12 months post-transplant that is observed in both living and deceased-donor recipients. (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00154310).

  14. V101L of human formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) increases receptor affinity and augments the antagonism mediated by cyclosporins

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Caihong; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jia; Feng, Yang; Wang, Haonan; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Yani; Ye, Richard D.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation plays a major role in drug response variability. CsA (cyclosporin A), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, is a specific antagonist for FPR1 (formyl peptide receptor 1), which is an important G-protein-coupled chemoattractant receptor in the innate immune system. In order to study the variable responses of cyclosporins to different FPR1 mutants, we investigated the distribution of human FPR1 haplotypes among 209 healthy Han Chinese subjects. The haplotype pattern in Han Chinese were characterized on the basis of five SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including rs5030878 (p.T11I), rs2070745 (p.V101L), rs5030880 (p.R190W), rs1042229 (p.N192K) and rs867228 (p.A346E). Receptor binding affinity of cyclosporins to FPR1 haplotypes was assessed using N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys–FITC in CHO-Gα16 cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding the top 12 FPR1 haplotypes in the Han Chinese. Variants of FPR1 carrying a single amino acid substitution of leucine for valine at position 101 (p.Leu101) displayed significantly higher pKi values for CsA and CsH (cyclosporin H), indicative of an improved receptor affinity. The polymorphism of FPR1 p.Leu101 also enhanced the inhibitory effects of cyclosporins on fMLF (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine)-induced activities, including calcium mobilization, cell chemotaxis and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation. These results point to a possible complication for clinical use of CsA in patients carrying the p.Leu101 allele of FPR1. PMID:23373827

  15. V101L of human formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) increases receptor affinity and augments the antagonism mediated by cyclosporins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Caihong; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jia; Feng, Yang; Wang, Haonan; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Yani; Ye, Richard D; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2013-04-15

    Genetic variation plays a major role in drug response variability. CsA (cyclosporin A), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, is a specific antagonist for FPR1 (formyl peptide receptor 1), which is an important G-protein-coupled chemoattractant receptor in the innate immune system. In order to study the variable responses of cyclosporins to different FPR1 mutants, we investigated the distribution of human FPR1 haplotypes among 209 healthy Han Chinese subjects. The haplotype pattern in Han Chinese were characterized on the basis of five SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including rs5030878 (p.T11I), rs2070745 (p.V101L), rs5030880 (p.R190W), rs1042229 (p.N192K) and rs867228 (p.A346E). Receptor binding affinity of cyclosporins to FPR1 haplotypes was assessed using N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-FITC in CHO-G(α16) cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding the top 12 FPR1 haplotypes in the Han Chinese. Variants of FPR1 carrying a single amino acid substitution of leucine for valine at position 101 (p.Leu(101)) displayed significantly higher pK(i) values for CsA and CsH (cyclosporin H), indicative of an improved receptor affinity. The polymorphism of FPR1 p.Leu(101) also enhanced the inhibitory effects of cyclosporins on fMLF (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine)-induced activities, including calcium mobilization, cell chemotaxis and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation. These results point to a possible complication for clinical use of CsA in patients carrying the p.Leu(101) allele of FPR1.

  16. Relevance of p-glycoprotein for the enteral absorption of cyclosporin A: in vitro-in vivo correlation.

    PubMed Central

    Fricker, G.; Drewe, J.; Huwyler, J.; Gutmann, H.; Beglinger, C.

    1996-01-01

    1. The interaction of cyclosporin A (CyA) with p-glycoprotein during intestinal uptake was investigated by a combination of in vitro experiments with human Caco-2 cells and an intubation study in healthy volunteers. 2. CyA uptake into the cells was not saturable and exhibited only a low temperature sensitivity, suggesting passive diffusion. When the permeation of CyA across Caco-2 monolayers from the apical to the basolateral side was determined, overall transport had an apparently saturable component up to a concentration of 1 microM. At higher concentrations permeation increased over-proportionally. Calculation of the kinetic parameters of apical to basolateral permeation suggested a diffusional process with a KD of 0.5 microliter min-1 per filter, which was overlayed by an active system in basolateral to apical direction with a KM of 3.8 microM and a Jmax of 6.5 picomol min-1 per filter. 3. CyA permeation was significantly higher when the drug was given from the basolateral side as compared to the permeation from the apical side. Apical to basolateral transport of CyA was increased in the presence of vinblastine, daunomycin and a non-immunosuppressive CyA-derivative. All compounds inhibit p-glycoprotein-mediated transport processes. Basolateral to apical permeation of CyA showed a dose-dependent decrease in the presence of vinblastine. Permeation of daunomycin across Caco-2 cell monolayers was also higher from the basolateral to the apical side than vice versa. Basolateral to apical permeation was decreased in the presence of SDZ PSC 833 and cyclosporin A. 4. Western blot analysis of Caco-2 cells with the monoclonal antibody C219 confirmed the presence of p-glycoprotein in the used cell system. 5. When the absorption of CyA in the gastrointestinal (GI)-tract of healthy volunteers was determined, a remarkable decrease of the plasma AUC could be observed dependent on the location of absorption in the rank order stomach > jejunum/ileum > colon. The decrease in

  17. Cyclosporine a 0.05% eye drops for the treatment of subepithelial infiltrates after epidemic keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the treatment with topical 0.05% cyclosporine A (CsA) in patients with subepithelial corneal infiltrates (SEI). Methods We reviewed 16 patients (22 eyes) before and after the treatment with 0.05% CsA eye drops. All patients had been treated previously with topical corticosteroids without any improvement and also they had to stop the medication secondary to intraocular pressure elevation. The objective data recorded included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), evaluation of corneal subepithelial infiltrate scores (CSIS), intraocular pressure (IOP) prior to treatment and the last follow-up visit. Results Six males (37.5%) and 10 females (62.5%), mean age of 35.2 ± 16.6 years, were included. The patients’ average topical CsA use duration was 5.1 ± 3.5 months (1 – 13 months). The average follow up time of the patients was 9.2 ± 4.7 months (4 – 22 months). One patient, although he didn’t have a 0 scale of SCIS, did not show up for follow up examinations after six months. The mean BCVA (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution) before and after the treatment were 0.15 ± 0.15 and 0.07 ± 0.07 respectively, CSIS 1.68 ± 0.89 and 0.23 ± 0.53 respectively, IOP 18.50 ± 3.82 and 16.86 ± 2.76 mmHg respectively. There were statistically significant improvements in BCVA (p = 0.002), reduction of CSIS (p = 0.002) and reduction of IOP (p < 0.001) prior to treatment and the last follow-up visit. 18 eyes (81.9%) showed clinical improvement and 4 (18.1%) had decreased SEI which did not fully disappear during the treatment period. The eyes which reached CSIS score 0 (18 eyes) were treated with CsA for 1 – 13 months; while the eyes which had clinical improvement but had not CSIS score 0 (4 eyes) were decided to discontinue of CsA treatment in last follow-up visit. There were recurrences in 2 eyes 3 months after the treatment. Patients reported reduction in the severity of symptoms after the

  18. Influence of cyclosporine and everolimus on the main mycophenolate mofetil pharmacokinetic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Noreikaitė, Aurelija; Saint-Marcoux, Franck; Marquet, Pierre; Kaduševičius, Edmundas; Stankevičius, Edgaras

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of cyclosporine (CsA) on the pharmacokinetic parameters of mycophenolic acid (MPA), an active mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) metabolite, and to compare with the effect of everolimus (EVR). Anonymized medical records of 404 kidney recipients were reviewed. The main MPA pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC(0–12) and Cmax) were evaluated. The patients treated with a higher mean dose of CsA displayed higher MPA AUC(0–12) exposure in the low-dose MMF group (1000 mg/day) (40.50 ± 10.97 vs 28.08 ± 11.03 h mg/L; rs = 0.497, P < 0.05), medium-dose MMF group (2000 mg/day) (43.00 ± 6.27 vs 28.85 ± 11.08 h mg/L; rs = 0.437, P < 0.01), and high-dose MMF group (3000 mg/day) (56.75 ± 16.78 vs 36.20 ± 3.70 h mg/L; rs = 0.608, P < 0.05). A positive correlation was also observed between the mean CsA dose and the MPA Cmax in the low-dose MMF group (Cmax 22.83 ± 10.82 vs 12.08 ± 5.59 mg/L; rs = 0.507, P < 0.05) and in the medium-dose MMF group (22.77 ± 8.86 vs 13.00 ± 6.82 mg/L; rs = 0.414, P < 0.01). The comparative analysis between 2 treatment arms (MMF + CsA and MMF + EVR) showed that MPA AUC(0–12) exposure was by 43% higher in the patients treated with a medium dose of MMF and EVR than in the patients treated with a medium dose of MMF and CsA. The data of the present study suggest a possible CsA versus EVR influence on MMF pharmacokinetics. Study results show that CsA has an impact on the main MPA pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC(0–12) and Cmax) in a CsA dose-related manner, while EVR mildly influence or does not affect MPA pharmacokinetic parameters. Low-dose CsA (lower than 180 mg/day) reduces MPA AUC(0–12) exposure under the therapeutic window and may lead to ineffective therapy, while a high-dose CsA (>240 mg/day) is related to greater than 10 mg/L MPA Cmax and increases the

  19. Influence of cyclosporine and everolimus on the main mycophenolate mofetil pharmacokinetic parameters: Cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Noreikaitė, Aurelija; Saint-Marcoux, Franck; Marquet, Pierre; Kaduševičius, Edmundas; Stankevičius, Edgaras

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of cyclosporine (CsA) on the pharmacokinetic parameters of mycophenolic acid (MPA), an active mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) metabolite, and to compare with the effect of everolimus (EVR).Anonymized medical records of 404 kidney recipients were reviewed. The main MPA pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC(0-12) and Cmax) were evaluated.The patients treated with a higher mean dose of CsA displayed higher MPA AUC(0-12) exposure in the low-dose MMF group (1000 mg/day) (40.50 ± 10.97 vs 28.08 ± 11.03 h mg/L; rs = 0.497, P < 0.05), medium-dose MMF group (2000 mg/day) (43.00 ± 6.27 vs 28.85 ± 11.08 h mg/L; rs = 0.437, P < 0.01), and high-dose MMF group (3000 mg/day) (56.75 ± 16.78 vs 36.20 ± 3.70 h mg/L; rs = 0.608, P < 0.05).A positive correlation was also observed between the mean CsA dose and the MPA Cmax in the low-dose MMF group (Cmax 22.83 ± 10.82 vs 12.08 ± 5.59 mg/L; rs = 0.507, P < 0.05) and in the medium-dose MMF group (22.77 ± 8.86 vs 13.00 ± 6.82 mg/L; rs = 0.414, P < 0.01).The comparative analysis between 2 treatment arms (MMF + CsA and MMF + EVR) showed that MPA AUC(0-12) exposure was by 43% higher in the patients treated with a medium dose of MMF and EVR than in the patients treated with a medium dose of MMF and CsA.The data of the present study suggest a possible CsA versus EVR influence on MMF pharmacokinetics. Study results show that CsA has an impact on the main MPA pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC(0-12) and Cmax) in a CsA dose-related manner, while EVR mildly influence or does not affect MPA pharmacokinetic parameters. Low-dose CsA (lower than 180 mg/day) reduces MPA AUC(0-12) exposure under the therapeutic window and may lead to ineffective therapy, while a high-dose CsA (>240 mg/day) is related to greater than 10 mg/L MPA Cmax and increases the likelihood of adverse events.

  20. Preparation and evaluation of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide) micelles as nanocarriers for oral delivery of cyclosporine a.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhui; Li, Xinru; Zhou, Yanxia; Wang, Xiaoning; Fan, Yating; Huang, Yanqing; Liu, Yan

    2010-03-27

    A series of monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide) (mPEG-PLA) diblock copolymers were designed according to polymer-drug compatibility and synthesized, and mPEG-PLA micelle was fabricated and used as a nanocarrier for solubilization and oral delivery of Cyclosporine A (CyA). CyA was efficiently encapsulated into the micelles with nanoscaled diameter ranged from 60 to 96 nm with a narrow size distribution. The favorable stabilities of CyA-loaded polymeric micelles were observed in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. The in vitro drug release investigation demonstrated that drug release was retarded by polymeric micelles. The enhanced intestinal absorption of CyA-loaded polymeric micelles, which was comparable to the commercial formulation of CyA (Sandimmun Neoral®), was found. These suggested that polymeric micelles might be an effective nanocarrier for solubilization of poorly soluble CyA and further improving oral absorption of the drug.

  1. The effect of arbutin on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant capacity in the serum of cyclosporine-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Khadir, Fatemeh; Pouramir, Mahdi; Joorsaraee, Seyyed Gholamali; Feizi, Farideh; Sorkhi, Hadi; Yousefi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a potent immunosuppressant drug with therapeutic and toxic actions. The use of CsA is limited by its toxicity. Several researchers had proposed that oxidative stress could play an important role in CsA-induced toxicity. Arbutin has recently been shown to possess antioxidative and free radical scavenging abilities. The present study was designed to investigate the in vivo effects of arbutin on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant capacity in the serum of cyclosporine treated rats. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were divided into six groups (n=8/group): (I) control (no CsA and arbutin administration), (II and III) were treated subcutaneously (Sc) with arbutin (50,100 mg/kg/bw), respectively, (IV) administered CsA (25 mg/kg/bw) intraperitoneally (IP), (V and VI) received the combination of CsA (25 mg/kg/bw) i.p and arbutin (50,100 mg/kg/bw) Sc daily, respectively. At the end of the treatment (after3 weeks), serum lipid peroxidation was measured by thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) and serum total antioxidant capacity (ferric reducing ability of plasma [FRAP]) was assayed based on spectrophotometric method. Results: TBARS had been significantly increased by CsA administration compared with control rats. Arbutin (50mg/kg/bw) completely prevented this effect, but arbutin (100 mg/kg/bw) alone or in combination with CsA significantly increased lipid peroxidation compared with controls. Conclusion: Our data indicate that arbutin (50mg/kg/bw) had protective effect in the CsA-induced toxicity but high concentration of arbutin (100mg/kg/bw) showed meaningful oxidative and lipoperoxidative effects. PMID:26644892

  2. Protective Effects of Co-Administration of Gallic Acid and Cyclosporine on Rat Myocardial Morphology Against Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Mahin; Sadeghi, Najmeh; Badavi, Mohammad; Panahi, Marziyeh; Taheri Moghadam, Mahin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Irreversible myocardial ischemic injury begins 20 minutes after the onset of coronary occlusion. Then the infarcted cells show signs of necrosis and death. Objectives: This study investigated the effects of co-administration of Gallic acid (antioxidant) with cyclosporine (mitochondrial permeability transition pore [mPTP] inhibitor) on myocardial morphology of rats during ischemia and reperfusion. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four male Wistar rats (250-300 g), were randomly divided into 9 groups: sham, control (Ca received saline, 1 mL/kg, Cb: perfused with cyclosporine CsA 0.2 µM), 3 groups pretreated with Gallic acid in saline (G1a:7.5, G2a:15, and G3a: 30 mg/kg/day, and gavage daily for 10 days, n = 6), and the other three groups were pretreated with Gallic acid then perfused using CsA, (G1b:7.5, G2b:15, and G3b: 30 mg/kg/day) at the first 13 minutes of reperfusion period. After 10 days pretreatment, the rat hearts were isolated and transferred to Langendorff apparatus and exposed to 30 minutes ischemia following 60 minutes reperfusion. Afterward, the hearts were preserved in 10% formalin for histological studies at the end of the experiment. Finally, hematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome staining techniques were used for evaluating the changes in myocardial architecture, degradation of myofibers, and collagen integrity. The differences were analyzed using Pearson test. Results: Cell degenerative changes, pyknotic nuclei, contraction bands, edema, and loosening of collagen in between muscle fibers were observed during ischemia-reperfusion. Myocardial architecture and cellular morphology were recovered in co-administration groups, especially in (Gallic acid 15 mg/kg + CsA, P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results suggest the important role of the antioxidant system potentiation in the prevention of myocardial damage. PMID:25625048

  3. Blood cyclosporin concentrations and the short-term risk of lung rejection following heart-lung transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Best, N G; Trull, A K; Tan, K K; Hue, K L; Spiegelhalter, D J; Gore, S M; Wallwork, J

    1992-01-01

    1. The relationship between blood cyclosporin concentration (CyACb) and a patient's risk of organ rejection following heart-lung (HL) transplantation was investigated. 2. Longitudinal data were collected for 90 days post-operation for 31 HL transplant recipients. Following exploratory analysis, a multiple logistic regression model with a binary outcome variable representing presence or absence of lung rejection (as defined on biopsy findings and/or intention to treat) in the next 5 days was fitted to the data. 3. A significant interaction between time post-transplant and CyACb was found. During weeks 1-3, the relative risk (RR) of rejection per unit increase in log(e) (5-day mean CyACb) was reduced: RR = 0.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) = (0.12, 0.72). After 3 post-operative weeks, this trend was reversed: RR = 1.61, 95% CI = (0.96, 2.70). Increases in cyclosporin dose (CyAD) and in coefficient of variation (CV) for both CyAD and CyACb over the previous 10 days significantly increased the risk of rejection: RR per unit increase in log(e) (5-day mean CyAD) = 2.72, 95% CI = (1.18, 6.25); RR per increase of 10% (i.e. from, say, 20% to 30%) in the CV for CyAD = 1.20, 95% CI = (1.07, 1.36); RR if the CV for CyACb > 40% = 1.51, 95% CI = (1.01, 2.27). Administration of high dose steroids in the previous 5 days was found to protect against further rejection: RR if steroid treatment was given = 0.23, 95% CI = (0.13, 0.38).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1493084

  4. Cyclosporine A treatment for Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy: a cellular study of mitochondrial dysfunction and its rescue.

    PubMed

    Hicks, D; Lampe, A K; Laval, S H; Allamand, V; Jimenez-Mallebrera, C; Walter, M C; Muntoni, F; Quijano-Roy, S; Richard, P; Straub, V; Lochmüller, H; Bushby, K M D

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3, the genes which encode the extra-cellular matrix component collagen VI, lead to Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). Although the Col6a1(-/-) null mouse has an extremely mild neuromuscular phenotype, a mitochondrial defect has been demonstrated, linked to dysregulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. This finding has been replicated in UCMD muscle cells in culture, providing justification for a clinical trial using cyclosporine A, an inhibitor of PTP opening. We investigated whether PTP dysregulation could be detected in UCMD fibroblasts (the predominant source of muscle collagen VI), in myoblast cells from patients with other diseases and its response to rescue agents other than collagen VI. Although we confirm the presence of PTP dysregulation in muscle-derived cultures from two UCMD patients, fibroblasts from the same patients and the majority of fibroblasts from other well-characterized UCMD patients behave normally. PTP dysregulation is found in limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2B myoblasts but not in myoblasts from patients with Bethlem myopathy, merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, LGMD2A, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Leigh syndrome. In addition to rescue by cyclosporine A and collagen VI, this cellular phenotype was also rescued by other extra-cellular matrix constituents (laminin and collagen I). As the muscle derived cultures demonstrating PTP dysregulation shared poor growth in culture and lack of desmin labelling, we believe that PTP dysregulation may be a particular characteristic of the state of these cells in culture and is not specific to the collagen VI defect, and can in any case be rescued by a range of extra-cellular matrix components. Further work is needed on the relationship of PTP dysregulation with UCMD pathology.

  5. Cyclosporine therapy during pregnancy in a patient with β-thalassemia major and autoimmune haemolytic anemia: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Agapidou, A; Vlachaki, E; Theodoridis, T; Economou, M; Perifanis, V

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the management of hemoglobinopathies offer an improved potential for safe pregnancy with favourable outcome in patients with β-thalassemia major. Autoimmune diseases that are common in women at reproductive age might be fulminant and hardly manageable in pregnant women with thalassemia. Thus immunosuppressant drugs like cyclosporine A could be necessary in order to maintain good maternal and foetal health. We present a case report of a 35-year-old woman with β-thalassemia major, splenectomy, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and insulin treated diabetes mellitus who was treated with cyclosporine A during her pregnancy, and delivered a healthy male infant. First line therapy with steroids was ineffective, due to deregulation of diabetes mellitus. PMID:23935353

  6. Cyclosporin A does not protect the disruption of the inner mitochondrial membrane potential induced by potassium ionophores in intact K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Marques-Santos, Luis F; Coqueiro, Vivian M; Rumjanek, Vivian M

    2006-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been widely associated with programmed cell death. Studies of intact cells are important for the understanding of the process of cell death and its relation to mitochondrial physiology. Using cytofluorometric approaches we studied the mitochondrial behavior in an erythroleukemic cell line. The effects of protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), potassium exchanger (nigericin), potassium ionophore (valinomycin), Na+K+-ATPase inhibitor (ouabain) and mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor (cyclosporin A) were evaluated. Cyclosporin A (CSA) was very effective in attenuating the disruption of inner mitochondrial membrane potential induced by CCCP. However, CSA failed to protect the loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential induced by potassium intracellular flux manipulation. Our findings suggest that mitochondrial cyclophilin is not involved in the cell events mediated by deregulation of potassium flux, underlining the need for further studies in intact tumor cells for a better understanding of the involvement of mitochondria physiology in cell death events.

  7. The efficacy and safety of cyclosporine reduction in de novo renal allograft patients receiving sirolimus and corticosteroids: results from an open-label comparative study.

    PubMed

    Mühlbacher, Ferdinand; Neumayer, Hans-Helmut; del Castillo, Domingo; Stefoni, Sergio; Zygmunt, Anthony J; Budde, Klemens

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of a sirolimus, corticosteroid, and cyclosporine reduction regimen in an open-label, 12-month trial of 420 de novo renal allograft recipients at 49 European transplant centers. One month post-transplantation, 357 patients were randomized to receive standard-dose cyclosporine (sCsA, n = 179) or reduced-dose cyclosporine (rCsA, n = 178). All patients also received sirolimus and corticosteroids. The primary end points were the rate of biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (BCAR) and renal function, as measured by serum creatinine. Baseline demographic and donor characteristics were similar between groups. BCAR rates at 12 months were not significantly different: 11.2% for rCsA patients and 16.2% for sCsA patients. Mean serum creatinine (±SEM) was significantly lower (1.75 ± 0.10 vs. 1.97 ± 0.07 mg/dl, P < 0.001), and creatinine clearance (±SEM; Nankivell method) was significantly higher (57.8 ± 1.78 vs. 49.5 ± 2.46 ml/min, P < 0.001) in patients receiving rCsA versus sCsA at 1 year, respectively. Patient and graft survival exceeded 98% in both groups. No significant differences in infection or malignancy were noted between groups. The rCsA with sirolimus and corticosteroid regimen resulted in excellent 12-month patient and graft survival, a low incidence of BCAR, and improved renal function in renal allograft recipients. Sirolimus administered with rCsA and corticosteroids provided adequate immunosuppression while reducing the potential for the nephrotoxic effects of cyclosporine. These findings may help to improve long-term renal allograft outcomes.

  8. Enhancement of physicochemical properties of nanocolloidal carrier loaded with cyclosporine for topical treatment of psoriasis: in vitro diffusion and in vivo hydrating action

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Siti Hajar; Basri, Mahiran; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shamsudin, Norashikin; Salim, Norazlinaliza

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease that cannot be cured. It can however be controlled by various forms of treatment, including topical, systemic agents, and phototherapy. Topical treatment is the first-line treatment and favored by most physicians, as this form of therapy has more patient compliance. Introducing a nanoemulsion for transporting cyclosporine as an anti-inflammatory drug to an itchy site of skin disease would enhance the effectiveness of topical treatment for psoriasis. The addition of nutmeg and virgin coconut-oil mixture, with their unique properties, could improve cyclosporine loading and solubility. A high-shear homogenizer was used in formulating a cyclosporine-loaded nanoemulsion. A D-optimal mixture experimental design was used in the optimization of nanoemulsion compositions, in order to understand the relationships behind the effect of independent variables (oil, surfactant, xanthan gum, and water content) on physicochemical response (particle size and polydispersity index) and rheological response (viscosity and k-value). Investigation of these variables suggests two optimized formulations with specific oil (15% and 20%), surfactant (15%), xanthan gum (0.75%), and water content (67.55% and 62.55%), which possessed intended responses and good stability against separation over 3 months’ storage at different temperatures. Optimized nanoemulsions of pH 4.5 were further studied with all types of stability analysis: physical stability, coalescence-rate analysis, Ostwald ripening, and freeze–thaw cycles. In vitro release proved the efficacy of nanosize emulsions in carrying cyclosporine across rat skin and a synthetic membrane that best fit the Korsmeyer–Peppas kinetic model. In vivo skin analysis towards healthy volunteers showed a significant improvement in the stratum corneum in skin hydration.

  9. Indomethacin and cyclosporin a inhibit in vitro ischemia-induced expression of ICAM-1 and chemokines in human brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Smith, C; Monette, R; Hutchison, J; Stanimirovic, D B

    2000-01-01

    Brain inflammation has been implicated in the development of brain edema and secondary brain damage in ischemia and trauma. Mechanisms involved in leukocyte infiltration across the blood-brain barrier are still unknown. In this study, we show that human cere-bromicrovascular endothelial cells (HCEC) subjected to a 4 h in vitro ischemia (hypoxia + glucose deprivation) followed by a 4-24 h recovery express elevated levels of ICAM-1, IL-8, and MCP-1 mRNAs (semi-quantitative RT-PCR) and secrete increased amounts of the immunoreactive chemokines IL-8 and MCP-1 (ELISA). The ischemia-induced expression of ICAM-1 in HCEC, and the expression/release of IL-8 and MCP-1 in HCEC were abolished by the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin (100-300 microM). The immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (50 microM) partially reduced the ischemia-stimulated IL-8 and MCP-1 secretion by HCEC. Both indomethacin and cyclosporin A also inhibited the ischemia-induced neutrophil chemotaxis elicited by HCEC media. The study indicates that in vitro ischemia augments the expression of adhesion molecules and leukocyte chemoattractants at the site of the BBB. This ischemic pro-inflammatory activation of HCEC may constitute a key event in initiating post-ischemic inflammation, and it can be suppressed by the anti-inflammatory drugs, indomethacin and cyclosporin A.

  10. Cyclosporine-induced autoimmunity. Conditions for expressing disease, requirement for intact thymus, and potency estimates of autoimmune lymphocytes in drug-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    These studies explore the phenomenon of cyclosporine-induced autoimmunity in irradiated Lewis rats. We show that (a) the presence of a thymus is required, and autoimmune precursors develop in and exit from this organ to the peripheral lymphocyte pool within a 2-wk period after the initiation of cyclosporine treatment; (b) adoptive transfers of drug-induced autoimmunity to irradiated secondary recipients can be accomplished with relatively few cells of the Th subset, and these transfers of autoimmunity can be blocked by cotransfer of normal lymphoid cells; and (c) potency estimates, using popliteal lymph node assays in syngeneic and F1 recipients indicate similar levels of auto- and alloreactivity by cells from drug-induced autoimmune donors. These various findings indicate that this particular animal model may be useful for studies of the onset and control of autoimmunity, and they raise the possibility that the lack of autoimmunity in normal animals and its induction with cyclosporine may involve similar cellular mechanism as have been found to be operative in GVH reactions and specifically induced immunologic resistance to GVHD. PMID:3490534

  11. Enhancing effect of negative polypropylene electret on in vitro transdermal delivery of cyclosporine A solution and its synergistic effect with ethyl oleate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, L. L.; Ma, L.; Liang, Y. Y.; Liu, H. Y.; Guo, X.; Jiang, J.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the corona charged electrets at voltages of -500 V, -1000 V and -2000 V were made from polypropylene (PP) film. The cyclosporine A (CsA) and 10% ethyl oleate were chosen as the model drug and chemical enhancer, respectively. The charge storage stability of the electrets and the in vitro transdermal behaviour of the model drug in solution under different conditions were studied. The results indicate that the external electrostatic field of the negative PP electrets could penetrate through the rat skin and enhance the transdermal delivery of cyclosporine A. A synergistic effect on enhancing the transdermal delivery of cyclosporine A was observed by combining different surface potential negative PP electrets with 10% ethyl oleate, and the amount of transdermal delivery of CsA was greatly increased comparing with only application of electrets. Therefore, the combination application of electret and chemical enhancer could be a feasible strategy in enhancing transdermal delivery of small peptide drugs or some large molecular drugs.

  12. Kimura's disease: case report of an Italian young male and response to oral cyclosporine A in an 8 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Beccastrini, Enrico; Emmi, Giacomo; Chiodi, Michela; Di Paolo, Camilla; Benedetta Silvestri, Elena; Massi, Daniela; Maggi, Enrico; Liotta, Francesco; Emmi, Lorenzo

    2013-03-01

    Kimura's disease is a benign chronic inflammatory disease, common in Asian males and rare in Western people. Clinically, Kimura's disease is characterized by subcutaneous nodular lesions, usually localised in head and neck, often associated with regional lymphadenopathy. Peripheral blood eosinophilia and elevated serum IgE are often observed. We report a case of a 40-year-old Italian patient presenting with nodular subcutaneous lesions and peripheral eosinophilia. Based on clinical, histopathological and laboratory findings, a diagnosis of Kimura's disease was made. The patient was treated with very low doses of cyclosporine A with no evidence of disease recurrence over the following 8 years. However, the discontinuation of cyclosporine A determined a relapse of the disease. The relevance of this case is due to the rarity of the disease in Italy, to its peculiar clinical presentation and, moreover, it is the first case in literature that has a good response to treatment with low doses of cyclosporine A, documented in an 8-year follow-up.

  13. Physicochemical characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of organic solution advanced spray-dried cyclosporine A multifunctional particles for dry powder inhalation aerosol delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Weifen; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    In this systematic and comprehensive study, inhalation powders of the polypeptide immunosuppressant drug - cyclosporine A - for lung delivery as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were successfully designed, developed, and optimized. Several spray drying pump rates were rationally chosen. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, Karl Fischer titration, laser size diffraction, and gravimetric vapor sorption. Aerosol dispersion performance was conducted using a next generation impactor with a Food and Drug Administration-approved DPI device. These DPIs displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance with high values in emitted dose, respirable fraction, and fine particle fraction. In addition, novel multifunctional inhalation aerosol powder formulations of cyclosporine A with lung surfactant-mimic phospholipids were also successfully designed and developed by advanced organic solution cospray drying in closed mode. The lung surfactantmimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-snglycero- 3-(phosphor-rac-1-glycerol). These cyclosporine A lung surfactant-mimic aerosol powder formulations were comprehensively characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state was preserved following advanced organic solution spray drying in closed mode. These novel multifunctional inhalation powders were optimized for DPI delivery with excellent aerosol dispersion performance and high aerosol performance parameters.

  14. Effect of FK506 and cyclosporine A on the expression of BDNF, tyrosine kinase B and p75 neurotrophin receptors in astrocytes exposed to simulated ischemia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gabryel, Bozena; Bernacki, Jacek

    2009-07-01

    We investigated whether the immunosuppressive drugs, FK506 and cyclosporine A, increase BDNF protein and/or mRNA expression in ischemic astrocytes and if an increase could be related to changes in the nuclear expression of p-CREB, p-Erk1/2 and p-Akt. The influence of these immunosuppressants on protein and mRNA levels of TrkB and p75(NTR) receptors was also examined. On day 21, cultures of rat astrocytes were subjected to ischemic conditions simulated in vitro (combined oxygen glucose deprivation, OGD) for 8h and exposed to FK506 (10-1000nM) and cyclosporine A (0.25-10microM). FK506 and cyclosporine A (at 1000nM and 0.25microM, respectively) stimulated the expression and release of BDNF in cultured rat cerebral cortical astrocytes exposed to OGD. The immunosuppressants at these doses simultaneously increased p-CREB and p-Erk1/2 expression in the nuclear fraction of astrocytes. The results RT-PCR and Western blot analysis provided further evidence of a modulating influence of the drugs on the expression of trkB and p75(NTR) genes and their protein products in ischemic astrocytes.

  15. Physicochemical characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of organic solution advanced spray-dried cyclosporine A multifunctional particles for dry powder inhalation aerosol delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Weifen; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    In this systematic and comprehensive study, inhalation powders of the polypeptide immunosuppressant drug – cyclosporine A – for lung delivery as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were successfully designed, developed, and optimized. Several spray drying pump rates were rationally chosen. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, Karl Fischer titration, laser size diffraction, and gravimetric vapor sorption. Aerosol dispersion performance was conducted using a next generation impactor with a Food and Drug Administration-approved DPI device. These DPIs displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance with high values in emitted dose, respirable fraction, and fine particle fraction. In addition, novel multifunctional inhalation aerosol powder formulations of cyclosporine A with lung surfactant-mimic phospholipids were also successfully designed and developed by advanced organic solution cospray drying in closed mode. The lung surfactantmimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-snglycero- 3-(phosphor-rac-1-glycerol). These cyclosporine A lung surfactant-mimic aerosol powder formulations were comprehensively characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state was preserved following advanced organic solution spray drying in closed mode. These novel multifunctional inhalation powders were optimized for DPI delivery with excellent aerosol dispersion performance and high aerosol performance parameters. PMID:23569375

  16. A pharmacologically-based array to identify targets of cyclosporine A-induced toxicity in cultured renal proximal tubule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sarró, Eduard; Jacobs-Cachá, Conxita; Itarte, Emilio; Meseguer, Anna

    2012-01-15

    Mechanisms of cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity were generally thought to be hemodynamic in origin; however, there is now accumulating evidence of a direct tubular effect. Although genomic and proteomic experiments by our group and others provided overall information on genes and proteins up- or down-regulated by CsA in proximal tubule cells (PTC), a comprehensive view of events occurring after CsA exposure remains to be described. For this purpose, we applied a pharmacologic approach based on the use of known activities of a large panel of potentially protective compounds and evaluated their efficacy in preventing CsA toxicity in cultured mouse PTC. Our results show that compounds that blocked protein synthesis and apoptosis, together with the CK2 inhibitor DMAT and the PI3K inhibitor apigenin, were the most efficient in preventing CsA toxicity. We also identified GSK3, MMPs and PKC pathways as potential targets to prevent CsA damage. Additionally, heparinase-I and MAPK inhibitors afforded partial but significant protection. Interestingly, antioxidants and calcium metabolism-related compounds were unable to ameliorate CsA-induced cytotoxicity. Subsequent experiments allowed us to clarify the hierarchical relationship of targeted pathways after CsA treatment, with ER stress identified as an early effector of CsA toxicity, which leads to ROS generation, phenotypical changes and cell death. In summary, this work presents a novel experimental approach to characterizing cellular responses to cytotoxics while pointing to new targets to prevent CsA-induced toxicity in proximal tubule cells. Highlights: ► We used a novel pharmacological approach to elucidate cyclosporine (CsA) toxicity. ► The ability of a broad range of compounds to prevent CsA toxicity was evaluated. ► CsA toxicity was monitored using LDH release assay and PARP cleavage. ► Protein synthesis, PI3K, GSK3, MMP, PKC and caspase inhibitors prevented CsA toxicity. ► We also identified ER

  17. Cyclosporine A-induced increase in glomerular cyclic GMP in rats and the involvement of the endothelinB receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tack, Ivan; Marin-Castano, Encarna; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Pecher, Christiane; Ader, Jean-Louis; Girolami, Jean-Pierre

    1997-01-01

    A transient two fold increase in the cyclic GMP content was observed in rat freshly isolated glomeruli 6 to 9 h after a single subcutaneous injection of 20 mg kg−1 cyclosporine A (CsA) in conscious animals. In vitro stimulation with endothelin 3 (ET-3) of isolated glomeruli obtained from CsA-untreated rats resulted in a dose-dependent increase in cyclic GMP content. The increase observed with 10 nM ET-3 was similar to that observed in glomeruli isolated 9 h after in vivo CsA administration. The rise in glomerular cyclic GMP content after in vivo CsA injection was prevented by in vivo treatment with L-NAME (10 mg kg−1) or by in vitro calcium deprivation of the incubation medium. The stimulating effects of CsA on glomerular cyclic GMP content were inhibited by in vivo administration of the ETB receptor antagonist BQ-788 (2 mg kg−1) but not by the ETA receptor antagonist BQ-123 (2 mg kg−1). The maximum increase in glomerular cyclic GMP content induced in vitro by acetylcholine (100 μM) and by ET-3 (100 nM) was slightly lower (approximately by 20–25%, P<0.05) in glomeruli from CsA-treated rats than in glomeruli from untreated rats. In contrast, the maximum increase achieved with 1 μM sodium nitroprusside was similar in both groups. A single subcutaneous injection of CsA did not significantly alter the glomerular mRNA expression of constitutive endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), as evaluated by RT–PCR, whereas the mRNA expression of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS), which follows pretreatment with lipopolysaccharide, was prevented. These results indicate that in vivo administration of a single dose of cyclosporine A transiently increases the cyclic GMP content of freshly isolated glomeruli, and that activation of ETB receptors and stimulation of the NO pathway are involved in this process. Furthermore, a single administration of CsA does not impair eNOS mRNA expression and only slightly reduces NO-dependent glomerular cyclic GMP

  18. Hyaluronic acid coated poly-epsilon-caprolactone nanospheres deliver high concentrations of cyclosporine A into the cornea.

    PubMed

    Yenice, Irem; Mocan, Mehmet C; Palaska, Erhan; Bochot, Amélie; Bilensoy, Erem; Vural, Imran; Irkeç, Murat; Hincal, A Atilla

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine cyclosporine A (Cy A) levels in ocular tissues and fluids after topical administration of poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL)/benzalkonium chloride (BKC) nanospheres and hyaluronic acid (HA) coated PCL/BKC nanospheres onto healthy rabbit corneas. Nanospheres were prepared by nanoprecipitation and purified by gradient-rate centrifugation. Cy A (0.1%) in either castor oil solution (group 1), PCL/BKC nanosphere formulation (group 2) or HA coated PCL/BKC nanosphere formulation (group 3) was instilled onto rabbit corneas. Tear samples were adsorbed onto Schirmer tear strips. Cy A concentrations of fluid (blood, aqueous humor, tear) and specimen extracts (cornea, conjunctiva, iris/ciliary body) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The mean corneal Cy A concentration obtained at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24h following instillation of the formulations ranged between 0.12 and 1.2 ng/mg tissue for group 1, 5.9-15.5 ng/mg tissue for group 2 and 11.4-23.0 ng/mg for group 3 (one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and pairwise tests (SNK (Student-Newman-Keuls) and Tukey); p<0.05). Conjunctival Cy A levels of group 2 and 3 were not significantly different at any of the time points tested. However, there was a significant difference between Cy A concentration of castor oil formulation and that of PCL/BKC nanosphere formulation at 1 and 8h (p<0.05). The mean iris/ciliary body concentrations obtained with the three formulations were not significantly different at any time point with the exception of group 2 levels being higher than those of groups 1 and 3 at 1h (p<0.05). The lowest ocular tear Cy A concentrations (16-114 ng/ml) were found following the instillation of HA coated PCL/BKC nanoparticles (group 3) during the time period tested. Cy A loaded PCL/BKC and HA coated PCL/BKC nanospheres are able to achieve high levels of Cy A in the cornea that is 10-15-fold higher than that is achieved with Cy A

  19. Concurrent short-term use of prednisolone with cyclosporine A accelerates pruritus reduction and improvement in clinical scoring in dogs with atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A randomized, unmasked, multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the rate of pruritus reduction and improvement in clinical scoring by cyclosporine A (5 mg/kg orally, once daily for 28 days) either alone (n = 25 dogs) or with concurrent prednisolone (1 mg/kg once daily for 7 days, followed by alternate dosing for 14 days; n = 23 dogs) for the treatment of atopic dermatitis in dogs. Dogs were included in the study after exclusion of other causes of pruritic dermatitis, and were assessed by dermatologists on days 0, 14 ± 1 and 28 ± 2. Assessments included: general physical examination, CADESI-03 lesion scoring, overall clinical response, evaluation of adverse events (AEs), body weight and clinical pathology (hematology, clinical chemistry and urinalysis). Owner assessments, including pruritus (visual analogue scale, VAS) and overall assessment of response were conducted every 3–4 days, either during visits to the clinic or at home. Owners reported AEs to the investigator throughout the study. Results By day 28 ± 2 both treatment groups resulted in a significant improvement of the atopic dermatitis. Both investigators and owners agreed that concurrent therapy resulted in a quicker improvement of the dogs ‘overall’ skin condition and of pruritus (significant reduction of pruritus by day 3–4, 72.8% improvement by day 14 ± 1), when compared to cyclosporine A alone (significant reduction of pruritus by day 7–8, 24.7% improvement by day 14 ± 1). CADESI-03 scores significantly improved in both groups by day 14 ± 1 onwards, and there were no significant differences in the scores between treatment groups at any time points. A total of 56 AEs (cyclosporine A alone = 34; concurrent therapy = 22) were reported in 33 dogs. No dogs died or stopped treatment due to an AE. The most commonly reported AEs in the cyclosporine A group were associated with the digestive tract, whilst systemic disorders were

  20. Solution structures of cyclosporin a and its complex with dysprosium(III) in SDS micelles: NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Francesca; D'Amelio, Nicola; Gaggelli, Elena; Molteni, Elena; Valensin, Gianni

    2008-01-24

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is a cyclic naturally occurring peptide used to prevent graft rejection in organ transplantations. Its immunosuppressive activity is due to the formation of a complex with cyclophilin A (Cyp), in which the cis 9MeLeu-10MeLeu amide bond of CsA assumes a trans conformation. The mechanism of the conformational inversion has not been delineated, but it has been postulated that metal ions binding induces a conformational change that enables CsA to bind Cyp. In this work, we solved the structures of CsA in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles (which enhance its solubility and mimic the hydrophobic environment clinically used for drug delivery) and its complex with Dy(III) ion, whose coordination chemistry is frequently used to reproduce the effect of Ca(II). The paramagnetic properties of Dy(III) allowed us to build up a structure using proton relaxation enhancements, which remains stable in a MD simulation in the micelle environment.

  1. The effects of cyclosporin-A on functional outcome and axonal regrowth following spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Roozbehi, Amrollah; Joghataie, Mohammad Taghi; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Mirzaei, Ali; Delaviz, Hamdollah

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the immunophilin ligands have the special advantage in spinal cord repair. In this study, the effects of cyclosporine A (CsA) on functional recovery and histological outcome were evaluated following spinal cord injury in rats. After spinal cord hemisection in thirty six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (200- 250 g), treatment groups received CsA (2.5 mg/kg i.p.) at 15min and 24h after lesion (CsA 15min group and CsA 24h group) daily, for 8 weeks. Control and sham groups received normal saline and in sham operated animals the spinal cord was exposed in the same manner as treatment groups, but was not hemisected. Hindlimb motor function was assessed in 1, 3, 5 and 7 weeks after lesion, using locomotive rating scale developed by Basso, Bresnahan and Beattie (BBB). Motor neurons were counted within the lamina IX of ventral horn and lesion size was measured in 5 mm of spinal lumbar segment with the epicenter of the lesion site. The mean number of motor neurons and the mean BBB scale in 3, 5 and 7 weeks in CsA 15min groups significantly increased compared to the control group. Although, the lesion size reduced in rats with CsA treatment compared to the control group, no significant difference was observed. Thus, it can be concluded that CsA can improve locomotor function and histological outcome in the partial spinal cord injury.

  2. Fatal Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation in an Acquired Aplastic Anemia Patient Treated with Rabbit Antithymocyte Globulin and Cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tohru; Maruyama, Yumiko; Saitoh, Mayuko; Itoh, Hideto; Yoshimoto, Mitsuru; Tsujisaki, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) after immunosuppressive therapy for aplastic anemia (AA) is extremely rare in a nontransplant setting and has not been well described. This report describes a severe AA patient in whom fatal EBV-LPD developed after being treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulins (ATG) and cyclosporine A (CsA). An 81-year-old man was diagnosed as having severe AA. He was started on CsA followed by administration of ATG for five consecutive days. One month after the start of ATG, persistent fever which was not responsive to antibiotics or antifungal agents developed and atypical lymphocytes emerged in peripheral blood. Repeated blood cultures were negative. An extremely high level of EBV virus in his peripheral blood plasma was detected by means of a quantitative real-time PCR assay. Even after the cessation of CsA, the fever persisted and the peripheral atypical lymphocytes proliferated rapidly. The patient suffered from respiratory failure, liver dysfunction, and metabolic acidosis. Rituximab was administered without success and he died. PMID:26425376

  3. EAU in the guinea pig: inhibition of cell-mediated immunity and Ia antigen expression by cyclosporin A.

    PubMed Central

    Liversidge, J; Thomson, A W; Sewell, H F; Forrester, J V

    1987-01-01

    Guinea pigs were immunized subcutaneously with highly purified bovine retinal S antigen (SAg) in complete Freund's adjuvant and treated from day 0 with cyclosporin A (CsA; 25 mg/kg by mouth) or drug vehicle. Skin tests carried out at 7 and 13 days showed maximal reactions to SAg at 24 h; at 13 days, however, strong, early, 'Arthus'-like responses to SAg were also recorded. CsA profoundly reduced DTH skin reactions to SAg and PPD, and prevented vitreal inflammation assessed at 17 days and retinal damage. Lymphocytes from the draining lymph nodes but not spleens of immunized guinea pigs showed a proliferative response to SAg which was suppressed by CsA administration. Responses to PHA, Con A or LPS were not so affected. Immunohistochemical staining (alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase; APAAP) of the eye with newly available monoclonal antibodies to guinea pig T lymphocytes revealed a predominantly T cytotoxic/suppressor cell (Tc/s) infiltrate of the choroid and retina. CsA administration did not affect choroidal infiltration of Tc/s cells but markedly inhibited Ia antigen expression. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3478162

  4. Establishing a Clinically Relevant Large Animal Model Platform for TBI Therapy Development: Using Cyclosporin A as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Margulies, Susan S.; Kilbaugh, Todd; Sullivan, Sarah; Smith, Colin; Propert, Kathleen; Byro, Melissa; Saliga, Kristen; Costine, Beth A.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine

    2015-01-01

    We have developed the first immature large animal translational treatment trial of a pharmacologic intervention for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. The preclinical trial design includes multiple doses of the intervention in two different injury types (focal and diffuse) to bracket the range seen in clinical injury and uses two post-TBI delays to drug administration. Cyclosporin A (CsA) was used as a case study in our first implementation of the platform because of its success in multiple preclinical adult rodent TBI models and its current use in children for other indications. Tier 1 of the therapy development platform assessed the short-term treatment efficacy after 24 h of agent administration. Positive responses to treatment were compared with injured controls using an objective effect threshold established prior to the study. Effective CsA doses were identified to study in Tier 2. In the Tier 2 paradigm, agent is administered in a porcine intensive care unit utilizing neurological monitoring and clinically relevant management strategies, and intervention efficacy is defined as improvement in longer term behavioral endpoints above untreated injured animals. In summary, this innovative large animal preclinical study design can be applied to future evaluations of other agents that promote recovery or repair after TBI. PMID:25904045

  5. Buparvaquone but not cyclosporin A prevents Theileria annulata-infected bovine lymphoblastoid cells from stimulating uninfected lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Rintelen, M; Schein, E; Ahmed, J S

    1990-06-01

    The influence of Buparvaquone on the morphology, proliferation, and stimulation with T and B cell mitogens of Theileria annulata-infected cells was studied. In addition, the stimulatory capacity of the infected cells before and after treatment with Buparvaquone or cyclosporin A (CsA) was also examined and compared to that of ConA-stimulated bovine peripheral blood cells (PBL). After incubation of the cells for 4 days with Buparvaquone only few schizonts were detectable in the cells. Prolongation of the incubation time to 8, 12, or 14 days eliminated completely the parasites. Despite the elimination of the parasites, the cells were still unable to undergo a proliferative response to Con A or PWM. However, the drug did not interfere with the response of normal PBL to these mitogens. Furthermore, Buparvaquone but not CsA inhibits the generation of mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). None of the drugs could prevent ConA-blasts from stimulating autologous PBL. These results suggest that the antigen expressed by the infected cells and recognised by the responder PBL was induced by the schizonts.

  6. TLR4-mediated inflammation is a key pathogenic event leading to kidney damage and fibrosis in cyclosporine nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    González-Guerrero, Cristian; Cannata-Ortiz, Pablo; Guerri, Consuelo; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ramos, Adrián M

    2017-04-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) successfully prevents allograft rejection, but nephrotoxicity is still a dose-limiting adverse effect. TLR4 activation promotes kidney damage but whether this innate immunity receptor mediates CsA nephrotoxicity is unknown. The in vivo role of TLR4 during CsA nephrotoxicity was studied in mice co-treated with CsA and the TLR4 inhibitor TAK242 and also in TLR4(-/-) mice. CsA-induced renal TLR4 expression in wild-type mice. Pharmacological or genetic targeting of TLR4 reduced the activation of proinflammatory signaling, including JNK/c-jun, JAK2/STAT3, IRE1α and NF-κB and the expression of Fn14. Expression of proinflammatory factors and cytokines was also decreased, and kidney monocyte and lymphocyte influx was prevented. TLR4 inhibition also reduced tubular damage and drastically prevented the development of kidney fibrosis. In vivo and in vitro CsA promoted secretion of the TLR ligand HMGB1 by tubular cells upstream of TLR4 activation, and prevention of HMGB1 secretion significantly reduced CsA-induced synthesis of MCP-1, suggesting that HMGB1 may be one of the mediators of CsA-induced TLR4 activation. These results suggest that TLR4 is a potential pharmacological target in CsA nephrotoxicity.

  7. [Comparison of the determination of cyclosporin-A in blood samples collected on filter paper and by the ordinary technique].

    PubMed

    Azevedo, L S; Manrique, R; Sabbaga, E

    1995-01-01

    Monitoring cyclosporin-A (CsA) blood levels is of utmost importance for the rational use of this drug. Although many centers perform transplants, in Brazil there are few laboratories able to measure CsA blood levels. Therefore making blood samples reach the laboratory emerged as a problem. Collection of blood on filter paper has been a technique used for a long time in special cases. PURPOSE--To confirm the usefulness of measuring CsA blood levels in blood samples collected on filter paper and in the usual way. METHOD--We studied twenty renal cadaver kidney recipients who were receiving CsA, azathioprine and prednisone. Ninety five blood samples were collected and divided into two aliquots. One of them was sent routinely to one laboratory to perform whole blood CsA measurements. From the other aliquot, 20 microliters were pipetted on filter paper. When dried they were mailed to the other laboratory, where, after elution, CsA was measured. In both cases radioimmunoassay with polyclonal antibody was used. RESULTS--Linear correlation between both measurements revealed r = 0.81 with no statistical difference. CONCLUSION--The technique showed to be useful in clinical practice. In countries with continental size, as Brazil, it may be very helpful.

  8. Intracellular Ca2+ elevation and cyclosporin A synergistically induce TGF-beta 1-mediated apoptosis in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Andjelíc, S; Khanna, A; Suthanthiran, M; Nikolić-Zugić, J

    1997-03-15

    Apoptosis plays an essential role in the development and homeostasis of the immune system. During lymphocyte development, potentially autoreactive cells are eliminated via the activation of a tightly regulated cell death program(s). Similar processes operate in mature lymphocytes, to control the magnitude of the normal immune response by eliminating activated lymphocytes. However, differences in susceptibility to signal-induced apoptosis between immature and mature lymphocytes are numerous. One well-characterized example occurs in response to Ca2+ elevation: peripheral T lymphocytes are resistant, while immature thymocytes are highly susceptible, to Ca2+-mediated cell death (CMCD). In this study, we show that the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA) primes splenic lymphocytes to undergo CMCD upon ionomycin stimulation. This CsA-induced CMCD affected both T and B lymphocytes. CsA-plug Ca2+-mediated apoptosis was dissected into a two-step process: first, CsA and Ca2+ synergized to induce TGF-beta 1 secretion by B cells; and then TGF-beta 1 and Ca2+ synergistically triggered T and B lymphocyte apoptosis. Together, our results suggest that lymphocyte apoptosis may play a role in CsA-induced immunosuppression via a TGF-beta-dependent mechanism.

  9. Cyclosporin A Impairs the Secretion and Activity of ADAMTS13 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease with Thrombospondin Type 1 Repeat)*

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, Klilah; Simhadri, Vijaya L.; Blaisdell, Adam; Hunt, Ryan C.; Newell, Jordan; Tseng, Sandra C.; Hershko, Alon Y.; Choi, Jae Won; Sauna, Zuben E.; Wu, Andrew; Bram, Richard J.; Komar, Anton A.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2012-01-01

    The protease ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 repeat) cleaves multimers of von Willebrand factor, thus regulating platelet aggregation. ADAMTS13 deficiency leads to the fatal disorder thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). It has been observed that cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment, particularly in transplant patients, may sometimes be linked to the development of TTP. Until now, the reason for such a link was unclear. Here we provide evidence demonstrating that cyclophilin B (CypB) activity plays an important role in the secretion of active ADAMTS13. We found that CsA, an inhibitor of CypB, reduces the secretion of ADAMTS13 and leads to conformational changes in the protein resulting in diminished ADAMTS13 proteolytic activity. A direct, functional interaction between CypB (which possesses peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) and chaperone functions) and ADAMTS13 is demonstrated using immunoprecipitation and siRNA knockdown of CypB. Finally, CypB knock-out mice were found to have reduced ADAMTS13 levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that cyclophilin-mediated activity is an important factor affecting secretion and activity of ADAMTS13. The large number of proline residues in ADAMTS13 is consistent with the important role of cis-trans isomerization in the proper folding of this protein. These results altogether provide a novel mechanistic explanation for CsA-induced TTP in transplant patients. PMID:23144461

  10. Low-dose and short-term cyclosporine treatment in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria: a clinical and immunological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Serhat Inaloz, H; Ozturk, Savas; Akcali, Cenk; Kirtak, Necmettin; Tarakcioglu, Mehmet

    2008-05-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of 2.5 mg/kg/day cyclosporin (CsA) treatment in patients with severe chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and the impact of CsA treatment on several cytokines involved in the etiopathogenesis of CIU. Twenty-seven CIU patients and 24 healthy control subjects were included in the study. The autologous serum skin test (ASST) for autoantibodies and urticaria activity scoring (UAS) were measured for the evaluation of the clinical severity and the response to therapy, and the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-2 receptor, IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-5 were measured. The mean UAS score was 32.07 +/- 7.05 and 6.22 +/- 3.84 before and after CsA treatment, respectively. The serum IL-2 receptor, TNF-alpha and IL-5 levels of patients before CsA treatment were statistically higher than those of the control group (P = 0.001), and after 4 weeks of CsA therapy the mean IL-2R, TNF-alpha and IL-5 levels were significantly decreased. The data from this study demonstrate that CsA therapy is efficient and safe for CIU patients. Increase in clinical efficacy and marked decreases in serum cytokine levels suggest that inhibition of cytokine generation is involved in the action of the drug in this clinical setting.

  11. The efficacy of cyclosporine A in cats with presumed atopic dermatitis: a double blind, randomised prednisolone-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Wisselink, Marinus A; Willemse, Ton

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of cyclosporine A (CsA) and prednisolone in feline atopic dermatitis (AD) in a randomised, controlled double blind study. Twenty-nine cats with feline AD were randomly allocated to two groups. Eleven cats were treated orally with prednisolone (1mg/kg SID) and 18 were treated with CsA (5mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. At day 0 (D0) and D28, skin lesions were graded by means of the canine atopic dermatitis extent and severity index (CADESI). Skin biopsies and intradermal allergy tests were performed at D0 and blood samples for haematology and serum biochemistry were collected at D0 and D28. During the trial the cat owners were asked to evaluate the intensity of the pruritus once weekly on a linear analog scale and to record side effects. Based on the CADESI there was no significant difference between the two groups in the amount of remission (P=0.0562) or in the number of cats that improved by >25% (P=0.0571). The effect of CsA and prednisolone on pruritus as evaluated by the owners was not significantly different (P=0.41) between the two groups. No serious side effects were observed. The conclusion was that CsA is an effective alternative to prednisolone therapy in cats with presumed atopic dermatitis.

  12. Enhanced and sustained topical ocular delivery of cyclosporine A in thermosensitive hyaluronic acid-based in situ forming microgels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yijun; Yao, Jing; Zhou, Jianping; Dahmani, Fatima Zohra

    2013-01-01

    For nearly a decade, thermoresponsive ophthalmic in situ gels have been recognized as an interesting and promising ocular topical delivery vehicle for lipophilic drugs. In this study, a series of thermosensitive copolymers, hyaluronic acid-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (HA-g-PNIPAAm), was synthesized, by coupling carboxylic end-capped PNIPAAm to aminated hyaluronic acid through amide bond linkages, and was used as a potential carrier for the topical ocular administration of cyclosporine A (CyA). The lower critical solution temperature of HA-g-PNIPAAm59 in aqueous solutions was measured as 32.7°C, which was not significantly affected by the polymer concentration. Moreover, HA-g-PNIPAAm59 microgels showed a high drug loading efficiency (73.92%) and a controlled release profile that are necessary for biomedical application. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations showed that HA-g-PNIPAAm microgels were spherical in shape with homogeneous size. Based on the result of the eye irritation test, the HA-g-PNIPAAm microgels formulation was shown to be safe and nonirritant for rabbit eyes. In addition, HA-g-PNIPAAm microgels achieved significantly higher CyA concentration levels in rabbit corneas (1455.8 ng/g of tissue) than both castor oil formulation and commercial CyA eye drops. Therefore, these newly described thermoresponsive HA-g-PNIPAAm microgels demonstrated attractive properties to serve as pharmaceutical delivery vehicles for a variety of ophthalmic applications. PMID:24092975

  13. Antithymocyte globulin induction allows a prolonged delay in the initiation of cyclosporine in heart transplant patients with postoperative renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cantarovich, Marcelo; Giannetti, Nadia; Barkun, Jeffrey; Cecere, Renzo

    2004-09-15

    The authors evaluated the efficacy of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) induction and delayed initiation of cyclosporine (CsA) in heart transplant (HTx) patients with postoperative renal dysfunction (RD). The authors compared 15 adult HTx patients with postoperative RD (serum creatinine [SCr] > or =150 microM) to 17 controls without postoperative RD. ATG was given daily (1.5 mg/kg/day for 5 days) in controls and every 2 to 5 days in RD patients (total lymphocyte count <200/mm). All patients received corticosteroids and mycophenolate mofetil. The initiation of CsA was delayed in RD patients until SCr had decreased to less than 150 microM (day 12 +/- 8 vs. 2 +/- 1, P<0.0001). One-year patient survival and acute rejection rates were 87% and 27% in RD patients and 88% and 59% in controls, respectively (P=not significant). SCr improved in RD patients and did not differ from controls after the first month. The authors' results suggest that marked prolongation of the period of ATG induction permits a safe delay in the initiation of CsA in HTx patients with postoperative RD.

  14. Identification of a novel cyclosporin-sensitive element in the human tumor necrosis factor alpha gene promoter

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine with pleiotropic biological effects, is produced by a variety of cell types in response to induction by diverse stimuli. In this paper, TNF-alpha mRNA is shown to be highly induced in a murine T cell clone by stimulation with T cell receptor (TCR) ligands or by calcium ionophores alone. Induction is rapid, does not require de novo protein synthesis, and is completely blocked by the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA). We have identified a human TNF-alpha promoter element, kappa 3, which plays a key role in the calcium-mediated inducibility and CsA sensitivity of the gene. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, an oligonucleotide containing kappa 3 forms two DNA protein complexes with proteins that are present in extracts from unstimulated T cells. These complexes appear in nuclear extracts only after T cell stimulation. Induction of the inducible nuclear complexes is rapid, independent of protein synthesis, and blocked by CsA, and thus, exactly parallels the induction of TNF-alpha mRNA by TCR ligands or by calcium ionophore. Our studies indicate that the kappa 3 binding factor resembles the preexisting component of nuclear factor of activated T cells. Thus, the TNF-alpha gene is an immediate early gene in activated T cells and provides a new model system in which to study CsA-sensitive gene induction in activated T cells. PMID:8376940

  15. The inflammatory state provokes sexual dimorphism in left ventricular and electrocardiographic effects of chronic cyclosporine in rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Bassossy, Hany M.; Banjar, Zainy M.; El-Mas, Mahmoud M.

    2017-01-01

    Although cardiotoxicity has been recognized as an adverse effect of cyclosporine A (CSA), no information exists regarding sex specificity of CSA cardiotoxicity. We tested the hypothesis that left ventricular (LV) and electrocardiographic (ECG) effects of CSA and related inflammatory/histopathological derangements are sex related. CSA reduced the LV slope of end-systolic pressure volume relationship and increased isovolumic relaxation constant. These effects were more pronounced in male compared to female rats, suggesting LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction. ECG recordings showed elevated ST segments and increased QTc and T peak trend intervals in CSA-treated male rats, markers of LV ischemia and arrhythmogenesis. In female rats, CSA delayed AV conduction, as reflected by prolonged PR interval. Other sex-related effects for CSA included (i) increased blood cholesterol, and reduced rates of rise and fall in LV pressure and nuclear factor kappa B and angiotensin receptors type 1 expressions in male rats, and (ii) increased LV adiponectin in females. Histopatholgically, CSA caused vascular congestion, blood extravasation, and pyknotic or even absent nuclei in both sexes. In conclusion, rats exhibit sex-independent susceptibility to negative LV and histopathological influences of CSA. These effects become more intensified in male rats, perhaps on account of aggravated ischemic and inflammatory milieus. PMID:28211883

  16. Cyclosporin A inhibits caspase-independent death of NGF-deprived sympathetic neurons: a potential role for mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Louis K; Johnson, Eugene M

    2002-05-27

    Opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP) has been implicated as an important mitochondrial event that occurs during apoptosis. We examined the role of the PTP in the well-characterized cell death of rat sympathetic neurons deprived of nerve growth factor (NGF) in vitro. Removal of NGF causes these neurons to undergo either a classic apoptotic cell death or, when treated with a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor such as boc-aspartyl(OMe)-fluoromethylketone (BAF), a delayed, nonapoptotic cell death. The PTP inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA), blocked commitment-to-die in the presence of BAF, as defined by the ability of NGF readdition to rescue cells, but had little effect on commitment-to-die in the absence of BAF. CsA did not have trophic effects on BAF-saved cells, but did block the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. These data suggest that PTP opening is a critical event in caspase-independent, nonapoptotic (but not caspase-dependent, apoptotic) death of NGF-deprived rat sympathetic neurons.

  17. A Cell-Impermeable Cyclosporine A Derivative Reduces Pathology in a Mouse Model of Allergic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Balsley, Molly A.; Malesevic, Miroslav; Stemmy, Erik J.; Gigley, Jason; Jurjus, Rosalyn A.; Herzog, Dallen; Bukrinsky, Michael I.; Fischer, Gunter; Constant, Stephanie L.

    2013-01-01

    Although the main regulators of leukocyte trafficking are chemokines, another family of chemotactic agents is cyclophilins. Intracellular cyclophilins function as peptidyl-protyl cis-trans isomerases and are targets of the immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine A (CsA). Cyclophilins can also be secreted in response to stress factors, with elevated levels of extracellular cyclophilins detected in several inflammatory diseases. Extracellular cyclophilins are known to have potent chemotactic properties, suggesting they might contribute to inflammatory responses by recruiting leukocytes into tissues. The objective of the current study was to determine the impact of blocking cyclophilin activity using a cell-impermeable derivative of CsA, MM218, to specifically target extracellular pools of cyclophilins. We show that treatment with this compound in a mouse model of allergic lung inflammation: 1) demonstrates up to 80% reduction in inflammation, 2) directly inhibits the recruitment of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, and 3) works equally well when delivered at 100-fold lower doses to the airways. Our findings suggest that cell-impermeable analogs of CsA can effectively reduce inflammatory responses by targeting leukocyte recruitment mediated by extracellular cyclophilins. Specifically blocking the extracellular function(s) of cyclophilins may provide a novel approach for inhibiting the recruitment of one of the principal immune regulators of allergic lung inflammation, antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, into inflamed airways and lungs. PMID:21057089

  18. Alteration of cyclosporine (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity by gamma linolenic acid (GLA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Morphake, P; Bariety, J; Darlametsos, I; Tsipas, G; Gkikas, G; Hornysh, A; Papanikolaou, N

    1994-01-01

    Administration of cyclosporine (CsA), 37.4 microM (45 mg)/Kg, per day for 7 days, to Wistar rats, induced decreased creatinine clearance (Ccr) and body weight loss (BWL), but it did not induce proteinuria. These changes were associated with enhanced urinary thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and diminished 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (6kPGF1 alpha) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) excretions. The augmentation in TXB2 and the decrease in PGs highly diminished the ratios of 6kPGF1 alpha/TXB2 and PGE2/TXB2. In microscopic sections all of the kidneys were affected to variable degrees. When CsA was administered to animals fed for 70 days, prior to the experiment, on standard chow (SC) containing evening primrose oil (EPO) or fish oil (FO), 1% and 10% respectively (EPO contained 9% gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and FO 5.6% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)), the nephrotoxic effect of CsA was partially prevented. These changes were accompanied by increased ratios of urinary 6kPGF1 alpha/TXB2 and PGE2/TXB2 excretions. Light microscopic (LM) studies showed that rats' kidneys fed on SC containing EPO or FO were not always affected and the lesions were of minor importance. In conclusion, these results suggest that EPO (GLA) and FO (EPA) could play a beneficial role in the development or the modulation of the renal syndrome induced by CsA.

  19. Using a modified shepards method for optimization of a nanoparticulate cyclosporine a formulation prepared by a static mixer technique.

    PubMed

    Douroumis, Dionysios; Scheler, Stefan; Fahr, Alfred

    2008-02-01

    An innovative methodology has been used for the formulation development of Cyclosporine A (CyA) nanoparticles. In the present study the static mixer technique, which is a novel method for producing nanoparticles, was employed. The formulation optimum was calculated by the modified Shepard's method (MSM), an advanced data analysis technique not adopted so far in pharmaceutical applications. Controlled precipitation was achieved injecting the organic CyA solution rapidly into an aqueous protective solution by means of a static mixer. Furthermore the computer based MSM was implemented for data analysis, visualization, and application development. For the optimization studies, the gelatin/lipoid S75 amounts and the organic/aqueous phase were selected as independent variables while the obtained particle size as a dependent variable. The optimum predicted formulation was characterized by cryo-TEM microscopy, particle size measurements, stability, and in vitro release. The produced nanoparticles contain drug in amorphous state and decreased amounts of stabilizing agents. The dissolution rate of the lyophilized powder was significantly enhanced in the first 2 h. MSM was proved capable to interpret in detail and to predict with high accuracy the optimum formulation. The mixer technique was proved capable to develop CyA nanoparticulate formulations.

  20. Treatment of premalignancy: prevention of lymphoma in radiation leukemia virus-inoculated mice by cyclosporin A and immunotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Yefenof, E; Abboud, G; Epszteyn, S; Vitetta, E S

    1992-01-01

    Radiation leukemia virus (RadLV)-induced preleukemic (PL) latency is characterized by the appearance of virus-infected PL cells in the thymus. The survival of these PL cells is dependent upon autostimulation with interleukin 4 (IL-4). We have intervened prophylactically in RadLV-induced preleukemia by using cyclosporin-A (CSA), which inhibits IL-4 production, and an immunotoxin (ITx) that kills PL cells. CSA efficiently inhibited IL-4 secretion from RadLV-induced PL and leukemic cells, and its administration to PL mice caused a significant delay in their death. An ITx consisting of anti-RadLV glycoprotein-70 (gp70) antibody coupled to ricin A chain efficiently inhibited protein synthesis in virus-infected cells in vitro and, when injected into PL mice, also delayed their death. Combined treatment with CSA and ITx prevented 75% of the treated PL mice from developing lymphoma. These results show that the development of malignancy from a premalignant state can be averted by a combination of therapeutic modalities that decrease the size and growth rate of the premalignant cell population. PMID:1731346

  1. Nanoliposome containing cyclosporine A reduced neuroinflammation responses and improved neurological activities in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rat.

    PubMed

    Partoazar, Alireza; Nasoohi, Sanaz; Rezayat, Sayed M; Gilani, Kambiz; Mehr, Shahram E; Amani, Amir; Rahimi, Nastaran; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-04-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is known as a neuroprotective agent against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in animal models. However, the significant therapeutic effects of CsA have been observed in high systemic doses or manipulating the blood-brain barrier, resulting in systemic side effects and toxicity. As the liposome nanocarriers have been developed for efficient delivery of peptide and proteins, liposomal CsA (Lipo-CsA) could improve cerebral (I/R) injuries. In this study, the liposomal CsA formulation (CsA at dose of 2.5 mg/kg) was prepared to assess the brain injury outcomes in 90 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model followed by 48 h reperfusion in treating rats. Five minutes after induction of cerebral ischemia in rats, intravenous (iv) administration of Lipo-CsA significantly (P < 0.001) recovered the infarct size, the brain edema, and the neurological activities compared to corresponding control groups following 48 h I/R. In addition, after 48 h cerebral I/R, Lipo-CsA potentially (P < 0.001) inhibited the inflammation responses including MPO activity and tumor necrosis factor-alpha level in comparison to other groups. In conclusion, the results indicate that the low dose of CsA in liposomal formulation is more effective compared to higher dose of free form of CsA in treatment of ischemic brain in rats.

  2. Outcome of anti-thymocyte immunoglobulin plus cyclosporine A for severe aplastic anaemia with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Miao; Zhuang, Junling; Zhou, Daobin; Xu, Ying; Zhao, Yongqiang; Wang, Shujie; Zhang, Wei; Duan, Minghui; Zhu, Tienan; Li, Jian; Cai, Huacong; Cao, Xinxin; Han, Bing

    2017-04-01

    The influence of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection on the efficacy of intensive immunosuppressive treatment (IST) of severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) patients remains unclear. Previous reports on this topic have been mostly case reports or have had a relatively short follow-up. Eight SAA patients carrying chronic HBV infection and 24 matched patients without HBV at a ratio of 1:3 were included in this retrospective analysis. The patients were treated with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and cyclosporine A. Entecavir was or was not administered throughout the IST course to patients with positive or negative HBV-DNA results, respectively. No evident HBV reactivation developed. The overall response was 87.5% by 12 months, and the recurrence rate was 12.5%. There were no significant differences in overall response, overall survival and event-free survival between groups. Entecavir can effectively prevent reactivation of HBV in SAA patients with positive HBV-DNA who received intensive IST. Regular surveillance may be sufficient for HBV-DNA negative patients who should receive antiviral drugs immediately when their HBV-DNA status changes from negative to positive. The prognosis of SAA patients with chronic HBV infection after intensive IST treatment is not worse than those without HBV infection.

  3. Long-Term Impact of Cyclosporin Reduction with MMF Treatment in Chronic Allograft Dysfunction: REFERENECE Study 3-Year Follow Up.

    PubMed

    Frimat, L; Cassuto-Viguier, E; Provôt, F; Rostaing, L; Charpentier, B; Akposso, K; Moal, M C; Lang, P; Glotz, D; Caillard, S; Ducloux, D; Pouteil-Noble, C; Girardot-Seguin, S; Kessler, M

    2010-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) toxicity contributes to chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). In the 2-year, randomized, study, we showed that 50% cyclosporin (CsA) reduction in combination with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) treatment improves kidney function without increasing the risk for graft rejection/loss. To investigate the long-term effect of this regimen, we conducted a follow up study in 70 kidney transplant patients until 5 years after REFERENCE initiation. The improvement of kidney function was confirmed in the MMF group but not in the control group (CsA group). Four graft losses occurred, 2 in each group (graft survival in the MMF group 95.8% and 90.9% in control group). One death occurred in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of serious adverse events or acute graft rejections. A limitation is the weak proportion of patient still remaining within the control group. On the other hand, REFERENCE focuses on the CsA regimen while opinions about the tacrolimus ones are still debated. In conclusion, CsA reduction in the presence of MMF treatment seems to maintain kidney function and is well tolerated in the long term.

  4. Generation of oxygen free radicals during the metabolism of cyclosporine A: a cause-effect relationship with metabolism inhibition.

    PubMed

    Serino, F; Grevel, J; Napoli, K L; Kahan, B D; Strobel, H W

    1993-05-26

    A better understanding of the mechanism of lipid peroxidation during the metabolism of cyclosporine A (CsA) might help explain the toxicities of this immunosuppressive drug on various organs. Our in vitro work used microsomes prepared from livers of phenobarbital-induced male rats. The incubations (total volume 1ml) also contained a NADPH regenerating system and substrate (i.e., CsA, carbon tetrachloride, or aminopyrine) dissolved in ethanol. Lipid peroxidation was inferred from the presence of malondialdehyde (MDA) which was detected by the thiobarbituric acid assay. The formation of CsA hydroxylated metabolites (AM9 and AM1) was monitored by liquid chromatography. The activity of the microsomal incubation was confirmed by measurements of MDA and formaldehyde production caused by increasing concentrations of CsA, carbon tetrachloride, and aminopyrine. The occurrence of hydroxylated metabolites was not coupled to the production of MDA. Aminopyrine could inhibit MDA production by CsA, but CsA could not reduce the formation of formaldehyde by aminopyrine. Erythromycin, a competitor for the binding site of CsA on cytochrome P450, reduced MDA production by CsA, and CsA inhibited formaldehyde production by erythromycin. Interaction studies with SKF 525A, ketoconazole, superoxide dismutase, catalase, alpha-tocopherol, and reduced glutathione confirmed the role of cytochrome P450 and the presence of activated oxygen species as a source of microsomal peroxidation which in return may explain the inhibitory effect of CsA on cytochrome P450 itself.

  5. Establishing a Clinically Relevant Large Animal Model Platform for TBI Therapy Development: Using Cyclosporin A as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Margulies, Susan S; Kilbaugh, Todd; Sullivan, Sarah; Smith, Colin; Propert, Kathleen; Byro, Melissa; Saliga, Kristen; Costine, Beth A; Duhaime, Ann-Christine

    2015-05-01

    We have developed the first immature large animal translational treatment trial of a pharmacologic intervention for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. The preclinical trial design includes multiple doses of the intervention in two different injury types (focal and diffuse) to bracket the range seen in clinical injury and uses two post-TBI delays to drug administration. Cyclosporin A (CsA) was used as a case study in our first implementation of the platform because of its success in multiple preclinical adult rodent TBI models and its current use in children for other indications. Tier 1 of the therapy development platform assessed the short-term treatment efficacy after 24 h of agent administration. Positive responses to treatment were compared with injured controls using an objective effect threshold established prior to the study. Effective CsA doses were identified to study in Tier 2. In the Tier 2 paradigm, agent is administered in a porcine intensive care unit utilizing neurological monitoring and clinically relevant management strategies, and intervention efficacy is defined as improvement in longer term behavioral endpoints above untreated injured animals. In summary, this innovative large animal preclinical study design can be applied to future evaluations of other agents that promote recovery or repair after TBI.

  6. Immunosuppressive therapy with horse anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine as treatment for fulminant aplastic anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Shichino, Hiroyuki; Ohara, Akira; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Yabe, Hiromasa; Ohga, Shouichi; Hamamoto, Kazuko; Ohtsuka, Yoshitoshi; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Masami; Muramatsu, Hideki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kojima, Seiji

    2014-05-01

    Patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) and an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of 0 typically have fatal outcomes. We defined fulminant AA (FAA) as ANC = 0 for at least 2 weeks prior to and after immunosuppressive therapy (IST). We analyzed the outcomes of 35 children with FAA among 288 children who enrolled in a prospective study for AA (AA-97 study). AA was classified as FAA (n = 35), very SAA (vSAA; n = 129), or SAA (n = 124). All of the children received the IST with horse anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and cyclosporine (CsA). A significantly lower response rate at 6 months was seen in children with FAA when compared to those with vSAA or SAA (40.0, 63.6, and 63.7 %, respectively; p = 0.027). Of 20 nonresponder patients in the FAA group, 11 were rescued by alternative donor transplantation, and 5 patients showed a late response after 6 months. Consequently, no significant difference was noted in overall survival when comparing the FAA, vSAA, and SAA groups (88.5, 95.8, and 96.8 %). These findings indicate that IST with ATG and CsA is justified as a first-line treatment for children with FAA who lack a human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling donor.

  7. Cyclosporin A-associated changes in red blood cell membrane composition, deformability, blood and plasma viscosity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ademoglu, Evin; Tamer, Sule; Albeniz, Isil; Gokkusu, Cahide; Tanrikulu, Sevda

    2004-01-01

    Most of the studies concerning the effects of cyclosporin A (Cs A) on red blood cell (RBC) rheology were carried out in human transplant recipients who may still have residual insufficiency and concomitant administration of other immunosuppressive and antihypertensive drugs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Cs A on red cell rheology and membrane composition in nontransplant healthy rats. Female Wistar albino rats were divided into two groups of 10 animals each. Rats received 10 mg/kg Cs A, i.p. or saline for 4 weeks. Cs A administration significantly increased the RBC deformability, and plasma and blood viscosity (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 and p < 0.01, respectively). Cs A administration to the rats increased RBC membrane cholesterol (CHO) levels and the CHO/phospholipid (PL) ratio significantly (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively) but did not change RBC membrane proteins and membrane PL levels. These results suggest that Cs A changes the rheological functions of RBC and lipid content of RBC membrane in healthy rats and thereby it may play an important role in the regulation of microcirculation.

  8. Concentrations of cyclosporin A and FK506 that inhibit IL-2 induction in human T cells do not affect TGF-beta1 biosynthesis, whereas higher doses of cyclosporin A trigger apoptosis and release of preformed TGF-beta1.

    PubMed

    Minguillón, Jordi; Morancho, Beatriz; Kim, Seong-Jin; López-Botet, Miguel; Aramburu, José

    2005-05-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506 suppress T cell activation by inhibiting calcineurin and the calcineurin-dependent transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc), which are central regulators of T cell function. It was reported that CsA up-regulated the transcription of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) in lymphocytes and other cells and activated its promoter in A549 lung carcinoma cells, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood, and it is unclear whether calcineurin plays any role. We have studied the regulation of TGF-beta1 in normal human lymphocytes and cell lines. In Jurkat T cells, the TGF-beta1 promoter was activated by calcineurin and NFATc and inhibited by CsA and FK506. However, the promoter was insensitive to both drugs in A549 cells. In human T cells preactivated with phytohemagglutinin, biosynthesis of TGF-beta1, induced by the T cell receptor (TCR) or the TGF-beta receptor, was not substantially affected by CsA and FK506 concentrations (< or = 1 microM) that effectively inhibited interleukin-2 production. However, pretreatment of fresh lymphocytes with CsA or FK506 during primary TCR stimulation reduced their production of TGF-beta1 during secondary TCR activation. Finally, high concentrations of CsA (10 microM), in the range attained in vivo in experiments in rodents, caused apoptosis in human T cells and the release of preformed, bioactive TGF-beta1. These effects are unlikely to owe to calcineurin inhibition, as they were not observed with FK506. Our results indicate that CsA and FK506 are not general inducers of TGF-beta1 biosynthesis but can cause different effects on TGF-beta1 depending on the cell type and concentrations used.

  9. The P-glycoprotein inhibitor cyclosporin A differentially influences behavioural and neurochemical responses to the antidepressant escitalopram.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Fionn E; O'Connor, Richard M; Clarke, Gerard; Donovan, Maria D; Dinan, Timothy G; Griffin, Brendan T; Cryan, John F

    2014-03-15

    Recent studies have raised the possibility that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibition may represent a putative augmentation strategy for treatment with certain antidepressants. Indeed, we have previously shown that administration of the P-gp inhibitor verapamil increased the brain distribution and behavioural effects of the antidepressant escitalopram. The aim of the current study was to investigate if similar effects occur with another P-gp inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA). CsA pre-treatment exacerbated the severity of behaviours in an escitalopram-induced mouse model of serotonin syndrome, a potentially life-threatening adverse drug reaction associated with serotonergic drugs. P-gp inhibition by CsA enhanced the brain distribution of escitalopram by 70-80%. Serotonin (5-HT) turnover in the prefrontal cortex was reduced by escitalopram, and this effect was augmented by CsA. However, CsA pre-treatment did not augment the effect of escitalopram in the tail suspension test (TST) of antidepressant-like activity. Microdialysis experiments revealed that pre-treatment with CsA failed to augment, but blunted, the increase in extracellular 5-HT in response to escitalopram administration. This blunting effect may contribute to the lack of augmentation in the TST. Taken together, the present studies demonstrate that co-administration of CsA and escitalopram produces differential effects depending on the behavioural and neurochemical assays employed. Thus, the results highlight the need for further studies involving more selective pharmacological tools to specifically evaluate the impact of P-gp inhibition on behavioural responses to antidepressants which are subject to efflux by P-gp.

  10. Nanomicelle formulation for topical delivery of cyclosporine A into the cornea: in vitro mechanism and in vivo permeation evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuanlong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zhao; Li, Mengshuang; Li, Fengjie; Cui, Fenghua; Liu, Ting; Shi, Weiyun; Wu, Xianggen

    2015-01-01

    A stable topical ophthalmic cyclosporine A (CsA) formulation with good tolerance and high efficacy is still a desire in pharmaceutics and clinics. This article describes the preparation of CsA containing nanomicelles using a polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol (PVCL-PVA-PEG) graft copolymer. Both the polymer itself and the CsA nanomicelles were evaluated for cytotoxicity and ocular irritation. The in vitro uptake and intracellular fate of nanomicelles were characterized. In vivo cornea permeation test performed with 0.5 mg/mL CsA containing nanomicelles, and compared with a commercially available CsA (10 mg/mL) oil-based ophthalmic solution. The CsA nanomicelle ophthalmic solution was simple to prepare and remained storage stable. PVCL-PVA-PEG had no cytotoxicity as its monomer solution, and as its micelle solution (IC50(48 h) = 14.02 mg/mL). CsA nanomicelles also had excellent ocular tolerance in rabbits. The use of nanomicelles significantly improved in vitro cellular uptake, apparently by an energy dependent intracellular endocytosis pathway that involved early endosomes, late endosomes, lysosomes, and ER. In vivo permeation showed that 0.5 mg/mL CsA nanomicelles delivered high levels of CsA into the cornea, when compared to the oil-based 10 mg/mL CsA ophthalmic solution. These findings indicated PVCL-PVA-PEG nanomicelles could be a promising topical delivery system for ocular administration of CsA.

  11. Different Dose-Dependent Mechanisms Are Involved in Early Cyclosporine A-Induced Cholestatic Effects in HepaRG Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharanek, Ahmad; Azzi, Pamela Bachour-El; Al-Attrache, Houssein; Savary, Camille C.; Humbert, Lydie; Rainteau, Dominique; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in drug-induced cholestasis in humans remain poorly understood. Although cyclosporine A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506) share similar immunosuppressive properties, only CsA is known to cause dose-dependent cholestasis. Here, we have investigated the mechanisms implicated in early cholestatic effects of CsA using the differentiated human HepaRG cell line. Inhibition of efflux and uptake of taurocholate was evidenced as early as 15 min and 1 h respectively after addition of 10μM CsA; it peaked at around 2 h and was reversible. These early effects were associated with generation of oxidative stress and deregulation of cPKC pathway. At higher CsA concentrations (≥50μM) alterations of efflux and uptake activities were enhanced and became irreversible, pericanalicular F-actin microfilaments were disorganized and bile canaliculi were constricted. These changes were associated with induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress that preceded generation of oxidative stress. Concentration-dependent changes were observed on total bile acid disposition, which were characterized by an increase and a decrease in culture medium and cells, respectively, after a 24-h treatment with CsA. Accordingly, genes encoding hepatobiliary transporters and bile acid synthesis enzymes were differently deregulated depending on CsA concentration. By contrast, FK506 induced limited effects only at 25–50μM and did not alter bile canaliculi. Our data demonstrate involvement of different concentration-dependent mechanisms in CsA-induced cholestasis and point out a critical role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the occurrence of the major cholestatic features. PMID:24973091

  12. Conversion from cyclosporine to everolimus at 4.5 months posttransplant: 3-year results from the randomized ZEUS study.

    PubMed

    Budde, K; Lehner, F; Sommerer, C; Arns, W; Reinke, P; Eisenberger, U; Wüthrich, R P; Scheidl, S; May, C; Paulus, E-M; Mühlfeld, A; Wolters, H H; Pressmar, K; Stahl, R; Witzke, O

    2012-06-01

    The long-term effect of conversion from calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) therapy to an mTOR inhibitor requires clarification. Following completion of the 12-month, open-label, multicenter ZEUS study, in which 300 kidney transplant recipients were randomized to continue cyclosporine (CsA) or convert to everolimus at 4.5 months posttransplant, outcomes were assessed at month 36 (n = 284; 94.7%). CNI therapy was reintroduced in 28.4% of everolimus patients by month 36. The primary efficacy endpoint, estimated glomerular filtration rate (Nankivell, ANCOVA) was significantly higher with everolimus versus the CsA group at month 24 (7.6 mL/min/1.73 m(2) , 95%CI 4.3, 11.0 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ; p < 0.001) and month 36 (7.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) , 95%CI 3.6, 11.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ; p < 0.001). The incidence of biopsy-proven acute rejection from randomization to month 36 was 13.0% in the everolimus arm and 4.8% in the CsA arm (p = 0.015). Patient and graft survival, as well as incidences of malignancy, severe infections and hospitalization, were similar between groups. Kidney transplant patients who are converted from CsA to everolimus at month 4.5 and who remain on everolimus thereafter may achieve a significant improvement in renal function that is maintained to 3 years. There was a significantly higher rate of rejection in the everolimus arm but this did not exert a deleterious effect by 3 years posttransplant.

  13. Five-year outcomes in kidney transplant patients converted from cyclosporine to everolimus: the randomized ZEUS study.

    PubMed

    Budde, K; Lehner, F; Sommerer, C; Reinke, P; Arns, W; Eisenberger, U; Wüthrich, R P; Mühlfeld, A; Heller, K; Porstner, M; Veit, J; Paulus, E-M; Witzke, O

    2015-01-01

    ZEUS study was an open-label, 12-month, multicenter study in which 300 de novo kidney transplant recipients were randomized to continue receiving cyclosporine (CsA) or convert to everolimus at 4.5 months posttransplant. Five-year follow-up data were available for 245/269 patients (91.1%) who completed the core 12-month study (123 everolimus, 109 CsA). At 5 years, adjusted estimated GFR was 66.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) with everolimus versus 60.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2) with CsA; the mean difference was 5.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in favor of everolimus (95% CI 2.4, 8.3; p < 0.001 [intent-to-treat population]). In a post hoc analysis of patients remaining on study drug at 5 years (everolimus 77, CsA 86), mean difference was 8.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (95% CI 4.3, 12.1; p < 0.001) in favor of everolimus. The cumulative incidence of biopsy-proven acute rejection postrandomization was 13.6% with everolimus versus 7.5% with CsA (p = 0.095), largely accounted for by grade I rejection (16/21 patients and 7/11 patients, respectively). Postrandomization, graft loss, mortality, serious adverse events and neoplasms were similar in both arms. In conclusion, conversion of kidney transplant patients to everolimus at 4.5 months posttransplant is associated with a significant improvement in renal function that is maintained to at least 5 years. The increase in early mild acute rejection did not affect long-term graft function.

  14. Combined inhibition of p38 and Akt signaling pathways abrogates cyclosporine A-mediated pathogenesis of aggressive skin SCCs

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, Aadithya; Walsh, Stephanie B.; Xu, Jianmin; Afaq, Farrukh; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p38 and Akt are the crucial molecular targets in the pathogenesis of SCCs in OTRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined inhibition of these targets diminished tumor growth by 90%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of these targets act through downregulating mTOR signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) are the most common neoplasm in organ transplant recipients (OTRs). These cancers are more invasive and metastatic as compared to those developed in normal cohorts. Previously, we have shown that immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine A (CsA) directly alters tumor phenotype of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) by activating TGF-{beta} and TAK1/TAB1 signaling pathways. Here, we identified novel molecular targets for the therapeutic intervention of these SCCs. We observed that combined blockade of Akt and p38 kinases-dependent signaling pathways in CsA-promoted human epidermoid carcinoma A431 xenograft tumors abrogated their growth by more than 90%. This diminution in tumor growth was accompanied by a significant decrease in proliferation and an increase in apoptosis. The residual tumors following the combined treatment with Akt inhibitor triciribine and p38 inhibitors SB-203580 showed significantly diminished expression of phosphorylated Akt and p38 and these tumors were less invasive and highly differentiated. Diminished tumor invasiveness was associated with the reduced epithelial-mesenchymal transition as ascertained by the enhanced E-cadherin and reduced vimentin and N-cadherin expression. Consistently, these tumors also manifested reduced MMP-2/9. The decreased p-Akt expression was accompanied by a significant reduction in p-mTOR. These data provide first important combinatorial pharmacological approach to block the pathogenesis of CsA-induced highly aggressive cutaneous neoplasm in OTRs.

  15. Effect of cyclosporin A on human bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitors with anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Y; Matsuda, H; Kida, K

    1995-10-01

    Cyclosporin A (CyA) overcomes P-glycoprotein (P-gp) associated multidrug resistance (MDR). P-gp expression is frequently observed among, not only various cancer cells, but also several normal tissues including bone marrow progenitor cells. These findings lead us to examine whether CyA enhances the myelotoxicity of anti-cancer agents. Bone marrow mononuclear cells were incubated with anti-cancer agents (vincristine, VCR; doxorubicin, ADM; etoposide, VP-16; cytarabine, Ara-C; methotrexate, MTX) and a concentration of CyA (0.5, 5.0 micrograms/mL). The methylcellulose assay for granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (CFU-GM) was conducted using the post-treated cells. There was no significant toxicity for marrow CFU-GM formation after 72 h incubation with CyA (84-108% of control). The inhibitory concentration that reduced colonies by 50% (IC50) was 12 nmol/L for VCR, 6 nmol/L for ADM, 220 nmol/L for VP-16, 15 nmol/L for Ara-C and 35 nmol/L for MTX, respectively. For VCR, ADM and VP-16, the number of CFU-GM was unchanged with the addition of CyA at 0.5 microgram/mL concentration. In contrast at 5 micrograms/mL CyA, the number of CFU-GM (% of control) was reduced significantly (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). With MTX and Ara-C, the number of CFU-GM was unchanged after addition of CyA, even at 5 micrograms/mL concentration. We conclude CyA may therefore enhance cytotoxic drug sensitivity in MDR tumor cells at a clinically achievable concentration (0.5 microgram/mL) without marrow toxicity.

  16. On the Performance of Trimetazidine and Vitamin E as Pharmacoprotection Agents in Cyclosporin A-Induced Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cristina, De la Cruz Rodríguez Lilia; del Rosario, Rey María; Carmen Rosa, Araujo; Ana Veronica, Oldano

    2013-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A (CyA) has been used in diseases with immunological basis and in transplant patients. Nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity are the main adverse effects of this drug. To find a protective drug against those effects we assayed the cardioprotector Trimetazidine (TMZ) and vitamin E, used as nutritional supplements to alleviate oxidative stress. Six groups of eight male Wistar rats each were prepared (groups A–F): A, control; B, vitamin E (10 mg/Kg/day); C, TMZ (20 mg/Kg/day); D, 25 mg/Kg/day CyA; E, CyA and vitamin E (25 mg/Kg/day CyA + 10 mg/Kg/day Vit E); F, TMZ for 20 days (20 mg/kg/day); and then CyA (25 mg/kg/day) and TMZ (20 mg/Kg/day). The experiment lasted 120 days. The exposure of rats to CyA promoted nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity with an increase in serum urea, creatinine, and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH). Structural and ultrastructural studies of liver and kidney were performed. Group D showed adverse effects induced by CyA since statistically significant differences were found with respect to the control group (A). Vitamin E (E) showed no protective effect. Pretreatment with TMZ (F) attenuated the adverse effects of CyA. We conclude that CyA-induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity are attenuated by the cytoprotective effect of TMZ. TMZ inhibits the reabsorption and, consequently, the accumulation of CyA in the cell. The antioxidant capacity of vitamin E did not improve the effect of CyA. PMID:23691353

  17. Mechanisms of rapid induction of interleukin-22 in activated T cells and its modulation by cyclosporin a.

    PubMed

    Rudloff, Ina; Bachmann, Malte; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Mühl, Heiko

    2012-02-10

    IL-22 is an immunoregulatory cytokine displaying pathological functions in models of autoimmunity like experimental psoriasis. Understanding molecular mechanisms driving IL-22, together with knowledge on the capacity of current immunosuppressive drugs to target this process, may open an avenue to novel therapeutic options. Here, we sought to characterize regulation of human IL22 gene expression with focus on the established model of Jurkat T cells. Moreover, effects of the prototypic immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA) were investigated. We report that IL-22 induction by TPA/A23187 (T/A) or αCD3 is inhibited by CsA or related FK506. Similar data were obtained with peripheral blood mononuclear cells or purified CD3(+) T cells. IL22 promoter analysis (-1074 to +156 bp) revealed a role of an NF-AT (-95/-91 nt) and a CREB (-194/-190 nt) binding site for gene induction. Indeed, binding of CREB and NF-ATc2, but not c-Rel, under the influence of T/A to those elements could be proven by ChIP. Because CsA has the capability to impair IκB kinase (IKK) complex activation, the IKKα/β inhibitor IKKVII was evaluated. IKKVII likewise reduced IL-22 induction in Jurkat cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Interestingly, transfection of Jurkat cells with siRNA directed against IKKα impaired IL22 gene expression. Data presented suggest that NF-AT, CREB, and IKKα contribute to rapid IL22 gene induction. In particular the crucial role of NF-AT detected herein may form the basis of direct action of CsA on IL-22 expression by T cells, which may contribute to therapeutic efficacy of the drug in autoimmunity.

  18. The Mitochondrial Complex V–Associated Large-Conductance Inner Membrane Current Is Regulated by Cyclosporine and Dexpramipexole

    PubMed Central

    Alavian, Kambiz N.; Dworetzky, Steven I.; Bonanni, Laura; Zhang, Ping; Sacchetti, Silvio; Li, Hongmei; Signore, Armando P.; Smith, Peter J. S.; Gribkoff, Valentin K.

    2015-01-01

    Inefficiency of oxidative phosphorylation can result from futile leak conductance through the inner mitochondrial membrane. Stress or injury may exacerbate this leak conductance, putting cells, and particularly neurons, at risk of dysfunction and even death when energy demand exceeds cellular energy production. Using a novel method, we have recently described an ion conductance consistent with mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) within the c-subunit of the ATP synthase. Excitotoxicity, reactive oxygen species–producing stimuli, or elevated mitochondrial matrix calcium opens the channel, which is inhibited by cyclosporine A and ATP/ADP. Here we show that ATP and the neuroprotective drug dexpramipexole (DEX) inhibited an ion conductance consistent with this c-subunit channel (mPTP) in brain-derived submitochondrial vesicles (SMVs) enriched for F1FO ATP synthase (complex V). Treatment of SMVs with urea denatured extramembrane components of complex V, eliminated DEX- but not ATP-mediated current inhibition, and reduced binding of [14C]DEX. Direct effects of DEX on the synthesis and hydrolysis of ATP by complex V suggest that interaction of the compound with its target results in functional conformational changes in the enzyme complex. [14C]DEX bound specifically to purified recombinant b and oligomycin sensitivity–conferring protein subunits of the mitochondrial F1FO ATP synthase. Previous data indicate that DEX increased the efficiency of energy production in cells, including neurons. Taken together, these studies suggest that modulation of a complex V–associated inner mitochondrial membrane current is metabolically important and may represent an avenue for the development of new therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25332381

  19. Development of cyclosporine A-loaded dry-emulsion formulation using highly purified glycerol monooleate for safe inhalation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Kumiko; Kojo, Yoshiki; Kawabata, Yohei; Mizumoto, Takahiro; Yamada, Shizuo; Onoue, Satomi

    2013-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to improve the safety and oxidative stability of glycerol monooleate (GMO)-based dry-emulsion (DE) formulation containing cyclosporine A (CsA) for inhalation therapy. GMO or highly purified GMO (hpGMO) was used as surfactant for the DE formulations (GMO/DE or hpGMO/DE), the toxicological and physicochemical properties of which were characterized with a focus on oxidative stability, in vitro/in vivo toxicity, and dissolution property. Incubation of GMO at oxidation accelerating conditions for 10 days at 60°C resulted in the formation of lipid peroxides as evidenced by increased malondialdehyde (111 μmol/mg); however, hpGMO samples exhibited increase of only 20.7 μmol/mg in malondialdehyde level. No significant acute cytotoxicity was observed in rat alveolar L2 cells exposed to hpGMO (0.28mM), and intratracheal administration of hpGMO powder in rats did not cause an increase of the plasma LDH level. The hpGMO/DE exhibited marked improvement in dissolution behavior of CsA, and stable fine micelles with a mean diameter of 320 nm were formed when suspended in water. A respirable powder formulation of hpGMO/DE (hpGMO/DE-RP) was newly prepared, and its in vitro inhalation property and in vivo efficacy were also evaluated. The hpGMO/DE-RP exhibited high dispersibility in laser diffraction analysis and significantly improved potency to attenuate recruitment of inflammatory cells into airway and thickening of airway wall in an animal model. Thus, the strategic use of hpGMO would improve oxidative stability and local toxicity compared with a GMO-based DE formulation, and its application to RP formulation could be a promising approach for effective inhalation therapy.

  20. Synaptic Mitochondria Sustain More Damage than Non-Synaptic Mitochondria after Traumatic Brain Injury and Are Protected by Cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Kulbe, Jacqueline R; Hill, Rachel L; Singh, Indrapal N; Wang, Juan A; Hall, Edward D

    2016-10-13

    Currently, there are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapies for the treatment of those with traumatic brain injury (TBI). As central mediators of the secondary injury cascade, mitochondria are promising therapeutic targets for prevention of cellular death and dysfunction after TBI. One of the most promising and extensively studied mitochondrial targeted TBI therapies is inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) by the FDA-approved drug, cyclosporine A (CsA). A number of studies have evaluated the effects of CsA on total brain mitochondria after TBI; however, no study has investigated the effects of CsA on isolated synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria. Synaptic mitochondria are considered essential for proper neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity, and their dysfunction has been implicated in neurodegeneration. Synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria have heterogeneous characteristics, but their heterogeneity can be masked in total mitochondrial (synaptic and non-synaptic) preparations. Therefore, it is essential that mitochondria targeted pharmacotherapies, such as CsA, be evaluated in both populations. This is the first study to examine the effects of CsA on isolated synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria after experimental TBI. We conclude that synaptic mitochondria sustain more damage than non-synaptic mitochondria 24 h after severe controlled cortical impact injury (CCI), and that intraperitoneal administration of CsA (20 mg/kg) 15 min after injury improves synaptic and non-synaptic respiration, with a significant improvement being seen in the more severely impaired synaptic population. As such, CsA remains a promising neuroprotective candidate for the treatment of those with TBI.

  1. Procarcinogenic effects of cyclosporine A are mediated through the activation of TAK1/TAB1 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jianmin; Walsh, Stephanie B.; Verney, Zoe M.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2011-05-13

    Research highlights: {yields} Organ transplant recipients are highly susceptible to early skin cancer development. {yields} CsA-mediated TGFB1-dependent TAK1/TAB1 signaling augments invasive tumor growth. {yields} CsA enhances accumulation of upstream kinases, ZMP, AMPK and IRAK to activate TAK1. {yields} TAK1 mediates enhanced proliferation and reduced apoptosis via CsA-dependent NF{kappa}B. -- Abstract: Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressive drug commonly used for maintaining chronic immune suppression in organ transplant recipients. It is known that patients receiving CsA manifest increased growth of aggressive non-melanoma skin cancers. However, the underlying mechanism by which CsA augments tumor growth is not fully understood. Here, we show that CsA augments the growth of A431 epidermoid carcinoma xenograft tumors by activating tumor growth factor {beta}-activated kinase1 (TAK1). The activation of TAK1 by CsA occurs at multiple levels by kinases ZMP, AMPK and IRAK. TAK1 forms heterodimeric complexes with TAK binding protein 1 and 2 (TAB1/TAB2) which in term activate nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) and p38 MAP kinase. Transcriptional activation of NF{kappa}B is evidenced by IKK{beta}-mediated phosphorylation-dependent degradation of I{kappa}B and consequent nuclear translocation of p65. This also leads to enhancement in the expression of its transcriptional target genes cyclin D1, Bcl2 and COX-2. Similarly, activation of p38 leads to enhanced inflammation-related signaling shown by increased phosphorylation of MAPKAPK2 and which in turn phosphorylates its substrate HSP27. Activation of both NF{kappa}B and p38 MAP kinase provide mitogenic stimuli to augment the growth of SCCs.

  2. Effect of azithromycin on gingival overgrowth induced by cyclosporine A + nifedipine combination therapy: A morphometric analysis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ratre, Madhu Singh; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO) is a well-known adverse effect of cyclosporine A (CsA) and nifedipine (Nf) therapy. The aim of the present morphometric study was to evaluate the effect of azithromycin (Azi) on the combined GO in rats induced by CsA + Nf combination. Materials and Methods: Thirty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided equally into three groups. Group 1 (control) received olive oil only; Group 2 received a combination of CsA and Nf in olive oil throughout the study period; Group 3 received CsA + Nf combination therapy, and Azi was added for 1 week in the 5th week. All the drugs were delivered by oral route. Impressions of the mandibular central incisal regions were taken, and study models were prepared at baseline and biweekly up to the 8 weeks. Statistical analysis was done by one-way analysis of variance and intergroup comparisons were made using Tukey's post hoc analysis. Results: Significant GO was evident in Group 2 and Group 3 rats when compared to Group 1. However, in Group 3 (Azi), GO was observed up to the 4th week, but a significant decrease in GO was noticed during 6–8th week after the administration of Azi in 5th week. Conclusion: Azi is an effective drug in the remission of DIGO induced by combined therapy of CsA + Nf and thereby can be considered as a useful therapeutic regimen in minimizing the DIGO in transplant patients. PMID:28298821

  3. Vitamin E protects against the mitochondrial damage caused by cyclosporin A in LLC-PK1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arriba, G. de Perez de Hornedo, J.; Ramirez Rubio, S.; Calvino Fernandez, M.; Benito Martinez, S.; Maiques Camarero, M.; Parra Cid, T.

    2009-09-15

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) has nephrotoxic effects known to involve reactive oxygen species (ROS), since antioxidants prevent the kidney damage induced by this drug. Given that mitochondria are among the main sources of intracellular ROS, the aims of our study were to examine the mitochondrial effects of CsA in the porcine renal endothelial cell line LLC-PK1 and the influence of the antioxidant Vitamin E (Vit E). Following the treatment of LLC-PK1 cells with CsA, we assessed the mitochondrial synthesis of superoxide anion, permeability transition pore opening, mitochondrial membrane potential, cardiolipin peroxidation, cytochrome c release and cellular apoptosis, using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy procedures. Similar experiments were done after Vit E preincubation of cells. CsA treatment increased superoxide anion in a dose-dependent way. CsA opened the permeability transition pores, caused Bax migration to mitochondria, and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and cardiolipin content. Also CsA released cytochrome c into cytosol and provoked cellular apoptosis. Vit E pretreatment inhibited the effects that CsA induced on mitochondrial structure and function in LLC-PK1 cells and avoided apoptosis. CsA modifies mitochondrial LLC-PK1 cell physiology with loss of negative electrochemical gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane and increased lipid peroxidation. These features are related to apoptosis and can explain the cellular damage that CsA induces. As Vit E inhibited these effects, our results suggest that they were mediated by an increase in ROS production by mitochondria.

  4. The NRF2-heme oxygenase-1 system modulates cyclosporine A-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-ha; Park, Hyun-Min; Jung, Kyeong-Ah; Choi, Han-Gon; Kim, Jung-Ae; Kim, Dae-Duk; Kim, Sang Geon; Kang, Keon Wook; Ku, Sae Kwang; Kensler, Thomas W.; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an underlying mechanism of tissue fibrosis by generating myofibroblasts, which serve as the primary source of extracellular matrix production from tissue epithelial cells. Recently, it has been suggested that EMT is implicated in immunosuppressive cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced renal fibrosis. In the present study, the potential role of NRF2, which is the master regulator of genes associated with the cellular antioxidant defense system, in CsA-induced EMT-renal fibrosis has been investigated. Pre-treatment of rat tubular epithelial NRK-52E cells with sulforaphane, an activator of NRF2, could prevent EMT gene changes such as the loss of E-cadherin and the increase of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression. Conversely, genetic inhibition of NRF2 in these cells aggravated changes in CsA-induced EMT markers. These in vitro observations could be confirmed in vivo: CsA-treatment developed severe renal damage and fibrosis with increased expression of α-SMA in NRF2-deficient mice compared to wild-type mice. NRF2-mediated amelioration of CsA-EMT changes could be accounted in part by the regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). CsA treatment increased HO-1 expression in an NRF2-dependent manner in NRK cells as well as murine fibroblasts. Induction of HO-1 by CsA appears to be advantageous by counteracting EMT gene changes: specific increase of HO-1 expression by cobalt protoporphyrin prevented CsA-mediated α-SMA induction, while genetic inhibition of HO-1 by siRNA substantially enhanced α-SMA induction compared to control cells. Collectively, our current results suggest that the NRF2-HO-1 system plays a protective role against CsA-induced renal fibrosis by modulating EMT gene changes. PMID:20096777

  5. Polyomavirus BK Replication in De Novo Kidney Transplant Patients Receiving Tacrolimus or Cyclosporine: A Prospective, Randomized, Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, H H; Vincenti, F; Friman, S; Tuncer, M; Citterio, F; Wiecek, A; Scheuermann, E H; Klinger, M; Russ, G; Pescovitz, M D; Prestele, H

    2013-01-01

    Polyomavirus BK (BKV)-associated nephropathy causes premature kidney transplant (KT) failure. BKV viruria and viremia are biomarkers of disease progression, but associated risk factors are controversial. A total of 682 KT patients receiving basiliximab, mycophenolic acid (MPA), corticosteroids were randomized 1:1 to cyclosporine (CsA) or tacrolimus (Tac). Risk factors were analyzed in 629 (92.2%) patients having at least 2 BKV measurements until month 12 posttransplant. Univariate analysis associated CsA-MPA with lower rates of viremia than Tac-MPA at month 6 (10.6% vs. 16.3%, p = 0.048) and 12 (4.8% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.004) and lower plasma BKV loads at month 12 (3.9 vs. 5.1 log10 copies/mL; p = 0.028). In multivariate models, CsA-MPA remained associated with less viremia than Tac-MPA at month 6 (OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.36–0.99) and month 12 (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.16–0.68). Viremia at month 6 was also independently associated with higher steroid exposure until month 3 (OR 1.19 per 1 g), and with male gender (OR 2.49) and recipient age (OR 1.14 per 10 years) at month 12. The data suggest a dynamic risk factor evolution of BKV viremia consisting of higher corticosteroids until month 3, Tac-MPA compared to CsA-MPA at month 6 and Tac-MPA, older age, male gender at month 12 posttransplant. PMID:23137180

  6. Pharmacokinetics of baicalin in rats and its interactions with cyclosporin A, quinidine and SKF-525A: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pi-Lo; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2004-11-01

    Baicalin, a flavone glucuronide derived mainly from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis, has been used in traditional Chinese medicine as an anti-inflammatory and anti-viral agent. To explore whether the disposition of baicalin is related to multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp), baicalin (3, 10 and 30 mg kg(-1); i. v.) was injected to rats for a pharmacokinetic study using microdialysis coupled with HPLC. The results indicate that baicalin goes through hepatobiliary excretion against a concentration gradient based on the blood-to-bile distribution ratio (AUCbile/AUCblood), but that AUCblood or AUCbile did not show any dose-related increase in the range from 3 to 30 mg kg(-1). Coadministration of cyclosporin A (CsA) or quinidine (both are P-gp inhibitors) was used to delineate the role of P-gp on baicalin disposition, while SKF-525A (a cytochrome P450 inhibitor) could specifically inhibit the cytochrome P450 catalysis of baicalin without crossing with P-gp function. Both CsA and quinidine promoted the active transport of baicalin into bile and reduced its level in blood, and this result was the same as that obtained by treating with SKF-525A. Hence, the association of the involvement of P-gp in active baicalin efflux into bile seems to be excluded since CsA and quinidine are also cytochrome P450 inhibitors. In addition, baicalin was not detected in the brain striatum after treating with baicalin alone in the present study. Also, neither CsA nor quinidine co-administered with baicalin is able to induce measurable levels of baicalin in rat brain, which suggests that baicalin might not be able to pass through the blood-brain barrier (BBB).

  7. Phase I trial of EpCAM-targeting immunotoxin MOC31PE, alone and in combination with cyclosporin

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Y; Engebraaten, O; Juell, S; Aamdal, S; Brunsvig, P; Fodstad, Ø; Dueland, S

    2015-01-01

    Background: A phase I trial was performed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity of the anti-EpCAM immunotoxin (IT) MOC31PE in cancer patients. An important part of the study was to investigate whether the addition of Sandimmune (cyclosporin, CsA) suppressed the development of anti-IT antibodies. Methods: Patients with EpCAM-positive metastatic disease were eligible for treatment with intravenous MOC31PE using a modified Fibonacci dose escalation sequence. Maximum tolerated dose was first established without, then with intravenously administered CsA. Results: Sixty-three patients were treated with MOC31PE in doses ranging from 0.5 to 8 μg kg−1. Maximum tolerated dose was 8 μg kg−1 for MOC31PE alone, and 6.5 μg kg−1 when combined with CsA. The dose-limiting adverse event was reversible liver toxicity. No radiological complete or partial responses were observed, whereas stable disease was seen in 36% of the patients receiving MOC31PE only. The pharmacokinetic profile of MOC31PE was characterised by linear kinetics and with a half-life of ∼3 h. The addition of CsA delayed the generation of anti-IT antibodies. Conclusions: Intravenous infusion of MOC31PE can safely be administered to cancer patients. Immune suppression with CsA delays the development of anti-MOC31PE antibodies. The antitumour effect of MOC31PE warrants further evaluation in EpCAM-positive metastatic disease. PMID:26554649

  8. Estimation of Abbreviated Cyclosporine A Area under the Concentration-Time Curve in Allogenic Stem Cell Transplantation after Oral Administration.

    PubMed

    Eljebari, Hanene; Ben Fradj, Nadia; Salouage, Issam; Gaies, Emna; Trabelsi, Sameh; Jebabli, Nadia; Lakhal, Mohamed; Ben Othman, Tarek; Kouz, Anis

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of Cyclosporine (CsA) systemic exposure permit its dose adjustment in allogenic stem cell transplantation recipients to prevent graft-versus-host disease. CsA LSSs were developed and validated from 60 ASCT patients via multiple linear regressions. All whole-blood samples were analyzed by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA-Axym). The 10 models that have used CsA concentrations at a single time point did not have a good fit with AUC(0-12) (R(2) < 0.90). C(2) and C(4) were the time points that correlated best with AUC(0-12 h), R(2) were respectively 0.848, and 0.897. The LSS equation with the best predictive performance (bias, precision and number of samples) utilized three sampling concentrations was AUC(0-12 h) = 0.607 + 1.569 × C(0.5) + 2.098 × C(2) + 3.603 × C(4) (R(2) = 0.943). Optimal LSSs equations which limited to those utilizing three timed concentrations taken within 4 hours post-dose developed from ASCT recipient's patients yielded a low bias <5% ranged from 1.27% to 2.68% and good precision <15% ranged from 9.60% and 11.02%. We propose an LSS model with equation AUC(0-12 h) = 0.82 + 2.766 × C(2) + 3.409 × C(4) for a practical reason. Bias and precision for this model are respectively 2.68% and 11.02%.

  9. Estimation of Abbreviated Cyclosporine A Area under the Concentration-Time Curve in Allogenic Stem Cell Transplantation after Oral Administration

    PubMed Central

    ELjebari, Hanene; Ben Fradj, Nadia; Salouage, Issam; Gaies, Emna; Trabelsi, Sameh; Jebabli, Nadia; Lakhal, Mohamed; Ben Othman, Tarek; Kouz, Anis

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of Cyclosporine (CsA) systemic exposure permit its dose adjustment in allogenic stem cell transplantation recipients to prevent graft-versus-host disease. CsA LSSs were developed and validated from 60 ASCT patients via multiple linear regressions. All whole-blood samples were analyzed by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA-Axym). The 10 models that have used CsA concentrations at a single time point did not have a good fit with AUC0–12 (R2 < 0.90). C2 and C4 were the time points that correlated best with AUC0–12 h, R2 were respectively 0.848, and 0.897. The LSS equation with the best predictive performance (bias, precision and number of samples) utilized three sampling concentrations was AUC0–12 h = 0.607 + 1.569 × C0.5 + 2.098 × C2 + 3.603 × C4 (R2 = 0.943). Optimal LSSs equations which limited to those utilizing three timed concentrations taken within 4 hours post-dose developed from ASCT recipient's patients yielded a low bias <5% ranged from 1.27% to 2.68% and good precision <15% ranged from 9.60% and 11.02%. We propose an LSS model with equation AUC0–12 h = 0.82 + 2.766 × C2 + 3.409 × C4 for a practical reason. Bias and precision for this model are respectively 2.68% and 11.02%. PMID:22132303

  10. Protective Effect of Edaravone Against Cyclosporine-Induced Chronic Nephropathy Through Antioxidant and Nitric Oxide Modulating Pathways in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sattarinezhad, Elahe; Panjehshahin, Mohammad Reza; Torabinezhad, Simin; Kamali-Sarvestani, Eskandar; Farjadian, Shirin; Pirsalami, Fatema; Moezi, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressant with therapeutic indications in various immunological diseases; however, its use is associated with chronic nephropathy. Oxidative stress has a crucial role in CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. The present study evaluates the protective effect of edaravone on CsA-induced chronic nephropathy and investigates its antioxidant and nitric oxide modulating property. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=66) were distributed into nine groups, including a control (group 1) (n=7). Eight groups received CsA (15 mg/kg) for 28 days while being treated. The groups were categorized as: Group 2: Vehicle (n=10)Groups 3, 4, and 5: Edaravone (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg) (n=7 each)Group 6: Diphenyliodonium chloride, a specific endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor (n=7)Group 7: Aminoguanidine, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor (n=7)Group 8: Edaravone (10 mg/kg) plus diphenyliodonium chloride (n=7)Group 9: Edaravone (10 mg/kg) plus aminoguanidine (n=7) Blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels, malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase enzyme activities were measured using standard kits. Renal histopathological evaluations and measurements of eNOS and iNOS gene expressions by RT-PCR were also performed. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey’s test (SPSS software version 18.0). Results: Edaravone (10 mg/kg) significantly attenuated CsA-induced oxidative stress, renal dysfunction, and kidney tissue injury. Aminoguanidine improved the renoprotective effect of edaravone. Edaravone reduced the elevated mRNA level of iNOS, but could not alter the level of eNOS mRNA significantly. Conclusion: Edaravone protects against CsA-induced chronic nephropathy using antioxidant property and probably through inhibiting iNOS gene expression. PMID:28360443

  11. Active site mutants of human cyclophilin A separate peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity from cyclosporin A binding and calcineurin inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Zydowsky, L. D.; Etzkorn, F. A.; Chang, H. Y.; Ferguson, S. B.; Stolz, L. A.; Ho, S. I.; Walsh, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    Based on recent X-ray structural information, six site-directed mutants of human cyclophilin A (hCyPA) involving residues in the putative active site--H54, R55, F60, Q111, F113, and H126--have been constructed, overexpressed, and purified from Escherichia coli to homogeneity. The proteins W121A (Liu, J., Chen, C.-M., & Walsh, C.T., 1991a, Biochemistry 30, 2306-2310), H54Q, R55A, F60A, Q111A, F113A, and H126Q were assayed for cis-trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) activity, their ability to bind the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA), and protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) inhibition in the presence of CsA. Results indicate that H54Q, Q111A, F113A, and W121A retain 3-15% of the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of wild-type recombinant hCyPA. The remaining three mutants (R55A, F60A, and H126Q) each retain less than 1% of the wild-type catalytic efficiency, indicating participation by these residues in PPIase catalysis. Each of the mutants bound to a CsA affinity matrix. The mutants R55A, F60A, F113A, and H126Q inhibited calcineurin in the presence of CsA, whereas W121A did not. Although CsA is a competitive inhibitor of PPIase activity, it can complex with enzymatically inactive cyclophilins and inhibit the phosphatase activity of calcineurin. PMID:1338979

  12. Efficacy and safety of early cyclosporine conversion to sirolimus with continued MMF-four-year results of the Postconcept study.

    PubMed

    Lebranchu, Y; Thierry, A; Thervet, E; Büchler, M; Etienne, I; Westeel, P F; Hurault de Ligny, B; Moulin, B; Rérolle, J P; Frouget, T; Girardot-Seguin, S; Toupance, O

    2011-08-01

    Calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) withdrawal has been used as a strategy to improve renal allograft function. We previously reported that conversion from cyclosporine A (CsA) to sirolimus (SRL) 3 months after transplantation significantly improved renal function at 1 year. In the Postconcept trial, 77 patients in the SRL group and 85 in the CsA group were followed for 48 months. Renal function (Cockcroft and Gault) was significantly better at month 48 (M48) in the SRL group both in the intent-to-treat population (ITT): 62.6 mL/min/1.73 m(2) versus 57.1 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (p = 0.013) and in the on-treatment population (OT): 67.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) versus 57.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (p = 0.002). Two biopsy proven acute rejection episodes occurred after M12 in each group. Graft and patient survival were comparable (graft survival: 97.4 vs. 100%; patient survival: 97.4 vs. 97.6%, respectively). The incidence of new-onset diabetes was numerically increased in the SRL group (7 vs. 2). In OT, three cancers occurred in the SRL group versus nine in the CsA group and mean proteinuria was increased in the SRL group (0.42 ± 0.44 vs. 0.26 ± 0.37; p = 0.018). In summary, the renal benefits associated with conversion of CsA to SRL, at 3 months posttransplantation, in combination with MMF were maintained for 4 years posttransplantation.

  13. Tacrolimus with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or sirolimus vs. cyclosporine with MMF in cardiac transplant patients: 1-year report.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, J A; Miller, L W; Russell, S D; Ewald, G A; Zucker, M J; Goldberg, L R; Eisen, H J; Salm, K; Tolzman, D; Gao, J; Fitzsimmons, W; First, R

    2006-06-01

    The most advantageous combination of immunosuppressive agents for cardiac transplant recipients has not yet been established. Between November 2001 and June 2003, 343 de novo cardiac transplant recipients were randomized to receive steroids and either tacrolimus (TAC) + sirolimus (SRL), TAC + mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or cyclosporine (CYA) + MMF. Antilymphocyte induction therapy was allowed for up to 5 days. The primary endpoint of >/=3A rejection or hemodynamic compromise rejection requiring treatment showed no significant difference at 6 months (TAC/MMF 22.4%, TAC/SRL 24.3%, CYA/MMF 31.6%, p = 0.271) and 1 year (p = 0.056), but it was significantly lower in the TAC/MMF group when compared only to the CYA/MMF group at 1 year (23.4% vs. 36.8%; p = 0.029). Differences in the incidence of any treated rejection were significant (TAC/SRL = 35%, TAC/MMF = 42%, CYA/MMF = 59%; p < 0.001), as were median levels of serum creatinine (TAC/SRL = 1.5 mg/dL, TAC/MMF = 1.3 mg/dL, CYA/MMF = 1.5 mg/dL; p = 0.032) and triglycerides (TAC/SRL = 162 mg/dL, TAC/MMF = 126 mg/dL, CYA/MMF = 154 mg/dL; p = 0.028). The TAC/SRL group encountered fewer viral infections but more fungal infections and impaired wound healing. These secondary endpoints suggest that the TAC/MMF combination appears to offer more advantages than TAC/SRL or CYA/MMF in cardiac transplant patients, including fewer >/=3A rejections or hemodynamic compromise rejections and an improved side-effect profile.

  14. Cyclosporine A Treatment Inhibits Abcc6-Dependent Cardiac Necrosis and Calcification following Coxsackievirus B3 Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marton, Jennifer; Albert, Danica; Wiltshire, Sean A.; Park, Robin; Bergen, Arthur; Qureshi, Salman; Malo, Danielle; Burelle, Yan; Vidal, Silvia M.

    2015-01-01

    Coxsackievirus type B3 (CVB3) is a cardiotropic enterovirus. Infection causes cardiomyocyte necrosis and myocardial inflammation. The damaged tissue that results is replaced with fibrotic or calcified tissue, which can lead to permanently altered cardiac function. The extent of pathogenesis among individuals exposed to CVB3 is dictated by a combination of host genetics, viral virulence, and the environment. Here, we aimed to identify genes that modulate cardiopathology following CVB3 infection. 129S1 mice infected with CVB3 developed increased cardiac pathology compared to 129X1 substrain mice despite no difference in viral burden. Linkage analysis identified a major locus on chromosome 7 (LOD: 8.307, P<0.0001) that controlled the severity of cardiac calcification and necrosis following infection. Sub-phenotyping and genetic complementation assays identified Abcc6 as the underlying gene. Microarray expression profiling identified genotype-dependent regulation of genes associated with mitochondria. Electron microscopy examination showed elevated deposition of hydroxyapatite-like material in the mitochondrial matrices of infected Abcc6 knockout (Abcc6-/-) mice but not in wildtype littermates. Cyclosporine A (CsA) inhibits mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by inhibiting cyclophilin D (CypD). Treatment of Abcc6 -/- mice with CsA reduced cardiac necrosis and calcification by more than half. Furthermore, CsA had no effect on the CVB3-induced phenotype of doubly deficient CypD-/-Abcc6-/- mice. Altogether, our work demonstrates that mutations in Abcc6 render mice more susceptible to cardiac calcification following CVB3 infection. Moreover, we implicate CypD in the control of cardiac necrosis and calcification in Abcc6-deficient mice, whereby CypD inhibition is required for cardioprotection. PMID:26375467

  15. PEG-b-PPS diblock copolymer aggregates for hydrophobic drug solubilization and release: cyclosporin A as an example.

    PubMed

    Velluto, Diana; Demurtas, Davide; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    Micelles formed from amphiphilic block copolymers have been explored in recent years as carriers for hydrophobic drugs. In an aqueous environment, the hydrophobic blocks form the core of the micelle, which can host lipophilic drugs, while the hydrophilic blocks form the corona or outer shell and stabilize the interface between the hydrophobic core and the external medium. In the present work, mesophase behavior and drug encapsulation were explored in the AB block copolymeric amphiphile composed of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as a hydrophile and poly(propylene sulfide) PPS as a hydrophobe, using the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA) as an example of a highly hydrophobic drug. Block copolymers with a degree of polymerization of 44 on the PEG and of 10, 20 and 40 on the PPS respectively (abbreviated as PEG44-b-PPS10, PEG44-b-PPS20, PEG44-b-PPS40) were synthesized and characterized. Drug-loaded polymeric micelles were obtained by the cosolvent displacement method as well as the remarkably simple method of dispersing the warm polymer melt, with drug dissolved therein, in warm water. Effective drug solubility up to 2 mg/mL in aqueous media was facilitated by the PEG- b-PPS micelles, with loading levels up to 19% w/w being achieved. Release was burst-free and sustained over periods of 9-12 days. These micelles demonstrate interesting solubilization characteristics, due to the low glass transition temperature, highly hydrophobic nature, and good solvent properties of the PPS block.

  16. Cyclosporine restores hematopoietic function by compensating for decreased Tregs in patients with pure red cell aplasia and acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dao, An T T; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Sugimori, Chiharu; Katagiri, Takamasa; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Zaimoku, Yoshitaka; Maruyama, Kana; Ly, Trung Q; Espinoza, Luis; Nakao, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Most patients with acquired pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and some with acquired aplastic anemia (AA) respond well to cyclosporine (CsA), but thereafter often show CsA dependency. The mechanism underlying this dependency remains unknown. We established a reliable method for measuring the regulatory T cell (Treg) count using FoxP3 and Helios expression as markers and determined the balance between Tregs and other helper T cell subsets in 16 PRCA and 29 AA patients. The ratios of interferon-γ-producing CD4(+) (Th1) T cells to Tregs in untreated patients and CsA-dependent patients were significantly higher (PRCA 5.77 ± 1.47 and 7.38 ± 2.58; AA 6.18 ± 2.35 and 8.94 ± 4.06) than in healthy volunteers (HVs; 3.33 ± 0.90) due to the profound decrease in the percentage of Tregs. In contrast, the ratios were comparable to HVs in convalescent CsA-treated AA patients (4.74 ± 2.10) and AA patients in remission after the cessation of CsA treatment (4.24 ± 1.67). Low-dose CsA (100 ng/ml) inhibited the proliferation of conventional T cells (Tconv) to a similar degree to the inhibition by Tregs in a co-culture with a 1:1 Treg/Tconv ratio. The data suggest that CsA may reverse the hematopoietic suppression in PRCA and AA patients by compensating for the inadequate immune regulatory function that occurs due to a profound decrease in the Treg count.

  17. Adrenochrome reaction implicates oxygen radicals in metabolism of cyclosporine A and FK-506 in rat and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S S; Strobel, H W; Napoli, K L; Grevel, J

    1993-06-01

    The role of oxygen radicals in the metabolism of cyclosporine A (CyA), FR900506 (FK-506) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 system was investigated in vitro in rat and human microsomal preparations. Varying concentrations of CyA, FK-506 and CCl4 (100 microM-1.0 mM) were added to microsomal preparations, and lipid peroxidation was measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) formation as detected by the thiobarbituric acid assay. The effects of oxygen radical scavengers [superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT)] and an antioxidant [glutathione (GLUT)] were tested on various incubations of CyA, FK-506 and CCl4 to assess the role of oxygen radicals in lipid peroxidation. CyA-dependent MDA formation was moderately inhibited by SOD in the rat model and increased by SOD in the human model. In both models, CAT slightly inhibited CyA-dependent MDA formation and GLUT significantly inhibited MDA formation. FK-506-dependent MDA formation, studied only in the rat model, paralleled CyA-induced MDA formation but showed greater inhibition with CAT and less inhibition with SOD or GLUT. In both models, CCl4-dependent MDA formation was significantly inhibited by GLUT and showed no sensitivity to SOD or CAT. In addition, the adrenochrome reaction, which measures the oxidation of epinephrine to adrenochrome, was used to measure the increased oxygen radical-flux resulting from the metabolism of CyA, FK-506 and CCl4. CyA with epinephrine showed the highest oxidative activity, followed by FK-506 and then CCl4, which showed the least formation of adrenochrome. These results indicated a role for oxygen radicals in CyA and FK-506 metabolism.

  18. Cyclosporine monitoring in renal transplantation: area under the curve monitoring is superior to trough-level monitoring.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Welsh, M S; Kahan, B D

    1989-01-01

    Trough levels (TL) of cyclosporine (CS) measured in serum by the polyclonal radioimmunoassay (SR) are useful for dissecting the etiology of clinical events, but they are a poor guide to dosage adjustments. In renal transplant patients immunosuppressed by low doses of prednisone and CS given orally, once-a-day TL (24-h) monitoring was replaced by area under the curve (AUC) monitoring, i.e., measuring the area under the concentration (SR)-time curve from seven blood samples (0, 2, 4, 6, 10, 14, and 24 h) at clinical steady state, which was reached on the 3rd day after a change in the oral dose rate. The therapeutic target was an average concentration at steady state (Css av) of 200 ng/ml during the first 6 months after transplantation and 150 ng/ml thereafter. The Css av was calculated by dividing the AUC by the dosing interval (24 h). Two findings demonstrated the superiority of AUC monitoring over TL monitoring. First, in 71 paired observations AUC but not TL was significantly correlated with the dose expressed as total mg (r = 0.381, p = 0.001) or mg/kg body weight (r = 0.538, p = 0.0001). Second, after adjusting (n = 26) the oral dose rate (to achieve the therapeutic target) the absolute error (i.e., deviation from the target) in the AUC observation (15%) was significantly (p = 0.0005) smaller than in the TL observation (36%). Monitoring AUC at clinical steady state reduced the number of dosage adjustments by a factor of 3.

  19. Cyclosporine 0.05% Ophthalmic Emulsion for Dry Eye in Korea: A Prospective, Multicenter, Open-Label, Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Yong-Soo; Rho, Chang Rae; Cho, Kyungjin; Choi, Jin A; Na, Kyung Sun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effectiveness and tolerability of cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion (CsA) 0.05% in patients with moderate to severe dry eye disease in Korea. Methods This was a prospective, multicenter, open-label, surveillance study of 392 Korean patients with moderate to severe dry eye disease who were treated with CsA 0.05% for three months. An assessment of effectiveness was performed at baseline, and after 1, 2, and 3 months. The primary effectiveness outcomes were changes in ocular symptoms and Schirmer score. The secondary effectiveness outcomes were a change in conjunctival staining, use of artificial tears, global evaluation of treatment, and patient satisfaction. The primary safety outcome was the incidence and nature of adverse events. Results A total of 362 patients completed the study. After three months, all ocular symptom scores were significantly reduced compared to the baseline values, while the Schirmer scores were significantly increased relative to baseline (p < 0.0001). After three months, there were significant reductions from baseline in conjunctival staining (p < 0.01) and use of artificial tears (p < 0.0001). According to clinicians' global evaluations, most patients (>50%) experienced at least a 25% to 50% improvement in symptoms from baseline at each follow-up visit. The majority of patients (72.0%) were satisfied with the treatment results, and 57.2% reported having no or mild symptoms after treatment. The most common adverse events were ocular pain (11.0%). Conclusions Our findings indicate that CsA 0.05% is an effective and tolerable treatment for dry eye disease in Korean clinical practice. PMID:22131772

  20. Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition by cyclosporin A prevents pyrazole plus lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhuge, Jian; Cederbaum, Arthur I

    2009-02-01

    Previous results showed that pyrazole potentiates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury in mice. Mechanisms involved the overexpression of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), oxidative stress, and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The current study was carried out to test the hypothesis that the mitochondria permeability transition (MPT) plays a role in this pyrazole plus LPS toxicity. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with pyrazole for 2 days, followed by a challenge with LPS with or without treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA), an inhibitor of the MPT. Serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were increased by pyrazole plus LPS treatment, and CsA treatment could attenuate these increases. CsA also prevented pyrazole plus LPS-induced hepatocyte necrosis. Formation of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts and 3-nitrotyrosine protein adducts in liver tissue was increased by the pyrazole plus LPS treatment, and CsA treatment blunted these increases. Swelling, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol, and lipid peroxidation were increased in mitochondria isolated from the pyrazole plus LPS-treated mice, and CsA treatment prevented these changes. CsA did not prevent the increased levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), pp38 MAPK, and p-JNK2. In conclusion, although CsA does not prevent elevations in upstream mediators of the pyrazole plus LPS toxicity (iNOS, TNF-alpha, CYP2E1, MAPK), it does protect mice from the pyrazole plus LPS-induced liver toxicity by preventing the MPT and release of cytochrome c and decreasing mitochondrial oxidative stress. These results indicate that mitochondria are the critical targets of pyrazole plus LPS in mediating liver injury.

  1. Systems biology modeling of omics data: effect of cyclosporine a on the Nrf2 pathway in human renal cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Incorporation of omic data streams for building improved systems biology models has great potential for improving their predictions of biological outcomes. We have recently shown that cyclosporine A (CsA) strongly activates the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 pathway (Nrf2) in renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTECs) exposed in vitro. We present here a quantitative calibration of a differential equation model of the Nrf2 pathway with a subset of the omics data we collected. Results In vitro pharmacokinetic data on CsA exchange between cells, culture medium and vial walls, and data on the time course of omics markers in response to CsA exposure were reasonably well fitted with a coupled PK-systems biology model. Posterior statistical distributions of the model parameter values were obtained by Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling in a Bayesian framework. A complex cyclic pattern of ROS production and control emerged at 5 μM CsA repeated exposure. Plateau responses were found at 15 μM exposures. Shortly above those exposure levels, the model predicts a disproportionate increase in cellular ROS quantity which is consistent with an in vitro EC50 of about 40 μM for CsA in RPTECs. Conclusions The model proposed can be used to analyze and predict cellular response to oxidative stress, provided sufficient data to set its parameters to cell-specific values. Omics data can be used to that effect in a Bayesian statistical framework which retains prior information about the likely parameter values. PMID:24964791

  2. Functional and morphological analysis of the subretinal injection of human retinal progenitor cells under Cyclosporin A treatment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rui; Baranov, Petr; Lai, Kunbei; Zhang, Xinmei; Ge,, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional and morphological changes in subretinal xenografts of human retinal progenitor cells (hRPCs) in B6 mice treated with Cyclosporin A (CsA; 210 mg/l in drinking water). Methods The hRPCs from human fetal eyes were isolated and expanded for transplantation. These cells, with green fluorescent protein (GFP) at 11 passages, were transplanted into the subretinal space in B6 mice. A combination of invasive and noninvasive approaches was used to analyze the structural and functional consequences of the subretinal injection of the hRPCs. The process of change was monitored using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT), histology, and electroretinography (ERG) at 3 days, 1 week, and 3 weeks after transplantation. Cell counts were used to evaluate the survival rate with a confocal microscope. ERGs were performed to evaluate the physiologic changes, and the structural changes were evaluated using SDOCT and histological examination. Results The results of the histological examination showed that the hRPCs gained a better survival rate in the mice treated with CsA. The SDOCT showed that the bleb size of the retinal detachment was significantly decreased, and the retinal reattachment was nearly complete by 3 weeks. The ERG response amplitudes in the CsA group were less decreased after the injection, when compared with the control group, in the dark-adapted and light-adapted conditions. However, the cone-mediated function in both groups was less affected by the transplantation after 3 weeks than the rod-mediated function. Conclusions Although significant functional and structural recovery was observed after the subretinal injection of the hRPCs, the effectiveness of CsA in xenotransplantation may be a novel and potential approach for increasing retinal progenitor cell survival. PMID:25352736

  3. Acute, subacute and chronic effect of cyclosporin-A on mean arterial pressure of rats with severe spinal cord contusion.

    PubMed

    Romero, Samanta E; Bravo, Guadalupe; Hong, Enrique; Rojas, Guillermo; Ibarra, Antonio

    2008-11-07

    Cyclosporin-A (CsA) protects and regenerates the neural tissue after spinal cord (SC) injury. These beneficial effects are achieved when CsA is administered at a dose of 2.5mg/kg/12h during the first 2 days after lesion. In view of these observations, it is realistic to envision that, CsA could be tested in SC-clinical trials. Since CsA is a drug strongly related to hypertension, results imperative to evaluate experimentally the effect of the above CsA-dose regimen on blood pressure. For this purpose, one hundred and twenty adult rats were subjected (10 groups) or not (10 groups) to SC-injury. Five injured and five Sham-operated groups received CsA. The remaining groups received only vehicle. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was recorded from these animals at acute (6 and 24h post surgery; p.s.), subacute (96h), or chronic (30 days) stages of injury. In the latter, the therapy (CsA or vehicle) was administered only during the first 2 days p.s. or daily during 30 days of follow-up. The results of this study showed that SC-injury by itself induces a significant decrease of MAP during the acute and subacute phases of injury. CsA therapy was able to reestablish MAP parameters to control values in these phases. Regardless the therapy, a reestablishment of MAP was observed in chronic stages. Only the daily administration of CsA induced a significant increase in MAP, however; such variation remained into the normal ranges of MAP for rats. The potential benefits offered by CsA support its usefulness after SC-injury.

  4. Decreased incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease by continuous infusion of cyclosporine with a higher target blood level.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kumi; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Nakasone, Hideki; Arai, Shunya; Nishimoto, Nahoko; Sato, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Takuro; Hosoya, Noriko; Izutsu, Koji; Asai, Takashi; Hangaishi, Akira; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-03-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is the mainstay of pharmacologic prevention of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We previously reported that continuous infusion of CsA with a target blood level between 250 and 400 ng/ml significantly increased the incidence of acute GVHD compared to twice-daily infusion with a target trough level between 150 and 300 ng/ml. Thus, we raised the target level of CsA continuous infusion to 450-550 ng/ml. We treated 33 patients with the higher target level (CsA500) and compared the efficacy and toxicity with those in the 33 historical control patients (CsA300 group). Other transplantation procedures were not changed. The patients' characteristics were equivalent. The average CsA concentration was adjusted around 500 ng/ml and the actual daily dose was maintained at the initial dose (CsA 3mg/kg/day). Toxicities were equivalently observed among the two groups. The incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD was significantly lower in the CsA500 group (27 vs. 52%, P = 0.033). The target level of CsA was identified as an independent significant risk factor for grades II-IV acute GVHD (P = 0.039), adjusted for the presence of HLA mismatch. The incidence of chronic GVHD was also decreased in the CsA500 group (47 vs. 73%, P = 0.016). We conclude that the toxicity of the continuous CsA infusion with a target level of 450-550 ng/ml is acceptable and the efficacy to prevent acute GVHD is significant. A larger comparative study is warranted to confirm these findings.

  5. In-vitro immunosuppression of canine T-lymphocyte-specific proliferation with dexamethasone, cyclosporine, and the active metabolites of azathioprine and leflunomide in a flow-cytometric assay.

    PubMed

    Nafe, Laura A; Dodam, John R; Reinero, Carol R

    2014-07-01

    A high rate of mortality, expense, and complications of immunosuppressive therapy in dogs underscores the need for optimization of drug dosing. The purpose of this study was to determine, using a flow-cytometric assay, the 50% T-cell inhibitory concentration (IC50) of dexamethasone, cyclosporine, and the active metabolites of azathioprine (6-mercaptopurine) and leflunomide (A77 1726) in canine lymphocytes stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A). Whole blood was collected from 5 privately owned, healthy dogs of various ages, genders, and breeds. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, obtained by density-gradient separation, were cultured for 72 h with Con A, a fluorochrome-tagged cell proliferation dye, and various concentrations of dexamethasone (0.1, 1, 10, 100, 1000, and 10 000 μM), cyclosporine (0.2, 2, 10, 20, 30, 40, 80, and 200 ng/mL), 6-mercaptopurine (0.5, 2.5, 50, 100, 250, and 500 μM), and A77 1726 (1, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 200 μM). After incubation, the lymphocytes were labeled with propidium iodide and an antibody against canine CD5, a pan T-cell surface marker. Flow cytometry determined the percentage of live, proliferating T-lymphocytes incubated with or without immunosuppressants. The mean (± standard error) IC50 was 3460 ± 1900 μM for dexamethasone, 15.8 ± 2.3 ng/mL for cyclosporine, 1.3 ± 0.4 μM for 6-mercaptopurine, and 55.6 ± 22.0 μM for A77 1722. Inhibition of T-cell proliferation by the 4 immunosuppressants was demonstrated in a concentration-dependent manner, with variability between the dogs. These results represent the initial steps to tailor this assay for individual immunosuppressant protocols for dogs with immune-mediated disease.

  6. FTY720 versus MMF with cyclosporine in de novo renal transplantation: a 1-year, randomized controlled trial in Europe and Australasia.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, M; Budde, K; Charpentier, B; Klempnauer, J; Nashan, B; Pallardo, L M; Eris, J; Schena, F P; Eisenberger, U; Rostaing, L; Hmissi, A; Aradhye, S

    2006-12-01

    FTY720 is a novel immunomodulator investigated in de novo renal transplantation and other therapeutic areas including multiple sclerosis. This 1-year multicenter, randomized, phase III study in 668 de novo renal transplant patients compared FTY720 2.5 mg plus full-dose cyclosporine (FDC) or FTY720 5.0 mg plus reduced-dose cyclosporine (RDC), with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) plus FDC. The primary efficacy endpoint was the composite incidence of first treated biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR), graft loss, death or premature study discontinuation at month 12. Primary efficacy with FTY720 2.5 mg and MMF (32.4% and 30.2%; p = NS), plus mortality and BPAR incidence, were comparable. Patients receiving FTY720 5.0 mg plus RDC were discontinued from treatment due to increased risk of acute rejection (primary endpoint incidence 47.3%). FTY720 was associated with lower creatinine clearance (month 12: 53.1, 56.0 vs. 65.1 mL/min; p < 0.001) and more macular edema cases (2.2% and 1.3% vs. 0%), whereas cytomegalovirus infections were higher with MMF (6.2% and 10.6% vs. 18.1% p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0139, respectively). FTY720 2.5 mg provided comparable rejection prophylaxis over 12 months versus MMF; however, FTY720 5.0 mg did not support a 50% reduction in cyclosporine exposure. The cause of macular edema cases and lower creatinine clearance with FTY720 in de novo transplantation needs further investigation.

  7. The hepatitis B virus X protein activates nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) by a cyclosporin A-sensitive pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Pezzi, E; Armesilla, A L; Majano, P L; Redondo, J M; López-Cabrera, M

    1998-01-01

    The X gene product of the human hepatitis B virus (HBx) is a transcriptional activator of various viral and cellular genes. We recently have determined that the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by HBV-infected hepatocytes is transcriptionally up-regulated by HBx, involving nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT)-dependent activation of the TNF-alpha gene promoter. Here we show that HBx activates NF-AT by a cyclosporin A-sensitive mechanism involving dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor. Luciferase gene expression assays demonstrated that HBx transactivates transcription through NF-AT-binding sites and activates a Gal4-NF-AT chimeric protein. DNA-protein interaction assays revealed that HBx induces the formation of NF-AT-containing DNA-binding complexes. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that HBx induces the nuclear translocation of NF-AT, which can be blocked by the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A. Furthermore, immunoblot analysis showed that the HBx-induced activation and translocation of NF-AT are associated with its dephosphorylation. Thus, HBx may play a relevant role in the intrahepatic inflammatory processes by inducing locally the expression of cytokines that are regulated by NF-AT. PMID:9843511

  8. Transforming growth factor beta and cyclosporin A inhibit the inducible activity of the interleukin-2 gene in T cells through a noncanonical octamer-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Brabletz, T; Pfeuffer, I; Schorr, E; Siebelt, F; Wirth, T; Serfling, E

    1993-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) has a growth-inhibitory effect on numerous different cell types of the immune system, including T lymphocytes. We show in this study that the inhibitory action of TGF-beta on T lymphocytes is accompanied by a block of interleukin 2 (IL-2) gene expression which is mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of IL-2 promoter/enhancer activity. The functional analysis of cis-regulatory (proto-enhancer) elements of the IL-2 enhancer/promoter region showed that the most TGF-beta-responsive element maps to its so-called upstream promoter site. The proto-enhancer activity of the upstream promoter site element is also inhibited by cyclosporin A. The upstream promoter site DNA harbors two noncanonical, closely linked binding sequences for octamer and AP-1-like factors. Both sites are involved in the establishment of IL-2 enhancer activity. Since the activity of genuine octamer sites but not that of AP-1-binding sites is also impaired by TGF-beta and cyclosporin A in El4 T lymphoma cells, we conclude that both immunosuppressives interfere with the activity but not the DNA binding of octamer factors in T lymphocytes. Images PMID:8423782

  9. Comparison of cyclosporine determinations in whole blood by three different methods. HPLC, /sup 125/I RIA and /sup 3/H RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, W.Y.; Lipsey, A.I.; Cheng, M.H.

    1987-04-01

    The authors have analyzed and compared the cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood specimens from pediatric renal transplant patients using three different methods: high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (5u C18 reverse-phase column), /sup 3/H radioimmunoassay (RIA), and /sup 125/I RIA (substituted /sup 3/H-tracer in Sandoz Kit with /sup 125/I tracer. Results obtained by the /sup 125/I RIA correlated well with results obtained by the /sup 3/H RIA. Both RIA methods had similar correlation with the HPLC method. The /sup 125/I RIA method showed higher sensitivity and greater precision than the /sup 3/H RIA method. The authors conclude that the /sup 125/I RIA method can be used for cyclosporine determination in whole blood specimens. The use of the /sup 125/I RIA provides a simple and rapid method with higher counting efficiency and less background quenching than the /sup 3/H RIA method, which requires cumbersome liquid scintillation counting procedures.

  10. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor-induced myopathy in the rat: cyclosporine A interaction and mechanism studies.

    PubMed

    Smith, P F; Eydelloth, R S; Grossman, S J; Stubbs, R J; Schwartz, M S; Germershausen, J I; Vyas, K P; Kari, P H; MacDonald, J S

    1991-06-01

    Recent clinical evidence indicates a potential for skeletal muscle toxicity after therapy with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (HMGRIs) in man. Although the incidence of drug-induced skeletal muscle toxicity is very low (0.1-0.2%) with monotherapy, it may increase following concomitant drug therapy with the immunosuppressant, cyclosporine A (CsA), and possibly with certain other hypolipidemic agents. In the Sprague-Dawley rat, very high, pharmacologically comparable dosages (150-1200 mg/kg/day) of structurally similar HMGRIs (lovastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin and L-647, 318) produced dose-related increases in the incidence and severity of skeletal muscle degeneration. Physical signs included inappetence, decreased activity, loss of body weight, localized alopecia and mortality. To evaluate the interaction between HMGRIs and CsA, a rat model of CsA-induced cholestasis was developed. In this 2-week model, the skeletal muscle toxicity of the HMGRIs was clearly potentiated by CsA (10 mg/kg/day). Doses of HMGRIs which did not produce skeletal muscle toxicity when given alone caused between 75 and 100% incidence of myopathy (very slight to marked skeletal muscle degeneration) when CsA was coadministered. Typical light microscopic changes included myofiber necrosis with interstitial edema and inflammatory infiltration in areas of acute injury. Histochemical characterization of the muscle lesion indicated that type 2B fibers (primarily glycolytic white fibers) were most sensitive to this toxicity but that, with prolonged administration, all fiber types were ultimately affected. Results of pharmacokinetic studies in rats treated with various HMGRIs +/- CsA indicated that coadministration of CsA alters the disposition of these compounds, resulting in increased systemic exposure (e.g., increased area under the plasma drug concentration vs. time curve-AUC) and consequent (up to 13-fold) increases in skeletal muscle drug levels. Evaluation of the potential interaction between

  11. Mechanisms of immunologic unresponsiveness induced by ultraviolet-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusions and peritransplant cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Chabot, J.; Pepino, P.; Reemtsma, K.; Hardy, M.A.

    1988-09-01

    Recipient pretreatment with UV-B irradiated donor-specific blood transfusions (UV-DST) combined with peritransplant cyclosporine on days 0, +1, and +2 leads to permanent cardiac allograft survival in the ACI-to-Lewis rat strain combination. This study investigates the mechanisms of immunologic unresponsiveness induced by UV-DST and CsA by examining several in vitro and in vivo parameters in long-term cardiac allograft recipients. The results of the in vitro studies demonstrate that thoracic duct lymphocytes (TDL) of treated and allografted Lewis rats respond less in a mixed lymphocyte reaction to donor splenic lymphocytes (SpL) by 69%, 75%, and 73% (P less than 0.001) at 30, 50, and 100 days after transplantation, respectively, compared with controls, while the response to a third-party (W/F) SpL is unimpaired. In coculture experiments, the TDL from treated recipients specifically suppressed the response of unmodified Lewis TDL to ACI SpL by 59% and 40% (P less than 0.01) at 30 and 50 days after transplantation, respectively, while responses to W/F SpL were suppressed by only 3-6%. The sera obtained from ungrafted rats transfused with UV-DST suppressed the MLR between unmodified Lewis TDL and ACI SpL by 31% (P less than 0.05) while the sera from UV-DST and CsA-treated and allografted rats specifically suppressed the MLR by 75%, 80% (P less than 0.001) and 37% (P less than 0.01) at 10, 30, and 50 days after transplantation, respectively. In vivo adoptive transfer of 10(4) donor-type dendritic cells (DC) into recipients of beating cardiac allografts at 40 or 60 days after transplantation led to rapid and acute allograft rejection, while the adoptive transfer of 10(8) unseparated SpL obtained at 50 days after transplantation from treated Lewis recipients to syngeneic naive hosts led to a modest but significant prolongation of ACI test cardiac allografts.

  12. Everolimus in combination with cyclosporin a as pre- and posttransplantation immunosuppressive therapy in nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Junghanss, Christian; Rathsack, Susanne; Wacke, Rainer; Weirich, Volker; Vogel, Heike; Drewelow, Bernd; Mueller, Sabrina; Altmann, Simone; Freund, Mathias; Lange, Sandra

    2012-07-01

    Everolimus (RAD001) is an mTOR inhibitor that has been successfully used as an immunosuppressant in solid-organ transplantation. Data in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is limited. This study aimed to investigate pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of RAD001 in a canine allogeneic HSCT model. First, pharmacokinetics of RAD001 were performed in healthy dogs in order to determine the appropriate dosing. Doses of 0.25 mg RAD001 twice daily in combination with 15 mg/kg cyclosporin A (CsA) twice daily were identified as appropriate starting doses to achieve the targeted range of RAD001 (3-8 μg/L) when orally administered. Subsequently, 10 dogs were transplanted using 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) for conditioning and 0.25 mg RAD001 twice daily plus 15 mg/kg CsA twice daily for pre- and posttransplantation immunosuppression. Seven of the 10 transplanted dogs were maintained at the starting RAD001 dose throughout the study. For the remaining 3 dogs, dose adjustments were necessary. RAD001 accumulation over time did not occur. All dogs initially engrafted. Five dogs eventually rejected the graft (weeks 10, 10, 13, 27, and 56). Two dogs died of pneumonia (weeks 8 and 72) but were chimeric until then. Total cholesterol rose from median 4.1 mmol/L (3.5-5.7 mmol/L) before HSCT to 6.0 mmol/l (5.0-8.5 mmol/l) at day 21 after HSCT, but remained always within normal range. Changes in creatinine and triglyceride values were not observed. Long-term engraftment rates were inferior to sirolimus/CsA and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)/CsA regimen, respectively. RAD001/CsA caused a more pronounced reduction of platelet counts to median 2 × 10(9)/L (range: 0-21 × 10(9)/L) and longer time to platelet recovery of 21 days (range: 14-24 days) compared with MMF/CsA. CsA c(2h) levels were significantly enhanced in the RAD001/CsA regimen, but c(0h) and area under the curve from 0 to 12 hours (AUC(0-12h)) values did not differ compared with an MMF

  13. Celecoxib, but not indomethacin, ameliorates the hypertensive and perivascular fibrotic actions of cyclosporine in rats: Role of endothelin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; Helmy, Maged W.; Ali, Rabab M.; El-Gowelli, Hanan M.

    2015-04-01

    The immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine (CSA) is used with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in arthritic conditions. In this study, we investigated whether NSAIDs modify the deleterious hypertensive action of CSA and the role of endothelin (ET) receptors in this interaction. Pharmacologic, protein expression, and histopathologic studies were performed in rats to investigate the roles of endothelin receptors (ET{sub A}/ET{sub B}) in the hemodynamic interaction between CSA and two NSAIDs, indomethacin and celecoxib. Tail-cuff plethysmography measurements showed that CSA (20 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 10 days) increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR). CSA hypertension was associated with renal perivascular fibrosis and divergent changes in immunohistochemical signals of renal arteriolar ET{sub A} (increases) and ET{sub B} (decreases) receptors. While these effects of CSA were preserved in rats treated concomitantly with indomethacin (5 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}), celecoxib (10 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}) abolished the pressor, tachycardic, and fibrotic effects of CSA and normalized the altered renal ET{sub A}/ET{sub B} receptor expressions. Selective blockade of ET{sub A} receptors by atrasentan (5 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}) abolished the pressor response elicited by CSA or CSA plus indomethacin. Alternatively, BQ788 (ET{sub B} receptor blocker, 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}) caused celecoxib-sensitive elevations in SBP and potentiated the pressor response evoked by CSA. Together, the improved renovascular fibrotic and endothelin receptor profile (ET{sub A} downregulation and ET{sub B} upregulation) mediate, at least partly, the protective effect of celecoxib against the hypertensive effect of CSA. Clinically, the use of celecoxib along with CSA in the management of arthritic conditions might provide hypertension-free regimen. - Highlights: • Chronic CSA causes hypertension and renal perivascular fibrosis in rats.

  14. Pharmacokinetic and nephroprotective benefits of using Schisandra chinensis extracts in a cyclosporine A-based immune-suppressive regime.

    PubMed

    Lai, Qiao; Wei, Jiabao; Mahmoodurrahman, Mohammed; Zhang, Chenxue; Quan, Shijian; Li, Tongming; Yu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a powerful immunosuppressive drug. However, nephrotoxicity resulting from its long-term usage has hampered its prolonged therapeutic usage. Schisandra chinensis extracts (SCE) have previously been used in traditional Chinese medicine and more recently coadministered with Western medicine for the treatment of CsA-induced side effects in the People's Republic of China. This study aimed to investigate the possible effects of SCE on the pharmacokinetics of CsA in rats and elucidate the potential mechanisms by which it hinders the development of CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. A liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for determining the effect of SCE on the pharmacokinetics of CsA. Male Sprague Dawley rats, which were administered with CsA (25 mg/kg/d) alone or in combination with SCE (54 mg/kg/d and 108 mg/kg/d) for 28 days, were used to evaluate the nephroprotective effects of SCE. Our study showed that SCE increased the mean blood concentration of CsA. Furthermore, we found that the concomitant administration of SCE alongside CsA prevented the disruption of catalase activity and reduction in creatinine, urea, renal malondialdehyde, and glutathione peroxidase levels that would have otherwise occurred in the absence of SCE administration. SCE treatment markedly suppressed the expression of 4-hydroxynonenal, Bcl-2-associated X protein, cleaved caspase 3, and autophagy-related protein LC3 A/B. On the other hand, the expression of heme oxygenase-1, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and P-glycoprotein was enhanced by the very same addition of SCE. SCE was also able to increase the systemic exposure of CsA in rats. The renoprotective effects of SCE were thought to be mediated by its antiapoptotic and antioxidant abilities, which caused the attenuation of CsA-induced autophagic cell death. All in all, these findings suggest the prospective use of SCE as an effective adjunct in a Cs

  15. Pharmacokinetic and nephroprotective benefits of using Schisandra chinensis extracts in a cyclosporine A-based immune-suppressive regime

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Qiao; Wei, Jiabao; Mahmoodurrahman, Mohammed; Zhang, Chenxue; Quan, Shijian; Li, Tongming; Yu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a powerful immunosuppressive drug. However, nephrotoxicity resulting from its long-term usage has hampered its prolonged therapeutic usage. Schisandra chinensis extracts (SCE) have previously been used in traditional Chinese medicine and more recently coadministered with Western medicine for the treatment of CsA-induced side effects in the People’s Republic of China. This study aimed to investigate the possible effects of SCE on the pharmacokinetics of CsA in rats and elucidate the potential mechanisms by which it hinders the development of CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. A liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for determining the effect of SCE on the pharmacokinetics of CsA. Male Sprague Dawley rats, which were administered with CsA (25 mg/kg/d) alone or in combination with SCE (54 mg/kg/d and 108 mg/kg/d) for 28 days, were used to evaluate the nephroprotective effects of SCE. Our study showed that SCE increased the mean blood concentration of CsA. Furthermore, we found that the concomitant administration of SCE alongside CsA prevented the disruption of catalase activity and reduction in creatinine, urea, renal malondialdehyde, and glutathione peroxidase levels that would have otherwise occurred in the absence of SCE administration. SCE treatment markedly suppressed the expression of 4-hydroxynonenal, Bcl-2-associated X protein, cleaved caspase 3, and autophagy-related protein LC3 A/B. On the other hand, the expression of heme oxygenase-1, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and P-glycoprotein was enhanced by the very same addition of SCE. SCE was also able to increase the systemic exposure of CsA in rats. The renoprotective effects of SCE were thought to be mediated by its antiapoptotic and antioxidant abilities, which caused the attenuation of CsA-induced autophagic cell death. All in all, these findings suggest the prospective use of SCE as an effective adjunct in a Cs

  16. Delayed treatment with oleanolic acid attenuates tubulointerstitial fibrosis in chronic cyclosporine nephropathy through Nrf2/HO-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is known to protect against tissue injury by orchestrating antioxidant and detoxification responses to oxidative stress. This study investigated whether upregulation of Nrf2-dependent signaling by oleanolic acid (OA), which is known to activate Nrf2, could attenuate renal inflammation and fibrosis in cyclosporine (CsA)-induced kidney injury. Methods Male ICR mice were divided into four treatment groups: Vehicle (VH, n = 6), VH + OA (n = 6), CsA (n = 8), and CsA + OA (n = 8). For the OA-treated groups, OA (25 mg/kg/day) was administered by intraperitoneal injection for the final week of the 4-week experimental period. Renal function, morphologies and signaling were evaluated at the end of the study. Results Treatment with CsA resulted in decreased kidney function and urine osmolality and increased urine volume and urinary albumin levels. The CsA-induced changes were improved by OA treatment. Specifically, administration of OA decreased tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation scores that were increased in CsA-treated mice. Furthermore, OA treatment decreased urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-epi-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α) levels. The beneficial effects of OA were attributed to an increased ratio of nuclear/total Nrf2 and subsequently enhanced expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, as well as a stable level of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) expression, indicating that OA enhanced nuclear translocation of Nrf2. Increased apoptotic cell death and a high ratio of B cell leukaemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax) to Bcl-2 in CsA-treated mice were also significantly ameliorated by OA treatment. Conclusion Our results suggest that OA activates Nrf2/HO-1 signaling in chronic CsA nephropathy, which may have beneficial effects on inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:24559268

  17. Effect of tacrolimus versus cyclosporine on glucose metabolism of pancreas and kidney recipients in the late (> 8 years) posttransplant period.

    PubMed

    Havrdova, T; Jedinakova, T; Lipar, K; Skibova, J; Saudek, F

    2011-11-01

    Diabetogenic effects of immunosuppressive agents are of great importance in pancreas or islet transplantation. The aim of our study was to compare the glucose metabolism in type 1 diabetic kidney and pancreas recipients on tacrolimus (Tacro) versus cyclosporine-based (Cyclo) immunosuppression in the late posttransplant period. We examined 26 insulin-independent patients with stabile good renal function. They were at least 7 years after simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation and with unchanged immunosuppressive therapy for at least 6 years. The mean follow-up in Tacro (n = 13) and Cyclo (n = 13) groups were 9.7 ± 1.9 and 10.9 ± 1.3 years, respectively (P = .08). Fasting glycemia, insulin levels, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), a standard intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) with coefficient of glucose assimilation (K(G)) calculation and trough Tacro/Cyclo levels were assessed. Insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion were evaluated using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR, HOMA-B). Total C-peptide and insulin secretions were calculated as areas under the curves (AUC) from the serum levels during the IVGTT. Tacro and Cyclo groups did not differ in age and body mass index. We did not find any significant difference in any examined parameters of glucose metabolism (fasting glycemia, insulin and C-peptide levels, HbA(1c,) IVGTT with K(G), HOMA-IR, HOMA-B, AUC of C-peptide and AUC of insulin; P > .05). Two patients in the Tacro group and none in the Cyclo group had K(G) <0.8%/min. Seven recipients in the Tacro group and eight in the Cyclo group had the normal glucose tolerance with K(G) ≥ 1.2%/min. Trough Tacro or Cyclo levels did not correlate with any of examined parameters. The use of different types of calcineurin inhibitors in type 1 diabetic pancreas and kidney recipients had no effect on glucose metabolism in the late posttransplant period.

  18. Green tea polyphenols stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and improve renal function after chronic cyclosporin a treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Hasibur; Krishnasamy, Yasodha; Haque, Khujista; Thurman, Ronald G; Lemasters, John J; Schnellmann, Rick G; Zhong, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that an extract from Camellia sinenesis (green tea), which contains several polyphenols, attenuates nephrotoxicity caused by cyclosporine A (CsA). Since polyphenols are stimulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (MB), this study investigated whether stimulation of MB plays a role in green tea polyphenol protection against CsA renal toxicity. Rats were fed a powdered diet containing green tea polyphenolic extract (0.1%) starting 3 days prior to CsA treatment (25 mg/kg, i.g. daily for 3 weeks). CsA alone decreased renal nuclear DNA-encoded oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) protein ATP synthase-β (AS-β) by 42%, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded OXPHOS protein NADH dehydrogenase-3 (ND3) by 87% and their associated mRNAs. Mitochondrial DNA copy number was also decreased by 78% by CsA. Immunohistochemical analysis showed decreased cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX-IV), an OXPHOS protein, in tubular cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α, the master regulator of MB, and mitochondrial transcription factor-A (Tfam), the transcription factor that regulates mtDNA replication and transcription, were 42% and 90% lower, respectively, in the kidneys of CsA-treated than in untreated rats. These results indicate suppression of MB by chronic CsA treatment. Green tea polyphenols alone and following CsA increased AS-β, ND3, COX-IV, mtDNA copy number, PGC-1α mRNA and protein, decreased acetylated PGC-1α, and increased Tfam mRNA and protein. In association with suppressed MB, CsA increased serum creatinine, caused loss of brush border and dilatation of proximal tubules, tubular atrophy, vacuolization, apoptosis, calcification, and increased neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin expression, leukocyte infiltration, and renal fibrosis. Green tea polyphenols markedly attenuated CsA-induced renal injury and improved renal function. Together, these results demonstrate that green tea polyphenols attenuate Cs

  19. Effects of immunosuppressants, FK506 and cyclosporin A, on the osteogenic differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Yu-Kyung; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Kim, Su-Hwan; Kim, Young-Sung; Koo, Ki-Tae; Kim, Tai-Il; Seol, Yang-Jo; Ku, Young; Rhyu, In-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A (CsA) on the osteogenic differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Methods The effect of FK506 and CsA on rat MSCs was assessed in vitro. The MTT assay was used to determine the deleterious effect of immunosuppressants on stem cell proliferation at 1, 3, and 7 days. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was analyzed on days 3, 7, and 14. Alizarin red S staining was done on day 21 to check mineralization nodule formation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was also performed to detect the expressions of bone tissue-specific genes on days 1 and 7. Results Cell proliferation was promoted more in the FK506 groups than the control or CsA groups on days 3 and 7. The FK506 groups showed increased ALP activity compared to the other groups during the experimental period. The ALP activity of the CsA groups did not differ from the control group in any of the assessments. Mineralization nodule formation was most prominent in the FK506 groups at 21 days. RT-PCR results of the FK506 groups showed that several bone-related genes-osteopontin, osteonectin, and type I collagen (Col-I)-were expressed more than the control in the beginning, but the intensity of expression decreased over time. Runx2 and Dlx5 gene expression were up-regulated on day 7. The effects of 50 nM CsA on osteonectin and Col-I were similar to those of the FK506 groups, but in the 500 nM CsA group, most of the genes were less expressed compared to the control. Conclusions These results suggest that FK506 enhances the osteoblastic differentiation of rat MSCs. Therefore, FK506 might have a beneficial effect on bone regeneration when immunosuppressants are needed in xenogenic or allogenic stem cell transplantation to treat bone defects. PMID:22803008

  20. Structural and functional evolution of jejunal allograft rejection in rats and the ameliorating effects of cyclosporine therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Madara, J L; Kirkman, R L

    1985-01-01

    injury or decreased epithelial regenerative ability secondary to crypt injury. Last, we show that the detrimental structural and functional sequellae of jejunal transplantation across the major histocompatibility complex in this model is strikingly ameliorated with cyclosporine therapy. Images PMID:3973015

  1. Cyclosporin A inhibits flow-mediated activation of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase by altering cholesterol content in caveolae.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Andreea O; Jin, Zheng-Gen; Yamawaki, Hideyuki; Tanimoto, Tatsuo; Wong, Chelsea; Berk, Bradford C

    2004-11-19

    Fluid shear stress generated by blood flowing over the endothelium is a major determinant of arterial tone, vascular remodeling, and atherogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) plays an essential role in regulation of vascular function and structure by blood flow. Although cyclosporin A (CsA), an inhibitory ligand of cyclophilin A, is a widely used immunosuppressive drug, it causes arterial hypertension in part by impairing eNOS-dependent vasodilation. Here we show that CsA inhibits fluid shear stress-mediated eNOS activation in endothelial cells via decreasing cholesterol content in caveolae. Exposure of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells to 1 mum CsA for 1 h significantly inhibited NO production and eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1179 induced by flow (shear stress=dynes/cm2). The effect of CsA was not related to inhibition of two known eNOS kinases, protein kinase B (Akt) and protein kinase A, because CsA did not affect Akt or protein kinase A activation. In rabbit aorta perfused ex vivo, CsA also significantly inhibited flow-induced eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1179 but had no effect on Akt measured by phosphorylation at Ser-473. However, CsA treatment decreased cholesterol content in caveolae and displaced eNOS from caveolae, which may be caused by CsA disrupting the association of caveolin-1 and cyclophilin A. The magnitude of the cholesterol depleting effect was similar to that of beta-cyclodextrin, a cholesterol-binding molecule, and beta-cyclodextrin had a similar inhibitory effect on flow-mediated eNOS activation. Treating bovine aortic endothelial cells for 24 h with 30 mug/ml cholesterol blocked the CsA effect and restored eNOS phosphorylation in response to flow. These data suggest that decreasing cholesterol content in caveolae by CsA is a potentially important pathogenic mechanism for CsA-induced endothelial dysfunction and hypertension.

  2. Comparative bioavailability of the microemulsion formulation of cyclosporine (Neoral) with a generic dispersion formulation (Cicloral) in young healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kees, Frieder; Bucher, Michael; Schweda, Frank; Gschaidmeier, Harald; Burhenne, Juergen; Mikus, Gerd; Faerber, Lothar

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability of cyclosporine (CyA) from the generic dispersion formulation Cicloral (CIC) with the microemulsion formulation Neoral (NEO) and the original Sandimmune (SIM) capsules after single doses of 100, 300, or 600 mg of drug, respectively. The study was performed according to an open 3-period cross-over design with 12 young healthy male volunteers for each dosage. The concentrations of CyA and its main metabolites were determined by high performance liquid chromatography in whole blood and urine up to 48 hours postdosing. Peak concentrations and area under the time-concentration curve were greater for the NEO and CIC formulations compared with SIM, and the mean bioavailability of CIC was significantly (P<0.05) lower compared with NEO. The bioavailability of SIM compared with NEO was 54% to 71%, in agreement with previous results. Bioequivalence was not demonstrated between CIC (test) and NEO (reference) as the 90% confidence intervals were outside the 80% to 125% guidelines based on log-transformed AUCs, and were 75.2% to 87.7% at 100 mg, 79.2% to 91.8% at 300 mg, and 76.6% to 94.5% at 600 mg doses. The respective values for Cmax were 78.9% to 94.6%, 80.7% to 95.0%, and 71.4% to 84.1%. A good correlation was demonstrated between the urinary recovery of CyA and the AUC4. Therefore, the urinary recovery of CyA may be helpful as a surrogate parameter for the systemic exposure of patients to CyA. Whereas the relative amount of hydroxylated metabolites (AM1, AM9, AM1c) was similar for all formulations and doses, the urinary recovery of the N-demethylated metabolite AM4N decreased with increasing dose indicating saturable metabolism. No relationship could be demonstrated between CYP3A activity using dextromethorphan as a probe for the metabolic clearance of CyA.

  3. Cyclosporin A and doxorubicin-ifosfamide in resistant solid tumours: a phase I and an immunological study.

    PubMed Central

    González-Manzano, R.; Cid, J.; Brugarolas, A.; Piasecki, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    In order to test whether circumvention of clinical resistance can be obtained in common solid tumours by targeting different drug resistance mechanisms, a phase I clinical and immunological study was designed. The purpose of the study was to determine the dose of cyclosporin A (CsA), in combination with doxorubicin (DOX) and ifosfamide (IFX), needed to achieve steady-state whole-blood levels of 2000 ng ml-1 and the associated toxicity of this combination. Treatment consisted of CsA 5 mg kg-1 as a 2 h loading infusion, followed by a CsA 3 day continuous infusion (c.i.) (days 1-3) at doses that were escalated from 10 to 18 mg kg-1 day-1. Chemotherapy consisted of DOX 55 mg m-2 by i.v. 24 h c.i. (day 2) and IFX 2 g m-2 i.v. over 1 h on days 1 and 3. Treatments were repeated every 4 weeks. Eighteen patients with previously treated resistant solid tumours received 39 cycles. Mean steady-state CsA levels > or = 2000 ng ml-1 were reached at 5 mg kg-1 loading dose followed by a 3 day c.i. of 16 mg kg-1 day-1 or greater. Haematological toxicity was greater than expected for the same chemotherapy alone. One patient died of intracranial haemorrhage due to severe thrombopenia. Other observed toxicities were: asymptomatic hyperbilirubinaemia (46% cycles), mild nephrotoxicity (20% cycles), hypomagnesaemia (72% cycles), mild increase in body weight (100% cycles), hypertension (15% cycles) and headache (15% cycles). Overall the toxicity was acceptable and manageable. No alterations in absolute lymphocyte number, the lymphocyte subsets studied (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19) or CD4/CD8 ratio were observed in patients receiving more than one treatment cycle, although there were significant and non-uniform variations in the values of the different lymphocyte subsets studied when pre- and post-treatment values were compared. There was also a significant increase in the CD4/CD8 ratio. Tumour regressions were observed in two patients (epidermoid carcinoma of the cervix and Ewing's sarcoma). The

  4. The IMPACT study: a prospective evaluation of the effects of cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% on ocular surface staining and visual performance in patients with dry eye

    PubMed Central

    Stonecipher, Karl G; Torkildsen, Gail L; Ousler, George W; Morris, Scot; Villanueva, Linda; Hollander, David A

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% on ocular surface staining and visual performance in patients with dry eye. Methods This was a single-center, 6-month, open-label, Phase IV study. Patients with bilateral dry eye disease and a symptom score of ≥2 on the Ocular Discomfort and 4-Symptom Questionnaire, an Ocular Surface Disease Index score of >12, at least one eye with Schirmer’s score <10 mm/5 minutes, and central corneal staining graded as ≥2 on the Ora Calibra™ Corneal and Conjunctival Staining Scale were enrolled. Cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% (Restasis®) was instilled twice daily in each eye. The primary efficacy endpoints were ocular surface staining and visual function at 6 months. Secondary outcome measures included Schirmer’s test, tear film breakup time, symptoms, and adverse events. Results A total of 40 patients with the mean age of 59.4 years (range, 40–78 years) were enrolled; 35 (87.5%) were female and 37 (92.5%) completed the study. At 6 months, inferior corneal, central corneal, total corneal, and total ocular surface fluorescein staining were significantly improved from baseline in both eyes (P<0.001). Patient responses on the Ocular Surface Disease Index showed significant improvement in blurred vision and visual function related to reading, driving at night, working with a computer or bank machine, and watching television (P≤0.041). At 6 months, 35.1% of patients achieved ≥5 mm improvement and 18.9% achieved ≥10 mm improvement in the average eye Schirmer score. Mean tear film breakup time improved by >50% in both eyes (P>0.001). Patients reported significant improvement in ocular discomfort and dry eye symptoms (P<0.001). No patients discontinued treatment because of stinging or any other ocular adverse event. Conclusion Dry eye patients with difficulties with day-to-day visual function demonstrated improvement in both signs and symptoms of dry eye and

  5. Tacrolimus-Based versus Cyclosporine-Based Immunosuppression in Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Patients after Liver Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenmin; Chen, Yi; Tao, Renchuan; Xv, Jing; Meng, Jianyuan; Yong, Xiangzhi

    2014-01-01

    Background Most liver transplant recipients receive calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs), especially tacrolimus and cyclosporine, as immunosuppressant agents to prevent rejection. A controversy exists as to whether the outcomes of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected liver transplant patients differ based on the CNIs used. This meta-analysis compares the clinical outcomes of tacrolimus-based and cyclosporine-based immunosuppression, especially cases of HCV recurrence in liver transplant patients with end-stage liver disease caused by HCV infection. Methods Related articles were identified from the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, Medline, and Embase. Meta-analyses were performed for the results of homogeneous studies. Results Nine randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials were included. The total effect size of mortality (RR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.77–1.25, P = 0.87) and graft loss (RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.83–1.33, P = 0.67) showed no significant difference between the two groups irrespective of duration of immunosuppressant therapy after liver transplantation. In addition, the HCV recurrence-induced mortality (RR = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.66–1.89, P = 0.69), graft loss (RR = 1.62, 95% CI: 0.64–4.07, P  = 0.31) and retransplantation (RR = 1.40, 95% CI: 0.48–4.09, P = 0.54), as well as available biopsies, confirmed that histological HCV recurrences (RR =  0.92, 95% CI: 0.71–1.19, P = 0.51) were similar. Conclusion These results suggested no difference in posttransplant HCV recurrence-induced mortality, graft loss and retransplantation, as well as histological HCV recurrence in patients treated with tacrolimus-based and cyclosporine-based immunosuppresion. PMID:25198195

  6. Novel micelle carriers for cyclosporin A topical ocular delivery: in vivo cornea penetration, ocular distribution and efficacy studies.

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, Claudia; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Valamanesh, Fatemeh; Trubitsyn, Gregory; Torriglia, Alicia; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Gurny, Robert; Möller, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Cornea transplantation is one of the most performed graft procedures worldwide with an impressive success rate of 90%. However, for "high-risk" patients with particular ocular diseases in addition to the required surgery, the success rate is drastically reduced to 50%. In these cases, cyclosporin A (CsA) is frequently used to prevent the cornea rejection by a systemic treatment with possible systemic side effects for the patients. To overcome these problems, it is a challenge to prepare well-tolerated topical CsA formulations. Normally high amounts of oils or surfactants are needed for the solubilization of the very hydrophobic CsA. Furthermore, it is in general difficult to obtain ocular therapeutic drug levels with topical instillations due to the corneal barriers that efficiently protect the intraocular structures from foreign substances thus also from drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo the effects of a novel CsA topical aqueous formulation. This formulation was based on nanosized polymeric micelles as drug carriers. An established rat model for the prevention of cornea graft rejection after a keratoplasty procedure was used. After instillation of the novel formulation with fluorescent labeled micelles, confocal analysis of flat-mounted corneas clearly showed that the nanosized carriers were able to penetrate into all corneal layers. The efficacy of a 0.5% CsA micelle formulation was tested and compared to a physiological saline solution and to a systemic administration of CsA. In our studies, the topical CsA treatment was carried out for 14 days, and the three parameters (a) cornea transparency, (b) edema, and (c) neovascularization were evaluated by clinical observation and scoring. Compared to the control group, the treated group showed a significant higher cornea transparency and significant lower edema after 7 and 13 days of the surgery. At the end point of the study, the neovascularization was reduced by 50% in the CsA-micelle treated

  7. A prospective study of cyclosporine concentration in relation to its therapeutic effect and toxicity after renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Lindholm, A; Dahlqvist, R; Groth, G G; Sjöqvist, F

    1990-01-01

    1. Cyclosporine (CsA) concentrations in plasma and whole blood were monitored prospectively in 66 consecutive kidney transplant recipients for 6 months after transplantation or until graft loss. Immunosuppression was based on treatment with CsA and prednisolone in 27 patients and CsA, azathioprine and prednisolone in 39 patients. 2. Whole blood and plasma samples (separated at 37 degrees C) were collected 10-12 h after CsA dosage twice weekly over the first 3 months and thereafter once weekly. CsA concentrations were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.) in plasma, by specific and non-specific monoclonal radioimmunoassays (r.i.a.) in whole blood, and by polyclonal r.i.a. and polyclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay (f.p.i.a.) in whole blood and plasma. 3. There were no differences between the treatment schedules regarding graft or patient survival, occurrence of acute rejection, nephrotoxicity or infection. 4. CsA concentrations were significantly lower at the time of acute rejection than one week earlier based on all of the analytical methods used except f.p.i.a. 5. The lowest CsA concentration, recorded during the first month after transplantation, was significantly lower in patients with than in patients without experience of acute rejection episodes when the CsA concentrations were measured by polyclonal r.i.a. in whole blood and plasma and by specific and non-specific monoclonal r.i.a. in whole blood, but not by h.p.l.c. in plasma or polyclonal f.p.i.a. in whole blood or plasma. 6. The highest CsA concentration recorded during the second post-transplantation month, was higher in patients with acute nephrotoxicity than in those without nephrotoxicity when CsA was measured by specific monoclonal r.i.a. in whole blood (471 +/- 409 ng ml-1 vs 327 +/- 150 ng ml-1, P less than 0.05), but not by the other methods. 7. The mean plasma h.p.l.c. concentration of CsA measured by h.p.l.c. during the first month after transplantation was

  8. Cyclosporine A inhibits colorectal cancer proliferation probably by regulating expression levels of c-Myc, p21(WAF1/CIP1) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Masuo, Takashige; Okamura, Shinichi; Zhang, Yajing; Mori, Masatomo

    2009-11-18

    The present study investigated the role of calcineurin (CaN) in the proliferation of human colorectal cancers. CaN activity and protein expression were increased in human colorectal cancers. Nuclear transcription factor NFAT, a physiological substrate for CaN, was activated in human colon cancer specimen as well as in the human colon cancer cell lines. CaN inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) reduced cell growth in these cell lines. CsA decreased the expressions of c-Myc and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) but also increased p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression. Our results suggest that CaN promotes colorectal cancer proliferation probably by regulating levels of c-Myc, p21(WAF1/CIP1), and PCNA.

  9. Combined use of an immunotoxin and cyclosporine to prevent both activated and quiescent peripheral blood T cells from producing type 1 human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, K D; Ramilo, O; Vitetta, E S

    1993-01-01

    Two different populations of infected T cells are present in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals: activated cells that produce virions and quiescent cells that harbor the viral genome but are unable to produce virus unless they are activated. Using an in vitro model of acute HIV infection, we have evaluated the effect of depleting activated T cells with an immunotoxin and subsequently inhibiting activation of quiescent T cells with an immunosuppressive agent. CD25 (Tac, p55), the alpha chain of the interleukin 2 receptor, is expressed on activated, but not quiescent, T cells. An anti-CD25-ricin A chain immunotoxin eliminated activated, CD25+ HIV-infected cells and, thereby, inhibited viral production by these cells. Subsequent addition of cyclosporine to the residual CD25- cells prevented their activation and thereby suppressed their ability to produce virus and to propagate the infection to uninfected T cells. Images PMID:8434001

  10. Renal and segmental pancreatic grafting with draining of exocrine secretion and initial continuous intravenous cyclosporin A in a patient with insulin-dependent diabetes and renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Calne, R Y; White, D J G; Rolles, K; Duffy, T J; Kass, T

    1982-01-01

    A patient with renal failure and insulin-dependent diabetes received renal and segmental pancreatic allografts from the same donor, with exocrine drainage of the pancreas being directed into the bowel. An attempt was made to maintain the serum concentrations of cyclosporin A between 300 and 1000 μg/l to avoid serious nephrotoxicity and rejection. Considerable difficulty was experienced in controlling the serum concentrations even with continuous intravenous infusion. When the concentrations were maintained between 300 and 1000 μg/l function in both allografts was satisfactory. At seven months the patient required no insulin and had good renal function. He was not receiving corticosteroids. ImagesFIG 1 PMID:6809184

  11. An in vivo microdialysis measurement of harpagoside in rat blood and bile for predicting hepatobiliary excretion and its interaction with cyclosporin A and verapamil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Qi, Lian-Wen; Wang, Wei; Yi, Ling; Bi, Zhi-Ming; Li, Ping

    2009-03-15

    Harpagoside, a major bioactive iridoid glucoside in genus Scrophularia, has been widely used in clinical practice for the treatment of pain in the joints and lower back for its neuroprotective and anti-inflammation activities. To investigate the pharmacokinetics and hepatobiliary excretion, an in vivo microdialysis method coupled with high performance liquid chromatography was developed to monitor the concentration of harpagoside in blood and bile. The harpagoside bile-to-blood distribution ratio (AUC(bile)/AUC(blood)) up to 986.28+/-78.46 significantly decreased to 6.41+/-0.56 or 221.20+/-18.92 after co-administration of cyclosporin A or verapamil. The results indicated that harpagoside went through concentrative elimination from the bile which was probably regulated by P-glucoprotein, providing possible clinical trials of co-administration of transporter inhibitors to decrease drug efflux, thus to enhance the curative effects.

  12. The immunosuppressives FK 506 and cyclosporin A inhibit the generation of protein factors binding to the two purine boxes of the interleukin 2 enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brabletz, T; Pietrowski, I; Serfling, E

    1991-01-01

    Like Cyclosporin A (CsA), the macrolide FK 506 is a potent immunosuppressive that inhibits early steps of T cell activation, including the synthesis of Interleukin 2 (II-2) and numerous other lymphokines. The block of II-2 synthesis occurs at the transcriptional level. At concentrations that block T cell activation, FK 506 and CsA inhibit the proto-enhancer activity of Purine boxes of the II-2 promoter and the generation of lymphocyte-specific factors binding to the Purine boxes. Under the same conditions, the DNA binding of other II-2 enhancer factors remains unaffected by both compounds. These results support the view that FK 506 and CsA, which both inhibit the activity of peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerases, suppress T cell activation by a similar, if not identical mechanism. Images PMID:1707162

  13. [Cyclosporin A: experience of the Renal Transplant Unit of the Clinical Hospital of the Medical College of the University of Sao Paulo].

    PubMed

    Ianhez, L E; Chocair, P R; Fonseca, J A; Azevedo, L S; de Paula, F J; David Neto, E; Romão Júnior, J E; Galvão, M M; de Castro, M C; Arap, S

    1991-01-01

    The authors report their experience using cyclosporine-A (CsA) in renal transplant patients. When compared with azathioprine/prednisone, CsA contributed significantly to a better graft and patient survival, either if used associated with prednisone of with azathioprine plus prednisone. CsA was also used in substitution to azathioprine in patients with hepatopathy attributed to azathioprine toxicity. The initial results are promising. The association of CsA and azathioprine with corticosteroids withdrawal was used as an attempt to allow normal growth in children. This seems to be the best choice of treatment for children. Careful monitoring of CsA blood levels avoids, or at least, minimizes nephrotoxicity. To achieve therapeutic CsA levels, patients with liver damage need lower, while children need higher oral CsA doses. To summarise: when CsA in carefully used, it is an excellent immunosuppressive drug.

  14. Interactions of allogeneic human mononuclear cells in the two-way mixed leucocyte culture (MLC): influence of cell numbers, subpopulations and cyclosporin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Deiwick, A; Raddatz, G; Koyama, K; Schlitt, H J

    1999-01-01

    With organ allografts considerable numbers of donor-type mononuclear cells are transferred to the recipient, leading to bilateral immunological interactions between donor and recipient lymphocytes. To study such bilateral immune reactions in detail, human two-way MLC were performed. In this model proliferation kinetics, patterns of activation, and survival of the two populations were analysed, and the relevance of initial cell subset composition, relative cell numbers, and the effect of immunosuppression on this co-culture were evaluated. It could be demonstrated that with an initial 50:50 ratio of two populations of allogeneic cells one population dominated after 21 days of co-culture in 78 out of 80 combinations (97%) tested; the other population decreased markedly after an initially stable phase of 6–7 days. With unequal starting conditions the larger population dominated when resting cells were used, but small populations of preactivated cells or separated CD8+ cells could also dominate. Depletion of CD16+ natural killer (NK) cells and of CD2− cells (B cell and monocytes) had no effect on domination. Addition of cyclosporin delayed or blocked the domination process while addition of IL-2 accelerated it. Disappearance of one population was associated with detection of apoptotic cells. The findings indicate that co-cultures of allogeneic mononuclear cells are generally not stable for more than 1 week, but lead to active elimination of one population. CD8+ cells and particularly preactivated cells seem to play the most important role in that process, while NK cells are of less importance. Cyclosporin can prolong survival of allogeneic cells in co-culture. These observations suggest that under the conditions of clinical organ transplantation even small amounts of immunocompetent donor cells transferred by the graft may persist for some time and may, thereby, have the chance to exert immunomodulatory functions. PMID:9933457

  15. Down-regulation of transforming growth factor beta-2 expression is associated with the reduction of cyclosporin induced gingival overgrowth in rats treated with roxithromycin: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gingival overgrowth (GO) is a common side effect of the chronic use of cyclosporine (CsA), an immunosuppressant widely used to prevent rejection in transplant patients. Recent studies have reported elevated levels of specific cytokines in gingival overgrowth tissue, particularly TGF-beta, suggesting that this growth factor plays a role in the accumulation of extracellular matrix materials. The effectiveness of azithromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, in the regression of this undesirable side effect has also been demonstrated. Methods In this study, we created an experimental model for assessing the therapeutic effect of roxithromycin in GO and the expression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta2) through immunohistochemistry. We used four groups of rats totaling 32 individuals. GO was induced during five weeks and drug treatment was given on the 6th week as follows: group 1 received saline; group 2 received CsA and was treated with saline on the 6th week; group 3 received CsA and, on the 6th week, ampicilin; and group 4 received CsA during 5 weeks and, on the 6th week, was treated with roxithromycin. Results The results demonstrated that roxithromycin treatment was effective in reducing cyclosporine-induced GO in rats. Both epithelial and connective tissue showed a decrease in thickness and a significant reduction in TGF-beta2 expression, with a lower number of fibroblasts, reduction in fibrotic areas and decrease in inflammatory infiltrate. Conclusion The present data suggest that the down-regulation of TGF-beta2 expression may be an important mechanism of action by which roxithromycin inhibits GO. PMID:19995419

  16. In vitro study of drug-eluting stent coatings based on poly(L-lactide) incorporating cyclosporine A - drug release, polymer degradation and mechanical integrity.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Katrin; Kramer, Sven; Nischan, Claudia; Grabow, Niels; Langer, Thomas; Hennighausen, Gerhard; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter

    2007-07-01

    In this study, absorbable polymer stent coatings for localized drug delivery based on poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and cyclosporine A (CsA) were developed and tested in vitro. Metallic stents were coated with different compositions of PLLA/CsA (70/30, 60/40, 50/50% w/w) and beta-sterilized. The specimens were used to assess the drug release kinetics with HPLC. Sterilization influenced polymer degradation was measured with GPC. Mechanical integrity of the stent coatings was studied with SEM. The interconnection of the coated stents with a balloon-catheter was characterized by the measurement of stent dislodgment force. A migration assay was used to determine the inhibitory effect of the model drug CsA on smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration. The release of CsA was established over time periods up to 24 days in sodium chloride solution and in porcine blood plasma. An inhibition of SMC migration (max. 26-33%) was found for CsA concentrations of 4 x 10(-5) to 4 x 10(-7) mol/l. Marked molecular weight reduction (70-80%) of the PLLA matrix occurred after beta-sterilization. We also observed a substantial decrease of in vitro degradation time. The maintenance of the mechanical integrity of the polymer coating during crimping and dilation of the specimens could be verified, and a sufficient stent dislodgment force of 0.8-0.9 N was measured.

  17. Stimulatory effects of Cuminum cyminum and flavonoid glycoside on Cyclosporine-A and restraint stress induced immune-suppression in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Prashant Singh; Satti, Naresh Kumar; Suri, Krishan Avtar; Amina, Musarat; Bani, Sarang

    2010-04-15

    Many herbs and spices are known to modulate the immune system and have been shown to restore the immunity in immuno-compromised individuals. Spices generally used to increase the taste and flavor of food also has the history of usage as an ayurvedic medicine. Therefore to explore the health modulating effects of Cuminum cyminum and to identify the active compound, immunomodulatory properties were evaluated using flowcytometry and ELISA in normal and immune-suppressed animals. C. cyminum and compound 1 stimulated the T cells and Th1 cytokines expression in normal animals. Swiss albino mice subjected to Cyclosporine-A induced immune-suppression were dosed orally with C. cyminum (25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) on consecutive days. The results showed that administration significantly increased T cells (CD4 and CD8) count and Th1 predominant immune response in a dose dependent manner thereby suggesting immunomodulatory activity through modulation of T lymphocytes expression. In restraint stress induced immune-suppressed animals, compound 1 countered the depleted T lymphocytes, decreased the elevated corticosterone levels and size of adrenal glands and increased the weight of thymus and spleen. Based on the data we may conclude that C. cyminum is a potent immunomodulator and may develop as a lead to recover the immunity of immuno-compromised individuals.

  18. Sirolimus reduces the incidence and progression of UVB-induced skin cancer in SKH mice even with co-administration of cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Wulff, Brian C; Kusewitt, Donna F; VanBuskirk, Anne M; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Duncan, F Jason; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M

    2008-10-01

    Transplant immunosuppressants have been implicated in the increased incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer in transplant recipients, most of whom harbor considerable UVB-induced DNA damage in their skin prior to transplantation. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of two commonly used immunosuppressive drugs, cyclosporine A (CsA) and sirolimus (SRL), on the development and progression of UVB-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to UVB alone for 15 weeks, and then were treated with CsA, SRL, or CsA+SRL for 9 weeks following cessation of UVB treatment. Compared with vehicle, CsA treatment resulted in enhanced tumor size and progression. In contrast, mice treated with SRL or CsA+SRL had decreased tumor multiplicity, size, and progression compared with vehicle-treated mice. CsA, but not SRL or combined treatment, increased dermal mast cell numbers and TGF-beta1 levels in the skin. These findings demonstrate that specific immunosuppressive agents differentially alter the cutaneous tumor microenvironment, which in turn may contribute to enhanced development of UVB-induced skin cancer in transplant recipients. Furthermore, these results suggest that CsA alone causes enhanced growth and progression of skin cancer, whereas co-administration of SRL with CsA causes the opposite effect. JID JOURNAL CLUB ARTICLE: For questions, answers, and open discussion about this article please go to http://network.nature.com/group/jidclub

  19. The immunosuppressive agents rapamycin, cyclosporin A and tacrolimus increase lipolysis, inhibit lipid storage and alter expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Maria J; Palming, Jenny; Rizell, Magnus; Aureliano, Manuel; Carvalho, Eugénia; Svensson, Maria K; Eriksson, Jan W

    2013-01-30

    Cyclosporin A (CsA), tacrolimus and rapamycin are immunosuppressive agents (IAs) associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, although their molecular effects on lipid metabolism in adipose tissue are unknown. We explored IAs effects on lipolysis, lipid storage and expression of genes involved on lipid metabolism in isolated human adipocytes and/or adipose tissue obtained via subcutaneous and omental fat biopsies. CsA, tacrolimus and rapamycin increased isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis and inhibited lipid storage by 20-35% and enhanced isoproterenol-stimulated hormone-sensitive lipase Ser552 phosphorylation. Rapamycin also increased basal lipolysis (~20%) and impaired insulin's antilipolytic effect. Rapamycin, down-regulated the gene expression of perilipin, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and lipin 1, while tacrolimus down-regulated CD36 and aP2 gene expression. All three IAs increased IL-6 gene expression and secretion, but not expression and secretion of TNF-α or adiponectin. These findings suggest that CsA, tacrolimus and rapamycin enhance lipolysis, inhibit lipid storage and expression of lipogenic genes in adipose tissue, which may contribute to the development of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance associated with immunosuppressive therapy.

  20. Reversion of resistance to immunosuppressive agents in three patients with psoriatic arthritis by cyclosporine A: modulation of P-glycoprotein function.

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; Rosado, Manuela; Germano, Valentina; Scarsella, Marco; Giorda, Ezio; Podestà, Edoardo; D'Amelio, Raffaele; Carsetti, Rita; Laganà, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Secondary resistance may be a major problem in the management of autoimmune diseases. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) over-function has been described as a mechanism of drug resistance in autoimmune patients. P-gp function can in vitro be inhibited by cyclosporine A (CSA) and verapamil; moreover, P-gp reduction by CSA in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis has been demonstrated. Here, P-gp function before and after CSA administration in three psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients, who developed a resistance to MTX/SSA, has been evaluated. P-gp function on patient cells was analyzed by measuring the changes in rhodamine-123 (Rh-123) fluorescence after verapamil incubation. CSA treatment resulted in good clinical outcome that was related with a significant P-gp function reduction at CD3+ and CD8+ levels. In addition to its immunosuppressive activity, CSA results may also be related to MTX/SSA effect restoration through P-gp inhibition. This is the first time that CSA has been demonstrated as being able to revert MTX/SSA resistance in PsA.

  1. Controlled release of cyclosporine A self-nanoemulsifying systems from osmotic pump tablets: near zero-order release and pharmacokinetics in dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Yi, Yueneng; Qi, Jianping; Lu, Yi; Tian, Zhiqiang; Xie, Yunchang; Yuan, Hailong; Wu, Wei

    2013-08-16

    It is very important to enhance the absorption simultaneously while designing controlled release delivery systems for poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs (BCS IV). In this study, controlled release of cyclosporine (CyA) was achieved by the osmotic release strategy taking advantage of the absorption-enhancing capacity of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDSs). The liquid SNEDDS consisting of Labrafil M 1944CS, Transcutol P and Cremophor EL was absorbed by the osmotic tablet core excipients (sucrose, lactose monohydrate, polyethylene oxide, and partly pregelatinized starch) and then transformed into osmotic tablets. Near zero-order release could be achieved for CyA-loaded nanoemulsions reconstituted from the SNEDDS. In general, the influencing factor study indicated that the release rate increased with increase of inner osmotic pressure, ratio of osmotic agent to suspending agent, content of pore-forming agent, and size of release orifice, whereas the thickness of the membrane impeded the release of CyA nanoemulsion. Pharmacokinetic study showed steady blood CyA profiles with prolonged Tmax and MRT, and significantly reduced Cmax for self-nanoemulsifying osmotic pump tablet (SNEOPT) in comparison with highly fluctuating profiles of the core tablet and Sandimmune Neoral(®). However, similar oral bioavailability was observed for either controlled release or non-controlled release formulations. It was concluded that simultaneous controlling on CyA release and absorption-enhancing had been achieved by a combination of osmotic tablet and SNEDDS.

  2. Nanoparticles made of multi-block copolymer of lactic acid and ethylene glycol containing periodic side-chain carboxyl groups for oral delivery of cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Ankola, D. D.; Battisti, A.; Solaro, R.; Kumar, M. N. V. Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of new carboxylated multi-block copolymer of lactic acid and ethylene glycol (EL14) for nanoparticle (NP) formation and their ability to deliver high molecular weight hydrophobic drug—cyclosporine A (CsA). CsA-loaded EL14 NPs were compared with traditional poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NPs, both prepared by emulsion–diffusion–evaporation process. On the one hand, the increase in drug payload from 10 to 30 per cent for EL14 NPs showed no difference in particle size, however the entrapment efficiency tends to decrease from 50 to 43 per cent; on the other hand, the more hydrophobic PLGA showed an increasing trend in entrapment efficiency from 20 to 62 per cent with increasing particle size. Over 90 per cent of CsA was released in vitro from both the nanoparticulates; however, the release was much slower in the case of more hydrophobic PLGA. On in vivo evaluation in rats, the NPs made of EL14 showed a higher Cmax, a faster Tmax and enhanced tissue levels to that of PLGA that are crucial for CsA's activity and toxicity; however, the overall bioavailability of the nanoparticulates was similar and higher than Neoral. Together these data demonstrate the feasibility of NPs made of low molecular weight, hydrophilic polymer EL14 for efficient delivery of CsA. PMID:20504806

  3. Modulated release of cyclosporine from soluble vinyl pyrrolidone--hydroxyethyl methacrylate copolymer hydrogels. A correlation of 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' experiments.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, A; Fernández, F; Cifuentes, A; Díez-Masa, J C; Bermejo, P; Rebuelta, M; López-Bravo, A; San Román, J

    2001-05-14

    Soluble, uncrosslinked and high molecular weight copolymers of vinylpyrrolidone, VP, with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, HEMA, prepared by free radical copolymerization, are proposed as supports for the modulated release of the immunosuppressor cyclosporine. Two copolymeric systems with copolymer compositions f(VP)=0.52 (namely VP--HEMA 60--40) and 0.42 (VP--HEMA 40--60) have been prepared and tested in vitro and in vivo using rats as animal model. Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, MEKC, has been used for the simultaneous detection of the polymer reabsorption and the drug release for the in vitro experiments. The composition and microstructural distribution of the copolymer system controls the solubilization rate which modulates the in vitro release of the drug (with time profiles from a few days to several weeks for the VP--HEMA 60--40 and 40--60, respectively) and the in vivo response that correlates with the previous in vitro results: the more hydrophobic implant (VP--HEMA 40--60) reverts the immune response more slowly (2--4 weeks) compared to the more hydrophilic one (VP--HEMA 60--40, 1--2 weeks).

  4. Cyclosporin A inhibits nucleotide excision repair via downregulation of the xeroderma pigmentosum group A and G proteins, which is mediated by calcineurin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuschal, Christiane; Thoms, Kai-Martin; Boeckmann, Lars; Laspe, Petra; Apel, Antje; Schön, Michael P; Emmert, Steffen

    2011-10-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibits nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells, a process that contributes to the skin cancer proneness in organ transplant patients. We investigated the mechanisms of CsA-induced NER reduction by assessing all xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) genes (XPA-XPG). Western blot analyses revealed that XPA and XPG protein